Science.gov

Sample records for advanced polymer matrix

  1. Micromechanical characterization of nonlinear behavior of advanced polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Chen, J. L.; Sun, C. T.

    1994-01-01

    Due to the presence of curing stresses and oriented crystalline structures in the matrix of polymer matrix fiber composites, the in situ nonlinear properties of the matrix are expected to be rather different from those of the bulk resin. A plane stress micromechanical model was developed to retrieve the in situ elastic-plastic properties of Narmco 5260 and Amoco 8320 matrices from measured elastic-plastic properties of IM7/5260 and IM7/8320 advance composites. In the micromechanical model, the fiber was assumed to be orthotropically elastic and the matrix to be orthotropic in elastic and plastic properties. The results indicate that both in situ elastic and plastic properties of the matrices are orthotropic.

  2. Polymer, metal and ceramic matrix composites for advanced aircraft engine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdanels, D. L.; Serafini, T. T.; Dicarlo, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced aircraft engine research within NASA Lewis is being focused on propulsion systems for subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic aircraft. Each of these flight regimes requires different types of engines, but all require advanced materials to meet their goals of performance, thrust-to-weight ratio, and fuel efficiency. The high strength/weight and stiffness/weight properties of resin, metal, and ceramic matrix composites will play an increasingly key role in meeting these performance requirements. At NASA Lewis, research is ongoing to apply graphite/polyimide composites to engine components and to develop polymer matrices with higher operating temperature capabilities. Metal matrix composites, using magnesium, aluminum, titanium, and superalloy matrices, are being developed for application to static and rotating engine components, as well as for space applications, over a broad temperature range. Ceramic matrix composites are also being examined to increase the toughness and reliability of ceramics for application to high-temperature engine structures and components.

  3. Polymer, metal, and ceramic matrix composites for advanced aircraft engine applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Daniels, D.L.; Serafini, T.T.; Di Carlo, J.A.

    1986-06-01

    Advanced aircraft engine research within NASA Lewis focuses on propulsion systems for subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic aircraft. Each of these flight regimes requires different types of engines, but all require advanced materials to meet their goals of performance, thrust-to-weight ratio, and fuel efficiency. The high strength/weight and stiffness/weight properties of resin, metal, and ceramic matrix composites will play an increasingly key role in meeting these performance requirements. At NASA Lewis, research is ongoing to apply graphite/polyimide composites to engine components and to develop polymer matrices with higher operating temperature capabilities. Metal matrix composites, using magnesium, aluminum, titanium, and superalloy matrices, are being developed for application to static and rotating engine components, as well as for space applications, over a broad temperature range. Ceramic matrix composites are also being examined to increase the toughness and reliability of ceramics for application to high-temperature engine structures and components.

  4. Study of mould design and forming process on advanced polymer-matrix composite complex structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S. J.; Zhan, L. H.; Bai, H. M.; Chen, X. P.; Zhou, Y. Q.

    2015-07-01

    Advanced carbon fibre-reinforced polymer-matrix composites are widely applied to aviation manufacturing field due to their outstanding performance. In this paper, the mould design and forming process of the complex composite structure were discussed in detail using the hat stiffened structure as an example. The key issues of the moulddesign were analyzed, and the corresponding solutions were also presented. The crucial control points of the forming process such as the determination of materials and stacking sequence, the temperature and pressure route of the co-curing process were introduced. In order to guarantee the forming quality of the composite hat stiffened structure, a mathematical model about the aperture of rubber mandrel was introduced. The study presented in this paper may provide some actual references for the design and manufacture of the important complex composite structures.

  5. Advanced High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites for Gas Turbine Engines Program Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanley, David; Carella, John

    1999-01-01

    This document, submitted by AlliedSignal Engines (AE), a division of AlliedSignal Aerospace Company, presents the program final report for the Advanced High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites for Gas Turbine Engines Program Expansion in compliance with data requirements in the statement of work, Contract No. NAS3-97003. This document includes: 1 -Technical Summary: a) Component Design, b) Manufacturing Process Selection, c) Vendor Selection, and d) Testing Validation: 2-Program Conclusion and Perspective. Also, see the Appendix at the back of this report. This report covers the program accomplishments from December 1, 1996, to August 24, 1998. The Advanced High Temperature PMC's for Gas Turbine Engines Program Expansion was a one year long, five task technical effort aimed at designing, fabricating and testing a turbine engine component using NASA's high temperature resin system AMB-21. The fiber material chosen was graphite T650-35, 3K, 8HS with UC-309 sizing. The first four tasks included component design and manufacturing, process selection, vendor selection, component fabrication and validation testing. The final task involved monthly financial and technical reports.

  6. Nondestructive Evaluation of Advanced Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites: A Technology Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yolken, H. Thomas; Matzkanin, George A.

    2009-01-01

    Because of their increasing utilization in structural applications, the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of advanced fiber reinforced polymer composites continues to receive considerable research and development attention. Due to the heterogeneous nature of composites, the form of defects is often very different from a metal and fracture mechanisms are more complex. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview and technology assessment of the current state-of-the-art with respect to NDE of advanced fiber reinforced polymer composites.

  7. High Thermal Conductivity Polymer Matrix Composites (PMC) for Advanced Space Radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, E. Eugene; Bowman, Cheryl; Beach, Duane

    2007-01-01

    High temperature polymer matrix composites (PMC) reinforced with high thermal conductivity (approx. 1000 W/mK) pitch-based carbon fibers are evaluated for a facesheet/fin structure of large space radiator systems. Significant weight reductions along with improved thermal performance, structural integrity and space durability toward its metallic counterparts were envisioned. Candidate commercial resin systems including Cyanate Esters, BMIs, and polyimide were selected based on thermal capabilities and processability. PMC laminates were designed to match the thermal expansion coefficient of various metal heat pipes or tubes. Large, but thin composite panels were successfully fabricated after optimizing cure conditions. Space durability of PMC with potential degradation mechanisms was assessed by simulated thermal aging tests in high vacuum, 1-3 x 10(exp -6) torr, at three temperatures, 227 C, 277 C, and 316 C for up to one year. Nanocomposites with vapor-grown carbon nano-fibers and exfoliated graphite flakes were attempted to improve thermal conductivity (TC) and microcracking resistance. Good quality nanocomposites were fabricated and evaluated for TC and durability including radiation resistance. TC was measured in both in-plan and thru-the-thickness directions, and the effects of microcracks on TC are also being evaluated. This paper will discuss the systematic experimental approaches, various performance-durability evaluations, and current subcomponent design and fabrication/manufacturing efforts.

  8. High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites Conference held at the NASA Lewis Research Center on March 16 to 18, 1983. The purpose of the conference is to provide scientists and engineers working in the field of high temperature polymer matrix composites an opportunity to review, exchange, and assess the latest developments in this rapidly expanding area of materials technology. Technical papers are presented in the following areas: (1) matrix development; (2) adhesive development; (3) characterization; (4) environmental effects; and (5) applications.

  9. High temperature polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.

    1987-01-01

    With the increased emphasis on high performance aircraft the need for lightweight, thermal/oxidatively stable materials is growing. Because of their ease of fabrication, high specific strength, and ability to be tailored chemically to produce a variety of mechanical and physical properties, polymers and polymer matrix composites present themselves as attractive materials for a number of aeropropulsion applications. In the early 1970s researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center developed a highly processable, thermally stable (600 F) polyimide, PMR-15. Since that time, PMR-15 has become commercially available and has found use in military aircraft, in particular, the F-404 engine for the Navy's F/A-18 strike fighter. The NASA Lewis'contributions to high temperature polymer matrix composite research will be discussed as well as current and future directions.

  10. Hybridized polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    House, E. E.; Hoggatt, J. T.; Symonds, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    The extent to which graphite fibers are released from resin matrix composites that are exposed to fire and impact conditions was determined. Laboratory simulations of those conditions that could exist in the event of an aircraft crash and burn situation were evaluated. The effectiveness of various hybridizing concepts in preventing this release of graphite fibers were also evaluated. The baseline (i.e., unhybridized) laminates examined were prepared from commercially available graphite/epoxy, graphite/polyimide, and graphite/phenolic materials. Hybridizing concepts investigated included resin fillers, laminate coatings, resin blending, and mechanical interlocking of the graphite reinforcement. The baseline and hybridized laminates' mechanical properties, before and after isothermal and humidity aging, were also compared. It was found that a small amount of graphite fiber was released from the graphite/epoxy laminates during the burn and impact conditions used in this program. However, the extent to which the fibers were released is not considered a severe enough problem to preclude the use of graphite reinforced composites in civil aircraft structure. It also was found that several hybrid concepts eliminated this fiber release. Isothermal and humidity aging did not appear to alter the fiber release tendencies.

  11. Polymer Matrix Composite Material Oxygen Compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Tom

    2001-01-01

    Carbon fiber/polymer matrix composite materials look promising as a material to construct liquid oxygen (LOX) tanks. Based on mechanical impact tests the risk will be greater than aluminum, however, the risk can probably be managed to an acceptable level. Proper tank design and operation can minimize risk. A risk assessment (hazard analysis) will be used to determine the overall acceptability for using polymer matrix composite materials.

  12. [Modern polymers in matrix tablets technology].

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Łukasz; Kasperek, Regina; Poleszak, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Matrix tablets are the most popular method of oral drug administration, and polymeric materials have been used broadly in matrix formulations to modify and modulate drug release rate. The main goal of the system is to extend drug release profiles to maintain a constant in vivo plasma drug concentration and a consistent pharmacological effect. Polymeric matrix tablets offer a great potential as oral controlled drug delivery systems. Cellulose derivatives, like hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) are often used as matrix formers. However, also other types of polymers can be used for this purpose including: Kollidon SR, acrylic acid polymers such as Eudragits and Carbopols. Nevertheless, polymers of natural origin like: carragens, chitosan and alginates widely used in the food and cosmetics industry are now coming to the fore of pharmaceutical research and are used in matrix tablets technology. Modern polymers allow to obtain matrix tablets by 3D printing, which enables to develop new formulation types. In this paper, the polymers used in matrix tablets technology and examples of their applications were described.

  13. Bio-inspired Construction of Advanced Fuel Cell Cathode with Pt Anchored in Ordered Hybrid Polymer Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zhangxun; Wang, Suli; Jiang, Luhua; Sun, Hai; Liu, Shuang; Fu, Xudong; Zhang, Bingsen; Sheng Su, Dang; Wang, Jianqiang; Sun, Gongquan

    2015-01-01

    The significant use of platinum for catalyzing the cathodic oxygen reduction reactions (ORRs) has hampered the widespread use of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The construction of well-defined electrode architecture in nanoscale with enhanced utilization and catalytic performance of Pt might be a promising approach to address such barrier. Inspired by the highly efficient catalytic processes in enzymes with active centers embedded in charge transport pathways, here we demonstrate for the first time a design that allocates platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) at the boundaries with dual-functions of conducting both electrons by aid of polypyrrole and protons via Nafion® ionomer within hierarchical nanoarrays. By mimicking enzymes functionally, an impressive ORR activity and stability is achieved. Using this brand new electrode architecture as the cathode and the anode of a PEMFC, a high mass specific power density of 5.23 W mg−1Pt is achieved, with remarkable durability. These improvements are ascribed to not only the electron decoration and the anchoring effects from the Nafion® ionomer decorated PPy substrate to the supported Pt NPs, but also the fast charge and mass transport facilitated by the electron and proton pathways within the electrode architecture. PMID:26537781

  14. Bio-inspired Construction of Advanced Fuel Cell Cathode with Pt Anchored in Ordered Hybrid Polymer Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Zhangxun; Wang, Suli; Jiang, Luhua; Sun, Hai; Liu, Shuang; Fu, Xudong; Zhang, Bingsen; Sheng Su, Dang; Wang, Jianqiang; Sun, Gongquan

    2015-11-01

    The significant use of platinum for catalyzing the cathodic oxygen reduction reactions (ORRs) has hampered the widespread use of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The construction of well-defined electrode architecture in nanoscale with enhanced utilization and catalytic performance of Pt might be a promising approach to address such barrier. Inspired by the highly efficient catalytic processes in enzymes with active centers embedded in charge transport pathways, here we demonstrate for the first time a design that allocates platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) at the boundaries with dual-functions of conducting both electrons by aid of polypyrrole and protons via Nafion® ionomer within hierarchical nanoarrays. By mimicking enzymes functionally, an impressive ORR activity and stability is achieved. Using this brand new electrode architecture as the cathode and the anode of a PEMFC, a high mass specific power density of 5.23 W mg-1Pt is achieved, with remarkable durability. These improvements are ascribed to not only the electron decoration and the anchoring effects from the Nafion® ionomer decorated PPy substrate to the supported Pt NPs, but also the fast charge and mass transport facilitated by the electron and proton pathways within the electrode architecture.

  15. Advanced fiber/matrix material systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartness, J. Timothy

    1991-01-01

    Work completed in Phase 1 of the NASA Advanced Composite Technology program is discussed. Two towpreg forms (commingled yarns and fused powder towpregs) are being characterized under the program. These towpregs will be used to evaluate textile fabrication technologies for advanced aircraft composite structures. The unique characteristic of both of these material forms is that both fiber and matrix resin are handled in a single operation such as weaving, braiding, or fiber placement. The evaluation of both commingled and fused powder towpreg is described. Various polymer materials are considered for both subsonic and supersonic applications. Polymers initially being evaluated include thermoplastic polyimides such as Larc-TPI and New-TPI, thermoplastics such as PEEK and PEKEKK as well as some toughened crosslinked polyimides. Preliminary mechanical properties as well as tow handling are evaluated.

  16. Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendra Bordia

    2009-07-31

    The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and

  17. Polymer matrix effects on acid generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedynyshyn, Theodore H.; Goodman, Russell B.; Roberts, Jeanette

    2008-03-01

    We have measured the acid generation efficiency with EUV exposure of a PAG in different polymer matrixes representing the main classes of resist polymers as well as some previously described fluoropolymers for lithographic applications. The polymer matrix was found to have a significant effect on the acid generation efficiency of the PAG studied. A linear relationship exists between the absorbance of the resist and the acid generation efficiency. A second inverse relationship exists between Dill C and aromatic content of the resist polymer. It was shown that polymer sensitization is important for acid generation with EUV exposure and the Dill C parameter can be increased by up to five times with highly absorbing non-aromatic polymers, such as non-aromatic fluoropolymers, over an ESCAP polymer. The increase in the Dill C value will lead to an up to five fold increase in resist sensitivity. It is our expectation that these insights into the nature of polymer matrix effects on acid generation could lead to increased sensitivity for EUV resists.

  18. Polymer Matrix Composites for Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    2003-01-01

    The Access-to-Space study identified the requirement for lightweight structures to achieve orbit with a single-stage vehicle. Thus a task was undertaken to examine the use of polymer matrix composites for propulsion components. It was determined that the effort of this task would be to extend previous efforts with polymer matrix composite feedlines and demonstrate the feasibility of manufacturing large diameter feedlines with a complex shape and integral flanges, (i.e. all one piece with a 90 deg bend), and assess their performance under a cryogenic atmosphere.

  19. Light weight polymer matrix composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J. (Inventor); Lowell, Carl E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A graphite fiber reinforced polymer matrix is layed up, cured, and thermally aged at about 750.degree. F. in the presence of an inert gas. The heat treatment improves the structural integrity and alters the electrical conductivity of the materials. In the preferred embodiment PMR-15 polyimides and Celion-6000 graphite fibers are used.

  20. Light weight polymer matrix composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J. (Inventor); Lowell, Carl E. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A graphite fiber reinforced polymer matrix is layed up, cured, and thermally aged at about 750 F in the presence of an inert gas. The heat treatment improves the structural integrity and alters the electrical conductivity of the materials. In the preferred embodiment PMR-15 polyimides and Celion-6000 graphite fibers are used.

  1. Oriented nanofibers embedded in a polymer matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrera, Enrique V. (Inventor); Rodriguez-Macias, Fernando J. (Inventor); Lozano, Karen (Inventor); Chibante, Luis Paulo Felipe (Inventor); Stewart, David Harris (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method of forming a composite of embedded nanofibers in a polymer matrix is disclosed. The method includes incorporating nanofibers in a plastic matrix forming agglomerates, and uniformly distributing the nanofibers by exposing the agglomerates to hydrodynamic stresses. The hydrodynamic said stresses force the agglomerates to break apart. In combination or additionally elongational flow is used to achieve small diameters and alignment. A nanofiber reinforced polymer composite system is disclosed. The system includes a plurality of nanofibers that are embedded in polymer matrices in micron size fibers. A method for producing nanotube continuous fibers is disclosed. Nanofibers are fibrils with diameters of 100 nm, multiwall nanotubes, single wall nanotubes and their various functionalized and derivatized forms. The method includes mixing a nanofiber in a polymer; and inducing an orientation of the nanofibers that enables the nanofibers to be used to enhance mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. Orientation is induced by high shear mixing and elongational flow, singly or in combination. The polymer may be removed from said nanofibers, leaving micron size fibers of aligned nanofibers.

  2. Functional Reactive Polymer Electrospun Matrix.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Vipul; Ho, Dominic; Ho, Diwei; Galabura, Yuriy; Yasin, Faizah; Gong, Peijun; Ye, Weike; Singh, Ruhani; Munshi, Alaa; Saunders, Martin; Woodward, Robert C; St Pierre, Timothy; Wood, Fiona M; Fear, Mark; Lorenser, Dirk; Sampson, David D; Zdyrko, Bogdan; Luzinov, Igor; Smith, Nicole M; Iyer, K Swaminathan

    2016-02-01

    Synthetic multifunctional electrospun composites are a new class of hybrid materials with many potential applications. However, the lack of an efficient, reactive large-area substrate has been one of the major limitations in the development of these materials as advanced functional platforms. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of electrospun poly(glycidyl methacrylate) films as a highly versatile platform for the development of functional nanostructured materials anchored to a surface. The utility of this platform as a reactive substrate is demonstrated by grafting poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) to incorporate stimuli-responsive properties. Additionally, we demonstrate that functional nanocomposites can be fabricated using this platform with properties for sensing, fluorescence imaging, and magneto-responsiveness. PMID:26780245

  3. Advanced Polymer Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Muenchausen, Ross E.

    2012-07-25

    Some conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Radiation-assisted nanotechnology applications will continue to grow; (2) The APPF will provide a unique focus for radiolytic processing of nanomaterials in support of DOE-DP, other DOE and advanced manufacturing initiatives; (3) {gamma}, X-ray, e-beam and ion beam processing will increasingly be applied for 'green' manufacturing of nanomaterials and nanocomposites; and (4) Biomedical science and engineering may ultimately be the biggest application area for radiation-assisted nanotechnology development.

  4. Thermomechanical fatigue of polymer matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, L.H.; Koudela, K.L.; Karasek, M.L.; Amateau, M.F.; Runt, J.P.

    1996-12-31

    The present research was undertaken to evaluate the effects of mechanical constraint on the response of polymer matrix composites during thermal cycling. Analytical and experimental techniques were used to characterize the response of carbon-fiber-reinforced cyanate ester and bismaleimide composites. Cross-ply laminates were subjected to thermal cycles from 24 to 177 C in the unconstrained, fully constrained, and overconstrained conditions. Laminate response, damage mechanisms, and residual compressive properties were characterized for each material and degree of constraint. The results of this research indicate that the level of constraint can have a significant effect on the response of polymer matrix composites during thermal cycling. However, longer-term testing is required to determine if the observed changes in response will ultimately affect the final failure mode and fatigue endurance of the materials.

  5. Multifunctional Nanotube Polymer Nanocomposites for Aerospace Applications: Adhesion between SWCNT and Polymer Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Cheol; Wise, Kristopher E.; Kang, Jin Ho; Kim, Jae-Woo; Sauti, Godfrey; Lowther, Sharon E.; Lillehei, Peter T.; Smith, Michael W.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; Jordan, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Multifunctional structural materials can enable a novel design space for advanced aerospace structures. A promising route to multifunctionality is the use of nanotubes possessing the desired combination of properties to enhance the characteristics of structural polymers. Recent nanotube-polymer nanocomposite studies have revealed that these materials have the potential to provide structural integrity as well as sensing and/or actuation capabilities. Judicious selection or modification of the polymer matrix to promote donor acceptor and/or dispersion interactions can improve adhesion at the interface between the nanotubes and the polymer matrix significantly. The effect of nanotube incorporation on the modulus and toughness of the polymer matrix will be presented. Very small loadings of single wall nanotubes in a polyimide matrix yield an effective sensor material that responds to strain, stress, pressure, and temperature. These materials also exhibit significant actuation in response to applied electric fields. The objective of this work is to demonstrate that physical properties of multifunctional material systems can be tailored for specific applications by controlling nanotube treatment (different types of nanotubes), concentration, and degree of alignment.

  6. Survey of inorganic polymers. [for composite matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerber, A. H.; Mcinerney, E. F.

    1979-01-01

    A literature search was carried out in order to identify inorganic, metallo-organic, and hybrid inorganic-organic polymers that could serve as potential matrix resins for advanced composites. The five most promising candidates were critically reviewed and recommendations were made for the achievement of their potential in terms of performance and cost. These generic polymer classes comprise: (1) Poly(arylsil sesquioxanes); (2) Poly(silyl arylene siloxanes); (3) Poly(silarylenes); (4) Poly(silicon-linked ferrocenes); and (5) Poly(organo phosphazenes). No single candidate currently possesses the necessary combination of physicomechanical properties, thermal stability, processability, and favorable economics. The first three classes exhibit the best thermal performance. On the other hand, poly (organo phosphazenes), the most extensively studied polymer class, exhibit the best combination of structure-property control, processability, and favorable economics.

  7. Bismaleimides and related maleimido polymers as matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. A.; Kourtides, D. A.; Fohlen, G. M.

    1985-01-01

    Significant processing and property improvements can be achieved by copolymerization of state-of-the-art bisimides with various vinyl stilbazole derivatives to give both fire resistance and high-temperature properties from hot-melt compositions. Significant improvement in mechanical properties is achieved through these modifications, which may make these new matrix resins ideal candidates for fireworthy secondary graphite composite structures. Phosphorous modifications of maleimido polymers through phosphonate structure and tricyclophosphazene derivatives provide families of new matrix resins for short-time applications in severe thermo-oxidative environments. With further research these may provide matrix resins for long-term thermo-oxidative stability of advanced composites at temperatures up to 400 to 500 C.

  8. Advanced Integration Matrix Education Outreach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul Heather L.

    2004-01-01

    The Advanced Integration Matrix (AIM) will design a ground-based test facility for developing revolutionary integrated systems for joint human-robotic missions in order to study and solve systems-level integration issues for exploration missions beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO). This paper describes development plans for educational outreach activities related to technological and operational integration scenarios similar to the challenges that will be encountered through this project. The education outreach activities will provide hands-on, interactive exercises to allow students of all levels to experience design and operational challenges similar to what NASA deals with everyday in performing the integration of complex missions. These experiences will relate to and impact students everyday lives by demonstrating how their interests in science and engineering can develop into future careers, and reinforcing the concepts of teamwork and conflict resolution. Allowing students to experience and contribute to real-world development, research, and scientific studies of ground-based simulations for complex exploration missions will stimulate interest in the space program, and bring NASA's challenges to the student level. By enhancing existing educational programs and developing innovative activities and presentations, AIM will support NASA s endeavor to "inspire the next generation of explorers.. .as only NASA can."

  9. Microstructural evaluatoin of ceramic matrix composites produced by polymer pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, P.J.; Day, R.J.; TAylor, R.

    1995-09-01

    A microstructural characterisation of carbon fibre/silicon carbide matrix campsites is reported. Unidirectional- and bidirectional composites were studied and the silicon carbide matrix was deposited by decomposition of a polymer precursor.

  10. Polymer Matrix Composite Lines and Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.

    2001-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, a task was undertaken to assess the feasibility of making cryogenic feedlines with integral flanges from polymer matrix composite materials. An additional level of complexity was added by having the feedlines be elbow shaped. Four materials, each with a unique manufacturing method, were chosen for this program. Feedlines were to be made by hand layup (HLU) with standard autoclave cure, HLU with electron beam cure, solvent-assisted resin transfer molding (SARTM), and thermoplastic tape laying (TTL). A test matrix of fill and drain cycles with both liquid nitrogen and liquid helium, along with a heat up to 250 F, was planned for each of the feedlines. A pressurization to failure was performed on any feedlines that passed the cryogenic cycling testing. A damage tolerance subtask was also undertaken in this study. The effects of foreign object impact to the materials used was assessed by cross-sectional examination and by permeability after impact testing. At the end of the program, the manufacture of the electron beam-cured feedlines never came to fruition. All of the TTL feedlines leaked heavily before any cryogenic testing, all of the SARTM feedlines leaked heavily after one cryogenic cycle. Thus, only the HLU with autoclave cure feedlines underwent the complete test matrix. They passed the cyclic testing and were pressurized to failure.

  11. Fracture toughness testing of polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.

    1992-01-01

    A review of the interlaminar fracture indicates that a standard specimen geometry is needed to obtain consistent fracture toughness measurements in polymer matrix composites. In general, the variability of measured toughness values increases as the toughness of the material increases. This variability could be caused by incorrect sizing of test specimens and/or inconsistent data reduction procedures. A standard data reduction procedure is therefore needed as well, particularly for the tougher materials. Little work has been reported on the effects of fiber orientation, fiber architecture, fiber surface treatment or interlaminar fracture toughness, and the mechanisms by which the fibers increase fracture toughness are not well understood. The little data that is available indicates that woven fiber reinforcement and fiber sizings can significantly increase interlaminar fracture toughness.

  12. Polymer matrix and graphite fiber interface study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, D. F.; Zimmerman, R. S.; Odom, E. M.

    1985-01-01

    Hercules AS4 graphite fiber, unsized, or with EPON 828, PVA, or polysulfone sizing, was combined with three different polymer matrices. These included Hercules 3501-6 epoxy, Hercules 4001 bismaleimide, and Hexcel F155 rubber toughened epoxy. Unidirectional composites in all twelve combinations were fabricated and tested in transverse tension and axial compression. Quasi-isotropic laminates were tested in axial tension and compression, flexure, interlaminar shear, and tensile impact. All tests were conducted at both room temperature, dry and elevated temperature, and wet conditions. Single fiber pullout testing was also performed. Extensive scanning electron microphotographs of fracture surfaces are included, along with photographs of single fiber pullout failures. Analytical/experimental correlations are presented, based on the results of a finite element micromechanics analysis. Correlations between matrix type, fiber sizing, hygrothermal environment, and loading mode are presented. Results indicate that the various composite properties were only moderately influenced by the fiber sizings utilized.

  13. Creep of plain weave polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Abhishek

    Polymer matrix composites are increasingly used in various industrial sectors to reduce structural weight and improve performance. Woven (also known as textile) composites are one class of polymer matrix composites with increasing market share mostly due to their lightweight, their flexibility to form into desired shape, their mechanical properties and toughness. Due to the viscoelasticity of the polymer matrix, time-dependent degradation in modulus (creep) and strength (creep rupture) are two of the major mechanical properties required by engineers to design a structure reliably when using these materials. Unfortunately, creep and creep rupture of woven composites have received little attention by the research community and thus, there is a dire need to generate additional knowledge and prediction models, given the increasing market share of woven composites in load bearing structural applications. Currently, available creep models are limited in scope and have not been validated for any loading orientation and time period beyond the experimental time window. In this thesis, an analytical creep model, namely the Modified Equivalent Laminate Model (MELM), was developed to predict tensile creep of plain weave composites for any orientation of the load with respect to the orientation of the fill and warp fibers, using creep of unidirectional composites. The ability of the model to predict creep for any orientation of the load is a "first" in this area. The model was validated using an extensive experimental involving the tensile creep of plain weave composites under varying loading orientation and service conditions. Plain weave epoxy (F263)/ carbon fiber (T300) composite, currently used in aerospace applications, was procured as fabrics from Hexcel Corporation. Creep tests were conducted under two loading conditions: on-axis loading (0°) and off-axis loading (45°). Constant load creep, in the temperature range of 80-240°C and stress range of 1-70% UTS of the

  14. Characterization of Hybrid CNT Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimsley, Brian W.; Cano, Roberto J.; Kinney, Megan C.; Pressley, James; Sauti, Godfrey; Czabaj, Michael W.; Kim, Jae-Woo; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been studied extensively since their discovery and demonstrated at the nanoscale superior mechanical, electrical and thermal properties in comparison to micro and macro scale properties of conventional engineering materials. This combination of properties suggests their potential to enhance multi-functionality of composites in regions of primary structures on aerospace vehicles where lightweight materials with improved thermal and electrical conductivity are desirable. In this study, hybrid multifunctional polymer matrix composites were fabricated by interleaving layers of CNT sheets into Hexcel® IM7/8552 prepreg, a well-characterized toughened epoxy carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite. The resin content of these interleaved CNT sheets, as well as ply stacking location were varied to determine the effects on the electrical, thermal, and mechanical performance of the composites. The direct-current electrical conductivity of the hybrid CNT composites was characterized by in-line and Montgomery four-probe methods. For [0](sub 20) laminates containing a single layer of CNT sheet between each ply of IM7/8552, in-plane electrical conductivity of the hybrid laminate increased significantly, while in-plane thermal conductivity increased only slightly in comparison to the control IM7/8552 laminates. Photo-microscopy and short beam shear (SBS) strength tests were used to characterize the consolidation quality of the fabricated laminates. Hybrid panels fabricated without any pretreatment of the CNT sheets resulted in a SBS strength reduction of 70 percent. Aligning the tubes and pre-infusing the CNT sheets with resin significantly improved the SBS strength of the hybrid composite To determine the cause of this performance reduction, Mode I and Mode II fracture toughness of the CNT sheet to CFRP interface was characterized by double cantilever beam (DCB) and end notch flexure (ENF) testing, respectively. Results are compared to the

  15. Advances in shape-memory polymer actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Jinsong; Liu, Yanju; Lan, Xin

    2009-03-01

    Shape memory polymer (SMP) is a promising smart material, which is able to perform a large deformation upon applying an external stimulus, such as heat, light and moisture, etc. In recent years, many investigations have been advanced in thermo-responsive SMP actuation, and several novel actuations have been applied in SMP. In this paper, the mechanism and demonstration of three types of SMP actuations (infrared laser, physical swelling effect and electricity) are presented. These novel actuation approaches may help SMP to fully reach its potential application. Firstly, for the infrared laser-activated SMP, it is concerned about the drive of SMP by infrared light. The infrared laser, transmitted through the optical fiber embedded in the SMP matrix, was chosen to drive the SMP. The working frequency of infrared laser was installed in 3-4μm. Moreover, this paper presents a study on the effects of solution on the glass transition temperature (Tg). It shows that the hydrogen bonding of SMP was aroused by the absorbed solution that significantly reduces transition temperature of polymer. In this way, the shape memory effect (SME) can undergo solution-driven shape recovery. Finally, the actuation of two types of electro-active SMP composites filled with electrically conductive powders (carbon black, nickel powers) have been carried out, and the SMP composite can be driven by applying a relatively low voltage.

  16. Applications of Polymer Matrix Syntactic Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Nikhil; Zeltmann, Steven E.; Shunmugasamy, Vasanth Chakravarthy; Pinisetty, Dinesh

    2013-11-01

    A collection of applications of polymer matrix syntactic foams is presented in this article. Syntactic foams are lightweight porous composites that found their early applications in marine structures due to their naturally buoyant behavior and low moisture absorption. Their light weight has been beneficial in weight sensitive aerospace structures. Syntactic foams have pushed the performance boundaries for composites and have enabled the development of vehicles for traveling to the deepest parts of the ocean and to other planets. The high volume fraction of porosity in syntactic foams also enabled their applications in thermal insulation of pipelines in oil and gas industry. The possibility of tailoring the mechanical and thermal properties of syntactic foams through a combination of material selection, hollow particle volume fraction, and hollow particle wall thickness has helped in rapidly growing these applications. The low coefficient of thermal expansion and dimensional stability at high temperatures are now leading their use in electronic packaging, composite tooling, and thermoforming plug assists. Methods have been developed to tailor the mechanical and thermal properties of syntactic foams independent of each other over a wide range, which is a significant advantage over other traditional particulate and fibrous composites.

  17. Polymer Matrix Composites: A Perspective for a Special Issue of Polymer Reviews

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, Michael R.

    2012-09-04

    Polymer matrix composites, with their high specific strength and stiffness, are used in a wide range of applications from large wind turbine blades to microelectronics. This perspective article provides a brief primer on polymer matrix composites, discusses some of their advantages and limitations, and describes a number of emerging trends in the field. In addition, it introduces four review articles on the topics of recent developments in carbon fibers, natural fiber reinforced composites, evaluation of the interface between the fiber reinforcement and polymer matrix, and carbon nanotube reinforced polymers.

  18. Membrane consisting of polyquaternary amine ion exchange polymer network interpenetrating the chains of thermoplastic matrix polymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Wallace, C. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An ion exchange membrane was formed from a solution containing dissolved matrix polymer and a set of monomers which are capable of reacting to form a polyquaternary ion exchange material; for example vinyl pyride and a dihalo hydrocarbon. After casting solution and evaporation of the volatile component's, a relatively strong ion exchange membrane was obtained which is capable of removing anions, such as nitrate or chromate from water. The ion exchange polymer forms an interpenetrating network with the chains of the matrix polymer.

  19. Recent advances in photorefractive polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Jayan; Christenson, C. W.; Lynn, B.; Blanche, P.-A.; Voorakaranam, R.; Norwood, R. A.; Yamamoto, M.; Peyghambarian, N.

    2011-10-01

    Photorefractive composites derived from conducting polymers offer the advantage of dynamically recording holograms without the need for processing of any kind. Thus, they are the material of choice for many cutting edge applications, such as updatable three-dimensional (3D) displays and 3D telepresence. Using photorefractive polymers, 3D images or holograms can be seen with the unassisted eye and are very similar to how humans see the actual environment surrounding them. Absence of a large-area and dynamically updatable holographic recording medium has prevented realization of the concept. The development of a novel nonlinear optical chromophore doped photoconductive polymer composite as the recording medium for a refreshable holographic display is discussed. Further improvements in the polymer composites could bring applications in telemedicine, advertising, updatable 3D maps and entertainment.

  20. Electron beam curing of polymer matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, C.J.; Wheeler, D.; Saunders, C.

    1998-01-08

    The purpose of the CRADA was to conduct research and development activities to better understand and utilize the electron beam PMC curing technology. This technology will be used to replace or supplement existing PMC thermal curing processes in Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Programs (DP) projects and American aircraft and aerospace industries. This effort involved Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc./Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp. (Contractor), Sandia National Laboratories, and ten industrial Participants including four major aircraft and aerospace companies, three advanced materials companies, and three electron beam processing organizations. The technical objective of the CRADA was to synthesize and/or modify high performance, electron beam curable materials that meet specific end-use application requirements. There were six tasks in this CRADA including: Electron beam materials development; Electron beam database development; Economic analysis; Low-cost Electron Beam tooling development; Electron beam curing systems integration; and Demonstration articles/prototype structures development. The contractor managed, participated and integrated all the tasks, and optimized the project efforts through the coordination, exchange, and dissemination of information to the project participants. Members of the Contractor team were also the principal inventors on several electron beam related patents and a 1997 R and D 100 Award winner on Electron-Beam-Curable Cationic Epoxy Resins. The CRADA achieved a major breakthrough for the composites industry by having successfully developed high-performance electron beam curable cationic epoxy resins for use in composites, adhesives, tooling compounds, potting compounds, syntactic foams, etc. UCB Chemicals, the world`s largest supplier of radiation-curable polymers, has acquired a license to produce and sell these resins worldwide.

  1. Redox polymer electrodes for advanced batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg, Brian A.; Taylor, A. Michael

    1998-01-01

    Advanced batteries having a long cycle lifetime are provided. More specifically, the present invention relates to electrodes made from redox polymer films and batteries in which either the positive electrode, the negative electrode, or both, comprise redox polymers. Suitable redox polymers for this purpose include pyridyl or polypyridyl complexes of transition metals like iron, ruthenium, osmium, chromium, tungsten and nickel; porphyrins (either free base or metallo derivatives); phthalocyanines (either free base or metallo derivatives); metal complexes of cyclams, such as tetraazacyclotetradecane; metal complexes of crown ethers and metallocenes such as ferrocene, cobaltocene and ruthenocene.

  2. Redox polymer electrodes for advanced batteries

    DOEpatents

    Gregg, B.A.; Taylor, A.M.

    1998-11-24

    Advanced batteries having a long cycle lifetime are provided. More specifically, the present invention relates to electrodes made from redox polymer films and batteries in which either the positive electrode, the negative electrode, or both, comprise redox polymers. Suitable redox polymers for this purpose include pyridyl or polypyridyl complexes of transition metals like iron, ruthenium, osmium, chromium, tungsten and nickel; porphyrins (either free base or metallo derivatives); phthalocyanines (either free base or metallo derivatives); metal complexes of cyclams, such as tetraazacyclotetradecane; metal complexes of crown ethers and metallocenes such as ferrocene, cobaltocene and ruthenocene. 2 figs.

  3. Polymer composites based on gypsum matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucha, Maria; Mróz, Patrycja; Kocemba, Aleksandra

    2016-05-01

    The role of polymers as retarder additives is to prolong the workability connected with setting time of gypsum. Various cellulose derivatives, soluble in water in concentration up to 1,5% by weight were applied taking different water/binder ratio. The hydration process of calcium sulfate hemihydrate (gypsum binder) into dihydrate (gypsum plaster) was observed by setting and calorimetric techniques. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the gypsum microstructure was varied when polymers are used. The mechanical properties of gypsum plasters were studied by bending strength test and they are correlated with sample microstructure

  4. Metal- and Polymer-Matrix Composites: Functional Lightweight Materials for High-Performance Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Nikhil; Paramsothy, Muralidharan

    2014-06-01

    The special topic "Metal- and Polymer-Matrix Composites" is intended to capture the state of the art in the research and practice of functional composites. The current set of articles related to metal-matrix composites includes reviews on functionalities such as self-healing, self-lubricating, and self-cleaning capabilities; research results on a variety of aluminum-matrix composites; and investigations on advanced composites manufacturing methods. In addition, the processing and properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer-matrix composites and adhesive bonding of laminated composites are discussed. The literature on functional metal-matrix composites is relatively scarce compared to functional polymer-matrix composites. The demand for lightweight composites in the transportation sector is fueling the rapid development in this field, which is captured in the current set of articles. The possibility of simultaneously tailoring several desired properties is attractive but very challenging, and it requires significant advancements in the science and technology of composite materials. The progress captured in the current set of articles shows promise for developing materials that seem capable of moving this field from laboratory-scale prototypes to actual industrial applications.

  5. Rate Dependent Deformation and Strength Analysis of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1999-01-01

    A research program is being undertaken to develop rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composite materials. In previous work in this program, strain-rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations used to analyze polymers have been implemented into a mechanics of materials based composite micromechanics method. In the current work, modifications to the micromechanics model have been implemented to improve the calculation of the effective inelastic strain. Additionally, modifications to the polymer constitutive model are discussed in which pressure dependence is incorporated into the equations in order to improve the calculation of constituent and composite shear stresses. The Hashin failure criterion is implemented into the analysis method to allow for the calculation of ply level failure stresses. The deformation response and failure stresses for two representative uniaxial polymer matrix composites, IM7/977-2 and AS4-PEEK, are predicted for varying strain rates and fiber orientations. The predicted results compare favorably to experimentally obtained values.

  6. High Strain Rate Deformation Modeling of a Polymer Matrix Composite. Part 1; Matrix Constitutive Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    Recently applications have exposed polymer matrix composite materials to very high strain rate loading conditions, requiring an ability to understand and predict the material behavior under these extreme conditions. In this first paper of a two part report, background information is presented, along with the constitutive equations which will be used to model the rate dependent nonlinear deformation response of the polymer matrix. Strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive models which were originally developed to model the viscoplastic deformation of metals have been adapted to model the nonlinear viscoelastic deformation of polymers. The modified equations were correlated by analyzing the tensile/ compressive response of both 977-2 toughened epoxy matrix and PEEK thermoplastic matrix over a variety of strain rates. For the cases examined, the modified constitutive equations appear to do an adequate job of modeling the polymer deformation response. A second follow-up paper will describe the implementation of the polymer deformation model into a composite micromechanical model, to allow for the modeling of the nonlinear, rate dependent deformation response of polymer matrix composites.

  7. Advances in inherently conducting polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Aldissi, M.

    1987-09-01

    The discovery of polyacetylene as the prototype material led to extensive research on its synythesis and characterization. The techniques that emerged as the most important and promising ones are those that dealt with molecular orientation and that resulted in conductivities almost as high as that of copper. The study of dozens of other materials followed. Interest in conducting polymers stems from their nonclassical optical and electronic properties as well as their potential technological applications. However, some of the factors currently limiting their use are the lack of long-term stability and the need to develop conventional low-cost techniques for easy processing. Therefore, research was extended toward solving these problems, and progress has been recently made in that direction. The synthesis of new materials such as stable and easily processable alkylthiophenes, water-soluble polymers, and multicomponent systems, including copolymers and composites, constitutes an important step forward in the area of synthetic metals. However, a full understanding of materials chemistry and properties requires more work in the years to come. Although, few small-scale applications have proven to be successful, long-term stability and applicability tests are needed before their commercial use becomes reality.

  8. INTEGRATED COI S200 - Hi-NiCalon FIBER WITH AN S200 MATRIX (POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITE - PMC) / AETB 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    INTEGRATED COI S200 - Hi-NiCalon FIBER WITH AN S200 MATRIX (POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITE - PMC) / AETB 16 (FOAM CORE) / CARBON REINFORCED CYANOESTER (CERAMIC MATRIX COMPOSITE - CMC) HOT STRUCTURE, PANEL 884-1: SAMPLE 3

  9. INTEGRATED COI S200 - Hi-NiCalon FIBER WITH AN S200 MATRIX (POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITE - PMC) / AETB 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    INTEGRATED COI S200 - Hi-NiCalon FIBER WITH AN S200 MATRIX (POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITE - PMC) / AETB 16 (FOAM CORE) / CARBON REINFORCED CYANOESTER (CERAMIC MATRIX COMPOSITE - CMC) HOT STRUCTURE, PANEL 884-1: SAMPLE 1

  10. Polymer matrix electroluminescent materials and devices

    DOEpatents

    Marrocco, III, Matthew L.; Motamedi, Farshad J.; Abdelrazzaq, Feras Bashir; Abdelrazzaq, legal representative, Bashir Twfiq

    2012-06-26

    Photoluminescent and electroluminescent compositions are provided which comprise a matrix comprising aromatic repeat units covalently coordinated to a phosphorescent or luminescent metal ion or metal ion complexes. Methods for producing such compositions, and the electroluminescent devices formed therefrom, are also disclosed.

  11. Nanophosphor composite scintillators comprising a polymer matrix

    DOEpatents

    Muenchausen, Ross Edward; Mckigney, Edward Allen; Gilbertson, Robert David

    2010-11-16

    An improved nanophosphor composite comprises surface modified nanophosphor particles in a solid matrix. The nanophosphor particle surface is modified with an organic ligand, or by covalently bonding a polymeric or polymeric precursor material. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during formation of the composite material. The improved nanophosphor composite may be used in any conventional scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  12. Erosion Resistant Coatings for Polymer Matrix Composites in Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, James K.; Naik, Subhash K.; Horan, Richard; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Bowman, Cheryl; Ma, Kong; Leissler, George; Sinatra, Raymond; Cupp, Randall

    2003-01-01

    Polymer Matrix Composites (PMCs) offer lightweight and frequently low cost alternatives to other materials in many applications. High temperature PMCs are currently used in limited propulsion applications replacing metals. Yet in most cases, PMC propulsion applications are not in the direct engine flow path since particulate erosion degrades PMC component performance and therefore restricts their use in gas turbine engines. This paper compares two erosion resistant coatings (SANRES and SANPRES) on PMCs that are useful for both low and high temperature propulsion applications. Collaborating over a multi-year period, researchers at NASA Glenn Research Center, Allison Advanced Developed Company, and Rolls-Royce Corporation have optimized these coatings in terms of adhesion, surface roughness, and erosion resistance. Results are described for vigorous hot gas/particulate erosion rig and engine testing of uncoated and coated PMC fan bypass vanes from the AE 3007 regional jet gas turbine engine. Moreover, the structural durability of these coatings is described in long-term high cycle fatigue tests. Overall, both coatings performed well in all tests and will be considered for applications in both commercial and defense propulsion applications.

  13. Polymer matrix composites research: A survey of federally sponsored programs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This report identifies research conducted by agencies of the federal government other than the Department of Energy (DOE) in the area of advanced polymer matrix composites (PMCs). DOE commissioned the report to avoid duplicating other agencies' efforts in planning its own research program for PMCs. PMC materials consist of high-strength, short or continuous fibers fused together by an organic matrix. Compared to traditional structural metals, PMCs provide greater strength and stiffness, reduced weight and increased heat resistance. The key contributors to PMC research identified by the survey are the Department of Defense (DOD), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Department of Transportation (DOT). The survey identified a total of 778 projects. More than half of the total projects identified emphasize materials research with a goal toward developing materials with improved performance. Although an almost equal number of identified materials projects focus on thermosets and thermoplastics receive more attention because of their increased impact resistance and their easy formability and re-formability. Slightly more than one third of projects identified target structures research. Only 15 percent of the projects identified focus on manufacturing techniques, despite the need for efficient, economical methods manufacturing products constructed of PMCs--techniques required for PMCs to gain widespread acceptance. Three issues to be addressed concerning PMCs research are economy of use, improvements in processing, and education and training. Five target technologies have been identified that could benefit greatly from increased use of PMCs: aircraft fuselages, automobile frames, high-speed machinery, electronic packaging, and construction.

  14. Surface characterization of LDEF carbon fiber/polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grammer, Holly L.; Wightman, James P.; Young, Philip R.; Slemp, Wayne S.

    1995-01-01

    XPS (x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and SEM (scanning electron microscopy) analysis of both carbon fiber/epoxy matrix and carbon fiber/polysulfone matrix composites revealed significant changes in the surface composition as a result of exposure to low-earth orbit. The carbon 1s curve fit XPS analysis in conjunction with the SEM photomicrographs revealed significant erosion of the polymer matrix resins by atomic oxygen to expose the carbon fibers of the composite samples. This erosion effect on the composites was seen after 10 months in orbit and was even more obvious after 69 months.

  15. Advanced Polymers Containing the Phenyltrifluoroethylidene Connecting Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alstron, William B.; Sivko, Gloria S.

    2006-01-01

    A new, lower cost fluorinated dianhydride based on the phenyltrifluoroethylidene (3F) connecting linkage was invented by the principal author in the early 1980's. New 3F condensation and addition cured polyimides were synthesized with the newly discovered 3F dianhydride and the previously known 3F diamine. As controls, polyimides based on the somewhat analogous higher cost hexafluoroisopropylidene (6F) linkage were also prepared. The short term thermal oxidative stability (TOS), determined by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and the glass transition temperatures (Tg) of 3F dianhydride polyimides were found to be similar to 6F dianhydride polyimides, but the Tg was slightly higher for 3F diamine polyimides than 6F diamine polyimides. Unfortunately, in real time testing, long term TOS of 3F polymers was clearly inferior to 6F polymers. This was due to a 3 to 5 fold greater rate of loss of trifluoromethyl group from 3F versus 6F linkages. However, at shorter times or lower temperatures, 3F TOS was almost comparable to 6F TOS. The wide scope of the 3F technology was also demonstrated to have distinct unique advantages over 6F technology through the use of the 3F pendant phenyl ring as a synthetic site to introduce other functional groups. These groups have been used for the control or modification of polymer properties; an advantage lacking within 6F technology. The synthetic ease by which 3F can be introduced into various types of monomers has lead to the explosion of advanced 3F polyimides and other high performance advanced 3F polymers in the prior decade of 3F polymer literature as cited herein; covering polyimides, substituted polyimides, at least ten types of nonpolyimide 3F polymer modifications, and also the government's nine 3F U.S. patents and corporations' nine 3F U.S. patents.

  16. Ferroelectric Polymer Matrix for Probing Molecular Organization in Perylene Diimides.

    PubMed

    Chellappan, Kishore V; Kandappa, Sunil Kumar; Rajaram, Sridhar; Narayan, K S

    2015-01-15

    Ferroelectric films of poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) (PVDF-TrFE) provide a controlled environment to study the aggregation tendency of functional molecules such as perylene diimides (PDIs). The local electric field and free volume confinement parameters offered by the matrix are tailored to study the organizational and assembly characteritics of molecular acceptors. The optical properties of planar and nonplanar PDIs in the ferroelectric polymer matrix were studied systematically over a wide range that encompassed the ferroelectric transition temperature. This approach provides valuable insight into the properties of molecular materials used in applications ranging from bulk heterostructure-based photovoltaics to nonlinear optical materials.

  17. Thermal-vacuum response of polymer matrix composites in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, R. C.; Matthews, R.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes a thermal-vacuum outgassing model and test protocol for predicting outgassing times and dimensional changes for polymer matrix composites. Experimental results derived from 'control' samples are used to provide the basis for analytical predictions to compare with the outgassing response of Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) flight samples. Coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) data are also presented. In addition, an example is given illustrating the dimensional change of a 'zero' CTE laminate due to moisture outgassing.

  18. Electron Beam Curing of Polymer Matrix Composites - CRADA Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, C. J.; Howell, Dave; Norris, Robert E.

    1997-05-01

    The major cost driver in manufacturing polymer matrix composite (PMC) parts and structures, and one of the elements having the greatest effect on their quality and performance, is the standard thermal cure process. Thermal curing of PMCs requires long cure times and high energy consumption, creates residual thermal stresses in the part, produces volatile toxic by-products, and requires expensive tooling that is tolerant of the high cure temperatures.

  19. Constitutive Modeling and Testing of Polymer Matrix Composites Incorporating Physical Aging at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veazie, David R.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced polymer matrix composites (PMC's) are desirable for structural materials in diverse applications such as aircraft, civil infrastructure and biomedical implants because of their improved strength-to-weight and stiffness-to-weight ratios. For example, the next generation military and commercial aircraft requires applications for high strength, low weight structural components subjected to elevated temperatures. A possible disadvantage of polymer-based composites is that the physical and mechanical properties of the matrix often change significantly over time due to the exposure of elevated temperatures and environmental factors. For design, long term exposure (i.e. aging) of PMC's must be accounted for through constitutive models in order to accurately assess the effects of aging on performance, crack initiation and remaining life. One particular aspect of this aging process, physical aging, is considered in this research.

  20. Polydispersity for Tuning the Potential of Mean Force between Polymer Grafted Nanoparticles in a Polymer Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Tyler B.; Dodd, Paul M.; Jayaraman, Arthi

    2013-01-01

    We present an integrated theory and simulation study of polydisperse polymer grafted nanoparticles in a polymer matrix to demonstrate the effect of polydispersity in graft length on the potential of mean force between the grafted nanoparticles. In dense polymer solutions, increasing polydispersity in graft length reduces the strength of repulsion at contact and weakens the attractive well at intermediate interparticle distances, completely eliminating the latter at high polydispersity index. The reduction in contact repulsion is attributable to polydispersity relieving monomer crowding near the particle surface, especially at high grafting densities. The elimination of the midrange attractive well is attributable to the longer grafts in the polydisperse graft length distribution that introduce longer range steric repulsion and alter the wetting of the grafted layer by matrix chains. Dispersion of the grafted particles is stabilized by increased penetration or wetting of the polydisperse grafted layer by the matrix chains. This work demonstrates that at high grafting densities, polydispersity in graft length can be used to stabilize dispersions of grafted nanoparticles in a polymer matrix at conditions where monodisperse grafts would cause aggregation.

  1. Development of advanced polymer nanocomposite capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Miguel

    The current development of modern electronics has driven the need for new series of energy storage devices with higher energy density and faster charge/discharge rate. Batteries and capacitors are two of the most widely used energy storage devices. Compared with batteries, capacitors have higher power density and significant higher charge/discharge rate. Therefore, high energy density capacitors play a significant role in modern electronic devices, power applications, space flight technologies, hybrid electric vehicles, portable defibrillators, and pulse power applications. Dielectric film capacitors represent an exceptional alternative for developing high energy density capacitors due to their high dielectric constants, outstanding breakdown voltages, and flexibility. The implementation of high aspect ratio dielectric inclusions such as nanowires into polymer capacitors could lead to further enhancement of its energy density. Therefore, this research effort is focused on the development of a new series of dielectric capacitors composed of nanowire reinforced polymer matrix composites. This concept of nanocomposite capacitors combines the extraordinary physical and chemical properties of the one-dimension (1D) nanoceramics and high dielectric strength of polymer matrices, leading to a capacitor with improved dielectric properties and energy density. Lead-free sodium niobate (NaNbO3) and lead-containing lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (0.65PMN-0.35PT) nanowires were synthesized following hydrothermal and sol-gel approaches, respectively. The as-prepared nanowires were mixed with a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) matrix using solution-casting method for nanocomposites fabrication. The dielectric constants and breakdown voltages of the NaNbO3/PVDF and 0.65PMN-0.35PT/PVDF nanocomposites were measured under different frequency ranges and temperatures in order to determine their maximum energy (J/cm3) and specific (J/g) densities. The electrical properties of the

  2. Carchesium stalk fibrillar matrix as a highly filled polymer network.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, R

    1977-01-01

    Glycerolated stalks of the sessile peritrich ciliate Carchesium sp. were treated with 10(-6) g ion/1 Ca2+ to disrupt the contractile spasmoneme. The resulting preparation consisted primarily of the fibrillar matrix, a dense extra-cellular meshwork of microfibrils. Some mechanical properties of this preparation have been investigated. The matrix tensile force-extension ratio relation for an initial stretch was characteristic of a soft, swollen polymer network, elastic modulus in young stalks 1.7 X 10(5) Nm-2, in mature stalks 4.0 X 10(5) Nm-2. The higher elastic modulus in mature stalks implies an increase in the interchain cross-link frequency. In young stalks, elastic modulus was found to be independent of the ambient Ca2+ concentration in the threshold range for spasmonemal contraction. Stalk relaxation was pronouncedly irreversible, showing stress softening and permanent hysteresis on repeated loading. Hysteresis was time independent and stiffness was not recovered after four hours at zero strain. Hysteresis was enhanced by repeated loading to the same tensile force. Stress-strain hysteresis at a low extension is characteristic of highly filled polymer networks in which polymer chains are interconnected via rigid filler particles as well as directly cross-linked.

  3. Thermosetting polymer-matrix composites for structural repair applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goertzen, William Kirby

    2007-12-01

    Several classes of thermosetting polymer matrix composites were evaluated for use in structural repair applications. Initial work involved the characterization and evaluation of woven carbon fiber/epoxy matrix composites for structural pipeline repair. Cyanate ester resins were evaluated as a replacement for epoxy in composites for high-temperature pipe repair applications, and as the basis for adhesives for resin infusion repair of high-temperature composite materials. Carbon fiber/cyanate ester matrix composites and fumed silica/cyanate ester nanocomposites were evaluated for their thermal, mechanical, viscoelastic, and rheological properties as they relate to their structure, chemistry, and processing characteristics. The bisphenol E cyanate ester under investigation possesses a high glass transition temperature, excellent mechanical properties, and unique ambient temperature processability. The incorporation of fumed silica served to enhance the mechanical and rheological properties of the polymer and reduce thermal expansion without sacrificing glass transition or drastically altering curing kinetics. Characterization of the composites included dynamic mechanical analysis, thermomechanical analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, rheological and rheokinetic evaluation, and transmission electron microscopy.

  4. Thermosetting Polymer-Matrix Composites for Strucutral Repair Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Goertzen, William Kirby

    2007-12-01

    Several classes of thermosetting polymer matrix composites were evaluated for use in structural repair applications. Initial work involved the characterization and evaluation of woven carbon fiber/epoxy matrix composites for structural pipeline repair. Cyanate ester resins were evaluated as a replacement for epoxy in composites for high-temperature pipe repair applications, and as the basis for adhesives for resin infusion repair of high-temperature composite materials. Carbon fiber/cyanate ester matrix composites and fumed silica/cyanate ester nanocomposites were evaluated for their thermal, mechanical, viscoelastic, and rheological properties as they relate to their structure, chemistry, and processing characteristics. The bisphenol E cyanate ester under investigation possesses a high glass transition temperature, excellent mechanical properties, and unique ambient temperature processability. The incorporate of fumed silica served to enhance the mechanical and rheological properties of the polymer and reduce thermal expansion without sacrificing glass transition or drastically altering curing kinetics. Characterization of the composites included dynamic mechanical analysis, thermomechanical analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, rheological and rheokinetic evaluation, and transmission electron microscopy.

  5. Microstructural Preparation and Examination of Polymer-Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elban, Wayne L.; Rutzebeck, Maddy M.; Small, Ryan A.; Walsh, Adam M.

    1996-01-01

    Adapting procedures widely used in the metallographic characterization of metals and alloys, the microstructural preparation and examination of three polymer-matrix composites (PMC's) is described. The materials investigated contained either hollow ceramic filler particles or woven, continuous carbon/graphite fibers. Since the two particulate composites were considered to be isotropic, only one sample orientation was prepared. For the fiber composite, both longitudinal and planar orientations were studied. Once prepared, the samples were examined using reflected light microscopy. A number of microstructural features were evaluated qualitatively, including porosity and cracks, filler-matrix interfacial bonding, filler particle characteristics (shape, size, size distribution, and loading variation) and fiber characteristics (orientation, packing variation, and discontinuities).

  6. Space environmental effects on LDEF low Earth orbit exposed graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Pete

    1992-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was deployed on April 7, 1984 in low earth orbit (LEO) at an altitude of 482 kilometers. On board experiments experienced the harsh LEO environment including atomic oxygen (AO), ultraviolet radiation (UV), and thermal cycling. During the 5.8 year mission, the LDEF orbit decayed to 340 kilometers where significantly higher AO concentrations exist. LDEF was retrieved on January 12, 1990 from this orbit. One experiment on board LDEF was M0003, Space Effects on Spacecraft Materials. As a subset of M0003 nearly 500 samples of polymer, metal, and glass matrix composites were flown as the Advanced Composites Experiment M0003-10. The Advanced Composites Experiment is a joint effort between government and industry with the Aerospace Corporation serving as the experiment integrator. A portion of the graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites were furnished by the Boeing Defense and Space Group, Seattle, Washington. Test results and discussions for the Boeing portion of M0003-10 are presented. Experiment and specimen location on the LDEF are presented along with a quantitative summary of the pertinent exposure conditions. Matrix materials selected for the test were epoxy, polysulfone, and polyimide. These composite materials were selected due to their suitability for high performance structural capability in spacecraft applications. Graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites offer higher strength to weight ratios along with excellent dimensional stability. The Boeing space exposed and corresponding ground control composite specimens were subjected to post flight mechanical, chemical, and physical testing in order to determine any changes in critical properties and performance characteristics. Among the more significant findings are the erosive effect of atomic oxygen on leading edge exposed specimens and microcracking in non-unidirectionally reinforced flight specimens.

  7. Nanostructured polymer stable glasses via matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, Kimberly B.

    Amorphous materials, or glasses, which lack a crystalline structure, are technologically ubiquitous with applications including structural components, pharmaceuticals, and electronic devices. Glasses are traditionally formed by rapid cooling from the melt state, where molecules become kinetically trapped into a non-equilibrium configuration. The temperature at which the material transforms from supercooled liquid to glass is the glass transition temperature. The glass transition temperature is the most important property of amorphous materials, as it determines the range of temperatures where they are fabricated, used and stored. Recent technological developments in which glasses are formed by alternative routes, such as physical vapor deposition and matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE), enable tunability of Tg and related physical properties. High-Tg glasses formed by these techniques are termed "stable glasses" and exhibit a wide range of exceptional properties. This work focuses on the formation and characterization of stable polymer glasses fabricated via MAPLE. Bulk films (>1 microm thick) of glassy polymers fabricated by MAPLE at slow growth rates (<1 nm/s) and controlled substrate temperature (T sub = 0.85Tg,bulk) have greatly elevated Tg, low density, high enthalpy, increased kinetic stability and a spheroidal nanostructure. We focus on connecting the bulk and nanoscale properties of MAPLE-deposited polymer glasses. Building on molecular dynamics simulations from the literature on the MAPLE process, we experimentally study the origin of nanostructure in our MAPLE-deposited films. We measure the time-of-flight of MAPLE-deposited material, confirming that the velocity is sufficiently low for intact deposition of polymer nanoglobules. The size distribution of polymer nanoglobules fabricated in short MAPLE depositions provides insight into how nanostructured MAPLE films form. Using our atomic force microscopy-based nanoscale dilatometry technique

  8. Fabrication process of a high temperature polymer matrix engine duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, R. D.; Wilson, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    The process that was used in the molding of an advanced composite outer by-pass duct planned for the F404 engine is discussed. This duct was developed as a potential replacement for the existing titanium duct in order to reduce both the weight and cost of the duct. The composite duct is now going into the manufacturing technology portion of the program. The duct is fabricated using graphite cloth impregnated with the PMR-15 matrix system.

  9. Dispersion/Aggregation of polymer grafted nanorods in a polymer matrix studied by Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, Joao; Khani, Shaghayegh

    2015-03-01

    Nanorods are incorporated into polymer matrices for fabricating composite materials with enhanced physical and mechanical properties.The final macroscopic properties of the composites are directly related to the dispersion and organization of the nanoparticles in the matrix. For instance, a significant improvement in the mechanical properties of the nanorod-polymer composites is observed upon formation of a percolating network. One way of controlling the assembly of nanorods in the polymer medium is adjusting the chemical interactions which is done through grafting polymer chains on the surface of the rods. The recent developments in the computational techniques have paved the road for further understanding of the controlled dispersion and aggregation of nanorods in polymer matrices. In this study, Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) is employed in order to investigate the effect of enthalpic and entopic variables on the phase behavior of the abovementioned nanocomposites. In DPD, the interaction parameter between the components of the systems can be mapped onto the Flory-Huggins χ-parameter via well-known Groot-Warren expression. This works studies the effect of the enthalpic and entropic variables on phase transitions. The main goal is to provide a phase diagram than can be used to guide the experiments in designing new materials.

  10. Carbon dioxide (CO2) absorption behavior of mixed matrix polymer composites containing a flexible coordination polymer.

    PubMed

    Culp, Jeffrey T; Sui, Lang; Goodman, Angela; Luebke, David

    2013-03-01

    Mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) comprised of metal organic frameworks (MOFs) dispersed in organic polymers are popular materials under study for potential applications in gas separations. However, research on MMMs containing structurally dynamic sorbents known as flexible MOFs has only very recently appeared in the literature. The thermodynamic requirements of the structure transition between the low porosity and high porosity phases of flexible MOFs may provide a mechanism for high adsorption selectivity in these materials. A fundamental question in MMMs containing flexible MOFs is how the constraint of the polymer matrix on the intrinsic expansion of the flexible MOF particles that occurs during gas adsorption might affect the thermodynamics of this structural phase transition and influence the gas adsorption properties of the embedded MOF. To investigate the fundamental nature of this flexible MOF-polymer interface, thin films of ~20 um thickness were prepared using the flexible linear chain coordination polymer catena-bis(dibenzoylmethanato)-(4,4'bipyridyl)nickel(II) "Ni(Bpy)(DBM)(2)" embedded as 35 wt% dispersions in Matrimid®, polystyrene, and polysulfone. The adsorption of CO(2) in the polymers and embedded particles was studied using in situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and variable temperature volumetric CO(2) adsorption/desorption isotherms. Interestingly, no effect of the polymer matrix on the gas adsorption behavior of the embedded Ni(Bpy)(DBM)(2) particles was observed. The composite samples all showed the same threshold pressures for CO(2) absorption and desorption hysteresis associated with the structural phase change in the polymer embedded Ni(Bpy)(DBM)(2) particles as was observed in the pristine polycrystalline sample. The current results contrast those recently reported for a MMM containing the flexible MOF "NH(2)-MIL-53" where a significant increase in the threshold pressure for CO(2) adsorption associated with the structural phase change of the MOF was

  11. Advances in mechanistic understanding of release rate control mechanisms of extended-release hydrophilic matrix tablets.

    PubMed

    Timmins, Peter; Desai, Divyakant; Chen, Wei; Wray, Patrick; Brown, Jonathan; Hanley, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    Approaches to characterizing and developing understanding around the mechanisms that control the release of drugs from hydrophilic matrix tablets are reviewed. While historical context is provided and direct physical characterization methods are described, recent advances including the role of percolation thresholds, the application on magnetic resonance and other spectroscopic imaging techniques are considered. The influence of polymer and dosage form characteristics are reviewed. The utility of mathematical modeling is described. Finally, how all the information derived from applying the developed mechanistic understanding from all of these tools can be brought together to develop a robust and reliable hydrophilic matrix extended-release tablet formulation is proposed. PMID:27444495

  12. Biaxial Yield Surface Investigation of Polymer-Matrix Composites

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Junjie; Qiu, Yuanying; Zhai, Zhi; He, Zhengjia

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a numerical technique for computing the biaxial yield surface of polymer-matrix composites with a given microstructure. Generalized Method of Cells in combination with an Improved Bodner-Partom Viscoplastic model is used to compute the inelastic deformation. The validation of presented model is proved by a fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) strain test system through uniaxial testing under two different strain rate conditions. On this basis, the manufacturing process thermal residual stress and strain rate effect on the biaxial yield surface of composites are considered. The results show that the effect of thermal residual stress on the biaxial yield response is closely dependent on loading conditions. Moreover, biaxial yield strength tends to increase with the increasing strain rate. PMID:23529150

  13. Flexural analysis of palm fiber reinforced hybrid polymer matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatachalam, G.; Gautham Shankar, A.; Raghav, Dasarath; Santhosh Kiran, R.; Mahesh, Bhargav; Kumar, Krishna

    2015-07-01

    Uncertainty in availability of fossil fuels in the future and global warming increased the need for more environment friendly materials. In this work, an attempt is made to fabricate a hybrid polymer matrix composite. The blend is a mixture of General Purpose Resin and Cashew Nut Shell Liquid, a natural resin extracted from cashew plant. Palm fiber, which has high strength, is used as reinforcement material. The fiber is treated with alkali (NaOH) solution to increase its strength and adhesiveness. Parametric study of flexure strength is carried out by varying alkali concentration, duration of alkali treatment and fiber volume. Taguchi L9 Orthogonal array is followed in the design of experiments procedure for simplification. With the help of ANOVA technique, regression equations are obtained which gives the level of influence of each parameter on the flexure strength of the composite.

  14. Measuring time-dependent diffusion in polymer matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Pilli, Siva Prasad; Smith, Lloyd V.; Shutthanandan, V.

    2014-11-01

    Moisture plays a significant role in influencing the mechanical behavior and long-term durability of polymer matrix composites (PMC’s). The common methods used to determine the moisture diffusion coefficients of PMCs are based on the solution of Fickian diffusion in the one-dimensional domain. Fick’s Law assumes that equilibrium between the material surface and the external vapor is established instantaneously. A time dependent boundary condition has been shown to improve correlation with some bulk diffusion measurements, but has not been validated experimentally. The surface moisture content in a Toray 800S/3900-2B toughened quasi-isotropic laminate system, [0/±60]s, was analyzed experimentally using Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA). It was found that the surface moisture content showed a rapid increase to an intermediate concentration C0, followed by a slow linear increase to the saturation level.

  15. Advances in thermoplastic matrix composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Newaz, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    Accounts are given of the development status of thermoplastic composite processing methods, as well as their current thermal and mechanical behavior and delamination properties. Attention is given to the thermoplastic coating of carbon fibers, pultrusion-process modeling, the high temperature behavior of graphite/PEEK, the thermal conductivity of composites for electronic packaging, a FEM analysis of mode I and II thermoplastic-matrix specimens, and reinforcements' resin-impregnation behavior during thermoplastic composite manufacture. Also discussed are the mechanical properties of carbon fiber/PEEK for structural applications, moisture-content mechanical property effects in PPS-matrix composites, the interlaminar fracture toughness of thermoplastic composites, and thermoplastic composite delamination growth under elevated temperature cyclic loading.

  16. Polymers as advanced materials for desiccant applications

    SciTech Connect

    Czanderna, A.W.

    1990-12-01

    This research is concerned with solid materials used as desiccants for desiccant cooling systems (DCSs) that process water vapor in an atmosphere to produce cooling. Background information includes an introduction to DCSs and the role of the desiccant as a system component. The water vapor sorption performance criteria used for screening the modified polymers prepared include the water sorption capacity from 5% to 80% relative humidity (R.H.), isotherm shape, and rate of adsorption and desorption. Measurements are presented for the sorption performance of modified polymeric advanced desiccant materials with the quartz crystal microbalance. Isotherms of polystyrene sulfonic acid (PSSA) taken over a 5-month period show that the material has a dramatic loss in capacity and that the isotherm shape is time dependent. The adsorption and desorption kinetics for PSSA and all the ionic salts of it studied are easily fast enough for commercial DCS applications with a wheel rotation speed of 6 min per revolution. Future activities for the project are addressed, and a 5-year summary of the project is included as Appendix A. 34 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Creep-rupture of polymer-matrix composites. [graphite-epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinson, H. F.; Griffith, W. I.; Morris, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    An accelerated characterization method for resin matrix composites is reviewed. Methods for determining modulus and strength master curves are given. Creep rupture analytical models are discussed as applied to polymers and polymer matrix composites. Comparisons between creep rupture experiments and analytical models are presented. The time dependent creep rupture process in graphite epoxy laminates is examined as a function of temperature and stress level.

  18. Enhancing Crystalline Structural Orders of Polymer Semiconductors for Efficient Charge Transport via Polymer-Matrix-Mediated Molecular Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yanlian; Deng, Ping; Lin, Ming; Zheng, Xuelin; Zhu, Furong; Ong, Beng S

    2016-08-01

    A facile polymer-matrix-mediated molecular self-assembly of polymer semiconductors into highly crystalline orders for efficient charge transport in organic thin-film transistors is demonstrated. Phenomenal enhancements in field-effect mobility of about one order of magnitude and current on/off ratio of two to three orders of magnitude are realized with polyacrylonitrile-incorporated polymer semiconductor compositions via solution deposition. PMID:27168128

  19. Stochastic-Strength-Based Damage Simulation Tool for Ceramic Matrix and Polymer Matrix Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Pineda, Evan J.; Walton, Owen J.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic-based, discrete-event progressive damage simulations of ceramic-matrix composite and polymer matrix composite material structures have been enabled through the development of a unique multiscale modeling tool. This effort involves coupling three independently developed software programs: (1) the Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC), (2) the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life Prediction Program (CARES/ Life), and (3) the Abaqus finite element analysis (FEA) program. MAC/GMC contributes multiscale modeling capabilities and micromechanics relations to determine stresses and deformations at the microscale of the composite material repeating unit cell (RUC). CARES/Life contributes statistical multiaxial failure criteria that can be applied to the individual brittle-material constituents of the RUC. Abaqus is used at the global scale to model the overall composite structure. An Abaqus user-defined material (UMAT) interface, referred to here as "FEAMAC/CARES," was developed that enables MAC/GMC and CARES/Life to operate seamlessly with the Abaqus FEA code. For each FEAMAC/CARES simulation trial, the stochastic nature of brittle material strength results in random, discrete damage events, which incrementally progress and lead to ultimate structural failure. This report describes the FEAMAC/CARES methodology and discusses examples that illustrate the performance of the tool. A comprehensive example problem, simulating the progressive damage of laminated ceramic matrix composites under various off-axis loading conditions and including a double notched tensile specimen geometry, is described in a separate report.

