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Sample records for advanced practice registered

  1. Advanced Practice Registered Nurses. Final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2016-12-14

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is amending its medical regulations to permit full practice authority of three roles of VA advanced practice registered nurses (APRN) when they are acting within the scope of their VA employment. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNA) will not be included in VA's full practice authority under this final rule, but comment is requested on whether there are access issues or other unconsidered circumstances that might warrant their inclusion in a future rulemaking. The final rulemaking establishes the professional qualifications an individual must possess to be appointed as an APRN within VA, establishes the criteria under which VA may grant full practice authority to an APRN, and defines the scope of full practice authority for each of the three roles of APRN. The services provided by an APRN under full practice authority in VA are consistent with the nursing profession's standards of practice for such roles. This rulemaking increases veterans' access to VA health care by expanding the pool of qualified health care professionals who are authorized to provide primary health care and other related health care services to the full extent of their education, training, and certification, without the clinical supervision of physicians, and it permits VA to use its health care resources more effectively and in a manner that is consistent with the role of APRNs in the non-VA health care sector, while maintaining the patient-centered, safe, high-quality health care that veterans receive from VA.

  2. From challenges to advanced practice registered nursing role development: Qualitative interview study.

    PubMed

    Jokiniemi, Krista; Haatainen, Kaisa; Pietilä, Anna-Maija

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the factors hindering and facilitating the implementation of the advanced practice registered nurses role at Finnish university hospitals, and to examine the implications for its future development. A descriptive qualitative approach, using thematic individual interviews, was conducted in 2011 with a sample of 11 advanced practice registered nurses. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The advanced practice registered nurses role barriers had an impact on the role development needs. In turn, the facilitating factors helped encounter the challenges of the role, therefore having an impact on both the current role achievement, as well as contributing to the future role development. The factors hindering and facilitating the advanced practice registered nurses role need to be acknowledged to support the role implementation and planning of the future of the role. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Barriers to advanced practice registered nurse scope of practice: issue analysis.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Whitney J; Allen, Patricia E

    2012-09-01

    Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) have the unique potential to affect the changing needs of health care in the United States, but are restricted in care provision by varying state regulations and reimbursement policies. Although research shows APRN care to be safe, cost-effective, and of high quality, most medical professional organizations continue to oppose the removal of scope-of-practice barriers, citing patient safety concerns. Nursing organizations at the state and national levels have already begun to invest the time and resources needed for policy change. However, empirical evidence of APRN quality of care must be shared with policymakers, funding entities, and the public. Additionally, support must be garnered from the public and other health care disciplines. Scope-of-practice policy change will occur through the emergence of strong individuals within nursing professional organizations and the joining together of organizations to form one voice.

  4. Full Practice Authority for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses is a Gender Issue

    PubMed

    Rudner Lugo, Nancy

    2016-05-04

    In the United States, Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN) regulations are determined at the state level, through legislation and rule making. The lack of an evidence base to APRN regulation has resulted in a patchwork of varied regulations and requirements for nurse practitioners. The author begins this article by reviewing the history of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) in the United States and describing her study that assessed APRN fullpractice authority in states that ratified the ERA versus states that opposed it. She presents the study findings, limitations of the comparison, and discussion of the findings and implications. In conclusion, the findings demonstrated that progress toward full APRN practice will require building strategies for political support and framing the need to update APRN regulations in a manner that aligns with each state’s social and political values.

  5. Scope of Practice Barriers for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses: A State Task Force to Minimize Barriers.

    PubMed

    Lofgren, Maria A; Berends, Susan K; Reyes, Jimmy; Wycoff, Carmen; Kinnetz, Meghan; Frohling, Ami; Baker, Laura; Whitty, Sue; Dirks, Mary; OʼBrien, Mary

    2017-09-01

    Collegial relationships, administrative champions, and persistence are key components to breaking down barriers to advanced practice RN (APRN) practice. This article addresses how Iowa APRNs in a state-sanctioned task force identified barriers for practicing at the top of their licensure in a full practice authority state including defending the right to control the scope of nursing practice in court.

  6. The impact of interprofessional collaboration on the effectiveness, significance, and future of advanced practice registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Brooten, Dorothy; Youngblut, JoAnne M; Hannan, Jean; Guido-Sanz, Frank

    2012-06-01

    Interprofessional collaboration was essential for the conduct of research that demonstrated the effectiveness and significance of advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) in providing care, in reducing health care costs, and in developing innovative models of care for the nation's citizens. If the 2010 Affordable Care Act is to be implemented, APRNs, with their expertise and numbers, are essential to its implementation. Continued interdisciplinary collaboration is needed to expand the scope of APRN state practice regulations, to change reimbursement for APRN services, and to mute opposition to these changes by medical organizations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The role of the nurse executive in fostering and empowering the advanced practice registered nurse.

    PubMed

    Talbert, Tukea L

    2012-06-01

    The nurse executive plays a critical role in the design, oversight, and outcomes of the delivery of care and a key role in the success of the integration of advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) into an organization. The critical areas that nurse executives must consider to foster and empower APRNs are: (1) knowledge and self preparation, especially of political initiatives that affect the role, (2) visionary leadership and development of clear role expectations and appropriate credentialing, (3) strategies to reduce disconnection between the APRN and their practice setting, and (4) appropriate education and marketing of the role to stakeholders.

  8. Opioid therapy for chronic low back pain: prescribing considerations for advanced practice registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Lall, Maureen Patricia

    2014-12-01

    Chronic low back pain is a common, disabling, and costly condition, and advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) must carefully evaluate patients before considering long-term opioid therapy as a management strategy. APRNs should refer patients suspected of having a serious condition, or identifiable etiology, for specialist evaluation, as many patients improve with physical therapy, interventional pain management procedures, or surgical intervention. For patients unresponsive to nonopioid treatment, APRNs with an understanding of opioids, and the experience to assess and manage the risks of opioid misuse, abuse, and diversion, may consider long-term opioid therapy as part of a multimodal management plan. Such prescribing necessitates careful patient selection; informed consent; prudent opioid dosing and titration; and monitoring for response to treatment, adverse effects, and aberrant drug-taking behavior. Treatment and regulatory guidelines can assist APRNs in providing safe and effective care to patients with chronic low back pain.

  9. Advanced Practice Registered Nurses: Gateway to Screening for Bipolar Disorder in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Kriebel-Gasparro, Ann Marie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this mixed methods descriptive study was to explore Advanced Practice Registered Nurses’ (APRNs’) knowledge of bipolar disorder (BPD) and their perceptions of facilitators and barriers to screening patients with known depression for BPD. Methods: A mixed method study design using surveys on BPD knowledge and screening practices as well as focus group data collection method for facilitators and barriers to screening. Results: 89 APRNs completed the survey and 12 APRNs participated in the focus groups. APRNs in any practice setting had low knowledge scores of BPD. No significant differences in screening for BPD for primary and non primary care APRNs. Qualitative findings revealed screening relates to tool availability; time, unsure of when to screen, fear of sigma, symptoms knowledge of BPD, accessible referral system, personal experiences with BPD, and therapeutic relationships with patients. Conclusion: Misdiagnosis of BPD as unipolar depression is common in primary care settings, leading to a long lag time to optimal diagnosis and treatment. The wait time to diagnosis and treatment could be reduced if APRNs in primary care settings screen patients with a diagnosis of depression by using validated screening tools. These results can inform APRN practice and further research on the effectiveness of screening for reducing the morbidity and mortality of BPDs in primary care settings; underscores the need for integration of mental health care into primary care as well as the need for more APRN education on the diagnosis and management of bipolar disorders. PMID:27347256

  10. Current Status of Fellowship Programs for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses in the Nurse Practitioner Role.

    PubMed

    Camal Sanchez, Carlos Alberto

    2017-05-31

    Students completing an advanced practice RN program for practice as a nurse practitioner may seek options for further advancement. Although postgraduate clinical fellowship programs exist, information about such programs is not readily available. This article offers a resource for faculty to assist graduate students in finding advanced practice RN nurse practitioner fellowship programs in the United States.

  11. Integrating interprofessional collaboration skills into the advanced practice registered nurse socialization process.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Kathleen; Payne, Camille; Heye, Mary

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of interprofessional collaboration and practice as a means to provide patient-centered care and to decrease the current fragmentation of health care services in the 21st century provides a clear and unique opportunity for the advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) to assume a key role. For APRNs and other health care providers, to participate effectively as team members requires an interprofessional mindset. Development of interprofessional skills and knowledge for the APRN has been hindered by a silo approach to APRN role socialization. The Institute of Medicine Report (IOM; 2010) states that current health care systems should focus on team collaboration to deliver accessible, high-quality, patient-centered health care that addresses wellness and prevention of illness and adverse events, management of chronic illness, and increased capacity of all providers on the team. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the need to incorporate interprofessional education (IPE) into the socialization models used in advanced practice nursing programs. IPE requires moving beyond profession-specific educational efforts to engage students of different health care professions in interactive learning. Being able to work effectively as member of a clinical team while a student is a fundamental part of that learning (Interprofessional Education Collaborative Expert Panel, 2011). The objective of IPE curriculum models in graduate nursing programs is to educate APRNs in the development of an interprofessional mindset. Interprofessional collaboration and coordination are needed to achieve seamless transitions for patients between providers, specialties, and health care settings (IOM, 2010). Achieving the vision requires the continuous development of interprofessional competencies by APRNs as part of the learning process, so that upon entering the workforce, APRNs are ready to practice effective teamwork and team-based care. Socialization of the professional APRN

  12. Advanced registered nurse practitioners and physician assistants in the practice of pediatric neurosurgery: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    James, Hector E; MacGregor, Teresa L; Postlethwait, Richard A; Hofrichter, Paul B; Aldana, Phillip R

    2011-01-01

    This report addresses the clinical experience of the Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery with dedicated nurse practitioners and a physician assistant (PA) in outpatient and inpatient health care delivery, including surgical activities, as well as participation with the neurosurgery call schedule, quality improvement, teaching, and clinical research activities. We report on the activities of allied health personnel in the Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery for the purpose of identifying the current and future role for health care delivery, related to the care of the child with a neurosurgical condition. This addresses the participation of 2 advanced registered nurse practitioners (ARNPs) and a PA in the outpatient and inpatient setting, call schedule, interventions in and out of the operating room, quality improvement sessions, continuing medical education, clinical research, clinical databases, presentations in meetings, teaching, and scientific publications. This report covers the period from September 2003 (when the division was initiated) to February 2011. The division currently consists of 3 pediatric neurosurgeons, 2 ARNPs and 1 PA. The ARNPs/PA have participated in the pediatric neurosurgery clinic held 5 half-days per week, the monthly multidisciplinary clinics (Spinal Defects Clinic, Pediatric Neurosciences Clinic, and the Fetal Diagnosis and Therapy Center working group), and inpatient care, as well as assisting in operative interventions. They participated in the on-call schedule and attended the monthly quality improvement sessions of the division in addition to presenting papers and topics in the monthly continuing medical education session. The PA maintained a computerized database of operative interventions, coding, morbidities, and outcomes. All were involved in teaching activities. They prepared preoperative and postoperative orders and practice guidelines, and they were also involved in the preparation of the database of institutional clinical

  13. Reflective Journaling for Critical Thinking Development in Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Students.

    PubMed

    Raterink, Ginger

    2016-02-01

    Critical thinking, clinical decision making, and critical reflection have been identified as skills required of nurses in every clinical situation. The Educating Nurses: A Call for Radical Transformation report suggested that critical reflection is a key to improving the educational process. Reflective journaling is a tool that helps develop such skills. This article presents the tool of reflective journaling and the use of this process by educators working with students. It describes the use of reflective journaling in graduate nursing education, as well as a scoring process to evaluate the reflection and provide feedback. Students and faculty found the journaling to be helpful for reflection of a clinical situation focused on critical thinking skill development. The rubric scoring tool provided faculty with a method for feedback. Reflective journaling is a tool that faculty and students can use to develop critical thinking skills for the role of the advanced practice RN. A rubric scoring system offers a consistent format for feedback. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Advanced practice registered nurse usability testing of a tailored computer-mediated health communication program.

    PubMed

    Lin, Carolyn A; Neafsey, Patricia J; Anderson, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    This study tested the usability of a touch-screen-enabled Personal Education Program with advanced practice RNs. The Personal Education Program is designed to enhance medication adherence and reduce adverse self-medication behaviors in older adults with hypertension. An iterative research process was used, which involved the use of (1) pretrial focus groups to guide the design of system information architecture, (2) two different cycles of think-aloud trials to test the software interface, and (3) post-trial focus groups to gather feedback on the think-aloud studies. Results from this iterative usability-testing process were used to systematically modify and improve the three Personal Education Program prototype versions-the pilot, prototype 1, and prototype 2. Findings contrasting the two separate think-aloud trials showed that APRN users rated the Personal Education Program system usability, system information, and system-use satisfaction at a moderately high level between trials. In addition, errors using the interface were reduced by 76%, and the interface time was reduced by 18.5% between the two trials. The usability-testing processes used in this study ensured an interface design adapted to APRNs' needs and preferences to allow them to effectively use the computer-mediated health-communication technology in a clinical setting.

  15. Moving knowledge to action: a qualitative study of the Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario Advanced Clinical Practice Fellowship program.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Wendy A; Davies, Barbara L; Ploeg, Jenny; Eldred, Sue; Bajnok, Irmajean

    2013-03-01

    With funding from the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, the Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario (RNAO) established the Advanced Clinical Practice Fellowship (ACPF) program in 2000 to improve patient care and outcomes through advanced nursing knowledge and skills. This paper describes the perceptions of ACPF fellows regarding their influence on quality of care and patient outcomes, specifically, the types of practice change activities initiated, successful implementation and influence on outcomes, barriers encountered and strategies used to address them and influence change. Thirty telephone interviews were conducted with ACPF fellows after completing their fellowship. Interviews were analyzed using descriptive content analysis. Fifty-one practice change activities were identified. Ratings for successful implementation (1 = not successful, 10 = extremely successful) were 7.2/10; ratings for successful influence on outcomes were 7.4/10. Barriers identified were (a) resistant attitudes, (b) time and workload, (c) lack of administrative support and (d) lack of mentor's involvement. Strategies proposed were (a) building a knowledge base, (b) negotiation and dialogue and (c) self-reliance and persistence. The ACPF program is an innovative and highly utilized initiative. While this program supports strategic directions of government and nursing professional groups, further research will validate and expand on the specific ways in which the initiative influences professional development, healthcare delivery and patient outcomes.

  16. Advanced Practice Registered Nurses and Physician Assistants in Sleep Centers and Clinics: A Survey of Current Roles and Educational Background

    PubMed Central

    Colvin, Loretta; Cartwright, Ann; Collop, Nancy; Freedman, Neil; McLeod, Don; Weaver, Terri E.; Rogers, Ann E.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To survey Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN) and Physician Assistant (PA) utilization, roles and educational background within the field of sleep medicine. Methods: Electronic surveys distributed to American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) member centers and APRNs and PAs working within sleep centers and clinics. Results: Approximately 40% of responding AASM sleep centers reported utilizing APRNs or PAs in predominantly clinical roles. Of the APRNs and PAs surveyed, 95% reported responsibilities in sleep disordered breathing and more than 50% in insomnia and movement disorders. Most APRNs and PAs were prepared at the graduate level (89%), with sleep-specific education primarily through “on the job” training (86%). All APRNs surveyed were Nurse Practitioners (NPs), with approximately double the number of NPs compared to PAs. Conclusions: APRNs and PAs were reported in sleep centers at proportions similar to national estimates of NPs and PAs in physicians' offices. They report predominantly clinical roles, involving common sleep disorders. Given current predictions that the outpatient healthcare structure will change and the number of APRNs and PAs will increase, understanding the role and utilization of these professionals is necessary to plan for the future care of patients with sleep disorders. Surveyed APRNs and PAs reported a significant deficiency in formal and standardized sleep-specific education. Efforts to provide formal and standardized educational opportunities for APRNs and PAs that focus on their clinical roles within sleep centers could help fill a current educational gap. Citation: Colvin L, Cartwright Ann, Collop N, Freedman N, McLeod D, Weaver TE, Rogers AE. Advanced practice registered nurses and physician assistants in sleep centers and clinics: a survey of current roles and educational background. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(5):581-587. PMID:24812545

  17. Using Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) as Education in Advanced Practice Registered Nursing Education.

    PubMed

    Aronowitz, Teri; Aronowitz, Shoshana; Mardin-Small, Jennifer; Kim, BoRam

    Approximately 3 million nurses make up the U.S. health care workforce. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Institute of Medicine (2011) supported the call to strengthen the nursing profession by establishing global standards of educational criteria and outcomes. Throughout the world, health education is affected by fundamental inadequacies related to static, fragmented, and content-oriented curricula. There are inadequacies in our curricula, and nursing faculties are facing challenges with clinical placements (both the number and quality of these placements); therefore, alternative methods of providing practice to students need to be considered. A transformative agenda comprising changes in the way students are taught fully harnessing the potential of information and communications technology (i.e., simulation) is necessary. Simulated patient encounters and Objective Structured Clinical Examinations are 2 means to achieve needed practice in a safe environment. The purpose of this article is to show, by using simulation, how students can practice and be evaluated within their clinical practice role in a safe, controlled environment. In addition, this practice can (a) enable students to increase the complexity of their understanding and their autonomy and (b) educate students about social accountability, health and gender equity, social justice, and human rights. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. State variation in opioid and benzodiazepine prescriptions between independent and nonindependent advanced practice registered nurse prescribing states.

    PubMed

    Schirle, Lori; McCabe, Brian E

    2016-01-01

    Many people lack access to primary care services in the United States. One possible solution is to increase utilization of advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs). A common patient safety concern about independent prescribing by APRNs is that prescribers will increase prescriptions for medications with abuse/dependence potential, such as opioids or benzodiazepines. The purpose was to investigate the relationship in opioid- and benzodiazepine-prescribing rates between independent vs. nonindependent APRN prescribing states. Tertiary analysis of a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study reporting state variation in prescribing rates of opioids and benzodiazepines using 2012 Intercontinental Marketing Services Health retail prescription data representing 259,000,000 prescriptions. Analyses were performed using different definitions for independent states: (a) states allowing at least one APRN type independent prescribing and (b) states allowing all APRN types independent prescribing. ANOVA tests were used to test for differences in mean number of opioid- and benzodiazepine-prescribing rates per 100 residents. Analysis of Covariance tests were employed controlling for state characteristics previously determined to affect controlled substance-prescribing rates (e.g., Medicare rates, race, socioeconomic status, number of physicians/capita). There were significantly higher opioid and benzodiazepine prescriptions in states with nonindependent APRN prescribing laws than those in states with independent APRN prescribing laws and no significant differences in long-acting opioids or high-dose opioids. This study found no evidence to support the argument that independent prescribing increases prescriptions with abuse potential. Independent prescriptive authority, only one piece of APRN practice, has been one of the most controversial issues but one with great potential to help ease access to U.S. health care problems. Empirical evidence demonstrating the safety of

  19. American Dietetic Association and the National Kidney Foundation Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance for registered dietitians (generalist, specialty, and advanced) in nephrology care.

