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Sample records for advanced petrographic analysis

  1. Computer-aided petrographic analysis of sandstones

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, P.A.; Helmold, K.P.

    1987-05-01

    Thin-section point counting, mathematical and statistical analysis of petrographic-petrophysical data, report generation, and graphical presentation of results can be done efficiently by computer. Compositional and textural data are collected with a modified Schares point-counting system. The system uses an MS-DOS microcomputer programmed in BASIC to drive a motorized stage attached to a polarizing microscope. Numeric codes for up to 500 different categories of minerals, cements, pores, etc, are input using a separate keypad. Calculation and printing of constituent percentages, QFR, Folk name, and grain-size distribution are completed in seconds after data entry. Raw data files, compatible with software such as Lotus 1-2-3, SPSS, and SAS, are stored on floppy disk. Petrographic data files are transferred directly to a mainframe, merged with log and petrophysical data, analyzed statistically with SAS, and reports generated. SAS/GRAPH and TELL-A-GRAF routines linked with SAS generate a variety of cross plots, histograms, pie and bar charts, ternary diagrams, and vertical variation diagrams (e.g., depth vs. porosity, permeability, mean size, sorting, and percent grains-matrix-cement).

  2. A Microscopic Information System (MIS) to assist in petrographic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarquini, S.; Favalli, M.

    2009-04-01

    Rock texture results from all the petrological processes that have affected the rock system. The interpretation of a rock texture relies on the analysis of the morphometric parameters of the constituting components (e.g. crystals or grains). A consistent and statistically sound quantification of components size and shape is crucial to adequately unravel the petrology of a rock, but the gathering of these measurements may be time-consuming or difficult to achieve using low-cost facilities. The basic technique for texture analysis of rocks is the observation of thin sections in transmitted light by using a petrographic microscope. To automate and speed-up textural measurements from thin section in transmitted light, several image processing procedures have been published in the last two decades. Nevertheless, the complexity of the optical properties of crystals hampered the determination of a method that is completely satisfactory, especially for complex polymineralic plutonic rocks. This work provides a contribution to solve this problem. We present a novel composite procedure based on four approaches: i) the use of a slide scanner to acquire the input imagery in transmitted light from thin sections without using the petrographic microscope; ii) the storage of the resulting images in a GIS-like database structure that is extremely useful to retrieve, browse and analyze a large archive of images from a high number of thin sections; iii) the application of a custom image analysis procedure based on two region growing functions; iv) the refinement of the regions after raster to vector conversion using GIS software. We call the obtained analysis system a Microscopic Information System (MIS), because it relies on GIS software but it is not a geographic system. In this study we apply this technique to analyze 137 thin sections obtained from 49 samples of 8 different granitoid rocks that are commonly used in the decorative stone industry. For each thin section 5 collimated

  3. Implications of new petrographic analysis for the Olmec “mother culture” model

    PubMed Central

    Flannery, Kent V.; Balkansky, Andrew K.; Feinman, Gary M.; Grove, David C.; Marcus, Joyce; Redmond, Elsa M.; Reynolds, Robert G.; Sharer, Robert J.; Spencer, Charles S.; Yaeger, Jason

    2005-01-01

    Petrographic analysis of Formative Mexican ceramics by J. B. Stoltman et al. (see the companion piece in this issue of PNAS) refutes a recent model of Olmec “one-way” trade. In this paper, we address the model's more fundamental problems of sampling bias, anthropological implausibility, and logical non sequiturs. No bridging argument exists to link motifs on pottery to the social, political, and religious institutions of the Olmec. In addition, the model of unreciprocated exchange is implausible, given everything that the anthropological and ethnohistoric records tell us about non-Western societies of that general sociopolitical level. PMID:16061797

  4. ``Petrograph'': a New Software for the Analysis and Presentation of Geochemical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrelli, M.

    2003-04-01

    Evaluation, presentation and interpretation of geochemical data are fundamental operations in igneous petrology. Several software are available at present to perform most of operations needed to generate petrological plots and classification diagrams as well as to calculate geochemical models. Most of these software run on MS-DOS or MS-Windows platforms but in most cases they have severe limitations such as, for example, the inability to import MS-Excel worksheets or they lack of important classification diagrams that generally are time consuming to perform utilising general purpose plotting packages. In addition, some important petrological models cannot be readily performed and difficulties arise in the management of plots for presentation or publication purposes. The software "Petrograph" is an answer to all these difficulties and it is specifically intended to bridge the gap between manipulation, analysis and presentation of geochemical data in igneous petrology. The source code of "Petrograph" is written in MS-Visual Basic 6.0 and, as such, the software runs on Windows 98/2000/XP platforms. The software is able to import a variety of pre-formatted data files such as ASCII and MS-Excel worksheets. Data can be visualized using several types of plots including binary and triangular plots, and spider diagrams; in addition, a large number of classification and discriminating diagrams are ready to use with a simple click of mouse. Various options are present in each type of diagram in order to help the users to develop publication quality plots that can be easily exported as MS-metafiles (.wmf) into any other graphical software using both the MS-Windows clipboard or by saving directly the file onto the hard disk and than re-importing. Data can be treated in a variety of ways including mathematical operations and determination of the most used geochemical parameters and indexes. Mathematical operations include sum, subtraction, multiplication, division, exponent, and

  5. Petrographic and trace element analysis of non-reef Silurian carbonates, northern lower Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Porcher, E.; Harrison, W.B. III

    1984-04-01

    Carbonate sediments of the northern reef trend in Michigan have been the subject of serious scientific scrutiny since the discovery of significant hydrocarbon reservoirs in pinnacle reefs in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The reef trend is a complex of reef and non-reef carbonate facies capped by an evaporite/carbonate sequence. The reef and the evaporite/carbonate sequence have been extensively described and discussed over the last decade. However, the non-reef (interreef) facies has received little more than brief descriptions throughout this time. As these non-reef carbonates are virtually barren of hydrocarbons, their analysis has been neglected. Most exploration for pinnacle reefs centers around geophysical techniques; however, it should be considered that patterns of textural or geochemical gradients may occur between the reef masses and surrounding non-reef deposits. This study examines, in detail, the petrographic and geochemical character of these non-reef (interreef) sediments. These characteristics can provide additional data and a potential exploration tool for determining the spatial facies relationship between pinnacle reef and interreef carbonates in the Michigan northern reef trend.

  6. Petrographic and trace element analysis of nonreef Silurian carbonates, northern lower Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Porcher, E.; Harrison, W.B. III

    1984-04-01

    Carbonate sediments of the northern reef trend in Michigan have been the subject of serious scientific scrutiny since the discovery of significant hydrocarbon reservoirs in pinnacle reefs in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The reef trend is a complex of reef and nonreef carbonate facies capped by an evaporite/carbonate sequence. The reef and the evaporite/carbonate sequence have been extensively described and discussed over the last decade. However, the nonreef (interreef) facies has received little more than brief descriptions throughout this time. As these nonreef carbonates are virtually barren of hydrocarbons, their analysis has been neglected. Most exploration for pinnacle reefs centers around geophysical techniques; however, it should be considered that patterns of textural or geochemical gradients may occur between the reef masses and surrounding nonreef deposits. This study examines, in detail, the petrographic and geochemical character of these nonreef (interreef) sediments. These characteristics can provide additional data and a potential exploration tool for determining the spatial facies relationship between pinnacle reef and interreef carbonates in the Michigan northern reef trend.

  7. Computerized quantitative petrographic image analysis of Wilcox sandstone, Louisiana Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, J.R. Jr.; Gerard, R.E.; Manni, F.M.

    1987-05-01

    Computerized quantitative petrographic image analysis measures first-order parameters such as the abundance, cross-sectional area, length, width, diameter, and perimeter of a pore feature very rapidly and with great accuracy and precision. From these first-order parameters, second-order parameters such as shape factors, aspect ratios, specific surfaces, and pore size and roughness distributions can be calculated. These parameters can then be used to calculate even higher order parameters such as porosity, permeability, and capillary pressure curves. Analyses were performed on 350 samples from nine wells from the Wilcox Formation in southern Louisiana to characterize the two-dimensional rock pore complex of this Gulf Coast reservoir rock. Empirical equations were derived that describe relationships between first- and second-order image analysis parameters and conventional laboratory porosity and permeability measurements from core plugs. Because image analysis represents only a two-dimensional section of the power complex, these equations provide only an index of porosity and permeability which is restricted by the limited relationship of the two-dimensional section to the three-dimensional core plug. Both indices were derived from simplified equations, using parameters such as pore cross-sectional area, pore shape, and pore size. The permeability and porosity indices were correlated to the conventional laboratory permeability and porosity data (r = 0.855 and r = 0.804, respectively). First- and second-order image analysis parameters were also used to calculate mercury injection capillary pressure curves. Such curves were calculated from image analysis data from nine Wilcox samples and were scaled based on their correlation with actual measured brine capillary pressure curves.

  8. Microfabric reconstruction via quantitative digital petrographic image analysis for weakly foliated gneisses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Meng-Wan; Lin, Yu-Ling; Lee, Tung-Yi; Ji, Jian-Qing

    2013-03-01

    Detection and documentation of petro-structural features such as alignment features of minerals/grains, and extraction of such spatial property data are two fundamental steps for structural geology. Such tasks were mostly carried out manually. However, manual analysis is laborious and potentially biased. These drawbacks are less obvious when the foliation is well developed and the amount of platy mineral is higher. For samples with weakly developed foliation and low platy mineral content, automatic method is required for subjective interpretation. A semi-automatic computerized method of 3D foliation orientation reconstruction via two-dimensional petrographic-shape fabric analysis from serial oriented digital microphotograph has been developed and demonstrated in this study. The foliation is reconstructed by fitting a best fitting plane to the maximum modal peaks of micro textural parameters (SPO) for different mineral groups of platy and granular minerals from each thin section on a stereonet for four coarse grained biotite gneiss samples collected along the Jialie fault, SE Tibet, China. Regardless of platy or granular mineral aggregates, the reconstructed foliations showed similar orientation within 10° angular variation to the field measurement. The 10° angular variation can be maintained if the foliations are reconstructed by consecutive thin section groupings ≦ 50° angular intervals and a horizontal thin section. The angular spread increased to 30° for thin section groupings with > 50° to 100° angular intervals with a horizontal thin section. Major advantages of the computerized photometric methods demonstrated by this study are: the reduction of human prejudice and obtaining quantified and repeatable data sets.

  9. The Petrographic Analysis of Yucatan Shelf Sequence in UNAM-5, 6 and 7 Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, A. O.; Fucugauchi, J. U.

    2013-05-01

    We present the initial results of a stratigraphic, X-ray diffraction and petrographic study of the Cenozoic carbonate sequence in the Yucatan's shelf. The sequence is studied in cores from the UNAM-5, UNAM-6 and UNAM-7 boreholes, which are located in the southwest and southern sectors of the Yucatan state, close to the Ticul Sierra. The Yucatán shelf is an area of scientific interest because beneath the Cenozoic sedimentary deposits there is crater impact of 180-200 km diameter, which formed 65.5 Ma ago. The Yucatan shelf has been characterized to be a shallow ramp shelf that is tectonically stable and has a Cenozoic continuous sedimentary record. With the aim of investigating the nature, stratigraphic relations, textural changes and identify possible events that occurred along the Cenozoic record. Using macroscopic descriptions, we performed detailed stratigraphic columns for the three borehole cores and prepared samples collected across stratigraphic columns for the petrography and the clays identification. The petrographic studies were made at different depths above the K/Pg boundary and whit the aim of recognize the textural variations, and the skeletal content, the identification of dolomite was made by the method of staining thin sections. Analysis of microfacies associations followed the criteria in facies belts Wilson 1975 for carbonate rimmed platforms, using and comparing, while the ramp carbonate microfacies type of Flügel 2009 to homoclinal carbonate ramp platform. The method of X-ray diffraction was used to identify clay types. Three boreholes contain the K/Pg boundary at different depths that correspond to a sequence, from bottom to top of limestone with evaporites nodules, clay content identified as illite-esmectite, little content of benthic, scarce planktic foraminifera and oogonia fossils that correspond to lagoon zone. This sequence is underlying limestones with different degrees of dolomitization that in many cases destroyed all fossils

  10. Quantification of the effects of secondary matrix on the analysis of sandstone composition, and a petrographic-chemical technique for retrieving original framework grain modes of altered sandstones.

    PubMed

    Cox, R; Lowe, D R

    1996-05-01

    Most studies of sandstone provenance involve modal analysis of framework grains using techniques that exclude the fine-grained breakdown products of labile mineral grains and rock fragments, usually termed secondary matrix or pseudomatrix. However, the data presented here demonstrate that, when the proportion of pseudomatrix in a sandstone exceeds 10%, standard petrographic analysis can lead to incorrect provenance interpretation. Petrographic schemes for provenance analysis such as QFL and QFR should not therefore be applied to sandstones containing more than 10% secondary matrix. Pseudomatrix is commonly abundant in sandstones, and this is therefore a problem for provenance analysis. The difficulty can be alleviated by the use of whole-rock chemistry in addition to petrographic analysis. Combination of chemical and point-count data permits the construction of normative compositions that approximate original framework grain compositions. Provenance analysis is also complicated in many cases by fundamental compositional alteration during weathering and transport. Many sandstones, particularly shallow marine deposits, have undergone vigorous reworking, which may destroy unstable mineral grains and rock fragments. In such cases it may not be possible to retrieve provenance information by either petrographic or chemical means. Because of this, pseudomatrix-rich sandstones should be routinely included in chemical-petrological provenance analysis. Because of the many factors, both pre- and post-depositional, that operate to increase the compositional maturity of sandstones, petrologic studies must include a complete inventory of matrix proportions, grain size and sorting parameters, and an assessment of depositional setting. PMID:11539329

  11. Lithostratigraphic and petrographic analysis of ICDP drill core LB-07A, Bosumtwi impact structure, Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coney, Louise; Gibson, Roger L.; Reimold, Wolf Uwe; Koeberl, Christian

    Lithostratigraphic and petrographic studies of drill core samples from the 545.08 m deep International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) borehole LB-07A in the Bosumtwi impact structure revealed two sequences of impactites below the post-impact crater sediments and above coherent basement rock. The upper impactites (333.38-415.67 m depth) comprise an alternating sequence of suevite and lithic impact breccias. The lower impactite sequence (415.67-470.55 m depth) consists essentially of monomict impact breccia formed from meta-graywacke with minor shale, as well as two narrow injections of suevite, which differ from the suevites of the upper impactites in color and intensity of shock metamorphism of the clasts. The basement rock (470.55-545.08 m depth) is composed of lower greenschist-facies metapelites (shale, schist and minor phyllite), meta-graywacke, and minor meta-sandstone, as well as interlaminated quartzite and calcite layers. The basement also contains a number of suevite dikelets that are interpreted as injection veins, as well as a single occurrence of granophyric-textured rock, tentatively interpreted as a hydrothermally altered granitic intrusion likely related to the regional pre-impact granitoid complexes. Impact melt fragments are not as prevalent in LB-07A suevite as in the fallout suevite facies around the northern crater rim; on average, 3.6 vol% of melt fragments is seen in the upper suevites and up to 18 vol% in the lower suevite occurrences. Shock deformation features observed in the suevites and polymict lithic breccias include planar deformation features in quartz (1 to 3 sets), rare diaplectic quartz glass, and very rare diaplectic feldspar glass. Notably, no ballen quartz, which is abundant in the fallout suevites, has been found in the within-crater impact breccias. An overall slight increase in the degree of shock metamorphism occurs with depth in the impactites, but considerably lower shock degrees are seen in the suevites of

  12. Cathodoluminescence microscopy and petrographic image analysis of aggregates in concrete pavements affected by alkali-silica reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stastna, A.; Sachlova, S.; Pertold, Z.; Prikryl, R.; Leichmann, J.

    2012-03-15

    Various microscopic techniques (cathodoluminescence, polarizing and electron microscopy) were combined with image analysis with the aim to determine a) the modal composition and degradation features within concrete, and b) the petrographic characteristics and the geological types (rocks, and their provenance) of the aggregates. Concrete samples were taken from five different portions of Highway Nos. D1, D11, and D5 (the Czech Republic). Coarse and fine aggregates were found to be primarily composed of volcanic, plutonic, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, as well as of quartz and feldspar aggregates of variable origins. The alkali-silica reaction was observed to be the main degradation mechanism, based upon the presence of microcracks and alkali-silica gels in the concrete. Use of cathodoluminescence enabled the identification of the source materials of the quartz aggregates, based upon their CL characteristics (i.e., color, intensity, microfractures, deformation, and zoning), which is difficult to distinguish only employing polarizing and electron microscopy. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ASR in concrete pavements on the Highways Nos. D1, D5 and D11 (Czech Republic). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cathodoluminescence was combined with various microscopic techniques and image analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ASR was attributed to aggregates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Source materials of aggregates were identified based on cathodoluminescence characteristics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quartz comes from different volcanic, plutonic and metamorphic parent rocks.

  13. Field-mapping and petrographic analysis of volcanoes surrounding the Lake Natron Homo sapiens footprint site, northern Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, S. M.; Zimmer, B.; Liutkus, C.; Carmichael, S. K.; McGinnis, K.

    2010-12-01

    The Lake Natron Homo sapiens footprint site is located in northern Tanzania along the East African Rift escarpment. The site is positioned south of Lake Natron within an ephemeral channel of the Engare Sero River. The hominid footprints are preserved in a tuff, which originated from one of the volcanic centers surrounding the site. Two large volcanoes in the surrounding region, including the active carbonatite producing Oldoinyo L’engai and the now extinct Kerimasi are possible sources. This area also contains over 30 smaller tuff cones and tuff rings that have been poorly mapped and not analyzed in detail. The site is significant as it is the oldest modern human trackway in East Africa and one of the largest collections of hominid footprints in the world. Determining the source of the footprinted volcanic ash requires detailed field mapping, and both petrographic and geochemical analyses. Extensive field-mapping of the region revealed multiple regional beds that stratigraphically overlay the footprinted layer. Age dating as well as geochemical analysis is being conducted to relate these beds to the footprinted layer. Field-mapping showed that the footprinted tuff is over 35 cm thick, suggesting a large, sustained eruption. The bulk of the tuff cones examined in the field visibly varied in composition to the footprinted tuff and, based on proximity to the footprint site, are too small to produce the requisite volume of ash. Field analysis of samples collected from Oldoinyo L’engai reveal the most similar mineral assemblages to the footprinted layer, and the large volcano provides a source substantial enough to create a thick ash bed 10 km north of the summit. Preliminary research reveals that the footprinted tuff is a phonolite, characterized by silica depletion and the presence of sanidine, augite, and annite with interstitial calcite. XRD analysis of samples collected from Oldoinyo L’engai reveal a nepheline-rich phonolite with zeolites (ie. phillipsite

  14. Petrographic Analysis of Selected Core Materials from the Manson (Iowa) Impact Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, N. M.; Gold, D. P.

    1993-07-01

    The Manson impact structure, largest (36 km) in the U.S., is inferred to have produced shocked materials found in the upper layer of some K-T Boundary deposits, mainly because its radiometric age (66 my) is compatible. Short, in 1966 [1], was first to show that Manson is an impact crater through casual analysis then of 22 samples from a 1953 drill hole (2-A). These samples have now been studied in detail, with these key results: (1) the lithology of clasts within 2-A is dominantly granitic; (2) most quartz is strongly shocked (many planar deformation features, PDFs) and shows a pervasive alteration (clay minerals?; iron stain); (3) a unique texture (single crystals broken into hundreds of small fragments [polycrystalline]) occurs in some heavily shocked quartz; and (4) feldspars display a wide range of shock features from multiple PDFs to incipient melting (internal flow) and extensive recrystallization. Table 1 summarizes the major shock features arranged in stages of progressive shock metamorphism for the three principal minerals: quartz, feldspars, and biotite. The predominant mode of PDF occurrence in quartz within leucogranitic clasts, and in most quartz fragments in matrix material is marked by light, orange-brown to grayish-brown in plane-transmitted light, and a deeper reddish-brown, with reduced birefringence, cross-polarized light. At high magnification, the alteration consists of tiny specks of unknown identity that often obscure but do not destroy the sets of PDFs. The effect under the microscope sometimes resembles the "texture" of toasted bread. This hallmark of Manson shocked quartz is rarely seen in shocked quartz from other impact structures (occasional in materials examined by NMS from West Hawk Lake and Steen River in Canada). Sharpton et al [2] describe similar quartz in their examination of Manson materials, stating the origin of this alteration to be due to in-crater postimpact hydrothermal alteration; if so, such a condition would not be

  15. Petrographic analysis and interpretation of the Whiskey Creek Pass Ls Member, Minturn and Madera Fm, Sangre de Cristo range, south-central Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, K.D. . Geology Dept.)

    1994-04-01

    The Minturn and Madera formations of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains are laterally equivalent facies made up of interbedded carbonates and terrigenous clastic material deposited in the central Colorado trough during the mid Pennsylvanian period. To date, the Whiskey Creek Pass Ls Member (WCPLs) of the upper Minturn and Madera Fm. is the only marker unit of south-central Colorado that has been lithostratigraphically correlated for more than a few miles. This correlation is largely the result of the relative abundance of pure oolitic constituents within the WCPLs. As of yet, there has been no significant petrographic study of the lithologic character of the WCPLs. The WCPLs is well exposed in south-central Colorado containing overturned beds that dip approximately 70[degree] to the west. Six stratigraphic sections were measured and described from three separate localities: four sections were measured and described from three separate localities: four sections were measured on the north ridge of Trinchera Peak, one section at La Veta Pass, and one on Forbes Ranch near Fort Garland. Petrographic analysis shows that similar bioclastic constituents including brachiopods, echinoderms, mollusks, and foraminifera are found within all sections. These fossils are usually found in thin bands surrounded by oolitic and/or sandy limestone layers. Both radial and tangential ooids are evident but many are poorly preserved due to internal replacement by sparite. Oolitic nuclei are commonly composed of quartz, feldspar or bioclasts. Sparite or microspar is the main cementing agent. Diagenetic features such as compaction, syntaxial overgrowths, and replacement are common. Preliminary analysis suggests deposition occurred in a shallow marine environment close to an area of relatively high relief. Oolitic shoals and marginal lagoons predominate with siliclastic material suggesting proximal or distal localities of deposition for various units.

  16. Modern sand petrofacies in the Tonto and Salt River basins, central Arizona: Applying multivariate statistics to petrographic compositional analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Miksa, E.J. . Dept. of Geosciences); Heidke, J. )

    1993-04-01

    The Salt River and its tributary Tonto Creek occupy a large basin between the Mazatzal and Sierra Ancha Ranges. Over 200 sediment samples were collected from the Salt River, Tonto Creek, and their tributaries in order to identify discrete modern sand composition zones. The motivation for this study was to aid identification of archeological ceramic production locations. Most prehistoric ceramic production takes place within 1 km of raw material source areas. Identification of unique sand temper sources thereby aids in locating production areas and trade routes. Sediment samples were sieved and washed so that only the sand fraction remained. Samples were mounted in epoxy, thin-sectioned, and stained for K and Ca. Thin-sections were counted to 400 points using the Gazzi-Dickinson technique. Twenty-six grain types were identified, with special care being taken to distinguish among different rock fragments. Samples were divided into 15 likely petrofacies based on geologic maps and composition. Correspondence analysis was used with each grain type considered separately to further refine the petrofacies boundaries, resulting in 20 spatially and compositionally discrete groups. Discriminant analysis was used to test the possibility of separating samples from different petrofacies. For this test, grain types were grouped into categories (i.e. all metamorphic grains, all feldspars). Discrimination among the 20 petrofacies was found to be better than 75%.

  17. Relationship Between Petrographic Characteristics and the Engineering Properties of Jurassic Sandstones, Hamedan, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari, M.; Momeni, A. A.; Rafiei, B.; Khodabakhsh, S.; Torabi-Kaveh, M.

    2013-09-01

    To study the relationship between engineering properties and petrographic characteristics, 20 rock samples were collected from Jurassic sandstones in the Hamedan region, western Iran. The specimens were tested to determine uniaxial compressive strength, point load strength index, tangent modulus, porosity, and dry and saturated unit weights. Samples were also subjected to petrographic examination, which included the observation of 11 parameters and modal analysis. Based on the results of a statistical analysis, polynomial prediction equations were developed to estimate physical and mechanical properties from petrographic characteristics. The results show that textural characteristics are more important than mineral compositions for predicting engineering characteristics. The packing density, packing proximity and grain shape are the petrographic properties that significantly affect the engineering properties of samples. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed, employing four steps comprising various combinations of petrographic characteristics for each engineering parameter. The optimal equation, along with the relevant combination of petrographic characteristics for estimating the engineering properties of the rock samples is proposed.

  18. Structural and petrographic analysis of hypabyssal rocks in the central Menderes Massif: implications for the role of transfer zones during detachment faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkül, Fuat; Gürboǧa, Şule; Tatar Erkul, Sibel; Deveci, Zehra

    2014-05-01

    Structural and petrographic analysis of hypabyssal rocks in the central Menderes Massif: implications for the role of transfer zones during detachment faulting Fuat ERKÜL(1), Şule GÜRBOǧA(2), Sibel TATAR ERKÜL(3), Zehra DEVECİ(4) The central Menderes Massif is formed by complex assemblages of transfer zones, detachment faults and associated syn-extensional granitoids in western Turkey. Syn-extensional Salihli and Turgutlu granitoids were widely recognized in the footwall rocks of the Gediz detachment fault, but their hypabyssal equivalents were not described in detail. Hypabyssal rocks discovered during this study include substantial structural data that may shed light into the development of transfer zones during detachment faulting. Hypabyssal rocks are mafic and felsic in compositions. Mafic rocks, which are located to the SW of the Turgutlu granitoid, were emplaced into the phyllites as sills and dykes that were surrounded by a narrow hornfelsic halo. Dykes are subvertical and trend N20oW, intersecting the phyllites of the Menderes Massif. They include abundant xenoliths of phyllite and gneiss and are mainly characterized by ophitic texture formed by plagioclase, tremolite/actinolite, biotite, and pyroxene crystals. Felsic dykes, which are located in the SE of the Salihli granitoid, are defined as three subparallel, N10oW-trending dykes that intrude into the mica schists. Felsic dykes consist of quartz, sanidine and plagioclase and zircon, apatite and allanite as accessory phases. They display holocrystalline hypidiomorphic porphyritic texture, suggesting their typical shallow-seated and hypabyssal emplacement. Microcrystalline matrix surrounds embayed quartz and locally corroded crystals. Alteration mineral assemblages of chlorite, epidote and sericite and carbonatization are also common. Their mineral constituents appear to be similar to those of the Salihli granitoid. Felsic dykes have well-preserved two sets of slip surfaces striking NE and NW in

  19. Advanced PFBC transient analysis

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.S.; Bonk, D.L.

    1997-05-01

    Transient modeling and analysis of advanced Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) systems is a research area that is currently under investigation by the US Department of Energy`s Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC). The object of the effort is to identify key operating parameters that affect plant performance and then quantify the basic response of major sub-systems to changes in operating conditions. PC-TRAX{trademark}, a commercially available dynamic software program, was chosen and applied in this modeling and analysis effort. This paper describes the development of a series of TRAX-based transient models of advanced PFBC power plants. These power plants burn coal or other suitable fuel in a PFBC, and the high temperature flue gas supports low-Btu fuel gas or natural gas combustion in a gas turbine topping combustor. When it is utilized, the low-Btu fuel gas is produced in a bubbling bed carbonizer. High temperature, high pressure combustion products exiting the topping combustor are expanded in a modified gas turbine to generate electrical power. Waste heat from the system is used to raise and superheat steam for a reheat steam turbine bottoming cycle that generates additional electrical power. Basic control/instrumentation models were developed and modeled in PC-TRAX and used to investigate off-design plant performance. System performance for various transient conditions and control philosophies was studied.

  20. Advanced Economic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Marc W.; Laing, William

    2013-01-01

    An Economic Analysis (EA) is a systematic approach to the problem of choosing the best method of allocating scarce resources to achieve a given objective. An EA helps guide decisions on the "worth" of pursuing an action that departs from status quo ... an EA is the crux of decision-support.

  1. Chemical and petrographic correlations among carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Schmus, W. R.; Hayes, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Detailed study of the petrographic and chemical properties of carbonaceous chondrites shows that the four distinct petrographic subtypes may be related to one of two distinct chemical subdivisions. These subdivisions are recognized primarily by the relative abundances of the nonvolatile elements Si, Ca, Al, Ti, Cu and Fe. C1, C2 and C3(O) chondrites form one subdivision. Vigarano subtype chondrites form the other subdivision and include chondrites previously referred to as C2, C3 and C4. Normalized to silicon, the abundances of Ca, Al and Ti are relatively enriched in Vigarano subtype chondrites, whereas Fe and Cu are relatively more abundant in C1, C2 and C3(O) chondrites. Volatile elements tend to correlate with petrographic subtypes rather than with chemical subdivisions.

  2. Data base for the analysis of compositional characteristics of coal seams and macerals. Part 7. Petrographic variation due to depositional setting of the lower Kittanning seam, western Pennsylvania. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Allshouse, S.D.; Davis, A.

    1984-01-01

    Detailed megascopic and microscopic petrographic analyses were conducted on samples of the Lower Kittanning seam from western Pennsylvania. Relationships were sought between the paleoenvironmental setting of the coal swamp and the vertical and lateral variability of lithotypes, maceral composition and vitrinite types. Megascopically, the four samples collected from the freshwater facies of the seam are similar in appearance and relative lithotype composition, and display no distinct vertical zonations. The sample from the marine-influenced central portion of the basin (PSOC-1340) possesses a marked vertical zonation into a bright lower zone and a dull upper zone. The lower zone is similar in appearance to the freswater samples. Detailed microscopic analyses revealed that the vertical zonation of PSOC-1340 is apparent in both the maceral and vitrinite type composition. No similar zonation is apparent in the microscopic analysis of the four freshwater facies samples. Similarities between the lower zone of PSOC-1340 and the whole seam of the freshwater samples are most apparent in the vitrinite-type analysis. The lower zone of PSOC-1340 and the whole seam from the freshwater facies are considered to be laterally equivalent coal types. The dull upper zone of PSOC-1340 is considered to have formed in response to a major change in the paleoenvironment of the swamp, probably a marine transgression. 49 references, 25 figures, 15 tables.

  3. Advances in total scattering analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Proffen, Thomas E; Kim, Hyunjeong

    2008-01-01

    In recent years the analysis of the total scattering pattern has become an invaluable tool to study disordered crystalline and nanocrystalline materials. Traditional crystallographic structure determination is based on Bragg intensities and yields the long range average atomic structure. By including diffuse scattering into the analysis, the local and medium range atomic structure can be unravelled. Here we give an overview of recent experimental advances, using X-rays as well as neutron scattering as well as current trends in modelling of total scattering data.

  4. Quantifying pressure variations from petrographic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrijmoed, Johannes C.; Podladchikov, Yuri Y.

    2015-04-01

    The existence of grain scale pressure variations has been established over the last decennia. Mineral reactions are often accompanied by volume and shape changes in a system where much heterogeneity in material properties exists. This gives rise to internal stresses and pressure variation during metamorphic reactions. The residual pressure in inclusions can be measured by Raman spectroscopy, but is restricted to a narrow range of minerals that (potentially) have a well calibrated Raman shift with pressure. Several alternative methods to quantify pressure variations from petrographic observations are presented. We distinguish equilibrium and non-equilibrium methods. Equilibrium methods are based on a newly developed method to predict phase equilibria and composition under a given pressure gradient. The pressure gradient can be found by iteratively matching predicted phase assemblages and composition with petrographic observations. Non-equilibrium methods involve the estimation of pressure variation in initial stages of reaction in which the system may still be isochoric. It then results in the potential pressure buildup for a given unreacted rock for example in the initial stages of dehydration of serpentinite in subduction settings.

  5. Prediction of metallurgical coke strength from the petrographic composition of coal blends

    SciTech Connect

    Sutcu, H.; Toroglu, I.; Piskin, S.

    2009-07-01

    Turkey, especially Zonguldak on the West Coast of Black Sea region, has large reserves of bituminous coal that can be used either directly or in blends with other coals for metallurgical coke production. It is possible to predict the coking properties of these coals by petrographic analysis. In this study, semi- and non-coking coals were blended with coking bituminous coals in varying proportions and an estimation was made as to their stability factors through petrographic techniques. It was established that semi- and non-coking bituminous coals could be used in the production of metallurgical coke.

  6. LUTETIAN LIMESTONES IN THE PARIS REGION: PETROGRAPHIC AND COMPOSITIONAL EXAMINATION

    SciTech Connect

    BLANC,A.; HOLMES,L.L.; HARBOTTLE,G.

    1998-06-11

    Stone for building and decorating monuments in the Paris Basin from antiquity to the present came from numerous quarries in the Lutetian limestone formations of the region. To identify specific-stone sources used for masonry and sculptures in these monuments, a team of geologists and archaeologists has investigated 300 quarries and collected 2,300 limestone samples for study in a collaborative effort by geologists and chemists. Petrographic and paleontologic examinations of thin sections enable geologists to distinguish the Tertiary Lutetian limestones from similar stone in Jurassic and Cretaceous strata. The methods of the geologist have been supplemented by those of the chemist whose compositional studies by neutron activation analysis can differentiate among the fine-grained upper Lutetian limestones extracted from specific ancient quarries.

  7. Lutetian limestones in the Paris region: Petrographic and compositional examination

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, A.; Holmes, L.L.; Harbottle, G.

    1998-12-31

    Stone for building and decorating monuments in the Paris Basin from antiquity to the present came from numerous quarries in the Lutetian limestone formations of the region. To identify specific stone sources used for masonry and sculptures in these monuments, a team of geologists and archaeologists have investigated 300 quarries and collected 2,300 limestone samples for study in a collaborative effort by geologists and chemists. Petrographic and paleontologic examinations of thin sections enable geologists to distinguish the Tertiary Lutetian limestones from similar stone in Jurassic and Cretaceous strata. The methods of the geologist have been supplemented by those of the chemistry whose compositional studies by neutron activation analysis can differentiate among the fine-grained upper Lutetian limestones extracted from specific ancient quarries.

  8. Development and evaluation of an automated reflectance microscope system for the petrographic characterization of bituminous coals

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, D. S.; Davis, A.

    1980-10-01

    The development of automated coal petrographic techniques will lessen the demands on skilled personnel to do routine work. This project is concerned with the development and successful testing of an instrument which will meet these needs. The fundamental differences in reflectance of the three primary maceral groups should enable their differentiation in an automated-reflectance frequency histogram (reflectogram). Consequently, reflected light photometry was chosen as the method for automating coal petrographic analysis. Three generations of an automated system (called Rapid Scan Versions I, II and III) were developed and evaluated for petrographic analysis. Their basic design was that of a reflected-light microscope photometer with an automatic stage, interfaced with a minicomputer. The hardware elements used in the Rapid Scan Version I limited the system's flexibility and presented problems with signal digitization and measurement precision. Rapid Scan Version II was designed to incorporate a new microscope photometer and computer system. A digital stepping stage was incorporated into the Rapid Scan Version III system. The precision of reflectance determination of this system was found to be +- 0.02 percent reflectance. The limiting factor in quantitative interpretation of Rapid Scan reflectograms is the resolution of reflectance populations of the individual maceral groups. Statistical testing indicated that reflectograms were highly reproducible, and a new computer program, PETAN, was written to interpret the curves for vitrinite reflectance parameters ad petrographic.

  9. ADVANCED POWER SYSTEMS ANALYSIS TOOLS

    SciTech Connect

    Robert R. Jensen; Steven A. Benson; Jason D. Laumb

    2001-08-31

    The use of Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) modeling tools and improved analytical methods has provided key information in optimizing advanced power system design and operating conditions for efficiency, producing minimal air pollutant emissions and utilizing a wide range of fossil fuel properties. This project was divided into four tasks: the demonstration of the ash transformation model, upgrading spreadsheet tools, enhancements to analytical capabilities using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and improvements to the slag viscosity model. The ash transformation model, Atran, was used to predict the size and composition of ash particles, which has a major impact on the fate of the combustion system. To optimize Atran key factors such as mineral fragmentation and coalescence, the heterogeneous and homogeneous interaction of the organically associated elements must be considered as they are applied to the operating conditions. The resulting model's ash composition compares favorably to measured results. Enhancements to existing EERC spreadsheet application included upgrading interactive spreadsheets to calculate the thermodynamic properties for fuels, reactants, products, and steam with Newton Raphson algorithms to perform calculations on mass, energy, and elemental balances, isentropic expansion of steam, and gasifier equilibrium conditions. Derivative calculations can be performed to estimate fuel heating values, adiabatic flame temperatures, emission factors, comparative fuel costs, and per-unit carbon taxes from fuel analyses. Using state-of-the-art computer-controlled scanning electron microscopes and associated microanalysis systems, a method to determine viscosity using the incorporation of grey-scale binning acquired by the SEM image was developed. The image analysis capabilities of a backscattered electron image can be subdivided into various grey-scale ranges that can be analyzed separately. Since the grey scale's intensity is

  10. Integrated Geochemical-Petrographic Insights on Neoproterozoic Ocean Oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, A.; Planavsky, N.; Wallace, M. W.; Wang, X.; Gueguen, B.

    2015-12-01

    Novel isotope systems have the potential to provide new insights into biogeochemical cycling in Earth's evolving oceans. However, much recent paleo-redox work has been done without extensive consideration of sample preservation or paleoenvironmental setting. Neoproterozoic reef complexes from South Australia provide a perfect setting to test geochemical redox proxies (e.g. uranium isotopes and trace metal chemistry) within a well-defined sedimentological and petrographic context. These reefs developed significant frameworks over ~1km of steep platform relief from the seafloor, and contain a variety of carbonate components including primary dolomite marine cements. Analysis of a variety of components within these reefs reveals significant variation in uranium isotope composition and trace metal chemistry between components, even within a single sample. Marine cements, which precipitated directly from seawater, have much lower contamination element concentrations (e.g. Al, Zr, Th) than depositional micrites, and appear to represent the best archive of ancient ocean conditions. These cements have high levels of Fe, Mn in shallow and deep reef facies (e.g. 2-3wt% Fe), but only Fe-oxide inclusions in peritidal settings. This distribution suggests ferruginous conditions under a surficial chemocline in this Neoproterozoic seawater. Uranium isotopes from pristine marine cements have relatively heavy values compared to modern seawater (median = -0.22 δ238U). These values are essentially unfractionated from riverine inputs, which we interpret as tracking extensive near quantitative low-T reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) by abundant soluble iron in seawater. Depositional components and late stage cements have a much lighter and more variable U isotope compositions (-0.71 to -0.08 δ238U). This work highlights the need for fundamental petrographic constraints on the preservation of depositional geochemical signatures in the future use and development of sedimentary redox proxies.

  11. Advanced materials: Information and analysis needs

    SciTech Connect

    Curlee, T.R.; Das, S.; Lee, R.; Trumble, D.

    1990-09-01

    This report presents the findings of a study to identify the types of information and analysis that are needed for advanced materials. The project was sponsored by the US Bureau of Mines (BOM). It includes a conceptual description of information needs for advanced materials and the development and implementation of a questionnaire on the same subject. This report identifies twelve fundamental differences between advanced and traditional materials and discusses the implications of these differences for data and analysis needs. Advanced and traditional materials differ significantly in terms of physical and chemical properties. Advanced material properties can be customized more easily. The production of advanced materials may differ from traditional materials in terms of inputs, the importance of by-products, the importance of different processing steps (especially fabrication), and scale economies. The potential for change in advanced materials characteristics and markets is greater and is derived from the marriage of radically different materials and processes. In addition to the conceptual study, a questionnaire was developed and implemented to assess the opinions of people who are likely users of BOM information on advanced materials. The results of the questionnaire, which was sent to about 1000 people, generally confirm the propositions set forth in the conceptual part of the study. The results also provide data on the categories of advanced materials and the types of information that are of greatest interest to potential users. 32 refs., 1 fig., 12 tabs.

  12. Petrographic compositions of Paleozoic coals of Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jargal, Luvsanchultem; Erdenetsogt, Bat-Orshikh

    2016-04-01

    In Mongolia, the deposition of coal bearing strata commenced in Pennsylvanian, and continued in Upper Permian, in Lower-Middle Jurassic and finally in Lower Cretaceous time. Pennsylvanian coal seams were deposited in Western Mongolia, where peat formation was initially developed in the southernmost part and later gradually shifted to northward. By the Late Permian, the locus of coal formation had changed and main peat accumulation took place in southern Mongolia. Lower-Middle Jurassic coal was accumulated in western, northern and eastern Mongolia. During this time, peat forming condition was comparatively stable in entire Mongolia. In the Early Cretaceous, thick and extensive coal was formed in the Eastern Mongolia. Due to this general trend of peat accumulation, coal rank decreases from west (bituminous) to east (lignite). The significant portion of Pennsylvanian and Upper Permian coal reserves, existed in western and southern Mongolia, are coking coal. Thus, petrographical studies of the coals are notably important. However, previous studies of Paleozoic coals have been sparse, and only few deposits have been conducted. The maceral compositions of Western Mongolian Pennsylvanian coals such as Khushuut, Maanit, Khurengol, Zeegt, Tsagaangol, Nuurstkhotgor, Khartarvagatai and Olonbulag were studied. The results show that the coals are dominated by vitrinite (45 vol.% to 71 vol.%) and inertinite (28 vol.% to 53vol.%) macerals. Liptinite contents are low, less than 4 vol.%. In addition, vitrinite reflectance values (Rmax in oil) of Khushuut (1.85%), Maanit (0.92%), Khurengol (1.4%), Zeegt (0.86%), Tsagaangol (3.6%), Nuurstkhotgor (0.9%), Khartarvagatai (1.1%) and Olonbulag (1.7%) were determined. Upper Permian coals in southern Mongolia (Tavantolgoi, Nariinsukhait, Jargalant, Tsagaantolgoi, Buduuniikhyar) are dominated by vitrinite (55 vol.% to 78 vol.%) and inertinite macerals (19 vol.% to 44 vol.%). Liptinite contents range from 1 vol.% to 7 vol.%. The vitrinite

  13. Advanced analysis methods in particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Pushpalatha C.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Each generation of high energy physics experiments is grander in scale than the previous - more powerful, more complex and more demanding in terms of data handling and analysis. The spectacular performance of the Tevatron and the beginning of operations of the Large Hadron Collider, have placed us at the threshold of a new era in particle physics. The discovery of the Higgs boson or another agent of electroweak symmetry breaking and evidence of new physics may be just around the corner. The greatest challenge in these pursuits is to extract the extremely rare signals, if any, from huge backgrounds arising from known physics processes. The use of advanced analysis techniques is crucial in achieving this goal. In this review, I discuss the concepts of optimal analysis, some important advanced analysis methods and a few examples. The judicious use of these advanced methods should enable new discoveries and produce results with better precision, robustness and clarity.

  14. Advanced Power System Analysis Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    As a continuing effort to assist in the design and characterization of space power systems, the NASA Lewis Research Center's Power and Propulsion Office developed a powerful computerized analysis tool called System Power Analysis for Capability Evaluation (SPACE). This year, SPACE was used extensively in analyzing detailed operational timelines for the International Space Station (ISS) program. SPACE was developed to analyze the performance of space-based photovoltaic power systems such as that being developed for the ISS. It is a highly integrated tool that combines numerous factors in a single analysis, providing a comprehensive assessment of the power system's capability. Factors particularly critical to the ISS include the orientation of the solar arrays toward the Sun and the shadowing of the arrays by other portions of the station.

  15. Novel Methods of Determining Urinary Calculi Composition: Petrographic Thin Sectioning of Calculi and Nanoscale Flow Cytometry Urinalysis

    PubMed Central

    Gavin, Carson T; Ali, Sohrab N; Tailly, Thomas; Olvera-Posada, Daniel; Alenezi, Husain; Power, Nicholas E; Hou, Jinqiang; St. Amant, Andre H; Luyt, Leonard G; Wood, Stephen; Wu, Charles; Razvi, Hassan; Leong, Hon S

    2016-01-01

    Accurate determination of urinary stone composition has significant bearing on understanding pathophysiology, choosing treatment modalities and preventing recurrence. A need exists for improved methods to determine stone composition. Urine of 31 patients with known renal calculi was examined with nanoscale flow cytometry and the calculi collected during surgery subsequently underwent petrographic thin sectioning with polarized and fluorescent microscopy. Fluorescently labeled bisphosphonate probes (Alendronate-fluorescein/Alendronate-Cy5) were developed for nanoscale flow cytometry to enumerate nanocrystals that bound the fluorescent probes. Petrographic sections of stones were also imaged by fluorescent and polarized light microscopy with composition analysis correlated to alendronate +ve nanocrystal counts in corresponding urine samples. Urine samples from patients with Ca2+ and Mg2+ based calculi exhibited the highest alendronate +ve nanocrystal counts, ranging from 100–1000 nm in diameter. This novel urine based assay was in agreement with composition determined by petrographic thin sections with Alendronate probes. In some cases, high alendronate +ve nanocrystal counts indicated a Ca2+ or Mg2+ composition, as confirmed by petrographic analysis, overturning initial spectrophotometric diagnosis of stone composition. The combination of nanoscale flow cytometry and petrographic thin sections offer an alternative means for determining stone composition. Nanoscale flow cytometry of alendronate +ve nanocrystals alone may provide a high-throughput means of evaluating stone burden. PMID:26771074

  16. Advanced Placement: Model Policy Components. Policy Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinth, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Advanced Placement (AP), launched in 1955 by the College Board as a program to offer gifted high school students the opportunity to complete entry-level college coursework, has since expanded to encourage a broader array of students to tackle challenging content. This Education Commission of the State's Policy Analysis identifies key components of…

  17. Diagenetically altered stable isotope values from petrographically pristine brachiopods: lower Devonian Helderberg Group, New York State

    SciTech Connect

    Rush, P.F.; Chafetz, H.S.

    1988-02-01

    Brachiopods in the Devonian Helderberg Group carbonates and overlying Oriskany Sandstone are preserved with either an unaltered fabric which exhibits extremely fine preservation of original texture, or as neomorphosed coarsely crystalline bladed calcite. Petrographically pristine-looking as well as obviously neomorphosed brachiopods both display the same diagenetically altered carbon isotopic signatures. The carbon values of all skeletal components, including the petrographically well-preserved brachiopods, show a gradational change with stratigraphic distance beneath a Devonian unconformity. These values range from 2 to 3.5% PDB approximately 40 m below the unconformity to /minus/0.6 to 1.5% PDB immediately subjacent to the unconformity. Superjacent to the unconformity, brachiopods display an isotopic signature of 2.3 to 3.7% PDB, which is similar to values observed well below the unconformity. Diagenesis of the skeletal material must have occurred in contact with a meteoric system during the Siegenian (Lower Devonian) exposure. Of greater significance, petrographically pristine brachiopods have not retained their original carbon signature; instead these brachiopods have equilibrated with lighter meteoric waters without any visible change in their skeletal ultrastructure. This analysis was performed on the Lower Devonian Helderberg Group of central New York State, an accumulation of paralic to shallow open marine carbonates deposited on a shallow gradient ramp in a slowly subsiding (1.5 cm/1000 yrs) foreland basin.

  18. Recent advances in morphological cell image analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shengyong; Zhao, Mingzhu; Wu, Guang; Yao, Chunyan; Zhang, Jianwei

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the recent advances in image processing methods for morphological cell analysis. The topic of morphological analysis has received much attention with the increasing demands in both bioinformatics and biomedical applications. Among many factors that affect the diagnosis of a disease, morphological cell analysis and statistics have made great contributions to results and effects for a doctor. Morphological cell analysis finds the cellar shape, cellar regularity, classification, statistics, diagnosis, and so forth. In the last 20 years, about 1000 publications have reported the use of morphological cell analysis in biomedical research. Relevant solutions encompass a rather wide application area, such as cell clumps segmentation, morphological characteristics extraction, 3D reconstruction, abnormal cells identification, and statistical analysis. These reports are summarized in this paper to enable easy referral to suitable methods for practical solutions. Representative contributions and future research trends are also addressed. PMID:22272215

  19. The petrographic description of carbonate facies: are we all speaking the same language?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokier, Stephen; Junaibi, Mariam Al

    2015-04-01

    Despite the proposition of a number of alternatives, the Dunham Classification System has survived to become the most widely-adopted scheme for the petrographic description of carbonate sedimentary rocks. Both academia and industry require consistent and repeatable carbonate lithofacies classifications as a primary input to depositional, diagenetic and reservoir models, and the Dunham System has long been held to satisfy this requirement. However, despite a perceived clarity in the definitions employed within the Dunham System (along with subsequent modifications), ambiguities in the petrographic description of thin sections are widespread. This study has investigated the consistency of the use of the Dunham System across academia and industry at a wide range of experience levels in order to quantitatively assess reproducibility in the petrographic description of carbonate sediments at thin section scale. Phase one of the study was undertaken in order to assess the validity of the project and establish a procedure for a wider sampling strategy. A selection of synthetic carbonate thin sections were produced using strictly controlled component ratios and at a range of sedimentary textures spanning the Dunham Classification System. All samples were subjected to modal analysis and petrographic images of the samples were obtained. Volunteers, from both industry and academia, were randomly allocated either blind-labelled thin sections or photomicrographs and asked to describe the samples. Volunteers were also asked to complete a questionnaire detailing their background. This stage of the study established that the use of thin sections or photomicrographs did not make any perceivable difference to classification. In order to assess the applicability of the results of phase one to genuine carbonate samples, phase two of the study employed a set of fourteen carbonate thin sections derived from a range of Mesozoic and Cenozoic age carbonate lithologies. These thin sections

  20. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Sensitivity Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    David Shropshire; Kent Williams; J.D. Smith; Brent Boore

    2006-12-01

    A fuel cycle economic analysis was performed on four fuel cycles to provide a baseline for initial cost comparison using the Gen IV Economic Modeling Work Group G4 ECON spreadsheet model, Decision Programming Language software, the 2006 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis report, industry cost data, international papers, the nuclear power related cost study from MIT, Harvard, and the University of Chicago. The analysis developed and compared the fuel cycle cost component of the total cost of energy for a wide range of fuel cycles including: once through, thermal with fast recycle, continuous fast recycle, and thermal recycle.

  1. Advanced Analysis Methods in High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Pushpalatha C. Bhat

    2001-10-03

    During the coming decade, high energy physics experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron and around the globe will use very sophisticated equipment to record unprecedented amounts of data in the hope of making major discoveries that may unravel some of Nature's deepest mysteries. The discovery of the Higgs boson and signals of new physics may be around the corner. The use of advanced analysis techniques will be crucial in achieving these goals. The author discusses some of the novel methods of analysis that could prove to be particularly valuable for finding evidence of any new physics, for improving precision measurements and for exploring parameter spaces of theoretical models.

  2. Advanced Power Plant Development and Analysis Methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    A.D. Rao; G.S. Samuelsen; F.L. Robson; B. Washom; S.G. Berenyi

    2006-06-30

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include 'Zero Emission' power plants and the 'FutureGen' H2 co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the 'Vision 21' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

  3. Petrographic characterization of economizer fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Valentim, B.; Hower, J.C.; Soares, S.; Guedes, A.; Garcia, C.; Flores, D.; Oliveira, A.

    2009-11-15

    Policies for reducing NOx emissions have led power plants to restrict O{sub 2}, resulting in high-carbon fly ash production. Therefore, some potentially useful fly ash, such as the economizer fly ash, is discarded without a thorough knowledge of its composition. In order to characterize this type of fly ash, samples were collected from the economizer Portuguese power plant burning two low-sulfur bituminous coals. Characterization was also performed on economizer fly ash subsamples after wet sieving, density and magnetic separation. Analysis included atomic absorption spectroscopy, loss-on-ignition, scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, optical microscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy.

  4. Recent advances in flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Trojanowicz, Marek; Kołacińska, Kamila

    2016-04-01

    A dynamic development of methodologies of analytical flow injection measurements during four decades since their invention has reinforced the solid position of flow analysis in the arsenal of techniques and instrumentation of contemporary chemical analysis. With the number of published scientific papers exceeding 20 000, and advanced instrumentation available for environmental, food, and pharmaceutical analysis, flow analysis is well established as an extremely vital field of modern flow chemistry, which is developed simultaneously with methods of chemical synthesis carried out under flow conditions. This review work is based on almost 300 original papers published mostly in the last decade, with special emphasis put on presenting novel achievements from the most recent 2-3 years in order to indicate current development trends of this methodology. Besides the evolution of the design of whole measuring systems, and including especially new applications of various detections methods, several aspects of implications of progress in nanotechnology, and miniaturization of measuring systems for application in different field of modern chemical analysis are also discussed. PMID:26906258

  5. Subglacial conditions and ice-flow patterns reconstructed from petrographic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipka, Ewelina; Szuman, Izabela

    2010-05-01

    Usually the petrographic composition of sediments give a basis to distinguish sediments horizons and correlate them. In this study clasts petrography contributes to reconstruction of subglacial conditions as well. Together with till fabric analysis and geomorphological facts it can also give a valuable evidence for ice-flow patterns. The study concerns the Great Poland region, located in central-western Poland. The research area extnents are 53.149 °N and 51.849 °N paralells and 15.899 °E and 18.249 °E meridians. The area lies within the range of the Last Glacial Maximum phase (in Poland known as the Leszno Phase) and the Poznan Phase, which is the succeeding stage of the Weichselian Ice Sheet in Poland. The purpose of the study was twofold. Firstly, the authors aimed at revealing and reconstructing the vertical diversity of subglacial dynamics. Secondly it was intended to distinguish lower-scale flowline patterns within the major ice streams as well. A set of data was acquired from subglacial tills deposited by an active ice sheet sole (deformation and lodgement till). The data set included results of: lithofacies analysis results, till fabric measurements (a-axes of at least 30 elongated clasts), clasts-compositional data derived from 5-10 mm gravels and grain-size distribution obtained with wet and dry (mechanical) sieving techniques. Changes in the petrographic composition of gravels were investigated in two ways. At first, in parallel profiles, to detect a spatial tendency in the petrographic composition. The latter way concerned vertical profiles within subglacial till horizons with the purpose of revealing some trends induced by vertical changes of subglacial conditions. Subsequently all the textural features were associated with geomorphic traces, demonstrated by subglacial channels and other glacial lineations, obtained from Digital Elevation Model, in order to distinguish ice-flow patterns. The clasts petrography analysed in vertical profiles revealed

  6. Advancing Behavior Analysis in Zoos and Aquariums.

    PubMed

    Maple, Terry L; Segura, Valerie D

    2015-05-01

    Zoos, aquariums, and other captive animal facilities offer promising opportunities to advance the science and practice of behavior analysis. Zoos and aquariums are necessarily concerned with the health and well-being of their charges and are held to a high standard by their supporters (visitors, members, and donors), organized critics, and the media. Zoos and aquariums offer unique venues for teaching and research and a locus for expanding the footprint of behavior analysis. In North America, Europe, and the UK, formal agreements between zoos, aquariums, and university graduate departments have been operating successfully for decades. To expand on this model, it will be necessary to help zoo and aquarium managers throughout the world to recognize the value of behavior analysis in the delivery of essential animal health and welfare services. Academic institutions, administrators, and invested faculty should consider the utility of training students to meet the growing needs of applied behavior analysis in zoos and aquariums and other animal facilities such as primate research centers, sanctuaries, and rescue centers. PMID:27540508

  7. Petrographic and Geochemical Characterization of the Cambumbia STOCK in Andean Central Cordillera, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas Lequerica, S.; Jaramillo Mejía, J.; Concha Perdomo, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Cambumbia Stock is located on the western flank of the Central Cordillera of the northern Andes. The goals of this study were to petrographic and geochemically characterize the Cambumbia igneous body and to establish its petrogenetic history. 41 samples were collected, 28 for petrographic analysis and 14 for elementary chemical determination by ICP-MS. Petrographically the samples were classified as hornblende and pyroxene-gabbros varying to diorites, gabbronorites and tonalites, the rock texture varies from medium to coarse granular grain, with local microporfiritic texture. It was concluded from the major elements analysis that the samples correspond to the sub-alkaline series with low K content, mainly in the calc-alkaline series, within the gabbros and diorites fields. By using the SiO2 vs TiO2 (Jaramillo, 1980), Th/Yb vs Ta/Yb (Pearce, 1984) (Fig. 1) and Zr/117-Th-Nb/16 (Wood, 1979) diagrams it was determined that these rocks were generated in two geotectonic environments: one type MOR (extension) and other island arc (subduction, compression). Petrographic and geochemical comparisons between the rocks of Cambumbia Stock and Diorite and Gabbro El Pueblito (Giraldo, 2009) (located about 25 km to the north-west) may postulate a possible genetic link between them. Recently, a U/Pb age was obtained by the Universidad de Caldas in zircon in 2009 (not published data), yielded an age of 233.41 ± 3.4 Ma (Middle Triassic). This age is consistent with the global event of the extension and fragmentation of Pangea supercontinent. In addition, the mantle nature of the source and the petrogenetic evolution of the magmatic system were established. References GIRALDO, M.I., (2009): Esquema geodinámica de la parte noroccidental de la cordillera Central de Colombia. (Thesis). p.56-68. Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Medellín. JARAMILLO, J.M. (1980): Petrology and geochemistry of the Nevado del Ruiz Volcano northern Andes, Colombia (Thesis). 167 p. University of Houston

  8. Influences of petrographic parameters on technological properties of greywackes used for crushed stone production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prikryl, Richard; Cermak, Martin; Krutilova, Katerina

    2014-05-01

    This study focuses on the influence of petrographic parameters on technological properties of greywackes. These sedimentary rocks make about 27 % of crushed stone market in the Czech Republic. Mainly in Moravia (eastern part of the Czech Republic), greywackes represent almost exclusive high quality aggregate. The behaviour of greywackes varies, however, from quarry to quarry. In this study, we have selected the most important deposits that cover major lithological variation of local greywackes. Studied greywackes were analysed for their petrographic parameters quantitatively (using image analysis of thin sections). The pore space characteristics were determined by using fluorescent dye - epoxy resin impregnated specimens. The studied rocks are composed of subangular and angular quartz grains, lithoclasts (stable rocks: quartzites, and unstable rocks: phylites, metaphylites, siltstones, slates, greywackes, and less frequently acid eruptive rocks), feldspars (orthoclas, microcline, plagioclase), and detrital micas. Detrital and authigenic chlorite has been found as well. The matrix which represents the largest volume of rock-forming components contains a mixture of sericite, chlorite, clay minerals, cements, and clasts in aleuropelitic size. Based on the microscopic examination, all studied rock types were classified as greywacke with fine- to medium-grained massive rock fabric. Only specimen from Bělkovice has shown partly layered structure. Alteration of feldspars and unstable rock fragments represents common feature. Diagenetic features included pressure dissolution of quartz clasts and formation of siliceous and/or calcite cements. Based on the experimental study of technological performance of studied greywackes and its correlation to petrographic features, the average size of clasts and volume of matrix make the driving factors affecting the LA values. The LA values decrease with the increasing of volume of matrix (R = 0.61) and with decreasing average grain

  9. NASTRAN flutter analysis of advanced turbopropellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchuri, V.; Smith, G. C. C.

    1982-01-01

    An existing capability developed to conduct modal flutter analysis of tuned bladed-shrouded discs in NASTRAN was modified and applied to investigate the subsonic unstalled flutter characteristics of advanced turbopropellers. The modifications pertain to the inclusion of oscillatory modal aerodynamic loads of blades with large (backward and forward) variable sweep. The two dimensional subsonic cascade unsteady aerodynamic theory was applied in a strip theory manner with appropriate modifications for the sweep effects. Each strip is associated with a chord selected normal to any spanwise reference curve such as the blade leading edge. The stability of three operating conditions of a 10-bladed propeller is analyzed. Each of these operating conditions is iterated once to determine the flutter boundary. A 5-bladed propeller is also analyzed at one operating condition to investigate stability. Analytical results obtained are in very good agreement with those from wind tunnel tests.

  10. Advanced development in chemical analysis of Cordyceps.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J; Xie, J; Wang, L Y; Li, S P

    2014-01-01

    Cordyceps sinensis, also called DongChongXiaCao (winter worm summer grass) in Chinese, is a well-known and valued traditional Chinese medicine. In 2006, we wrote a review for discussing the markers and analytical methods in quality control of Cordyceps (J. Pharm. Biomed. Anal. 41 (2006) 1571-1584). Since then this review has been cited by others for more than 60 times, which suggested that scientists have great interest in this special herbal material. Actually, the number of publications related to Cordyceps after 2006 is about 2-fold of that in two decades before 2006 according to the data from Web of Science. Therefore, it is necessary to review and discuss the advanced development in chemical analysis of Cordyceps since then. PMID:23688494

  11. Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neil, Daniel A.; Mankins, John C.

    2004-01-01

    Developing credible mass and cost estimates for space exploration and development architectures require multidisciplinary analysis based on physics calculations, and parametric estimates derived from historical systems. Within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), concurrent engineering environment (CEE) activities integrate discipline oriented analysis tools through a computer network and accumulate the results of a multidisciplinary analysis team via a centralized database or spreadsheet Each minute of a design and analysis study within a concurrent engineering environment is expensive due the size of the team and supporting equipment The Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) reduces the cost of architecture analysis by capturing the knowledge of discipline experts into system oriented spreadsheet models. A framework with a user interface presents a library of system models to an architecture analyst. The analyst selects models of launchers, in-space transportation systems, and excursion vehicles, as well as space and surface infrastructure such as propellant depots, habitats, and solar power satellites. After assembling the architecture from the selected models, the analyst can create a campaign comprised of missions spanning several years. The ATLAS controller passes analyst specified parameters to the models and data among the models. An integrator workbook calls a history based parametric analysis cost model to determine the costs. Also, the integrator estimates the flight rates, launched masses, and architecture benefits over the years of the campaign. An accumulator workbook presents the analytical results in a series of bar graphs. In no way does ATLAS compete with a CEE; instead, ATLAS complements a CEE by ensuring that the time of the experts is well spent Using ATLAS, an architecture analyst can perform technology sensitivity analysis, study many scenarios, and see the impact of design decisions. When the analyst is

  12. A petrographic thin sectioning technique for evaluating composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D. S.; Yee, A. F.

    1989-01-01

    Petrographic thin sectioning by a low-speed diamond saw has been used in conjunction with transmission polarized light microscopy for the characterization of the microstructure and deformation mechanisms of a variety of polymer systems. It has proven possible by these means to study three types of thermoplastic matrices for composite applications: PEEK, BPA-based polycarbonate (PC), and a rubber-modified PC. The reinforcing fibers for these matrices were in all cases AS4 carbon fibers, unidirectionally arrayed. Superior analyzability of matrix morphology and subsurface fracture processes is achieved by thin sectioning.

  13. The petrographic microscope: Evolution of a mineralogical research instrument

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kile, D.E.

    2003-01-01

    The petrographic microscope, designed to observe and measure the optical properties of minerals as a means of identifying them, has provided a foundation for mineralogical and petrological research for more than 120 years. Much of what is known today in these fields is attributable to this instrument, the development of which paralleled an evolution of fundamental optical theory and its correlation with mineral structure and composition. This instrument and its related accessories have evolved through a range of models and designs, which are in themselves distinctive for their scientific function and elegant construction, and are today prized by collectors of scientific instruments.

  14. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles; Larson, Doug; Carr, Tom; Rath, Larry; Balash, Peter; Yih-Huei, Wan

    2008-11-28

    Growing concern over climate change is prompting new thinking about the technologies used to generate electricity. In the future, it is possible that new government policies on greenhouse gas emissions may favor electric generation technology options that release zero or low levels of carbon emissions. The Western U.S. has abundant wind and coal resources. In a world with carbon constraints, the future of coal for new electrical generation is likely to depend on the development and successful application of new clean coal technologies with near zero carbon emissions. This scoping study explores the economic and technical feasibility of combining wind farms with advanced coal generation facilities and operating them as a single generation complex in the Western US. The key questions examined are whether an advanced coal-wind hybrid (ACWH) facility provides sufficient advantages through improvements to the utilization of transmission lines and the capability to firm up variable wind generation for delivery to load centers to compete effectively with other supply-side alternatives in terms of project economics and emissions footprint. The study was conducted by an Analysis Team that consists of staff from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Western Interstate Energy Board (WIEB). We conducted a screening level analysis of the economic competitiveness and technical feasibility of ACWH generation options located in Wyoming that would supply electricity to load centers in California, Arizona or Nevada. Figure ES-1 is a simple stylized representation of the configuration of the ACWH options. The ACWH consists of a 3,000 MW coal gasification combined cycle power plant equipped with carbon capture and sequestration (G+CC+CCS plant), a fuel production or syngas storage facility, and a 1,500 MW wind plant. The ACWH project is connected to load centers by a 3,000 MW

  15. Artificial neural networks to support petrographic classification of carbonate-siliciclastic rocks using well logs and textural information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Adrielle A.; Lima Neto, Irineu A.; Misságia, Roseane M.; Ceia, Marco A.; Carrasquilla, Abel G.; Archilha, Nathaly L.