  20. Development of meniscus substitutes using a mixture of biocompatible polymers and extra cellular matrix components by electrospinning.

    PubMed

    López-Calzada, G; Hernandez-Martínez, A R; Cruz-Soto, M; Ramírez-Cardona, M; Rangel, D; Molina, G A; Luna-Barcenas, G; Estevez, M

    2016-04-01

    Despite the significant advances in the meniscus tissue engineering field, it is difficult to recreate the complex structure and organization of the collagenous matrix of the meniscus. In this work, we developed a meniscus prototype to be used as substitute or scaffold for the regeneration of the meniscal matrix, recreating the differential morphology of the meniscus by electrospinning. Synthetic biocompatible polymers were combined with the extracellular matrix component, collagen and used to replicate the meniscus. We studied the correlation between mechanical and structural properties of the polymer blend as a function of collagen concentration. Fibers were collected on a surface of a rapidly rotating precast mold, to accurately replicate each sectional morphology of the meniscus; different electro-tissues were produced. Detailed XRD analyses exhibited structural changes developed by electrospinning. We achieved to integrate all these electro-tissues to form a complete synthetic meniscus. Vascularization tests were performed to assess the potential use of our novel polymeric blend for promising meniscus regeneration.

  1. Advances in biomimetic regeneration of elastic matrix structures

    PubMed Central

    Sivaraman, Balakrishnan; Bashur, Chris A.

    2012-01-01

    Elastin is a vital component of the extracellular matrix, providing soft connective tissues with the property of elastic recoil following deformation and regulating the cellular response via biomechanical transduction to maintain tissue homeostasis. The limited ability of most adult cells to synthesize elastin precursors and assemble them into mature crosslinked structures has hindered the development of functional tissue-engineered constructs that exhibit the structure and biomechanics of normal native elastic tissues in the body. In diseased tissues, the chronic overexpression of proteolytic enzymes can cause significant matrix degradation, to further limit the accumulation and quality (e.g., fiber formation) of newly deposited elastic matrix. This review provides an overview of the role and importance of elastin and elastic matrix in soft tissues, the challenges to elastic matrix generation in vitro and to regenerative elastic matrix repair in vivo, current biomolecular strategies to enhance elastin deposition and matrix assembly, and the need to concurrently inhibit proteolytic matrix disruption for improving the quantity and quality of elastogenesis. The review further presents biomaterial-based options using scaffolds and nanocarriers for spatio-temporal control over the presentation and release of these biomolecules, to enable biomimetic assembly of clinically relevant native elastic matrix-like superstructures. Finally, this review provides an overview of recent advances and prospects for the application of these strategies to regenerating tissue-type specific elastic matrix structures and superstructures. PMID:23355960

  2. Advances in biomimetic regeneration of elastic matrix structures.

    PubMed

    Sivaraman, Balakrishnan; Bashur, Chris A; Ramamurthi, Anand

    2012-10-01

    Elastin is a vital component of the extracellular matrix, providing soft connective tissues with the property of elastic recoil following deformation and regulating the cellular response via biomechanical transduction to maintain tissue homeostasis. The limited ability of most adult cells to synthesize elastin precursors and assemble them into mature crosslinked structures has hindered the development of functional tissue-engineered constructs that exhibit the structure and biomechanics of normal native elastic tissues in the body. In diseased tissues, the chronic overexpression of proteolytic enzymes can cause significant matrix degradation, to further limit the accumulation and quality (e.g., fiber formation) of newly deposited elastic matrix. This review provides an overview of the role and importance of elastin and elastic matrix in soft tissues, the challenges to elastic matrix generation in vitro and to regenerative elastic matrix repair in vivo, current biomolecular strategies to enhance elastin deposition and matrix assembly, and the need to concurrently inhibit proteolytic matrix disruption for improving the quantity and quality of elastogenesis. The review further presents biomaterial-based options using scaffolds and nanocarriers for spatio-temporal control over the presentation and release of these biomolecules, to enable biomimetic assembly of clinically relevant native elastic matrix-like superstructures. Finally, this review provides an overview of recent advances and prospects for the application of these strategies to regenerating tissue-type specific elastic matrix structures and superstructures.

  3. Nanostructured conductive polymers for advanced energy storage.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ye; Peng, Lele; Ding, Yu; Zhao, Yu; Yu, Guihua

    2015-10-01

    Conductive polymers combine the attractive properties associated with conventional polymers and unique electronic properties of metals or semiconductors. Recently, nanostructured conductive polymers have aroused considerable research interest owing to their unique properties over their bulk counterparts, such as large surface areas and shortened pathways for charge/mass transport, which make them promising candidates for broad applications in energy conversion and storage, sensors, actuators, and biomedical devices. Numerous synthetic strategies have been developed to obtain various conductive polymer nanostructures, and high-performance devices based on these nanostructured conductive polymers have been realized. This Tutorial review describes the synthesis and characteristics of different conductive polymer nanostructures; presents the representative applications of nanostructured conductive polymers as active electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors and lithium-ion batteries and new perspectives of functional materials for next-generation high-energy batteries, meanwhile discusses the general design rules, advantages, and limitations of nanostructured conductive polymers in the energy storage field; and provides new insights into future directions.

  4. Ultrasonic Assessment of Impact-Induced Damage and Microcracking in Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, Benjamin; Zeichner, Glenn; Liu, Yanxiong; Bowles, Kenneth J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The main objective of this NASA FAR project is to conduct ultrasonic assessment of impact-induced damage and microcracking in polymer matrix composites at various temperatures. It is believed that the proposed study of impact damage assessment on polymer matrix composites will benefit several NASA's missions and current interests, such as ballistic impact testing of composite fan containment and high strain rate deformation modeling of polymer matrix composites. Currently, impact-induced delamination and fracture in 6061-T6 aluminum/cast acrylic sandwich plates adhered by epoxy were generated in an instrumented drop-weight impact machine. Although only a small dent was produced on the aluminum side when a hemispherical penetrator tup was dropped onto it from a couple of inches, a large ring of delamination at the interface was observed. The delamination damage was often accompanied by severe shattering in the acrylic substratum. Damage patterns in the acrylic layer include radial and ring cracks and, together with delamination at the interface, may cause peeling-off of acrylic material from the sandwich plate. Theory of stress-wave propagation can be used to explain these damage patterns. The impact tests were conducted at various temperatures. The results also show clearly that temperature effect is very important in impact damage. For pure cast acrylic nil-ductile transition (NDT) occurs between 185-195 F Excessive impact energy was dissipated into fracture energy when tested at temperature below this range or through plastic deformation when tested at temperature above the NDT temperature. Results from this study will be used as baseline data for studying fiber-metal laminates, such as GLARE and ARALL for advanced aeronautical and astronautical applications.

  5. Recent Advances in Antimicrobial Polymers: A Mini-Review

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Keng-Shiang; Yang, Chih-Hui; Huang, Shu-Ling; Chen, Cheng-You; Lu, Yuan-Yi; Lin, Yung-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Human safety and well-being is threatened by microbes causing numerous infectious diseases resulting in a large number of deaths every year. Despite substantial progress in antimicrobial drugs, many infectious diseases remain difficult to treat. Antimicrobial polymers offer a promising antimicrobial strategy for fighting pathogens and have received considerable attention in both academic and industrial research. This mini-review presents the advances made in antimicrobial polymers since 2013. Antimicrobial mechanisms exhibiting either passive or active action and polymer material types containing bound or leaching antimicrobials are introduced. This article also addresses the applications of these antimicrobial polymers in the medical, food, and textile industries. PMID:27657043

  6. Prediction of thermal cycling induced cracking in polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, Hugh L.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the work done in the period February 1993 through July 1993 on the 'Prediction of Thermal Cycling Induced Cracking In Polymer Matrix Composites' program. An oral presentation of this work was given to Langley personnel in September of 1993. This document was prepared for archival purposes. Progress studies have been performed on the effects of spatial variations in material strength. Qualitative agreement was found with observed patterns of crack distribution. These results were presented to NASA Langley personnel in November 1992. The analytical methodology developed by Prof. McManus in the summer of 1992 (under an ASEE fellowship) has been generalized. A method for predicting matrix cracking due to decreasing temperatures and/or thermal cycling in all plies of an arbitrary laminate has been implemented as a computer code. The code also predicts changes in properties due to the cracking. Experimental progressive cracking studies on a variety of laminates were carried out at Langley Research Center. Results were correlated to predictions using the new methods. Results were initially mixed. This motivated an exploration of the configuration of cracks within laminates. A crack configuration study was carried out by cutting and/or sanding specimens in order to examine the distribution of cracks within the specimens. These investigations were supplemented by dye-penetrant enhanced X-ray photographs. The behavior of thin plies was found to be different from the behavior of thicker plies (or ply groups) on which existing theories are based. Significant edge effects were also noted, which caused the traditional metric of microcracking (count of cracks on a polished edge) to be very inaccurate in some cases. With edge and configuration taken into account, rough agreement with predictions was achieved. All results to date were reviewed with NASA Langley personnel in September 1993.

  7. Electron Beam-Cure Polymer Matrix Composites: Processing and Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrenn, G.; Frame, B.; Jensen, B.; Nettles, A.

    2001-01-01

    Researchers from NASA and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are evaluating a series of electron beam curable composites for application in reusable launch vehicle airframe and propulsion systems. Objectives are to develop electron beam curable composites that are useful at cryogenic to elevated temperatures (-217 C to 200 C), validate key mechanical properties of these composites, and demonstrate cost-saving fabrication methods at the subcomponent level. Electron beam curing of polymer matrix composites is an enabling capability for production of aerospace structures in a non-autoclave process. Payoffs of this technology will be fabrication of composite structures at room temperature, reduced tooling cost and cure time, and improvements in component durability. This presentation covers the results of material property evaluations for electron beam-cured composites made with either unidirectional tape or woven fabric architectures. Resin systems have been evaluated for performance in ambient, cryogenic, and elevated temperature conditions. Results for electron beam composites and similar composites cured in conventional processes are reviewed for comparison. Fabrication demonstrations were also performed for electron beam-cured composite airframe and propulsion piping subcomponents. These parts have been built to validate manufacturing methods with electron beam composite materials, to evaluate electron beam curing processing parameters, and to demonstrate lightweight, low-cost tooling options.

  8. Modeling Woven Polymer Matrix Composites with MAC/GMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC) is used to predict the elastic properties of plain weave polymer matrix composites (PMCs). The traditional one step three-dimensional homogertization procedure that has been used in conjunction with MAC/GMC for modeling woven composites in the past is inaccurate due to the lack of shear coupling inherent to the model. However, by performing a two step homogenization procedure in which the woven composite repeating unit cell is homogenized independently in the through-thickness direction prior to homogenization in the plane of the weave, MAC/GMC can now accurately model woven PMCs. This two step procedure is outlined and implemented, and predictions are compared with results from the traditional one step approach and other models and experiments from the literature. Full coupling of this two step technique with MAC/ GMC will result in a widely applicable, efficient, and accurate tool for the design and analysis of woven composite materials and structures.

  9. Mechanocompatible Polymer-Extracellular-Matrix Composites for Vascular Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Suen, Rachel; Wang, Jiao-Jing; Zhang, Zheng J; Wertheim, Jason A; Ameer, Guillermo A

    2016-07-01

    Small-diameter vascular grafts developed from vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) can potentially be used for bypass surgeries and other vascular reconstruction and repair procedures. The addition of heparin to the ECM improves graft hemocompatibility but often involves chemical cross-linking, which increases ECM mechanical stiffness compared to native arteries. Herein, the importance of maintaining ECM mechanocompatibility is demonstrated, and a mechanocompatible strategy to immobilize heparin onto the ECM via a biodegradable elastomer is described. Specifically, poly(1,8-octamethylene citrate)-co-cysteine is hybridized to the ECM, forming a polymer-ECM composite that allows for heparin immobilization via maleimide-thiol "click" chemistry. Heparinized composites reduce platelet adhesion by >60% in vitro, without altering the elastic modulus of the ECM. In a rat abdominal aortic interposition model, intimal hyperplasia in heparinized mechanocompatible grafts is 65% lower when compared to ECM-only control grafts at four weeks. In contrast, grafts that are heparinized with carbodiimide chemistry exhibit increased intimal hyperplasia (4.2-fold) and increased macrophage infiltration (3.5-fold) compared to ECM-only control grafts. All grafts show similar, partial endothelial cell coverage and little to no ECM remodeling. Overall, a mechanocompatible strategy to improve ECM thromboresistance is described and the importance of ECM mechanical properties for proper in vivo graft performance is highlighted. PMID:27109033

  10. Polymer Drug Conjugates: Recent Advancements in Various Diseases.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jasbir; Desai, Sapna; Yadav, Snehlata; Narasimhan, Balasubramanian; Kaur, Harmeet

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, the arena of polymer therapeutics has acquired considerable interest and accompanied by advanced designs and chemical properties of polymer-drug conjugates. Various polymers, such as poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG), N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA), poly(glycolic acid) (PGA) and poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) have been used successfully for clinical utilization from decades. These polymers are used in combination of drugs in such a manner that they target the specific tissues and thus the toxicity of drugs to other tissues is reduced. Presently, numerous polymer drug conjugates are under clinical trial for treatment of various diseases including cancer, diabetes, AIDS, rheumatoid arthritis etc. Many protein-polymer conjugates have been approved by FDA for clinical use but till date, no polymer-synthetic drug conjugate is approved by FDA, although many of them are undergoing final phase of clinical trials. This review highlights the recent advancements in the polymer-drug conjugates for treatment of various diseases and their preclinical and clinical status. PMID:26898741

  11. Recent advances in conjugated polymers for light emitting devices.

    PubMed

    Alsalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Alam, Javed; Dass, Lawrence Arockiasamy; Raja, Mohan

    2011-01-01

    A recent advance in the field of light emitting polymers has been the discovery of electroluminescent conjugated polymers, that is, kind of fluorescent polymers that emit light when excited by the flow of an electric current. These new generation fluorescent materials may now challenge the domination by inorganic semiconductor materials of the commercial market in light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED) and polymer laser devices. This review provides information on unique properties of conjugated polymers and how they have been optimized to generate these properties. The review is organized in three sections focusing on the major advances in light emitting materials, recent literature survey and understanding the desirable properties as well as modern solid state lighting and displays. Recently, developed conjugated polymers are also functioning as roll-up displays for computers and mobile phones, flexible solar panels for power portable equipment as well as organic light emitting diodes in displays, in which television screens, luminous traffic, information signs, and light-emitting wallpaper in homes are also expected to broaden the use of conjugated polymers as light emitting polymers. The purpose of this review paper is to examine conjugated polymers in light emitting diodes (LEDs) in addition to organic solid state laser. Furthermore, since conjugated polymers have been approved as light-emitting organic materials similar to inorganic semiconductors, it is clear to motivate these organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) and organic lasers for modern lighting in terms of energy saving ability. In addition, future aspects of conjugated polymers in LEDs were also highlighted in this review.

  12. Recent Advances in Conjugated Polymers for Light Emitting Devices

    PubMed Central

    AlSalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Alam, Javed; Dass, Lawrence Arockiasamy; Raja, Mohan

    2011-01-01

    A recent advance in the field of light emitting polymers has been the discovery of electroluminescent conjugated polymers, that is, kind of fluorescent polymers that emit light when excited by the flow of an electric current. These new generation fluorescent materials may now challenge the domination by inorganic semiconductor materials of the commercial market in light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED) and polymer laser devices. This review provides information on unique properties of conjugated polymers and how they have been optimized to generate these properties. The review is organized in three sections focusing on the major advances in light emitting materials, recent literature survey and understanding the desirable properties as well as modern solid state lighting and displays. Recently, developed conjugated polymers are also functioning as roll-up displays for computers and mobile phones, flexible solar panels for power portable equipment as well as organic light emitting diodes in displays, in which television screens, luminous traffic, information signs, and light-emitting wallpaper in homes are also expected to broaden the use of conjugated polymers as light emitting polymers. The purpose of this review paper is to examine conjugated polymers in light emitting diodes (LEDs) in addition to organic solid state laser. Furthermore, since conjugated polymers have been approved as light-emitting organic materials similar to inorganic semiconductors, it is clear to motivate these organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) and organic lasers for modern lighting in terms of energy saving ability. In addition, future aspects of conjugated polymers in LEDs were also highlighted in this review. PMID:21673938

  13. Recent advances in conjugated polymers for light emitting devices.

    PubMed

    Alsalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Alam, Javed; Dass, Lawrence Arockiasamy; Raja, Mohan

    2011-01-01

    A recent advance in the field of light emitting polymers has been the discovery of electroluminescent conjugated polymers, that is, kind of fluorescent polymers that emit light when excited by the flow of an electric current. These new generation fluorescent materials may now challenge the domination by inorganic semiconductor materials of the commercial market in light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED) and polymer laser devices. This review provides information on unique properties of conjugated polymers and how they have been optimized to generate these properties. The review is organized in three sections focusing on the major advances in light emitting materials, recent literature survey and understanding the desirable properties as well as modern solid state lighting and displays. Recently, developed conjugated polymers are also functioning as roll-up displays for computers and mobile phones, flexible solar panels for power portable equipment as well as organic light emitting diodes in displays, in which television screens, luminous traffic, information signs, and light-emitting wallpaper in homes are also expected to broaden the use of conjugated polymers as light emitting polymers. The purpose of this review paper is to examine conjugated polymers in light emitting diodes (LEDs) in addition to organic solid state laser. Furthermore, since conjugated polymers have been approved as light-emitting organic materials similar to inorganic semiconductors, it is clear to motivate these organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) and organic lasers for modern lighting in terms of energy saving ability. In addition, future aspects of conjugated polymers in LEDs were also highlighted in this review. PMID:21673938

  14. Tuning the wetting-dewetting and dispersion-aggregation transitions in polymer nanocomposites using composition of graft and matrix polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Tyler B.; Jayaraman, Arthi

    2016-03-01

    Recent simulation and experimental work on polymer nanocomposites composed of polymer grafted particles and free matrix polymers, where the graft and matrix homopolymers are chemically dissimilar and exhibit lower critical solution temperature behavior with temperature, has shown that wetting to dewetting is a gradual and distinct transition from the sharp particle dispersion-aggregation transition. In this study, using coarse-grained molecular simulations, we demonstrate that the extent of wetting of the grafted polymer layer and the particle dispersion-aggregation transition are tuned using the composition of graft and matrix polymers. Specifically, we study composites where the graft and matrix chains are random copolymers composed of attractive and athermal monomers. We maintain a dense grafting density on the spherical particles of diameter five times the monomer diameter and study matrix lengths five times that of the graft chain length or equal graft and matrix chain lengths. We vary the fraction of attractive monomers in the graft ({f}{{G}}) and matrix ({f}{{M}}) chains, graft-matrix chain composition ratio ({f}{{G}}/{f}{{M}}), and the graft-matrix interaction strength, as characterized by the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter between graft and matrix attractive monomers: {χ }{{GM}}. When {χ }{{GM}} is negative, decreasing {f}{{G}} and/or {f}{{M}} decreases the extent of grafted layer wetting by matrix chains because the enthalpic driving force for wetting is reduced. As the {χ }{{GM}} increases and becomes positive, the extent of wetting decreases gradually till it reaches the wetting of analogous athermal composites. That value of {χ }{{GM}} where the extent of wetting is the same as that of an analogous athermal polymer nanocomposite marks the onset of dispersion-aggregation transition. For symmetric graft and matrix chain compositions ({f}{{G}}={f}{{M}}), the magnitude of {f}{{G}} and {f}{{M}} tunes the overall extent of wetting of the grafted

  15. Effects of physical aging on long-term creep of polymers and polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinson, L. Catherine; Gates, Thomas S.

    1994-01-01

    For many polymeric materials in use below the glass transition temperature, the long term viscoelastic behavior is greatly affected by physical aging. To use polymer matrix composites as critical structural components in existing and novel technological applications, this long term behavior of the material system must be understood. Towards that end, this study applied the concepts governing the mechanics of physical aging in a consistent manner to the study of laminated composite systems. Even in fiber-dominated lay-ups the effects of physical aging are found to be important in the long-term behavior of the composite. The basic concepts describing physical aging of polymers are discussed. Several aspects of physical aging which have not been previously documented are also explored in this study, namely the effects of aging into equilibrium and a relationship to the time-temperature shift factor. The physical aging theory is then extended to develop the long-term compliance/modulus of a single lamina with varying fiber orientation. The latter is then built into classical lamination theory to predict long-time response of general oriented lamina and laminates. It is illustrated that the long term response can be counterintuitive, stressing the need for consistent modeling efforts to make long term predictions of laminates to be used in structural situations.

  16. Advancing polymers of intrinsic microporosity by mechanochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengfei; Jiang, Xueguang; Wan, Shun; Dai, Sheng

    2015-02-20

    Herein, we report a fast (15 min) and solvent-free mechanochemical approach to construct polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs) with high molecular mass and low polydispersity by solid grinding. The enhanced reaction efficiency results from the instantaneous frictional heating and continuous exposure of active sites within those solid reactants.

  17. Advanced Polymer For Multilayer Insulating Blankets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haghighat, R. Ross; Shepp, Allan

    1996-01-01

    Polymer resisting degradation by monatomic oxygen undergoing commercial development under trade name "Aorimide" ("atomic-oxygen-resistant imidazole"). Intended for use in thermal blankets for spacecraft in low orbit, useful on Earth in outdoor applications in which sunlight and ozone degrades other plastics. Also used, for example, to make threads and to make films coated with metals for reflectivity.

  18. Polymeric drugs: Advances in the development of pharmacologically active polymers.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Yu, Fei; Chen, Yi; Oupický, David

    2015-12-10

    Synthetic polymers play a critical role in pharmaceutical discovery and development. Current research and applications of pharmaceutical polymers are mainly focused on their functions as excipients and inert carriers of other pharmacologically active agents. This review article surveys recent advances in alternative pharmaceutical use of polymers as pharmacologically active agents known as polymeric drugs. Emphasis is placed on the benefits of polymeric drugs that are associated with their macromolecular character and their ability to explore biologically relevant multivalency processes. We discuss the main therapeutic uses of polymeric drugs as sequestrants, antimicrobials, antivirals, and anticancer and anti-inflammatory agents.

  19. Recent Advances in Self-Oscillating Polymer Material Systems.

    PubMed

    Tamate, Ryota; Mizutani Akimoto, Aya; Yoshida, Ryo

    2016-08-01

    In 1996, we first reported self-oscillating polymer gels exhibiting autonomous swelling-deswelling oscillations driven by the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. In contrast to conventional stimuli-responsive gels, the self-oscillating gel can autonomously and periodically change its volume in a closed solution without any external stimuli. Since the first report, the novel concept of self-oscillating gels has been expanded into various polymer and gel systems. Herein, we summarize recent advances in self-oscillating polymers and gels. PMID:27265869

  20. E-beam-Cure Fabrication of Polymer Fiber/Matrix Composites for Multifunctional Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Jensen, Brian J.; Thibeault, Sheila A.; Hou, Tan-Hung; Saether, Erik; Glaessgen, Edward H.; Humes, Donald H.; Chang, Chie K.; Badavi, Francis F.; Kiefer, Rrichard L.; Adams, Dan O.

    2004-01-01

    Aliphatic polymers were identified as optimum radiation polymeric shielding materials for building multifunctional structural elements. Conceptual damage-tolerant configurations of polyolefins have been proposed but many issues on the manufacture remain. In the present paper, we will investigate fabrication technologies with e-beam curing for inclusion of high-strength aliphatic polymer fibers into a highly cross-linked polyolefin matrix. A second stage of development is the fabrication methods for applying face sheets to aliphatic polymer closed-cell foams.

  1. Advanced Developments in Cyclic Polymers: Synthesis, Applications, and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yinghuai; Hosmane, Narayan S

    2015-01-01

    Due to the topological effect, cyclic polymers demonstrate different and unique physical and biological properties in comparison with linear counterparts having the same molecular-weight range. With advanced synthetic and analytic technologies, cyclic polymers with different topologies, e.g. multicyclic polymers, have been reported and well characterized. For example, various cyclic DNA and related structures, such as cyclic duplexes, have been prepared conveniently by click chemistry. These types of DNA have increased resistance to enzymatic degradation and have high thermodynamic stability, and thus, have potential therapeutic applications. In addition, cyclic polymers have also been used to prepare organic–inorganic hybrids for applications in catalysis, e.g. catalyst supports. Due to developments in synthetic technology, highly pure cyclic polymers could now be produced in large scale. Therefore, we anticipate discovering more applications in the near future. Despite their promise, cyclic polymers are still less explored than linear polymers like polyolefins and polycarbonates, which are widely used in daily life. Some critical issues, including controlling the molecular weight and finding suitable applications, remain big challenges in the cyclic-polymer field. This review briefly summarizes the commonly used synthetic methodologies and focuses more on the attractive functional materials and their biological properties and potential applications. PMID:26478835

  2. Degradation of Terfenol-D particle epoxy composites under low frequency cyclic magneto-mechanical loading: comparisons of matrix polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, William D.; Shanmugham, Manikantan

    2005-05-01

    Magnetostrictive Terfenol-D particle actuated epoxy polymer matrix composites were prepared with polyamine and anhydride cured epoxy polymer matrices. The different matrix epoxies exhibited large differences in glass transition and creep behavior. The differences in matrix thermal-mechanical properties resulted in important differences in temperature dependant damage behavior and magneto-elastic strain output in the Terfenol-D particle actuated epoxy polymer matrix composites.

  3. Structural and functional polymer-matrix composites for electromagnetic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Junhua

    This dissertation addresses the science and technology of functional and structural polymer-matrix composite materials for electromagnetic applications, which include electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding and low observability (Stealth). The structural composites are continuous carbon fiber epoxy-matrix composites, which are widely used for airframes. The functional composites are composites with discontinuous fillers and in both bulk and coating forms. Through composite structure variation, attractive electromagnetic properties have been achieved. With no degradation of the tensile strength or modulus, the shielding effectiveness of the structural composites has been improved by enhancing multiple reflections through light activation of the carbon fiber. The multiple reflections loss of the electromagnetic wave increases from 1.1 to 10.2 dB at 1.0 GHz due to the activation. Such a large effect of multiple reflections has not been previously reported in any material. The observability of these composites has been lowered by decreasing the electrical conductivity (and hence decreasing the reflection loss) through carbon fiber coating. The incorporation of mumetal, a magnetic alloy particulate filler (28-40 mum size), in a latex paint has been found to be effective for enhancing the shielding only if the electrical resistivity of the resulting composite coating is below 10 O.cm, as rendered by a conductive particulate filler, such as nickel flake (14-20 mum size). This effectiveness (39 dB at 1.0 GHz) is attributed to the absorption of the electromagnetic wave by the mumetal and the nickel flake, with the high conductivity rendered by the presence of the nickel flake resulting in a relatively high reflection loss of 15.5 dB. Without the nickel flake, the mumetal gives only 3 dB of shielding and 1.5 dB of reflection loss at 1.0 GHz. Nickel powder (0.3-0.5 mum size) has been found to be an effective filler for improving the shielding of polyethersulfone (PES

  4. High Temperature Degradation Mechanisms in Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Ronan A.

    1996-01-01

    Polymer matrix composites are increasingly used in demanding structural applications in which they may be exposed to harsh environments. The durability of such materials is a major concern, potentially limiting both the integrity of the structures and their useful lifetimes. The goal of the current investigation is to develop a mechanism-based model of the chemical degradation which occurs, such that given the external chemical environment and temperatures throughout the laminate, laminate geometry, and ply and/or constituent material properties, we can calculate the concentration of diffusing substances and extent of chemical degradation as functions of time and position throughout the laminate. This objective is met through the development and use of analytical models, coupled to an analysis-driven experimental program which offers both quantitative and qualitative information on the degradation mechanism. Preliminary analyses using a coupled diffusion/reaction model are used to gain insight into the physics of the degradation mechanisms and to identify crucial material parameters. An experimental program is defined based on the results of the preliminary analysis which allows the determination of the necessary material coefficients. Thermogravimetric analyses are carried out in nitrogen, air, and oxygen to provide quantitative information on thermal and oxidative reactions. Powdered samples are used to eliminate diffusion effects. Tests in both inert and oxidative environments allow the separation of thermal and oxidative contributions to specimen mass loss. The concentration dependency of the oxidative reactions is determined from the tests in pure oxygen. Short term isothermal tests at different temperatures are carried out on neat resin and unidirectional macroscopic specimens to identify diffusion effects. Mass loss, specimen shrinkage, the formation of degraded surface layers and surface cracking are recorded as functions of exposure time. Geometry effects

  5. Advances in photorefractive polymers and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanche, P.-A.; Lynn, B.; Norwood, R. A.; Peyghambarian, N.

    2015-09-01

    Photorefractive (PR) polymers change their index of refraction upon illumination through a series of electronic phenomena that makes these materials one of the most complex organic systems known. The refractive index change is dynamic and fully reversible, making PR materials very interesting for a large variety of applications such as holography and 3D display. In order to improve the recording speed and achieve videorate for our stereographic display application, we have introduced a new type of electrode geometry where the anode and cathode are in the same plane and are shaped as interpenetrating combs. This type of electrode geometry does not require the sample to be tilted with respect to the writing beams to record the hologram, which is a significant advantage. To monitor the highly non-homogeneous field resulting from this configuration, we used a multiphoton microscope to directly observe the chromophore orientation in situ upon the application of an electric field. Most recently, we developed a fast repetition rate laser (10kHz) where the pulse width can be adjusted from microseconds to milliseconds so that, in conjunction with a ns Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and an externally chopped CW laser, the diffraction efficiency of the material could be measured over 9 orders of magnitude. This measurement helps us better understand the mechanism of grating buildup inside photorefractive polymers.

  6. Advances in Polymer and Polymeric Nanostructures for Protein Conjugation

    PubMed Central

    González-Toro, Daniella C.; Thayumanavan, S.

    2013-01-01

    Linear polymers have been considered the best molecular structures for the formation of efficient protein conjugates due to their biological advantages, synthetic convenience and ease of functionalization. In recent years, much attention has been dedicated to develop synthetic strategies that produce the most control over protein conjugation utilizing linear polymers as scaffolds. As a result, different conjugate models, such as semitelechelic, homotelechelic, heterotelechelic and branched or star polymer conjugates, have been obtained that take advantage of these well-controlled synthetic strategies. Development of protein conjugates using nanostructures and the formation of said nanostructures from protein-polymer bioconjugates are other areas in the protein bioconjugation field. Although several polymer-protein technologies have been developed from these discoveries, few review articles have focused on the design and function of these polymers and nanostructures. This review will highlight some recent advances in protein-linear polymer technologies that employ protein covalent conjugation and successful protein-nanostructure bioconjugates (covalent conjugation as well) that have shown great potential for biological applications. PMID:24058205

  7. Structural and functional polymer-matrix composites for electromagnetic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Junhua

    This dissertation addresses the science and technology of functional and structural polymer-matrix composite materials for electromagnetic applications, which include electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding and low observability (Stealth). The structural composites are continuous carbon fiber epoxy-matrix composites, which are widely used for airframes. The functional composites are composites with discontinuous fillers and in both bulk and coating forms. Through composite structure variation, attractive electromagnetic properties have been achieved. With no degradation of the tensile strength or modulus, the shielding effectiveness of the structural composites has been improved by enhancing multiple reflections through light activation of the carbon fiber. The multiple reflections loss of the electromagnetic wave increases from 1.1 to 10.2 dB at 1.0 GHz due to the activation. Such a large effect of multiple reflections has not been previously reported in any material. The observability of these composites has been lowered by decreasing the electrical conductivity (and hence decreasing the reflection loss) through carbon fiber coating. The incorporation of mumetal, a magnetic alloy particulate filler (28-40 mum size), in a latex paint has been found to be effective for enhancing the shielding only if the electrical resistivity of the resulting composite coating is below 10 O.cm, as rendered by a conductive particulate filler, such as nickel flake (14-20 mum size). This effectiveness (39 dB at 1.0 GHz) is attributed to the absorption of the electromagnetic wave by the mumetal and the nickel flake, with the high conductivity rendered by the presence of the nickel flake resulting in a relatively high reflection loss of 15.5 dB. Without the nickel flake, the mumetal gives only 3 dB of shielding and 1.5 dB of reflection loss at 1.0 GHz. Nickel powder (0.3-0.5 mum size) has been found to be an effective filler for improving the shielding of polyethersulfone (PES

  8. Development of Metal Matrix Composites for NASA'S Advanced Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2000-01-01

    The state-of-the-art development of several aluminum and copper based Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) for NASA's advanced propulsion systems will be presented. The presentation's goal is to provide an overview of NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center's planned and on-going activities in MMC for advanced liquid rocket engines such as the X-33 vehicle's Aerospike and X-34 Fastrac engine. The focus will be on lightweight and environmental compatibility with oxygen and hydrogen of key MMC materials, within each NASA's new propulsion application, that will provide a high payoff for NASA's reusable launch vehicle systems and space access vehicles. Advanced MMC processing techniques such as plasma spray, centrifugal casting, pressure infiltration casting will be discussed. Development of a novel 3D printing method for low cost production of composite preform, and functional gradient MMC to enhanced rocket engine's dimensional stability will be presented.

  9. Mixed matrix membranes with strengthened MOFs/polymer interfacial interaction and improved membrane performance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Rijia; Ge, Lei; Hou, Lei; Strounina, Ekaterina; Rudolph, Victor; Zhu, Zhonghua

    2014-04-23

    MOFs-based mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) have attracted extensive attention in recent years due to their potential high separation performance, the low cost, and good mechanical properties. However, it is still very challenging to achieve defect-free interface between micrometer-sized MOFs and a polymer matrix. In this study, [Cd2L(H2O)]2·5H2O (Cd-6F) synthesized using 4,4'-(hexafluoroisopropylidene)diphthalic anhydride (6FDA) as an organic ligand was introduced into the 6FDA-ODA polyimide matrix to achieve novel MOF MMMs. A specific interfacial interaction between MOF crystals and polymer chains was innovatively targeted and achieved through in situ polymerization procedure. The enhanced adhesion between MOF particles and polymer phase was observed, and the improved interfacial interaction between Cd-6F and the 6FDA-ODA polyimide matrix was confirmed by detailed characterizations including FTIR and NMR. In the meantime, the gas permeance and selectivity of the MMMs are strongly dependent on their morphology. The MMM derived from in situ polymerization presents excellent interfaces between micrometer-sized MOF crystals and the polymer matrix, resulting in increased permeability and selectivity. The strategy shown here can be further utilized to select the MOF/polymer pair, eliminate interfacial voids, and improve membrane separation performance of MOFs-based MMMs.

  10. Visualizing phase transition behavior of dilute stimuli responsive polymer solutions via Mueller matrix polarimetry.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Amal; Chandel, Shubham; Ghosh, Nirmalya; De, Priyadarsi

    2015-09-15

    Probing volume phase transition behavior of superdiluted polymer solutions both micro- and macroscopically still persists as an outstanding challenge. In this regard, we have explored 4 × 4 spectral Mueller matrix measurement and its inverse analysis for excavating the microarchitectural facts about stimuli responsiveness of "smart" polymers. Phase separation behavior of thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) and pH responsive poly(N,N-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) and their copolymers were analyzed in terms of Mueller matrix derived polarization parameters, namely, depolarization (Δ), diattenuation (d), and linear retardance (δ). The Δ, d, and δ parameters provided useful information on both macro- and microstructural alterations during the phase separation. Additionally, the two step action ((i) breakage of polymer-water hydrogen bonding and (ii) polymer-polymer aggregation) at the molecular microenvironment during the cloud point generation was successfully probed via these parameters. It is demonstrated that, in comparison to the present techniques available for assessing the hydrophobic-hydrophilic switch over of simple stimuli-responsive polymers, Mueller matrix polarimetry offers an important advantage requiring a few hundred times dilute polymer solution (0.01 mg/mL, 1.1-1.4 μM) at a low-volume format. PMID:26287499

  11. Effect of matrix molecular weight on the coarsening mechanism of polymer-grafted gold nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaolong; Listak, Jessica; Witherspoon, Velencia; Kalu, E Eric; Yang, Xiaoping; Bockstaller, Michael R

    2010-07-20

    A systematic evaluation of the effect of polymer matrix molecular weight on the coarsening kinetics of uniformly dispersed polystyrene-grafted gold nanoparticles is presented. Particle coarsening is found to proceed via three stages (i.e., atomic-diffusion-based Ostwald ripening (OR), particle-migration-based collision-coalescence, and the subsequent reshaping of particle assemblies). The relative significance of each stage and hence the evolution of particle size and shape have been found to depend sensitively upon time, temperature, and the molecular weight of the host polymer. At temperatures close to the matrix glass-transition temperature, Ostwald ripening has been observed to be dominant on all experimental timescales. With increasing annealing temperature, collision coalescence becomes the dominant mode of coarsening, leading to rapid particle growth. The onset of the latter process is found to be increasingly delayed with increasing molecular weight of the polymer host. Particle coalescence is observed to proceed via two fundamental modes (i.e., diffusion-limited aggregation and growth resulting in the formation of fractal particle clusters and the subsequent recrystallization into more spherical monolithic aggregate structures). Interestingly, particle coarsening in high-molecular-weight matrix polymers is found to proceed significantly faster than predicted on the basis of the bulk polymer viscosity; this acceleration is interpreted to be a consequence of the network characteristics of high-molecular-weight polymers by analogy to the phenomenon of nanoviscosity that has been reported in the context of nanoparticle diffusion within high-molecular-weight polymers. PMID:20575544

  12. Matrix-assisted polymer pen lithography induced Staudinger Ligation.

    PubMed

    Bian, Shudan; Schesing, Kevin B; Braunschweig, Adam B

    2012-05-21

    The Staudinger Ligation has been combined with Polymer Pen Lithography to create patterns of fluorescent and redox-active inks with 1-micrometer scale feature diameters over centimeter-scale areas. This report presents a straightforward strategy to expand the scope of organic reactions employed in surface science. PMID:22509494

  13. LS-DYNA Implementation of Polymer Matrix Composite Model Under High Strain Rate Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Xia-Hua; Goldberg, Robert K.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2003-01-01

    A recently developed constitutive model is implemented into LS-DYNA as a user defined material model (UMAT) to characterize the nonlinear strain rate dependent behavior of polymers. By utilizing this model within a micromechanics technique based on a laminate analogy, an algorithm to analyze the strain rate dependent, nonlinear deformation of a fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite is then developed as a UMAT to simulate the response of these composites under high strain rate impact. The models are designed for shell elements in order to ensure computational efficiency. Experimental and numerical stress-strain curves are compared for two representative polymers and a representative polymer matrix composite, with the analytical model predicting the experimental response reasonably well.

  14. Implementation of Fiber Substructuring Into Strain Rate Dependent Micromechanics Analysis of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.

    2001-01-01

    A research program is in progress to develop strain rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composites subject to impact loads. Previously, strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations developed to model the polymer matrix were incorporated into a mechanics of materials based micromechanics method. In the current work, the micromechanics method is revised such that the composite unit cell is divided into a number of slices. Micromechanics equations are then developed for each slice, with laminate theory applied to determine the elastic properties, effective stresses and effective inelastic strains for the unit cell. Verification studies are conducted using two representative polymer matrix composites with a nonlinear, strain rate dependent deformation response. The computed results compare well to experimentally obtained values.

  15. Inkjet printed polymer light-emitting devices fabricated by thermal embedding of semiconducting polymer nanospheres in an inert matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisslthaler, Evelin; Sax, Stefan; Scherf, Ullrich; Mauthner, Gernot; Moderegger, Erik; Landfester, Katharina; List, Emil J. W.

    2008-05-01

    An aqueous dispersion of semiconducting polymer nanospheres was used to fabricate polymer light-emitting devices by inkjet printing in an easy-to-apply process with a minimum feature size of 20μm. To form the devices, the electroluminescent material was printed on a nonemitting polystyrene matrix layer and embedded by thermal annealing. The process allows the printing of light-emitting thin-film devices without extensive optimization of film homogeneity and thickness of the active layer. Optical micrographs of printed device arrays, electroluminescence emission spectra, and I /V characteristics of printed ITO/PEDOT:PSS/PS/SPN/Al devices are presented.

  16. Analytical Modeling of the High Strain Rate Deformation of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.; Gilat, Amos

    2003-01-01

    The results presented here are part of an ongoing research program to develop strain rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composites subject to high strain rate impact loads. State variable constitutive equations originally developed for metals have been modified in order to model the nonlinear, strain rate dependent deformation of polymeric matrix materials. To account for the effects of hydrostatic stresses, which are significant in polymers, the classical 5 plasticity theory definitions of effective stress and effective plastic strain are modified by applying variations of the Drucker-Prager yield criterion. To verify the revised formulation, the shear and tensile deformation of a representative toughened epoxy is analyzed across a wide range of strain rates (from quasi-static to high strain rates) and the results are compared to experimentally obtained values. For the analyzed polymers, both the tensile and shear stress-strain curves computed using the analytical model correlate well with values obtained through experimental tests. The polymer constitutive equations are implemented within a strength of materials based micromechanics method to predict the nonlinear, strain rate dependent deformation of polymer matrix composites. In the micromechanics, the unit cell is divided up into a number of independently analyzed slices, and laminate theory is then applied to obtain the effective deformation of the unit cell. The composite mechanics are verified by analyzing the deformation of a representative polymer matrix composite (composed using the representative polymer analyzed for the correlation of the polymer constitutive equations) for several fiber orientation angles across a variety of strain rates. The computed values compare favorably to experimentally obtained results.

  17. Development of Metal Matrix Composites for NASA's Advanced Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J.; Elam, S.

    2001-01-01

    The state-of-the-art development of several Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) for NASA's advanced propulsion systems will be presented. The goal is to provide an overview of NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center's on-going activities in MMC components for advanced liquid rocket engines such as the X-33 vehicle's Aerospike engine and X-34's Fastrac engine. The focus will be on lightweight, low cost, and environmental compatibility with oxygen and hydrogen of key MMC materials, within each of NASA's new propulsion application, that will provide a high payoff for NASA's Reusable Launch Vehicles and space access vehicles. In order to fabricate structures from MMC, effective joining methods must be developed to join MMC to the same or to different monolithic alloys. Therefore, a qualitative assessment of MMC's welding and joining techniques will be outlined.

  18. E-Beam Processing of Polymer Matrix Composites for Multifunctional Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Tan-Hung; Wilson, John W.; Jensen, Brian J.; Thibeault, Sheila A.; Chang, Chie K.; Kiefer, Richard L.

    2005-01-01

    Aliphatic polymers were identified as optimum radiation shielding polymeric materials for building multifunctional structural elements for in-space habitats. Conceptual damage tolerant configurations of polyolefins have been proposed, but many manufacturing issues relied on methods and materials which have sub-optimal radiation shielding characteristics (for example, epoxy matrix and adhesives). In the present approach, we shall investigate e-beam processing technologies for inclusion of high-strength aliphatic polymer reinforcement structures into a highly cross-linked polyolefin matrix. This paper reports the baseline thermo-mechanical properties of low density polyethylene and highly crystallized polyethylene.

  19. A review on the cords & plies reinforcement of elastomeric polymer matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, S. S.; Husin, H.; Mat-Shayuti, M. S.; Hassan, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Steel, polyester, nylon and rayon are the main materials of cords & plies that have been reinforced in the natural rubber to produce quality tyres but there is few research reported on cord and plies reinforcement in silicone rubber. Taking the innovation of tyres as inspiration, this review's first objective is to compile the comprehensive studies about the cords & plies reinforcement in elastomeric polymer matrix. The second objective is to gather information about silicone rubber that has a high potential as a matrix phase for cords and plies reinforcement. All the tests and findings are gathered and compiled in sections namely processing preparation, curing, physical and mechanical properties, and adhesion between cords-polymer.

  20. Evaporation-induced Nanoparticle Self-Assembly in a Polymer Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shengfeng

    A critical challenge in many applications of polymer nanocomposites is to control the dispersion of nanoparticles in a polymer matrix. We employ large-scale molecular dynamics simulations to study the assembly of nanoparticles as the solvent evaporates from a polymer solution containing nanoparticles. Results show that the organization of nanoparticles can be controlled by varying the strength of the polymer-nanoparticle interactions. When the nanoparticles and polymers strongly attract, as the solvent evaporates, a concentrated polymer film forms at the surface and entraps a layer of nanoparticles, which assemble into a close-packed hexagonal lattice. This dense film of polymers and nanoparticles dramatically reduce the rate of evaporation as the solvent has to transverse the film to reach the surface. If the nanoparticle-polymer interactions are weak, then as the solvent evaporates, the surface layer is almost entirely made of polymers. The nanoparticles are largely excluded from the surface and dispersed randomly in the region below the surface layer. In this case the slowing-down of the evaporation by the surface layer is less dramatic. Also of interest is the case of a nanoparticle solution in contact with polymers that are end grafted to a flat surface to form a polymer brush. For a relatively weak nanoparticle-brush attraction, after evaporation of the solvent the nanoparticles straddle the brush surface and form an ordered lattice. For a strong nanoparticle-polymer attraction, however, the nanoparticles are engulfed inside the brush and the packing quality diminishes because the lateral diffusion of the nanoparticles is suppressed. To better understand the nanoparticle-brush interactions, our calculations to quantify the free energy penalty of inserting a nanoparticle into a polymer brush will also be discussed.

  1. Bridging Microstructure, Properties and Processing of Polymer Based Advanced Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dongsheng; Ahzi, Said; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2012-01-01

    This is a guest editorial for a special issue in Journal of Engineering Materials and Technology. The papers collected in this special issue emphasize significant challenges, current approaches and future strategies necessary to advance the development of polymer-based materials. They were partly presented at the symposium of 'Bridging microstructure, properties and processing of polymer based advanced materials' in the TMS 2011 annual conference meeting, which was held in San Diego, US, on Feb 28 to March 3, 2011. This symposium was organized by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (USA) and the Institute of Mechanics of Fluids and Solids of the University of Strasbourg (France). The organizers were D.S. Li, S. Ahzi, and M. Khaleel.

  2. Printing microstructures in a polymer matrix using a ferrofluid droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Fattah, Abdel Rahman; Ghosh, Suvojit; Puri, Ishwar K.

    2016-03-01

    We print complex curvilinear microstructures in an elastomer matrix using a ferrofluid droplet as the print head. A magnetic field moves the droplet along a prescribed path in liquid polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The droplet sheds magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) clusters in its wake, forming printed features. The PDMS is subsequently heated so that it crosslinks, which preserves the printed features in the elastomer matrix. The competition between magnetic and drag forces experienced by the ferrofluid droplet and its trailing MNPs highlight design criteria for successful printing, which are experimentally confirmed. The method promises new applications, such as flexible 3D circuitry.

  3. Radiation and Thermal Stability of Solid Radwaste After Immobilization in Polymer Matrix - 13504

    SciTech Connect

    Pokhitonov, Yu.; Babain, V.; Strelkov, S.; Kuznetsov, D.; Kelley, Dennis

    2013-07-01

    The paper will illustrate results of the various experiments on radiation and thermal stability of polymer matrixes after solutions solidification including aqueous and organic solutions and mixed waste. It was shown that- after irradiation the specimen and after solidification the mixture with oil and TBP hydrogen has been observed (less 1%) and some others gases have been detected. Results of the performed experiments and the radiation stability data of the polymer compositions allow the conclusion that the technological process of immobilizing the above mentioned aqueous solutions and solutions with organic products into polymers at room temperature is the explosion- and flameproof as well as the storage thereof. (authors)

  4. Symposium Review: Metal and Polymer Matrix Composites at MS&T 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Nikhil; Paramsothy, Muralidharan

    2014-06-01

    This article reflects on the presentations made during the Metal and Polymer Matrix Composites symposium at Materials Science and Technology 2013 (MS&T'13) held in Montreal (Quebec, Canada) from October 27 to 31. The symposium had three sessions on metal matrix composites and one session on polymer matrix composites containing a total of 23 presentations. While the abstracts and full-text papers are available through databases, the discussion that took place during the symposium is often not captured in writing and gets immediately lost. We have tried to recap some of the discussion in this article and hope that it will supplement the information present in the proceedings. The strong themes in the symposium were porous composites, aluminum matrix composites, and nanocomposites. The development of processing methods was also of interest to the speakers and attendees.

  5. Polymer/inorganic nanocomposites with tailored hierarchical structure as advanced dielectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Manias, Evangelos; Randall, Clive; Tomer, Vivek; Polyzos, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    Most advances and commercial successes of polymer/inorganic nanocomposites rely only on the dispersion of nanoparticles in a polymer matrix. Such approaches leave untapped opportunities where performance can be improved by controlling the larger length-scale structures. Here, we review selected examples where the hierarchical structure (from millimeter to nanometer) is tailored to control the transport properties of the materials, giving rise to marked property enhancements, relevant to dielectric materials for power capacitors. These examples address composite structures that are self-assembled, both at the nm and the micron scales, and, thus, can be produced using standard industrial practices. Specifically, polyethylene (PE) blends or poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) copolymers are reinforced with nanofillers; these composites are designed with high filler orientation, which yielded marked improvements in electric-field breakdown strength and, consequently, large improvements in their recoverable energy densities.

  6. Protective coatings for high-temperature polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, David R.; Sutter, James K.; Papadopoulos, Demetrios S.

    1993-01-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition was used to deposit silicon nitride on graphite-fiber-reinforced polyimide composites to protect against oxidation at elevated temperatures. The adhesion and integrity of the coating were evaluated by isothermal aging (371 C for 500 hr) and thermal cycling. The amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiN:H) coating could withstand stresses ranging from approximately 0.18 GPa (tensile) to -1.6 GPa (compressive) and provided a 30 to 80 percent reduction in oxidation-induced weight loss. The major factor influencing the effectiveness of a-SiN:H as a barrier coating against oxidation is the surface finish of the polymer composite.

  7. Development of meniscus substitutes using a mixture of biocompatible polymers and extra cellular matrix components by electrospinning.

    PubMed

    López-Calzada, G; Hernandez-Martínez, A R; Cruz-Soto, M; Ramírez-Cardona, M; Rangel, D; Molina, G A; Luna-Barcenas, G; Estevez, M

    2016-04-01

    Despite the significant advances in the meniscus tissue engineering field, it is difficult to recreate the complex structure and organization of the collagenous matrix of the meniscus. In this work, we developed a meniscus prototype to be used as substitute or scaffold for the regeneration of the meniscal matrix, recreating the differential morphology of the meniscus by electrospinning. Synthetic biocompatible polymers were combined with the extracellular matrix component, collagen and used to replicate the meniscus. We studied the correlation between mechanical and structural properties of the polymer blend as a function of collagen concentration. Fibers were collected on a surface of a rapidly rotating precast mold, to accurately replicate each sectional morphology of the meniscus; different electro-tissues were produced. Detailed XRD analyses exhibited structural changes developed by electrospinning. We achieved to integrate all these electro-tissues to form a complete synthetic meniscus. Vascularization tests were performed to assess the potential use of our novel polymeric blend for promising meniscus regeneration. PMID:26838921

  8. Laser induced fluorescence imaging of thermal damage in polymer matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, W.G.; Meyer, K.E.; Wachter, E.A.; Perl, D.R.; Kulowitch, P.J.

    1997-06-01

    A simple, fluorescence based imaging system has been developed that is capable of identifying regions of thermal damage in polymer matrix composites (PMCs). These materials are playing an increasingly important role in the production of high performance vehicles and aircraft, where their low weight and high mechanical strength, combined with advancements in manufacturing technology, ensure increased use for a variety of applications. Of particular concern in the aerospace industry is the tendency of some PMC materials to become irreversibly damaged when exposed to elevated temperatures. Traditional nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques are capable of detecting physical anomalies such as cracks and delaminations but cannot detect initial heat damage, which occurs on a molecular scale. Spectroscopic techniques such as laser induced fluorescence provide an attractive means for detecting this type of damage and are amenable to imaging large, irregularly shaped surfaces. In this report the authors describe instrumentation capable of rapidly detecting thermal damage in graphite epoxy components and suggest improvements which will enable this technology to make quantitative judgments concerning the mechanical strength properties of heat damaged specimens.

  9. The powder flow and compact mechanical properties of two recently developed matrix-forming polymers.

    PubMed

    Hancock, B C; Carlson, G T; Ladipo, D D; Langdon, B A; Mullarney, M P

    2001-09-01

    The powder flow and compact mechanical properties of two recently developed matrix-forming polymers were determined. The polymers are cross-linked high-amylose starch (Contramid) and poly(acrylic acid) (Carbopol EX507), and their properties were compared with those of two established matrix-forming polymers, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (Methocel K100LV) and hydroxypropyl cellulose (Klucel EXF). The particle morphology, size distribution and true density of the four materials were quite different and they exhibited measurable performance differences with respect to powder flow, compact ductility, compact elasticity and compact tensile strength. Recommendations for formulating solid dosage forms with each of these excipients were made, based on a consideration of their physical properties and their anticipated processing performance.

  10. Evaluation of tensile strength of hybrid fiber (jute/gongura) reinforced hybrid polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatachalam, G.; Gautham Shankar, A.; Vijay, Kumar V.; Chandan, Byral R.; Prabaharan, G. P.; Raghav, Dasarath

    2015-07-01

    The polymer matrix composites attract many industrial applications due to its light weight, less cost and easy for manufacturing. In this paper, an attempt is made to prepare and study of the tensile strength of hybrid (two natural) fibers reinforced hybrid (Natural + Synthetic) polymer matrix composites. The samples were prepared with hybrid reinforcement consists of two different fibers such as jute and Gongura and hybrid polymer consists of polyester and cashew nut shell resins. The hybrid composites tensile strength is evaluated to study the influence of various fiber parameters on mechanical strength. The parameters considered here are the duration of fiber treatment, the concentration of alkali in fiber treatment and nature of fiber content in the composites.

  11. High Strain Rate Deformation Modeling of a Polymer Matrix Composite. Part 2; Composite Micromechanical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    Recently applications have exposed polymer matrix composite materials to very high strain rate loading conditions, requiring an ability to understand and predict the material behavior under these extreme conditions. In this second paper of a two part report, a three-dimensional composite micromechanical model is described which allows for the analysis of the rate dependent, nonlinear deformation response of a polymer matrix composite. Strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations utilized to model the deformation response of a polymer are implemented within the micromechanics method. The deformation response of two representative laminated carbon fiber reinforced composite materials with varying fiber orientation has been predicted using the described technique. The predicted results compare favorably to both experimental values and the response predicted by the Generalized Method of Cells, a well-established micromechanics analysis method.

  12. Interface Characterization in Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naya, F.; Molina-Aldareguía, J. M.; Lopes, C. S.; González, C.; LLorca, J.

    2016-10-01

    A novel methodology is presented and applied to measure the shear interface strength of fiber-reinforced polymers. The strategy is based in fiber push-in tests carried out on the central fiber of highly-packed fiber clusters with hexagonal symmetry, and it is supported by a detailed finite element analysis of the push-in test to account for the influence of hygrothermal residual stresses, fiber constraint and fiber anisotropy on the interface strength. Examples of application are presented to determine the shear interface strength in carbon and glass fiber composites reinforced with either thermoset or thermoplastic matrices. In addition, the influence of the environment (either dry or wet conditions) on the interface strength in C/epoxy composites is demonstrated.

  13. Studies on natural fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R. H.; Kapatel, P. M.; Machchhar, A. D.; Kapatel, Y. A.

    2016-05-01

    Natural fiber reinforced composites show increasing importance in day to days applications because of their low cost, lightweight, easy availability, non-toxicity, biodegradability and environment friendly nature. But these fibers are hydrophilic in nature. Thus they have very low reactivity and poor compatibility with polymers. To overcome these limitations chemical modifications of the fibers have been carried out. Therefore, in the present work jute fibers have chemically modified by treating with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions. These treated jute fibers have been used to fabricate jute fiber reinforced epoxy composites. Mechanical properties like tensile strength, flexural strength and impact strength have been found out. Alkali treated composites show better properties compare to untreated composites.

  14. Material and structural studies of metal and polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signorelli, R. A.; Serafini, T. T.; Johns, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    The application of fiber composites to aeronautical and space vehicle systems indicates the following: It appears quite probable that resin/fiber composites can be developed for service at 315 C for several thousand hours and at 370 C for a few hundred hours. The retention of resin/fiber strength at these high temperatures can be achieved by modifying the polymer molecular structure or by developing new processing techniques, or both. Carbon monofilament with attractive strength values has been produced and fabrication studies to reinforce aluminum with such monofilaments have been initiated. Refractory wire-superalloy composites have demonstrated sufficiently high strength and impact values to suggest that they have potential for application to turbine blades at temperatures to 1200 C and above.

  15. A comparison of fiber effects on polymer matrix composite oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1991-01-01

    A number of thermo-oxidative stability studies addressing the effects of fiber reinforcement on composite thermal stability and influence of geometry on the results of aging studies were performed at NASA-Lewis. The information presented herein, a compilation of some results from these studies, shows the influence of the reinforcement fibers on the oxidative degradation of various PMR-15 composites. Reinforcement of graphite and ceramics were studied and three composite oxidation mechanisms were observed. One was a dominant attack of the reinforcement fiber, the second was the aggressive oxidation of the matrix material, and the third was interfacial degradation.

  16. Synthesis of genetically engineered protein polymers (recombinamers) as an example of advanced self-assembled smart materials.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cabello, José Carlos; Girotti, Alessandra; Ribeiro, Artur; Arias, Francisco Javier

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe two methods for bio-producing recombinant repetitive polypeptide polymers for use in biomedical devices. These polymers, known as elastin-like recombinamers (ELRs), are derived from the repetition of selected amino acid domains of extracellular matrix proteins with the aim of recreating their mechanical and physiological features. The proteinaceous nature of ELRs allows us to make use of the natural biosynthetic machinery of heterologous hosts to express advanced and large polymers or "recombinamers." Despite the essentially unlimited possibilities for designing recombinamers, the production of synthetic genes to encode them should allow us to overcome the difficulties surrounding bioproduction of these non-natural monotonous DNA and protein sequences. The aim of this work is to supply the biotechnologist with fine-tuning methods to biosynthesize advanced self-assembled smart materials.

  17. Fillers for improved graphite fiber retention by polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    House, E. E.; Sheppard, C. H.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a program designed to determine the extent to which elemental boron and boron containing fillers added to the matrix resin of graphite/epoxy composites prevent the release of graphite fibers when the composites are exposed to fire and impact conditions are described. The fillers evaluated were boron, boron carbide and aluminum boride. The conditions evaluated were laboratory simulations of those that could exist in the event of an aircraft crash and burn situation. The baseline (i.e., unfilled) laminates evaluated were prepared from commercially available graphite/epoxy. The baseline and filled laminates' mechanical properties, before and after isothermal and humidity aging, also were compared. It was found that a small amount of graphite fiber was released from the baseline graphite/epoxy laminates during the burn and impact conditions used in this program. However, the extent to which the fibers were released is not considered a severe enough problem to preclude the use of graphite reinforced composites in civil aircraft structure. It also was found that the addition of boron and boron containing fillers to the resin matrix eliminated this fiber release. Mechanical properties of laminates containing the boron and boron containing fillers were lower than those of the baseline laminates. These property degradations for two systems: boron (5 micron) at 2.5 percent filler loading, and boron (5 micron) at 5.0 percent filler loading do not appear severe enough to preclude their use in structural composite applications.

  18. Probabilistic simulation of long term behavior in polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, A. R.; Singhal, S. N.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1995-04-01

    A methodology to compute cumulative probability distribution functions (CDF) of fatigue life for different ratios, r of applied stress to the laminate strength based on first ply failure criteria has been developed and demonstrated. Degradation effects due to long term environmental exposure and mechanical cyclic loads are considered in the simulation process. A unified time-stress dependent multi-factor interaction equation model developed at NASA Lewis Research Center has been used to account for the degradation/aging of material properties due to cyclic loads. Fast probability integration method is used to perform probabilistic simulation of uncertainties. Sensitivity of fatigue life reliability to uncertainties in the primitive random variables are computed and their significance in the reliability based design for maximum life is discussed. The results show that the graphite/epoxy (0/+45/90) deg laminate with ply thickness 0.125 in. has 500,000 cycles life for applied stress to laminate strength ratio of 0.6 and a reliability of 0.999. Also, the fatigue life reliability has been found to be most sensitive to the ply thickness and matrix tensile strength. Tighter quality controls must therefore be enforced on ply thickness and matrix strength in order to achieve high reliability of the structure.

  19. Probabilistic simulation of long term behavior in polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, A. R.; Singhal, S. N.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1995-01-01

    A methodology to compute cumulative probability distribution functions (CDF) of fatigue life for different ratios, r of applied stress to the laminate strength based on first ply failure criteria has been developed and demonstrated. Degradation effects due to long term environmental exposure and mechanical cyclic loads are considered in the simulation process. A unified time-stress dependent multi-factor interaction equation model developed at NASA Lewis Research Center has been used to account for the degradation/aging of material properties due to cyclic loads. Fast probability integration method is used to perform probabilistic simulation of uncertainties. Sensitivity of fatigue life reliability to uncertainties in the primitive random variables are computed and their significance in the reliability based design for maximum life is discussed. The results show that the graphite/epoxy (0/+45/90) deg laminate with ply thickness 0.125 in. has 500,000 cycles life for applied stress to laminate strength ratio of 0.6 and a reliability of 0.999. Also, the fatigue life reliability has been found to be most sensitive to the ply thickness and matrix tensile strength. Tighter quality controls must therefore be enforced on ply thickness and matrix strength in order to achieve high reliability of the structure.

  20. Stress and Damage in Polymer Matrix Composite Materials Due to Material Degradation at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McManus, Hugh L.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes analytical methods for calculating stresses and damage caused by degradation of the matrix constituent in polymer matrix composite materials. Laminate geometry, material properties, and matrix degradation states are specified as functions of position and time. Matrix shrinkage and property changes are modeled as functions of the degradation states. The model is incorporated into an existing composite mechanics computer code. Stresses, strains, and deformations at the laminate, ply, and micro levels are calculated, and from these calculations it is determined if there is failure of any kind. The rationale for the model (based on published experimental work) is presented, its integration into the laminate analysis code is outlined, and example results are given, with comparisons to existing material and structural data. The mechanisms behind the changes in properties and in surface cracking during long-term aging of polyimide matrix composites are clarified. High-temperature-material test methods are also evaluated.

  1. Controlled release evaluation of bacterial fertilizer using polymer composites as matrix.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chin-San

    2008-11-24

    The use of polybutylene succinate (PBSU)/starch-type composite as biodegradable matrix material for the controlled release of bacterial fertilizer was evaluated. The composites were prepared by a melting-blending method and various methods/instruments were applied to characterize composites and PBSU. The mechanical properties of the PBSU/starch composite were worse than PBSU alone because the former had poor compatibility between starch and the polymer matrix. Much better dispersion and homogeneity were observed in the composite when PBSU was replaced by acrylic acid grafted PBSU (PBSU-g-AA), hence leading to better mechanical properties of PBSU-g-AA/starch. Furthermore, PBSU-g-AA/starch was more easily processed. The bacterial fertilizer was encapsulated in PBSU and PBSU-g-AA/starch matrix. Increased blending of starch increased the biodegradability of matrix and the amount and rate of cell release from matrix suggesting that this composite is a promising candidate material for 'controlled release' bacterial fertilizer.

  2. Advanced Measurements of Silicon Carbide Ceramic Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Farhad Farzbod; Stephen J. Reese; Zilong Hua; Marat Khafizov; David H. Hurley

    2012-08-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is being considered as a fuel cladding material for accident tolerant fuel under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Division of the Department of Energy. Silicon carbide has many potential advantages over traditional zirconium based cladding systems. These include high melting point, low susceptibility to corrosion, and low degradation of mechanical properties under neutron irradiation. In addition, ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) made from SiC have high mechanical toughness enabling these materials to withstand thermal and mechanical shock loading. However, many of the fundamental mechanical and thermal properties of SiC CMCs depend strongly on the fabrication process. As a result, extrapolating current materials science databases for these materials to nuclear applications is not possible. The “Advanced Measurements” work package under the LWRS fuels pathway is tasked with the development of measurement techniques that can characterize fundamental thermal and mechanical properties of SiC CMCs. An emphasis is being placed on development of characterization tools that can used for examination of fresh as well as irradiated samples. The work discuss in this report can be divided into two broad categories. The first involves the development of laser ultrasonic techniques to measure the elastic and yield properties and the second involves the development of laser-based techniques to measurement thermal transport properties. Emphasis has been placed on understanding the anisotropic and heterogeneous nature of SiC CMCs in regards to thermal and mechanical properties. The material properties characterized within this work package will be used as validation of advanced materials physics models of SiC CMCs developed under the LWRS fuels pathway. In addition, it is envisioned that similar measurement techniques can be used to provide process control and quality assurance as well as measurement of

  3. Advanced Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.

    2005-01-01

    Advanced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are enabling materials for a number of demanding applications in aerospace, energy, and nuclear industries. In the aerospace systems, these materials are being considered for applications in hot sections of jet engines such as the combustor liner, vanes, nozzle components, nose cones, leading edges of reentry vehicles, and space propulsion components. Applications in the energy and environmental industries include radiant heater tubes, heat exchangers, heat recuperators, gas and diesel particulate filters, and components for land based turbines for power generation. These materials are also being considered for use in the first wall and blanket components of fusion reactors. In the last few years, a number of CMC components have been developed and successfully tested for various aerospace and ground based applications. However, a number of challenges still remain slowing the wide scale implementation of these materials. They include robust fabrication and manufacturing, assembly and integration, coatings, property modeling and life prediction, design codes and databases, repair and refurbishment, and cost. Fabrication of net and complex shape components with high density and tailorable matrix properties is quite expensive, and even then various desirable properties are not achievable. In this presentation, a number of examples of successful CMC component development and testing will be provided. In addition, critical need for robust manufacturing, joining and assembly technologies in successful implementation of these systems will be discussed.

  4. Probabilistic micromechanics and macromechanics of polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mase, G. T.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    A probabilistic evaluation of an eight ply graphite-epoxy quasi-isotropic laminate was completed using the Integrated Composite Analyzer (ICAN) in conjunction with Monte Carlo simulation and Fast Probability Integration (FPI) techniques. Probabilistic input included fiber and matrix properties, fiber misalignment, fiber volume ratio, void volume ratio, ply thickness and ply layup angle. Cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) for select laminate properties are given. To reduce the number of simulations, a Fast Probability Integration (FPI) technique was used to generate CDFs for the select properties in the absence of fiber misalignment. These CDFs were compared to a second Monte Carlo simulation done without fiber misalignment effects. It was found that FPI requires fewer simulations to obtain the cumulative distribution functions as opposed to Monte Carlo simulation techniques. Furthermore, FPI provides valuable information regarding the sensitivities of composite properties to the constituent properties, fiber volume ratio and void volume ratio.

  5. Probabilistic Evaluation of Advanced Ceramic Matrix Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abumeri, Galib H.; Chamis, Christos C.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this report is to summarize the deterministic and probabilistic structural evaluation results of two structures made with advanced ceramic composites (CMC): internally pressurized tube and uniformly loaded flange. The deterministic structural evaluation includes stress, displacement, and buckling analyses. It is carried out using the finite element code MHOST, developed for the 3-D inelastic analysis of structures that are made with advanced materials. The probabilistic evaluation is performed using the integrated probabilistic assessment of composite structures computer code IPACS. The affects of uncertainties in primitive variables related to the material, fabrication process, and loadings on the material property and structural response behavior are quantified. The primitive variables considered are: thermo-mechanical properties of fiber and matrix, fiber and void volume ratios, use temperature, and pressure. The probabilistic structural analysis and probabilistic strength results are used by IPACS to perform reliability and risk evaluation of the two structures. The results will show that the sensitivity information obtained for the two composite structures from the computational simulation can be used to alter the design process to meet desired service requirements. In addition to detailed probabilistic analysis of the two structures, the following were performed specifically on the CMC tube: (1) predicted the failure load and the buckling load, (2) performed coupled non-deterministic multi-disciplinary structural analysis, and (3) demonstrated that probabilistic sensitivities can be used to select a reduced set of design variables for optimization.

  6. Effect of fiber reinforcements on thermo-oxidative stability and mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1991-01-01

    A number of studies have investigated the thermo-oxidative behavior of polymer matrix composites. Two significant observations have been made from these research efforts: (1) fiber reinforcement has a significant effect on composite thermal stability; and (2) geometric effects must be considered when evaluating thermal aging data. A compilation of some results from these studies is presented, and this information shows the influence of the reinforcement fibers on the oxidative degradation of various polymer matrix composites. The polyimide PMR-15 was the matrix material that was used in these studies. The control composite material was reinforced with Celion 6000 graphite fiber. T-40R graphite fibers, along with some very stable ceramic fibers were selected as reinforcing fibers because of their high thermal stability. The ceramic fibers were Nicalon (silicon carbide) and Nextel 312 (alumina-silica-boron oxide). The mechanical properties of the two graphite fiber composites were significantly different, probably owing to variations in interfacial bonding between the fibers and the polyimide matrix. The Celion 6000/PMR-15 bond is very tight but the T-40/PMR-15 bond is less tight. Three oxidation mechanisms were observed: (1) the preferential oxidation of the Celion 6000 fiber ends at cut surfaces, leaving a surface of matrix material with holes where the fiber ends were originally situated; (2) preferential oxidation of the composite matrix; and (3) interfacial degradation by oxidation. The latter two mechanisms were also observed on fiber end cut surfaces. The fiber and interface attacks appeared to initiate interfiber cracking along these surfaces.

  7. Recent advances in solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ticianelli, E.A.; Srinivasan, S.; Gonzalez, E.R.

    1988-01-01

    With methods used to advance solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell technology, we are close to obtaining the goal of 1 A/cm/sup 2/ at 0.7. Higher power densities have been reported (2 A/cm/sup 2/ at 0.5 V) but only with high catalyst loading electrodes (2 mg/cm/sup 2/ and 4 mg/cm/sup 2/ at anode and cathode, respectively) and using a Dow membrane with a better conductivity and water retention characteristics. Work is in progress to ascertain performances of cells with Dow membrane impregnated electrodes and Dow membrane electrolytes. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Development of novel graphene and carbon nanotubes based multifunctional polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, S. N.; Khan, M. O.; Naguib, H. E.