    PubMed

    Brommage, Deborah; Karalis, Maria; Martin, Cathi; McCarthy, Maureen; Benner, Deborah; Goeddeke-Merickel, Catherine M; Wiesen, Karen; Byham-Gray, Laura; House, Jennie Lang; Pavlinac, Jessie; McCann, Linda

    2009-09-01

    The American Dietetic Association (ADA) Renal Dietitians Practice Group (RPG) and the National Kidney Foundation Council on Renal Nutrition (NKF CRN), under the guidance of the ADA Quality Management Committee and Scope of Dietetics Practice Framework Sub-Committee, have developed the Standards of Practice (SOP) and Standards of Professional Performance (SOPP) for Registered Dietitians (Generalist, Specialty, and Advanced) in Nephrology Care (Supplementary Figures 1, 2, and 3 are available only online at www.jrnjournal.org). The SOP and SOPP documents are based upon the 2008 Revised Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance for Registered Dietitians (RDs)(1), which are part of ADA's Scope of Dietetics Practice Framework(2). The 2008 Revised SOP in Nutrition Care and SOPP, along with the Code of Ethics(3), guide the practice and performance of RDs in all settings.

  20. Using nursing intervention classification in an advance practice registered nurse-led preventive model for adults aging with developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Joan Earle

    2014-09-01

    To describe the most frequently reported and the most central nursing interventions in an advance practice registered nurse (APRN)-led in-home preventive intervention model for adults aging with developmental disabilities using the Nursing Intervention Classification (NIC) system. A descriptive data analysis and a market basket analysis were conducted on de-identified nominal nursing intervention data from two home visits conducted by nurse practitioners (NPs) from October 2010 to June 2012 for 80 community-dwelling adults with developmental disabilities, ages 29 to 68 years. The mean number of NIC interventions was 4.7 in the first visit and 6.0 in the second visit and last visit. NPs reported 45 different intervention types as classified using a standardized language, with 376 in Visit One and 470 in Visit Two. Approximately 85% of the sample received the Health education intervention. The market basket analysis revealed common pairs, triples, and quadruple sets of interventions in this preventive model. The NIC nursing interventions that occurred together repeatedly were: Health education, Weight management, Nutrition management, Health screening, and Behavior management. Five NIC interventions form the basis of an APRN-led preventive intervention model for individuals aging with lifelong disability, with health education as the most common intervention, combined with interventions to manage weight and nutrition, promote healthy behaviors, and encourage routine health screening. Less frequently reported NIC interventions suggest the need to tailor prevention to individual needs, whether acute or chronic. APRNs employing prevention among adults aging with developmental disabilities must anticipate the need to focus on health education strategies for health promotion and prevention as well as tailor and target a patient-centered approach to support self-management of health to promote healthy aging in place. These NIC interventions serve not only as a guide for

  1. Evidence-based use of electronic clinical tracking systems in advanced practice registered nurse education: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Branstetter, M Laurie; Smith, Lynette S; Brooks, Andrea F

    2014-07-01

    Over the past decade, the federal government has mandated healthcare providers to incorporate electronic health records into practice by 2015. This technological update in healthcare documentation has generated a need for advanced practice RN programs to incorporate information technology into education. The National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties created core competencies to guide program standards for advanced practice RN education. One core competency is Technology and Information Literacy. Educational programs are moving toward the utilization of electronic clinical tracking systems to capture students' clinical encounter data. The purpose of this integrative review was to evaluate current research on advanced practice RN students' documentation of clinical encounters utilizing electronic clinical tracking systems to meet advanced practice RN curriculum outcome goals in information technology as defined by the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties. The state of the science depicts student' and faculty attitudes, preferences, opinions, and data collections of students' clinical encounters. Although electronic clinical tracking systems were utilized to track students' clinical encounters, these systems have not been evaluated for meeting information technology core competency standards. Educational programs are utilizing electronic clinical tracking systems with limited evidence-based literature evaluating the ability of these systems to meet the core competencies in advanced practice RN programs.

  2. Education and Practice Barriers for Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Malina, Debra P; Izlar, Janice J

    2014-05-31

    Of the recognized advanced practice registered nursing (APRN) specialties, Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) have historically experienced the most vigorous and organized resistance from outside entities regarding rights to practice to the full scope of their education and experience. Opposition to nurse anesthetists practicing to the full scope of their education and training is present in the clinical arena and educational milieu.

  3. A proof-of-concept implementation of a unit-based advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) role: structural empowerment, role clarity and team effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Feistritzer, Nancye R; Jones, Pam O

    2014-03-01

    The quest for decreased cost of care and improved outcomes has created the need for highly effective clinical roles and teams. This article describes the role of a unit-based advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) within a proof-of-concept implementation of a new care delivery model, the Vanderbilt Anticipatory Care Team. Role clarity is central to both structural empowerment of the APRN and team effectiveness. A modified PeaceHealth Team Development Measure tool measured baseline role clarity as a component of overall team effectiveness. A role description for the unit-based APRN based on a comprehensive assessment of the proof-of-concept unit is provided.

  4. Interprofessional Obstetric Ultrasound Education: Successful Development of Online Learning Modules; Case-Based Seminars; and Skills Labs for Registered and Advanced Practice Nurses, Midwives, Physicians, and Trainees.

    PubMed

    Shaw-Battista, Jenna; Young-Lin, Nichole; Bearman, Sage; Dau, Kim; Vargas, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is an important aid in the clinical diagnosis and management of normal and complicated pregnancy and childbirth. The technology is widely applied to maternity care in the United States, where comprehensive standard ultrasound examinations are routine. Targeted scans are common and used for an increasing number of clinical indications due to emerging research and a greater availability of equipment with better image resolution at lower cost. These factors contribute to an increased demand for obstetric ultrasound education among students and providers of maternity care, despite a paucity of data to inform education program design and evaluation. To meet this demand, from 2012 to 2015 the University of California, San Francisco nurse-midwifery education program developed and implemented an interprofessional obstetric ultrasound course focused on clinical applications commonly managed by maternity care providers from different professions and disciplines. The course included matriculating students in nursing and medicine, as well as licensed practitioners such as registered and advanced practice nurses, midwives, and physicians and residents in obstetrics and gynecology and family medicine. After completing 10 online modules with a pre- and posttest of knowledge and interprofessional competencies related to teamwork and communication, trainees attended a case-based seminar and hands-on skills practicum with pregnant volunteers. The course aimed to establish a foundation for further supervised clinical training prior to independent practice of obstetric ultrasound. Course development was informed by professional guidelines and clinical and education research literature. This article describes the foundations, with a review of the challenges and solutions encountered in obstetric ultrasound education development and implementation. Our experience will inform educators who wish to facilitate obstetric ultrasound competency development among new and experienced

  5. The accuracy of age—sex registers, practice medical records and family practitioner committee registers

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Robin C.; Clayton, David G.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a point prevalent evaluation of the comparative reliability and validity of age-sex registers, practice medical records and family practitioner committee (FPC) registers from five teaching practices. They all exhibited similar levels of acceptable accuracy for patient names, sex and age, but the distribution of wrong addresses varied greatly: practice medical records 3·9 per cent, age-sex registers 8·2 per cent and FPC registers 17·1 per cent. The presence of a patient entry in all three registers was associated with a high degree of probability (95·3 per cent) that this individual would be a bona fide practice patient. The register population inflation rates were FPC records 5·5 per cent, practice records 9·8 per cent and age-sex registers 10·6 per cent, but there were large variations between individual practices. A statistically significant contribution to inflation rates came from the age groups 0 to 1 and 21 to 40 (p<0·0005). The register population deflation rates were minimal. The significance of these findings is discussed and the need for practices to determine the accuracy of their individual age-sex registers is stressed. A convenient and economic method for so doing is suggested. We also suggest ways of making it easier to construct and use age-sex registers, since they can be a most versatile and useful aid to research in general practice. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:7320986

  6. The Career Advancement for Registered Nurse Excellence Program.

    PubMed

    Fusilero, Jane; Lini, Linda; Prohaska, Priscilla; Szweda, Christine; Carney, Katie; Mion, Lorraine C

    2008-12-01

    Nurse administrators focus on factors that influence nurses' levels of satisfaction to reduce turnover and improve retention. One important determinant of nurses' satisfaction is the opportunity for professional development. On the basis of feedback from the nurses, a professional development program, Career Advancement for Registered Nurse Excellence, was instituted. The authors describe one approach to create opportunities to improve professional nurse development and the necessity for ongoing assessment of its impact on nurses' job satisfaction.

  7. Advanced urology nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Helen

    2014-03-01

    Urology nursing has developed as a specialty over the past few decades in response to several factors, workload demands being a prime reason. Nurses are taking on additional roles and activities including procedures such as cystoscopy and prostate biopsy, and running nurse-led clinics for a variety of urological conditions. Audits of advanced urological nursing practice have shown this care to be of a high standard and investigative procedures performed by these nurses match the diagnostic quality of existing services. Professional urological nursing organizations support the professional needs of these nurses, but the provision of education and training for advanced practice activities remains an unaddressed need. A range of confusing advanced urology nursing titles exists, and uncertainty regarding the roles and scope of practice for these nurses remains a concern. Acceptance and support from medical colleagues is required for the success of advanced urological nursing practice, but opinions on these roles remain divided.

  8. Advancing advanced practice - clarifying the conceptual confusion.

    PubMed

    Stasa, Helen; Cashin, Andrew; Buckley, Thomas; Donoghue, Judith

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, there has been a substantial increase in the number of nurses holding advanced practice nursing positions. However, the lack of clarity regarding key terms such as 'advanced practice nursing', 'advanced nursing practice', 'scope of practice' and 'extended practice', and international variability in how these terms are used has created significant confusion. This lack of clarity is problematic for nurses, other health professionals, health service consumers, educators and policy makers, particularly given the global mobility of the nursing workforce. 1) To highlight the significant international variability in how advanced practice nursing, and associated terms such as extended and expanded practice, are defined and regulated across a variety of different English speaking countries, including the US, UK, New Zealand, Canada and Australia. 2) To propose innovative formulations for how the nursing profession may attempt to ensure greater precision and agreement around advanced practice terminology. Discursive paper. It was found that there is a considerable lack of clarity regarding the precise definitions of key terms surrounding the discussion of advanced practice. Additionally, there are large disparities in how the five chosen countries regulate advanced practice nursing, and roles such as that of the nurse practitioner. It is suggested that the confusion regarding advanced practice terminology can be reduced definitionally by minimising the use of the term 'expanded practice'; defining advanced practice nursing to refer to the type of practice in defined and regulated advanced practice nursing scopes; and defining advanced nursing practice as expert practice within a regulated nursing scope. © 2013.

  9. 16 CFR 1011.4 - Forms of advance public notice of meetings; Public Calendar/Master Calendar and Federal Register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...; Public Calendar/Master Calendar and Federal Register. 1011.4 Section 1011.4 Commercial Practices CONSUMER... meetings; Public Calendar/Master Calendar and Federal Register. Advance notice of Agency activities is... Calendar/Master Calendar. (1) The printed Public Calendar and the Master Calendar maintained in the...

  10. 16 CFR 1011.4 - Forms of advance public notice of meetings; Public Calendar/Master Calendar and Federal Register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...; Public Calendar/Master Calendar and Federal Register. 1011.4 Section 1011.4 Commercial Practices CONSUMER... meetings; Public Calendar/Master Calendar and Federal Register. Advance notice of Agency activities is... Calendar/Master Calendar. (1) The printed Public Calendar and the Master Calendar maintained in the...

  11. 16 CFR 1011.4 - Forms of advance public notice of meetings; Public Calendar/Master Calendar and Federal Register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...; Public Calendar/Master Calendar and Federal Register. 1011.4 Section 1011.4 Commercial Practices CONSUMER... meetings; Public Calendar/Master Calendar and Federal Register. Advance notice of Agency activities is... Calendar/Master Calendar. (1) The printed Public Calendar and the Master Calendar maintained in the...

  12. A unique perspective on advanced practice nursing.

    PubMed

    Sieloff, C L; DiCarlo, B L; Killeen, M B; McDermott, S D

    1994-01-01

    This article presents a working definition of the advanced practice registered nurse (APRN). The types of nurses that could be included in this definition and the benefits of broadening the category are discussed, as well as possible reasons for the less inclusive, previous definition of this category. Strategies are proposed for resolving concerns about broadening the category.

  13. Registered nurse scope of practice in Australia: an integrative review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Birks, Melanie; Davis, Jenny; Smithson, John; Cant, Robyn

    2016-10-01

    The nursing profession comprises Australia's largest regulated health workforce yet its practice boundaries are poorly understood. The ambiguity surrounding the practice scope of nurses limits the profession's ability to fully respond to Australia's current and emerging health system challenges. The aim of this review is to explore the concept of scope of practice of registered nurses (RN) in Australia, as reflected in contemporary literature. An integrative review of literature relating to the scope of practice of the Australian registered nurse published between 2007 and 2014 was conducted. Twenty primary papers and nine secondary source papers were included in the review. Themes that arose from the analysis are: Scope of practice - an elusive concept; Scope of practice and context; Scope of practice and boundaries; and Scope of practice and advanced practice. Discussion of these themes includes consideration of the professional, legal and ethical significance of scope of practice for the RN, as well as the legislative, professional and contextual influences on, and challenges to, defining scope of practice at both a professional and individual level. For the Australian registered nursing workforce to continue to be a significant and influential contributor to Australia(')s dynamic healthcare context, a clearly articulated scope of practice is both necessary and overdue.

  14. 16 CFR 1011.4 - Forms of advance public notice of meetings; Public Calendar/Master Calendar and Federal Register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... meetings, selected staff meetings, advisory committee meetings, and other activities such as speeches and... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Forms of advance public notice of meetings... meetings; Public Calendar/Master Calendar and Federal Register. Advance notice of Agency activities...

  15. Registered dietitians' use of physical assessment parameters in professional practice.

    PubMed

    Mackle, Tami Jones; Touger-Decker, Riva; O'Sullivan Maillet, Julie; Holland, Bart K

    2003-12-01

    To examine how registered dietitians who have completed one of two physical assessment programs use the knowledge and skills learned in practice and whether method of instruction had an affect on use of skills in practice. Surveys were mailed to 891 persons, all of whom completed a Dietitians in Nutrition Support dietetic practice group or University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey continuing education program. Four hundred seventeen surveys were returned and 407 were usable. chi(2) analysis and stepwise logistic regression was used to analyze the data. Statistical significance was P=.05. Sixty percent of respondents worked in a clinic setting. Four of the five most-used competencies were similar between the two programs. More registered dietitians are using physical assessment competency information in clinical assessment, but not performing the competencies independently. Respondents with the Certified Diabetic Educator credential (P=.007) and Certified Nutrition Support Dietitians credential (P=.215) were more likely to use select physical assessment competencies. Confidence was reported as enhancing use of physical assessment competencies (n=153, 45%) and time was a barrier to using physical assessment competencies (n=159, 52%). There were no significant differences in use of physical assessment competencies between the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey program and the Dietitians in Nutrition Support program. Although not statistically significant, there appeared to be more use of physical assessment competencies by those who received additional training and those who completed the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey program. This study reveals that registered dietitians are using the values in clinical assessment, however they must move to actually performing physical assessment competencies in practice.

  16. Advanced Practice Nursing Education: Challenges and Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Cynthia; Kantrowitz-Gordon, Ira; Katz, Janet; Hirsch, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Nursing education programs may face significant difficulty as they struggle to prepare sufficient numbers of advanced practice registered nurses to fulfill the vision of helping to design an improved US healthcare system as described in the Institute of Medicine's “Future of nursing” report. This paper describes specific challenges and provides strategies to improve advanced practice nursing clinical education in order to ensure that a sufficient number of APRNs are available to work in educational, practice, and research settings. Best practices are identified through a review of classic and current nursing literature. Strategies include intensive interprofessional collaborations and radical curriculum revisions such as increased use of simulation and domestic and international service work. Nurse educators must work with all stakeholders to create effective and lasting change. PMID:22220273

  17. A clinical advancement program for registered nurses with an outpatient focus.

    PubMed

    Streeter, Bonnie L

    2007-01-01

    Clinical advancement programs have been in use for almost 30 years. Although clinical advancement programs have been designed for many areas, it appears that one has never been developed specific to the outpatient-focused registered nurse. This article describes the development of a clinical advancement program for non-hospital-based registered nurses employed at the Guthrie Clinic in Sayre, Pennsylvania and highlights recommendations for instituting this program in any outpatient setting.

  18. Developing practice protocols for advanced practice nursing.

    PubMed

    Paul, S

    1999-08-01

    In most states, the role of an advanced practice nurse is dependent on practice protocols that provide an organized method for analyzing and managing a disease or major symptom. They are also used to control the process of medical care and to specify steps in the delivery of that care. Creating appropriate practice protocols is one of the most important precursors to implementing the advanced practice role, because they virtually drive the clinician's ability to treat or manage clinical situations or disease states. This article outlines the steps involved in developing practice protocols and discusses the content that should be included in a protocol, providing an example of narrative and algorithm format protocols. Pros and cons, as well as legal issues related to practice protocols, are also presented.

  19. Preparation for Advanced Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frik, Seigina M.; Pollock, Susan E.

    1993-01-01

    Lehman College's graduate nursing program uses theory-based courses to prepare advanced nurse practitioners. Students increase scholarly inquiry skills and clinical decision making; use of nursing conceptual models helped them plan and evaluate their practice. (SK)

  20. 20 CFR 655.670 - Federal Register notice of determination of prevailing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Federal Register notice of determination of... Federal Register notice of determination of prevailing practice. (a) Pursuant to § 655.625(b), the Administrator shall publish in the Federal Register a notice of the Administrator's determination of...

  1. 20 CFR 655.670 - Federal Register notice of determination of prevailing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Federal Register notice of determination of... Federal Register notice of determination of prevailing practice. (a) Pursuant to § 655.625(b), the Administrator shall publish in the Federal Register a notice of the Administrator's determination of...

  2. 20 CFR 655.670 - Federal Register notice of determination of prevailing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Federal Register notice of determination of... Federal Register notice of determination of prevailing practice. (a) Pursuant to § 655.625(b), the Administrator shall publish in the Federal Register a notice of the Administrator's determination of...

  3. 20 CFR 655.670 - Federal Register notice of determination of prevailing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Federal Register notice of determination of... Federal Register notice of determination of prevailing practice. (a) Pursuant to § 655.625(b), the Administrator shall publish in the Federal Register a notice of the Administrator's determination of...

  4. 20 CFR 655.670 - Federal Register notice of determination of prevailing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Federal Register notice of determination of... Federal Register notice of determination of prevailing practice. (a) Pursuant to § 655.625(b), the Administrator shall publish in the Federal Register a notice of the Administrator's determination of...