    2015-06-01

    Petrographic class identification is of great importance to petroleum reservoir characterization and wellbore economic viability analysis, and is usually performed using core or geophysical log analysis. The coring process is costly, and well log analysis requires highly specific knowledge. Thus, great interest has arisen in new methods for predicting the lithological and textural properties of a wide area from a small number of samples. The artificial neural network (ANN) is a computational method based on human brain function and is efficient in recognizing previously trained patterns. This paper demonstrates petrographic classification of carbonate-siliciclastic rocks using a back-propagation neural network algorithm supported by elastic, mineralogical, and textural information from a well data set located in the South Provence Basin, in the southwest of France. The accuracy of the testing suggests that an ANN application offers an auxiliary tool for petrographic classification based on well data, specifically for prediction intervals in wells that have not been sampled or wells adjacent to sampled wells.

  16. Parametric cost analysis for advanced energy concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    This report presents results of an exploratory study to develop parametric cost estimating relationships for advanced fossil-fuel energy systems. The first of two tasks was to develop a standard Cost Chart of Accounts to serve as a basic organizing framework for energy systems cost analysis. The second task included development of selected parametric cost estimating relationships (CERs) for individual elements (or subsystems) of a fossil fuel plant, nominally for the Solvent-Refined Coal (SRC) process. Parametric CERs are presented for the following elements: coal preparation, coal slurry preparation, dissolver (reactor); gasification; oxygen production; acid gas/CO/sub 2/ removal; shift conversion; cryogenic hydrogen recovery; and sulfur removal. While the nominal focus of the study was on the SRC process, each of these elements is found in other fossil fuel processes. Thus, the results of this effort have broader potential application. However, it should also be noted that the CERs presented in this report are based upon a limited data base. Thus, they are applicable over a limited range of values (of the independent variables) and for a limited set of specific technologies (e.g., the gasifier CER is for the multi-train, Koppers-Totzek process). Additional work is required to extend the range of these CERs. 16 figures, 13 tables.

  17. Geochemical, petrographic and physical characterizations and associated alterations of the volcanic rocks of the Romanesque San Nicola Church (Ottana, central Sardinia, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Columbu, Stefano; Palomba, Marcella; Sitzia, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    In this research, the volcanic rocks belonging to the Sardinia Oligo-Miocene volcanic cycle (32 - 11 Ma) and building up the structure of the San Nicola church, one of the most representative churches of the Romanesque architecture, were studied. These stones were widely used in medieval architecture for the excellent workability, but they present some disadvantages, since they are greatly affected by alteration phenomena. The main objectives of this research are i) to focus the mineral, chemical and petrographic compositions of the San Nicola stones, ii) the chemical and physical alteration processes affecting these materials, and iii) to establish the exactly provenance of the volcanic rocks. Furthermore, a comparative study between the rocks from the ancient quarries and those forming the structure of the church was performed. In the ancient quarries, where presumably a more advanced alteration occurs due to the vertical alteration gradient, different facies of the same volcanic lithology, characterized by macroscopical evidences of chemical-physical degradation degree, were sampled. Petrographic, geochemical (both major elements that the traces) and physical-mechanical features of the collected samples were determined to highlight the compositional differences (density, porosity, water-absorption kinetics, mechanical resistance) as a function of the different alteration degree. Moreover, chemical-mineralogical analysis of the sample surfaces from the church, was performed, to highlight possible presence and nature of secondary newly-formed phases (e.g., salt efflorescence). Several methodologies were applied to carry out physical-chemical and petrographic analysis: X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) and Inductively Coupled Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), X-Ray Diffractometry (XRD) for chemical and mineral composition; Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) for textures, mineral assemblages and microstructures studies; He-picnometry, water-absorption and mechanical

  18. Advanced Materials and Solids Analysis Research Core (AMSARC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Advanced Materials and Solids Analysis Research Core (AMSARC), centered at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Andrew W. Breidenbach Environmental Research Center in Cincinnati, Ohio, is the foundation for the Agency's solids and surfaces analysis capabilities. ...

  19. Criteria for recognition of localization and timing of multiple events of hydrothermal alteration in sandstones illustrated by petrographic, fluid inclusion, and isotopic analysis of the Tera Group, Northern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Acebrón, Laura; Goldstein, R. H.; Mas, Ramón; Arribas, José

    2011-11-01

    Stratigraphic relations, detailed petrography, microthermometry of fluid inclusions, and fine-scale isotopic analysis of diagenetic phases indicate a complex thermal history in Tithonian fluvial sandstones and lacustrine limestones of the Tera Group (North Spain). Two different thermal events have been recognized and characterized, which are likely associated with hydrothermal events that affected the Cameros Basin during the mid-Cretaceous and the Eocene. Multiple stages of quartz cementation were identified using scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence on sandstones and fracture fills. Primary fluid inclusions reveal homogenization temperatures (Th) from 195 to 350°C in the quartz cements of extensional fracture fillings. The high variability of Th data in each particular fluid inclusion assemblage is related to natural reequilibration of the fluid inclusions, probably due to Cretaceous hydrothermal metamorphism. Some secondary fluid inclusion assemblages show very consistent data (Th = 281-305°C) and are considered not to have reequilibrated. They are likely related to an Eocene hydrothermal event or to a retrograde stage of the Cretaceous hydrothermalism. This approach shows how multiple thermal events can be discriminated. A very steep thermal gradient of 97-214°C/km can be deduced from δ18O values of ferroan calcites (δ18O -14.2/-11.8‰ V-PDB) that postdate quartz cements in fracture fillings. Furthermore, illite crystallinity data (anchizone-epizone boundary) are out of equilibrium with high fluid inclusion Th. These observations are consistent with heat-flux related to short-lived events of hydrothermal alteration focused by permeability contrasts, rather than to regional heat-flux associated with dynamo-thermal metamorphism. These results illustrate how thermal data from fracture systems can yield thermal histories markedly different from host-rock values, a finding indicative of hydrothermal fluid flow.

  20. Integrated ultrasonic and petrographical characterization of carbonate building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligas, Paola; Fais, Silvana; Cuccuru, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    petrographical and petrophysical study of the investigated stone materials to correlate their petrographical-petrophysical features with the elastic ones. From this integrated study results that the modifications in the elasto-mechanical and petrographical-petrophysical features of the investigated carbonate materials are the main causes which reduce their quality as building materials. The use of the ultrasonic method integrated with information on petrography and petrophysics of the rocks has been successful to assess the rock quality and better understanding their alteration process. Acknowledgments: This work was financially supported by Sardinian Local Administration (RAS - LR 7 August 2007, n.7, Promotion of Scientific Research and Innovation in Sardinia - Italy, Responsible Scientist: S. Fais).

  1. Metamorphism and aqueous alteration in low petrographic type ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, T.; Lipschutz, M. E.; Sears, D. W. G.; Guimon, R. K.; Jie, Lu; Benoit, P. H.; O'D. Alexander, C. M.; Wright, Ian; Pillinger, C.; Morse, A. D.; Hutchison, Robert

    1995-01-01

    In order to investigate the relative importance of dry metamorphism and aqueous alteration in the history of chondruies, chondruies were hand-picked from the Semarkona (petrographic type 3.0), Bishunpur (3. 1), Chainpur (3.4), Dhajala (3.8) and Allegan (5) chondrites, and matrix samples were extracted from the first three ordinary chondrites. The thermoluminescence (TL) properties of all the samples were measured, and appropriate subsets of the samples were analyzed by electron-microprobe and radiochemical neutron activation and the water and H-isotopic composition determined. The TL data for chondrules from Semarkona and Bishunpur scatter widely showing no unambiguous trends, although group B1 chondrules tend to have lower sensitivities and lower peak temperatures compared with group A5 chondrules. It is argued that these data reflect the variety of processes accompanying chondrule formation. The chondrules show remarkably uniform contents of the highly labile elements, indicating mineralogical control on abundance and volatile loss from silicates and loss and recondensation of mobile chalcophiles and siderophiles in some cases. Very high D/H values (up to approx. 8000% SMOW) are observed in certain Semarkona chondrules, a confirmation of earlier work. With increasing petrographic type, mean TL sensitivities of the chondrules increase, the spread of values within an individual meteorite decreases, and peak temperatures and peak widths show trends indicating that the TL is mainly produced by feldspar and that dry, thermal metamorphism is the dominant secondary process experienced by the chondrules. The TL sensitivities of matrix samples also increase with petrographic type. Chainpur matrix samples show the same spread of peak temperatures and peak widths as Chainpur chondruies, indicating metamorphism-related changes in the feldspar are responsible for the TL of the matrix. The TL data for the Semarkona and Bishunpur matrix samples provide, at best, only weak

  2. Unique Systems Analysis Task 7, Advanced Subsonic Technologies Evaluation Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenberg, Joseph D. (Technical Monitor); Bettner, J. L.; Stratton, S.

    2004-01-01

    To retain a preeminent U.S. position in the aircraft industry, aircraft passenger mile costs must be reduced while at the same time, meeting anticipated more stringent environmental regulations. A significant portion of these improvements will come from the propulsion system. A technology evaluation and system analysis was accomplished under this task, including areas such as aerodynamics and materials and improved methods for obtaining low noise and emissions. Previous subsonic evaluation analyses have identified key technologies in selected components for propulsion systems for year 2015 and beyond. Based on the current economic and competitive environment, it is clear that studies with nearer turn focus that have a direct impact on the propulsion industry s next generation product are required. This study will emphasize the year 2005 entry into service time period. The objective of this study was to determine which technologies and materials offer the greatest opportunities for improving propulsion systems. The goals are twofold. The first goal is to determine an acceptable compromise between the thermodynamic operating conditions for A) best performance, and B) acceptable noise and chemical emissions. The second goal is the evaluation of performance, weight and cost of advanced materials and concepts on the direct operating cost of an advanced regional transport of comparable technology level.

  3. Quantitative methods for three-dimensional comparison and petrographic description of chondrites

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, J.M.

    2008-10-20

    X-ray computed tomography can be used to generate three-dimensional (3D) volumetric representations of chondritic meteorites. One of the challenges of using collected X-ray tomographic data is the extraction of useful data for 3D petrographic analysis or description. Here, I examine computer-aided quantitative 3D texture metrics that can be used for the classification of chondritic meteorites. These quantitative techniques are extremely useful for discriminating between chondritic materials, but yield little information on the 3D morphology of chondrite components. To investigate the morphology of chondrite minerals such as Fe(Ni) metal and related sulfides, the homology descriptors known as Betti numbers, are examined. Both methodologies are illustrated with theoretical discussion and examples. Betti numbers may be valuable for examining the nature of metal-silicate structural changes within chondrites with increasing degrees of metamorphism.

  4. Petrographic and geochemical data for Cenozoic volcanic rocks of the Bodie Hills, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, Edward A.; John, David A.; Box, Stephen E.; Vikre, Peter G.; Fleck, Robert J.; Cousens, Brian L.

    2013-01-01

    Petrographic and geochemical data for Cenozoic volcanic rocks of the Bodie Hills, California and Nevada // // This report presents petrographic and geochemical data for samples collected during investigations of Tertiary volcanism in the Bodie Hills of California and Nevada. Igneous rocks in the area are principally 15–6 Ma subduction-related volcanic rocks of the Bodie Hills volcanic field but also include 3.9–0.1 Ma rocks of the bimodal, post-subduction Aurora volcanic field. Limited petrographic results for local basement rocks, including Mesozoic granitoid rocks and their metamorphic host rocks, are also included in the compilation. The petrographic data include visual estimates of phenocryst abundances as well as other diagnostic petrographic criteria. The geochemical data include whole-rock major oxide and trace element data, as well as limited whole-rock isotopic data.

  5. The Tuition Advance Fund: An Analysis Prepared for Boston University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botsford, Keith

    Three models for anlayzing the Tuition Advance Fund (TAF) are examined. The three models are: projections by the Institute for Demographic and Economic Studies (IDES), projections by Data Resources, Inc. (DRI), and the Tuition Advance Fund Simulation (TAFSIM) models from Boston University. Analysis of the TAF is based on enrollment, price, and…

  6. A Meta-Analysis of Advance-Organizer Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Carol Leth

    Long term studies of advance organizers (AO) were analyzed with Glass's meta-analysis technique. AO's were defined as bridges from reader's previous knowledge to what is to be learned. The results were compared with predictions from Ausubel's model of assimilative learning. The results of the study indicated that advance organizers were associated…

  7. Advanced Fingerprint Analysis Project Fingerprint Constituents

    SciTech Connect

    GM Mong; CE Petersen; TRW Clauss

    1999-10-29

    The work described in this report was focused on generating fundamental data on fingerprint components which will be used to develop advanced forensic techniques to enhance fluorescent detection, and visualization of latent fingerprints. Chemical components of sweat gland secretions are well documented in the medical literature and many chemical techniques are available to develop latent prints, but there have been no systematic forensic studies of fingerprint sweat components or of the chemical and physical changes these substances undergo over time.

  8. Advanced nuclear rocket engine mission analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsthaler, J.; Farbman, G.; Sulmeisters, T.; Buden, D.; Harris, P.

    1987-12-01

    The use of a derivative of the NERVA engine developed from 1955 to 1973 was evluated for potential application to Air Force orbital transfer and maneuvering missions in the time period 1995 to 2020. The NERVA stge was found to have lower life cycle costs (LCC) than an advanced chemical stage for performing low earth orbit (LEO) to geosynchronous orbit (GEO0 missions at any level of activity greater than three missions per year. It had lower life cycle costs than a high performance nuclear electric engine at any level of LEO to GEO mission activity. An examination of all unmanned orbital transfer and maneuvering missions from the Space Transportation Architecture study (STAS 111-3) indicated a LCC advantage for the NERVA stage over the advanced chemical stage of fifteen million dollars. The cost advanced accured from both the orbital transfer and maneuvering missions. Parametric analyses showed that the specific impulse of the NERVA stage and the cost of delivering material to low earth orbit were the most significant factors in the LCC advantage over the chemical stage. Lower development costs and a higher thrust gave the NERVA engine an LCC advantage over the nuclear electric stage. An examination of technical data from the Rover/NERVA program indicated that development of the NERVA stage has a low technical risk, and the potential for high reliability and safe operation. The data indicated the NERVA engine had a great flexibility which would permit a single stage to perform all Air Force missions.

  9. Advanced Modeling, Simulation and Analysis (AMSA) Capability Roadmap Progress Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonsson, Erik; Gombosi, Tamas

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: NASA capability roadmap activity. Advanced modeling, simulation, and analysis overview. Scientific modeling and simulation. Operations modeling. Multi-special sensing (UV-gamma). System integration. M and S Environments and Infrastructure.

  10. Provenance, tectonics and palaeoclimate of Proterozoic Chandarpur sandstones, Chattisgarh basin: A petrographic view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Basudeb

    2005-06-01

    Sandstones of early Neoproterozoic Chandarpur Group, Chattisgarh Supergroup, central India display progressive change towards greater textural and mineralogical maturity from base to top of the succession. The clay-silt matrix decreases, sorting of sand grains improves, frequency of rounded grains increases, monocrystalline quartz content increases with concomitant decrease in polycrystalline quartz, feldspar and rock fragments. The trend of variations in different mineralogical and textural attributes, however, exhibits inflections at different stratigraphic levels. The sandstones of the basal Lohardih Formation are alluvial fan deposits, characterized by high matrix and feldspar content, iron-oxide impregnated highly angular grains and poor sorting. Petrographic properties collectively indicate that the sandstones were derived from a weathered granitic crust under a humid climatic condition. Abundance of well rounded grains within the alluvial fan and overlying braided fluvial deposit indicates prolonged wind action during episodes of high aridity. The shallow marine deposit overlying the fluvial deposits in the upper part of the Lohardih Formation exhibits bed-to-bed variation in the frequency of angular grains, feldspar content and overall maturity suggesting environmentally controlled segregation of sediments. The abrupt appearance of coarse-grained immature sandstones with concomitant reappearance of iron-oxide impregnated/altered feldspar grains in the upper part of the shelf deposits of the Chaporadih Formation point to a phase of tectonic uplift that possibly triggered a regression. Continued regression and peneplanation heralded the deposition of supermature medium-grained purple quartzarenite of the upper shoreface Kansapathar Formation in the uppermost part of the Chandarpur succession under a hot desertic climatic condition. The provenance analysis revealed that the Chandarpur clastics were derived from granites and granite-gneisses of a continental

  11. Advanced surface design for logistics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Tim R.; Hansen, Scott D.

    The development of anthropometric arm/hand and tool models and their manipulation in a large system model for maintenance simulation are discussed. The use of Advanced Surface Design and s-fig technology in anthropometrics, and three-dimensional graphics simulation tools, are found to achieve a good balance between model manipulation speed and model accuracy. The present second generation models are shown to be twice as fast to manipulate as the first generation b-surf models, to be easier to manipulate into various configurations, and to more closely approximate human contours.

  12. Advanced tracking systems design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potash, R.; Floyd, L.; Jacobsen, A.; Cunningham, K.; Kapoor, A.; Kwadrat, C.; Radel, J.; Mccarthy, J.

    1989-01-01

    The results of an assessment of several types of high-accuracy tracking systems proposed to track the spacecraft in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Advanced Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (ATDRSS) are summarized. Tracking systems based on the use of interferometry and ranging are investigated. For each system, the top-level system design and operations concept are provided. A comparative system assessment is presented in terms of orbit determination performance, ATDRSS impacts, life-cycle cost, and technological risk.

  13. Recent Advances in Anthocyanin Analysis and Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Cara R.; Wu, Qingli; Simon, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Anthocyanins are a class of polyphenols responsible for the orange, red, purple and blue colors of many fruits, vegetables, grains, flowers and other plants. Consumption of anthocyanins has been linked as protective agents against many chronic diseases and possesses strong antioxidant properties leading to a variety of health benefits. In this review, we examine the advances in the chemical profiling of natural anthocyanins in plant and biological matrices using various chromatographic separations (HPLC and CE) coupled with different detection systems (UV, MS and NMR). An overview of anthocyanin chemistry, prevalence in plants, biosynthesis and metabolism, bioactivities and health properties, sample preparation and phytochemical investigations are discussed while the major focus examines the comparative advantages and disadvantages of each analytical technique. PMID:19946465

  14. Analysis of an advanced technology subsonic turbofan incorporating revolutionary materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knip, Gerald, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Successful implementation of revolutionary composite materials in an advanced turbofan offers the possibility of further improvements in engine performance and thrust-to-weight ratio relative to current metallic materials. The present analysis determines the approximate engine cycle and configuration for an early 21st century subsonic turbofan incorporating all composite materials. The advanced engine is evaluated relative to a current technology baseline engine in terms of its potential fuel savings for an intercontinental quadjet having a design range of 5500 nmi and a payload of 500 passengers. The resultant near optimum, uncooled, two-spool, advanced engine has an overall pressure ratio of 87, a bypass ratio of 18, a geared fan, and a turbine rotor inlet temperature of 3085 R. Improvements result in a 33-percent fuel saving for the specified misssion. Various advanced composite materials are used throughout the engine. For example, advanced polymer composite materials are used for the fan and the low pressure compressor (LPC).

  15. Black and red granites in the Egyptian Antiquity Museum of Turin. A minero-petrographic and provenance study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, M.; Borghi, A.; Vaggelli, G.; D'Amicone, E.; Vigna, L.

    2009-04-01

    The University of Turin, in cooperation with the Egyptian Antiquity Museum, has recently undertaken several projects aimed at developing a scientific approach to the analysis of ancient Egyptian finds. In particular, a straightforward project to investigate the stony handcrafts preserved in the statuary rooms started in 2006 to obtain their systematic petrographic classification and their possible geological sources. The main intent of the project was to understand the provenance of the materials used in Pharaonic period, setting the base for the identification of the ancient quarry sites and for a correct interpretation of the extraction and working techniques, in order to provide fundamental information about economical and social development of Egyptian civilization through historical times. The choice to focus attention on black and red granites came from the statement of the percentage relevance (40 of the 54 sculptures actually exposed) of these materials in the statuary rooms. Moreover, especially for black granites, the need of detailed minero-petrographic analysis arose from the difficulty in making a macroscopic classification of the fine-grained dark-coloured rock varieties. Therefore, five black granite statues, belonging to the Drovetti collection were sampled in a micro-invasive way: three sculptures of goddess Sekhmet (cat. 260, 251, 247), the statue of Ramses II (cat. 1380) and the statue of goddess Hathor (cat. 694). The choice to analyse even three of the twenty-one statues of goddess Sekhmet (cat. 247, cat. 251, cat. 260), originally located in the same Egyptian temple but ichnographically different, derived from the need of answering the archaeological questions about their provenance. On the other hand, the opportunity of studying the fine-grained black rocks used for the sculptures of goddess Hathor (cat. 694) and of Ramses II in Majesty (cat. 1380), symbol of the Egyptian museum of Turin, provided the opportunity to analyse and classify the

  16. Advanced reliability method for fatigue analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Y.-T.; Wirsching, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    When design factors are considered as random variables and the failure condition cannot be expressed by a closed form algebraic inequality, computations of risk (or probability of failure) may become extremely difficult or very inefficient. This study suggests using a simple and easily constructed second degree polynomial to approximate the complicated limit state in the neighborhood of the design point; a computer analysis relates the design variables at selected points. Then a fast probability integration technique (i.e., the Rackwitz-Fiessler algorithm) can be used to estimate risk. The capability of the proposed method is demonstrated in an example of a low cycle fatigue problem for which a computer analysis is required to perform local strain analysis to relate the design variables. A comparison of the performance of this method is made with a far more costly Monte Carlo solution. Agreement of the proposed method with Monte Carlo is considered to be good.

  17. Modeling and analysis of advanced binary cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Gawlik, K.

    1997-12-31

    A computer model (Cycle Analysis Simulation Tool, CAST) and a methodology have been developed to perform value analysis for small, low- to moderate-temperature binary geothermal power plants. The value analysis method allows for incremental changes in the levelized electricity cost (LEC) to be determined between a baseline plant and a modified plant. Thermodynamic cycle analyses and component sizing are carried out in the model followed by economic analysis which provides LEC results. The emphasis of the present work is on evaluating the effect of mixed working fluids instead of pure fluids on the LEC of a geothermal binary plant that uses a simple Organic Rankine Cycle. Four resources were studied spanning the range of 265{degrees}F to 375{degrees}F. A variety of isobutane and propane based mixtures, in addition to pure fluids, were used as working fluids. This study shows that the use of propane mixtures at a 265{degrees}F resource can reduce the LEC by 24% when compared to a base case value that utilizes commercial isobutane as its working fluid. The cost savings drop to 6% for a 375{degrees}F resource, where an isobutane mixture is favored. Supercritical cycles were found to have the lowest cost at all resources.

  18. [The mineralogical and petrographical work of the pharmacists in the Museum].

    PubMed

    Kaspar, Caroline; Jaussaud, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Three famous pharmacists were working in the Muséum national d'histoire naturelle in Paris, in the field of earth sciences: Louis Nicolas Vauquelin (1763-1829), André Laugier (1770-1832) and Alfred Lacroix (1863-1948). Vauquelin, professor of Chemical arts, established the chemical composition of numerous minerals, which led him to the discovery of new chemical elements. He also took a hand in demonstrating the extra-terrestrial origin of meteorites. Laugier, professor of General chemistry, was an admitted expert in the analytical field of these rocks. Lacroix, who held during more than forty years the chair of Mineralogy in the Museum, carried out major scientific work. This field working naturalist who was also famous vulcanologist placed his studies of the mineral species into a petrographical context. He described numerous new minerals, took an interest in their origin and classification of the volcanic rocks, as well as in contact metamorphism. In other respects, he increased the collections in the Museum (minerals, rocks, meteorites). The works of Vauquelin, Laugier and Lacroix contributed to advance those begun by some scientists of the Jardin du Roi, as Buffon or the Rouelle brothers before the French Revolution. PMID:16358466

  19. Progress in Advanced Spectral Analysis of Radioxenon

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Derek A.; Schrom, Brian T.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Ely, James H.; Flory, Adam E.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Saunders, Danielle L.; Suckow, Thomas J.

    2010-09-21

    Improvements to a Java based software package developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for display and analysis of radioxenon spectra acquired by the International Monitoring System (IMS) are described here. The current version of the Radioxenon JavaViewer implements the region of interest (ROI) method for analysis of beta-gamma coincidence data. Upgrades to the Radioxenon JavaViewer will include routines to analyze high-purity germanium detector (HPGe) data, Standard Spectrum Method to analyze beta-gamma coincidence data and calibration routines to characterize beta-gamma coincidence detectors. These upgrades are currently under development; the status and initial results will be presented. Implementation of these routines into the JavaViewer and subsequent release is planned for FY 2011-2012.

  20. Recent advances in statistical energy analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heron, K. H.

    1992-01-01

    Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) has traditionally been developed using modal summation and averaging approach, and has led to the need for many restrictive SEA assumptions. The assumption of 'weak coupling' is particularly unacceptable when attempts are made to apply SEA to structural coupling. It is now believed that this assumption is more a function of the modal formulation rather than a necessary formulation of SEA. The present analysis ignores this restriction and describes a wave approach to the calculation of plate-plate coupling loss factors. Predictions based on this method are compared with results obtained from experiments using point excitation on one side of an irregular six-sided box structure. Conclusions show that the use and calculation of infinite transmission coefficients is the way forward for the development of a purely predictive SEA code.

  1. Advancing Usability Evaluation through Human Reliability Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Boring; David I. Gertman

    2005-07-01

    This paper introduces a novel augmentation to the current heuristic usability evaluation methodology. The SPAR-H human reliability analysis method was developed for categorizing human performance in nuclear power plants. Despite the specialized use of SPAR-H for safety critical scenarios, the method also holds promise for use in commercial off-the-shelf software usability evaluations. The SPAR-H method shares task analysis underpinnings with human-computer interaction, and it can be easily adapted to incorporate usability heuristics as performance shaping factors. By assigning probabilistic modifiers to heuristics, it is possible to arrive at the usability error probability (UEP). This UEP is not a literal probability of error but nonetheless provides a quantitative basis to heuristic evaluation. When combined with a consequence matrix for usability errors, this method affords ready prioritization of usability issues.

  2. Advanced Techniques for Root Cause Analysis

    2000-09-19

    Five items make up this package, or can be used individually. The Chronological Safety Management Template utilizes a linear adaptation of the Integrated Safety Management System laid out in the form of a template that greatly enhances the ability of the analyst to perform the first step of any investigation which is to gather all pertinent facts and identify causal factors. The Problem Analysis Tree is a simple three (3) level problem analysis tree whichmore » is easier for organizations outside of WSRC to use. Another part is the Systemic Root Cause Tree. One of the most basic and unique features of Expanded Root Cause Analysis is the Systemic Root Cause portion of the Expanded Root Cause Pyramid. The Systemic Root Causes are even more basic than the Programmatic Root Causes and represent Root Causes that cut across multiple (if not all) programs in an organization. the Systemic Root Cause portion contains 51 causes embedded at the bottom level of a three level Systemic Root Cause Tree that is divided into logical, organizationally based categorie to assist the analyst. The Computer Aided Root Cause Analysis that allows the analyst at each level of the Pyramid to a) obtain a brief description of the cause that is being considered, b) record a decision that the item is applicable, c) proceed to the next level of the Pyramid to see only those items at the next level of the tree that are relevant to the particular cause that has been chosen, and d) at the end of the process automatically print out a summary report of the incident, the causal factors as they relate to the safety management system, the probable causes, apparent causes, Programmatic Root Causes and Systemic Root Causes for each causal factor and the associated corrective action.« less

  3. Advanced CMOS Radiation Effects Testing Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan Allen; Marshall, Paul W.; Rodbell, Kenneth P.; Gordon, Michael S.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Schwank, James R.; Dodds, Nathaniel A.; Castaneda, Carlos M.; Berg, Melanie D.; Kim, Hak S.; Phan, Anthony M.; Seidleck, Christina M.

    2014-01-01

    Presentation at the annual NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program Electronic Technology Workshop (ETW). The material includes an update of progress in this NEPP task area over the past year, which includes testing, evaluation, and analysis of radiation effects data on the IBM 32 nm silicon-on-insulator (SOI) complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The testing was conducted using test vehicles supplied by directly by IBM.

  4. Advanced CMOS Radiation Effects Testing and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, J. A.; Marshall, P. W.; Rodbell, K. P.; Gordon, M. S.; LaBel, K. A.; Schwank, J. R.; Dodds, N. A.; Castaneda, C. M.; Berg, M. D.; Kim, H. S.; Phan, A. M.; Seidleck, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Presentation at the annual NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program Electronic Technology Workshop (ETW). The material includes an update of progress in this NEPP task area over the past year, which includes testing, evaluation, and analysis of radiation effects data on the IBM 32 nm silicon-on-insulator (SOI) complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The testing was conducted using test vehicles supplied by directly by IBM.

  5. The Petrographic Distinction between Basalt and Andesite Based upon the Arrested Fractionation of Plagioclase Phenocrysts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garlick, G. Donald; Garlick, Benjamin J.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the need to take into account the effects of arrested fractional crystallization in the petrographic classification of volcanic rocks containing plagioclase phenocrysts. Describes the development and use of a computer program to accomplish this task graphically. (TW)

  6. Advances in Analysis of Longitudinal Data

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Robert D.; Hedeker, Donald; DuToit, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we explore recent developments in the area of linear and nonlinear generalized mixed-effects regression models and various alternatives, including generalized estimating equations for analysis of longitudinal data. Methods are described for continuous and normally distributed as well as categorical (binary, ordinal, nominal) and count (Poisson) variables. Extensions of the model to three and four levels of clustering, multivariate outcomes, and incorporation of design weights are also described. Linear and nonlinear models are illustrated using an example involving a study of the relationship between mood and smoking. PMID:20192796

  7. Advanced Orion Optimized Laser System Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Contractor shall perform a complete analysis of the potential of the solid state laser in the very long pulse mode (100 ns pulse width, 10-30 hz rep-rate) and in the very short pulse mode (100 ps pulse width 10-30 hz rep rate) concentrating on the operation of the device in the 'hot-rod' mode, where no active cooling the laser operation is attempted. Contractor's calculations shall be made of the phase aberrations which develop during the repped-pulse train, and the results shall feed into the adaptive optics analyses. The contractor shall devise solutions to work around ORION track issues. A final report shall be furnished to the MSFC COTR including all calculations and analysis of estimates of bulk phase and intensity aberration distribution in the laser output beam as a function of time during the repped-pulse train for both wave forms (high-energy/long-pulse, as well as low-energy/short-pulse). Recommendations shall be made for mitigating the aberrations by laser re-design and/or changes in operating parameters of optical pump sources and/or designs.

  8. Value analysis for advanced technology products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulliere, Mark

    2011-03-01

    Technology by itself can be wondrous, but buyers of technology factor in the price they have to pay along with performance in their decisions. As a result, the ``best'' technology may not always win in the marketplace when ``good enough'' can be had at a lower price. Technology vendors often set pricing by ``cost plus margin,'' or by competitors' offerings. What if the product is new (or has yet to be invented)? Value pricing is a methodology to price products based on the value generated (e.g. money saved) by using one product vs. the next best technical alternative. Value analysis can often clarify what product attributes generate the most value. It can also assist in identifying market forces outside of the control of the technology vendor that also influence pricing. These principles are illustrated with examples.

  9. Advanced stability analysis for laminar flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orszag, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    Five classes of problems are addressed: (1) the extension of the SALLY stability analysis code to the full eighth order compressible stability equations for three dimensional boundary layer; (2) a comparison of methods for prediction of transition using SALLY for incompressible flows; (3) a study of instability and transition in rotating disk flows in which the effects of Coriolis forces and streamline curvature are included; (4) a new linear three dimensional instability mechanism that predicts Reynolds numbers for transition to turbulence in planar shear flows in good agreement with experiment; and (5) a study of the stability of finite amplitude disturbances in axisymmetric pipe flow showing the stability of this flow to all nonlinear axisymmetric disturbances.

  10. Performance analysis of advanced spacecraft TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, William C.

    1987-01-01

    The analysis on the feasibility for using metal hydrides in the thermal protection system of cryogenic tanks in space was based on the heat capacity of ice as the phase change material (PCM). It was found that with ice the thermal protection system weight could be reduced by, at most, about 20 percent over an all LI-900 insulation. For this concept to be viable, a metal hydride with considerably more capacity than water would be required. None were found. Special metal hydrides were developed for hydrogen fuel storage applications and it may be possible to do so for the current application. Until this appears promising further effort on this feasibility study does not seem warranted.

  11. Advanced analysis techniques for uranium assay

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, W. H.; Ensslin, Norbert; Carrillo, L. A.; Beard, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Uranium has a negligible passive neutron emission rate making its assay practicable only with an active interrogation method. The active interrogation uses external neutron sources to induce fission events in the uranium in order to determine the mass. This technique requires careful calibration with standards that are representative of the items to be assayed. The samples to be measured are not always well represented by the available standards which often leads to large biases. A technique of active multiplicity counting is being developed to reduce some of these assay difficulties. Active multiplicity counting uses the measured doubles and triples count rates to determine the neutron multiplication (f4) and the product of the source-sample coupling ( C ) and the 235U mass (m). Since the 35U mass always appears in the multiplicity equations as the product of Cm, the coupling needs to be determined before the mass can be known. A relationship has been developed that relates the coupling to the neutron multiplication. The relationship is based on both an analytical derivation and also on empirical observations. To determine a scaling constant present in this relationship, known standards must be used. Evaluation of experimental data revealed an improvement over the traditional calibration curve analysis method of fitting the doubles count rate to the 235Um ass. Active multiplicity assay appears to relax the requirement that the calibration standards and unknown items have the same chemical form and geometry.

  12. Multispectral laser imaging for advanced food analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senni, L.; Burrascano, P.; Ricci, M.

    2016-07-01

    A hardware-software apparatus for food inspection capable of realizing multispectral NIR laser imaging at four different wavelengths is herein discussed. The system was designed to operate in a through-transmission configuration to detect the presence of unwanted foreign bodies inside samples, whether packed or unpacked. A modified Lock-In technique was employed to counterbalance the significant signal intensity attenuation due to transmission across the sample and to extract the multispectral information more efficiently. The NIR laser wavelengths used to acquire the multispectral images can be varied to deal with different materials and to focus on specific aspects. In the present work the wavelengths were selected after a preliminary analysis to enhance the image contrast between foreign bodies and food in the sample, thus identifying the location and nature of the defects. Experimental results obtained from several specimens, with and without packaging, are presented and the multispectral image processing as well as the achievable spatial resolution of the system are discussed.

  13. Advances in carbonate exploration and reservoir analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garland, J.; Neilson, J.; Laubach, S.E.; Whidden, Katherine J.

    2012-01-01

    The development of innovative techniques and concepts, and the emergence of new plays in carbonate rocks are creating a resurgence of oil and gas discoveries worldwide. The maturity of a basin and the application of exploration concepts have a fundamental influence on exploration strategies. Exploration success often occurs in underexplored basins by applying existing established geological concepts. This approach is commonly undertaken when new basins ‘open up’ owing to previous political upheavals. The strategy of using new techniques in a proven mature area is particularly appropriate when dealing with unconventional resources (heavy oil, bitumen, stranded gas), while the application of new play concepts (such as lacustrine carbonates) to new areas (i.e. ultra-deep South Atlantic basins) epitomizes frontier exploration. Many low-matrix-porosity hydrocarbon reservoirs are productive because permeability is controlled by fractures and faults. Understanding basic fracture properties is critical in reducing geological risk and therefore reducing well costs and increasing well recovery. The advent of resource plays in carbonate rocks, and the long-standing recognition of naturally fractured carbonate reservoirs means that new fracture and fault analysis and prediction techniques and concepts are essential.

  14. Advanced computational tools for 3-D seismic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barhen, J.; Glover, C.W.; Protopopescu, V.A.

    1996-06-01

    The global objective of this effort is to develop advanced computational tools for 3-D seismic analysis, and test the products using a model dataset developed under the joint aegis of the United States` Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) and the European Association of Exploration Geophysicists (EAEG). The goal is to enhance the value to the oil industry of the SEG/EAEG modeling project, carried out with US Department of Energy (DOE) funding in FY` 93-95. The primary objective of the ORNL Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR) is to spearhead the computational innovations techniques that would enable a revolutionary advance in 3-D seismic analysis. The CESAR effort is carried out in collaboration with world-class domain experts from leading universities, and in close coordination with other national laboratories and oil industry partners.

  15. METHODS ADVANCEMENT FOR MILK ANALYSIS: THE MAMA STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Methods Advancement for Milk Analysis (MAMA) study was designed by US EPA and CDC investigators to provide data to support the technological and study design needs of the proposed National Children=s Study (NCS). The NCS is a multi-Agency-sponsored study, authorized under the...

  16. Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers in Dryer Lint: An Advanced Analysis Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Robert Q.

    2008-01-01

    An advanced analytical chemistry laboratory experiment is described that involves environmental analysis and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Students analyze lint from clothes dryers for traces of flame retardant chemicals, polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), compounds receiving much attention recently. In a typical experiment, ng/g…

  17. A Meta-Analysis of Advanced Organizer Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Carol Leth

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-nine reports yielding 112 studies were analyzed with Glass's meta-analysis technique, and results were compared with predictions from Ausubel's model of assimilative learning. Overall, advance organizers were shown to be associated with increased learning and retention of material to be learned. (Author)

  18. Advanced GIS Exercise: Predicting Rainfall Erosivity Index Using Regression Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Post, Christopher J.; Goddard, Megan A.; Mikhailova, Elena A.; Hall, Steven T.

    2006-01-01

    Graduate students from a variety of agricultural and natural resource fields are incorporating geographic information systems (GIS) analysis into their graduate research, creating a need for teaching methodologies that help students understand advanced GIS topics for use in their own research. Graduate-level GIS exercises help students understand…

  19. NASTRAN documentation for flutter analysis of advanced turbopropellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchuri, V.; Gallo, A. M.; Skalski, S. C.

    1982-01-01

    An existing capability developed to conduct modal flutter analysis of tuned bladed-shrouded discs was modified to facilitate investigation of the subsonic unstalled flutter characteristics of advanced turbopropellers. The modifications pertain to the inclusion of oscillatory modal aerodynamic loads of blades with large (backward and forward) varying sweep.

  20. Advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures are investigated. Constructions of special elements which containing traction-free circular boundaries are investigated. New versions of mixed variational principle and version of hybrid stress elements are formulated. A method is established for suppression of kinematic deformation modes. semiLoof plate and shell elements are constructed by assumed stress hybrid method. An elastic-plastic analysis is conducted by viscoplasticity theory using the mechanical subelement model.

  1. Recent Advances in Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization, part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelemy, Jean-Francois M. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    This three-part document contains a collection of technical papers presented at the Second NASA/Air Force Symposium on Recent Advances in Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization, held September 28-30, 1988 in Hampton, Virginia. The topics covered include: aircraft design, aeroelastic tailoring, control of aeroelastic structures, dynamics and control of flexible structures, structural design, design of large engineering systems, application of artificial intelligence, shape optimization, software development and implementation, and sensitivity analysis.

  2. Recent Advances in Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelemy, Jean-Francois M. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    This three-part document contains a collection of technical papers presented at the Second NASA/Air Force Symposium on Recent Advances in Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization, held September 28-30, 1988 in Hampton, Virginia. The topics covered include: helicopter design, aeroelastic tailoring, control of aeroelastic structures, dynamics and control of flexible structures, structural design, design of large engineering systems, application of artificial intelligence, shape optimization, software development and implementation, and sensitivity analysis.

  3. Recent Advances in Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelemy, Jean-Francois M. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    This three-part document contains a collection of technical papers presented at the Second NASA/Air Force Symposium on Recent Advances in Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization, held September 28-30, 1988 in Hampton, Virginia. The topics covered include: helicopter design, aeroelastic tailoring, control of aeroelastic structures, dynamics and control of flexible structures, structural design, design of large engineering systems, application of artificial intelligence, shape optimization, software development and implementation, and sensitivity analysis.

  4. Petrographic description of calcite/opal samples collected on field trip of December 5-9, 1992. Special report No. 7

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, C.A.; Schluter, C.M.

    1993-06-01

    This study is part of the research program of the Yucca Mountain Project intended to provide the State of Nevada with a detailed analysis and assessment of the water-deposited minerals of Yucca Mountain and adjacent regions. Forty-three separate stops were made and 203 samples were collected during the five days of the field trip. This report describes petrographic observations made on the calcite/opal samples.

  5. NMR relaxation of neritic carbonates: An integrated petrophysical and petrographical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Benoit; Fleury, Marc; Santerre, Yannick; Brigaud, Benjamin

    2011-05-01

    A set of carbonate outcrop samples, covering a wide range of the sedimentary textures and depositional environments existing on carbonate systems, was studied through an integrated petrographical and petrophysical approach. With the aim of improving the understanding of the NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) signal of carbonates, this work is: 1) providing an atlas for various carbonate reservoir rock-types, 2) providing a workflow for integrating geological and petrophysical data and, 3) documenting common shortfalls in NMR/MICP analyses in carbonates. The petrographical investigation includes thin section and SEM (Secondary Electron Microscope) observations, whereas petrophysical investigation includes porosity (Φ), permeability (K), NMR, MICP (Mercury Injection Capillary Pressure), and specific surface area (BET) measurements. On the basis of NMR and MICP data, 4 groups of samples were identified: (1) microporous samples, (2) micro-mesoporous samples, (3) wide multimodal samples, and (4) atypical samples. The microporous samples allow us to define a maximum NMR threshold for microporosity at a T 2 of 200 ms. NMR and MICP response of the investigated carbonates are often comparable in terms of modal distribution (microporous, micro-mesoporous and wide multimodal samples). In particular, micritization, a well known but underestimated early diagenetic process, tends to homogenize the NMR signal of primarily different sedimentary facies. A grainstone with heavily micritized grains can display well sorted unimodal NMR and MICP signatures very similar, even identical, to a mudstone-wackestone. Their signatures are comparable to that of a simple sphere packing model. On the contrary, several samples (labeled atypical samples) show a discrepancy between NMR and MICP response. This discrepancy is explained by the fact that MICP can be affected by the physical connectivity of the pore network, in case of disseminated and isolated molds in a micrite matrix for instance

  6. Petrophysical and petrographic evaluation of Sidri Member of Belayim Formation, Badri field, Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abudeif, A. M.; Attia, M. M.; Radwan, A. E.

    2016-03-01

    Presence of sandstone streaks in Sidri Member within Belayim Formation that lies between two productive zones; Kareem Formation and Hammam Faraun Member, was the main reason to perform this study. It may represent a good hydrocarbon reservoir and will be added to the Egyptian oil production in some wells of Badri field. This Member has high resistivity signature on Electric-logs responses which attracted the attention to investigate its occurrence in the field, to delineate its distribution all-over the area, to evaluate the petrographic and petrophysical characteristics and to evaluate its productivity. Petrographic and petrophysical analyses of these sand zones were undertaken using thin section samples. The electric logs and subsurface geologic data was used to evaluate the main reservoir characteristics of the Sidri sandstone such as lithology, cementation, shale volume, porosity (Φ), effective porosity (Φ eff), estimated permeability (K), fluid saturation, fluid type and Net pay thickness. This study revealed that, Sidri sandstone facies was classified into two mainly sandy facies; blocky sandy facies which located at the northern part of the field and streaky sandy facies at the southern area of the field. These two facies are separated by shaley facies. Some wells were studied to represent the two sandy facies in Sidri Member and these sand intervals have not been tested yet. These sands consist of quartz grains with grey and pink feldspars as accessory minerals, with siliceous and calcareous cementation, with good porosity. Petrophysical evaluation of this sand unit indicated that it is hydrocarbon bearing formation in three wells and water bearing one in other wells. Electrical logs analysis (Resistivity, Density-Neutron, Sonic and Gamma-Ray) revealed that The volume of shale in this sandstone, the effective porosity, the water saturation, the estimated permeability, the hydrocarbon saturation, and the net-pay thickness are varying from 9 to 13%, 19

  7. Isolation and analysis of ginseng: advances and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong-Zhi

    2011-01-01

    Ginseng occupies a prominent position in the list of best-selling natural products in the world. Because of its complex constituents, multidisciplinary techniques are needed to validate the analytical methods that support ginseng’s use worldwide. In the past decade, rapid development of technology has advanced many aspects of ginseng research. The aim of this review is to illustrate the recent advances in the isolation and analysis of ginseng, and to highlight their new applications and challenges. Emphasis is placed on recent trends and emerging techniques. The current article reviews the literature between January 2000 and September 2010. PMID:21258738

  8. Issues affecting advanced passive light-water reactor safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Beelman, R.J.; Fletcher, C.D.; Modro, S.M.

    1992-08-01

    Next generation commercial reactor designs emphasize enhanced safety through improved safety system reliability and performance by means of system simplification and reliance on immutable natural forces for system operation. Simulating the performance of these safety systems will be central to analytical safety evaluation of advanced passive reactor designs. Yet the characteristically small driving forces of these safety systems pose challenging computational problems to current thermal-hydraulic systems analysis codes. Additionally, the safety systems generally interact closely with one another, requiring accurate, integrated simulation of the nuclear steam supply system, engineered safeguards and containment. Furthermore, numerical safety analysis of these advanced passive reactor designs wig necessitate simulation of long-duration, slowly-developing transients compared with current reactor designs. The composite effects of small computational inaccuracies on induced system interactions and perturbations over long periods may well lead to predicted results which are significantly different than would otherwise be expected or might actually occur. Comparisons between the engineered safety features of competing US advanced light water reactor designs and analogous present day reactor designs are examined relative to the adequacy of existing thermal-hydraulic safety codes in predicting the mechanisms of passive safety. Areas where existing codes might require modification, extension or assessment relative to passive safety designs are identified. Conclusions concerning the applicability of these codes to advanced passive light water reactor safety analysis are presented.

  9. Issues affecting advanced passive light-water reactor safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Beelman, R.J.; Fletcher, C.D.; Modro, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    Next generation commercial reactor designs emphasize enhanced safety through improved safety system reliability and performance by means of system simplification and reliance on immutable natural forces for system operation. Simulating the performance of these safety systems will be central to analytical safety evaluation of advanced passive reactor designs. Yet the characteristically small driving forces of these safety systems pose challenging computational problems to current thermal-hydraulic systems analysis codes. Additionally, the safety systems generally interact closely with one another, requiring accurate, integrated simulation of the nuclear steam supply system, engineered safeguards and containment. Furthermore, numerical safety analysis of these advanced passive reactor designs wig necessitate simulation of long-duration, slowly-developing transients compared with current reactor designs. The composite effects of small computational inaccuracies on induced system interactions and perturbations over long periods may well lead to predicted results which are significantly different than would otherwise be expected or might actually occur. Comparisons between the engineered safety features of competing US advanced light water reactor designs and analogous present day reactor designs are examined relative to the adequacy of existing thermal-hydraulic safety codes in predicting the mechanisms of passive safety. Areas where existing codes might require modification, extension or assessment relative to passive safety designs are identified. Conclusions concerning the applicability of these codes to advanced passive light water reactor safety analysis are presented.

  10. Advanced Post-Irradiation Examination Capabilities Alternatives Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Bryan; Bill Landman; Porter Hill

    2012-12-01

    An alternatives analysis was performed for the Advanced Post-Irradiation Capabilities (APIEC) project in accordance with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE O 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets”. The Alternatives Analysis considered six major alternatives: ? No Action ? Modify Existing DOE Facilities – capabilities distributed among multiple locations ? Modify Existing DOE Facilities – capabilities consolidated at a few locations ? Construct New Facility ? Commercial Partnership ? International Partnerships Based on the alternatives analysis documented herein, it is recommended to DOE that the advanced post-irradiation examination capabilities be provided by a new facility constructed at the Materials and Fuels Complex at the Idaho National Laboratory.

  11. A petrographical and geochemical study of quartzose nodules, country rocks, and dike rocks from the Upheaval Dome structure, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koeberl, C.; Plescia, J.B.; Hayward, C.L.; Reimold, W.U.

    1999-01-01

    Upheaval Dome, in Canyonlands National Park, Utah, USA, is a unique structure on the Colorado Plateau. It has earlier been interpreted as an impact structure or as a pinched-off salt diapir. Some subrounded quartzose fragments were found in a ring depression near the eastern margin of the structure and, based on vesicularity and apparent flow structure, the fragments were interpreted by early researchers as 'impactites.' Our petrographic studies show no indication of a high-temperature history and are in agreement with a slow, low-temperature formation of the quartz nodules. Compositionally, the lag deposit samples are almost pure SiO2. They show no chemical similarity to any of the possible target rocks (e.g., Navajo Sandstone), from which they should have formed by melting if they were impactites. Instead, the samples have relatively high contents of elements that indicate fluid interaction (e.g., hydrothermal growth), such as As, Sb, Ba, and U, and show positive Ce anomalies. Thus, we interpret the 'lag deposit samples' as normal low-temperature (hydrothermally-grown?) quartz that show no indication of being impact-derived. In addition, a petrographic and geochemical analysis of a series of dike samples yielded no evidence for shock metamorphism or a meteoritic component.

  12. "ATLAS" Advanced Technology Life-cycle Analysis System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lollar, Louis F.; Mankins, John C.; ONeil, Daniel A.

    2004-01-01

    Making good decisions concerning research and development portfolios-and concerning the best systems concepts to pursue - as early as possible in the life cycle of advanced technologies is a key goal of R&D management This goal depends upon the effective integration of information from a wide variety of sources as well as focused, high-level analyses intended to inform such decisions Life-cycle Analysis System (ATLAS) methodology and tool kit. ATLAS encompasses a wide range of methods and tools. A key foundation for ATLAS is the NASA-created Technology Readiness. The toolkit is largely spreadsheet based (as of August 2003). This product is being funded by the Human and Robotics The presentation provides a summary of the Advanced Technology Level (TRL) systems Technology Program Office, Office of Exploration Systems, NASA Headquarters, Washington D.C. and is being integrated by Dan O Neil of the Advanced Projects Office, NASA/MSFC, Huntsville, AL

  13. Develop Advanced Nonlinear Signal Analysis Topographical Mapping System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jong, Jen-Yi

    1997-01-01

    During the development of the SSME, a hierarchy of advanced signal analysis techniques for mechanical signature analysis has been developed by NASA and AI Signal Research Inc. (ASRI) to improve the safety and reliability for Space Shuttle operations. These techniques can process and identify intelligent information hidden in a measured signal which is often unidentifiable using conventional signal analysis methods. Currently, due to the highly interactive processing requirements and the volume of dynamic data involved, detailed diagnostic analysis is being performed manually which requires immense man-hours with extensive human interface. To overcome this manual process, NASA implemented this program to develop an Advanced nonlinear signal Analysis Topographical Mapping System (ATMS) to provide automatic/unsupervised engine diagnostic capabilities. The ATMS will utilize a rule-based Clips expert system to supervise a hierarchy of diagnostic signature analysis techniques in the Advanced Signal Analysis Library (ASAL). ASAL will perform automatic signal processing, archiving, and anomaly detection/identification tasks in order to provide an intelligent and fully automated engine diagnostic capability. The ATMS has been successfully developed under this contract. In summary, the program objectives to design, develop, test and conduct performance evaluation for an automated engine diagnostic system have been successfully achieved. Software implementation of the entire ATMS system on MSFC's OISPS computer has been completed. The significance of the ATMS developed under this program is attributed to the fully automated coherence analysis capability for anomaly detection and identification which can greatly enhance the power and reliability of engine diagnostic evaluation. The results have demonstrated that ATMS can significantly save time and man-hours in performing engine test/flight data analysis and performance evaluation of large volumes of dynamic test data.

  14. Petrographical, palynological, and sedimentological aspects regarding the genesis of Palaeogene lignites near Alexandroupolis, Thrace, Greece

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniadis, P.; Kaouras, G.; Khanaqa, P.; Riegel, W.; Gentzis, T.

    2006-01-21

    Several minor lignite deposits of Palaeogene (Eocene to Oligocene) age occur in the vicinity of Alexandroupolis, Thrace, northern Greece. A few, rather thin seams were mined in the past by small private operations for local use. Coal samples have been collected from old mine dumps and outcrops around abandoned mine posts to be studied by means of maceral analysis at high magnification. The groundwater and vegetation index are calculated from the maceral composition and used to draw conclusions concerning the environment of deposition. In addition, block samples of coal cut perpendicular to bedding were studied at intermediate magnification and underfluorescence, thus revealing some interesting bedding features as well as well-preserved plant organisms. The coals are characteristically finely laminated and highly gelified. Palynological preparations have thus far yielded only poorly preserved palynomorph assemblages, rather low in diversity and dominated by fern spores. This fern dominance is rather unusual: however, it is compatible with the occurrence of fertile fern fronds observed in petrographic coal sections. Accompanying clastic sediments exhibit cyclic fining-upward sequences at a scale averaging about 1 m in vertical extent. Grain sizes range from small gravel to clay and silt. In some cases, siltstones in the roof of coal seams include abundant plant fragments showing parallel venation. The evidence presented from various sources suggests a rather unstable fluvial environment and a generally high water table on the flood plain for the formation of these lignites.

  15. A structural and petrographic investigation of the pretoria saltpan impact structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, D.; Reimold, W. U.

    1993-01-01

    The Pretoria Saltpan crater is located in the southern portion of the Bushveld Igneous Complex some 40 km NNW of Pretoria, South Africa, at 25 deg 24 min 30 sec S/28 deg 4 min 59 sec E. The near-circular structure of 1.13 km diameter exhibits a well-preserved, uptilted granite rim. Granitic breccia overlies Karroo sediment in places, indicating a post-Karroo age for the cratering event. The coincidence of the spacial occurrence of the crater with respect to various alkaline and ultramafic intrusives has been the main argument put for yard against an impact origin for the structure. Detailed mapping of the crater rim exposures and the crater environs was carried out and revealed many occurrences of intrusives in the whole region. Structural analysis along the rim revealed the presence of typical impact crater related structures. Comparative petrographic and chemical studies of crater-related and non-related intrusives showed close similarities between these sample suites.

  16. Advances in Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Haas, Julian; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2016-06-12

    Infrared spectroscopy in the 3-20 μm spectral window has evolved from a routine laboratory technique into a state-of-the-art spectroscopy and sensing tool by benefitting from recent progress in increasingly sophisticated spectra acquisition techniques and advanced materials for generating, guiding, and detecting mid-infrared (MIR) radiation. Today, MIR spectroscopy provides molecular information with trace to ultratrace sensitivity, fast data acquisition rates, and high spectral resolution catering to demanding applications in bioanalytics, for example, and to improved routine analysis. In addition to advances in miniaturized device technology without sacrificing analytical performance, selected innovative applications for MIR spectroscopy ranging from process analysis to biotechnology and medical diagnostics are highlighted in this review. PMID:27070183

  17. Advances in Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Julian; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2016-06-01

    Infrared spectroscopy in the 3–20 μm spectral window has evolved from a routine laboratory technique into a state-of-the-art spectroscopy and sensing tool by benefitting from recent progress in increasingly sophisticated spectra acquisition techniques and advanced materials for generating, guiding, and detecting mid-infrared (MIR) radiation. Today, MIR spectroscopy provides molecular information with trace to ultratrace sensitivity, fast data acquisition rates, and high spectral resolution catering to demanding applications in bioanalytics, for example, and to improved routine analysis. In addition to advances in miniaturized device technology without sacrificing analytical performance, selected innovative applications for MIR spectroscopy ranging from process analysis to biotechnology and medical diagnostics are highlighted in this review.

  18. Analysis and design of advanced composite bounded joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    Advances in the analysis of adhesive-bonded joints are presented with particular emphasis on advanced composite structures. The joints analyzed are of double-lap, single-lap, scarf, stepped-lap and tapered-lap configurations. Tensile, compressive, and in-plane shear loads are covered. In addition to the usual geometric variables, the theory accounts for the strength increases attributable to adhesive plasticity (in terms of the elastic-plastic adhesive model) and the joint strength reductions imposed by imbalances between the adherends. The solutions are largely closed-form analytical results, employing iterative solutions on a digital computer for the more complicated joint configurations. In assessing the joint efficiency, three potential failure modes are considered. These are adherend failure outside the joint, adhesive failure in shear, and adherend interlaminar tension failure (or adhesive failure in peel). Each mode is governed by a distinct mathematical analysis and each prevails throughout different ranges of geometric sizes and proportions.

  19. Advanced gamma ray balloon experiment ground checkout and data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackstone, M.

    1976-01-01

    A software programming package to be used in the ground checkout and handling of data from the advanced gamma ray balloon experiment is described. The Operator's Manual permits someone unfamiliar with the inner workings of the software system (called LEO) to operate on the experimental data as it comes from the Pulse Code Modulation interface, converting it to a form for later analysis, and monitoring the program of an experiment. A Programmer's Manual is included.

  20. [Advances in independent component analysis and its application].

    PubMed

    Chen, Huafu; Yao, Dezhong

    2003-06-01

    The independent component analysis (ICA) is a new technique in statistical signal processing, which decomposes mixed signals into statistical independent components. The reported applications in biomedical and radar signal have demonstrated its good prospect in various blind signal separation. In this paper, the progress of ICA in such as its principle, algorithm and application and advance direction of ICA in future is reviewed. The aim is to promote the research in theory and application in the future. PMID:12856621

  1. Advanced superposition methods for high speed turbopump vibration analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielson, C. E.; Campany, A. D.

    1981-01-01

    The small, high pressure Mark 48 liquid hydrogen turbopump was analyzed and dynamically tested to determine the cause of high speed vibration at an operating speed of 92,400 rpm. This approaches the design point operating speed of 95,000 rpm. The initial dynamic analysis in the design stage and subsequent further analysis of the rotor only dynamics failed to predict the vibration characteristics found during testing. An advanced procedure for dynamics analysis was used in this investigation. The procedure involves developing accurate dynamic models of the rotor assembly and casing assembly by finite element analysis. The dynamically instrumented assemblies are independently rap tested to verify the analytical models. The verified models are then combined by modal superposition techniques to develop a completed turbopump model where dynamic characteristics are determined. The results of the dynamic testing and analysis obtained are presented and methods of moving the high speed vibration characteristics to speeds above the operating range are recommended. Recommendations for use of these advanced dynamic analysis procedures during initial design phases are given.

  2. Advanced image analysis for the preservation of cultural heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Fenella G.; Christens-Barry, William; Toth, Michael B.; Boydston, Kenneth

    2010-02-01

    The Library of Congress' Preservation Research and Testing Division has established an advanced preservation studies scientific program for research and analysis of the diverse range of cultural heritage objects in its collection. Using this system, the Library is currently developing specialized integrated research methodologies for extending preservation analytical capacities through non-destructive hyperspectral imaging of cultural objects. The research program has revealed key information to support preservation specialists, scholars and other institutions. The approach requires close and ongoing collaboration between a range of scientific and cultural heritage personnel - imaging and preservation scientists, art historians, curators, conservators and technology analysts. A research project of the Pierre L'Enfant Plan of Washington DC, 1791 had been undertaken to implement and advance the image analysis capabilities of the imaging system. Innovative imaging options and analysis techniques allow greater processing and analysis capacities to establish the imaging technique as the first initial non-invasive analysis and documentation step in all cultural heritage analyses. Mapping spectral responses, organic and inorganic data, topography semi-microscopic imaging, and creating full spectrum images have greatly extended this capacity from a simple image capture technique. Linking hyperspectral data with other non-destructive analyses has further enhanced the research potential of this image analysis technique.

  3. [Advanced data analysis and visualization for clinical laboratory].

    PubMed

    Inada, Masanori; Yoneyama, Akiko

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes visualization techniques that help identify hidden structures in clinical laboratory data. The visualization of data is helpful for a rapid and better understanding of the characteristics of data sets. Various charts help the user identify trends in data. Scatter plots help prevent misinterpretations due to invalid data by identifying outliers. The representation of experimental data in figures is always useful for communicating results to others. Currently, flexible methods such as smoothing methods and latent structure analysis are available owing to the presence of advanced hardware and software. Principle component analysis, which is a well-known technique used to reduce multidimensional data sets, can be carried out on a personal computer. These methods could lead to advanced visualization with regard to exploratory data analysis. In this paper, we present 3 examples in order to introduce advanced data analysis. In the first example, a smoothing spline was fitted to a time-series from the control chart which is not in a state of statistical control. The trend line was clearly extracted from the daily measurements of the control samples. In the second example, principal component analysis was used to identify a new diagnostic indicator for Graves' disease. The multi-dimensional data obtained from patients were reduced to lower dimensions, and the principle components thus obtained summarized the variation in the data set. In the final example, a latent structure analysis for a Gaussian mixture model was used to draw complex density functions suitable for actual laboratory data. As a result, 5 clusters were extracted. The mixed density function of these clusters represented the data distribution graphically. The methods used in the above examples make the creation of complicated models for clinical laboratories more simple and flexible. PMID:21404582

  4. Advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, Theodore H. H.

    1991-01-01

    The following tasks on the study of advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures are described: (1) constructions of special elements which contain traction-free circular boundaries; (2) formulation of new version of mixed variational principles and new version of hybrid stress elements; (3) establishment of methods for suppression of kinematic deformation modes; (4) construction of semiLoof plate and shell elements by assumed stress hybrid method; and (5) elastic-plastic analysis by viscoplasticity theory using the mechanical subelement model.

  5. Advanced Signal Analysis for Forensic Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Koppenjan; Matthew Streeton; Hua Lee; Michael Lee; Sashi Ono

    2004-06-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) systems have traditionally been used to image subsurface objects. The main focus of this paper is to evaluate an advanced signal analysis technique. Instead of compiling spatial data for the analysis, this technique conducts object recognition procedures based on spectral statistics. The identification feature of an object type is formed from the training vectors by a singular-value decomposition procedure. To illustrate its capability, this procedure is applied to experimental data and compared to the performance of the neural-network approach.

  6. Advances in Computational Stability Analysis of Composite Aerospace Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Degenhardt, R.; Araujo, F. C. de

    2010-09-30

    European aircraft industry demands for reduced development and operating costs. Structural weight reduction by exploitation of structural reserves in composite aerospace structures contributes to this aim, however, it requires accurate and experimentally validated stability analysis of real structures under realistic loading conditions. This paper presents different advances from the area of computational stability analysis of composite aerospace structures which contribute to that field. For stringer stiffened panels main results of the finished EU project COCOMAT are given. It investigated the exploitation of reserves in primary fibre composite fuselage structures through an accurate and reliable simulation of postbuckling and collapse. For unstiffened cylindrical composite shells a proposal for a new design method is presented.

  7. Advanced Models for Aeroelastic Analysis of Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Mahajan, Aparajit

    1996-01-01

    This report describes an integrated, multidisciplinary simulation capability for aeroelastic analysis and optimization of advanced propulsion systems. This research is intended to improve engine development, acquisition, and maintenance costs. One of the proposed simulations is aeroelasticity of blades, cowls, and struts in an ultra-high bypass fan. These ducted fans are expected to have significant performance, fuel, and noise improvements over existing engines. An interface program was written to use modal information from COBSTAN and NASTRAN blade models in aeroelastic analysis with a single rotation ducted fan aerodynamic code.

  8. Recommended procedures and techniques for the petrographic description of bituminous coals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, E.C.T.; Minkin, J.A.; Thompson, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    bed. The use of bulk-specific-gravity determinations is alo recommended for identification and characterization of the distinctive lithologic units. The availability of an AIAS also enhances the capability to acquire textural information. Ranges of size of maceral and mineral grains can be quickly and precisely determined by use of an AIAS. We assume that shape characteristics of coal particles can also be readily evaluated by automated image analysis, although this evaluation has not yet been attempted in our laboratory. Definitive data on the particulate mineral content of coal constitute another important segment of petrographic description. Characterization of mineral content may be accomplished by optical identification, electron microprobe analysis, X-ray diffraction, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Individual mineral grains in place in polished blocks or polished this sections, or separated from the coal matrix by sink-float methods are studied by analytical techniques appropriate to the conditions of sampling. Finally, whenever possible, identification of the probable genus or plant species from which a given coal component is derived will add valuable information and meaning to the petrographic description. ?? 1982.

  9. Structural Configuration Systems Analysis for Advanced Aircraft Fuselage Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Welstead, Jason R.; Quinlan, Jesse R.; Guynn, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Structural configuration analysis of an advanced aircraft fuselage concept is investigated. This concept is characterized by a double-bubble section fuselage with rear mounted engines. Based on lessons learned from structural systems analysis of unconventional aircraft, high-fidelity finite-element models (FEM) are developed for evaluating structural performance of three double-bubble section configurations. Structural sizing and stress analysis are applied for design improvement and weight reduction. Among the three double-bubble configurations, the double-D cross-section fuselage design was found to have a relatively lower structural weight. The structural FEM weights of these three double-bubble fuselage section concepts are also compared with several cylindrical fuselage models. Since these fuselage concepts are different in size, shape and material, the fuselage structural FEM weights are normalized by the corresponding passenger floor area for a relative comparison. This structural systems analysis indicates that an advanced composite double-D section fuselage may have a relative structural weight ratio advantage over a conventional aluminum fuselage. Ten commercial and conceptual aircraft fuselage structural weight estimates, which are empirically derived from the corresponding maximum takeoff gross weight, are also presented and compared with the FEM- based estimates for possible correlation. A conceptual full vehicle FEM model with a double-D fuselage is also developed for preliminary structural analysis and weight estimation.

  10. Validation Database Based Thermal Analysis of an Advanced RPS Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balint, Tibor S.; Emis, Nickolas D.