    2014-05-01

    This paper investigates strategies to alter the nano-and-microstructures of carbon-based filler-reinforced polymer matrix composites (PMCs). The matrix materials being studied in this work include polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) and liquid crystal polymer (LCP). A set of experiments were performed to investigate various strategies (i) to fabricate a morphological structure within the polymer matrix; (ii) to develop a thermally and electrically conductive network of nano-scaled fillers; and (iii) to produce a thermally conductive but electrically insulative network of hybrid fillers of nano-and-micro scales. The PMCs' structure-to-property relationships, including electrical and thermal properties, were revealed. In particular, the composites' effective thermal conductivities could be increased by as much as 10-folded over the neat polymers. By structuring the embedded electrically conductive pathways in the PMCs, their electrical conductivities could be tailored to levels that ranged from those of electrical insulators to those of semi-conductors. These multifunctional carbon-based filler-reinforced PMCs are envisioned to be potential solutions of various engineering problems. For example, light-weight thermally conductive PMCs with tailored electrical conductivities can serve as a new family of materials for electronic packaging or heat management applications.

  9. Development of novel graphene and carbon nanotubes based multifunctional polymer matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, S. N. Khan, M. O. Naguib, H. E.

    2014-05-15

    This paper investigates strategies to alter the nano-and-microstructures of carbon-based filler-reinforced polymer matrix composites (PMCs). The matrix materials being studied in this work include polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) and liquid crystal polymer (LCP). A set of experiments were performed to investigate various strategies (i) to fabricate a morphological structure within the polymer matrix; (ii) to develop a thermally and electrically conductive network of nano-scaled fillers; and (iii) to produce a thermally conductive but electrically insulative network of hybrid fillers of nano-and-micro scales. The PMCs' structure-to-property relationships, including electrical and thermal properties, were revealed. In particular, the composites' effective thermal conductivities could be increased by as much as 10-folded over the neat polymers. By structuring the embedded electrically conductive pathways in the PMCs, their electrical conductivities could be tailored to levels that ranged from those of electrical insulators to those of semi-conductors. These multifunctional carbon-based filler-reinforced PMCs are envisioned to be potential solutions of various engineering problems. For example, light-weight thermally conductive PMCs with tailored electrical conductivities can serve as a new family of materials for electronic packaging or heat management applications.

  10. Study on dosimetry characteristics of polymer-CNT nanocomposites: Effect of polymer matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malekie, Shahryar; Ziaie, Farhood; Esmaeli, Abdolreza

    2016-04-01

    In this research work, the current density of polymer-carbon nanotube nanocomposite in different weight percentages of nanotubes, over the radiation absorbed dose under a fixed DC voltage for different polymer matrices such as high density polyethylene, polycarbonate, polyethylene terephthalate, polymethyl methacrylate, and polystyrene was investigated via finite element method. The predicted electrical percolation threshold values in different composites were validated by experimental results published by other scientists. The absorbed dose value was considered as multiplying of heat capacity and temperature rise of the composite, regarding the calorimetric approach. Results show that the polymer type having different characteristics of relative permittivity and heat capacity could affect the sensitivity and working dose range of the composite as a dosimeter.

  11. [LOXOCELES BITE WOUND TREATMENT WITH SYNTHETIC POLYMER MATRIX].

    PubMed

    Navarro Caballero, Ma Ascensión

    2015-05-01

    Loxocelism is a toxic condition produces by the venom inoculated by the bit of the recluse spider (genus Loxosceles). In can appear in two clinical forms: cutaneous loxocelism and viscerocutaneous Ioxocelim. The species Loxoceles rufescens, found in Spain, is responsible of cases of cutaneous loxocelism. Cutaneous loxocelism starts with an itch, later giving rise to intense pain, and it later takes either a more or less severe necrotic form or an edematous form. The latter, with a better prognosis, is the one we focus on here. The diagnosis is clinical. The systemic treatment consists in analgesics, antihistamines, corticosteroids, broad-spectrum antibiotics, and dapsone in severe cases. The local treatment is based on the cleaning and debridement of the wound, and in advanced treatments for complex wounds. It is not uncommon that such wounds require skin grafting. We present the case of an 18-year female bitten by a loxosceles on the dorsal area of the foot. She developed a deep tissue necrosis in the area. She presented systemic complications such as leucocitosis, fever, local infection and cellulitis. Systemic treatment and hospitalization were required, as well as advanced therapeutic care. Finally, cutaneous integrity was restored after 84 days.

  12. Nanoparticle and Gelation Stabilized Functional Composites of an Ionic Salt in a Hydrophobic Polymer Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Kanyas, Selin; Aydın, Derya; Kizilel, Riza; Demirel, A. Levent; Kizilel, Seda

    2014-01-01

    Polymer composites consisted of small hydrophilic pockets homogeneously dispersed in a hydrophobic polymer matrix are important in many applications where controlled release of the functional agent from the hydrophilic phase is needed. As an example, a release of biomolecules or drugs from therapeutic formulations or release of salt in anti-icing application can be mentioned. Here, we report a method for preparation of such a composite material consisted of small KCOOH salt pockets distributed in the styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) polymer matrix and demonstrate its effectiveness in anti-icing coatings. The mixtures of the aqueous KCOOH and SBS-cyclohexane solutions were firstly stabilized by adding silica nanoparticles to the emulsions and, even more, by gelation of the aqueous phase by agarose. The emulsions were observed in optical microscope to check its stability in time and characterized by rheological measurements. The dry composite materials were obtained via casting the emulsions onto the glass substrates and evaporations of the organic solvent. Composite polymer films were characterized by water contact angle (WCA) measurements. The release of KCOOH salt into water and the freezing delay experiments of water droplets on dry composite films demonstrated their anti-icing properties. It has been concluded that hydrophobic and thermoplastic SBS polymer allows incorporation of the hydrophilic pockets/phases through our technique that opens the possibility for controlled delivering of anti-icing agents from the composite. PMID:24516593

  13. Material and structural studies of metal and polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signorelli, R. A.; Serafini, T. T.; Johns, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites and design analysis methods for these materials are being developed because of the vast potential of composites for decreasing weight and/or increasing use temperature capability in aerospace systems. These composites have potential for use in airbreathing engine components as well as aeronautical and space vehicle structures. Refractory wire-superalloy composites for use up to 2200 F or more and metal-matrix composites for lower temperature applications such as aerospace structures and turbojet fan and compressor blades are under investigation and are discussed. The development of a number of resin systems, including the polyimides and polyphenylquinoxalines, is described and their potential for use at temperatures approaching 315 C (600 F) is indicated. Various molecular modifications that improve processability and/or increase thermal and oxidative resistance of the resins are also described. Structural analysis methods are discussed for determining the stresses and deformations in complex composite systems. Consideration is also given to residual stresses resulting from the curing process and to the foreign object damage problem in fan blade applications.

  14. Functionalized carbon nanotubes mixed matrix membranes of polymers of intrinsic microporosity for gas separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Muntazim Munir; Filiz, Volkan; Bengtson, Gisela; Shishatskiy, Sergey; Rahman, Mushfequr; Abetz, Volker

    2012-09-01

    The present work reports on the gas transport behavior of mixed matrix membranes (MMM) which were prepared from multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and dispersed within polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-1) matrix. The MWCNTs were chemically functionalized with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) for a better dispersion in the polymer matrix. MMM-incorporating functionalized MWCNTs (f-MWCNTs) were fabricated by dip-coating method using microporous polyacrylonitrile membrane as a support and were characterized for gas separation performance. Gas permeation measurements show that MMM incorporated with pristine or functionalized MWCNTs exhibited improved gas separation performance compared to pure PIM-1. The f-MWCNTs MMM show better performance in terms of permeance and selectivity in comparison to pristine MWCNTs. The gas permeances of the derived MMM are increased to approximately 50% without sacrificing the selectivity at 2 wt.% of f-MWCNTs' loading. The PEG groups on the MWCNTs have strong interaction with CO2 which increases the solubility of polar gas and limit the solubility of nonpolar gas, which is advantageous for CO2/N2 selectivity. The addition of f-MWCNTs inside the polymer matrix also improved the long-term gas transport stability of MMM in comparison with PIM-1. The high permeance, selectivity, and long term stability of the fabricated MMM suggest that the reported approach can be utilized in practical gas separation technology.

  15. Designing Functionalized Nanoparticles for Controlled Assembly in Polymer Matrix: Self consistent PRISM Theory and Monte Carlo simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, Arthi; Nair, Nitish

    2011-03-01

    Significant interest has grown around the ability to create hybrid materials with controlled spatial arrangement of nanoparticles mediated by a polymer matrix. By functionalizing or grafting polymers on to nanoparticle surfaces and systematically tuning the composition, chemistry, molecular weight and grafting density of the grafted polymers one can tailor the inter-particle interactions and control the assembly/dispersion of the particles in the polymer matrix. In our recent work using self-consistent Polymer Reference Interaction Site Model (PRISM) theory- Monte Carlo simulations we have shown that tailoring the monomer sequences in the grafted copolymers provides a novel route to tuning the effective inter-particle interactions between the functionalized nanoparticles in a polymer matrix. In this talk I will present how monomer sequence and molecular weights (with and without polydispersity) of the grafted polymers, compatibility of the graft and matrix polymers, and nanoparticle size affect the chain conformations of the grafted polymers and the potential of mean force between the grafted nanoparticles in the matrix.

  16. Supramolecular polymer adhesives: advanced materials inspired by nature.

    PubMed

    Heinzmann, Christian; Weder, Christoph; de Espinosa, Lucas Montero

    2016-01-21

    Due to their dynamic, stimuli-responsive nature, non-covalent interactions represent versatile design elements that can be found in nature in many molecular processes or materials, where adaptive behavior or reversible connectivity is required. Examples include molecular recognition processes, which trigger biological responses or cell-adhesion to surfaces, and a broad range of animal secreted adhesives with environment-dependent properties. Such advanced functionalities have inspired researchers to employ similar design approaches for the development of synthetic polymers with stimuli-responsive properties. The utilization of non-covalent interactions for the design of adhesives with advanced functionalities such as stimuli responsiveness, bonding and debonding on demand capability, surface selectivity or recyclability is a rapidly emerging subset of this field, which is summarized in this review. PMID:26203784

  17. Thermo-oxidative stability studies of PMR-15 polymer matrix composites reinforced with various fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to measure the thermo-oxidative stability of PMR-15 polymer matrix composites reinforced with various fibers and to observe differences in the way they degrade in air. The fibers that were studied included graphite and the thermally stable Nicalon and Nextel ceramic fibers. Weight loss rates for the different composites were assessed as a function of mechanical properties, specimen geometry, fiber sizing, and interfacial bond strength. Differences were observed in rates of weight loss, matrix cracking, geometry dependency, and fiber-sizing effects. It was shown that Celion 6000 fiber-reinforced composites do not exhibit a straight-line Arrhenius relationship at temperatures above 316 C.

  18. Modeling & processing of ceramic and polymer precursor ceramic matrix composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolin

    of filler particle reaction, microstructure evolution, at the microscale as well as transient fluid flow, heat transfer, and species transport at the macroscale. The model comprises of (i) a microscale model and (ii) a macroscale transport model, and aims to provide optimal conditions for the fabrication process of the ceramics. The porous media macroscale model for SiC-based metal-ceramic materials processing will be developed to understand the thermal polymer pyrolysis, chemical reaction of active fillers and transport phenomena in the porous media. The macroscale model will include heat and mass transfer, curing, pyrolysis, chemical reaction and crystallization in a mixture of preceramic polymers and submicron/nano-sized metal particles of uranium, zirconium, niobium, or hafnium. The effects of heating rate, sample size, size and volume ratio of the metal particles on the reaction rate and product uniformity will be studied. The microscale model will be developed for modeling the synthesis of SiC matrix and metal particles. The macroscale model provides thermal boundary conditions to the microscale model. The microscale model applies to repetitive units in the porous structure and describes mass transport, composition changes and motion of metal particles. The unit-cell is the representation unit of the source material, and it consists of several metal particles, SiC matrix and other components produced from the synthesis process. The reactions between different components, the microstructure evolution of the product will be considered. The effects of heating rate and metal particle size on species uniformity and microstructure are investigated.

  19. Multiscale characterization of chemical–mechanical interactions between polymer fibers and cementitious matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández-Cruz, Daniel; Hargis, Craig W.; Bae, Sungchul; Itty, Pierre A.; Meral, Cagla; Dominowski, Jolee; Radler, Michael J.; Kilcoyne, David A.; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.

    2014-04-01

    Together with a series of mechanical tests, the interactions and potential bonding between polymeric fibers and cementitious materials were studied using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and microtomography (lCT). Experimental results showed that these techniques have great potential to characterize the polymer fiber-hydrated cement-paste matrix interface, as well as differentiating the chemistry of the two components of a bi-polymer (hybrid) fiber the polypropylene core and the ethylene acrylic acid copolymer sheath. Similarly, chemical interactions between the hybrid fiber and the cement hydration products were observed, indicating the chemical bonding between the sheath and the hardened cement paste matrix. Microtomography allowed visualization of the performance of the samples, and the distribution and orientation of the two types of fiber in mortar. Beam flexure tests confirmed improved tensile strength of mixes containing hybrid fibers, and expansion bar tests showed similar reductions in expansion for the polypropylene and hybrid fiber mortar bars.

  20. Implementation of Laminate Theory Into Strain Rate Dependent Micromechanics Analysis of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.

    2000-01-01

    A research program is in progress to develop strain rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composites subject to impact loads. Previously, strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations developed to model the polymer matrix were implemented into a mechanics of materials based micromechanics method. In the current work, the computation of the effective inelastic strain in the micromechanics model was modified to fully incorporate the Poisson effect. The micromechanics equations were also combined with classical laminate theory to enable the analysis of symmetric multilayered laminates subject to in-plane loading. A quasi-incremental trapezoidal integration method was implemented to integrate the constitutive equations within the laminate theory. Verification studies were conducted using an AS4/PEEK composite using a variety of laminate configurations and strain rates. The predicted results compared well with experimentally obtained values.

  1. Computational Simulation of the High Strain Rate Tensile Response of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.

    2002-01-01

    A research program is underway to develop strain rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composites subject to high strain rate impact loads. Under these types of loading conditions, the material response can be highly strain rate dependent and nonlinear. State variable constitutive equations based on a viscoplasticity approach have been developed to model the deformation of the polymer matrix. The constitutive equations are then combined with a mechanics of materials based micromechanics model which utilizes fiber substructuring to predict the effective mechanical and thermal response of the composite. To verify the analytical model, tensile stress-strain curves are predicted for a representative composite over strain rates ranging from around 1 x 10(exp -5)/sec to approximately 400/sec. The analytical predictions compare favorably to experimentally obtained values both qualitatively and quantitatively. Effective elastic and thermal constants are predicted for another composite, and compared to finite element results.

  2. Analysis of Carbon Nanotube Pull-out from a Polymer Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankland, S. J. V.; Harik, V. M.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of carbon nanotube (NT) pull-out from a polymer matrix are carried out. As the NT pull-out develops in the simulation, variations in the displacement and velocities of the NT are monitored. The existence of a carbon-ring-based period in NT sliding during pull-out is identified. Linear trends in the NT velocity-force relation are observed and used to estimate an effective viscosity coefficient for interfacial sliding at the NT/polymer interface. As a result, the entire process of NT pull-out is characterized by an interfacial friction model that is based on a critical pull-out force, and an analog of Newton's friction law used to describe the NT/polymer interfacial sliding.

  3. Titanate nanotubes for reinforcement of a poly(ethylene oxide)/chitosan polymer matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porras, R.; Bavykin, D. V.; Zekonyte, J.; Walsh, F. C.; Wood, R. J.

    2016-05-01

    Soft polyethylene oxide (PEO)/chitosan mixtures, reinforced with hard titanate nanotubes (TiNTs) by co-precipitation from aqueous solution, have been used to produce compact coatings by the ‘drop-cast’ method, using water soluble PEO polymer and stable, aqueous colloidal solutions of TiNTs. The effects of the nanotube concentration and their length on the hardness and modulus of the prepared composite have been studied using nanoindentation and nanoscratch techniques. The uniformity of TiNT dispersion within the polymer matrix has been studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A remarkable increase in hardness and reduced Young’s modulus of the composites, compared to pure polymer blends, has been observed at a TiNT concentration of 25 wt %. The short (up to 30 min) ultrasound treatment of aqueous solutions containing polymers and a colloidal TiNT mixture prior to drop casting has resulted in some improvements in both hardness and reduced Young’s modulus of dry composite films, probably due to a better dispersion of ceramic nanotubes within the matrix. However, further (more than 1 h) treatment of the mixture with ultrasound resulted in a deterioration of the mechanical properties of the composite accompanied by a shortening of the nanotubes, as observed by the TEM.

  4. Titanate nanotubes for reinforcement of a poly(ethylene oxide)/chitosan polymer matrix.

    PubMed

    Porras, R; Bavykin, D V; Zekonyte, J; Walsh, F C; Wood, R J

    2016-05-13

    Soft polyethylene oxide (PEO)/chitosan mixtures, reinforced with hard titanate nanotubes (TiNTs) by co-precipitation from aqueous solution, have been used to produce compact coatings by the 'drop-cast' method, using water soluble PEO polymer and stable, aqueous colloidal solutions of TiNTs. The effects of the nanotube concentration and their length on the hardness and modulus of the prepared composite have been studied using nanoindentation and nanoscratch techniques. The uniformity of TiNT dispersion within the polymer matrix has been studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A remarkable increase in hardness and reduced Young's modulus of the composites, compared to pure polymer blends, has been observed at a TiNT concentration of 25 wt %. The short (up to 30 min) ultrasound treatment of aqueous solutions containing polymers and a colloidal TiNT mixture prior to drop casting has resulted in some improvements in both hardness and reduced Young's modulus of dry composite films, probably due to a better dispersion of ceramic nanotubes within the matrix. However, further (more than 1 h) treatment of the mixture with ultrasound resulted in a deterioration of the mechanical properties of the composite accompanied by a shortening of the nanotubes, as observed by the TEM. PMID:27039947

  5. Sulfur polymer cement as a low-level waste glass matrix encapsulant

    SciTech Connect

    Sliva, P.; Peng, Y.B.; Peeler, D.K.

    1996-01-01

    Sulfur polymer cement (SPC) is being considered as a matrix encapsulant for the Hanford low-level (activity) waste glass. SPC is an elemental sulfur polymer-stabilized thermoplastic that is fluid at 120 {degrees}C to 140{degrees}C. The candidate process would encapsulate the waste glass by mixing the glass cullet with the SPC and casting it into the container. As the primary barrier to groundwater and a key factor in controlling the local environment of the disposal system after it has been compromised, SPC plays a key role in the waste form`s long-term performance assessment. Work in fiscal year 1995 targeted several technical areas of matrix encapsulation involving SPC. A literature review was performed to evaluate potential matrix-encapsulant materials. The dissolution and corrosion behavior of SPC under static conditions was determined as a function of temperature, pH, and sample surface area/solution volume. Preliminary dynamic flow-through testing was performed. SPC formulation and properties were investigated, including controlled crystallization, phase formation, modifying polymer effects on crystallization, and SPC processibility. The interface between SPC and simulated LLW glass was examined. Interfacial chemistry and stability, the effect of water on the glass/SPC interface, and the effect of molten sulfur on the glass surface chemistry were established. Preliminary scoping experiments, involving SPC`s Tc gettering capabilities were performed. Compressive strengths of SPC and SPC/glass composites, both before and after lifetime radiation dose exposure, were determined.

  6. Molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry studies of the interactions in polymer matrix nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, James Sherwood

    A combination of computational chemistry and molecular dynamics (MD) approaches was used to study two polymer-nanoparticle composite (PNPC) systems, first a model bead spring polymer with spherical nanoparticles and generalized interactions, and second, a Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-silica system with accurate quantum chemistry (QC) based force fields. The following molecular processes, which are fundamental to the reinforcement of polymer-nanoparticle composites (PNPC), were studied: (1) the effect of nanoparticle-polymer interactions and polymer molecular weight on nanoparticle dispersion and distribution, (2) the free energy and conformational changes when stretching individual PDMS chains in a melt, and (3) the effect of silica fillers with different surface modifications on the properties of PDMS chains at the interface. In the model PNPC consisting of spherical nanoparticles in a bead-spring polymer melt, it was found that when the polymer-nanoparticle interactions were relatively weak the polymer matrix promoted nanoparticle aggregation. Increasingly attractive nanoparticle-polymer interactions led to strong adsorption of the polymer chains on the surface of the nanoparticles and promoted dispersion of the nanoparticles and were independent of polymer molecular weight. A classical force field for PDMS and its oligomers has been derived on the basis of intermolecular binding energies, molecular geometries, molecular electrostatic potentials, and conformational energies obtained from quantum chemistry calculations and in MD simulations and it accurately reproduces the properties of PDMS melts of various molecular weights. MD simulations using umbrella sampling methods to sample the free energy of stretching a PDMS oligomer in a melt of PDMS oligomers found that the restoring forces were mainly a result of the changes in entropy of the chain as the chain was contracted or stretched, and only at severe extensions did energetic contributions due to deformation

  7. Carbon fiber polymer-matrix structural composites for electrical-resistance-based sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Daojun

    This dissertation has advanced the science and technology of electrical-resistance-based sensing of strain/stress and damage using continuous carbon fiber epoxy-matrix composites, which are widely used for aircraft structures. In particular, it has extended the technology of self-sensing of carbon fiber polymer-matrix composites from uniaxial longitudinal loading and flexural loading to uniaxial through-thickness loading and has extended the technology from structural composite self-sensing to the use of the composite (specifically a one-lamina composite) as an attached sensor. Through-thickness compression is encountered in the joining of composite components by fastening. Uniaxial through-thickness compression results in strain-induced reversible decreases in the through-thickness and longitudinal volume resistivities, due to increase in the fiber-fiber contact in the through-thickness direction, and minor-damage-induced irreversible changes in these resistivities. The Poisson effect plays a minor role. The effects in the longitudinal resistivity are small compared to those in the through-thickness direction, but longitudinal resistance measurement is more amenable to practical implementation in structures than through-thickness resistance measurement. The irreversible effects are associated with an increase in the through-thickness resistivity and a decrease in the longitudinal resistivity. The through-thickness gage factor is up to 5.1 and decreases with increasing compressive strain above 0.2%. The reversible fractional change in through-thickness resistivity per through-thickness strain is up to 4.0 and decreases with increasing compressive strain. The irreversible fractional change in through-thickness resistivity per unit through-thickness strain is around -1.1 and is independent of the strain. The sensing is feasible by measuring the resistance away from the stressed region, though the effectiveness is less than that at the stressed region. A one

  8. Influence of interphase morphology on adhesion and composite durability in semicrystalline polymer matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.L. Jr.; Kander, R.G.

    1996-12-31

    The microstructure of the interphase in semicrystalline polymer matrix composites has a dramatic influence on their mechanical properties. Studies have been performed to alter this region and to correlate various interphase morphologies with changes in fiber-matrix adhesion. A reinforced nylon 66 composite, when subjected to specific thermal histories, contains an interphase composed of transcrystallinity. This region has been altered by coating fibers with a diluent, poly(vinyl pyrrolidone), and/or adding the diluent to the matrix material in very small quantities. Interphase morphology was investigated with optical microscopy, and adhesion was measured using a modified fiber pull-out test. It was found that transcrystallinity increases the interfacial shear strength. The effect different interphase morphologies have on the durability of bulk composite samples is currently under investigation.

  9. Full eigenvalues of the Markov matrix for scale-free polymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongzhi; Guo, Xiaoye; Lin, Yuan

    2014-08-01

    Much important information about the structural and dynamical properties of complex systems can be extracted from the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a Markov matrix associated with random walks performed on these systems, and spectral methods have become an indispensable tool in the complex system analysis. In this paper, we study the Markov matrix of a class of scale-free polymer networks. We present an exact analytical expression for all the eigenvalues and determine explicitly their multiplicities. We then use the obtained eigenvalues to derive an explicit formula for the random target access time for random walks on the studied networks. Furthermore, based on the link between the eigenvalues of the Markov matrix and the number of spanning trees, we confirm the validity of the obtained eigenvalues and their corresponding degeneracies.

  10. Advanced composites: Environmental effects on selected resin matrix materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welhart, E. K.

    1976-01-01

    The effects that expected space flight environment has upon the mechanical properties of epoxy and polyimide matrix composites were analyzed. Environmental phenomena covered water immersion, high temperature aging, humidity, lightning strike, galvanic action, electromagnetic interference, thermal shock, rain and sand erosion, and thermal/vacuum outgassing. The technology state-of-the-art for graphite and boron reinforced epoxy and polyimide matrix materials is summarized to determine the relative merit of using composites in the space shuttle program. Resin matrix composites generally are affected to some degree by natural environmental phenomena with polyimide resin matrix materials less affected than epoxies.

  11. Performance of dielectric nanocomposites: matrix-free, hairy nanoparticle assemblies and amorphous polymer-nanoparticle blends.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Christopher A; Koerner, Hilmar; Meth, Jeffrey S; Dang, Alei; Hui, Chin Ming; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Bockstaller, Michael R; Durstock, Michael F; Vaia, Richard A

    2014-12-10

    Demands to increase the stored energy density of electrostatic capacitors have spurred the development of materials with enhanced dielectric breakdown, improved permittivity, and reduced dielectric loss. Polymer nanocomposites (PNCs), consisting of a blend of amorphous polymer and dielectric nanofillers, have been studied intensely to satisfy these goals; however, nanoparticle aggregates, field localization due to dielectric mismatch between particle and matrix, and the poorly understood role of interface compatibilization have challenged progress. To expand the understanding of the inter-relation between these factors and, thus, enable rational optimization of low and high contrast PNC dielectrics, we compare the dielectric performance of matrix-free hairy nanoparticle assemblies (aHNPs) to blended PNCs in the regime of low dielectric contrast to establish how morphology and interface impact energy storage and breakdown across different polymer matrices (polystyrene, PS, and poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA) and nanoparticle loadings (0-50% (v/v) silica). The findings indicate that the route (aHNP versus blending) to well-dispersed morphology has, at most, a minor impact on breakdown strength trends with nanoparticle volume fraction; the only exception being at intermediate loadings of silica in PMMA (15% (v/v)). Conversely, aHNPs show substantial improvements in reducing dielectric loss and maintaining charge/discharge efficiency. For example, low-frequency dielectric loss (1 Hz-1 kHz) of PS and PMMA aHNP films was essentially unchanged up to a silica content of 50% (v/v), whereas traditional blends showed a monotonically increasing loss with silica loading. Similar benefits are seen via high-field polarization loop measurements where energy storage for ∼15% (v/v) silica loaded PMMA and PS aHNPs were 50% and 200% greater than respective comparable PNC blends. Overall, these findings on low dielectric contrast PNCs clearly point to the performance benefits of

  12. Processing and Material Characterization of Continuous Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Polymer Derived Ceramics.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah B.

    2014-01-01

    The need for high performance vehicles in the aerospace industry requires materials which can withstand high loads and high temperatures. New developments in launch pads and infrastructure must also be made to handle this intense environment with lightweight, reusable, structural materials. By using more functional materials, better performance can be seen in the launch environment, and launch vehicle designs which have not been previously used can be considered. The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer matrix composites can be used for temperatures up to 260C. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in the composites. In this study, continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. The oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing have been performed on test panels and the test results are presented.

  13. Temperature Stability and Bioadhesive Properties of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Incorporated Hydroxypropylcellulose Polymer Matrix Systems

    PubMed Central

    Repka, Michael A.; Munjal, Manish; ElSohly, Mahmoud A.; Ross, Samir A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the bioadhesive profiles of hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) polymer matrices as a function of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) content. In addition, the effect of processing temperature on the stability of THC and its extent of degradation to cannabinol (CBN) was investigated. A hot-melt cast molding method was used to prepare HPC polymer matrix systems incorporated with THC at 0, 4, 8, and 16 percent. Bioadhesive measurements including peak adhesive force, area under the curve, and elongation at adhesive failure were recorded utilizing the TA.XT2i Texture Analyzer™. Data obtained from these tests at various contact time intervals suggested that the incorporation of THC led to an increase in the bioadhesive strength of the HPC polymer matrices. To determine the stability of THC and the resulting CBN content in the matrices, three different processing temperatures were utilized (120, 160, and 200°C). Post-production High Performance Liquid Chromotography (HPLC) analysis revealed that the processed systems contained at least 94% of THC and the relative percent formation of CBN was 0.5% at 120°C and 0.4% at 160°C compared to 1.6% at 200°C. These findings indicate that the cannabinoid may be a plausible candidate for incorporation into systems utilizing hot-melt extrusion techniques for the development of an effective mucoadhesive transmucosal matrix system for delivery of THC. PMID:16455601

  14. Two approaches to the model drug immobilization into conjugated polymer matrix.

    PubMed

    Krukiewicz, Katarzyna; Stokfisz, Anna; Zak, Jerzy K

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop biocompatible and conducting coating being carrier of biologically active compounds with the potential use in neuroprosthetics. Conducting polypyrrole matrix has been used to immobilize and release model drugs, quercetin and ciprofloxacin. Two routes of immobilization are described: drugs have been incorporated in the polymer matrix in the course of the electropolymerization process or after polymerization, in the course of polymer oxidation. Using UV/Vis spectroscopic detection we demonstrate that both immobilization approaches display different drug-loading efficiencies. In the case of ciprofloxacin, drug incorporation following synthesis is a more efficient immobilization approach (final drug concentration: 43.3 (±9.5) μM/cm(2)), while for quercetin the highest loading is accomplished by drug incorporation during synthesis (final drug concentration: 29.1 (±5.9) μM/cm(2)). The process of drug incorporation results in the variation of surface morphology with respect to the method of immobilization as well as the choice of drug. The results prove that electrochemical methods are efficient procedures for making multifunctional polymer matrices which might be perspective bioactive coatings for implantable neuroprosthetic devices.

  15. Imaging of Au nanoparticles deeply buried in polymer matrix by various atomic force microscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kuniko; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2013-10-01

    Recently, some papers reported successful imaging of subsurface features using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Some theoretical studies have also been presented, however the imaging mechanisms are not fully understood yet. In the preceeding papers, imaging of deeply buried nanometer-scale features has been successful only if they were buried in a soft matrix. In this paper, subsurface features (Au nanoparticles) buried in a soft polymer matrix were visualized. To elucidate the imaging mechanisms, various AFM techniques; heterodyne force microscopy, ultrasonic atomic force microscopy (UAFM), 2nd-harmonic UAFM and force modulation microscopy (FMM) were employed. The particles buried under 960 nm from the surface were successfully visualized which has never been achieved. The results elucidated that it is important for subsurface imaging to choose a cantilever with a suitable stiffness range for a matrix. In case of using the most suitable cantilever, the nanoparticles were visualized using every technique shown above except for FMM. The experimental results suggest that the subsurface features buried in a soft matrix with a depth of at least 1 µm can affect the local viscoelasticity (mainly viscosity) detected as the variation of the amplitude and phase of the tip oscillation on the surface. This phenomenon presumably makes it possible to visualize such deeply buried nanometer-scale features in a soft matrix. PMID:23770541

  16. Effect of fiber reinforcement on thermo-oxidative stability and mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, K. J.

    1992-01-01

    A number of studies have investigated the thermooxidative behavior of polymer matrix composites. Two significant observations have been made from these research efforts: (1) fiber reinforcement has a significant effect on composite thermal stability; and (2) geometric effects must be considered when evaluating thermal aging data. The polyimide PMR-15 was the matrix material used in these studies. The control composite material was reinforced with Celion 6000 graphite fiber. T-4OR graphite fibers, along with some very stable ceramic fibers were selected as reinforcing fibers because of their high thermal stability. The ceramic fibers were Nicalon (silicon carbide) and Nextel 312 (alumina-silica-boron oxide). The mechanical properties of the two graphite fiber composites were significantly different, probably owing to variations in interfacial bonding between the fibers and the polyimide matrix. Three oxidation mechanisms were observed: (1) the preferential oxidation of the Celion 6000 fiber ends at cut surfaces, leaving a surface of matrix material with holes where the fiber ends were originally situated; (2) preferential oxidation of the composite matrix; and (3) interfacial degradation by oxidation. The latter two mechanisms were also observed on fiber end cut surfaces. The fiber and interface attacks appeared to initiate interfiber cracking along these surfaces.

  17. Optimal Substrate Preheating Model for Thermal Spray Deposition of Thermosets onto Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivosevic, M.; Knight, R.; Kalidindi, S. R.; Palmese, G. R.; Tsurikov, A.; Sutter, J. K.

    2003-01-01

    High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) sprayed, functionally graded polyimide/WC-Co composite coatings on polymer matrix composites (PMC's) are being investigated for applications in turbine engine technologies. This requires that the polyimide, used as the matrix material, be fully crosslinked during deposition in order to maximize its engineering properties. The rapid heating and cooling nature of the HVOF spray process and the high heat flux through the coating into the substrate typically do not allow sufficient time at temperature for curing of the thermoset. It was hypothesized that external substrate preheating might enhance the deposition behavior and curing reaction during the thermal spraying of polyimide thermosets. A simple analytical process model for the deposition of thermosetting polyimide onto polymer matrix composites by HVOF thermal spray technology has been developed. The model incorporates various heat transfer mechanisms and enables surface temperature profiles of the coating to be simulated, primarily as a function of substrate preheating temperature. Four cases were modeled: (i) no substrate preheating; (ii) substrates electrically preheated from the rear; (iii) substrates preheated by hot air from the front face; and (iv) substrates electrically preheated from the rear and by hot air from the front.

  18. Self-assembly in a polymer matrix and its impact on phase separation.

    PubMed

    Dudowicz, Jacek; Douglas, Jack F; Freed, Karl F

    2009-03-26

    Molecular self-assembly often occurs in the presence of long chain polymers, and we develop a theory to describe the competition between self-assembly and phase separation that generally occurs in these complex fluid mixtures. The theory includes a description of the particularly interesting situation where the associating "monomeric" species form high molecular mass polymeric structures and where the assembly process transforms the phase boundary from a form typical of a polymer solution to one that more resembles a polymer blend. We consider both self-assembly upon cooling and upon heating, but the van der Waals interactions are chosen so that phase separation occurs only upon cooling in the absence of association. Systems that associate upon heating prove to be particularly rich, and closed loop and ordinary (upper solution critical) phase boundaries are found to coexist over a wide range of interaction parameter values. Each critical temperature in the limit of a large polymerization index for the matrix polymers approaches its respective theta temperature. The calculations elucidate basic physical principles governing the phase behavior of these complex mixtures.

  19. A comparative study on industrial waste fillers affecting mechanical properties of polymer-matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkliğ, Ahmet; Alsaadi, Mohamad; Bulut, Mehmet

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates the mechanical properties of the various inorganic filler-filled polymer composites. Sewage sludge ash (SSA), fly ash (FA) and silicon carbide (SiC) micro-particles were used as filler in the polyester resin. Composite samples were prepared with various filler content of 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt%. The results indicated that the tensile and flexural strength increased at the particle content of 5 wt% and then followed a decreasing trend with further particle inclusion. The tensile and flexural modulus values of the particulate polyester composites were significantly enhanced compared with the unfilled polyester composite. SEM micrograph results showed good indication for dispersion of FA, SSA and SiC particles within the polymer matrix.

  20. Sulfur polymer cement as a low-level waste glass matrix encapsulant

    SciTech Connect

    Sliva, P.; Peng, Y.B.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1995-12-31

    Sulfur polymer cement (SPC) is being considered as a matrix encapsulant for the Hanford low-level (activity) waste glass. SPC is an elemental sulfur polymer-stabilized thermoplastic that is fluid at 140{degrees}C. The candidate process would encapsulate the glass by filling the waste container with glass (e.g., as cullet) and backfiring with SPC to form a composite. As the primary barrier to groundwater, SPC plays a key role in the waste form`s long-term performance assessment. Work to date has targeted both the performance characteristics of the SPC alone and its potential influence on the glass. Bulk properties of the glass-SPC composite will be discussed along with glass-SPC interface characteristics. Properties that will be addressed include SPC properties, mechanical strength of the composite and the glass-SPC interface, glass-SPC interface chemistry, glass-SPC aqueous durability, and radiation effects.

  1. Multi-scale mechanism based life prediction of polymer matrix composites for high temperature airframe applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyaya, Priyank

    A multi-scale mechanism-based life prediction model is developed for high-temperature polymer matrix composites (HTPMC) for high temperature airframe applications. In the first part of this dissertation the effect of Cloisite 20A (C20A) nano-clay compounding on the thermo-oxidative weight loss and the residual stresses due to thermal oxidation for a thermoset polymer bismaleimide (BMI) are investigated. A three-dimensional (3-D) micro-mechanics based finite element analysis (FEA) was conducted to investigate the residual stresses due to thermal oxidation using an in-house FEA code (NOVA-3D). In the second part of this dissertation, a novel numerical-experimental methodology is outlined to determine cohesive stress and damage evolution parameters for pristine as well as isothermally aged (in air) polymer matrix composites. A rate-dependent viscoelastic cohesive layer model was implemented in an in-house FEA code to simulate the delamination initiation and propagation in unidirectional polymer composites before and after aging. Double cantilever beam (DCB) experiments were conducted (at UT-Dallas) on both pristine and isothermally aged IM-7/BMI composite specimens to determine the model parameters. The J-Integral based approach was adapted to extract cohesive stresses near the crack tip. Once the damage parameters had been characterized, the test-bed FEA code employed a micromechanics based viscoelastic cohesive layer model to numerically simulate the DCB experiment. FEA simulation accurately captures the macro-scale behavior (load-displacement history) simultaneously with the micro-scale behavior (crack-growth history).

  2. NASA Glenn/AADC-Rolls Royce Collaborated to Measure Erosion Resistance on Coated Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Sutter, James K.; Mondry, Richard; Ma, Kong; Horan, Dick; Naik, Subhash; Cupp, Randall

    2003-01-01

    Polymer matrix composites (PMCs) are increasingly used in aerospace and automotive applications because of their light weight and high strength-to-weight ratio relative to metals. However, a major drawback of PMCs is poor abrasion resistance, which restricts their use, especially at high temperatures. Simply applying a hard coating on PMCs to improve abrasion and erosion resistance is not effective since coating durability is short lived (ref. 1). Generally, PMCs have higher coefficients of thermal expansion than metallic or ceramic coatings have, and coating adhesion suffers because of poor interfacial adhesion strength. One technique commonly used to improve coating adhesion or durability is the use of bond coats that are interleaved between a coating and a substrate with vastly different coefficients of thermal expansion. An example of this remedy is the use of bondcoats for ceramic thermal barrier coatings on metallic turbine components (ref. 2). Prior collaborative research between the NASA Glenn Research Center and the Allison Advanced Development Company (AADC) demonstrated that bond coats sandwiched between PMCs and high-quality plasma-sprayed, erosion-resistant coatings substantially improved the erosion resistance of PMCs (ref. 3). One unresolved problem in this earlier collaboration was that there was no easy, accurate way to measure the coating erosion wear scar. Coating wear was determined by both profilometry and optical microscopy. Both techniques are time consuming. Wear measurement by optical microscopy requires sample destruction and does not provide a comprehensive measure of the entire wear volume. An even more subtle, yet critical, problem is that these erosion coatings contain two or more materials with different densities. Therefore, simply measuring specimen mass loss before and after erosion will not provide an accurate gauge for coating and/or substrate volume loss. By using a noncontact technique called scanning optical interferometry

  3. [Alteration of white rats brain tissue inducted by assessment of silver nanocomposite incapsulated in polymer matrix].

    PubMed

    Titov, E A; Sosedova, L M; Novikov, M A

    2015-01-01

    The paper present experimental materials of intragastric administration of silver nanoparticles encapsulated in polymer matrix of arabinogalactan by white outbred male rats. Animals were injected "pure" arabinogalactan and colloid silver solution containing silver macroform separately for comparison. Research provided data about status of brain tissue at the impact of these substances on organism. Histological analysis revealed the presence of a pathological process, character and intensity of which varied depending on the type of injected material. Pathological process under the influence of silver-arabinogalactan characterized by appearance in brain tissue of perivascular edema and development of acute inflammation in formation of glial scars, swelling of vascular bundles in sum. PMID:27116877

  4. Method and apparatus for evaluating structural weakness in polymer matrix composites

    DOEpatents

    Wachter, E.A.; Fisher, W.G.

    1996-01-09

    A method and apparatus for evaluating structural weaknesses in polymer matrix composites is described. An object to be studied is illuminated with laser radiation and fluorescence emanating therefrom is collected and filtered. The fluorescence is then imaged and the image is studied to determine fluorescence intensity over the surface of the object being studied and the wavelength of maximum fluorescent intensity. Such images provide a map of the structural integrity of the part being studied and weaknesses, particularly weaknesses created by exposure of the object to heat, are readily visible in the image. 6 figs.

  5. Method and apparatus for evaluating structural weakness in polymer matrix composites

    DOEpatents

    Wachter, Eric A.; Fisher, Walter G.

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus for evaluating structural weaknesses in polymer matrix composites is described. An object to be studied is illuminated with laser radiation and fluorescence emanating therefrom is collected and filtered. The fluorescence is then imaged and the image is studied to determine fluorescence intensity over the surface of the object being studied and the wavelength of maximum fluorescent intensity. Such images provide a map of the structural integrity of the part being studied and weaknesses, particularly weaknesses created by exposure of the object to heat, are readily visible in the image.

  6. Optically transparent bionanofiber composites with low sensitivity to refractive index of the polymer matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogi, Masaya; Handa, Keishin; Nakagaito, Antonio Norio; Yano, Hiroyuki

    2005-12-01

    Transparent polymers were reinforced by bacterial cellulose (BC) nanofibers, which are 10×50nm ribbon-shaped fibers. They exhibited high luminous transmittance at a fiber content as high as 60 wt %, and low sensitivity to a variety of refractive indices of matrix resins. Due to the nanofiber size effect, high transparency was obtained against a wider distribution of refractive index of resins from 1.492 to 1.636 at 20 °C. The optical transparency was also surprisingly insensitive to temperature increases up to 80 °C. As such, BC nanofibers appear to be viable candidates for optically transparent reinforcement.

  7. MS&T'13 Symposium Preview: Metal and Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Nikhil; Paramsothy, Muralidharan

    2013-08-01

    The Metal and Polymer Matrix Composites symposium at Materials Science & Technology 2013 (MS&T'13) conference is planned to provide a platform to researchers working on various aspects of composite materials and capture the state of the art in this area. The dialogue among leading researchers is expected to provide insight into the future of this field and identify the future directions in terms of research, development, and applications of composite materials. In the 2 day program, the symposium includes 34 presentations, including 10 invited presentations. The contributions have come from 16 different countries including USA, Mexico, Switzerland, India, Egypt, and Singapore.

  8. Assessment of Erosion Resistance of Coated Polymer Matrix Composites for Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Sutter, James K.; Horan, Richard A.; Naik, Subhash K.; Cupp, Randall J.

    2004-01-01

    The erosion behavior of tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) coated and uncoated polymer matrix composites (PMCs) was examined with solid particle impingement using air jets. Erosion tests were conducted with Arizona road dust impinging at 20 degrees, 60 degrees, and 90 degrees angles at a velocity of 229 meters per second at both 294 and 366 K. Noncontact optical profilometry was used to measure the wear volume loss. Results indicate that the WC-Co coating enhanced erosion resistance and reduced erosion wear volume loss by a factor of nearly 2. This should contribute to longer wear lives, reduced related breakdowns, decreased maintenance costs, and increased product reliability.

  9. [Alteration of white rats brain tissue inducted by assessment of silver nanocomposite incapsulated in polymer matrix].

    PubMed

    Titov, E A; Sosedova, L M; Novikov, M A

    2015-01-01

    The paper present experimental materials of intragastric administration of silver nanoparticles encapsulated in polymer matrix of arabinogalactan by white outbred male rats. Animals were injected "pure" arabinogalactan and colloid silver solution containing silver macroform separately for comparison. Research provided data about status of brain tissue at the impact of these substances on organism. Histological analysis revealed the presence of a pathological process, character and intensity of which varied depending on the type of injected material. Pathological process under the influence of silver-arabinogalactan characterized by appearance in brain tissue of perivascular edema and development of acute inflammation in formation of glial scars, swelling of vascular bundles in sum.

  10. The effect of receptor-polymer matrix compatibility on electrochemical properties of PEO-based polymer electrolytes containing supramolecular additives. Part 2. Ionic transport study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, M.; Sołgała, A.; Siekierski, M.; Pawłowska, M.; Rokicki, G.; Wieczorek, W.

    Poly(ethylene oxide)-lithium salt composite electrolytes containing two different derivatives of calix[4]arene were tested as anion complexing agents for I - and CF 3SO 3 -. Both calix[4]arene derivatives studied have identical anion coordination groups but they have different compatibility with the polymer matrix obtained by chemical linking of the oligo(ethylene oxide) chains to one of the studied calixarenes. The impedance spectroscopy studies showed that the addition of the anion receptor significantly changes the conductivity. The character of this changes strongly depends on the receptor used while the electrochemical stability of these two calixarene receptors measured by cyclic voltammetry is similar. It was also proved that addition of the anion receptor strongly changes the polymer matrix morphology and thermal behavior. By the comparison with the liquid systems which electrical properties were similar to the polymer matrix, we can assume that these changes are a result of anion-receptor interactions.

  11. Particle-matrix interfacial bonding: Effect on the fracture properties of rubber-modified epoxy polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.; Kinloch, A.J.; Bertsch, R.J.; Siebert, A.R.

    1993-12-31

    This study employed various butadiene-acrylonitrile rubbers and showed that both the functionality of the end groups and the acrylonitrile content have a strong influence on the microstructure and the interfacial bonding that are observed in the resulting rubber-toughened epoxy. For the rubbers examined, significant toughening is recorded only when the rubber forms a separate phase in the epoxy matrix with a particle size on the order of micrometers. These microstructural features are affected by both the functionality of the end groups and the acrylonitrile content of the rubber employed. However, once phase separation of the rubber has been achieved to give particles on the order of micrometers in size, then the interfacial bonding between the rubber particles and the epoxy matrix has only a small effect on the fracture properties of the rubber-toughened epoxy polymers. 28 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Polymer matrix composites on LDEF experiments M0003-9 and M0003-10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steckel, Gary L.; Cookson, Thomas; Blair, Christopher

    1992-01-01

    Over 250 polymer matrix composites were exposed to the natural space environment on Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) experiments M0003-9 and 10. The experiments included a wide variety of epoxy, thermoplastic, polyimide, and bismalimide matrix composites reinforced with graphite, glass, or organic fibers. A review of the significant observations and test results obtained to date is presented. Estimated recession depths from atomic oxygen exposure are reported and the resulting surface morphologies are discussed. The effects of the LDEF exposure on the flexural strength and modulus, short beam shear strength, and coefficient of thermal expansion of several classes of bare and coated composites are reviewed. Lap shear data are presented for composite-to-composite and composite-to-aluminum alloy samples that were prepared using different bonding techniques and subsequently flown on LDEF.

  13. Advanced composites: Fabrication processes for selected resin matrix materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welhart, E. K.

    1976-01-01

    This design note is based on present state of the art for epoxy and polyimide matrix composite fabrication technology. Boron/epoxy and polyimide and graphite/epoxy and polyimide structural parts can be successfully fabricated. Fabrication cycles for polyimide matrix composites have been shortened to near epoxy cycle times. Nondestructive testing has proven useful in detecting defects and anomalies in composite structure elements. Fabrication methods and tooling materials are discussed along with the advantages and disadvantages of different tooling materials. Types of honeycomb core, material costs and fabrication methods are shown in table form for comparison. Fabrication limits based on tooling size, pressure capabilities and various machining operations are also discussed.

  14. Polymers as advanced materials for desiccant applications, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Czanderna, A.W.; Neidlinger, H.H.

    1990-09-01

    This report documents work to identify a next-generation, low-cost material with which solar energy or heat from another low-cost energy source can be used for regenerating the water vapor sorption activity of the desiccant. The objective of the work is to determine how the desired sorption performance of advanced desiccant materials can be predicted by understanding the role of the material modifications and material surfaces. The work concentrates on solid materials to be used for desiccant cooling systems and which process water vapor in an atmosphere to produce cooling. The work involved preparing modifications of polystyrene sulfonic acid sodium salt, synthesizing a hydrogel, and evaluating the sorption performances of these and similar commercially available polymeric materials; all materials were studied for their potential application in solid commercial desiccant cooling systems. Background information is also provided on desiccant cooling systems and the role of a desiccant material within such a system, and it includes the use of polymers as desiccant materials. 31 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Matrix effects in nilotinib formulations with pH-responsive polymer produced by carbon dioxide-mediated precipitation.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Stefano; Brisander, Magnus; Haglöf, Jakob; Sjövall, Peter; Andersson, Per; Østergaard, Jesper; Malmsten, Martin

    2015-10-15

    Factors determining the pH-controlled dissolution kinetics of nilotinib formulations with the pH-titrable polymer hydroxypropyl methylcellulose phthalate, obtained by carbon dioxide-mediated precipitation, were mechanistically examined in acid and neutral environment. The matrix effect, modulating the drug dissolution, was characterized with a battery of physicochemical methodologies, including ToF-SIMS for surface composition, SAXS/WAXS and modulated DSC for crystallization characterization, and simultaneous UV-imaging and Raman spectroscopy for monitoring the dissolution process in detail. The hybrid particle formulations investigated consisted of amorphous nilotinib embedded in a polymer matrix in single continuous phase, displaying extended retained amorphicity also under wet conditions. It was demonstrated by Raman and FTIR spectroscopy that the efficient drug dispersion and amorphization in the polymer matrix were mediated by hydrogen bonding between the drug and the phthalate groups on the polymer. Simultaneous Raman and UV-imaging studies of the effect of drug load on the swelling and dissolution of the polymer matrix revealed that high nilotinib load prevented matrix swelling on passage from acid to neutral pH, thereby preventing re-precipitation and re-crystallization of incorporated nilotinib. These findings provide a mechanistic foundation of formulation development of nilotinib and other protein kinase inhibitors, which are now witnessing an intense therapeutic and industrial attention due to the difficulty in formulating these compounds so that efficient oral bioavailability is reached.

  16. Polymer Matrix Role in Light Absorption and Emission by Nano-CdS/PVA Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalchuk, Andrii; Rudko, Galyna; Fediv, Volodymyr; Ren, Qijun; Buyanova, Irina; Chen, Weimin; Department of Optics Team; Department of Biophysics and Medical Informatics Team; Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology Team

    2013-03-01

    Influence of a polymeric medium on the light absorption and emission processes of composite nano-CdS/polyvinyl alcohol is studied by activating different absorption-emission routes via changing of excitation wavelengths. The mechanisms are analyzed by employing the time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. It is shown that the polymeric component of the composite contributes mainly to the excitation processes of photoluminescence via absorption of external laser excitation and its following transfer to the CdS nanoparticles that are incorporated into polymer matrix. The composite emission occurs mostly within the nanoparticles. It is also shown that time-decays of the photoluminescence emission from the CdS nanoparticles embedded in the composite depend on the excitation wavelength. Such behavior is ascribed to the interplay between the intrinsic nanoparticles excitation and extrinsic feeding of the nanoparticles via energy transfer from the excited polymer matrix. Possible mechanisms of the observed energy transfer are also discussed. Financial support from the Swedish Institute via Visby program is greatly appreciated.

  17. Photoluminescence properties of cadmium-selenide quantum dots embedded in a liquid-crystal polymer matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Tselikov, G. I. Timoshenko, V. Yu.; Plenge, J.; Ruehl, E.; Shatalova, A. M.; Shandryuk, G. A.; Merekalov, A. S.; Tal'roze, R. V.

    2013-05-15

    The photoluminescence properties of cadmium-selenide (CdSe) quantum dots with an average size of {approx}3 nm, embedded in a liquid-crystal polymer matrix are studied. It was found that an increase in the quantum-dot concentration results in modification of the intrinsic (exciton) photoluminescence spectrum in the range 500-600 nm and a nonmonotonic change in its intensity. Time-resolved measurements show the biexponential decay of the photoluminescence intensity with various ratios of fast and slow components depending on the quantum-dot concentration. In this case, the characteristic lifetimes of exciton photoluminescence are 5-10 and 35-50 ns for the fast and slow components, respectively, which is much shorter than the times for colloidal CdSe quantum dots of the same size. The observed features of the photoluminescence spectra and kinetics are explained by the effects of light reabsorption, energy transfer from quantum dots to the liquid-crystal polymer matrix, and the effect of the electronic states at the CdSe/(liquid crystal) interface.

  18. Long-term water-aging of whisker-reinforced polymer-matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Xu, H H K

    2003-01-01

    Long-term water exposure may degrade polymer-matrix composites. This study investigated the water-aging of whisker composites. It was hypothesized that whiskers would provide stable and substantial reinforcement, and that whisker type would affect water-aging resistance. Silica-fused Si(3)N(4) and SiC whiskers were incorporated into a resin. The specimens were tested by three-point flexure and nano-indentation vs. water-aging for 1 to 730 days. After 730 days, SiC composite had a strength (mean +/- SD; n = 6) of 185 +/- 33 MPa, similar to 146 +/- 44 MPa for Si(3)N(4) composite (p = 0.064); both were significantly higher than 67 +/- 23 MPa for an inlay/onlay control (p < 0.001). Compared with 1 day, the strength of the SiC composite showed no decrease, while that of the Si(3)N(4) composite decreased. The decrease was due to whisker weakening rather than to resin degradation or interface breakdown. Whisker composites also had higher moduli than the controls. In conclusion, silica-fused whiskers bonded to polymer matrix and resisted long-term water attack, resulting in much stronger composites than the controls after water-aging.

  19. Matrix polymer species have distinct effects on the mechanics of bacterial biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovach, Kristin; Davis-Fields, Megan; Gordon, Vernita

    2015-03-01

    Biofilms are aggregates of microorganisms embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymer matrix. The matrix confers protection to these microorganisms against mechanical and chemical stresses that they may experience in their environment. The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is widely used as a model biofilm-forming organism because it is an opportunistic human pathogen common in hospital-acquired infections, in chronic wounds, and in cystic fibrosis lung disease. P. aeruginosa strain PA01 forms biofilms that are primarily structured by the extracellular polysaccharides Pel and Psl. Using bulk rheological measurements, we show that these polysaccharides each play a unique role in the mechanical robustness of the biofilm. Psl increases the elastic storage modulus while Pel increases the ductility of the biofilm. Increased expression of either Psl or Pel increases the yield stress by about the same amount. Identifying the mechanism(s) by which these polymers contribute to the mechanical toughness of the biofilm could allow new approaches to effective biofilm clearance, by revealing targets for disruption that would weaken the biofilm.

  20. An Analysis of Nondestructive Evaluation Techniques for Polymer Matrix Composite Sandwich Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgriff, Laura M.; Roberts, Gary D.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Zheng, Diahua; Averbeck, Timothy; Roth, Donald J.; Jeanneau, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Structural sandwich materials composed of triaxially braided polymer matrix composite material face sheets sandwiching a foam core are being utilized for applications including aerospace components and recreational equipment. Since full scale components are being made from these sandwich materials, it is necessary to develop proper inspection practices for their manufacture and in-field use. Specifically, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques need to be investigated for analysis of components made from these materials. Hockey blades made from sandwich materials and a flat sandwich sample were examined with multiple NDE techniques including thermographic, radiographic, and shearographic methods to investigate damage induced in the blades and flat panel components. Hockey blades used during actual play and a flat polymer matrix composite sandwich sample with damage inserted into the foam core were investigated with each technique. NDE images from the samples were presented and discussed. Structural elements within each blade were observed with radiographic imaging. Damaged regions and some structural elements of the hockey blades were identified with thermographic imaging. Structural elements, damaged regions, and other material variations were detected in the hockey blades with shearography. Each technique s advantages and disadvantages were considered in making recommendations for inspection of components made from these types of materials.

  1. Fabrication and characterization of novel polymer-matrix nanocomposites and their constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Rui

    Two main issues for the wide application of polymer-matrix nanocomposites need to be addressed: cost-effective processing of high-performance nanomaterials, and fundamental understanding of the nanofiller-polymer interaction related to property changes of nanocomposites. To fabricate inexpensive and robust carbon nanofibers (CNFs) by the electrospinning technique, an organosolv lignin for replacing polyacrylonitrile (PAN) precursor was investigated in this work. Modification of lignin to its butyl ester alters the electrospinnability and the thermal mobility of the lignin/PAN blend precursor fibers, which further affect the thermostabilization and carbonization processes of CNFs. The micromorphology, carbon structure, and mechanical properties of resultant CNFs were evaluated in detail. Lignin butyration reveals a new approach to controlling inter-fiber bonding of CNFs which efficiently increases the tensile strength and modulus of nonwoven mats. A commercial vapor-grown CNF reinforcing of room-temperature-vulcanized (RTV) polysiloxane foam has potential impact on the residual tin catalyst in composites and consequently the aging and the long-term performance of the materials. Elemental spectra and mapping were employed to analyze the distribution and the composition of tin catalyst residues in the CNF/polysiloxane composites. Thermal analysis revealed a significant increase of thermal stability for CNF-filled composites. Further, the glass transition properties of polysiloxane are not evidently influenced by the physical interaction between CNF filler and polysiloxane matrix. Nanocomposites consisting of anthracene, a model polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compound, and a thermosetting epoxy was matrix was studied to interpret the reinforcing effect on the glass transition temperature ( Tg) by different routes: physical dispersion and/or covalent modification. The molecular dynamics of the relaxation processes were analyzed by broadband dielectric

  2. Do the cations in clay and the polymer matrix affect quantum dot fluorescent properties?

    PubMed

    Wei, Wenjun; Liu, Cui; Liu, Jiyan; Liu, Xueqing; Zou, Linling; Cai, Shaojun; Shi, Hong; Cao, Yuan-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    This paper studied the effects of cations and polymer matrix on the fluorescent properties of quantum dots (QDs). The results indicated that temperature has a greater impact on fluorescence intensity than clay cations (mainly K(+) and Na(+) ). Combined fluorescence lifetime and steady-state spectrometer tests showed that QD lifetimes all decreased when the cation concentration was increased, but the quantum yields were steady at various cation concentrations of 0, 0.05, 0.5 and 1 M. Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and diepoxy resin were used to study the effects of polymers on QD lifetime and quantum yield. The results showed that the lifetime for QDs 550 nm in PEO and PVA was 17.33 and 17.12 ns, respectively; for the epoxy resin, the lifetime was 0.74 ns, a sharp decrease from 24.47 ns. The quantum yield for QDs 550 nm changed from 34.22% to 7.45% and 7.81% in PEO and PVA, respectively; for the epoxy resin the quantum yield was 2.25%. QDs 580 nm and 620 nm showed the same results as QDs 550 nm. This study provides useful information on the design, synthesis and application of QDs-polymer luminescent materials. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26663530

  3. Castor oil polymer induces bone formation with high matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Saran, Wallace Rocha; Chierice, Gilberto Orivaldo; da Silva, Raquel Assed Bezerra; de Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino; Paula-Silva, Francisco Wanderley Garcia; da Silva, Léa Assed Bezerra

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the modulation of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and -9 (MMP-9) expression in newly formed bone tissue at the interface between implants derived from castor oil (Ricinus communis) polymer and the tibia medullary canal. Forty-four rabbits were assigned to either Group 1 (n = 12; control) or Group 2 (n = 30), which had the tibial medullary canals reamed bilaterally and filled with polymer. CT scans showed no space between the material surface and the bone at the implant/bone marrow interface, and the density of the tissues at this interface was similar to the density measured of other regions of the bone. At 90 days postimplantation, the interface with the polymer presented a thick layer of newly formed bone tissue rich in osteocytes. This tissue exhibited ongoing maturation at 120 and 150 days postimplantation. Overall, bone remodeling process was accompanied by positive modulation of MMP-2 and low MMP-9 expression. Differently, in control group, the internal surface close to the medullary canal was lined by osteoblasts, followed by a bone tissue zone with few lacunae filled with osteocytes. Maturation of the tissue of the medullary internal surface occurred in the inner region, with the bone being nonlamellar.

  4. Light-triggered conducting properties of a random carbon nanotubes network in a photochromic polymer matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castagna, R.; Sciascia, C.; Srimath Kandada, A. R.; Meneghetti, M.; Lanzani, G.; Bertarelli, C.

    2011-10-01

    Photochromic materials reversibly change their colour due to a photochemical reaction that takes place when the material is irradiated with photons of suitable energy. This peculiar feature has been extensively exploited to develop smart sunglasses, filters and inks. With a proper molecular design it is possible to enable modulation not only of colour but also of other properties such as refractive index, dipole moment, nonlinear optical properties or conductivity by a photoswitching of the molecular structure. The approach herein developed consists in modifying, upon irradiation, the properties of a molecular component coupled with the photochromic molecule. In particular, the switching features of photochromic systems are matched with the intriguing peculiar properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A photochromic polyester has been properly synthesised to be used as switching polymer matrix coupled with a network of CNTs. Irradiation of the polymer/CNTs blend results into a light-triggered conductance switching. The reversible electrocyclization of the polymer under UV-vis illumination results into a modification of the inter-tube charge mobility, and accordingly, of the overall resistance of the blend. Solution techniques allow us to obtain blended films with sheet resistance modulation larger than 150%, good thermal stability and fatigue resistance at room conditions, in an easier, faster and scalable way as respect to the single-molecule approach.ÿ

  5. Multi-Scale CNT-Based Reinforcing Polymer Matrix Composites for Lightweight Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberly, Daniel; Ou, Runqing; Karcz, Adam; Skandan, Ganesh; Mather, Patrick; Rodriguez, Erika

    2013-01-01

    Reinforcing critical areas in carbon polymer matrix composites (PMCs), also known as fiber reinforced composites (FRCs), is advantageous for structural durability. Since carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have extremely high tensile strength, they can be used as a functional additive to enhance the mechanical properties of FRCs. However, CNTs are not readily dispersible in the polymer matrix, which leads to lower than theoretically predicted improvement in mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of CNT composites. The inability to align CNTs in a polymer matrix is also a known issue. The feasibility of incorporating aligned CNTs into an FRC was demonstrated using a novel, yet commercially viable nanofiber approach, termed NRMs (nanofiber-reinforcing mats). The NRM concept of reinforcement allows for a convenient and safe means of incorporating CNTs into FRC structural components specifically where they are needed during the fabrication process. NRMs, fabricated through a novel and scalable process, were incorporated into FRC test panels using layup and vacuum bagging techniques, where alternating layers of the NRM and carbon prepreg were used to form the reinforced FRC structure. Control FRC test panel coupons were also fabricated in the same manner, but comprised of only carbon prepreg. The FRC coupons were machined to size and tested for flexural, tensile, and compression properties. This effort demonstrated that FRC structures can be fabricated using the NRM concept, with an increased average load at break during flexural testing versus that of the control. The NASA applications for the developed technologies are for lightweight structures for in-space and launch vehicles. In addition, the developed technologies would find use in NASA aerospace applications such as rockets, aircraft, aircraft/spacecraft propulsion systems, and supporting facilities. The reinforcing aspect of the technology will allow for more efficient joining of fiber composite parts, thus offering

  6. Humidity versus photo-stability of metal halide perovskite films in a polymer matrix.

    PubMed

    Manshor, Nurul Ain; Wali, Qamar; Wong, Ka Kan; Muzakir, Saifful Kamaluddin; Fakharuddin, Azhar; Schmidt-Mende, Lukas; Jose, Rajan

    2016-08-21

    Despite the high efficiency of over 21% reported for emerging thin film perovskite solar cells, one of the key issues prior to their commercial deployment is to attain their long term stability under ambient and outdoor conditions. The instability in perovskite is widely conceived to be humidity induced due to the water solubility of its initial precursors, which leads to decomposition of the perovskite crystal structure; however, we note that humidity alone is not the major degradation factor and it is rather the photon dose in combination with humidity exposure that triggers the instability. In our experiment, which is designed to decouple the effect of humidity and light on perovskite degradation, we investigate the shelf-lifetime of CH3NH3PbI3 films in the dark and under illumination under high humidity conditions (Rel. H. > 70%). We note minor degradation in perovskite films stored in a humid dark environment whereas upon exposure to light, the films undergo drastic degradation, primarily owing to the reactive TiO2/perovskite interface and also the surface defects of TiO2. To enhance its air-stability, we incorporate CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite in a polymer (poly-vinylpyrrolidone, PVP) matrix which retained its optical and structural characteristics in the dark for ∼2000 h and ∼800 h in room light soaking, significantly higher than a pristine perovskite film, which degraded completely in 600 h in the dark and in less than 100 h when exposed to light. We attribute the superior stability of PVP incorporated perovskite films to the improved structural stability of CH3NH3PbI3 and also to the improved TiO2/perovskite interface upon incorporating a polymer matrix. Charge injection from the polymer embedded perovskite films has also been confirmed by fabricating solar cells using them, thereby providing a promising future research pathway for stable and efficient perovskite solar cells. PMID:27432518

  7. Recent Advances in Glycerol Polymers: Chemistry and Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Glycerol polymers are attracting increased attention due to the diversity of polymer compositions and architectures available. This article provides a brief chronological review on the current status of these polymers along with representative examples of their use for biomedical applications. First, we describe the underlying chemistry of glycerol, which provides access to a range of monomers for subsequent polymerizations. We then review the various synthetic methodologies to prepare glycerol-based polymers including polyethers, polycarbonates, polyesters, and so forth. Next, we describe several biomedical applications where glycerol polymers are being investigated including carriers for drug delivery, sealants or coatings for tissue repair, and agents possessing antibacterial activity. Fourth, we describe the growing market opportunity for the use of polymers in medicine. Finally we conclude and summarize the findings, as well as discuss potential opportunities for continued research efforts. PMID:25308354

  8. Recent advances in glycerol polymers: chemistry and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2014-11-01

    Glycerol polymers are attracting increased attention due to the diversity of polymer compositions and architectures available. This article provides a brief chronological review on the current status of these polymers along with representative examples of their use for biomedical applications. First, the underlying chemistry of glycerol that provides access to a range of monomers for subsequent polymerizations is described. Then, the various synthetic methodologies to prepare glycerol-based polymers including polyethers, polycarbonates, polyesters, and so forth are reviewed. Next, several biomedical applications where glycerol polymers are being investigated including carriers for drug delivery, sealants or coatings for tissue repair, and agents possessing antibacterial activity are described. Fourth, the growing market opportunity for the use of polymers in medicine is described. Finally, the findings are concluded and summarized, as well as the potential opportunities for continued research efforts are discussed.

  9. Recent advances in the study of zebrafish extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Jessen, Jason R

    2015-05-01

    The zebrafish extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic and pleomorphic structure consisting of numerous proteins that together regulate a variety of cellular and morphogenetic events beginning as early as gastrulation. The zebrafish genome encodes a similar complement of ECM proteins as found in other vertebrate organisms including glycoproteins, fibrous proteins, proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans, and interacting or modifying proteins such as integrins and matrix metalloproteinases. As a genetic model system combined with its amenability to high-resolution microscopic imaging, the zebrafish allows interrogation of ECM protein structure and function in both the embryo and adult. Accumulating data have identified important roles for zebrafish ECM proteins in processes as diverse as cell polarity, migration, tissue mechanics, organ laterality, muscle contraction, and regeneration. In this review, I highlight recently published data on these topics that demonstrate how the ECM proteins fibronectin, laminin, and collagen contribute to zebrafish development and adult homeostasis.

  10. Immobilization of radioactive and hazardous wastes in a developed sulfur polymer cement (SPC) matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Wagdy, M.; Azim, Abdel; El-Gammal, Belal; Husain, Ahmed

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: A process has been developed for the immobilization Cs, Sr, Ce, Pb, and Cr in forms that is non-dispersible and could be safely immobilized. The simulated radioactive wastes of Cs, Sr, and Ce, and the hazardous wastes of Cr, and Pb were immobilized in the stable form of sulfur polymer cement (SPC). In this process, the contaminants (in a single form) were added to the sulfur mixture of sulfur and aromatic /or aliphatic hydrocarbons that used as polymerizing agents for sulfur (95% S, and 5% organic polymer by weight). Durability of the fabricated SPC matrices was assessed in terms of their water of immersion, porosity, and compressive strength. The water immersion, and open porosity were found to be less than 2.5% for all the prepared matrices, whereas the compressive strength was in the range between 62.4 and 142.3 Kg.cm{sup -2}, depending on the composition of the prepared matrix. The prepared SPC matrices that characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that the different added contaminants were stabilized during the solidification process during their reaction with sulfur and the organic polymer to form the corresponding metal sulfides. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the IAEA standard method have assessed the leachability of the prepared waste matrices. The TCLP results showed that most the concentration of the contaminants released were under their detection limit. The leach index for the investigated metals from the prepared SPC matrices was in the range of 9-11. The order of release of the investigated metals was Sr>Cs>Pb>Cr>Ce for the aliphatic polymer, and Sr>Cr>Pb>Cs>Ce for the aromatic one. The results obtained revealed a high performance for the prepared SPC matrices, as they are of low cost effect, highly available materials, and possessed good mechanical and leaching properties. Key Words: SPC/ Matrices/ Immobilization/ Wastes/ Leachability. (authors)

  11. Implementation and Assessment of Advanced Analog Vector-Matrix Processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, Charles K.; Bualat, Maria G.; Lum, Henry, Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the design and implementation of an analog optical vecto-rmatrix coprocessor with a throughput of 128 Mops for a personal computer. Vector matrix calculations are inherently parallel, providing a promising domain for the use of optical calculators. However, to date, digital optical systems have proven too cumbersome to replace electronics, and analog processors have not demonstrated sufficient accuracy in large scale systems. The goal of the work described in this paper is to demonstrate a viable optical coprocessor for linear operations. The analog optical processor presented has been integrated with a personal computer to provide full functionality and is the first demonstration of an optical linear algebra processor with a throughput greater than 100 Mops. The optical vector matrix processor consists of a laser diode source, an acoustooptical modulator array to input the vector information, a liquid crystal spatial light modulator to input the matrix information, an avalanche photodiode array to read out the result vector of the vector matrix multiplication, as well as transport optics and the electronics necessary to drive the optical modulators and interface to the computer. The intent of this research is to provide a low cost, highly energy efficient coprocessor for linear operations. Measurements of the analog accuracy of the processor performing 128 Mops are presented along with an assessment of the implications for future systems. A range of noise sources, including cross-talk, source amplitude fluctuations, shot noise at the detector, and non-linearities of the optoelectronic components are measured and compared to determine the most significant source of error. The possibilities for reducing these sources of error are discussed. Also, the total error is compared with that expected from a statistical analysis of the individual components and their relation to the vector-matrix operation. The sufficiency of the measured accuracy of the

  12. Crystalline morphology of the matrix of PEEK-carbon fiber aromatic polymer composites. I. Assessment of crystallinity. [Polyetheretherketone

    SciTech Connect

    Blundell, D.J.; Chalmers, J.M.; Mackenzie, M.W.; Gaskin, W.F.