  5. Identifying advanced practice: A national survey of a nursing workforce.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Glenn; Duffield, Christine; Doubrovsky, Anna; Adams, Margaret

    2016-03-01

    The size and flexibility of the nursing workforce has positioned nursing as central to the goals of health service improvement. Nursing's response to meeting these goals has resulted in proliferation of advanced practice nursing with a confusing array of practice profiles, titles and roles. Whilst numerous models and definitions of advanced practice nursing have been developed there is scant published research of significant scope that supports these models. Consequently there is an ongoing call in the literature for clarity and stability in nomenclature, and confusion in the health industry on how to optimise the utility of advanced practice nursing. To identify and delineate advanced practice from other levels of nursing practice through examination of a national nursing workforce. A cross-sectional electronic survey of nurses using the validated Advanced Practice Role Delineation tool based on the Strong Model of Advanced Practice. Study participants were registered nurses employed in a clinical service environment across all states and territories of Australia. A sample of 5662 registered nurses participated in the study. Domain means for each participant were calculated then means for nursing position titles were calculated. Position titles were grouped by delineation and were compared with one-way analysis of variance on domain means. The alpha for all tests was set at 0.05. Significant effects were examined with Scheffe post hoc comparisons to control for Type 1 error. The survey tool was able to identify position titles where nurses were practicing at an advanced level and to delineate this cohort from other levels of nursing practice, including nurse practitioner. The results show that nurses who practice at an advanced level are characterised by high mean scores across all Domains of the Strong Model of Advanced Practice. The mean scores of advanced practice nurses were significantly different from nurse practitioners in the Direct Care Domain and

  6. Nursing Home Registered Nurses' and Licensed Practical Nurses' Knowledge of Causes of Falls.

    PubMed

    Gray-Miceli, Deanna; de Cordova, Pamela B; Crane, Giles L; Quigley, Patricia; Ratcliffe, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    Reducing falls in nursing homes requires a knowledgeable nursing workforce. To test knowledge, 8 validated vignettes representing multifactorial fall causes were administered to 47 nurses from 3 nursing homes. Although licensed practical nurses scored higher than registered nurses in individual categories of falls, when we computed the average score of all 8 categories between groups of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses, registered nurses scored higher (F = 4.106; P < .05) in identifying 8 causal reasons for older adults to fall.

  7. Register and Genre in Course Design for Advanced Learners of Russian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moskver, Katherine V.

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the possibility of combining in the same course heritage learners who are borderline or seminative speakers with advanced language learners of Russian. After providing typology of advanced language learners in Russian and establishing that register and genre can be the focal point of such a course, the article discusses the…

  8. Register and Genre in Course Design for Advanced Learners of Russian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moskver, Katherine V.

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the possibility of combining in the same course heritage learners who are borderline or seminative speakers with advanced language learners of Russian. After providing typology of advanced language learners in Russian and establishing that register and genre can be the focal point of such a course, the article discusses the…

  9. Private practice--an advanced practice option.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Anne; Jarman, Heather

    2002-10-01

    Currently there is considerable debate on the role and function of nurses in Australia and internationally. This debate stems from developments within the nursing profession itself from political and economic issues in health platforms, due to restructuring of the health care system, consumer expectations of health care and nurses' expectations of a career. This paper provides the opportunity to reflect on the development of the role of the private practice (independent nurse) and where that role is situated in the nursing profession. This forms the basis for discussion of the development of specialty practice at an advanced level in Australia and to demonstrate its relationship with the nurse practitioner movement in Australia.

  10. Knowledge, attitudes, and predictors of advance directive discussions of registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Lipson, Amy R; Hausman, Alice J; Higgins, Patricia A; Burant, Christopher J

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and experiences regarding advance directives. A secondary purpose was to examine predictors of advance directive discussions between nurses and patients. Seven-hundred and nineteen respondents, randomly selected from a list of registered nurses in the state of Ohio, completed mailed questionnaires. Descriptive t test, chi-square, and logistic regression statistics were used in the data analyses. The respondents were knowledgeable and possessed positive attitudes about advance directives. Higher self-perceived confidence in advance directive discussion skills and the experience of caring for at least one patient with a current advance directive were found to be significant predictors of advance directive discussions. These findings suggest that experience with advance directives documents is critical for nurses' comfort and that developing interventions to further nurses' confidence in their discussion skills may increase advance directive discussions.

  11. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Scope of Practice for the Dietetic Technician, Registered.

    PubMed

    2013-06-01

    The Scope of Practice for the Dietetic Technician, Registered provides standards and tools to guide competence in performing nutrition and dietetics practice. Composed of statutory and individual components, the DTR's scope of practice is determined by state statute and the DTR's education, training, credentialing, and demonstrated and documented competence in practice. The Scope of Practice for the Dietetic Technician, Registered reflects the Academy's position on the DTR scope of practice and the essential technical assistance role of the DTR in providing safe timely person-centered care for the delivery of quality food and nutrition services.

  12. Registered Nurses’ Patient Education in Everyday Primary Care Practice

    PubMed Central

    Bergh, Anne-Louise; Friberg, Febe; Persson, Eva; Dahlborg-Lyckhage, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Nurses’ patient education is important for building patients’ knowledge, understanding, and preparedness for self-management. The aim of this study was to explore the conditions for nurses’ patient education work by focusing on managers’ discourses about patient education provided by nurses. In 2012, data were derived from three focus group interviews with primary care managers. Critical discourse analysis was used to analyze the transcribed interviews. The discursive practice comprised a discourse order of economic, medical, organizational, and didactic discourses. The economic discourse was the predominant one to which the organization had to adjust. The medical discourse was self-evident and unquestioned. Managers reorganized patient education routines and structures, generally due to economic constraints. Nurses’ pedagogical competence development was unclear, and practice-based experiences of patient education were considered very important, whereas theoretical pedagogical knowledge was considered less important. Managers’ support for nurses’ practical- and theoretical-based pedagogical competence development needs to be strengthened. PMID:28462314

  13. 31 CFR 306.26 - Redemption of registered securities at maturity, upon prior call, or for prerefunding or advance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... maturity, upon prior call, or for prerefunding or advance refunding. 306.26 Section 306.26 Money and... § 306.26 Redemption of registered securities at maturity, upon prior call, or for prerefunding or advance refunding. Registered securities presented and surrendered for redemption at maturity or pursuant...

  14. 31 CFR 306.26 - Redemption of registered securities at maturity, upon prior call, or for prerefunding or advance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... at maturity, upon prior call, or for prerefunding or advance refunding. 306.26 Section 306.26 Money... or Payment § 306.26 Redemption of registered securities at maturity, upon prior call, or for prerefunding or advance refunding. Registered securities presented and surrendered for redemption at maturity...

  15. 31 CFR 306.26 - Redemption of registered securities at maturity, upon prior call, or for prerefunding or advance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... maturity, upon prior call, or for prerefunding or advance refunding. 306.26 Section 306.26 Money and... § 306.26 Redemption of registered securities at maturity, upon prior call, or for prerefunding or advance refunding. Registered securities presented and surrendered for redemption at maturity or pursuant...

  16. 31 CFR 306.26 - Redemption of registered securities at maturity, upon prior call, or for prerefunding or advance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... maturity, upon prior call, or for prerefunding or advance refunding. 306.26 Section 306.26 Money and... § 306.26 Redemption of registered securities at maturity, upon prior call, or for prerefunding or advance refunding. Registered securities presented and surrendered for redemption at maturity or pursuant...

  17. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs…

  18. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs…

  19. ASRC Aerospace Corporation Selects Dynamically Reconfigurable Anadigm(Registered Trademark) FPAA For Advanced Data Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mata, Carlos T.

    2003-01-01

    Anadigm(registered trademark) today announced that ASRC Aerospace Corporation has designed Anadigm's dynamically reconfigurable Field Programmable Analog Array (FPAA) technology into an advanced data acquisition system developed under contract for NASA. ASRC Aerospace designed in the Anadigm(registered trademark) FPAA to provide complex analog signal conditioning in its intelligent, self-calibrating, and self-healing advanced data acquisition system (ADAS). The ADAS has potential applications in industrial, manufacturing, and aerospace markets. This system offers highly reliable operation while reducing the need for user interaction. Anadigm(registered trademark)'s dynamically reconfigurable FPAAs can be reconfigured in-system by the designer or on the fly by a microprocessor. A single device can thus be programmed to implement multiple analog functions and/or to adapt on-the-fly to maintain precision operation despite system degradation and aging. In the case of the ASRC advanced data acquisition system, the FPAA helps ensure that the system will continue to operating at 100% functionality despite changes in the environment, component degradation, and/or component failures.

  20. ASRC Aerospace Corporation Selects Dynamically Reconfigurable Anadigm(Registered Trademark) FPAA For Advanced Data Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mata, Carlos T.

    2003-01-01

    Anadigm(registered trademark) today announced that ASRC Aerospace Corporation has designed Anadigm's dynamically reconfigurable Field Programmable Analog Array (FPAA) technology into an advanced data acquisition system developed under contract for NASA. ASRC Aerospace designed in the Anadigm(registered trademark) FPAA to provide complex analog signal conditioning in its intelligent, self-calibrating, and self-healing advanced data acquisition system (ADAS). The ADAS has potential applications in industrial, manufacturing, and aerospace markets. This system offers highly reliable operation while reducing the need for user interaction. Anadigm(registered trademark)'s dynamically reconfigurable FPAAs can be reconfigured in-system by the designer or on the fly by a microprocessor. A single device can thus be programmed to implement multiple analog functions and/or to adapt on-the-fly to maintain precision operation despite system degradation and aging. In the case of the ASRC advanced data acquisition system, the FPAA helps ensure that the system will continue to operating at 100% functionality despite changes in the environment, component degradation, and/or component failures.

  1. Use of three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices by registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Cathy L

    2009-12-01

    To provide optimal postoperative pain relief, nursing practice should be based on the best evidence available. For over 20 years, results of studies regarding nurses' use of evidence-based practices, including postoperative pain assessment practices, have shown that nurses use the practices inconsistently. The present cross-sectional survey study was conducted to: 1) determine the extent to which registered nurses caring for postoperative patients experiencing pain used three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices; and 2) identify relationships among the level of adoption of evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices and selected characteristics of registered nurses. Data were collected from a convenience sample of all nurses caring for adult postoperative patients in two Midwestern hospitals where 443 surveys (46.9%) were returned. Respondents were aware of, but not using, three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices consistently. Registered nurses who used multiple sources to identify solutions to clinical practice problems or read one or two professional journals regularly were more likely to have adopted the three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices. Registered nurses need to be encouraged to use multiple sources to identify solutions to clinical practice problems, including professional nursing journals. Innovative approaches to promote the application of research to education and practice settings are needed. It is important to identify opinion leaders, because opinion leaders are an important resource in overcoming the barriers so that adoption of pain of evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices can proceed. Additional research is needed to identify what variables effect the adoption of evidence-based practices and identify interventions to improve the level of adoption.

  2. An ontological view of advanced practice nursing.

    PubMed

    Arslanian-Engoren, Cynthia; Hicks, Frank D; Whall, Ann L; Algase, Donna L

    2005-01-01

    Identifying, developing, and incorporating nursing's unique ontological and epistemological perspective into advanced practice nursing practice places priority on delivering care based on research-derived knowledge. Without a clear distinction of our metatheoretical space, we risk blindly adopting the practice values of other disciplines, which may not necessarily reflect those of nursing. A lack of focus may lead current advanced practice nursing curricula and emerging doctorate of nursing practice programs to mirror the logical positivist paradigm and perspective of medicine. This article presents an ontological perspective for advanced practice nursing education, practice, and research.

  3. New graduate registered nurses' knowledge of patient safety and practice: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Murray, Melanie; Sundin, Deborah; Cope, Vicki

    2017-03-02

    To critically appraise available literature and summarise evidence pertaining to the patient safety knowledge and practices of new graduate registered nurses. Responsibility for patient safety should not be limited to the practice of the bedside nurses, rather the responsibility of all in the healthcare system. Previous research identified lapses in safety across the health care, more specifically with new practitioners. Understanding these gaps and what may be employed to counteract them is vital to ensuring patient safety. A focused review of research literature. The review used key terms and Boolean operators across a 5-year time frame in CINAHL, Medline, psycINFO and Google Scholar for research articles pertaining to the area of enquiry. Eighty-four articles met the inclusion criteria, 39 discarded due to irrelevant material and 45 articles were included in the literature review. This review acknowledges that nursing has different stages of knowledge and practice capabilities. A theory-practice gap for new graduate registered nurses exists, and transition to practice is a key learning period setting new nurses on the path to becoming expert practitioners. Within the literature, there was little to no acknowledgement of patient safety knowledge of the newly registered nurse. Issues raised in the 1970s remain a concern for today's new graduate registered nurses. Research has recognised several factors affecting transition from nursing student to new graduate registered nurse. These factors are leaving new practitioners open to potential errors and risking patient safety. Understanding the knowledge of a new graduate registered nurse upon entering clinical practice may assist in organisations providing appropriate clinical and theoretical support to these nurses during their transition. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Clinical practice opportunities for advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Marfell, Julie A

    2002-09-01

    With approximately 132,000 practicing APNs and a continued need for APNs, the role will continue to expand. Many different business options and models for healthcare practice exist for the APN. Commonly thought of professional practice options for APNs include private practice, joint or collaborative practice, and group practice. Each model of professional practice brings with it different roles and responsibilities, rewards and challenges, and criteria for success. When evaluating different practice opportunities. APNs must be aware of each of these factors and evaluate each factor based on his or her chosen lifestyle. This article has presented an overview of common practice models and the roles and responsibilities, challenges and rewards, criteria for success, and lifestyle considerations inherent in each.

  5. The European Registered Toxicologist (ERT): Current status and prospects for advancement.

    PubMed

    Wilks, Martin F; Blaauboer, Bas J; Schulte-Hermann, Rolf; Wallace, Heather M; Galli, Corrado L; Haag-Grönlund, Marie; Matović, Vesna; Teixeira, Joao Paulo; Zilliacus, Johanna; Basaran, Nursen; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie; Bourrinet, Philippe; Brueller, Werner; Claude, Nancy; Miranda, Joana P; Gundert-Remy, Ursula; Håkansson, Helen; Kovatsi, Leda; Liesivuori, Jyrki; Lindeman, Brigitte; Lison, Dominique; Leconte, Isabelle; Martínez-López, Emma; Murias, Marek; Michel, Cécile; Scheepers, Paul T J; Stanley, Lesley; Tsatsakis, Aristidis

    2016-09-30

    Following its inception in 1994, the certification of European Registered Toxicologists (ERT) by EUROTOX has been recognized as ensuring professional competence as well as scientific integrity and credibility. Criteria and procedures for registration are contained in the ERT "Guidelines for Registration 2012". The register of ERT currently has over 1900 members. In order to continue the harmonisation of requirements and processes between national registering bodies as a prerequisite for official recognition of the ERT title as a standard, and to take account of recent developments in toxicology, an update of the ERT Guidelines has been prepared in a series of workshops by the EUROTOX subcommittees for education and registration, in consultation with representatives of national toxicology societies and registers. The update includes details of topics and learning outcomes for theoretical training, and how these can be assessed. The importance of continuing professional development as the cornerstone of re-registration is emphasised. To help with the process of harmonisation, it is necessary to collate and share best practices of registration conditions and procedures across Europe. Importantly, this information can also be used to audit compliance with the EUROTOX standards. As recognition of professionals in toxicology, including specialist qualifications, is becoming more important than ever, we believe that this can best be achieved based on the steps for harmonisation outlined here together with the proposed new Guidelines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. National agenda for advanced practice nursing: the practice doctorate.

    PubMed

    Clinton, Patricia; Sperhac, Arlene M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to provide the background and rationale for the practice doctorate in nursing. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing's Position Statement on the Practice Doctorate in Nursing, approved in October 2004, will be discussed. Outlined are some of the changes that will be needed in education, regulation, and advanced practice. Common questions and concerns that advanced practice nurses have, including titling, salary, and transitioning to the doctor of nursing practice degree, will be addressed.

  7. The Swedish National Diabetes Register in clinical practice and evaluation in primary health care.

    PubMed

    Hallgren Elfgren, Ing-Marie; Grodzinsky, Ewa; Törnvall, Eva

    2016-11-01

    Aim The purpose of this project is to describe the use of the Swedish National Diabetes Register (NDR) in clinical practice in a Swedish county and to specifically monitor the diabetes care routines at two separate primary health-care centres (PHCC) with a special focus on older patients.

  8. Examination of Motivating Factors Attracting Licensed Practical Nurses into a Registered Nursing Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Care, Wm. Dean

    A study identified characteristics and motivating factors that influenced licensed practical nurses (LPNs) to participate in a registered nursing (RN) upgrading program at a hospital in western Canada. A literature review considered the concepts of motivation, participation, adult learning, and life transitions and explored a variety of models and…

  9. Proportion of pet cats registered with a veterinary practice and factors influencing registration in the UK.

    PubMed

    Murray, Jane K; Gruffydd-Jones, Timothy J

    2012-06-01

    Registration of a cat with a veterinary practice is likely to be a critical factor for access to key preventative medicine. A cross-sectional study was conducted to collect data in the United Kingdom on the registration status of cats and potential explanatory variables. These data were also used to identify potential sources of bias associated with selecting controls from veterinary registered populations of cats due to differences between registered and unregistered cats. Cat owners reported that 13.6% (84/616) of their cats had not been registered with a veterinary practice since living at their current address. Multivariable logistic regression indicated that unregistered cats were significantly more likely than registered cats to be entire, to have not been vaccinated within the previous year, to be living in households in Northern Ireland and in households with an annual income <£10,000.(1) Whilst the neuter status and the vaccination status of the cat are likely to result from non-registration, the household location and annual income are factors that can be used to inform future interventions designed to increase the proportion of veterinary registered cats.

  10. 76 FR 31306 - Admittance to Practice and Roster of Registered Patent Attorneys and Agents Admitted to Practice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ... Patent and Trademark Office Admittance to Practice and Roster of Registered Patent Attorneys and Agents... Attorney, Office of Enrollment and Discipline, United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), P.O. Box... regulations governing the recognition and conduct of agents, attorneys or other persons...

  11. Advanced midwifery practice: An evolutionary concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Goemaes, Régine; Beeckman, Dimitri; Goossens, Joline; Shawe, Jill; Verhaeghe, Sofie; Van Hecke, Ann

    2016-11-01

    the concept of 'advanced midwifery practice' is explored to a limited extent in the international literature. However, a clear conception of advanced midwifery practice is vital to advance the discipline and to achieve both internal and external legitimacy. This concept analysis aims to clarify advanced midwifery practice and identify its components. a review of the literature was executed using Rodgers' evolutionary method of concept analysis to analyze the attributes, references, related terms, antecedents and consequences of advanced midwifery practice. an international consensus definition of advanced midwifery practice is currently lacking. Four major attributes of advanced midwife practitioners (AMPs) are identified: autonomy in practice, leadership, expertise, and research skills. A consensus was found on the need of preparation at master's level for AMPs. Such midwives have a broad and internationally varied scope of practice, fulfilling different roles such as clinicians, clinical and professional leaders, educators, consultants, managers, change agents, researchers, and auditors. Evidence illustrating the important part AMPs play on a clinical and strategic level is mounting. the findings of this concept analysis support a wide variety in the emergence, titles, roles, and scope of practice of AMPs. Research on clinical and strategic outcomes of care provided by AMPs supports further implementation of these roles. As the indistinctness of AMPs' titles and roles is one of the barriers for implementation, a clear conceptualization of advanced midwifery practice seems essential for successful implementation. an international debate and consensus on the defining elements of advanced midwifery practice could enhance the further development of midwifery as a profession and is a prerequisite for its successful implementation. Due to rising numbers of AMPs, extension of practice and elevated quality requirements in healthcare, more outcomes research exclusively

  12. Advances in grazing distribution practices

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Grazing distribution management practices are intended to improve livestock production efficiency while conserving or enhancing environmental conditions, and sustaining or promoting other ecosystem services on grazed lands. Ancient practices such as herding, fencing, vegetation treatment (e.g., fi...