    2006-01-01

    Advanced RPS concepts can be conceived, designed and assessed using high-end computational analysis tools. These predictions may provide an initial insight into the potential performance of these models, but verification and validation are necessary and required steps to gain confidence in the numerical analysis results. This paper discusses the findings from a numerical validation exercise for a small advanced RPS concept, based on a thermal analysis methodology developed at JPL and on a validation database obtained from experiments performed at Oregon State University. Both the numerical and experimental configurations utilized a single GPHS module enabled design, resembling a Mod-RTG concept. The analysis focused on operating and environmental conditions during the storage phase only. This validation exercise helped to refine key thermal analysis and modeling parameters, such as heat transfer coefficients, and conductivity and radiation heat transfer values. Improved understanding of the Mod-RTG concept through validation of the thermal model allows for future improvements to this power system concept.

  11. Black and red granites in the Egyptian Antiquity Museum of Turin. A minero-petrographic and provenance study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, M.; Borghi, A.; Vaggelli, G.; D'Amicone, E.; Vigna, L.

    2009-04-01

    The University of Turin, in cooperation with the Egyptian Antiquity Museum, has recently undertaken several projects aimed at developing a scientific approach to the analysis of ancient Egyptian finds. In particular, a straightforward project to investigate the stony handcrafts preserved in the statuary rooms started in 2006 to obtain their systematic petrographic classification and their possible geological sources. The main intent of the project was to understand the provenance of the materials used in Pharaonic period, setting the base for the identification of the ancient quarry sites and for a correct interpretation of the extraction and working techniques, in order to provide fundamental information about economical and social development of Egyptian civilization through historical times. The choice to focus attention on black and red granites came from the statement of the percentage relevance (40 of the 54 sculptures actually exposed) of these materials in the statuary rooms. Moreover, especially for black granites, the need of detailed minero-petrographic analysis arose from the difficulty in making a macroscopic classification of the fine-grained dark-coloured rock varieties. Therefore, five black granite statues, belonging to the Drovetti collection were sampled in a micro-invasive way: three sculptures of goddess Sekhmet (cat. 260, 251, 247), the statue of Ramses II (cat. 1380) and the statue of goddess Hathor (cat. 694). The choice to analyse even three of the twenty-one statues of goddess Sekhmet (cat. 247, cat. 251, cat. 260), originally located in the same Egyptian temple but ichnographically different, derived from the need of answering the archaeological questions about their provenance. On the other hand, the opportunity of studying the fine-grained black rocks used for the sculptures of goddess Hathor (cat. 694) and of Ramses II in Majesty (cat. 1380), symbol of the Egyptian museum of Turin, provided the opportunity to analyse and classify the

  12. Advanced hydrogen/oxygen thrust chamber design analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoji, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The results are reported of the advanced hydrogen/oxygen thrust chamber design analysis program. The primary objectives of this program were to: (1) provide an in-depth analytical investigation to develop thrust chamber cooling and fatigue life limitations of an advanced, high pressure, high performance H2/O2 engine design of 20,000-pounds (88960.0 N) thrust; and (2) integrate the existing heat transfer analysis, thermal fatigue and stress aspects for advanced chambers into a comprehensive computer program. Thrust chamber designs and analyses were performed to evaluate various combustor materials, coolant passage configurations (tubes and channels), and cooling circuits to define the nominal 1900 psia (1.31 x 10 to the 7th power N/sq m) chamber pressure, 300-cycle life thrust chamber. The cycle life capability of the selected configuration was then determined for three duty cycles. Also the influence of cycle life and chamber pressure on thrust chamber design was investigated by varying in cycle life requirements at the nominal chamber pressure and by varying the chamber pressure at the nominal cycle life requirement.

  13. Advanced Main Combustion Chamber structural jacket strength analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, L. M.; Perkins, L. A.; Denniston, C. L.; Price, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    The structural analysis of the Advanced Main Combustion Chamber (AMCC) is presented. The AMCC is an advanced fabrication concept of the Space Shuttle Main Engine main combustion chamber (MCC). Reduced cost and fabrication time of up to 75 percent were the goals of the AMCC with cast jacket with vacuum plasma sprayed or platelet liner. Since the cast material for the AMCC is much weaker than the wrought material for the MCC, the AMCC is heavier and strength margins much lower in some areas. Proven hand solutions were used to size the manifolds cutout tee areas for combined pressure and applied loads. Detailed finite element strength analyses were used to size the manifolds, longitudinal ribs, and jacket for combined pressure and applied local loads. The design of the gimbal actuator strut attachment lugs were determined by finite element analyses and hand solutions.

  14. Whole-genome CNV analysis: advances in computational approaches

    PubMed Central

    Pirooznia, Mehdi; Goes, Fernando S.; Zandi, Peter P.

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that DNA copy number variation (CNV) is likely to make a significant contribution to human diversity and also play an important role in disease susceptibility. Recent advances in genome sequencing technologies have enabled the characterization of a variety of genomic features, including CNVs. This has led to the development of several bioinformatics approaches to detect CNVs from next-generation sequencing data. Here, we review recent advances in CNV detection from whole genome sequencing. We discuss the informatics approaches and current computational tools that have been developed as well as their strengths and limitations. This review will assist researchers and analysts in choosing the most suitable tools for CNV analysis as well as provide suggestions for new directions in future development. PMID:25918519

  15. An advanced probabilistic structural analysis method for implicit performance functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Y.-T.; Millwater, H. R.; Cruse, T. A.

    1989-01-01

    In probabilistic structural analysis, the performance or response functions usually are implicitly defined and must be solved by numerical analysis methods such as finite element methods. In such cases, the most commonly used probabilistic analysis tool is the mean-based, second-moment method which provides only the first two statistical moments. This paper presents a generalized advanced mean value (AMV) method which is capable of establishing the distributions to provide additional information for reliability design. The method requires slightly more computations than the second-moment method but is highly efficient relative to the other alternative methods. In particular, the examples show that the AMV method can be used to solve problems involving non-monotonic functions that result in truncated distributions.

  16. The analysis of protein pharmaceuticals: near future advances.

    PubMed

    Middaugh, C R

    1994-01-01

    The analysis of protein pharmaceuticals currently involves a complex series of chromatographic, electrophoretic, spectroscopic, immunological and biological measurements to unequivocally establish their identity, purity and integrity. In this review, I briefly consider the possibility that at least the functional identity and integrity of a protein drug might be established by either a single analysis involving X-ray diffraction, NMR or mass spectrometry, or by a chromatographically based multi-detector system in which a number of critical parameters are essentially simultaneously determined. The use of a protein standard to obtain comparative measurements and new advances in the technology of each of these methods is emphasized. A current major obstacle to the implementation of these approaches is the frequent microheterogeneity of protein preparations. The evolution of biological assays into measurements examining more defined intracellular signal transduction events or based on novel biosensors as well as the analysis of vaccines is also briefly discussed. PMID:7765931

  17. Composite Structure Modeling and Analysis of Advanced Aircraft Fuselage Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Sorokach, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project and the Boeing Company are collabrating to advance the unitized damage arresting composite airframe technology with application to the Hybrid-Wing-Body (HWB) aircraft. The testing of a HWB fuselage section with Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) construction is presently being conducted at NASA Langley. Based on lessons learned from previous HWB structural design studies, improved finite-element models (FEM) of the HWB multi-bay and bulkhead assembly are developed to evaluate the performance of the PRSEUS construction. In order to assess the comparative weight reduction benefits of the PRSEUS technology, conventional cylindrical skin-stringer-frame models of a cylindrical and a double-bubble section fuselage concepts are developed. Stress analysis with design cabin-pressure load and scenario based case studies are conducted for design improvement in each case. Alternate analysis with stitched composite hat-stringers and C-frames are also presented, in addition to the foam-core sandwich frame and pultruded rod-stringer construction. The FEM structural stress, strain and weights are computed and compared for relative weight/strength benefit assessment. The structural analysis and specific weight comparison of these stitched composite advanced aircraft fuselage concepts demonstrated that the pressurized HWB fuselage section assembly can be structurally as efficient as the conventional cylindrical fuselage section with composite stringer-frame and PRSEUS construction, and significantly better than the conventional aluminum construction and the double-bubble section concept.

  18. Advanced water window x-ray microscope design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, D. L.; Wang, C.; Jiang, W.; Lin, J.

    1992-01-01

    The project was focused on the design and analysis of an advanced water window soft-x-ray microscope. The activities were accomplished by completing three tasks contained in the statement of work of this contract. The new results confirm that in order to achieve resolutions greater than three times the wavelength of the incident radiation, it will be necessary to use aspherical mirror surfaces and to use graded multilayer coatings on the secondary (to accommodate the large variations of the angle of incidence over the secondary when operating the microscope at numerical apertures of 0.35 or greater). The results are included in a manuscript which is enclosed in the Appendix.

  19. Advanced Wireless Power Transfer Vehicle and Infrastructure Analysis (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Gonder, J.; Brooker, A.; Burton, E.; Wang, J.; Konan, A.

    2014-06-01

    This presentation discusses current research at NREL on advanced wireless power transfer vehicle and infrastructure analysis. The potential benefits of E-roadway include more electrified driving miles from battery electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, or even properly equipped hybrid electric vehicles (i.e., more electrified miles could be obtained from a given battery size, or electrified driving miles could be maintained while using smaller and less expensive batteries, thereby increasing cost competitiveness and potential market penetration). The system optimization aspect is key given the potential impact of this technology on the vehicles, the power grid and the road infrastructure.

  20. Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) Technology Tool Box (TTB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, Monica; ONeil, Daniel A.; Christensen, Carissa B.

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) is a decision support tool designed to aid program managers and strategic planners in determining how to invest technology research and development dollars. It is an Excel-based modeling package that allows a user to build complex space architectures and evaluate the impact of various technology choices. ATLAS contains system models, cost and operations models, a campaign timeline and a centralized technology database. Technology data for all system models is drawn from a common database, the ATLAS Technology Tool Box (TTB). The TTB provides a comprehensive, architecture-independent technology database that is keyed to current and future timeframes.

  1. Creep analysis of fuel plates for the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Swinson, W.F.; Yahr, G.T.

    1994-11-01

    The reactor for the planned Advanced Neutron Source will use closely spaced arrays of fuel plates. The plates are thin and will have a core containing enriched uranium silicide fuel clad in aluminum. The heat load caused by the nuclear reactions within the fuel plates will be removed by flowing high-velocity heavy water through narrow channels between the plates. However, the plates will still be at elevated temperatures while in service, and the potential for excessive plate deformation because of creep must be considered. An analysis to include creep for deformation and stresses because of temperature over a given time span has been performed and is reported herein.

  2. Design, analysis and test verification of advanced encapsulation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, A., III

    1982-01-01

    An analytical methodology for advanced encapsulation designs was developed. From these methods design sensitivities are established for the development of photovoltaic module criteria and the definition of needed research tasks. Analytical models were developed to perform optical, thermal, electrical and analyses on candidate encapsulation systems. From these analyses several candidate systems were selected for qualification testing. Additionally, test specimens of various types are constructed and tested to determine the validity of the analysis methodology developed. Identified deficiencies and/or discrepancies between analytical models and relevant test data are corrected. Prediction capability of analytical models is improved. Encapsulation engineering generalities, principles, and design aids for photovoltaic module designers is generated.

  3. Life-cycle cost analysis of advanced design mixer pump

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.N., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-23

    This analysis provides cost justification for the Advanced Design Mixer Pump program based on the cost benefit to the Hanford Site of 4 mixer pump systems defined in terms of the life-cycle cost.A computer model is used to estimate the total number of service hours necessary for each mixer pump to operate over the 20-year retrieval sequence period for single-shell tank waste. This study also considered the double-shell tank waste retrieved prior to the single-shell tank waste which is considered the initial retrieval.

  4. Computer modeling for advanced life support system analysis.

    PubMed

    Drysdale, A

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses the equivalent mass approach to advanced life support system analysis, describes a computer model developed to use this approach, and presents early results from modeling the NASA JSC BioPlex. The model is built using an object oriented approach and G2, a commercially available modeling package Cost factor equivalencies are given for the Volosin scenarios. Plant data from NASA KSC and Utah State University (USU) are used, together with configuration data from the BioPlex design effort. Initial results focus on the importance of obtaining high plant productivity with a flight-like configuration. PMID:11540448

  5. ADVISOR: a systems analysis tool for advanced vehicle modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markel, T.; Brooker, A.; Hendricks, T.; Johnson, V.; Kelly, K.; Kramer, B.; O'Keefe, M.; Sprik, S.; Wipke, K.

    This paper provides an overview of Advanced Vehicle Simulator (ADVISOR)—the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) ADVISOR written in the MATLAB/Simulink environment and developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. ADVISOR provides the vehicle engineering community with an easy-to-use, flexible, yet robust and supported analysis package for advanced vehicle modeling. It is primarily used to quantify the fuel economy, the performance, and the emissions of vehicles that use alternative technologies including fuel cells, batteries, electric motors, and internal combustion engines in hybrid (i.e. multiple power sources) configurations. It excels at quantifying the relative change that can be expected due to the implementation of technology compared to a baseline scenario. ADVISOR's capabilities and limitations are presented and the power source models that are included in ADVISOR are discussed. Finally, several applications of the tool are presented to highlight ADVISOR's functionality. The content of this paper is based on a presentation made at the 'Development of Advanced Battery Engineering Models' workshop held in Crystal City, Virginia in August 2001.

  6. First petrographic results on impactites from the Yaxcopoil-1 borehole Chicxulub structure, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchscherer, Martin G.; Reimold, W. Uwe; Koeberl, Christian; Gibson, Roger L.; de Bruin, Deon

    2004-06-01

    The ICDP Yaxcopoil-1 (Yax-1) borehole located 60 km south-southwest of the center of the Chicxulub impact structure intercepted an interval of allogenic impactites (depth of 795-895 m). Petrographic analysis of these impactites allows them to be differentiated into five units based on their textural and modal variations. Unit 1 (795-922 m) comprises an apparently reworked, poorly sorted and graded, fine-grained, clast-supported, melt fragment-bearing suevitic breccia. The interstitial material, similar to units 2 and 3, is permeated by numerous carbonate veinlets. Units 2 (823-846 m) and 3 (846-861 m) are groundmass-supported breccias that comprise green to variegated angular and fluidal melt particles. The groundmass of units 2 and 3 comprises predominantly fine-grained calcite, altered alkali element-, Ca-, and Si-rich cement, as well as occasional lithic fragments. Unit 4 (861- 885 m) represents a massive, variably devitrified, and brecciated impact melt rock. The lowermost unit, unit 5 (885-895 m), comprises highly variable proportions of melt rock particles (MRP) and lithic fragments in a fine-grained, carbonate-dominated groundmass. This groundmass could represent either a secondary hydrothermal phase or a carbonate melt phase, or both. Units 1 and 5 contain well-preserved foraminifera fossils and a significantly higher proportion of carbonate clasts than the other units. All units show diagnostic shock deformation features in quartz and feldspar clasts. Our observations reveal that most felsic and all mafic MRP are altered. They register extensive K-metasomatism. In terms of emplacement, we suggest that units 1 to 3 represent fallout suevite from a collapsing impact plume, whereby unit 1 was subsequently reworked by resurging water. Unit 4 represents a coherent impact melt body, the formation of which involved a significant proportion of crystalline basement. Unit 5 is believed to represent an initial ejecta/ground-surge deposit.

  7. Lithological and Petrographic Analyses of Carbonates and Sandstones From the Southern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Avendaño, A.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    2012-04-01

    We present results of sedimentological and petrological studies of drill cores from the Bay of Campeche in the southern Gulf of Mexico. Based on reports on drill cores obtained from oil exploratory wells in the Cantarell Complex located 80 kilometres offshore in the Bay of Campeche and studies related to regional geology composite simplified stratigraphic columns for offshore Campeche region have been constructed up to depths of approximately 5000 m. The stratigraphic column is formed by a thick sediment sequence of Middle Jurassic age (evaporites, Callovian), Late Jurassic (terrigenous, calcareous clays and calcareous layers), Lower Cretaceous (carbonates), Upper Cretaceous-Paleogene (calcareous breccias), Paleogene-Neogene (terrigenous-carbonates intercalations) and Quaternary (terrigenous). The core samples studied come from wells in the Sihil and Akal fields in Cantarell. Analysis of reports on lithological descriptions indicates that these wells sample dolomitized sedimentary breccias from the Upper Cretaceous-Paleocene and fine-grained sandstones from the Late Jurassic Tithonian, respectively. Based on results of petrographic studies, the texture, cementing material and porosity of the units have been documented. The thin sections for carbonates were classified based on their texture according to Dunham (1962) for carbonate rocks, classified according to their components using the ternary diagrams of Folk (1974). Percentages refer to the data presented in tables, which were obtained by point-counting technique (with a total 250). Photomicrographs of scanning electron microscope (SEM) provide magnification for easy documentation of crystalline arrangements and description of micro-porous for different types of carbonates such as dolomite, in addition to the morphology of authigenic clays. Results of these studies and previous works in the area permit characterization of diagenetic processes of the carbonate sediments in the Campeche Bay, and provide

  8. Imaging spectroscopic analysis at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    MacDowell, A. A.; Warwick, T.; Anders, S.; Lamble, G.M.; Martin, M.C.; McKinney, W.R.; Padmore, H.A.

    1999-05-12

    One of the major advances at the high brightness third generation synchrotrons is the dramatic improvement of imaging capability. There is a large multi-disciplinary effort underway at the ALS to develop imaging X-ray, UV and Infra-red spectroscopic analysis on a spatial scale from. a few microns to 10nm. These developments make use of light that varies in energy from 6meV to 15KeV. Imaging and spectroscopy are finding applications in surface science, bulk materials analysis, semiconductor structures, particulate contaminants, magnetic thin films, biology and environmental science. This article is an overview and status report from the developers of some of these techniques at the ALS. The following table lists all the currently available microscopes at the. ALS. This article will describe some of the microscopes and some of the early applications.

  9. Advanced Video Analysis Needs for Human Performance Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Paul D.

    1994-01-01

    Evaluators of human task performance in space missions make use of video as a primary source of data. Extraction of relevant human performance information from video is often a labor-intensive process requiring a large amount of time on the part of the evaluator. Based on the experiences of several human performance evaluators, needs were defined for advanced tools which could aid in the analysis of video data from space missions. Such tools should increase the efficiency with which useful information is retrieved from large quantities of raw video. They should also provide the evaluator with new analytical functions which are not present in currently used methods. Video analysis tools based on the needs defined by this study would also have uses in U.S. industry and education. Evaluation of human performance from video data can be a valuable technique in many industrial and institutional settings where humans are involved in operational systems and processes.

  10. Tool for Sizing Analysis of the Advanced Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Hue-Hsie Jannivine; Brown, Cheryl B.; Jeng, Frank J.

    2005-01-01

    Advanced Life Support Sizing Analysis Tool (ALSSAT) is a computer model for sizing and analyzing designs of environmental-control and life support systems (ECLSS) for spacecraft and surface habitats involved in the exploration of Mars and Moon. It performs conceptual designs of advanced life support (ALS) subsystems that utilize physicochemical and biological processes to recycle air and water, and process wastes in order to reduce the need of resource resupply. By assuming steady-state operations, ALSSAT is a means of investigating combinations of such subsystems technologies and thereby assisting in determining the most cost-effective technology combination available. In fact, ALSSAT can perform sizing analysis of the ALS subsystems that are operated dynamically or steady in nature. Using the Microsoft Excel spreadsheet software with Visual Basic programming language, ALSSAT has been developed to perform multiple-case trade studies based on the calculated ECLSS mass, volume, power, and Equivalent System Mass, as well as parametric studies by varying the input parameters. ALSSAT s modular format is specifically designed for the ease of future maintenance and upgrades.

  11. Adaptive Modeling, Engineering Analysis and Design of Advanced Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Hsu, Su-Yuen; Mason, Brian H.; Hicks, Mike D.; Jones, William T.; Sleight, David W.; Chun, Julio; Spangler, Jan L.; Kamhawi, Hilmi; Dahl, Jorgen L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes initial progress towards the development and enhancement of a set of software tools for rapid adaptive modeling, and conceptual design of advanced aerospace vehicle concepts. With demanding structural and aerodynamic performance requirements, these high fidelity geometry based modeling tools are essential for rapid and accurate engineering analysis at the early concept development stage. This adaptive modeling tool was used for generating vehicle parametric geometry, outer mold line and detailed internal structural layout of wing, fuselage, skin, spars, ribs, control surfaces, frames, bulkheads, floors, etc., that facilitated rapid finite element analysis, sizing study and weight optimization. The high quality outer mold line enabled rapid aerodynamic analysis in order to provide reliable design data at critical flight conditions. Example application for structural design of a conventional aircraft and a high altitude long endurance vehicle configuration are presented. This work was performed under the Conceptual Design Shop sub-project within the Efficient Aerodynamic Shape and Integration project, under the former Vehicle Systems Program. The project objective was to design and assess unconventional atmospheric vehicle concepts efficiently and confidently. The implementation may also dramatically facilitate physics-based systems analysis for the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Mission. In addition to providing technology for design and development of unconventional aircraft, the techniques for generation of accurate geometry and internal sub-structure and the automated interface with the high fidelity analysis codes could also be applied towards the design of vehicles for the NASA Exploration and Space Science Mission projects.

  12. Petrographic Analyses of Lonestones from ODP Drill Sites Leg 188 Prydz Bay, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detterman, K.; Warnke, D. A.; Richter, C.

    2006-12-01

    ODP Leg 188 was drilled in 2000 to sample the first advances of the Antarctic ice sheet and to document further cryospheric development. Continental shelf Site 1166 documented the earliest stages of glaciation during the Eocene-Oligocene and continental slope Site 1167 documented rapid deposition by debris flows during the Pliocene-Pleistocene and a subtle change in onshore erosion areas. Site 1165, located on the continental rise, documented long-term transition from wet-based lower Miocene glaciers to dry-based upper Miocene glaciers, including short-term fluctuations starting in the early Miocene. Source areas for all drill sites are the Lambert Glacier-Amery Ice Shelf drainage area, encompassing the Northern and Southern Prince Charles Mountains, the Gamburtsev Sub-glacial Mountains, and the Grove Mountains. Lonestones occur in most of the cores from all sites of Leg 188 prompting research for potential source areas and transportation modes of the lonestones. One-hundred and seventeen thin sections of lonestones were prepared from Sites 1166, 1167, and 1165 for petrographic analyses. Metamorphic lonestones outnumber igneous and sedimentary lonestones at all three sites. Sedimentary lonestones were not found in the thin sections of Site 1166. Extrusive igneous lonestones were found only at Site 1165 and comprised 5.1 percent of Leg 188's lithology. The anorthite content of igneous and metamorphic lonestones represented at all three sites was albite-oligoclase plagioclase. Albite oligoclase plagioclase has been documented in the Southern Prince Charles Mountains. The results of this study of a selection of lonestones from Site 1167 supports a hypothesis first proposed by the Shipboard Scientific Party in 2001 that as time elapsed, the source area for Site 1167 lonestones shifted slightly from a largely sandstone source to a largely granitic source within the drainage area. One potential source area for the Site 1167 sandstone lonestones is the Permian to Triassic

  13. Heterogeneity of groundwater storage properties in the critical zone of Irish metamorphic basement from geophysical surveys and petrographic analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comte, Jean-Christophe; Cassidy, Rachel; Caulfield, John; Nitsche, Janka; Ofterdinger, Ulrich; Wilson, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Weathered/fractured bedrock aquifers contain groundwater resources that are crucial in hard rock basement regions for rural water supply and maintaining river flow and ecosystem resilience. Groundwater storage in metamorphic rocks is subject to high spatial variations due to the large degree of heterogeneity in fracture occurrence and weathering patterns. Point measurements such as borehole testing are, in most cases, insufficient to characterise and quantify those storage variations because borehole sampling density is usually much lower than the scale of heterogeneities. A suite of geophysical and petrographic investigations was implemented in the weathered/fractured micaschist basement of Donegal, NW Ireland. Electrical Resistivity Tomography provided a high resolution 2D distribution of subsurface resistivities. Resistivity variations were transferred into storage properties (i.e. porosities) in the saturated critical zone of the aquifer through application of a petrophysical model derived from Archie's Law. The petrophysical model was calibrated using complementary borehole gamma logging and clay petrographic analysis at multi-depth well clusters distributed along a hillslope transect at the site. The resulting distribution of porosities shows large spatial variations along the studied transect. With depth, porosities rapidly decrease from about a few % in the uppermost, highly weathered basement to less than 0.5% in the deep unweathered basement, which is encountered at depths of between 10 and 50m below the ground surface. Along the hillslope, porosities decrease with distance from the river in the valley floor, ranging between 5% at the river to less than 1% at the top of the hill. Local traces of regional fault zones that intersect the transect are responsible for local increases in porosity in relation to deeper fracturing and weathering. Such degrees of spatial variation in porosity are expected to have a major impact on the modality of the response of

  14. Petrographic and geochemical evidence for an allochthonous, possibly impact melt, origin of pseudotachylite from the Vredefort Dome, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieger, Daniel; Riller, Ulrich; Gibson, Roger L.

    2011-08-01

    Hypotheses proposed to explain the origin of pseudotachylite bodies formed during impact cratering include: (1) frictional heating, (2) shock loading, (3) decompression or (4) drainage of impact melt into target rocks. In order to differentiate among these processes, we conducted detailed geochemical and petrographic analysis of the matrices in pseudotachylitic veins and dikes and of their respective wall rocks. Our analyses indicate that the chemical compositions of matrices locally deviate significantly from their immediate wall rocks and that assimilation of wall rock has substantially modified the pseudotachylite matrix compositions in places. Variable magnitudes of assimilation can be explained by the surface area of wall rock or its fragments in contact with melt, as well as the initial temperature and cooling rate of the pseudotachylitic melt. Chemical trends observed can be explained either by admixture of an exotic melt component with immediate wall rock or by mixing of melts derived from local lithologies. Trends in the compositional deviation of centimetre to metre-wide pseudotachylite dikes from their immediate wall rocks are consistent with the presence of a primary melt component having granitoid composition akin to the average composition of Vredefort Granophyre dikes. Within veins, melt transport can be geochemically and petrographically traced for distances of centimetres to metres, with the direction of melt transport from larger pseudotachylite veins toward smaller ones and into apophyses. Sulphide and silicate mineralogy indicates that the initial temperature of pseudotachylitic melt must have been at least 1200-1700 °C. Collectively, these characteristics point to an allochthonous origin of pseudotachylitic melt . We advocate the possibility that impact melt from the initially superheated impact melt sheet contributed to the formation of pseudotachylite bodies at Vredefort.

  15. Advanced probabilistic risk analysis using RAVEN and RELAP-7

    SciTech Connect

    Rabiti, Cristian; Alfonsi, Andrea; Mandelli, Diego; Cogliati, Joshua; Kinoshita, Robert

    2014-06-01

    RAVEN, under the support of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program [1], is advancing its capability to perform statistical analyses of stochastic dynamic systems. This is aligned with its mission to provide the tools needed by the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) path-lead [2] under the Department Of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability program [3]. In particular this task is focused on the synergetic development with the RELAP-7 [4] code to advance the state of the art on the safety analysis of nuclear power plants (NPP). The investigation of the probabilistic evolution of accident scenarios for a complex system such as a nuclear power plant is not a trivial challenge. The complexity of the system to be modeled leads to demanding computational requirements even to simulate one of the many possible evolutions of an accident scenario (tens of CPU/hour). At the same time, the probabilistic analysis requires thousands of runs to investigate outcomes characterized by low probability and severe consequence (tail problem). The milestone reported in June of 2013 [5] described the capability of RAVEN to implement complex control logic and provide an adequate support for the exploration of the probabilistic space using a Monte Carlo sampling strategy. Unfortunately the Monte Carlo approach is ineffective with a problem of this complexity. In the following year of development, the RAVEN code has been extended with more sophisticated sampling strategies (grids, Latin Hypercube, and adaptive sampling). This milestone report illustrates the effectiveness of those methodologies in performing the assessment of the probability of core damage following the onset of a Station Black Out (SBO) situation in a boiling water reactor (BWR). The first part of the report provides an overview of the available probabilistic analysis capabilities, ranging from the different types of distributions available, possible sampling

  16. Recent advances in (soil moisture) triple collocation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, A.; Su, C.-H.; Zwieback, S.; Crow, W.; Dorigo, W.; Wagner, W.

    2016-03-01

    To date, triple collocation (TC) analysis is one of the most important methods for the global-scale evaluation of remotely sensed soil moisture data sets. In this study we review existing implementations of soil moisture TC analysis as well as investigations of the assumptions underlying the method. Different notations that are used to formulate the TC problem are shown to be mathematically identical. While many studies have investigated issues related to possible violations of the underlying assumptions, only few TC modifications have been proposed to mitigate the impact of these violations. Moreover, assumptions, which are often understood as a limitation that is unique to TC analysis are shown to be common also to other conventional performance metrics. Noteworthy advances in TC analysis have been made in the way error estimates are being presented by moving from the investigation of absolute error variance estimates to the investigation of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) metrics. Here we review existing error presentations and propose the combined investigation of the SNR (expressed in logarithmic units), the unscaled error variances, and the soil moisture sensitivities of the data sets as an optimal strategy for the evaluation of remotely-sensed soil moisture data sets.

  17. Recent advances in computational structural reliability analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thacker, Ben H.; Wu, Y.-T.; Millwater, Harry R.; Torng, Tony Y.; Riha, David S.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of structural reliability analysis is to determine the probability that the structure will adequately perform its intended function when operating under the given environmental conditions. Thus, the notion of reliability admits the possibility of failure. Given the fact that many different modes of failure are usually possible, achievement of this goal is a formidable task, especially for large, complex structural systems. The traditional (deterministic) design methodology attempts to assure reliability by the application of safety factors and conservative assumptions. However, the safety factor approach lacks a quantitative basis in that the level of reliability is never known and usually results in overly conservative designs because of compounding conservatisms. Furthermore, problem parameters that control the reliability are not identified, nor their importance evaluated. A summary of recent advances in computational structural reliability assessment is presented. A significant level of activity in the research and development community was seen recently, much of which was directed towards the prediction of failure probabilities for single mode failures. The focus is to present some early results and demonstrations of advanced reliability methods applied to structural system problems. This includes structures that can fail as a result of multiple component failures (e.g., a redundant truss), or structural components that may fail due to multiple interacting failure modes (e.g., excessive deflection, resonate vibration, or creep rupture). From these results, some observations and recommendations are made with regard to future research needs.

  18. Advanced Stress, Strain And Geometrical Analysis In Semiconductor Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Neels, Antonia; Dommann, Alex; Niedermann, Philippe; Farub, Claudiu; Kaenel, Hans von

    2010-11-24

    High stresses and defect densities increases the risk of semiconductor device failure. Reliability studies on potential failure sources have an impact on design and are essential to assure the long term functioning of the device. Related to the dramatically smaller volume of semiconductor devices and new bonding techniques on such devices, new methods in testing and qualification are needed. Reliability studies on potential failure sources have an impact on design and are essential to assure the long term functioning of the device. In this paper, the applications of advanced High Resolution X-ray Diffraction (HRXRD) methods in strain, defect and deformation analysis on semiconductor devices are discussed. HRXRD with Rocking Curves (RC's) and Reciprocal Space Maps (RSM's) is used as accurate, non-destructive experimental method to evaluate the crystalline quality, and more precisely for the given samples, the in-situ strain, defects and geometrical parameters such as tilt and bending of device. The combination with advanced FEM simulations gives the possibility to support efficiently semiconductor devices design.

  19. Petrographic studies of refractory inclusions from the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPherson, G. J.; Grossman, L.; Hashimoto, A.; Bar-Matthews, M.; Tanaka, T.

    1984-11-01

    Textural and mineral-chemical data on freeze-thaw disaggregated refractory inclusions from the Murchison meteorite are reported. The data were obtained with neutron activation analysis, SEM, and spectroscopy, the study revealed corundum-bearing inclusions, spinel-hibonite aggregates and spherules, and spinel-pyroxene and elivine-pyroxene inclusions. One of the three spinel-, pyroxene-, forsterite-rich inclusions had an amoeba-shaped spinel-pyroxene core, implying vapor-to-solid condensation and therefore crystallization from a melt. It is concluded that the meteorite formation encompassed diverse nebular materials, and that further studies of the meteorite will enhance the data base on the planetary nebular processes.

  20. Petrographic studies of refractory inclusions from the Murchison meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Macpherson, G.J.; Grossman, L.; Hashimoto, A.; Bar-Matthews, M.

    1984-11-15

    Textural and mineral-chemical data on freeze-thaw disaggregated refractory inclusions from the Murchison meteorite are reported. The data were obtained with neutron activation analysis, SEM, and spectroscopy, the study revealed corundum-bearing inclusions, spinel-hibonite aggregates and spherules, and spinel-pyroxene and elivine-pyroxene inclusions. One of the three spinel-, pyroxene-, forsterite-rich inclusions had an amoeba-shaped spinel-pyroxene core, implying vapor-to-solid condensation and therefore crystallization from a melt. It is concluded that the meteorite formation encompassed diverse nebular materials, and that further studies of the meteorite will enhance the data base on the planetary nebular processes.

  1. Petrographic studies of refractory inclusions from the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macpherson, G. J.; Grossman, L.; Hashimoto, A.; Bar-Matthews, M.; Tanaka, T.

    1984-01-01

    Textural and mineral-chemical data on freeze-thaw disaggregated refractory inclusions from the Murchison meteorite are reported. The data were obtained with neutron activation analysis, SEM, and spectroscopy, the study revealed corundum-bearing inclusions, spinel-hibonite aggregates and spherules, and spinel-pyroxene and elivine-pyroxene inclusions. One of the three spinel-, pyroxene-, forsterite-rich inclusions had an amoeba-shaped spinel-pyroxene core, implying vapor-to-solid condensation and therefore crystallization from a melt. It is concluded that the meteorite formation encompassed diverse nebular materials, and that further studies of the meteorite will enhance the data base on the planetary nebular processes.

  2. Systems analysis and futuristic designs of advanced biofuel factory concepts.

    SciTech Connect

    Chianelli, Russ; Leathers, James; Thoma, Steven George; Celina, Mathias Christopher; Gupta, Vipin P.

    2007-10-01

    The U.S. is addicted to petroleum--a dependency that periodically shocks the economy, compromises national security, and adversely affects the environment. If liquid fuels remain the main energy source for U.S. transportation for the foreseeable future, the system solution is the production of new liquid fuels that can directly displace diesel and gasoline. This study focuses on advanced concepts for biofuel factory production, describing three design concepts: biopetroleum, biodiesel, and higher alcohols. A general schematic is illustrated for each concept with technical description and analysis for each factory design. Looking beyond current biofuel pursuits by industry, this study explores unconventional feedstocks (e.g., extremophiles), out-of-favor reaction processes (e.g., radiation-induced catalytic cracking), and production of new fuel sources traditionally deemed undesirable (e.g., fusel oils). These concepts lay the foundation and path for future basic science and applied engineering to displace petroleum as a transportation energy source for good.

  3. Advanced XAS Analysis for Investigating Fuel Cell Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Witkowska, Agnieszka; Principi, Emiliano; Di Cicco, Andrea; Marassi, Roberto

    2007-02-02

    In the paper we present an accurate structural study of a Pt-based electrode by means of XAS, accounting for both the catalytic nanoparticles size distribution and sample inhomogeneities. Morphology and size distribution of the nanoparticles were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction techniques. XAS data-analysis was performed using advanced multiple-scattering techniques (GNXAS), disentangling possible effects due to surface atom contributions in nanoparticles and sample homogeneity, contributing to a reduction of intensity of the structural signal. This approach for XAS investigation of electrodes of FC devices can represent a viable and reliable way to understand structural details, important for producing more efficient catalytic materials.

  4. Analysis of biofluids by paper spray MS: advances and challenges.

    PubMed

    Manicke, Nicholas E; Bills, Brandon J; Zhang, Chengsen

    2016-03-01

    Paper spray MS is part of a cohort of ambient ionization or direct analysis methods that seek to analyze complex samples without prior sample preparation. Extraction and electrospray ionization occur directly from the paper substrate upon which a dried matrix spot is stored. Paper spray MS is capable of detecting drugs directly from dried blood, plasma and urine spots at the low ng/ml to pg/ml levels without sample preparation. No front end separation is performed, so MS/MS or high-resolution MS is required. Here, we discuss paper spray methodology, give a comprehensive literature review of the use of paper spray MS for bioanalysis, discuss technological advancements and variations on this technique and discuss some of its limitations. PMID:26916068

  5. Beam Optics Analysis - An Advanced 3D Trajectory Code

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Bui, Thuc; Vogler, William; Neilson, Jeff; Read, Mike; Shephard, Mark; Bauer, Andrew; Datta, Dibyendu; Beal, Mark

    2006-01-03

    Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. has completed initial development of an advanced, 3D program for modeling electron trajectories in electromagnetic fields. The code is being used to design complex guns and collectors. Beam Optics Analysis (BOA) is a fully relativistic, charged particle code using adaptive, finite element meshing. Geometrical input is imported from CAD programs generating ACIS-formatted files. Parametric data is inputted using an intuitive, graphical user interface (GUI), which also provides control of convergence, accuracy, and post processing. The program includes a magnetic field solver, and magnetic information can be imported from Maxwell 2D/3D and other programs. The program supports thermionic emission and injected beams. Secondary electron emission is also supported, including multiple generations. Work on field emission is in progress as well as implementation of computer optimization of both the geometry and operating parameters. The principle features of the program and its capabilities are presented.

  6. Recent trends in the advanced analysis of bioactive fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Rodriguez, Alejandro; Reglero, Guillermo; Ibañez, Elena

    2010-01-20

    The consumption of dietary fats have been long associated to chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, cancer, arthritis, asthma, and cardiovascular disease; although some controversy still exists in the role of dietary fats in human health, certain fats have demonstrated their positive effect in the modulation of abnormal fatty acid and eicosanoid metabolism, both of them associated to chronic diseases. Among the different fats, some fatty acids can be used as functional ingredients such as alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), arachidonic acid (AA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), stearidonic acid (STA) and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), among others. The present review is focused on recent developments in FAs analysis, covering sample preparation methods such as extraction, fractionation and derivatization as well as new advances in chromatographic methods such as GC and HPLC. Special attention is paid to trans fatty acids due its increasing interest for the food industry. PMID:19525080

  7. Beam Optics Analysis — An Advanced 3D Trajectory Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Bui, Thuc; Vogler, William; Neilson, Jeff; Read, Mike; Shephard, Mark; Bauer, Andrew; Datta, Dibyendu; Beal, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. has completed initial development of an advanced, 3D program for modeling electron trajectories in electromagnetic fields. The code is being used to design complex guns and collectors. Beam Optics Analysis (BOA) is a fully relativistic, charged particle code using adaptive, finite element meshing. Geometrical input is imported from CAD programs generating ACIS-formatted files. Parametric data is inputted using an intuitive, graphical user interface (GUI), which also provides control of convergence, accuracy, and post processing. The program includes a magnetic field solver, and magnetic information can be imported from Maxwell 2D/3D and other programs. The program supports thermionic emission and injected beams. Secondary electron emission is also supported, including multiple generations. Work on field emission is in progress as well as implementation of computer optimization of both the geometry and operating parameters. The principle features of the program and its capabilities are presented.

  8. Advanced functional network analysis in the geosciences: The pyunicorn package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donges, Jonathan F.; Heitzig, Jobst; Runge, Jakob; Schultz, Hanna C. H.; Wiedermann, Marc; Zech, Alraune; Feldhoff, Jan; Rheinwalt, Aljoscha; Kutza, Hannes; Radebach, Alexander; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    Functional networks are a powerful tool for analyzing large geoscientific datasets such as global fields of climate time series originating from observations or model simulations. pyunicorn (pythonic unified complex network and recurrence analysis toolbox) is an open-source, fully object-oriented and easily parallelizable package written in the language Python. It allows for constructing functional networks (aka climate networks) representing the structure of statistical interrelationships in large datasets and, subsequently, investigating this structure using advanced methods of complex network theory such as measures for networks of interacting networks, node-weighted statistics or network surrogates. Additionally, pyunicorn allows to study the complex dynamics of geoscientific systems as recorded by time series by means of recurrence networks and visibility graphs. The range of possible applications of the package is outlined drawing on several examples from climatology.

  9. Advanced in aerospace lubricant and wear metal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Saba, C.S.; Centers, P.W.

    1995-09-01

    Wear metal analysis continues to play an effective diagnostic role for condition monitoring of gas turbine engines. Since the early 1960s the United States` military services have been using spectrometric oil analysis program (SOAP) to monitor the condition of aircraft engines. The SOAP has proven to be effective in increasing reliability, fleet readiness and avoiding losses of lives and machinery. Even though historical data have demonstrated the success of the SOAP in terms of detecting imminent engine failure verified by maintenance personnel, the SOAP is not a stand-alone technique and is limited in its detection of large metallic wear debris. In response, improved laboratory, portable, in-line and on-line diagnostic techniques to perfect SOAP and oil condition monitoring have been sought. The status of research and development as well as the direction of future developmental activities in oil analysis due to technological opportunities, advanced in engine development and changes in military mission are reviewed and discussed. 54 refs.

  10. Application of petrographic examination techniques to the assessment of fire-damaged concrete and masonry structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ingham, Jeremy P.

    2009-07-15

    The number of building fires has doubled over the last 50 years. There has never been a greater need for structures to be assessed for fire damage to ensure safety and enable appropriate repairs to be planned. Fortunately, even after a severe fire, concrete and masonry structures are generally capable of being repaired rather than demolished. By allowing direct examination of microcracking and mineralogical changes, petrographic examination has become widely used to determine the depth of fire damage for reinforced concrete elements. Petrographic examination can also be applied to fire-damaged masonry structures built of materials such as stone, brick and mortar. Petrography can ensure accurate detection of damaged geomaterials, which provides cost savings during building repair and increased safety reassurance. This paper comprises a review of the role of petrography in fire damage assessments, drawing on a range of actual fire damage investigations.

  11. Preliminary petrographic description and geologic implications of the Apollo 17 Station 7 boulder consortium samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, E.C.T.; Minkin, J.A.; Thompson, C.L.

    1974-01-01

    Preliminary petrographic description and mineral composition of four hand samples (77135, 77115, 77075 and 77215) are presented. 77135, 77115, and 77075 all crystallized from fragment-laden melts; they are similar in textures but differ in grain size. 77135 and 77115 are pigeonite feldspathic basalts. On the basis of geologic and petrographic evidence, 77115 and 77075 are related; they formed, cooled, and consolidated before being engulfed in the vesicular 77135. The impact or igneous origin of the melts from which these rocks crystallized cannot be determined. 77215 is a shocked, strongly sheared and granulated microbreccia consisting of three major lithologies dominated by mineral clasts of orthopyroxene and calcic plagioclase. The orthopyroxene clasts contain coarse exsolved blebs of augite, suggesting a deep-seated origin. The major, minor, and trace element compositions of 77135, 77115, and 77075 are in general similar. They represent a major highland rock type, perhaps more important than anorthosites. ?? 1974.

  12. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Quarterly progress report, March 1982-May 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Hower, J.C.; Ferm, J.C.; Cobb, J.C.; Trinkle, E.J.; Frankie, K.A.; Poe, S.H.; Baynard, D.N.; Graese, A.M.; Raione, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The project Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals consists of three specific areas of coal petrology: spectral fluorescence of liptinite macerals, properties of semi-inert macerals, and size/form/microlithotype association of pyrite/marcasite. Additional research on the Mannington and Dunbar coals in western Kentucky and the Alma coal zone in eastern Kentucky will apply techniques developed in the first three areas. Suites of coals from other states will also be studied to expand the variability in the sample set.

  13. Geochemical and petrographic data for intrusions peripheral to the Big Timber Stock, Crazy Mountains, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, Edward A.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2015-01-01

    The Paleocene Fort Union Formation hosts a compositionally diverse array of Eocene plugs, dikes, and sills arrayed around the Eocene Big Timber stock in the Crazy Mountains of south-central Montana. The geochemistry and petrography of the sills have not previously been characterized or interpreted. The purpose of this report is (1) to present available geochemical and petrographic data for several dozen samples of these rocks and (2) to provide a basic interpretive synthesis of these data.

  14. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Quarterly progress report, June 1982-August 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Hower, J.C.; Ferm, J.C.; Cobb, J.C.; Trinkle, E.J.; Frankie, K.A.; Poe, S.H.; Baynard, D.N.; Graese, A.M.; Raione, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The project Petrographic Characterization of Kentucky Coals consists of three specific areas of coal petrology: spectral fluorescence of liptinite macerals, properties of semi-inert macerals, and size/form/microlithotype association of pyrite/marcasite. Additional research on the Mannington and Dunbar coals in western Kentucky and the Alma coal zone in eastern Kentucky will apply techniques developed in the first three areas. Suites of coals from other states will also be studied to expand the variability in the sample set.

  15. ASR DIAGNOSIS BY PETROGRAPHIC INVESTIGATION AND EVALUATION OF MECHANICAL PERFORMANCE OF ASR DETERIORATED PRETENSIONED PC BEAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiyama, Jun; Yamada, Kazuo; Kaneda, Kazuo; Iraha, Shigeo; Oshiro, Takeshi

    ASR diagnosis and evaluation of load carrying capacity have been performed on the pre-tensioned PC beam which was cut out of a national high way bridge. The bridge was replaced lately after 25years service due to ASR deterioration. Comprehensive investigations such as crack measurement, material strength test, petrographic investigation, beam bending test have been performed on the deteriorated beam. Cracks have been observed on all sides and the appearance has been classified as severe deterioration grade. Petrographic investigation concluded that the reacted mineral was mainly reactive cristobalite contained in andesite of fine aggregates and EPMA investigation found that the reaction seemed to be the final stage. The late expansive ASR has been superimposed by cryptocrystalline quartz in coarse aggregates and it is still in progress. Deteriorated concrete cores with no visual crack have reduced only 10% of compressive strength compared with design strength, but significant loss has been observed on the elastic modulus. The static bending load test on the deteriorated test beam showed 95% of design load capacity indicating that the visual deterioration on surfaces has affected slight damages at this moment. But loss of bending rigidity has been appeared on the deteriorated beam .after bending cracks have started. This comprehensive study including the petrographic diagnosis and the appraisal on mechanical performance of the deteriorated beam conclude that there is a possibility of ASR deterioration in progress and further loss of mechanical performance though the beam had some margin for loading capacity at this moment.

  16. Engineering Geological and Petrographic Characterization of Migmatites Belonging to the Calabria-Peloritani Orogen (Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, G.; Punturo, R.; Mineo, S.; Ortolano, G.; Castelli, F.

    2016-04-01

    The laboratory characterization of migmatite rocks, affected by tunneling works in southern Calabria (Italy), has been carried out with the purpose of investigating the relationship between some potentially interdependent petrographic and petrophysical features with the mechanical behavior of the excavated rocks. Mineralogical and petrographic investigation allowed estimating the modal composition of the rock and the grain size of the constituting minerals, as well as examining the intergranular contacts and associated microfractures. The velocity of seismic waves within the specimens has been measured and calculated, along with the elastic properties of the rock. Specimens were also characterized from the physical-mechanical point of view and their mode of failure was considered. Results show that the mechanical behavior of migmatites varies within the sample population, although the specimens belong to the same sampling area. It is controlled by both porosity and modal composition of the rock. Thus, primary minerals were grouped with respect to their elastic properties; their abundance/deficiency within the specimen controls its mechanical strength. This is also reflected in the modes of failure associated to different strength values. This is a new consideration in the laboratory characterization of this rock type, largely cropping out in several contexts worldwide. Results should be taken into account before starting engineering works, in order to avoid errors resulting from considering this rock as a homogeneous material from the mechanical and petrographic points of view.

  17. Advanced High Temperature Reactor Systems and Economic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, David Eugene; Peretz, Fred J; Qualls, A L

    2011-09-01

    The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a large-output [3400 MW(t)] fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR). FHRs, by definition, feature low-pressure liquid fluoride salt cooling, coated-particle fuel, a high-temperature power cycle, and fully passive decay heat rejection. The AHTR's large thermal output enables direct comparison of its performance and requirements with other high output reactor concepts. As high-temperature plants, FHRs can support either high-efficiency electricity generation or industrial process heat production. The AHTR analysis presented in this report is limited to the electricity generation mission. FHRs, in principle, have the potential to be low-cost electricity producers while maintaining full passive safety. However, no FHR has been built, and no FHR design has reached the stage of maturity where realistic economic analysis can be performed. The system design effort described in this report represents early steps along the design path toward being able to predict the cost and performance characteristics of the AHTR as well as toward being able to identify the technology developments necessary to build an FHR power plant. While FHRs represent a distinct reactor class, they inherit desirable attributes from other thermal power plants whose characteristics can be studied to provide general guidance on plant configuration, anticipated performance, and costs. Molten salt reactors provide experience on the materials, procedures, and components necessary to use liquid fluoride salts. Liquid metal reactors provide design experience on using low-pressure liquid coolants, passive decay heat removal, and hot refueling. High temperature gas-cooled reactors provide experience with coated particle fuel and graphite components. Light water reactors (LWRs) show the potentials of transparent, high-heat capacity coolants with low chemical reactivity. Modern coal-fired power plants provide design experience with

  18. Ultra Wideband Indoor Positioning Technologies: Analysis and Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Alarifi, Abdulrahman; Al-Salman, AbdulMalik; Alsaleh, Mansour; Alnafessah, Ahmad; Al-Hadhrami, Suheer; Al-Ammar, Mai A.; Al-Khalifa, Hend S.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, indoor positioning has emerged as a critical function in many end-user applications; including military, civilian, disaster relief and peacekeeping missions. In comparison with outdoor environments, sensing location information in indoor environments requires a higher precision and is a more challenging task in part because various objects reflect and disperse signals. Ultra WideBand (UWB) is an emerging technology in the field of indoor positioning that has shown better performance compared to others. In order to set the stage for this work, we provide a survey of the state-of-the-art technologies in indoor positioning, followed by a detailed comparative analysis of UWB positioning technologies. We also provide an analysis of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) to analyze the present state of UWB positioning technologies. While SWOT is not a quantitative approach, it helps in assessing the real status and in revealing the potential of UWB positioning to effectively address the indoor positioning problem. Unlike previous studies, this paper presents new taxonomies, reviews some major recent advances, and argues for further exploration by the research community of this challenging problem space. PMID:27196906

  19. Inside Single Cells: Quantitative Analysis with Advanced Optics and Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yi; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Single cell explorations offer a unique window to inspect molecules and events relevant to mechanisms and heterogeneity constituting the central dogma of biology. A large number of nucleic acids, proteins, metabolites and small molecules are involved in determining and fine-tuning the state and function of a single cell at a given time point. Advanced optical platforms and nanotools provide tremendous opportunities to probe intracellular components with single-molecule accuracy, as well as promising tools to adjust single cell activity. In order to obtain quantitative information (e.g. molecular quantity, kinetics and stoichiometry) within an intact cell, achieving the observation with comparable spatiotemporal resolution is a challenge. For single cell studies both the method of detection and the biocompatibility are critical factors as they determine the feasibility, especially when considering live cell analysis. Although a considerable proportion of single cell methodologies depend on specialized expertise and expensive instruments, it is our expectation that the information content and implication will outweigh the costs given the impact on life science enabled by single cell analysis. PMID:25430077

  20. Quantitative Computed Tomography and Image Analysis for Advanced Muscle Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Edmunds, Kyle Joseph; Gíslason, Magnus K.; Arnadottir, Iris D.; Marcante, Andrea; Piccione, Francesco; Gargiulo, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Medical imaging is of particular interest in the field of translational myology, as extant literature describes the utilization of a wide variety of techniques to non-invasively recapitulate and quantity various internal and external tissue morphologies. In the clinical context, medical imaging remains a vital tool for diagnostics and investigative assessment. This review outlines the results from several investigations on the use of computed tomography (CT) and image analysis techniques to assess muscle conditions and degenerative process due to aging or pathological conditions. Herein, we detail the acquisition of spiral CT images and the use of advanced image analysis tools to characterize muscles in 2D and 3D. Results from these studies recapitulate changes in tissue composition within muscles, as visualized by the association of tissue types to specified Hounsfield Unit (HU) values for fat, loose connective tissue or atrophic muscle, and normal muscle, including fascia and tendon. We show how results from these analyses can be presented as both average HU values and compositions with respect to total muscle volumes, demonstrating the reliability of these tools to monitor, assess and characterize muscle degeneration. PMID:27478562

  1. Ultra Wideband Indoor Positioning Technologies: Analysis and Recent Advances.

    PubMed

    Alarifi, Abdulrahman; Al-Salman, AbdulMalik; Alsaleh, Mansour; Alnafessah, Ahmad; Al-Hadhrami, Suheer; Al-Ammar, Mai A; Al-Khalifa, Hend S

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, indoor positioning has emerged as a critical function in many end-user applications; including military, civilian, disaster relief and peacekeeping missions. In comparison with outdoor environments, sensing location information in indoor environments requires a higher precision and is a more challenging task in part because various objects reflect and disperse signals. Ultra WideBand (UWB) is an emerging technology in the field of indoor positioning that has shown better performance compared to others. In order to set the stage for this work, we provide a survey of the state-of-the-art technologies in indoor positioning, followed by a detailed comparative analysis of UWB positioning technologies. We also provide an analysis of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) to analyze the present state of UWB positioning technologies. While SWOT is not a quantitative approach, it helps in assessing the real status and in revealing the potential of UWB positioning to effectively address the indoor positioning problem. Unlike previous studies, this paper presents new taxonomies, reviews some major recent advances, and argues for further exploration by the research community of this challenging problem space. PMID:27196906

  2. Inside single cells: quantitative analysis with advanced optics and nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yi; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Single-cell explorations offer a unique window to inspect molecules and events relevant to mechanisms and heterogeneity constituting the central dogma of biology. A large number of nucleic acids, proteins, metabolites, and small molecules are involved in determining and fine-tuning the state and function of a single cell at a given time point. Advanced optical platforms and nanotools provide tremendous opportunities to probe intracellular components with single-molecule accuracy, as well as promising tools to adjust single-cell activity. To obtain quantitative information (e.g., molecular quantity, kinetics, and stoichiometry) within an intact cell, achieving the observation with comparable spatiotemporal resolution is a challenge. For single-cell studies, both the method of detection and the biocompatibility are critical factors as they determine the feasibility, especially when considering live-cell analysis. Although a considerable proportion of single-cell methodologies depend on specialized expertise and expensive instruments, it is our expectation that the information content and implication will outweigh the costs given the impact on life science enabled by single-cell analysis. PMID:25430077

  3. Advances in genome-wide DNA methylation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Romi; Nagarajan, Arvindhan; Wajapeyee, Narendra

    2013-01-01

    The covalent DNA modification of cytosine at position 5 (5-methylcytosine; 5mC) has emerged as an important epigenetic mark most commonly present in the context of CpG dinucleotides in mammalian cells. In pluripotent stem cells and plants, it is also found in non-CpG and CpNpG contexts, respectively. 5mC has important implications in a diverse set of biological processes, including transcriptional regulation. Aberrant DNA methylation has been shown to be associated with a wide variety of human ailments and thus is the focus of active investigation. Methods used for detecting DNA methylation have revolutionized our understanding of this epigenetic mark and provided new insights into its role in diverse biological functions. Here we describe recent technological advances in genome-wide DNA methylation analysis and discuss their relative utility and drawbacks, providing specific examples from studies that have used these technologies for genome-wide DNA methylation analysis to address important biological questions. Finally, we discuss a newly identified covalent DNA modification, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), and speculate on its possible biological function, as well as describe a new methodology that can distinguish 5hmC from 5mC. PMID:20964631

  4. Lock Acquisition and Sensitivity Analysis of Advanced LIGO Interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynov, Denis

    Laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory (LIGO) consists of two complex large-scale laser interferometers designed for direct detection of gravitational waves from distant astrophysical sources in the frequency range 10Hz - 5kHz. Direct detection of space-time ripples will support Einstein's general theory of relativity and provide invaluable information and new insight into physics of the Universe. The initial phase of LIGO started in 2002, and since then data was collected during the six science runs. Instrument sensitivity improved from run to run due to the effort of commissioning team. Initial LIGO has reached designed sensitivity during the last science run, which ended in October 2010. In parallel with commissioning and data analysis with the initial detector, LIGO group worked on research and development of the next generation of detectors. Major instrument upgrade from initial to advanced LIGO started in 2010 and lasted until 2014. This thesis describes results of commissioning work done at the LIGO Livingston site from 2013 until 2015 in parallel with and after the installation of the instrument. This thesis also discusses new techniques and tools developed at the 40m prototype including adaptive filtering, estimation of quantization noise in digital filters and design of isolation kits for ground seismometers. The first part of this thesis is devoted to the description of methods for bringing the interferometer into linear regime when collection of data becomes possible. States of longitudinal and angular controls of interferometer degrees of freedom during lock acquisition process and in low noise configuration are discussed in details. Once interferometer is locked and transitioned to low noise regime, instrument produces astrophysics data that should be calibrated to units of meters or strain. The second part of this thesis describes online calibration technique set up in both observatories to monitor the quality of the collected data in

  5. Concise Atlas of the Solar System (11): Petrographic Textures and Evolutionary Processes from the Chondritic Parent Bodies, Moon and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérczi, Sz.; Gucsik, A.; Hargitai, H.; Józsa, S.; Kereszturi, A.; Nagy, Sz.; Szakmány, J.

    2009-03-01

    The 11th atlas of the Solar System helps students in a systematic approach to petrographic textures of planetary materials of processes on asteroids, Moon and Mars, arranged in their igneous units of their geological settings in the parent body.

  6. Detailed petrographic descriptions and microprobe data for tertiary silicic volcanic rocks in drill hole USW G-1, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Caporuscio, F.A.; Warren, R.G.; Broxton, D.E.

    1985-12-01

    This report contains detailed petrographic descriptions of 74 thin sections from drill hole USW G-1 at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These descriptions are keyed to the distinctions between devitrified, vitrophyre, vitric, and zeolitized intervals below the Topopah Spring Member repository horizon. The petrographic features of the zeolitized intervals down through the Crater Flat tuff, as well as the sorption properties determined from these intervals, suggest that these zeolite occurrences may each have comparable sorptive capability.

  7. Develop advanced nonlinear signal analysis topographical mapping system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) has been undergoing extensive flight certification and developmental testing, which involves some 250 health monitoring measurements. Under the severe temperature, pressure, and dynamic environments sustained during operation, numerous major component failures have occurred, resulting in extensive engine hardware damage and scheduling losses. To enhance SSME safety and reliability, detailed analysis and evaluation of the measurements signal are mandatory to assess its dynamic characteristics and operational condition. Efficient and reliable signal detection techniques will reduce catastrophic system failure risks and expedite the evaluation of both flight and ground test data, and thereby reduce launch turn-around time. The basic objective of this contract are threefold: (1) develop and validate a hierarchy of innovative signal analysis techniques for nonlinear and nonstationary time-frequency analysis. Performance evaluation will be carried out through detailed analysis of extensive SSME static firing and flight data. These techniques will be incorporated into a fully automated system; (2) develop an advanced nonlinear signal analysis topographical mapping system (ATMS) to generate a Compressed SSME TOPO Data Base (CSTDB). This ATMS system will convert tremendous amount of complex vibration signals from the entire SSME test history into a bank of succinct image-like patterns while retaining all respective phase information. High compression ratio can be achieved to allow minimal storage requirement, while providing fast signature retrieval, pattern comparison, and identification capabilities; and (3) integrate the nonlinear correlation techniques into the CSTDB data base with compatible TOPO input data format. Such integrated ATMS system will provide the large test archives necessary for quick signature comparison. This study will provide timely assessment of SSME component operational status, identify probable causes of

  8. Develop advanced nonlinear signal analysis topographical mapping system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jong, Jen-Yi

    1993-01-01

    The SSME has been undergoing extensive flight certification and developmental testing, which involves some 250 health monitoring measurements. Under the severe temperature pressure, and dynamic environments sustained during operation, numerous major component failures have occurred, resulting in extensive engine hardware damage and scheduling losses. To enhance SSME safety and reliability, detailed analysis and evaluation of the measurements signal are mandatory to assess its dynamic characteristics and operational condition. Efficient and reliable signal detection techniques will reduce catastrophic system failure risks and expedite the evaluation of both flight and ground test data, and thereby reduce launch turn-around time. The basic objective of this contract are threefold: (1) Develop and validate a hierarchy of innovative signal analysis techniques for nonlinear and nonstationary time-frequency analysis. Performance evaluation will be carried out through detailed analysis of extensive SSME static firing and flight data. These techniques will be incorporated into a fully automated system. (2) Develop an advanced nonlinear signal analysis topographical mapping system (ATMS) to generate a Compressed SSME TOPO Data Base (CSTDB). This ATMS system will convert tremendous amounts of complex vibration signals from the entire SSME test history into a bank of succinct image-like patterns while retaining all respective phase information. A high compression ratio can be achieved to allow the minimal storage requirement, while providing fast signature retrieval, pattern comparison, and identification capabilities. (3) Integrate the nonlinear correlation techniques into the CSTDB data base with compatible TOPO input data format. Such integrated ATMS system will provide the large test archives necessary for a quick signature comparison. This study will provide timely assessment of SSME component operational status, identify probable causes of malfunction, and indicate

  9. Advanced Diagnostic and Prognostic Testbed (ADAPT) Testability Analysis Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ossenfort, John

    2008-01-01

    As system designs become more complex, determining the best locations to add sensors and test points for the purpose of testing and monitoring these designs becomes more difficult. Not only must the designer take into consideration all real and potential faults of the system, he or she must also find efficient ways of detecting and isolating those faults. Because sensors and cabling take up valuable space and weight on a system, and given constraints on bandwidth and power, it is even more difficult to add sensors into these complex designs after the design has been completed. As a result, a number of software tools have been developed to assist the system designer in proper placement of these sensors during the system design phase of a project. One of the key functions provided by many of these software programs is a testability analysis of the system essentially an evaluation of how observable the system behavior is using available tests. During the design phase, testability metrics can help guide the designer in improving the inherent testability of the design. This may include adding, removing, or modifying tests; breaking up feedback loops, or changing the system to reduce fault propagation. Given a set of test requirements, the analysis can also help to verify that the system will meet those requirements. Of course, a testability analysis requires that a software model of the physical system is available. For the analysis to be most effective in guiding system design, this model should ideally be constructed in parallel with these efforts. The purpose of this paper is to present the final testability results of the Advanced Diagnostic and Prognostic Testbed (ADAPT) after the system model was completed. The tool chosen to build the model and to perform the testability analysis with is the Testability Engineering and Maintenance System Designer (TEAMS-Designer). The TEAMS toolset is intended to be a solution to span all phases of the system, from design and

  10. Advanced AEM by Comprehensive Analysis and Modeling of System Drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, Arnulf; Klune, Klaus; Schattauer, Ingrid

    2010-05-01

    The quality of the assessment of risks outgoing from environmental hazards strongly depends on the spatial and temporal distribution of the data collected in a survey area. Natural hazards generally emerge from wide areas as it is in the case of volcanoes or land slides. Conventional surface measurements are restricted to few lines or locations and often can't be conducted in difficult terrain. So they only give a spatial and temporary limited data set and therefore limit the reliability of risk analysis. Aero-geophysical measurements potentially provide a valuable tool for completing the data set as they can be performed over a wide area, even above difficult terrain within a short time. A most desirable opportunity in course of such measurements is the ascertainment of the dynamics of such potentially hazardous environmental processes. This necessitates repeated and reproducible measurements. Current HEM systems can't accomplish this adequately due to their system immanent drift and - in some cases - bad signal to noise ratio. So, to develop comprising concepts for advancing state of the art HEM-systems to a valuable tool for data acquisition in risk assessment or hydrological problems, different studies have been undertaken which form the contents of the presented work conducted in course of the project HIRISK (Helicopter Based Electromagnetic System for Advanced Environmental Risk Assessment - FWF L-354 N10, supported by the Austrian Science Fund). The methodology is based upon two paths: A - Comprehensive experimental testing on an existing HEM system serving as an experimental platform. B - The setup of a numerical model which is continuously refined according to the results of the experimental data. The model then serves to simulate the experimental as well as alternative configurations and to analyze them subject to their drift behavior. Finally, concepts for minimizing the drift are derived and tested. Different test series - stationary on ground as well

  11. Advancing sensitivity analysis to precisely characterize temporal parameter dominance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guse, Björn; Pfannerstill, Matthias; Strauch, Michael; Reusser, Dominik; Lüdtke, Stefan; Volk, Martin; Gupta, Hoshin; Fohrer, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    Parameter sensitivity analysis is a strategy for detecting dominant model parameters. A temporal sensitivity analysis calculates daily sensitivities of model parameters. This allows a precise characterization of temporal patterns of parameter dominance and an identification of the related discharge conditions. To achieve this goal, the diagnostic information as derived from the temporal parameter sensitivity is advanced by including discharge information in three steps. In a first step, the temporal dynamics are analyzed by means of daily time series of parameter sensitivities. As sensitivity analysis method, we used the Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) applied directly onto the modelled discharge. Next, the daily sensitivities are analyzed in combination with the flow duration curve (FDC). Through this step, we determine whether high sensitivities of model parameters are related to specific discharges. Finally, parameter sensitivities are separately analyzed for five segments of the FDC and presented as monthly averaged sensitivities. In this way, seasonal patterns of dominant model parameter are provided for each FDC segment. For this methodical approach, we used two contrasting catchments (upland and lowland catchment) to illustrate how parameter dominances change seasonally in different catchments. For all of the FDC segments, the groundwater parameters are dominant in the lowland catchment, while in the upland catchment the controlling parameters change seasonally between parameters from different runoff components. The three methodical steps lead to clear temporal patterns, which represent the typical characteristics of the study catchments. Our methodical approach thus provides a clear idea of how the hydrological dynamics are controlled by model parameters for certain discharge magnitudes during the year. Overall, these three methodical steps precisely characterize model parameters and improve the understanding of process dynamics in hydrological

  12. Steady-state Analysis Model for Advanced Fuelcycle Schemes

    2006-05-12

    The model was developed as a part of the study, "Advanced Fuel Cycles and Waste Management", which was performed during 2003—2005 by an ad-hoc expert group under the Nuclear Development Committee in the OECD/NEA. The model was designed for an efficient conduct of nuclear fuel cycle scheme cost analyses. It is simple, transparent and offers users the capability to track down the cost analysis results. All the fuel cycle schemes considered in the model aremore » represented in a graphic format and all values related to a fuel cycle step are shown in the graphic interface, i.e., there are no hidden values embedded in the calculations. All data on the fuel cycle schemes considered in the study including mass flows, waste generation, cost data, and other data such as activities, decay heat and neutron sources of spent fuel and high—level waste along time are included in the model and can be displayed. The user can modify easily the values of mass flows and/or cost parameters and see the corresponding changes in the results. The model calculates: front—end fuel cycle mass flows such as requirements of enrichment and conversion services and natural uranium; mass of waste based on the waste generation parameters and the mass flow; and all costs. It performs Monte Carlo simulations with changing the values of all unit costs within their respective ranges (from lower to upper bounds).« less

  13. Advances in protein complex analysis using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gingras, Anne-Claude; Aebersold, Ruedi; Raught, Brian

    2005-02-15

    Proteins often function as components of larger complexes to perform a specific function, and formation of these complexes may be regulated. For example, intracellular signalling events often require transient and/or regulated protein-protein interactions for propagation, and protein binding to a specific DNA sequence, RNA molecule or metabolite is often regulated to modulate a particular cellular function. Thus, characterizing protein complexes can offer important insights into protein function. This review describes recent important advances in mass spectrometry (MS)-based techniques for the analysis of protein complexes. Following brief descriptions of how proteins are identified using MS, and general protein complex purification approaches, we address two of the most important issues in these types of studies: specificity and background protein contaminants. Two basic strategies for increasing specificity and decreasing background are presented: whereas (1) tandem affinity purification (TAP) of tagged proteins of interest can dramatically improve the signal-to-noise ratio via the generation of cleaner samples, (2) stable isotopic labelling of proteins may be used to discriminate between contaminants and bona fide binding partners using quantitative MS techniques. Examples, as well as advantages and disadvantages of each approach, are presented. PMID:15611014

  14. Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) Technology Tool Box (TTB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Monica M.; O'Neil, Daniel A.; Christensen, Carissa B.