    1985-07-01

    The crystallinity of the polyetheretherketone (PEEK) matrix polymer in the Aromatic Polymer Composite APC-2 has been estimated using a combination of techniques based on wide angle x-ray diffraction and infrared reflection spectroscopy. Crystallinity varies systematically with cooling rate and annealing time over the range 20 to 40%. The occurrence of oriented crystal growth of the PEEK relative to the carbon fiber can be monitored by x-ray diffraction. 8 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  13. Strain rate-dependent deformation and strength modeling of a polymer matrix composite utilizing a micromechanics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Robert Keith

    1999-11-01

    Potential gas turbine applications will expose polymer matrix composites to very high strain rate loading conditions, requiring an ability to understand and predict the material behavior under extreme conditions. Specifically, analytical methods designed for these applications must have the capability of properly capturing the strain rate sensitivities and nonlinearities that are present in the material response. The Ramaswamy-Stouffer constitutive equations, originally developed to analyze the viscoplastic deformation of metals, have been modified to simulate the nonlinear deformation response of ductile, crystalline polymers. The constitutive model is characterized and correlated for two representative ductile polymers, Fiberite 977-2 and PEEK, and the computed results correlate well with experimental values. The polymer constitutive equations are implemented in a mechanics of materials based composite micromechanics model to predict the nonlinear, rate dependent deformation response of a composite ply. Uniform stress and uniform strain assumptions are applied to compute the effective stresses of a composite unit cell from the applied strains. The micromechanics equations are successfully verified for two polymer matrix composites, IM7/977-2 and AS4/PEEK. The ultimate strength of a composite ply is predicted with the Hashin failure criteria that were implemented in the composite micromechanics model. The failure stresses of the two composite material systems are accurately predicted for a variety of fiber orientations and strain rates. The composite deformation model is implemented in LS-DYNA, a commercially available transient dynamic explicit finite element code. The matrix constitutive equations are converted into an incremental form, and the model is implemented into LS-DYNA through the use of a user defined material subroutine. The deformation response of a bulk polymer and a polymer matrix composite are predicted by finite element analyses. The results

  14. Grafting of a functionalized side-chain liquid crystal polymer on carbon fiber surfaces: Novel coupling agents for fiber/polymer matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Le Bonheur, V.; Stupp, S.I. )

    1993-09-01

    The authors studied covalent grafting to functionalized carbon fibers of a specially designed liquid crystalline monomer and its corresponding side-chain liquid crystalline polymer containing pendant chemical functions on their mesogenic groups. From a materials point of view these liquid crystalline compounds could act as coupling agents at fiber/polymer matrix interfaces, offering a mechanism to control composite properties not only through bonding but also through their [open quotes]spontaneous[close quotes] molecular orientation in interfacial regions. The grafting methodology for both monomer and polymer to fiber surfaces involved esterification through carbodiimide chemistry in solution. Carboxylic acid groups found on functionalized carbon fiber surfaces were esterified to phenolic functions in the side chains of the experimental polymer. Following grafting procedures the fibers were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by contact angle measurements. SEM micrographs of fibers grafted with polymer revealed the presence of strongly attached polymeric material on the graphitic surface after rigorous extraction with polymer solvent. Contact angle measurements and polar/dispersive free energy analysis indicated also a smaller polar component of the surface free energy of fibers possibly due to the hydrophobic polymer backbone grafted on the carbon surfaces. On the basis of results, it is concluded that the esterification reaction grafted the polyphenolic liquid-crystal polymer on graphite fiber surfaces. 24 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. A novel approach for FE-SEM imaging of wood-matrix polymer interface in a biocomposite.

    PubMed

    Singh, Adya P; Anderson, Ross; Park, Byung-Dae; Nuryawan, Arif

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the interface between polymer and biomass in composite products is important for developing high performance products, as the quality of adhesion at the interface determines composite properties. For example, with greater stiffness compared to polymer matrix, such as that of high density polyethylene, the wood component enhances stiffness of wood-polymer composites, provided there is good adhesion between composite components. However, in composites made from wood flour (wood particles) and synthetic resins it is often difficult to clearly resolve particle-matrix interfaces in the conventionally employed microscopy method that involves SEM examination of fractured faces of composites. We developed a novel approach, where composites made from high density polyethylene and wood flour were examined and imaged with a FE-SEM (field emission scanning electron microscope) in transverse sections cut through the composites. Improved definition of the interface was achieved using this approach, which enabled a more thorough comparison to be made of the features of the interface between wood particles and the matrix in composites with and without a coupling agent, as it was possible to clearly resolve the interfaces for particles of all sizes, from large particles consisting of many cells down to tiny cell wall fragments, particularly in composites that did not incorporate the coupling agent used to enhance particle adhesion with the matrix polymer. The method developed would be suitable particularly for high definition SEM imaging of a wide range of composites made combining wood and agricultural residues with synthetic polymers.

  16. A novel approach for FE-SEM imaging of wood-matrix polymer interface in a biocomposite.

    PubMed

    Singh, Adya P; Anderson, Ross; Park, Byung-Dae; Nuryawan, Arif

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the interface between polymer and biomass in composite products is important for developing high performance products, as the quality of adhesion at the interface determines composite properties. For example, with greater stiffness compared to polymer matrix, such as that of high density polyethylene, the wood component enhances stiffness of wood-polymer composites, provided there is good adhesion between composite components. However, in composites made from wood flour (wood particles) and synthetic resins it is often difficult to clearly resolve particle-matrix interfaces in the conventionally employed microscopy method that involves SEM examination of fractured faces of composites. We developed a novel approach, where composites made from high density polyethylene and wood flour were examined and imaged with a FE-SEM (field emission scanning electron microscope) in transverse sections cut through the composites. Improved definition of the interface was achieved using this approach, which enabled a more thorough comparison to be made of the features of the interface between wood particles and the matrix in composites with and without a coupling agent, as it was possible to clearly resolve the interfaces for particles of all sizes, from large particles consisting of many cells down to tiny cell wall fragments, particularly in composites that did not incorporate the coupling agent used to enhance particle adhesion with the matrix polymer. The method developed would be suitable particularly for high definition SEM imaging of a wide range of composites made combining wood and agricultural residues with synthetic polymers. PMID:24063951

  17. Insights into the mechanisms of chitosan-anionic polymers-based matrix tablets for extended drug release.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Wang, Linlin; Li, Jinfeng; Jiang, Shan; Wang, Yitong; Zhang, Xin; Ding, Jiaojiao; Yu, Tongya; Mao, Shirui

    2014-12-10

    The aim of this study was to investigate drug release mechanisms from physical mixtures of chitosan-anionic polymers-based matrix tablets and to obtain a comprehensive understanding about release characteristics. Six types of anionic polymers (i.e., Eudragit(®) L100, sodium alginate, carrageenan, carboxymethylcellulose sodium, carbomer and xanthan gum) and two model drugs (i.e., theophylline and metoprolol succinate) with varied solubility were chosen. Texture analyzer, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were applied to better understand drug release mechanisms. In vitro release experiments were conducted in a pH-changing medium to simulate the physiological condition of the gastrointestinal tract. Interestingly, a common phenomenon was observed in all the CS-anionic polymers-based matrix tablets investigated here, that is, the inner layer of the swollen tablets was coated by CS-anionic polymer polyelectrolyte complexes (PEC)-based film formed by self-assembly. Formation of the in situ self-assembled film was further confirmed by texture analysis, DSC, and FTIR. It was further identified that properties of the film were influenced by the characteristics of anionic polymers and the physiological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract. Moreover, this novel structure could alter swelling and erosion-based release mechanisms of the tablets. In addition, drug release characteristics from CS-anionic polymer systems depended on the properties of anionic polymers and the drug solubility. In conclusion, our studies may broaden current views on cationic polymer-anionic polymer-based oral matrix tablets for extended release.

  18. Nonlinear mechanical behavior of thermoplastic matrix materials for advanced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenz, R. J.; Landel, R. F.

    1989-01-01

    Two recent theories of nonlinear mechanical response are quantitatively compared and related to experimental data. Computer techniques are formulated to handle the numerical integration and iterative procedures needed to solve the associated sets of coupled nonlinear differential equations. Problems encountered during these formulations are discussed and some open questions described. Bearing in mind these cautions, the consequences of changing parameters that appear in the formulations on the resulting engineering properties are discussed. Hence, engineering approaches to the analysis of thermoplastic matrix material can be suggested.

  19. Ultra-thin Solid-State Li-Ion Electrolyte Membrane Facilitated by a Self-Healing Polymer Matrix.

    PubMed

    Whiteley, Justin M; Taynton, Philip; Zhang, Wei; Lee, Se-Hee

    2015-11-18

    Thin solid membranes are formed by a new strategy, whereby an in situ derived self-healing polymer matrix that penetrates the void space of an inorganic solid is created. The concept is applied as a separator in an all-solid-state battery with an FeS2 -based cathode and achieves tremendous performance for over 200 cycles. Processing in dry conditions represents a paradigm shift for incorporating high active-material mass loadings into mixed-matrix membranes.

  20. An NDE approach for characterizing quality problems in polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Baaklini, George Y.; Sutter, James K.; Bodis, James R.; Leonhardt, Todd A.; Crane, Elizabeth A.

    1994-01-01

    Polymer matrix composite (PMC) materials are periodically identified appearing optically uniform but containing a higher than normal level of global nonuniformity as indicated from preliminary ultrasonic scanning. One such panel was thoroughly examined by nondestructive (NDE) and destructive methods to quantitatively characterize the nonuniformity. The NDE analysis of the panel was complicated by the fact that the panel was not uniformly thick. Mapping of ultrasonic velocity across a region of the panel in conjunction with an error analysis was necessary to (1) characterize properly the porosity gradient that was discovered during destructive analyses and (2) account for the thickness variation effects. Based on this study, a plan for future NDE characterization of PMC's is presented to the PMC community.

  1. Space environmental effects on polymer matrix composites as a function of sample location on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, R. C.; Cool, G. R.; Zimcik, D. G.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents results on the effect of circumferential location on the variation in solar absorptance (alpha(sub S)) and infrared emittance (epsilon) for five different polymer matrix composites (PMC), and variations in erosion depth due to atomic oxygen (AO) for fourteen different PMC materials. In addition, a chemical content design parameter (gamma) has been found that correlates well with the erosion yield obtained from space flight data and hyperthermal AO tests for hydrocarbon polymeric materials. This parameter defines the ratio of the total number of atoms in a repeat monomer unit to the difference between the total carbon content and the total number of intermolecular oxygen atoms in the same repeat unit.

  2. The semi-interpenetrating polymer network matrix of fiber-reinforced composite and its effect on the surface adhesive properties.

    PubMed

    Lastumäki, T M; Lassila, L V J; Vallittu, P K

    2003-09-01

    This aim of this study was to examine the effect of further-impregnation time of polymer pre-impregnated fiber-reinforcement on polymer matrix structure of the fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) used in dental applications. In addition, shear bond strength between the FRC and veneering composite after various length of further-impregnation was studied. Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) pre-impregnated glass fiber-reinforcement was further-impregnated with a diacrylate monomer resin by using five lengths of further-impregnation from 10 min to 24 h. The test specimens (n=5) from each five groups were treated with the solvent tetrahydrofuran and examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determinate the existence of linear PMMA in the polymer matrix of the FRC. The same lengths of further-impregnation were used to form an adhesive substrate for veneering composite and to measure the shear bond strength (n=8). The SEM examination showed that linear PMMA-polymer and cross-linked diacrylate polymer formed two independent networks for the polymer matrix of FRC. The highest mean shear bond strength value (18.7+/-2.9 MPa) was achieved when the fiber reinforcement was further-impregnated for 24 h. The shortest further-impregnation, 10 min, resulted in the lowest mean shear bond strength (12.7+/-2.9 MPa). A correlation between increased shear bond strength and longer further-impregnation was found (0.689, p<0.001). The results revealed that linear PMMA network of the polymer matrix of the FRC remained in the structure regardless of the various lengths of the further-impregnation with diacrylate resin. PMID:15348401

  3. Advanced density matrix renormalization group method for nuclear structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legeza, Ã.-.; Veis, L.; Poves, A.; Dukelsky, J.

    2015-11-01

    We present an efficient implementation of the Density Matrix Renormalization Group (DMRG) algorithm that includes an optimal ordering of the proton and neutron orbitals and an efficient expansion of the active space utilizing various concepts of quantum information theory. We first show how this new DMRG methodology could solve a previous 400 keV discrepancy in the ground state energy of 56Ni. We then report the first DMRG results in the p f +g 9 /2 shell model space for the ground 0+ and first 2+ states of 64Ge which are benchmarked with reference data obtained from a Monte Carlo shell model. The corresponding correlation structure among the proton and neutron orbitals is determined in terms of two-orbital mutual information. Based on such correlation graphs we propose several further algorithmic improvement possibilities that can be utilized in a new generation of tensor network based algorithms.

  4. Fundamental Studies of Low Velocity Impact Resistance of Graphite Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, K. J.

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to relate the impact resistance of graphite fiber reinforced composites with matrix properties through gaining an understanding of the basic mechanics involved in the deformation and fracture process, and the effect of the polymer matrix structure on these mechanisms. It was found that the resin matrix structure influences the composite impact resistance in at least two ways. The integration of flexibilizers into the polymer chain structure tends to reduce the T sub g and the mechanical properties of the polymer. The reduction in the mechanical properties of the matrix does not enhance the composite impact resistance because it allows matrix controlled failure to initiate impact damage. It was found that when the instrumented dropweight impact tester is used as a means for assessing resin toughness, the resin toughness is enhanced by the ability of the clamped specimen to deflect enough to produce sufficient membrane action to support a significant amount of the load. The results of this study indicate that crossplied composite impact resistance is very much dependent on the matrix mechanical properties.

  5. Durability of polymer matrix composites for infrastructure: The role of the interphase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verghese, Kandathil Nikhil Eapen

    1999-12-01

    As fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites find greater use in markets such as civil infrastructure and ground transportation, the expectations placed on these materials are ever increasing. The overall cost and reliability have become the drivers of these high performance materials and have led to the disappearance of resins such as bismaleimides (BMI). cyanate esters and other high performance polyimides and epoxys. In their place polymers, such polyester and vinylester have arisen. The reinforcing fiber scenario has also undergone changes from the high quality and performance assured IM7 and AS4 to cheaper and hybrid systems consisting of both glass and low cost carbon. Manufacturing processes have had their share of changes too with processes such as pultrusion and other mass production techniques replacing hand lay-up and resin transfer molding. All of this has however come with little or no concession on material performance. The motivation of the present research has therefore been to try to improve the properties of these low cost composites by better understanding the constituent materials (fiber and matrix) and the region that lies in-between them namely the interphase. In order to achieve this. working with controls is necessary and the present discourse therefore deals with the AS4 fiber system from Hexcel Corporation and the vinyl ester resin, Derakane 441-400 from The Dow Chemical Company. The following eight chapters sum up the work done thus far on composites made with sized fibers and the above mentioned resin and fiber systems. They are in the form of publications that have either been accepted. submitted or going to be submitted to various peer reviewed journals. The sizings used have been poly(vinylpyrrolidone) PVP and Polyhydroxyether (Phenoxy) thermoplastic polymers and G' an industrial sizing material supplied by Hexcel. A number of issues have been addressed ranging from viscoelastic relaxation to enviro-mechanical durability. Chapter 1

  6. Magnetic Properties of Core/Shell Structured Iron/Iron-oxide Nanoparticles Dispersed in Polymer Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemati Porshokouh, Zohreh; Khurshid, Hafsa; Phan, Manh-Huong; Srikanth, Hariharan

    2014-03-01

    Iron-based nanoparticles (NPs) show interesting magnetic properties for a wide range of applications; however rapid oxidation of iron limits its practical use. Protecting iron with a thin layer of iron-oxide is a possible way to prevent oxidation, forming core/shell (CS) iron/iron-oxide. Due to the different diffusivity rates of the two materials, a gap appears between the core and shell after a period of time (Kirkendall effect), degrading the magnetic properties of the sample. We minimize the Kirkendall effect while retaining good magnetic properties of ~12.5 nm CS iron/iron-oxide NPs by dispersing them into a polymer matrix. Magnetic measurements reveal that after a period of 3 months the blocking temperature (TB) of as-made CS NPs decreases from 107 K to 90 K. The change in TB marks the formation of a gap between the core and shell, which is also evident from HRTEM studies. By contrast, NPs dispersed in RP show no change in TB over the same time period. We repeated experiments with ~10.5 nm CS NPs and the results are consistent. Our study shows the importance of dispersing CS NPs in polymers to preserve desirable magnetic properties for practical applications, ranging from RF sensors and microwave devices to bioengineering.

  7. Approach for achieving flame retardancy while retaining physical properties in a compatible polymer matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Smith, Trent M. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The invention provides polymer blends containing polyhydroxyamide and one or more flammable polymers. The polymer blends are flame retardant and have improved durability and heat stability compared to the flammable polymer portion of the blends. Articles containing the polymer blends are also provided.

  8. Approach for achieving flame retardancy while retaining physical properties in a compatible polymer matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Smith, Trent M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The invention provides polymer blends containing polyhydroxyamide and one or more flammable polymers. The polymer blends are flame retardant and have improved durability and heat stability compared to the flammable polymer portion of the blends. Articles containing the polymer blends are also provided.

  9. Incorporation of Mean Stress Effects into the Micromechanical Analysis of the High Strain Rate Response of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.; Gilat, Amos

    2002-01-01

    The results presented here are part of an ongoing research program, to develop strain rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composites subject to high strain rate impact loads. A micromechanics approach is employed in this work, in which state variable constitutive equations originally developed for metals have been modified to model the deformation of the polymer matrix, and a strength of materials based micromechanics method is used to predict the effective response of the composite. In the analysis of the inelastic deformation of the polymer matrix, the definitions of the effective stress and effective inelastic strain have been modified in order to account for the effect of hydrostatic stresses, which are significant in polymers. Two representative polymers, a toughened epoxy and a brittle epoxy, are characterized through the use of data from tensile and shear tests across a variety of strain rates. Results computed by using the developed constitutive equations correlate well with data generated via experiments. The procedure used to incorporate the constitutive equations within a micromechanics method is presented, and sample calculations of the deformation response of a composite for various fiber orientations and strain rates are discussed.

  10. Predictive model for microcracking and mechanical properties of polymer-matrix composite materials for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issoupov, V.; Viel-Inguimbert, V.; Dinguirard, M.; Startsev, O. V.; Nikishin, E. F.

    2003-09-01

    Thermal ageing of polymer-matrix composite materials of any long-life spacecraft in LEO involves evolution of mechanical, thermophysical and morphological properties, especially if the structure operates under external mechanical stress like bending. Behavior of KMU-4l carbon/epoxy composite material under combined effect of thermal profiles and static mechanical loading has been studied in a simulated LEO space environment. Thermal cycling was performed on specimens under bending stress reaching 30.4% of the material ultimate strength. Specimens subjected to combined thermal and mechanical fatigue were examined in a series of 4 intermediate points with a maximum of 120 cycles. The DMTA technique has been employed to follow the global thermomechanical response of KMU-4l composite. The degradation produced was detected by moisture diffusion analysis, the crack density was estimated at the edges of the specimens using a scanning electron microscope. Effects such as the temperature dependence of material properties and matrix post-curing phenomena are also discussed. The results are compared with the appropriate data obtained on specimens of KMU-4l exposed for up to 1501 days to LEO space environments onboard SALYUT and MIR space stations.

  11. A Micromechanical Constitutive Model of Progressive Crushing in Random Carbon Fiber Polymer Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.K.; Simunovic, S.

    1999-09-01

    A micromechanical damage constitutive model is presented to predict the overall elastoplastic behavior and damage evolution in random carbon fiber polymer matrix composites (RFPCs).To estimate the overall elastoplastic damage responses,an effective yield criterion is derived based on the ensemble-volume averaging process and first-order effects of eigenstrains due to the existence of spheroidal (prolate) fibers.The proposed effective yield criterion,to ether with the assumed overall associative plastic flow rule and hardening law, constitutes the analytical foundation for the estimation of effective elastoplastic behavior of ductile matrix composites.First,an effective elastoplastic constitutive dama e model for aligned fiber-reinforced composites is proposed.A micromechanical damage constitutive model for RFPCs is then developed.The average process over all orientations upon overning constitutive field equations and overall yield function for aligned fiber-reinforced composites i s performed to obtain the constitutive relations and effective yield function of RFPCs.The discrete numerical integration algorithms and the continuum tan ent operator are also presented to implement the proposed dama e constitutive model.The dama e constitutive model forms the basis for the pro ressive crushing in composite structures under impact loading.

  12. A thermally modified polymer matrix composite material with structural integrity to 371 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1988-01-01

    The potential for utilizing surface coatings to inhibit the thermal oxidation of polymer matrix composites was studied. Isothermal, inert gas exposures of graphite/PMR-15 composites indicated that after an initial loss of weight, no significant amounts of thermal degradation products are given off during high temperature exposures in the absence of oxygen. As long as a coating remains effective, the composite material should remain stable. It was also found that the glass transition temperature T sub g of the matrix resin could be increased to values in excess of 400 C. This resulted in measured short beam shear strengths of 75.9 MPa (11 Ksi), flexural strengths of 1172 MPa (170 Ksi) and flexural moduli of 141 GPa (20.5 Msi) for the material at a test temperature of 371 C. The treatment that was used caused a decrease in the PMR-15 resin density from 1.31 to 1.29 gm/cc. It was concluded that state-of-the-art composites, protected by oxygen-impervious coatings, can be used as materials of construction with structural integrity to at least 371 C and possibly above.

  13. Advances in random matrix theory, zeta functions, and sphere packing.

    PubMed

    Hales, T C; Sarnak, P; Pugh, M C

    2000-11-21

    Over four hundred years ago, Sir Walter Raleigh asked his mathematical assistant to find formulas for the number of cannonballs in regularly stacked piles. These investigations aroused the curiosity of the astronomer Johannes Kepler and led to a problem that has gone centuries without a solution: why is the familiar cannonball stack the most efficient arrangement possible? Here we discuss the solution that Hales found in 1998. Almost every part of the 282-page proof relies on long computer verifications. Random matrix theory was developed by physicists to describe the spectra of complex nuclei. In particular, the statistical fluctuations of the eigenvalues ("the energy levels") follow certain universal laws based on symmetry types. We describe these and then discuss the remarkable appearance of these laws for zeros of the Riemann zeta function (which is the generating function for prime numbers and is the last special function from the last century that is not understood today.) Explaining this phenomenon is a central problem. These topics are distinct, so we present them separately with their own introductory remarks.

  14. Advances in random matrix theory, zeta functions, and sphere packing

    PubMed Central

    Hales, T. C.; Sarnak, P.; Pugh, M. C.

    2000-01-01

    Over four hundred years ago, Sir Walter Raleigh asked his mathematical assistant to find formulas for the number of cannonballs in regularly stacked piles. These investigations aroused the curiosity of the astronomer Johannes Kepler and led to a problem that has gone centuries without a solution: why is the familiar cannonball stack the most efficient arrangement possible? Here we discuss the solution that Hales found in 1998. Almost every part of the 282-page proof relies on long computer verifications. Random matrix theory was developed by physicists to describe the spectra of complex nuclei. In particular, the statistical fluctuations of the eigenvalues (“the energy levels”) follow certain universal laws based on symmetry types. We describe these and then discuss the remarkable appearance of these laws for zeros of the Riemann zeta function (which is the generating function for prime numbers and is the last special function from the last century that is not understood today.) Explaining this phenomenon is a central problem. These topics are distinct, so we present them separately with their own introductory remarks. PMID:11058156

  15. Advances in random matrix theory, zeta functions, and sphere packing.

    PubMed

    Hales, T C; Sarnak, P; Pugh, M C

    2000-11-21

    Over four hundred years ago, Sir Walter Raleigh asked his mathematical assistant to find formulas for the number of cannonballs in regularly stacked piles. These investigations aroused the curiosity of the astronomer Johannes Kepler and led to a problem that has gone centuries without a solution: why is the familiar cannonball stack the most efficient arrangement possible? Here we discuss the solution that Hales found in 1998. Almost every part of the 282-page proof relies on long computer verifications. Random matrix theory was developed by physicists to describe the spectra of complex nuclei. In particular, the statistical fluctuations of the eigenvalues ("the energy levels") follow certain universal laws based on symmetry types. We describe these and then discuss the remarkable appearance of these laws for zeros of the Riemann zeta function (which is the generating function for prime numbers and is the last special function from the last century that is not understood today.) Explaining this phenomenon is a central problem. These topics are distinct, so we present them separately with their own introductory remarks. PMID:11058156

  16. Evaluation of Influence of Various Polymers on Dissolution and Phase Behavior of Carbamazepine-Succinic Acid Cocrystal in Matrix Tablets

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Majeed; Ullah, Hanif; Murtaza, Ghulam; Mahmood, Qaisar; Hussain, Izhar

    2015-01-01

    The aim of current study was to explore the influence of three commonly used polymers, that is, cellulosics and noncellulosics, for example, Methocel K4M, Kollidon VA/64, and Soluplus, on the phase disproportionation and drug release profile of carbamazepine-succinic acid (CBZ-SUC) cocrystal at varying drug to polymer ratios (1 : 1 to 1 : 0.25) in matrix tablets. The polymorphic phase disproportionation during in-depth dissolution studies of CBZ-SUC cocrystals and its crystalline properties were scrutinized by X-ray powder diffractrometry and Raman spectroscopy. The percent drug release from HPMC formulations (CSH) showed inverse relation with the concentration of polymer; that is, drug release increased with decrease in polymer concentration. On contrary, direct relation was observed between percent drug release and polymer concentrations of Kollidon VA 64/Soluplus (CSK, CSS). At similar polymer concentration, drug release from pure carbamazepine was slightly lower with HPMC formulations than that of cocrystal; however, opposite trend in release rate was observed with Kollidon VA/64 and Soluplus. The significant increase in dissolution rate of cocrystal occurred with Kollidon VA/64 and Soluplus at higher polymer concentration. Moreover, no phase change took place in Methocel and Kollidon formulations. No tablet residue was left for Soluplus formulation so the impact of polymer on cocrystal integrity cannot be predicted. PMID:26380301

  17. Evaluation of Influence of Various Polymers on Dissolution and Phase Behavior of Carbamazepine-Succinic Acid Cocrystal in Matrix Tablets.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Majeed; Ullah, Hanif; Murtaza, Ghulam; Mahmood, Qaisar; Hussain, Izhar

    2015-01-01

    The aim of current study was to explore the influence of three commonly used polymers, that is, cellulosics and noncellulosics, for example, Methocel K4M, Kollidon VA/64, and Soluplus, on the phase disproportionation and drug release profile of carbamazepine-succinic acid (CBZ-SUC) cocrystal at varying drug to polymer ratios (1 : 1 to 1 : 0.25) in matrix tablets. The polymorphic phase disproportionation during in-depth dissolution studies of CBZ-SUC cocrystals and its crystalline properties were scrutinized by X-ray powder diffractrometry and Raman spectroscopy. The percent drug release from HPMC formulations (CSH) showed inverse relation with the concentration of polymer; that is, drug release increased with decrease in polymer concentration. On contrary, direct relation was observed between percent drug release and polymer concentrations of Kollidon VA 64/Soluplus (CSK, CSS). At similar polymer concentration, drug release from pure carbamazepine was slightly lower with HPMC formulations than that of cocrystal; however, opposite trend in release rate was observed with Kollidon VA/64 and Soluplus. The significant increase in dissolution rate of cocrystal occurred with Kollidon VA/64 and Soluplus at higher polymer concentration. Moreover, no phase change took place in Methocel and Kollidon formulations. No tablet residue was left for Soluplus formulation so the impact of polymer on cocrystal integrity cannot be predicted. PMID:26380301

  18. Advanced Proton Conducting Polymer Electrolytes for Electrochemical Capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Han

    Research on solid electrochemical energy storage devices aims to provide high performance, low cost, and safe operation solutions for emerging applications from flexible consumer electronics to microelectronics. Polymer electrolytes, minimizing device sealing and liquid electrolyte leakage, are key enablers for these next-generation technologies. In this thesis, a novel proton-conducing polymer electrolyte system has been developed using heteropolyacids (HPAs) and polyvinyl alcohol for electrochemical capacitors. A thorough understanding of proton conduction mechanisms of HPAs together with the interactions among HPAs, additives, and polymer framework has been developed. Structure and chemical bonding of the electrolytes have been studied extensively to identify and elucidate key attributes affecting the electrolyte properties. Numerical models describing the proton conduction mechanism have been applied to differentiate those attributes. The performance optimization of the polymer electrolytes through additives, polymer structural modifications, and synthesis of alternative HPAs has achieved several important milestones, including: (a) high proton mobility and proton density; (b) good ion accessibility at electrode/electrolyte interface; (c) wide electrochemical stability window; and (d) good environmental stability. Specifically, high proton mobility has been addressed by cross-linking the polymer framework to improve the water storage capability at normal-to-high humidity conditions (e.g. 50-80% RH) as well as by incorporating nano-fillers to enhance the water retention at normal humidity levels (e.g. 30-60% RH). High proton density has been reached by utilizing additional proton donors (i.e. acidic plasticizers) and by developing different HPAs. Good ion accessibility has been achieved through addition of plasticizers. Electrochemical stability window of the electrolyte system has also been investigated and expanded by utilizing HPAs with different heteroatoms

  19. A Bridging Cell Multiscale Methodology to Model the Structural Behaviour of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacobellis, Vincent

    Composite and nanocomposite materials exhibit behaviour which is inherently multiscale, extending from the atomistic to continuum levels. In composites, damage growth tends to occur at the nano and microstructural scale by means of crack growth and fibre-matrix debonding. Concurrent multiscale modeling provides a means of efficiently solving such localized phenomena, however its use in this application has been limited due to a number of existing issues in the multiscale field. These include the seamless transfer of information between continuum and atomistic domains, the small timesteps required for dynamic simulation, and limited research into concurrent multiscale modeling of amorphous polymeric materials. The objective of this thesis is thus twofold: to formulate a generalized approach to solving a coupled atomistic-to-continuum system that addresses these issues and to extend the application space of concurrent multiscale modeling to damage modeling in composite microstructures. To achieve these objectives, a finite element based multiscale technique termed the Bridging Cell Method (BCM), has been formulated with a focus on crystalline material systems. Case studies are then presented that show the effectiveness of the developed technique with respect to full atomistic simulations. The BCM is also demonstrated for applications of stress around a nanovoid, nanoindentation, and crack growth due to monotonic and cyclic loading. Next, the BCM is extended to modeling amorphous polymeric material systems where an adaptive solver and a two-step iterative solution algorithm are introduced. Finally, the amorphous and crystalline BCM is applied to modeling a polymer-graphite interface. This interface model is used to obtain cohesive zone parameters which are used in a cohesive zone model of fibre-matrix interfacial cracking in a composite microstructure. This allows for an investigation of the temperature dependent damage mechanics from the nano to microscale within

  20. On crack initiation in notched, cross-plied polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q. D.; Schesser, D.; Niess, M.; Wright, P.; Mavrogordato, M. N.; Sinclair, I.; Spearing, S. M.; Cox, B. N.

    2015-05-01

    The physics of crack initiation in a polymer matrix composite are investigated by varying the modeling choices made in simulations and comparing the resulting predictions with high-resolution in situ images of cracks. Experimental data were acquired using synchrotron-radiation computed tomography (SRCT) at a resolution on the order of 1 μm, which provides detailed measurement of the location, shape, and size of small cracks, as well as the crack opening and shear displacements. These data prove sufficient to discriminate among competing physical descriptions of crack initiation. Simulations are executed with a high-fidelity formulation, the augmented finite element method (A-FEM), which permits consideration of coupled damage mechanisms, including both discrete cracks and fine-scale continuum damage. The discrete cracks are assumed to be nonlinear fracture events, governed by reasonably general mixed-mode cohesive laws. Crack initiation is described in terms of strength parameters within the cohesive laws, so that the cohesive law provides a unified model for crack initiation and growth. Whereas the cracks investigated are typically 1 mm or less in length, the fine-scale continuum damage refers to irreversible matrix deformation occurring over gauge lengths extending down to the fiber diameter (0.007 mm). We find that the location and far-field stress for crack initiation are predicted accurately only if the variations of local stress within plies and in the presence of stress concentrators (notches, etc.) are explicitly computed and used in initiation criteria; stress redistribution due to matrix nonlinearity that occurs prior to crack initiation is accounted for; and a mixed-mode criterion is used for crack initiation. If these factors are not all considered, which is the case for commonly used failure criteria, predictions of the location and far-field stress for initiation are not accurate.

  1. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric analysis of aliphatic biodegradable photoluminescent polymers using new ionic liquid matrices.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Carlos A; Zhang, Yi; Yang, Jian; Schug, Kevin A

    2011-05-15

    In this study, two novel ionic liquid matrices (ILMs), N,N-diisopropylethylammonium 3-oxocoumarate and N,N-diisopropylethylammonium dihydroxymonooxoacetophenoate, were tested for the structural elucidation of recently developed aliphatic biodegradable polymers by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). The polymers, formed by a condensation reaction of three components, citric acid, octane diol, and an amino acid, are fluorescent, but the exact mechanism behind their luminescent properties has not been fully elucidated. In the original studies, which introduced the polymer class (J. Yang et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2009, 106, 10086-10091), a hyper-conjugated cyclic structure was proposed as the source for the photoluminescent behavior. With the use of the two new ILMs, we present evidence that supports the presence of the proposed cyclization product. In addition, the new ILMs, when compared with a previously established ILM, N,N-diisopropylethylammonium α-cyano-3-hydroxycinnimate, provided similar signal intensities and maintained similar spectral profiles. This research also established that the new ILMs provided good spot-to-spot reproducibility and high ionization efficiency compared with corresponding crystalline matrix preparations. Many polymer features revealed through the use of the ILMs could not be observed with crystalline matrices. Ultimately, the new ILMs highlighted the composition of the synthetic polymers, as well as the loss of water that was expected for the formation of the proposed cyclic structure on the polymer backbone.

  2. Do Membranes Dream of Electric Tubes? Advanced Membranes Using Carbon Nanotube - Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lannoy, Charles-Francois Pedro Claude Karolek Ghislain

    Membrane technologies represent an energy efficient, effective solution for treating municipal and commercial waters/wastewaters. Membranes are predominantly polymer-based and despite steady advances in polymeric materials, they continue to suffer from operational problems including biofouling and breakages. This work addresses these two disparate problems by developing novel CNT-polymer nanocomposite materials that contain variously functionalized carbon nanotubes (fCNTs) in low quantities (<0.5wt%). Several strategies have been employed to achieve highly functional CNT-polymer nanocomposite membranes including blend mixing, ionic charge association, and covalent cross-linking with monomer and oligomer constituents. These CNT-polymer nanocomposite membranes were compared to traditional polymer membranes across various properties including increased Young's Modulus, changes in surface hydrophilicity, fine control over molecular weight cut-off and flux, and surface electrical conductivity. Membranes with high surface electrical conductivity were further tested for their anti-biofouling properties. Finally, CNT stability and polymer compatibility were evaluated throughout membrane manufacture, use, and cleaning. The incorporation of CNTs mixed in bulk phase and linked through ionic associations in polymer matrices showed significant (50%) increases in Young's modulus for certain CNT functionalizations and derivatization percent. Membranes formed with high surface electrical conductivity demonstrated almost complete resistance to biofouling (> 95%) in long-term bacterially challenged experiments. CNTs and polymer mixtures that lacked covalent or ionic bonds were susceptible to significant (up to 10%) loss of CNTs during membrane non-solvent gelation and aggressive chemical cleaning treatment. Functionalized carbon nanotubes endow polymer membranes with their unique strength and electrically conductive properties. These added properties were demonstrated to greatly

  3. Recent advances in the chemical modification of unsaturated polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, D. N.; Turner, S. R.; Golub, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    The present discussion has the objective to update the most comprehensive reviews on the considered subject and to fill in the gaps of less complete, but more modern treatments. Only simple chemical functionalization or structural modification of unsaturated polymers are covered, and the literature of diene polymer modification since 1974 is emphasized. Attention is given to hydrogenation, halogenation and hydrohalogenation, cyclization, cis-trans isomerization, epoxidation, ene and other cycloaddition reactions, sulfonation, carboxylation, phosphonylation, sulfenyl chloride addition, carbene addition, metalation, and silylation. It is pointed out that modern synthetic reagents and catalysts have been advantageously employed to improve process and/or product quality. Synthetic techniques have been refined to allow the selective modification of specific polymer microstructures or blocks.

  4. Nanometer-sized extracellular matrix coating on polymer-based scaffold for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Noriyuki; Sivaraman, Srikanth; Amoroso, Nicholas J; Wagner, William R; Nishiguchi, Akihiro; Matsusaki, Michiya; Akashi, Mitsuru; Nagatomi, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    Surface modification can play a crucial role in enhancing cell adhesion to synthetic polymer-based scaffolds in tissue engineering applications. Here, we report a novel approach for layer-by-layer (LbL) fabrication of nanometer-size fibronectin and gelatin (FN-G) layers on electrospun fibrous poly(carbonate urethane)urea (PCUU) scaffolds. Alternate immersions into the solutions of fibronectin and gelatin provided thickness-controlled FN-G nano-layers (PCUU(FN-G) ) which maintained the scaffold's 3D structure and width of fibrous bundle of PCUU as evidenced by scanning electron miscroscopy. The PCUU(FN-G) scaffold improved cell adhesion and proliferation of bladder smooth muscles (BSMCs) when compared to uncoated PCUU. The high affinity of PCUU(FN-G) for cells was further demonstrated by migration of adherent BSMCs from culture plates to the scaffold. Moreover, the culture of UROtsa cells, human urothelium-derived cell line, on PCUU(FN-G) resulted in an 11-15 μm thick multilayered cell structure with cell-to-cell contacts although many UROtsa cells died without forming cell connections on PCUU. Together these results indicate that this approach will aid in advancing the technology for engineering bladder tissues in vitro. Because FN-G nano-layers formation is based on nonspecific physical adsorption of fibronectin onto polymer and its subsequent interactions with gelatin, this technique may be applicable to other polymer-based scaffold systems for various tissue engineering/regenerative medicine applications. PMID:26194176

  5. [Advances in polymer materials as chiral stationary phase].

    PubMed

    Dai, Rongji; Wang, Huiting; Sun, Weiwei; Deng, Yulin; Lü, Fang; Liu, Xiujie

    2016-01-01

    The applications of chiral drugs had a profound impact on human health. With the development of disciplines of chemistry, materials and life science, the research on the separation and analysis of chiral drugs became intensified. Chromatography and the selection of chiral stationary phase played important roles in resolving chiral drugs. The optimization of polymer materials and their derivatives as chiral stationary phase become the main issue in recent years. Recent studies as well as prospects in polymer materials used as chiral stationary phase are presented in this paper. PMID:27319162

  6. Aromatic/aliphatic diamine derivatives for advanced compositions and polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delozier, Donovan M. (Inventor); Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Jr., Joseph G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Novel compositions of matter comprise certain derivatives of 9,9-dialkyl fluorene diamine (AFDA). The resultant compositions, whether compositions of matter or monomers that are subsequently incorporated into a polymer, are unique and useful in a variety of applications. Useful applications of AFDA-based material include heavy ion radiation shielding components and components of optical and electronic devices.

  7. Hierarchical self-assembly of nanoparticles in polymer matrix and the nature of the interparticle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Chiao; Chen, Chun-Yu; Chen, Hsin-Lung; Hashimoto, Takeji; Chen, Show-An; Li, Yen-Cheng

    2015-06-01

    Using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we elucidated the spatial organization of palladium (Pd) nanoparticles (NPs) in the polymer matrix of poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VP) and the nature of inter-nanoparticle interactions, where the NPs were synthesized in the presence of P2VP by the reduction of palladium acetylacetonate (Pd(acac)2). The experimental SAXS profiles were analysed on the basis of a hierarchical structure model considering the following two types of interparticle potential: (i) hard-core repulsion only (i.e., the hard-sphere interaction) and (ii) hard-core repulsion together with an attractive potential well (i.e., the sticky hard-sphere interaction). The corresponding theoretical scattering functions, which were used for analysing the experimental SAXS profiles, were obtained within the context of the Percus-Yevick closure and the Ornstein-Zernike equation in the fundamental liquid theory. The analyses revealed that existence of the attractive potential well is indispensable to account for the experimental SAXS profiles. Moreover, the morphology of the hybrids was found to be characterized by a hierarchical structure with three levels, where about six primary NPs with the diameter of ca. 1.8 nm (level one) formed local clusters (level two), and these clusters aggregated to build up a large-scale mass-fractal structure (level three) with the fractal dimension of ca. 2.3. The scattering function developed here is of general use for quantitatively characterizing the morphological structures of polymer/NP hybrids and, in particular, for exploring the interaction potential of the NPs on the basis of the fundamental liquid theory.

  8. Long distance energy transfer in a polymer matrix doped with a perylene dye.

    PubMed

    Fennel, Franziska; Lochbrunner, Stefan

    2011-02-28

    Exciton migration over long distances is a key issue for various applications in organic electronics. We investigate a disordered material system which has the potential for long exciton diffusion lengths in combination with a high versatility. The perylene bisimide dye Perylene Red is incorporated in a polymer matrix with a high concentration. The dye molecules represent active sites with a narrow energy distribution for the electronically excited states. Excitons can be efficiently exchanged between them by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). The narrow energy distribution reduces drastically the trapping probability of the excitons compared to polymers and allows for long transfer distances. To characterize the mobility of the excitons and their diffusion length the dye Oxazine 1 is added as an acceptor in low concentration and the transfer probability to the acceptor is determined by measuring the reduction of Perylene Red fluorescence. The quenched quantum yield is measured for dye concentrations varying from 0.05 M to 0.15 M for Perylene Red and from 0.3 mM to 3 mM for Oxazine 1. The experimental results are compared to a model which assumes that excitons can diffuse through the material by FRET between Perylene Red sites and are trapped at an acceptor with a final hetero FRET step. We find a quite good match between theory and experiment though the observed diffusion constant is about two times smaller than the calculated one. The exciton diffusion length extracted from the data is 30 nm for a Perylene Red concentration of 0.1 M and demonstrates that long distance energy transfer is possible in this disordered material system.

  9. Preliminary in vivo studies on the osteogenic potential of bone morphogenetic proteins delivered from an absorbable puttylike polymer matrix.

    PubMed

    Andriano, K P; Chandrashekar, B; McEnery, K; Dunn, R L; Moyer, K; Balliu, C M; Holland, K M; Garrett, S; Huffer, W E

    2000-01-01

    This article describes preliminary in vivo studies evaluating the osteogeneic potential of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) delivered from an absorbable puttylike polymer matrix. In the first study, bovine-derived bone morphogenetic proteins were incorporated in an polymer matrix consisting of 50:50 poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) dissolved in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone. The matrix was implanted in an 8 mm critical-size calvarial defect created in the skull of adult Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 5 per treatment group). After 28 days, the implant sites were removed and examined for new bone formation, polymer degradation, and tissue reaction. Gamma-irradiated polymer matrices appeared to give more bone formation than nonirradiated samples (histological analysis; 2. 76 + 1.34 mm(2) of bone versus 1.30 + 0.90 mm(2) of bone, respectively and x-ray analysis; 27.2 + 15.9 mm(2) of bone versus 20. 7 + 16.7 mm(2) of bone, respectively) and less residual polymer (0.0 + 0.0 versus 0.2 + 0.4, respectively). The polymer implants with bone morphogenetic protein also gave less inflammatory response than the polymer controls (gamma irradiated polymer/BMP = 1.8 + 0.4 and nonirradiated polymer/BMP = 1.2 + 0.4 versus polymer only = 3.0 + 1. 2, respectively). However, despite trends in both the x-ray and histological data there was no statistical difference in the amount of new bone formed among the four treatment groups (P > 0.05). This was most likely due to the large variance in the data scatter and the small number of animals per group. In the second animal study, bovine-derived BMPs and the polymeric carrier were gamma irradiated separately, at doses of 1.5 or 2.5 Mrad, and their ability to form bone in a rat skull onlay model was evaluated using Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 5 per treatment group). Histomorphometry of skull caps harvested 28 days after implantation showed no significant differences as compared to non-irradiated samples, in implant area, new bone area, and percent new bone (P

  10. Recent advances in metathesis-derived polymers containing transition metals in the side chain

    PubMed Central

    Demonceau, Albert; Fischer, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Summary This account critically surveys the field of side-chain transition metal-containing polymers as prepared by controlled living ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) of the respective metal-incorporating monomers. Ferrocene- and other metallocene-modified polymers, macromolecules including metal-carbonyl complexes, polymers tethering early or late transition metal complexes, etc. are herein discussed. Recent advances in the design and syntheses reported mainly during the last three years are highlighted, with special emphasis on new trends for superior applications of these hybrid materials. PMID:26877797

  11. Polymer/Graphene Hybrids for Advanced Energy-Conversion and -Storage Materials.

    PubMed

    Cui, Linfan; Gao, Jian; Xu, Tong; Zhao, Yang; Qu, Liangti

    2016-04-20

    Polymer/graphene-based materials with interesting physical and chemical properties have been attracting considerable attention and have been shown to have great potential as active materials in the field of energy conversion and storage. In this review, we focus on recent significant advances in the fabrication and application of polymer/graphene hybrids as electrocatalysts and electrode materials. Synthetic strategies and application of these materials in energy conversion and storage are presented, particularly in devices such as fuel cells, actuators, and supercapacitors, accompanied with a discussion of the challenges and research directions necessary for the future development of polymer/graphene hybrids.

  12. Advanced Composites: Mechanical Properties and Hardware Programs for Selected Resin Matrix Materials. [considering space shuttle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welhart, E. K.

    1976-01-01

    This design note presents typical mechanical properties tabulated from industrial and governmental agencies' test programs. All data are correlated to specific products and all of the best known products are presented. The data include six epoxies, eight polyimides and one polyquinoxaline matrix material. Bron and graphite are the fiber reinforcements. Included are forty-two summaries of advanced (resin matrix) composite programs in existence in the United States. It is concluded that the selection of appropriate matrices, the geometric manner in which the fibers are incorporated in the matrix and the durability of the bond between fiber and matrix establish the end properties of the composite material and the performance of the fabricated structure.

  13. Smart Materials for Advanced Applications: Self-Decontaminating Polymers, Photofunctional Composites, and Electroconductive Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Brian Kevin

    2011-12-01

    Materials capable of providing multifunctional properties controllable by some external stimulus (pH, light, temperature, etc) are highly desirable and obtainable given recent advancements in material science. Development of these so called "Smart" materials spanned across many disciplines of science with applications in industrial areas such as medical, military, security, and environmental. Furthermore, next-generation materials require the ability to not only sense/respond to changes in their external/internal environment, but process information in regards to these changes and adapt accordingly in a dynamic fashion, autonomously, so called "Intelligent" materials. Findings reported in this manuscript detail the synthesis, characterization, and application of smart materials in the following three areas: (1) self-cleaning polymers (2) photoresponsive composites and (3) electroconductive fibers. Self-Cleaning Polymers: Self-decontaminating polymers are unique materials capable of degrading toxic organic chemicals (TOCs). Barriers composed of or coated with our photochemical reactive polymer matrix could be applied to multiple surfaces for defense against TOCs; for example, military garments for protection against chemical warfare agents. This study investigates conditions necessary for formation of peroxides via O2 reduction induced by long-lived, strongly reducing benzophenyl ketyl (BPK) polymer radicals. Photolysis of aqueous solutions composed of sulphonated poly(ether etherketone), SPEEK, and poly(vinyl alcohol), PVA lead to the formation of the BPK radicals. Experiments investigate the formation and decomposition of peroxides in aqueous solutions of SPEEK/PVA under photolysis. Photofunctional Composites: Photoresponsive nanoporous (PN) films and powders were studied and evaluated as possible additives to sensitize the initiation of CH3NO2 via a mechanism involving coalescence of reaction sites. Such materials consist of a 3-D mesoporous silica framework

  14. The influence of the nature of a nanoparticle and polymer matrix on the morphological characteristics of polymeric nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valueva, S. V.; Kipper, A. I.; Borovikova, L. N.; Matveeva, N. A.

    2010-12-01

    Comparative studies of the morphological characteristics of selenium- and platinum-containing nanostructures were performed by molecular optics methods. The nanostructures were based on an ionogenic polymeric stabilizer, poly-N,N,N,N-trimethylmethacryloyloxyethylammonium methyl sulfate, and a non-ionogenic polymeric stabilizer, oxyethylcellulose. Studies were performed in aqueous solutions at a fixed ratio between components. The adsorption of a considerable number of polymer macromolecules on nanoparticles with the formation of superhigh-molecular-weight nanostructures with shapes close to spherical was observed for all the nanosystems studied. The thermodynamic state of nanosystems was characterized. Certain morphological characteristics of nanostructures were substantially influenced by the nature of both nanoparticles and polymer matrix.

  15. Research Update: Preserving the photoluminescence efficiency of near infrared emitting nanocrystals when embedded in a polymer matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomeshch, Olga; Tessler, Nir

    2016-04-01

    Near infrared light emitting nanocrystals are known to lose efficiency when embedded in a polymer matrix. One of the factors leading to reduced efficiency is the labile nature of the ligands that may desorb off the nanocrystal surface when the nanocrystals are in the polymer solution. We show that adding trioctylphosphine to the nanocrystal-poly(methylmethacrylate) solution prior to film casting enhances the photoluminescence efficiency. The solid films' photoluminescence quantum efficiency values are reduced by less than a factor of two in the solid form compared to the solution case. We demonstrate record efficiency values of 25% for lead sulfide nanocrystals solid films emitting at 1100 nm.

  16. Bone Formation is Affected by Matrix Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs) In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao; Mostafa, Ahmed Jenan; Appleford, Mark; Sun, Lian-Wen; Wang, Xiaodu

    2016-10-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) accumulate in bone extracellular matrix as people age. Although previous evidence shows that the accumulation of AGEs in bone matrix may impose significant effects on bone cells, the effect of matrix AGEs on bone formation in vivo is still poorly understood. To address this issue, this study used a unique rat model with autograft implant to investigate the in vivo response of bone formation to matrix AGEs. Fluorochrome biomarkers were sequentially injected into rats to label the dynamic bone formation in the presence of elevated levels of matrix AGEs. After sacrificing animals, dynamic histomorphometry was performed to determine mineral apposition rate (MAR), mineralized surface per bone surface (MS/BS), and bone formation rate (BFR). Finally, nanoindentation tests were performed to assess mechanical properties of newly formed bone tissues. The results showed that MAR, MS/BS, and BFR were significantly reduced in the vicinity of implant cores with high concentration of matrix AGEs, suggesting that bone formation activities by osteoblasts were suppressed in the presence of elevated matrix AGEs. In addition, MAR and BFR were found to be dependent on the surrounding environment of implant cores (i.e., cortical or trabecular tissues). Moreover, MS/BS and BFR were also dependent on how far the implant cores were away from the growth plate. These observations suggest that the effect of matrix AGEs on bone formation is dependent on the biological milieu around the implants. Finally, nanoindentation test results indicated that the indentation modulus and hardness of newly formed bone tissues were not affected by the presence of elevated matrix AGEs. In summary, high concentration of matrix AGEs may slow down the bone formation process in vivo, while imposing little effects on bone mineralization.

  17. Preparation of organic/inorganic composite membranes using two types of polymer matrix via a sol-gel process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seung-Hee; Park, Jin-Soo; Yim, Sung-Dae; Park, Seok-Hee; Lee, Young-Moo; Kim, Chang-Soo

    Organic/inorganic composite membranes were prepared using two different polymers. BPO 4 particles were introduced into polymers via an in situ sol-gel process. Pre-/post-sulfonated polymers were used to prepare composite membranes as matrix. Pre-sulfonated poly(aryl ether ketone) (SPAEK-6F) copolymer was synthesized via nucleophilic aromatic substitution. Degree of sulfonation was adjusted by the percentage of sulfonated monomer. Post-sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) was prepared using concentrated sulfuric acid as sulfonation agent. The membranes were characterized in terms of the ion-exchange capacity (IEC), proton conductivity, water uptake, AFM, SEM and their thermal properties. The SPAEK-6F plain membranes showed higher proton conductivity than that of the SPEEK plain membranes at similar water uptake or IEC due to their structural difference. SEM images of the composite membranes showed that the BPO 4 particles were homogenously dispersed in the polymer matrices and BPO 4 particle size was greatly influenced by polymer matrix. The SPAEK-6F/BPO 4 composite membranes had much smaller BPO 4 particle size than the SPEEK/BPO 4 composite membranes due to well dispersion of BPO 4 sol-like particulates in SPAEK-6F polymer solutions forming more hydrophobic/hydrophilic nanophase than SPEEK polymer solutions. The latter containing a few micrometer-scale BPO 4 particles showed higher proton conductivity than the former containing hundreds nanometer-scale BPO 4 particles at similar water uptake due to the increase in freezable water and effect of particle size.

  18. A Limited Comparison of the Thermal Durability of Polyimide Candidate Matrix Polymers with PMR-15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Papadopoulos, Demetrios S.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Inghram, Linda L.; McCorkle, Linda S.; Klans, Ojars V.

    2003-01-01

    Studies were conducted with six different candidate high-temperature neat matrix resin specimens of varied geometric shapes to investigate the mechanisms involved in the thermal degradation of polyimides like PMR-15. The metrics for assessing the quality of these candidates were chosen to be glass transition temperature (T(sub g)), thermo-oxidative stability, dynamic mechanical properties, microstructural changes, and dimensional stability. The processing and mechanical properties were not investigated in the study reported herein. The dimensional changes and surface layer growth were measured and recorded. The data were in agreement with earlier published data. An initial weight increase reaction was observed to be dominating at the lower temperatures. However, at the more elevated temperatures, the weight loss reactions were prevalent and probably masked the weight gain reaction. These data confirmed the findings of the existence of an initial weight gain reaction previously reported. Surface- and core-dependent weight losses were shown to control the polymer degradation at the higher temperatures.

  19. Mechanics of aligned carbon nanotube polymer matrix nanocomposites simulated via stochastic three-dimensional morphology.

    PubMed

    Stein, Itai Y; Wardle, Brian L

    2016-01-22

    The promise of enhanced and tailored properties motivates the study of one-dimensional nanomaterials, especially aligned carbon nanotubes (A-CNTs), for the reinforcement of polymeric materials. While CNTs have remarkable theoretical properties, previous work on aligned CNT polymer matrix nanocomposites (A-PNCs) reported mechanical properties that are orders of magnitude lower than those predicted by rule of mixtures. This large difference primarily originates from the morphology of the CNTs, because the CNTs that comprise the A-PNCs have significant local curvature commonly referred to as waviness. Here we present a simulation framework capable of analyzing 10(5) wavy CNTs with realistic three-dimensional morphologies to quantify the impact of waviness on the effective elastic modulus contribution of wavy CNTs. The simulation results show that due to the low shear modulus of the reinforcing CNT 'fibers', and large ([Formula: see text]) compliance contribution of the shear deformation mode, waviness reduces the effective stiffness contribution of the A-CNTs by two to three orders of magnitude. Also, the mechanical property predictions resulting from the simulation framework outperform those previously reported using finite element analysis since representative descriptions of the morphology are required to accurately predict properties of the A-PNCs. Further work to quantify the morphology of A-PNCs in three-dimensions, simulate their full non-isotropic constitutive relations, and predict their failure mechanisms is planned. PMID:26636342

  20. Mechanics of aligned carbon nanotube polymer matrix nanocomposites simulated via stochastic three-dimensional morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Itai Y.; Wardle, Brian L.

    2016-01-01

    The promise of enhanced and tailored properties motivates the study of one-dimensional nanomaterials, especially aligned carbon nanotubes (A-CNTs), for the reinforcement of polymeric materials. While CNTs have remarkable theoretical properties, previous work on aligned CNT polymer matrix nanocomposites (A-PNCs) reported mechanical properties that are orders of magnitude lower than those predicted by rule of mixtures. This large difference primarily originates from the morphology of the CNTs, because the CNTs that comprise the A-PNCs have significant local curvature commonly referred to as waviness. Here we present a simulation framework capable of analyzing 105 wavy CNTs with realistic three-dimensional morphologies to quantify the impact of waviness on the effective elastic modulus contribution of wavy CNTs. The simulation results show that due to the low shear modulus of the reinforcing CNT ‘fibers’, and large (\\gt 50%) compliance contribution of the shear deformation mode, waviness reduces the effective stiffness contribution of the A-CNTs by two to three orders of magnitude. Also, the mechanical property predictions resulting from the simulation framework outperform those previously reported using finite element analysis since representative descriptions of the morphology are required to accurately predict properties of the A-PNCs. Further work to quantify the morphology of A-PNCs in three-dimensions, simulate their full non-isotropic constitutive relations, and predict their failure mechanisms is planned.

  1. Proposed test program and data base for LDEF polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, R. C.; George, Pete; Steckel, Gary L.; Zimcik, D. G.

    1992-01-01

    A survey of the polymer matrix composite materials that were flown on Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is presented with particular attention to the effect of circumferential location (alpha) on the measured degradation and property changes. Specifically, it is known that atomic oxygen fluence (AO), VUV radiation dose, and number of impacts by micrometeoroids/debris vary with alpha. Thus, it is possible to assess material degradation and property damage changes with alpha for those materials that are common to three or more locations. Once the alpha-dependence functions were defined, other material samples will provide data that can readily be used to predict damage and property changes as a function of alpha as well. What data can be realistically obtained from these materials, how this data can be obtained, and the scientific/design value of the data to the user community is summarized. Finally, a proposed test plan is presented with recommended characterization methodologies that should be employed by all investigators to ensure consistency in the data base that will result from this exercise.

  2. Reconfigurable optical interleaver modules with tunable wavelength transfer matrix function using polymer photonics lightwave circuits.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changming; Niu, Xiaoyan; Han, Chao; Shi, Zuosen; Wang, Xinbin; Sun, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Fei; Cui, Zhanchen; Zhang, Daming

    2014-08-25

    A transparent reconfigurable optical interleaver module composed of cascaded AWGs-based wavelength-channel-selector/interleaver monolithically integrated with multimode interference (MMI) variable optical attenuators (VOAs) and Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) switch arrays was designed and fabricated using polymer photonic lightwave circuits. Highly fluorinated photopolymer and grafting modified organic-inorganic hybrid material were synthesized as the waveguide core and caldding, respectively. Thermo-optic (TO) tunable wavelength transfer matrix (WTM) function of the module can be achieved for optical routing network. The one-chip transmission loss is ~ 6 dB and crosstalk is less than ~25 dB for transverse-magnetic (TM) mode. The crosstalk and extinction ratio of the MMI VOAs were measured as -15.2 dB and 17.5 dB with driving current 8 mA, respectively. The modulation depth of the TO switches is obtained as ~18.2 dB with 2.2 V bias. Proposed novel interleaver module could be well suited for DWDM optical communication systems.

  3. A Damage Resistance Comparison Between Candidate Polymer Matrix Composite Feedline Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T

    2000-01-01

    As part of NASAs focused technology programs for future reusable launch vehicles, a task is underway to study the feasibility of using the polymer matrix composite feedlines instead of metal ones on propulsion systems. This is desirable to reduce weight and manufacturing costs. The task consists of comparing several prototype composite feedlines made by various methods. These methods are electron-beam curing, standard hand lay-up and autoclave cure, solvent assisted resin transfer molding, and thermoplastic tape laying. One of the critical technology drivers for composite components is resistance to foreign objects damage. This paper presents results of an experimental study of the damage resistance of the candidate materials that the prototype feedlines are manufactured from. The materials examined all have a 5-harness weave of IM7 as the fiber constituent (except for the thermoplastic, which is unidirectional tape laid up in a bidirectional configuration). The resin tested were 977-6, PR 520, SE-SA-1, RS-E3 (e-beam curable), Cycom 823 and PEEK. The results showed that the 977-6 and PEEK were the most damage resistant in all tested cases.

  4. Fabrication Of Carbon-Boron Reinforced Dry Polymer Matrix Composite Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, Harry L.; Cano, Roberto J.; Treasure, Monte; Shahood, Thomas W.

    1999-01-01

    Future generation aerospace vehicles will require specialized hybrid material forms for component structure fabrication. For this reason, high temperature composite prepregs in both dry and wet forms are being developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). In an attempt to improve compressive properties of carbon fiber reinforced composites, a hybrid carbon-boron tape was developed and used to fabricate composite laminates which were subsequently cut into flexural and compression specimens and tested. The hybrid material, given the designation HYCARB, was fabricated by modifying a previously developed process for the manufacture of dry polymer matrix composite (PMC) tape at LaRC. In this work, boron fibers were processed with IM7/LaRC(TradeMark)IAX poly(amide acid) solution-coated prepreg to form a dry hybrid tape for Automated Tow Placement (ATP). Boron fibers were encapsulated between two (2) layers of reduced volatile, low fiber areal weight poly(amide acid) solution-coated prepreg. The hybrid prepreg was then fully imidized and consolidated into a dry tape suitable for ATP. The fabrication of a hybrid boron material form for tow placement aids in the reduction of the overall manufacturing cost of boron reinforced composites, while realizing the improved compression strengths. Composite specimens were press-molded from the hybrid material and exhibited excellent mechanical properties.

  5. Development of new and improved polymer matrix resin systems, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, M. S.

    1983-01-01

    Vinystilbazole (vinylstryrylpyridine) and vinylpolystyrulpyridine were prepared for the purpose of modifying bismaleimide composite resins. Cure studies of resins systems were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry. The vinylstyrylpyridine-modified bismaleimide composite resins were found to have lower cure and gel temperatures, and shorter cure times than the corresponding unmodified composite resins. The resin systems were reinforced with commercially avialable satin-weave carbon cloth. Prepregs were fabricated by solvent or hot melt techniques. Thermal stability, flammability, moisture absorption, and mechanical properties of the composites (such as flexural strength, modulus, tensile and short beam shear strength) were determined. Composite laminates showed substantial improvements in both processability and mechanical properties compared to he bismaleimide control systems. The vinylstyrylpyridine modified bismaleimide resins can be used as advanced matrix resins for graphite secondary structures where ease of processing, fireworthiness, and high temperature stability are required for aerospace applications.

  6. A micro to macro approach to polymer matrix composites damage modeling : final LDRD report.

    SciTech Connect

    English, Shawn Allen; Brown, Arthur A.; Briggs, Timothy M.

    2013-12-01

    Capabilities are developed, verified and validated to generate constitutive responses using material and geometric measurements with representative volume elements (RVE). The geometrically accurate RVEs are used for determining elastic properties and damage initiation and propagation analysis. Finite element modeling of the meso-structure over the distribution of characterizing measurements is automated and various boundary conditions are applied. Plain and harness weave composites are investigated. Continuum yarn damage, softening behavior and an elastic-plastic matrix are combined with known materials and geometries in order to estimate the macroscopic response as characterized by a set of orthotropic material parameters. Damage mechanics and coupling effects are investigated and macroscopic material models are demonstrated and discussed. Prediction of the elastic, damage, and failure behavior of woven composites will aid in macroscopic constitutive characterization for modeling and optimizing advanced composite systems.

  7. Visualization of subsurface nanoparticles in a polymer matrix using resonance tracking atomic force acoustic microscopy and contact resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kuniko; Kobayashi, Kei; Yao, Atsushi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2016-10-14

    A visualization technique of subsurface features with a nanometer-scale spatial resolution is strongly demanded. Some research groups have demonstrated the visualization of subsurface features using various techniques based on atomic force microscopy. However, the imaging mechanisms have not yet been fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated the visualization of subsurface Au nanoparticles buried in a polymer matrix 900 nm from the surface using two techniques; i.e., resonance tracking atomic force acoustic microscopy and contact resonance spectroscopy. It was clarified that the subsurface features were visualized by the two techniques as the area with a higher contact resonance frequency and a higher Q-factor than those in the surrounding area, which suggests that the visualization is realized by the variation of the contact stiffness and damping of the polymer matrix due to the existence of the buried nanoparticles. PMID:27607548

  8. The incorporation of extracellular matrix proteins in protein polymer hydrogels to improve encapsulated beta-cell function.

    PubMed

    Beenken-Rothkopf, Liese N; Karfeld-Sulzer, Lindsay S; Davis, Nicolynn E; Forster, Ryan; Barron, Annelise E; Fontaine, Magali J

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterial encapsulation of islets has been proposed to improve the long-term success of islet transplantation by recreating a suitable microenvironment and enhancing cell-matrix interactions that affect cellular function. Protein polymer hydrogels previously showed promise as a biocompatible scaffold by maintaining high cell viability. Here, enzymatically-crosslinked protein polymers were used to investigate the effects of varying scaffold properties and of introducing ECM proteins on the viability and function of encapsulated MIN6 β-cells. Chemical and mechanical properties of the hydrogel were modified by altering the protein concentrations while collagen IV, fibronectin, and laminin were incorporated to reestablish cell-matrix interactions lost during cell isolation. Rheology indicated all hydrogels formed quickly, resulting in robust, elastic hydrogels with Young's moduli similar to soft tissue. All hydrogels tested supported both high MIN6 β-cell viability and function and have the potential to serve as an encapsulation platform for islet cell delivery in vivo.

  9. Visualization of subsurface nanoparticles in a polymer matrix using resonance tracking atomic force acoustic microscopy and contact resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kuniko; Kobayashi, Kei; Yao, Atsushi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2016-10-14

    A visualization technique of subsurface features with a nanometer-scale spatial resolution is strongly demanded. Some research groups have demonstrated the visualization of subsurface features using various techniques based on atomic force microscopy. However, the imaging mechanisms have not yet been fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated the visualization of subsurface Au nanoparticles buried in a polymer matrix 900 nm from the surface using two techniques; i.e., resonance tracking atomic force acoustic microscopy and contact resonance spectroscopy. It was clarified that the subsurface features were visualized by the two techniques as the area with a higher contact resonance frequency and a higher Q-factor than those in the surrounding area, which suggests that the visualization is realized by the variation of the contact stiffness and damping of the polymer matrix due to the existence of the buried nanoparticles.

  10. Visualization of subsurface nanoparticles in a polymer matrix using resonance tracking atomic force acoustic microscopy and contact resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Kuniko; Kobayashi, Kei; Yao, Atsushi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2016-10-01

    A visualization technique of subsurface features with a nanometer-scale spatial resolution is strongly demanded. Some research groups have demonstrated the visualization of subsurface features using various techniques based on atomic force microscopy. However, the imaging mechanisms have not yet been fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated the visualization of subsurface Au nanoparticles buried in a polymer matrix 900 nm from the surface using two techniques; i.e., resonance tracking atomic force acoustic microscopy and contact resonance spectroscopy. It was clarified that the subsurface features were visualized by the two techniques as the area with a higher contact resonance frequency and a higher Q-factor than those in the surrounding area, which suggests that the visualization is realized by the variation of the contact stiffness and damping of the polymer matrix due to the existence of the buried nanoparticles.

  11. Efficient separation of conjugated polymers using a water soluble glycoprotein matrix: from fluorescence materials to light emitting devices.

    PubMed

    Hendler, Netta; Wildeman, Jurjen; Mentovich, Elad D; Schnitzler, Tobias; Belgorodsky, Bogdan; Prusty, Deepak K; Rimmerman, Dolev; Herrmann, Andreas; Richter, Shachar

    2014-03-01

    Optically active bio-composite blends of conjugated polymers or oligomers are fabricated by complexing them with bovine submaxilliary mucin (BSM) protein. The BSM matrix is exploited to host hydrophobic extended conjugated π-systems and to prevent undesirable aggregation and render such materials water soluble. This method allows tuning the emission color of solutions and films from the basic colors to the technologically challenging white emission. Furthermore, electrically driven light emitting biological devices are prepared and operated.

  12. Effect of monomer composition of polymer matrix on flexural properties of glass fibre-reinforced orthodontic archwire.

    PubMed

    Ohtonen, J; Vallittu, P K; Lassila, L V J

    2013-02-01

    To compare force levels obtained from glass fibre-reinforced composite (FRC) archwires. Specifically, FRC wires were compared with polymer matrices having different dimethacrylate monomer compositions. FRC material (E-glass provided by Stick Tech Ltd, Turku, Finland) with continuous unidirectional glass fibres and four different types of dimethacrylate monomer compositions for the resin matrix were tested. Cross-sectionally round FRC archwires fitting into the 0.3 mm slot of a bracket were divided into 16 groups with six specimens in each group. Glass fibres were impregnated by the manufacturer, and they were initially light-cured by hand light-curing unit or additionally post-cured in light-curing oven. The FRC archwire specimens were tested at 37°C according to a three-point bending test in dry and wet conditions using a span length of 10 mm and a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. The wires were loaded until final failure. The data were statistically analysed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). The dry FRC archwire specimens revealed higher load values than water stored ones, regardless of the polymer matrix. A majority of the FRC archwires showed higher load values after being post-cured. ANOVA revealed that the polymer matrix, curing method, and water storage had a significant effect (P < 0.05) on the flexural behaviour of the FRC archwire. Polymer matrix composition, curing method, and water storage affected the flexural properties and thus, force level and working range which could be obtained from the FRC archwire. PMID:22058110

  13. Advancing reversible shape memory by tuning the polymer network architecture

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Qiaoxi; Zhou, Jing; Vatankhah-Varnoosfaderani, Mohammad; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Gang, Oleg; Sheiko, Sergei S.

    2016-02-02

    Because of counteraction of a chemical network and a crystalline scaffold, semicrystalline polymer networks exhibit a peculiar behavior—reversible shape memory (RSM), which occurs naturally without applying any external force and particular structural design. There are three RSM properties: (i) range of reversible strain, (ii) rate of strain recovery, and (iii) decay of reversibility with time, which can be improved by tuning the architecture of the polymer network. Different types of poly(octylene adipate) networks were synthesized, allowing for control of cross-link density and network topology, including randomly cross-linked network by free-radical polymerization, thiol–ene clicked network with enhanced mesh uniformity, and loosemore » network with deliberately incorporated dangling chains. It is shown that the RSM properties are controlled by average cross-link density and crystal size, whereas topology of a network greatly affects its extensibility. In conclusion, we have achieved 80% maximum reversible range, 15% minimal decrease in reversibility, and fast strain recovery rate up to 0.05 K–1, i.e., ca. 5% per 10 s at a cooling rate of 5 K/min.« less

  14. Recent Advances in Thermoplastic Puncture-Healing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, K. L.; Working, D. C.; Wise, K. E.; Bogert, P. B.; Britton, S. M.; Topping, C.C.; Smith, J. Y.; Siochi, E. J.