  13. Patient safety in practical nurses' education: A cross-sectional survey of newly registered practical nurses in Canada.

    PubMed

    VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth; Sears, Nancy; Edge, Dana S; Tregunno, Deborah; Ginsburg, Liane

    2017-04-01

    Practical nurses have experienced an increasing scope of practice, including an expectation to care for complex patients and function on interdisciplinary teams. Little is known about the degree to which patient safety principles are addressed in practical nursing education. To examine self-reported patient safety competencies of practical nurses. A cross-sectional online survey (July 2014) and face-to-face interviews (June 2015). Ontario, Canada. Survey participants were practical nurses newly registered with the College of Nurses of Ontario between January 2012 and December 2013. Interview participants were faculty and students in a practical nursing program in Ontario. Survey respondents completed the Health Professional Education in Patient Safety Survey online. Self-reported competencies in various patient safety domains were compared between classroom and clinical settings. Faculty members were interviewed about educational preparation of practical nurses and students were interviewed to provide insight into interpretation of survey questions. The survey response rate was 28.4% (n=1104/3883). Mean domain scores indicated a high level of confidence in patient safety competence (<4.0/5.0). Confidence was highest in respondents registered with the College of Nurses of Ontario >2years and in those who obtained their education outside of Canada. Faculty believed their approach to teaching and learning instilled a deep understanding of the limits to practical nurse autonomous practice. Practical nurses were confident in what they learned about patient safety in their educational programs. The high degree of patient safety competence may be a true reflection of practical nurses understanding of, and comfort with, the limits of their knowledge and, ultimately, the limits of their individual autonomous practice. Further exploration as to whether the questionnaire requires additional modification for use with practical nurse populations is warranted. However, this

  14. How does care coordination provided by registered nurses "fit" within the organisational processes and professional relationships in the general practice context?

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Carolyn; Kendall, Elizabeth; St John, Winsome

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop understanding about how a registered nurse-provided care coordination model can "fit" within organisational processes and professional relationships in general practice. In this project, registered nurses were involved in implementation of registered nurse-provided care coordination, which aimed to improve quality of care and support patients with chronic conditions to maintain their care and manage their lifestyle. Focus group interviews were conducted with nurses using a semi-structured interview protocol. Interpretive analysis of interview data was conducted using Normalization Process Theory to structure data analysis and interpretation. Three core themes emerged: (1) pre-requisites for care coordination, (2) the intervention in context, and (3) achieving outcomes. Pre-requisites were adequate funding mechanisms, engaging organisational power-brokers, leadership roles, and utilising and valuing registered nurses' broad skill base. To ensure registered nurse-provided care coordination processes were sustainable and embedded, mentoring and support as well as allocated time were required. Finally, when registered nurse-provided care coordination was supported, positive client outcomes were achievable, and transformation of professional practice and development of advanced nursing roles was possible. Registered nurse-provided care coordination could "fit" within the context of general practice if it was adequately resourced. However, the heterogeneity of general practice can create an impasse that could be addressed through close attention to shared and agreed understandings. Successful development and implementation of registered nurse roles in care coordination requires attention to educational preparation, support of the individual nurse, and attention to organisational structures, financial implications and team member relationships.

  15. Preceptors, Interns, and Newly Registered Pharmacists' Perceptions of New Zealand Pharmacy Graduates' Preparedness to Practice

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Christy; Shaw, John

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the perceptions of pharmacy interns and newly registered pharmacists and preceptors regarding the preparedness of graduates to enter professional practice. Methods A questionnaire was developed from the New Zealand Competence Standards for the Pharmacy Profession (pharmacist level), with additional questions on communication skills included. The instrument contained 16 items and was mailed to preceptors (n=141), interns (n=72), and newly-registered pharmacists (n=101). Microsoft Excel (pivot tables) was used to analyse the quantitative responses. The final question asked respondents to provide free-text comments about the questionnaire, graduates and the program and responses were analyzed quantitatively and thematically. Results The response rates were 54.6% (n = 77) for preceptors, 100% (n = 72) for interns and 45.5% (n = 46), for newly registered pharmacists. The majority of responses (87.6%; n=2,562) were in agreement that the degree had prepared graduates for practice. Overall, preceptor perceptions of graduates' preparedness for practice were less favorable than graduates' self-perceptions of their preparedness. Four themes were identified from the free-text comments: the need for improved skills, more professional attitudes, better English communication, and additional training in extemporaneous compounding. Conclusion Feedback elicited from graduates and preceptors was helpful in identifying the strengths and weaknesses of a new bachelor of pharmacy (BPharm) program and proved useful in both the accreditation and curriculum revision processes. PMID:21045950

  16. The subject of pedagogy from theory to practice--the view of newly registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, Bodil; Nilsson, Gunilla

    2009-07-01

    The aim was to describe, from the newly registered nurses' perspective, specific events when using their pedagogical knowledge in their everyday clinical practice. The design was qualitative and the critical incident technique was used. Data was collected via interviews with ten newly registered nurses who graduated from the same University program 10 months earlier and are now employed at a university hospital. Two categories emerged in the analyses. The first category was "Pedagogical methods in theory" with the sub-categories Theory and the application of the course in practice, Knowledge of pedagogy and Information as a professional competence. The second category was "Pedagogical methods in everyday clinical practice" with sub-categories Factual knowledge versus pedagogical knowledge, Information and relatives, Difficulties when giving information, Understanding information received, Pedagogical tools, Collaboration in teams in pedagogical situations, and Time and giving information. By identifying specific events regarding pedagogical methods the findings can be useful for everyone from teachers and health-care managers to nurse students and newly registered nurses, to improve teaching methods in nurse education.

  17. An Academic-Practice Partnership to Advance DNP Education and Practice.

    PubMed

    Howard, Patricia B; Williams, Tracy E

    During the past decade, the growth of doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs in the United States has been phenomenal, with most focusing on the preparation of advanced practice registered nurses. Simultaneously, academic-practice partnerships have been a frequent subject of discussion for nursing's leading academic, administrative, and practice organizations. Numerous reports about academic-practice partnerships concerning aspects of baccalaureate nursing education exist, but partnership accounts for DNP programs are essentially nonexistent. The purpose of this article is to describe the initial phase of an academic-practice partnership between a multisystem health care organization and a college of nursing in a public land-grant university in the southeastern United States. The 7-year partnership agreement between Norton Healthcare and the University of Kentucky College of Nursing was designed to prepare 5 cohorts of 20 to 30 baccalaureate-prepared staff nurses as DNP graduates for advanced practice registered nurse eligibility. The description of partnering institution characteristics frames an emphasis on elements of the partnership proposal, contractual agreement, and partner responsibilities along with the logic model evaluation plan. Lessons learned include the importance of proposals and contracts to sustain the partnership, frequent communication to build trust, and strategic analysis for rapid response to challenging situations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Specialty practice entrepreneur: the advanced practice nurse.

    PubMed

    Kowal, N

    1998-01-01

    There are many opportunities in the health care arena to make a difference. The structured sense of change is "old school." New "surfers" of the system will be entrepreneurial in spirit, energy, and flexibility. There is no job description for the perfect person, only a sense of excitement and innovation that gives one the feeling energetic change is about to happen. In nursing, the risk takers are abundant in the APN role. It is the reason why they walk the line of provider/nurse. Making a difference to patients is important. Riding the waves of clinical care is the excitement. The final results are "the big waves" of life--a patient's life. A provider who defines the reality of practice creates a vision and skillfully bridges the road between the two. Design the surfboard--catch the wave.

  19. Education of advanced practice nurses in Canada.

    PubMed

    Martin-Misener, Ruth; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Harbman, Patricia; Donald, Faith; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Carter, Nancy; Kilpatrick, Kelley; DiCenso, Alba

    2010-12-01

    In Canada, education programs for the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) and nurse practitioner (NP) roles began 40 years ago. NP programs are offered in almost all provinces. Education for the CNS role has occurred through graduate nursing programs generically defined as providing preparation for advanced nursing practice. For this paper, we drew on pertinent sections of a scoping review of the literature and key informant interviews conducted for a decision support synthesis on advanced practice nursing to describe the following: (1) history of advanced practice nursing education in Canada, (2) current status of advanced practice nursing education in Canada, (3) curriculum issues, (4) interprofessional education, (5) resources for education and (6) continuing education. Although national frameworks defining advanced nursing practice and NP competencies provide some direction for education programs, Canada does not have countrywide standards of education for either the NP or CNS role. Inconsistency in the educational requirements for primary healthcare NPs continues to cause significant problems and interferes with inter-jurisdictional licensing portability. For both CNSs and NPs, there can be a mismatch between a generalized education and specialized practice. The value of interprofessional education in facilitating effective teamwork is emphasized. Recommendations for future directions for advanced practice nursing education are offered.

  20. Training Advanced Practice Palliative Care Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Deborah Witt

    1999-01-01

    Describes the role and responsibilities of advanced-practice nurses in palliative care and nursing's initiative in promoting high-quality care through the educational preparation of these nurses. (JOW)

  1. Establishing radiation therapy advanced practice in New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Karen; Jasperse, Marieke; Herst, Patries; Yielder, Jill

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Advanced practice (AP) is of increasing interest to many radiation therapists (RTs) both nationally and internationally. In New Zealand, initial research (2005–2008) showed strong support for the development of an AP role for medical radiation technologists (MRTs). Here, we report on a nationwide survey in which RTs validated and prioritised nine AP profiles for future development. Methods: All registered RTs in New Zealand (n = 260) were invited to take part in a survey in December 2011; 73 of whom returned a complete response. Results: RTs supported the implementation of AP roles in New Zealand and the requirement of a Master's degree qualification to underpin clinical knowledge. Most RTs endorsed the criteria attributed to each of the nine proposed AP profiles. The study identified that activities may qualify as either advanced practice or standard practice depending on the department. All participants agreed that an advanced practitioner should be a leader in the field, able to initiate and facilitate future developments within as well as outside this specific role. Acceptance of the AP roles by RTs and other health professionals as well as the availability of resources for successful implementation, were concerns expressed by some RTs. Conclusion: The authors recommend (1) the development of one scope of practice titled ‘advanced practitioner’ with generic and specialist criteria for each profile as the future career pathway, (2) promotion and support for the AP pathway by the New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology and the New Zealand Medical Radiation Technologists Board.

  2. Registered nurses' constructed meaning of concepts of solution and their use in clinical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, Lesley M.; Batts, Judith E.

    1991-12-01

    Since the introduction of nursing into tertiary institutions in Australia in 1975, there has been increasing interest in the teaching of physical science to nurses. Various courses in physical science for nurse students have been developed. They vary in length and content but there is agreement that concepts taught should be closely related to nursing applications. The choice of relevant concepts tends to be made by individual curriculum developers. This paper reports an examination of the use of physical science concepts and their relevance from the perspective of registered nurses practising in general ward areas. Inherent in this study is the premise that for registered nurses to have ideas of the physical science underlying their practice they must have constructed meaning first for these concepts. Specific chemical concepts related to solutions are discussed in these terms.

  3. Registered nurse job satisfaction and satisfaction with the professional practice model.

    PubMed

    McGlynn, Karen; Griffin, Mary Quinn; Donahue, Moreen; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes the initial assessment of job satisfaction and satisfaction with the professional practice environment of registered nurses working on units where a professional practice model was implemented and the relationship between these two variables. The nursing shortage has been linked to overall job satisfaction and specifically to nurses' satisfaction with the professional practice environment. Initiatives to increase retention and recruitment and decrease turnover have been linked to work satisfaction among nurses. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used with participants (N = 101) from four patient care units; this represented a 55% response rate. The nurses were moderately satisfied with the professional practice environment but had overall low job satisfaction. There was a significant negative relationship between overall work satisfaction and satisfaction with the professional practice environment (P < 0.0001). The introduction of the professional practice model may have raised awareness of the components of job satisfaction that were not being met. Thus, the nurses may have become more knowledgeable about the potential needs in these areas. Nurse managers and leaders must recognize that job satisfaction consists of many dimensions, and each of these dimensions is important to nurse retention. Implementation of a professional practice model may heighten awareness of the missing components within a practice environment and lead to decreased overall satisfaction. A broader understanding of characteristics associated with increased satisfaction may aid in development of organizational change necessary to retain and attract nurses. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Algorithm linking patients and general practices in Denmark using the Danish National Health Service Register

    PubMed Central

    Kjaersgaard, Maiken Ina Siegismund; Vedsted, Peter; Parner, Erik Thorlund; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Vestergaard, Mogens; Flarup, Kaare Rud; Fenger-Grøn, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Background The patient list system in Denmark assigns virtually all residents to a general practice. Nevertheless, historical information on this link between patient and general practice is not readily available for research purposes. Objectives To develop, implement, and evaluate the performance of an algorithm linking individual patients to their general practice by using information from the Danish National Health Service Register and the Danish Civil Registration System. Materials and methods The National Health Service Register contains information on all services provided by general practitioners from 1990 and onward. On the basis of these data and information on migration history and death obtained from the Civil Registration System, we developed an algorithm that allocated patients to a general practice on a monthly basis. We evaluated the performance of the algorithm between 2002 and 2007. During this time period, we had access to information on the link between patients and general practices. Agreement was assessed by the proportion of months for which the algorithm allocated patients to the correct general practice. We also assessed the proportion of all patients in the patient list system for which the algorithm was able to suggest an allocation. Results The overall agreement between algorithm and patient lists was 98.6%. We found slightly higher agreement for women (98.8%) than for men (98.4%) and lower agreement in the age group 18–34 years (97.1%) compared to all other age groups (≥98.6%). The algorithm had assigned 83% of all patients in the patient list system after 1 year of follow-up, 91% after 2 years of follow-up, and peaked at 94% during the fourth year. Conclusion We developed an algorithm that enables valid and nearly complete linkage between patients and general practices. The algorithm performs better in subgroups of patients with high health care needs. The algorithm constitutes a valuable tool for primary health care research. PMID

  5. Algorithm linking patients and general practices in Denmark using the Danish National Health Service Register.

    PubMed

    Kjaersgaard, Maiken Ina Siegismund; Vedsted, Peter; Parner, Erik Thorlund; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Vestergaard, Mogens; Flarup, Kaare Rud; Fenger-Grøn, Morten

    2016-01-01

    The patient list system in Denmark assigns virtually all residents to a general practice. Nevertheless, historical information on this link between patient and general practice is not readily available for research purposes. To develop, implement, and evaluate the performance of an algorithm linking individual patients to their general practice by using information from the Danish National Health Service Register and the Danish Civil Registration System. The National Health Service Register contains information on all services provided by general practitioners from 1990 and onward. On the basis of these data and information on migration history and death obtained from the Civil Registration System, we developed an algorithm that allocated patients to a general practice on a monthly basis. We evaluated the performance of the algorithm between 2002 and 2007. During this time period, we had access to information on the link between patients and general practices. Agreement was assessed by the proportion of months for which the algorithm allocated patients to the correct general practice. We also assessed the proportion of all patients in the patient list system for which the algorithm was able to suggest an allocation. The overall agreement between algorithm and patient lists was 98.6%. We found slightly higher agreement for women (98.8%) than for men (98.4%) and lower agreement in the age group 18-34 years (97.1%) compared to all other age groups (≥98.6%). The algorithm had assigned 83% of all patients in the patient list system after 1 year of follow-up, 91% after 2 years of follow-up, and peaked at 94% during the fourth year. We developed an algorithm that enables valid and nearly complete linkage between patients and general practices. The algorithm performs better in subgroups of patients with high health care needs. The algorithm constitutes a valuable tool for primary health care research.

  6. Development of the transformational advanced professional practice model.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Elizabeth C; Walden, Marlene

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the development of a professional practice model (PPM) for advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs). A literature review was conducted on PPMs. Simultaneous review of authoritative resources, including The National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF) and the Licensure, Accreditation, Certification and Education (LACE) Consensus Model, was performed. An expert panel was established to validate the transformational advanced professional practice (TAPP) model. APRNs are relied upon by organizations to provide leadership in the delivery of high-quality, cost-effective health care while improving access and eliminating preventable morbidities. Existing models fail to fully capture the professional scope of practice for APRNs. The TAPP model serves as a framework to guide professional development and mentorship of APRNs in seven domains of professional practice (DOPP). To meet the Institute of Medicine's recommendations for the future of nursing, APRNs should practice to the fullest extent of their education and training. Providing clarification regarding the DOPP of the APRN role is needed to standardized professional practice. The TAPP model is an inspiring blueprint that allows APRNs to model the way by delivering comprehensive health care in seven DOPP. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  7. Teaching Research Synthesis to Advanced Practice Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upchurch, Sandra; Brosnan, Christine A.; Grimes, Deanna E.

    2002-01-01

    A process for teaching research synthesis to advanced practice nurses includes two courses: a first research applications course in which students build bibliographic databases, practice statistical analysis, and develop search skills; and a second course in which they complete literature reviews or meta analyses of research on clinical practice…

  8. Teaching Research Synthesis to Advanced Practice Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upchurch, Sandra; Brosnan, Christine A.; Grimes, Deanna E.

    2002-01-01

    A process for teaching research synthesis to advanced practice nurses includes two courses: a first research applications course in which students build bibliographic databases, practice statistical analysis, and develop search skills; and a second course in which they complete literature reviews or meta analyses of research on clinical practice…

  9. Practical Advances in Petroleum Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chang S.; Robinson, Paul R.

    "This comprehensive book by Robinson and Hsu will certainly become the standard text book for the oil refining business...[A] must read for all who are associated with oil refining." - Dr. Walter Fritsch, Senior Vice President Refining, OMV "This book covers a very advanced horizon of petroleum processing technology. For all refiners facing regional and global environmental concerns, and for those who seek a more sophisticated understanding of the refining of petroleum resources, this book has been long in coming." - Mr. Naomasa Kondo, Cosmo Oil Company, Ltd.