    2005-02-01

    Forecasting technology capabilities requires a tool and a process for capturing state-of-the-art technology metrics and estimates for future metrics. A decision support tool, known as the Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS), contains a Technology Tool Box (TTB) database designed to accomplish this goal. Sections of this database correspond to a Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) developed by NASA's Exploration Systems Research and Technology (ESRT) Program. These sections cover the waterfront of technologies required for human and robotic space exploration. Records in each section include technology performance, operations, and programmatic metrics. Timeframes in the database provide metric values for the state of the art (Timeframe 0) and forecasts for timeframes that correspond to spiral development milestones in NASA's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) development strategy. Collecting and vetting data for the TTB will involve technologists from across the agency, the aerospace industry and academia. Technologists will have opportunities to submit technology metrics and forecasts to the TTB development team. Semi-annual forums will facilitate discussions about the basis of forecast estimates. As the tool and process mature, the TTB will serve as a powerful communication and decision support tool for the ESRT program.

  15. Steady-State Analysis Model for Advanced Fuel Cycle Schemes.

    2008-03-17

    Version 00 SMAFS was developed as a part of the study, "Advanced Fuel Cycles and Waste Management", which was performed during 2003-2005 by an ad-hoc expert group under the Nuclear Development Committee in the OECD/NEA. The model was designed for an efficient conduct of nuclear fuel cycle scheme cost analyses. It is simple, transparent and offers users the capability to track down cost analysis results. All the fuel cycle schemes considered in the model aremore » represented in a graphic format and all values related to a fuel cycle step are shown in the graphic interface, i.e., there are no hidden values embedded in the calculations. All data on the fuel cycle schemes considered in the study including mass flows, waste generation, cost data, and other data such as activities, decay heat and neutron sources of spent fuel and high-level waste along time are included in the model and can be displayed. The user can easily modify values of mass flows and/or cost parameters and see corresponding changes in the results. The model calculates: front-end fuel cycle mass flows such as requirements of enrichment and conversion services and natural uranium; mass of waste based on the waste generation parameters and the mass flow; and all costs.« less

  16. Advanced research equipment for fast ultraweak luminescence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudisco, S.; Musumeci, F.; Scordino, A.; Privitera, G.

    2003-10-01

    This article describes new advanced research equipment for fast ultraweak luminescence analysis, which can detect at high sensitivity photons after ultraviolet A laser irradiation in biological probes as well as plant, animal, and human cells. The design and construction of this equipment, developed at the Southern National Laboratory of the National Nuclear Physics Institute, is described with the first experimental results and future developments. The setup, employing a photomultiplier tube working in single photon counting mode, allows accurate and reliable photoluminescence measurements with excitation wavelengths in the range 337-700 nm and the emission wavelength in the range 400-800 nm. With respect to the traditional setup, this new equipment is able to perform measurements starting at a few microseconds after the laser irradiation is switched off and with a large detection efficiency (about 10% of the total solid angle). Moreover, the adopted design assures a low background noise level. A further optimization of the system is under study, with special care for the reliability needed for the delayed luminescence for optical screening project aimed to enhance the detection of the low level photoinduced luminescence from human cells to be used as an optical biopsy technique.

  17. Advances in the analysis of iminocyclitols: Methods, sources and bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Amézqueta, Susana; Torres, Josep Lluís

    2016-05-01

    Iminocyclitols are chemically and metabolically stable, naturally occurring sugar mimetics. Their biological activities make them interesting and extremely promising as both drug leads and functional food ingredients. The first iminocyclitols were discovered using preparative isolation and purification methods followed by chemical characterization using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In addition to this classical approach, gas and liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry are increasingly used; they are highly sensitive techniques capable of detecting minute amounts of analytes in a broad spectrum of sources after only minimal sample preparation. These techniques have been applied to identify new iminocyclitols in plants, microorganisms and synthetic mixtures. The separation of iminocyclitol mixtures by chromatography is particularly difficult however, as the most commonly used matrices have very low selectivity for these highly hydrophilic structurally similar molecules. This review critically summarizes recent advances in the analysis of iminocyclitols from plant sources and findings regarding their quantification in dietary supplements and foodstuffs, as well as in biological fluids and organs, from bioavailability studies. PMID:26946023

  18. Safety Analysis of Soybean Processing for Advanced Life Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hentges, Dawn L.

    1999-01-01

    Soybeans (cv. Hoyt) is one of the crops planned for food production within the Advanced Life Support System Integration Testbed (ALSSIT), a proposed habitat simulation for long duration lunar/Mars missions. Soybeans may be processed into a variety of food products, including soymilk, tofu, and tempeh. Due to the closed environmental system and importance of crew health maintenance, food safety is a primary concern on long duration space missions. Identification of the food safety hazards and critical control points associated with the closed ALSSIT system is essential for the development of safe food processing techniques and equipment. A Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) model was developed to reflect proposed production and processing protocols for ALSSIT soybeans. Soybean processing was placed in the type III risk category. During the processing of ALSSIT-grown soybeans, critical control points were identified to control microbiological hazards, particularly mycotoxins, and chemical hazards from antinutrients. Critical limits were suggested at each CCP. Food safety recommendations regarding the hazards and risks associated with growing, harvesting, and processing soybeans; biomass management; and use of multifunctional equipment were made in consideration of the limitations and restraints of the closed ALSSIT.

  19. Crashworthiness analysis using advanced material models in DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, R.W.; Burger, M.J.; McMichael, L.D.; Parkinson, R.D.

    1993-10-22

    As part of an electric vehicle consortium, LLNL and Kaiser Aluminum are conducting experimental and numerical studies on crashworthy aluminum spaceframe designs. They have jointly explored the effect of heat treat on crush behavior and duplicated the experimental behavior with finite-element simulations. The major technical contributions to the state of the art in numerical simulation arise from the development and use of advanced material model descriptions for LLNL`s DYNA3D code. Constitutive model enhancements in both flow and failure have been employed for conventional materials such as low-carbon steels, and also for lighter weight materials such as aluminum and fiber composites being considered for future vehicles. The constitutive model enhancements are developed as extensions from LLNL`s work in anisotropic flow and multiaxial failure modeling. Analysis quality as a function of level of simplification of material behavior and mesh is explored, as well as the penalty in computation cost that must be paid for using more complex models and meshes. The lightweight material modeling technology is being used at the vehicle component level to explore the safety implications of small neighborhood electric vehicles manufactured almost exclusively from these materials.

  20. Late Triassic tuff intervals in the Ordos basin, Central China: Their depositional, petrographic, geochemical characteristics and regional implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Xinwei; Liu, Chiyang; Mao, Guangzhou; Deng, Yu; Wang, Feifei; Wang, Jianqiang

    2014-02-01

    Tuff intervals of Upper Triassic Yanchang Formation are laterally widespread in the Ordos basin, Central China. This paper focuses on magmatic origins and potential source regions of these tuff intervals through detail depositional, petrographic and geochemical analyses. Most of the tuff intervals are well-documented at the bottom of the Chang7 oil reservoir unit and can be correlated laterally, and certain tuff beds are reworked by turbidity current or seismic activity. Petrographic studies of the Chang7 tuffs indicate that they are composed of crystal shards, lithic shards and altered glass shards, and the crystal shards include plagioclase, quartz and biotite. Alteration of the Chang7 tuffs is ubiquitous, thus, most of these tuffs transformed into illite/smectite (I/S) mixed-layers which are identified by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Less common minerals are also detected in the Chang7 tuffs such as zircon, hematite, siderite, anatase. Major elements are determined by the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis, the results indicate that the Chang7 tuffs are enriched in K2O (average 4.21%), the ratio of SiO2/Al2O3 ranges from 1.73 to 2.85 (average 2.17), and the ratio of TiO2/Al2O3 varies between 0.006 and 0.032 (average 0.017), which imply that the Chang7 tuffs originated from a felsic parental magma. Trace elements are determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), indicating the total rare earth element (∑REE) concentrations are variable, and range from 117.46 to 466.83 ppm (average 251.88 ppm). REE distribution pattern of the Chang7 tuffs presents a LREE rightward incline with flat HREE curve. The value of δEu ranges from 0.151 to 0.837 (average 0.492), suggesting a strong to weak negative Eu anomaly. The Chang7 tuffs show positive anomalies in Rb, Th and U and negative anomalies in Nb, Sr and Eu on a primitive mantle normalized spidergram. A preliminary analysis of the geochemical composition of the

  1. Advanced Coursework Rates by Ethnicity: An 11-Year, Statewide Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Janis C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine advanced coursework completion rates, Advanced Placement (AP)/International Baccalaureate (IB) testing rates, AP/IB exam passage rates, and the percentage of AP/IB exam scores at or above the criterion that may exist among Texas public high school students from 2001 to 2012 to ascertain (a) the…

  2. Male biological clock: a critical analysis of advanced paternal age

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Ranjith; Chiba, Koji; Butler, Peter; Lamb, Dolores J.

    2016-01-01

    Extensive research defines the impact of advanced maternal age on couples’ fecundity and reproductive outcomes, but significantly less research has been focused on understanding the impact of advanced paternal age. Yet it is increasingly common for couples at advanced ages to conceive children. Limited research suggests that the importance of paternal age is significantly less than that of maternal age, but advanced age of the father is implicated in a variety of conditions affecting the offspring. This review examines three aspects of advanced paternal age: the potential problems with conception and pregnancy that couples with advanced paternal age may encounter, the concept of discussing a limit to paternal age in a clinical setting, and the risks of diseases associated with advanced paternal age. As paternal age increases, it presents no absolute barrier to conception, but it does present greater risks and complications. The current body of knowledge does not justify dissuading older men from trying to initiate a pregnancy, but the medical community must do a better job of communicating to couples the current understanding of the risks of conception with advanced paternal age. PMID:25881878

  3. Advanced methods of structural and trajectory analysis for transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, Mark D.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the efforts in two areas: (1) development of advanced methods of structural weight estimation, and (2) development of advanced methods of trajectory optimization. The majority of the effort was spent in the structural weight area. A draft of 'Analytical Fuselage and Wing Weight Estimation of Transport Aircraft', resulting from this research, is included as an appendix.

  4. Integrated design and analysis of advanced airfoil shapes for gas turbine engines

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, B.A.; Rooney, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    An integral process in the mechanical design of gas turbine airfoils is the conversion of hot or running geometry into cold or as-manufactured geometry. New and advanced methods of design and analysis must be created that parallel new and technologically advanced turbine components. In particular, to achieve the high performance required of today's gas turbine engines, the industry is forced to design and manufacture increasingly complex airfoil shapes using advanced analysis and modeling techniques. This paper describes a method of integrating advanced, general purpose finite element analysis techniques in the mechanical design process.

  5. Generic Repository Concepts and Thermal Analysis for Advanced Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, Ernest; Blink, James; Carter, Joe; Massimiliano, Fratoni; Greenberg, Harris; Howard, Rob L

    2011-01-01

    The current posture of the used nuclear fuel management program in the U.S. following termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, is to pursue research and development (R&D) of generic (i.e., non-site specific) technologies for storage, transportation and disposal. Disposal R&D is directed toward understanding and demonstrating the performance of reference geologic disposal concepts selected to represent the current state-of-the-art in geologic disposal. One of the principal constraints on waste packaging and emplacement in a geologic repository is management of the waste-generated heat. This paper describes the selection of reference disposal concepts, and thermal management strategies for waste from advanced fuel cycles. A geologic disposal concept for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or high-level waste (HLW) consists of three components: waste inventory, geologic setting, and concept of operations. A set of reference geologic disposal concepts has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Used Fuel Disposition Campaign, for crystalline rock, clay/shale, bedded salt, and deep borehole (crystalline basement) geologic settings. We performed thermal analysis of these concepts using waste inventory cases representing a range of advanced fuel cycles. Concepts of operation consisting of emplacement mode, repository layout, and engineered barrier descriptions, were selected based on international progress and previous experience in the U.S. repository program. All of the disposal concepts selected for this study use enclosed emplacement modes, whereby waste packages are in direct contact with encapsulating engineered or natural materials. The encapsulating materials (typically clay-based or rock salt) have low intrinsic permeability and plastic rheology that closes voids so that low permeability is maintained. Uniformly low permeability also contributes to chemically reducing conditions common in soft clay, shale, and salt formations. Enclosed modes are associated

  6. Petrographic, biological, and chemical techniques used to characterize two tombs in the Protestant Cemetery of Rome (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Russa, M. F.; Ruffolo, S. A.; Malagodi, M.; Barca, D.; Cirrincione, R.; Pezzino, A.; Crisci, G. M.; Miriello, D.

    2010-09-01

    In this multidisciplinary contribution, several diagnostic tests were carried out in order to characterize the stone materials, forms of alteration, and protective products applied in the past to two monumental tombs located in the Protestant Cemetery of Rome (Italy). The Protestant Cemetery is a very important historic site, and has been included in the List of 100 Most Endangered Sites in the World since 2005. In this work, two of its tombs were studied: those of Karl (or Charles) Brjullov, a Russian painter who lived in the first half of the nineteenth century, and of Lady Elisa Temple, wife of the artist Sir Grenville Temple. The tombs are both made of white marble and travertine, and the same forms of alteration and degradation, such as blackish biological patinas, black crusts, and chromatic alterations, were found on both monuments. Petrographic analysis of the different lithotypes made it possible to determine textural characteristics, evaluate the state of preservation, and formulate some hypotheses about their provenance by means of oxygen and carbon isotopic ratios, and evaluation of maximum grain size (MGS) and shape preferred orientation (SPO) of calcite grains. Laboratory culture analysis identified autotrophic species and, in some cases, black patinas caused by fungal species were found. Lastly, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) revealed that some synthetic protective products had been used in previous, undocumented restoration processes on some portions of both graves.

  7. Petrographic and geochemical characterization of the granitic rocks of the Araguainha impact crater, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Dailto; Lana, Cristiano; Souza Filho, Carlos Roberto

    2016-03-01

    Petrographic and geochemical data obtained on the Araguainha impact crater (Goiás/Mato Grosso States, Brazil) indicate the existence of several molten products that originated during impact-induced congruent melting of an alkali-granite exposed in the inner part of the central uplift of the structure. Although previous studies have described these melts to some extent, there is no detailed discussion on the petrographic and geochemical variability in the granite and its impactogenic derivatives, and therefore, little is known about the geochemical behavior and mobility of trace elements during its fusion in the central part of the Araguainha crater. This paper demonstrates that the preserved granitoid exposed in the core of the structure is a magnesium-rich granite, similar to postcollisional, A-type granites, also found in terrains outside the Araguainha crater, in the Brasília orogenic belt. The molten products are texturally distinct and different from the original rock, but have very similar geochemical composition, making it difficult to separate these lithotypes based on concentrations of major and minor elements. This also applies for trace and rare earth elements (REE), thus indicating a high degree of homogenization during impact-induced congruent melting under high pressure and postshock temperature conditions. Petrographic observations, along with geochemical data, indicate that melting occurs selectively, where some of the elements are transported with the melt. Simultaneously, there is an effective dissolution of the rock (granite), which leads to entrainment of the most resistant solid phases (intact or partially molten minerals) into the melt. Minerals more resistant to melting, such as quartz and oxides, contribute substantially to a chemical balance between the preserved granite and the fusion products generated during the meteoritic impact.

  8. Petrographic evidence shows that pottery exchange between the Olmec and their neighbors was two-way

    PubMed Central

    Stoltman, James B.; Marcus, Joyce; Flannery, Kent V.; Burton, James H.; Moyle, Robert G.

    2005-01-01

    Petrographic thin sections of pottery from five Formative Mexican archaeological sites show that exchanges of vessels between highland and lowland chiefly centers were reciprocal, or two-way. These analyses contradict recent claims that the Gulf Coast was the sole source of pottery carved with iconographic motifs. Those claims were based on neutron activation, which, by relying on chemical elements rather than actual minerals, has important limitations in its ability to identify nonlocal pottery from within large data sets. Petrography shows that the ceramics in question (and hence their carved motifs) have multiple origins and were widely traded. PMID:16061796

  9. Determination of fluoride source in ground water using petrographic studies in Dashtestan area, south of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaleb-Looie, Sedigheh; Moore, Farid, ,, Dr.

    2010-05-01

    The groundwater occurs in Dashtestan area, contains a high level of fluoride. Since groundwater is vastly used for drinking and irrigation purposes, the local residents are at high risk of fluoride toxicity, as already evidenced by the occurrence of dental Fluorosis in many residents. 35 surface and groundwater samples were collected in September, 2009. The results show that in 23 samples the fluoride concentration is above the permissible level (1.5ppm). Petrographic study of lithological units in the catchment area indicates that mica minerals are the most probable source of fluoride content in the study area.

  10. Iodine-xenon studies of petrographically and chemically characterized Chainpur chondrules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, T. D.; Caffee, M. W.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Lindstrom, M. M.; Taylor, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    INAA, noble gas, and petrographic studies conducted on samples of 18 chondrules and matric material from the Chainpur (LL3) indicate that the I-129/I-127 ratio, R(0), varies by a factor of more than 10 among the chondrules. This corresponds to a greater-than-50 Ma span in apparent I-Xe ages. Models which invoke either gas-dust mixing or nebular heterogeneity cannot satisfactorily explain these data, any more than can hypotheses which attribute the variations to differences in formation age, metamorphic rate, or time of aqueous alteration. It is alternatively suggested that the variations represent periods of low-grade shock events.

  11. Iodine-xenon studies of petrographically and chemically characterized Chainpur chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swindle, T. D.; Caffee, M. W.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Lindstrom, M. M.; Taylor, G. J.

    1991-03-01

    INAA, noble gas, and petrographic studies conducted on samples of 18 chondrules and matric material from the Chainpur (LL3) indicate that the I-129/I-127 ratio, R(0), varies by a factor of more than 10 among the chondrules. This corresponds to a greater-than-50 Ma span in apparent I-Xe ages. Models which invoke either gas-dust mixing or nebular heterogeneity cannot satisfactorily explain these data, any more than can hypotheses which attribute the variations to differences in formation age, metamorphic rate, or time of aqueous alteration. It is alternatively suggested that the variations represent periods of low-grade shock events.

  12. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Quarterly progress report, September-November 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Hower, J.C.; Ferm, J.C.; Cobb, J.C.; Trinkle, E.J.; Frankie, K.A.; Poe, S.H.; Baynard, D.N.

    1981-01-01

    The project Petrographic Characterization of Kentucky Coals consists of research in three specific areas of coal petrology: spectral fluorescence of liptinite macerals, properties of semi-inert macerals, and size/form/microlithotype association of pyrite/marcasite. Additional research on the Mannington (No. 4, also known as Mining City and Lewisport) coal will apply techniques developed in the first three areas. Certain suits of coals from other states will also be studied to expand the variability in the samples. Preliminary results are reported.

  13. Engineering design and analysis of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-20

    This project is sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for the Engineering Design and Analysis of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technologies. The major goal is to provide the simulation tools for modeling both conventional and advanced coal cleaning technologies. This DOE project is part of a major research initiative by the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) aimed at advancing three advanced coal cleaning technologies-heavy-liquid cylconing, selective agglomeration, and advanced froth flotation through the proof-of-concept (POC) level.

  14. A radiometric and petrographic interpretation of discrepancies on uranium content in samples collected at Alte Madonie Mounts region (Sicily, Italy).

    PubMed

    Lanzo, G; Rizzo, S; Tomarchio, E

    2014-03-01

    The main goal of this work is to evaluate a correlation between anomalous Uranium (U) content and petrographic features of some soil and rock samples collected at Alte Madonie Mounts region (North-central Sicily, Italy). A total of 41 samples of selected soils and rocks were collected, powdered, dried and sealed in "Marinelli" beakers for 20 days before the measurement to ensure that radioactive equilibrium between (226)Ra and (214)Bi was reached. Gamma-ray spectrometric analysis was used to quantify radioactivity concentrations. Mineralogical and chemical features of the samples were determined by X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), X-ray Diffractometry (XRD), Attenuated Total Reflection-Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) and Scanning Electron Microscope - Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (SEM-EDS) analyses. The average values of concentrations of (226)Ra, (228)Ac and (40)K were respectively 30, 17 and 227 Bq kg(-1) while the greatest values were 134, 59 and 748 Bq kg(-1). Linear relationships were observed between (226)Ra, (228)Ac and (40)K concentrations: the activities of (226)Ra and (228)Ac were comparable, while those of (40)K were about 10 times greater. An exception was highlighted for a group of samples where (226)Ra activities were much higher than expectations. Chemical compositions and mineralogical features of the samples have made it possible to justify these anomalies. PMID:24389108

  15. Petrographic characteristics of the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed (Paleocene), Powder River Basin, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warwick, P.D.; Stanton, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Six lithofacies of the thick ( > 30 m) Wyodak-Anderson subbituminous coal bed of the Fort Union Formation (Paleocene), Powder River Basin, Wyoming, can be delimited using megascopic and petrographic data. Previous lithofacies analysis of the rock types associated with the Wyodak-Anderson bed suggested that raised peat accumulated in restricted parts of an inland flood plain. The peat bodies were separated by deposits of contemporaneous, possibly anastomosed channels. In this study, megascopic descriptions from four mine highwalls of the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed were found to be similar to facies defined by microscopic data from core and highwall samples. The data indicate that the upper and lower parts of the coal bed are rich in preserved wood remains (for instance, humotelinite), whereas the middle part of the bed contains comparatively larger amounts of material that resulted from degradation and comminution of the peat (e.g. eugelinite). The facies are interpreted to be the result of different chemical and biological environments at the time of peat formation. ?? 1988.

  16. Spectroscopic, microchemical and petrographic analyses of plasters from ancient buildings in Lamezia Terme (Calabria, Southern Italy).

    PubMed

    De Luca, Raffaella; Gigliotti, Valentina; Panarello, Mario; Bloise, Andrea; Crisci, Gino M; Miriello, Domenico

    2016-01-15

    This work shows the results of the spectroscopic, microchemical and petrographic study carried out on six plasters coming from three important residential buildings of the 18th century, located in Lamezia Terme (Catanzaro, Southern Italy). To study the provenance of the raw materials used to make the plasters, one sample of limestone and two samples of sand were also collected from the quarries near Lamezia Terme and compared with the historical plasters. Samples were studied by polarized optical microscopy (OM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and Raman spectroscopy. The results of these analyses allowed to determine the mineralogical, petrographical and chemical characteristics of the plasters, identify the pigments used for their coloration and provide useful information about the building techniques, the raw materials employed and the production technology of plasters during the 18th century in Lamezia Terme. SEM-EDS microanalysis also revealed the presence of gold and silver on the surface of two samples. PMID:26311479

  17. Petrographically deduced triassic climate for the Deep River Basin, eastern piedmont of North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    McCarn, S.T.; Mansfield, C.F.

    1985-01-01

    A petrographic comparison of Triassic, fluvial sandstones from the Deep River Basin in the eastern piedmont of North Carolina with nearby Holocene stream sands (1) indicates that he Triassic climate was more arid than today's and (2) distinguishes an eastern, more plutonic terrane from a western, more metamorphic source terrane. The paleoclimatic interpretation is based on differences in framework composition between modern and ancient sands of the same grain size, derived from the same rock type, transported similar distances and deposited in similar settings. The Triassic sandstones contain more lithic-fragments but less quartz than otherwise equivalent, modern sand in the Deep River Basin. Feldspar content is more complex, controlled by both source-rock composition and climate. Sand from the more plutonic terrane contains more feldspar and plutonic lithic-fragments than sand from the more metamorphic terrane, which contains more quartz and metamorphic lithic-fragments. This petrographic interpretation of the Triassic sandstones along with the presence of coal, limestone, chert and caliche in the middle of the section suggests that the Triassic climate was cyclic, changing from arid to humid and back to arid. Plate-tectonic reconstructions place the Deep River Basin between the Triassic equator and Tropic of cancer, where the easterly trade winds would predominate. Therefore, the arid portions of the cycle could have been due to a periodic, orographic, rain shadow formed as the result of intermittent movement along the Jonesboro Fault, creating a highland area east of the Deep River Basin.

  18. Spectroscopic, microchemical and petrographic analyses of plasters from ancient buildings in Lamezia Terme (Calabria, Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, Raffaella; Gigliotti, Valentina; Panarello, Mario; Bloise, Andrea; Crisci, Gino M.; Miriello, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    This work shows the results of the spectroscopic, microchemical and petrographic study carried out on six plasters coming from three important residential buildings of the 18th century, located in Lamezia Terme (Catanzaro, Southern Italy). To study the provenance of the raw materials used to make the plasters, one sample of limestone and two samples of sand were also collected from the quarries near Lamezia Terme and compared with the historical plasters. Samples were studied by polarized optical microscopy (OM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and Raman spectroscopy. The results of these analyses allowed to determine the mineralogical, petrographical and chemical characteristics of the plasters, identify the pigments used for their coloration and provide useful information about the building techniques, the raw materials employed and the production technology of plasters during the 18th century in Lamezia Terme. SEM-EDS microanalysis also revealed the presence of gold and silver on the surface of two samples.

  19. Quality and petrographic characteristics of Paleocene coals from the Hanna basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierce, B.S.

    1996-01-01

    Coal beds from the Ferris and Hanna Formations, in the Hanna basin, south-central Wyoming, exhibit distinct differences in ash yield, sulfur content, and petrographic and palynologic constituents. These differences are interpreted to be controlled by tectonic changes of the Hanna basin and adjoining uplifts during evolutionary development, which, in turn, controlled mire chemistry and sedimentation. These conditions created two very different settings under which the peats developed during deposition of the Ferris and the Hanna Formations. In addition, there appears to be a geographic (latitudinal) and/or climatic control on the coal characteristics manifested by major differences of Paleocene coals in the Hanna basin compared to those in the Raton basin in Colorado and New Mexico and the Powder River basin in Wyoming.Coal beds from the Ferris and Hanna Formations, in the Hanna basin, south-central Wyoming, exhibit distinct differences in ash yield, sulfur content, and petrographic and palynologic constituents. These differences are interpreted to be controlled by tectonic changes of the Hanna basin and adjoining uplifts during evolutionary development, which, in turn, controlled mire chemistry and sedimentation. These conditions created two very different settings under which the peats developed during deposition of the Ferris and the Hanna Formations. In addition, there appears to be a geographic (latitudinal) and/or climatic control on the coal characteristics manifested by major differences of Paleocene coals in the Hanna basin compared to those in the Raton basin in Colorado and New Mexico and the Powder River basin in Wyoming.

  20. Petrographic and Geochemical Analyses of Mafic Enclaves from Uturuncu Volcano, SW Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoux, G.; Michelfelder, G.; Feeley, T.

    2011-12-01

    Magma mixing is an essential concept in igneous petrology used to classify volcanic systems. Evidence of magma mixing includes magmatic enclaves, which are inclusions emplaced within a host magma of related but distinct composition and of separated genesis. Enclaves are pertinent to our understanding of volcanic systems, as they provide information about the internal processes involved within the magma chamber. The origin of these features is uncertain and a variety of hypotheses exist, including: incorporation of solid wall rock, xenoliths, restite retained from deep crustal melting zones, and cumulate fragments derived from the partially crystalline rinds of upper crustal magma reservoirs. We characterized mafic enclaves within lava flows from Uturuncu Volcano in Southwest Bolivia to determine heterogeneity and evolution of the system and the origin of the enclaves. Methods used were X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and petrographic analyses of thin sections. These analyses were conducted on fifteen samples collected from a variety of lava flows. We present here petrographic and geochemical heterogeneity within mafic enclaves from a single flow and other flows that span the lifespan of Uturuncu volcano. We propose the enclaves originated as undercooled blobs from a deeper crustal reservoir that were not completely mixed with the host melt.

  1. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Final report. Part IV. A petrographic and chemical model for the evolution of the Tradewater Formation coals in Western Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Graese, A.M.; Hower, J.C.; Ferm, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    A depositional model for the coals of the Tradewater Formation and associated rock units was constructed as a predictive device for the occurrence of economically important low sulfur coal. Twenty-one cores were examined and ninety-eight coal samples were analyzed for maceral, ash, and sulfur contents. These data were then analyzed to determine regional variation as well as vertical variation in single coal columns. Core data indicate that the majority of the Tradewater rocks consist of irregularly distributed, coarsening-upward, fine-grained detrital material which was deposited in shallow bodies of water. Minor fossiliferous shales and limestones suggest a marine influence. Less common coarse-grained, fining-upward sequences appear to be deposits of meandering channels. Like the detrital rocks, the coal seams are also irregularly distributed and exhibit variable petrographic and chemical properties reflecting changes in the Eh and pH of the coal swamp waters as well as detrital influx into the swamps. These swamps were relatively limited in extent and probably occupied the upper reaches of the tidal zone. The lack of significant stratigraphic and geographic trends in the regional data suggests that this mode of deposition was widespread and continued for a long period of time. 42 references, 19 figures, 9 tables.

  2. Advanced Satellite Research Project: SCAR Research Database. Bibliographic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelton, Joseph N.

    1991-01-01

    The literature search was provided to locate and analyze the most recent literature that was relevant to the research. This was done by cross-relating books, articles, monographs, and journals that relate to the following topics: (1) Experimental Systems - Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS), and (2) Integrated System Digital Network (ISDN) and Advance Communication Techniques (ISDN and satellites, ISDN standards, broadband ISDN, flame relay and switching, computer networks and satellites, satellite orbits and technology, satellite transmission quality, and network configuration). Bibliographic essay on literature citations and articles reviewed during the literature search task is provided.

  3. Nonlinear displacement analysis of advanced propeller structures using NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, C.; Kielb, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    The steady state displacements of a rotating advanced turboprop are computed using the geometrically nonlinear capabilities of COSMIC NASTRAN Rigid Format 4 and MSC NASTRAN Solution 64. A description of the modified Newton-Raphson algorithm used by Solution 64 and the iterative scheme used by Rigid Format 4 is provided. A representative advanced turboprop, SR3, was used for the study. Displacements for SR3 are computed for rotational speeds up to 10,000 rpm. The results show Solution 64 to be superior for computating displacements of flexible rotating structures. This is attributed to its ability to update the displacement dependent centrifugal force during the solution process.

  4. Observations Regarding Use of Advanced CFD Analysis, Sensitivity Analysis, and Design Codes in MDO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Perry A.; Hou, Gene J. W.; Taylor, Arthur C., III

    1996-01-01

    Observations regarding the use of advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis, sensitivity analysis (SA), and design codes in gradient-based multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) reflect our perception of the interactions required of CFD and our experience in recent aerodynamic design optimization studies using CFD. Sample results from these latter studies are summarized for conventional optimization (analysis - SA codes) and simultaneous analysis and design optimization (design code) using both Euler and Navier-Stokes flow approximations. The amount of computational resources required for aerodynamic design using CFD via analysis - SA codes is greater than that required for design codes. Thus, an MDO formulation that utilizes the more efficient design codes where possible is desired. However, in the aerovehicle MDO problem, the various disciplines that are involved have different design points in the flight envelope; therefore, CFD analysis - SA codes are required at the aerodynamic 'off design' points. The suggested MDO formulation is a hybrid multilevel optimization procedure that consists of both multipoint CFD analysis - SA codes and multipoint CFD design codes that perform suboptimizations.

  5. A Simultaneous Analysis Problem for Advanced General Chemistry Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leary, J. J.; Gallaher, T. N.

    1983-01-01

    Oxidation of magnesium metal in air has been used as an introductory experiment for determining the formula of a compound. The experiment described employs essentially the same laboratory procedure but is significantly more advanced in terms of information sought. Procedures and sample calculations/results are provided. (JN)

  6. Design, analysis and test verification of advanced encapsulation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, A., III

    1983-01-01

    The analytical methodology for advanced encapsulation designs for the development of photovoltaic modules is presented. Analytical models are developed to test optical, thermal, electrical and structural properties of the various encapsulation systems. Model data is compared to relevant test data to improve model accuracy and develop general principles for the design of photovoltaic modules.

  7. Integrating Advanced High School Chemistry Research with Organic Chemistry and Instrumental Methods of Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Brian J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses the unique chemistry course opportunities beyond the advanced placement-level available at a science and technology magnet high school. Students may select entry-level courses such as honors and advanced placement chemistry; they may also take electives in organic chemistry with instrumental methods of analysis;…

  8. Genome Reshuffling for Advanced Intercross Permutation (GRAIP): Simulation and permutation for advanced intercross population analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Jeremy; Broman, Karl; Lu, Lu; Chesler, Elissa J; Zhou, Guomin; Airey, David; Birmingham, Amanda; Williams, Robert

    2008-04-01

    Background: Advanced intercross lines (AIL) are segregating populations created using a multi-generation breeding protocol for fine mapping complex trait loci (QTL) in mice and other organisms. Applying QTL mapping methods for intercross and backcross populations, often followed by na ve permutation of individuals and phenotypes, does not account for the effect of AIL family structure in which final generations have been expanded and leads to inappropriately low significance thresholds. The critical problem with na ve mapping approaches in AIL populations is that the individual is not an exchangeable unit. Methodology/Principal Findings: The effect of family structure has immediate implications for the optimal AIL creation (many crosses, few animals per cross, and population expansion before the final generation) and we discuss these and the utility of AIL populations for QTL fine mapping. We also describe Genome Reshuffling for Advanced Intercross Permutation, (GRAIP) a method for analyzing AIL data that accounts for family structure. GRAIP permutes a more interchangeable unit in the final generation crosses - the parental genome - and simulating regeneration of a permuted AIL population based on exchanged parental identities. GRAIP determines appropriate genome-wide significance thresholds and locus-specific Pvalues for AILs and other populations with similar family structures. We contrast GRAIP with na ve permutation using a large densely genotyped mouse AIL population (1333 individuals from 32 crosses). A na ve permutation using coat color as a model phenotype demonstrates high false-positive locus identification and uncertain significance levels, which are corrected using GRAIP. GRAIP also detects an established hippocampus weight locus and a new locus, Hipp9a. Conclusions and Significance: GRAIP determines appropriate genome-wide significance thresholds and locus-specific Pvalues for AILs and other populations with similar family structures. The effect of

  9. [Advances in energy analysis of agro-ecosystems].

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongfang; Lan, Shengfang; Chen, Feipeng; Peng, Shaolin

    2004-01-01

    The energy analysis of agro-ecosystems from the view point of energy flow is a quantitative study on the function of agro-ecosystem, and is one of the most important aspects in agro-ecosystem study. In this paper, the history and some current progresses of energy analysis on agro-ecosystems were reviewed briefly, and the difference and breakthrough of emergy analysis theory with the traditional energy analysis method, some current challenges in front of emergy analysis of agro-ecosystems, and some of the new trends were discussed. Using the direct and indirect cost of solar energy to evaluate any energy or material, emergy analysis is the new development of energy analysis, not only in concept but also on calculation method. Developing to emergy analysis phase, there were still some deficiencies on energy analysis of agro-ecosystem, such as the complicate calculation of transformation and the vacancy of energy index for sustainable development, etc. How to solve these problems combined with the clearing of the maximum Em-power principle, the combination among energy analysis, emergy analysis, material analysis and landscape analysis has made up of the current and future trends of energy analysis of agro-ecosystem. PMID:15139211

  10. An advanced structural analysis/synthesis capability - ACCESS 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmit, L. A.; Miura, H.

    1976-01-01

    An advanced automated design procedure for minimum-weight design of structures (ACCESS 2) is reported. Design variable linking, constraint deletion, and explicit constraint approximation are used to combine effectively finite-element and nonlinear mathematical programming techniques. The approximation-concepts approach to structural synthesis is extended to problems involving fiber composite structure, thermal effects, and natural frequency constraints in addition to the usual static stress and displacement limitations. Sample results illustrating these features are given.

  11. An advanced structural analysis/synthesis capability - ACCESS 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmit, L. A.; Miura, H.

    1978-01-01

    An advanced automated design procedure for minimum weight design of structures (ACCESS 2) is reported. Design variable linking, constraint deletion, and explicit constraint approximation are used to effectively combine finite element and nonlinear mathematical programming techniques. The approximation concepts approach to structural synthesis is extended to problems involving fiber composite structure, thermal effects and natural frequency constraints in addition to the usual static stress and displacement limitations. Sample results illustrating these new features are given.

  12. Systematic analysis of advanced fusion fuel in inertial fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velarde, G.; Eliezer, S.; Henis, Z.; Piera, M.; Martinez-Val, J. M.

    1997-04-01

    Aneutronic fusion reactions can be considered as the cleanest way to exploit nuclear energy. However, these reactions present in general two main drawbacks.—very high temperatures are needed to reach relevant values of their cross sections—Moderate (and even low) energy yield per reaction. This value is still lower if measured in relation to the Z number of the reacting particles. It is already known that bremsstrahlung overruns the plasma reheating by fusion born charged-particles in most of the advanced fuels. This is for instance the case for proton-boron-11 fusion in a stoichiometric plasma and is also so in lithium isotopes fusion reactions. In this paper, the use of deuterium-tritium seeding is suggested to allow to reach higher burnup fractions of advanced fuels, starting at a lower ignition temperature. Of course, neutron production increases as DT contents does. Nevertheless, the ratio of neutron production to energy generation is much lower in DT-advanced fuel mixtures than in pure DT plasmas. One of the main findings of this work is that some natural resources (as D and Li-7) can be burned-up in a catalytic regime for tritium. In this case, neither external tritium breeding nor tritium storage are needed, because the tritium inventory after the fusion burst is the same as before it. The fusion reactor can thus operate on a pure recycling of a small tritium inventory.

  13. Structural weights analysis of advanced aerospace vehicles using finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Lance B.; Lentz, Christopher A.; Rehder, John J.; Naftel, J. Chris; Cerro, Jeffrey A.

    1989-01-01

    A conceptual/preliminary level structural design system has been developed for structural integrity analysis and weight estimation of advanced space transportation vehicles. The system includes a three-dimensional interactive geometry modeler, a finite element pre- and post-processor, a finite element analyzer, and a structural sizing program. Inputs to the system include the geometry, surface temperature, material constants, construction methods, and aerodynamic and inertial loads. The results are a sized vehicle structure capable of withstanding the static loads incurred during assembly, transportation, operations, and missions, and a corresponding structural weight. An analysis of the Space Shuttle external tank is included in this paper as a validation and benchmark case of the system.

  14. Advanced space system analysis software. Technical, user, and programmer guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, C. E.; Zimbelman, H. F.

    1981-01-01

    The LASS computer program provides a tool for interactive preliminary and conceptual design of LSS. Eight program modules were developed, including four automated model geometry generators, an associated mass properties module, an appendage synthesizer module, an rf analysis module, and an orbital transfer analysis module. The existing rigid body controls analysis module was modified to permit analysis of effects of solar pressure on orbital performance. A description of each module, user instructions, and programmer information are included.

  15. Correlations between petrographical properties, chemical structure and technological behaviour of Rhenish brown coal

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfrum, E.A.

    1983-08-01

    For the purpose of an assessment with a view to refining, the petrographical, chemical and physical properties of lithotypes of Rhenish brown coal were established and compared with one another. The investigated coal types cover more than 90% of the coal types proved in the Rhenish deposit. A correlation of the results shows a describable, sometimes multidimensional dependency. A comparison of raw material properties and the results of the technical experiments quickly reveals the limits set to such an approach. Out of all the refining processes subjected to investigation briquetting places the highest requirements on the raw material properties. The major part of the established parameters leads only to qualitative indications of the briquetting properties of the coals. Parameters of greater significance can hardly be utilized in practice. What remains in the experience gained by coal technologists, is the determination of the classical coal properties and indications from laboratory briquetting.

  16. Bi-cycles petrographic association in middle part of East Pana PGE layers deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asavin, Alex; Veksler, Ilya; Gorbunov, Artem

    2016-04-01

    The PGE mineralization in the East Pana layered gabbroic intrusion forms three discrete layers at different stratigraphic levels, which are traditionally labeled as zones A, B and C. In order to investigate possible relationships of mineralization with magmatic layering we sampled a 120 m long drill core section across zone B in the middle part of the intrusion and carried out detailed petrographic, mineralogical and geochemical studies of the samples. The ore zone is located in medial part of the of East's Pana deposite. The samples represent mainly from a layered sequence of gabbro and gabbro-norite. This zone is composed of interlayers of gabbroic sequences and gabbro-norite of various color, with different structures and different relationship of rock-forming minerals of Ol-Opx-Cpx-Pl. We studied one of key's drill-hole section of ore zone, in which is located two ore horizons. Fundamental feature layered intrusions are presence in cross-section cycles includes of stable petrographic association. In section of ore zone it is possible to select two most contrast petrographic types. Whole-rock analyses and petrographic observations reveal two units of modal layering comprising, from bottom to top, melanocratic gabbro grading upwards into mesocratic gabbro and gabbro-norite overlain by pegmatoidal, gabbroic rock with has sharp footwall and hanging wall contacts.There is also an olivine-bearing gabbro at the bottom of the lower unit. The ore horizons are located in same gabbro-norite type rock. The ore horizons are located in same gabbro-norite type part. The second upper ore zone located in more differential species types. There is the common trend of system evolution of well distinguished on triangle of Ol-Pl-Di, Ol-Pl-Q and other. However composition of the rocks in the two parts of our section show us similar, but independent trends. For example on diagram differentiation of rocks composition, with normative content of anorthite on the X axis, trends of

  17. The Apollo 16 regolith - A petrographically-constrained chemical mixing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempa, M. J.; Papike, J. J.; White, C.

    1980-01-01

    A mixing model for Apollo 16 regolith samples has been developed, which differs from other A-16 mixing models in that it is both petrographically constrained and statistically sound. The model was developed using three components representative of rock types present at the A-16 site, plus a representative mare basalt. A linear least-squares fitting program employing the chi-squared test and sum of components was used to determine goodness of fit. Results for surface soils indicate that either there are no significant differences between Cayley and Descartes material at the A-16 site or, if differences do exist, they have been obscured by meteoritic reworking and mixing of the lithologies.

  18. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Quarterly progress report, December 1982 to February 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Hower, J.C.; Ferm, J.C.; Cobb, J.C.; Trinkle, E.J.; Frankie, K.A.; Poe, S.H.; Baynard, D.N.; Graese, A.M.; Raione, R.P.

    1983-01-01

    The project Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals consists of three specific areas of coal petrology: spectral fluorescence of liptinite macerals, properties of semi-inert macerals, and size/form/microlithotype association of pyrite/marcasite. Additional research on the Mannington and Dunbar coals in western Kentucky and the Alma coal zone in eastern Kentucky will apply techniques developed in the first three areas. Suites of coals from other states will also be studied to expand the variability in the sample set. Due to the discrete nature of the projects, the final reports will be submitted in several parts. The first report on spectral fluorescence is in development and should be submitted prior to the end of the project. The other reports will be submitted shortly after the end of the project.

  19. Compositional-petrographic investigation of pristine nonmare rocks. [unmixed survivors of lunar meteoritic bombardment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, P. H.; Wasson, J. T.

    1978-01-01

    Twenty-six highlands rocks and clasts are characterized petrographically and by determinations of major and trace elements, including key incompatibles and siderophiles. Most samples were selected in the hope that they would prove to be pristine, i.e., unremelted, monomict products of endogenous lunar magmatism. About 3/5 are almost certainly pristine, while about 1/4 are definitely non-pristine, and the remainder await further study before pristinity may be either proven or disproven. All of the major conclusions of Warren and Wasson (1977) about the significance of pristine nonmare rocks and the nature of the lunar crust still appear correct. Probably none, or virtually none, of the samples possessing the attributes by which 'pristinity' is judged formed as 'secondary differentiates' in giant impact melt pools, as Delano and Ringwood (1978) propose. Those which possess markedly plutonic textures (e.g., 62236) almost certainly did not.

  20. The Third Air Force/NASA Symposium on Recent Advances in Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The third Air Force/NASA Symposium on Recent Advances in Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization was held on 24-26 Sept. 1990. Sessions were on the following topics: dynamics and controls; multilevel optimization; sensitivity analysis; aerodynamic design software systems; optimization theory; analysis and design; shape optimization; vehicle components; structural optimization; aeroelasticity; artificial intelligence; multidisciplinary optimization; and composites.

  1. Genome Reshuffling for Advanced Intercross Permutation (GRAIP): Simulation and permutation for advanced intercross population analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Jeremy; Broman, Karl; Chesler, Elissa J; Zhou, Guomin; Airey, David; Birmingham, Amanda; Williams, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Advanced intercross lines (AIL) are segregating populations created using a multigeneration breeding protocol for fine mapping complex traits in mice and other organisms. Applying quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping methods for intercross and backcross populations, often followed by na ve permutation of individuals and phenotypes, does not account for the effect of family structure in AIL populations in which final generations have been expanded and leads to inappropriately low significance thresholds. The critical problem with a na ve mapping approach in such AIL populations is that the individual is not an exchangeable unit given the family structure. Methodology/Principal Findings The effect of family structure has immediate implications for the optimal AIL creation (many crosses, few animals per cross, and population expansion before the final generation) and we discuss these and the utility of AIL populations for QTL fine mapping. We also describe Genome Reshuffling for Advanced Intercross Permutation, (GRAIP) a method for analyzing AIL data that accounts for family structure. RAIP permutes a more interchangeable unit in the final generation crosses - the parental genome - and simulating regeneration of a permuted AIL population based on exchanged parental identities. GRAIP determines appropriate genome- ide significance thresholds and locus-specific P-values for AILs and other populations with similar family structures. We contrast GRAIP with na ve permutation using a large densely genotyped mouse AIL population (1333 individuals from 32 crosses). A na ve permutation using coat color as a model phenotype demonstrates high false-positive locus identification and uncertain significance levels in our AIL population, which are corrected by use of GRAIP. We also show that GRAIP detects an established hippocampus weight locus and a new locus, Hipp9a. Conclusions and Significance GRAIP determines appropriate genome-wide significance thresholds

  2. Analysis of an advanced ducted propeller subsonic inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iek, Chanthy; Boldman, Donald R.; Ibrahim, Mounir

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that a time marching Navier-Stokes code called PARC can be utilized to provide a reasonable prediction of the flow field within an inlet for an advanced ducted propeller. The code validation was implemented for a nonseparated flow condition associated with the inlet functioning at angles-of-attack of zero and 25 deg. Comparison of the computational results with the test data shows that the PARC code with the propeller face fixed flow properties boundary conditions (BC) provided a better prediction of the inlet surface static pressures than the prediction when the mass flow BC was employed.

  3. Finite element analysis of advanced neutron source fuel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Luttrell, C.R.

    1995-08-01

    The proposed design for the Advanced Neutron Source reactor core consists of closely spaced involute fuel plates. Coolant flows between the plates at high velocities. It is vital that adjacent plates do not come in contact and that the coolant channels between the plates remain open. Several scenarios that could result in problems with the fuel plates are studied. Finite element analyses are performed on fuel plates under pressure from the coolant flowing between the plates at a high velocity, under pressure because of a partial flow blockage in one of the channels, and with different temperature profiles.

  4. Analysis of advanced solar hybrid desiccant cooling systems for buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Schlepp, D.; Schultz, K.

    1984-10-01

    This report describes an assessment of the energy savings possible from developing hybrid desiccant/vapor-compression air conditioning systems. Recent advances in dehumidifier design for solar desiccant cooling systems have resulted in a dehumidifier with a low pressure drop and high efficiency in heat and mass transfer. A recent study on hybrid desiccant/vapor compression systems showed a 30%-80% savings in resource energy when compared with the best conventional systems with vapor compression. A system consisting of a dehumidifier with vapor compression subsystems in series was found to be the simplest and best overall performer.

  5. Design and analysis of advanced flight planning concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, John A.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of this continuing effort are to develop and evaluate new algorithms and advanced concepts for flight management and flight planning. This includes the minimization of fuel or direct operating costs, the integration of the airborne flight management and ground-based flight planning processes, and the enhancement of future traffic management systems design. Flight management (FMS) concepts are for on-board profile computation and steering of transport aircraft in the vertical plane between a city pair and along a given horizontal path. Flight planning (FPS) concepts are for the pre-flight ground based computation of the three-dimensional reference trajectory that connects the city pair and specifies the horizontal path, fuel load, and weather profiles for initializing the FMS. As part of these objectives, a new computer program called EFPLAN has been developed and utilized to study advanced flight planning concepts. EFPLAN represents an experimental version of an FPS. It has been developed to generate reference flight plans compatible as input to an FMS and to provide various options for flight planning research. This report describes EFPLAN and the associated research conducted in its development.

  6. The Effect of Petrographic Characteristics on Engineering Properties of Conglomerates from Famenin Region, Northeast of Hamedan, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanlari, G. R.; Heidari, M.; Noori, M.; Momeni, A.

    2016-07-01

    To assess relationship between engineering characteristics and petrographic features, conglomerates samples related to Qom formation from Famenin region in northeast of Hamedan province were studied. Samples were tested in laboratory to determine the uniaxial compressive strength, point load strength index, modulus of elasticity, porosity, dry and saturation densities. For determining petrographic features, textural and mineralogical parameters, thin sections of the samples were prepared and studied. The results show that the effect of textural characteristics on the engineering properties of conglomerates supposed to be more important than mineralogical composition. It also was concluded that the packing proximity, packing density, grain shape and mean grain size, cement and matrix frequency are as textural features that have a significant effect on the physical and mechanical properties of the studied conglomerates. In this study, predictive statistical relationships were developed to estimate the physical and mechanical properties of the rocks based on the results of petrographic features. Furthermore, multivariate linear regression was used in four different steps comprising various combinations of petrographical characteristics for each engineering parameters. Finally, the best equations with specific arrangement were suggested to estimate engineering properties of the Qom formation conglomerates.

  7. Recent advances in (soil moisture) triple collocation analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To date, triple collocation (TC) analysis is one of the most important methods for the global scale evaluation of remotely sensed soil moisture data sets. In this study we review existing implementations of soil moisture TC analysis as well as investigations of the assumptions underlying the method....

  8. Classroom Communication and Instructional Processes: Advances through Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gayle, Barbara Mae, Ed.; Preiss, Raymond W., Ed.; Burrell, Nancy, Ed.; Allen, Mike, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    This volume offers a systematic review of the literature on communication education and instruction. Making meta-analysis findings accessible and relevant, the editors of this volume approach the topic from the perspective that meta-analysis serves as a useful tool for summarizing experiments and for determining how and why specific teaching and…

  9. Compositional and petrographic similarities of CV and CK chondrites: A single group with variations in textures and volatile concentrations attributable to impact heating, crushing and oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, John T.; Isa, Junko; Rubin, Alan E.

    2013-05-01

    Greenwood et al. (2010) gathered data on O-isotopic and elemental compositions and reevaluated literature data for CV and CK chondrites. They concluded that these two chondrite groups originated on the same parent asteroid, with CK chondrites being metamorphosed CV chondrites (which are otherwise missing types 4 through 6). To test this interpretation we have gathered new instrumental neutron-activation-analysis (INAA) data for CV and CK chondrites and reexamined their petrographic features. The new INAA data like the older data show scatter attributable to weathering effects, but we conclude that the refractory lithophile abundances are the same in CV and CK, in agreement with the Greenwood et al. interpretation. Several volatile elements are significantly lower in CK than in CV chondrites. Among the elements we determine, the greatest difference between CV and CK is found for Br, for which the CV/CK ratio is ∼4; As and Sb are about 20% lower in CK than CV and smaller differences are observed for Zn, Ga and Se. It seems likely that volatiles were lost during impact-heating events that also provided the heat responsible for metamorphic recrystallization. Within statistical uncertainty, chondrules in CV and CK chondrites are the same size and have similar textural distributions. A significant petrographic difference between CK and CV chondrites cited by Kallemeyn et al. (1991) was the much higher percentage of igneous rims around CV chondrules. However, we now recognize that many chondrules in CK3.8 NWA 1559 have igneous rims and in CK4 chondrites, igneous rims are recognizable by their associated sulfide-rich rings; there are no quantifiable CV-CK differences in igneous-rim abundances. We used Ca and Al maps to show that CK chondrites have CAI abundances similar to those of CV chondrites. It thus appears that there are no resolvable pre-metamorphic petrographic differences between CV and CK chondrites. We recommend that the “CK” designation be abandoned and

  10. Correlated petrographic, electron microprobe, and ion microprobe studies of selected primitive and processed phase assemblages in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albee, Arden L.

    1993-01-01

    During the past three years we have received support to continue our research in elucidating the formation and alteration histories of selected meteoritic materials by a combination of petrographic, trace element, and isotopic analyses employing optical and scanning electron microscopes and electron and ion microprobes. The awarded research funds enabled the P.I. to attend the annual LPSC, the co-I to devote approximately 15 percent of his time to the research proposed in the grant, and partial support for a visiting summer post-doctoral fellow to conduct electron microprobe analyses of meteoritic samples in our laboratory. The research funds, along with support from the NASA Education Initiative awarded to P.I. G. Wasserburg, enabled the co-I to continue a mentoring program with inner-city minority youth. The support enabled us to achieve significant results in the five projects that we proposed (in addition to the Education Initiative), namely: studies of the accretional and post-accretional alteration and thermal histories in CV meteorites, characterization of periclase-bearing Fremdlinge in CV meteorites, characterization of Ni-Pt-Ge-Te-rich Fremdlinge in CV meteorites in an attempt to determine the constraints they place on the petrogenetic and thermal histories of their host CAI's, correlated electron and ion microprobe studies of silicate and phosphate inclusions in the Colomera meteorite in an attempt to determine the petrogenesis of the IE iron meteorites, and development of improved instrumental and correction procedures for improved accuracy of analysis of meteoritic materials with the electron microprobe. This grant supported, in part or whole, 18 publications so far by our research team, with at least three more papers anticipated. The list of these publications is included. The details of the research results are briefly summarized.

  11. Subwavelength alignment mark signal analysis of advanced memory products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiaoming; Wong, Alfred K. K.; Wheeler, Donald C.; Williams, Gary; Lehner, Eric A.; Zach, Franz X.; Kim, Byeong Y.; Fukuzaki, Yuzo; Lu, Zhijian G.; Credendino, Santo; Wiltshire, Timothy J.

    2000-06-01

    The impact of alignment mark structure, mark geometry, and stepper alignment optical system on mark signal contrast was investigated using computer simulation. Several sub-wavelength poly silicon recessed film stack alignment targets of advanced memory products were studied. Stimulated alignment mark signals for both dark-field and bright-field systems using the rigorous electromagnetic simulation program TEMPEST showed excellent agreement with experimental data. For a dark-field alignment system, the critical parameters affecting signal contrast were found to be mark size and mark recess depth below silicon surface. On the other hand, film stack thickness and mark recess depth below/above silicon surface are the important parameters for a bright-field alignment system. From observed simulation results optimal process parameters are determined. Based on the simulation results some signal enhancement techniques will be discussed.

  12. Experimental and CFD Analysis of Advanced Convective Cooling Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, Yassin A; Ugaz, Victor M

    2012-06-27

    The objective of this project is to study the fundamental physical phenomena in the reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) of very high-temperature reactors (VHTRs). One of the primary design objectives is to assure that RCCS acts as an ultimate heat sink capable of maintaining thermal integrity of the fuel, vessel, and equipment within the reactor cavity for the entire spectrum of postulated accident scenarios. Since construction of full-scale experimental test facilities to study these phenomena is impractical, it is logical to expect that computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations will play a key role in the RCCS design process. An important question then arises: To what extent are conventional CFD codes able to accurately capture the most important flow phenomena, and how can they be modified to improve their quantitative predictions? Researchers are working to tackle this problem in two ways. First, in the experimental phase, the research team plans to design and construct an innovative platform that will provide a standard test setting for validating CFD codes proposed for the RCCS design. This capability will significantly advance the state of knowledge in both liquid-cooled and gas-cooled (e.g., sodium fast reactor) reactor technology. This work will also extend flow measurements to micro-scale levels not obtainable in large-scale test facilities, thereby revealing previously undetectable phenomena that will complement the existing infrastructure. Second, in the computational phase of this work, numerical simulation of the flow and temperature profiles will be performed using advanced turbulence models to simulate the complex conditions of flows in critical zones of the cavity. These models will be validated and verified so that they can be implemented into commercially available CFD codes. Ultimately, the results of these validation studies can then be used to enable a more accurate design and safety evaluation of systems in actual nuclear power

  13. Advancing school-based interventions through economic analysis.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Tina M; Ferrer-Wreder, Laura; Eninger, Lilianne

    2014-01-01

    Commentators interested in school-based prevention programs point to the importance of economic issues for the future of prevention efforts. Many of the processes and aims of prevention science are dependent upon prevention resources. Although economic analysis is an essential tool for assessing resource use, the attention given economic analysis within school-based prevention remains cursory. Largely, economic analyses of school-based prevention efforts are undertaken as secondary research. This limits these efforts to data that have been collected previously as part of epidemiological and outcomes research. Therefore, economic analyses suffer from gaps in the knowledge generated by these studies. This chapter addresses the importance of economic analysis for the future of school-based substance abuse prevention programs and highlights the role of prevention research in the development of knowledge that can be used for economic analysis. PMID:24753283

  14. Advanced concepts for gamma ray isotopic analysis and instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, W. M.; Carlson, J. B.

    1994-07-01

    The Safeguards Technology Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is developing actinide isotopic analysis technologies in response to needs that address issues of flexibility of analysis, robustness of analysis, ease-of-use, automation and portability. Recent developments such as the Intelligent Actinide Analysis System (IAAS), begin to address these issues. We are continuing to develop enhancements on this and other instruments that improve ease-of-use, automation and portability. Requests to analyze samples with unusual isotopics, contamination, or containers have made us aware of the need for more flexible and robust analysis. We have modified the MGA program to extend its plutonium isotopic analysis capability to samples with greater Am-241 content or U isotopics. We are looking at methods for dealing with tantalum or lead contamination and contamination with high-energy gamma emitters, such as U-233. We are looking at ways to allow the program to use additional information about the sample to further extend the domain of analyzable samples. These unusual analyses will come from the domain of samples that need to be measured because of complex reconfiguration or environmental cleanup.

  15. Reactor Accident Analysis Methodology for the Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility Documented Safety Analysis Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg L. Sharp; R. T. McCracken

    2003-06-01

    The regulatory requirement to develop an upgraded safety basis for a DOE nuclear facility was realized in January 2001 by issuance of a revision to Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Section 830 (10 CFR 830).1 Subpart B of 10 CFR 830, “Safety Basis Requirements,” requires a contractor responsible for a DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, or 3 nuclear facility to either submit by April 9, 2001 the existing safety basis which already meets the requirements of Subpart B, or to submit by April 10, 2003 an upgraded facility safety basis that meets the revised requirements.1 10 CFR 830 identifies Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide 1.70, “Standard Format and Content of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants”2 as a safe harbor methodology for preparation of a DOE reactor documented safety analysis (DSA). The regulation also allows for use of a graded approach. This report presents the methodology that was developed for preparing the reactor accident analysis portion of the Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility (ATRC) upgraded DSA. The methodology was approved by DOE for developing the ATRC safety basis as an appropriate application of a graded approach to the requirements of 10 CFR 830.

  16. Reactor Accident Analysis Methodology for the Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility Documented Safety Analysis Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, G.L.; McCracken, R.T.

    2003-05-13

    The regulatory requirement to develop an upgraded safety basis for a DOE Nuclear Facility was realized in January 2001 by issuance of a revision to Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Section 830 (10 CFR 830). Subpart B of 10 CFR 830, ''Safety Basis Requirements,'' requires a contractor responsible for a DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, or 3 nuclear facility to either submit by April 9, 2001 the existing safety basis which already meets the requirements of Subpart B, or to submit by April 10, 2003 an upgraded facility safety basis that meets the revised requirements. 10 CFR 830 identifies Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide 1.70, ''Standard Format and Content of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' as a safe harbor methodology for preparation of a DOE reactor documented safety analysis (DSA). The regulation also allows for use of a graded approach. This report presents the methodology that was developed for preparing the reactor accident analysis portion of the Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility (ATRC) upgraded DSA. The methodology was approved by DOE for developing the ATRC safety basis as an appropriate application of a graded approach to the requirements of 10 CFR 830.

  17. Analysis of an advanced ducted propeller subsonic inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iek, Chanthy; Boldman, Donald R.; Ibrahim, Mounir

    1992-01-01

    A time marching Navier-Stokes code called PARC (PARC2D for 2-D/axisymmetric and PARC3D for 3-D flow simulations) was validated for an advanced ducted propeller (ADP) subsonic inlet. The code validation for an advanced ducted propeller (ADP) subsonic inlet. The code validation was implemented for a non-separated flow condition associated with the inlet operating at angles-of-attack of 0 and 25 degrees. The inlet test data were obtained in the 9 x 15 ft Low Speed Wind Tunnel at NASA Lewis Research Center as part of a cooperative study with Pratt and Whitney. The experimental study focused on the ADP inlet performance for take-off and approach conditions. The inlet was tested at a free stream Mach number of 0.2, at angles-of-attack between O and 35 degrees, and at a maximum propeller speed of 12,000 RPM which induced a corrected air flow rate of about 46 lb/sec based on standard day conditions. The computational grid and flow boundary conditions (BC) were based on the actual inlet geometry and the funnel flow conditions. At the propeller face, two types of BC's were applied: a mass flow BC and a fixed flow properties BC. The fixed flow properties BC was based on a combination of data obtained from the experiment and calculations using a potential flow code. Comparison of the computational results with the test data indicates that the PARC code with the propeller face fixed flow properties BC provided a better prediction of the inlet surface static pressures than the predictions when the mass flow BC was used. For an angle-of-attack of 0 degrees, the PARC2D code with the propeller face mass flow BC provided a good prediction of inlet static pressures except in the region of high pressure gradient. With the propeller face fixed flow properties BC, the PARC2D code provided a good prediction of the inlet static pressures. For an angle-of-attack of 25 degrees with the mass flow BC, the PARC3D code predicted statis pressures which deviated significantly from the test data

  18. SEM-contour shape analysis method for advanced semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Yasutaka; Shindo, Hiroyuki; Ota, Yoshihiro; Matsuoka, Ryoichi; Hojo, Yutaka; Fuchimoto, Daisuke; Hibino, Daisuke; Sakai, Hideo

    2013-04-01

    The new measuring method that we developed executes a contour shape analysis that is based on the pattern edge information from a SEM image. This analysis helps to create a highly precise quantification of every circuit pattern shape by comparing the contour extracted from the SEM image using a CD measurement algorithm and the ideal circuit pattern. The developed method, in the next phase, can generate four shape indices by using the analysis mass measurement data. When the shape index measured using the developed method is compared the CD, the difference of the shape index and the CD is negligibly small for the quantification of the circuit pattern shape. In addition, when the 2D patterns on a FEM wafer are measured using the developed method, the tendency for shape deformations is precisely caught by the four shape indices. This new method and the evaluation results will be presented in detail in this paper.

  19. Application of advanced reliability methods to local strain fatigue analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, T. T.; Wirsching, P. H.