    2009-01-01

    Self-healing materials provide a route for enhanced damage tolerance in materials for aerospace applications. In particular, puncture-healing upon impact has the potential to mitigate significant damage caused by high velocity micrometeoroid impacts. This type of material also has the potential to improve damage tolerance in load bearing structures to enhance vehicle health and aircraft durability. The materials being studied are those capable of instantaneous puncture healing, providing a mechanism for mechanical property retention in lightweight structures. These systems have demonstrated healing capability following penetration of fast moving projectiles -- velocities that range from 9 mm bullets shot from a gun (approx.330 m/sec) to close to micrometeoroid debris velocities of 4800 m/sec. In this presentation, we report on a suite of polymeric materials possessing this characteristic. Figure 1 illustrates the puncture healing concept. Puncture healing in these materials is dependent upon how the combination of a polymer's viscoelastic properties responds to the energy input resulting from the puncture event. Projectile penetration increases the temperature in the vicinity of the impact. Self-healing behavior occurs following puncture, whereby energy must be transferred to the material during impact both elastically and inelastically, thus establishing two requirements for puncture healing to occur: a.) The need for the puncture event to produce a local melt state in the polymer material and b.) The molten material has to have sufficient melt elasticity to snap back and close the hole. 1,2 Previous ballistic testing studies revealed that Surlyn materials warmed up to a temperature approx.98 C during projectile puncture (3 C higher than it s melting temperature). 1,2 The temperature increase produces a localized flow state and the melt elasticity to snap back thus sealing the hole. Table 1 lists the commercially polymers studied here, together with their physical

  15. Synergistic Effects of Physical Aging and Damage on Long-Term Behavior of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinson, L. Cate

    1999-01-01

    The research consisted of two major parts, first modeling and simulation of the combined effects of aging and damage on polymer composites and secondly an experimental phase examining composite response at elevated temperatures, again activating both aging and damage. For the simulation, a damage model for polymeric composite laminates operating at elevated temperatures was developed. Viscoelastic behavior of the material is accounted for via the correspondence principle and a variational approach is adopted to compute the temporal stresses within the laminate. Also, the effect of physical aging on ply level stress and on overall laminate behavior is included. An important feature of the model is that damage evolution predictions for viscoelastic laminates can be made. This allows us to track the mechanical response of the laminate up to large load levels though within the confines of linear viscoelastic constitutive behavior. An experimental investigation of microcracking and physical aging effects in polymer matrix composites was also pursued. The goal of the study was to assess the impact of aging on damage accumulation, in ten-ns of microcracking, and the impact of damage on aging and viscoelastic behavior. The testing was performed both at room and elevated temperatures on [+/- 45/903](sub s) and [02/903](sub s) laminates, both containing a set of 90 deg plies centrally located to facilitate investigation of microcracking. Edge replication and X-ray-radiography were utilized to quantify damage. Sequenced creep tests were performed to characterize viscoelastic and aging parameters. Results indicate that while the aging times studied have limited ]Influence on damage evolution, elevated temperature and viscoelastic effects have a profound effect on the damage mode seen. Some results are counterintuitive, including the lower strain to failure for elevated temperature tests and the catastrophic failure mode observed for the [+/- 45/9O3](sub s), specimens. The

  16. Evaluation of a molecularly imprinted polymer for determination of steroids in goat milk by matrix solid phase dispersion.

    PubMed

    Gañán, Judith; Morante-Zarcero, Sonia; Gallego-Picó, Alejandrina; Garcinuño, Rosa María; Fernández-Hernando, Pilar; Sierra, Isabel

    2014-08-01

    A molecularly imprinted polymer-matrix solid-phase dispersion methodology for simultaneous determination of five steroids in goat milk samples was proposed. Factors affecting the extraction recovery such as sample/dispersant ratio and washing and elution solvents were investigated. The molecularly imprinted polymer used as dispersant in the matrix solid-phase dispersion procedure showed high affinity to steroids, and the obtained extracts were sufficiently cleaned to be directly analyzed. Analytical separation was performed by micellar electrokinetic chromatography using a capillary electrophoresis system equipped with a diode array detector. A background electrolyte composed of borate buffer (25mM, pH 9.3), sodium dodecyl sulfate (10mM) and acetonitrile (20%) was used. The developed MIP-MSPD methodology was applied for direct determination of testosterone (T), estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (17β-E2), 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) and progesterone (P) in different goat milk samples. Mean recoveries obtained ranged from 81% to 110%, with relative standard deviations (RSD)≤12%. The molecularly imprinted polymer-matrix solid-phase dispersion method is fast, selective, cost-effective and environment-friendly compared with other pretreatment methods used for extraction of steroids in milk.

  17. Oxygen plasma treatment and deposition of CN{sub x} on a fluorinated polymer matrix composite for improved erosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Muratore, C.; Korenyi-Both, A.; Bultman, J. E.; Waite, A. R.; Jones, J. G.; Storage, T. M.; Voevodin, A. A.

    2007-07-15

    The use of polymer matrix composites in aerospace propulsion applications is currently limited by insufficient resistance to erosion by abrasive media. Erosion resistant coatings may provide necessary protection; however, adhesion to many high temperature polymer matrix composite (PMC) materials is poor. A low pressure oxygen plasma treatment process was developed to improve adhesion of CN{sub x} coatings to a carbon reinforced, fluorinated polymer matrix composite. Fullerene-like CN{sub x} was selected as an erosion resistant coating for its high hardness-to-elastic modulus ratio and elastic resilience which were expected to reduce erosion from media incident at different angles (normal or glancing) relative to the surface. In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to evaluate the effect of the plasma treatment on surface chemistry, and electron microscopy was used to identify changes in the surface morphology of the PMC substrate after plasma exposure. The fluorine concentration at the surface was significantly reduced and the carbon fibers were exposed after plasma treatment. CN{sub x} coatings were then deposited on oxygen treated PMC substrates. Qualitative tests demonstrated that plasma treatment improved coating adhesion resulting in an erosion resistance improvement of a factor of 2 compared to untreated coated composite substrates. The combination of PMC pretreatment and coating with CN{sub x} reduced the erosion rate by an order of magnitude for normally incident particles.

  18. Encapsulation of Mentha Oil in Chitosan Polymer Matrix Alleviates Skin Irritation.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Nidhi; Rai, Vineet Kumar; Yadav, Kuldeep Singh; Sinha, Priyam; Kanaujia, Archana; Chanda, Debabrata; Jakhmola, Apurva; Saikia, Dharmendra; Yadav, Narayan Prasad

    2016-04-01

    Mentha spicata L. var. viridis oil (MVO) is a potent antifungal agent, but its application in the topical treatment is limited due to its irritancy and volatility. It was aimed to develop more efficient, chitosan-incrusted MVO microspheres with reduced volatility and lesser irritancy and to dispense it in the form of ointment. Simple coacervation technique was employed to microencapsulate MVO in chitosan matrix. Morphological properties and polymer cross-linking were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry, respectively. Optimization was carried out on the basis of entrapment efficiency (EE) using response surface methodology. Well-designed microspheres having smooth surface and spherical shape were observed. EE (81.20%) of optimum batch (R21) was found at 1.62% w/v of cross-linker, 5.4:5 of MVO to chitosan ratio and at 1000 rpm. R21 showed 69.38 ± 1.29% in vitro MVO release in 12 h and 96.92% retention of MVO in microspheres even after 8 week. Ointments of PEG 4000 and PEG 400 comprising MVO (F1) and R21 (F2) were developed separately. F2 showed comparatively broader zone of growth inhibition (13.33 ± 1.76-18.67 ± 0.88 mm) and less irritancy (PII 0.5833, irritation barely perceptible) than that of F1. F2 was able to avoid the direct contact of mild irritant MVO with the skin and to reduce its rapid volatility. Controlled release of MVO helped in lengthening the duration of availability of MVO in agar media and hence improved its therapeutic efficacy. In conclusion, a stable and non-irritant formulation with improved therapeutic potential was developed.

  19. Measurements of Erosion Wear Volume Loss on Bare and Coated Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Sutter, James K.; Mondry, Richard J.; Bowman, Cheryl; Ma, Kong; Horan, Richard A.; Naik, Subhash K.; Cupp, Randall J.

    2003-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the erosion behavior of uncoated and coated polymer matrix composite (PMC) specimens subjected to solid particle impingement using air jets. The PMCs were carbon-Kevlar (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) fiber-epoxy resin composites with a temperature capability up to 393 K (248 F). Tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) was the primary topcoat constituent. Bondcoats were applied to the PMC substrates to improve coating adhesion; then, erosion testing was performed at the University of Cincinnati. All erosion tests were conducted with Arizona road-dust (ARD), impinging at angles of 20 and 90 on both uncoated and two-layer coated PMCs at a velocity of 229 m/s and at a temperature of 366 K (200 F). ARD contains primarily 10-m aluminum oxide powders. Vertically scanning interference microscopy (noncontact, optical profilometry) was used to evaluate surface characteristics, such as erosion wear volume loss and depth, surface topography, and surface roughness. The results indicate that noncontact, optical interferometry can be used to make an accurate determination of the erosion wear volume loss of PMCs with multilayered structures while preserving the specimens. The two-layered (WC-Co topcoat and metal bondcoat) coatings on PMCs remarkably reduced the erosion volume loss by a factor of approximately 10. The tenfold increase in erosion resistance will contribute to longer PMC component lives, lower air friction, reduced related breakdowns, decreased maintenance costs, and increased PMC reliability. The decrease in the surface roughness of the coated vanes will lead to lower air friction and will subsequently reduce energy consumption. Eventually, the coatings could lead to overall economic savings.

  20. Polymer-nanocomposite brush-like architectures as an all-solid electrolyte matrix.

    PubMed

    Gowneni, Soujanya; Ramanjaneyulu, Kota; Basak, Pratyay

    2014-11-25

    Herein, we report on polymer-nanocomposites with brush-like architectures and evaluate their feasibility as an all-solid electrolyte matrix supporting Li(+)-ion conduction. Showcased as a first example in the domain of electrolyte research, the study probes several key factors, such as (i) core morphology, (ii) surface modifiers/functionality, (iii) grafting length, and (iv) density of the brushes, and determines their role on the overall electrochemical properties of these nanostructured organic-inorganic hybrids. Nanostructured titania was synthesized via wet-chemical approaches using either controlled hydrolysis or hydrothermal methods. Exercising suitable control on reaction parameters led to well-defined morphologies/phases, such as nanoparticles, nanospindles, nanourchins, nanorods or nanotubes, in either anatase, rutile or mixed forms. Covalent anchoring on titania nanostructures was achieved using dopamine, gallic acid and glycerol as small organic moieties. A one-pot process of priming the available surface functional groups postmodification with isocyanate chemistry was followed by grafting polyethylene glycol monomethyl ethers of desired chain lengths. Finally, complexation with lithium salt yielded electrolyte compositions where the ethylene oxide (EO) fractions aid in ion-solvation with ease. The synthesized materials were characterized in detail employing XRD, TEM, DRS-UV, FTIR, micro-Raman, TG-DTA and DSC at each stage to confirm the products and ascertain the physicochemical properties. Comprehensive evaluation using temperature-step electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) of these brush-like nanocomposites provided crucial leads toward establishing a plausible physical model for the system and understanding the mechanism of ion transport in these all-solid matrices. The preliminary results on ionic conductivity (σ) obtained for some of the compositions are estimated to be within the range of ∼10(-4) to 10(-5) S cm(-1) in the temperature

  1. The Advanced Integration Matrix Project and Analog Sites: Difference or Duplication?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Kevin M.

    2004-01-01

    Several project teams have conducted Mars and Lunar mission simulations at analog sites and facilities over the past decade. These projects have a range of scope, participants, and objectives. NASA has provided many of these projects with funding, equipment, and personnel. Despite their variety, a consistent aim of these sites is advancing our capability to return to the Moon or to go to Mars. The Advanced Integration Matrix (AIM) Project was begun in 2002 with a corollary aim: that of advancing the technology needed for long duration human exploration of space. As a new project, it is prudent to ask and answer the question: "What does AIM offer to NASA that is distinct from what current and past analog sites offer?" The price tag for human spaceflight is high enough without needless duplication of efforts. The AIM Project concept is distinct from currently operating terrestrial analogs in three important ways. First, AIM is not strictly an analog site or facility; second, AIM is primarily focused on systems and integration issues; and finally, AIM is organizationally related to NASA s advanced development groups and subject to the rigors of the JSC Engineering Directorate s development process. The successful development of destination-independent, cost-effective, safe, and reliable long duration human exploration systems requires that NASA use both the analog sites and ground-based systems integration efforts. The Advanced Integration Matrix Project will not simply duplicate the former, but will give the agency the capability for the latter.

  2. Chitosan based polymer matrix with silver nanoparticles decorated multiwalled carbon nanotubes for catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol.

    PubMed

    Alshehri, Saad M; Almuqati, Turki; Almuqati, Naif; Al-Farraj, Eida; Alhokbany, Norah; Ahamad, Tansir

    2016-10-20

    A novel catalyst for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) was prepared using carboxyl group-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), polymer matrix, and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The AgNPs were prepared by the reduction of silver nitrate by trisodium citrate in the MWCNTs-polymer nanocomposite; the size of the synthesized AgNPs was found to be 3nm (average diameter). The synthesized nanocomposites were characterized using several analytical techniques. Ag@MWCNTs-polymer composite in the presence of sodium borohydride (NaBH4) in aqueous solution is an effective catalyst for the reduction of 4-NP. The apparent kinetics of reduction has a pseudo-first-order kinetics, and the rate constant and catalytic activity parameter were found to be respectively 7.88×10(-3)s(-1)and 11.64s(-1)g(-1). The MWCNTs-polymer nanocomposite renders stability to AgNPs against the environment and the reaction medium, which means that the Ag@MWCNTs-polymer composite can be re-used for many catalytic cycles. PMID:27474552

  3. Chitosan based polymer matrix with silver nanoparticles decorated multiwalled carbon nanotubes for catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol.

    PubMed

    Alshehri, Saad M; Almuqati, Turki; Almuqati, Naif; Al-Farraj, Eida; Alhokbany, Norah; Ahamad, Tansir

    2016-10-20

    A novel catalyst for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) was prepared using carboxyl group-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), polymer matrix, and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The AgNPs were prepared by the reduction of silver nitrate by trisodium citrate in the MWCNTs-polymer nanocomposite; the size of the synthesized AgNPs was found to be 3nm (average diameter). The synthesized nanocomposites were characterized using several analytical techniques. Ag@MWCNTs-polymer composite in the presence of sodium borohydride (NaBH4) in aqueous solution is an effective catalyst for the reduction of 4-NP. The apparent kinetics of reduction has a pseudo-first-order kinetics, and the rate constant and catalytic activity parameter were found to be respectively 7.88×10(-3)s(-1)and 11.64s(-1)g(-1). The MWCNTs-polymer nanocomposite renders stability to AgNPs against the environment and the reaction medium, which means that the Ag@MWCNTs-polymer composite can be re-used for many catalytic cycles.

  4. Hydrostatic Stress Effects Incorporated Into the Analysis of the High-Strain-Rate Deformation of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2003-01-01

    Procedures for modeling the effect of high strain rate on composite materials are needed for designing reliable composite engine cases that are lighter than the metal cases in current use. The types of polymer matrix composites that are likely to be used in such an application have a deformation response that is nonlinear and that varies with strain rate. The nonlinearity and strain rate dependence of the composite response is primarily due to the matrix constituent. Therefore, in developing material models to be used in the design of impact-resistant composite engine cases, the deformation of the polymer matrix must be correctly analyzed. However, unlike in metals, the nonlinear response of polymers depends on the hydrostatic stresses, which must be accounted for within an analytical model. An experimental program has been carried out through a university grant with the Ohio State University to obtain tensile and shear deformation data for a representative polymer for strain rates ranging from quasi-static to high rates of several hundred per second. This information has been used at the NASA Glenn Research Center to develop, characterize, and correlate a material model in which the strain rate dependence and nonlinearity (including hydrostatic stress effects) of the polymer are correctly analyzed. To obtain the material data, Glenn s researchers designed and fabricated test specimens of a representative toughened epoxy resin. Quasi-static tests at low strain rates and split Hopkinson bar tests at high strain rates were then conducted at the Ohio State University. The experimental data confirmed the strong effects of strain rate on both the tensile and shear deformation of the polymer. For the analytical model, Glenn researchers modified state variable constitutive equations previously used for the viscoplastic analysis of metals to allow for the analysis of the nonlinear, strain-rate-dependent polymer deformation. Specifically, we accounted for the effects of

  5. Effect of polymer matrix on structure of Se particles formed in aqueous solutions during redox process

    SciTech Connect

    Suvorova, E. I. Klechkovskaya, V. V.

    2010-12-15

    Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray energy dispersive microanalysis study of the structure of particles formed during the reduction of Se(IV) to Se(0) in aqueous solutions in the presence of amphiphilic polymers showed the formation of Se/polymer composite particles. The content of carbon inside the particles can be as large as 80 at %. Polymers deeply influence the structure of particles. Depending on polymers, the composite particles may be unstable with time and they spontaneously evolve from Se/polymer composite particles to crystalline particles of monoclinic Se. For the stable ones, addition of bacterial cellulose Acetobacter xylinum gel-film can induce crystallization in the particles which expel the polymeric material. The Se/polymer composite particles and Se crystalline particles exhibit different sensitivity to electron irradiation and stiffness.

  6. Advances in ferroelectric polymers for shock compression sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, F.; Moulard, H.; Samara, G.

    1998-07-01

    Our studies of the shock compression response of PVDF polymer are continuing in order to understand the physical properties under shock loading and to develop high fidelity, reproducible, time-resolved dynamic stress gauges. New PVDF technology, new electrode configurations and piezoelectric analysis have resulted in enhanced precision gauges. Our new standard gauges have a precision of better than 1{percent} in electrical charge release under shock up to 15 GPa. The piezoelectric response of shock compressed PVDF gauges 1 mm{sup 2} in active area has been studied and yielded well-behaved reproducible data up to 20 GPa. Analysis of the response of these gauges in the {open_quotes}thin mode regime{close_quotes} using a Lagrangian hydrocode will be presented. P(VDF-TrFE) copolymers exhibit unique piezoelectric properties over a wide range of temperature depending on the composition. Their properties and phase transitions are being investigated. Emphasis of the presentation will be on key results and implications. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Formulation and Evaluation of Cephalexin Extended-release Matrix Tablets Using Hydroxy Propyl Methyl Cellulose as Rate-controlling Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, J; Sahadevan, JT; Prabhakaran, R; Gilhotra, R Mehra

    2012-01-01

    The present investigation reports the design and evaluation of six-hour extended release film-coated matrix tablets of cephalexin using different grades of hydrophilic polymer hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) employing direct compression method. The preformulation studies performed included the physical compatibility studies, Differential Scanning Calorimetry analysis, drug characterization using Fourier Transform Infra Red spectroscopic analysis and particle size analysis using sieve method. The tablets were evaluated for weight variation, hardness, thickness and friability. Results of the studies indicate that the polymers used have significant release-retarding effect on the formulation. The dissolution profile comparison of the prepared batches P1 to P8 and market preparation (Sporidex AF 375) was done by using Food and Drug Administration-recommended similarity factor (f2) determination. The formulation P8 (10% HPMC K4M, 15% HPMC 15cps) with a similarity factor (f2) of 77.75 was selected as the optimized formulae for scale-up batches. The dissolution data of the best formulation P8 was fitted into zero order, first order, Higuchi and Korsemeyer-Peppas models to identify the pharmacokinetics and mechanism of drug release. The results of the accelerated stability study of best formulation P8 for three months revealed that storage conditions were not found to have made any significant changes in final formulation F3. The release of cephalexin was prolonged for 6 h by using polymer combinations of HPMC and a twice daily matrix tablet was formulated. PMID:22523453

  8. Heat capacities of solid polymers (The Advanced THermal Analysis System, ATHAS)

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderlich, B.

    1990-01-01

    The thermal properties of solid, linear macromolecules are accessible through heat capacity measurements from about 10 K to the glass transition. By measuring and collecting data on over 150 polymers, a data bank was established and used as a base for detailed correlation with an approximate frequency spectrum for the polymers. Besides assessment of the entropy at zero kelvin of disordered polymers, this heat capacity knowledge has helped in the elucidation of partial phase transitions and conformationally disordered crystal phases. A link has also been established to measurements of mobility through solid state nuclear magnetic resonance. Most recently heat capacity measurements have been linked to full dynamic simulations of crystal segments of 1900 chain atoms. Questions of disorder and anharmonicity can thus be analyzed. The work is summarized as the Advanced Thermal Analysis System, ATHAS. 27 refs., 26 figs.

  9. Current Advances in Polymer-Based Nanotheranostics for Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nanotheranostics is a relatively new, fast-growing field that combines the advantages of treatment and diagnosis via a single nanoscale carrier. The ability to bundle both therapeutic and diagnostic capabilities into one package offers exciting prospects for the development of novel nanomedicine. Nanotheranostics can deliver treatment while simultaneously monitoring therapy response in real-time, thereby decreasing the potential of over- or under-dosing patients. Polymer-based nanomaterials, in particular, have been used extensively as carriers for both therapeutic and bioimaging agents and thus hold great promise for the construction of multifunctional theranostic formulations. Herein, we review recent advances in polymer-based systems for nanotheranostics, with a particular focus on their applications in cancer research. We summarize the use of polymer nanomaterials for drug delivery, gene delivery, and photodynamic therapy, combined with imaging agents for magnetic resonance imaging, radionuclide imaging, and fluorescence imaging. PMID:25014486

  10. High molecular weight polymers block cortical granule exocytosis in sea urchin eggs at the level of granule matrix disassembly.

    PubMed

    Chandler, D E; Whitaker, M; Zimmerberg, J

    1989-09-01

    Recently, we have shown that high molecular weight polymers inhibit cortical granule exocytosis at total osmolalities only slightly higher than that of sea water (Whitaker, M., and J. Zimmerberg. 1987. J. Physiol. 389:527-539). In this study, we visualize the step at which this inhibition occurs. Lytechinus pictus and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus eggs were exposed to 0.8 M stachyose or 40% (wt/vol) dextran (average molecular mass of 10 kD) in artificial sea water, activated with 60 microM of the calcium ionophore A23187, and then either fixed with glutaraldehyde and embedded or quick-frozen and freeze-fractured. Stachyose (2.6 osmol/kg) appears to inhibit cortical granule exocytosis by eliciting formation of a granule-free zone (GFZ) in the egg cortex which pushes granules away from the plasma membrane thus preventing their fusion. In contrast, 40% dextran (1.58 osmol/kg) does not result in a GFZ and cortical granules undergo fusion. In some specimens, the pores joining granule and plasma membranes are relatively small; in other cases, the exocytotic pocket has been stabilized in an omega configuration and the granule matrix remains intact. These observations suggest that high molecular weight polymers block exocytosis because of their inability to enter the granule matrix: they retard the water entry that is needed for matrix dispersal.

  11. Associative Flow Rule Used to Include Hydrostatic Stress Effects in Analysis of Strain-Rate-Dependent Deformation of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2004-01-01

    designing reliable composite engine cases that are lighter than the metal cases in current use. The types of polymer matrix composites that are likely to be used in such an application have a deformation response that is nonlinear and that varies with strain rate. The nonlinearity and the strain-rate dependence of the composite response are due primarily to the matrix constituent. Therefore, in developing material models to be used in the design of impact-resistant composite engine cases, the deformation of the polymer matrix must be correctly analyzed. However, unlike in metals, the nonlinear response of polymers depends on the hydrostatic stresses, which must be accounted for within an analytical model. By applying micromechanics techniques along with given fiber properties, one can also determine the effects of the hydrostatic stresses in the polymer on the overall composite deformation response. First efforts to account for the hydrostatic stress effects in the composite deformation applied purely empirical methods that relied on composite-level data. In later efforts, to allow polymer properties to be characterized solely on the basis of polymer data, researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center developed equations to model the polymers that were based on a non-associative flow rule, and efforts to use these equations to simulate the deformation of representative polymer materials were reasonably successful. However, these equations were found to have difficulty in correctly analyzing the multiaxial stress states found in the polymer matrix constituent of a composite material. To correct these difficulties, and to allow for the accurate simulation of the nonlinear strain-rate-dependent deformation analysis of polymer matrix composites, in the efforts reported here Glenn researchers reformulated the polymer constitutive equations from basic principles using the concept of an associative flow rule. These revised equations were characterized and validated in an

  12. Advanced multi-contrast Jones matrix optical coherence tomography for Doppler and polarization sensitive imaging.

    PubMed

    Ju, Myeong Jin; Hong, Young-Joo; Makita, Shuichi; Lim, Yiheng; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Duan, Lian; Miura, Masahiro; Tang, Shuo; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2013-08-12

    An advanced version of Jones matrix optical coherence tomography (JMT) is demonstrated for Doppler and polarization sensitive imaging of the posterior eye. JMT is capable of providing localized flow tomography by Doppler detection and investigating the birefringence property of tissue through a three-dimensional (3-D) Jones matrix measurement. Owing to an incident polarization multiplexing scheme based on passive optical components, this system is stable, safe in a clinical environment, and cost effective. Since the properties of this version of JMT provide intrinsic compensation for system imperfection, the system is easy to calibrate. Compared with the previous version of JMT, this advanced JMT achieves a sufficiently long depth measurement range for clinical cases of posterior eye disease. Furthermore, a fine spectral shift compensation method based on the cross-correlation of calibration signals was devised for stabilizing the phase of OCT, which enables a high sensitivity Doppler OCT measurement. In addition, a new theory of JMT which integrates the Jones matrix measurement, Doppler measurement, and scattering measurement is presented. This theory enables a sensitivity-enhanced scattering OCT and high-sensitivity Doppler OCT. These new features enable the application of this system to clinical cases. A healthy subject and a geographic atrophy patient were measured in vivo, and simultaneous imaging of choroidal vasculature and birefringence structures are demonstrated.

  13. Advanced multi-contrast Jones matrix optical coherence tomography for Doppler and polarization sensitive imaging.

    PubMed

    Ju, Myeong Jin; Hong, Young-Joo; Makita, Shuichi; Lim, Yiheng; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Duan, Lian; Miura, Masahiro; Tang, Shuo; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2013-08-12

    An advanced version of Jones matrix optical coherence tomography (JMT) is demonstrated for Doppler and polarization sensitive imaging of the posterior eye. JMT is capable of providing localized flow tomography by Doppler detection and investigating the birefringence property of tissue through a three-dimensional (3-D) Jones matrix measurement. Owing to an incident polarization multiplexing scheme based on passive optical components, this system is stable, safe in a clinical environment, and cost effective. Since the properties of this version of JMT provide intrinsic compensation for system imperfection, the system is easy to calibrate. Compared with the previous version of JMT, this advanced JMT achieves a sufficiently long depth measurement range for clinical cases of posterior eye disease. Furthermore, a fine spectral shift compensation method based on the cross-correlation of calibration signals was devised for stabilizing the phase of OCT, which enables a high sensitivity Doppler OCT measurement. In addition, a new theory of JMT which integrates the Jones matrix measurement, Doppler measurement, and scattering measurement is presented. This theory enables a sensitivity-enhanced scattering OCT and high-sensitivity Doppler OCT. These new features enable the application of this system to clinical cases. A healthy subject and a geographic atrophy patient were measured in vivo, and simultaneous imaging of choroidal vasculature and birefringence structures are demonstrated. PMID:23938857

  14. Development of a variable frequency microwave processing system for post-curing of thermoset polymer matrix composite materials. Final report, 1 September 1994-28 February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.

    1995-02-28

    Using a Variable frequency Microwave Furnace (VFMF) technology, Lambda Technologies has demonstrated the ability to tune to the optimum incident frequency for best coupling into a given material structure (e.g., polymer matrix composite, PMC), and then by sweeping around that incident center frequency, producing uniform energy distribution throughout the cavity and sample volume. Hence, the advantages of microwave energy---enhanced reaction rates, reduced process time, and heat generation at the molecular level---are now obtainable with controlled and uniform results compatible for commercial scale-up. The processing via VFMF is 8 - 10 times faster than conventional processing methods. The advantages of VFMF technology over single frequency microwave technology in achieving the uniform electromagnetic energy distribution required for rapid and reliable processing of advanced polymer composites are systematically demonstrated in the Phase I (Both Glass and Carbon fiber reinforced PMC were investigated). In addition, a numerical modeling program implemented during Phase I provided a foundation for the ability to predict field distribution and temperature profiles in various geometries (plate, disk and cylinder) and materials (glass and graphite fiber reinforced PMCs) when being heated with variable frequency microwave energy.

  15. Advanced Compositional Analysis of Nanoparticle-polymer Composites Using Direct Fluorescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Crick, Colin R; Noimark, Sacha; Peveler, William J; Bear, Joseph C; Ivanov, Aleksandar P; Edel, Joshua B; Parkin, Ivan P

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication of polymer-nanoparticle composites is extremely important in the development of many functional materials. Identifying the precise composition of these materials is essential, especially in the design of surface catalysts, where the surface concentration of the active component determines the activity of the material. Antimicrobial materials which utilize nanoparticles are a particular focus of this technology. Recently swell encapsulation has emerged as a technique for inserting antimicrobial nanoparticles into a host polymer matrix. Swell encapsulation provides the advantage of localizing the incorporation to the external surfaces of materials, which act as the active sites of these materials. However, quantification of this nanoparticle uptake is challenging. Previous studies explore the link between antimicrobial activity and surface concentration of the active component, but this is not directly visualized. Here we show a reliable method to monitor the incorporation of nanoparticles into a polymer host matrix via swell encapsulation. We show that the surface concentration of CdSe/ZnS nanoparticles can be accurately visualized through cross-sectional fluorescence imaging. Using this method, we can quantify the uptake of nanoparticles via swell encapsulation and measure the surface concentration of encapsulated particles, which is key in optimizing the activity of functional materials. PMID:27500449

  16. A process to recover carbon fibers from polymer-matrix composites in end-of-life vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jody, Bassam J.; Pomykala, Joseph A.; Daniels, Edward J.; Greminger, Jessica L.

    2004-08-01

    Because of their high strength-to-weight ratios, carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer-matrix composite (PMC) materials are being evaluated for use in the automotive industry. The major barriers to their widespread use are their relatively high cost and the uncertainty about whether they can be recycled. A process to recover carbon fibers from obsolete PMC materials has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The process was tested using PMC samples made with different thermoset or thermoplastic substrates. For most mixtures of PMCs, the process can be energy self-sufficient using the polymer substrate as an energy source. An evaluation of the recovered samples found that the fibers appear to have retained good properties and characteristics and are suitable for short fiber applications. This paper describes the process and the characteristics and properties of the recovered fibers.

  17. An experimental investigation of inhomogeneities in resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed-laser deposited thin polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubb, Daniel M.; Corgan, Jeff; Yi, Sunyong; Khan, Mishae; Hughes, Leon; Gurudas, Ullas; Papantonakis, Michael; McGill, R. Andrew

    2010-08-01

    Thin polymer films are deposited using matrix-assisted pulsed-laser evaporation and subsequently are characterized by scanning electron and atomic force microscopies. An Er : YAG laser (2937 nm, 350 μs) is used as a light source and the effect of the energy density supplied by the laser on the morphology of the deposited films is investigated. It is found that the appearance of undesirable non-uniform morphological features arises from either poor solubility of the guest molecules or insufficient energy density provided by the laser to vaporize the entire ejected volume. In addition, the surface roughness of two guest-host systems is found to depend linearly on the polymer concentration. These results allow us to better understand earlier work in the field and to establish a framework by which MAPLE films may be improved.

  18. Nanoparticle Self-Assembly in a Polymer Matrix and Its Impact on Phase Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Jack

    2011-03-01

    The ubiquitous clustering of nanoparticles (NPs) in solutions and polymer melts depends sensitively on the strength and directionality of the effective NP-NP interactions, as well as on the molecular geometry and interactions of the dispersing fluid. Surface functionalization apparently can also lead to emergent anisotropic interactions that can influence NP dispersion. Since NP clustering can strongly influence the properties of polymer nanocomposites and NP solutions, we investigate the reversible self-assembly of model NPs into clusters under equilibrium conditions through a combination of simulation and analytic methods. First, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of polyhedral NPs in a coarse-grained dense bead--spring polymer melt and find a transition from a dispersed to clustered NP state, consistent with the thermodynamic models of equilibrium particle association such as equilibrium polymerization. We also describe the competition between self-assembly and phase separation in an analytic lattice model of a mixture of polymers and NPs. We then focus on the particularly interesting situation where the associating ``monomeric'' NP species form high molecular mass dynamic polymeric clusters and where the assembly process then transforms the phase boundary from a form typical of a polymer solution to one that more resembles a polymer blend with increasing association near the critical point for phase separation. The model calculations elucidate basic physical principles governing the coupling of self-assembly and phase behavior in these complex mixtures.

  19. Polymer NDE; Proceedings of the European Workshop on Nondestructive Evaluation of Polymers and Polymer Matrix Composites, Termar do Vimeiro, Portugal, September 4, 5, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Ashbe, K.M.G.

    1986-01-01

    The state of the art in the characterization, detection and quantification of defects in polymer materials for industrial and aerospace applications is described. The defects include inhomogeneous mixing, inclusions of foreign materials, macroscopic anisotropy, segregation and residual stress. The manifestations of the defects are discussed in terms of NDT methods for probing the microstructure at the molecular level and for determining the molecular orientation of the polymer constituents. NDT techniques are also described for lifetime prediction and in-service testing of laminated composites. Analytical methods are reviewed for using acoustic emission data to monitor physical changes in gels and solids, detect defects in filament wound pressure vessels, and evaluate failure mechanisms in CFRP materials. NDT applications are also described for employing electromagnetic wave propagation, vibrations, elastic wave, and holographic interferographic data for qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the effects of defects and loading on polymer materials.

  20. Tailoring surface topographies of polymers by using ion beam: Recent advances and the potential applications in biomedical and tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasebe, Terumitsu; Nagashima, So; Yoshimoto, Yukihiro; Hotta, Atsushi; Suzuki, Tetsuya

    2012-07-01

    Ion beam technique has recently been actively employed to create various patterns on the surface of polymers. In this paper, we highlight some of the recent advances in tailoring surface topographies of polymers by using ion beam and present a brief discussion on the potential applications in biomedical and tissue engineering.

  1. Depletion of reactive advanced glycation endproducts from diabetic uremic sera using a lysozyme-linked matrix.

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuhashi, T; Li, Y M; Fishbane, S; Vlassara, H

    1997-01-01

    Diabetic uremic sera contain excessive amounts of reactive advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), which accelerate the vasculopathy of diabetes and end-stage renal disease. To capture in vivo-derived toxic AGEs, high affinity AGE-binding protein lysozyme (LZ) was linked to a Sepharose 4B matrix. Initial studies showed that > 80% of 125I-AGE-BSA was retained by the LZ matrix, compared with < 10% retained by a control matrix. More than 60% of AGE-lysine was captured by the LZ matrix, and the LZ-bound fraction retained immunoreactivity and cross-linking activity, but had little intrinsic fluorescence (370/440 nm). After passage through the LZ matrix, AGE levels in diabetic sera (0.37+/-0.04 U/mg) were significantly reduced to a level (0.09+/-0.01 U/mg; n = 10; P < 0. 0001) comparable with the level of normal human serum, whereas total protein absorption was < 3%. The AGE-enriched serum fraction exhibited cross-linking activity, which was completely prevented by aminoguanidine. Among numerous LZ-bound proteins in diabetic uremic sera, three major proteins "susceptible" to AGE modification were identified: the immunoglobulin G light chain, apolipoprotein J (clusterin/SP-40,40), and the complement 3b beta chain. These findings indicate that the LZ-linked AGE affinity column may serve as an efficient method for the depletion of toxic AGEs from sera, including specific AGE-modified proteins that may be linked to altered immunity, lipoprotein metabolism, and accelerated vasculopathy in renal failure patients with or without diabetes. PMID:9259584

  2. Binding of matrix attachment regions to lamin polymers involves single-stranded regions and the minor groove.

    PubMed Central

    Ludérus, M E; den Blaauwen, J L; de Smit, O J; Compton, D A; van Driel, R

    1994-01-01

    Chromatin in eukaryotic nuclei is thought to be partitioned into functional loop domains that are generated by the binding of defined DNA sequences, named MARs (matrix attachment regions), to the nuclear matrix. We have previously identified B-type lamins as MAR-binding matrix components (M. E. E. Ludérus, A. de Graaf, E. Mattia, J. L. den Blaauwen, M. A. Grande, L. de Jong, and R. van Driel, Cell 70:949-959, 1992). Here we show that A-type lamins and the structurally related proteins desmin and NuMA also specifically bind MARs in vitro. We studied the interaction between MARs and lamin polymers in molecular detail and found that the interaction is saturable, of high affinity, and evolutionarily conserved. Competition studies revealed the existence of two different types of interaction related to different structural features of MARs: one involving the minor groove of double-stranded MAR DNA and one involving single-stranded regions. We obtained similar results for the interaction of MARs with intact nuclear matrices from rat liver. A model in which the interaction of nuclear matrix proteins with single-stranded MAR regions serves to stabilize the transcriptionally active state of chromatin is discussed. Images PMID:8065361

  3. The NASA "PERS" Program: Solid Polymer Electrolyte Development for Advanced Lithium-Based Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Richard S.; Bennett, William R.

    2007-01-01

    In fiscal year 2000, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) established a collaborative effort to support the development of polymer-based, lithium-based cell chemistries and battery technologies to address the next generation of aerospace applications and mission needs. The ultimate objective of this development program, which was referred to as the Polymer Energy Rechargeable System (PERS), was to establish a world-class technology capability and U.S. leadership in polymer-based battery technology for aerospace applications. Programmatically, the PERS initiative exploited both interagency collaborations to address common technology and engineering issues and the active participation of academia and private industry. The initial program phases focused on R&D activities to address the critical technical issues and challenges at the cell level. Out of a total of 38 proposals received in response to a NASA Research Announcement (NRA) solicitation, 18 proposals (13 contracts and 5 grants) were selected for initial award to address these technical challenges. Brief summaries of technical approaches, results and accomplishments of the PERS Program development efforts are presented. With Agency support provided through FY 2004, the PERS Program efforts were concluded in 2005, as internal reorganizations and funding cuts resulted in shifting programmatic priorities within NASA. Technically, the PERS Program participants explored, to various degrees over the lifetime of the formal program, a variety of conceptual approaches for developing and demonstrating performance of a viable advanced solid polymer electrolyte possessing the desired attributes, as well as several participants addressing all components of an integrated cell configuration. Programmatically, the NASA PERS Program was very successful, even though the very challenging technical goals for achieving a viable solid polymer electrolyte material or

  4. Towards Acid-Tolerated Ethanol Dehydration: Chitosan-Based Mixed Matrix Membranes Containing Cyano-Bridged Coordination Polymer Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wu, C-W; Kang, Chao-Hsiang; Lin, Yi-Feng; Tung, Kuo-Lun; Deng, Yu-Heng; Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M; Suzuki, Norihiro; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2016-04-01

    Prussian blue (PB) nanoparticles, one of many cyano-bridged coordination polymers, are successfully incorporated into chitosan (CS) polymer to prepare PB/CS mixed matrix membranes (MMMs). The PB nanoparticles are uniformly distributed in the MMMs without the collapse of the original PB structure. As-prepared PB/CS MMMs are used for ethanol dehydration at 25 °C in the pervaporation process. The effect of loading PB in CS matrix on pervaporation performance is carefully investigated. The PB/CS membrane with 30 wt% PB loading shows the best performance with a permeate flux of 614 g. m-2 . h-1 and a separation factor of 1472. The pervaporation using our PB/CS membranes exhibits outstanding performance in comparison with the previously reported CS-based membranes and MMMs. Furthermore, the addition of PB allows PB/CS MMMs to be tolerant of acidic environment. The present work demonstrates good pervaporation performance of PB/CS MMMs for the separation of an ethanol/water (90:10 in wt%) solution. Our new system provides an opportunity for dehydration of bioethanol in the future. PMID:27451778

  5. Implementation of Improved Transverse Shear Calculations and Higher Order Laminate Theory Into Strain Rate Dependent Analyses of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Lin-Fa; Kim, Soo; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Goldberg, Robert K.

    2004-01-01

    A numerical procedure has been developed to investigate the nonlinear and strain rate dependent deformation response of polymer matrix composite laminated plates under high strain rate impact loadings. A recently developed strength of materials based micromechanics model, incorporating a set of nonlinear, strain rate dependent constitutive equations for the polymer matrix, is extended to account for the transverse shear effects during impact. Four different assumptions of transverse shear deformation are investigated in order to improve the developed strain rate dependent micromechanics model. The validities of these assumptions are investigated using numerical and theoretical approaches. A method to determine through the thickness strain and transverse Poisson's ratio of the composite is developed. The revised micromechanics model is then implemented into a higher order laminated plate theory which is modified to include the effects of inelastic strains. Parametric studies are conducted to investigate the mechanical response of composite plates under high strain rate loadings. Results show the transverse shear stresses cannot be neglected in the impact problem. A significant level of strain rate dependency and material nonlinearity is found in the deformation response of representative composite specimens.

  6. Towards Acid-Tolerated Ethanol Dehydration: Chitosan-Based Mixed Matrix Membranes Containing Cyano-Bridged Coordination Polymer Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wu, C-W; Kang, Chao-Hsiang; Lin, Yi-Feng; Tung, Kuo-Lun; Deng, Yu-Heng; Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M; Suzuki, Norihiro; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2016-04-01

    Prussian blue (PB) nanoparticles, one of many cyano-bridged coordination polymers, are successfully incorporated into chitosan (CS) polymer to prepare PB/CS mixed matrix membranes (MMMs). The PB nanoparticles are uniformly distributed in the MMMs without the collapse of the original PB structure. As-prepared PB/CS MMMs are used for ethanol dehydration at 25 °C in the pervaporation process. The effect of loading PB in CS matrix on pervaporation performance is carefully investigated. The PB/CS membrane with 30 wt% PB loading shows the best performance with a permeate flux of 614 g. m-2 . h-1 and a separation factor of 1472. The pervaporation using our PB/CS membranes exhibits outstanding performance in comparison with the previously reported CS-based membranes and MMMs. Furthermore, the addition of PB allows PB/CS MMMs to be tolerant of acidic environment. The present work demonstrates good pervaporation performance of PB/CS MMMs for the separation of an ethanol/water (90:10 in wt%) solution. Our new system provides an opportunity for dehydration of bioethanol in the future.

  7. Recent advances in lipid nanoparticle formulations with solid matrix for oral drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Das, Surajit; Chaudhury, Anumita

    2011-03-01

    Lipid nanoparticles based on solid matrix have emerged as potential drug carriers to improve gastrointestinal (GI) absorption and oral bioavailability of several drugs, especially lipophilic compounds. These formulations may also be used for sustained drug release. Solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN) and the newer generation lipid nanoparticle, nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC), have been studied for their capability as oral drug carriers. Biodegradable, biocompatible, and physiological lipids are generally used to prepare these nanoparticles. Hence, toxicity problems related with the polymeric nanoparticles can be minimized. Furthermore, stability of the formulations might increase than other liquid nano-carriers due to the solid matrix of these lipid nanoparticles. These nanoparticles can be produced by different formulation techniques. Scaling up of the production process from lab scale to industrial scale can be easily achieved. Reasonably high drug encapsulation efficiency of the nanoparticles was documented. Oral absorption and bioavailability of several drugs were improved after oral administration of the drug-loaded SLNs or NLCs. In this review, pros and cons, different formulation and characterization techniques, drug incorporation models, GI absorption and oral bioavailability enhancement mechanisms, stability and storage condition of the formulations, and recent advances in oral delivery of the lipid nanoparticles based on solid matrix will be discussed. PMID:21174180

  8. Formulation and in vitro evaluation of theophylline matrix tablets prepared by direct compression: Effect of polymer blends

    PubMed Central

    El-Bagory, Ibrahim; Barakat, Nahla; Ibrahim, Mohamed A.; El-Enazi, Fouza

    2011-01-01

    The deformation mechanism of pharmaceutical powders, used in formulating directly compressed matrix tablets, affects the characteristics of the formed tablets. Three polymers of different deformation mechanisms were tested for their impact on theophylline directly compressed tablets namely Kollidon SR (KL SR, plastic deformation), Ethylcellulose (EC, elastic deformation) and Carnauba wax (CW, brittle deformation) at different compression forces. However, tablets based mainly on KL SR, the plastically deformed polymer (TN1) exhibited the highest hardness values compared to the other formulae which are based on either blends of KL SR with CW, the very brittle deformed polymer. The upper detected force for TN formulae and the lower punch force were found to dependent mainly on the powder deformation. This difference is attributed to the work done during the compression phase as well as the work lost during the decompression phase. Furthermore, the release profiles of TN from formulae TN2 and TN4 that are based on the composition (2KL SR:1EC) and (1KL SR:2EC), respectively, were consistent with different deformation mechanisms of KL SR and EC and on the physicochemical properties like the water absorptive capacity of EC. Upon increasing the weight ratio of KL SR (TN2), the release rate was greatly retarded (39.4%, 37.1%, 35.0% and 33.6% released after 8 h at 5, 10, 15 and 20 kN. PMID:24115902

  9. The effect of mixing methods and polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) cycles on the densification of silicon carbide inert matrix fuel through a polymer precursor route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Chunghao; Tulenko, J. S.; Baney, R. H.

    2011-12-01

    The effect of mixing methods on the fabrication of silicon carbide (SiC) inert matrix fuel through a polymer precursor route was investigated in order to break up the agglomerates of the SiC particles observed in earlier studies. It was found that a high energy shaker mill could effectively break up the agglomerates and thereby achieve a higher pellet density. Moreover, it was found that the pellet density depended less on the pressing pressure, when the particles are well mixed. SEM images showed cracks caused by the springback effect on pellets with a high cold pressing pressure of 600 MPa, but no signs of springback effect were observed for the 200 MPa pressed pellets. The polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) cycles were used to further increase the pellet density and close the open pores. The first PIP cycle was found to increase the theoretical density of the pellets from 81.2% to 86.0% and close ˜50% of the open pores. The pore size distribution showed that most of the remaining open pores had diameters smaller than 10 nm. The successive second PIP cycle is not as effective on either the density or the pore size distribution because the small pores present before the second PIP cycle made the infiltration process difficult.

  10. Development of scalable methods for the utilization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in polymer and metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennerberg, Danny Curtis

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have received considerable attention as reinforcement for composites due to their high tensile strength, stiffness, electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity as well as their low coefficient of thermal expansion. However, despite the availability of huge quantities of low-cost, commercially synthesized nanotubes, the utilization of MWCNTs in engineering composites is extremely limited due to difficulties in achieving uniform dispersion and strong interfacial bonding with the matrix. A proven method of enhancing the nanotube-polymer interface and degree of MWCNT dispersion involves functionalizing the MWCNTs through oxidation with strong acids. While effective at laboratory scales, this technique is not well-suited for large-scale operations due to long processing times, poor yield, safety hazards, and environmental concerns. This work aims to find scalable solutions to several of the challenges associated with the fabrication of MWCNT-reinforced composites. For polymer matrix composite applications, a rapid, dry, and cost-effective method of oxidizing MWCNTs with O3 in a fluidized bed was developed as an alternative to acid oxidation. Oxidized MWCNTs were further functionalized with silane coupling agents using water and supercritical carbon dioxide as solvents in order to endow the MWCNTs with matrix-specific functionalities. The effect of silanization on the cure kinetics, rheological behavior, and thermo-mechanical properties of model epoxy nanocomposites were investigated. Small additions of functionalized MWCNTs were found to increase the glass transition temperature, strength, and toughness of the epoxy. In order to achieve composite properties approaching those of individual nanotubes, new approaches are needed to allow for high loadings of MWCNTs. One strategy involves making macroscopic mats of nanotubes called buckypaper (BP) and subsequently infiltrating the mats with resin in processes familiar to

  11. Strain Rate Dependent Deformation and Strength Modeling of a Polymer Matrix Composite Utilizing a Micromechanics Approach. Degree awarded by Cincinnati Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.

    1999-01-01

    Potential gas turbine applications will expose polymer matrix composites to very high strain rate loading conditions, requiring an ability to understand and predict the material behavior under extreme conditions. Specifically, analytical methods designed for these applications must have the capability of properly capturing the strain rate sensitivities and nonlinearities that are present in the material response. The Ramaswamy-Stouffer constitutive equations, originally developed to analyze the viscoplastic deformation of metals, have been modified to simulate the nonlinear deformation response of ductile, crystalline polymers. The constitutive model is characterized and correlated for two representative ductile polymers. Fiberite 977-2 and PEEK, and the computed results correlate well with experimental values. The polymer constitutive equations are implemented in a mechanics of materials based composite micromechanics model to predict the nonlinear, rate dependent deformation response of a composite ply. Uniform stress and uniform strain assumptions are applied to compute the effective stresses of a composite unit cell from the applied strains. The micromechanics equations are successfully verified for two polymer matrix composites. IM7/977-2 and AS4/PEEK. The ultimate strength of a composite ply is predicted with the Hashin failure criteria that were implemented in the composite micromechanics model. The failure stresses of the two composite material systems are accurately predicted for a variety of fiber orientations and strain rates. The composite deformation model is implemented in LS-DYNA, a commercially available transient dynamic explicit finite element code. The matrix constitutive equations are converted into an incremental form, and the model is implemented into LS-DYNA through the use of a user defined material subroutine. The deformation response of a bulk polymer and a polymer matrix composite are predicted by finite element analyses. The results

  12. Residual thermal stresses in filamentary polymer-matrix composites containing an elastomeric interphase

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S.D.; Pittman, C.U. Jr.; Hackett, R.M. Mississippi Univ., University )

    1993-01-01

    A three-phase micromechanical model based on the method of cells is formulated to characterize residual thermal stresses in filamentary composites containing an interphase between the fiber and the matrix. This is the first such study to incorporate a true three-phase version of the method of cells. The model's performance is critically evaluated using data generated from other micromechanical models. Subsequently, a parametric study is performed to quantify the residual stresses in two hypothetical graphite fiber/epoxy matrix composites: one containing an elastomeric interphase whose Young's modulus is less than that of the fiber and the matrix and one incorporating an interphase whose Young's modulus is intermediate with respect to the fiber and the matrix. The data correlate the residual thermal stresses in the fiber, interphase and matrix as a function of the interphase thickness and fiber volume fraction within each model eomposite. The study makes a broad assessment of the stress-attenuating characteristics that each interphase imparts to the graphite/epoxy composites. Over the range of variables considered, properly dimensioning the elastomer interphase leads to a more favorable reduction of residual thermal stress. 38 refs.

  13. Processing and properties of ceramic matrix-polymer composites for dental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hsuan Yao

    The basic composite structure of natural hard tissue was used to guide the design and processing of dental restorative materials. The design incorporates the methodology of using inorganic minerals as the main structural phase reinforced with a more ductile but tougher organic phase. Ceramic-polymer composites were prepared by slip casting a porous ceramic structure, heating and chemical treating the porous preform, infiltrating with monomer and then curing. The three factors that determined the mechanical properties of alumina-polymer composites were the type of polymer used, the method of silane treatments, and the type of bond between particles in the porous preforms. Without the use of silane coupling agents, the composites were measured to have a lower strength. The composite with a more "flexible" porous alumina network had a greater ability to plastically dissipate the energy of propagating cracks. However, the aggressive nature of the alumina particles on opposing enamel requires that these alumina-polymer composites have a wear compatible coating for practical application. A route to dense bioactive apatite wollastonite glass ceramics (AWGC)-polymer composites was developed. The problems associated with glass dissolution into the aqueous medium for slip casting were overcome with the use of silane. The role of heating rate and development of ceramic compact microstructure on composite properties was explored. In general, if isothermal heating was not applied, decreasing heating rate increased glass crystallinity and particle-particle fusion, but decreased pore volume. Also composite strength and fracture toughness decreased while modulus and hardness increased with decreasing heating rate. If isothermal heating was applied, glass crystallinity, pore content, and composite mechanical properties showed relatively little change regardless of the initial heating rate. The potential of AWGC-polymer composites for dental and implant applications was explored

  14. Implementation of an Associative Flow Rule Including Hydrostatic Stress Effects Into the High Strain Rate Deformation Analysis of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.; Gilat, Amos

    2003-01-01

    A previously developed analytical formulation has been modified in order to more accurately account for the effects of hydrostatic stresses on the nonlinear, strain rate dependent deformation of polymer matrix composites. State variable constitutive equations originally developed for metals have been modified in order to model the nonlinear, strain rate dependent deformation of polymeric materials. To account for the effects of hydrostatic stresses, which are significant in polymers, the classical J2 plasticity theory definitions of effective stress and effective inelastic strain, along with the equations used to compute the components of the inelastic strain rate tensor, are appropriately modified. To verify the revised formulation, the shear and tensile deformation of two representative polymers are computed across a wide range of strain rates. Results computed using the developed constitutive equations correlate well with experimental data. The polymer constitutive equations are implemented within a strength of materials based micromechanics method to predict the nonlinear, strain rate dependent deformation of polymer matrix composites. The composite mechanics are verified by analyzing the deformation of a representative polymer matrix composite for several fiber orientation angles across a variety of strain rates. The computed values compare well to experimentally obtained results.

  15. RBS analysis of the diffusion of nano-size spheres in a polymer matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, D.H. |; Shull, K.R.; Rehn, L.E.; Baldo, P.M.

    1997-08-01

    Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) with 1.5-MeV He ions was employed to measure the depth distribution of gold particles sandwitched between two poly(tert-butyl acrylate) layers following various isothermal annealing treatments; temperatures were kept below 170{degrees}C to prevent degradation of the polymer. Since PTBA also degrades when the ion beam impinges the sample, it was necessary to quantify the mass loss in order to obtain accurate diffusion coefficients. Although the total mass loss was substantial (40-60%), a simple expansion of the energy-to-depth scale was sufficient to account for the beam-induced shrinkage. This result is attributed to the fact that the mass loss occurs very rapidly, and is uniformly distributed through the depth of the sample. The data reveal that the diffusion of the nanometer-size gold particles is substantially slower than is predicted by a simple physical model (Stokes-Einstein) for noninteracting particles. This slowdown is attributed to polymer bridging interactions, in which polymer strands bind to individual metal particles, thereby retarding their diffusion.

  16. Properties of Multifunctional Hybrid Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Fiber Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cano, Roberto J.; Kang, Jin Ho; Grimsley, Brian W.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    For aircraft primary structures, carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites possess many advantages over conventional aluminum alloys due to their light weight, higher strength- and stiffness-to-weight ratios, and low life-cycle maintenance costs. However, the relatively low electrical and thermal conductivities of CFRP composites fail to provide structural safety in certain operational conditions such as lightning strikes. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) offer the potential to enhance the multi-functionality of composites with improved thermal and electrical conductivity. In this study, hybrid CNT/carbon fiber (CF) polymer composites were fabricated by interleaving layers of CNT sheets with Hexcel® IM7/8852 prepreg. Resin concentrations from 1 wt% to 50 wt% were used to infuse the CNT sheets prior to composite fabrication. The interlaminar properties of the resulting hybrid composites were characterized by mode I and II fracture toughness testing. Fractographical analysis was performed to study the effect of resin concentration. In addition, multi-directional physical properties like thermal conductivity of the orthotropic hybrid polymer composite were evaluated.

  17. Recent advances in ionic polymer conductor composite materials as distributed nanosensors, nanoactuators, and artificial muscles (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen

    2005-05-01

    Recent advances in ionic polymer conductor composites (IPCC) and ionic polymer metal composites (IPMC) as biomimetic distributed nanosensors, nanoactuators, nanotransducers and artificial muscles are briefly discussed in this paper. These advances include brief reproduction of some of these advances that appeared in a new book and a recent set of 4 review articles published in the International Journal of Smart Materials and Structures, advances in manufacturing, force optimization, modeling and simulation and new products developed by Environmental Robots Incorporated, as well as numerous potential applications using Ionic Polymer-Metal Composites (IPMC's) as distributed nanosensors, nanotransducers, nanoactuators and artificial muscles. It is certainly clear that the extent of applications of IPCC's and IPMC's go beyond the scope of this paper or the space allocated to this paper. However, this paper will present the breadth and the depth of all such applications of IPCC's and IPMC's as biomimetic robotic distributed nanosensors, nanoactuators, nanotransducers and artificial/synthetic muscles.

  18. Advanced composite structures. [metal matrix composites - structural design criteria for spacecraft construction materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A monograph is presented which establishes structural design criteria and recommends practices to ensure the design of sound composite structures, including composite-reinforced metal structures. (It does not discuss design criteria for fiber-glass composites and such advanced composite materials as beryllium wire or sapphire whiskers in a matrix material.) Although the criteria were developed for aircraft applications, they are general enough to be applicable to space vehicles and missiles as well. The monograph covers four broad areas: (1) materials, (2) design, (3) fracture control, and (4) design verification. The materials portion deals with such subjects as material system design, material design levels, and material characterization. The design portion includes panel, shell, and joint design, applied loads, internal loads, design factors, reliability, and maintainability. Fracture control includes such items as stress concentrations, service-life philosophy, and the management plan for control of fracture-related aspects of structural design using composite materials. Design verification discusses ways to prove flightworthiness.

  19. Mechanical properties of several neat polymer matrix materials and unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coguill, Scott L.; Adams, Donald F.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanical and physical properties of three neat matrix materials, i.e., PEEK (polyetheretherketone) thermoplastic, Hexcel F155 rubber-toughened epoxy and Hercules 8551-7 rubber-toughened epoxy, were experimentally determined. Twelve unidirectional carbon fiber composites, incorporating matrix materials characterized in this or earlier studies (with one exception; the PISO(sub 2)-TPI matrix itself was not characterized), were also tested. These composite systems included AS4/2220-1, AS4/2220-3, T500/R914, IM6/HX1504, T300/4901A (MDA), T700/4901A (MDA), T300/4901B (MPDA), T700/4901B (MPDA), APC2 (AS4/PEEK, ICI), APC2 (AS4/PEEK, Langley Research Center), AS4/8551-7, and AS4/PISO(sub 2)-TPI. For the neat matrix materials, the tensile, shear, fracture toughness, coefficient of thermal expansion, and coefficient of moisture expansion properties were measured as a function of both temperature and moisture content. For the unidirectional composites, axial and transverse tensile, longitudinal shear, coefficient of thermal expansion, and coefficient of moisture expansion properties were determined, at room temperature and 100 C.

  20. Molecular Mechanism Responsible for Fibronectin-controlled Alterations in Matrix Stiffness in Advanced Chronic Liver Fibrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Ayumi; Sakai, Keiko; Moriya, Kei; Sasaki, Takako; Keene, Douglas R; Akhtar, Riaz; Miyazono, Takayoshi; Yasumura, Satoshi; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Morishita, Shin; Sakai, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosis is characterized by extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and stiffening. However, the functional contribution of tissue stiffening to noncancer pathogenesis remains largely unknown. Fibronectin (Fn) is an ECM glycoprotein substantially expressed during tissue repair. Here we show in advanced chronic liver fibrogenesis using a mouse model lacking Fn that, unexpectedly, Fn-null livers lead to more extensive liver cirrhosis, which is accompanied by increased liver matrix stiffness and deteriorated hepatic functions. Furthermore, Fn-null livers exhibit more myofibroblast phenotypes and accumulate highly disorganized/diffuse collagenous ECM networks composed of thinner and significantly increased number of collagen fibrils during advanced chronic liver damage. Mechanistically, mutant livers show elevated local TGF-β activity and lysyl oxidase expressions. A significant amount of active lysyl oxidase is released in Fn-null hepatic stellate cells in response to TGF-β1 through canonical and noncanonical Smad such as PI3 kinase-mediated pathways. TGF-β1-induced collagen fibril stiffness in Fn-null hepatic stellate cells is significantly higher compared with wild-type cells. Inhibition of lysyl oxidase significantly reduces collagen fibril stiffness, and treatment of Fn recovers collagen fibril stiffness to wild-type levels. Thus, our findings indicate an indispensable role for Fn in chronic liver fibrosis/cirrhosis in negatively regulating TGF-β bioavailability, which in turn modulates ECM remodeling and stiffening and consequently preserves adult organ functions. Furthermore, this regulatory mechanism by Fn could be translated for a potential therapeutic target in a broader variety of chronic fibrotic diseases.

  1. A fission matrix based validation protocol for computed power distributions in the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, J. W.; Nigg, D. W.; LaPorta, A. W.

    2013-07-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been engaged in a significant multi year effort to modernize the computational reactor physics tools and validation procedures used to support operations of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and its companion critical facility (ATRC). Several new protocols for validation of computed neutron flux distributions and spectra as well as for validation of computed fission power distributions, based on new experiments and well-recognized least-squares statistical analysis techniques, have been under development. In the case of power distributions, estimates of the a priori ATR-specific fuel element-to-element fission power correlation and covariance matrices are required for validation analysis. A practical method for generating these matrices using the element-to-element fission matrix is presented, along with a high-order scheme for estimating the underlying fission matrix itself. The proposed methodology is illustrated using the MCNP5 neutron transport code for the required neutronics calculations. The general approach is readily adaptable for implementation using any multidimensional stochastic or deterministic transport code that offers the required level of spatial, angular, and energy resolution in the computed solution for the neutron flux and fission source. (authors)

  2. Polymers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, David C.

    1986-01-01

    Presents an open-ended experiment which has students exploring polymer chemistry and reverse osmosis. This activity involves construction of a polymer membrane, use of it in a simple osmosis experiment, and application of its principles in solving a science-technology-society problem. (ML)

  3. Electrically tunable microlens arrays based on polarization-independent optical phase of nano liquid crystal droplets dispersed in polymer matrix.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ji Hoon; Chen, Hung-Shan; Chen, Po-Ju; Song, Ki Hoon; Noh, Seong Cheol; Lee, Jae Myeong; Ren, Hongwen; Lin, Yi-Hsin; Lee, Seung Hee

    2015-06-29

    Electrically tunable focusing microlens arrays based on polarization independent optical phase of nano liquid crystal droplets dispersed in polymer matrix are demonstrated. Such an optical medium is optically isotropic which is so-called an optically isotropic liquid crystals (OILC). We not only discuss the optical theory of OILC, but also demonstrate polarization independent optical phase modulation based on the OILC. The experimental results and analytical discussion show that the optical phase of OILC microlens arrays results from mainly orientational birefringence which is much larger than the electric-field-induced birefringence (or Kerr effect). The response time of OILC microlens arrays is fast~5.3ms and the tunable focal length ranges from 3.4 mm to 3.8 mm. The potential applications are light field imaging systems, 3D integrating imaging systems and devices for augment reality.

  4. Two-photon excitation of dyes in a polymer matrix by femtosecond pulses from a Ti:sapphire laser

    SciTech Connect

    Meshalkin, Yu P; Myachin, A Yu; Bakhareva, S S; Svetlichnyi, Valerii A; Kopylova, T N; Reznichenko, A V; Dolotov, S M; Ponomarenko, E P

    2003-09-30

    Two-photon fluorescence was observed for 18 organic dyes in a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) matrix excited by a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser. The product of the cross section for two-photon absorption by the quantum yield of fluorescence (two-photon fluorescence cross section) is estimated by comparing it with fluorescence of Rhodamine 6G in ethanol. Using this parameter, dyes are selected that exhibit the most intense fluorescence in PMMA and their concentrations in PMMA are optimised. Coumarin and rhodamine dyes in polymer matrices are proposed for using as visualisers of femtosecond radiation of a Ti:sapphire laser and as detectors in self-triggering systems. (active media. lasers)

  5. Study of optical and structural properties of CdSe quantum dot embedded in PVA polymer matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Chetna; Sharma, Ambika

    2015-08-01

    To enhance the properties and applicability of devices it is essential to incorporate semiconductor nanoparticles into polymer matrix. This introduces a new branch of science which includes device fabrications such as gas sensors, nonlinear optics, catalysis etc. Herein, we have synthesized CdSe/PVA nanocomposite (NC) material using wet chemical synthesis technique. The XRD studies revealed the formation of crystalline structure of CdSe nanoparticles (NP's) and PVA NC's with an average size of 100 nm and 5 nm respectively. Energy band gap is determined using UV-VIS Spectroscopy. A red shift in the absorption edge of CdSe/PVA NC is observed with respect to CdSe Np's, The photoluminescence spectra also show red shift for CdSe/PVA NC as compared to CdSe NP's Thus the use of CdSe/PVA for solar cell application would be more preferable than CdSe NP's.

  6. Electrically tunable microlens arrays based on polarization-independent optical phase of nano liquid crystal droplets dispersed in polymer matrix.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ji Hoon; Chen, Hung-Shan; Chen, Po-Ju; Song, Ki Hoon; Noh, Seong Cheol; Lee, Jae Myeong; Ren, Hongwen; Lin, Yi-Hsin; Lee, Seung Hee

    2015-06-29

    Electrically tunable focusing microlens arrays based on polarization independent optical phase of nano liquid crystal droplets dispersed in polymer matrix are demonstrated. Such an optical medium is optically isotropic which is so-called an optically isotropic liquid crystals (OILC). We not only discuss the optical theory of OILC, but also demonstrate polarization independent optical phase modulation based on the OILC. The experimental results and analytical discussion show that the optical phase of OILC microlens arrays results from mainly orientational birefringence which is much larger than the electric-field-induced birefringence (or Kerr effect). The response time of OILC microlens arrays is fast~5.3ms and the tunable focal length ranges from 3.4 mm to 3.8 mm. The potential applications are light field imaging systems, 3D integrating imaging systems and devices for augment reality. PMID:26191743

  7. A green and environment-friendly gel polymer electrolyte with higher performances based on the natural matrix of lignin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Sheng-Dong; Huang, Yun; Cao, Hai-Jun; Lin, Yuan-Hua; Li, Yang; Tang, Shui-Hua; Wang, Ming-Shan; Li, Xing

    2016-03-01

    In order to explore one truly green and environment-friendly gel polymer electrolyte (GPE), the natural biopolymer of lignin is firstly all over the world used as matrix to prepare GPE. The electrolyte membrane based on lignin can be easily fabricated just with lignin, liquid electrolyte and distilled water. Through comprehensive investigation of obtained GPE, it is found that the liquid electrolyte uptake reaches up to 230 wt.%; before 100 °C, GPE does not lose any weight and is thermal stable; at room temperature the ion conductivity is 3.73 mS cm-1; the amazing property of lithium ion transference number is high up to 0.85; GPE expresses complete electrochemical stability before 7.5 V and favorable compatibility with lithium anode; the outstanding cell performance of C-rate and cycle capacity. All these remarkably excellent performances endow lignin with application potential in GPE used in lithium ion batteries (LIBs) with higher performances.

  8. Survivability of Affordable High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites for Propulsion Engine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Derrick; Haque, Anwar; Vaidya, Uday; Meador, Michael A. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    PMR-type polyimides are regarded as state of the art high temperature polymers, due to their excellent thermo-mechanical properties and thermo-oxidative stability. One of their drawbacks, however is the inability to process them using cost-effective processing methods such as Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) and Resin Film Infusion (RFI). Development of low viscosity, high temperature polymers has been the subject of intense research. Recently, a new generation of low viscosity polyimides were synthesized by the introduction of twisted biphenyl or binapthyl groups into the backbone. This report details the progress for Year 1, which has involved acquiring samples and initiating Phases I and II of the proposed research. Specifically, studies of the process-property relationships of a series of polymers using oligomers based on 2,3,3' ,4'-biphenyltertracarboxylic dianhydride (PBDA) and a mixture of a diamine, BAX and a triamine, 1,3,5-Tris (4-aminophenoxybenzene), TAB, where the amount of TAB was varied have been initiated. The sample containing 10 percent TAB possesses a slightly higher degree of crystalline order versus that of the 20 percent TAB sample, based on x-ray diffraction studies of the b-staged oligomers. Both systems lose all of the crystalline order upon curing, however. The chemorheology has been studied as a function of the TAB content. While the magnitude of the viscosity is essentially the same for both systems, the cure kinetics of the 10 percent TAB system is faster than that for the 20 percent TAB system. The sample exhibits a melting-recrystallization-remelting behavior before the crosslinking commences. Correlation of other kinetic parameters, such as the activation energies for curing, the Tg and mechanical properties to the structure of these systems is underway. Future studies will involve characterization of mechanical and thermal properties of the pure resins and the fabrication of fiber reinforced composites using these materials.

  9. High efficiency removal of phosphate from water by zirconium sulfate-surfactant micelle mesostructure immobilized on polymer matrix.

    PubMed

    Pitakteeratham, Niti; Hafuka, Akira; Satoh, Hisashi; Watanabe, Yoshimasa

    2013-07-01

    A zirconium sulfate-surfactant micelle mesostructure (ZS) was synthesized to investigate its capacity for phosphate removal from water. Its phosphate adsorption kinetics, the effect of pH and interfering anions, adsorption isotherm, desorption capacity, and reusability were investigated. The adsorption isotherms could be described by the Langmuir model. The ZS was an effective adsorbent for phosphate with a very high adsorption capacity (114 mg P/g ZS). The phosphate adsorption capacity increased with decrease in pH. Although the adsorption of nitrate, chloride and acetate ions was negligible, bicarbonate ions were found to be possible interfering anions. The adsorbed phosphate was desorbed effectively using NaOH solution. Since breakage of ZS particles resulted when using NaOH, ZS was immobilized on a polymer matrix and a 50-cycle adsorption-desorption test was carried out to determine the ZS-immobilized polymer (P-ZS) reusability. The P-ZS retained its functionality and adsorption and desorption capacity over 50 cycles without loss of original capacity. A phosphate solution containing about 10 mg P/L was treated in a column packed with P-ZS. The phosphate could be adsorbed completely onto P-ZS up to 1020 bed volumes. These results indicate clearly that ZS is a highly effective adsorbent for phosphate and enables the removal of phosphate from water.

  10. High efficiency removal of phosphate from water by zirconium sulfate-surfactant micelle mesostructure immobilized on polymer matrix.

    PubMed

    Pitakteeratham, Niti; Hafuka, Akira; Satoh, Hisashi; Watanabe, Yoshimasa

    2013-07-01

    A zirconium sulfate-surfactant micelle mesostructure (ZS) was synthesized to investigate its capacity for phosphate removal from water. Its phosphate adsorption kinetics, the effect of pH and interfering anions, adsorption isotherm, desorption capacity, and reusability were investigated. The adsorption isotherms could be described by the Langmuir model. The ZS was an effective adsorbent for phosphate with a very high adsorption capacity (114 mg P/g ZS). The phosphate adsorption capacity increased with decrease in pH. Although the adsorption of nitrate, chloride and acetate ions was negligible, bicarbonate ions were found to be possible interfering anions. The adsorbed phosphate was desorbed effectively using NaOH solution. Since breakage of ZS particles resulted when using NaOH, ZS was immobilized on a polymer matrix and a 50-cycle adsorption-desorption test was carried out to determine the ZS-immobilized polymer (P-ZS) reusability. The P-ZS retained its functionality and adsorption and desorption capacity over 50 cycles without loss of original capacity. A phosphate solution containing about 10 mg P/L was treated in a column packed with P-ZS. The phosphate could be adsorbed completely onto P-ZS up to 1020 bed volumes. These results indicate clearly that ZS is a highly effective adsorbent for phosphate and enables the removal of phosphate from water. PMID:23726694

  11. Crystalline morphology of the matrix of PEEK-carbon fiber aromatic polymer composites. II. Crystallization behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Blundell, D.J.; Osborn, B.N.