  10. Moral distress in certified registered nurse anesthetists: implications for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Radzvin, Linda Clerici

    2011-02-01

    Registered nurses are frequently confronted with ethical dilemmas in their nursing practice. As a consequence of their decisions regarding ethical challenges, nurses report experiencing moral distress. This experience is often manifested by such feelings as anger, guilt, and sadness, and has been identified as a contributing factor to burnout and turnover in nursing. The purpose of this exploratory, descriptive study was to determine if Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) experience moral distress in their nursing practice. A random sample of 800 CRNAs from the registry of the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists was selected to participate in this study. Participating nurses were asked to complete a demographic data survey and the Ethics Stress Scale. Three hundred surveys were analyzed for this study. The data supported the assumption that CRNAs do experience moral distress in their nursing practice. Although a small number of nurse anesthetists experienced high levels of moral distress, CRNAs generally experienced moderate levels of moral distress. Moral distress was associated with situations in which anesthetists believed they were aware of the morally correct course of action but were unable to follow through with these behaviors. Also, CRNAs reported physical and psychological manifestations in relation to moral distress.

  11. A Delphi approach to developing a core competency framework for family practice registered nurses in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Moaveni, Azadeh; Gallinaro, Anna; Conn, Lesley Gotlib; Callahan, Sheilagh; Hammond, Melanie; Oandasan, Ivy

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes the results of a Delphi panel process to gain consensus on a role description and competency framework for family practice registered nurses (FP-RNs) in Ontario. Based on the findings from interviews and focus groups with family practice registered nurses and their inter-professional colleagues throughout Ontario, a core competency framework for FP-RNs emerged consisting of six distinct roles - Professional, Expert, Communicator, Synergist, Health Educator and Lifelong Learner - with accompanying enabling competency statements. This framework was refined and validated by a panel of experts from various nursing and family medicine associations and organizations through a Delphi consensus process. This core competency framework for FP-RNs was developed as a stepping stone for clarifying this very important and poorly understood role in family practice. As a result of this research, we expect a greater acknowledgement of the contributions and expertise of the FP-RN as well as the need to celebrate and profile this role. This work has already led to the establishment of a network of stakeholders from nursing organizations in Ontario who are considering opportunities to move the development and use of the competency framework forward.

  12. Story theory: advancing nursing practice scholarship.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mary Jane; Liehr, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Stories are a fundamental dimension of human experience and nursing practice. Story theory describes a narrative happening that occurs through intentional nurse-person dialogue. Seven inquiry phases are associated with story theory, including gathering the story, reconstructing the story, connecting it to the literature, naming the complicating health challenge, describing the story plot, identifying movement toward resolving, and gathering additional stories. This article describes the use of story theory to advance nursing practice scholarship in both academic and everyday nursing practice.

  13. Immersion scenarios bridge the education-practice gap for new graduate registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Mowry, Marianne J; Crump, Mark D

    2013-07-01

    An education gap exists for new graduate registered nurses in mental health because of insufficient clinical experience. In an effort to bridge this gap, defined competencies and assessments provided the framework and direction for educational immersion scenarios with standardized patients. Kirkpatrick's (1995) model directed the evaluation of the learning achieved through the immersion scenarios. A qualitative evaluation provided themes of realism, safety, and opportunity. Formative and summative competencies were met effectively and efficiently. This educational method can be used to actively achieve competency and enhance the transition to clinical practice.

  14. Senior nurse role expectations of graduate registered and enrolled nurses on commencement to practice.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Elisabeth R; McKenna, Lisa; D'Amore, Angelo

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports on a project to examine the expectations of senior nurses regarding graduate roles of registered and enrolled nurses educated in Victoria, Australia. Participants completed an online survey to indicate whether predetermined competencies were in the roles of graduate enrolled or registered nurses or not in the role of either nurse. Chi-squared analysis was used to identify differences between participant groups. Participants expressed variations in role expectations for the different level of graduate nurse. Although basic nursing care was undertaken by both graduate enrolled and registered nurses, no specific role was identified for enrolled nurses. Differences were found in the opinions of senior nurses over the roles of graduate nurses, demonstrating considerable variation in expectations. Management, education and research roles were not identified as the role of either nurse on graduation. Differences were found in the expectations of the different senior nurse groups regarding the roles of the enrolled nurse, particularly in the new skills taught in the enrolled nurse diploma program. Confusion exists regarding the roles of both types of nurse on graduation. Further research across Australia is required to clarify the roles of the different level of nurse in different practice contexts.

  15. Pharmacists' self-perceptions in relation to the 'Advanced Pharmacy Practice Framework'.

    PubMed

    Ali, A S; Fejzic, J; Grant, G D; Nissen, L M

    2016-01-01

    The Australian Pharmacy Practice Framework was developed by the Advanced Pharmacy Practice Steering Committee and endorsed by the Pharmacy Board of Australia in October 2012. The Steering Committee conducted a study that found practice portfolios to be the preferred method to assess and credential Advanced Pharmacy Practitioner, which is currently being piloted by the Australian Pharmacy Council. Credentialing is predicted to open to all pharmacists practising in Australia by November 2015. To explore how Australian pharmacists self-perceived being advanced in practice and how they related their level of practice to the Australian Advanced Pharmacy Practice Framework. This was an explorative, cross-sectional study with mixed methods analysis. Advanced Pharmacy Practice Framework, a review of the recent explorative study on Advanced Practice conducted by the Advanced Pharmacy Practice Framework Steering Committee and semi-structured interviews (n = 10) were utilized to create, refine and pilot the questionnaire. The questionnaire was advertised across pharmacy-organizational websites via a purposive sampling method. The target population were pharmacists currently registered in Australia. Seventy-two participants responded to the questionnaire. The participants were mostly female (56.9%) and in the 30-40 age group (26.4%). The pharmacists self-perceived their levels of practice as either entry, transition, consolidation or advanced, with the majority selecting the consolidation level (38.9%). Although nearly half (43.1%) of the participants had not seen the Framework beforehand, they defined Advanced Pharmacy Practice similarly to the definition outlined in the Framework, but also added specialization as a requirement. Pharmacists explained why they were practising at their level of practice, stating that not having more years of practice, lacking experience, or postgraduate/post-registration qualifications, and more involvement and recognition in practice were the

  16. Pain Management: Knowledge and Attitudes of Senior Nursing Students and Practicing Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messmer, Sherry

    2009-01-01

    Despite scientific advances in pain management, inadequate pain relief in hospitalized patients continues to be an on-going phenomenon. Although nurses do not prescribe medication for pain, the decision to administer pharmacological or other interventions for pain relief is part of nursing practice. Nurses play a critical role in the relief of…

  17. Pain Management: Knowledge and Attitudes of Senior Nursing Students and Practicing Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messmer, Sherry

    2009-01-01

    Despite scientific advances in pain management, inadequate pain relief in hospitalized patients continues to be an on-going phenomenon. Although nurses do not prescribe medication for pain, the decision to administer pharmacological or other interventions for pain relief is part of nursing practice. Nurses play a critical role in the relief of…

  18. Retainment incentives in three rural practice settings: variations in job satisfaction among staff registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Stratton, T D; Dunkin, J W; Juhl, N; Geller, J M

    1995-05-01

    Researchers have demonstrated repeatedly the importance of the relationship linking job satisfaction to employee retention. In rural areas of the country, where a persistent maldistribution of nurses continues to hamper health care delivery, the potential benefits of bolstering retention via enhancements in job satisfaction are of utmost utility to administrators and providers alike. Data were gathered from a multistate survey of registered nurses (RNs) practicing in rural hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, and community/public health settings (N = 1,647; response rate = 40.3%). The investigators found that the use of tuition reimbursement corresponded significantly with increased levels of job satisfaction among nurses in all three practice environments, as did day care services for nurses in acute care settings. Also, among hospital-based RNs, level of nursing education was found to be a significant factor in the relationship between tuition reimbursement and job satisfaction, with the highest level occurring among diploma-prepared nurses.

  19. 31 CFR 306.26 - Redemption of registered securities at maturity, upon prior call, or for prerefunding or advance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... at maturity, upon prior call, or for prerefunding or advance refunding. 306.26 Section 306.26 Money... Payment § 306.26 Redemption of registered securities at maturity, upon prior call, or for prerefunding or... to a call for redemption before maturity need not be assigned, unless the owner desires that...

  20. Medical nutrition therapy in adults with chronic kidney disease: integrating evidence and consensus into practice for the generalist registered dietitian nutritionist.

    PubMed

    Beto, Judith A; Ramirez, Wendy E; Bansal, Vinod K

    2014-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease is classified in stages 1 to 5 by the National Kidney Foundation's Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative depending on the level of renal function by glomerular filtration rate and, more recently, using further categorization depending on the level of glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria by the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes initiative. Registered dietitian nutritionists can be reimbursed for medical nutrition therapy in chronic kidney disease stages 3 to 4 for specific clients under Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services coverage. This predialysis medical nutrition therapy counseling has been shown to both potentially delay progression to stage 5 (renal replacement therapy) and decrease first-year mortality after initiation of hemodialysis. The Joint Standards Task Force of the American Dietetic Association (now the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics), the Renal Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group, and the National Kidney Foundation Council on Renal Nutrition collaboratively published 2009 Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance for generalist, specialty, and advanced practice registered dietitian nutritionists in nephrology care. The purpose of this article is to provide an update on current recommendations for screening, diagnosis, and treatment of adults with chronic kidney disease for application in clinical practice for the generalist registered dietitian nutritionist using the evidence-based library of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published clinical practice guidelines (ie, National Kidney Foundation Council on Renal Nutrition, Renal Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group, Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative, and Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes), the Nutrition Care Process model, and peer-reviewed literature.

  1. Developing the Advanced Practice Nurse in Catalonia.

    PubMed

    Comellas-Oliva, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    The development of advanced practice nurses (APN) has proved a challenge for nurses in countries such as the USA, Canada, Great Britain, and Australia among others. It is only in recent years that the system has been considered in Catalonia and Spain as a way to develop new roles to bring effectiveness and efficiency to the health system. From the standpoint of training and implementation of the above-mentioned new nursing roles, the following article aims to conceptualise APN and its reference models, as well as to contextualise and reflect on APN in Catalonia in order to assimilate them into advanced practice.

  2. Using advanced mobile devices in nursing practice--the views of nurses and nursing students.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Pauline; Petersson, Göran; Saveman, Britt-Inger; Nilsson, Gunilla

    2014-09-01

    Advanced mobile devices allow registered nurses and nursing students to keep up-to-date with expanding health-related knowledge but are rarely used in nursing in Sweden. This study aims at describing registered nurses' and nursing students' views regarding the use of advanced mobile devices in nursing practice. A cross-sectional study was completed in 2012; a total of 398 participants replied to a questionnaire, and descriptive statistics were applied. Results showed that the majority of the participants regarded an advanced mobile device to be useful, giving access to necessary information and also being useful in making notes, planning their work and saving time. Furthermore, the advanced mobile device was regarded to improve patient safety and the quality of care and to increase confidence. In order to continuously improve the safety and quality of health care, advanced mobile devices adjusted for nursing practice should be further developed, implemented and evaluated in research. © The Author(s) 2013.

  3. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: revised 2015 standards of practice and standards of professional performance for registered dietitian nutritionists (competent, proficient, and expert) in pediatric nutrition.

    PubMed

    Nevin-Folino, Nancy; Ogata, Beth N; Charney, Pamela J; Holt, Katrina; Brewer, Holly L; Sharrett, Mary K; Carney, Liesje N

    2015-03-01

    All of the health care professions recognize that care of infants and children is best managed as a specialty area of practice. Nutrition plays a key role in normal growth and development. Appropriate nutrition care is vital adjuvant therapy for infants and children with acute or chronic illness. Provision of nutrition services in pediatric practice requires that registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs) have advanced knowledge in the focus area of pediatric nutrition. Therefore, the Pediatric Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group, with guidance from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Management Committee, has developed this revision of the Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance for RDNs in Pediatric Nutrition as a resource for RDNs working in pediatric nutrition to assess skill level and to identify needs for professional development to advance practice in pediatric nutrition. This revision reflects recent advances in pediatric nutrition and replaces the previous Standards published in 2009. The Standards of Practice represent the four steps of the Nutrition Care Process as applied to the care of patients/clients. The Standards of Professional Performance represent six domains of professionalism: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. The Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance are complementary resources for RDNs working in pediatric nutrition and dietetics practice. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Registered Dietitian Nutritionists' Perspectives on Integrating Food and Water System Issues into Professional Practice.

    PubMed

    Heidelberger, Lindsay; Smith, Chery; Robinson-O'Brien, Ramona; Earthman, Carrie; Robien, Kim

    2017-02-01

    Sustainable agriculture encompasses economic, environmental, and social aspects of the food system. Members of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy) play an important role in promoting sustainable agriculture because they work in areas where they can influence the food purchasing decisions of foodservice operations and the public. To investigate behavior of registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs) toward incorporating sustainable agriculture principles into professional practice using the Theory of Planned Behavior. This cross-sectional study surveyed RDNs nationwide about their perspectives on incorporating sustainable agriculture issues into practice. The survey questions were based on a survey originally administered to Minnesota RDNs during 2002. The sample (N=626) was drawn from a randomly selected, national sample of Academy members. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, independent t tests, Pearson correlations, and stepwise regression. The sample was mostly white, female, and the average age was 45.4±12.2 years. Almost half of Academy RDNs (47%) reported incorporating environmental issues into their practice. All four Theory of Planned Behavior variables (intention, attitude, perceived behavior control, and subjective norm) were predictive of behavior to include sustainable agriculture issues into practice. Barriers to incorporating this topic into practice included lack of knowledge, ability, time, and employer support. This study found that most of the RDN respondents had heard of sustainable agriculture and nearly half reported including this topic in their professional practice. To integrate this topic into practice more consistently, RDNs need more knowledge, time, and employer support. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The uniqueness of elderly care: registered nurses' experience as preceptors during clinical practice in nursing homes and home-based care.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Elisabeth; Bengtsson, Mariette

    2014-04-01

    The expected shortage of registered nurses with an advanced degree as specialists in geriatric care or gerontology is imminent. Previous studies report that clinical practice where student nurses are supervised by registered nurses has a direct impact on how students perceive nursing as a profession and future career choice. Considering the anticipated need for well-educated and specialised nurses it is therefore, relevant as well as necessary to describe clinical learning with a focus on preceptorship in geriatric nursing care. This paper is a report of a study describing registered nurses' experience of precepting undergraduate student nurses during clinical practice in nursing homes and home-based care. A qualitative design, based on seven focus group interviews, was employed with 30 registered nurses with preceptor experience from nursing homes and home-based care for the elderly. Our findings present three precepting strategies that are unique to elderly care: preparing students for end of life care, facilitating a respectful approach to the older person and promoting creativity and independent work. The findings are discussed using a socio-cultural perspective and illustrate how communities of elderly practice can be valuable learning environments. © 2013.

  6. Nursing practice environment and registered nurses' job satisfaction in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H

    2012-08-01

     Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs in nursing homes.   The sample included 863 RNs working as staff RNs in 282 skilled nursing facilities in New Jersey. Two-level hierarchical linear modeling was used to account for the RNs nested by nursing homes.   Controlling for individual and nursing home characteristics, staff RNs' participation in facility affairs, supportive manager, and resource adequacy were positively associated with RNs' job satisfaction. Ownership status was significantly related to job satisfaction; RNs working in for-profit nursing homes were less satisfied.   A supportive practice environment is significantly associated with higher job satisfaction among RNs working in nursing homes. Unlike other nursing home characteristics, specific dimensions of the nursing practice environment can be modified through administrative actions to enhance RN job satisfaction.

  7. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses’ Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs in nursing homes. Design and Methods: The sample included 863 RNs working as staff RNs in 282 skilled nursing facilities in New Jersey. Two-level hierarchical linear modeling was used to account for the RNs nested by nursing homes. Results: Controlling for individual and nursing home characteristics, staff RNs’ participation in facility affairs, supportive manager, and resource adequacy were positively associated with RNs’ job satisfaction. Ownership status was significantly related to job satisfaction; RNs working in for-profit nursing homes were less satisfied. Implications: A supportive practice environment is significantly associated with higher job satisfaction among RNs working in nursing homes. Unlike other nursing home characteristics, specific dimensions of the nursing practice environment can be modified through administrative actions to enhance RN job satisfaction. PMID:21908803

  8. Pediatric Sedation: Using Secondary Data to Describe Registered Nurse Practice in Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Crego, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Children, often require sedation for procedures due to their developmental level and difficulty complying with positioning. There are few studies that describe nurse sedation practices or adverse events. Studies of pediatric sedation care have small sample sizes that are inadequate to detect adverse events. This study reports practices and outcomes of sedation delivered to children from infancy up to 14 years of age, that were monitored only by registered nurses (RNs) during diagnostic radiology procedures drawn from a sample of 12,584 cases from the Pediatric Sedation Research Consortium (PSRC) database. There were 727 adverse events (5.78%). However, no deaths, cardiac arrests, intubations or aspirations were reported in this sample. The most common adverse event was inadequate sedation/agitation/delirium 196 (155.8/10,000) and desaturation below baseline for greater than 30 seconds 173 (138/10,000). Further research comparing sedation practices and outcomes by type of providers, including nurses, are necessary to improve practice. PMID:25530734

  9. Advanced paternal age and childhood cancer in offspring: A nationwide register-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Urhoj, Stine Kjaer; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Hansen, Anne Vinkel; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Andersen, Per Kragh; Nybo Andersen, Anne-Marie

    2017-06-01

    Cancer initiation is presumed to occur in utero for many childhood cancers and it has been hypothesized that advanced paternal age may have an impact due to the increasing number of mutations in the sperm DNA with increasing paternal age. We examined the association between paternal age and specific types of childhood cancer in offspring in a large nationwide cohort of 1,904,363 children born in Denmark from 1978 through 2010. The children were identified in the Danish Medical Birth Registry and were linked to information from other national registers, including the Danish Cancer Registry. In total, 3,492 children were diagnosed with cancer before the age of 15 years. The adjusted hazard ratio of childhood cancer according to paternal age was estimated using Cox proportional hazards regressions. We found a 13% (95% confidence interval: 4-23%) higher hazard rate for every 5 years advantage in paternal age for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, while no clear association was found for acute myeloid leukemia (hazard ratio pr. 5 years = 1.02, 95% confidence interval: 0.80-1.30). The estimates for neoplasms in the central nervous system suggested a lower hazard rate with higher paternal age (hazard ratio pr. 5 years = 0.92, 95% confidence interval: 0.84-1.01). No clear associations were found for the remaining childhood cancer types. The findings suggest that paternal age is moderately associated with a higher rate of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, but not acute myeloid leukemia, in offspring, while no firm conclusions could be made for other specific cancer types. © 2017 UICC.

  10. Knowledge, attitude, and preventive practice survey regarding AIDS comparing registered to freelance commercial sex workers in Iloilo City, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Liu, T I; So, R

    1996-12-01

    A survey of female commercial sex workers (CSW) in Iloilo City, Philipines, was conducted in October and November 1995 to determine the level of knowledge, attitudes, and preventive practices regarding HIV/AIDS to guide future education programs. CSWs in the Philippines were categorized as registered or freelance. Registered CSWs included "hospitality girls" from licensed bars, night clubs, and massage parlors who have registered with the local social hygiene clinic (SHC). Freelance CSWs are not registered. 110 registered and 46 freelance CSWs were surveyed. We compared demographic data, scores from a basic knowledge test, and preventive practices between registered and freelance CSWs. Demographic data indicate that registered CSWs often originate from provinces outside of the Visayan Islands (25%) and most have never been married (93%). Freelance CSWs included more married (11%) and separated (11%) women from nearby cities. Knowledge test scores of registered and freelance CSWs were not significantly different. 90-96% of CSWs correctly answered questions regarding modes of transmission. However, 25% still believed it is possible to contract AIDS from using a public restroom. Registered and freelance CSWs believed their risks for AIDS to be equally great. However, 38% of freelance CSWs admit to never or almost never using condoms compared to 15% of registered CSWs. Licensed establishments and a support staff at the social hygiene clinic may provide a relatively structured working environment, giving registered CSWs security and confidence to insist on condom use. In most cases, condom use seems to depend on male customer compliance, and CSWs, especially freelancers, cannot afford to insist on condom use. The CSWs indicated that they learned most about AIDS through health personnel and television.