    1983-01-01

    When design factors are considered as random variables and the failure condition cannot be expressed by a closed form algebraic inequality, computations of risk (or probability of failure) might become extremely difficult or very inefficient. This study suggests using a simple, and easily constructed, second degree polynomial to approximate the complicated limit state in the neighborhood of the design point; a computer analysis relates the design variables at selected points. Then a fast probability integration technique (i.e., the Rackwitz-Fiessler algorithm) can be used to estimate risk. The capability of the proposed method is demonstrated in an example of a low cycle fatigue problem for which a computer analysis is required to perform local strain analysis to relate the design variables. A comparison of the performance of this method is made with a far more costly Monte Carlo solution. Agreement of the proposed method with Monte Carlo is considered to be good.

  20. Advances in the identification of transfer function models using Prony analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Trudnowski, D.J.; Donnelly, M.K.; Hauer, J.F.

    1993-06-01

    This paper further advances the usefulness and understanding of Prony analysis as a tool for identification of models. The presented results allow more generality in the assumed model formulation. In addition, a comparison is made between Prony analysis and autoregressive moving-average (ARMA) modeling. Special attention is given to system conditions often encountered with power system electromechanical dynamics.

  1. Advances in diagnosis and spatial analysis of cysticercosis and taeniasis.

    PubMed

    Raoul, Francis; Li, Tiaoying; Sako, Yasuhito; Chen, Xingwang; Long, Changping; Yanagida, Tetsuya; Wu, Yunfei; Nakao, Minoru; Okamoto, Munehiro; Craig, Philip S; Giraudoux, Patrick; Ito, Akira

    2013-11-01

    Human cysticercosis, caused by accidental ingestion of eggs of Taenia solium, is one of the most pathogenic helminthiases and is listed among the 17 WHO Neglected Tropical Diseases. Controlling the life-cycle of T. solium between humans and pigs is essential for eradication of cysticercosis. One difficulty for the accurate detection and identification of T. solium species is the possible co-existence of two other human Taenia tapeworms (T. saginata and T. asiatica, which do not cause cysticercosis in humans). Several key issues for taeniasis/cysticercosis (T/C) evidence-based epidemiology and control are reviewed: (1) advances in immunological and molecular tools for screening of human and animals hosts and identification of Taenia species, with a focus on real-time detection of taeniasis carriers and infected animals in field community screenings, and (2) spatial ecological approaches that have been used to detect geospatial patterns of case distributions and to monitor pig activity and behaviour. Most recent eco-epidemiological studies undertaken in Sichuan province, China, are introduced and reviewed. PMID:23985371

  2. Micromechanics Based Design/Analysis Codes for Advanced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    Advanced high temperature Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) hold an enormous potential for use in aero and space related applications specifically for propulsion system components. Consequently, this has led to a multitude of research activities pertaining to fabrication, testing and modeling of these materials. The efforts directed at the development of ceramic matrix composites have focused primarily on improving the properties of the constituents as individual phases. It has, however, become increasingly clear that for CMC to be successfully employed in high temperature applications, research and development efforts should also focus on optimizing the synergistic performance of the constituent phases within the as-produced microstructure of the complex shaped CMC part. Despite their attractive features, the introduction of these materials in a wide spectrum of applications has been excruciatingly slow. The reasons are the high costs associated with the manufacturing and a complete experimental testing and characterization of these materials. Often designers/analysts do not have a consistent set of necessary properties and design allowables to be able to confidently design and analyze structural components made from these composites. Furthermore, the anisotropy of these materials accentuates the burden both on the test engineers and the designers by requiring a vastly increased amount of data/characterization compared to conventional materials.

  3. Some Advanced Concepts in Discrete Aerodynamic Sensitivity Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Arthur C., III; Green, Lawrence L.; Newman, Perry A.; Putko, Michele M.

    2003-01-01

    An efficient incremental iterative approach for differentiating advanced flow codes is successfully demonstrated on a two-dimensional inviscid model problem. The method employs the reverse-mode capability of the automatic differentiation software tool ADIFOR 3.0 and is proven to yield accurate first-order aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives. A substantial reduction in CPU time and computer memory is demonstrated in comparison with results from a straightforward, black-box reverse-mode applicaiton of ADIFOR 3.0 to the same flow code. An ADIFOR-assisted procedure for accurate second-rder aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives is successfully verified on an inviscid transonic lifting airfoil example problem. The method requires that first-order derivatives are calculated first using both the forward (direct) and reverse (adjoinct) procedures; then, a very efficient noniterative calculation of all second-order derivatives can be accomplished. Accurate second derivatives (i.e., the complete Hesian matrices) of lift, wave drag, and pitching-moment coefficients are calculated with respect to geometric shape, angle of attack, and freestream Mach number.

  4. Some Advanced Concepts in Discrete Aerodynamic Sensitivity Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Arthur C., III; Green, Lawrence L.; Newman, Perry A.; Putko, Michele M.

    2001-01-01

    An efficient incremental-iterative approach for differentiating advanced flow codes is successfully demonstrated on a 2D inviscid model problem. The method employs the reverse-mode capability of the automatic- differentiation software tool ADIFOR 3.0, and is proven to yield accurate first-order aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives. A substantial reduction in CPU time and computer memory is demonstrated in comparison with results from a straight-forward, black-box reverse- mode application of ADIFOR 3.0 to the same flow code. An ADIFOR-assisted procedure for accurate second-order aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives is successfully verified on an inviscid transonic lifting airfoil example problem. The method requires that first-order derivatives are calculated first using both the forward (direct) and reverse (adjoint) procedures; then, a very efficient non-iterative calculation of all second-order derivatives can be accomplished. Accurate second derivatives (i.e., the complete Hessian matrices) of lift, wave-drag, and pitching-moment coefficients are calculated with respect to geometric- shape, angle-of-attack, and freestream Mach number

  5. Artificial flagellates: Analysis of advancing motions of biflagellate micro-objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Nobuhito; Kuribayashi, Kaori; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2010-02-01

    This paper describes an analysis of advancing motions of micro-objects with two flagella separated from a unicellular alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We harnessed their flagella as actuators of the micro-objects. The isolated flagella can be attached to microbeads and propel them. We found that the biflagellate beads tend to advance, while the uniflagellate microbeads only rotate. Our model for the motion of the biflagellate beads led to conditions for generating an advancing motion. This approach is important since it provides general guidelines for designing micro-objects driven by flagellalike actuators.

  6. Progress in Conceptual Design and Analysis of Advanced Rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Gloria K.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation will give information on Multi-Disciplinary Analysis and Technology Development, including it's objectives and how they will be met. In addition, it will also present recent highlights including the Lift-Offset Civil Design and it's study conclusions, as well as, the LCTR2 Propulsion Concept's study conclusions. Recent publications and future publications will also be discussed.

  7. Advancing School-Based Interventions through Economic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsson, Tina M.; Ferrer-Wreder, Laura; Eninger, Lilianne

    2014-01-01

    Commentators interested in school-based prevention programs point to the importance of economic issues for the future of prevention efforts. Many of the processes and aims of prevention science are dependent upon prevention resources. Although economic analysis is an essential tool for assessing resource use, the attention given economic analysis…

  8. Conformational Analysis in an Advanced Integrated Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, David B.; Miller, Randy M.

    2004-01-01

    A series of sophisticated, combined laboratory experiments are developed involving the use of various spectroscopic and other techniques in the conformational analysis of cyclohexane mechanisms. The multi-system approach enables the students to transcend the one-dimensional procedure, and develops their synthetic and diagnostic skills.

  9. Advanced multivariate analysis to assess remediation of hydrocarbons in soils.

    PubMed

    Lin, Deborah S; Taylor, Peter; Tibbett, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Accurate monitoring of degradation levels in soils is essential in order to understand and achieve complete degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated soils. We aimed to develop the use of multivariate methods for the monitoring of biodegradation of diesel in soils and to determine if diesel contaminated soils could be remediated to a chemical composition similar to that of an uncontaminated soil. An incubation experiment was set up with three contrasting soil types. Each soil was exposed to diesel at varying stages of degradation and then analysed for key hydrocarbons throughout 161 days of incubation. Hydrocarbon distributions were analysed by Principal Coordinate Analysis and similar samples grouped by cluster analysis. Variation and differences between samples were determined using permutational multivariate analysis of variance. It was found that all soils followed trajectories approaching the chemical composition of the unpolluted soil. Some contaminated soils were no longer significantly different to that of uncontaminated soil after 161 days of incubation. The use of cluster analysis allows the assignment of a percentage chemical similarity of a diesel contaminated soil to an uncontaminated soil sample. This will aid in the monitoring of hydrocarbon contaminated sites and the establishment of potential endpoints for successful remediation. PMID:25028320

  10. Connecting Performance Analysis and Visualization to Advance Extreme Scale Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, Peer-Timo; Mohr, Bernd; Schulz, Martin; Pasccci, Valerio; Gamblin, Todd; Brunst, Holger

    2015-07-29

    The characterization, modeling, analysis, and tuning of software performance has been a central topic in High Performance Computing (HPC) since its early beginnings. The overall goal is to make HPC software run faster on particular hardware, either through better scheduling, on-node resource utilization, or more efficient distributed communication.

  11. WAATS: A computer program for Weights Analysis of Advanced Transportation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glatt, C. R.

    1974-01-01

    A historical weight estimating technique for advanced transportation systems is presented. The classical approach to weight estimation is discussed and sufficient data is presented to estimate weights for a large spectrum of flight vehicles including horizontal and vertical takeoff aircraft, boosters and reentry vehicles. A computer program, WAATS (Weights Analysis for Advanced Transportation Systems) embracing the techniques discussed has been written and user instructions are presented. The program was developed for use in the ODIN (Optimal Design Integration System) system.

  12. A petrographic study of shocked minerals from the Vredefort Dome, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintero, R. R.; Cavosie, A. J.

    2007-12-01

    The effects of impact-induced shock metamorphism can be preserved in the microstructure of individual mineral grains in target rocks, and thus provide a record of past impact events. This undergraduate research project is a petrographic study of shock metamorphism preserved in minerals from the Vredefort Dome impact structure, South Africa, with the goal of documenting shock features using standard petrographic techniques. The Vredefort Dome is widely regarded as the oldest and largest preserved impact crater on Earth at 2.02 Ga (Kamo et al., 1996 EPSL), and is thus important in studies of impact processes on the Precambrian Earth. Five samples representing three rock types were collected from the Vredefort Dome: two different quartzites were sampled from the collar zone, including Dominion Group quartzite (Ro) on R53 north of Parys, and quartzite Rjo1 on the maps of Bisschoff (1999). In addition, three granitoids were sampled, including two pseudotachylite breccias, from the center of the dome. Two pseudotachylite samples from quarries within the amphibolite zone contain granitoid clasts; a third sample of granulite-facies granitoid (charnockite) was collected from the amphibolite-granulate transition near Vredefort. In general, all of the samples are quartz-rich, and exhibit quartz grains with variably developed planar deformation features (PDFs). Two and three compelling sets of PDFs within individual grains were only observed in quartz from the collar zone; most samples contain quartz with only one set of conspicuous PDFs, usually decorated, that are readily visible with optical light microscopy. Shock microstructures were also observed in accessory minerals, including zircon. Detrital zircons in quartzite (unit Ro) contain PDFs that are readily apparent with a 10x to 40x objective. The zircons are average size (e.g. 125 microns), and contain parallel PDFs with an apparent regular spacing of 5 microns. Zircons were observed in all granitoid and pseudotachylite

  13. Advances in Analysis of Human Milk Oligosaccharides123

    PubMed Central

    Ruhaak, L. Renee; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2012-01-01

    Oligosaccharides in human milk strongly influence the composition of the gut microflora of neonates. Because it is now clear that the microflora play important roles in the development of the infant immune system, human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) are studied frequently. Milk samples contain complex mixtures of HMO, usually comprising several isomeric structures that can be either linear or branched. Traditionally, HMO profiling was performed using HPLC with fluorescence or UV detection. By using porous graphitic carbon liquid chromatography MS, it is now possible to separate and identify most of the isomers, facilitating linkage-specific analysis. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight analysis allows fast profiling, but does not allow isomer separation. Novel MS fragmentation techniques have facilitated structural characterization of HMO that are present at lower concentrations. These techniques now facilitate more accurate studies of HMO consumption as well as Lewis blood group determinations. PMID:22585919

  14. System analysis of power transients in advanced WDM networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorinevsky, Dimitry; Farber, Gennady

    2002-06-01

    This paper considers dynamical transient effects in the physical layer of an optical circuit-switched WDM network. These transients of the average transmission power have millisecond time scales. Instead of studying detailed nonlinear dynamics of the network elements, such as optical line amplifiers, a linearized model of the dynamics around a given steady state is considered. System-level analysis in this paper uses modern control theory methods and handles nonlinearity as uncertainty. The analysis translates requirements on the network performance into the requirements to the network elements. These requirements involve a few gross measures of performance for network elements and do not depend on the circuit switching state. One such performance measure is the worst amplification gain for all harmonic disturbances of the average transmission power. Another, is cross coupling of the wavelength channel power variations. The derived requirements guarantee system-level performance for all network configurations and can be used for specifying optical components and subsystems.

  15. Characterization of PTFE Using Advanced Thermal Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumm, J.; Lindemann, A.; Meyer, M.; Strasser, C.

    2010-10-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is a synthetic fluoropolymer used in numerous industrial applications. It is often referred to by its trademark name, Teflon. Thermal characterization of a PTFE material was carried out using various thermal analysis and thermophysical properties test techniques. The transformation energetics and specific heat were measured employing differential scanning calorimetry. The thermal expansion and the density changes were determined employing pushrod dilatometry. The viscoelastic properties (storage and loss modulus) were analyzed using dynamic mechanical analysis. The thermal diffusivity was measured using the laser flash technique. Combining thermal diffusivity data with specific heat and density allows calculation of the thermal conductivity of the polymer. Measurements were carried out from - 125 °C up to 150 °C. Additionally, measurements of the mechanical properties were carried out down to - 170 °C. The specific heat tests were conducted into the fully molten regions up to 370 °C.

  16. Advanced analysis of metal distributions in human hair

    SciTech Connect

    Kempson, Ivan M.; Skinner, William M.

    2008-06-09

    A variety of techniques (secondary electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry, and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence) were utilized to distinguish metal contamination occurring in hair arising from endogenous uptake from an individual exposed to a polluted environment, in this case a lead smelter. Evidence was sought for elements less affected by contamination and potentially indicative of biogenic activity. The unique combination of surface sensitivity, spatial resolution, and detection limits used here has provided new insight regarding hair analysis. Metals such as Ca, Fe, and Pb appeared to have little representative value of endogenous uptake and were mainly due to contamination. Cu and Zn, however, demonstrate behaviors worthy of further investigation into relating hair concentrations to endogenous function.

  17. Recent advances in steady compressible aerodynamic sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Arthur C., III; Newman, Perry A.; Hou, Gene J.-W.; Jones, Henry E.

    1992-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis methods are classified as belonging to either of the two broad categories: the discrete (quasi-analytical) approach and the continuous approach. The two approaches differ by the order in which discretization and differentiation of the governing equations and boundary conditions is undertaken. The discussion focuses on the discrete approach. Basic equations are presented, and the major difficulties are reviewed in some detail, as are the proposed solutions. Recent research activity concerned with the continuous approach is also discussed.

  18. Recent advances in trace analysis of pharmaceutical genotoxic impurities.

    PubMed

    Liu, David Q; Sun, Mingjiang; Kord, Alireza S

    2010-04-01

    Genotoxic impurities (GTIs) in pharmaceuticals at trace levels are of increasing concerns to both pharmaceutical industries and regulatory agencies due to their potentials for human carcinogenesis. Determination of these impurities at ppm levels requires highly sensitive analytical methodologies, which poses tremendous challenges on analytical communities in pharmaceutical R&D. Practical guidance with respect to the analytical determination of diverse classes of GTIs is currently lacking in the literature. This article provides an industrial perspective with regard to the analysis of various structural classes of GTIs that are commonly encountered during chemical development. The recent literatures will be reviewed, and several practical approaches for enhancing analyte detectability developed in recent years will be highlighted. As such, this article is organized into the following main sections: (1) trace analysis toolbox including sample introduction, separation, and detection techniques, as well as several 'general' approaches for enhancing detectability; (2) method development: chemical structure and property-based approaches; (3) method validation considerations; and (4) testing and control strategies in process chemistry. The general approaches for enhancing detection sensitivity to be discussed include chemical derivatization, 'matrix deactivation', and 'coordination ion spray-mass spectrometry'. Leveraging the use of these general approaches in method development greatly facilitates the analysis of poorly detectable or unstable/reactive GTIs. It is the authors' intent to provide a contemporary perspective on method development and validation that can guide analytical scientists in the pharmaceutical industries. PMID:20022442

  19. Advances in GPR data acquisition and analysis for archaeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wenke; Tian, Gang; Forte, Emanuele; Pipan, Michele; Wang, Yimin; Li, Xuejing; Shi, Zhanjie; Liu, Haiyan

    2015-07-01

    The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the applicability and the effectiveness of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to identify a thin burnt soil layer, buried more than 2 m below the topographic surface at the Liangzhu Site, in Southeastern China. The site was chosen for its relatively challenging conditions of GPR techniques due to electrical conductivity and to the presence of peach tree roots that produced scattering. We completed the data acquisition by using 100 and 200 MHz antennas in TE and TM broadside and cross-polarized configurations. In the data processing and interpretation phase, we used GPR attribute analysis, including instantaneous phase and geometrical attributes. Validation analysis ground-truthing performed after the geophysical surveys, validated the GPR imaging, confirmed the electrical conductivity and relative dielectric permittivity (RDP) measurements performed at different depths, and allowed a reliable quantitative correlation between GPR results and subsurface physical properties. The research demonstrates that multiple antenna configurations in GPR data acquisition combined with attribute analysis can enhance the ability to characterize prehistoric archaeological remains even in complex subsurface conditions.

  20. Advanced Vibration Analysis Tool Developed for Robust Engine Rotor Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this research program is to develop vibration analysis tools, design tools, and design strategies to significantly improve the safety and robustness of turbine engine rotors. Bladed disks in turbine engines always feature small, random blade-to-blade differences, or mistuning. Mistuning can lead to a dramatic increase in blade forced-response amplitudes and stresses. Ultimately, this results in high-cycle fatigue, which is a major safety and cost concern. In this research program, the necessary steps will be taken to transform a state-of-the-art vibration analysis tool, the Turbo- Reduce forced-response prediction code, into an effective design tool by enhancing and extending the underlying modeling and analysis methods. Furthermore, novel techniques will be developed to assess the safety of a given design. In particular, a procedure will be established for using natural-frequency curve veerings to identify ranges of operating conditions (rotational speeds and engine orders) in which there is a great risk that the rotor blades will suffer high stresses. This work also will aid statistical studies of the forced response by reducing the necessary number of simulations. Finally, new strategies for improving the design of rotors will be pursued.

  1. Proceedings: Workshop on advanced mathematics and computer science for power systems analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Esselman, W.H.; Iveson, R.H. )

    1991-08-01

    The Mathematics and Computer Workshop on Power System Analysis was held February 21--22, 1989, in Palo Alto, California. The workshop was the first in a series sponsored by EPRI's Office of Exploratory Research as part of its effort to develop ways in which recent advances in mathematics and computer science can be applied to the problems of the electric utility industry. The purpose of this workshop was to identify research objectives in the field of advanced computational algorithms needed for the application of advanced parallel processing architecture to problems of power system control and operation. Approximately 35 participants heard six presentations on power flow problems, transient stability, power system control, electromagnetic transients, user-machine interfaces, and database management. In the discussions that followed, participants identified five areas warranting further investigation: system load flow analysis, transient power and voltage analysis, structural instability and bifurcation, control systems design, and proximity to instability. 63 refs.

  2. Advanced view factor analysis method for radiation exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sookuk; Tuller, Stanton E.

    2014-03-01

    A raster-based method for determining complex view factor patterns is presented (HURES model). The model uses Johnson and Watson's view factor analysis method for fisheye lens photographs. The entire sphere is divided into 13 different view factors: open sky; sunny and shaded building walls, vegetation (trees) and ground surfaces above and below 1.2 m from the ground surface. The HURES model gave reasonable view factor results in tests at two urban study sites on summer days: downtown Nanaimo, B.C., Canada and Changwon, Republic of Korea. HURES gave better estimates of open sky view factors determined from fisheye lens photographs than did ENVI-met 3.1 and RayMan Pro. However, all three models underestimated sky view factor. For view factor analysis in outdoor urban areas, the 10° interval of rotation angle at 100 m distance of annuli will be suitable settings for three-dimensional computer simulations. The HURES model can be used for the rapid determination of complex view factor patterns which facilitates the analysis of their effects. Examples of how differing view factor patterns can affect human thermal sensation indices are given. The greater proportion of sunny view factors increased the computed predicted mean vote (PMV) by 1.3 on the sunny side of the street compared with the shady side during mid-morning in downtown Nanaimo. In another example, effects of differing amounts of open sky, sunny ground, sunny buildings and vegetation combined to produce only slight differences in PMV and two other human thermal sensation indices, PET and UTCI.

  3. Cost analysis of advanced turbine blade manufacturing processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, C. F.; Blake, D. E.; Stelson, T. S.

    1977-01-01

    A rigorous analysis was conducted to estimate relative manufacturing costs for high technology gas turbine blades prepared by three candidate materials process systems. The manufacturing costs for the same turbine blade configuration of directionally solidified eutectic alloy, an oxide dispersion strengthened superalloy, and a fiber reinforced superalloy were compared on a relative basis to the costs of the same blade currently in production utilizing the directional solidification process. An analytical process cost model was developed to quantitatively perform the cost comparisons. The impact of individual process yield factors on costs was also assessed as well as effects of process parameters, raw materials, labor rates and consumable items.

  4. Advances in the identification of electrochemical transfer function models using Prony analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Trudnowski, D.J. ); Donnelly, M.K. ); Hauer, J.F. )

    1993-02-01

    This paper further advances the usefulness and understanding of Prony analysis as a tool for identification of power system electromechanical oscillation models. These linear models are developed by analyzing power system ring-down data. The presented results allow more generality in the assumed model formulation. In addition, a comparison is made between Prony analysis and autoregressive moving-average (KARMA) modeling, which has also been proposed for analysis of system oscillations. Under the conditions investigated, the Prony algorithm performed more accurate identification.

  5. Stress analysis of advanced attack helicopter composite main rotor blade root end lug

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    Stress analysis of the Advanced Attack Helicopter (AAH) composite main rotor blade root end lug is described. The stress concentration factor determined from a finite element analysis is compared to an empirical value used in the lug design. The analysis and test data indicate that the stress concentration is primarily a function of configuration and independent of the range of material properties typical of Kevlar-49/epoxy and glass epoxy.

  6. Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) multibeam antenna analysis and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Lagin, Alan R.; Larko, Jeffrey M.; Narvaez, Adabelle

    1992-01-01

    One of the most important aspects of a satellite communication system design is the accurate estimation of antenna performance degradation. Pointing error, end coverage gain, peak gain degradation, etc. are the main concerns. The thermal or dynamic distortions of a reflector antenna structural system can affect the far-field antenna power distribution in a least four ways. (1) The antenna gain is reduced; (2) the main lobe of the antenna can be mispointed thus shifting the destination of the delivered power away from the desired locations; (3) the main lobe of the antenna pattern can be broadened, thus spreading the RF power over a larger area than desired; and (4) the antenna pattern sidelobes can increase, thus increasing the chances of interference among adjacent beams of multiple beam antenna system or with antenna beams of other satellites. The in-house developed NASA Lewis Research Center thermal/structural/RF analysis program was designed to accurately simulate the ACTS in-orbit thermal environment and predict the RF antenna performance. The program combines well establish computer programs (TRASYS, SINDA and NASTAN) with a dual reflector-physical optics RF analysis program. The ACTS multibeam antenna configuration is analyzed and several thermal cases are presented and compared with measurements (pre-flight).

  7. Recent Advances in Launch Vehicle Toxic Hazard and Risk Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyman, R. L.

    2012-01-01

    A number of widely used rocket propellants produce toxic combustion byproducts or are themselves toxic in their un-reacted state. In this paper we focus on the methodology used to evaluate early flight catastrophic failures and nominal launch emissions that release large amounts of propellant or combustion products into the planetary boundary layer that pose a potential risk to launch area personnel, spectators, or the general public. The United States has traditionally used the Rocket Exhaust Effluent Diffusion Model (REEDM) [1] to access the hazard zones associated with such releases. REEDM is a 1970's vintage Gaussian atmospheric dispersion model that is limited in its ability to accurately simulate certain aspects of the initial source geometry and dynamics of a vehicle breakup and propellant fragment dispersion. The Launch Area Toxic Risk Analysis 3-Dimensional (LATRA3D) [2] computer program has been developed that addresses many of REEDM's deficiencies. LATRA3D is a probabilistic risk analysis tool that simulates both nominal vehicle flight and in-flight failure emissions.

  8. Advances in computational design and analysis of airbreathing propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klineberg, John M.

    1989-01-01

    The development of commercial and military aircraft depends, to a large extent, on engine manufacturers being able to achieve significant increases in propulsion capability through improved component aerodynamics, materials, and structures. The recent history of propulsion has been marked by efforts to develop computational techniques that can speed up the propulsion design process and produce superior designs. The availability of powerful supercomputers, such as the NASA Numerical Aerodynamic Simulator, and the potential for even higher performance offered by parallel computer architectures, have opened the door to the use of multi-dimensional simulations to study complex physical phenomena in propulsion systems that have previously defied analysis or experimental observation. An overview of several NASA Lewis research efforts is provided that are contributing toward the long-range goal of a numerical test-cell for the integrated, multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization of propulsion systems. Specific examples in Internal Computational Fluid Mechanics, Computational Structural Mechanics, Computational Materials Science, and High Performance Computing are cited and described in terms of current capabilities, technical challenges, and future research directions.

  9. Petrographic characteristics and palaeoenvironment of the Permian coal resources of the Barapukuria and Dighipara Basins, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhaduzzaman, Md.; Abdullah, Wan Hasiah; Islam, Md. Aminul

    2013-03-01

    Twenty-seven coal samples from the Barapukuria and Dighipara Coal Basins of Bangladesh were analysed for their maceral content, petrographic characteristics and vitrinite reflectance. The most predominant maceral was the inertinite group (mean 40%), followed by vitrinite (mean 31%) and liptinite (mean 22%), with considerable amounts of mineral matter (mean 7%). Semifusinite, fusinite and inertodetrinite were the most common macerals of the inertinite group. Collotelinite, collodetrinite and vitrodetrinite were the most frequently found macerals of the vitrinite group, while sporinite and cutinite were the most common in the liptinite group. Clay minerals occurred in higher concentrations than other minerals. The measured vitrinite reflectance values (%Ro) ranged from 0.71 to 0.80, indicating a high volatile bituminous B ranking.Facies modelling using maceral composition and maceral indices suggested an environment of forest swamps with alternating oxic-anoxic depositional conditions. Microlithotype-dependent depositional modelling indicated evolution in limno-telmatic zones under fluvio-lacustrine control, accompanied by the development of upper to lower deltaic plain conditions. A terrestrial origin with dry forest to piedmont plain conditions was suggested by the Gelification Index (GI) and Tissue Preservation Index (TPI). The lateral variation of the measured TPI values indicated an increase in the rate of basin subsidence. A cross-plot of the Ground Water Index (GWI) vs. the Vegetation Index (VI) suggested mires under ombotrophic to mesotrophic hydrogeological conditions containing herbaceous plants.

  10. Petrographic studies of "fallout" suevite from outside the Bosumtwi impact structure, Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boamah, Daniel; Koeberl, Christian

    2006-11-01

    Field studies and a shallow drilling program carried out in 1999 provided information about the thickness and distribution of suevite to the north of the Bosumtwi crater rim. Suevite occurrence there is known from an ˜1.5 km2 area; its thickness is ≤15 m. The present suevite distribution is likely the result of differential erosion and does not reflect the initial areal extent of continuous Bosumtwi ejecta deposits. Here we discuss the petrographic characteristics of drill core samples of melt-rich suevite. Macroscopic constituents of the suevites are melt bodies and crystalline and metasedimentary rock (granite, graywacke, phyllite, shale, schist, and possibly slate) clasts up to about 40 cm in size. Shock metamorphic effects in the clasts include multiple sets of planar deformation features (PDFs), diaplectic quartz and feldspar glasses, lechatelierite, and ballen quartz, besides biotite with kink bands. Basement rock clasts in the suevite represent all stages of shock metamorphism, ranging from samples without shock effects to completely shock-melted material that is indicative of shock pressures up to ˜60 GPa.

  11. Inferences of paleoenvironment from petrographic, chemical and stable-isotope studies of calcretes and fracture calcites

    SciTech Connect

    Vaniman, D.T.; Whelan, J.F.

    1994-03-01

    Past research has indicated a genetic connection between calcite formed in calcretes at the surface of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and calcites deposited in underlying fractures of the unsaturated zone. This common genesis suggests that paleoenvironmental information, as well as the timing and pathways of past recharge episodes, might be obtained from studies of the deposits in both the calcretes and the unsaturated fractures. Chemical and isotopic modification of calcite-precipitating fluids appears to begin at the surface, largely under the influence of plant roots and their decay products. Chemical characteristics of the deeper calcites are either initiated or largely defined within the first few meters of fluid migration into the unsaturated tuffs beneath the calcretes. However, petrographic and isotopic data indicate a very unique low-{delta}{sup 13}C microenvironment that is localized at the upper surfaces of the calcretes. These surfaces form an interface in the soil horizon where infiltration may pond above the underlying carbonate ``plug.`` In order to decipher the chemistry and petrology of past recharge events, it is important to first understand microenvironments such as this that contribute to mineral precipitation/dissolution events in the pedogenic environment.

  12. Petrographic analyses of Knobloch coal seam (Paleocene), Powder River County, southeastern Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, J.A.

    1986-08-01

    A single core of Knobloch coal from Powder River County, southeast Montana, was drilled to obtain samples for coal quality studies. The coal occurs in the lower Tongue River Member of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation. The Knobloch coal core (63 ft long) was divided into 1-ft increments and analyzed using chemical and petrographic methods. Definite variations in maceral content were seen. Preliminary studies show relationship between ash, gelinite, inertinite, and humodetrinite contents. A zone of low gelinite, low humodetrinite, and high inertinite, located in the lower quarter of the seam, implies a period of severe oxidation occurred, possibly as swamp fires. Four zones of high inertinite and high humodetrinite (three in the upper half and one in the lower half of the seam) indicate fluctuations in the water table, allowing moderate oxidation and weathering of plant material and subsequent mechanical reworking of humic grains. Near the center of the seam, a zone of high inertinite, high humodetrinite, and high ash content suggests water levels were high enough to allow significant sediment influx as well as reworking of the humic materials. These conclusions suggest the Knobloch coal is autochthonous and hypautochthonous in origin, a result of several water-table fluctuations and/or climatic changes due to drought.

  13. Petrographic correlations and mathematical analysis of log signatures for clay identification

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, B.

    1992-04-01

    This report presents the results of correlation of log signature with information on distribution of the types and volumes of clays in the sandstone pore spaces determined from detailed CT-scan, XRD, SEM and thin section analyses of core samples from three sandstone reservoirs. The log signatures are then analyzed to determine if suitable mathematical/statistical parameter(s) could be calculated from the logs for identification of types and volumes of clays in sandstone reservoirs.

  14. Develop advanced nonlinear signal analysis topographical mapping system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jong, Jen-Yi

    1993-01-01

    As reported in the monthly technical progress report for July 1993, a new signal analysis technique called instantaneous frequency correlation (IFC) for time delay estimation was developed which will be incorporated into the ATMS system. In this report, a different technique for time delay estimation called phase difference time derivative estimator (FDTDE) will be discussed. The FDTDE technique does not replace the IFC method since their application conditions are different. The IFC technique can estimate the time delay between two spectral components of two measurement signals when the center frequency of the components is constant, while the FDTDE method can provide accurate time delay estimation when the frequency of the subject component changes linearly such as during engine startup or shut-down.

  15. Design, analysis, and test verification of advanced encapsulation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, N.; Minning, C.

    1982-01-01

    Design sensitivities are established for the development of photovoltaic module criteria and the definition of needed research tasks. The program consists of three phases. In Phase I, analytical models were developed to perform optical, thermal, electrical, and structural analyses on candidate encapsulation systems. From these analyses several candidate systems will be selected for qualification testing during Phase II. Additionally, during Phase II, test specimens of various types will be constructed and tested to determine the validity of the analysis methodology developed in Phase I. In Phse III, a finalized optimum design based on knowledge gained in Phase I and II will be developed. All verification testing was completed during this period. Preliminary results and observations are discussed. Descriptions of the thermal, thermal structural, and structural deflection test setups are included.

  16. Design, analysis and test verification of advanced encapsulated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, A., III

    1985-11-01

    Methods have been developed to aid the photovoltaic manufacturer in the design of modules which will optimize the use of materials and method of manufacture for novel encapsulation schemes. Methods are described for using master curves to enable the design of modules which will withstand pressure loading from wind and/or precipitation as well as stress produced from diurnal and seasonal thermal cycling. Analysis methods using finite element modeling are presented to examine maximum electric field concentrations dependent on the geometry of cells and interconnects. Techniques for determining the operating temperature and optical efficiency of panels are presented. Several novel methods of manufacturing modules are described. Experimental results in the use of conductive polymers in photovoltaic cells as AR coatings, conductivity enhancers and passivation coatings are discussed.

  17. Review on Recent Advances in the Analysis of Isolated Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Satori, Chad P.; Kostal, Vratislav; Arriaga, Edgar A.

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of isolated organelles is one of the pillars of modern bioanalytical chemistry. This review describes recent developments on the isolation and characterization of isolated organelles both from living organisms and cell cultures. Salient reports on methods to release organelles focused on reproducibility and yield, membrane isolation, and integrated devices for organelle release. New developments on organelle fractionation after their isolation were on the topics of centrifugation, immunocapture, free flow electrophoresis, flow field-flow fractionation, fluorescence activated organelle sorting, laser capture microdissection, and dielectrophoresis. New concepts on characterization of isolated organelles included atomic force microscopy, optical tweezers combined with Raman spectroscopy, organelle sensors, flow cytometry, capillary electrophoresis, and microfluidic devices. PMID:23107131

  18. Generalized Advanced Propeller Analysis System (GAPAS). Volume 2: Computer program user manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glatt, L.; Crawford, D. R.; Kosmatka, J. B.; Swigart, R. J.; Wong, E. W.

    1986-01-01

    The Generalized Advanced Propeller Analysis System (GAPAS) computer code is described. GAPAS was developed to analyze advanced technology multi-bladed propellers which operate on aircraft with speeds up to Mach 0.8 and altitudes up to 40,000 feet. GAPAS includes technology for analyzing aerodynamic, structural, and acoustic performance of propellers. The computer code was developed for the CDC 7600 computer and is currently available for industrial use on the NASA Langley computer. A description of all the analytical models incorporated in GAPAS is included. Sample calculations are also described as well as users requirements for modifying the analysis system. Computer system core requirements and running times are also discussed.

  19. Advanced accident sequence precursor analysis level 1 models

    SciTech Connect

    Sattison, M.B.; Thatcher, T.A.; Knudsen, J.K.; Schroeder, J.A.; Siu, N.O.

    1996-03-01

    INEL has been involved in the development of plant-specific Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) models for the past two years. These models were developed for use with the SAPHIRE suite of PRA computer codes. They contained event tree/linked fault tree Level 1 risk models for the following initiating events: general transient, loss-of-offsite-power, steam generator tube rupture, small loss-of-coolant-accident, and anticipated transient without scram. Early in 1995 the ASP models were revised based on review comments from the NRC and an independent peer review. These models were released as Revision 1. The Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research has sponsored several projects at the INEL this fiscal year to further enhance the capabilities of the ASP models. Revision 2 models incorporates more detailed plant information into the models concerning plant response to station blackout conditions, information on battery life, and other unique features gleaned from an Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation quick review of the Individual Plant Examination submittals. These models are currently being delivered to the NRC as they are completed. A related project is a feasibility study and model development of low power/shutdown (LP/SD) and external event extensions to the ASP models. This project will establish criteria for selection of LP/SD and external initiator operational events for analysis within the ASP program. Prototype models for each pertinent initiating event (loss of shutdown cooling, loss of inventory control, fire, flood, seismic, etc.) will be developed. A third project concerns development of enhancements to SAPHIRE. In relation to the ASP program, a new SAPHIRE module, GEM, was developed as a specific user interface for performing ASP evaluations. This module greatly simplifies the analysis process for determining the conditional core damage probability for a given combination of initiating events and equipment failures or degradations.

  20. Modeling with the Advanced Science Analysis Package (ASAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, F.; Schilke, P.; Muders, D.; Comito, C.; Leurini, S.; Parise, B.; van der Tak, F.; Menten, K.

    ASAP is a project initiated at the MPIfR which aims at providing a new generation of scientific analysis tools to extract the physical information from the high dynamical range data of current and future instruments. It was motivated by the ALMA project but the concepts and their implementations are applicable to all wavelengths. This presentation is focused on DALIA (Direct Aproach to spectral Line Analysis), a prototype software for forward modeling. It consists of a JAVA graphical user interface through which the user can fit models to observations. The models are stored as binaries and are described by XML files according to a schema. New models developed in any language can thus be easily added to the model database by the user. The different steps of the fit (simulation, evaluation, parameter change) can be executed manually or automatically through an optimization engine. The interface allows the user to have a direct control on the model parameters which can be fixed or constrained. The data to be modeled can be of any type (1D, 2D, 3D, specral, spatial, temporal...) and associations of datasets of different types are supported as long as the axes are identical to those of the model output. In this prototype the FITS format is supported. For spectral synthesis, the spectroscopic data from the molecular databases (Cologne, JPL) are used. This approach is very generic and uses concepts similar to those of the Virtual Observatory. Its integration into the VO would allow astronomers to use the data archives to constrain a model and would permit to store model solutions for each source. These model solutions could thus be easily shared and be improved with the aquisition of new data.

  1. Modeling with the Advanced Science Analysis Package (ASAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, F.; Schilke, P.; Muders, D.; Comito, C.; Leurini, S.; Parise, B.; van der Tak, F.; Menten, K.

    2005-12-01

    ASAP is a project initiated at the MPIfR which aims at providing a new generation of scientific analysis tools to extract the physical information from the high dynamical range data of current and future instruments. It was motivated by the ALMA project but the concepts and their implementations are applicable to all wavelengths. This presentation is focused on DALIA (Direct Aproach to spectral Line Analysis), a prototype software for forward modeling. It consists of a JAVA graphical user interface through which the user can fit models to observations. The models are stored as binaries and are described by XML files according to a schema. New models developed in any language can thus be easily added to the model database by the user. The different steps of the fit (simulation, evaluation, parameter change) can be executed manually or automatically through an optimization engine. The interface allows the user to have a direct control on the model parameters which can be fixed or constrained. The data to be modeled can be of any type (1D, 2D, 3D, spectral, spatial, temporal...) and associations of datasets of different types are supported as long as the axes are identical to those of the model output. In this prototype the data need to be in FITS format. For spectral synthesis, the spectroscopic data from the molecular databases (Cologne, JPL) are used. This approach is very generic and uses concepts similar to those of the Virtual Observatory. Its integration into the VO would allow astronomers to use the data archives to constrain a model and would permit to store model solutions for each source. These model solutions could thus be easily shared and be improved each time new observations of the source are made.

  2. Advancements in 3D Structural Analysis of Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Siler, Drew L; Faulds, James E; Mayhew, Brett; McNamara, David

    2013-06-23

    Robust geothermal activity in the Great Basin, USA is a product of both anomalously high regional heat flow and active fault-controlled extension. Elevated permeability associated with some fault systems provides pathways for circulation of geothermal fluids. Constraining the local-scale 3D geometry of these structures and their roles as fluid flow conduits is crucial in order to mitigate both the costs and risks of geothermal exploration and to identify blind (no surface expression) geothermal resources. Ongoing studies have indicated that much of the robust geothermal activity in the Great Basin is associated with high density faulting at structurally complex fault intersection/interaction areas, such as accommodation/transfer zones between discrete fault systems, step-overs or relay ramps in fault systems, intersection zones between faults with different strikes or different senses of slip, and horse-tailing fault terminations. These conceptualized models are crucial for locating and characterizing geothermal systems in a regional context. At the local scale, however, pinpointing drilling targets and characterizing resource potential within known or probable geothermal areas requires precise 3D characterization of the system. Employing a variety of surface and subsurface data sets, we have conducted detailed 3D geologic analyses of two Great Basin geothermal systems. Using EarthVision (Dynamic Graphics Inc., Alameda, CA) we constructed 3D geologic models of both the actively producing Brady’s geothermal system and a ‘greenfield’ geothermal prospect at Astor Pass, NV. These 3D models allow spatial comparison of disparate data sets in 3D and are the basis for quantitative structural analyses that can aid geothermal resource assessment and be used to pinpoint discrete drilling targets. The relatively abundant data set at Brady’s, ~80 km NE of Reno, NV, includes 24 wells with lithologies interpreted from careful analysis of cuttings and core, a 1

  3. Development of advanced structural analysis methodologies for predicting widespread fatigue damage in aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    NASA is developing a 'tool box' that includes a number of advanced structural analysis computer codes which, taken together, represent the comprehensive fracture mechanics capability required to predict the onset of widespread fatigue damage. These structural analysis tools have complementary and specialized capabilities ranging from a finite-element-based stress-analysis code for two- and three-dimensional built-up structures with cracks to a fatigue and fracture analysis code that uses stress-intensity factors and material-property data found in 'look-up' tables or from equations. NASA is conducting critical experiments necessary to verify the predictive capabilities of the codes, and these tests represent a first step in the technology-validation and industry-acceptance processes. NASA has established cooperative programs with aircraft manufacturers to facilitate the comprehensive transfer of this technology by making these advanced structural analysis codes available to industry.

  4. Advanced multiphysics coupling for LWR fuel performance analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, J. D.; Tonks, M. R.; Gleicher, F. N.; Spencer, B. W.; Novascone, S. R.; Williamson, R. L.; Pastore, G.; Perez, D. M.

    2015-10-01

    Even the most basic nuclear fuel analysis is a multiphysics undertaking, as a credible simulation must consider at a minimum coupled heat conduction and mechanical deformation. The need for more realistic fuel modeling under a variety of conditions invariably leads to a desire to include coupling between a more complete set of the physical phenomena influencing fuel behavior, including neutronics, thermal hydraulics, and mechanisms occurring at lower length scales. This paper covers current efforts toward coupled multiphysics LWR fuel modeling in three main areas. The first area covered in this paper concerns thermomechanical coupling. The interaction of these two physics, particularly related to the feedback effect associated with heat transfer and mechanical contact at the fuel/clad gap, provides numerous computational challenges. An outline is provided of an effective approach used to manage the nonlinearities associated with an evolving gap in BISON, a nuclear fuel performance application. A second type of multiphysics coupling described here is that of coupling neutronics with thermomechanical LWR fuel performance. DeCART, a high-fidelity core analysis program based on the method of characteristics, has been coupled to BISON. DeCART provides sub-pin level resolution of the multigroup neutron flux, with resonance treatment, during a depletion or a fast transient simulation. Two-way coupling between these codes was achieved by mapping fission rate density and fast neutron flux fields from DeCART to BISON and the temperature field from BISON to DeCART while employing a Picard iterative algorithm. Finally, the need for multiscale coupling is considered. Fission gas production and evolution significantly impact fuel performance by causing swelling, a reduction in the thermal conductivity, and fission gas release. The mechanisms involved occur at the atomistic and grain scale and are therefore not the domain of a fuel performance code. However, it is possible to use

  5. Recent Advances on Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Cheng, C.; Lin, P.

    2002-12-01

    Before the occurrence of the September 21, 1999, Chi-Chi Taiwan earthquake (MW7.6), the results of probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) from different agencies and different authors were totally underestimated earthquake hazard in Central Taiwan. The shortcoming of previous PSHA in Taiwan is due to lack of proper handling activity of fault sources. Other impacts on PSHA after the Chi-Chi earthquake includes: previously-used local magnitude ML is saturated at large magnitude, relative low of ground-motion level for a MW 7.6 earthquake, distinct hangingwall effect, velocity pulse of directivity and fling, and a must to use closest distance to fault in developing a ground-motion attenuation relationship and in PSHA. We firstly worked out the earthquake catalog and the strong-motion records, and established a main-shock catalog in moment magnitude MW, a database for strong-motion spectral accelerations (Sa) for each major earthquake and each recording station, and a database for attributes of active faults. Then, we carefully divided the earthquake sources into crustal earthquakes, subduction zone interface earthquakes and subduction zone intraslab earthquakes, and divided the site condition into hard site and soft site, and considered hangingwall effect for certain faults. We adopted the closest distance to seismogenic rupture and selected the Campbell form for regression analysis of Sa attenuation relationship for each combination of conditions. Totally eight sets of good quality Sa attenuation equation with 18 different spectral periods each were got. For PSHA, our primary achievement is the accomplishment of assessing fault parameters and developing a characteristic-earthquake model for each fault. We adopted the logic-tree method to handle uncertainty of parameters. Result reveals that the use of fault sources in PSHA is absolutely necessary in a tectonic active region such as in Taiwan. More meaningful hazard pattern and more reasonable hazard level have

  6. Advanced multiphysics coupling for LWR fuel performance analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hales, J. D.; Tonks, M. R.; Gleicher, F. N.; Spencer, B. W.; Novascone, S. R.; Williamson, R. L.; Pastore, G.; Perez, D. M.

    2015-10-01

    Even the most basic nuclear fuel analysis is a multiphysics undertaking, as a credible simulation must consider at a minimum coupled heat conduction and mechanical deformation. The need for more realistic fuel modeling under a variety of conditions invariably leads to a desire to include coupling between a more complete set of the physical phenomena influencing fuel behavior, including neutronics, thermal hydraulics, and mechanisms occurring at lower length scales. This paper covers current efforts toward coupled multiphysics LWR fuel modeling in three main areas. The first area covered in this paper concerns thermomechanical coupling. The interaction of these two physics,more » particularly related to the feedback effect associated with heat transfer and mechanical contact at the fuel/clad gap, provides numerous computational challenges. An outline is provided of an effective approach used to manage the nonlinearities associated with an evolving gap in BISON, a nuclear fuel performance application. A second type of multiphysics coupling described here is that of coupling neutronics with thermomechanical LWR fuel performance. DeCART, a high-fidelity core analysis program based on the method of characteristics, has been coupled to BISON. DeCART provides sub-pin level resolution of the multigroup neutron flux, with resonance treatment, during a depletion or a fast transient simulation. Two-way coupling between these codes was achieved by mapping fission rate density and fast neutron flux fields from DeCART to BISON and the temperature field from BISON to DeCART while employing a Picard iterative algorithm. Finally, the need for multiscale coupling is considered. Fission gas production and evolution significantly impact fuel performance by causing swelling, a reduction in the thermal conductivity, and fission gas release. The mechanisms involved occur at the atomistic and grain scale and are therefore not the domain of a fuel performance code. However, it is

  7. Characterization of Maghsail meteorite from Oman by Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and petrographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rawas, A. D.; Gismelseed, A. M.; Al-Kathiri, A. F.; Elzain, M. E.; Yousif, A. A.; Al-Kathiri, S. B.; Widatallah, H. M.; Abdalla, S. B.

    2008-09-01

    The meteorite found at Maghsail (16 55 70 N 53 46 69 E) west of Salalah Oman, has been studied by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-diffractometry and petrographic microscopy. In the polished section the meteorite exhibits a porphyritic texture consisting of pyroxene and olivine phenocrysts in a fine to medium grained ground mass in addition to minor phases possibly skeletal chromite, troilite and minute amount of iron oxides. X-ray diffraction supports the existence of these compounds. The Mössbauer spectra of powdered material from the core of the rock at 298 K and 78 K exhibit a mixture of magnetic and paramagnetic components. The paramagnetic components are assigned to the silicate minerals olivine and pyroxene. On the other hand, the magnetic spectra reveal the presence of troilite and iron oxides. The petrographic analyses indicate that the iron oxides are terrestrial alteration products.

  8. Petrographic and geochemical characteristics of a section through the Tiva Canyon Tuff at Antler Ridge, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, F.R.; Widmann, B.L.; Dickerson, R.P.; Byers, F.M. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    The Tiva Canyon Tuff of the Paintbrush Group of Miocene age caps much of Yucca Mountain, Nevada and is a compositionally zoned, compound cooling, pyroclastic flow that ranges from a dominantly high-silica rhyolitic base to a quartz-latitic caprock. Petrographic and geochemical studies have focused on rigorously defining the internal stratigraphy of this unit to support the detailed mapping of the Ghost Dance fault and other structures in the central fault block of Yucca Mountain. This study shows that devitrification textures and vapor phase mineralogy, in addition to other physical attributes such as pumice variability (flattening) and crystal content, can be used as distinguishing criteria to better define lithologic zones within the Tiva Canyon Tuff. In addition, the study also shows that the petrographic textures and chemistry of the groundmass vary systematically within recognizable lithologic zones and may be used to characterize and vertically divide litho-stratigraphic zones within the Tiva Canyon Tuff.

  9. Advanced Thermal Simulator Testing: Thermal Analysis and Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David; Reid, Robert; Adams, Mike; Davis, Joe

    2008-01-21

    Work at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center seeks to develop high fidelity, electrically heated thermal simulators that represent fuel elements in a nuclear reactor design to support non-nuclear testing applicable to the potential development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. Comparison between the fuel pins and thermal simulators is made at the outer fuel clad surface, which corresponds to the outer sheath surface in the thermal simulator. The thermal simulators that are currently being tested correspond to a liquid metal cooled reactor design that could be applied for Lunar surface power. These simulators are designed to meet the geometric and power requirements of a proposed surface power reactor design, accommodate testing of various axial power profiles, and incorporate imbedded instrumentation. This paper reports the results of thermal simulator analysis and testing in a bare element configuration, which does not incorporate active heat removal, and testing in a water-cooled calorimeter designed to mimic the heat removal that would be experienced in a reactor core.

  10. Analysis of Advanced Respiratory Support Onboard ISS and CCV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Ronak V.; Kertsman, Eric L.; Alexander, David J.; Duchesne, Ted; Law, Jennifer; Roden, Sean K.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is collaborating with private entities for the development of commercial space vehicles. The Space and Clinical Operations Division was tasked to review the oxygen and respiratory support system and recommend what capabilities, if any, the vehicle should have to support the return of an ill or injured crewmember. The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) was utilized as a data source for the development of these recommendations. The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) was used to simulate a six month, six crew, International Space Station (ISS) mission. Three medical system scenarios were considered based on the availability of (1) oxygen only, (2) oxygen and a ventilator, or (3) neither oxygen nor ventilator. The IMM analysis provided probability estimates of medical events that would require either oxygen or ventilator support. It also provided estimates of crew health, the probability of evacuation, and the probability of loss of crew life secondary to medical events for each of the three medical system scenarios. These IMM outputs were used as objective data to enable evidence-based decisions regarding oxygen and respiratory support system requirements for commercial crew vehicles. The IMM provides data that may be utilized to support informed decisions regarding the development of medical systems for commercial crew vehicles.

  11. Recent Advances in Water Analysis with Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacAskill, John A.; Tsikata, Edem

    2014-01-01

    We report on progress made in developing a water sampling system for detection and analysis of volatile organic compounds in water with a gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS). Two approaches are described herein. The first approach uses a custom water pre-concentrator for performing trap and purge of VOCs from water. The second approach uses a custom micro-volume, split-splitless injector that is compatible with air and water. These water sampling systems will enable a single GC-based instrument to analyze air and water samples for VOC content. As reduced mass, volume, and power is crucial for long-duration, manned space-exploration, these water sampling systems will demonstrate the ability of a GCMS to monitor both air and water quality of the astronaut environment, thereby reducing the amount of required instrumentation for long duration habitation. Laboratory prototypes of these water sampling systems have been constructed and tested with a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer as well as a thermal conductivity detector. Presented herein are details of these water sampling system with preliminary test results.

  12. Coded aperture Fast Neutron Analysis: Latest design advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accorsi, Roberto; Lanza, Richard C.

    2001-07-01

    Past studies have showed that materials of concern like explosives or narcotics can be identified in bulk from their atomic composition. Fast Neutron Analysis (FNA) is a nuclear method capable of providing this information even when considerable penetration is needed. Unfortunately, the cross sections of the nuclear phenomena and the solid angles involved are typically small, so that it is difficult to obtain high signal-to-noise ratios in short inspection times. CAFNAaims at combining the compound specificity of FNA with the potentially high SNR of Coded Apertures, an imaging method successfully used in far-field 2D applications. The transition to a near-field, 3D and high-energy problem prevents a straightforward application of Coded Apertures and demands a thorough optimization of the system. In this paper, the considerations involved in the design of a practical CAFNA system for contraband inspection, its conclusions, and an estimate of the performance of such a system are presented as the evolution of the ideas presented in previous expositions of the CAFNA concept.

  13. Advances in directional borehole radar data analysis and visualization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.V.G.; Brown, P.J., II

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is developing a directional borehole radar (DBOR) tool for mapping fractures, lithologic changes, and underground utility and void detection. An important part of the development of the DBOR tool is data analysis and visualization, with the aim of making the software graphical user interface (GUI) intuitive and easy to use. The DBOR software system consists of a suite of signal and image processing routines written in Research Systems' Interactive Data Language (IDL). The software also serves as a front-end to many widely accepted Colorado School of Mines Center for Wave Phenomena (CWP) Seismic UNIX (SU) algorithms (Cohen and Stockwell, 2001). Although the SU collection runs natively in a UNIX environment, our system seamlessly emulates a UNIX session within a widely used PC operating system (MicroSoft Windows) using GNU tools (Noer, 1998). Examples are presented of laboratory data acquired with the prototype tool from two different experimental settings. The first experiment imaged plastic pipes in a macro-scale sand tank. The second experiment monitored the progress of an invasion front resulting from oil injection. Finally, challenges to further development and planned future work are discussed.

  14. Advanced Thermal Simulator Testing: Thermal Analysis and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David; Reid, Robert; Adams, Mike; Davis, Joe

    2008-01-01

    Work at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center seeks to develop high fidelity, electrically heated thermal simulators that represent fuel elements in a nuclear reactor design to support non-nuclear testing applicable to the development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. Comparison between the fuel pins and thermal simulators is made at the outer fuel clad surface, which corresponds to the outer sheath surface in the thermal simulator. The thermal simulators that are currently being tested correspond to a SNAP derivative reactor design that could be applied for Lunar surface power. These simulators are designed to meet the geometric and power requirements of a proposed surface power reactor design, accommodate testing of various axial power profiles, and incorporate imbedded instrumentation. This paper reports the results of thermal simulator analysis and testing in a bare element configuration, which does not incorporate active heat removal, and testing in a water-cooled calorimeter designed to mimic the heat removal that would be experienced in a reactor core.

  15. Advanced microgrid design and analysis for forward operating bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reasoner, Jonathan

    This thesis takes a holistic approach in creating an improved electric power generation system for a forward operating base (FOB) in the future through the design of an isolated microgrid. After an extensive literature search, this thesis found a need for drastic improvement of the FOB power system. A thorough design process analyzed FOB demand, researched demand side management improvements, evaluated various generation sources and energy storage options, and performed a HOMERRTM discrete optimization to determine the best microgrid design. Further sensitivity analysis was performed to see how changing parameters would affect the outcome. Lastly, this research also looks at some of the challenges which are associated with incorporating a design which relies heavily on inverter-based generation sources, and gives possible solutions to help make a renewable energy powered microgrid a reality. While this thesis uses a FOB as the case study, the process and discussion can be adapted to aide in the design of an off-grid small-scale power grid which utilizes high-penetration levels of renewable energy.

  16. A petrographic and geochemical investigation into the Gatun structure, a possible Tertiary impact structure near Gamboa, Republic de Panama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornabene, L. L.; Ryan, J. G.; Stewart, R. H.

    2001-05-01

    The Gatun Structure, (Latitude N 09 deg 05' 58.1", Longitude W 79 deg 47' 21.8", situated in the triple-canopy rainforest 10 km to the WSW of the Gamboa and about 2 km south of the Isle of Barbacoas, Republic de Panama), is a partially inundated, quasi-concentric surface feature 2.2km in diameter, which appears in aerial photographs and in radar imagery as an arcuate chain of islands with a raised central feature. Although deeply eroded, the structure possesses traits consistent with complex crater morphology: an elevated circular central uplift feature approximately 500-600 m in diameter and 50m high, and arcuate boundary ridges (a possible rim structure) ranging from 50-100 meters high. Within the central peak, highly altered and fractured siltstone of the Gatuncillo formation (Eocene) are uplifted and exposed through surrounding calcareous units of the Caimito formation (Oligocene), the major target rocks in the structure. The structure is crosscut by numerous dikes of unshocked basalt and basaltic andesite related to volcanism along the Panamanian segment of the Central American arc to the south. Analysis of mineral assemblages of units within the structure, and mineral compositions were measured via SEM-EDS and electron microprobe, using the JEOL SEM-Probe facility at the Center for the Study of Materials in Extreme Conditions (CeSMEC) at Florida International University. Bulk chemical and trace element analysis of whole rock samples were conducted via DC Plasma spectrometry at USF. Occurring concentrically within the structure, are limestones with anomalous spherical glass inclusions, both black and white hypocrystalline glasses (melt rocks?), lithic breccias, and melt-bearing breccias, some of which contain flow banding and evidence of selective melting. Three types of spherules (glass, fluid-drop and lithic), a pyroxene-quartz "necklace" disequilibrium structure and possibly shocked amphibole are all petrographic indicators of a possible impact event. In

  17. Insights to Meteorites and Impact Processes provided by Advanced EBSD Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palasse, Laurie; Berlin, Jana; Goran, Daniel; Tagle, Roald; Hamers, Maartje; Assis Fernandes, Vera; Deutsch, Alexander; Schulte, Peter; Salge, Tobias

    2013-04-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is a powerful analytical technique for assessing the petrographic texture of rocks and the crystallographic orientation of minerals therein using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Innovations in EBSD technology include colour-coded forescattered electron (FSE) images, high resolution and highly sensitive EBSD detectors, together with advanced EDS integration. It allows to accurately identify and discriminate different phases, and to investigate microstructures related to shock metamorphism. As an example, shocked carbonates and shocked quartz reveal a complex thermal history during post-shock cooling. (A) EBSD studies of calcite ejecta particles from the Chicxulub impact event, at the K-Pg boundary of El Guayal, Mexico (~520 km SW of the Chicxulub crater centre) display various microstructures [1] and spherulitic calcite ejecta particles reveal a fibre texture of elongated crystals with a preferred orientation. This indicates the presence of carbonate melts which were ejected at T>1240°C and P>40 bar from upper target lithologies and crystallized at cooling rates of ~100´s °C/s [2]. The calcite particles of El Guayal and the K/Pg boundary of La Lajilla (~1000 km W of the crater centre) show distinct microstructures represented by unoriented, equiaxed crystals with random orientation distribution. It documents recrystallization upon impact induced thermal stress at T>550°C during prolonged atmospheric transport. (B) Combined EBSD, FSE and cathodoluminescence (CL) studies of semi-amorphous shocked quartz of Chicxulub, Ries and Popigai impactites, reveal various microstructures. Colour-coded FSE imaging reveal recrystallized/deformed bands in Ries and Popigai samples indicative of planar deformation features. EBSD studies of Popigai allow to distinguish twinned Qz, α-Qz and α-cristobalite along the transition zone between shocked gneiss clast and impact melt. Recrystallized Qz grains are associated with amorphous SiO2

  18. Advancing Collaborative Climate Studies through Globally Distributed Geospatial Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R.; Percivall, G.

    2009-12-01

    Infrastructure and the broader GEOSS architecture. Of specific interest to this session is the work on geospatial workflows and geo-processing and data discovery and access. CCIP demonstrates standards-based interoperability between geospatial applications in the service of Climate Change analysis. CCIP is planned to be a yearly exercise. It consists of a network of online data services (WCS, WFS, SOS), analysis services (WPS, WCPS, WMS), and clients that exercise those services. In 2009, CCIP focuses on Australia, and the initial application of existing OGC services to climate studies. The results of the 2009 CCIP will serve as requirements for more complex geo-processing services to be developed for CCIP 2010. The benefits of CCIP include accelerating the implementation of the GCOS, and building confidence that implementations using multi-vendor interoperable technologies can help resolve vexing climate change questions. AIP-2: Architecture Implementation Pilot, Phase 2 CCIP: Climate Challenge Integration Plugfest GEO: Group on Earth Observations GEOSS: Global Earth Observing System of Systems GCOS: Global Climate Observing System OGC: Open Geospatial Consortium SOS: Sensor Observation Service WCS: Web Coverage Service WCPS: Web Coverage Processing Service WFS: Web Feature Service WMS: Web Mapping Service

  19. Interglacial climate dynamics and advanced time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudelsee, Manfred; Bermejo, Miguel; Köhler, Peter; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2013-04-01

    Studying the climate dynamics of past interglacials (IGs) helps to better assess the anthropogenically influenced dynamics of the current IG, the Holocene. We select the IG portions from the EPICA Dome C ice core archive, which covers the past 800 ka, to apply methods of statistical time series analysis (Mudelsee 2010). The analysed variables are deuterium/H (indicating temperature) (Jouzel et al. 2007), greenhouse gases (Siegenthaler et al. 2005, Loulergue et al. 2008, L¨ü thi et al. 2008) and a model-co-derived climate radiative forcing (Köhler et al. 2010). We select additionally high-resolution sea-surface-temperature records from the marine sedimentary archive. The first statistical method, persistence time estimation (Mudelsee 2002) lets us infer the 'climate memory' property of IGs. Second, linear regression informs about long-term climate trends during IGs. Third, ramp function regression (Mudelsee 2000) is adapted to look on abrupt climate changes during IGs. We compare the Holocene with previous IGs in terms of these mathematical approaches, interprete results in a climate context, assess uncertainties and the requirements to data from old IGs for yielding results of 'acceptable' accuracy. This work receives financial support from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Project ClimSens within the DFG Research Priority Program INTERDYNAMIK) and the European Commission (Marie Curie Initial Training Network LINC, No. 289447, within the 7th Framework Programme). References Jouzel J, Masson-Delmotte V, Cattani O, Dreyfus G, Falourd S, Hoffmann G, Minster B, Nouet J, Barnola JM, Chappellaz J, Fischer H, Gallet JC, Johnsen S, Leuenberger M, Loulergue L, Luethi D, Oerter H, Parrenin F, Raisbeck G, Raynaud D, Schilt A, Schwander J, Selmo E, Souchez R, Spahni R, Stauffer B, Steffensen JP, Stenni B, Stocker TF, Tison JL, Werner M, Wolff EW (2007) Orbital and millennial Antarctic climate variability over the past 800,000 years. Science 317:793. Köhler P, Bintanja R

  20. Specification, Design, and Analysis of Advanced HUMS Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, Ravi

    2004-01-01

    During the two-year project period, we have worked on several aspects of domain-specific architectures for HUMS. In particular, we looked at using scenario-based approach for the design and designed a language for describing such architectures. The language is now being used in all aspects of our HUMS design. In particular, we have made contributions in the following areas. 1) We have employed scenarios in the development of HUMS in three main areas. They are: (a) To improve reusability by using scenarios as a library indexing tool and as a domain analysis tool; (b) To improve maintainability by recording design rationales from two perspectives - problem domain and solution domain; (c) To evaluate the software architecture. 2) We have defined a new architectural language called HADL or HUMS Architectural Definition Language. It is a customized version of xArch/xADL. It is based on XML and, hence, is easily portable from domain to domain, application to application, and machine to machine. Specifications written in HADL can be easily read and parsed using the currently available XML parsers. Thus, there is no need to develop a plethora of software to support HADL. 3) We have developed an automated design process that involves two main techniques: (a) Selection of solutions from a large space of designs; (b) Synthesis of designs. However, the automation process is not an absolute Artificial Intelligence (AI) approach though it uses a knowledge-based system that epitomizes a specific HUMS domain. The process uses a database of solutions as an aid to solve the problems rather than creating a new design in the literal sense. Since searching is adopted as the main technique, the challenges involved are: (a) To minimize the effort in searching the database where a very large number of possibilities exist; (b) To develop representations that could conveniently allow us to depict design knowledge evolved over many years; (c) To capture the required information that aid the

  1. Advanced morphological analysis of patterns of thin anodic porous alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Toccafondi, C.; Stępniowski, W.J.; Leoncini, M.; Salerno, M.

    2014-08-15

    Different conditions of fabrication of thin anodic porous alumina on glass substrates have been explored, obtaining two sets of samples with varying pore density and porosity, respectively. The patterns of pores have been imaged by high resolution scanning electron microscopy and analyzed by innovative methods. The regularity ratio has been extracted from radial profiles of the fast Fourier transforms of the images. Additionally, the Minkowski measures have been calculated. It was first observed that the regularity ratio averaged across all directions is properly corrected by the coefficient previously determined in the literature. Furthermore, the angularly averaged regularity ratio for the thin porous alumina made during short single-step anodizations is lower than that of hexagonal patterns of pores as for thick porous alumina from aluminum electropolishing and two-step anodization. Therefore, the regularity ratio represents a reliable measure of pattern order. At the same time, the lower angular spread of the regularity ratio shows that disordered porous alumina is more isotropic. Within each set, when changing either pore density or porosity, both regularity and isotropy remain rather constant, showing consistent fabrication quality of the experimental patterns. Minor deviations are tentatively discussed with the aid of the Minkowski measures, and the slight decrease in both regularity and isotropy for the final data-points of the porosity set is ascribed to excess pore opening and consequent pore merging. - Highlights: • Thin porous alumina is partly self-ordered and pattern analysis is required. • Regularity ratio is often misused: we fix the averaging and consider its spread. • We also apply the mathematical tool of Minkowski measures, new in this field. • Regularity ratio shows pattern isotropy and Minkowski helps in assessment. • General agreement with perfect artificial patterns confirms the good manufacturing.