    1985-10-01

    The crystallization behavior of the aromatic polymer composite APC-2 was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry under isothermal and constant cooling conditions. A model based on the Avrami kinetic equation is used to estimate the extrapolated crystallization behavior at very fast cooling rates. This shows that beyond about 700/sup 0/C/minute, the spherulitic growth will be unable to achieve completion and that cooling rates should therefore be kept below this figure if adequate crystallization is to occur during fabrication. If cooling rates faster than this are used then satisfactory crystallization can be achieved by annealing between 200 and 300/sup 0/C. 6 references, 4 figures.

  12. Sulfur polymer cement as a low-level waste glass matrix encapsulant. Part 1: Thermal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Sliva, P.; Peng, Y.B.; Bunnell, L.R.; Peeler, D.K.; Feng, X.; Martin, P.; Turner, P.J.

    1996-08-01

    Sulfur polymer cement (SPC) is a candidate material to encapsulate low-level waste (LLW) glass. Molten SPC will be poured into a LLW glass cullet-filled canister, surrounding the glass to act as an additional barrier to groundwater intrusion. This paper covers the first part of a study performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory concerned with the fundamental aspects of embedding LLW glass in SPC. Part one is a study of the SPC itself. Variations in SPC properties are discussed, especially in relation to long-term stability and controlling crystallization in a cooling canister.

  13. Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composites for Shrouds and Combustor Liners of Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra; Jill Jonkowski; Joseph Mavec; Paul Bakke; Debbie Haught; Merrill Smith

    2011-01-07

    This report covers work performed under the Advanced Materials for Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines (AMAIGT) program by GE Global Research and its collaborators from 2000 through 2010. A first stage shroud for a 7FA-class gas turbine engine utilizing HiPerComp{reg_sign}* ceramic matrix composite (CMC) material was developed. The design, fabrication, rig testing and engine testing of this shroud system are described. Through two field engine tests, the latter of which is still in progress at a Jacksonville Electric Authority generating station, the robustness of the CMC material and the shroud system in general were demonstrated, with shrouds having accumulated nearly 7,000 hours of field engine testing at the conclusion of the program. During the latter test the engine performance benefits from utilizing CMC shrouds were verified. Similar development of a CMC combustor liner design for a 7FA-class engine is also described. The feasibility of using the HiPerComp{reg_sign} CMC material for combustor liner applications was demonstrated in a Solar Turbines Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine (CSGT) engine test where the liner performed without incident for 12,822 hours. The deposition processes for applying environmental barrier coatings to the CMC components were also developed, and the performance of the coatings in the rig and engine tests is described.

  14. An antibacterial coating based on a polymer/sol-gel hybrid matrix loaded with silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivero, Pedro José; Urrutia, Aitor; Goicoechea, Javier; Zamarreño, Carlos Ruiz; Arregui, Francisco Javier; Matías, Ignacio Raúl

    2011-12-01

    In this work a novel antibacterial surface composed of an organic-inorganic hybrid matrix of tetraorthosilicate and a polyelectrolyte is presented. A precursor solution of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and poly(acrylic acid sodium salt) (PAA) was prepared and subsequently thin films were fabricated by the dip-coating technique using glass slides as substrates. This hybrid matrix coating is further loaded with silver nanoparticles using an in situ synthesis route. The morphology and composition of the coatings have been studied using UV-VIS spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) was also used to confirm the presence of the resulting silver nanoparticles within the thin films. Finally the coatings have been tested in bacterial cultures of genus Lactobacillus plantarum to observe their antibacterial properties. It has been experimentally demonstrated that these silver loaded organic-inorganic hybrid films have a very good antimicrobial behavior against this type of bacteria.

  15. Erosion Coatings for High-Temperature Polymer Composites: A Collaborative Project With Allison Advanced Development Company

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, James K.

    2000-01-01

    The advantages of replacing metals in aircraft turbine engines with high-temperature polymer matrix composites (PMC's) include weight savings accompanied by strength improvements, reduced part count, and lower manufacturing costs. Successfully integrating high-temperature PMC's into turbine engines requires several long-term characteristics. Resistance to surface erosion is one rarely reported property of PMC's in engine applications because PMC's are generally softer than metals and their erosion resistance suffers. Airflow rates in stationary turbine engine components typically exceed 2.3 kg/sec at elevated temperatures and pressures. In engine applications, as shown in the following photos, the survivability of PMC components is clearly a concern, especially when engine and component life-cycle requirements become longer. Although very few publications regarding the performance of erosion coatings on PMC's are available particularly in high-temperature applications the use of erosion-resistant coatings to significantly reduce wear on metallic substrates is well documented. In this study initiated by the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field, a low-cost (less than $140/kg) graphite-fiber-reinforced T650 35/PMR 15 sheet-molding compound was investigated with various coatings. This sheet-molding compound has been compression molded into many structurally complicated components, such as shrouds for gas turbine inlet housings and gearboxes. Erosion coatings developed for PMC s in this study consisted of a two-layered system: a bondcoat sprayed onto a cleaned PMC surface, followed by an erosion-resistant, hard topcoat sprayed onto the bondcoat as shown in following photomicrograph. Six erosion coating systems were evaluated for their ability to withstand harsh thermal cycles, erosion resistance (ASTM G76 83 "Standard Practice for Conducting Erosion Tests by Solid Particle Impingement Using Gas Jets") using Al2O3, and adhesion to the graphite fiber polyimide

  16. In situ evidence for metabolic and chemical microdomains in the structured polymer matrix of bacterial microcolonies.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, J R; Swerhone, G D W; Kuhlicke, U; Neu, T R

    2016-11-01

    CLSM and fluorescent probes were applied to assess the structure, composition, metabolic activity and gradients within naturally occurring β-proteobacteria microcolonies. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) as defined by lectin-binding analyses had three regions: (i) cell associated, (ii) intercellular and (iii) an outer layer covering the entire colony. We assessed structural, microenvironmental and metabolic implications of this complex EPS structure. Permeability studies indicated that the outer two layers were permeable to 20 nm beads, intercellular EPS to <40 nm beads and the outer layer was permeable to <100 nm beads. Phosphatase activity occurred at the cell surface and associated polymer. Glucose oxidase activity was only detected inside the cells and the cell-associated polymer. Rhodamine 123 suggested that activity was highest near the cell surface. The potential sensitive dye JC-1 concentrated within the outer EPS layer and the gradient was responsive to inhibition by KCN, dispersion using KCl and enhanced by addition of nutrients (nutrient broth). pH gradients occurred from the cell interior (pH 7) to the microcolony interior (pH 4+) with a gradient of increasing pH (pH 7+) to the colony exterior. The EPS provides a physical and chemical structuring mechanism forming microdomains that segregate extracellular activities at the microscale, possibly resulting in a microcolony with unitary structure and function. PMID:27562775

  17. Advances in Ceramic Matrix Composite Blade Damping Characteristics for Aerospace Turbomachinery Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Harris, Donald L.; Ting, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    For advanced aerospace propulsion systems, development of ceramic matrix composite integrally-bladed turbine disk technology is attractive for a number of reasons. The high strength-to-weight ratio of ceramic composites helps to reduce engine weight and the one-piece construction of a blisk will result in fewer parts count, which should translate into reduced operational costs. One shortcoming with blisk construction, however, is that blisks may be prone to high cycle fatigue due to their structural response to high vibration environments. Use of ceramic composites is expected to provide some internal damping to reduce the vibratory stresses encountered due to unsteady flow loads through the bladed turbine regions. A goal of our research was to characterize the vibration viscous damping behavior of C/SiC composites. The vibration damping properties were measured and calculated. Damping appeared to decrease with an increase in the natural frequency. While the critical damping amount of approximately 2% is required for typical aerospace turbomachinery engines, the C/SiC damping at high frequencies was less than 0.2% from our study. The advanced high-performance aerospace propulsion systems almost certainly will require even more damping than what current vehicles require. A purpose of this paper is to review some work on C/SiC vibration damping by the authors for the NASA CMC turbine blisk development program and address an importance of the further investigation of the blade vibration damping characteristics on candidate CMC materials for the NASA s advanced aerospace turbomachinery engine systems.

  18. Tuning the performance of direct methanol fuel cell membranes by embedding multifunctional inorganic submicrospheres into polymer matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingtao; Zhang, Han; Jiang, Zhongyi; Yang, Xinlin; Xiao, Lulu

    A series of surface functionalized silica submicrospheres by distillation-precipitation polymerization were embedded into chitosan (CS) matrix to fabricate the hybrid membranes for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). SEM characterization indicated that the submicrospheres could disperse homogenously within the CS matrix via tuning the polymer/particle and particle/particle interfacial interactions. The incorporation of sulfonated silica and carboxylated silica led to the reduced fractional free volume (FFV), whereas the incorporation of quaternary aminated silica resulted in increased FFV in the hybrid membranes, which was confirmed by the free volume characteristics analysis using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). The correlation between methanol crossover and FFV was established: the hybrid membranes with lower FFV displayed higher methanol resistance. Meanwhile, the correlation between the proton acceptor/donor capability and proton conductivity in the hybrid membranes was established. Compared with sulfonated silica and quaternary aminated silica, carboxylated silica possessed the optimum matching in proton acceptor and donor capabilities. Therefore, the membrane embedded with carboxylated silica displayed the highest proton conductivity. In particular, embedding carboxylated silica simultaneously reduced the methanol permeability by 63% and increased the proton conductivity by 40% in comparison with pure CS membrane.

  19. Evolution of stress and deformations in high-temperature polymer matrix composites during thermo-oxidative aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochiraju, K. V.; Tandon, G. P.; Schoeppner, G. A.

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents a model-based analysis of thermo-oxidative behavior in high-temperature polymer matrix composite (HTPMC) materials. The thermo-oxidative behavior of the composite differs from that of the constituents as the composite microstructure, the fiber/matrix interphase/interface behavior and damage mechanisms introduce anisotropy in the diffusion and oxidation behavior. Three-dimensional Galerkin finite element methods (GFEM) that model the thermo-oxidative layer growth with time are used together with homogenization techniques to analyze lamina-scale behavior using representative volume elements (RVEs). Thermo-oxidation-induced shrinkage is characterized from dimensional changes observed during aging in inert (argon) and oxidative (air) environments. Temperature-dependent macro-scale (bulk) mechanical testing and nano-indentation techniques are used for characterizing the effect of oxidative aging on modulus evolution. The stress and deformation fields in a single ply unidirectional lamina are studied using coupled oxidation evolution and non-linear elastic deformation analyses. Deformation and stress states are shown as a function of the aging time. While the thermo-oxidative processes are controlled by diffusion phenomenon in neat resin, the onset and propagation of damage determines the oxidative response of an HTPMC.

  20. Preparation and properties of hybrid direct methanol fuel cell membranes by embedding organophosphorylated titania submicrospheres into a chitosan polymer matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hong; Hou, Weiqiang; Wang, Jingtao; Xiao, Lulu; Jiang, Zhongyi

    Organophosphorylated titania submicrospheres (OPTi) are prepared and incorporated into a chitosan (CS) matrix to fabricate hybrid membranes with enhanced methanol resistance and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC). The pristine monodispersed titania submicrospheres (TiO 2) of controllable particle size are synthesized through a modified sol-gel method and then phosphorylated by amino trimethylene phosphonic acid (ATMP) via chemical adsorption, which is confirmed by XPS, FTIR and TGA. The morphology and thermal property of the hybrid membranes are explored by SEM and TGA. The ionic cross-linking between the -PO 3H 2 groups on OPTi and the -NH 2 groups on CS lead to better compatibility between the inorganic fillers and the polymer matrix, as well as a decreased fractional free volume (FFV), which is verified by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). The effects of particle size and content on the methanol permeability, proton conductivity, swelling and FFV of the membranes are investigated. Compared to pure CS membrane, the hybrid membranes exhibit an increased proton conductivity to an acceptable level of 0.01 S cm -1 for DMFC application and a reduced methanol permeability of 5 × 10 -7 cm 2 s -1 at a 2 M methanol feed.

  1. Schottky diodes between Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanorods and metal nanoparticles in a polymer matrix as hybrid bulk-heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Sudip K.; Pal, Amlan J.

    2015-07-07

    We report the use of metal-semiconductor Schottky junctions in a conjugated polymer matrix as solar cells. The Schottky diodes, which were formed between Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanorods and gold nanoparticles, efficiently dissociated photogenerated excitons. The bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) devices based on such metal-semiconductor Schottky diodes in a polymer matrix therefore acted as an efficient solar cell as compared to the devices based on only the semiconductor nanorods in the polymer matrix or when gold nanoparticles were added separately to the BHJs. In the latter device, gold nanoparticles offered plasmonic enhancement due to an increased cross-section of optical absorption. We report growth and characteristics of the Schottky junctions formed through an intimate contact between Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanorods and gold nanoparticles. We also report fabrication and characterization of BHJ solar cells based on such heterojunctions. We highlight the benefit of using metal-semiconductor Schottky diodes over only inorganic semiconductor nanorods or quantum dots in a polymer matrix in forming hybrid BHJ solar cells.

  2. Schottky diodes between Bi2S3 nanorods and metal nanoparticles in a polymer matrix as hybrid bulk-heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Sudip K.; Pal, Amlan J.

    2015-07-01

    We report the use of metal-semiconductor Schottky junctions in a conjugated polymer matrix as solar cells. The Schottky diodes, which were formed between Bi2S3 nanorods and gold nanoparticles, efficiently dissociated photogenerated excitons. The bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) devices based on such metal-semiconductor Schottky diodes in a polymer matrix therefore acted as an efficient solar cell as compared to the devices based on only the semiconductor nanorods in the polymer matrix or when gold nanoparticles were added separately to the BHJs. In the latter device, gold nanoparticles offered plasmonic enhancement due to an increased cross-section of optical absorption. We report growth and characteristics of the Schottky junctions formed through an intimate contact between Bi2S3 nanorods and gold nanoparticles. We also report fabrication and characterization of BHJ solar cells based on such heterojunctions. We highlight the benefit of using metal-semiconductor Schottky diodes over only inorganic semiconductor nanorods or quantum dots in a polymer matrix in forming hybrid BHJ solar cells.

  3. Quantum efficiency of PAG decomposition in different polymer matrices at advanced lithographic wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedynyshyn, Theodore H.; Sinta, Roger F.; Mowers, William A.; Cabral, Alberto

    2003-06-01

    The Dill ABC parameters for optical resists are typically determined by measuring the change in the intensity of transmitted light at the wavelength of interest as a function of incident energy. The effectiveness of the experiment rests with the fact that the resist optical properties change with exposure and that the optical properties are directly related to the concentration of PAG compound. These conditions are not typically satisfied in CA resists and thus C is unobtainable by this method. FT-IR spectroscopy can directly measure changes in the photoactive species by isolating and measuring absorbance peaks unique to the photoactive species. We employed the ProABC software, specially modified to allow FT-IR absorbance input, to extract ABS parameters through a best fit of the lithography model to experimental data. The quantum efficiency of PAG decomposition at 157-, 193-, and 248-nm was determined for four diazomethane type PAGs in four different polymer matrices. It was found that both the Dill C parameter and the quantum efficiency for all PAGs increased as wavelength decreased, but that the magnitude of the increase was strongly dependent on the polymer matrix.

  4. Improving processing and toughness of a high performance composite matrix through an interpenetrating polymer network. VI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H.

    1990-01-01

    A simultaneous semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN) concept is presented which combines easy-to-process, but brittle, thermosetting polyimides with tough, but difficult to process, linear thermoplastic polyimides. The combination results in a semi-IPN with the easy processability of a thermoset and good toughness of a thermoplastic. Four simultaneous semi-IPN systems were developed from commercially available NR-150B2 combined with each of the four Thermid materials (LR-600, AL-600, MC-600, and FA-700). It is concluded that there is a significant improvement in resin fracture toughness of Thermid-polyimide-based semi-IPN systems and some improvement in composite microcracking resistance compared to Thermid LR-600. Excellent composite mechanical properties have been achieved. These new semi-IPN materials have the potential to be used as composite matrices, adhesives, and molding materials.

  5. Improving processing and toughness of a high performance composite matrix through an interpenetrating polymer network. VI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H.

    1990-01-01

    The use of a semiinterpenetrating polymer network (SIPN) of the high-performance polyimide NR-150B2 to reduce brittleness and improve processability in the highly crosslinked acetylene-terminated polyimides Thermid LR-600, AL-600, MC-600, and FA-700 is described. The theoretical basis of the SIPN process is reviewed; the preparation and characterization of the neat SIPN resins and unidirectional graphite-fiber composites are explained; and the results are presented in extensive tables, graphs, and micrographs and discussed in detail. Significant increases in fracture energy were observed with SIPN, from 93 J/sq m for unmodified LR-600 to 283-603 J/sq m for the SIPN materials; the room-temperature flexural strength of the unidirectional composites also increased, from 1344 MPa for an unmodified MC-600 composite to 2020-1751 MPa for the SIPN composites. The potential applicability of SIPN-based composites to aerospace structures and electronic components is indicated.

  6. New high temperature cross linking monomers. [for polymer matrix composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    Several PMR-polyimide resins capable of being processed at a maximum temperature of 232 C to 288 C without sacrifice of high temperature capability were developed. Four monomethyl esters were synthesized and characterized for use in the crosslinking studies. The infrared and DSC studies of each crosslinker suggested that curing could be accomplished at 288 C. However, fabrication of dense, void free polymer specimens required a temperature of 316 C and a pressure of 0.69 MPa (100 psi). Crosslinkers were evaluated in Celion 6000/PMR polyimide composites. These composites were characterized at RT, 288 C and 316 C initially and after isothermal aging at 288 C and 316 C for several hundred hours. The results suggest that both PMR systems are promising candidates as matrices for addition type polyimide composites. It is demonstrated that alternate crosslinkers are feasible, but mechanisms to lower the crosslinking temperature must be developed to provide lower temperature processing PMR-type polyimides.

  7. TiO2 nanowire dispersions in viscous polymer matrix: electrophoretic alignment and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šutka, Andris; Saal, Kristjan; Kisand, Vambola; Lõhmus, Rünno; Joost, Urmas; Timusk, Martin

    2014-10-01

    The changes in optical properties during TiO2 nanowire orientation in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix under the influence of an electric field are strongly influenced by nanowire (NW) diameter. It was demonstrated for the first time that either positive or negative change in transmittance can be induced by NW alignment parallel to the electric field depending on the NW diameter. These effects can be explained by the interplay between scattering and reflectance. Experimental findings reported could be important for smart window applications for the regulation of visible or even infrared transparency, thus reducing the energy consumption by air conditioning systems in buildings and automobiles in the future.

  8. Three-Dimensional Nanoporous Cellulose Gels as a Flexible Reinforcement Matrix for Polymer Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhuqun; Huang, Junchao; Liu, Chuanjun; Ding, Beibei; Kuga, Shigenori; Cai, Jie; Zhang, Lina

    2015-10-21

    With the world's focus on utilization of sustainable natural resources, the conversion of wood and plant fibers into cellulose nanowhiskers/nanofibers is essential for application of cellulose in polymer nanocomposites. Here, we present a novel fabrication method of polymer nanocomposites by in-situ polymerization of monomers in three-dimensionally nanoporous cellulose gels (NCG) prepared from aqueous alkali hydroxide/urea solution. The NCG have interconnected nanofibrillar cellulose network structure, resulting in high mechanical strength and size stability. Polymerization of the monomer gave P(MMA/BMA)/NCG, P(MMA/BA)/NCG nanocomposites with a volume fraction of NCG ranging from 15% to 78%. SEM, TEM, and XRD analyses show that the NCG are finely distributed and preserved well in the nanocomposites after polymerization. DMA analysis demonstrates a significant improvement in tensile storage modulus E' above the glass transition temperature; for instance, at 95 °C, E' is increased by over 4 orders of magnitude from 0.03 MPa of the P(MMA/BMA) up to 350 MPa of nanocomposites containing 15% v/v NCG. This reinforcement effect can be explained by the percolation model. The nanocomposites also show remarkable improvement in solvent resistance (swelling ratio of 1.3-2.2 in chloroform, acetone, and toluene), thermal stability (do not melt or decompose up to 300 °C), and low coefficients of thermal expansion (in-plane CTE of 15 ppm·K(-1)). These nanocomposites will have great promising applications in flexible display, packing, biomedical implants, and many others. PMID:26397710

  9. Longtime Durability of PMR-15 Matrix Polymer at 204, 260, 288, and 316 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Papadopoulos, Demetrios S.; Inghram, Linda L.; McCorkle, Linda S.; Klan, Ojars V.

    2001-01-01

    Isothermal weight loss studies at the Glenn (Lewis) Research Center were conducted at four temperatures (204, 260, 288, and 316 C) with specimens of varied geometric shapes to investigate the mechanisms involved in the thermal degradation of PMR-15. Both neat resin behavior and composite behaviors were studied. Two points of interest in these studies are the role(s) of oxygen in the mechanisms involved in the thermo-oxidative degradation of these composite materials and the dimensional changes that occur during their useable lifetime. Specimen dimensional changes and surface layer growth were measured and recorded. It was shown that physical and chemical changes take place as a function of time and location in PMR-15 neat resin and composites as aging takes place in air at elevated temperatures. These changes initiate at the outer surfaces of both materials and progress inward following the oxygen as it proceeds by diffusion into the central core of each material. Microstructural changes cause changes in density, material shrinkage (strains), glass transition temperature, dimension, dynamic shear modulus, and compression properties. These changes also occur slowly dividing the polymer material into two distinct parts: a visibly undamaged core section between two visibly damaged surface layers. The surface layer has a significant effect on compression properties of thinner specimens, but the visibly undamaged core material controls these properties for specimens having eight or more plies. It was demonstrated that there are three different mechanisms involved in the degradation of PMR-15 during aging at elevated temperatures. These are a weight gain, a small weight fraction bulk material weight loss, and a large mass fraction weight loss concentrated at the surface of the polymer or composite. At the higher temperatures (260 C and above), the surface loss predominates. Below 260 C, the surface loss and the bulk core loss become more equivalent. Between 175 and 260 C

  10. Accumulation of Extracellular Matrix in Advanced Lesions of Canine Distemper Demyelinating Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Seehusen, Frauke; Al-Azreg, Seham A.; Raddatz, Barbara B.; Haist, Verena; Puff, Christina; Spitzbarth, Ingo; Ulrich, Reiner; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In demyelinating diseases, changes in the quality and quantity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) may contribute to demyelination and failure of myelin repair and axonal sprouting, especially in chronic lesions. To characterize changes in the ECM in canine distemper demyelinating leukoencephalitis (DL), histochemical and immunohistochemical investigations of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cerebella using azan, picrosirius red and Gomori`s silver stain as well as antibodies directed against aggrecan, type I and IV collagen, fibronectin, laminin and phosphacan showed alterations of the ECM in CDV-infected dogs. A significantly increased amount of aggrecan was detected in early and late white matter lesions. In addition, the positive signal for collagens I and IV as well as fibronectin was significantly increased in late lesions. Conversely, the expression of phosphacan was significantly decreased in early and more pronounced in late lesions compared to controls. Furthermore, a set of genes involved in ECM was extracted from a publically available microarray data set and was analyzed for differential gene expression. Gene expression of ECM molecules, their biosynthesis pathways, and pro-fibrotic factors was mildly up-regulated whereas expression of matrix remodeling enzymes was up-regulated to a relatively higher extent. Summarized, the observed findings indicate that changes in the quality and content of ECM molecules represent important, mainly post-transcriptional features in advanced canine distemper lesions. Considering the insufficiency of morphological regeneration in chronic distemper lesions, the accumulated ECM seems to play a crucial role upon regenerative processes and may explain the relatively small regenerative potential in late stages of this disease. PMID:27441688

  11. Relationship between voids and interlaminar shear strength of polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Frimpong, Stephen

    1991-01-01

    The effect of voids on the interlaminar shear strength of a polyimide matrix composite system is described. The AS4 graphite/PMR-15 composite was chosen for study because this system can be readily processed by using the standard specified cure cycle to produce void-free composites and because preliminary work in this study had shown that the processing parameters of this resin matrix system can be altered to produce cured composites of varying void contents. Thirty-eight 12-ply unidirectional composite panels were fabricated for this study. A significant range of void contents (0 to 10 percent) was produced. The panels were mapped, ultrasonically inspected, and sectioned into interlaminar shear, flexure, and fiber content specimens. The density of each specimen was measured and interlaminar shear and flexure strength measurements were then made. The fiber content was measured last. The results of these tests were evaluated by using ultrasonic results, photomicrographs, statistical methods, theoretical relationships derived by other investigators, and comparison of the test data with the Integrated Composite Analyzer (ICAN) computer program developed at the Lewis Research Center for predicting composite ply properties. The testing is described in as much detail as possible in order to help others make realistic comparisons.

  12. Advances in the design of macroporous polymer scaffolds for potential applications in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Braschler, Thomas M.; Renaud, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    A paradigm shift is taking place in medicine and dentistry from using synthetic implants and tissue grafts to a tissue engineering approach that uses degradable porous three-dimensional (3D) material hydrogels integrated with cells and bioactive factors to regenerate tissues such as dental bone and other oral tissues. Hydrogels have been established as a biomaterial of choice for many years, as they offer diverse properties that make them ideal in regenerative medicine, including dental applications. Being highly biocompatible and similar to native extracellular matrix, hydrogels have emerged as ideal candidates in the design of 3D scaffolds for tissue regeneration and drug delivery applications. However, precise control over hydrogel properties, such as porosity, pore size, and pore interconnectivity, remains a challenge. Traditional techniques for creating conventional crosslinked polymers have demonstrated limited success in the formation of hydrogels with large pore size, thus limiting cellular infiltration, tissue ingrowth, vascularization, and matrix mineralization (in the case of bone) of tissue-engineered constructs. Emerging technologies have demonstrated the ability to control microarchitectural features in hydrogels such as the creation of large pore size, porosity, and pore interconnectivity, thus allowing the creation of engineered hydrogel scaffolds with a structure and function closely mimicking native tissues. In this review, we explore the various technologies available for the preparation of macroporous scaffolds and their potential applications. PMID:24455437

  13. Recent advances in polymer solar cells: realization of high device performance by incorporating water/alcohol-soluble conjugated polymers as electrode buffer layer.

    PubMed

    He, Zhicai; Wu, Hongbin; Cao, Yong

    2014-02-01

    This Progress Report highlights recent advances in polymer solar cells with special attention focused on the recent rapid-growing progress in methods that use a thin layer of alcohol/water-soluble conjugated polymers as key component to obtain optimized device performance, but also discusses novel materials and device architectures made by major prestigious institutions in this field. We anticipate that due to drastic improvements in efficiency and easy utilization, this method opens up new opportunities for PSCs from various material systems to improve towards 10% efficiency, and many novel device structures will emerge as suitable architectures for developing the ideal roll-to-roll type processing of polymer-based solar cells.

  14. Rate dependent stress-strain behavior of advanced polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.

    1991-01-01

    The formulation of an elastic/viscoplastic constitutive model which was used to predict the measured behavior of graphite/thermoplastic and graphite/bismaleimide composite materials at elevated temperature is described. The model incorporates the concepts of overstress and effective strain/strain to provide a simple formulation which was able to account for material behavior under monotonic tension or compression loads over a temperature range of 23 to 200 C. Observed behavior such as stress relaxation and steady state creep, in off-axis tension and compression tests, were predicted by the model. Material constants required by the model were extracted from simple off-axis test data.

  15. [Bioanode for a microbial fuel cell based on Gluconobacter oxydans inummobilized into a polymer matrix].

    PubMed

    Alferov, S V; Minaĭcheva, P R; Arliapov, V A; Asulian, L D; Alferov, V A; Ponomareva, O N; Reshetilov, A N

    2014-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria Gluconobacter oxydans subsp. industrius RKM V-1280 were immobilized into a synthetic matrix based on polyvinyl alcohol modified with N-vinylpyrrolidone and used as biocatalysts for the development ofbioanodes for microbial fuel cells. The immobilization method did not significantly affect bacterial substrate specificity. Bioanodes based on immobilized bacteria functioned stably for 7 days. The maximum voltage (fuel cell signal) was reached when 100-130 µM of an electron transport mediator, 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol, was added into the anode compartment. The fuel cell signals reached a maximum at a glucose concentration higher than 6 mM. The power output of the laboratory model of a fuel cell based on the developed bioanode reached 7 mW/m2 with the use of fermentation industry wastes as fuel.

  16. Damage Tolerance Enhancement of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites by Nanoreinforcement of Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenner, Joel Stewart

    Nanocomposites are a relatively new class of materials which incorporate exotic, engineered nanoparticles to achieve superior material properties. Because of their extremely small size and well-ordered structure, many nanoparticles possess properties that exceed those offered by a wide range of other known materials, making them attractive candidates for novel materials engineering development. Their small size is also an impediment to their practical use, as they typically cannot be employed by themselves to realize those properties in large structures. Furthermore, nanoparticles typically possess strong self-affinity, rendering them difficult to disperse uniformly into a composite. However, contemporary research has shown that, if well-dispersed, nanoparticles have great capacity to improve the mechanical properties of composites, especially damage tolerance, in the form of fracture toughness, fatigue life, and impact damage mitigation. This research focuses on the development, manufacturing, and testing of hybrid micro/nanocomposites comprised of woven carbon fibers with a carbon nanotube reinforced epoxy matrix. Material processing consisted of dispersant-and-sonication based methods to disperse nanotubes into the matrix, and a vacuum-assisted wet lay-up process to prepare the hybrid composite laminates. Various damage tolerance properties of the hybrid composite were examined, including static strength, fracture toughness, fatigue life, fatigue crack growth rate, and impact damage behavior, and compared with similarly-processed reference material produced without nanoreinforcement. Significant improvements were obtained in interlaminar shear strength (15%), Mode-I fracture toughness (180%), shear fatigue life (order of magnitude), Mode-I fatigue crack growth rate (factor of 2), and effective impact damage toughness (40%). Observations by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and ultrasonic imaging showed significant differences in failure behavior

  17. Quantifying the release of lactose from polymer matrix tablets with an amperometric biosensor utilizing cellobiose dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Knöös, Patrik; Schulz, Christopher; Piculell, Lennart; Ludwig, Roland; Gorton, Lo; Wahlgren, Marie

    2014-07-01

    The release of lactose (hydrophilic) from polymer tablets made with hydrophobically modified poly(acrylic acid) (HMPAA) have been studied and compared to the release of ibuprofen, a hydrophobic active substance. Lactose is one of the most used excipients for tablets, but lactose release has not been widely studied. One reason could be a lack of good analytical tools. A novel biosensor with cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) was used to detect the lactose release, which has a polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDADMAC) layer that increases the response. A sample treatment using polyethylenimine (PEI) was developed to eliminate possible denaturants. The developed methodology provided a good approach to detect and quantify the released lactose. The release was studied with or without the presence of a model amphiphilic substance, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), in the release medium. Ibuprofen showed very different release rates in the different media, which was attributed to hydrophobic interactions between the drug, the HMPAA and the SDS in the release medium. The release of hydrophilic lactose, which did not associate to any of the other components, was rapid and showed only minor differences. The new methodology provides a useful tool to further evaluate tablet formulations by a relatively simple set of experiments.

  18. Cheap glass fiber mats as a matrix of gel polymer electrolytes for lithium ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yusong; Wang, Faxing; Liu, Lili; Xiao, Shiyin; Yang, Yaqiong; Wu, Yuping

    2013-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries (LIBs) are going to play more important roles in electric vehicles and smart grids. The safety of the current LIBs of large capacity has been remaining a challenge due to the existence of large amounts of organic liquid electrolytes. Gel polymer electrolytes (GPEs) have been tried to replace the organic electrolyte to improve their safety. However, the application of GPEs is handicapped by their poor mechanical strength and high cost. Here, we report an economic gel-type composite membrane with high safety and good mechanical strength based on glass fiber mats, which are separator for lead-acid batteries. The gelled membrane exhibits high ionic conductivity (1.13 mS cm−1), high Li+ ion transference number (0.56) and wide electrochemical window. Its electrochemical performance is evaluated by LiFePO4 cathode with good cycling. The results show this gel-type composite membrane has great attraction to the large-capacity LIBs requiring high safety with low cost. PMID:24216756

  19. Advanced two-photon photolithography for patterning of transparent, electrically conductive ionic liquid-polymer nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhtina, Natalia A.; MacKinnon, Neil; Korvink, Jan G.

    2016-04-01

    A key challenge in micro- and nanotechnology is the direct patterning of functional structures. For example, it is highly desirable to possess the ability to create three-dimensional (3D), conductive, and optically transparent structures. Efforts in this direction have, to date, yielded less than optimal results since the polymer composites had low optical transparency over the visible range, were only slightly conductive, or incompatible with high resolution structuring. We have previously presented the novel cross-linkable, conductive, highly transparent composite material based on a photoresist (IP-L 780, OrmoComp, or SU-8) and the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide. Material patterning by conventional and two-photon photolithography has been demonstrated as proof-of-concept. Aiming to increase the resolution and to extend the spectrum of exciting applications we continued our research into identifying new ionic liquid - polymer composites. In this paper, we report the precise 3D single-step structuring of optically transparent and electrically conductive ionic liquid - polymer nanostructures with the highest spatial resolution (down to 150 nm) achieved to date. This was achieved via the development of novel cross-linkable composite based on the photoresist IP-G 780 and the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide. The successful combination of the developed material with the advanced direct laser writing technique enabled the time- and cost-saving direct manufacturing of transparent, electrically conductive components. We believe that the excellent characteristics of the structured material will open a wider range of exciting applications.

  20. Clearance Kinetics and Matrix Binding Partners of the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products

    PubMed Central

    Milutinovic, Pavle S.; Englert, Judson M.; Crum, Lauren T.; Mason, Neale S.; Ramsgaard, Lasse; Enghild, Jan J.; Sparvero, Louis J.; Lotze, Michael T.; Oury, Tim D.

    2014-01-01

    Elucidating the sites and mechanisms of sRAGE action in the healthy state is vital to better understand the biological importance of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). Previous studies in animal models of disease have demonstrated that exogenous sRAGE has an anti-inflammatory effect, which has been reasoned to arise from sequestration of pro-inflammatory ligands away from membrane-bound RAGE isoforms. We show here that sRAGE exhibits in vitro binding with high affinity and reversibly to extracellular matrix components collagen I, collagen IV, and laminin. Soluble RAGE administered intratracheally, intravenously, or intraperitoneally, does not distribute in a specific fashion to any healthy mouse tissue, suggesting against the existence of accessible sRAGE sinks and receptors in the healthy mouse. Intratracheal administration is the only effective means of delivering exogenous sRAGE to the lung, the organ in which RAGE is most highly expressed; clearance of sRAGE from lung does not differ appreciably from that of albumin. PMID:24642901

  1. Preparation and characterization of an advanced collagen aggregate from porcine acellular dermal matrix.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinhua; Dan, Nianhua; Dan, Weihua

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to extract and characterize an advanced collagen aggregate (Ag-col) from porcine acellular dermal matrix (pADM). Based on histological examination, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM), Ag-col was composed of the D-periodic cross-striated collagen fibrils and thick collagen fiber bundles with uneven diameters and non-orientated arrangement. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of pADM, Ag-col and Col were similar and revealed the presence of the triple helix. Circular dichroism (CD) analysis exhibited a slightly higher content of α-helix but inappreciably less amount of random coil structure in Ag-col compared to Col. Moreover, imino acid contents of pADM, Ag-col and Col were 222.43, 218.30 and 190.01 residues/1000 residues, respectively. From zeta potential analysis, a net charge of zero was found at pH 6.45 and 6.11 for Ag-col and Col, respectively. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study suggested that the Td of Ag-col was 20°C higher than that of Col as expected, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) indicated that Ag-col possessed a higher storage modulus but similar loss factor compared to Col. Therefore, the collagen aggregate from pADM could serve as a better alternative source of collagens for further applications in food and biological industries. PMID:27039117

  2. Thermo-mechanical fatigue of polymer matrix composites. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, L.H. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This research was undertaken to evaluate the effects of mechanical constraint on the response of polymer composites during thermal cycling. Analytical and experimental techniques were used to characterize the response of carbon fiber reinforced cyanate ester (IM6/BT3008) and bismaleimide (IM7/5250-4) composites. Cross-ply laminates were subjected to thermal cycles from 24 to 177 C in the unconstrained, fully-constrained and over-constrained conditions. Laminate response, damage mechanisms and residual compressive properties were characterized. Predicted ply stress distributions are significantly different for the various degrees of constraint and are highly sensitive to temperature-dependent lamina properties and laminate stress free temperature. Predictions of laminate response correlate well with experimental results. Deviations are apparent at elevated temperature which are attributed to the effects of time-dependent deformation. Changes in laminate response are observed during thermal cycling of IM6/BT3008 in the unconstrained and fully-constrained conditions. The changes are attributed to time-dependent deformation in the 90 deg plies which leads to changes in the ply stress distribution and ultimately to transverse microcracking. Microcracking initiates more rapidly for fully-constrained laminates due to higher 90 ply stresses which result in more time-dependent deformation per cycle. With continued cycling, microcrack densities converge and become equivalent after 1000 cycles. The ply stress distribution in over-constrained laminates is substantially different from those in unconstrained and fully-constrained laminates. Time-dependent deformation in the 90 deg plies results in changes in the ply stress distribution but does not significantly alter the laminate response. The microcrack density in over constrained laminates is equivalent to that in unconstrained and fully constrained laminates after 1000 cycles.

  3. Efficient light-emitting diodes based on nanocrystalline perovskite in a dielectric polymer matrix.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangru; Tan, Zhi-Kuang; Di, Dawei; Lai, May Ling; Jiang, Lang; Lim, Jonathan Hua-Wei; Friend, Richard H; Greenham, Neil C

    2015-04-01

    Electroluminescence in light-emitting devices relies on the encounter and radiative recombination of electrons and holes in the emissive layer. In organometal halide perovskite light-emitting diodes, poor film formation creates electrical shunting paths, where injected charge carriers bypass the perovskite emitter, leading to a loss in electroluminescence yield. Here, we report a solution-processing method to block electrical shunts and thereby enhance electroluminescence quantum efficiency in perovskite devices. In this method, a blend of perovskite and a polyimide precursor dielectric (PIP) is solution-deposited to form perovskite nanocrystals in a thin-film matrix of PIP. The PIP forms a pinhole-free charge-blocking layer, while still allowing the embedded perovskite crystals to form electrical contact with the electron- and hole-injection layers. This modified structure reduces nonradiative current losses and improves quantum efficiency by 2 orders of magnitude, giving an external quantum efficiency of 1.2%. This simple technique provides an alternative route to circumvent film formation problems in perovskite optoelectronics and offers the possibility of flexible and high-performance light-emitting displays.

  4. Protein-resistant polymer coatings obtained by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusen, L.; Mustaciosu, C.; Mitu, B.; Filipescu, M.; Dinescu, M.; Dinca, V.

    2013-08-01

    Adsorption of proteins and polysaccharides is known to facilitate microbial attachment and subsequent formation of biofilm on surfaces that ultimately results in its biofouling. Therefore, protein repellent modified surfaces are necessary to block the irreversible attachment of microorganisms. Within this context, the feasibility of using the Poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(ɛ-caprolactone) methyl ether (PEG-block-PCL Me) copolymer as potential protein-resistant coating was explored in this work. The films were deposited using Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE), a technique that allows good control of composition, thickness and homogeneity. The chemical and morphological characteristics of the films were examined using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), contact angle measurements and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The FTIR data demonstrates that the functional groups in the MAPLE-deposited films remain intact, especially for fluences below 0.5 J cm-2. Optical Microscopy and AFM images show that the homogeneity and the roughness of the coatings are related to both laser parameters (fluence, number of pulses) and target composition. Protein adsorption tests were performed on the PEG-block-PCL Me copolymer coated glass and on bare glass surface as a control. The results show that the presence of copolymer as coating significantly reduces the adsorption of proteins.

  5. Transfer-matrix calculations of DNA polymer micromechanics under tension and torque constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremov, Artem K.; Winardhi, Ricksen S.; Yan, Jie

    2016-09-01

    Recent development of single-molecule manipulation technologies has made it possible to exert constant force and torque on individual DNA biopolymers to probe their elastic characteristics and structural stability. It has been previously shown that depending on the nature of applied mechanical constraints, DNA can exist in several forms including B-, L-, and P-DNA. However, there is still a lack of understanding of how structural heterogeneity of DNA, which may naturally arise due to sequence-dependent DNA properties, protein binding, or DNA damage, influences local stability of the above DNA states. To provide a more complete and detailed description of the DNA mechanics, we developed a theoretical framework based on transfer-matrix calculations and demonstrated how it can be used to predict the DNA behavior upon application of a wide range of force and torque constraints. The resulting phase diagram shows DNA structural transitions that are in good agreement with previous experimental and theoretical studies. We further discuss how the constructed formalism can be extended to include local inhomogeneities in the DNA physical properties, thus making it possible to investigate the effect of DNA sequence as well as protein binding on DNA structural stability.

  6. Thermal/Mechanical Response of a Polymer Matrix Composite at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitley, Karen S.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2003-01-01

    In order for polymeric-matrix composites to be considered for use as structural materials in the next generation of space transportation systems, the mechanical behavior of these materials at cryogenic temperatures must be investigated. This paper presents experimental data on the residual mechanical properties of a carbon-fiber polymeric composite, IM7/PETI-5, both before and after aging. Both tension and compression modulus and strength were measured at room temperature, -196C, and -269 C on five different laminate configurations. One set of specimens was aged isothermally for 576 hours at -184 C in an unconstrained state. Another set of corresponding specimens was aged under constant uniaxial strain for 576 hours at -184 C. Based on the experimental data presented, it is shown that trends in stiffness and strength that result from changes in temperature are not always smooth and consistent. Moreover, it is shown that loading mode and direction are significant for both stiffness and strength, and aging at cryogenic temperature while under load can alter the mechanical properties of pristine, un-aged laminates made of IM7/PETI-5 material.

  7. Thermal/Mechanical Durability of Polymer-Matrix Composites in Cryogenic Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Whitley, Karen S.; Grenoble, Ray W.; Bandorawalla, Tozer

    2003-01-01

    In order to increase the reliability of the next generation of space transportation systems, the mechanical behavior of polymeric-matrix composite (PMC) materials at cryogenic temperatures must be investigated. This paper presents experimental data on the residual mechanical properties of a carbon fiber polymeric composite, IM7/PETI-5 as a function of temperature and aging. Tension modulus and strength were measured at room temperature, -196 C, and -269 C on five different specimens ply lay-ups. Specimens were preconditioned with one set of coupons being isothermally aged for 576 hours at -184 C, in an unloaded state. Another set of corresponding coupons were mounted in constant strain fixtures such that a constant uniaxial strain was applied to the specimens for 576 hours at -184 C. A third set was mechanically cycled in tension at -184 C. The measured properties indicated that temperature, aging, and loading mode can all have significant influence on performance. Moreover, this influence is a strong function of laminate stacking sequence. Thermal-stress calculations based on lamination theory predicted that the transverse tensile ply stresses could be quite high for cryogenic test temperatures. Microscopic examination of the surface morphology showed evidence of degradation along the exposed edges of the material because of aging at cryogenic temperatures. ________________

  8. Advanced insulations for refrigerator/freezers: The potential for new shell designs incorporating polymer barrier construction

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, B.T.; Arasteh, D.

    1992-11-01

    The impending phase-out of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) used to expand foam insulation, combined with requirements for increased energy efficiency, make the use of non-CFC-based high performance insulation technologies increasingly attractive. The majority of current efforts are directed at using advanced insulations in the form of thin, flat low-conductivity gas-filled or evacuated orthogonal panels, which we refer to as Advanced Insulation Panels (AIPs). AIPs can be used in composite with blown polymer foams to improve insulation performance in refrigerator/freezers (R/Fs) of conventional design and manufacture. This AIP/foam composite approach is appealing because it appears to be a feasible, near-term method for incorporating advanced insulations into R/Fs without substantial redesign or retooling. However, the requirements for adequate flow of foam during the foam-in-place operation impose limitations on the allowable thickness and coverage area of AIPs. This report examines design alternatives which may offer a greater increase in overall thermal resistance than is possible with the use of AIP/foam composites in current R/F design. These design alternatives generally involve a basic redesign of the R/F taking into account the unique requirements of advanced insulations and the importance of minimizing thermal bridging with high thermal resistance insulations. The focus here is on R/F doors because they are relatively simple and independent R/F components and are therefore good candidates for development of alterative designs. R/F doors have significant thermal bridging problems due to the steel outer shell construction. A three dimensional finite difference computer modeling exercise of a R/F door geometry was used to compare the overall levels of thermal resistance (R-value) for various design configurations.

  9. Final Technical Report - Advanced Optical Sensors to Minimize Energy Consumption in Polymer Extrusion Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Susan J. Foulk

    2012-07-24

    Project Objective: The objectives of this study are to develop an accurate and stable on-line sensor system to monitor color and composition on-line in polymer melts, to develop a scheme for using the output to control extruders to eliminate the energy, material and operational costs of off-specification product, and to combine or eliminate some extrusion processes. Background: Polymer extrusion processes are difficult to control because the quality achieved in the final product is complexly affected by the properties of the extruder screw, speed of extrusion, temperature, polymer composition, strength and dispersion properties of additives, and feeder system properties. Extruder systems are engineered to be highly reproducible so that when the correct settings to produce a particular product are found, that product can be reliably produced time after time. However market conditions often require changes in the final product, different products or grades may be processed in the same equipment, and feed materials vary from lot to lot. All of these changes require empirical adjustment of extruder settings to produce a product meeting specifications. Optical sensor systems that can continuously monitor the composition and color of the extruded polymer could detect process upsets, drift, blending oscillations, and changes in dispersion of additives. Development of an effective control algorithm using the output of the monitor would enable rapid corrections for changes in materials and operating conditions, thereby eliminating most of the scrap and recycle of current processing. This information could be used to identify extruder systems issues, diagnose problem sources, and suggest corrective actions in real-time to help keep extruder system settings within the optimum control region. Using these advanced optical sensor systems would give extruder operators real-time feedback from their process. They could reduce the amount of off-spec product produced and

  10. Modulating polymer chemistry to enhance non-viral gene delivery inside hydrogels with tunable matrix stiffness.

    PubMed

    Keeney, Michael; Onyiah, Sheila; Zhang, Zhe; Tong, Xinming; Han, Li-Hsin; Yang, Fan

    2013-12-01

    Non-viral gene delivery holds great promise for promoting tissue regeneration, and offers a potentially safer alternative than viral vectors. Great progress has been made to develop biodegradable polymeric vectors for non-viral gene delivery in 2D culture, which generally involves isolating and modifying cells in vitro, followed by subsequent transplantation in vivo. Scaffold-mediated gene delivery may eliminate the need for the multiple-step process in vitro, and allows sustained release of nucleic acids in situ. Hydrogels are widely used tissue engineering scaffolds given their tissue-like water content, injectability and tunable biochemical and biophysical properties. However, previous attempts on developing hydrogel-mediated non-viral gene delivery have generally resulted in low levels of transgene expression inside 3D hydrogels, and increasing hydrogel stiffness further decreased such transfection efficiency. Here we report the development of biodegradable polymeric vectors that led to efficient gene delivery inside poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogels with tunable matrix stiffness. Photocrosslinkable gelatin was maintained constant in the hydrogel network to allow cell adhesion. We identified a lead biodegradable polymeric vector, E6, which resulted in increased polyplex stability, DNA protection and achieved sustained high levels of transgene expression inside 3D PEG-DMA hydrogels for at least 12 days. Furthermore, we demonstrated that E6-based polyplexes allowed efficient gene delivery inside hydrogels with tunable stiffness ranging from 2 to 175 kPa, with the peak transfection efficiency observed in hydrogels with intermediate stiffness (28 kPa). The reported hydrogel-mediated gene delivery platform using biodegradable polyplexes may serve as a local depot for sustained transgene expression in situ to enhance tissue engineering across broad tissue types.

  11. Optimal Topology and Experimental Evaluation of Piezoelectric Materials for Actively Shunted General Electric Polymer Matrix Fiber Composite Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Benjamin B.; Duffy, Kirsten; Kauffman, Jeffrey L.; Kray, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center, in collaboration with GE Aviation, has begun the development of a smart adaptive structure system with piezoelectric (PE) transducers to improve composite fan blade damping at resonances. Traditional resonant damping approaches may not be realistic for rotating frame applications such as engine blades. The limited space in which the blades reside in the engine makes it impossible to accommodate the circuit size required to implement passive resonant damping. Thus, a novel digital shunt scheme has been developed to replace the conventional electric passive shunt circuits. The digital shunt dissipates strain energy through the load resistor on a power amplifier. General Electric (GE) designed and fabricated a variety of polymer matrix fiber composite (PMFC) test specimens. Investigating the optimal topology of PE sensors and actuators for each test specimen has revealed the best PE transducer location for each target mode. Also a variety of flexible patches, which can conform to the blade surface, have been tested to identify the best performing PE patch. The active damping control achieved significant performance at target modes. This work has been highlighted by successful spin testing up to 5000 rpm of subscale GEnx composite blades in Glenn s Dynamic Spin Rig.

  12. Study of optical and structural properties of CdSe quantum dot embedded in PVA polymer matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Tyagi, Chetna Sharma, Ambika

    2015-08-28

    To enhance the properties and applicability of devices it is essential to incorporate semiconductor nanoparticles into polymer matrix. This introduces a new branch of science which includes device fabrications such as gas sensors, nonlinear optics, catalysis etc. Herein, we have synthesized CdSe/PVA nanocomposite (NC) material using wet chemical synthesis technique. The XRD studies revealed the formation of crystalline structure of CdSe nanoparticles (NP’s) and PVA NC’s with an average size of 100 nm and 5 nm respectively. Energy band gap is determined using UV-VIS Spectroscopy. A red shift in the absorption edge of CdSe/PVA NC is observed with respect to CdSe Np’s, The photoluminescence spectra also show red shift for CdSe/PVA NC as compared to CdSe NP’s Thus the use of CdSe/PVA for solar cell application would be more preferable than CdSe NP’s.

  13. Optimal topology and experimental evaluation of PE materials for actively shunted GE polymer matrix fiber composite blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Benjamin B.; Duffy, Kirsten; Kauffman, Jeffrey L.; Kray, Nicholas

    2012-04-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), in collaboration with GE Aviation, has begun the development of a smart adaptive structure system with piezoelectric transducers to improve composite fan blade damping at resonances. Traditional resonant damping approaches may not be realistic for rotating frame applications such as engine blades. The limited space in which the blades reside in the engine makes it impossible to accommodate the circuit size required to implement passive resonant damping. Thus, we have developed a novel digital shunt scheme to replace the conventional electric passive shunt circuits. The digital shunt dissipates strain energy through the load capacitor on a power amplifier. GE designed and fabricated a variety of polymer matrix fiber composite (PMFC) test specimens. We investigated the optimal topology of PE sensors and actuators for each test specimen to discover the best PE transducer location for each target mode. Also a variety of flexible patches, which can conform to the blade surface, have been tested to identify the best performing piezoelectric patch. The active damping control achieved significant performance at target modes. This work has been highlighted by successful spin testing up to 5,000 rpm of subscale GEnx composite blades in GRC's Dynamic Spin Rig.

  14. Advanced polymer PV system: PVMaT 4A1 annual report, September 1995--September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Hanoka, J; Chleboski, R; Farber, M; Fava, J; Kane, P; Martz, J

    1997-06-01

    Purpose of this subcontract was to produce lower module and systems costs through the innovative use of polymeric materials. The Innovative Mounting System (IMS) was developed and testing begun during the first year of this contract. IMS reduces the cost of installed PV systems by reducing labor and materials costs both in the factory and in field installation. It incorporates several advances in polymers, processing methods and product design. An advanced backskin material permits elimination of the conventional Al perimeter frame by protecting and sealing the edge and by direct bonding of multifunctional mounting bars. Electrical interconnection is easier and more reliable with a new junction box. Feasibility of a non-vacuum, high-throughput lamination method was also demonstrated, involving a novel transparent encapsulant with UV stabilization package that can be laminated in air and which should lead to longer field life than conventional designs. The first-year program culminated in the fielding of prototype products with the new encapsulant, backskin, junction box, frameless edge seal, and IMS. Feedback and marketing information from potential customers were solicited. Result promises a $0.50/watt manufacturing and system cost reductions as well as increased system lifetime. The second year will complete refinement and test of the encapsulant and backskin, complete the new lamination method, and refine product designs.

  15. Advanced Polymer Technology for Containing and Immobilizing Strontium-90 in the Subsurface - 8361

    SciTech Connect

    K. Baker; G. Heath; C. Scott; A. Schafer; S. Bryant; M. Sharma; C. Huh; S. K. Choi

    2008-02-01

    Many Department of Energy (DOE) sites, including Idaho and Hanford, have heavy metals and/or radionuclides (e.g. strontium-90) present that are strongly adsorbed in the vadose zone, but which nevertheless are propagating toward the water table. A key challenge for immobilization of these contaminants is bringing the chosen amendment or remediation technology into contact with the contaminated porous medium, while ensuring that contaminated water and colloids do not escape. This is particularly challenging when the subsurface geology is complex and highly heterogeneous, as is the case at many DOE sites. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in collaboration with the University of Texas at Austin (UT) has conducted research sponsored through the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) Advanced Remediation Technologies Phase I program that successfully demonstrated application of a novel, pH-triggered advanced polymer for creating a physical barrier that prevents heavy metals and radionuclides in vadose zone soil and soil-pore water from migrating to the groundwater. The focus of this paper is on the column and sandbox experiments conducted by researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory in support of the Phase I program objectives. Proof of these concepts provides a technology basis for confining or isolating a volume of contaminated groundwater, to be implemented in future investigations at the Vadose Zone Research Park (VZRP) at INL.

  16. A Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA) of Human Space Missions for the Advanced Integration Matrix (AIM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry W.; Dillon-Merrill, Robin L.; Thomas, Gretchen A.

    2003-01-01

    The Advanced Integration Matrix (AIM) Project u7ill study and solve systems-level integration issues for exploration missions beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO), through the design and development of a ground-based facility for developing revolutionary integrated systems for joint human-robotic missions. This paper describes a Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA) of human space missions that was developed to help define the direction and priorities for AIM. Risk analysis is required for all major NASA programs and has been used for shuttle, station, and Mars lander programs. It is a prescribed part of early planning and is necessary during concept definition, even before mission scenarios and system designs exist. PRA cm begin when little failure data are available, and be continually updated and refined as detail becomes available. PRA provides a basis for examining tradeoffs among safety, reliability, performance, and cost. The objective of AIM's PRA is to indicate how risk can be managed and future human space missions enabled by the AIM Project. Many critical events can cause injuries and fatalities to the crew without causing loss of vehicle or mission. Some critical systems are beyond AIM's scope, such as propulsion and guidance. Many failure-causing events can be mitigated by conducting operational tests in AIM, such as testing equipment and evaluating operational procedures, especially in the areas of communications and computers, autonomous operations, life support, thermal design, EVA and rover activities, physiological factors including habitation, medical equipment, and food, and multifunctional tools and repairable systems. AIM is well suited to test and demonstrate the habitat, life support, crew operations, and human interface. Because these account for significant crew, systems performance, and science risks, AIM will help reduce mission risk, and missions beyond LEO are far enough in the future that AIM can have significant impact.

  17. Joint Strength Control at the Fiber/Matrix Interface during the Production of Polymer Composite Materials Reinforced with High Performance Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudinov, Vladimir V.; Korneeva, Natalia V.

    2010-06-01

    The paper presents the results obtained in the study of the joint strength between polymer matrix and high performance polyethylene fiber. The fiber/matrix joints simulate the unit cell of the fiber-reinforced composite materials. Effect of heat treatment on the composite properties at the interface was estimated by a multifilament wet-pull-out method. It was found that the joint strength may be increased with the help of extra heart treatment. Both the energy to peak load and the energy to failure for CM joints at various stages of loading were determined.

  18. Computer Simulation of Spatial Arrangement and Connectivity of Particles in Three-Dimensional Microstructure: Application to Model Electrical Conductivity of Polymer Matrix Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louis, P.; Gokhale, A. M.

    1996-01-01

    Computer simulation is a powerful tool for analyzing the geometry of three-dimensional microstructure. A computer simulation model is developed to represent the three-dimensional microstructure of a two-phase particulate composite where particles may be in contact with one another but do not overlap significantly. The model is used to quantify the "connectedness" of the particulate phase of a polymer matrix composite containing hollow carbon particles in a dielectric polymer resin matrix. The simulations are utilized to estimate the morphological percolation volume fraction for electrical conduction, and the effective volume fraction of the particles that actually take part in the electrical conduction. The calculated values of the effective volume fraction are used as an input for a self-consistent physical model for electrical conductivity. The predicted values of electrical conductivity are in very good agreement with the corresponding experimental data on a series of specimens having different particulate volume fraction.

  19. Effect of fabric structure and polymer matrix on flexural strength, interlaminar shear stress, and energy dissipation of glass fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the effect of glass fiber structure and the epoxy polymer system on the flexural strength, interlaminar shear stress (ILSS), and energy absorption properties of glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites. Four different GFRP composites were fabricated from two glass fiber textiles of...

  20. Biological Matrix Effects in Quantitative Tandem Mass Spectrometry-Based Analytical Methods: Advancing Biomonitoring

    PubMed Central

    Panuwet, Parinya; Hunter, Ronald E.; D’Souza, Priya E.; Chen, Xianyu; Radford, Samantha A.; Cohen, Jordan R.; Marder, M. Elizabeth; Kartavenka, Kostya; Ryan, P. Barry; Barr, Dana Boyd

    2015-01-01

    The ability to quantify levels of target analytes in biological samples accurately and precisely, in biomonitoring, involves the use of highly sensitive and selective instrumentation such as tandem mass spectrometers and a thorough understanding of highly variable matrix effects. Typically, matrix effects are caused by co-eluting matrix components that alter the ionization of target analytes as well as the chromatographic response of target analytes, leading to reduced or increased sensitivity of the analysis. Thus, before the desired accuracy and precision standards of laboratory data are achieved, these effects must be characterized and controlled. Here we present our review and observations of matrix effects encountered during the validation and implementation of tandem mass spectrometry-based analytical methods. We also provide systematic, comprehensive laboratory strategies needed to control challenges posed by matrix effects in order to ensure delivery of the most accurate data for biomonitoring studies assessing exposure to environmental toxicants. PMID:25562585

  1. Development of a Subcell Based Modeling Approach for Modeling the Architecturally Dependent Impact Response of Triaxially Braided Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorini, Chris; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Goldberg, Robert K.; Kohlman, Lee W.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the high velocity impact response of polymer matrix composites with complex architectures is critical to many aerospace applications, including engine fan blade containment systems where the structure must be able to completely contain fan blades in the event of a blade-out. Despite the benefits offered by these materials, the complex nature of textile composites presents a significant challenge for the prediction of deformation and damage under both quasi-static and impact loading conditions. The relatively large mesoscale repeating unit cell (in comparison to the size of structural components) causes the material to behave like a structure rather than a homogeneous material. Impact experiments conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center have shown the damage patterns to be a function of the underlying material architecture. Traditional computational techniques that involve modeling these materials using smeared homogeneous, orthotropic material properties at the macroscale result in simulated damage patterns that are a function of the structural geometry, but not the material architecture. In order to preserve heterogeneity at the highest length scale in a robust yet computationally efficient manner, and capture the architecturally dependent damage patterns, a previously-developed subcell modeling approach where the braided composite unit cell is approximated as a series of four adjacent laminated composites is utilized. This work discusses the implementation of the subcell methodology into the commercial transient dynamic finite element code LS-DYNA (Livermore Software Technology Corp.). Verification and validation studies are also presented, including simulation of the tensile response of straight-sided and notched quasi-static coupons composed of a T700/PR520 triaxially braided [0deg/60deg/-60deg] composite. Based on the results of the verification and validation studies, advantages and limitations of the methodology as well as plans for future work

  2. Mechanical properties and in vivo behavior of a biodegradable synthetic polymer microfiber - extracellular matrix hydrogel biohybrid scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yi; Huber, Alexander; Takanari, Keisuke; Amoroso, Nicholas J.; Hashizume, Ryotaro; Badylak, Stephen F.; Wagner, William R.

    2011-01-01

    A biohybrid composite consisting of extracellular matrix (ECM) gel from porcine dermal tissue and biodegradable elastomeric fibers was generated and evaluated for soft tissue applications. ECM gel possesses attractive biocompatibility and bioactivity with weak mechanical properties and rapid degradation, while electrospun biodegradable poly(ester urethane)urea (PEUU) has good mechanical properties but limited cellular infiltration and tissue integration. A concurrent gel electrospray/polymer electrospinning method was employed to create ECM gel/PEUU fiber composites with attractive mechanical properties, including high flexibility and strength. Electron microscopy revealed a structure of interconnected fibrous layers embedded in ECM gel. Tensile mechanical properties could be tuned by altering the PEUU/ECM weight ratio. Scaffold tensile strengths for PEUU/ECM ratios of 67/33, 72/28 and 80/20 ranged from 80–187 kPa in the longitudinal axis (parallel to the collecting mandrel axis) and 41–91 kPa in the circumferential axis with 645–938% breaking strains. The 72/28 biohybrid composite and a control scaffold generated from electrospun PEUU alone were implanted into Lewis rats, replacing a full-thickness abdominal wall defect. At 4 wk, no infection or herniation was found at the implant site. Histological staining showed extensive cellular infiltration into the biohybrid scaffold with the newly developed tissue well integrated with the native periphery, while minimal cellular ingress into the electrospun PEUU scaffold was observed. Mechanical testing of explanted constructs showed evidence of substantial remodeling, with composite scaffolds adopting properties more comparable to the native abdominal wall. The described elastic biohybrid material imparts features of ECM gel bioactivity with PEUU strength and handling to provide a promising composite biomaterial for soft tissue repair and replacement. PMID:21303718

  3. Thermo- and pH-responsive polymer brushes-grafted gigaporous polystyrene microspheres as a high-speed protein chromatography matrix.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jian-Bo; Xu, Yu-Liang; Liu, Jun-Yi; Zeng, Jing-Bin; Chen, Yan-Li; Zhou, Wei-Qing; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2016-04-01

    Dual thermo- and pH-responsive chromatography has been proposed using poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-butyl methacrylate-co-N,N-dimethylaminopropyl acrylamide) (P(NIPAM-co-BMA-co-DMAPAAM)) brushes grafted gigaporous polystyrene microspheres (GPM) as matrix. Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiator was first coupled onto GPM through Friedel-Crafts acylation with 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide. The dual-responsive polymer brushes were then grafted onto GPM via surface-initiated ATRP. The surface composition, gigaporous structure, protein adsorption and dual-responsive chromatographic properties of the matrix (GPM-P(NIPAM-co-BMA-co-DMAPAAM) were characterized in detail. Results showed that GPM were successfully grafted with thermoresponsive cationic polymer brushes and that the gigaporous structure was well maintained. A column packed with GPM-P(NIPAM-co-BMA-co-DMAPAAM presented low backpressure, good permeability and appreciable thermo-responsibility. By changing pH of the mobile phase and temperature of the column in turn, the column can separate three model proteins at the mobile phase velocity up to 2528cmh(-1). A separation mechanism of this matrix was also proposed. All results indicate that the dual thermo- and pH-responsive chromatography matrix has great potentials in 'green' high-speed protein chromatography.

  4. Thermo- and pH-responsive polymer brushes-grafted gigaporous polystyrene microspheres as a high-speed protein chromatography matrix.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jian-Bo; Xu, Yu-Liang; Liu, Jun-Yi; Zeng, Jing-Bin; Chen, Yan-Li; Zhou, Wei-Qing; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2016-04-01

    Dual thermo- and pH-responsive chromatography has been proposed using poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-butyl methacrylate-co-N,N-dimethylaminopropyl acrylamide) (P(NIPAM-co-BMA-co-DMAPAAM)) brushes grafted gigaporous polystyrene microspheres (GPM) as matrix. Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiator was first coupled onto GPM through Friedel-Crafts acylation with 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide. The dual-responsive polymer brushes were then grafted onto GPM via surface-initiated ATRP. The surface composition, gigaporous structure, protein adsorption and dual-responsive chromatographic properties of the matrix (GPM-P(NIPAM-co-BMA-co-DMAPAAM) were characterized in detail. Results showed that GPM were successfully grafted with thermoresponsive cationic polymer brushes and that the gigaporous structure was well maintained. A column packed with GPM-P(NIPAM-co-BMA-co-DMAPAAM presented low backpressure, good permeability and appreciable thermo-responsibility. By changing pH of the mobile phase and temperature of the column in turn, the column can separate three model proteins at the mobile phase velocity up to 2528cmh(-1). A separation mechanism of this matrix was also proposed. All results indicate that the dual thermo- and pH-responsive chromatography matrix has great potentials in 'green' high-speed protein chromatography. PMID:26947166

  5. Matrix-assisted and polymer-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometric analysis of low molecular weight polystyrenes and polyethylene glycols.

    PubMed

    Woldegiorgis, Andreas; Löwenhielm, Peter; Björk, Anders; Roeraade, Johan

    2004-01-01

    Recently, matrices based on oligomers of dioxin and thiophene (polymer-assisted laser desorption/ionization (PALDI)) have been described for mass spectrometric (MS) analysis of low molecular weight compounds (Woldegiorgis A, von Kieseritzky F, Dahlstedt E, Hellberg J, Brinck T, Roeraade J. Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2004; 18: 841-852). In this paper, we report the use of PALDI matrices for low molecular weight polymers. An evaluation with polystyrene and polyethylene glycol showed that no charge transfer ionization occurs. Ionization is mediated through metal ion adduction. Comparison of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) data for two very low molecular weight polymers with data obtained from size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) revealed a systematic difference regarding mean molecular weight and dispersity. Further, the mass spectra obtained with PALDI matrices had a higher signal-to-noise ratio than the spectra obtained with conventional matrices. For polymers with higher molecular weights (>1500 Da), the conventional matrices gave better performance. For evaluation of the MALDI spectra, three non-linear mathematical models were evaluated to model the cumulative distributions of the different oligomers and their maximal values of Mw, Mn and PDI. Models based on sigmoidal or Boltzmann equations proved to be most suitable. Objective modeling tools are necessary to compare different sample and instrumental conditions during method optimization of MALDI analysis of polymers, since the bias between MALDI and SEC data can be misleading.

  6. Advances in solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell technology with low-platinum-loading electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Ticianelli, E. A.; Derouin, C. R.; Redondo, A.

    1987-01-01

    The Gemini Space program demonstrated the first major application of fuel cell systems. Solid polymer electrolyte fuel cells were used as auxiliary power sources in the spacecraft. There has been considerable progress in this technology since then, particularly with the substitution of Nafion for the polystyrene sulfonate membrane as the electrolyte. Until recently the performance was good only with high platinum loading (4 mg/sq cm) electrodes. Methods are presented to advance the technology by (1) use of low platinum loading (0.35 mg/sq cm) electrodes; (2) optimization of anode/membrane/cathode interfaces by hot pressing; (3) pressurization of reactant gases, which is most important when air is used as cathodic reactant; and (4) adequate humidification of reactant gases to overcome the water management problem. The high performance of the fuel cell with the low loading of platinum appears to be due to the extension of the three dimensional reaction zone by introduction of a proton conductor, Nafion. This was confirmed by cyclic voltammetry.

  7. Hybridized polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    London, A.

    1981-01-01

    Design approaches and materials are described from which are fabricated pyrostatic graphite/epoxy (Gr/Ep) laminates that show improved retention of graphite particulates when subjected to burning. Sixteen hybridized plus two standard Gr/Ep laminates were designed, fabricated, and tested in an effort to eliminate the release of carbon (graphite) fiber particles from burned/burning, mechanically disturbed samples. The term pyrostatic is defined as meaning mechanically intact in the presence of fire. Graphite particulate retentive laminates were constructed whose constituent materials, cost of fabrication, and physical and mechanical properties were not significantly different from existing Gr/Ep composites. All but one laminate (a Celion graphite/bis-maleimide polyimide) were based on an off-the-shelf Gr/Ep, the AS-1/3501-5A system. Of the 16 candidates studied, four thin (10-ply) and four thick (50-ply) hybridized composites are recommended.

  8. Hybridized polymer matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, B. A.; Visser, T.

    1981-01-01

    Under certain conditions of combined fire and impact, graphite fibers are released to the atmosphere by graphite fiber composites. The retention of graphite fibers in these situations is investigated. Hybrid combinations of graphite tape and cloth, glass cloth, and resin additives are studied with resin systems. Polyimide resins form the most resistant composites and resins based on simple novolac epoxies the least resistant of those tested. Great improvement in the containment of the fibers is obtained in using graphite/glass hybrids, and nearly complete prevention of individual fiber release is made possible by the use of resin additives.

  9. Hybridized polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henshaw, J.

    1983-01-01

    Methods of improving the fire resistance of graphite epoxy composite laminates were investigated with the objective of reducing the volume of loose graphite fibers disseminated into the airstream as the result of a high intensity aircraft fuel fire. Improvements were sought by modifying the standard graphite epoxy systems without significantly negating their structural effectiveness. The modifications consisted primarily of an addition of a third constituent material such as glass fibers, glass flakes, carbon black in a glassy resin. These additions were designed to encourage coalescense of the graphite fibers and thereby reduce their aerodynamic float characteristics. A total of 38 fire tests were conducted on thin (1.0 mm) and thick (6.0 mm) hybrid panels.

  10. Kinetics of ligand binding to receptor immobilized in a polymer matrix, as detected with an evanescent wave biosensor. I. A computer simulation of the influence of mass transport.