  11. Measuring the use of intuition by registered nurses in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Smith, A

    To administer the Smith Intuition Instrument to a sample of registered nurses to clarify its factors and test convergent validity. The Smith Intuition Instrument (27 items), a subscale of the Miller Intuitiveness Instrument (18 items), and demographic questions, were posted to 1,000 registered nurses in January 2006. With a response rate of 79% (n=79), the findings are preliminary. Principal component factor analysis with orthogonal varimax rotation resulted in four factors accounting for 70.8% of variance: spiritual connections (373%), reassuring feelings (14.6%), physical sensations (12.5%) and bad feelings (6.2%). Eigenvalues ranged from 1.1 to 6.7 and factor loadings ranged from 0.705 to 0.887 An 18-item instrument emerged with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.896 and a range of 0.806 to 0.892 for each factor. Pearson's correlation between the two intuition measures was 0.520. Psychometric evaluation demonstrated construct validity, convergent validity and reliability, and clarified the factors. The Smith Intuition Instrument is a valid and reliable tool for measuring nurses' use of intuition in clinical practice.

  12. Integrating Practice and Theory for Advancement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakewell, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    This is the first installment of a multipart practitioners' guide focused on strategic planning, organizational development, and legal issues. It features practical advice and powerful insights for implementing advancement programs that are organized, productive, and legal--and that generate top results. The author, an organizational development…

  13. Advanced practice nursing role: nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Pastorino, C

    1998-01-01

    Nurse Practitioners are advanced practice nurses (APNs) who provide primary and acute care to individuals in many settings. The NP diagnoses and treats medical and surgical conditions that require acute, short-term management and chronic, long-term treatment. States vary in regulating processes regarding collaborative agreements, prescriptive authority, medical staff privileges, and insurance/third party reimbursement.

  14. Advanced practice nurse as outcomes manager.

    PubMed

    Houston, S; Luquire, R

    1997-01-01

    Outcomes management as a patient management system has been designed to impact and improve select outcomes. Central to the development and implementation of best practice senario identified throughout outcomes management is the advanced practice nurse. SLEH has been in the forefront of development and implementation of an outcomes management program. This article describes the outcomes management position and shares the job description and performance evaluation used at this institution. The tools allow for measuring and quantifying the impact of the outcomes manager position on improving patient outcomes. The improvement of outcomes has increased the value of the advanced practice nurse and provided the institution with a solid future necessary for survival in a managed care market.

  15. Registered nurses' ideas of physical science concepts relevant to their clinical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, Lesley M.; Batts, Judith E.

    1996-09-01

    Experience in teaching science to nurses has raised the question of whether nurses' expressions of their understanding of concepts in physical science are adequate for professional practice. Nurses' descriptions of physical science concepts relevant to their practice must be explicated before educators can develop strategies to enhance nurses' learning of science. A cross-sectional study was undertaken to establish registered nurses' conceptions of physical science in their clinical practice. Data were collected using a multiple choice question survey, field work and focused interviews. Six categories of conceptions emerged from data analysis. Of the three which related to complexity of understanding “association” and “definition” were predominant and related in the main, to two of the three contextual categories “instrumentation/equipment” and “procedure.” There were few examples of the other two categories of “elaboration” and “body processes.” We argue that the conceptions held by the nurses were not adequate to allow them to fulfil their roles as professional practitioners in health care.

  16. Food safety practices and HACCP implementation: perceptions of registered dietitians and dietary managers.

    PubMed

    Strohbehn, Catherine H; Gilmore, Shirley A; Sneed, Jeannie

    2004-11-01

    Assess perceptions of consultant registered dietitians (RDs) and dietary managers about food safety practices and Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) implementation in assisted-living and long-term care facilities for the elderly. A mail questionnaire was developed using a modified Delphi process. Respondents were asked to assess food safety concerns in facilities where employed, identify prerequisite programs, rate barriers to implementation of HACCP, and provide demographic information. The survey was sent to a random sample from national membership in the American Dietetic Association's Consultant Dietitians in Health Care Facilities dietetic practice group (n=1,181) and to all dietary managers who listed assisted living as their employment location as part of membership in the national Dietary Managers Association (n=274). Descriptive statistics were calculated for each questionnaire item for all respondents. Factor analyses and t test comparisons of items and factors determined if significant differences existed between perceptions of RDs and dietary managers. Both RDs and dietary managers identified employee knowledge and experience and food practices as food safety concerns. More than 80% of both RDs and dietary managers agreed that the majority of listed HACCP prerequisites were necessary. Respondents identified the greatest barriers to implementation of HACCP as those related to time. Findings indicate a need to develop written policies for food safety, such as access to production areas. To minimize risk of foodborne illness to the elderly, barriers to implementation of HACCP should be addressed, including commitment of time and resources to develop systems, train employees, and retain employees.

  17. 27th Annual APRN legislative update: advancements continue for APRN practice.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Susanne J

    2015-01-16

    As the tides of healthcare in the United States continue to change, advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) are at the forefront of legislative history. This overview provides a snapshot of legislative and regulatory activity in 2014 as reported by state Boards of Nursing and nursing organizations representing APRNs.

  18. Do the nutrition qualifications and professional practices of registered exercise professionals align?

    PubMed

    McKean, Mark R; Slater, Gary; Oprescu, Florin; Burkett, Brendan J

    2015-04-01

    Australia has approximately 26,000 registered exercise professionals (REP), in comparison with 3,379 accredited practicing dietitians (APD). The REP workforce has the potential to reach more than 10% of the Australian population but there is limited data on their educational background and professional behaviors with regards to nutritional counseling of clients. The purpose of this research was to determine if REPs are working within their scope of practice and if their qualifications align with their practice, specifically as it relates to nutrition advice. Using a cross sectional descriptive study design, a self-administered online survey of REPs was conducted over 5 months. REPs were recruited through electronic and social media using a snowballing technique. The study focused on education, nutrition advice, and sources of information. A total of 286 respondents completed the survey, including 13 with tertiary dietetic qualifications i.e., APDs. The nationally recognized industry Certificate III/IV in Fitness was the most common qualification. The majority of REPs responding (88%) were working outside of their professional scope of practice, offering individual nutrition advice to clients across fitness and medical issues. This was despite 40% of REPs undertaking no further training in nutrition since graduating, and primarily basing advice on use of readily accessible sources of nutrition information. It is recommended the nutrition advice provided to REPs during training be limited to general nonmedical nutrition information in accordance with nationally endorsed evidence based guidelines and that issues pertaining to scope of practice be addressed with onward referral to other health professionals be advocated.

  19. Queensland nursing staffs' perceptions of the preparation for practice of registered and enrolled nurses.

    PubMed

    Hegney, Desley; Eley, Robert; Francis, Karen

    2013-10-01

    In Australia, unlike other countries, programmes which lead to registration as a registered or enrolled nurse (called "entry to practice" programmes) are carried out solely in the tertiary sector. In Australian nursing and the wider community, there continues to be a debate over the place of preparation and the "work readiness" of graduates. Despite several opinion papers on the preparation of registered nurses, there is a dearth of published research on the perceptions of the clinical nursing workforce on the suitability of the current preparation for practice models. Data were collected from approximately 3000 nurses in Queensland, Australia in 2007 and 2010. The aim of these studies was to ascertain issues around nursing work. This paper reports on qualitative data that were collected as part of that larger survey. Specifically this paper provides the thematic analysis of one open-ended question: "what are the five key issues and strategies that you see could improve nursing and nursing work?" as it was apparent when we undertook thematic analysis of this question that there was a major theme around the preparation of nurses for the nursing workforce. We therefore carried out a more detailed thematic analysis around this major theme. The major sub-themes that we identified from comments on the preparation of the nursing workforce were: perceptions of lack of clinical exposure and the need to increase the amount of clinical hours; the design of the curriculum, the place of preparation (solely within industry or a great focus on industry), financial consideration (students to be paid for their work); and in 2007 only, the need for students to have better time management. The findings suggest that a majority of respondents believed there should be changes to the entry to practice preparation for nurses. The major focus of these comments was the perception of insufficient clinical experience and inappropriate curriculum content. Thus, graduates are not "work ready

  20. Academy of nutrition and dietetics: revised 2014 standards of practice and standards of professional performance for registered dietitian nutritionists (competent, proficient, and expert) in sports nutrition and dietetics.

    PubMed

    Steinmuller, Patricia L; Kruskall, Laura J; Karpinski, Christine A; Manore, Melinda M; Macedonio, Michele A; Meyer, Nanna L

    2014-04-01

    Sports nutrition and dietetics addresses relationships of nutrition with physical activity, including weight management, exercise, and physical performance. Nutrition plays a key role in the prevention and treatment of obesity and chronic disease and for maintenance of health, and the ability to engage in physical activity, sports, and other aspects of physical performance. Thus, the Sports, Cardiovascular, and Wellness Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group, with guidance from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Management Committee, has developed the Revised 2014 Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance as a resource for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists working in sports nutrition and dietetics to assess their current skill levels and to identify areas for further professional development in this emerging practice area. The revised document reflects advances in sports nutrition and dietetics practice since the original standards were published in 2009 and replaces those standards. The Standards of Practice represents the four steps in the Nutrition Care Process as applied to the care of patients/clients. The Standards of Professional Performance covers six standards of professional performance: quality in practice, competence and accountability, provision of services, application of research, communication and application of knowledge, and utilization and management of resources. Within each standard, specific indicators provide measurable action statements that illustrate how the standards can be applied to practice. The indicators describe three skill levels (competent, proficient, and expert) for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists working in sports nutrition and dietetics. The Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance are complementary resources for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists in sports nutrition and dietetics practice. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc

  1. Development of a postbasic critical care program for registered nurses: a collaborative venture between education and practice.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Brenda

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a collaborative venture between nursing education and nursing practice focused on continuing education. A province-wide assessment of the educational needs of registered nurses identified the need to create a critical care education program. A critical care project team was established to develop a Postbasic Critical Care Program for registered nurses. The development of the project team, initiation of the program, and the mutual benefits and challenges posed by this collaborative venture are presented.

  2. The University of NSW electronic practice based research network: disease registers, data quality and utility.

    PubMed

    Taggart, J; Liaw, S T; Dennis, S; Yu, H; Rahimi, A; Jalaludin, B; Harris, M

    2012-01-01

    Accurate well-maintained registers are a prerequisite to co-ordinated care of patients with chronic diseases. Their effectiveness in enabling improved management is dependent on the quality of the information captured. This paper provides an overview into the methodology and data quality of the electronic Practice Based Research Network. Clinical records with no identifying information are routinely extracted from four general practices. The data are linked in the data warehouse. Data quality is assessed for completeness, correctness and consistency. Reports on data quality are given back to practices and semi-structured interviews provide information to interpret the results and discuss how data quality could be improved. Data quality is mostly complete for sex and date of birth but indigenous status, smoking and weight were incomplete. There are generally high levels of correctness and internal consistency. Completeness of records in assisting the management of diabetes patients using the annual cycle of care was poor. GPs often use the progress notes to enter information during the consultation and coding diagnoses was considered onerous. The routine capture of electronic clinical health records from primary health care and health services can be used to monitor performance and improve the quality of clinical records. There is a need for accurate and comprehensive clinical records to ensure the safety and quality of clinical practice. Understanding the true reasons for poor data quality is complex. Having a community-based research network may assist in answering some of these questions. Electronic health records are increasingly being used for secondary research and evaluation, beyond the primary purpose of supporting clinical care. The data must be of sufficient quality to support these purposes.

  3. Advancing practice relating to SEA alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    González, Ainhoa; Thérivel, Riki; Fry, John; Foley, Walter

    2015-07-15

    Developing and assessing alternatives is a key and central stage to Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA). However, research has repeatedly reported this stage as one of the most poorly undertaken aspects of the SEA process. Current practice limitations include belated consideration of reasonable alternatives, narrow scope of alternatives that often include unrealistic or retrofitted options, limited stakeholder and public involvement in their identification, assessment and selection, lack of systematic approaches to their assessment and comparison, and inadequate reporting of the ‘storyline’ on how they were identified, what the potential impacts are and why the preferred alternative was selected. These issues have resulted in objections and judicial reviews. On the positive side, a number of good practice case studies enable extraction of key lessons and formulation of a set of general recommendations to advance practice in SEA alternatives. In this paper, practical guidance on the identification and development of alternatives, their assessment and comparison, selection of the preferred option, and documentation of the process and the reasons for selection is provided and discussed to frame good practice approaches. - Highlights: • Alternatives are one of the most poorly completed aspects of Strategic Environmental Assessment. • Current practice limitations need to be addressed to enhance SEA effectiveness. • A set of recommendations are extracted from good practice case studies. • These recommendations can be applied across jurisdictions and sectors and tailored as necessary.

  4. Doctor of Nursing Practice Education: Impact on Advanced Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Paplham, Pamela; Austin-Ketch, Tammy

    2015-11-01

    To discuss how doctoral education, specifically the doctorate of nursing practice (DNP) can promote changes in advanced practice nursing. Medline, CINAHL, PubMed. Variations continue to exist in educational curricula, program plans, and scholarly projects, leading to a lack of consistency in experiential learning. At this point in time it is too early in the DNP implementation process to determine ultimate impact. Continuous program self-assessment and evaluation of DNP education programs will be of paramount importance to assure program quality and optimization of health trajectories. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Advanced practice nurses' scope of practice: a qualitative study of advanced clinical competencies.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Anna-Lena; Mannevaara, Bodil; Fagerström, Lisbeth

    2011-12-01

    To describe and explore Advanced Practice Nurses' clinical competencies and how these are expressed in clinical practice. Discussion concerning advanced clinical practice has been ongoing in the USA since the 1960s and in the UK since the late 1980s. Approximately 24 countries, excluding the USA, have implemented the role of Advance Practice Nurse (APN). In the Nordic countries, especially Sweden and Finland, APNs have been introduced in some organizations but their competency domains have not yet been clearly defined. The study's theoretical framework emanates from Aristotle's three-dimensional view of knowledge that is epistêmê, technê, and phronesis. Between October 2005 and January 2006, focus group interviews of Clinical Nurse Specialists who provide expert functions in pediatric, internal medicine, and surgical units (n = 26) and APN students (n = 8) were conducted. The data material was analyzed using inductive content analysis. Grouped into five main themes, the study results indicate that APNs possess advanced level clinical competencies in: (A) assessment of patients' caring needs and nursing care activities, (B) the caring relationship, (C) multi-professional teamwork, (D) development of competence and nursing care, and (E) leadership in a learning and caring culture. Clinical competencies consist of advanced skills, which typify an expanding role that offers new possibilities for holistic patient care practice. APNs' scope of practice is characterized by responsibility and competence in making autonomous judgments based on expanded clinical competence. On an advanced level, clinical competence consists not merely of advanced skills for assessing and meeting the needs of patients but also the creation of safe and trustful relationships with patients and collaboration with colleagues. APNs can realize advanced skills in their actions through their manner of knowing, doing, and being. © 2011 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2011

  6. The Path to Advanced Practice Licensure for Clinical Nurse Specialists in Washington State.

    PubMed

    Schoonover, Heather

    The aim of this study was to provide a review of the history and process to obtaining advanced practice licensure for clinical nurse specialists in Washington State. Before 2016, Washington State licensed certified nurse practitioners, certified nurse midwives, and certified nurse anesthetists under the designation of an advanced registered nurse practitioner; however, the state did not recognize clinical nurse specialists as advanced practice nurses. The work to drive the rule change began in 2007. The Washington Affiliate of the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists used the Power Elite Theory to guide advocacy activities, building coalitions and support for the desired rule changes. On January 8, 2016, the Washington State Nursing Care Quality Assurance Commission voted to amend the state's advanced practice rules, including clinical nurse specialists in the designation of an advanced practice nurse. Since the rule revision, clinical nurse specialists in Washington State have been granted advanced registered nurse practitioner licenses. Driving changes in state regulatory rules requires diligent advocacy, partnership, and a deep understanding of the state's rule-making processes. To be successful in changing rules, clinical nurse specialists must build strong partnerships with key influencers and understand the steps in practice required to make the desired changes.

  7. Compiling a register of patients with moderate or severe learning disabilities: experience at one United Kingdom general practice.

    PubMed

    Lodge, Keri-Michèle; Milnes, David; Gilbody, Simon M

    2011-03-01

    Background Identifying patients with learning disabilities within primary care is central to initiatives for improving the health of this population. UK general practitioners (GPs) receive additional income for maintaining registers of patients with learning disabilities as part of the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF), and may opt to provide Directed Enhanced Services (DES), which requires practices to maintain registers of patients with moderate or severe learning disabilities and offer them annual health checks.Objectives This paper describes the development of a register of patients with moderate or severe learning disabilities at one UK general practice.Methods A Read code search of one UK general practice's electronic medical records was conducted in order to identify patients with learning disabilities. Confirmation of diagnoses was sought by scrutinising records and GP verification. Cross-referencing with the practice QOF register of patients with learning disabilities of any severity, and the local authority's list of clients with learning disabilities, was performed.Results Of 15 001 patients, 229 (1.5%) were identified by the Read code search as possibly having learning disabilities. Scrutiny of records and GP verification confirmed 64 had learning disabilities and 24 did not, but the presence or absence of learning disability remained unclear in 141 cases. Cross-referencing with the QOF register (n=81) and local authority list (n=49) revealed little overlap.Conclusion Identifying learning disability and assessing its severity are tasks GPs may be unfamiliar with, and relying on Read code searches may result in under-detection. Further research is needed to define optimum strategies for identifying, cross-referencing and validating practice-based registers of patients with learning disabilities.