  2. Solution-processed photovoltaics with advanced characterization and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Hsin-Sheng

    In support of hyperspectral imaging system design and parameter trade-off research, an analytical end-to-end model to simulate the remote sensing system pipeline and to forecast remote sensing system performance has been implemented. It is also being made available to the remote sensing community through a website. Users are able to forecast hyperspectral imaging system performance by defining an observational scenario along with imaging system parameters. For system modeling, the implemented analytical model includes scene, sensor and target characteristics as well as atmospheric features, background spectral reflectance statistics, sensor specifications and target class reflectance statistics. The sensor model has been extended to include the airborne ProspecTIR instrument. To validate the analytical model, experiments were designed and conducted. The predictive system model has been verified by comparing the forecast results to ones obtained using real world data collected during the RIT SHARE 2012 collection. Results include the use of large calibration panels to show the predicted radiance consistent with the collected data. Grass radiance predicted from ground truth reflectance data also compare well with the real world collected data, and an eigenvector analysis also supports the validity of the predictions. Two examples of subpixel target detection scenario are presented. One is to detect subpixel wood yellow painted planks in an asphalt playground, and the other is to detect subpixel green painted wood planks in grass. To validate our system performance, the detection performance are analyzed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves in a comprehensive scenario setting. The predicted ROC result of the yellow planks matches well the ROC derived from collected data. However, the predicted ROC curve of green planks differs from collected data ROC curve. Additional experiments were conducted and analyzed to discuss the possible reasons of the

  3. Quantitative analysis of autophagy using advanced 3D fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Changou, Chun A; Wolfson, Deanna L; Ahluwalia, Balpreet Singh; Bold, Richard J; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Chuang, Frank Y S

    2013-01-01

    stages of autophagy induction. With commercially available digital image analysis applications, we can readily obtain statistical information about autophagosome and lysosome number, size, distribution, and degree of colocalization from any imaged cell. This information allows us to precisely track the progress of autophagy in living cells and enables our continued investigation into the role of autophagy in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:23665532

  4. Teaching Advanced Data Analysis Tools to High School Astronomy Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, David V.; Herring, Julie; Hintz, Eric G.

    2015-01-01

    A major barrier to becoming an astronomer is learning how to analyze astronomical data, such as using photometry to compare the brightness of stars. Most fledgling astronomers learn observation, data reduction, and analysis skills through an upper division college class. If the same skills could be taught in an introductory high school astronomy class, then more students would have an opportunity to do authentic science earlier, with implications for how many choose to become astronomers. Several software tools have been developed that can analyze astronomical data ranging from fairly straightforward (AstroImageJ and DS9) to very complex (IRAF and DAOphot). During the summer of 2014, a study was undertaken at Brigham Young University through a Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program to evaluate the effectiveness and ease-of-use of these four software packages. Standard tasks tested included creating a false-color IR image using WISE data in DS9, Adobe Photoshop, and The Gimp; a multi-aperture analyses of variable stars over time using AstroImageJ; creating Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) of stars using photometry at multiple wavelengths in AstroImageJ and DS9; and color-magnitude and hydrogen alpha index diagrams for open star clusters using IRAF and DAOphot. Tutorials were then written and combined with screen captures to teach high school astronomy students at Walden School of Liberal Arts in Provo, UT how to perform these same tasks. They analyzed image data using the four software packages, imported it into Microsoft Excel, and created charts using images from BYU's 36-inch telescope at their West Mountain Observatory. The students' attempts to complete these tasks were observed, mentoring was provided, and the students then reported on their experience through a self-reflection essay and concept test. Results indicate that high school astronomy students can successfully complete professional-level astronomy data analyses when given detailed

  5. WinSRFR: Current Advances in Software for Surface Irrigation Simulation and Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Significant advances have been made over the last decade in the development of software for surface irrigation analysis. WinSRFR is an integrated tool that combines unsteady flow simulation with tools for system evaluation/parameter estimation, system design, and for operational optimization. Ongoi...

  6. The Effect of Modeling and Silent Analysis on the Performance Effectiveness of Advanced Elementary Instrumentalists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortney, Patrick M.

    1992-01-01

    By keeping abreast of the latest research in the field, music educators can better understand how practicing helps students to use practice methods that are the most effective. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative effectiveness of modeling and silent analysis on the performance ability of advanced elementary school…

  7. Development of Advanced Light-Duty Powertrain and Hybrid Analysis Tool (SAE 2013-01-0808)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Advanced Light-Duty Powertrain and Hybrid Analysis tool was created by Environmental Protection Agency to evaluate the Greenhouse gas emissions and fuel efficiency from light-duty vehicles. It is a physics-based, forward-looking, full vehicle computer simulator, which is cap...

  8. Advanced GIS Exercise: Performing Error Analysis in ArcGIS ModelBuilder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Steven T.; Post, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of Geographic Information Systems is quickly becoming an integral part of the natural resource professionals' skill set. With the growing need of professionals with these skills, we created an advanced geographic information systems (GIS) exercise for students at Clemson University to introduce them to the concept of error analysis,…

  9. Content Analysis Schedule for Bilingual Education Programs: HABLA-Helping Advance Bilingual Learning in Abernathy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Richard T.; Shore, Marietta Saravia

    This content analysis schedule for HABLA-Helping Advance Bilingual Learning in Abernathy, Texas, presents information on the history, funding, and scope of the project. Included are sociolinguistic process variables such as the native and dominant languages of students and their interaction. Information is provided on staff selection and the…

  10. Women, Occupational Advancement, and Mentoring: An Analysis of One Public Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vertz, Laura L.

    1985-01-01

    Studies obstacles to career advancement of women in the Milwaukee District Office of the Internal Revenue Service. Includes an analysis of obstacles that must be overcome if mentoring is to be successful. Describes the research design and discusses specific obstacles as they pertain to mentoring. Concludes that a systematic approach would be most…

  11. Analysis of a rotating advanced-technology space station for the year 2025

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queijo, M. J.; Butterfield, A. J.; Cuddihy, W. F.; King, C. B.; Stone, R. W.; Garn, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis is made of several aspects of an advanced-technology rotating space station configuration generated under a previous study. The analysis includes examination of several modifications of the configuration, interface with proposed launch systems, effects of low-gravity environment on human subjects, and the space station assembly sequence. Consideration was given also to some aspects of space station rotational dynamics, surface charging, and the possible application of tethers.

  12. Analysis of advanced programs (Study 2.3). Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    An analysis of advanced programs for space missions is presented. The subjects discussed are (1) alternate space shuttle configurations, (2) space transportation systems, (3) computer programs and methodology to estimate program cost implications of space vehicle program uncertainties, (4) vehicle synthesis program, (5) relative effectiveness of various proposals for space vehicles, and (6) cost analysis of solid propellant rocket engine program to support space shuttle vehicle.

  13. A Petrographic History of Martian Meteorite ALH84001: Two Shocks and an Ancient Age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    1995-01-01

    ALH84001 is an igneous meteorite, an orthopyroxenite of martian origin. It contains petrographic evidence of two shock metamorphic events, separated by thermal and chemical events. The evidence for two shock events suggests that ALH84001 is ancient and perhaps a sample of the martian highlands. From petrography and mineral chemistry, the history of ALH84001 must include: crystallization from magma, a first shock (impact) metamorphism, thermal metamorphism, low-temperature chemical alteration, and a second shock (impact) metamorphism. Originally, ALH84001 was igneous, an orthopyroxene-chromite cumulate. In the first shock event, the igneous rock was cut by melt-breccia or cataclastic veinlets, now bands of equigranular fine-grained pyroxene and other minerals (crush zones). Intact fragments of the cumulate were fractured and strained (now converted to polygonized zones). The subsequent thermal metamorphism (possibly related to the first shock) annealed the melt-breccia or cataclastic veinlets to their present granoblastic texture and permitted chemical homogenization of all mineral species present. The temperature of metamorphism was at least 875 C, based on mineral thermometers. Next, Mg-Fe-Ca carbonates and pyrite replaced plagioclase in both clasts and granular bands, producing ellipsoidal carbonate globules with sub-micron scale compositional stratigraphy, repeated identically in all globules, The second shock event produced microfault offsets of carbonate stratigraphy and other mineral contacts, radial fractures around chromite and maskelynite, and strain birefringence in pyroxene. Maskelynite could not have been preserved from the first shock event, because it would have crystallized back to plagioclase. The martian source area for ALH84001 must permit this complex, multiple impact history. Very few craters on young igneous surfaces are on or near earlier impact features. It is more likely that ALH84001 was ejected from an old igneous unit (Hesperian or

  14. Palynologic and petrographic cycles in the McLeansboro Group, Western Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Hower, J.C. . Center for Applied Energy Research); Helfrich, C.T. ); Williams, D.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The McLeansboro Group in the Western Kentucky coal field spans the upper Desmoinesian and the Missourian and Virgilian series. Extensive drilling has demonstrated the lateral continuity of major and minor beds in the group, making it possible to study vertical and lateral changes in palynology and petrology. The Desmoinesian (Westphalian D) Baker (No. 13) and Wheatcroft (No. 13a) coal beds were included in the study but the primary emphasis is on the Missourian and Virgilian (Stephanian) coals. Patoka fm (lower Missourian) coals are dominated by tree fern spores with lesser sphenopsids, ferns, and cordaites. This is in marked contrast to the arborescent lycopod-dominated Desmoinesian coals. Only the No. 15 coal bed exceeds 80% vitrinite with the No. 16 coal bed vitrinite content of < 72% being the lowest of any Western Kentucky humic coal. The Bond Fm. (upper Missourian) represents a distinct floristic cycle with a greater diversity of plant groups including herbaceous lycopods, relatively minor contributors to the Patoka coals. The coals generally exceed 80% vitrinite. The Mattoon Fm. (Virgilian) coals have a variety of polynomorph assemblages. The low-sulfur Geiger Lake coal bed is dominated by tree ferns with important contributions from ferns and sphenopsids. Similar to the underlying tree fern interval, vitrinite contents are <80%. The uppermost Mattoon coals are dominated by ferns and are notable in being the only >1 m thick coals in the Stephanian portion of the section, with the top coal being 4.3 m thick. The uppermost coals are generally > 80% vitrinite. The palynologic/petrographic cycles appear to represent fluctuating dry (low vitrinite) and wet intervals within the Missourian/Virgilian which itself was drier than the Desmoinesian.

  15. Petrographic and Facies Properties of the Evaporites in the Cihanbeyli-Yeniceoba Basin (Central Anatolia, Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sami Us, Muhammed; Tekin, Erdoǧan

    2016-04-01

    The Cihanbeyli-Yeniceoba Tertiary basin and other neighbouring basins such as Haymana on the NW and Tuzgölü on the east were formed after ophiolite emplacement and then evolved as tectonic controlled basins bordered with normal and oblique-slip fault systems NW-SE in extending. Where sedimentation commenced with Late Cretaceous-Early Paleocene marine transgression and ended by late Middle Eocene-Early Oligocene regression that involved thick evaporite sedimentation just before the onset of the terrestrial regime through the early Late Oligocene-Pliocene time. This study mainly was focused on the evaporitic sediments of the Late Oligocene-Middle Miocene aged Gökdaǧ Formation which unconformably overlain by fluvial and alluvial units of the Cihanbeyli Formation (Late Miocene-Early Pliocene). Typical outcrops have been seen around the Yeniceoba-Kütükuşaǧı-Kuşca region located in the western part of Tuz Gölü (Salt Lake). The study includes several targets. These are stratigraphical contact and relationship between evaporite and non-evaporite units, evaporite environments and mineralogical, petrographical and microtextural features of the evaporites. The following five evaporite facies were described: a) massive gypsum (F1), b) laminated-banded gypsum (F2), c) nodular gypsum (F3), d) clastic gypsum (F4), e) satin-spar gypsum (F5). On the other hand polarized microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM) show that secondary gypsums are represented by alabastrine and porfiroblastic textures. Primary anhydrite relicts, euhedral celestine crystals accompanied with the secondary gypsum. Clastic gypsum is rich in fragment fossils (mostly nummulites) and kaolinite clay minerals. All data suggest that evaporites were widely deposited as basin margin evaporite that temporally underwent atmospheric conditions gave rise to detrital gypsum ranging from gypsarenite to gypsum conglomerate. Acknowledgement:This presentation was prepared MS thesis to financially

  16. A radiometric and petrographic approach to risk assessment at Alte Madonie Mounts region (Sicily, Italy).

    PubMed

    Lanzo, G; Rizzo, S; Tomarchio, E

    2014-03-01

    The main goal of this work was to assess the radiological hazard at Alte Madonie Mounts region (north-central Sicily, Italy) in response to rumours of an increase in the incidence of cancer in this area. A correlation between the natural radionuclide contents and the petrographic features of the soil and rock samples was also evaluated. A total of 41 samples of selected soils and rocks were collected, powdered, dried and sealed in 'Marinelli' beakers for 20 d prior to measurement to ensure that a radioactive equilibrium between (226)Ra and (214)Bi had been reached. A gamma-ray spectrometer was used to quantify the radioactivity concentrations. To determine (238)U and (232)Th activities, the 609.3-keV line from (214)Bi in secular equilibrium with (226)Ra and the 911-keV line from (228)Ac, with which (232)Th can be assumed to be in equilibrium, were used, respectively. The gamma transition of 1461 keV was used to determine (40)K activity. The average values of the concentrations of (214)Bi, (228)Ac and (40)K were 30, 17 and 227 Bq kg(-1), respectively, whereas the greatest values were 134, 59 and 748 Bq kg(-1), respectively. A linear relationship was found between the activity values of (214)Bi, (228)Ac and (40)K. An exception was found for a group of samples in which the (214)Bi activities were much higher than expected. The chemical compositions and mineralogical features of the samples permitted the justification of these anomalies. The results of the primordial radionuclide contents are reassuring from a radiation protection point of view because the activities of the uranium and thorium series products and of the (40)K do not present a significant radiological hazard. PMID:24106332

  17. Advancing Risk Analysis for Nanoscale Materials: Report from an International Workshop on the Role of Alternative Testing Strategies for Advancement.

    PubMed

    Shatkin, J A; Ong, Kimberly J; Beaudrie, Christian; Clippinger, Amy J; Hendren, Christine Ogilvie; Haber, Lynne T; Hill, Myriam; Holden, Patricia; Kennedy, Alan J; Kim, Baram; MacDonell, Margaret; Powers, Christina M; Sharma, Monita; Sheremeta, Lorraine; Stone, Vicki; Sultan, Yasir; Turley, Audrey; White, Ronald H

    2016-08-01

    The Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) has a history of bringing thought leadership to topics of emerging risk. In September 2014, the SRA Emerging Nanoscale Materials Specialty Group convened an international workshop to examine the use of alternative testing strategies (ATS) for manufactured nanomaterials (NM) from a risk analysis perspective. Experts in NM environmental health and safety, human health, ecotoxicology, regulatory compliance, risk analysis, and ATS evaluated and discussed the state of the science for in vitro and other alternatives to traditional toxicology testing for NM. Based on this review, experts recommended immediate and near-term actions that would advance ATS use in NM risk assessment. Three focal areas-human health, ecological health, and exposure considerations-shaped deliberations about information needs, priorities, and the next steps required to increase confidence in and use of ATS in NM risk assessment. The deliberations revealed that ATS are now being used for screening, and that, in the near term, ATS could be developed for use in read-across or categorization decision making within certain regulatory frameworks. Participants recognized that leadership is required from within the scientific community to address basic challenges, including standardizing materials, protocols, techniques and reporting, and designing experiments relevant to real-world conditions, as well as coordination and sharing of large-scale collaborations and data. Experts agreed that it will be critical to include experimental parameters that can support the development of adverse outcome pathways. Numerous other insightful ideas for investment in ATS emerged throughout the discussions and are further highlighted in this article. PMID:27510619

  18. Advancing complementary and alternative medicine through social network analysis and agent-based modeling.

    PubMed

    Frantz, Terrill L

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces the contemporary perspectives and techniques of social network analysis (SNA) and agent-based modeling (ABM) and advocates applying them to advance various aspects of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). SNA and ABM are invaluable methods for representing, analyzing and projecting complex, relational, social phenomena; they provide both an insightful vantage point and a set of analytic tools that can be useful in a wide range of contexts. Applying these methods in the CAM context can aid the ongoing advances in the CAM field, in both its scientific aspects and in developing broader acceptance in associated stakeholder communities. PMID:22327550

  19. Developing a Comprehensive Software Suite for Advanced Reactor Performance and Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pointer, William David; Bradley, Keith S; Fischer, Paul F; Smith, Micheal A; Tautges, Timothy J; Ferencz, Robert M; Martineau, Richard C; Jain, Rajeev; Obabko, Aleksandr; Billings, Jay Jay

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an introduction to the reactor analysis capabilities of the nuclear power reactor simulation tools that are being developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy s Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Toolkit. The NEAMS Toolkit is an integrated suite of multi-physics simulation tools that leverage high-performance computing to reduce uncertainty in the prediction of performance and safety of advanced reactor and fuel designs. The Toolkit effort is comprised of two major components, the Fuels Product Line (FPL), which provides tools for fuel performance analysis, and the Reactor Product Line (RPL), which provides tools for reactor performance and safety analysis. This paper provides an overview of the NEAMS RPL development effort.

  20. Advanced Damage Tolerance Analysis of International Space Station Pressure Wall Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.

    2006-01-01

    EM20/MSFC has sponsored technology in the area of advanced damage tolerance analysis tools used to analyze the International Space Station (ISS) pressure wall welds. The ISS European modules did not receive non-destructive evaluation (NDE) inspection after proof test. In final assembly configuration, most welds could only be inspected from one side, and some welds were uninspectible. Therefore, advanced damage tolerance analysis was required to determine the critical initial flaw sizes and predicted safe life for the pressure wall welds. EM20 sponsored the development of a new finite element tools using FEA-Crack and WARP3D to solve the problem. This presentation gives a brief overview of the new analytical tools and the analysis results.

  1. Overview of clinical flow cytometry data analysis: recent advances and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Pedreira, Carlos E; Costa, Elaine S; Lecrevisse, Quentin; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Orfao, Alberto

    2013-07-01

    Major technological advances in flow cytometry (FC), both for instrumentation and reagents, have emerged over the past few decades. These advances facilitate simultaneous evaluation of more parameters in single cells analyzed at higher speed. Consequently, larger and more complex data files that contain information about tens of parameters for millions of cells are generated. This increasing complexity has challenged pre-existing data analysis tools and promoted the development of new algorithms and tools for data analysis and visualization. Here, we review the currently available (conventional and newly developed) data analysis and visualization strategies that aim for easier, more objective, and robust interpretation of FC data both in biomedical research and clinical diagnostic laboratories. PMID:23746659

  2. Analysis of interior noise ground and flight test data for advanced turboprop aircraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, M. A.; Tran, B. N.

    1991-01-01

    Interior noise ground tests conducted on a DC-9 aircraft test section are described. The objectives were to study ground test and analysis techniques for evaluating the effectiveness of interior noise control treatments for advanced turboprop aircraft, and to study the sensitivity of the ground test results to changes in various test conditions. Noise and vibration measurements were conducted under simulated advanced turboprop excitation, for two interior noise control treatment configurations. These ground measurement results were compared with results of earlier UHB (Ultra High Bypass) Demonstrator flight tests with comparable interior treatment configurations. The Demonstrator is an MD-80 test aircraft with the left JT8D engine replaced with a prototype UHB advanced turboprop engine.

  3. Systems analysis and engineering of the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Rochau, G.E.; Hands, J.A.; Raglin, P.S.; Ramirez, J.J.

    1998-10-01

    The X-1 Advanced Radiation Source, which will produce {approximately} 16 MJ in x-rays, represents the next step in providing US Department of Energy`s Stockpile Stewardship program with the high-energy, large volume, laboratory x-ray sources needed for the Radiation Effects Science and Simulation (RES), Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), and Weapon Physics (WP) Programs. Advances in fast pulsed power technology and in z-pinch hohlraums on Sandia National Laboratories` Z Accelerator in 1997 provide sufficient basis for pursuing the development of X-1. This paper will introduce the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source Facility Project, describe the systems analysis and engineering approach being used, and identify critical technology areas being researched.

  4. Advanced Behavioral Applications in Schools: A Review of R. Douglas Greer's "Designing Teaching Strategies: An Applied Behavior Analysis Systems Approach"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moxley, Roy A.

    2004-01-01

    R. Douglas Greer's "Designing Teaching Strategies" is an important book directed to advanced students in applied behavior analysis for classrooms. This review presents some of the striking features of the Comprehensive Applied Behavior Analysis to Schooling (CABAS[R]) program and the individualized instruction that the book advances. These include…

  5. Recent advances in capillary electrophoretic migration techniques for pharmaceutical analysis (2013-2015).

    PubMed

    El Deeb, Sami; Wätzig, Hermann; Abd El-Hady, Deia; Sänger-van de Griend, Cari; Scriba, Gerhard K E

    2016-07-01

    This review updates and follows-up a previous review by highlighting recent advancements regarding capillary electromigration methodologies and applications in pharmaceutical analysis. General approaches such as quality by design as well as sample injection methods and detection sensitivity are discussed. The separation and analysis of drug-related substances, chiral CE, and chiral CE-MS in addition to the determination of physicochemical constants are addressed. The advantages of applying affinity capillary electrophoresis in studying receptor-ligand interactions are highlighted. Finally, current aspects related to the analysis of biopharmaceuticals are reviewed. The present review covers the literature between January 2013 and December 2015. PMID:26988029

  6. Application of advanced multidisciplinary analysis and optimization methods to vehicle design synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Consoli, Robert David; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    1990-01-01

    Advanced multidisciplinary analysis and optimization methods, namely system sensitivity analysis and non-hierarchical system decomposition, are applied to reduce the cost and improve the visibility of an automated vehicle design synthesis process. This process is inherently complex due to the large number of functional disciplines and associated interdisciplinary couplings. Recent developments in system sensitivity analysis as applied to complex non-hierarchic multidisciplinary design optimization problems enable the decomposition of these complex interactions into sub-processes that can be evaluated in parallel. The application of these techniques results in significant cost, accuracy, and visibility benefits for the entire design synthesis process.

  7. Engineering design and analysis of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Gallier, P.W.

    1993-01-20

    This project is sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for the Engineering Design and Analysis of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technologies: The major goal is to provide the simulation tools for modeling both conventional and advanced coal cleaning technologies. This DOE project is part of a major research initiative by the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) aimed at advancing three advanced coal cleaning technologies-heavy-liquid cycloning, selective agglomeration, and advanced froth flotation through the proof-of-concept (POC) level. The commercially available ASPEN PLUS process simulation package will be extended to handle coal cleaning applications. Algorithms for predicting the process performance, equipment size, and flowsheet economics of commercial coal cleaning devices and related ancillary equipment will be incorporated into the coal cleaning simulator. This report is submitted to document the progress of Aspen Technology, Inc. (AspenTech), its contractor, ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc.,(ICF KE) and CQ Inc., a subcontractor to ICF KE, for the period of October through December 1992. ICF KE is providing coal preparation consulting and processing engineering services in this work and they are responsible for recommending the design of models to represent conventional coal cleaning equipment and costing of these models. CQ Inc. is a subcontractor to ICF KE on Tasks 1-5.

  8. Parametric analysis of performance and design characteristics for advanced earth-to-orbit shuttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, E. A., Jr.; Strack, W. C.; Padrutt, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    Performance, trajectory, and design characteristics are presented for (1) a single-stage shuttle with a single advanced rocket engine, (2) a single-stage shuttle with an initial parallel chemical engine and advanced engine burn followed by an advanced engine sustainer burn, (3) a single-stage shuttle with an initial chemical engine burn followed by an advanced engine burn, and (4) a two-stage shuttle with a chemical propulsion booster stage and an advanced propulsion upper stage. The ascent trajectory profile includes a brief initial vertical rise; zero-lift flight through the sensible atmosphere; variational steering into an 83-kilometer by 185-kilometer intermediate orbit; and a fixed, 460-meter per second allowance for subsequent maneuvers. Results are given in terms of burnout mass fractions (including structure and payload), trajectory profiles, propellant loadings, and burn times. These results are generated with a trajectory analysis that includes a parametric variation of the specific impulse from 800 to 3000 seconds and the specific engine weight from 0 to 1.0.

  9. Stable isotopic, petrographic and trace element analyses of two stalagmites from Sirtlanini Cave, SW Turkey: insights into Mid-Late Holocene environmental and climatic change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peckover, Emily; Mason, Jennifer; Ozbek, Onur; Marca, Alina; Rowe, Peter; Andrews, Julian; Noble, Steve; Brindle, John; Baba, Alper; Kendall, Alan; Al-Omari, Sa'ad

    2015-04-01

    Palaeoclimatic and palaeoenvironmental reconstructions from two Holocene stalagmites (HY-8 and HY-9) from Sirtlanini Cave, southwest Turkey have been created using petrographic, stable isotope and trace element analyses where the stratigraphy of the stalagmites overlaps from ~6 ka. The cave elevation is 830 metres a.s.l., located 100 km northwest of Lake Golhisar, which has yielded a low resolution Holocene isotopic record (Eastwood et al. 2007), and 120 km northwest of Caltilar Höyük, the site of one of the earliest urban settlements in the region (Momigliano et al., 2011). Both stalagmites contain prominent dark grey-blue layers up to a few mm thick. Trace element analysis reveals that these layers contain elevated Fe, Mn and Zn concentrations suggesting enhanced mobilization of these elements, possibly adsorbed to organic matter on 100 nm to 1 μm soil particles (Hartland et al. 2012). Raman spectroscopy identifies the presence of soot within the layers and evidence for plant material has been identified by SEM along with detritus (clay, quartz). This suggests increased infiltration though the karst, probably due to decreased vegetation cover, a conclusion supported by positive δ13C excursions associated with some grey layers. It is likely that episodes of burning occurred above the cave either due to natural wild fires or anthropogenic activity. The δ18O record of HY-8 shows no long term trend but fluctuates about a mean of -6.3 oḢowever it is punctuated by several shorted lived excursions of 1 o - 2.5 o amplitude. δ13C decreases steadily (-6o to -10 ) through the Mid/Late Holocene with numerous short lived excursions, many >2o and some (not exclusively) associated with grey layers . Carbon and oxygen are poorly correlated, although sympathetic trends are seen during some excursions. δ18O values have probably responded to changes in winter rainfall amounts with δ13C likely reflecting fluctuating vegetation density above the cave, particularly when

  10. Advanced Connectivity Analysis (ACA): a Large Scale Functional Connectivity Data Mining Environment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Nixon, Erika; Herskovits, Edward

    2016-04-01

    Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) to study functional connectivity is of great importance to understand normal development and function as well as a host of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Seed-based analysis is one of the most widely used rs-fMRI analysis methods. Here we describe a freely available large scale functional connectivity data mining software package called Advanced Connectivity Analysis (ACA). ACA enables large-scale seed-based analysis and brain-behavior analysis. It can seamlessly examine a large number of seed regions with minimal user input. ACA has a brain-behavior analysis component to delineate associations among imaging biomarkers and one or more behavioral variables. We demonstrate applications of ACA to rs-fMRI data sets from a study of autism. PMID:26662457

  11. Immunoassay Methods and their Applications in Pharmaceutical Analysis: Basic Methodology and Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Darwish, Ibrahim A.

    2006-01-01

    Immunoassays are bioanalytical methods in which the quantitation of the analyte depends on the reaction of an antigen (analyte) and an antibody. Immunoassays have been widely used in many important areas of pharmaceutical analysis such as diagnosis of diseases, therapeutic drug monitoring, clinical pharmacokinetic and bioequivalence studies in drug discovery and pharmaceutical industries. The importance and widespread of immunoassay methods in pharmaceutical analysis are attributed to their inherent specificity, high-throughput, and high sensitivity for the analysis of wide range of analytes in biological samples. Recently, marked improvements were achieved in the field of immunoassay development for the purposes of pharmaceutical analysis. These improvements involved the preparation of the unique immunoanalytical reagents, analysis of new categories of compounds, methodology, and instrumentation. The basic methodologies and recent advances in immunoassay methods applied in different fields of pharmaceutical analysis have been reviewed. PMID:23674985

  12. ATWS Analysis with an Advanced Boiling Curve Approach within COBRA 3-CP

    SciTech Connect

    Gensler, A.; Knoll, A.; Kuehnel, K.

    2007-07-01

    In 2005 the German Reactor Safety Commission issued specific requirements on core coolability demonstration for PWR ATWS (anticipated transients without scram). Thereupon AREVA NP performed detailed analyses for all German PWRs. For a German KONVOI plant the results of an ATWS licensing analysis are presented. The plant dynamic behavior is calculated with NLOOP, while the hot channel analysis is performed with the thermal hydraulic computer code COBRA 3-CP. The application of the fuel rod model included in COBRA 3-CP is essential for this type of analysis. Since DNB (departure from nucleate boiling) occurs, the advanced post DNB model (advanced boiling curve approach) of COBRA 3-CP is used. The results are compared with those gained with the standard BEEST model. The analyzed ATWS case is the emergency power case 'loss of main heat sink with station service power supply unavailable'. Due to the decreasing coolant flow rate during the transient the core attains film boiling conditions. The results of the hot channel analysis strongly depend on the performance of the boiling curve model. The BEEST model is based on pool boiling conditions whereas typical PWR conditions - even in most transients - are characterized by forced flow for which the advanced boiling curve approach is particularly suitable. Compared with the BEEST model the advanced boiling curve approach in COBRA 3-CP yields earlier rewetting, i.e. a shorter period in film boiling. Consequently, the fuel rod cladding temperatures, that increase significantly due to film boiling, drop back earlier and the high temperature oxidation is significantly diminished. The Baker-Just-Correlation was used to calculate the value of equivalent cladding reacted (ECR), i.e. the reduction of cladding thickness due to corrosion throughout the transient. Based on the BEEST model the ECR value amounts to 0.4% whereas the advanced boiling curve only leads to an ECR value of 0.2%. Both values provide large margins to the 17

  13. Low-latency analysis pipeline for compact binary coalescences in the advanced gravitational wave detector era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, T.; Buskulic, D.; Germain, V.; Guidi, G. M.; Marion, F.; Montani, M.; Mours, B.; Piergiovanni, F.; Wang, G.

    2016-09-01

    The multi-band template analysis (MBTA) pipeline is a low-latency coincident analysis pipeline for the detection of gravitational waves (GWs) from compact binary coalescences. MBTA runs with a low computational cost, and can identify candidate GW events online with a sub-minute latency. The low computational running cost of MBTA also makes it useful for data quality studies. Events detected by MBTA online can be used to alert astronomical partners for electromagnetic follow-up. We outline the current status of MBTA and give details of recent pipeline upgrades and validation tests that were performed in preparation for the first advanced detector observing period. The MBTA pipeline is ready for the outset of the advanced detector era and the exciting prospects it will bring.

  14. Advances in Instrumental Analysis of Brominated Flame Retardants: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This review aims to highlight the recent advances and methodological improvements in instrumental techniques applied for the analysis of different brominated flame retardants (BFRs). The literature search strategy was based on the recent analytical reviews published on BFRs. The main selection criteria involved the successful development and application of analytical methods for determination of the target compounds in various environmental matrices. Different factors affecting chromatographic separation and mass spectrometric detection of brominated analytes were evaluated and discussed. Techniques using advanced instrumentation to achieve outstanding results in quantification of different BFRs and their metabolites/degradation products were highlighted. Finally, research gaps in the field of BFR analysis were identified and recommendations for future research were proposed. PMID:27433482

  15. Advances in explosives analysis--part I: animal, chemical, ion, and mechanical methods.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kathryn E; Greenfield, Margo T; McGrane, Shawn D; Moore, David S

    2016-01-01

    The number and capability of explosives detection and analysis methods have increased substantially since the publication of the Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry special issue devoted to Explosives Analysis (Moore and Goodpaster, Anal Bioanal Chem 395(2):245-246, 2009). Here we review and critically evaluate the latest (the past five years) important advances in explosives detection, with details of the improvements over previous methods, and suggest possible avenues towards further advances in, e.g., stand-off distance, detection limit, selectivity, and penetration through camouflage or packaging. The review consists of two parts. This part, Part I, reviews methods based on animals, chemicals (including colorimetry, molecularly imprinted polymers, electrochemistry, and immunochemistry), ions (both ion-mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry), and mechanical devices. Part II will review methods based on photons, from very energetic photons including X-rays and gamma rays down to the terahertz range, and neutrons. PMID:26462922

  16. Advances in explosives analysis--part II: photon and neutron methods.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kathryn E; Greenfield, Margo T; McGrane, Shawn D; Moore, David S

    2016-01-01

    The number and capability of explosives detection and analysis methods have increased dramatically since publication of the Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry special issue devoted to Explosives Analysis [Moore DS, Goodpaster JV, Anal Bioanal Chem 395:245-246, 2009]. Here we review and critically evaluate the latest (the past five years) important advances in explosives detection, with details of the improvements over previous methods, and suggest possible avenues towards further advances in, e.g., stand-off distance, detection limit, selectivity, and penetration through camouflage or packaging. The review consists of two parts. Part I discussed methods based on animals, chemicals (including colorimetry, molecularly imprinted polymers, electrochemistry, and immunochemistry), ions (both ion-mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry), and mechanical devices. This part, Part II, will review methods based on photons, from very energetic photons including X-rays and gamma rays down to the terahertz range, and neutrons. PMID:26446898

  17. Analysis of life cycle costs for electric vans with advanced battery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Marr, W.W.; Walsh, W.J.; Miller, J.F.

    1988-11-01

    The performance of advanced Zn/Br/sub 2/, LiAl/FeS, Na/S, Ni/Fe, and Fe/Air batteries in electric vans was compared to that of tubular lead-acid technology. The MARVEL computer analysis system evaluated these batteries for the G-Van and IDSEP vehicles over two driving schedules. Each of the advanced batteries exhibited the potential for major improvements in both range and life cycle cost compared with tubular lead-acid. A sensitivity analysis revealed specific energy, battery initial cost, and cycle life to be the dominant factors in reducing life cycle cost for the case of vans powered by tubular lead-acid batteries. 5 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Analysis of life cycle costs for electric vans with advanced battery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Marr, W.W.; Walsh, W.J.; Miller, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    The performance of advanced Zn/Br/sub 2/, LiAl/FeS, Na/S, Ni/Fe, and Fe/Air batteries in electric vans was compared to that of tubular lead-acid technology. The MARVEL computer analysis system evaluated these batteries for the G-Van and IDSEP vehicles over two driving schedules. Each of the advanced batteries exhibited the potential for major improvements in both range and life cycle cost compared with tubular lead-acid. A sensitivity analysis reveals specific energy, battery initial cost, and cycle life to be the dominant factors in reducing life cycle cost for the case of vans powered by tubular lead-acid batteries.

  19. Petrographic variation of the Topopah Spring tuff matrix within and between cored drill holes, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, F.M. Jr.; Moore, L.M.

    1987-02-01

    Our study extends the petrographic zonation of the devitrified rhyolitic tuff matrix of the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff observed in USW G-4 to four other cored holes in the Yucca Mountain area of the Nevada Test Site: UE-25a No. 1, USW G-1, USW G-2, and USW GU-3. The four petrographic zones occur above the basal vitrophyre and in ascending order are the lower nonlithophysal (ln); the lower lithophysal (ll); the middle nonlithophysal (mn); and the upper lithophysal (ul). Drill hole USW G-2, about two miles north of the Yucca Mountain Exploratory Block, differs significantly from the other four cored holes within or near the block; it has essentially one thick microlitic zone, largely lithophysal, above the vitrophyre. Textural attributes (from coarsest to finest) are phenocrysts, lithics, granophyre, amygdules, spherulites, and cryptocrystalline groundmass. Among individual phenocrysts, only quartz shows significant decrease upward. The four petrographic zones agree fairly well with those defined by contacts placed by USGS geologists and, with minor reservations, can be correlated between the four cored holes in the vicinity of the exploration block. The ln zone is characterized by dense welding, upwardly decreasing cryptocrystallinity, common lithics, and quartz phenocrysts. The ll zone is largely spherulitic with 1 to 13% granophyre generally increasing upward and shard texture becoming less distinct upward. The mn zone is similar to the ln zone except for the moderate welding and fewer quartz and lithic fragments present in the mn zone. The ul and ll zones are similar in microscopic texture, but the ul has more amygdules with tridymite rather than cristobalite and can generally be recognized by its "Swiss cheese" appearance in core or hand specimens. A series of discriminatory statistical analyses were made with the thin section modal data to test variation in textural type and quartz phenocrysts.

  20. Final Technical Report: Advanced Measurement and Analysis of PV Derate Factors.

    SciTech Connect

    King, Bruce Hardison; Burton, Patrick D.; Hansen, Clifford; Jones, Christian Birk

    2015-12-01

    The Advanced Measurement and Analysis of PV Derate Factors project focuses on improving the accuracy and reducing the uncertainty of PV performance model predictions by addressing a common element of all PV performance models referred to as “derates”. Widespread use of “rules of thumb”, combined with significant uncertainty regarding appropriate values for these factors contribute to uncertainty in projected energy production.

  1. An advanced image analysis tool for the quantification and characterization of breast cancer in microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Goudas, Theodosios; Maglogiannis, Ilias

    2015-03-01

    The paper presents an advanced image analysis tool for the accurate and fast characterization and quantification of cancer and apoptotic cells in microscopy images. The proposed tool utilizes adaptive thresholding and a Support Vector Machines classifier. The segmentation results are enhanced through a Majority Voting and a Watershed technique, while an object labeling algorithm has been developed for the fast and accurate validation of the recognized cells. Expert pathologists evaluated the tool and the reported results are satisfying and reproducible. PMID:25681102

  2. Preliminary examination of lunar samples. Part A: A petrographic and chemical description of samples from the lunar highlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Chemical, petrographic, and textural characteristics of a representative collection of the Apollo 16 rock and soil samples are reported. The macroscopic and microscopic texture are the result of two or more events in the history of any given sample. Cataclastic, highly crushed rocks are common along with complex intergrowths of shock-produced glass, devitrified glass, and pre-existing clasts. The dominant chemical feature is the high abundance of aluminum and calcium. In terms of their petrogenesis, the rocks are typed as cataclastically, and cataclysmically modified anorthosites; igneous; and polymict breccias.

  3. Implementation and Initial Testing of Advanced Processing and Analysis Algorithms for Correlated Neutron Counting

    SciTech Connect

    Santi, Peter Angelo; Cutler, Theresa Elizabeth; Favalli, Andrea; Koehler, Katrina Elizabeth; Henzl, Vladimir; Henzlova, Daniela; Parker, Robert Francis; Croft, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the accuracy and capabilities of neutron multiplicity counting, additional quantifiable information is needed in order to address the assumptions that are present in the point model. Extracting and utilizing higher order moments (Quads and Pents) from the neutron pulse train represents the most direct way of extracting additional information from the measurement data to allow for an improved determination of the physical properties of the item of interest. The extraction of higher order moments from a neutron pulse train required the development of advanced dead time correction algorithms which could correct for dead time effects in all of the measurement moments in a self-consistent manner. In addition, advanced analysis algorithms have been developed to address specific assumptions that are made within the current analysis model, namely that all neutrons are created at a single point within the item of interest, and that all neutrons that are produced within an item are created with the same energy distribution. This report will discuss the current status of implementation and initial testing of the advanced dead time correction and analysis algorithms that have been developed in an attempt to utilize higher order moments to improve the capabilities of correlated neutron measurement techniques.

  4. A thermoanalytical, X-ray diffraction and petrographic approach to the forensic assessment of fire affected concrete in the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Alqassim, M A; Jones, M R; Berlouis, L E A; Nic Daeid, N

    2016-07-01

    For most fires, forensic investigation takes place well after building materials have cooled and knowledge of the structural damage due to heat exposure can reveal the temperature reached during an incident. Recently, there have been significant changes in the types and hence characteristics of cementitious materials used in the United Arab Emirates. Few studies focus on the application of thermo-analytical, X-ray diffraction and petrographic techniques on newly developed structures and this work aims to address this deficiency by utilising a series of parametric laboratory-based tests to assess the effects of heat on hardened concrete. Specimens were made with a design mix typically used for low-rise residential homes and storage facilities. The key constituents were: Portland cement (PC), crushed gabbro stone and dune sand with water/cement ratios of 0.4-0.5. Portland cement substitutes included ground granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBS), and silica fume (SF) at replacement percentages of up to 50% and 4%, respectively. The concrete cubes of 100-mm size were produced and standard cured to 28 days and then exposed to heat inside an electric furnace with pre-determined temperature regimes of 150°C, 300°C, 600°C and 900°C. Petrographic examination was utilised to compare the discolouration of the cooled concrete. Data derived from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) are reported in order to assess the usefulness of these techniques in fire scene investigation to differentiate between these temperature regimes. The results from the TGA indicate that the majority of the percentage weight loss for all the mixtures occurred in the range 650-700°C, which corresponds to the decarbonation of calcium carbonate, mainly from the aggregates. The endothermic DSC peak at 70-120°C relates to the loss of evaporable water. Since both of these reactions are irreversible, this information can help fire investigators estimate the

  5. Recent Advances in Clinical Natural Language Processing in Support of Semantic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mowery, D.; South, B. R.; Kvist, M.; Dalianis, H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives We present a review of recent advances in clinical Natural Language Processing (NLP), with a focus on semantic analysis and key subtasks that support such analysis. Methods We conducted a literature review of clinical NLP research from 2008 to 2014, emphasizing recent publications (2012-2014), based on PubMed and ACL proceedings as well as relevant referenced publications from the included papers. Results Significant articles published within this time-span were included and are discussed from the perspective of semantic analysis. Three key clinical NLP subtasks that enable such analysis were identified: 1) developing more efficient methods for corpus creation (annotation and de-identification), 2) generating building blocks for extracting meaning (morphological, syntactic, and semantic subtasks), and 3) leveraging NLP for clinical utility (NLP applications and infrastructure for clinical use cases). Finally, we provide a reflection upon most recent developments and potential areas of future NLP development and applications. Conclusions There has been an increase of advances within key NLP subtasks that support semantic analysis. Performance of NLP semantic analysis is, in many cases, close to that of agreement between humans. The creation and release of corpora annotated with complex semantic information models has greatly supported the development of new tools and approaches. Research on non-English languages is continuously growing. NLP methods have sometimes been successfully employed in real-world clinical tasks. However, there is still a gap between the development of advanced resources and their utilization in clinical settings. A plethora of new clinical use cases are emerging due to established health care initiatives and additional patient-generated sources through the extensive use of social media and other devices. PMID:26293867

  6. Advances in Proteomics Data Analysis and Display Using an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, Jennifer S.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-01-20

    Proteomics, and the larger field of systems biology, have recently demonstrated utility in both the understanding of cellular processes on the molecular level and the identification of potential biomarkers of various disease states. The large amount of data generated by utilizing high mass accuracy mass spectrometry for high-throughput proteomics analyses presents a challenge in data processing, analysis and display. This review focuses on recent advances in nanoLC-FTICR-MS-based proteomics analysis and the accompanying data processing tools that have been developed in order to interpret and display the large volumes of data produced.

  7. Analysis and correlation of the test data from an advanced technology rotor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jepson, D.; Moffitt, R.; Hilzinger, K.; Bissell, J.

    1983-01-01

    Comparisons were made of the performance and blade vibratory loads characteristics for an advanced rotor system as predicted by analysis and as measured in a 1/5 scale model wind tunnel test, a full scale model wind tunnel test and flight test. The accuracy with which the various tools available at the various stages in the design/development process (analysis, model test etc.) could predict final characteristics as measured on the aircraft was determined. The accuracy of the analyses in predicting the effects of systematic tip planform variations investigated in the full scale wind tunnel test was evaluated.

  8. Second NASA Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM): Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) Technology Tool Box (TTB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONeil, D. A.; Mankins, J. C.; Christensen, C. B.; Gresham, E. C.

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS), a spreadsheet analysis tool suite, applies parametric equations for sizing and lifecycle cost estimation. Performance, operation, and programmatic data used by the equations come from a Technology Tool Box (TTB) database. In this second TTB Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM), technologists, system model developers, and architecture analysts discussed methods for modeling technology decisions in spreadsheet models, identified specific technology parameters, and defined detailed development requirements. This Conference Publication captures the consensus of the discussions and provides narrative explanations of the tool suite, the database, and applications of ATLAS within NASA s changing environment.

  9. A preliminary analysis of advanced life support systems for manned Mars missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wercinski, Paul F.; Nishioka, Kenji

    1990-01-01

    This paper outlines the key parameters of the manned mission to Mars and presents some top-level requirements, issues, and constraints associated with a manned Mars mission that impact the life support system (LSS). Results are presented of a preliminary analysis for advanced LSSs based on physical/chemical reclamation processes, using as a baseline for the analysis the mission profile of a Split-Sprint class mission for an arrival date at Mars in the year 2009. Special attention is given to the potential cost savings as measured by reducing Mars spacecraft mass in LEO.

  10. Thermal hydraulic analysis of advanced Pb-Bi cooled NPP using natural circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novitrian, Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul

    2012-06-01

    We present thermal hydraulic analysis for a low power advanced nuclear reactor cooled by lead-bismuth eutectic. In this work is to study the thermal hydraulic analysis of a low power SPINNOR (Small Power Reactor, Indonesia, No On-site Refuelling) reactor with 125 MWth which a design a core with very small volume and fuel column height, resulting in a negative coolant temperature coefficient and very low channel pressure drop. And also at full power the heat can be completely removed by natural circulation in the primary circuit, thus eliminating the needs for pumps.

  11. Oxidative Lipidomics Coming of Age: Advances in Analysis of Oxidized Phospholipids in Physiology and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidized phospholipids are now well recognized as markers of biological oxidative stress and bioactive molecules with both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory effects. While analytical methods continue to be developed for studies of generic lipid oxidation, mass spectrometry (MS) has underpinned the advances in knowledge of specific oxidized phospholipids by allowing their identification and characterization, and it is responsible for the expansion of oxidative lipidomics. Recent Advances: Studies of oxidized phospholipids in biological samples, from both animal models and clinical samples, have been facilitated by the recent improvements in MS, especially targeted routines that depend on the fragmentation pattern of the parent molecular ion and improved resolution and mass accuracy. MS can be used to identify selectively individual compounds or groups of compounds with common features, which greatly improves the sensitivity and specificity of detection. Application of these methods has enabled important advances in understanding the mechanisms of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis, steatohepatitis, leprosy, and cystic fibrosis, and it offers potential for developing biomarkers of molecular aspects of the diseases. Critical Issues and Future Directions: The future in this field will depend on development of improved MS technologies, such as ion mobility, novel enrichment methods and databases, and software for data analysis, owing to the very large amount of data generated in these experiments. Imaging of oxidized phospholipids in tissue MS is an additional exciting direction emerging that can be expected to advance understanding of physiology and disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1646–1666. PMID:25694038

  12. Single Particle ICP-MS: Advances toward routine analysis of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Montaño, Manuel D; Olesik, John W; Barber, Angela G; Challis, Katie; Ranville, James F

    2016-07-01

    From its early beginnings in characterizing aerosol particles to its recent applications for investigating natural waters and waste streams, single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (spICP-MS) has proven to be a powerful technique for the detection and characterization of aqueous dispersions of metal-containing nanomaterials. Combining the high-throughput of an ensemble technique with the specificity of a single particle counting technique and the elemental specificity of ICP-MS, spICP-MS is capable of rapidly providing researchers with information pertaining to size, size distribution, particle number concentration, and major elemental composition with minimal sample perturbation. Recently, advances in data acquisition, signal processing, and the implementation of alternative mass analyzers (e.g., time-of-flight) has resulted in a wider breadth of particle analyses and made significant progress toward overcoming many of the challenges in the quantitative analysis of nanoparticles. This review provides an overview of spICP-MS development from a niche technique to application for routine analysis, a discussion of the key issues for quantitative analysis, and examples of its further advancement for analysis of increasingly complex environmental and biological samples. Graphical Abstract Single particle ICP-MS workflow for the analysis of suspended nanoparticles. PMID:27334719

  13. Chemical, petrographic, and K-Ar age data to accompany reconnaissance geologic strip map from Kingman to south of Bill Williams Mountain, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Arney, B.; Goff, F.; Eddy, A.C.

    1985-04-01

    As part of a reconnaissance mapping project, 40 chemical analyses and 13 potassium-argon age dates were obtained for Tertiary volcanic and Precambrian granitic rocks between Kingman and Bill Williams Mountain, Arizona. The dated volcanic rocks range in age from 5.5 +- 0.2 Myr for basalt in the East Juniper Mountains to about 25 Myr for a biotite-pyroxene andesite. The date for Picacho Butte, a rhyodacite in the Mt. Floyd volcanic field, was 9.8 +- 0.07 Myr, making it the oldest rhyodacite dome in that volcanic field. Dated rocks in the Fort Rock area range from 20.7 to 24.3 Myr. No ages were obtained on the Precambrian rocks. Compositionally, the volcanic rocks analyzed range from alkali basalt to rhyolite, but many rocks on the western side of the map area are unusually potassic. The granites chosen for analysis include syenogranite from the Hualapai Mountains, a muscovite granite from the Picacho Butte area, and two other granites. The chemical and K-Ar age data and petrographic descriptions included in this report accompany the reconnaissance geologic strip map published as LA-9202-MAP by Goff, Eddy, and Arney. 9 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Work Domain Analysis Methodology for Development of Operational Concepts for Advanced Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hugo, Jacques

    2015-05-01

    This report describes a methodology to conduct a Work Domain Analysis in preparation for the development of operational concepts for new plants. This method has been adapted from the classical method described in the literature in order to better deal with the uncertainty and incomplete information typical of first-of-a-kind designs. The report outlines the strategy for undertaking a Work Domain Analysis of a new nuclear power plant and the methods to be used in the development of the various phases of the analysis. Basic principles are described to the extent necessary to explain why and how the classical method was adapted to make it suitable as a tool for the preparation of operational concepts for a new nuclear power plant. Practical examples are provided of the systematic application of the method and the various presentation formats in the operational analysis of advanced reactors.

  15. Cost/benefit analysis of advanced materials technology candidates for the 1980's, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, R. E.; Maertins, H. F.

    1980-01-01

    Cost/benefit analyses to evaluate advanced material technologies projects considered for general aviation and turboprop commuter aircraft through estimated life-cycle costs, direct operating costs, and development costs are discussed. Specifically addressed is the selection of technologies to be evaluated; development of property goals; assessment of candidate technologies on typical engines and aircraft; sensitivity analysis of the changes in property goals on performance and economics, cost, and risk analysis for each technology; and ranking of each technology by relative value. The cost/benefit analysis was applied to a domestic, nonrevenue producing, business-type jet aircraft configured with two TFE731-3 turbofan engines, and to a domestic, nonrevenue producing, business type turboprop aircraft configured with two TPE331-10 turboprop engines. In addition, a cost/benefit analysis was applied to a commercial turboprop aircraft configured with a growth version of the TPE331-10.

  16. Seismically induced relay chatter risk analysis for the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Khericha, S.T.; Calley, M.B.; Farmer, F.G.; Eide, S.A.; Ravindra, M.K.; Campbell, R.D.

    1992-12-31

    A seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) was performed as part of the Level I PRA for the Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). This seismic PRA included a comprehensive and efficient seismically-induced relay chatter risk analysis. The key elements to this comprehensive and efficient seismically-induced relay chatter analysis included (1) screening procedures to identify the critical relays to be evaluated, (2) streamlined seismic fragility evaluation, and (3) comprehensive seismic risk evaluation using detailed event trees and fault trees. These key elements were performed to provide a core fuel damage frequency evaluation due to seismically induced relay chatter. A sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the impact of including seismically-induced relay chatter events in the seismic PRA. The systems analysis was performed by EG&G Idaho, Inc. and the fragilities for the relays were developed by EQE Engineering Consultants.

  17. Seismically induced relay chatter risk analysis for the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Khericha, S.T.; Calley, M.B.; Farmer, F.G. ); Eide, S.A. ); Ravindra, M.K.; Campbell, R.D. )

    1992-01-01

    A seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) was performed as part of the Level I PRA for the Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). This seismic PRA included a comprehensive and efficient seismically-induced relay chatter risk analysis. The key elements to this comprehensive and efficient seismically-induced relay chatter analysis included (1) screening procedures to identify the critical relays to be evaluated, (2) streamlined seismic fragility evaluation, and (3) comprehensive seismic risk evaluation using detailed event trees and fault trees. These key elements were performed to provide a core fuel damage frequency evaluation due to seismically induced relay chatter. A sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the impact of including seismically-induced relay chatter events in the seismic PRA. The systems analysis was performed by EG G Idaho, Inc. and the fragilities for the relays were developed by EQE Engineering Consultants.

  18. Integrated performance and dependability analysis using the advanced design environment prototype tool ADEPT

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, R.; Rahman, A.; Johnson, B.W.

    1995-09-01

    The Advanced Design Environment Prototype Tool (ADEPT) is an evolving integrated design environment which supports both performance and dependability analysis. ADEPT models are constructed using a collection of predefined library elements, called ADEPT modules. Each ADEPT module has an unambiguous mathematical definition in the form of a Colored Petri Net (CPN) and a corresponding Very High Speed Integrated Circuits (VHSIC) Hardware Description Language (VHDL) description. As a result, both simulation-based and analytical approaches for analysis can be employed. The focus of this paper is on dependability modeling and analysis using ADEPT. We present the simulation based approach to dependability analysis using ADEPT and an approach to integrating ADEPT and the Reliability Estimation System Testbed (REST) engine developed at NASA. We also present analytical techniques to extract the dependability characteristics of a system from the CPN definitions of the modules, in order to generate alternate models such as Markov models and fault trees.

  19. The Advanced Modeling, Simulation and Analysis Capability Roadmap Vision for Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Thomas; Lieber, Mike; Norton, Charles; Fucik, Karen

    2006-01-01

    This paper summarizes a subset of the Advanced Modeling Simulation and Analysis (AMSA) Capability Roadmap that was developed for NASA in 2005. The AMSA Capability Roadmap Team was chartered to "To identify what is needed to enhance NASA's capabilities to produce leading-edge exploration and science missions by improving engineering system development, operations, and science understanding through broad application of advanced modeling, simulation and analysis techniques." The AMSA roadmap stressed the need for integration, not just within the science, engineering and operations domains themselves, but also across these domains. Here we discuss the roadmap element pertaining to integration within the engineering domain, with a particular focus on implications for future observatory missions. The AMSA products supporting the system engineering function are mission information, bounds on information quality, and system validation guidance. The Engineering roadmap element contains 5 sub-elements: (1) Large-Scale Systems Models, (2) Anomalous Behavior Models, (3) advanced Uncertainty Models, (4) Virtual Testing Models, and (5) space-based Robotics Manufacture and Servicing Models.

  20. Petrographic and X-ray diffraction analyses of selected samples from Marker Bed 139 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrich, J.T.; Zeuch, D.H.

    1996-04-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is located 660 m underground in the Salado Formation which consists of thick, horizontally bedded pure and impure salt and thin, laterally continuous clay and anhydrite interbeds. The Salado Two-Phase Flow Laboratory Program was established to provide site-specific-two-phase flow and other related rock properties to support performance assessment modeling of the WIPP repository. Owing to their potentially significant role in the hydrologic response of the repository, the program initially focused on the anhydrite interbeds, and in particular, on Marker Bed 139 (MB 139), which lies approximately 1 m below the planned waste storage rooms. This report synthesizes petrographic and X-ray powder diffraction studies performed to support the Salado Two-Phase Flow Laboratory Program. Experimental scoping activities in this area were performed in FY 1993 by three independent laboratories in order to: (1) quantify the mineral composition to support laboratory studies of hydrologic properties and facilitate correlation of transport properties with composition; (2) describe textures, including grain size; and (3) describe observed porosity. Samples from various depths were prepared from six 6-inch diameter cores which were obtained by drilling into the marker bed from the floor of two separate rooms. The petrographic analyses are augmented here with additional study of the original thin sections, and the pore structure observations are also examined in relation to an independent observational study of microcracks in Marker Bed 139 core samples performed in FY 1994 by the Geomechanics Department at Sandia National Laboratories.

  1. Are petrographic textural criteria valid for determining timing of dolomitization. An example from Wahoo Formation, Prudhoe Bay, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, J.

    1989-03-01

    Textural criteria such as crystal size, shape, and fabric preservation may be misleading when trying to distinguish early from late dolomites. Data from the Wahoo formation, a typical Pennsylvanian shallow-marine carbonate, reveal that petrographically similar dolomites can have very different origins. In the absence of other evidence, fine-grained (15-30 ..mu..m), subhedral-to-anhedral or hypidiotopic fabrics with well-preserved depositional textures are often regarded as having formed relatively early. Coarse, nonfabric selective dolomitization generally is considered to be of late origin. The problem of using textural criteria to determine timing is particularly acute in hypidiotopic fabrics, where more than one stage of dolomitization may be present. Crosscutting relationships and geochemical and isotopic data reveal the range of origins of Wahoo formation hypidiotopic dolomites. The earliest dolomites were of mixing zone origin and probably formed during the Pennsylvanian. Dolomitization resumed in the Permian-Triassic as the Wahoo formation was buried to depths of 1000-2000 ft. Permian-Triassic burial dolomites are usually overgrowths of earlier dolomite. Trace element gradients reveal that burial dolomitizing fluids were sourced from the shales above the Wahoo formation. In spite of their diverse origins, Wahoo dolomites are petrographically similar. Geochemical and isotopic data reveal that most dolomites that meet the early criteria formed relatively late at shallow to intermediate burial depths. Petrography incorrectly suggests only one episode of dolomitization. Textural criteria alone are a misleading guide to the origin of Wahoo dolomites.

  2. Petrographic and geochemical constraints on the deposition and diagenesis of the Haynesville Formation (Upper Jurassic), southwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Eustice, R. )

    1991-03-01

    The Haynesville Formation in Clarke County, southwestern Alabama, is a 250 m thick, halite-dominated evaporite rock composed of four vertically stacked evaporite facies. The different facies present include a basal chevron-dominated unit, a gray cumulate unit, a unit dominated by brown, organic-rich cumulates, and a unit composed of halite and anhydrite interbedded with sand and mud. The facies are defined by halite textures, the presence of anhydrite laminae and dissolution surfaces, and the relative amount of terrigenous material. These criteria were used because they provide some constraint on the brine depths present during precipitation of the salt. The integration of geochemical data with petrographic observations has been used to formulate a model for the deposition and diagenesis of the deposits. The bromide concentrations within the basal chevron zone systematically rise from 36 ppm to 101 ppm, while the bromide concentrations within the overlying cumulate zone rise more rapidly from 121 ppm to 440 ppm. The strontium isotopic composition of the salt over this interval systematically increases from 0.7068 to 0.7084. Bromide concentrations, strontium isotope ratios, and other chemical parameters, in combination with petrographic observations, constrain the relative importance of depositional and diagenetic processes. Processes that are important in controlling the geochemistry of the deposits include the influx of seawater and meteoric fluid into the basin, synsedimentary dissolution and recycling of solutes, the reflux of brines within the basin, and burial diagenetic processes.

  3. Using Micro-Synchrophasor Data for Advanced Distribution Grid Planning and Operations Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Emma; Kiliccote, Sila; McParland, Charles; Roberts, Ciaran

    2014-07-01

    This report reviews the potential for distribution-grid phase-angle data that will be available from new micro-synchrophasors (µPMUs) to be utilized in existing distribution-grid planning and operations analysis. This data could augment the current diagnostic capabilities of grid analysis software, used in both planning and operations for applications such as fault location, and provide data for more accurate modeling of the distribution system. µPMUs are new distribution-grid sensors that will advance measurement and diagnostic capabilities and provide improved visibility of the distribution grid, enabling analysis of the grid’s increasingly complex loads that include features such as large volumes of distributed generation. Large volumes of DG leads to concerns on continued reliable operation of the grid, due to changing power flow characteristics and active generation, with its own protection and control capabilities. Using µPMU data on change in voltage phase angle between two points in conjunction with new and existing distribution-grid planning and operational tools is expected to enable model validation, state estimation, fault location, and renewable resource/load characterization. Our findings include: data measurement is outstripping the processing capabilities of planning and operational tools; not every tool can visualize a voltage phase-angle measurement to the degree of accuracy measured by advanced sensors, and the degree of accuracy in measurement required for the distribution grid is not defined; solving methods cannot handle the high volumes of data generated by modern sensors, so new models and solving methods (such as graph trace analysis) are needed; standardization of sensor-data communications platforms in planning and applications tools would allow integration of different vendors’ sensors and advanced measurement devices. In addition, data from advanced sources such as µPMUs could be used to validate models to improve

  4. Bearing defect signature analysis using advanced nonlinear signal analysis in a controlled environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoladz, T.; Earhart, E.; Fiorucci, T.

    1995-01-01

    Utilizing high-frequency data from a highly instrumented rotor assembly, seeded bearing defect signatures are characterized using both conventional linear approaches, such as power spectral density analysis, and recently developed nonlinear techniques such as bicoherence analysis. Traditional low-frequency (less than 20 kHz) analysis and high-frequency envelope analysis of both accelerometer and acoustic emission data are used to recover characteristic bearing distress information buried deeply in acquired data. The successful coupling of newly developed nonlinear signal analysis with recovered wideband envelope data from accelerometers and acoustic emission sensors is the innovative focus of this research.

  5. Advanced Automation for Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry-New Opportunities for Real-Time Autonomous Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Peter T.; Wong, C. M.; Salmonson, J. D.; Yost, R. A.; Griffin, T. P.; Yates, N. A.; Lawless, James G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The utility of MS/MS for both target compound analysis and the structure elucidation of unknowns has been described in a number of references. A broader acceptance of this technique has not yet been realized as it requires large, complex, and costly instrumentation which has not been competitive with more conventional techniques. Recent advancements in ion trap mass spectrometry promise to change this situation. Although the ion trap's small size, sensitivity, and ability to perform multiple stages of mass spectrometry have made it eminently suitable for on-line, real-time monitoring applications, advance automation techniques are required to make these capabilities more accessible to non-experts. Towards this end we have developed custom software for the design and implementation of MS/MS experiments. This software allows the user to take full advantage of the ion trap's versatility with respect to ionization techniques, scan proxies, and ion accumulation/ejection methods. Additionally, expert system software has been developed for autonomous target compound analysis. This software has been linked to ion trap control software and a commercial data system to bring all of the steps in the analysis cycle under control of the expert system. These software development efforts and their utilization for a number of trace analysis applications will be described.

  6. Impact of advanced microstructural characterization techniques on modeling and analysis of radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Odette, G.R.

    1980-01-01

    The evolution of radiation-induced alterations of dimensional and mechanical properties has been shown to be a direct and often predictable consequence of radiation-induced microstructural changes. Recent advances in understanding of the nature and role of each microstructural component in determining the property of interest has led to a reappraisal of the type and priority of data needed for further model development. This paper presents an overview of the types of modeling and analysis activities in progress, the insights that prompted these activities, and specific examples of successful and ongoing efforts. A review is presented of some problem areas that in the authors' opinion are not yet receiving sufficient attention and which may benefit from the application of advanced techniques of microstructural characterization. Guidelines based on experience gained in previous studies are also provided for acquisition of data in a form most applicable to modeling needs.

  7. Left Ventricular Flow Analysis: Recent Advances in Numerical Methods and Applications in Cardiac Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Borazjani, Iman; Westerdale, John; McMahon, Eileen M.; Rajaraman, Prathish K.; Heys, Jeffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    The left ventricle (LV) pumps oxygenated blood from the lungs to the rest of the body through systemic circulation. The efficiency of such a pumping function is dependent on blood flow within the LV chamber. It is therefore crucial to accurately characterize LV hemodynamics. Improved understanding of LV hemodynamics is expected to provide important clinical diagnostic and prognostic information. We review the recent advances in numerical and experimental methods for characterizing LV flows and focus on analysis of intraventricular flow fields by echocardiographic particle image velocimetry (echo-PIV), due to its potential for broad and practical utility. Future research directions to advance patient-specific LV simulations include development of methods capable of resolving heart valves, higher temporal resolution, automated generation of three-dimensional (3D) geometry, and incorporating actual flow measurements into the numerical solution of the 3D cardiovascular fluid dynamics. PMID:23690874

  8. TIMSS Advanced 2015 and Advanced Placement Calculus & Physics. A Framework Analysis. Research in Review 2016-1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazzaro, Christopher; Jones, Lee; Webb, David C.; Grover, Ryan; Di Giacomo, F. Tony; Marino, Katherine Adele

    2016-01-01

    This report will determine to what degree the AP Physics 1 and 2 and AP Calculus AB and BC frameworks are aligned with the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) Advanced Physics and Mathematics frameworks. This will enable an exploration of any differences in content coverage and levels of complexity, and will set the stage…

  9. The volcanic aggregate of ancient Roman mortars from the Capitoline Hill: Petrographic criteria for identification of Rome's "pozzolans" and historical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Fabrizio; Danti, Alberto; Gaeta, Mario

    2015-12-01

    We present a petrographic study of the pyroclastic-flow deposits used to produce mortar aggregates (Pozzolane Rosse, Pozzolane Nere, and Pozzolanelle), as well as dimension stones (Tufo del Palatino and Tufo Lionato) in ancient Roman times, in which we describe the characteristic textures and mineralogic assemblages of their juvenile fraction. This petrographic dataset is employed to compare and classify, through observation in thin section at the optical microscope, and complementary trace-element analyses, as well as EMP analyses on matrix glass on archaeological and bulk natural samples, the composition of the volcanic aggregate of 11 samples of ancient Roman mortars collected from several archaeological structures excavated on the Capitoline Hill. By means of the combined petrographic and geochemical identification criteria illustrated in this work, we recognize two main types of mortar aggregates characteristic of the Republican and Imperial ages, respectively, and a third type pertaining to the mediaeval epoch.