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, P

    1996-01-01

    The influence of mass transport on ligand binding to receptor immobilized in a polymer matrix, as detected with an evanescent wave biosensor, was investigated. A one-dimensional computer model for the mass transport of ligand between the bulk solution and the polymer gel and within the gel was employed, and the influence of the diffusion coefficient, the partition coefficient, the thickness of the matrix, and the distribution of immobilized receptor were studied for a variety of conditions. Under conditions that may apply to many published experimental studies, diffusion within the matrix was found to decrease the overall ligand transport significantly. For relatively slow reactions, small spatial gradients of free and bound ligand in the gel are found, whereas for relatively rapid reactions strong inhomogeneities of ligand within the gel occur before establishment of equilibrium. Several types of deviations from ideal pseudo-first-order binding progress curves are described that resemble those of published experimental data. Extremely transport limited reactions can in some cases be fitted with apparently ideal binding progress curves, although with apparent reaction rates that are much lower than the true reaction rates. Nevertheless, the ratio of the apparent rate constants can be semiquantitatively consistent with the true equilibrium constant. Apparently "cooperative" binding can result from high chemical on rates at high receptor saturation. Dissociation in the presence of transport limitation was found to be well described empirically by a single or a double exponential, with both apparent rate constants considerably lower than the intrinsic chemical rate constant. Transport limitations in the gel can introduce many generally unknown factors into the binding progress curve. The simulations suggest that unexpected deviations from ideal binding progress curves may be due to highly transport influenced binding kinetics. The use of a thinner polymer matrix could

  11. Recent advances in the field of ceramic fibers and ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naslain, R.

    2005-03-01

    Progress achieved during the last decade in the field of ceramic fibers and related ceramic matrix composites is reviewed. Both SiC-based and alumina-based fine fibers have been improved in terms of thermal stability and creep resistance with temperature limit of about 1400 and 1200 ° C, respectively. Two concepts for achieving damage-tolerant ceramic matrix composites have been identified : (i) that of non-oxide composites with a dense matrix in which matrix cracks formed under load are deflected and arrested in a weak fiber coating referred to as the interphase and (ii) that of all-oxide composites with a highly porous matrix with no need of any fiber coating. The lifetime under load of non-oxide composites in oxidizing atmospheres, is improved through the use of multilayered self-healing interphases and matrices deposited from gaseous precursors by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). Lifetime ranging from 1000 to 10,000 hours at 1200 ° C under cyclic loading in air are foreseen. Alumina-based composites although attractive for long term exposures in oxidizing atmospheres up to ≈1200 ° C, are still experimental materials.

  12. Recent advances in solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell technology with low platinum loading electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Manko, David J.; Enayatullah, Mohammad; Appleby, A. John

    1989-01-01

    High power density fuel cell systems for defense and civilian applications are being developed. Taking into consideration the main causes for efficiency losses (activation, mass transport and ohmic overpotentials) the only fuel cell systems capable of achieving high power densities are the ones with alkaline and solid polymer electrolyte. High power densities (0.8 W/sq cm at 0.8 V and 1 A/sq cm with H2 and O2 as reactants), were already used in NASA's Apollo and Space Shuttle flights as auxiliary power sources. Even higher power densities (4 W/sq cm - i.e., 8 A sq cm at 0.5 V) were reported by the USAF/International Fuel Cells in advanced versions of the alkaline system. High power densities (approximately 1 watt/sq cm) in solid polymer electrolyte fuel cells with ten times lower platinum loading in the electrodes (i.e., 0.4 mg/sq cm) were attained. It is now possible to reach a cell potential of 0.620 V at a current density of 2 A/sq cm and at a temperature of 95 C and pressure of 4/5 atm with H2/O2 as reactants. The slope of the linear region of the potential-current density plot for this case is 0.15 ohm-sq cm. With H2/air as reactants and under the same operating conditions, mass transport limitations are encountered at current densities above 1.4 A/sq cm. Thus, the cell potential at 1 A/sq cm with H2/air as reactants is less than that with H2/O2 as reactants by 40 mV, which is the expected value based on electrode kinetics of the oxygen reduction reaction, and at 2 A/sq cm with H2/air as reactant is less than the corresponding value with H2/O2 as reactants by 250 mV, which is due to the considerably greater mass transport limitations in the former case.

  13. Development and testing of new biologically-based polymers as advanced biocompatible contact lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2000-06-01

    Nature has evolved complex and elegant materials well suited to fulfill a myriad of functions. Lubricants, structural scaffolds and protective sheaths can all be found in nature, and these provide a rich source of inspiration for the rational design of materials for biomedical applications. Many biological materials are based in some fashion on hydrogels, the crosslinked polymers that absorb and hold water. Biological hydrogels contribute to processes as diverse as mineral nucleation during bone growth and protection and hydration of the cell surface. The carbohydrate layer that coats all living cells, often referred to as the glycocalyx, has hydrogel-like properties that keep cell surfaces well hydrated, segregated from neighboring cells, and resistant to non-specific protein deposition. With the molecular details of cell surface carbohydrates now in hand, adaptation of these structural motifs to synthetic materials is an appealing strategy for improving biocompatibility. The goal of this collaborative project between Prof. Bertozzi's research group, the Center for Advanced Materials at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Sunsoft Corporation was the design, synthesis and characterization of novel hydrogel polymers for improved soft contact lens materials. Our efforts were motivated by the urgent need for improved materials that allow extended wear, and essential feature for those whose occupation requires the use of contact lenses rather than traditional spectacles. Our strategy was to transplant the chemical features of cell surface molecules into contact lens materials so that they more closely resemble the tissue in which they reside. Specifically, we integrated carbohydrate molecules similar to those found on cell surfaces, and sulfoxide materials inspired by the properties of the carbohydrates, into hydrogels composed of biocompatible and manufacturable substrates. The new materials were characterized with respect to surface and bulk hydrophilicity, and

  14. From innovative polymers to advanced nanomedicine: key challenges, recent progress and future perspectives: the second Symposium on Innovative Polymers for Controlled Delivery Suzhou, China, 11–14 September 2012 .

    PubMed

    Feijen, Jan; Hennink, Wim E; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2013-02-01

    Recent developments in polymer-based controlled delivery systems have made a significant clinical impact. The second Symposium on Innovative Polymers for Controlled Delivery (SIPCD) was held in Suzhou, China to address the key challenges and provide up-to-date progress and future perspectives in the innovation of polymer-based therapeutics. At SIPCD, a stimulating panel discussion was introduced for the first time on "What is the future of nanomedicine?" This report highlights the most recent research and developments in biomedical polymers and nanomedicine made by 29 invited scientists from around the world, as well as important issues regarding clinical advancements of nanomedicine conferred during the panel discussion.

  15. Selection of polymer binders and fabrication of SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, John S.; Lightfoot, A.; Sigalovsky, J.

    1993-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: effects of solvent and polymer exposures on nitriding kinetics of high purity Si powders and on resulting phase distributions; effects of solvent and polymer exposures on Si Surface Chemistry; effects of solvent and polymeric exposures on nitriding kinetics; and fabrication of flexural test samples.

  16. Implementation of advanced matrix corrections for active interrogation of waste drums using the CTEN instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Melton, S.; Estep, R.; Hollas, C.

    1998-12-31

    The combined thermal/epithermal neutron instrument (CTEN) was designed at Los Alamos to improve measurement accuracy and mitigate self shielding effects inherent in the differential dieaway technique (DDT). A major goal in this research effort has been the development of a calibration technique that incorporates recently developed matrix and self-shielding corrections using data generated from additional detectors and new acquisition techniques. A comprehensive data set containing both active and passive measurements was generated using 26 different matrices and comprising a total of 1,400 measurements. In all, 31 flux-and-matrix-dependent parameters, 24 positional parameters, two dieaway times, and a correlated ratio were determined from each of the over 1,400 measurements. A reduced list of matrix indicators, prioritized using the alternating conditional expectation (ACE) algorithm, was used to train a neural network using a generalized regression technique (GRNN) to determine matrix- and position-corrected calibration factors. This paper describes the experimental, analytical, and empirical techniques used to determine the corrected calibration factor for an unknown waste drum. Results from a range of cases are compared with those obtained using a mobile DDT instrument and traditional DDT algorithms.

  17. Polymer-based metal nano-coated disposable target for matrix-assisted and matrix-free laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bugovsky, Stefan; Winkler, Wolfgang; Balika, Werner; Koranda, Manfred; Allmaier, Günter

    2016-07-15

    The ideal MALDI/LDI mass spectrometry sample target for an axial TOF instrument possesses a variety of properties. Primarily, it should be chemically inert to the sample, i.e. analyte, matrix and solvents, highly planar across the whole target, without any previous chemical contact and provide a uniform surface to facilitate reproducible measurements without artifacts from previous sample or matrix compounds. This can be hard to achieve with a metal target, which has to be extensively cleaned every time after use. Any cleaning step may leave residues behind, may change the surface properties due to the type of cleaning method used or even cause microscopic scratches over time hence altering matrix crystallization behavior. Alternatively, use of disposable targets avoids these problems. As each possesses the same surface they therefore have the potential to replace the conventional full metal targets so commonly employed. Furthermore, low cost single-use targets with high planarity promise an easier compliance with GLP guidelines as they alleviate the problem of low reproducibility due to inconsistent sample/matrix crystallization and changes to the target surface properties. In our tests, polymeric metal nano-coated targets were compared to a stainless steel reference. The polymeric metal nano-coated targets exhibited all the performance characteristics for a MALDI MS sample support, and even surpassed the - in our lab commonly used - reference in some aspects like limit of detection. The target exhibits all necessary features such as electrical conductivity, vacuum, laser and solvent compatibility.

  18. The use of novel biodegradable, optically active and nanostructured poly(amide-ester-imide) as a polymer matrix for preparation of modified ZnO based bionanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Abdolmaleki, Amir; Mallakpour, Shadpour; Borandeh, Sedigheh

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel biodegradable and nanostructured PAEI based on two amino acids, was synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnO nanoparticles were modified via two different silane coupling agents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PAEI/modified ZnO BNCs were synthesized through ultrasound irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnO particles were dispersed homogeneously in PAEI matrix on nanoscale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of ZnO nanoparticles on the properties of synthesized polymer was examined. -- Abstract: A novel biodegradable and nanostructured poly(amide-ester-imide) (PAEI) based on two different amino acids, was synthesized via direct polycondensation of biodegradable N,N Prime -bis[2-(methyl-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)propanoate)]isophthaldiamide and N,N Prime -(pyromellitoyl)-bis-L-phenylalanine diacid. The resulting polymer was characterized by FT-IR, {sup 1}H NMR, specific rotation, elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) analysis. The synthesized polymer showed good thermal stability with nano and sphere structure. Then PAEI/ZnO bionanocomposites (BNCs) were fabricated via interaction of pure PAEI and ZnO nanoparticles. The surface of ZnO was modified with two different silane coupling agents. PAEI/ZnO BNCs were studied and characterized by FT-IR, XRD, UV/vis, FE-SEM and TEM. The TEM and FE-SEM results indicated that the nanoparticles were dispersed homogeneously in PAEI matrix on nanoscale. Furthermore the effect of ZnO nanoparticle on the thermal stability of the polymer was investigated with TGA and DSC technique.

  19. Recent advances in understanding the reinforcing ability and mechanism of carbon nanotubes in ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estili, Mehdi; Sakka, Yoshio

    2014-12-01

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), commonly referred to as ultimate reinforcement, the main purpose for fabricating CNT-ceramic matrix composites has been mainly to improve the fracture toughness and strength of the ceramic matrix materials. However, there have been many studies reporting marginal improvements or even the degradation of mechanical properties. On the other hand, those studies claiming noticeable toughening measured using indentation, which is an indirect/unreliable characterization method, have not demonstrated the responsible mechanisms applicable to the nanoscale, flexible CNTs; instead, those studies proposed those classical methods applicable to microscale fiber/whisker reinforced ceramics without showing any convincing evidence of load transfer to the CNTs. Therefore, the ability of CNTs to directly improve the macroscopic mechanical properties of structural ceramics has been strongly questioned and debated in the last ten years. In order to properly discuss the reinforcing ability (and possible mechanisms) of CNTs in a ceramic host material, there are three fundamental questions to our knowledge at both the nanoscale and macroscale levels that need to be addressed: (1) does the intrinsic load-bearing ability of CNTs change when embedded in a ceramic host matrix?; (2) when there is an intimate atomic-level interface without any chemical reaction with the matrix, could one expect any load transfer to the CNTs along with effective load bearing by them during crack propagation?; and (3) considering their nanometer-scale dimensions, flexibility and radial softness, are the CNTs able to improve the mechanical properties of the host ceramic matrix at the macroscale when individually, intimately and uniformly dispersed? If so, how? Also, what is the effect of CNT concentration in such a defect-free composite system? Here, we briefly review the recent studies addressing the above fundamental questions. In particular, we discuss the new

  20. Zirconia-magnesia inert matrix fuel and waste form: Synthesis, characterization and chemical performance in an advanced fuel cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holliday, Kiel Steven

    There is a significant buildup in plutonium stockpiles throughout the world, because of spent nuclear fuel and the dismantling of weapons. The radiotoxicity of this material and proliferation risk has led to a desire for destroying excess plutonium. To do this effectively, it must be fissioned in a reactor as part of a uranium free fuel to eliminate the generation of more plutonium. This requires an inert matrix to volumetrically dilute the fissile plutonium. Zirconia-magnesia dual phase ceramic has been demonstrated to be a favorable material for this task. It is neutron transparent, zirconia is chemically robust, magnesia has good thermal conductivity and the ceramic has been calculated to conform to current economic and safety standards. This dissertation contributes to the knowledge of zirconia-magnesia as an inert matrix fuel to establish behavior of the material containing a fissile component. First, the zirconia-magnesia inert matrix is synthesized in a dual phase ceramic containing a fissile component and a burnable poison. The chemical constitution of the ceramic is then determined. Next, the material performance is assessed under conditions relevant to an advanced fuel cycle. Reactor conditions were assessed with high temperature, high pressure water. Various acid solutions were used in an effort to dissolve the material for reprocessing. The ceramic was also tested as a waste form under environmental conditions, should it go directly to a repository as a spent fuel. The applicability of zirconia-magnesia as an inert matrix fuel and waste form was tested and found to be a promising material for such applications.

  1. Atomic step-and-terrace surface of polyimide sheet for advanced polymer substrate engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, G.; Shimada, K.; Nozawa, Y.; Kaneko, S.; Urakami, T.; Koyama, K.; Komura, M.; Matsuda, A.; Yoshimoto, M.

    2016-07-01

    Typical thermostable and flexible polyimide polymers exhibit many excellent properties such as strong mechanical and chemical resistance. However, in contrast to single-crystal substrates like silicon or sapphire, polymers mostly display disordered and rough surfaces, which may result in instability and degradation of the interfaces between thin films and polymer substrates. As a step toward the development of next-generation polymer substrates, we here report single-atom-layer imprinting onto the polyimide sheets, resulting in an ultrasmooth 0.3 nm high atomic step-and-terrace surface on the polyimides. The ultrasmooth polymer substrates are expected to be applied to the fabrication of nanostructures such as superlattices, nanowires, or quantum dots in nanoscale-controlled electronic devices. We fabricate smooth and atomically stepped indium tin oxide transparent conducting oxide thin films on the imprinted polyimide sheets for future use in organic-based optoelectronic devices processed with nanoscale precision. Furthermore, toward 2D polymer substrate nanoengineering, we demonstrate nanoscale letter writing on the atomic step-and-terrace polyimide surface via atomic force microscopy probe scratching.

  2. Atomic step-and-terrace surface of polyimide sheet for advanced polymer substrate engineering.

    PubMed

    Tan, G; Shimada, K; Nozawa, Y; Kaneko, S; Urakami, T; Koyama, K; Komura, M; Matsuda, A; Yoshimoto, M

    2016-07-22

    Typical thermostable and flexible polyimide polymers exhibit many excellent properties such as strong mechanical and chemical resistance. However, in contrast to single-crystal substrates like silicon or sapphire, polymers mostly display disordered and rough surfaces, which may result in instability and degradation of the interfaces between thin films and polymer substrates. As a step toward the development of next-generation polymer substrates, we here report single-atom-layer imprinting onto the polyimide sheets, resulting in an ultrasmooth 0.3 nm high atomic step-and-terrace surface on the polyimides. The ultrasmooth polymer substrates are expected to be applied to the fabrication of nanostructures such as superlattices, nanowires, or quantum dots in nanoscale-controlled electronic devices. We fabricate smooth and atomically stepped indium tin oxide transparent conducting oxide thin films on the imprinted polyimide sheets for future use in organic-based optoelectronic devices processed with nanoscale precision. Furthermore, toward 2D polymer substrate nanoengineering, we demonstrate nanoscale letter writing on the atomic step-and-terrace polyimide surface via atomic force microscopy probe scratching. PMID:27284690

  3. Influence of AL2O3 Nanoparticles on the Phase Matrix of Polyethylene Oxide - Silver Triflate Polymer Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suthanthiraraj, S. Austin; Sheeba, D. Joice

    2006-06-01

    Solid polymer electrolytes comprising polyethylene oxide (PEO), silver triflate (AgCF3SO3) and varying weight percentage of Al2O3 (0, 2, 5, 10, 15) nanoparticles, were prepared by solution casting technique using acetonitrile as the common solvent. These polymer electrolytes were formed as very thin films of large surface area and the thickness of these films was measured using Air-Wedge technique. Typical values for the thickness of these films ranged from 30 to 100 μm. The effect of the dispersion of various amounts of Al2O3 nanoparticles in polyethylene oxide - silver triflate polymer electrolytes was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Wagner's polarization techniques. The X-ray diffraction pattern, indicated the amorphous nature of the polymer electrolyte. The DSC traces showed slight change in the glass transition temperature (Tg), whereas the degree of crystallization (Xc) decreased from 99.2%(pure PEO) to 27.3% for the nano - Al2O3 blended polymer electrolytes. The total ionic transference number (tion) calculated by wagner's polarization technique was found to be approximately unity, reveling that the significant contribution to electrical conduction was due to ions.

  4. Durability and CMAS Resistance of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings Systems for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2015-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in next generation turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures with improved efficiency, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. This paper will emphasize advanced environmental barrier coating developments for SiCSiC turbine airfoil components, by using advanced coating compositions and processing, in conjunction with mechanical and environment testing and durability validations. The coating-CMC degradations and durability in the laboratory simulated engine fatigue-creep and complex operating environments are being addressed. The effects of Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) from road sand or volcano-ash deposits on the degradation mechanisms of the environmental barrier coating systems will be discussed. The results help understand the advanced EBC-CMC system performance, aiming at the durability improvements of more robust, prime-reliant environmental barrier coatings for successful applications of the component technologies and lifing methodologies.

  5. Carbohydrate base co-polymers as an efficient immobilization matrix to enhance lipase activity for potential biocatalytic applications.

    PubMed

    Badgujar, Kirtikumar Chandulal; Bhanage, Bhalchandra Mahadeo

    2015-12-10

    In the present study, we have synthesized biocompatible hybrid blend of cellulosic polymers of hydroxypropyl-methyl-cellulose (HPMC) and chitosan (CHY) for the immobilization of Candida rugosa lipase (CRL). The immobilized biocatalyst HPMC:CHY:CRL was subjected for characterization such as SEM, TGA, water content analysis, lipase activity, specific activity and protein content analysis. The kinetic parameter study (Rmax/Km) demonstrated improved biocatalytic activity of lipase after immobilization on carbohydrate co-polymers of HPMC:CHY. This biocatalyst was then employed to study practical biocatalytic applications for kinetic resolution which provided 50% conversion and >94% enantiomeric excess of substrate/product (ees/eep). The protocol demonstrated excellent recyclability upto five cycles. Finally, we studied influence of immobilization on cellulosic polymers for substrate, structure and reactivity for kinetic resolution. Hence, we investigated R0 (initial reaction rate), E-value (enantioselectivity) and Ea (activation energy). This study confirms that, lipase immobilized on carbohydrate polymers had 3-4 folds higher biocatalytic activity as compared to crude CRL. PMID:26428176

  6. Recent advances in solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell technology with low platinum loading electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Manko, David J.; Koch, Hermann; Enayetullah, Mohammad A.; Appleby, A. John

    1989-01-01

    Of all the fuel cell systems only alkaline and solid polymer electrolyte fuel cells are capable of achieving high power densities (greater than 1 W/sq cm) required for terrestrial and extraterrestrial applications. Electrode kinetic criteria for attaining such high power densities are discussed. Attainment of high power densities in solid polymer electrolyte fuel cells has been demonstrated earlier by different groups using high platinum loading electrodes (4 mg/sq cm). Recent works at Los Alamos National Laboratory and at Texas A and M University (TAMU) demonstrated similar performance for solid polymer electrolyte fuel cells with ten times lower platinum loading (0.45 mg/sq cm) in the electrodes. Some of the results obtained are discussed in terms of the effects of type and thickness of membrane and of the methods platinum localization in the electrodes on the performance of a single cell.

  7. Efficient upconversion polymer-inorganic nanocomposite thin film emitters prepared by the double beam matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (DB-MAPLE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwish, Abdalla M.; Burkett, Allan; Blackwell, Ashley; Taylor, Keylantra; Walker, Vernell; Sarkisov, Sergey; Koplitz, Brent

    2014-09-01

    We report on fabrication and investigation of optical and morphological properties of highly efficient (a quantum yield of 1%) upconversion polymer-inorganic nanocomposite thin film emitters prepared by the new technique of double beam matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (DB-MAPLE). Polymer poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) host was evaporated on a silicon substrate using a 1064-nm pulsed laser beam using a target made of frozen (to the temperature of liquid nitrogen) solution of PMMA in chlorobenzene. Concurrently, the second 532-nm pulsed beam from the same laser was used to impregnate the polymer host with the inorganic nanoparticulate made of the rare earth upconversion compounds NaYF4: Yb3+, Er3+, NaYF4: Yb3+, Ho3+, and NaYF4: Yb3+, Tm3+. The compounds were initially synthesized using the wet process, baked, and compressed in solid pellet targets. The proposed DB-MAPLE method has the advantage of making highly homogeneous nanocomposite films with precise control of the doping rate due to the optimized overlapping of the plumes produced by the ablation of the organic and inorganic target with the infrared and visible laser beams respectively. X-ray diffraction, electron and atomic force microscopy, and optical fluorescence spectroscopy indicated that the inorganic nanoparticulate preserved its crystalline structure and upconversion properties (strong emission in green, red, and blue bands upon illumination with 980-nm laser diode) after being transferred from the target in the polymer nanocomposite film. The produced films can be used in applications varying from the efficiency enhancement of the photovoltaic cells, optical sensors and biomarkers to anti-counterfeit labels.

  8. Threaded molecular wires as building blocks for advanced polymer blends: WPLEDs, ultra-broadband optical amplifiers, multi color lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovelli, Sergio; Mroz, Marta; Sforazzini, Giuseppe; Virgili, Tersilla; Meinardi, Franco; Paleari, Alberto; Anderson, Harry L.; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Cacialli, Franco

    2011-03-01

    The ability to produce semiconducting polymer blends with white emission spectra, large emission cross sections and broad optical gain is critical to their application in white PLEDs, lasers and broadband amplifiers. Cyclodextrin-encapsulation is an effective means of suppressing detrimental intermolecular interactions, and energy transfer (ET) channels in polymer blends, thus enabling fabrication of white-PLEDs. We show that all such properties combine into a high impact photonic application: ultra-broad optical gain and two-color lasing in a binary polyrotaxane blend. We study the ultrafast photophysics of a blend of a conventional and an encapsulated polyfluorene. The morphology is investigated by microRaman imaging, AFM, and fluorescence lifetime microscopy. We ascribe the ultra-broad optical gain (>850 meV), and the simultaneous ASE for both constituents, to the dual effect of reduced polaron formation and suppressed ET. Our results demonstrate that polyrotaxanes could realistically represent the building blocks for advanced polymer blends with highly controlled optical properties, for applications in solid state lightning, lasers and photovoltaic technologies.

  9. MALDI mass spectrometry of biomolecules and synthetic polymers using alkali hexacyanoferrate (II) complexes and glycerol as matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zollner, Peter; Stubiger, Gerald; Schmid, Erich; Pittenauer, Ernst; Allmaier, Gunter

    1997-12-01

    K4[Fe(CN)6]/glycerol and Na4[Fe(CN)6]/glycerol have been investigated as liquid matrix systems for UV-MALDI MS applying a N2 laser. Analyte molecules were detected as sodium or potassium adduct ions and, in the case of proteins, as well as protonated molecular ions. Mass accuracies were comparable to those found with standard solid matrix systems with -0.06 to +0.05% deviation in the reflectron mode and with -0.24 to +0.13% in the linear mode. Useful results could be obtained within a mass range of 15 000 Da for single-charged proteins and 8000 Da for potassium cationized polyethylene glycols. Detection limits were found for hydrophilic compounds in the low picomol range and for lipophilic compounds as triacylglycerols or peracetylated and partially benzylated carbohydrates in the low femtomol range. As shown by scanning electron microscopic investigations, the generation of a thin homogenous matrix layer was essential for a successful mass spectrometric experiment. A very careful cleaning of the target surface with glacial acid prior to matrix deposition improved the formation of such a matrix film that maximum sensitivity as well as good reproducibility of the experiments could be achieved.

  10. Advanced High-Temperature Engine Materials Technology Progresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the Advanced High Temperature Engine Materials Technology Program (HITEMP) at the NASA Lewis Research Center is to generate technology for advanced materials and structural analysis that will increase fuel economy, improve reliability, extend life, and reduce operating costs for 21st century civil propulsion systems. The primary focus is on fan and compressor materials (polymer-matrix composites - PMC's), compressor and turbine materials (superalloys, and metal-matrix and intermetallic-matrix composites - MMC's and IMC's), and turbine materials (ceramic-matrix composites - CMC's). These advanced materials are being developed in-house by Lewis researchers and on grants and contracts.

  11. Development of Resonant Soft X-ray Scattering for Polymer Systems at Advanced Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Hexemer, Alexander; Nasiatka, James; Chan, Elaine; Padmore, Howard

    2010-03-01

    It is envisioned that many polymer applications will rely on the heterogeneous morphologies of polymer blends or block copolymers to yield specific functional properties, such as organic light-emitting diodes and photovoltaics. Over the past few years, it has been strongly demonstrated that scattering at soft x-ray energies near the carbon K-edge yields chemically specific and enhanced contrast, thereby enabling structural studies of heterogeneous polymer films with thicknesses of only tens of nanometers. Resonant soft x-ray scattering (RSoXS) will provide the capability for a high-resolution chemical probe with interfacial sensitivity. We will discuss here the development of a dedicated RSoXS setup at the ALS Beamline 11.0.1, which is an elliptically polarized undulator beamline that covers the energy range of 200-1300 eV. It can accommodate a large variety of thin film samples and scattering geometries, including transmission, specular and off-specular reflection, as well as grazing incidence geometries, that will enable users to study both laterally- and depth-resolved structures. The generality, strength, and ease of RSoXS will have significant and immediate impacts in many areas of polymer science and technology. This will be achieved through systematic, collaborative studies of materials with potentially high impact applications.

  12. Sonochemical deposition of platinum nanoparticles on polymer beads and their transfer on the pore surface of a silica matrix.

    PubMed

    Chave, Tony; Grunenwald, Anthony; Ayral, André; Lacroix-Desmazes, Patrick; Nikitenko, Sergey I

    2013-04-01

    This study reported the sonochemical deposition of platinum on the surface of polystyrene beads (PSBs) and the transfer of obtained Pt nanoparticles into a porous silica matrix using the PSB as a sacrificial template. Platinum nanoparticle deposition was ensured by the sonochemical reduction of Pt(IV) at room temperature in latex solutions containing polystyrene beads in the presence of formic acid under Ar or under Ar/CO atmosphere without any additives. After ultrasonic treatments for few hours, well dispersed Pt nanoparticles within the range of 3-5 nm deposited on PSB were obtained in both studied conditions. Samples were then mixed with TEOS, dried, and heated at 450°C to ensure the PSB removal from the silica matrix. TEM and SEM results clearly show that final silica pore size is within the same order of magnitude than initial PSB. Finally, platinum decorated silica matrix with chosen pore sizes was successfully prepared.

  13. Cross-linked κ-carrageenan polymer/zinc nanoporous composite matrix for expanded bed application: Fabrication and hydrodynamic characterization.

    PubMed

    Mohsenkhani, Sadaf; Jahanshahi, Mohsen; Rahimpour, Ahmad

    2015-08-21

    Expanded bed adsorption (EBA) is a reliable separation technique for the purification of bioproducts from complex feedstocks. The specifically designed adsorbent is necessary to form a stable expanded bed. In the present work, a novel custom-designed composite matrix has been prepared through the method of water-in-oil emulsification. In order to develop an adsorbent with desirable qualities and reduce the costs, κ-carrageenan and zinc powder were used as the polymeric skeleton and the densifier, respectively. The prepared composite matrix was named as KC-Zn. Optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were applied to characterize the morphology and structure of prepared composite matrix. These analyses approved good spherical shape and porous structure with nano-scale pores in the range of about 60-180nm. The results from the particle size analyzer (PSA) revealed that all the KC-Zn beads followed logarithmic normal size distribution with the range of 50-350μm and average diameter of 160-230μm, respectively. Main physical properties of KC-Zn matrices were measured as a function of zinc powder ratio to κ-carrageenan slurry, which showed an appropriate wet density in the range of 1.39-2.27g/ml, water content of 72.67-36.41% and porosity of 98.07-80.24%, respectively. The effects of matrix density and liquid phase viscosity on hydrodynamic behavior of prepared matrix have been investigated by residence time distribution (RTD) experiments in an expanded bed. The results indicated that in a constant liquid velocity as the matrix density was increased, the expansion factor of bed decreased and the axial mixing coefficient increased. Moreover, an enhancement in the fluid viscosity led to an increase in the bed expansion and a decrease in the stability of expanded bed. Therefore using a matrix with higher density seems necessary to face viscous feedstocks. All the results demonstrated that proper physical properties and hydrodynamic characteristics

  14. Parmacokinetic evaluation of ibuprofen controlled release matrix tablets using hydrophilic Eudragit® polymer and co-excipients.

    PubMed

    Bakhsh, Sattar; Khan, Gul Majid; Menaa, Farid; Khan, Barkat Ali

    2015-09-01

    The present study was conducted to formulate controlled release dosage forms containing Ibuprofen with Eudragit® S 100 polymer. The tablets were formulated at three different ratios with the polymer to investigate the effect of different concentrations of polymer on in vitro drug release patterns/kinetics and in vivo absorption/pharmacokinetics. Pre-formulation studies were conducted including bulk density, tapped density, compressibility index, Hausner ratio and angle of repose. In vitro studies were conducted using phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) as dissolution medium. In vivo performance was evaluated using albino rabbits. Physico-chemical characteristics (i.e. dimensional tests, weight variation, hardness, friability and drug content determination) fell in the USP acceptable limits. The compressibility index was found to range between 12.02 ± 0.01% and 18.66 ± 0.03%, the Hausner ratio varied between 1.02 ± 0.01 and 1.19 ± 0.10 and the angle of repose ranged from 15.19 ± 0.01 to 24.52 ± 0.10, all indicating better flow properties than the bulk-reference standard. Both bulk and tapped densities also fell in the USP acceptable range. Ibuprofen market tablets showed Tmax of 2.1 ± 0.4h, which was significantly (P-value <0.05) lower compared to that of the reference standard (i.e. 4.09 ± 1.3h). Ibuprofen test formulation has a half-life (t1/2) of 16.9 ± 2.5h, which was significantly (P-value<0.001) higher compared to that of the reference standard (i.e. 9.23 ± 2.9h). Eudragit® S 100 polymers can be used efficiently to develop directly compressed prolonged release tablets.

  15. Advanced ceramic matrix composite materials for current and future propulsion technology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, S.; Beyer, S.; Knabe, H.; Immich, H.; Meistring, R.; Gessler, A.

    2004-08-01

    Current rocket engines, due to their method of construction, the materials used and the extreme loads to which they are subjected, feature a limited number of load cycles. Various technology programmes in Europe are concerned, besides developing reliable and rugged, low cost, throwaway equipment, with preparing for future reusable propulsion technologies. One of the key roles for realizing reusable engine components is the use of modern and innovative materials. One of the key technologies which concern various engine manufacturers worldwide is the development of fibre-reinforced ceramics—ceramic matrix composites. The advantages for the developers are obvious—the low specific weight, the high specific strength over a large temperature range, and their great damage tolerance compared to monolithic ceramics make this material class extremely interesting as a construction material. Over the past years, the Astrium company (formerly DASA) has, together with various partners, worked intensively on developing components for hypersonic engines and liquid rocket propulsion systems. In the year 2000, various hot-firing tests with subscale (scale 1:5) and full-scale nozzle extensions were conducted. In this year, a further decisive milestone was achieved in the sector of small thrusters, and long-term tests served to demonstrate the extraordinary stability of the C/SiC material. Besides developing and testing radiation-cooled nozzle components and small-thruster combustion chambers, Astrium worked on the preliminary development of actively cooled structures for future reusable propulsion systems. In order to get one step nearer to this objective, the development of a new fibre composite was commenced within the framework of a regionally sponsored programme. The objective here is to create multidirectional (3D) textile structures combined with a cost-effective infiltration process. Besides material and process development, the project also encompasses the development of

  16. Relationship between Surface Properties and In Vitro Drug Release from a Compressed Matrix Containing an Amphiphilic Polymer Material.

    PubMed

    Yarce, Cristhian J; Pineda, Diego; Correa, Clara E; Salamanca, Constain H

    2016-01-01

    The performance of compressed tablet drug delivery systems made using polymeric materials depend on multiple factors, such as surface properties like contact angle, surface free energy and water absorption rate, besides the release mechanisms driven by the kind of polymer used. Hence, it should be possible to establish a relationship between the surface properties and the drug release kinetics. Compressed tablets with different proportions of poly(maleic acid-alt-octadecene) potassium salt (0%, 10%, 20%, 30% and 40%) were prepared. Blends of a model drug (ampicillin trihydrate) and the polymer material were analyzed by DSC. The surface properties of the tablets were determined by the sessile drop method, while the surface energy was determined using the semi-empirical Young-Dupre, Neumann and OWRK models. The release profiles were determined simulating in vitro conditions (buffer solutions pH 1.2 and pH 7.4 with ionic strength of 1.5 M at 37 °C (310.15 K)). A kinetic analysis of the dissolution profiles using different models (zero order, first order, Higuchi and Korsmeyer-Peppas) was realized. The results showed a significant effect of the proportion of polymer in both the surface properties of the tablets and the dissolution release, indicating a relationship between the kinetic and thermodynamic properties. PMID:27347979

  17. Relationship between Surface Properties and In Vitro Drug Release from a Compressed Matrix Containing an Amphiphilic Polymer Material

    PubMed Central

    Yarce, Cristhian J.; Pineda, Diego; Correa, Clara E.; Salamanca, Constain H.

    2016-01-01

    The performance of compressed tablet drug delivery systems made using polymeric materials depend on multiple factors, such as surface properties like contact angle, surface free energy and water absorption rate, besides the release mechanisms driven by the kind of polymer used. Hence, it should be possible to establish a relationship between the surface properties and the drug release kinetics. Compressed tablets with different proportions of poly(maleic acid-alt-octadecene) potassium salt (0%, 10%, 20%, 30% and 40%) were prepared. Blends of a model drug (ampicillin trihydrate) and the polymer material were analyzed by DSC. The surface properties of the tablets were determined by the sessile drop method, while the surface energy was determined using the semi-empirical Young-Dupre, Neumann and OWRK models. The release profiles were determined simulating in vitro conditions (buffer solutions pH 1.2 and pH 7.4 with ionic strength of 1.5 M at 37 °C (310.15 K)). A kinetic analysis of the dissolution profiles using different models (zero order, first order, Higuchi and Korsmeyer-Peppas) was realized. The results showed a significant effect of the proportion of polymer in both the surface properties of the tablets and the dissolution release, indicating a relationship between the kinetic and thermodynamic properties. PMID:27347979

  18. Thermosetting polyimide resin matrix composites with interpenetrating polymer networks for precision foil resistor chips based on special mechanical performance requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. Y.; Ma, J. X.; Li, C. G.; Wang, H. X.

    2014-04-01

    Based on interpenetrating networks (IPNs) different macromolecular materials such as epoxy, phenolic, and silicone resin were chosen to modify thermosetting polyimide (TSPI) resin to solve the lack of performance when used for protecting precision foil resistor chips. Copolymerization modification, controlled at curing stage, was used to prepare TSPI composites considering both performance and process requirements. The mechanical properties related to trimming process were mainly studied due to the special requirements of the regularity of scratch edges caused by a tungsten needle. The analysis on scratch edges reveals that the generation and propagation of microcracks caused by scratching together with crack closure effect may lead to regular scratch traces. Experiments show that the elongation at break of TSPI composites is the main reason that determines the special mechanical properties. The desired candidate materials should have proper hardness and toughness, and the specific mechanical data are that the mean elongation at break and tensile strength of polymer materials are in the range of 9.2-10.4% and 100-107 MPa, respectively. Possible reasons for the effect of the modifiers chosen on TSPI polymers, the reaction mechanisms on modified TSPI resin and the IPN structure in TSPI composite polymers were discussed based on IR and TG analysis.

  19. Relationship between Surface Properties and In Vitro Drug Release from a Compressed Matrix Containing an Amphiphilic Polymer Material.

    PubMed

    Yarce, Cristhian J; Pineda, Diego; Correa, Clara E; Salamanca, Constain H

    2016-06-24

    The performance of compressed tablet drug delivery systems made using polymeric materials depend on multiple factors, such as surface properties like contact angle, surface free energy and water absorption rate, besides the release mechanisms driven by the kind of polymer used. Hence, it should be possible to establish a relationship between the surface properties and the drug release kinetics. Compressed tablets with different proportions of poly(maleic acid-alt-octadecene) potassium salt (0%, 10%, 20%, 30% and 40%) were prepared. Blends of a model drug (ampicillin trihydrate) and the polymer material were analyzed by DSC. The surface properties of the tablets were determined by the sessile drop method, while the surface energy was determined using the semi-empirical Young-Dupre, Neumann and OWRK models. The release profiles were determined simulating in vitro conditions (buffer solutions pH 1.2 and pH 7.4 with ionic strength of 1.5 M at 37 °C (310.15 K)). A kinetic analysis of the dissolution profiles using different models (zero order, first order, Higuchi and Korsmeyer-Peppas) was realized. The results showed a significant effect of the proportion of polymer in both the surface properties of the tablets and the dissolution release, indicating a relationship between the kinetic and thermodynamic properties.

  20. Li(+)-conductive polymer-embedded nano-Si particles as anode material for advanced Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Zeng, Shi; Qian, Jianfeng; Wang, Yadong; Cao, Yuliang; Yang, Hanxi; Ai, Xinping

    2014-03-12

    Si has been considered as a promising alternative anode for next-generation lithium ion batteries (LIBs), but the commercial application of Si anodes is still limited due to their poor cyclability. In this paper, we propose a new strategy to enhance the long-term cyclability of Si anode by embedding nano-Si particles into a Li(+)-conductive polymer to form a Si/polymer composite with core-shell structure, in which nano-Si cores act as active Li-storage phase and the polymeric matrix serves not only as a strong buffer to accommodate the volume change, but also as a protection barrier to prevent the direct contact of Si surface with electrolyte, so as to maintain the mechanical integrity of Si anode and suppress the repeated destruction and construction of solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) on the Si surface. To realize this strategy, we synthesize a Si/PPP (polyparaphenylene) composite simply by ball-milling the Si nanoparticles with PPP polymer that has n-doping activity. Our experimental results demonstrate that the thus-prepared Si/PPP composite exhibits a high capacity of 3184 mA h g(-1) with an initial coulombic efficiency of 78%, an excellent rate capability with a considerably high capacity of 1670 mA h g(-1) even at a very high rate of 16 A g(-1), and a long-term cyclability with 60% capacity retention over 400 cycles, showing a great prospect for battery application. In addition, this structural design could be adopted to other Li-storable metals or alloys for developing cycle-stable anode materials for Li-ion batteries.

  1. Identification of transformation products during advanced oxidation of diatrizoate: Effect of water matrix and oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Azerrad, Sara P; Lütke Eversloh, Christian; Gilboa, Maayan; Schulz, Manoj; Ternes, Thomas; Dosoretz, Carlos G

    2016-10-15

    Removal of micropollutants from reverse osmosis (RO) brines of wastewater desalination by oxidation processes is influenced by the scavenging capacity of brines components, resulting in the accumulation of transformation products (TPs) rather than complete mineralization. In this work the iodinated contrast media diatrizoate (DTZ) was used as model compound due to its relative resistance to oxidation. Identification of TPs was performed in ultrapure water (UPW) and RO brines applying nonthermal plasma (NTP) and UVA-TiO2 as oxidation techniques. The influence of main RO brines components in the formation and accumulation of TPs, such as chloride, bicarbonate alkalinity and humic acid, was also studied during UVA-TiO2. DTZ oxidation pattern in UPW resulted similar in both UVA-TiO2 and NTP achieving 66 and 61% transformation, respectively. However, DTZ transformation in RO brines was markedly lower in UVA-TiO2 (9%) than in NTP (27%). These differences can be attributed to the synergic effect of RO brines components during NTP. Moreover, reactive species other than hydroxyl radical contributed to DTZ transformation, i.e., direct photolysis in UVA-TiO2 and direct photolysis + O3 in NTP accounted for 16 and 23%, respectively. DTZ transformation led to iodide formation in both oxidation techniques but it further oxidized to iodate by ozone in NTP. In total 14 transformation products were identified in UPW of which 3 were present only in UVA-TiO2 and 2 were present exclusively in NTP; 5 of the 14 TPs were absent in RO brines. Five of them were new and were denoted as TP-474A/B, TP-522, TP-586, TP-602, TP-628. TP-522 (mono-chlorinated) was elucidated only in presence of high chloride titer-synthetic water matrix in NTP, most probably formed by active chlorine species generated in situ. TPs accumulation in RO brines was markedly different in comparison to UPW. This denotes the influence of RO brines components in the formation of reactive species that could further attack

  2. Identification of transformation products during advanced oxidation of diatrizoate: Effect of water matrix and oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Azerrad, Sara P; Lütke Eversloh, Christian; Gilboa, Maayan; Schulz, Manoj; Ternes, Thomas; Dosoretz, Carlos G

    2016-10-15

    Removal of micropollutants from reverse osmosis (RO) brines of wastewater desalination by oxidation processes is influenced by the scavenging capacity of brines components, resulting in the accumulation of transformation products (TPs) rather than complete mineralization. In this work the iodinated contrast media diatrizoate (DTZ) was used as model compound due to its relative resistance to oxidation. Identification of TPs was performed in ultrapure water (UPW) and RO brines applying nonthermal plasma (NTP) and UVA-TiO2 as oxidation techniques. The influence of main RO brines components in the formation and accumulation of TPs, such as chloride, bicarbonate alkalinity and humic acid, was also studied during UVA-TiO2. DTZ oxidation pattern in UPW resulted similar in both UVA-TiO2 and NTP achieving 66 and 61% transformation, respectively. However, DTZ transformation in RO brines was markedly lower in UVA-TiO2 (9%) than in NTP (27%). These differences can be attributed to the synergic effect of RO brines components during NTP. Moreover, reactive species other than hydroxyl radical contributed to DTZ transformation, i.e., direct photolysis in UVA-TiO2 and direct photolysis + O3 in NTP accounted for 16 and 23%, respectively. DTZ transformation led to iodide formation in both oxidation techniques but it further oxidized to iodate by ozone in NTP. In total 14 transformation products were identified in UPW of which 3 were present only in UVA-TiO2 and 2 were present exclusively in NTP; 5 of the 14 TPs were absent in RO brines. Five of them were new and were denoted as TP-474A/B, TP-522, TP-586, TP-602, TP-628. TP-522 (mono-chlorinated) was elucidated only in presence of high chloride titer-synthetic water matrix in NTP, most probably formed by active chlorine species generated in situ. TPs accumulation in RO brines was markedly different in comparison to UPW. This denotes the influence of RO brines components in the formation of reactive species that could further attack

  3. Advanced polymer-inorganic hybrid hard coatings utilizing in situ polymerization method.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Toshihiko; Nishiura, Katsunori; Mizuta, Yasushi; Itou, Yuichi

    2006-12-01

    Hard coatings are frequently used to give plastics high scratch resistance. Coating hardness and adhesion to the substrate are considered to be key factors influencing scratch resistance, but it is difficult to produce coatings that have both properties. Hybridization of polymers and inorganic materials is a promising approach for solving this problem. We prepared polymer-silica hybrid coatings by using in situ polymerization to carry out radical polymerization of vinyl monomers in a sol-gel solution of alkoxysilanes, and measured the abrasion resistance of the coatings. However, the expected properties were not obtained because the sol-gel reaction did not perfectly proceed on the surface of the coatings under the N2 conditions. We found that curing the hybrid coatings by UV irradiation in air promoted the sol-gel reaction on the surface, resulting in coatings having excellent abrasion resistance.

  4. Cellular ferroelectrets for electroactive polymer hybrid systems: soft matter integrated devices with advanced functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwödiauer, Reinhard; Graz, Ingrid; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Keplinger, Christoph; Bartu, Petr; Buchberger, Gerda; Ortwein, Christoph; Bauer, Siegfried

    2008-03-01

    Thin polymer foams with a closed cell void-structure can be internally charged by silent or partial discharges within the voids. The resulting material, which carries positive and negative charges on the internal void surfaces is called a ferroelectret. Ferroelectrets behave like typical ferroelectrics, hence they provide a novel class of ferroic materials. The soft foams are strongly piezoelectric in the 3-direction, but show negligible piezoelectric response in the transverse direction. This, together with a very low pyroelectric coefficient, make ferroelectrets highly suitable for flexible electroactive transducer element which can be integrated in thin bendable organic electronic devices. Here we describe some fundamental characteristics of cellular ferroelectrets and present a number of promising examples for a possible combination with various functional polymer systems. Our examples focus on flexible ferroelectret field-effect transistor systems for large-area sensor skins and microphones, flexible large-array position detectors (touchpad), and stretchable large-array pressure sensors.

  5. Fibre prestressed composites: A study of the influences of fibre prestressing on the mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motahhari, Siamak

    1998-12-01

    the fibre prestressed composites were a linear, increasing function of the prestressing level. Furthermore, a new method was introduced to measure the shrinkage of the polymeric resins. By the use of this method, the shrinkage of the epoxy resin was measured for the three curing temperatures, previously used to fabricate the samples. The tests were carried out on the un-reinforced polymer. In the next step, some experiments were arranged to investigate the contribution of the resin shrinkage to the formation of the residual stresses in the reinforced polymer. To achieve this goal, a bi-layer composite-neat polymer bar was made. The residual strain of the polymer was calculated by the measurement of the deflection of the bar. Comparison of the residual strain of the polymer in the bi-layer sample with the shrinkage of the polymer in the un-reinforced sample revealed that only 3.3% of the shrinkage of the resin contributes to form the residual stresses in the bi-layer sample. The stress free temperature of the bi-layer sample, the temperature at which the deflection of the sample disappeared, was determined by re-heating the sample and measuring the deflection of the sample at the same time. This temperature was the point below which the stresses were formed in the composite. The stress free temperature was found to be much lower than the curing temperature which usually was taken as stress free temperature.

  6. Mechanical, Electromagnetic, and X-ray Shielding Characterization of a 3D Printable Tungsten-Polycarbonate Polymer Matrix Composite for Space-Based Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemelya, Corey M.; Rivera, Armando; Perez, Angel Torrado; Rocha, Carmen; Liang, Min; Yu, Xiaoju; Kief, Craig; Alexander, David; Stegeman, James; Xin, Hao; Wicker, Ryan B.; MacDonald, Eric; Roberson, David A.

    2015-08-01

    Material-extrusion three-dimensional (3D) printing has recently attracted much interest because of its process flexibility, rapid response to design alterations, and ability to create structures "on-the-go". For this reason, 3D printing has possible applications in rapid creation of space-based devices, for example cube satellites (CubeSat). This work focused on fabrication and characterization of tungsten-doped polycarbonate polymer matrix composites specifically designed for x-ray radiation-shielding applications. The polycarbonate-tungsten polymer composite obtained intentionally utilizes low loading levels to provide x-ray shielding while limiting effects on other properties of the material, for example weight, electromagnetic functionality, and mechanical strength. The fabrication process, from tungsten functionalization to filament extrusion and material characterization, is described, including printability, determination of x-ray attenuation, tensile strength, impact resistance, and gigahertz permittivity, and failure analysis. The proposed materials are uniquely advantageous when implemented in 3D printed structures, because even a small volume fraction of tungsten has been shown to substantially alter the properties of the resulting composite.

  7. Secreted Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 of Proliferating Smooth Muscle Cells as a Trigger for Drug Release from Stent Surface Polymers in Coronary Arteries.

    PubMed

    Gliesche, Daniel G; Hussner, Janine; Witzigmann, Dominik; Porta, Fabiola; Glatter, Timo; Schmidt, Alexander; Huwyler, Jörg; Meyer Zu Schwabedissen, Henriette E

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading causes of death in industrialized countries. Atherosclerotic coronary arteries are commonly treated with percutaneous transluminal coronary intervention followed by stent deployment. This treatment has significantly improved the clinical outcome. However, triggered vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation leads to in-stent restenosis in bare metal stents. In addition, stent thrombosis is a severe side effect of drug eluting stents due to inhibition of endothelialization. The aim of this study was to develop and test a stent surface polymer, where cytotoxic drugs are covalently conjugated to the surface and released by proteases selectively secreted by proliferating smooth muscle cells. Resting and proliferating human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMC) and endothelial cells (HCAEC) were screened to identify an enzyme exclusively released by proliferating HCASMC. Expression analyses and enzyme activity assays verified selective and exclusive activity of the matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in proliferating HCASMC. The principle of drug release exclusively triggered by proliferating HCASMC was tested using the biodegradable stent surface polymer poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) and the MMP-9 cleavable peptide linkers named SRL and AVR. The specific peptide cleavage by MMP-9 was verified by attachment of the model compound fluorescein. Fluorescein release was observed in the presence of MMP-9 secreting HCASMC but not of proliferating HCAEC. Our findings suggest that cytotoxic drug conjugated polymers can be designed to selectively release the attached compound triggered by MMP-9 secreting smooth muscle cells. This novel concept may be beneficial for stent endothelialization thereby reducing the risk of restenosis and thrombosis.

  8. Environmental Barrier Coating Development for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Recent Advances and Future Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    This presentation briefly reviews the SiC/SiC major environmental and environment-fatigue degradations encountered in simulated turbine combustion environments, and thus NASA environmental barrier coating system evolution for protecting the SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites for meeting the engine performance requirements. The presentation will review several generations of NASA EBC materials systems, EBC-CMC component system technologies for SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite combustors and turbine airfoils, highlighting the temperature capability and durability improvements in simulated engine high heat flux, high pressure, high velocity, and with mechanical creep and fatigue loading conditions. This paper will also focus on the performance requirements and design considerations of environmental barrier coatings for next generation turbine engine applications. The current development emphasis is placed on advanced NASA candidate environmental barrier coating systems for SiC/SiC CMCs, their performance benefits and design limitations in long-term operation and combustion environments. The efforts have been also directed to developing prime-reliant, self-healing 2700F EBC bond coat; and high stability, lower thermal conductivity, and durable EBC top coats. Major technical barriers in developing environmental barrier coating systems, the coating integrations with next generation CMCs having the improved environmental stability, erosion-impact resistance, and long-term fatigue-environment system durability performance will be described. The research and development opportunities for turbine engine environmental barrier coating systems by utilizing improved compositions, state-of-the-art processing methods, and simulated environment testing and durability modeling will be briefly discussed.

  9. A novel promising biomolecule immobilization matrix: synthesis of functional benzimidazole containing conducting polymer and its biosensor applications.

    PubMed

    Uzun, Sema Demirci; Unlu, Naime Akbasoglu; Sendur, Merve; Kanik, Fulya Ekiz; Timur, Suna; Toppare, Levent

    2013-12-01

    In order to construct a robust covalent binding between biomolecule and immobilization platform in biosensor preparation, a novel functional monomer 4-(4,7-di(thiophen-2-yl)-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)benzaldehyde (BIBA) was designed and successfully synthesized. After electropolymerization of this monomer, electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical properties were investigated in detail. To fabricate the desired biosensor, glucose oxidase (GOx) was immobilized as a model enzyme on the polymer coated graphite electrode with the help of glutaraldehyde (GA). During the immobilization step, an imine bond was formed between the free amino groups of enzyme and aldehyde group of polymer. The surface characterization and morphology were investigated to confirm bioconjugation by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at each step of biosensor fabrication. The optimized biosensor shows good linearity between 0.02mM and 1.20mM and a low limit of detection (LOD) of 2.29μM. Kinetic parameters Km(app) and Imax were determined as 0.94mM and 10.91μA, respectively. The biosensor was tested for human blood serum samples.

  10. A novel dispersion method comprising a nucleating agent solubilized in a microemulsion, in polymeric matrix I. Dispersion method and polymer characterization.

    PubMed

    Libster, D; Aserin, A; Garti, N

    2006-07-01

    This is the first of a two-part study focusing on a novel dispersion method which enables increasing the crystallization rate of polypropylene (PP) through the incorporation of nucleating agent HPN-68 into the molten polymer using a microemulsion as a nanovehicle. The cycle time for processing the PP is significantly reduced and thus the effectiveness of its production is increased. Our concept is based on creating an advantage in dispersion capability of the nucleator that is dissolved in a nanoreactor vehicle in comparison with its conventional introduction as a crystalline powder. The microemulsions were introduced to the target PP using a mixer. By the end of the mixing, when the water phase had evaporated, only the nucleator and the surfactant remained in the matrix. The microemulsion components that solubilized the HPN-68 were mineral oil, alcohol, surfactant, and water. DSC results showed a 24% improvement in nucleation efficiency of PP by this method. WAXS results showed that HPN-68 is a gamma-nucleator. It causes polymorphism by significantly raising the gamma-phase concentration in the PP. SEM results showed a four-fold decrease in the PP spherulite size due to the improved dispersion of HPN-68 within the matrix via microemulsion compared to conventional nucleator incorporation. PMID:16554065

  11. A new solid polymer electrolyte incorporating Li10GeP2S12 into a polyethylene oxide matrix for all-solid-state lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanran; Wu, Chuan; Peng, Gang; Chen, Xiaotian; Yao, Xiayin; Bai, Ying; Wu, Feng; Chen, Shaojie; Xu, Xiaoxiong

    2016-01-01

    Li10GeP2S12 (LGPS) is incorporated into polyethylene oxide (PEO) matrix to fabricate composite solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) membranes. The lithium ion conductivities of as-prepared composite membranes are evaluated, and the optimal composite membrane exhibits a maximum ionic conductivity of 1.21 × 10-3 S cm-1 at 80 °C and an electrochemical window of 0-5.7 V. The phase transition behaviors for electrolytes are characterized by DSC, and the possible reasons for their enhanced ionic conductivities are discussed. The LGPS microparticles, acting as active fillers incorporation into the PEO matrix, have a positive effect on the ionic conductivity, lithium ion transference number and electrochemical stabilities. In addition, two kinds of all-solid-state lithium batteries (LiFeO4/SPE/Li and LiCoO2/SPE/Li) are fabricated to demonstrate the good compatibility between this new SPE membrane and different electrodes. And the LiFePO4/Li battery exhibits fascinating electrochemical performance with high capacity retention (92.5% after 50 cycles at 60 °C) and attractive capacities of 158, 148, 138 and 99 mAh g-1 at current rates of 0.1 C, 0.2 C, 0.5 C and 1 C at 60 °C, respectively. It is demonstrated that this new composite SPE should be a promising electrolyte applied in solid state batteries based on lithium metal electrode.

  12. Advanced modeling of polymer non-linear stress relaxation - poly (methylmethacrylate) and polycarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, José R. S.; Cruz Pinto, José J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Sound models of temperature- and strain-dependent non-linear stress relaxation are still lacking. Very recent work has shown that focusing on polymers' local, non-affine, strains and stresses provides an adequate basis for developing such models and accurately predicting experimental stress relaxation moduli, the values of meaningful physical parameters and long time behavior, from experiments spanning only a few hours. A new modeling strategy that explicitly considers such non-affine local stresses and strains was applied to two amorphous polymers - a poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA, and a bisphenol-A polycarbonate, PC. The results support a view of the stress relaxation process where a temperature-dependent, truncated, approximately log-normal distribution of local cooperative (or clustering) transitions are involved, at and above a minimum (or primitive) relaxor size. Within this view, cooperativity (via the average and maximum cluster sizes) increases with decreasing temperatures. Beyond the reasonable agreement with the experiments, the model succeeds in predicting (1) the effect of increases in the fully relaxed modulus, E∞, as in semi-crystalline or strongly cross-linked polymers, (2) the strict inapplicability of time-temperature and strain-time super-positions, (3) an extended, Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts, type of relaxation response, spanning 12 or more time decades, and (4) specific, meaningful, physical parameters: a minimum activation energy (close to those of corresponding β-type transitions), the (occupied + free) volume of the primitive relaxor, and the approximate crossover temperature, Tc, and frequency, νc both of critical importance in condensed matter dynamics. The model also has the potential of incorporating the effect of changes in free volume and allows very fast computations, irrespective of the experimental time scale.

  13. Fabrication of Ruthenium Nanoparticles in Porous Organic Polymers: Towards Advanced Heterogeneous Catalytic Nanoreactors.

    PubMed

    Mondal, John; Kundu, Sudipta K; Hung Ng, Wilson Kwok; Singuru, Ramana; Borah, Parijat; Hirao, Hajime; Zhao, Yanli; Bhaumik, Asim

    2015-12-21

    A novel strategy has been adopted for the construction of a copolymer of benzene-benzylamine-1 (BBA-1), which is a porous organic polymer (POP) with a high BET surface area, through Friedel-Crafts alkylation of benzylamine and benzene by using formaldehyde dimethyl acetal as a cross-linker and anhydrous FeCl3 as a promoter. Ruthenium nanoparticles (Ru NPs) were successfully distributed in the interior cavities of polymers through NaBH4, ethylene glycol, and hydrothermal reduction routes, which delivered Ru-A, Ru-B, and Ru-C materials, respectively, and avoided aggregation of metal NPs. Homogeneous dispersion, the nanoconfinement effect of the polymer, and the oxidation state of Ru NPs were verified by employing TEM, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy mapping, cross polarization magic-angle spinning (13)C NMR spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analytical tools. These three new Ru-based POP materials exhibited excellent catalytic performance in the hydrogenation of nitroarenes at RT (with a reaction time of only ≈ 30 min), with high conversion, selectivity, stability, and recyclability for several catalytic cycles, compared with other traditional materials, such as Ru@C, Ru@SiO2, and Ru@TiO2, but no clear agglomeration or loss of catalytic activity was observed. The high catalytic performance of the ruthenium-based POP materials is due to the synergetic effect of nanoconfinement and electron donation offered by the 3D POP network. DFT calculations showed that hydrogenation of nitrobenzene over the Ru (0001) catalyst surface through a direct reaction pathway is more favorable than that through an indirect reaction pathway.

  14. Fabrication of Ruthenium Nanoparticles in Porous Organic Polymers: Towards Advanced Heterogeneous Catalytic Nanoreactors.

    PubMed

    Mondal, John; Kundu, Sudipta K; Hung Ng, Wilson Kwok; Singuru, Ramana; Borah, Parijat; Hirao, Hajime; Zhao, Yanli; Bhaumik, Asim

    2015-12-21

    A novel strategy has been adopted for the construction of a copolymer of benzene-benzylamine-1 (BBA-1), which is a porous organic polymer (POP) with a high BET surface area, through Friedel-Crafts alkylation of benzylamine and benzene by using formaldehyde dimethyl acetal as a cross-linker and anhydrous FeCl3 as a promoter. Ruthenium nanoparticles (Ru NPs) were successfully distributed in the interior cavities of polymers through NaBH4, ethylene glycol, and hydrothermal reduction routes, which delivered Ru-A, Ru-B, and Ru-C materials, respectively, and avoided aggregation of metal NPs. Homogeneous dispersion, the nanoconfinement effect of the polymer, and the oxidation state of Ru NPs were verified by employing TEM, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy mapping, cross polarization magic-angle spinning (13)C NMR spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analytical tools. These three new Ru-based POP materials exhibited excellent catalytic performance in the hydrogenation of nitroarenes at RT (with a reaction time of only ≈ 30 min), with high conversion, selectivity, stability, and recyclability for several catalytic cycles, compared with other traditional materials, such as Ru@C, Ru@SiO2, and Ru@TiO2, but no clear agglomeration or loss of catalytic activity was observed. The high catalytic performance of the ruthenium-based POP materials is due to the synergetic effect of nanoconfinement and electron donation offered by the 3D POP network. DFT calculations showed that hydrogenation of nitrobenzene over the Ru (0001) catalyst surface through a direct reaction pathway is more favorable than that through an indirect reaction pathway. PMID:26572500

  15. Photo-Curable Polymer Blend Dielectrics for Advancing Organic Field-Effect Transistor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    S Kim; K Hong; M Jang; J Jang; J Anthony; H Yang; C Park

    2011-12-31

    A solution method of photo-curable and -patternable polymer gate dielectrics was introduced by using blend solutions of poly(4-dimethylsilyl styrene) (PDMSS) and poly(melamine-co-formaldehyde) acrylate (PMFA). The fabrication was optimized to produce a smooth hydrophobic gate dielectric with good insulating and solvent-resistant properties. On the optimized PDMSS/PMFA blend gate dielectric, pentacene could grow into highly ordered structure, showing high electric performances for the resulting OFETs, as well as PTCDI-C13 and TES-ADT.

  16. Hot Melt Extruded Amorphous Solid Dispersion of Posaconazole with Improved Bioavailability: Investigating Drug-Polymer Miscibility with Advanced Characterisation

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Purnima

    2014-01-01

    Invasive antifungal infections are reasons for morbidity and mortality in immunogenic patients worldwide. Posaconazole is a most promising antifungal agent against all types of invasive infections with high % of cure rate. The marketed suspension formulation has low bioavailability and is needed to be taken with food. In this paper, PCZ hot melt extruded amorphous solid dispersion (SD) with immediate release and improved bioavailability was prepared using Soluplus (Sol) as primary carrier for solubilization. Surfactants such as PEG 400, Lutrol F27, Lutrol F68, and TPGS are also used in combination with Soluplus to improve the physicochemical performance of the formulation when it comes in contact with GI (gastrointestinal) fluid. Drug-polymer miscibility of SD was investigated using advanced techniques. In the in vivo study, the AUC(0–72) and Cmax of PCZ/Soluplus were 11.5 and 11.74 time higher than those of pure PCZ. The formulation of the extrudate SD had an AUC(0–72) and Cmax higher than those with the commercial capsule (Noxafil). Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies were carried out using in silico molecular modelling to understand the drug-polymer intermolecular behaviour. The results of this research ensure enhanced dissolution and bioavailability of the solid dispersion of PCZ prepared by HME compared with the PCZ suspension. PMID:25143935

  17. Hot melt extruded amorphous solid dispersion of posaconazole with improved bioavailability: investigating drug-polymer miscibility with advanced characterisation.

    PubMed

    Fule, Ritesh; Amin, Purnima

    2014-01-01

    Invasive antifungal infections are reasons for morbidity and mortality in immunogenic patients worldwide. Posaconazole is a most promising antifungal agent against all types of invasive infections with high % of cure rate. The marketed suspension formulation has low bioavailability and is needed to be taken with food. In this paper, PCZ hot melt extruded amorphous solid dispersion (SD) with immediate release and improved bioavailability was prepared using Soluplus (Sol) as primary carrier for solubilization. Surfactants such as PEG 400, Lutrol F27, Lutrol F68, and TPGS are also used in combination with Soluplus to improve the physicochemical performance of the formulation when it comes in contact with GI (gastrointestinal) fluid. Drug-polymer miscibility of SD was investigated using advanced techniques. In the in vivo study, the AUC(0-72) and C(max) of PCZ/Soluplus were 11.5 and 11.74 time higher than those of pure PCZ. The formulation of the extrudate SD had an AUC(0-72) and C(max) higher than those with the commercial capsule (Noxafil). Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies were carried out using in silico molecular modelling to understand the drug-polymer intermolecular behaviour. The results of this research ensure enhanced dissolution and bioavailability of the solid dispersion of PCZ prepared by HME compared with the PCZ suspension.

  18. Engineered glycated amino dendritic polymers as specific nonviral gene delivery vectors targeting the receptor for advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Giron-Gonzalez, M Dolores; Morales-Portillo, Arturo; Salinas-Castillo, Alfonso; Lopez-Jaramillo, F Javier; Hernandez-Mateo, Fernando; Santoyo-Gonzalez, Francisco; Salto-Gonzalez, Rafael

    2014-06-18

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is involved in diabetes or angiogenesis in tumors. Under pathological conditions, RAGE is overexpressed and upon ligand binding and internalization stimulates signaling pathways that promote cell proliferation. In this work, amino dendritic polymers PEI 25 kDa and alkylated derivatives of PAMAM-G2 were engineered by the nonenzymatic Maillard glycation reaction to generate novel AGE-containing gene delivery vectors targeting the RAGE. The glycated dendritic polymers were easily prepared and retained the capability to bind and protect DNA from endonucleases. Furthermore, while glycation decreased the transfection efficiency of the dendriplexes in CHO-k1 cells which do not express RAGE, glycated dendriplexes acted as efficient transfection reagents in CHO-k1 cells which stably express recombinant RAGE. In addition, preincubation with BSA-AGEs, a natural ligand of the RAGE, or dansyl cadaverine, an inhibitor of the RAGE internalization, blocked transfection, confirming their specificity toward RAGE. The results were confirmed in NRK and RAW264.7 cell lines, which naturally express the receptor. The glycated compounds retain their transfection efficiency in the presence of serum and promote in vivo transfection in a mouse model. Accordingly, RAGE is a suitable molecular target for the development of site-directed engineered glycated nonviral gene vectors.

  19. Colorless, transparent, dye-doped polymer films exhibiting tunable luminescence color: controlling the dual-color luminescence of 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine derivatives with the surrounding matrix.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Shintaro; Shono, Hideaki; Mutai, Toshiki; Araki, Koji

    2014-09-24

    Colorless, transparent, polymer films including 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine (HPIP) derivatives, 1 and 2, are prepared by a spin-coating method. The observed emission spectra upon photoexcitation of these polymer films were composed of dual emission bands: the normal luminescence at 370-410 nm (purple) and the greatly Stokes-shifted emission at 520-580 nm (yellow) assigned as the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) luminescence. Relative intensity of the two emissions varied according to the polymer matrices, resulting in change in the luminescent color of the dye-doped polymer films. Particularly, the luminescence properties of 6-cyano HPIP, 2, are highly susceptible to the surrounding environment, and therefore successfully tuned to produce a wide range of colors, from purple to orange, by changing its concentration within and the type of the polymer matrix. This observation can be ascribed to the formation of a relatively weak intramolecular hydrogen bond resulting from the electron-withdrawing 6-cyano group. Thus, we demonstrate large variations in emission color can be achieved using interactions of the single component with the surrounding matrix. These results offer promise as a convenient and effective method for a wide-range tuning the luminescence colors of dye-doped polymer films. PMID:25153019

  20. Electro-Optical Behavior of Polymer Cholesteric Liquid Crystal FLake/Fluid Suspensions in a Microencapsulation Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, K.L.; Kimball, E.; McNamara, S.; Kosc, T.Z.; Trajkovska-Petkoska, A.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2004-10-25

    When flakes of polymer cholesteric liquid crystals (PCLC's) are dispersed in a fluid host and subjected to an applied electric field, their bright, polarization-selective reflection color is extinguished as they undergo field-induced rotation. Maxwell-Wagner (interfacial) polarization is the underlying physical mechanism for flake motion and results from the large difference in dielectric properties of the flake and fluid hosts. Flake reorientation times can be as short as 300 ms to 400 ms at exceedingly low driving fields (10 to 100 mVrms/um) and are dependent on flake size and shape, fluid host dielectric constant and viscosity, and drive-field frequency and magnitude. These attributes make this new materials system of special interest in electro-optical and photonics applications, where reflective-mode operation, polarization selectivity, and low power consumption are of critical importance (e.g., reflective displays).

  1. Investigation on mineralization behaviour of Type I collagen and noncollageneous extracellular matrix protein immobilized on polymer thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ba, Xiaolan; Kristal, Ariella; Dimisi, Elaine; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2009-03-01

    The effects of the components of extracellular matrix on the bone formation and the kinetics of crystal growth of calcium phosphate have remained unknown. Here we reported a method to investigate the role of Type I collagen and the interactions with other ECM proteins such as fibronectin and elastin during biomineralization process. The early stage of mineralization was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and shear modulation force microscopy (SMFM). The late stage of mineralization was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), grazing incident x-ray diffraction (GIXD). The results showed the calcium phosphate biomineralization only occurred when the collagen interacted with fibronectin or elastin.

  2. Conductive Polymer-Coated VS4 Submicrospheres As Advanced Electrode Materials in Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanli; Li, Yanlu; Yang, Jing; Tian, Jian; Xu, Huayun; Yang, Jian; Fan, Weiliu

    2016-07-27

    VS4 as an electrode material in lithium-ion batteries holds intriguing features like high content of sulfur and one-dimensional structure, inspiring the exploration in this field. Herein, VS4 submicrospheres have been synthesized via a simple solvothermal reaction. However, they quickly degrade upon cycling as an anode material in lithium-ion batteries. So, three conductive polymers, polythiophene (PEDOT), polypyrrole (PPY), and polyaniline (PANI), are coated on the surface to improve the electron conductivity, suppress the diffusion of polysulfides, and modify the interface between electrode/electrolyte. PANI is the best in the polymers. It improves the Coulombic efficiency to 86% for the first cycle and keeps the specific capacity at 755 mAh g(-1) after 50 cycles, higher than the cases of naked VS4 (100 mAh g(-1)), VS4@PEDOT (318 mAh g(-1)), and VS4@PPY (448 mAh g(-1)). The good performances could be attributed to the improved charge-transfer kinetics and the strong interaction between PANI and VS4 supported by theoretical simulation. The discharge voltage ∼2.0 V makes them promising cathode materials. PMID:27377263

  3. Support for the Advanced Polymers Beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, Benjamin S

    2008-10-01

    The primary focus of the X27C beamline is to investigate frontier polymer science and engineering problems with emphasis on real-time studies of structures, morphologies and dynamics from atomic, nanoscopic, microscopic to mesoscopic scales using simultaneous small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) techniques. The scientific merit of this project is as follows. Currently, many unique sample chambers for in-situ synchrotron studies, developed by the PI (B. Hsiao) and Co-PI (B. Chu), are available for general users of X27C at NSLS. These instruments include a gel/melt spinning apparatus, a continuous fiber drawing apparatus, a tensile stretching apparatus, a high pressure X-ray cell using supercritical carbon dioxide, a parallel plate strain-controlled shear stage and a dynamic rheometer for small-strain oscillatory deformation study. Based on the use of these instruments in combination with synchrotron X-rays, many new insights into the relationships between processing and structure have been obtained in recent years. The broader impact of this project is as follows. The X27C beamline is the first synchrotron facility in the United States dedicated to chemistry/materials research (with emphasis on polymers). The major benefit of this facility to the materials community is that no extensive synchrotron experience and equipment preparation are required from general users to carry out cutting-edge experiments.