  8. Compiling a register of patients with moderate or severe learning disabilities: experience at one United Kingdom general practice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Identifying patients with learning disabilities within primary care is central to initiatives for improving the health of this population. UK general practitioners (GPs) receive additional income for maintaining registers of patients with learning disabilities as part of the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF), and may opt to provide Directed Enhanced Services (DES), which requires practices to maintain registers of patients with moderate or severe learning disabilities and offer them annual health checks. Objectives This paper describes the development of a register of patients with moderate or severe learning disabilities at one UK general practice. Methods A Read code search of one UK general practice's electronic medical records was conducted in order to identify patients with learning disabilities. Confirmation of diagnoses was sought by scrutinising records and GP verification. Cross-referencing with the practice QOF register of patients with learning disabilities of any severity, and the local authority's list of clients with learning disabilities, was performed. Results Of 15 001 patients, 229 (1.5%) were identified by the Read code search as possibly having learning disabilities. Scrutiny of records and GP verification confirmed 64 had learning disabilities and 24 did not, but the presence or absence of learning disability remained unclear in 141 cases. Cross-referencing with the QOF register (n=81) and local authority list (n=49) revealed little overlap. Conclusion Identifying learning disability and assessing its severity are tasks GPs may be unfamiliar with, and relying on Read code searches may result in under-detection. Further research is needed to define optimum strategies for identifying, cross-referencing and validating practice-based registers of patients with learning disabilities. PMID:22479290

  9. Descriptors of anesthesia support personnel from the perspective of practicing certified registered nurse anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Ford, Mary Bryant

    2012-12-01

    Anesthesia support personnel provide direct support to anesthesia providers. They bring extra supplies or equipment, prepare equipment for the case, maintain and clean equipment, and generally function as directed by the anesthesia provider. Given the importance of anesthesia support personnel in maintaining equipment essential to safe anesthesia practice, it is necessary to ensure that these individuals are properly trained and capable of complying with safety standards. However, the literature describing this population is limited and shows variation in the utilization and qualifications of these personnel. A prospective, descriptive survey of Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists was conducted to describe the education, training, job functions, and work environment of anesthesia support personnel. Results (N = 354) indicated that utilization of anesthesia support personnel varies by hospital but has a propensity to be greater at larger medical centers that have a level I or II trauma center. Formal supervision of these personnel is limited. Their tasks tended to be more frequently directed at equipment management, with a smaller portion of anesthesia support personnel performing tasks related to direct patient care. Further research is needed to adequately describe this population.

  10. Anthropometric Assessment for Bariatric Procedures in the Private Practice of a Registered Dietitian in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Carvajal, Claudia; Savino, Patricia; Ramirez, Andrea; Grajales, Martha; Nassar, Ricardo; Zundel, Natan

    2017-06-01

    Obesity and its consequences have now reached worldwide pandemic proportions. Among treatments, bariatric interventions are the most effective for weight reduction. Here, we describe the change in anthropometric measurements (AMs) of 615 adult bariatric procedure patients seen in the private practice of a registered dietitian (RD) in Bogotá, Colombia. Observational retrospective study of AMs recorded between 1996 and 2013 for patients who had laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG, n = 290), laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB, n = 207), and laparoscopic Roux-EN-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB, n = 36) or the non-surgical gastric balloon (GB, n = 82) procedure. Patients had three bimonthly follow-up visits. Paired t tests compared baseline (first) and 6-month (fourth) follow-up visit values. Differences in AMs between the baseline and fourth visits were statistically significant for the surgical interventions. A mean weight loss of 22 kg, equivalent to a 22% total body weight loss, together with significant reduction of the waist-to-height-ratio (WHtR)(p < 0.001) and body mass index (BMI)(p < 0.001), was observed across all procedures. The use of multiple AMs enables a comprehensive assessment of body composition in patients who undergo bariatric procedures. Our study is a useful resource for international future reference and highlights the impact that the RD can have on understanding and influencing the effectiveness of bariatric procedures.

  11. Advancing Cybersecurity Capability Measurement Using the CERT(registered trademark)-RMM Maturity Indicator Level Scale

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    Institute at permission@sei.cmu.edu. * These restrictions do not apply to U.S. government entities. CERT® and CMMI ® are registered marks of Carnegie...Attributes 4 1.3.4 Appraisal and Scoring Methods 5 1.3.5 Improvement Roadmaps 5 2 Introducing the Maturity Indicator Level (MIL) Concept 6 2.1...CERT®-RMM v1.2) utilizes the maturity architecture (levels and descriptions) as provided in the Capability Maturity Model Integration ( CMMI

  12. The Designing and Development of a Program to Prepare Inactive Registered Nurses for Reentry into Practice. Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belock, Shirley

    The planning and design of a course for the inactive registered nurse desiring to return to active practice is reported in this practicum paper. Current literature was reviewed with emphasis on the needs in rural states, such as Vermont, and characteristics of the target group. The first three modules of the course were developed, entitled: The…

  13. The Designing and Development of a Program to Prepare Inactive Registered Nurses for Reentry into Practice. Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belock, Shirley

    The planning and design of a course for the inactive registered nurse desiring to return to active practice is reported in this practicum paper. Current literature was reviewed with emphasis on the needs in rural states, such as Vermont, and characteristics of the target group. The first three modules of the course were developed, entitled: The…

  14. Trauma advanced practice nurses: implementing the role.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kathleen D; Molitor-Kirsch, Shirley; Elgart, Heidi; Ruffolo, Daria C; Sicoutris, Corinna; Meredith, Denise

    2004-01-01

    The need for advanced practice nurses (APN) has expanded over the past several decades as a result of the changing healthcare environment. Increased patient acuity and decreased resident work hours have lead to a need for additional clinical expertise at the bedside. APNs are becoming an integral part of the acute care delivery team in many trauma programs and intensive care units. To date little has been published regarding the role of the APN in Trauma Centers. This article outlines the wide variety of responsibilities and services provided by a select group of nurse practitioners who work in trauma centers throughout the United States.

  15. Educational Changes to Support Advanced Practice Nursing Education

    PubMed Central

    LeFlore, Judy L.; Thomas, Patricia E.

    2016-01-01

    Educational factors limit the number of advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) graduates to meet the growing workforce demands. Healthcare dynamics are necessitating a shift in how nursing education envisions, creates, and implements clinical learning opportunities. The current clinical education model in APRN programs continues to be the same as it was 45 years ago when the student numbers were much smaller. New approaches in graduate nursing education are needed to address the shortage of APRNs in primary and acute care areas. Determining competency based on the number of clinical hours can be inefficient, ineffective, and costly and limits the ability to increase capacity. Little research exists in graduate nursing education to support the effectiveness and efficiency of current hours of clinical required for nurse practitioner students. Simulation and academic-practice partnership models can offer innovative approaches to nurse practitioner education for clinical training, with the goal of producing graduates who can provide safe, quality care within the complex practice-based environment of the nation's evolving healthcare system. PMID:27465446

  16. Registered nurses' clinical reasoning in home healthcare clinical practice: A think-aloud study with protocol analysis.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Hege Mari; Slettebø, Åshild; Fossum, Mariann

    2016-05-01

    The home healthcare context can be unpredictable and complex, and requires registered nurses with a high level of clinical reasoning skills and professional autonomy. Thus, additional knowledge about registered nurses' clinical reasoning performance during patient home care is required. The aim of this study is to describe the cognitive processes and thinking strategies used by recently graduated registered nurses while caring for patients in home healthcare clinical practice. An exploratory qualitative think-aloud design with protocol analysis was used. Home healthcare visits to patients with stroke, diabetes, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in seven healthcare districts in southern Norway. A purposeful sample of eight registered nurses with one year of experience. Each nurse was interviewed using the concurrent think-aloud technique in three different patient home healthcare clinical practice visits. A total of 24 home healthcare visits occurred. Follow-up interviews were conducted with each participant. The think-aloud sessions were transcribed and analysed using three-step protocol analysis. Recently graduated registered nurses focused on both general nursing concepts and concepts specific to the domains required and tasks provided in home healthcare services as well as for different patient groups. Additionally, participants used several assertion types, cognitive processes, and thinking strategies. Our results showed that recently graduated registered nurses used both simple and complex cognitive processes involving both inductive and deductive reasoning. However, their reasoning was more reactive than proactive. The results may contribute to nursing practice in terms of developing effective nursing education programmes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A critical engagement with the concept of advancing nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Por, Jitna

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims to elucidate the concept of advancing nursing practice by engaging critically with developments in policy in the UK and ongoing debates in the international literature. Advancing practice to the outer edges of nursing's scope of practice is a challenge for the profession both in the UK and elsewhere. However, defining what advancing nursing practice is and what it might become remains problematic. Critical analysis of published papers and policy documents pertaining to the concept of advancing nursing practice. Advancing nursing practice as a concept offers enormous potential for nurses and has been the subject of numerous debates over the last 25 years. Previous history of advanced practice offers no imperative practice and informs us little about the future roles of advanced nurse practitioners. Current understanding about the role of advanced nurse practitioner and the nature of advanced practice remains unclear. Measuring the impact and outcome of the complex advanced practice nursing roles remains a challenge. While it is difficult to articulate succinctly what constitutes advancing nursing practice, defining the activities nurses engage in, the skills and competencies involved and the qualities and attributes required help reduce the ambiguities of the role.

  18. Teaching nursing students and newly registered nurses strategies to deal with violent behaviors in the professional practice environment.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Cynthia M

    2010-07-01

    Direct and indirect violent behaviors toward nursing students and newly registered nurses must be eliminated. Nursing students and newly registered nurses are particularly vulnerable to acts of violence. The article discusses the effect of violence on students and newly registered nurses, the role of the continuing education nurse in eliminating violence, examples of aggressive situations, and strategies to educate and support students and new nurses and empower them to eliminate violence directed toward them. Strategies include confrontation tips, implementation of violence-free contracts, participation in role-play activities, adoption of a professional communication technique, reflection journaling and cognitive recognition, promotion of carefronting, introduction of dialogue through the World Café, and use of nurse preceptors, practice partnerships, residency programs.

  19. An Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience in Academia

    PubMed Central

    Sylvia, Lynne M.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To create an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) that would encourage students to consider a career in academia. Design A 6-week, 6-credit elective APPE was created that offered students the opportunity to observe and participate in activities consistent with a full-time faculty appointment. Assessment A 9-question survey instrument was administered to 27 students who completed the APPE between 2000 and 2004 to determine the impact of the APPE on the student's career choice. Sixteen (59%) of the 27 students returned the completed survey instrument. Ten of the 16 respondents noted that the APPE had influenced their pursuit of a position with a teaching component. Conclusion Offering APPEs in academia may encourage students to incorporate teaching and scholarship into their career plans. PMID:17149426

  20. Neonatal resuscitation: advances in training and practice

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, Taylor; Umoren, Rachel A; Gray, Megan M

    2017-01-01

    Each year in the US, some four hundred thousand newborns need help breathing when they are born. Due to the frequent need for resuscitation at birth, it is vital to have evidence-based care guidelines and to provide effective neonatal resuscitation training. Every five years, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) reviews the science of neonatal resuscitation. In the US, the American Heart Association (AHA) develops treatment guidelines based on the ILCOR science review, and the Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) translates the AHA guidelines into an educational curriculum. In this report, we review recent advances in neonatal resuscitation training and practice. We begin with a review of the new 7th edition NRP training curriculum. Then, we examine key changes to the 2015 AHA neonatal resuscitation guidelines. The four components of the NRP curriculum reviewed here include eSim®, Performance Skills Stations, Integrated Skills Station, and Simulation and Debriefing. The key changes to the AHA neonatal resuscitation guidelines reviewed include initial steps of newborn care, positive-pressure ventilation, endotracheal intubation and use of laryngeal mask, chest compressions, medications, resuscitation of preterm newborns, and ethics and end-of-life care. We hope this report provides a succinct review of recent advances in neonatal resuscitation. PMID:28096704

  1. The First 500 Registrations to the Research Registry(®): Advancing Registration of Under-Registered Study Types.

    PubMed

    Agha, Riaz; Fowler, Alexander J; Limb, Christopher; Al Omran, Yasser; Sagoo, Harkiran; Koshy, Kiron; Jafree, Daniyal J; Anwar, Mohammed Omer; McCullogh, Peter; Orgill, Dennis Paul

    2016-01-01

    The Declaration of Helsinki 2013 encourages the registration of all research studies involving human participants. However, emphasis has been placed on prospective clinical trials, and it is estimated that only 10% of observational studies are registered. In response, Research Registry(®) was launched in February 2015; a retrospectively curated registry that is free and easy to use. Research Registry(®) enables prospective or retrospective registration of studies, including those study types that cannot be registered on existing registries. In this study, we describe the first 500 registrations on Research Registry(®). Since the launch of Research Registry(®) in February 2015, data of registrations have been collected, including type of studies registered, country of origin, and data curation activity. Inappropriate registrations, such as duplicates, were identified by the data curation process. These were removed from the database or modified as required. A quality score was assigned for each registration, based on Sir Austin Bradford Hill's criteria on what research studies should convey. Changes in quality scores over time were assessed. A total of 500 studies were registered on Research Registry(®) from February 2015 to October 2015, with a total of 1.7 million patients enrolled. The most common study types were retrospective cohort studies (37.2%), case series (14.8%), and first-in-man case reports (10.4%). Registrations were received from 57 different countries; the most submissions were received from Turkey, followed by China and the United Kingdom. Retrospective data curation identified 80 studies that were initially registered as the incorrect study type, and were subsequently correct. The Kruskal-Wallis test identified a significant improvement in quality scores for registrations from February 2015 to October 2015 (p < 0.0001). Since its conception in February 2015, Research Registry(®) has established itself as a new registry that is free, easy

  2. Ratings of the Performances of Practicing Internists by Hospital-Based Registered Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenrich, Marjorie D.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    In a survey, 1,851 registered nurses evaluated 232 internists' humanistic qualities, communication skills, and selected aspects of their clinical skills. Their ratings corresponded moderately with peer physician evaluations and had a common structure but were lower for several humanistic qualities. A reliable assessment required 11-15 nurses'…

  3. How registered nurses, licensed practical nurses and resident aides spend time in nursing homes: An observational study.

    PubMed

    McCloskey, Rose; Donovan, Cindy; Stewart, Connie; Donovan, Alicia

    2015-09-01

    Calls for improved conditions in nursing homes have pointed to the importance of optimizing the levels and skills of care providers. Understanding the work of care providers will help to determine if staff are being used to their full potential and if opportunities exist for improved efficiencies. To explore the activities of care providers in different nursing homes and to identify if variations exist within and across homes and shifts. A multi-centre cross-sectional observational work flow study was conducted in seven different nursing homes sites in one Canadian province. Data were collected by a research assistant who conducted 368 h of observation. The research assistant collected data by following an identical route in each site and recording observations on staff activities. Findings indicate staff activities vary across roles, sites and shifts. Licensed practical nurses (nursing assistants) have the greatest variation in their role while registered nurses have the least amount of variability. In some sites both registered nurses and licensed practical nurses perform activities that may be safely delegated to others. Care providers spend as much as 53.7% of their time engaged in non-value added activities. There may be opportunities for registered nurses and licensed practical nurses to delegate some of their activities to non-regulated workers. The time care providers spend in non-value activities suggest there may be opportunities to improve efficiencies within the nursing home setting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Competency frameworks for advanced practice nursing: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Sastre-Fullana, P; De Pedro-Gómez, J E; Bennasar-Veny, M; Serrano-Gallardo, P; Morales-Asencio, J M

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes a literature review that identified common traits in advanced practice nursing that are specific to competency development worldwide. There is a lack of international agreement on the definition of advanced practice nursing and its core competencies. Despite the lack of consensus, there is an ongoing process worldwide to establish and outline the standards and competencies for advanced practice nursing roles. International agencies, such as the International Council of Nurses, have provided general definitions for advanced practice nursing. Additionally, a set of competency standards for this aim has been developed. A literature review and a directed search of institutional websites were performed to identify specific developments in advanced practice nursing competencies and standards of practice. To determine a competency map specific to international advanced practice nursing, key documents were analysed using a qualitative approach based on content analysis to identify common traits among documents and countries. The review process identified 119 relevant journal articles related to advanced practice nursing competencies. Additionally, 97 documents from grey literature that were related to advanced practice nursing competency mapping were identified. From the text analysis, 17 worldwide transversal competency domains emerged. Despite the variety of patterns in international advanced practice nursing development, essential competency domains can be found in most national frameworks for the role development of international advanced practice nursing. These 17 core competencies can be used to further develop instruments that assess the perceived competency of advanced practice nurses. The results of this review can help policy developers and researchers develop instruments to compare advanced practice nursing services in various contexts and to examine their association with related outcomes. © 2014 International Council of Nurses.

  5. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Scope of Practice for the Registered Dietitian.

    PubMed

    2013-06-01

    The Scope of Practice for the RD provides standards and tools to guide competence in performing nutrition and dietetics practice. Composed of statutory and individual components, the RD's scope of practice is determined by state statute and the RD's individual scope of practice is based on education, training, credentialing, and demonstrated and documented competence in practice. The Scope of Practice for the RD reflects the Academy's position on the RD's scope of practice and the essential role of the RD in directing and coordinating safe, timely, person-centered care for the delivery of quality food and nutrition services.

  6. Advanced paternal age and stillbirth rate: a nationwide register-based cohort study of 944,031 pregnancies in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Urhoj, Stine Kjaer; Andersen, Per Kragh; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Davey Smith, George; Nybo Andersen, Anne-Marie

    2017-03-01

    Advanced paternal age has been associated with a variety of rare conditions and diseases of great public health impact. An increased number of de novo point mutations in sperm with increasing age have been suggested as a mechanism, which would likely also affect fetal viability. We examined the association between paternal age and stillbirth rate in a large nationwide cohort. We identified all pregnancies in Denmark from 1994 to 2010 carried to a gestational age of at least 22 completed weeks (n = 944,031) as registered in national registers and linked to individual register data about the parents. The hazard ratio of stillbirth according to paternal age was estimated, adjusted for maternal age in 1-year categories, year of outcome, and additionally parental educational levels. The relative rate of stillbirth (n = 4946) according to paternal age was found to be J-shaped with the highest hazard ratio for fathers aged more than 40 years when paternal age was modelled using restricted cubic splines. When modelled categorically, the adjusted hazard ratios of stillbirth were as follows: <25, 1.16 (95% confidence interval, CI 1.01-1.34); 25-29, 1.03 (95% CI 0.95-1.11); 35-39, 1.16 (95% CI 1.07-1.26); 40-44, 1.41 (95% CI 1.26-1.59); 45-49, 1.20 (95% CI 0.97-1.49); 50+, 1.58 (95% CI 1.18-2.11), compared with fathers aged 30-34 years. These estimates attenuated slightly when further adjusted for parental education. Our study showed that paternal age was associated with the relative rate of stillbirth in a J-shaped manner with the highest hazard ratios among fathers aged more than 40 years.