  10. Comparison of a Traditional Probabilistic Risk Assessment Approach with Advanced Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Curtis L; Mandelli, Diego; Zhegang Ma

    2014-11-01

    As part of the Light Water Sustainability Program (LWRS) [1], the purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) [2] Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margin management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. In this paper, we describe the RISMC analysis process illustrating how mechanistic and probabilistic approaches are combined in order to estimate a safety margin. We use the scenario of a “station blackout” (SBO) wherein offsite power and onsite power is lost, thereby causing a challenge to plant safety systems. We describe the RISMC approach, illustrate the station blackout modeling, and contrast this with traditional risk analysis modeling for this type of accident scenario. We also describe our approach we are using to represent advanced flooding analysis.

  11. Miniaturized PCR chips for nucleic acid amplification and analysis: latest advances and future trends

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunsun; Xing, Da

    2007-01-01

    The possibility of performing fast and small-volume nucleic acid amplification and analysis on a single chip has attracted great interest. Devices based on this idea, referred to as micro total analysis, microfluidic analysis, or simply ‘Lab on a chip’ systems, have witnessed steady advances over the last several years. Here, we summarize recent research on chip substrates, surface treatments, PCR reaction volume and speed, architecture, approaches to eliminating cross-contamination and control and measurement of temperature and liquid flow. We also discuss product-detection methods, integration of functional components, biological samples used in PCR chips, potential applications and other practical issues related to implementation of lab-on-a-chip technologies. PMID:17576684

  12. Linking Advanced Visualization and MATLAB for the Analysis of 3D Gene Expression Data

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebel, Oliver; Keranen, Soile V.E.; Biggin, Mark; Knowles, David W.; Weber, Gunther H.; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, E. Wes

    2011-03-30

    Three-dimensional gene expression PointCloud data generated by the Berkeley Drosophila Transcription Network Project (BDTNP) provides quantitative information about the spatial and temporal expression of genes in early Drosophila embryos at cellular resolution. The BDTNP team visualizes and analyzes Point-Cloud data using the software application PointCloudXplore (PCX). To maximize the impact of novel, complex data sets, such as PointClouds, the data needs to be accessible to biologists and comprehensible to developers of analysis functions. We address this challenge by linking PCX and Matlab via a dedicated interface, thereby providing biologists seamless access to advanced data analysis functions and giving bioinformatics researchers the opportunity to integrate their analysis directly into the visualization application. To demonstrate the usefulness of this approach, we computationally model parts of the expression pattern of the gene even skipped using a genetic algorithm implemented in Matlab and integrated into PCX via our Matlab interface.

  13. Advanced functionality for radio analysis in the Offline software framework of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E.J.; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; /INFN, Naples /Copenhagen Astron. Observ. /Nijmegen U., IMAPP

    2011-01-01

    The advent of the Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) necessitates the development of a powerful framework for the analysis of radio measurements of cosmic ray air showers. As AERA performs 'radio-hybrid' measurements of air shower radio emission in coincidence with the surface particle detectors and fluorescence telescopes of the Pierre Auger Observatory, the radio analysis functionality had to be incorporated in the existing hybrid analysis solutions for fluorescence and surface detector data. This goal has been achieved in a natural way by extending the existing Auger Offline software framework with radio functionality. In this article, we lay out the design, highlights and features of the radio extension implemented in the Auger Offline framework. Its functionality has achieved a high degree of sophistication and offers advanced features such as vectorial reconstruction of the electric field, advanced signal processing algorithms, a transparent and efficient handling of FFTs, a very detailed simulation of detector effects, and the read-in of multiple data formats including data from various radio simulation codes. The source code of this radio functionality can be made available to interested parties on request.

  14. Transcriptomic analysis of stage 1 versus advanced adult granulosa cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Dilys; Gould, Jodee A.; Jobling, Tom; Fuller, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian granulosa cell tumors (GCT) are hormonally-active neoplasms characterized, in the adult-subtype, by a mutation in the FOXL2 gene (C134W). They exhibit an indolent course with an unexplained propensity for late recurrence; ∼80% of patients with aggressive, advanced stage tumors die from their disease; aside from surgery, therapeutic options are limited. To identify the molecular basis of advanced stage disease we have used whole transcriptome analysis of FOXL2 C134W mutation positive adult (a)GCT to identify genes that are differentially expressed between early (stage 1) and advanced (stage 3) aGCT. Transcriptome profiles for early (n = 6) and stage 3 (n = 6) aGCT, and for the aGCT-derived KGN, cell line identified 24 genes whose expression significantly differs between the early and stage 3 aGCT. Of these, 16 were more abundantly expressed in the stage 3 aGCT and 8 were higher in the stage 1 tumors. These changes were further examined for the genes which showed the greatest fold change: the cytokine CXCL14, microfibrillar-associated protein 5, insulin-like 3 and desmin. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis identified overexpression of genes on chromosome 7p15 which includes the homeobox A gene locus. The analysis therefore identifies a small number of genes with clearly discriminate patterns of expression arguing that the clinicopathological-derived distinction of the tumor stage is robust, whilst confirming the relative homogeneity of expression for many genes across the cohort and hence of aGCT. The expression profiles do however identify several overexpressed genes in both stage 1 and/or stage 3 aGCT which warrant further study as possible therapeutic targets. PMID:26893359

  15. Advances in coupled safety modeling using systems analysis and high-fidelity methods.

    SciTech Connect

    Fanning, T. H.; Thomas, J. W.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-05-31

    The potential for a sodium-cooled fast reactor to survive severe accident initiators with no damage has been demonstrated through whole-plant testing in EBR-II and FFTF. Analysis of the observed natural protective mechanisms suggests that they would be characteristic of a broad range of sodium-cooled fast reactors utilizing metal fuel. However, in order to demonstrate the degree to which new, advanced sodium-cooled fast reactor designs will possess these desired safety features, accurate, high-fidelity, whole-plant dynamics safety simulations will be required. One of the objectives of the advanced safety-modeling component of the Reactor IPSC is to develop a science-based advanced safety simulation capability by utilizing existing safety simulation tools coupled with emerging high-fidelity modeling capabilities in a multi-resolution approach. As part of this integration, an existing whole-plant systems analysis code has been coupled with a high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics code to assess the impact of high-fidelity simulations on safety-related performance. With the coupled capabilities, it is possible to identify critical safety-related phenomenon in advanced reactor designs that cannot be resolved with existing tools. In this report, the impact of coupling is demonstrated by evaluating the conditions of outlet plenum thermal stratification during a protected loss of flow transient. Outlet plenum stratification was anticipated to alter core temperatures and flows predicted during natural circulation conditions. This effect was observed during the simulations. What was not anticipated, however, is the far-reaching impact that resolving thermal stratification has on the whole plant. The high temperatures predicted at the IHX inlet due to thermal stratification in the outlet plenum forces heat into the intermediate system to the point that it eventually becomes a source of heat for the primary system. The results also suggest that flow stagnation in the

  16. Analysis of Advanced Modular Power Systems (AMPS) for Deep Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard; Soeder, James F.; Beach, Ray

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Modular Power Systems (AMPS) project is developing a modular approach to spacecraft power systems for exploration beyond Earth orbit. AMPS is intended to meet the need of reducing the cost of design development, test and integration and also reducing the operational logistics cost of supporting exploration missions. AMPS seeks to establish modular power building blocks with standardized electrical, mechanical, thermal and data interfaces that can be applied across multiple exploration vehicles. The presentation discusses the results of a cost analysis that compares the cost of the modular approach against a traditional non-modular approach.

  17. Qualitative analysis of interference on receiver performance using advanced pulse compression noise (APCN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govoni, Mark A.; Elwell, Ryan A.

    2015-05-01

    We present an analysis of receiver performance when diverse waveforms such as the advanced pulse compression noise (APCN) are used. Two perspectives within the shared channel are considered: (1) a radar transceiving APCN in the presence of other radar interference sources, and (2) a communications system transceiving M-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) in the presence of a radar interference sources practicing waveform diversity. Through simulation, we show how waveform diversity and the ability to tune the APCN spectrum characteristics minimizes interference for co-channel users.

  18. NASA Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM): Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) Technology Tool Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONeil, D. A.; Craig, D. A.; Christensen, C. B.; Gresham, E. C.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this Technical Interchange Meeting was to increase the quantity and quality of technical, cost, and programmatic data used to model the impact of investing in different technologies. The focus of this meeting was the Technology Tool Box (TTB), a database of performance, operations, and programmatic parameters provided by technologists and used by systems engineers. The TTB is the data repository used by a system of models known as the Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS). This report describes the result of the November meeting, and also provides background information on ATLAS and the TTB.

  19. Advances in Proteomics Data Analysis and Display Using an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Jennifer S.D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Proteomics has recently demonstrated utility in understanding cellular processes on the molecular level as a component of systems biology approaches and for identifying potential biomarkers of various disease states. The large amount of data generated by utilizing high efficiency (e.g., chromatographic) separations coupled to high mass accuracy mass spectrometry for high-throughput proteomics analyses presents challenges related to data processing, analysis, and display. This review focuses on recent advances in nanoLC-FTICR-MS-based proteomics approaches and the accompanying data processing tools that have been developed to display and interpret the large volumes of data being produced. PMID:16429408

  20. Recent advances in laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) for label-free analysis of single cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, James W

    2013-01-01

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS), a technique that integrates optical tweezers with confocal Raman spectroscopy, is a variation of micro-Raman spectroscopy that enables the manipulation and biochemical analysis of single biological particles in suspension. This article provides an overview of the LTRS method, with an emphasis on highlighting recent advances over the past several years in the development of the technology and several new biological and biomedical applications that have been demonstrated. A perspective on the future developments of this powerful cytometric technology will also be presented. PMID:23175434

  1. Structural analysis of advanced polymeric foams by means of high resolution X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacucchi, M.; De Pascalis, F.; Scatto, M.; Capodieci, L.; Albertoni, R.

    2016-06-01

    Advanced polymeric foams with enhanced thermal insulation and mechanical properties are used in a wide range of industrial applications. The properties of a foam strongly depend upon its cell structure. Traditionally, their microstructure has been studied using 2D imaging systems based on optical or electron microscopy, with the obvious disadvantage that only the surface of the sample can be analysed. To overcome this shortcoming, the adoption of X-ray micro-tomography imaging is here suggested to allow for a complete 3D, non-destructive analysis of advanced polymeric foams. Unlike metallic foams, the resolution of the reconstructed structural features is hampered by the low contrast in the images due to weak X-ray absorption in the polymer. In this work an advanced methodology based on high-resolution and low-contrast techniques is used to perform quantitative analyses on both closed and open cells foams. Local structural features of individual cells such as equivalent diameter, sphericity, anisotropy and orientation are statistically evaluated. In addition, thickness and length of the struts are determined, underlining the key role played by the achieved resolution. In perspective, the quantitative description of these structural features will be used to evaluate the results of in situ mechanical and thermal test on foam samples.

  2. An analysis of cost effective incentives for initial commercial deployment of advanced clean coal technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, D.F.

    1997-12-31

    This analysis evaluates the incentives necessary to introduce commercial scale Advanced Clean Coal Technologies, specifically Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (ICGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) powerplants. The incentives required to support the initial introduction of these systems are based on competitive busbar electricity costs with natural gas fired combined cycle powerplants, in baseload service. A federal government price guarantee program for up to 10 Advanced Clean Coal Technology powerplants, 5 each ICGCC and PFBC systems is recommended in order to establish the commercial viability of these systems by 2010. By utilizing a decreasing incentives approach as the technologies mature (plants 1--5 of each type), and considering the additional federal government benefits of these plants versus natural gas fired combined cycle powerplants, federal government net financial exposure is minimized. Annual net incentive outlays of approximately 150 million annually over a 20 year period could be necessary. Based on increased demand for Advanced Clean Coal Technologies beyond 2010, the federal government would be revenue neutral within 10 years of the incentives program completion.

  3. Development of Advanced Methods of Structural and Trajectory Analysis for Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, Mark D.

    1996-01-01

    In this report the author describes: (1) development of advanced methods of structural weight estimation, and (2) development of advanced methods of flight path optimization. A method of estimating the load-bearing fuselage weight and wing weight of transport aircraft based on fundamental structural principles has been developed. This method of weight estimation represents a compromise between the rapid assessment of component weight using empirical methods based on actual weights of existing aircraft and detailed, but time-consuming, analysis using the finite element method. The method was applied to eight existing subsonic transports for validation and correlation. Integration of the resulting computer program, PDCYL, has been made into the weights-calculating module of the AirCraft SYNThesis (ACSYNT) computer program. ACSYNT bas traditionally used only empirical weight estimation methods; PDCYL adds to ACSYNT a rapid, accurate means of assessing the fuselage and wing weights of unconventional aircraft. PDCYL also allows flexibility in the choice of structural concept, as well as a direct means of determining the impact of advanced materials on structural weight.

  4. Eclogitic breccia from the Monviso ophiolite complex: new field and petrographic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locatelli, Michele; Verlaguet, Anne; Federico, Laura; Agard, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    The Monviso meta-ophiolite complex (Northern Italy, Western Alps) represents a coherent portion of oceanic lithosphere metamorphosed under eclogite facies conditions during the Alpine orogeny (2.6 GPa - 550°C, Lago Superiore Unit, Angiboust et al., 2011), and exhibits from bottom to top a thick serpentinite sole locally capped by metasediments, Mg-Al-rich metagabbros, then Fe-Ti-metagabbros capped by metabasalts. This section is disrupted by three main shear zones. Our study focusses on the Lower Shear Zone (LSZ), situated between the serpentinite sole (to the East) and the Mg-metagabbro bodies (to the West), and composed of blocks of both Fe-Ti and Mg-Al metagabbros embedded in a talc and tremolite-rich serpentinite matrix. Among these blocks, some were described as eclogitic breccias and interpreted as the result of a seismic rupture plane (Angiboust et al., 2012). These breccias correspond to blocks of Fe-Ti-metagabbros that were brecciated in eclogitic facies conditions (as attested by the omphacite + garnet ± lawsonite cement of the breccia) in a fluid-rich environment, as suggested by the abundance of lawsonite in the cement. Here we present new field data on the distribution and petrographic characterization of these eclogitic blocks in the LSZ. The aim of this work is twofold: (I) detailed mapping of the eclogitic block distribution along the LSZ, in order to determine precisely the extent and representativity of the breccias and (II) characterization of the brecciated blocks, at the outcrop scale, to explore the brecciation processes and structures. Between Pian del Re and Colle di Luca localities, the occurrence of eclogite blocks is uniform along the strike of the shear-zone, resulting in a 16 km-long belt of outcropping eclogitic bodies embedded in serpentinite matrix. The shear-zone width, by contrast, varies from 1.3 km to 0.8 km. Three types of eclogitic blocks can be distinguished: (1) intact (i.e., not brecciated) blocks of Fe

  5. Technical analysis of advanced wastewater-treatment systems for coal-gasification plants

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-31

    This analysis of advanced wastewater treatment systems for coal gasification plants highlights the three coal gasification demonstration plants proposed by the US Department of Energy: The Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant, the Illinois Coal Gasification Group Pipeline Gas Demonstration Plant, and the CONOCO Pipeline Gas Demonstration Plant. Technical risks exist for coal gasification wastewater treatment systems, in general, and for the three DOE demonstration plants (as designed), in particular, because of key data gaps. The quantities and compositions of coal gasification wastewaters are not well known; the treatability of coal gasification wastewaters by various technologies has not been adequately studied; the dynamic interactions of sequential wastewater treatment processes and upstream wastewater sources has not been tested at demonstration scale. This report identifies key data gaps and recommends that demonstration-size and commercial-size plants be used for coal gasification wastewater treatment data base development. While certain advanced treatment technologies can benefit from additional bench-scale studies, bench-scale and pilot plant scale operations are not representative of commercial-size facility operation. It is recommended that coal gasification demonstration plants, and other commercial-size facilities that generate similar wastewaters, be used to test advanced wastewater treatment technologies during operation by using sidestreams or collected wastewater samples in addition to the plant's own primary treatment system. Advanced wastewater treatment processes are needed to degrade refractory organics and to concentrate and remove dissolved solids to allow for wastewater reuse. Further study of reverse osmosis, evaporation, electrodialysis, ozonation, activated carbon, and ultrafiltration should take place at bench-scale.

  6. Improved methodology for integral analysis of advanced reactors employing passive safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muftuoglu, A. Kursad

    After four decades of experience with pressurized water reactors, a new generation of nuclear plants are emerging. These advanced designs employ passive safety which relies on natural forces, such as gravity and natural circulation. The new concept of passive safety also necessitates improvement in computational tools available for best-estimate analyses. The system codes originally designed for high pressure conditions in the presence of strong momentum sources such as pumps are challenged in many ways. Increased interaction of the primary system with the containment necessitates a tool for integral analysis. This study addresses some of these concerns. An improved tool for integral analysis coupling primary system with containment calculation is also presented. The code package is based on RELAP5 and CONTAIN programs, best-estimate thermal-hydraulics code for primary system analysis and containment code for containment analysis, respectively. The suitability is demonstrated with a postulated small break loss of coolant accident analysis of Westinghouse AP600 plant. The thesis explains the details of the analysis including the coupling model.

  7. Advances in liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry for quantitative and qualitative environmental analysis.

    PubMed

    Aceña, Jaume; Stampachiacchiere, Serena; Pérez, Sandra; Barceló, Damià

    2015-08-01

    This review summarizes the advances in environmental analysis by liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) during the last decade and discusses different aspects of their application. LC-HRMS has become a powerful tool for simultaneous quantitative and qualitative analysis of organic pollutants, enabling their quantitation and the search for metabolites and transformation products or the detection of unknown compounds. LC-HRMS provides more information than low-resolution (LR) MS for each sample because it can accurately determine the mass of the molecular ion and its fragment ions if it can be used for MS-MS. Another advantage is that the data can be processed using either target analysis, suspect screening, retrospective analysis, or non-target screening. With the growing popularity and acceptance of HRMS analysis, current guidelines for compound confirmation need to be revised for quantitative and qualitative purposes. Furthermore, new commercial software and user-built libraries are required to mine data in an efficient and comprehensive way. The scope of this critical review is not to provide a comprehensive overview of the many studies performed with LC-HRMS in the field of environmental analysis, but to reveal its advantages and limitations using different workflows. PMID:26138893

  8. Preliminary analysis of hot spot factors in an advanced reactor for space electric power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lustig, P. H.; Holms, A. G.; Davison, H. W.

    1973-01-01

    The maximum fuel pin temperature for nominal operation in an advanced power reactor is 1370 K. Because of possible nitrogen embrittlement of the clad, the fuel temperature was limited to 1622 K. Assuming simultaneous occurrence of the most adverse conditions a deterministic analysis gave a maximum fuel temperature of 1610 K. A statistical analysis, using a synthesized estimate of the standard deviation for the highest fuel pin temperature, showed probabilities of 0.015 of that pin exceeding the temperature limit by the distribution free Chebyshev inequality and virtually nil assuming a normal distribution. The latter assumption gives a 1463 K maximum temperature at 3 standard deviations, the usually assumed cutoff. Further, the distribution and standard deviation of the fuel-clad gap are the most significant contributions to the uncertainty in the fuel temperature.

  9. Single virus detection by means of atomic force microscopy in combination with advanced image analysis.

    PubMed

    Bocklitz, Thomas; Kämmer, Evelyn; Stöckel, Stephan; Cialla-May, Dana; Weber, Karina; Zell, Roland; Deckert, Volker; Popp, Jürgen

    2014-10-01

    In the present contribution virions of five different virus species, namely Varicella-zoster virus, Porcine teschovirus, Tobacco mosaic virus, Coliphage M13 and Enterobacteria phage PsP3, are investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). From the resulting height images quantitative features like maximal height, area and volume of the viruses could be extracted and compared to reference values. Subsequently, these features were accompanied by image moments, which quantify the morphology of the virions. Both types of features could be utilized for an automatic discrimination of the five virus species. The accuracy of this classification model was 96.8%. Thus, a virus detection on a single-particle level using AFM images is possible. Due to the application of advanced image analysis the morphology could be quantified and used for further analysis. Here, an automatic recognition by means of a classification model could be achieved in a reliable and objective manner. PMID:25196422

  10. MossWinn—methodological advances in the field of Mössbauer data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klencsár, Zoltán

    2013-04-01

    The methodology of Mössbauer data analysis has been advanced via the development of a novel scientific database system concept and its realization in the field of Mössbauer spectroscopy, as well as by the application of parallel computing techniques for the enhancement of the efficiency of various processes encountered in the practice of Mössbauer data handling and analysis. The present article describes the new database system concept along with details of its realization in the form of the MossWinn Internet Database (MIDB), and illustrates the performance advantage that may be realized on multi-core processor systems by the application of parallel algorithms for the implementation of database system functions.

  11. Re-Entry Mission Analysis of the Advanced Re-entry Vehicle (ARV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, D.; Haya Ramos, R.; Strauch, H.; Bottacini, M.

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents the results of the DEIMOS Space S.L.U. Re-entry Mission Analysis activities obtained in the frame of the Phase A up to PRR milestone of the Advanced Re-entry Vehicle (ARV) ESA project leaded by ASTRIUM. Results presented show how the trajectory and the vehicle design are strictly related and how a feasible and robust solution can be efficiently obtained by considering since the beginning several constraints limiting the design. The process implemented combines the design of key vehicle and trajectory parameters. Once the vehicle design parameters and the conditions at the EIP are fixed, the Mission Analysis is completed by the definition of the optimal trajectory from the deorbiting to the EIP that allow the correct targeting of the EIP conditions but also a safe separation of the different modules and the correct targeting of the desired landing site.

  12. Re-Entry Mission Analysis Of The Advanced Re-Entry Vehicle (ARV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, Davide; Haya Ramos, Rodrigo; Strauch, Hans; Bottacini, Massimiliano

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents the results of the DEIMOS Space S.L.U. Re-entry Mission Analysis activities obtained in the frame of the Phase A up to PRR milestone of the Advanced Re-entry Vehicle (ARV) ESA project leaded by ASTRIUM. Results presented show how the trajectory and the vehicle design are strictly related and how a feasible and robust solution can be efficiently obtained by considering since the beginning several constraints limiting the design. The process implemented combines the design of key vehicle and trajectory parameters. Once the vehicle design parameters and the conditions at the EIP are fixed, the Mission Analysis is completed by the definition of the optimal trajectory from the de- orbiting to the EIP that allow the correct targeting of the EIP conditions but also a safe separation of the different modules and the correct targeting of the desired landing site.

  13. Advanced grazing-incidence techniques for modern soft-matter materials analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hexemer, Alexander; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The complex nano-morphology of modern soft-matter materials is successfully probed with advanced grazing-incidence techniques. Based on grazing-incidence small- and wide-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (GISAXS, GIWAXS, GISANS and GIWANS), new possibilities arise which are discussed with selected examples. Due to instrumental progress, highly interesting possibilities for local structure analysis in this material class arise from the use of micro- and nanometer-sized X-ray beams in micro- or nanofocused GISAXS and GIWAXS experiments. The feasibility of very short data acquisition times down to milliseconds creates exciting possibilities forin situandin operandoGISAXS and GIWAXS studies. Tuning the energy of GISAXS and GIWAXS in the soft X-ray regime and in time-of flight GISANS allows the tailoring of contrast conditions and thereby the probing of more complex morphologies. In addition, recent progress in software packages, useful for data analysis for advanced grazing-incidence techniques, is discussed.

  14. Advanced grazing-incidence techniques for modern soft-matter materials analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hexemer, Alexander; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The complex nano-morphology of modern soft-matter materials is successfully probed with advanced grazing-incidence techniques. Based on grazing-incidence small- and wide-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (GISAXS, GIWAXS, GISANS and GIWANS), new possibilities arise which are discussed with selected examples. Due to instrumental progress, highly interesting possibilities for local structure analysis in this material class arise from the use of micro- and nanometer-sized X-ray beams in micro- or nanofocused GISAXS and GIWAXS experiments. The feasibility of very short data acquisition times down to milliseconds creates exciting possibilities forin situandin operandoGISAXS and GIWAXS studies. Tuning the energy of GISAXS and GIWAXS in themore » soft X-ray regime and in time-of flight GISANS allows the tailoring of contrast conditions and thereby the probing of more complex morphologies. In addition, recent progress in software packages, useful for data analysis for advanced grazing-incidence techniques, is discussed.« less

  15. Advanced grazing-incidence techniques for modern soft-matter materials analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hexemer, Alexander; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The complex nano-morphology of modern soft-matter materials is successfully probed with advanced grazing-incidence techniques. Based on grazing-incidence small- and wide-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (GISAXS, GIWAXS, GISANS and GIWANS), new possibilities arise which are discussed with selected examples. Due to instrumental progress, highly interesting possibilities for local structure analysis in this material class arise from the use of micro- and nanometer-sized X-ray beams in micro- or nanofocused GISAXS and GIWAXS experiments. The feasibility of very short data acquisition times down to milliseconds creates exciting possibilities for in situ and in operando GISAXS and GIWAXS studies. Tuning the energy of GISAXS and GIWAXS in the soft X-ray regime and in time-of flight GISANS allows the tailoring of contrast conditions and thereby the probing of more complex morphologies. In addition, recent progress in software packages, useful for data analysis for advanced grazing-incidence techniques, is discussed. PMID:25610632

  16. Quantitative Analysis of Diverse Lactobacillus Species Present in Advanced Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Roy; Nadkarni, Mangala A.; Chhour, Kim-Ly; Martin, F. Elizabeth; Jacques, Nicholas A.; Hunter, Neil

    2004-01-01

    Our previous analysis of 65 advanced dental caries lesions by traditional culture techniques indicated that lactobacilli were numerous in the advancing front of the progressive lesion. Production of organic acids by lactobacilli is considered to be important in causing decalcification of the dentinal matrix. The present study was undertaken to define more precisely the diversity of lactobacilli found in this environment and to quantify the major species and phylotypes relative to total load of lactobacilli by real-time PCR. Pooled DNA was amplified by PCR with Lactobacillus genus-specific primers for subsequent cloning, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis. Based on 16S ribosomal DNA sequence comparisons, 18 different phylotypes of lactobacilli were detected, including strong representation of both novel and gastrointestinal phylotypes. Specific PCR primers were designed for nine prominent species, including Lactobacillus gasseri, L. ultunensis, L. salivarius, L. rhamnosus, L. casei, L. crispatus, L. delbrueckii, L. fermentum, and L. gallinarum. More than three different species were identified as being present in most of the dentine samples, confirming the widespread distribution and numerical importance of various Lactobacillus spp. in carious dentine. Quantification by real-time PCR revealed various proportions of the nine species colonizing carious dentine, with higher mean loads of L. gasseri and L. ultunensis than of the other prevalent species. The findings provide a basis for further characterization of the pathogenicity of Lactobacillus spp. in the context of extension of the carious lesion. PMID:15243071

  17. The TEF modeling and analysis approach to advance thermionic space power technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Albert C.

    1997-01-01

    Thermionics space power systems have been proposed as advanced power sources for future space missions that require electrical power levels significantly above the capabilities of current space power systems. The Defense Special Weapons Agency's (DSWA) Thermionic Evaluation Facility (TEF) is carrying out both experimental and analytical research to advance thermionic space power technology to meet this expected need. A Modeling and Analysis (M&A) project has been created at the TEF to develop analysis tools, evaluate concepts, and guide research. M&A activities are closely linked to the TEF experimental program, providing experiment support and using experimental data to validate models. A planning exercise has been completed for the M&A project, and a strategy for implementation was developed. All M&A activities will build on a framework provided by a system performance model for a baseline Thermionic Fuel Element (TFE) concept. The system model is composed of sub-models for each of the system components and sub-systems. Additional thermionic component options and model improvements will continue to be incorporated in the basic system model during the course of the program. All tasks are organized into four focus areas: 1) system models, 2) thermionic research, 3) alternative concepts, and 4) documentation and integration. The M&A project will provide a solid framework for future thermionic system development.

  18. Advanced Mesh-Enabled Monte carlo capability for Multi-Physics Reactor Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Paul; Evans, Thomas; Tautges, Tim

    2012-12-24

    This project will accumulate high-precision fluxes throughout reactor geometry on a non- orthogonal grid of cells to support multi-physics coupling, in order to more accurately calculate parameters such as reactivity coefficients and to generate multi-group cross sections. This work will be based upon recent developments to incorporate advanced geometry and mesh capability in a modular Monte Carlo toolkit with computational science technology that is in use in related reactor simulation software development. Coupling this capability with production-scale Monte Carlo radiation transport codes can provide advanced and extensible test-beds for these developments. Continuous energy Monte Carlo methods are generally considered to be the most accurate computational tool for simulating radiation transport in complex geometries, particularly neutron transport in reactors. Nevertheless, there are several limitations for their use in reactor analysis. Most significantly, there is a trade-off between the fidelity of results in phase space, statistical accuracy, and the amount of computer time required for simulation. Consequently, to achieve an acceptable level of statistical convergence in high-fidelity results required for modern coupled multi-physics analysis, the required computer time makes Monte Carlo methods prohibitive for design iterations and detailed whole-core analysis. More subtly, the statistical uncertainty is typically not uniform throughout the domain, and the simulation quality is limited by the regions with the largest statistical uncertainty. In addition, the formulation of neutron scattering laws in continuous energy Monte Carlo methods makes it difficult to calculate adjoint neutron fluxes required to properly determine important reactivity parameters. Finally, most Monte Carlo codes available for reactor analysis have relied on orthogonal hexahedral grids for tallies that do not conform to the geometric boundaries and are thus generally not well

  19. Demasking the integrated value of discharge - Advanced sensitivity analysis on the components of hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guse, Björn; Pfannerstill, Matthias; Gafurov, Abror; Fohrer, Nicola; Gupta, Hoshin

    2016-04-01

    The hydrologic response variable most often used in sensitivity analysis is discharge which provides an integrated value of all catchment processes. The typical sensitivity analysis evaluates how changes in the model parameters affect the model output. However, due to discharge being the aggregated effect of all hydrological processes, the sensitivity signal of a certain model parameter can be strongly masked. A more advanced form of sensitivity analysis would be achieved if we could investigate how the sensitivity of a certain modelled process variable relates to the changes in a parameter. Based on this, the controlling parameters for different hydrological components could be detected. Towards this end, we apply the approach of temporal dynamics of parameter sensitivity (TEDPAS) to calculate the daily sensitivities for different model outputs with the FAST method. The temporal variations in parameter dominance are then analysed for both the modelled hydrological components themselves, and also for the rates of change (derivatives) in the modelled hydrological components. The daily parameter sensitivities are then compared with the modelled hydrological components using regime curves. Application of this approach shows that when the corresponding modelled process is investigated instead of discharge, we obtain both an increased indication of parameter sensitivity, and also a clear pattern showing how the seasonal patterns of parameter dominance change over time for each hydrological process. By relating these results with the model structure, we can see that the sensitivity of model parameters is influenced by the function of the parameter. While capacity parameters show more sensitivity to the modelled hydrological component, flux parameters tend to have a higher sensitivity to rates of change in the modelled hydrological component. By better disentangling the information hidden in the discharge values, we can use sensitivity analyses to obtain a clearer signal

  20. Recent advances and trends in the liquid-chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of flavonoids.

    PubMed

    de Villiers, André; Venter, Pieter; Pasch, Harald

    2016-01-22

    Flavonoids have elicited significant attention as a result of their importance in plants, their influence on the properties of natural-product derived commodities and especially as a consequence of their purported health benefits. Research in all of these fields relies heavily on accurate analytical data, and in this LC-MS has come to play an influential role by allowing relatively fast tentative identification and accurate quantification of low levels of flavonoids in a variety of matrices. The field has undergone rapid expansion in the last decade due to important developments in both HPLC and MS instrumentation, which nowadays allow much faster and more accurate analysis of flavonoids. This contribution aims to provide an overview of these developments and their application in flavonoid analysis since 2009. The discussion is focussed first on methodologies which provide improved LC separation of flavonoids in terms of speed and/or resolution, including ultra high pressure LC (UHPLC), monolithic and superficially porous phases, high temperature LC (HTLC) and comprehensive two-dimensional LC (LC×LC). The fundamental background relevant to each of these will be briefly outlined, as well as the implications and promise of their hyphenation to MS. Secondly, the possibilities and limitations of a range of the latest MS instruments available in combination with advanced LC analysis will be discussed, including ion trap, triple quadrupole, time-of-flight, Orbitrap, ion mobility and various hybrid instruments. Examples from the latest literature will be used to illustrate the performance gains achievable in flavonoid analysis by the hyphenation of advanced LC separation and high-end MS instrumentation. PMID:26718188

  1. Development, Implementation and Application of Micromechanical Analysis Tools for Advanced High Temperature Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This document contains the final report to the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) for the research project entitled Development, Implementation, and Application of Micromechanical Analysis Tools for Advanced High-Temperature Composites. The research supporting this initiative has been conducted by Dr. Brett A. Bednarcyk, a Senior Scientist at OM in Brookpark, Ohio from the period of August 1998 to March 2005. Most of the work summarized herein involved development, implementation, and application of enhancements and new capabilities for NASA GRC's Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC) software package. When the project began, this software was at a low TRL (3-4) and at release version 2.0. Due to this project, the TRL of MAC/GMC has been raised to 7 and two new versions (3.0 and 4.0) have been released. The most important accomplishments with respect to MAC/GMC are: (1) A multi-scale framework has been built around the software, enabling coupled design and analysis from the global structure scale down to the micro fiber-matrix scale; (2) The software has been expanded to analyze smart materials; (3) State-of-the-art micromechanics theories have been implemented and validated within the code; (4) The damage, failure, and lifing capabilities of the code have been expanded from a very limited state to a vast degree of functionality and utility; and (5) The user flexibility of the code has been significantly enhanced. MAC/GMC is now the premier code for design and analysis of advanced composite and smart materials. It is a candidate for the 2005 NASA Software of the Year Award. The work completed over the course of the project is summarized below on a year by year basis. All publications resulting from the project are listed at the end of this report.

  2. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Shropshire

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

  3. PREFACE: 16th International workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in physics research (ACAT2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiala, L.; Lokajicek, M.; Tumova, N.

    2015-05-01

    This volume of the IOP Conference Series is dedicated to scientific contributions presented at the 16th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT 2014), this year the motto was ''bridging disciplines''. The conference took place on September 1-5, 2014, at the Faculty of Civil Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic. The 16th edition of ACAT explored the boundaries of computing system architectures, data analysis algorithmics, automatic calculations, and theoretical calculation technologies. It provided a forum for confronting and exchanging ideas among these fields, where new approaches in computing technologies for scientific research were explored and promoted. This year's edition of the workshop brought together over 140 participants from all over the world. The workshop's 16 invited speakers presented key topics on advanced computing and analysis techniques in physics. During the workshop, 60 talks and 40 posters were presented in three tracks: Computing Technology for Physics Research, Data Analysis - Algorithms and Tools, and Computations in Theoretical Physics: Techniques and Methods. The round table enabled discussions on expanding software, knowledge sharing and scientific collaboration in the respective areas. ACAT 2014 was generously sponsored by Western Digital, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Hewlett Packard, DataDirect Networks, M Computers, Bright Computing, Huawei and PDV-Systemhaus. Special appreciations go to the track liaisons Lorenzo Moneta, Axel Naumann and Grigory Rubtsov for their work on the scientific program and the publication preparation. ACAT's IACC would also like to express its gratitude to all referees for their work on making sure the contributions are published in the proceedings. Our thanks extend to the conference liaisons Andrei Kataev and Jerome Lauret who worked with the local contacts and made this conference possible as well as to the program

  4. Factor analysis and advanced inelastic background analysis in XPS: Unraveling time dependent contamination growth on multilayers and thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusenleitner, S.; Hauschild, D.; Graber, T.; Ehm, D.; Tougaard, S.; Reinert, F.

    2013-10-01

    In order to follow and understand time dependent contamination growth on multilayer mirrors for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography applications, particular heterosystems were investigated with X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS). Diverse capping layers can be used to terminate EUV multilayer mirrors to protect the underlying multilayer stack, e.g. Ru metal. In XPS problems were encountered when analyzing spectra as the core-level signals of Ru and C overlap. Further, Ru was not only present as pure metal, but also in its oxidized state. Disentangling the overlapping XPS spectra was achieved by application of factor analysis (FA) yielding not only the spectra of each component but also the according weights. Thus a model for the time dependent contamination growth was developed. This model was cross checked by advanced inelastic background analysis. Both methods displayed a way to unravel overlapping data sets and for deducing multilayer composition models.

  5. Work Domain Analysis and Operational Concepts for Advanced Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques Hugo

    2001-02-01

    The nuclear industry is currently designing and building a new generation of reactors that will differ in important respects from the older generation. Differences in new plants will include different structural, functional, and environmental aspects, all of which are likely to have a significant impact on the way these plants are operated. In order to meet economic and safety objectives, these new reactors will all use advanced technologies to some extent, including new materials and advanced digital instrumentation and control systems. Examples of these advances include distribution of load-following demand among multiple units, different product streams (steam, process heat, or electricity), increased use of passive safety systems, high levels of automation with humans in supervisory roles, integration of computerized procedures for control room and field work, and remote surveillance and on-line monitoring. New technologies will affect not only operational strategies, but will also require a new approach to how functions are allocated to humans or machines to ensure optimal performance. There is still much uncertainty about the effect of large scale changes in plant design on operations and human tasks, such as workload, situation awareness, human reliability, staffing levels, and the appropriate allocation of functions between the crew and various automated plant systems. This uncertainty will remain until sound technical bases are developed for new operational concepts and strategies. Existing human factors and systems engineering design standards and methodologies are not current in terms of human interaction requirements for dynamic automated systems and are no longer suitable for the analysis of evolving operational concepts. Up-to-date models and guidance are required for the development of operational concepts for complex socio-technical systems. Designers need to be able to identify and evaluate specific human factors challenges related to non

  6. Advanced Visualization and Analysis of Climate Data using DV3D and UV-CDAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, T. P.

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes DV3D, a Vistrails package of high-level modules for the Ultra-scale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT) interactive visual exploration system that enables exploratory analysis of diverse and rich data sets stored in the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF). DV3D provides user-friendly workflow interfaces for advanced visualization and analysis of climate data at a level appropriate for scientists. The application builds on VTK, an open-source, object-oriented library, for visualization and analysis. DV3D provides the high-level interfaces, tools, and application integrations required to make the analysis and visualization power of VTK readily accessible to users without exposing burdensome details such as actors, cameras, renderers, and transfer functions. It can run as a desktop application or distributed over a set of nodes for hyperwall or distributed visualization applications. DV3D is structured as a set of modules which can be linked to create workflows in Vistrails. Figure 1 displays a typical DV3D workflow as it would appear in the Vistrails workflow builder interface of UV-CDAT and, on the right, the visualization spreadsheet output of the workflow. Each DV3D module encapsulates a complex VTK pipeline with numerous supporting objects. Each visualization module implements a unique interactive 3D display. The integrated Vistrails visualization spreadsheet offers multiple synchronized visualization displays for desktop or hyperwall. The currently available displays include volume renderers, volume slicers, 3D isosurfaces, 3D hovmoller, and various vector plots. The DV3D GUI offers a rich selection of interactive query, browse, navigate, and configure options for all displays. All configuration operations are saved as Vistrails provenance. DV3D's seamless integration with UV-CDAT's climate data management system (CDMS) and other climate data analysis tools provides a wide range of climate data analysis operations, e

  7. PREFACE: 14th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorescu, Liliana; Britton, David; Glover, Nigel; Heinrich, Gudrun; Lauret, Jérôme; Naumann, Axel; Speer, Thomas; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro

    2012-06-01

    ACAT2011 This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to scientific contributions presented at the 14th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT 2011) which took place on 5-7 September 2011 at Brunel University, UK. The workshop series, which began in 1990 in Lyon, France, brings together computer science researchers and practitioners, and researchers from particle physics and related fields in order to explore and confront the boundaries of computing and of automatic data analysis and theoretical calculation techniques. It is a forum for the exchange of ideas among the fields, exploring and promoting cutting-edge computing, data analysis and theoretical calculation techniques in fundamental physics research. This year's edition of the workshop brought together over 100 participants from all over the world. 14 invited speakers presented key topics on computing ecosystems, cloud computing, multivariate data analysis, symbolic and automatic theoretical calculations as well as computing and data analysis challenges in astrophysics, bioinformatics and musicology. Over 80 other talks and posters presented state-of-the art developments in the areas of the workshop's three tracks: Computing Technologies, Data Analysis Algorithms and Tools, and Computational Techniques in Theoretical Physics. Panel and round table discussions on data management and multivariate data analysis uncovered new ideas and collaboration opportunities in the respective areas. This edition of ACAT was generously sponsored by the Science and Technology Facility Council (STFC), the Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology (IPPP) at Durham University, Brookhaven National Laboratory in the USA and Dell. We would like to thank all the participants of the workshop for the high level of their scientific contributions and for the enthusiastic participation in all its activities which were, ultimately, the key factors in the

  8. Rock magnetic and petrographical-mineralogical studies of the dredged rocks from the submarine volcanoes of the Sea-of-Okhotsk slope within the northern part of the Kuril Island Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidov, V. A.; Pilipenko, O. V.; Petrova, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    The rock magnetic properties of the samples of dredged rocks composing the submarine volcanic edifices within the Sea-of-Okhotsk slope of the northern part of the Kuril Island Arc are studied. The measurements of the standard rock magnetic parameters, thermomagnetic analysis, petrographical studies, and microprobe investigations have been carried out. The magnetization of the studied rocks is mainly carried by the pseudo-single domain and multidomain titanomagnetite and low-Ti titanomagnetite grains. The high values of the natural remanent magnetization are due to the pseudo-single-domain structure of the titanomagnetite grains, whereas the high values of magnetic susceptibility are associated with the high concentration of ferrimagnetic grains. The highest Curie points are observed in the titanomagnetite grains of the igneous rocks composing the edifices of the Smirnov, Edelshtein, and 1.4 submarine volcanoes.

  9. RISMC advanced safety analysis working plan: FY2015 - FY2019. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    SciTech Connect

    Szilard, Ronaldo H; Smith, Curtis L

    2014-09-01

    In this report, the Advanced Safety Analysis Program (ASAP) objectives and value proposition is described. ASAP focuses on modernization of nuclear power safety analysis (tools, methods and data); implementing state-of-the-art modeling techniques (which include, for example, enabling incorporation of more detailed physics as they become available); taking advantage of modern computing hardware; and combining probabilistic and mechanistic analyses to enable a risk informed safety analysis process. The modernized tools will maintain the current high level of safety in our nuclear power plant fleet, while providing an improved understanding of safety margins and the critical parameters that affect them. Thus, the set of tools will provide information to inform decisions on plant modifications, refurbishments, and surveillance programs, while improving economics. The set of tools will also benefit the design of new reactors, enhancing safety per unit cost of a nuclear plant. As part of the discussion, we have identified three sets of stakeholders, the nuclear industry, the Department of Energy (DOE), and associated oversight organizations. These three groups would benefit from ASAP in different ways. For example, within the DOE complex, the possible applications that are seen include the safety of experimental reactors, facility life extension, safety-by-design in future generation advanced reactors, and managing security for the storage of nuclear material. This report provides information in five areas: (1) A value proposition (“why is this important?”) that will make the case for stakeholder’s use of the ASAP research and development (R&D) products; (2) An identification of likely end users and pathway to adoption of enhanced tools by the end-users; (3) A proposed set of practical and achievable “use case” demonstrations; (4) A proposed plan to address ASAP verification and validation (V&V) needs; and (5) A proposed schedule for the multi-year ASAP.

  10. Improvement of hybrid yield by advanced backcross QTL analysis in elite maize.

    PubMed

    Ho, C.; McCouch, R.; Smith, E.

    2002-08-01

    We applied an advanced backcross breeding strategy to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) of agronomic importance in a cross between two elite inbreds of maize, RD6502 (Mo17-type recurrent parent) and RD3013 (Iodent donor parent). Two hundred and four BC(2) families were scored at 106 SSR, 15 AFLP, and 38 Heartbreaker (MITE) loci. BC(2) testcrosses (TC) with B73 were phenotyped at six locations in the Midwest and N.Y. We detected four grain yield, six grain moisture, and three plant height QTLs at which the RD3013 allele had a favorable effect ( p < 0.05). All four yield QTLs were selected as target introgressions in the development of BC(3)TC families. As predicted by BC(2)TC analysis, BC(3)TC entries containing introgressions at yld3.1 and yld10.1 significantly outperformed non-carrier entries by 11.1% (15.6 bu/A at one location) and 6.7% (7.1 bu/A averaged across two locations), respectively, in replicated Midwestern trials ( p < 0.05). Detection of yld10.1 effects in the BC(2)TC by spatial analysis (i.e., incomplete block, response surface, autoregressive, moving average or autoregressive moving average), but not by conventional single point analysis or interval mapping, indicated the utility of local environmental control for QTL mapping in unreplicated maize progeny. This work demonstrated that the advanced backcross QTL method can be applied to identify and manipulate useful QTLs in heterotic inbreds of elite maize. Genetic gains by this approach can be coupled with the maintenance and selection of favorable epistatic gene complexes by traditional hybrid breeding for maize improvement. PMID:12582549

  11. Preliminary fracture analysis of the core pressure boundary tube for the Advanced Neutron Source Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, K.C.; Yahr, G.T.

    1995-08-01

    The outer core pressure boundary tube (CPBT) of the Advanced neutron Source (ANS) reactor being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is currently specified as being composed of 6061-T6 aluminum. ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code fracture analysis rules for nuclear components are based on the use of ferritic steels; the expressions, tables, charts and equations were all developed from tests and analyses conducted for ferritic steels. Because of the nature of the Code, design with thin aluminum requires analytical approaches that do not directly follow the Code. The intent of this report is to present a methodology comparable to the ASME Code for ensuring the prevention of nonductile fracture of the CPBT in the ANS reactor. 6061-T6 aluminum is known to be a relatively brittle material; the linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) approach is utilized to determine allowable flaw sizes for the CPBT. A J-analysis following the procedure developed by the Electric Power Research Institute was conducted as a check; the results matched those for the LEFM analysis for the cases analyzed. Since 6061-T6 is known to embrittle when irradiated, the reduction in K{sub Q} due to irradiation is considered in the analysis. In anticipation of probable requirements regarding maximum allowable flaw size, a survey of nondestructive inspection capabilities is also presented. A discussion of probabilistic fracture mechanics approaches, principally Monte Carlo techniques, is included in this report as an introduction to what quantifying the probability of nonductile failure of the CPBT may entail.

  12. Advanced Sensitivity Analysis of the Danish Eulerian Model in Parallel and Grid Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostromsky, Tz.; Dimov, I.; Marinov, P.; Georgieva, R.; Zlatev, Z.

    2011-11-01

    A 3-stage sensitivity analysis approach, based on analysis of variances technique for calculating Sobol's global sensitivity indices and computationaly efficient Monte Carlo integration techniques is considered and applied to a large-scale air pollurion model, the Danish Eulerian Model. On the first stage it is necessary to carry out a set of computationally expensive numerical experiments and to extract the necessary sensitivity analysis data. The output is used to construct mesh-functions of ozone concentration ratios to be used in the next stages for evaluating the necessary variances. Here we use a specially adapted for the purpose version of the model, called SA-DEM. It has been successfully implemented and run on the most powerful parallel supercomputer in Bulgaria—IBM Blue Gene/P. A more advanced version, capable of using efficiently the full capacity of this powerful supercomputer, is described in this paper, followed by some performance analysis of the numerical experiments. Another source of computational power for solving such a tuff numerical problem is the computational grid. That is why another version of SA-DEM has been adapted to exploit efficiently the capacity of our Grid infrastructure. The numerical results from both the parallel and Grid implementation are presented, compared and analysed.

  13. Updated pipe break analysis for Advanced Neutron Source Reactor conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, M.W.; Chen, N.C.J.; Yoder, G.L.

    1994-04-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) is a research reactor to be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory that will supply the highest continuous neutron flux levels of any reactor in the world. It uses plate-type fuel with high-mass-flux and highly subcooled heavy water as the primary coolant. The Conceptual Safety Analysis for the ANSR was completed in June 1992. The thermal-hydraulic pipe-break safety analysis (performed with a specialized version of RELAP5/MOD3) focused primarily on double-ended guillotine breaks of the primary piping and some core-damage mitigation options for such an event. Smaller, instantaneous pipe breaks in the cold- and hot-leg piping were also analyzed to a limited extent. Since the initial analysis for the conceptual design was completed, several important changes to the RELAP5 input model have been made reflecting improvements in the fuel grading and changes in the elevation of the primary coolant pumps. Also, a new philosophy for pipe-break safety analysis (similar to that adopted for the New Production Reactor) accentuates instantaneous, limited flow area pipe-break accidents in addition to finite-opening-time, double-ended guillotine breaks of the major coolant piping. This paper discloses the results of the most recent instantaneous pipe-break calculations.

  14. SOARCA Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station Long-Term Station Blackout Uncertainty Analysis: Knowledge Advancement.

    SciTech Connect

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Mattie, Patrick D.; Bixler, Nathan E.; Ross, Kyle; Cardoni, Jeffrey N; Kalinich, Donald A.; Osborn, Douglas M.; Sallaberry, Cedric Jean-Marie; Ghosh, S. Tina

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes the knowledge advancements from the uncertainty analysis for the State-of- the-Art Reactor Consequence Analyses (SOARCA) unmitigated long-term station blackout accident scenario at the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station. This work assessed key MELCOR and MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System, Version 2 (MACCS2) modeling uncertainties in an integrated fashion to quantify the relative importance of each uncertain input on potential accident progression, radiological releases, and off-site consequences. This quantitative uncertainty analysis provides measures of the effects on consequences, of each of the selected uncertain parameters both individually and in interaction with other parameters. The results measure the model response (e.g., variance in the output) to uncertainty in the selected input. Investigation into the important uncertain parameters in turn yields insights into important phenomena for accident progression and off-site consequences. This uncertainty analysis confirmed the known importance of some parameters, such as failure rate of the Safety Relief Valve in accident progression modeling and the dry deposition velocity in off-site consequence modeling. The analysis also revealed some new insights, such as dependent effect of cesium chemical form for different accident progressions. (auth)

  15. Advanced Software for Analysis of High-Speed Rolling-Element Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poplawski, J. V.; Rumbarger, J. H.; Peters, S. M.; Galatis, H.; Flower, R.

    2003-01-01

    COBRA-AHS is a package of advanced software for analysis of rigid or flexible shaft systems supported by rolling-element bearings operating at high speeds under complex mechanical and thermal loads. These loads can include centrifugal and thermal loads generated by motions of bearing components. COBRA-AHS offers several improvements over prior commercial bearing-analysis programs: It includes innovative probabilistic fatigue-life-estimating software that provides for computation of three-dimensional stress fields and incorporates stress-based (in contradistinction to prior load-based) mathematical models of fatigue life. It interacts automatically with the ANSYS finite-element code to generate finite-element models for estimating distributions of temperature and temperature-induced changes in dimensions in iterative thermal/dimensional analyses: thus, for example, it can be used to predict changes in clearances and thermal lockup. COBRA-AHS provides an improved graphical user interface that facilitates the iterative cycle of analysis and design by providing analysis results quickly in graphical form, enabling the user to control interactive runs without leaving the program environment, and facilitating transfer of plots and printed results for inclusion in design reports. Additional features include roller-edge stress prediction and influence of shaft and housing distortion on bearing performance.

  16. An Advanced Neutronic Analysis Toolkit with Inline Monte Carlo capability for BHTR Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    William R. Martin; John C. Lee

    2009-12-30

    Monte Carlo capability has been combined with a production LWR lattice physics code to allow analysis of high temperature gas reactor configurations, accounting for the double heterogeneity due to the TRISO fuel. The Monte Carlo code MCNP5 has been used in conjunction with CPM3, which was the testbench lattice physics code for this project. MCNP5 is used to perform two calculations for the geometry of interest, one with homogenized fuel compacts and the other with heterogeneous fuel compacts, where the TRISO fuel kernels are resolved by MCNP5.

  17. Formability Analysis of Diode-Laser-Welded Tailored Blanks of Advanced High-Strength Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, S. K.; Baltazar Hernandez, V. H.; Kuntz, M. L.; Zhou, Y.

    2009-08-01

    Currently, advances due to tailored blanking can be enhanced by the development of new grades of advanced high-strength steels (HSSs), for the further weight reduction and structural improvement of automotive components. In the present work, diode laser welds of three different grades of advanced high-strength dual-phase (DP) steel sheets (with tensile strengths of 980, 800, and 450 MPa) to high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) material were fabricated by applying the proper welding parameters. Formability in terms of Hecker’s limiting dome height (LDH), the strain distribution on the hemispherical dome surface, the weld line movement during deformation, and the load-bearing capacity during the stretch forming of these different laser-welded blanks were compared. Finite element (FE) analysis of the LDH tests of both the parent metals and laser-welded blanks was done using the commercially available software package LS-DYNA (Livermore Software Technology Corporation, Livermore, CA); the results compared well with the experimental data. It was also found that the LDH was not affected by the soft zone or weld zone properties; it decreased, however, with an increase in a nondimensional parameter, the “strength ratio” (SR). The weld line movement during stretch forming is an indication of nonuniform deformation resulting in a decrease in the LDH. In all the dissimilar weldments, fracture took place on the HSLA side, but the fracture location shifted to near the weld line (at the pole) in tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) of a higher strength ratio.

  18. Parametric Analysis of a Hover Test Vehicle using Advanced Test Generation and Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundy-Burlet, Karen; Schumann, Johann; Menzies, Tim; Barrett, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Large complex aerospace systems are generally validated in regions local to anticipated operating points rather than through characterization of the entire feasible operational envelope of the system. This is due to the large parameter space, and complex, highly coupled nonlinear nature of the different systems that contribute to the performance of the aerospace system. We have addressed the factors deterring such an analysis by applying a combination of technologies to the area of flight envelop assessment. We utilize n-factor (2,3) combinatorial parameter variations to limit the number of cases, but still explore important interactions in the parameter space in a systematic fashion. The data generated is automatically analyzed through a combination of unsupervised learning using a Bayesian multivariate clustering technique (AutoBayes) and supervised learning of critical parameter ranges using the machine-learning tool TAR3, a treatment learner. Covariance analysis with scatter plots and likelihood contours are used to visualize correlations between simulation parameters and simulation results, a task that requires tool support, especially for large and complex models. We present results of simulation experiments for a cold-gas-powered hover test vehicle.

  19. An Analysis of Energy Savings Possible Through Advances in Automotive Tooling Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Rick Schmoyer, RLS

    2004-12-03

    The use of lightweight and highly formable advanced materials in automobile and truck manufacturing has the potential to save fuel. Advances in tooling technology would promote the use of these materials. This report describes an energy savings analysis performed to approximate the potential fuel savings and consequential carbon-emission reductions that would be possible because of advances in tooling in the manufacturing of, in particular, non-powertrain components of passenger cars and heavy trucks. Separate energy analyses are performed for cars and heavy trucks. Heavy trucks are considered to be Class 7 and 8 trucks (trucks rated over 26,000 lbs gross vehicle weight). A critical input to the analysis is a set of estimates of the percentage reductions in weight and drag that could be achieved by the implementation of advanced materials, as a consequence of improved tooling technology, which were obtained by surveying tooling industry experts who attended a DOE Workshop, Tooling Technology for Low-Volume Vehicle Production, held in Seattle and Detroit in October and November 2003. The analysis is also based on 2001 fuel consumption totals and on energy-audit component proportions of fuel use due to drag, rolling resistance, and braking. The consumption proportions are assumed constant over time, but an allowance is made for fleet growth. The savings for a particular component is then the product of total fuel consumption, the percentage reduction of the component, and the energy audit component proportion. Fuel savings estimates for trucks also account for weight-limited versus volume-limited operations. Energy savings are assumed to be of two types: (1) direct energy savings incurred through reduced forces that must be overcome to move the vehicle or to slow it down in braking. and (2) indirect energy savings through reductions in the required engine power, the production and transmission of which incur thermodynamic losses, internal friction, and other

  20. Petrographic and geochemical characteristics of the Paleogene sedimentary rocks from the North Jiangsu Basin, Eastern China: implications for provenance and tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ni; Lin, Chun-Ming; Zhang, Xia

    2014-08-01

    The petrography and geochemistry (major, trace, and rare earth elements) of clastic sedimentary rocks from the Paleogene Dainan Formation (E2 d) in the North Jiangsu Basin, eastern China, are investigated to trace their provenance and to constrain their tectonic setting. The studied samples are characterized by LREE enrichment, flat HREE, and negative Eu anomaly similar to the upper continental crust composed chiefly of felsic components in the source area. Petrographic observation indicates that the sandstones contain predominant metamorphic and sedimentary clasts that were derived from peripheral recycled orogen and intrabasinal materials. The trace element ratios (Co/Th, La/Sc, La/Th, and Th/U) and the La-Th-Sc ternary plot further confirm that the sandstones are derived from granitic gneiss sources from recycled orogen and the intrabasinal mixed sedimentary provenance. The granitic gneiss source rocks may have derived from the Proterozoic granitic gneiss denuded in the eastern Dabie-Sulu orogen; and the intrabasinal provenance may come from the underlying strata during the Late Paleocene Wubao movement. The chemical index of alteration (CIA) and A-CN-K plot show that these source rocks may have experienced weak to medium chemical weathering. Analysis on tectonic setting of the source area suggests an active continental margin, which is intimate with tectonic feature of the Dabie-sulu orogen and the Yangtze block. In summary, we suggest that the North Jiangsu Basin is an ideal site for the study of the coupling between the uplift of the orogen and the subsidence of the foreland basin.

  1. Stratigraphy, structure, and some petrographic features of Tertiary volcanic rocks at the USW G-2 drill hole, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Maldonado, F.; Koether, S.L.

    1983-12-31

    A continuously cored drill hole penetrated 1830.6 m of Tertiary volcanic strata comprised of the following in descending order: Paintbrush Tuff, tuffaceous beds of Calico Hills, Crater Flat Tuff, lava and flow breccia (rhyodacitic), tuff of Lithic Ridge, bedded and ash-flow tuff, lava and flow breccia bedded tuff, conglomerate and ash-flow tuff, and older tuffs of USW G-2. Comparison of unit thicknesses at USW G-2 to unit thicknesses at previously drilled holes at Yucca Mountain indicate: (1) thickening of the Paintbrush Tuff members and tuffaceous beds of Calico Hills toward the northern part of Yucca Mountain; (2) thickening of the Prow Pass Member but thinning of the Bullfrog Member and Tram unit; (3) thinning of the tuff of Lithic Ridge; (4) presence of about 280 m of lava and flow breccia not previously penetrated by any drill hole; and (5) presence of an ash-flow tuff unit at the bottom of the drill hole not previously intersected, apparently the oldest unit penetrated at Yucca Mountain to date. Petrographic features of some of the units include: (1) decrease in quartz and K-feldspar and increases in biotite and plagioclase with depth in the tuffaceous beds of Calico Hills; (2) an increase in quartz phenocrysts from the top to the bottom members of the Crater Flat Tuff; (3) a low quartz content in the tuff of Lithic Ridge, suggesting tapping of the magma chamber at quartz-poor levels; (4) a change in zeolitic alteration from heulandite to clinoptilolite to mordenite with increasing depth; (5) lavas characterized by a rhyolitic top and dacitic base, suggesting reverse compositional zoning; and (6) presence of hydrothermal mineralization in the lavas that could be related to an itrusive under Yucca Mountain or to volcanism associated with the Timber Mountain-Claim Canyon caldera complex. A fracture analysis of the core resulted in tabulation of 7848 fractures, predominately open and high angle.

  2. Advanced Residuals Analysis for Determining the Number of PARAFAC Components in Dissolved Organic Matter.

    PubMed

    Cuss, Chad W; Guéguen, Céline; Andersson, Per; Porcelli, Don; Maximov, Trofim; Kutscher, Liselott

    2016-02-01

    Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) has facilitated an explosion in research connecting the fluorescence properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) to its functions and biogeochemical cycling in natural and engineered systems. However, the validation of robust PARAFAC models using split-half analysis requires an oft unrealistically large number (hundreds to thousands) of excitation-emission matrices (EEMs), and models with too few components may not adequately describe differences between DOM. This study used self-organizing maps (SOM) and comparing changes in residuals with the effects of adding components to estimate the number of PARAFAC components in DOM from two data sets: MS (110 EEMs from nine leaf leachates and headwaters) and LR (64 EEMs from the Lena River). Clustering by SOM demonstrated that peaks clearly persisted in model residuals after validation by split-half analysis. Plotting the changes to residuals was an effective method for visualizing the removal of fluorophore-like fluorescence caused by increasing the number of PARAFAC components. Extracting additional PARAFAC components via residuals analysis increased the proportion of correctly identified size-fractionated leaf leachates from 56.0 ± 0.8 to 75.2 ± 0.9%, and from 51.7 ± 1.4 to 92.9 ± 0.0% for whole leachates. Model overfitting was assessed by considering the correlations between components, and their distributions amongst samples. Advanced residuals analysis improved the ability of PARAFAC to resolve the variation in DOM fluorescence, and presents an enhanced validation approach for assessing the number of components that can be used to supplement the potentially misleading results of split-half analysis. PMID:26783366

  3. Anvi’o: an advanced analysis and visualization platform for ‘omics data

    PubMed Central

    Esen, Özcan C.; Quince, Christopher; Vineis, Joseph H.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Sogin, Mitchell L.; Delmont, Tom O.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in high-throughput sequencing and ‘omics technologies are revolutionizing studies of naturally occurring microbial communities. Comprehensive investigations of microbial lifestyles require the ability to interactively organize and visualize genetic information and to incorporate subtle differences that enable greater resolution of complex data. Here we introduce anvi’o, an advanced analysis and visualization platform that offers automated and human-guided characterization of microbial genomes in metagenomic assemblies, with interactive interfaces that can link ‘omics data from multiple sources into a single, intuitive display. Its extensible visualization approach distills multiple dimensions of information about each contig, offering a dynamic and unified work environment for data exploration, manipulation, and reporting. Using anvi’o, we re-analyzed publicly available datasets and explored temporal genomic changes within naturally occurring microbial populations through de novo characterization of single nucleotide variations, and linked cultivar and single-cell genomes with metagenomic and metatranscriptomic data. Anvi’o is an open-source platform that empowers researchers without extensive bioinformatics skills to perform and communicate in-depth analyses on large ‘omics datasets. PMID:26500826

  4. HER2 status in advanced gastric carcinoma: A retrospective multicentric analysis from Sicily

    PubMed Central

    IENI, A.; BARRESI, V.; GIUFFRÈ, G.; CARUSO, R.A.; LANZAFAME, S.; VILLARI, L.; SALOMONE, E.; ROZ, E.; CABIBI, D.; FRANCO, V.; CERTO, G.; LABATE, A.; NAGAR, C.; MAGLIOLO, E.; BROGGI, B.; FAZZARI, C.; ITALIA, F.; TUCCARI, G.

    2013-01-01

    According to the ToGA trial, HER2 has been shown to be predictive for the success of treatment with trastuzumab in advanced gastric cancer (AGC). A number of studies have analyzed HER-2/neu overexpression in gastric carcinoma and identified the rate of HER2 positivity to be markedly varied. To date, the prevalence of HER2 overexpression in Sicilian people with AGC is unknown. Therefore, in the present study, a retrospective immunohistochemical analysis of HER2 was performed in a cohort of 304 AGC samples that were obtained from the archives of 10 Sicilian anatomopathological diagnostic units in order to verify the positive rate of HER2-positive cases. Furthermore, the characteristics of histotype, grade, stage and Ki-67 expression were also analyzed. HER2 overexpression was encountered in 17.43% of all the gastric adenocarcinomas, which was consistent with the results that have been reported elsewhere in the literature. A progressive increase in HER2 overexpression was observed, from the poorly cohesive histotype to the tubular adenocarcinomas and gastric hepatoid adenocarcinomas. HER2 overexpression was significantly associated with a high grade, advanced stage and high Ki-67 labeling index. Further investigations performed jointly by pathologists and oncologists within the geographical area of the present study should confirm that the association of trastuzumab with chemotherapy results in an improvement of survival in patients with AGC. PMID:24260051

  5. Regional price targets appropriate for advanced coal extraction. [Forecasting to 1985 and 2000; USA; Regional analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Terasawa, K.L.; Whipple, D.W.