  4. Conductive Polymer-Coated VS4 Submicrospheres As Advanced Electrode Materials in Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanli; Li, Yanlu; Yang, Jing; Tian, Jian; Xu, Huayun; Yang, Jian; Fan, Weiliu

    2016-07-27

    VS4 as an electrode material in lithium-ion batteries holds intriguing features like high content of sulfur and one-dimensional structure, inspiring the exploration in this field. Herein, VS4 submicrospheres have been synthesized via a simple solvothermal reaction. However, they quickly degrade upon cycling as an anode material in lithium-ion batteries. So, three conductive polymers, polythiophene (PEDOT), polypyrrole (PPY), and polyaniline (PANI), are coated on the surface to improve the electron conductivity, suppress the diffusion of polysulfides, and modify the interface between electrode/electrolyte. PANI is the best in the polymers. It improves the Coulombic efficiency to 86% for the first cycle and keeps the specific capacity at 755 mAh g(-1) after 50 cycles, higher than the cases of naked VS4 (100 mAh g(-1)), VS4@PEDOT (318 mAh g(-1)), and VS4@PPY (448 mAh g(-1)). The good performances could be attributed to the improved charge-transfer kinetics and the strong interaction between PANI and VS4 supported by theoretical simulation. The discharge voltage ∼2.0 V makes them promising cathode materials.

  5. Multiscale Modeling of Inclusions and Precipitation Hardening in Metal Matrix Composites: Application to Advanced High-Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Askari, Hesam A.; Zbib, Hussein M.; Sun, Xin

    2013-06-30

    In this study, the strengthening effect of inclusions and precipitates in metals is investigated within a multiscale approach that utilizes models at various length scales, namely, Molecular Mechanics (MM), discrete Dislocation Dynamics (DD), and an Eigenstrain Inclusion Method (EIM). Particularly, precipitates are modeled as hardsoft particles whose stress fields interact with dislocations. The stress field resulting from the elastic mismatch between the particles and the matrix is accounted for through the EIM. While the MM method is employed for the purpose of developing rules for DD for short range interaction between a single dislocation and an inclusion, the DD method is used to predict the strength of the composite resulting from the interaction between ensembles of dislocations and particles. As an application to this method, the mechanical behavior of Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS) is investigated and the results are then compared to the experimental data. The results show that the finely dispersive precipitates can strengthen the material by pinning the dislocations up to a certain shear stress and retarding the recovery, as well as annihilation of dislocations. The DD results show that strengthening due to nano sized particles is a function of the density and size of the precipitates. This size effect is then explained using a mechanistic model developed based on dislocation-particle interaction.

  6. An investigation into the drug release from ibuprofen matrix tablets with ethylcellulose and some poly-acrylate polymers.

    PubMed

    Tabandeh, Hosseinali; Mortazavi, Seyed Alireza

    2014-05-01

    This study was performed to achieve sustained-release Ibuprofen matrix tablets with a zero-order release kinetic while most of the previous formulations have shown Higuchi release kinetic. Considering the results from previous studies, ethyl cellulose, Carbopol 934P, Carbopol 974P, and Pemulen TR-1 were used at different amounts for preparation of the tablets by direct compression. The release profiles were studied in a two-stage release test using non-linear regression analysis. Carbopols 934P and 974P could not sustain the release adequately while Pemulen TR-1 had too strong sustaining effect. Therefore, combination formulations were considered and studied. The release profiles of ethyl cellulose formulation and the combination formulation consisting Carbopol 934P and Pemulen TR-1 best fitted in Higuchi model, although the zero-order model was not completely rejected. However, the kinetic model of release from the combination formulation consisting Carbopol 974P and Pemulen TR-1 changed to zero-order indicating the most constant release rate among formulations. This was speculated to be due to some erosion of the gel, as well as some interaction of the hydrophobic chain of Pemulen TR-1 with Ibuprofen. Therefore, this formulation is suggested for directly compressed sustained-release matrix tablets of Ibuprofen with a more constant release rate. PMID:24811808

  7. In vitro Evaluation of the Effect of Combination of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Polymers on Controlled Release Zidovudine Matrix Tablets.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, S; Radhakrishnan, M; Ravi, M; Prasannakumar, B; Kalyani, J

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to prepare and characterize controlled-release matrix tablets of zidovudine using hydrophilic HPMC K4 M or Carbopol 934 alone or in combination with hydrophobic ethyl cellulose. Release kinetics was evaluated by using USP XXIV dissolution apparatus No.2 (paddle) type. Scanning electron microscopy was used to visualize the effect of dissolution medium on matrix tablet surface. The in vitro results of controlled - release zidovudine tablets were compared with conventional marketed tablet Zidovir. The in vitro drug release study revealed that HPMC K4 M or Carbopol 934 preparation was able to sustain the drug release near to 6 hours. Combining HPMC K4 M or Carbopol 934 with ethyl cellulose sustained the drug release for nearly 12 h. The in vitro evaluation showed that the drug release may be by diffusion along with erosion. Results suggest that the developed controlled-release tablets of zidovudine could perform therapeutically better than marketed dosage forms, leading to improve efficacy, controlling the release and better patient compliance. PMID:20046771

  8. Free Radical Addition Polymerization Kinetics without Steady-State Approximations: A Numerical Analysis for the Polymer, Physical, or Advanced Organic Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iler, H. Darrell; Brown, Amber; Landis, Amanda; Schimke, Greg; Peters, George

    2014-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the free radical addition polymerization system is described that provides those teaching polymer, physical, or advanced organic chemistry courses the opportunity to introduce students to numerical methods in the context of a simple but mathematically stiff chemical kinetic system. Numerical analysis can lead students to an…

  9. Utilizing advanced polymerization techniques for simplifying polymer grafting from silica colloidal crystal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerneni, Charu K.

    Polyacrylamide has been well established as a biocompatible material when Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) came into existence in the 1960s. Under aqueous buffer conditions it becomes non-adsorptive to proteins and due to its molecular level pore forming nature could be used in size based biomolecule separations. Since then considerable research has been done to explore the non-adsorptive nature of polyacrylamide on a platform or substrate. Attempts were made to grow polyacrylamide chains from silica as a substrate which can then be used in various protein separation techniques. Based on an ionic polymerization method which was used for gel casting in PAGE, polymers were grown on silica gel. Though considerable thickness could be achieved, polymerization was not just confined to the surface. Therefore a rigid polymer brush layer could not be achieved. Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) method showed the solution to this problem. Polymer brush layers with acceptable thickness could now be achieved for growing polyacrylamide from silica gel. Yet it still suffered from several disadvantages such as the need of an inert atmosphere for polymerization and limited thickness. Many developments have taken place in the past decade which led to improvements in substrate and polymerization methods. This research used non porous sub-micron silica as the substrate and AGET ATRP (Activator generated electron transfer atom transfer radical polymerization) for surface grafting polyacrylamide. Non porous submicron silica has been shown to be a better stationary phase substrate for protein separations than conventional substrates. AGET ATRP enables polymerization to be performed under ambient conditions and in water based solutions which gives thicknesses much higher than conventional ATRP. Data from various analytical techniques showed that within the experimental range the polymerization is linear and has decent control. This means silica nanoparticles coated with

  10. Recent advances in amphiphilic polymers for simultaneous delivery of hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs.

    PubMed

    Martin, Chloe; Aibani, Noorjahan; Callan, John F; Callan, Bridgeen

    2016-01-01

    Nanomedicine has evolved with the use of biological compounds such as proteins, peptides and DNA. These hydrophilic and often highly charged compounds require a delivery system to allow effective transport and release at the site of action. These new biological therapeutics have not replaced the more traditional smaller molecule, but instead are working synergistically to the benefit of the end user. To that end, drug delivery systems are now required to encapsulate both larger hydrophilic compounds as well as the smaller and generally more hydrophobic compound. This review highlights the emerging role in drug delivery of amphiphilic polymers that by their very nature can associate with compounds of differing physicochemical properties, in particular the role of micelles, polymersomes and nanocapsules.

  11. Advanced analysis of optical loss factors in polymers for integrated optics circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosc, D.; Maalouf, A.; Messaad, K.; Mahé, H.; Bodiou, L.

    2013-04-01

    In the context of optical transmission in the polymer integrated waveguides, transmission losses are a limiting factor for the development of such a technology. In this paper, we analyze the different features that cause optical losses namely intrinsic absorption of the material and light scattering in the bulk. This analysis of optical transmissions mainly in the telecom C-band (1530-1565 nm) and O-band (1260-1360 nm) is based on measurements in bulk material and solutions. These allow to assess the limiting level of losses induced by the material itself. The results can give the intensity attenuation resulting from defects induced by the waveguide processing. It results that losses by scattering process can reach 0.1 dB/cm at 1550 nm when samples are filtered at 0.2 μm. It is slightly higher at 1320 nm but probably less than 0.2 dB/cm. Most of the optical losses are then due to the intrinsic absorption and can be around 0.7 dB/cm for PMMA, at 1550 nm. Consequently, in the case of channel singlemode waveguides, the global linear loss is higher at this wavelength, and, the additional losses are brought by imperfections of the channel both in the bulk and on the surface. This article also shows that reducing the level of C-H bonds content of the polymers down to 25 × 10-3 cm-3 the material losses are limiting by scattering and can fall down to around 0.2 dB/cm (at 1550 nm).

  12. Development of advanced catalytic layer based on vertically aligned conductive polymer arrays for thin-film fuel cell electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shangfeng; Yi, Baolian; Cao, Longsheng; Song, Wei; Zhao, Qing; Yu, Hongmei; Shao, Zhigang

    2016-10-01

    The degradation of carbon supports significantly influences the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), particularly in the cathode, which must be overcome for the wide application of fuel cells. In this study, advanced catalytic layer with electronic conductive polymer-polypyrrole (PPy) nanowire as ordered catalyst supports for PEMFCs is prepared. A platinum-palladium (PtPd) catalyst thin layer with whiskerette shapes forms along the long axis of the PPy nanowires. The resulting arrays are hot-pressed on both sides of a Nafion® membrane to construct a membrane electrode assembly (without additional ionomer). The ordered thin catalyst layer (approximately 1.1 μm) is applied in a single cell as the anode and the cathode without additional Nafion® ionomer. The single cell yields a maximum performance of 762.1 mW cm-2 with a low Pt loading (0.241 mg Pt cm-2, anode + cathode). The advanced catalyst layer indicates better mass transfer in high current density than that of commercial Pt/C-based electrode. The mass activity is 1.08-fold greater than that of DOE 2017 target. Thus, the as-prepared electrodes have the potential for application in fuel cells.

  13. Electrospinning of Bioinspired Polymer Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Jose V; Carvalho, Pedro P; Best, Serena M

    2015-01-01

    Electrospinning is a technique used in the production of polymer nanofibre meshes. The use of biodegradable and biocompatible polymers to produce nanofibres that closely mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) of different tissues has opened a wide range of possibilities for the application of electrospinning in Tissue Engineering. It is believed that nano-features (such as voids and surface cues) present in nanofibre mesh scaffolds, combined with the chemical composition of the fibres, can stimulate cell attachment, growth and differentiation. Despite the widespread use of electrospun nanofibres in tissue engineering, the present chapter will focus on the advances made in the utilisation of these materials in bone, cartilage and tooth related applications. Several aspects will be taken into consideration, namely the choice of polymers, the surface modification of the nanofibres in order to achieve mineralisation, and also the biological application of such materials. PMID:26545743

  14. Electrospinning of Bioinspired Polymer Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Jose V; Carvalho, Pedro P; Best, Serena M

    2015-01-01

    Electrospinning is a technique used in the production of polymer nanofibre meshes. The use of biodegradable and biocompatible polymers to produce nanofibres that closely mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) of different tissues has opened a wide range of possibilities for the application of electrospinning in Tissue Engineering. It is believed that nano-features (such as voids and surface cues) present in nanofibre mesh scaffolds, combined with the chemical composition of the fibres, can stimulate cell attachment, growth and differentiation. Despite the widespread use of electrospun nanofibres in tissue engineering, the present chapter will focus on the advances made in the utilisation of these materials in bone, cartilage and tooth related applications. Several aspects will be taken into consideration, namely the choice of polymers, the surface modification of the nanofibres in order to achieve mineralisation, and also the biological application of such materials.

  15. Click Grafting of Alkyne-containing Vinyl Polymers onto Biosynthesized Extracellular Matrix Protein Containing Azide Functionality and Adhesion Control of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Tomoki

    2015-01-01

    In vivo incorporation of a phenylalanine (Phe) analogue, p-azidophenylalanine (p-N3Phe) into an artificial extracellular matrix protein (aECM-CS5-ELF) was accomplished using a bacterial expression host that harbors the mutant phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (PheRS) with an enlarged binding pocket, in which the Ala294Gly/Thr251Gly mutant PheRS (PheRS**) was expressed under the control of T7 promoters. In this study, biosynthesized aECM-CS5-ELF containing p-N3Phe (aECM-CS5-ELF-N3) was coupled with alkyne-containing vinyl polymers prepared via controlled radical polymerization of three vinyl monomers, (styrene, acrylamide, and N-isopropylacrylamide) using a trithiocarbonate as the RAFT agent. Grafting of the vinyl polymers onto the aECM was accomplished via a copper-catalyzed alkyne-azide click reaction. The lower critical transition temperature (LCST) was evaluated, as well as the solubility in aqueous and organic media, which are dependent on the incorporation ratio of p-N3Phe and species of graft chains, in which the LCST behavior was altered remarkably when poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) moieties were attached as side chains. Circular dichroism measurements indicate conformational change was not induced by the grafting. Specific adhesion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) onto the aECM-CS5-ELF-N3-graft-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) composite surface and subsequent temperature-sensitive detachment were also demonstrated. PMID:26294960

  16. Influence of matching solubility parameter of polymer matrix and CNT on electrical conductivity of CNT/rubber composite

    PubMed Central

    Ata, Seisuke; Mizuno, Takaaki; Nishizawa, Ayumi; Subramaniam, Chandramouli; Futaba, Don N.; Hata, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    We report a general approach to fabricate elastomeric composites possessing high electrical conductivity for applications ranging from wireless charging interfaces to stretchable electronics. By using arbitrary nine kinds of rubbers as matrices, we experimentally demonstrate that the matching the solubility parameter of CNTs and the rubber matrix is important to achieve higher electrical conductivity in CNT/rubber composite, resulting in continuous conductive pathways leading to electrical conductivities as high as 15 S/cm with 10 vol% CNT in fluorinated rubber. Further, using thermodynamic considerations, we demonstrate an approach to mix CNTs to arbitrary rubber matrices regardless of solubility parameter of matrices by adding small amounts of fluorinated rubber as a polymeric-compatibilizer of CNTs. We thereby achieved electrical conductivities ranging from 1.2 to 13.8 S/cm (10 vol% CNTs) using nine varieties of rubber matrices differing in chemical structures and physical properties. Finally, we investigated the components of solubility parameter of CNT by using Hansen solubility parameters, these findings may useful for controlling solubility parameter of CNTs. PMID:25434701

  17. Biocomposites based on Argan nut shell and a polymer matrix: Effect of filler content and coupling agent.

    PubMed

    Essabir, Hamid; Bensalah, Mohammed Ouadi; Rodrigue, Denis; Bouhfid, Rachid; Qaiss, Abou El Kacem

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed at developing a biocomposite using polypropylene (PP) as the matrix and Argan nut shell (ANS) as reinforcement. Also, styrene-(ethylene-butene)-styrene triblock copolymer grafted with maleic anhydride (SEBS-g-MA) was used as a coupling agent. The samples were prepared by using extrusion compounding followed by injection molding to determine the effect of filler and coupling agent content on the morphological, thermal, mechanical, and hygroscopic properties of the biocomposites. SEM micrographs revealed that good ANS dispersion/distribution into PP was achieved with an important reduction of fiber pull-out, micro-spaces, and voids with coupling agent addition. This led to substantial improvement intension, torsion, and water absorption reduction due to improved interfacial adhesion. Although ANS particles did not significantly modify the thermal stability of PP, the use of a coupling agent increased it. The experimental data were compared with several theoretical models such Voigt, Reuss, Hirsch, and Tsai-Pagano to characterize the interfacial adhesion quality and to determine the elastic modulus of a single ANS particle. Finally, all the results show that Argan waste to produce PP biocomposites is an interesting avenue to effectively deal with agricultural wastes and develop valuable industrial and practical applications. PMID:27083345

  18. Experimental development of advanced air filtration media based on electrospun polymer fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghochaghi, Negar

    Electrospinning is a process by which polymer fibers can be produced using an electrostatically driven fluid jet. Electrospun fibers can be produced at the micro- or nano-scale and are, therefore, very promising for air filtration applications. However, because electrospun fibers are electrically charged, it is difficult to control the morphology of filtration media. Fiber size, alignment and uniformity are very important factors that affect filter performance. The focus of this project is to understand the relationship between filter morphology and performance and to develop new methods to create filtration media with optimum morphology. This study is divided into three focus areas: unimodal and bimodal microscale fibrous media with aligned, orthogonal and random fiber orientations; unimodal and bimodal nanoscale fibers in random orientations; bimodal micrometer and nanometer fiber media with orthogonally aligned orientations. The results indicate that the most efficient filters, which are those with the highest ratio of particle collection efficiency divided by pressure drop, can be obtained through fabricating filters in orthogonal layers of aligned fibers with two different fiber diameters. Moreover, our results show that increasing the number of layers increases the performance of orthogonally layered fibers. Also, controlling fiber spacing in orthogonally layered micrometer fiber media can be an alternative way to study the filtration performance. Finally, such coatings presented throughout this research study can be designed and placed up-stream, down-stream, and/or in between conventional filters.

  19. Advances in the development of organic polymer monolithic columns and their applications in food analysis--a review.

    PubMed

    Jandera, Pavel

    2013-10-25

    Monolithic continuous separation media are gradually finding their way to sample pre-treatment, isolation, enrichment and final analytical separations of a plethora of compounds, occurring as food components, additives or contaminants, including pharmaceuticals, pesticides and toxins, which have traditionally been the domain of particulate chromatographic materials. In the present review, recent advances in the technology of monolithic columns and the applications in food analysis are addressed. Silica-based monoliths are excellent substitutes to conventional particle-packed columns, improving the speed of analysis for low-molecular weight compounds, due to their excellent efficiency and high permeability. These properties have been recently appreciated in two-dimensional HPLC, where the performance in the second dimension is of crucial importance. Organic-polymer monoliths in various formats provide excellent separations of biopolymers. Thin monolithic disks or rod columns are widely employed in isolation, purification and pre-treatment of sample containing proteins, peptides or nucleic acid fragments. Monolithic capillaries were originally intended for use in electrochromatography, but are becoming more frequently used for capillary and micro-HPLC. Monoliths are ideal highly porous support media for immobilization or imprinting template molecules, to provide sorbents for shape-selective isolation of target molecules from various matrices occurring in food analysis. The separation efficiency of organic polymer monoliths for small molecules can be significantly improved by optimization of polymerization approach, or by post-polymerization modification. This will enable full utilization of a large variety of available monomers to prepare monoliths with chemistry matching the needs of selectivity of separations of various food samples containing even very polar or ionized compounds.

  20. Multi-Length Scale-Enriched Continuum-Level Material Model for Kevlar®-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Pandurangan, B.; Snipes, J. S.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2013-03-01

    Fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composite materials display quite complex deformation and failure behavior under ballistic/blast impact loading conditions. This complexity is generally attributed to a number of factors such as (a) hierarchical/multi-length scale architecture of the material microstructure; (b) nonlinear, rate-dependent and often pressure-sensitive mechanical response; and (c) the interplay of various intrinsic phenomena and processes such as fiber twisting, interfiber friction/sliding, etc. Material models currently employed in the computational engineering analyses of ballistic/blast impact protective structures made of this type of material do not generally include many of the aforementioned aspects of the material dynamic behavior. Consequently, discrepancies are often observed between computational predictions and their experimental counterparts. To address this problem, the results of an extensive set of molecular-level computational analyses regarding the role of various microstructural/morphological defects on the Kevlar® fiber mechanical properties are used to upgrade one of the existing continuum-level material models for fiber-reinforced composites. The results obtained show that the response of the material is significantly affected as a result of the incorporation of microstructural effects both under quasi-static simple mechanical testing condition and under dynamic ballistic-impact conditions.

  1. Capillary-Channeled Polymer (C-CP) Films as Processing Platforms for Protein Analysis by Matrix-Assisted Laser/Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittman, Jennifer J.; Manard, Benjamin T.; Kowalski, Paul J.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Polypropylene (PP) capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) films have parallel, μm-sized channels that induce solution wicking via capillary action. Efficient mass transport from the solution phase to the channel surface leads to adsorption of hydrophobic protein solutes. The basic premise by which C-CP films can be used as media to manipulate analyte solutions (e.g., proteins in buffer), for the purpose of desalting or chromatographic separation prior to MALDI-MS analysis is presented here. Cytochrome c and myoglobin prepared in a Tris-HCl buffer, and ribonuclease A, lysozyme, and transferrin prepared in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), are used as the test solutions to demonstrate the desalting concept. Protein analysis is performed after deposition on a C-CP film with and without a water washing step, followed by spray deposition of a typical sinapinic acid matrix. Extracted MALDI mass spectra exhibit much improved signal-to-noise characteristics after water washing. A mixture of cytochrome c and myoglobin (2 μL of 2.5 μM each in Tris-HCl buffer) was applied, washed with water and spatially separated via simple capillary action (wicking) using a reversed-phase solvent composition of 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) in 50:50 acetonitrile (ACN):H2O. Subsequent application of sinapinic acid followed by imaging of the film using MALDI-MS reveals that as the protein solution is wicked down the film, separation occurs.

  2. Capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) films as processing platforms for protein analysis by matrix-assisted laser/desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS).

    PubMed

    Pittman, Jennifer J; Manard, Benjamin T; Kowalski, Paul J; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Polypropylene (PP) capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) films have parallel, μm-sized channels that induce solution wicking via capillary action. Efficient mass transport from the solution phase to the channel surface leads to adsorption of hydrophobic protein solutes. The basic premise by which C-CP films can be used as media to manipulate analyte solutions (e.g., proteins in buffer), for the purpose of desalting or chromatographic separation prior to MALDI-MS analysis is presented here. Cytochrome c and myoglobin prepared in a Tris-HCl buffer, and ribonuclease A, lysozyme, and transferrin prepared in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), are used as the test solutions to demonstrate the desalting concept. Protein analysis is performed after deposition on a C-CP film with and without a water washing step, followed by spray deposition of a typical sinapinic acid matrix. Extracted MALDI mass spectra exhibit much improved signal-to-noise characteristics after water washing. A mixture of cytochrome c and myoglobin (2 μL of 2.5 μM each in Tris-HCl buffer) was applied, washed with water and spatially separated via simple capillary action (wicking) using a reversed-phase solvent composition of 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) in 50:50 acetonitrile (ACN):H(2)O. Subsequent application of sinapinic acid followed by imaging of the film using MALDI-MS reveals that as the protein solution is wicked down the film, separation occurs. PMID:22012690

  3. Development of novel encapsulated formulations using albumin-chitosan as a polymer matrix for ocular drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addo, Richard Tettey

    exposed up to 120 minutes to different BSA-CSN MS concentrations. Using fluorometry, the influence of temperature and effect of metabolic inhibition were studied. The in vitro uptake and internalization studies were evaluated using confocal microscopy in HCET-1. In vivo studies were evaluated in rabbit's eye using blink response and pupil to cornea ratio for tetracaine and atropine studies respectively. Results: Our results showed particles size in the range of 3-5 microns with encapsulation efficiency of about 96 percent. Differential Scanning Calorimetry showed no drug-polymer interactions. BSA-CSN MS were internalized by the HCET-1 and was affected both by temperature and metabolic inhibitor, sodium azide. There were no signs of ocular surface toxicity or inflammation. The encapsulated drugs exhibited superior properties in vivo compared to the solution formulations currently in clinical use. Conclusion: We successfully developed microparticulate drug carriers for ocular delivery. BSA-CSN MS were internalized by the HCET-1 by temperature dependent active transport mechanism that did not compromise cell viability.

  4. Star Polymers.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jing M; McKenzie, Thomas G; Fu, Qiang; Wong, Edgar H H; Xu, Jiangtao; An, Zesheng; Shanmugam, Sivaprakash; Davis, Thomas P; Boyer, Cyrille; Qiao, Greg G

    2016-06-22

    Recent advances in controlled/living polymerization techniques and highly efficient coupling chemistries have enabled the facile synthesis of complex polymer architectures with controlled dimensions and functionality. As an example, star polymers consist of many linear polymers fused at a central point with a large number of chain end functionalities. Owing to this exclusive structure, star polymers exhibit some remarkable characteristics and properties unattainable by simple linear polymers. Hence, they constitute a unique class of technologically important nanomaterials that have been utilized or are currently under audition for many applications in life sciences and nanotechnologies. This article first provides a comprehensive summary of synthetic strategies towards star polymers, then reviews the latest developments in the synthesis and characterization methods of star macromolecules, and lastly outlines emerging applications and current commercial use of star-shaped polymers. The aim of this work is to promote star polymer research, generate new avenues of scientific investigation, and provide contemporary perspectives on chemical innovation that may expedite the commercialization of new star nanomaterials. We envision in the not-too-distant future star polymers will play an increasingly important role in materials science and nanotechnology in both academic and industrial settings.

  5. Polymers influencing transportability profile of drug

    PubMed Central

    Gaikwad, Vinod L.; Bhatia, Manish S.

    2013-01-01

    Drug release from various polymers is generally governed by the type of polymer/s incorporated in the formulation and mechanism of drug release from polymer/s. A single polymer may show one or more mechanisms of drug release out of which one mechanism is majorly followed for drug release. Some of the common mechanisms of drug release from polymers were, diffusion, swelling, matrix release, leaching of drug, etc. Mechanism or rate of drug release from a polymer or a combination of polymers can be predicted by using different computational methods or models. These models were capable of predicting drug release from its dosage form in advance without actual formulation and testing of drug release from dosage form. Quantitative structure–property relationship (QSPR) is an important tool used in the prediction of various physicochemical properties of actives as well as inactives. Since last several decades QSPR has been applied in new drug development for reducing the total number of drugs to be synthesized, as it involves a selection of the most desirable compound of interest. This technique was also applied in predicting in vivo performance of drug/s for various parameters. QSPR serves as a predictive tool to correlate structural descriptors of molecules with biological as well as physicochemical properties. Several researchers have contributed at different extents in this area to modify various properties of pharmaceuticals. The present review is focused on a study of different polymers that influence the transportability profiles of drugs along with the application of QSPR either to study different properties of polymers that regulate drug release or in predicting drug transportability from different polymer systems used in formulations. PMID:24227951

  6. Effect of HPMC - E15 LV premium polymer on release profile and compression characteristics of chitosan/ pectin colon targeted mesalamine matrix tablets and in vitro study on effect of pH impact on the drug release profile.

    PubMed

    Newton, A M J; Lakshmanan, Prabakaran

    2014-04-01

    The study was designed to investigate the in vitro dissolution profile and compression characteristics of colon targeted matrix tablets prepared with HPMC E15 LV in combination with pectin and Chitosan. The matrix tablets were subjected to two dissolution models in various simulated fluids such as pH 1.2, 6, 6.8, 7.2, 5.5. The fluctuations in colonic pH conditions during IBD (inflammatory bowel disease) and the nature of less fluid content in the colon may limit the expected drug release in the polysaccharide-based matrices when used alone. The Hydrophilic hydroxyl propyl methylcellulose ether premium polymer (HPMC E15 LV) of low viscosity grade was used in the formulation design, which made an excellent modification in physical and compression characteristics of the granules. The release studies indicated that the prepared matrices could control the drug release until the dosage form reaches the colon and the addition HPMC E15 LV showed the desirable changes in the dissolution profile by its hydrophilic nature since the colon is known for its less fluid content. The hydrophilic HPMC E15 LV allowed the colonic fluids to enter into the matrix and confirmed the drug release at the target site from a poorly water soluble polymer such as Chitosan and also from water soluble Pectin. The dramatic changes occurred in the drug release profile and physicochemical characteristics of the Pectin, Chitosan matrix tablets when a premium polymer HPMC E15 LV added in the formulation design in the optimized concentration. Various drug release mechanisms used for the examination of drug release characteristics. Drug release followed the combined mechanism of diffusion, erosion, swelling and polymer entanglement. In recent decade, IBD attracts many patents in novel treatment methods by using novel drug delivery systems.

  7. Development and characteristics of polymer monoliths for advanced LC bioscreening applications: A review.

    PubMed

    Acquah, Caleb; Moy, Charles K S; Danquah, Michael K; Ongkudon, Clarence M

    2016-03-15

    Biomedical research advances over the past two decades in bioseparation science and engineering have led to the development of new adsorbent systems called monoliths, mostly as stationary supports for liquid chromatography (LC) applications. They are acknowledged to offer better mass transfer hydrodynamics than their particulate counterparts. Also, their architectural and morphological traits can be tailored in situ to meet the hydrodynamic size of molecules which include proteins, pDNA, cells and viral targets. This has enabled their development for a plethora of enhanced bioscreening applications including biosensing, biomolecular purification, concentration and separation, achieved through the introduction of specific functional moieties or ligands (such as triethylamine, N,N-dimethyl-N-dodecylamine, antibodies, enzymes and aptamers) into the molecular architecture of monoliths. Notwithstanding, the application of monoliths presents major material and bioprocess challenges. The relationship between in-process polymerisation characteristics and the physicochemical properties of monolith is critical to optimise chromatographic performance. There is also a need to develop theoretical models for non-invasive analyses and predictions. This review article therefore discusses in-process analytical conditions, functionalisation chemistries and ligands relevant to establish the characteristics of monoliths in order to facilitate a wide range of enhanced bioscreening applications. It gives emphasis to the development of functional polymethacrylate monoliths for microfluidic and preparative scale bio-applications. PMID:26919447

  8. Advanced composite materials and processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    Composites are generally defined as two or more individual materials, which, when combined into a single material system, results in improved physical and/or mechanical properties. The freedom of choice of the starting components for composites allows the generation of materials that can be specifically tailored to meet a variety of applications. Advanced composites are described as a combination of high strength fibers and high performance polymer matrix materials. These advanced materials are required to permit future aircraft and spacecraft to perform in extended environments. Advanced composite precursor materials, processes for conversion of these materials to structures, and selected applications for composites are reviewed.

  9. Advances in the engineering science of immiscible polymer blends: A powder route for delicate polymer precursors and a highly renewable polyamide/terephthalate blend system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giancola, Giorgiana

    Powder processing of thermoplastic polymer composites is an effective way to achieve a high level of component homogenization in raw blends prior to melt processing, thus reducing the thermal and shear stress on the components. Polymer blends can be prepared that would otherwise not be possible due to thermodynamic incompatibility. Evaluation of this concept was conducted by processing PMMA and HDPE micron sized powders which were characterized using DSC and rheology. Optical microscopy and SEM, showed that high-quality, fine domain sized blends can be made by the compression molding process. Silica marker spheres were used to qualitatively assess the level dispersive mixing. EDS chemical analysis was effective in providing image contrast between PMMA and HDPE based on the carbonyl and ester oxygen. EDS image maps, combined with secondary electron images show that compression molding of blended powder precursors produces composites of comparable homogeneity and domain size as extrusion processing. FTIR proved valuable when assessing the intimacy of the constituents at the interface of the immiscible domains. The formation of an in-situ, PMMA nano-network structure resulting from solvent extraction and redeposition using DMF was uniquely found on the surface of these immiscible polymer blends. This work has shown that powder processing of polymers is an effective means to melt processed fragile polymers to high quality blends. Recently, efforts towards the development of sustainable materials have evolved due in part to the increase in price and limited supply of crude oil. Immiscible polymer blending is a paradigm that enables synergistic material performance in certain instances where the composite properties are superior to the sum of the constituents. The addition of PA6,10 to PTT offers an opportunity to increase the bio-based content of PTT while simultaneously maintaining or improving mechanical properties. PA6,10 and PTT are immiscible polymers that can be

  10. An advanced algorithm for construction of Integral Transport Matrix Method operators using accumulation of single cell coupling factors

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, B. P.; Azmy, Y. Y.

    2013-07-01

    The Integral Transport Matrix Method (ITMM) has been shown to be an effective method for solving the neutron transport equation in large domains on massively parallel architectures. In the limit of very large number of processors, the speed of the algorithm, and its suitability for unstructured meshes, i.e. other than an ordered Cartesian grid, is limited by the construction of four matrix operators required for obtaining the solution in each sub-domain. The existing algorithm used for construction of these matrix operators, termed the differential mesh sweep, is computationally expensive and was developed for a structured grid. This work proposes the use of a new algorithm for construction of these operators based on the construction of a single, fundamental matrix representing the transport of a particle along every possible path throughout the sub-domain mesh. Each of the operators is constructed by multiplying an element of this fundamental matrix by two factors dependent only upon the operator being constructed and on properties of the emitting and incident cells. The ITMM matrix operator construction time for the new algorithm is demonstrated to be shorter than the existing algorithm in all tested cases with both isotropic and anisotropic scattering considered. While also being a more efficient algorithm on a structured Cartesian grid, the new algorithm is promising in its geometric robustness and potential for being applied to an unstructured mesh, with the ultimate goal of application to an unstructured tetrahedral mesh on a massively parallel architecture. (authors)

  11. Microstructural Characterization of a Mg Matrix U-Mo Dispersion Fuel Plate Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor to High Fission Density: SEM Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiser, Dennis D.; Jue, Jan-Fong; Miller, Brandon D.; Gan, Jian; Robinson, Adam B.; Medvedev, Pavel G.; Madden, James W.; Moore, Glenn A.

    2016-06-01

    Low-enriched (U-235 <20 pct) U-Mo dispersion fuel is being developed for use in research and test reactors. In most cases, fuel plates with Al or Al-Si alloy matrices have been tested in the Advanced Test Reactor to support this development. In addition, fuel plates with Mg as the matrix have also been tested. The benefit of using Mg as the matrix is that it potentially will not chemically interact with the U-Mo fuel particles during fabrication or irradiation, whereas with Al and Al-Si alloys such interactions will occur. Fuel plate R9R010 is a Mg matrix fuel plate that was aggressively irradiated in ATR. This fuel plate was irradiated as part of the RERTR-8 experiment at high temperature, high fission rate, and high power, up to high fission density. This paper describes the results of the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of an irradiated fuel plate using polished samples and those produced with a focused ion beam. A follow-up paper will discuss the results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Using SEM, it was observed that even at very aggressive irradiation conditions, negligible chemical interaction occurred between the irradiated U-7Mo fuel particles and Mg matrix; no interconnection of fission gas bubbles from fuel particle to fuel particle was observed; the interconnected fission gas bubbles that were observed in the irradiated U-7Mo particles resulted in some transport of solid fission products to the U-7Mo/Mg interface; the presence of microstructural pathways in some U-9.1 Mo particles that could allow for transport of fission gases did not result in the apparent presence of large porosity at the U-7Mo/Mg interface; and, the Mg-Al interaction layers that were present at the Mg matrix/Al 6061 cladding interface exhibited good radiation stability, i.e. no large pores.

  12. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites: A comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  13. Highly efficient direct aerobic oxidative esterification of cinnamyl alcohol with alkyl alcohols catalysed by gold nanoparticles incarcerated in a nanoporous polymer matrix: a tool for investigating the role of the polymer host.

    PubMed

    Buonerba, Antonio; Noschese, Annarita; Grassi, Alfonso

    2014-04-25

    The selective aerobic oxidation of cinnamyl alcohol to cinnamaldehyde, as well as direct oxidative esterification of this alcohol with primary and secondary aliphatic alcohols, were achieved with high chemoselectivity by using gold nanoparticles supported in a nanoporous semicrystalline multi-block copolymer matrix, which consisted of syndiotactic polystyrene-co-cis-1,4-polybutadiene. The cascade reaction that leads to the alkyl cinnamates occurs through two oxidation steps: the selective oxidation of cinnamyl alcohol to cinnamaldehyde, followed by oxidation of the hemiacetal that results from the base-catalysed reaction of cinnamaldehyde with an aliphatic alcohol. The rate constants for the two steps were evaluated in the temperature range 10-45 °C. The cinnamyl alcohol oxidation is faster than the oxidative esterification of cinnamaldehyde with methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, 1-hexanol or 1-octanol. The rate constants of the latter reaction are pseudo-zero order with respect to the aliphatic alcohol and decrease as the bulkiness of the alcohol is increased. The activation energy (Ea) for the two oxidation steps was calculated for esterification of cinnamyl alcohol with 1-butanol (Ea = 57.8±11.5 and 62.7±16.7 kJ mol(-1) for the first and second step, respectively). The oxidative esterification of cinnamyl alcohol with 2-phenylethanol follows pseudo-first-order kinetics with respect to 2-phenylethanol and is faster than observed for other alcohols because of fast diffusion of the aromatic alcohol in the crystalline phase of the support. The kinetic investigation allowed us to assess the role of the polymer support in the determination of both high activity and selectivity in the title reaction. PMID:24644103

  14. Highly efficient direct aerobic oxidative esterification of cinnamyl alcohol with alkyl alcohols catalysed by gold nanoparticles incarcerated in a nanoporous polymer matrix: a tool for investigating the role of the polymer host.

    PubMed

    Buonerba, Antonio; Noschese, Annarita; Grassi, Alfonso

    2014-04-25

    The selective aerobic oxidation of cinnamyl alcohol to cinnamaldehyde, as well as direct oxidative esterification of this alcohol with primary and secondary aliphatic alcohols, were achieved with high chemoselectivity by using gold nanoparticles supported in a nanoporous semicrystalline multi-block copolymer matrix, which consisted of syndiotactic polystyrene-co-cis-1,4-polybutadiene. The cascade reaction that leads to the alkyl cinnamates occurs through two oxidation steps: the selective oxidation of cinnamyl alcohol to cinnamaldehyde, followed by oxidation of the hemiacetal that results from the base-catalysed reaction of cinnamaldehyde with an aliphatic alcohol. The rate constants for the two steps were evaluated in the temperature range 10-45 °C. The cinnamyl alcohol oxidation is faster than the oxidative esterification of cinnamaldehyde with methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, 1-hexanol or 1-octanol. The rate constants of the latter reaction are pseudo-zero order with respect to the aliphatic alcohol and decrease as the bulkiness of the alcohol is increased. The activation energy (Ea) for the two oxidation steps was calculated for esterification of cinnamyl alcohol with 1-butanol (Ea = 57.8±11.5 and 62.7±16.7 kJ mol(-1) for the first and second step, respectively). The oxidative esterification of cinnamyl alcohol with 2-phenylethanol follows pseudo-first-order kinetics with respect to 2-phenylethanol and is faster than observed for other alcohols because of fast diffusion of the aromatic alcohol in the crystalline phase of the support. The kinetic investigation allowed us to assess the role of the polymer support in the determination of both high activity and selectivity in the title reaction.

  15. Single and compact ESD device Beta-Matrix solution based on bidirectional SCR Network in advanced 28/32 nm technology node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeat, Johan; Galy, Philippe

    2013-09-01

    Advanced CMOS technologies, like CMOS32 nm high K metal gate, become more and more sensitive to electrostatic discharge (ESD) phenomenon particularly because of their low overvoltage robustness. In this context, we develop a Beta-Matrix concept [1] which merges six silicon controlled rectifier (SCR) in a same structure and having one single triggering gate N (GN) for a high integration and high flexibility in IO frame. This device is the center of a new protection strategy which combined both local and global protection approach [1]. Also, a specific trigger circuit has been developed to turn-on Beta-Matrix whatever stressed pins during an ESD event and to keep it off when IC is in normal operation mode and is presented in [2]. Both, Beta-Matrix and trigger circuit, make a robust and very efficient ESD network which allows removing all IO placement constraint and power IO [3]. Also, this study is a synthesis of both previous work and a development of new Beta-Matrix topology to improve the device behavior, particularly by improving the uniformity of activation and decreasing triggering voltage of the structure. This work presents results of 3 dimensional TCAD simulations and measurements of transmission line pulse (TLP) and very fast-TLP.

  16. From Commodity Polymers to Functional Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Tao; Wang, Ling-Ren; Ma, Lang; Han, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Rui; Cheng, Chong; Xia, Yi; Qin, Hui; Zhao, Chang-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Functional polymers bear specified chemical groups, and have specified physical, chemical, biological, pharmacological, or other uses. To adjust the properties while keeping material usage low, a method for direct synthesis of functional polymers is indispensable. Here we show that various functional polymers can be synthesized by in situ cross-linked polymerization/copolymerization. We demonstrate that the polymers synthesized by the facile method using different functional monomers own outstanding pH-sensitivity and pH-reversibility, antifouling property, antibacterial, and anticoagulant property. Our study opens a route for the functionalization of commodity polymers, which lead to important advances in polymeric materials applications. PMID:24710333

  17. From Commodity Polymers to Functional Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Tao; Wang, Ling-Ren; Ma, Lang; Han, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Rui; Cheng, Chong; Xia, Yi; Qin, Hui; Zhao, Chang-Sheng

    2014-04-01

    Functional polymers bear specified chemical groups, and have specified physical, chemical, biological, pharmacological, or other uses. To adjust the properties while keeping material usage low, a method for direct synthesis of functional polymers is indispensable. Here we show that various functional polymers can be synthesized by in situ cross-linked polymerization/copolymerization. We demonstrate that the polymers synthesized by the facile method using different functional monomers own outstanding pH-sensitivity and pH-reversibility, antifouling property, antibacterial, and anticoagulant property. Our study opens a route for the functionalization of commodity polymers, which lead to important advances in polymeric materials applications.

  18. Advanced analysis of polymer emulsions: Particle size and particle size distribution by field-flow fractionation and dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Makan, Ashwell C; Spallek, Markus J; du Toit, Madeleine; Klein, Thorsten; Pasch, Harald

    2016-04-15

    Field flow fractionation (FFF) is an advanced fractionation technique for the analyses of very sensitive particles. In this study, different FFF techniques were used for the fractionation and analysis of polymer emulsions/latexes. As model systems, a pure acrylic emulsion and emulsions containing titanium dioxide were prepared and analyzed. An acrylic emulsion polymerization was conducted, continuously sampled from the reactor and subsequently analyzed to determine the particle size, radius of gyration in specific, of the latex particles throughout the polymerization reaction. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) and sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF), coupled to a multidetector system, multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS), ultraviolet (UV) and refractive index (RI), respectively, were used to investigate the evolution of particle sizes and particle size distributions (PSDs) as the polymerization progressed. The obtained particle sizes were compared against batch-mode dynamic light scattering (DLS). Results indicated differences between AF4 and DLS results due to DLS taking hydration layers into account, whereas both AF4 and SdFFF were coupled to MALLS detection, hence not taking the hydration layer into account for size determination. SdFFF has additional separation capabilities with a much higher resolution compared to AF4. The calculated radii values were 5 nm larger for SdFFF measurements for each analyzed sample against the corresponding AF4 values. Additionally a low particle size shoulder was observed for SdFFF indicating bimodality in the reactor very early during the polymerization reaction. Furthermore, different emulsions were mixed with inorganic species used as additives in cosmetics and coatings such as TiO2. These complex mixtures of species were analyzed to investigate the retention and particle interaction behavior under different AF4 experimental conditions, such as the mobile phase. The AF4 system was coupled online

  19. Nanocrystal doped matrixes

    SciTech Connect

    Parce, J. Wallace; Bernatis, Paul; Dubrow, Robert; Freeman, William P.; Gamoras, Joel; Kan, Shihai; Meisel, Andreas; Qian, Baixin; Whiteford, Jeffery A.; Ziebarth, Jonathan

    2010-01-12

    Matrixes doped with semiconductor nanocrystals are provided. In certain embodiments, the semiconductor nanocrystals have a size and composition such that they absorb or emit light at particular wavelengths. The nanocrystals can comprise ligands that allow for mixing with various matrix materials, including polymers, such that a minimal portion of light is scattered by the matrixes. The matrixes of the present invention can also be utilized in refractive index matching applications. In other embodiments, semiconductor nanocrystals are embedded within matrixes to form a nanocrystal density gradient, thereby creating an effective refractive index gradient. The matrixes of the present invention can also be used as filters and antireflective coatings on optical devices and as down-converting layers. Processes for producing matrixes comprising semiconductor nanocrystals are also provided. Nanostructures having high quantum efficiency, small size, and/or a narrow size distribution are also described, as are methods of producing indium phosphide nanostructures and core-shell nanostructures with Group II-VI shells.

  20. Effect of delay time and grid voltage changes on the average molecular mass of polydisperse polymers and polymeric blends determined by delayed extraction matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mineo, Placido; Vitalini, Daniele; Scamporrino, Emilio; Bazzano, Sebastiano; Alicata, Rossana

    2005-01-01

    The dependence of the calculated average molecular mass of a polyethylene glycol with a large polydispersity on the instrumental parameters adopted in the acquisition of mass spectra using delayed extraction matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (DE MALDI-TOFMS) was investigated. It has been shown that a combined effect of delay times and potential gradients can act on the ion cloud in the source chamber affecting both mass resolution and average molecular mass value of the analyzed polymeric sample. Also examined was a blend of two different polymers (a PEG and a PMMA commercial sample having a similar average molecular mass), which presents an additional problem concerning the discrimination among the different polymer species as a function of the experimental conditions. In this work, the best instrumental conditions to obtain both good resolution and a correct average molecular mass for the examined polydisperse sample are reported. PMID:16134231

  1. Mixed matrix membrane development.

    PubMed

    Kulprathipanja, Santi

    2003-03-01

    Two types of mixed matrix membranes were developed by UOP in the late 1980s. The first type includes adsorbent polymers, such as silicalite-cellulose acetate (CA), NaX-CA, and AgX-CA mixed matrix membranes. The silicalite-CA has a CO(2)/H(2) selectivity of 5.15 +/- 2.2. In contrast, the CA membrane has a CO(2)/H(2) selectivity of 0.77 +/- 0.06. The second type of mixed matrix membrane is PEG-silicone rubber. The PEG-silicone rubber mixed matrix membrane has high selectivity for polar gases, such as SO(2), NH(3), and H(2)S.

  2. Polymer-phyllosilicate nanocomposites and their preparation

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.

    2007-01-09

    Polymer-phyllosilicate nanocomposites that exhibit superior properties compared to the polymer alone, and methods-for producing these polymer-phyllosilicate nanocomposites, are provided. Polymeric surfactant compatabilizers are adsorbed onto the surface of hydrophilic or natural phyllosilicates to facilitate the dispersal and exfoliation of the phyllosilicate in a polymer matrix. Utilizing polymeric glycol based surfactants, polymeric dicarboxylic acids, polymeric diammonium surfactants, and polymeric diamine surfactants as compatabilizers facilitates natural phyllosilicate and hydrophilic organoclay dispersal in a polymer matrix to produce nanocomposites.

  3. Fabrication of a multifunctional nano-in-micro drug delivery platform by microfluidic templated encapsulation of porous silicon in polymer matrix.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongbo; Liu, Dongfei; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Mäkilä, Ermei; Herranz-Blanco, Bárbara; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A

    2014-07-01

    A multifunctional nano-in-micro drug delivery platform is developed by conjugating the porous silicon nanoparticles with mucoadhesive polymers and subsequent encapsulation into a pH-responsive polymer using microfluidics. The multistage platform shows monodisperse size distribution and pH-responsive payload release, and the released nanoparticles are mucoadhesive. Moreover, this platform is capable of simultaneously loading and releasing multidrugs with distinct properties.

  4. Metal coordination polymer derived mesoporous Co3O4 nanorods with uniform TiO2 coating as advanced anodes for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Hongbo; Ang, Huixiang; Ding, Xianguang; Tan, Huiteng; Guo, Guile; Qu, Genlong; Yang, Yonggang; Zheng, Junwei; Yan, Qingyu; Gu, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a one-dimensional Co3O4@TiO2 core-shell electrode material with superior electrochemical performance is fabricated by a convenient and controllable route. The approach involves two main steps: the homogeneous deposition of polydopamine and TiO2 layers in sequence on the cobalt coordination polymer and the thermal decomposition of the polymer matrix. The as-prepared electrode material can achieve excellent electrochemical properties and stability as an anode material for lithium ion batteries, such as a high specific capacity of 1279 mA h g-1, good cycling stability (around 803 mA h g-1 at a current density of 200 mA g-1 after 100 cycles), and stable rate performance (around 520 mA h g-1 at a current density of 1000 mA g-1). This dramatic electrochemical performance is mainly attributed to the excellent structural characteristics, which could improve the electrical conductivity and lithium ion mobility, as well as electrolyte permeability and architectural stability during cycling.In this work, a one-dimensional Co3O4@TiO2 core-shell electrode material with superior electrochemical performance is fabricated by a convenient and controllable route. The approach involves two main steps: the homogeneous deposition of polydopamine and TiO2 layers in sequence on the cobalt coordination polymer and the thermal decomposition of the polymer matrix. The as-prepared electrode material can achieve excellent electrochemical properties and stability as an anode material for lithium ion batteries, such as a high specific capacity of 1279 mA h g-1, good cycling stability (around 803 mA h g-1 at a current density of 200 mA g-1 after 100 cycles), and stable rate performance (around 520 mA h g-1 at a current density of 1000 mA g-1). This dramatic electrochemical performance is mainly attributed to the excellent structural characteristics, which could improve the electrical conductivity and lithium ion mobility, as well as electrolyte permeability and architectural

  5. Advanced poly-LED displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, Mark; Nisato, Giovanni; Fish, D.; Giraldo, Andrea; Jenkins, A. J.; Johnson, Mark T.

    2003-05-01

    Philips have been actively developing polymer OLED (poly-LED) displays as a future display technology. Their emissive nature leads to a very attractive visual appearance, with wide viewing angle, high brightness and fast response speed. Whilst the first generation of poly-LED displays are likely to be passive-matrix driven, power reduction and resolution increase will lead to the use of active-matrix poly-LED displays. Philips Research have designed, fabricated and characterized five different designs of active-matrix polymer-LED display. Each of the five displays makes use of a distinct pixel programming- or pixel drive-technique, including current programming, threshold voltage measurement and photodiode feedback. It will be shown that hte simplest voltage-programmed current-source pixel suffers from potentially unacceptable brightness non-uniformity, and that advanced pixel circuits can provide a solution to this. Optical-feedback pixel circuits will be discussed, showing that they can be used to improve uniformity and compensate for image burn-in due to polymer-LED material degradation, improving display lifetime. Philips research has also been active in developing technologies required to implement poly-LED displays on flexible substrates, including materials, processing and testing methods. The fabrication of flexible passive-matrix poly-LED displays will be presented, as well as the ongoing work to assess the suitability of processing flexible next-generation poly-LED displays.

  6. Sustained release characteristics of tablets prepared with mixed matrix of sodium carrageenan and chitosan: effect of polymer weight ratio, dissolution medium, and drug type.

    PubMed

    Bani-Jaber, Ahmad; Al-Ghazawi, Mutasim

    2005-03-01

    The interpolymeric complexation of carrageenan and chitosan was investigated for its effect on drug release from polymeric matrices in comparison to single polymers. For this purpose, matrices with carrageenan: chitosan (CG:CS) ratios of 100%, 75%, 50%, 25%, and 0% were prepared at 1:1 drug to polymer ratio. The effect of dissolution medium and drug type on drug release from the formulations was addressed. Two model drugs were utilized: diltiazem HCl (DZ) as a salt of a basic drug and diclofenac Na (DS) as a salt of an acidic drug. Three dissolution media were used: water, simulated gastric fluid (SGF), and simulated intestinal fluid (SIF). Some combinations of the two polymers showed remarkable sustained release effect on DZ in comparison to the single polymers in water and SGF. However, no apparent effect for the combination on DZ release was shown in SIF. The medium effect was explained by the necessity of chitosan ionization, which could be attained by the acidic SGF or microacidic environment created by the used acidic salt of DZ in water, but not in SIF. An interaction between the medium type and CG:CS ratio was also found. With DS, the polymer combinations had similar dissolution profiles to those of the single polymers in water and SIF, which was explained by the lack of chitosan ionization by the medium or the drug basic salt. The dissolution profiles could not be obtained in SGF, which was attributed to the conversion of DS into diclofenac free acid. The importance of chitosan ionization for its interaction with CG to have an effect on the release of DS was demonstrated by performing dissolution of SGF presoaked tablets of DS in SIF, which showed an effect of combining the two polymers on sustaining the drug release.

  7. Supramolecular Polymer Nanocomposites - Improvement of Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinricher, Jesse; Neikirk, Colin; Priestley, Rodney

    2015-03-01

    Supramolecular polymers differ from traditional polymers in that their repeat units are connected by hydrogen bonds that can reversibly break and form under various stimuli. They can be more easily recycled than conventional materials, and their highly temperature dependent viscosities result in reduced energy consumption and processing costs. Furthermore, judicious selection of supramolecular polymer architecture and functionality allows the design of advanced materials including shape memory and self-healing materials. Supramolecular polymers have yet to see widespread use because they can't support much weight due to their inherent mechanical weakness. In order to address this issue, the mechanical strength of supramolecular polymer nanocomposites based on ureidopyrmidinone (UPy) telechelic poly(caprolactone) doped with surface activated silica nanoparticles was investigated by tensile testing and dynamic mechanical analysis. The effects of varying amounts and types of nanofiller surface functionality were investigated to glean insight into the contributions of filler-filler and filler-matrix interactions to mechanical reinforcement in supramolecular polymer nanocomposites. MRSEC NSF DMR 0819860 (PI: Prof. N. Phuan Ong) REU Site Grant: NSF DMR-1156422 (PI: Prof. Mikko Haataja)

  8. Recent Advances in Bacteria Identification by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using Nanomaterials as Affinity Probes

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Tai-Chia

    2014-01-01

    Identifying trace amounts of bacteria rapidly, accurately, selectively, and with high sensitivity is important to ensuring the safety of food and diagnosing infectious bacterial diseases. Microbial diseases constitute the major cause of death in many developing and developed countries of the world. The early detection of pathogenic bacteria is crucial in preventing, treating, and containing the spread of infections, and there is an urgent requirement for sensitive, specific, and accurate diagnostic tests. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is an extremely selective and sensitive analytical tool that can be used to characterize different species of pathogenic bacteria. Various functionalized or unmodified nanomaterials can be used as affinity probes to capture and concentrate microorganisms. Recent developments in bacterial detection using nanomaterials-assisted MALDI-MS approaches are highlighted in this article. A comprehensive table listing MALDI-MS approaches for identifying pathogenic bacteria, categorized by the nanomaterials used, is provided. PMID:24786089

  9. Differential impact of mechanical unloading on structural and nonstructural components of the extracellular matrix in advanced human heart failure.

    PubMed

    Sakamuri, Siva S V P; Takawale, Abhijit; Basu, Ratnadeep; Fedak, Paul W M; Freed, Darren; Sergi, Consolato; Oudit, Gavin Y; Kassiri, Zamaneh

    2016-06-01

    Adverse remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is a significant characteristic of heart failure. Reverse remodeling of the fibrillar ECM secondary to mechanical unloading of the left ventricle (LV) by left ventricular assist device (LVAD) has been subject of intense investigation; however, little is known about the impacts on nonfibrillar ECM and matricellular proteins that also contribute to disease progression. Explanted failing hearts were procured from patients with nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with or without LVAD support, and compared to nonfailing control hearts. LV free wall specimens were formalin-fixed, flash-frozen or optimum cutting temperature-mount frozen. Histologic and biochemical assessment of fibrillar ECM showed that LVAD support was associated with lower levels of insoluble collagen, collagen type I mRNA, and collagen I/III ratio compared with no-LVAD hearts. A disintegrin and Metalloproteinase with Thrombospondin Motifs-2 (ADAM-TS2), a procollagen endopeptidase, was reduced in no-LVAD but not in LVAD hearts. The rise in ECM proteolytic activities was significantly lower in LVAD hearts. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP1, MMP2, MMP8, MMP13, and MT1-MMP/MMP14) were comparable between DCM hearts. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)3 and TIMP4 messenger RNA and protein showed the greatest reduction in no-LVAD hearts. Basement membrane proteins exhibited less severe disarray of laminin and fibronectin-1 in LVAD-supported hearts. The rise in matricellular protein, osteopontin, was suppressed in LVAD hearts, whereas secreted protein, acidic, cysteine-rich (SPARC) levels was unaffected by LVAD. Mechanical unloading of the failing DCM hearts can restore the fibrillar ECM and the basement membrane, contributing toward improved clinical outcomes. However, persistent elevation of matricellular proteins such as SPARC could contribute to the relapse of failing hearts on removal of LVAD support.

  10. Using Polydispersity in Polymer Grafted Nanoparticles for Tuning Morphology in Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Tyler; Jayaraman, Arthi

    2013-03-01

    Polymer nanocomposites, consisting of nanoscale additives in a polymer matrix, are used in many applications where high thermal and wear resistance is important e.g. automotive tires. To achieve uniform mechanical and thermal properties of the nanocomposite, the nanoparticles need to be well dispersed in the polymer matrix. One way to control the nanoparticle spatial organization in the polymer matrix is by grafting the nanoparticle surface with polymers that are chemically similar to the matrix polymer and tuning the effective interactions between the particles by simply tuning the grafting density, graft length, matrix length, particle size, filler concentration, and matrix density. In this study, we demonstrate that polydisperse polymer grafts can stabilize dispersions of polymer grafted nanoparticles in a polymer matrix in cases where monodisperse grafts would cause aggregation of particles. The change in the effective inter-particle interactions with increasing polydisersity is because of increased wetting of the grafted polymers by the matrix polymers. The implication that polydispersity can stabilize particle dispersions in matrix shows that it can be used as a design tool to program inter-particle interactions in a polymer matrix.

  11. Blue to near-IR energy transfer cascade within a dye-doped polymer matrix, mediated by a photochromic molecular switch.

    PubMed

    Dryza, Viktoras; Smith, Trevor A; Bieske, Evan J

    2016-02-21

    The spectroscopic properties of a poly(methyl methacrylate) matrix doped with a coumarin dye, a cyanine dye, and a photochromic spiropyran dye have been investigated. Before UV irradiation of the matrix, excitation of the coumarin dye results in minimal energy transfer to the cyanine dye. The energy transfer is substantially enhanced following UV irradiation of the matrix, which converts the colourless spiropyran isomer to the coloured merocyanine isomer, which then acts as an intermediate bridge by accepting energy from the coumarin dye and then donating energy to the cyanine dye. This demonstration of a switchable energy transfer cascade should help initiate new research directions in molecular photonics.

  12. Study of improved resins for advanced supersonic technology composites. Part 1: Heteroaromatic polymers containing ether groups. Part 2: Curing chemistry of aromatic polymers and composite studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takekoshi, T.; Hillig, W. B.; Mellinger, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    Fourteen ether-containing, aromatic dianhydrides have been synthesized from N-phenyl-3 or 4-nitrophthalimide and various bisphenols. The process involves nucleophilic displacement of activated nitro groups with bisphenolate ions. Ether-containing dianhydrides were indefinitely stable in the presence of atmospheric moisture. One-step, high temperature solution polymerization of the ether-containing dianhydrides with m-phenylene diamine, 4,4'-oxydianiline and 1, 3-bis(4-aminophenoxy)benzene afforded 42 polyetherimides. The polyetherimides were all soluble in m-cresol except two which were found to be crystalline. The glass transition temperatures of the polyetherimides ranged from 178 to 277 C. Soluble polybenzimidazopyrrolones containing ether groups were also prepared from the same ether-containing dianhydrides and aromatic tetraamines by one-step solution polymerization. Using low molecular weight polyetherimides, various thermoset resin systems were developed and tested as matrices for fiber-reinforced composites. The curing chemistry involving reaction of the phthalonitrile group and the o-diaminophenyl group was found to be generally applicable to crosslinking various aromatic polymers other than polyimides.

  13. An implantable and controlled drug-release silk fibroin nanofibrous matrix to advance the treatment of solid tumour cancers.

    PubMed

    Xie, Maobin; Fan, Dejun; Chen, Yufeng; Zhao, Zheng; He, Xiaowen; Li, Gang; Chen, Aizheng; Wu, Xiaojian; Li, Jiashen; Li, Zhi; Hunt, John A; Li, Yi; Lan, Ping

    2016-10-01

    The development of more effective cancer therapeutic strategies are still critically required. The maximization of the therapeutic effect in combination with avoiding the severe side effects on normal tissues when using chemotherapy drugs is still an urgent problem that requires improvements urgently. Here we provide implantable and controllable drug-release that utilises silk fibroin (SF) as a nanofibrous drug delivery system (DDS) for cancer treatment. A nanofibrous structure with controllable fibre diameter (<100 nm) was produced. The drug release rate of the SF DDS was controlled by applying a post-treatment process. In vitro anti-cancer (HCT116) results indicated that curcumin (CM)-SF nanofibrous matrix had a superior anti-cancer potential when the concentration was >5 μg/mL. The mechanism could be explained by the cell cycle being held in the S phase. The toxic effect on normal cells (NCM460) was minimized by using a treatment concentration range (5-20 μg/mL). Implantation of this DDS into the tumour site inhibited the growth of solid tumour; this offers an alternative approach for novel cancer therapy. PMID:27376557

  14. PEDOT Radical Polymer with Synergetic Redox and Electrical Properties

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The development of new redox polymers is being boosted by the increasing interest in the area of energy and health. The development of new polymers is needed to further advance new applications or improve the performance of actual devices such as batteries, supercapacitors, or drug delivery systems. Here we show the synthesis and characterization of a new polymer which combines the present most successful conjugated polymer backbone and the most successful redox active side group, i.e., poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), and a nitroxide stable radical. First, a derivative of the 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) molecule with side nitroxide stable radical group (TEMPO) was synthesized. The electrochemical polymerization of the PEDOT-TEMPO monomer was investigated in detail using cyclic voltammetry, potential step, and constant current methods. Monomer and polymer were characterized by NMR, FTIR, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, elemental analysis, cyclic voltammetry, and four-point probe conductivity. The new PEDOT-TEMPO radical polymer combines the electronic conductivity of the conjugated polythiophene backbone and redox properties of the nitroxide group. As an example of application, this redox active polymer was used as a conductive binder in lithium ion batteries. Good cycling stability with high Coulombic efficiency and increased cyclability at different rates were obtained using this polymer as a replacement of two ingredients: conductive carbon additive and polymeric binders. PMID:26877892

  15. Functional polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Wegner, G.

    2000-01-01

    Improving the existing polymer materials and the designing of model polymers need fundamental insights into the structure and dynamics over a large range of length and time scales. Consequently, a host of quite different methods needs to be applied to gain insights into the molecular and supramolecular structures and interactions that determine the performance of these materials. Supramolecular structures derived from shape persistent (stiff) macromolecules are used as examples to demonstrate the correlation between chemical structure, order phenomena and performance in applications concerning advanced or developing technologies: organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and separator membranes in lithium based batteries and fuel cells. Polymers are also important as additives in the manufacture and the processing of other materials. The design of block copolymers to control the nucleation and growth of inorganic particles precipitating from aqueous solutions (mineralization) is discussed as well as the use of block copolymers to optimize the processing of ceramic pieces and objects. Finally, the modification of surfaces by polymers including aspects of biocompatibility is discussed. Some remarks concerning the importance of recent developments and advances in synthesis of macromolecular materials are also given.

  16. The National Lung Matrix Trial: translating the biology of stratification in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, G.; Crack, L. R.; Popat, S.; Swanton, C.; Hollingsworth, S. J.; Buller, R.; Walker, I.; Carr, T. H.; Wherton, D.; Billingham, L. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The management of NSCLC has been transformed by stratified medicine. The National Lung Matrix Trial (NLMT) is a UK-wide study exploring the activity of rationally selected biomarker/targeted therapy combinations. Patients and methods The Cancer Research UK (CRUK) Stratified Medicine Programme 2 is undertaking the large volume national molecular pre-screening which integrates with the NLMT. At study initiation, there are eight drugs being used to target 18 molecular cohorts. The aim is to determine whether there is sufficient signal of activity in any drug–biomarker combination to warrant further investigation. A Bayesian adaptive design that gives a more realistic approach to decision making and flexibility to make conclusions without fixing the sample size was chosen. The screening platform is an adaptable 28-gene Nextera next-generation sequencing platform designed by Illumina, covering the range of molecular abnormalities being targeted. The adaptive design allows new biomarker–drug combination cohorts to be incorporated by substantial amendment. The pre-clinical justification for each biomarker–drug combination has been rigorously assessed creating molecular exclusion rules and a trumping strategy in patients harbouring concomitant actionable genetic abnormalities. Discrete routes of pathway activation or inactivation determined by cancer genome aberrations are treated as separate cohorts. Key translational analyses include the deep genomic analysis of pre- and post-treatment biopsies, the establishment of patient-derived xenograft models and longitudinal ctDNA collection, in order to define predictive biomarkers, mechanisms of resistance and early markers of response and relapse. Conclusion The SMP2 platform will provide large scale genetic screening to inform entry into the NLMT, a trial explicitly aimed at discovering novel actionable cohorts in NSCLC. Clinical Trial ISRCTN 38344105. PMID:26410619

  17. Renewability is not Enough: Recent Advances in the Sustainable Synthesis of Biomass-Derived Monomers and Polymers.

    PubMed

    Llevot, Audrey; Dannecker, Patrick-Kurt; von Czapiewski, Marc; Over, Lena C; Söyler, Zafer; Meier, Michael A R

    2016-08-01

    Taking advantage of the structural diversity of different biomass resources, recent efforts were directed towards the synthesis of renewable monomers and polymers, either for the substitution of petroleum-based resources or for the design of novel polymers. Not only the use of biomass, but also the development of sustainable chemical approaches is a crucial aspect for the production of sustainable materials. This review discusses the recent examples of chemical modifications and polymerizations of abundant biomass resources with a clear focus on the sustainability of the described processes. Topics such as synthetic methodology, catalysis, and development of new solvent systems or greener alternative reagents are addressed. The chemistry of vegetable oil derivatives, terpenes, lignin, carbohydrates, and sugar-based platform chemicals was selected to highlight the trends in the active field of a sustainable use of renewable resources. PMID:27355829

  18. Renewability is not Enough: Recent Advances in the Sustainable Synthesis of Biomass-Derived Monomers and Polymers.

    PubMed

    Llevot, Audrey; Dannecker, Patrick-Kurt; von Czapiewski, Marc; Over, Lena C; Söyler, Zafer; Meier, Michael A R

    2016-08-01

    Taking advantage of the structural diversity of different biomass resources, recent efforts were directed towards the synthesis of renewable monomers and polymers, either for the substitution of petroleum-based resources or for the design of novel polymers. Not only the use of biomass, but also the development of sustainable chemical approaches is a crucial aspect for the production of sustainable materials. This review discusses the recent examples of chemical modifications and polymerizations of abundant biomass resources with a clear focus on the sustainability of the described processes. Topics such as synthetic methodology, catalysis, and development of new solvent systems or greener alternative reagents are addressed. The chemistry of vegetable oil derivatives, terpenes, lignin, carbohydrates, and sugar-based platform chemicals was selected to highlight the trends in the active field of a sustainable use of renewable resources.

  19. Use of the Dynamic Gastric Model as a tool for investigating fed and fasted sensitivities of low polymer content hydrophilic matrix formulations.

    PubMed

    Mason, Laura M; Chessa, Simona; Huatan, Hiep; Storey, David E; Gupta, Pranav; Burley, Jonathan; Melia, Colin D

    2016-08-20

    The Dynamic Gastric Model (DGM) is an in-vitro system which aims to closely replicate the complex mixing, dynamic biochemical release and emptying patterns of the human stomach. In this study, the DGM was used to understand how the polymer content of hydrophilic matrices influences drug release in fasted and fed dissolution environments. Matrices containing a soluble model drug (caffeine) and between 10 and 30% HPMC 2208 (METHOCEL(®) K4M CR) were studied in the DGM under simulated fasted and fed conditions. The results were compared with compendial USP I and USP II dissolution tests. The USP I and II tests clearly discriminated between formulations containing different polymer levels, whereas the fasted DGM test bracketed drug release profiles into three groups and was not able to distinguish between some different formulations. DGM tests in the fed state showed that drug release was substantially influenced by the presence of a high fat meal. Under these conditions, there was a delay before initial drug release, and differences between matrices with different polymer contents were no longer clear. Matrices containing the typical amount of HPMC polymer (30% w/w) exhibited similar release rates under fed and fasted DGM conditions, but matrices with lower polymer contents exhibited more rapid drug release in the fasted state. In both the fasted and fed states erosion mechanisms appeared to dominate drug release in the DGM: most likely a consequence of the changing, cylindrical forces exerted during simulated antral cycling. This is in contrast to the USP tests in which diffusion played a significant role in the drug release process. This study is one of the first publications where a series of extended release (ER) formulations have been studied in the DGM. The technique appears to offer a useful tool to explore the potential sensitivity of ER formulations with respect to the gastric environment, especially the presence of food.

  20. Use of the Dynamic Gastric Model as a tool for investigating fed and fasted sensitivities of low polymer content hydrophilic matrix formulations.

    PubMed

    Mason, Laura M; Chessa, Simona; Huatan, Hiep; Storey, David E; Gupta, Pranav; Burley, Jonathan; Melia, Colin D

    2016-08-20

    The Dynamic Gastric Model (DGM) is an in-vitro system which aims to closely replicate the complex mixing, dynamic biochemical release and emptying patterns of the human stomach. In this study, the DGM was used to understand how the polymer content of hydrophilic matrices influences drug release in fasted and fed dissolution environments. Matrices containing a soluble model drug (caffeine) and between 10 and 30% HPMC 2208 (METHOCEL(®) K4M CR) were studied in the DGM under simulated fasted and fed conditions. The results were compared with compendial USP I and USP II dissolution tests. The USP I and II tests clearly discriminated between formulations containing different polymer levels, whereas the fasted DGM test bracketed drug release profiles into three groups and was not able to distinguish between some different formulations. DGM tests in the fed state showed that drug release was substantially influenced by the presence of a high fat meal. Under these conditions, there was a delay before initial drug release, and differences between matrices with different polymer contents were no longer clear. Matrices containing the typical amount of HPMC polymer (30% w/w) exhibited similar release rates under fed and fasted DGM conditions, but matrices with lower polymer contents exhibited more rapid drug release in the fasted state. In both the fasted and fed states erosion mechanisms appeared to dominate drug release in the DGM: most likely a consequence of the changing, cylindrical forces exerted during simulated antral cycling. This is in contrast to the USP tests in which diffusion played a significant role in the drug release process. This study is one of the first publications where a series of extended release (ER) formulations have been studied in the DGM. The technique appears to offer a useful tool to explore the potential sensitivity of ER formulations with respect to the gastric environment, especially the presence of food. PMID:27311354