    1980-12-01

    The object of the study is to provide a methodology for predicting coal prices in regional markets for the target time frames 1985 and 2000 that could subsequently be used to guide the development of an advanced coal extraction system. The model constructed for the study is a supply and demand model that focuses on underground mining, since the advanced technology is expected to be developed for these reserves by the target years. The supply side of the model is based on coal reserve data generated by Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. (EEA). Given this data and the cost of operating a mine (data from US Department of Energy and Bureau of Mines), the Minimum Acceptable Selling Price (MASP) is obtained. The MASP is defined as the smallest price that would induce the producer to bring the mine into production, and is sensitive to the current technology and to assumptions concerning miner productivity. Based on this information, market supply curves can then be generated. On the demand side of the model, demand by region is calculated based on an EEA methodology that emphasizes demand by electric utilities and demand by industry. The demand and supply curves are then used to obtain the price targets. This last step is accomplished by allocating the demands among the suppliers so that the combined cost of producing and transporting coal is minimized.

  6. Advanced alpha spectrum analysis based on the fitting and covariance analysis of dependent variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihantola, S.; Pelikan, A.; Pöllänen, R.; Toivonen, H.

    2011-11-01

    The correct handling of statistical uncertainties is crucial especially when unfolding alpha spectra that contain a low number of counts or overlapping peaks from different nuclides. For this purpose, we have developed a new spectrum analysis software package called ADAM, which performs a full covariance calculus for alpha-particle emitting radionuclides. By analyzing a large number of simulated and measured spectra, the program was proved to give unbiased peak areas and statistically correct uncertainty limits. This applies regardless of the peak areas and the number of unknown parameters during the fitting. In addition, ADAM performs reliable deconvolution for multiplets, which opens the way for the determination of isotope ratios, such as 239Pu/240Pu.

  7. Modeling & analysis of criticality-induced severe accidents during refueling for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Georgevich, V.; Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Jackson, S.

    1992-10-01

    This paper describes work done at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for evaluating the potential and resulting consequences of a hypothetical criticality accident during refueling of the 330-MW Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) research reactor. The development of an analytical capability is described. Modeling and problem formulation were conducted using concepts of reactor neutronic theory for determining power level escalation, coupled with ORIGEN and MELCOR code simulations for radionuclide buildup and containment transport Gaussian plume transport modeling was done for determining off-site radiological consequences. Nuances associated with modeling this blast-type scenario are described. Analysis results for ANS containment response under a variety of postulated scenarios and containment failure modes are presented. It is demonstrated that individuals at the reactor site boundary will not receive doses beyond regulatory limits for any of the containment configurations studied.

  8. TRAC-PF1: an advanced best-estimate computer program for pressurized water reactor analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.

    1984-02-01

    The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) is being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light water reactors. The TRAC-PF1 program provides this capability for pressurized water reactors and for many thermal-hydraulic experimental facilities. The code features either a one-dimensional or a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and its associated internals; a two-phase, two-fluid nonequilibrium hydrodynamics model with a noncondensable gas field; flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment; optional reflood tracking capability for both bottom flood and falling-film quench fronts; and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. This report describes the thermal-hydraulic models and the numerical solution methods used in the code. Detailed programming and user information also are provided.

  9. Conceptual design loss-of-coolant accident analysis for the Advanced Neutron Source reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, N.C.J.; Wendel, M.W.; Yoder, G.L. Jr. )

    1994-01-01

    A RELAP5 system model for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor has been developed for performing conceptual safety analysis report calculations. To better represent thermal-hydraulic behavior of the core, three specific changes in the RELAP5 computer code were implemented: a turbulent forced-convection heat transfer correlation, a critical heat flux (CHF) correlation, and an interfacial drag correlation. The model consists of the core region, the heat exchanger loop region, and the pressurizing/letdown system region. Results for three loss-of-coolant accident analyses are presented: (1) an instantaneous double-ended guillotine (DEG) core outlet break with a cavitating venturi installed downstream of the core, (b) a core pressure boundary tube outer wall rupture, and (c) a DEG core inlet break with a finite break-formation time. The results show that the core can survive without exceeding the flow excursion of CHF thermal limits at a 95% probability level if the proper mitigation options are provided.

  10. Particulate multi-phase flowfield analysis for advanced solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, Paul; Chen, Yen-Sen; Shang, Huan-Min; Doran, Denise

    1993-01-01

    Particulate multi-phase flowfield with chemical reaction for a 2D advanced solid rocket motor (ASRM) is analyzed using the finite difference Navier-Stokes (FDNS) code. The flowfield in the aft dome cavity of the ASRM is examined and its significant impact on the motor operation and performance is demonstrated. Chemical reaction analysis is performed for H2O, O2, H2, O, H, OH, CO, CO2, Cl, Cl2, HCl, and N2. The turbulent dispersion effect is calculated with the Monte Carlo method. Result show that a recirculation zone exists at the entry of the aft-dome cavity. The particle impingement could cause the erosion and damage nozzle wall. Accumulating in the impingement area the particles change the wall shape and affect the motor performance.

  11. Advanced Launch Technology Life Cycle Analysis Using the Architectural Comparison Tool (ACT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCleskey, Carey M.

    2015-01-01

    Life cycle technology impact comparisons for nanolauncher technology concepts were performed using an Affordability Comparison Tool (ACT) prototype. Examined are cost drivers and whether technology investments can dramatically affect the life cycle characteristics. Primary among the selected applications was the prospect of improving nanolauncher systems. As a result, findings and conclusions are documented for ways of creating more productive and affordable nanolauncher systems; e.g., an Express Lane-Flex Lane concept is forwarded, and the beneficial effect of incorporating advanced integrated avionics is explored. Also, a Functional Systems Breakdown Structure (F-SBS) was developed to derive consistent definitions of the flight and ground systems for both system performance and life cycle analysis. Further, a comprehensive catalog of ground segment functions was created.

  12. Analysis and Preliminary Design of an Advanced Technology Transport Flight Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazzini, R.; Vaughn, D.

    1975-01-01

    The analysis and preliminary design of an advanced technology transport aircraft flight control system using avionics and flight control concepts appropriate to the 1980-1985 time period are discussed. Specifically, the techniques and requirements of the flight control system were established, a number of candidate configurations were defined, and an evaluation of these configurations was performed to establish a recommended approach. Candidate configurations based on redundant integration of various sensor types, computational methods, servo actuator arrangements and data-transfer techniques were defined to the functional module and piece-part level. Life-cycle costs, for the flight control configurations, as determined in an operational environment model for 200 aircraft over a 15-year service life, were the basis of the optimum configuration selection tradeoff. The recommended system concept is a quad digital computer configuration utilizing a small microprocessor for input/output control, a hexad skewed set of conventional sensors for body rate and body acceleration, and triple integrated actuators.

  13. Advanced Nuclear Measurements - Sensitivity Analysis Emerging Safeguards, Problems and Proliferation Risk

    SciTech Connect

    Dreicer, J.S.

    1999-07-15

    During the past year this component of the Advanced Nuclear Measurements LDRD-DR has focused on emerging safeguards problems and proliferation risk by investigating problems in two domains. The first is related to the analysis, quantification, and characterization of existing inventories of fissile materials, in particular, the minor actinides (MA) formed in the commercial fuel cycle. Understanding material forms and quantities helps identify and define future measurement problems, instrument requirements, and assists in prioritizing safeguards technology development. The second problem (dissertation research) has focused on the development of a theoretical foundation for sensor array anomaly detection. Remote and unattended monitoring or verification of safeguards activities is becoming a necessity due to domestic and international budgetary constraints. However, the ability to assess the trustworthiness of a sensor array has not been investigated. This research is developing an anomaly detection methodology to assess the sensor array.

  14. A review of breast tomosynthesis. Part II. Image reconstruction, processing and analysis, and advanced applications.

    PubMed

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Many important post-acquisition aspects of breast tomosynthesis imaging can impact its clinical performance. Chief among them is the reconstruction algorithm that generates the representation of the three-dimensional breast volume from the acquired projections. But even after reconstruction, additional processes, such as artifact reduction algorithms, computer aided detection and diagnosis, among others, can also impact the performance of breast tomosynthesis in the clinical realm. In this two part paper, a review of breast tomosynthesis research is performed, with an emphasis on its medical physics aspects. In the companion paper, the first part of this review, the research performed relevant to the image acquisition process is examined. This second part will review the research on the post-acquisition aspects, including reconstruction, image processing, and analysis, as well as the advanced applications being investigated for breast tomosynthesis. PMID:23298127

  15. A review of breast tomosynthesis. Part II. Image reconstruction, processing and analysis, and advanced applications

    PubMed Central

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Many important post-acquisition aspects of breast tomosynthesis imaging can impact its clinical performance. Chief among them is the reconstruction algorithm that generates the representation of the three-dimensional breast volume from the acquired projections. But even after reconstruction, additional processes, such as artifact reduction algorithms, computer aided detection and diagnosis, among others, can also impact the performance of breast tomosynthesis in the clinical realm. In this two part paper, a review of breast tomosynthesis research is performed, with an emphasis on its medical physics aspects. In the companion paper, the first part of this review, the research performed relevant to the image acquisition process is examined. This second part will review the research on the post-acquisition aspects, including reconstruction, image processing, and analysis, as well as the advanced applications being investigated for breast tomosynthesis. PMID:23298127

  16. Advanced FE homogenization strategies for failure analysis of double curvature masonry elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessandri, Claudio; Milani, Gabriele; Tralli, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    The paper addresses the topic of the numerical analysis up to collapse of masonry vaults. At this aim, an advanced numerical model is utilized, which requires the discretization of the structure by means of three dimensional six-noded wedge finite elements rigid and infinitely resistant and interfaces exhibiting a non linear behavior with softening. The incremental problem is solved by means of a robust quadratic programming procedure and interfaces mechanical properties are estimated by means of a consolidated homogenization strategy. Failure mechanisms and collapse loads are evaluated numerically for a case study in Italy (a masonry cross vault subjected to increasing vertical live loads up to collapse), varying mechanical properties of the vault and considering the stabilizing role played by the backfill. In light of the results obtained, limitations and possibilities of the widely diffusedtraditional approaches based on the subdivision of the vault into a series of arches are addressed.

  17. Determining women's sexual self-schemas through advanced computerized text analysis.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Amelia M; Boyd, Ryan L; Pulverman, Carey S; Meston, Cindy M

    2015-08-01

    The meaning extraction method (MEM), an advanced computerized text analysis technique, was used to analyze women's sexual self-schemas. Participants (n=239) completed open-ended essays about their personal feelings associated with sex and sexuality. These essays were analyzed using the MEM, a procedure designed to extract common themes from natural language. Using the MEM procedure, we extracted seven unique themes germane to sexual self-schemas: family and development, virginity, abuse, relationship, sexual activity, attraction, and existentialism. Each of these themes is comprised of frequently used words across the participants' descriptions of their sexual selves. Significant differences in sexual self-schemas were observed to covary with age, relationship status, and sexual abuse history. PMID:26146161

  18. Advanced In-Situ Detection and Chemical Analysis of Interstellar Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Z.; Gemer, A.; Gruen, E.; Horanyi, M.; Kempf, S.; Maute, K.; Postberg, F.; Srama, R.; Williams, E.; O'brien, L.; Rocha, J. R. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Ulysses dust detector discovered that interstellar dust particles pass through the solar system. The Hyperdsut instrument is developed for the in-situ detection and analysis of these particles to determine the elemental, chemical and isotopic compositions. Hyperdust builds on the heritage of previous successful instruments, e.g. the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) on Cassini. Hyperdust combines a highly sensitive Dust Trajectory Sensor (DTS) and the high mass resolution Chemical Analyzer (CA). The DTS will detect dust particles as small as 0.3 μm in radius, and the velocity vector information is used to confirm the interstellar origin and/or reveal the dynamics from the interactions within the solar system. The effective target area of the CA is > 600 cm2 achieves mass resolution in excess of 200, which is considerably higher than that of CDA, and is acheved by advanced ion optics design. The Hyperdust instrument is in the final phases of development to TRL 6.

  19. Analysis of insertion device magnet measurements for the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, S.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.M.; Schlueter, R.; Wang, C.

    1993-07-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), which is currently being commissioned at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is a third generation light source designed to produce XUV radiation of unprecedented brightness. To meet the high brightness goal the storage ring has been designed for very small electron beam emittance and the undulators installed in the ALS are built to a high degree of precision. The allowable magnetic field errors are driven by electron beam and radiation requirements. Detailed magnetic measurements and adjustments are performed on each undulator to qualify it for installation in the ALS. The first two ALS undulators, IDA and IDB, have been installed. This paper describes the program of measurements, data analysis, and adjustments carried out for these two devices. Calculations of the radiation spectrum, based upon magnetic measurements, are included. Final field integral distributions are also shown. Good field integral uniformity has been achieved using a novel correction scheme, which is also described.

  20. Integrating advanced materials simulation techniques into an automated data analysis workflow at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Borreguero Calvo, Jose M; Campbell, Stuart I; Delaire, Olivier A; Doucet, Mathieu; Goswami, Monojoy; Hagen, Mark E; Lynch, Vickie E; Proffen, Thomas E; Ren, Shelly; Savici, Andrei T; Sumpter, Bobby G

    2014-01-01

    This presentation will review developments on the integration of advanced modeling and simulation techniques into the analysis step of experimental data obtained at the Spallation Neutron Source. A workflow framework for the purpose of refining molecular mechanics force-fields against quasi-elastic neutron scattering data is presented. The workflow combines software components to submit model simulations to remote high performance computers, a message broker interface for communications between the optimizer engine and the simulation production step, and tools to convolve the simulated data with the experimental resolution. A test application shows the correction to a popular fixed-charge water model in order to account polarization effects due to the presence of solvated ions. Future enhancements to the refinement workflow are discussed. This work is funded through the DOE Center for Accelerating Materials Modeling.

  1. Advanced phenotyping and phenotype data analysis for the study of plant growth and development

    PubMed Central

    Rahaman, Md. Matiur; Chen, Dijun; Gillani, Zeeshan; Klukas, Christian; Chen, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Due to an increase in the consumption of food, feed, fuel and to meet global food security needs for the rapidly growing human population, there is a necessity to breed high yielding crops that can adapt to the future climate changes, particularly in developing countries. To solve these global challenges, novel approaches are required to identify quantitative phenotypes and to explain the genetic basis of agriculturally important traits. These advances will facilitate the screening of germplasm with high performance characteristics in resource-limited environments. Recently, plant phenomics has offered and integrated a suite of new technologies, and we are on a path to improve the description of complex plant phenotypes. High-throughput phenotyping platforms have also been developed that capture phenotype data from plants in a non-destructive manner. In this review, we discuss recent developments of high-throughput plant phenotyping infrastructure including imaging techniques and corresponding principles for phenotype data analysis. PMID:26322060

  2. A Review of Failure Analysis Methods for Advanced 3D Microelectronic Packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Srinath, Purushotham Kaushik Muthur; Goyal, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Advanced three dimensional (3D) packaging is a key enabler in driving form factor reduction, performance benefits, and package cost reduction, especially in the fast paced mobility and ultraportable consumer electronics segments. The high level of functional integration and the complex package architecture pose a significant challenge for conventional fault isolation (FI) and failure analysis (FA) methods. Innovative FI/FA tools and techniques are required to tackle the technical and throughput challenges. In this paper, the applications of FI and FA techniques such as Electro Optic Terahertz Pulse Reflectometry, 3D x-ray computed tomography, lock-in thermography, and novel physical sample preparation methods to 3D packages with package on package and stacked die with through silicon via configurations are reviewed, along with the key FI and FA challenges.

  3. Technology Alignment and Portfolio Prioritization (TAPP): Advanced Methods in Strategic Analysis, Technology Forecasting and Long Term Planning for Human Exploration and Operations, Advanced Exploration Systems and Advanced Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funaro, Gregory V.; Alexander, Reginald A.

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced Concepts Office (ACO) at NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center is expanding its current technology assessment methodologies. ACO is developing a framework called TAPP that uses a variety of methods, such as association mining and rule learning from data mining, structure development using a Technological Innovation System (TIS), and social network modeling to measure structural relationships. The role of ACO is to 1) produce a broad spectrum of ideas and alternatives for a variety of NASA's missions, 2) determine mission architecture feasibility and appropriateness to NASA's strategic plans, and 3) define a project in enough detail to establish an initial baseline capable of meeting mission objectives ACO's role supports the decision­-making process associated with the maturation of concepts for traveling through, living in, and understanding space. ACO performs concept studies and technology assessments to determine the degree of alignment between mission objectives and new technologies. The first step in technology assessment is to identify the current technology maturity in terms of a technology readiness level (TRL). The second step is to determine the difficulty associated with advancing a technology from one state to the next state. NASA has used TRLs since 1970 and ACO formalized them in 1995. The DoD, ESA, Oil & Gas, and DoE have adopted TRLs as a means to assess technology maturity. However, "with the emergence of more complex systems and system of systems, it has been increasingly recognized that TRL assessments have limitations, especially when considering [the] integration of complex systems." When performing the second step in a technology assessment, NASA requires that an Advancement Degree of Difficulty (AD2) method be utilized. NASA has used and developed or used a variety of methods to perform this step: Expert Opinion or Delphi Approach, Value Engineering or Value Stream, Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP), Technique for the Order of

  4. OPTIMA: advanced methods for the analysis, integration, and optimization of PRISMA mission products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzi, Donatella; Pippi, Ivan; Aiazzi, Bruno; Baronti, Stefano; Carlà, Roberto; Lastri, Cinzia; Nardino, Vanni; Raimondi, Valentina; Santurri, Leonardo; Selva, Massimo; Alparone, Luciano; Garzelli, Andrea; Lopinto, Ettore; Ananasso, Cristina; Barducci, Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    PRISMA is an Earth observation system that combines a hyperspectral sensor with a panchromatic, medium-resolution camera. OPTIMA is one of the five independent scientific research projects funded by the Italian Space Agency in the framework of PRISMA mission for the development of added-value algorithms and advanced applications. The main goal of OPTIMA is to increase and to strengthen the applications of PRISMA through the implementation of advanced methodologies for the analysis, integration and optimization of level 1 and 2 products. The project is comprehensive of several working packages: data simulation, data quality, data optimization, data processing and integration and, finally, evaluation of some applications related to natural hazards. Several algorithms implemented during the project employ high-speed autonomous procedures for the elaboration of the upcoming images acquired by PRISMA. To assess the performances of the developed algorithms and products, an end-to-end simulator of the instrument has been implemented. Data quality analysis has been completed by introducing noise modeling. Stand-alone procedures of radiometric and atmospheric corrections have been developed, allowing the retrieval of at-ground spectral reflectance maps. Specific studies about image enhancement, restoration and pan-sharpening have been carried out for providing added-value data. Regarding the mission capability of monitoring environmental processes and disasters, different techniques for estimating surface humidity and for analyzing burned areas have been investigated. Finally, calibration and validation activities utilizing the CAL/VAL test site managed by CNR-IFAC and located inside the Regional Park of San Rossore (Pisa), Italy have been considered.

  5. Advanced measurement and analysis of surface textures produced by micro-machining processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordatchev, Evgueni V.; Hafiz, Abdullah M. K.

    2014-09-01

    Surface texture of a part or a product has significant effects on its functionality, physical-mechanical properties and visual appearance. In particular for miniature products, the implication of surface quality becomes critical owing to the presence of geometrical features with micro/nano-scale dimensions. Qualitative and quantitative assessments of surface texture are carried out predominantly by profile parameters, which are often insufficient to address the contribution of constituent spatial components with varied amplitudes and wavelengths. In this context, this article presents a novel approach for advanced measurement and analysis of profile average roughness (Ra) and its spatial distribution at different wavelength intervals. The applicability of the proposed approach was verified for three different surface topographies prepared by grinding, laser micro-polishing and micro-milling processes. From the measurement and analysis results, Ra(λ) spatial distribution was found to be an effective measure of revealing the contributions of various spatial components within specific wavelength intervals towards formation of the entire surface profile. In addition, the approach was extended to the measurement and analysis of areal average roughness Sa(λ) spatial distribution within different wavelength intervals. Besides, the proposed method was demonstrated to be a useful technique in developing a functional correlation between a manufacturing process and its corresponding surface profile.

  6. Advances and Pitfalls in the Analysis and Interpretation of Resting-State FMRI Data

    PubMed Central

    Cole, David M.; Smith, Stephen M.; Beckmann, Christian F.

    2010-01-01

    The last 15 years have witnessed a steady increase in the number of resting-state functional neuroimaging studies. The connectivity patterns of multiple functional, distributed, large-scale networks of brain dynamics have been recognised for their potential as useful tools in the domain of systems and other neurosciences. The application of functional connectivity methods to areas such as cognitive psychology, clinical diagnosis and treatment progression has yielded promising preliminary results, but is yet to be fully realised. This is due, in part, to an array of methodological and interpretative issues that remain to be resolved. We here present a review of the methods most commonly applied in this rapidly advancing field, such as seed-based correlation analysis and independent component analysis, along with examples of their use at the individual subject and group analysis levels and a discussion of practical and theoretical issues arising from this data ‘explosion’. We describe the similarities and differences across these varied statistical approaches to processing resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging signals, and conclude that further technical optimisation and experimental refinement is required in order to fully delineate and characterise the gross complexity of the human neural functional architecture. PMID:20407579

  7. Advanced optical system simulation in a coupled CAD/optical analysis package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Michael A.; Campillo, Chris J.; Jenkins, David G.

    1999-05-01

    Software packages capable of simulating complex optical systems have the power to shorten the design process for non-imaging illumination, projection display, and other imaging illumination systems, Breault Research Organization's Advanced Systems Analysis Program (ASAP) and Robert McNeel and Associates' Rhinoceros computer aided design software, together, allow complicated optical systems to be simulated and analyzed. Through the use of Rhinoceros, an optical system can be accurately modeled in a 3D design environment. ASAP is then used to assign optical properties to the Rhinoceros CAD model. After the optical system has been characterized, it can be analyzed and optimized, by way of features specific to the ASAP optical analysis engine. Using this simulation technique, an HID arc source manufactured by Ushio America, Inc. is accurately represented. 2D CCD images are gathered for the source's emitting-volume across its spectral bandwidth. The images are processed within ASAP, via the inverse Abel command, to produce a 3D emitting-volume. This emitting-volume is combined with an accurate model of the source geometry and its optical properties, to finalize a functioning virtual source model. The characterized source is then joined with a simulated optical system for detailed performance analysis: namely, a projection display system.

  8. Recent Advances in the Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Glycoproteins: Theoretical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Iulia M.; Lazar, Alexandru C.; Cortes, Diego F.; Kabulski, Jarod L.

    2011-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is involved in a broad range of biological processes that regulate protein function and control cell fate. As aberrant glycosylation has been found to be implicated in numerous diseases, the study and large-scale characterization of protein glycosylation is of great interest not only to the biological and biomedical research community, but also to the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry. Due to the complex chemical structure and differing chemical properties of the protein/peptide and glycan moieties, the analysis and structural characterization of glycoproteins has been proven to be a difficult task. Large-scale endeavors have been further limited by the dynamic outcome of the glycosylation process itself, and, occasionally, by the low abundance of glycoproteins in biological samples. Recent advances in mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation, and progress in miniaturized technologies for sample handling, enrichment and separation, have resulted in robust and compelling analysis strategies that effectively address the challenges of the glycoproteome. This review summarizes the key steps that are involved in the development of efficient glycoproteomic analysis methods, and the latest innovations that led to successful strategies for the characterization of glycoproteins and their corresponding glycans. As a follow-up to this work, we review innovative capillary and microfluidic-MS workflows for the identification, sequencing, and characterization of glycoconjugates. PMID:21171109

  9. Advances in enantioselective analysis of chiral brominated flame retardants. Current status, limitations and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Badea, Silviu-Laurentiu; Niculescu, Violeta Carolina; Ionete, Roxana-Elena; Eljarrat, Ethel

    2016-10-01

    Enantioselective analysis is a powerful tool for the discrimination of biotic and abiotic transformation processes of chiral environmental contaminants because their environmental biodegradation is mostly stereospecific. However, it is challenging when applied to new contaminants since enantioselective analysis methods are currently available only for a limited number of compounds. The enantioselective analysis of chiral novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) either using gas chromatography (GC) or liquid chromatography (LC) with various chiral stationary phases (CSP) coupled with various mass spectrometric techniques was extensively discussed. The elution order of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) enantiomers in chiral LC was reviewed using the experimental LC data combined also with predictions from a multi-mode Hamiltonian dynamics simulation model based on interaction energies of HBCD enantiomers with β-permethylated cyclodextrin. The further development of analytical methodologies for new chiral BFRs using advanced hyphenated analytical techniques, but also the next generation mass spectrometer analyzers (i.e. GC-Qrbitrap MS-MS, LC-Qrbitrap MS-MS), will contribute to a better characterization of the transformation pathways of chiral BFRs. PMID:27265736

  10. Advanced Turbine Systems Program, Conceptual Design and Product Development. Task 6, System definition and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The strategy of the ATS program is to develop a new baseline for industrial gas turbine systems for the 21st century, meeting the buying criteria of industrial gas turbine end users, and having growth potential. These criteria guided the Solar ATS Team in selecting the system definition described in this Topical Report. The key to selecting the ATS system definition was meeting or exceeding each technical goal without negatively impacting other commercial goals. Among the most crucial goals are the buying criteria of the industrial gas turbine market. Solar started by preliminarily considering several cycles with the potential to meet ATS program goals. These candidates were initially narrowed based on a qualitative assessment of several factors such as the potential for meeting program goals and for future growth; the probability of successful demonstration within the program`s schedule and expected level of funding; and the appropriateness of the cycle in light of end users` buying criteria. A first level Quality Function Deployment (QFD) analysis then translated customer needs into functional requirements, and ensured favorable interaction between concept features. Based on this analysis, Solar selected a recuperated cycle as the best approach to fulfilling both D.O.E. and Solar marketing goals. This report details the design and analysis of the selected engine concept, and explains how advanced features of system components achieve program goals. Estimates of cost, performance, emissions and RAMD (reliability, availability, maintainability, durability) are also documented in this report.

  11. Recent Advance in Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Techniques for Environmental Analysis in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    The techniques and measurement methods developed in the Environmental Survey and Monitoring of Chemicals by Japan’s Ministry of the Environment, as well as a large amount of knowledge archived in the survey, have led to the advancement of environmental analysis. Recently, technologies such as non-target liquid chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography with micro bore column have further developed the field. Here, the general strategy of a method developed for the liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis of environmental chemicals with a brief description is presented. Also, a non-target analysis for the identification of environmental pollutants using a provisional fragment database and “MsMsFilter,” an elemental composition elucidation tool, is presented. This analytical method is shown to be highly effective in the identification of a model chemical, the pesticide Bendiocarb. Our improved micro-liquid chromatography injection system showed substantially enhanced sensitivity to perfluoroalkyl substances, with peak areas 32–71 times larger than those observed in conventional LC/MS. PMID:26819891

  12. Advanced satellite workstation: An integrated workstation environment for operational support of satellite system planning and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, Stewart A.

    1992-01-01

    A prototype integrated environment, the Advanced Satellite Workstation (ASW), is described that has been developed and delivered for evaluation and operator feedback in an operational satellite control center. The current ASW hardware consists of a Sun Workstation and Macintosh II Workstation connected via an ethernet Network Hardware and Software, Laser Disk System, Optical Storage System, and Telemetry Data File Interface. The central mission of ASW is to provide an intelligent decision support and training environment for operator/analysts of complex systems such as satellites. There have been many workstation implementations recently which incorporate graphical telemetry displays and expert systems. ASW is a considerably broader look at intelligent, integrated environments for decision support, based upon the premise that the central features of such an environment are intelligent data access and integrated toolsets. A variety of tools have been constructed in support of this prototype environment including: an automated pass planner for scheduling vehicle support activities, architectural modeler for hierarchical simulation and analysis of satellite vehicle subsystems, multimedia-based information systems that provide an intuitive and easily accessible interface to Orbit Operations Handbook and other relevant support documentation, and a data analysis architecture that integrates user modifiable telemetry display systems, expert systems for background data analysis, and interfaces to the multimedia system via inter-process communication.

  13. Fast discrimination of danshen from different geographical areas by NIR spectroscopy and advanced cluster analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Wang, Yan; Xu, Kexin

    2006-09-01

    Near infrared (NIR) diffuse reflection spectroscopy has been an effective way to perform quantitative analysis without the requirement of sample pretreatnient. In this paper, NIR Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has been introduced to probe spectral features of traditional Chinese medicine Danshen. Infrared fingerprint spectra of Danshen can be established. Influence of differentiation of spectrum is also discussed. After pretreatment and derivation on the spectral data, methods of principal analysis (PCA), soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) are combined to sort the geographical origins of 53 samples by local modeling. The result show that, as a basis of the other two methods, PCA is a more efficient one for identifying the geographical origins of Danshen. Combining SIMCA with PCA, an effective model is built to analyze the data after normalization and differentiation, the correct identification rate reaches above 90%. Then 36 samples are chosen as training set while other 17 samples being verifying set. Using ANN-based Back Propagation method, after proper training of BP network, the origins of Danshen are completely classified. Therefore, combined with advanced mathematical analysis, NIR diffuse spectroscopy can be a novel and rapid way to accurately evaluate the origin of Chinese medicine, and also to accelerate the modernization process of Chinese drugs.

  14. Development and Validation of ARKAS cellule: An Advanced Core-Bowing Analysis Code for Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, Hirokazu; Yokoo, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Masatoshi; Matsuyama, Shinichiro

    2004-05-15

    An advanced analysis code, ARKAS cellule, has been developed to determine the core distortion and the mechanical behavior of fast reactors. In this code, each hexagonal subassembly duct is represented by a folded thin plate structure divided into a user-specified number of shell elements so that the interduct contact forms and the cross-sectional distortion effect of each duct are properly taken into account. In this paper, the numerical model of the ARKAS cellule code is introduced, and the analytical results for two validation problems are presented. From a single duct compaction analysis, the first validation problem, it is clarified that the new analytical model is applicable to simulating the change of duct compaction stiffness that depends on the loading conditions such as the loading pad forms and the number of contact faces. The second validation analysis has been conducted by comparison with the experimental values obtained by the National Nuclear Corporation Limited in the United Kingdom using the core restraint uniplanar experimental rig (CRUPER), an ex-reactor rig in which a cluster of 91 short ducts is compressed by 30 movable peripheral rams toward the center of the cluster in seven stages. The analysis clarified that the predictions obtained using ARKAS cellule agree well with the measured ram loads and interwrapper gap widths during the compaction sequence. One may conclude that ARKAS cellule is valid for quantitative analysis of the core mechanical behavior and will be particularly useful for the evaluation of transient deformation of core assemblies during accidents in which the distortion of loading pads have important effects on obtaining favorable reactivity feedback.

  15. PREFACE: 15th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianxiong

    2014-06-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to scientific contributions presented at the 15th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT 2013) which took place on 16-21 May 2013 at the Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. The workshop series brings together computer science researchers and practitioners, and researchers from particle physics and related fields to explore and confront the boundaries of computing and of automatic data analysis and theoretical calculation techniques. This year's edition of the workshop brought together over 120 participants from all over the world. 18 invited speakers presented key topics on the universe in computer, Computing in Earth Sciences, multivariate data analysis, automated computation in Quantum Field Theory as well as computing and data analysis challenges in many fields. Over 70 other talks and posters presented state-of-the-art developments in the areas of the workshop's three tracks: Computing Technologies, Data Analysis Algorithms and Tools, and Computational Techniques in Theoretical Physics. The round table discussions on open-source, knowledge sharing and scientific collaboration stimulate us to think over the issue in the respective areas. ACAT 2013 was generously sponsored by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), National Natural Science Foundation of China (NFSC), Brookhaven National Laboratory in the USA (BNL), Peking University (PKU), Theoretical Physics Cernter for Science facilities of CAS (TPCSF-CAS) and Sugon. We would like to thank all the participants for their scientific contributions and for the en- thusiastic participation in all its activities of the workshop. Further information on ACAT 2013 can be found at http://acat2013.ihep.ac.cn. Professor Jianxiong Wang Institute of High Energy Physics Chinese Academy of Science Details of committees and sponsors are available in the PDF

  16. Advancing Clinical Proteomics via Analysis Based on Biological Complexes: A Tale of Five Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Goh, Wilson Wen Bin; Wong, Limsoon

    2016-09-01

    Despite advances in proteomic technologies, idiosyncratic data issues, for example, incomplete coverage and inconsistency, resulting in large data holes, persist. Moreover, because of naïve reliance on statistical testing and its accompanying p values, differential protein signatures identified from such proteomics data have little diagnostic power. Thus, deploying conventional analytics on proteomics data is insufficient for identifying novel drug targets or precise yet sensitive biomarkers. Complex-based analysis is a new analytical approach that has potential to resolve these issues but requires formalization. We categorize complex-based analysis into five method classes or paradigms and propose an even-handed yet comprehensive evaluation rubric based on both simulated and real data. The first four paradigms are well represented in the literature. The fifth and newest paradigm, the network-paired (NP) paradigm, represented by a method called Extremely Small SubNET (ESSNET), dominates in precision-recall and reproducibility, maintains strong performance in small sample sizes, and sensitively detects low-abundance complexes. In contrast, the commonly used over-representation analysis (ORA) and direct-group (DG) test paradigms maintain good overall precision but have severe reproducibility issues. The other two paradigms considered here are the hit-rate and rank-based network analysis paradigms; both of these have good precision-recall and reproducibility, but they do not consider low-abundance complexes. Therefore, given its strong performance, NP/ESSNET may prove to be a useful approach for improving the analytical resolution of proteomics data. Additionally, given its stability, it may also be a powerful new approach toward functional enrichment tests, much like its ORA and DG counterparts. PMID:27454466

  17. Recent advances in the analysis of therapeutic proteins by capillary and microchip electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Creamer, Jessica S.; Oborny, Nathan J.; Lunte, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    The development of therapeutic proteins and peptides is an expensive and time-intensive process. Biologics, which have become a multi-billion dollar industry, are chemically complex products that require constant observation during each stage of development and production. Post-translational modifications along with chemical and physical degradation from oxidation, deamidation, and aggregation, lead to high levels of heterogeneity that affect drug quality and efficacy. The various separation modes of capillary electrophoresis (CE) are commonly utilized to perform quality control and assess protein heterogeneity. This review attempts to highlight the most recent developments and applications of CE separation techniques for the characterization of protein and peptide therapeutics by focusing on papers accepted for publication in the in the two-year period between January 2012 and December 2013. The separation principles and technological advances of CE, capillary gel electrophoresis, capillary isoelectric focusing, capillary electrochromatography and CE-mass spectrometry are discussed, along with exciting new applications of these techniques to relevant pharmaceutical issues. Also included is a small selection of papers on microchip electrophoresis to show the direction this field is moving with regards to the development of inexpensive and portable analysis systems for on-site, high-throughput analysis. PMID:25126117

  18. Advanced spatio-temporal filtering techniques for photogrammetric image sequence analysis in civil engineering material testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebold, F.; Maas, H.-G.

    2016-01-01

    The paper shows advanced spatial, temporal and spatio-temporal filtering techniques which may be used to reduce noise effects in photogrammetric image sequence analysis tasks and tools. As a practical example, the techniques are validated in a photogrammetric spatio-temporal crack detection and analysis tool applied in load tests in civil engineering material testing. The load test technique is based on monocular image sequences of a test object under varying load conditions. The first image of a sequence is defined as a reference image under zero load, wherein interest points are determined and connected in a triangular irregular network structure. For each epoch, these triangles are compared to the reference image triangles to search for deformations. The result of the feature point tracking and triangle comparison process is a spatio-temporally resolved strain value field, wherein cracks can be detected, located and measured via local discrepancies. The strains can be visualized as a color-coded map. In order to improve the measuring system and to reduce noise, the strain values of each triangle must be treated in a filtering process. The paper shows the results of various filter techniques in the spatial and in the temporal domain as well as spatio-temporal filtering techniques applied to these data. The best results were obtained by a bilateral filter in the spatial domain and by a spatio-temporal EOF (empirical orthogonal function) filtering technique.

  19. Analysis and test evaluation of the dynamic response and stability of three advanced turboprop models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, P. N.; Arseneaux, P. J.; Smith, A. F.; Turnberg, J. E.; Brooks, B. M.

    1985-01-01

    Results of dynamic response and stability wind tunnel tests of three 62.2 cm (24.5 in) diameter models of the Prop-Fan, advanced turboprop, are presented. Measurements of dynamic response were made with the rotors mounted on an isolated nacelle, with varying tilt for nonuniform inflow. One model was also tested using a semi-span wing and fuselage configuration for response to realistic aircraft inflow. Stability tests were performed using tunnel turbulence or a nitrogen jet for excitation. Measurements are compared with predictions made using beam analysis methods for the model with straight blades, and finite element analysis methods for the models with swept blades. Correlations between measured and predicted rotating blade natural frequencies for all the models are very good. The IP dynamic response of the straight blade model is reasonably well predicted. The IP response of the swept blades is underpredicted and the wing induced response of the straight blade is overpredicted. Two models did not flutter, as predicted. One swept blade model encountered an instability at a higher RPM than predicted, showing predictions to be conservative.

  20. Advancements in integrated structural/thermal/optical (STOP) analysis of optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckel, Gerhard; Crompton, David; Perron, Gerard

    2007-09-01

    Applications involving optical systems with a variety of transient loading conditions in conjunction with tight optical error budgets require new tools to assess system performance accurately and quickly. For example, an optical telescope in geostationary orbit (e.g.: laser communications or weather satellite) may be required to maintain excellent optical performance with sun intermittently crossing near, or even within the telescope's field of view. To optimize the design, the designer would wish to analyze a large number of time steps through the orbit without sacrificing accuracy of the results. Historically, shortcuts have been taken to make the analysis effort manageable: contributing errors are combined in a root-sum-squared fashion; non-linear optical sensitivities to optical motions are made linear; and the surface deformation of non-circular optics and/or footprints are fit with zernike polynomials. L-3 SSG-Tinsley presents a method that eliminates these errors while allowing very fast processing of many cases. The method uses a software application that interfaces with both structural and optical analysis codes, and achieves raytrace-generated results from the optical model. This technique is shown to provide more accurate results than previous methods, as well as provide critical insights into the performance of the system that may be exploited in the design process. Results from the Advanced Baseline Imager ABI telescope are presented as an example.

  1. Non-contact ultrasonic technique for rapid and advanced analysis of fibrous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periyaswamy, T.; Lerch, T. P.; Balasubramanian, K.

    2012-05-01

    Fibrous ensembles are, typically, multi-scale flexible assemblies with unique physical and rheological properties, unlike continuum materials. Macroscopic behaviors of these materials are greatly the result of non-linear interactions at the micro levels. These micro-scale interactions can be assessed by capturing the material behavior under low mechanical stress conditions. While ultrasonic based non-destructive testing was suitably implemented for continuum materials, their application to fibrous structures was limited primarily due to the inherent structural arrangements of these unique assemblies. Discontinuities, non-uniform orientations and multi-phase components make these ensembles difficult to study using the existing scan-based methods. This work presents a novel rapid and advanced analysis tool for complex fibrous systems using a noncontact air-coupled ultrasonic system. Five characteristic features of ultrasound signals transmitted through fibrous structures were studied, i.e., dampness in signal flight, signal velocity, power spectral density, signal power and rate of amplitude attenuation. Analysis of these features under two different acoustic frequencies, 500 kHz and 1 MHz, allowed us to study the componentized behavior of these materials for three of the key mechanical properties including bending rigidity, shear rigidity and low stress tensile stress. A material response index (MRI) was also derived using the signal features.

  2. Multi-Disciplinary Analysis for Future Launch Systems Using NASA's Advanced Engineering Environment (AEE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monell, Donald; Mathias, Donovan; Reuther, James; Garn, Michelle

    2003-01-01

    A new engineering environment constructed for the purposes of analyzing and designing Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLVs) is presented. The new environment has been developed to allow NASA to perform independent analysis and design of emerging RLV architectures and technologies. The new Advanced Engineering Environment (AEE) is both collaborative and distributed. It facilitates integration of the analyses by both vehicle performance disciplines and life-cycle disciplines. Current performance disciplines supported include: weights and sizing, aerodynamics, trajectories, propulsion, structural loads, and CAD-based geometries. Current life-cycle disciplines supported include: DDT&E cost, production costs, operations costs, flight rates, safety and reliability, and system economics. Involving six NASA centers (ARC, LaRC, MSFC, KSC, GRC and JSC), AEE has been tailored to serve as a web-accessed agency-wide source for all of NASA's future launch vehicle systems engineering functions. Thus, it is configured to facilitate (a) data management, (b) automated tool/process integration and execution, and (c) data visualization and presentation. The core components of the integrated framework are a customized PTC Windchill product data management server, a set of RLV analysis and design tools integrated using Phoenix Integration's Model Center, and an XML-based data capture and transfer protocol. The AEE system has seen production use during the Initial Architecture and Technology Review for the NASA 2nd Generation RLV program, and it continues to undergo development and enhancements in support of its current main customer, the NASA Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) program.

  3. [Advances of microarray analysis on plant gene expression under environmental stresses].

    PubMed

    Lin, Hai-Jian; Zhang, Zhi-Ming; Shen, Ya-Ou; Gao, Shi-Bin; Pan, Guang-Tang

    2009-12-01

    Different stressed conditions impair plant growth and further, cause great loss of crop yield and even lead to lose production completely. Increasing resistance/tolerance of crops under stressed conditions is a major goal of numerous plant breeders, and many elegant works are focusing on this area to uncover these complicated mechanisms underlying it. However, the traditional strategies including physiological and biochemical methods, as well as studies on a few genes, can not well understand the overall biological mechanism. Microarray analysis opens a door to uncover these cryptic mechanisms, and has the ability of detecting gene transcription and regulation at genomic level in different plant tissues. And works in association with related methods of proteomics and metabolomics. Therefore, it is possible to locate genes in certain key metabolism pathways. Through these procedures, it is also possible to look for critical genes in the pathway and to well understand the molecular mechanism of resistance/tolerance. These results can be as a guidance for increasing the resistance/tolerance of stressed conditions using biotechnology methods in future. This paper mainly focused on and discussed the advances of microarray analysis of stressed conditions-related genes in plants. PMID:20042386

  4. Recent advances in the analysis of behavioural organization and interpretation as indicators of animal welfare

    PubMed Central

    Asher, Lucy; Collins, Lisa M.; Ortiz-Pelaez, Angel; Drewe, Julian A.; Nicol, Christine J.; Pfeiffer, Dirk U.

    2009-01-01

    While the incorporation of mathematical and engineering methods has greatly advanced in other areas of the life sciences, they have been under-utilized in the field of animal welfare. Exceptions are beginning to emerge and share a common motivation to quantify ‘hidden’ aspects in the structure of the behaviour of an individual, or group of animals. Such analyses have the potential to quantify behavioural markers of pain and stress and quantify abnormal behaviour objectively. This review seeks to explore the scope of such analytical methods as behavioural indicators of welfare. We outline four classes of analyses that can be used to quantify aspects of behavioural organization. The underlying principles, possible applications and limitations are described for: fractal analysis, temporal methods, social network analysis, and agent-based modelling and simulation. We hope to encourage further application of analyses of behavioural organization by highlighting potential applications in the assessment of animal welfare, and increasing awareness of the scope for the development of new mathematical methods in this area. PMID:19740922

  5. Advances in Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of natural glasses: From sample preparation to data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Aulock, F. W.; Kennedy, B. M.; Schipper, C. I.; Castro, J. M.; Martin, D. E.; Oze, C.; Watkins, J. M.; Wallace, P. J.; Puskar, L.; Bégué, F.; Nichols, A. R. L.; Tuffen, H.

    2014-10-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) is an analytical technique utilized to measure the concentrations of H and C species in volcanic glasses. Water and CO2 are the most abundant volatile species in volcanic systems. Water is present in magmas in higher concentrations than CO2 and is also more soluble at lower pressures, and, therefore it is the dominant volatile forming bubbles during volcanic eruptions. Dissolved water affects both phase equilibria and melt physical properties such as density and viscosity, therefore, water is important for understanding magmatic processes. Additionally, quantitative measurements of different volatile species using FTIR can be achieved at high spatial resolution. Recent developments in analytical equipment such as synchrotron light sources and the development of focal plane array (FPA) detectors allow higher resolution measurements and the acquisition of concentration maps. These new capabilities are being used to characterize spatial gradients (or lack thereof) around bubbles and other textural features, which in turn lead to new insights into the behavior of volcanic feeder systems. Here, practical insights about sample preparation and analysis of the distribution and speciation of volatiles in volcanic glasses using FTIR spectroscopy are discussed. New advances in the field of FTIR analysis produce reliable data at high spatial resolution that can be used to produce datasets on the distribution, dissolution and diffusion of volatiles in volcanic materials.

  6. Analysis of the effectiveness of gas centrifuge enrichment plants advanced safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Brian David; Erpenbeck, Heather H; Miller, Karen A; Swinjoe, Martyn T; Ianakiev, Kiril D; Marlow, Johnna B

    2010-01-01

    Current safeguards approaches used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to verify declared low-enriched uranium (LEU) production, detect undeclared LEU production and detect highly enriched uranium (HEU) production with adequate detection probability using non destructive assay (NDA) techniques. At present inspectors use attended systems, systems needing the presence of an inspector for operation, during inspections to verify the mass and 235U enrichment of declared UF6 containers used in the process of enrichment at GCEPs. This paper contains an analysis of possible improvements in unattended and attended NDA systems including process monitoring and possible on-site destructive assay (DA) of samples that could reduce the uncertainty of the inspector's measurements. These improvements could reduce the difference between the operator's and inspector's measurements providing more effective and efficient IAEA GCEPs safeguards. We also explore how a few advanced safeguards systems could be assembled for unattended operation. The analysis will focus on how unannounced inspections (UIs), and the concept of information-driven inspections (IDS) can affect probability of detection of the diversion of nuclear materials when coupled to new GCEPs safeguards regimes augmented with unattended systems.

  7. Optimizing spinning time-domain gravitational waveforms for advanced LIGO data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devine, Caleb; Etienne, Zachariah B.; McWilliams, Sean T.

    2016-06-01

    The spinning effective-one-body–numerical relativity (SEOBNR) series of gravitational wave approximants are among the best available for advanced LIGO data analysis. Unfortunately, SEOBNR codes as they currently exist within LALSuite are generally too slow to be directly useful for standard Markov-chain Monte Carlo-based parameter estimation (PE). Reduced-order models (ROMs) of SEOBNR have been developed for this purpose, but there is no known way to make ROMs of the full eight-dimensional intrinsic parameter space more efficient for PE than the SEOBNR codes directly. So as a proof of principle, we have sped up the original LALSuite SEOBNRv2 approximant code, which models waveforms from aligned-spin systems, by nearly 300x. Our optimized code shortens the timescale for conducting PE with this approximant to months, assuming a purely serial analysis, so that even modest parallelization combined with our optimized code will make running the full PE pipeline with SEOBNR codes directly a realistic possibility. A number of our SEOBNRv2 optimizations have already been applied to SEOBNRv3, a new approximant capable of modeling sources with all eight (precessing) intrinsic degrees of freedom. We anticipate that once all of our optimizations have been applied to SEOBNRv3, a similar speed-up may be achieved.

  8. Recent advances in the analysis of nanotube-reinforced polymeric biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, J. N.; Unnikrishnan, Vinu U.; Unnikrishnan, Ginu U.

    2013-12-01

    Conventional experimental or computational techniques are often inadequate for the analysis and development of nanocomposite-based materials as they are tedious (e.g., experimental methods) or are unsuitable to capture the properties of these novel materials (e.g., conventional computational techniques), thereby requiring multiscale computational strategies. During the last 5 years, major developments were made by the authors on the formulation and implementation of multiscale computational models, using atomistic simulation and micro-mechanics-based techniques, to study the mechanical and thermal behavior of nanocomposite-based materials. In this article, the advances made in the computational analysis of nanocomposites for tissue engineering applications (e.g., scaffolds and bioreactors) would be discussed. The material properties of the nanocomposites in the lower scales were determined using molecular dynamics, and were then transferred to the macroscale using various homogenization techniques. Also in this article, the authors discuss the development of a theory of mixture-based finite element model for nutrient flow in a hollow fiber membrane bioreactor and the use of computational tools to improve the efficiency of the bioreactor.

  9. Optimizing spinning time-domain gravitational waveforms for Advanced LIGO data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etienne, Zachariah; Devine, Caleb; McWilliams, Sean

    2016-03-01

    The Spinning Effective One Body--Numerical Relativity (SEOBNR) series of gravitational wave approximants are among the best available for Advanced LIGO data analysis. Unfortunately, SEOBNR codes as they currently exist within LALSuite are generally too slow to be directly useful for standard Markov-Chain Monte Carlo-based parameter estimation (PE). Reduced-Order Models (ROMs) of SEOBNR have been developed for this purpose, but there is no known way to make ROMs of the full eight-dimensional parameter space more efficient for PE than the SEOBNR codes directly. So as a proof of principle, we have sped up the original LALSuite SEOBNRv2 approximant code, which models waveforms from aligned-spin systems, by about 280x. Our optimized code shortens the timescale for conducting PE with this approximant to months, assuming a purely serial analysis, so that even modest parallelization combined with our optimized code will make running the full PE pipeline with SEOBNR codes directly a realistic possibility. A number of our SEOBNRv2 optimizations have already been applied to SEOBNRv3, a new approximant capable of modeling sources with all eight intrinsic degrees of freedom. We anticipate that once all of our optimizations have been applied to SEOBNRv3, a similar speed-up will be achieved.

  10. ANALYSIS ON EFFLUENT WATER QUALITY AND ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION AFTER INTRODUCING ADVANCED SEWAGE TREATMENT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiojiri, Yasuo; Maekawa, Shunich

    We analyze effluent water quality and electricity consumption after in troducing advanced treatment in sewage treatment plant. We define 'advanced treatment ratio' as volume of treated water through advanced treatment processes divided by total volume of treated water in plant. Advanced treatment ratio represents degree of introducing advanced treatment. We build two types of equation. One represents relation between effluent water quality and advanced treatment ratio, the other between electricity consumption and advanced treatment ratio. Each equation is fitted by least squares on 808 samples: 8 fiscal years operation data of 101 plants working in Kanagawa, Tokyo, Saitama and Chiba areas, and coefficient of advanced treatment ratio is estimated. The result is as follows. (1) After introducing advanced treatment aimed at nitrogen removal, T-N in effluent water decreases by 51.3% and electricity consum ption increases by 52.2%. (2) After introducing advanced treatment aimed at phosphorus removal, T-P in effluent water decreases by 27.8%. Using the above result, we try prioritizing 71 plants in Tokyo Bay watershed about raising advanced treatment ratio, so that, in total, pollutant in effluent water decreases with minimized increase of electricity consumption.

  11. Investigation of advanced counterrotation blade configuration concepts for high speed turboprop systems. Task 4: Advanced fan section aerodynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crook, Andrew J.; Delaney, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study is the development of a three-dimensional Euler/Navier-Stokes flow analysis for fan section/engine geometries containing multiple blade rows and multiple spanwise flow splitters. An existing procedure developed by Dr. J. J. Adamczyk and associates and the NASA Lewis Research Center was modified to accept multiple spanwise splitter geometries and simulate engine core conditions. The procedure was also modified to allow coarse parallelization of the solution algorithm. This document is a final report outlining the development and techniques used in the procedure. The numerical solution is based upon a finite volume technique with a four stage Runge-Kutta time marching procedure. Numerical dissipation is used to gain solution stability but is reduced in viscous dominated flow regions. Local time stepping and implicit residual smoothing are used to increase the rate of convergence. Multiple blade row solutions are based upon the average-passage system of equations. The numerical solutions are performed on an H-type grid system, with meshes being generated by the system (TIGG3D) developed earlier under this contract. The grid generation scheme meets the average-passage requirement of maintaining a common axisymmetric mesh for each blade row grid. The analysis was run on several geometry configurations ranging from one to five blade rows and from one to four radial flow splitters. Pure internal flow solutions were obtained as well as solutions with flow about the cowl/nacelle and various engine core flow conditions. The efficiency of the solution procedure was shown to be the same as the original analysis.

  12. Sorafenib in advanced melanoma: a Phase II randomised discontinuation trial analysis.

    PubMed

    Eisen, T; Ahmad, T; Flaherty, K T; Gore, M; Kaye, S; Marais, R; Gibbens, I; Hackett, S; James, M; Schuchter, L M; Nathanson, K L; Xia, C; Simantov, R; Schwartz, B; Poulin-Costello, M; O'Dwyer, P J; Ratain, M J

    2006-09-01

    The effects of sorafenib--an oral multikinase inhibitor targeting the tumour and tumour vasculature--were evaluated in patients with advanced melanoma enrolled in a large multidisease Phase II randomised discontinuation trial (RDT). Enrolled patients received a 12-week run-in of sorafenib 400 mg twice daily (b.i.d.). Patients with changes in bi-dimensional tumour measurements <25% from baseline were then randomised to sorafenib or placebo for a further 12 weeks (ie to week 24). Patients with > or =25% tumour shrinkage after the run-in continued on open-label sorafenib, whereas those with > or =25% tumour growth discontinued treatment. This analysis focussed on secondary RDT end points: changes in bi-dimensional tumour measurements from baseline after 12 weeks and overall tumour responses (WHO criteria) at week 24, progression-free survival (PFS), safety and biomarkers (BRAF, KRAS and NRAS mutational status). Of 37 melanoma patients treated during the run-in phase, 34 were evaluable for response: one had > or =25% tumour shrinkage and remained on open-label sorafenib; six (16%) had <25% tumour growth and were randomised (placebo, n=3; sorafenib, n=3); and 27 had > or =25% tumour growth and discontinued. All three randomised sorafenib patients progressed by week 24; one remained on sorafenib for symptomatic relief. All three placebo patients progressed by week-24 and were re-started on sorafenib; one experienced disease re-stabilisation. Overall, the confirmed best responses for each of the 37 melanoma patients who received sorafenib were 19% stable disease (SD) (ie n=1 open-label; n=6 randomised), 62% (n=23) progressive disease (PD) and 19% (n=7) unevaluable. The overall median PFS was 11 weeks. The six randomised patients with SD had overall PFS values ranging from 16 to 34 weeks. The most common drug-related adverse events were dermatological (eg rash/desquamation, 51%; hand-foot skin reaction, 35%). There was no relationship between V600E BRAF status and disease

  13. Integration of Advanced Probabilistic Analysis Techniques with Multi-Physics Models

    SciTech Connect

    Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit; none,; Flanagan, George F.; Poore III, Willis P.; Muhlheim, Michael David

    2014-07-30

    An integrated simulation platform that couples probabilistic analysis-based tools with model-based simulation tools can provide valuable insights for reactive and proactive responses to plant operating conditions. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the benefits of a partial implementation of the Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Detailed Framework Specification through the coupling of advanced PRA capabilities and accurate multi-physics plant models. Coupling a probabilistic model with a multi-physics model will aid in design, operations, and safety by providing a more accurate understanding of plant behavior. This represents the first attempt at actually integrating these two types of analyses for a control system used for operations, on a faster than real-time basis. This report documents the development of the basic communication capability to exchange data with the probabilistic model using Reliability Workbench (RWB) and the multi-physics model using Dymola. The communication pathways from injecting a fault (i.e., failing a component) to the probabilistic and multi-physics models were successfully completed. This first version was tested with prototypic models represented in both RWB and Modelica. First, a simple event tree/fault tree (ET/FT) model was created to develop the software code to implement the communication capabilities between the dynamic-link library (dll) and RWB. A program, written in C#, successfully communicates faults to the probabilistic model through the dll. A systems model of the Advanced Liquid-Metal Reactor–Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module (ALMR-PRISM) design developed under another DOE project was upgraded using Dymola to include proper interfaces to allow data exchange with the control application (ConApp). A program, written in C+, successfully communicates faults to the multi-physics model. The results of the example simulation were successfully plotted.

  14. Advances on the compositional analysis of glycosphingolipids combining thin-layer chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Müthing, Johannes; Distler, Ute

    2010-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs), composed of a hydrophilic carbohydrate chain and a lipophilic ceramide anchor, play pivotal roles in countless biological processes, including infectious diseases and the development of cancer. Knowledge of the number and sequence of monosaccharides and their anomeric configuration and linkage type, which make up the principal items of the glyco code of biologically active carbohydrate chains, is essential for exploring the function of GSLs. As part of the investigation of the vertebrate glycome, GSL analysis is undergoing rapid expansion owing to the application of novel biochemical and biophysical technologies. Mass spectrometry (MS) takes part in the network of collaborations to further unravel structural and functional aspects within the fascinating world of GSLs with the ultimate aim to better define their role in human health and disease. However, a single-method analytical MS technique without supporting tools is limited yielding only partial structural information. Because of its superior resolving power, robustness, and easy handling, high-performance thin-layer chromatography (TLC) is widely used as an invaluable tool in GSL analysis. The intention of this review is to give an insight into current advances obtained by coupling supplementary techniques such as TLC and mass spectrometry. A retrospective view of the development of this concept and the recent improvements by merging (1) TLC separation of GSLs, (2) their detection with oligosaccharide-specific proteins, and (3) in situ MS analysis of protein-detected GSLs directly on the TLC plate, are provided. The procedure works on a nanogram scale and was successfully applied to the identification of cancer-associated GSLs in several types of human tumors. The combination of these two supplementary techniques opens new doors by delivering specific structural information of trace quantities of GSLs with only limited investment in sample preparation. PMID:19609886

  15. Current advances in molecular, biochemical, and computational modeling analysis of microalgal triacylglycerol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lenka, Sangram K; Carbonaro, Nicole; Park, Rudolph; Miller, Stephen M; Thorpe, Ian; Li, Yantao

    2016-01-01

    Triacylglycerols (TAGs) are highly reduced energy storage molecules ideal for biodiesel production. Microalgal TAG biosynthesis has been studied extensively in recent years, both at the molecular level and systems level through experimental studies and computational modeling. However, discussions of the strategies and products of the experimental and modeling approaches are rarely integrated and summarized together in a way that promotes collaboration among modelers and biologists in this field. In this review, we outline advances toward understanding the cellular and molecular factors regulating TAG biosynthesis in unicellular microalgae with an emphasis on recent studies on rate-limiting steps in fatty acid and TAG synthesis, while also highlighting new insights obtained from the integration of multi-omics datasets with mathematical models. Computational methodologies such as kinetic modeling, metabolic flux analysis, and new variants of flux balance analysis are explained in detail. We discuss how these methods have been used to simulate algae growth and lipid metabolism in response to changing culture conditions and how they have been used in conjunction with experimental validations. Since emerging evidence indicates that TAG synthesis in microalgae operates through coordinated crosstalk between multiple pathways in diverse subcellular destinations including the endoplasmic reticulum and plastids, we discuss new experimental studies and models that incorporate these findings for discovering key regulatory checkpoints. Finally, we describe tools for genetic manipulation of microalgae and their potential for future rational algal strain design. This comprehensive review explores the potential synergistic impact of pathway analysis, computational approaches, and molecular genetic manipulation strategies on improving TAG production in microalgae. PMID:27321475

  16. Multiple episodes of dolomitization in the Arbuckle Group, Arbuckle Mountains, south-central Oklahoma: Field, petrographic, and geochemical evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, G.; Land, L.S.; Elmore, R.D.

    1995-04-03

    The Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle Group in the Arbuckle Mountains, south-central Oklahoma, had a complex history of dolomitization that resulted in two different geometries of dolomite bodies: stratal dolomite, of stratigraphically consistent, widespread distribution, and non-stratal dolomite, of stratigraphically inconsistent, local occurrence. Stratal dolomite includes the Royer and Butterly units in the lower Arbuckle Group. Most stratal dolomite samples are coarsely crystalline and have {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios similar to Late Cambrian limestone and coeval seawater. All stratal dolomite and Arbuckle limestone samples have low {Delta}{sup 18}O values. Nonstratal dolomite is present in two areas: the Tishomingo Anticline and the Arbuckle Anticline. In the Tishomingo Anticline area, massive bodies (> 10 km{sup 2}) of nonstratal dolomite are present in a paleokarst system of pre-Middle Ordovician age. The petrographic and isotopic characteristics suggest that the nonstratal dolomite probably resulted from dolomitization of recrystallized limestone by post-Early Ordovician seawater. In the Arbuckle Anticline area, nonstratal dolomite is present as small irregular bodies that are related to Pennsylvanian faults and are associated with the margins of stratal Butterly dolomite. The nonstratal dolomite, medium to coarsely crystalline and brightly luminescent, is characterized by high {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios values, and Fe and Mn concentrations, relative to all Arbuckle carbonates. Such compositions suggest that this type of dolomite probably originated from fluids that were derived from the adjacent basin(s) during late Paleozoic time.

  17. Petrographic and microthermometrical studies of emeralds in the `Garimpo' of Capoeirana, Nova Era, Minas Gerais State, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, J. L.; Mendes, J. C.; da Silveira Bello, R. M.; Svisero, D. P.; Valarelli, J. V.

    1992-03-01

    Petrographic investigations in the area of the Capoeirana emerald deposit, Minas Gerais State, revealed two main lithostructural units. The first unit is comprised of gneissic rocks of granitic composition belonging to the basement complex, and the second is composed of a highly weathered metasedimentary-metavolcanic sequence represented by metapelitic schists, amphibolites, schists derived from ultramafic rocks, and quartzites. Quartz and pegmatoid veins appear near the contacts between the gneissic rocks and the mineralization metasedimentary-metavolcanic sequence. The emerald mineralization is dominantly concentrated within the intercalations of meta-ultramafic schists near the contact of the pegmatoid veins. Microthermometric studies of the fluid inclusions of the emerald grains indicate that crystallization occurred in the pressure and temperature ranges of 2000 to 2750 bar and 450 to 650 °C, respectively. These data suggest that the mineralizing solutions have had a late hydrothermal-pneumatolytic origin characterized by low pressures, suggestive of the paragenesis talc + tremolite + carbonate + biotite-phlogopite + chlorite of the emerald wall rocks.

  18. Iodine-xenon, chemical, and petrographic studies of Semarkona chondrules - Evidence for the timing of aqueous alteration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, T. D.; Grossman, J. N.; Olinger, C. T.; Garrison, D. H.

    1991-01-01

    The relationship of the I-Xe system of the Semarkona meteorite to other measured properties is investigated via INAA, petrographic, and noble-gas analyses on 17 chondrules from the meteorite. A range of not less than 10 Ma in apparent I-Xe ages is observed. The three latest apparent ages fall in a cluster, suggesting the possibility of a common event. It is argued that the initial I-129/I-127 ratio (R0) is related to chondrule type and/or mineralogy, with nonporphyritic and pyroxene-rich chondrules showing evidence for lower R0s than porphyritic and olivine-rich chondrules. Chondrules with sulfides on or near the surface have lower R0s than other chondrules. The He-129/Xe-132 ratio in the trapped Xe component anticorrelates with R0, consistent with the evolution of a chronometer in a closed system or in multiple systems. It is concluded that the variations in R0 represent variations in ages, and that later events, possibly aqueous alteration, preferentially affected chondrules with nonporphyritic textures and/or sulfide-rich exteriors about 10 Ma after the formation of the chondrules.

  19. Petrographic characterization and provenance determination of the white marbles used in the Roman sculptures of Forum Sempronii (Fossombrone, Marche, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, Fabrizio; Columbu, Stefano; Lezzerini, Marco; Miriello, Domenico

    2014-06-01

    The Roman municipium of Forum Sempronii (Fossombrone, Marche) was located along the `Via Consolare Flaminia', in the stretch of road where it ran along the final sector of the valley of the River Metauro ( Mataurus). The ancient colony of Forum Sempronii, which is cited by Strabo, Pliny, and Ptolemy, was found in the second century BC, probably on the site of an earlier community and its activity continued until the end of the fifth century AD. During ancient and more recent archaeological excavations, many fragments of coloured stones and marbles, and some white marble sculptures have been unearthed. In this paper, we report the results of the provenance identification of the white marbles used for the sculptures found in the archaeological site of Forum Sempronii and now displayed at the local archaeological museum. The determination of the source origin of the white marbles used for the sculptures has been established by mineralogical-petrographic and geochemical analyses. Microscopic study of thin sections together with carbon and oxygen stable isotope ratios indicate that more than one type of white marbles was used: Pentelikon, Lunense, and Thasian.

  20. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Quarterly progress report, December 1981-February 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Hower, J.C.; Ferm, J.C.; Cobb, J.C.; Trinkle, E.J.; Frankie, K.A.; Poe, S.H.; Baynard, D.N.

    1982-01-01

    The project involves three specific areas of coal petrology: spectral fluorescence of liptinite macerals; properties of semi-inert macerals; and size/form/microlithotype association of pyrite/marcasite. Additional research on the Mannington and Dunbar coals in western Kentucky will apply techniques developed in the first three areas. Suites of coals from other states will also be studied to expand the variability for the project which involves the determination of coal rank through the use of fluorescence measurements on sporinite, all samples have been studied and data analysis is still incomplete. Interpretation of results will be presented in future reports. The actual developments of pseudovitrinites are being investigated. Two possible mechanisms for the origin of pseudovitrinites have been suggested. The first mechanism is differential coalification of similar materials. The second factor for influencing the development of pseudovitrinite is an actual difference in original plant composition. Pyrite analysis of western Kentucky coals has been completed, however data reduction is still incomplete. Changes in the petrography of western coals may be related to depositional environments of the coal.