  7. Identifying components of advanced-level clinical nutrition practice: a Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Brody, Rebecca A; Byham-Gray, Laura; Touger-Decker, Riva; Passannante, Marian R; O'Sullivan Maillet, Julie

    2012-06-01

    The dietetics profession lacks a comprehensive definition of advanced-level practice. Using a three-round Delphi study with mailed surveys, expert consensus on four dimensions of advanced-level practice that define advanced practice registered dietitians (RDs) in clinical nutrition was explored. Purposive sampling identified 117 RDs who met advanced-level practice criteria. In round 1, experts rated the essentiality of statements on a 7-point ordinal scale and generated open-ended practice activity statements regarding the following four dimensions of advanced-level practice: professional knowledge, abilities and skills, approaches to practice, roles and relationships, and practice behaviors. Median ratings of 1.0 to 3.0 were defined as essential, 4.0 was neutral, and 5.0 to 7.0 were nonessential. In rounds 2 and 3, experts re-rated statements not reaching consensus by evaluating their previous responses, group median rating, and comments. Consensus was reached when the interquartile range of responses to a statement was ≤2.0. Eighty-five experts enrolled (72.6%); 76 (89.4%) completed all rounds. In total, 233 statements were rated, with 100% achieving consensus; 211 (90.6%) were essential to advanced practice RD clinical practice. Having a master's degree; completing an advanced practice residency; research coursework; and advanced continuing education were essential, as were having 8 years of experience; clinical nutrition knowledge/expertise; specialization; participation in research activities; and skills in technology and communication. Highly essential approaches to practice were systematic yet adaptable and used critical thinking and intuition and highly essential values encompassed professional growth and service to patients. Roles emphasized patient care and leadership. Essential practice activities within the nutrition care process included provision of complex patient-centered nutrition care using application of advanced knowledge/expertise and

  8. Evolvement of French advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Bonnel, Galadriel

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this review is to chronicle the development of the advanced practice nurse (APN) in France and compare international APN indictors of quality care with French studies. A review of the literature was performed by accessing the MEDLINE, Science Direct, and Cochrane Databases for studies of quality of care by APNs during 1965-2012. The author's participation on a national task force in collaboration with the French Ministry of Health provided additional information. After applying limits of this search, 36 studies fulfilled inclusion and exclusion criteria. In both the French and international APN nursing literature, the most frequently described quality of care measures were level of patient satisfaction and other patient outcomes (clinical and laboratory measures) according to evidence-based guidelines. In three French studies (nephrology, neuro-oncology, and urology settings), nurses performed direct patient care and were legally permitted to take on some limited responsibilities usually held by French physicians, including clinical examinations, diagnosing, and prescribing. Creation of the APN role in France can respond to public health challenges including the rising incidence of chronic diseases and an impending physician shortage. Future APN research should focus on rigorous, innovative design development including collaborative care models. ©2013 The Author(s) ©2013 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  9. Practice Experiences at a Single Institutional Practice Site to Improve Advanced Pharmacy Practice Examination Performance

    PubMed Central

    Britton, Mark L.; Wheeler, Richard E.; Carter, Sandra M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether sequential assignment of students to the same facility for institutional practice experiences improves their advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) examination scores. Design. Student volunteers were assigned to the same healthcare facility for all institutional introductory pharmacy practice experiences (IPPEs) and advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs). Other students completed institutional IPPEs and APPEs at separate healthcare facilities, ranging from 2 to 4 different facilities per student. APPE examination scores of students assigned to the same facility for all institutional learning experiences were compared with those of students assigned to more than 1 institutional practice site. Assessment. Holding grade point average constant, students assigned to the same facility for institutional IPPEs and APPEs scored 3 percentage points higher on the APPE institutional examination compared with students assigned to separate facilities for these experiences. Conclusion. Assigning students to the same facility for both institutional IPPEs and APPEs positively influenced knowledge-based APPE examination performance. PMID:24761021

  10. Epigenetics: An Emerging Framework for Advanced Practice Psychiatric Nursing.

    PubMed

    DeSocio, Janiece E

    2016-07-01

    The aims of this paper are to synthesize and report research findings from neuroscience and epigenetics that contribute to an emerging explanatory framework for advanced practice psychiatric nursing. Discoveries in neuroscience and epigenetics reveal synergistic mechanisms that support the integration of psychotherapy, psychopharmacology, and psychoeducation in practice. Advanced practice psychiatric nurses will benefit from an expanded knowledge base in neuroscience and epigenetics that informs and explains the scientific rationale for our integrated practice. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Trial Steering Committees in randomised controlled trials: A survey of registered clinical trials units to establish current practice and experiences.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Elizabeth J; Harman, Nicola L; Lane, J Athene; Lewis, Steff C; Murray, Gordon; Norrie, John; Sydes, Matt R; Gamble, Carrol

    2015-12-01

    The Medical Research Council Guidelines for Good Clinical Practice outlines a three-committee trial oversight structure--the day-to-day Trial Management Group, the Data Monitoring Committee and the Trial Steering Committee. In this model, the Trial Steering Committee is the executive committee that oversees the trial and considers the recommendations from the Data Monitoring Committee. There is yet to be in-depth consideration establishing the Trial Steering Committee's role and functionality. A survey to establish Trial Steering Committee's current practices, role and the use and opinion on the Medical Research Council guidelines was undertaken within UK Clinical Research Collaborative registered Clinical Trials Units. Completed surveys were obtained from 38 of 47 fully and partially registered Units. Individual items in the survey were analysed and reported spanning current Trial Steering Committee practices including its role, requirement and experience required for membership; methods to identify members; and meeting frequency. Terms (a document describing the committee's remit, objectives and functionality) were obtained and analysed from 21 of 33 Units with documents in place at their Unit. A total of 20 responders suggested aspects of the current Medical Research Council Guidelines that need improvement. We present the first survey reporting on practices within UK Clinical Research Collaborative registered Clinical Trials Units on the experience and remits of Trial Steering Committees. We have identified a widespread adoption of Medical Research Council Guidelines for Trial Steering Committees in the United Kingdom, but limitations in this existing provision have been identified that need to be addressed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Advanced maternal age increases the risk of very preterm birth, irrespective of parity: a population-based register study.

    PubMed

    Waldenström, U; Cnattingius, S; Vixner, L; Norman, M

    2017-07-01

    To investigate whether advanced maternal age is associated with preterm birth, irrespective of parity. Population-based registry study. Swedish Medical Birth Register. First, second, and third live singleton births to women aged 20 years or older in Sweden, from 1990 to 2011 (n = 2 009 068). Logistic regression analysis was used in each parity group to estimate risks of very and moderately preterm births to women at 20-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, and 40 years or older, using 25-29 years as the reference group. Odds ratios (ORs) were adjusted for year of birth, education, country of birth, smoking, body mass index, and history of preterm birth. Age-related risks of spontaneous and medically indicated preterm births were also investigated. Very preterm (22-31 weeks of gestation) and moderately preterm (32-36 weeks) births. Risks of very preterm birth increased with maternal age, irrespective of parity: adjusted ORs in first, second, and third births ranged from 1.18 to 1.28 at 30-34 years, from 1.59 to 1.70 at 35-39 years, and from 1.97 to 2.40 at ≥40 years. In moderately preterm births, age-related associations were weaker, but were statistically significant from 35-39 years in all parity groups. Advanced maternal age increased the risks of both spontaneous and medically indicated preterm births. Advanced maternal age is associated with an increased risk of preterm birth, irrespective of parity, especially very preterm birth. Women aged 35 years and older, expecting their first, second, or third births, should be regarded as a risk group for very preterm birth. Women aged 35 years and older should be regarded as a risk group for very preterm birth, irrespective of parity. © 2016 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  13. Advanced practice in paediatric intensive care: a review.

    PubMed

    Heward, Yvonne

    2009-02-01

    Advanced nursing roles are one way of encouraging experienced nurses to stay in clinical practice so they can provide expert care, develop practice and be role models for junior staff. A search for literature about advanced nurse practice in paediatric intensive care units in the UK identified just four articles, including one survey, but no reports of empirical research. There is some consensus on the nature and educational requirements for advanced practice but delays in agreeing a regulatory framework and failure to recognise the potential contribution of advanced roles mean that development is hindered. Although several UK units have developed or are developing the role, more insight and better evidence is needed on how nursing can be advanced in paediatric intensive care settings.

  14. Exploring Best Practices in Advance Care Planning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-11

    Background: The factors that influence completion of advance care planning for elderly adults in the primary care setting are poorly understood...System factors such as expansion of technological and medical options added to lists of tasks primary care providers are expected to complete in ever...to low rates of completion. We hypothesized that prioritized utilization of motivational interviewing during a visit specified to address advance care planning will enhance completion rates of appropriate planning.

  15. Articulating Scientific Practice: Understanding Dean Hamer's "Gay Gene" Study as Overlapping Material, Social and Rhetorical Registers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Rhetoricians have tried to develop a better understanding of the connection between words and things, but these attempts often employ a logic of representation that undermines a full examination of materiality and the complexity of scientific practice. A logic of articulation offers a viable alternative by focusing attention on the linkages…

  16. Articulating Scientific Practice: Understanding Dean Hamer's "Gay Gene" Study as Overlapping Material, Social and Rhetorical Registers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Rhetoricians have tried to develop a better understanding of the connection between words and things, but these attempts often employ a logic of representation that undermines a full examination of materiality and the complexity of scientific practice. A logic of articulation offers a viable alternative by focusing attention on the linkages…

  17. The Influence of Organizational Culture on Affinity for Knowledge Management Practices of Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    This study addressed the problems of hospitals' duplicated effort and ad hoc knowledge management (KM) practices. The purpose of this quantitative study was to examine the focus and type of organizational culture in order to describe and predict the relationship between organizational culture and the affinity for KM of nurses working in health…

  18. Genres and Registers of Student Report Writing: An SFL Perspective on Texts and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Sheena

    2012-01-01

    Academic literacies research has tended to focus on writers in context, while systemic functional linguistic research has tended to focus on texts in context. While literacy practices and written texts may be usefully analysed independently, this paper describes how an investigation of genres of academic writing in the BAWE (British Academic…

  19. The Influence of Organizational Culture on Affinity for Knowledge Management Practices of Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    This study addressed the problems of hospitals' duplicated effort and ad hoc knowledge management (KM) practices. The purpose of this quantitative study was to examine the focus and type of organizational culture in order to describe and predict the relationship between organizational culture and the affinity for KM of nurses working in health…

  20. Australia's first transition to professional practice in primary care program for graduate registered nurses: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Aggar, Christina; Bloomfield, Jacqueline; Thomas, Tamsin H; Gordon, Christopher J

    2017-01-01

    Increases in ageing, chronic illness and complex co-morbidities in the Australian population are adding pressure to the primary care nursing workforce. Initiatives to attract and retain nurses are needed to establish a sustainable and skilled future primary care nursing workforce. We implemented a transition to professional practice program in general practice settings for graduate nurses and evaluated graduate nurse competency, the graduate nurse experience and program satisfaction. This study aimed to determine whether a transition to professional practice program implemented in the general practice setting led to competent practice nurses in their first year post-graduation. A longitudinal, exploratory mixed-methods design was used to assess the pilot study. Data were collected at three times points (3, 6, 12 months) with complete data sets from graduate nurses (n = 4) and preceptors (n = 7). We assessed perceptions of the graduates' nursing competency and confidence, satisfaction with the preceptor/graduate relationship, and experiences and satisfaction with the program. Graduate nurse competency was assessed using the National Competency Standards for Nurses in General Practice. Semi-structured interviews with participants at Time 3 sought information about barriers, enablers, and the perceived impact of the program. Graduate nurses were found to be competent within their first year of clinical practice. Program perceptions from graduate nurses and preceptors were positive and the relationship between the graduate nurse and preceptor was key to this development. With appropriate support registered nurses can transition directly into primary care and are competent in their first year post-graduation. While wider implementation and research is needed, findings from this study demonstrate the potential value of transition to professional practice programs within primary care as a nursing workforce development strategy.

  1. Advanced practice nursing in Latin America and the Caribbean: regulation, education and practice

    PubMed Central

    Zug, Keri Elizabeth; Cassiani, Silvia Helena De Bortoli; Pulcini, Joyce; Garcia, Alessandra Bassalobre; Aguirre-Boza, Francisca; Park, Jeongyoung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to identify the current state of advanced practice nursing regulation, education and practice in Latin America and the Caribbean and the perception of nursing leaders in the region toward an advanced practice nursing role in primary health care to support Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage initiatives. Method: a descriptive cross-sectional design utilizing a web-based survey of 173 nursing leaders about their perceptions of the state of nursing practice and potential development of advanced practice nursing in their countries, including definition, work environment, regulation, education, nursing practice, nursing culture, and perceived receptiveness to an expanded role in primary health care. Result: the participants were largely familiar with the advanced practice nursing role, but most were unaware of or reported no current existing legislation for the advanced practice nursing role in their countries. Participants reported the need for increased faculty preparation and promotion of curricula reforms to emphasize primary health care programs to train advanced practice nurses. The vast majority of participants believed their countries' populations could benefit from an advanced practice nursing role in primary health care. Conclusion: strong legislative support and a solid educational framework are critical to the successful development of advanced practice nursing programs and practitioners to support Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage initiatives. PMID:27508923

  2. For love or money: registered nurses who return to hospital practice.

    PubMed

    Kent, Leslie N

    2015-07-01

    This commentary explores the value that returning nurses bring to the hospital setting. Nurses who have left hospital practice, usually due to family obligations, often return once the children are older. They return because they love nursing or they need to make money. They are at a point in their lives where they want to make a difference and miss the nurse-patient relationship. During recessions, nurses return to hospital practice because recessions tend to affect male dominated occupations. Research and policy literature on the returning and/or older nurse was reviewed with a focus on the benefits and challenges of having returning nurses in hospital practice. Returning nurses serve as role models to younger nurses. They also bring experiential knowledge to patient situations. There is limited research on this group of nurses. Yet they are ready for reentry in short order during nursing shortages. When they return, they add value to the hospital unit. Returning nurses want shorter workdays, alternative roles, and less physically taxing work. This can be achieved by offering flexible scheduling and work hours, creating niche roles and providing a more worker friendly physical environment. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Accrediting advanced practice: who will benefit?

    PubMed

    2017-02-27

    Last month I attended the 2017 RCN advanced nurse practitioner (ANP) conference in London. The title of the conference referred to 'moving the agenda forward' and there were many examples of ANPs pioneering developments in emergency care, primary care, acute medicine, mental health and other services.

  4. Advancing the Practice of Systems Engineering at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Ross; Jansma, Patti A.; Derro, Mary Ellen; Burns, Margaret J.; Blom, Kris

    2007-01-01

    Systems Engineering Advancement (SEA) practices at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is presented. The topics include: 1) SEA background; 2) Three Key Components of change; and 3) Three Support Components of Change.

  5. Implementation of a professional portfolio: a tool to demonstrate professional development for advanced practice.

    PubMed

    Chamblee, Tracy B; Dale, Juanita Conkin; Drews, Barbie; Spahis, Joanna; Hardin, Teri

    2015-01-01

    The literature has a gap related to professional development for APRNs. In the United States, many health care organizations use clinical advancement programs for registered nurses, but APRNs are not often included in these programs. If APRNs are included, advancement opportunities are very limited. At CMC, implementation of a professional portfolio resulted in increased satisfaction among APPs regarding their ability to showcase professional growth and expertise, as well as the uniqueness of their advanced practice. Use of the professional portfolio led to improved recognition by APS and organizational leaders of APP performance excellence during the annual performance evaluation, as well as improved recognition among APP colleagues in terms of nominations for honors and awards.

  6. Advancing Best Practices for Prescription Drug Labeling.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Stacy Cooper; Navaratnam, Prakash; Black, Heather; Russell, Allison L; Wolf, Michael S

    2015-11-01

    Problematic prescription drug labeling has been cited as a root cause of patient misunderstanding, medication errors, and nonadherence. Although numerous studies have recently been conducted to identify and test labeling best practices, the last systematic review on this topic was conducted a decade ago. The objective of this review was, therefore, to examine, summarize, and update best practices for conveying written prescription medication information and instructions to patients. English-language articles published from June 2005 to June 2015 were identified in MEDLINE and CINAHL by searching the following text words: 'medication OR prescription OR drug' AND 'label OR leaflet OR brochure OR pamphlet OR medication guide OR medication insert OR drug insert OR medication information OR drug information OR instructions' AND 'patient OR consumer.' Reference mining and secondary searches were also performed. A total of 31 articles providing evidence on how to improve written, prescription drug labeling for patient use were selected. Two reviewers independently screened articles, rated their quality, and abstracted data. Identified best practices included the use of plain language, improved formatting and organization, and more explicit instructions to improve patient comprehension. The use of icons had conflicting findings, and few studies tested whether practices improved knowledge or behaviors with patients' actual prescribed regimens. Future studies are needed to determine how specific modifications and improvements in drug labeling can enhance patient knowledge and behavior in actual use. Synthesizing best practices across all patient materials will create a more useful, coordinated system of prescription information. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Developing entry-to-practice nursing informatics competencies for registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Nagle, Lynn M; Crosby, Kristine; Frisch, Noreen; Borycki, Elizabeth; Donelle, Lorie; Hannah, Kathryn; Harris, Alexandra; Jetté, Sylvie; Shaben, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    Information and communication technologies (ICT) have brought about significant changes to the processes of health care delivery and changed how nurses perform in clinical, administrative, academic, and research settings. Because the potential benefits of ICT are significant, it is critical that new nurses have the knowledge and skills in informatics to provide safe and effective care. Despite the prevalence of technology in our day to day lives, and the potential significant benefits to patients, new nurses may not be prepared to work in this evolving reality. An important step in addressing this need for ICT preparation is to ensure that new graduates are entering the work force ready for technology-enabled care environments. In this paper, we describe the process and outcomes of developing informatics entry-to-practice competencies for adoption by Canadian Schools of Nursing.

  8. Phase II study of capecitabine (Xeloda (registered) ) and concomitant boost radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Sunil; Janjan, Nora A.; Skibber, John M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Wolff, Robert A.; Das, Prajnan; Delclos, Marc E.; Chang, George J.; Hoff, Paulo M.; Eng, Cathy; Brown, Thomas D.; Crane, Christopher H.; Feig, Barry W.; Morris, Jeffrey; Vadhan-Raj, Saroj; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Lin, Edward H. . E-mail: elin@u.washington.edu

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of capecitabine (Xeloda (registered) ), an oral fluoropyrimidine, as a radiosensitizer in the neoadjuvant treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: We conducted a phase II study of capecitabine (825 mg/m{sup 2} orally, twice daily continuous) with radiotherapy (52.5 Gy/30 fractions to the primary tumor and perirectal nodes) in 54 patients with LARC (node-negative {>=}T3 or any node-positive tumor) staged by endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). The primary endpoint was pathologic response rate; secondary endpoints included toxicity profiles and survival parameters. Results: Of the 54 patients (median age, 56.7 years; range, 21.3-78.7 years; male:female ratio, 1.7; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-1: 100%), 51 patients (94%) had T3N0 or T3N1 disease by EUS. Surgery was not performed in 3 patients; 2 of these patients had metastatic disease, and the third patient refused after a complete clinical response. Of the 51 patients evaluable for pathologic response, 9 patients (18%) achieved complete response, and 12 patients (24%) had microscopic residual disease (<10% viable cells). In addition, 26 patients of all 54 patients (51%) achieved T-downstaging, and 15 patients of 29 patients (52%) achieved N-downstaging. Grade 3/4 toxicities were radiation dermatitis (9%) and diarrhea (2%). Sphincter preservation rate for tumor {<=}5 cm from the anal verge was 67% (18/27). Conclusion: This regimen of radiotherapy plus capecitabine is well tolerated and is more convenient than protracted venous infusion of 5-FU. The pathologic response rate is comparable to our previous experience using protracted venous infusion 5-FU for LARC.

  9. Advanced Holistic Nursing Practice Narratives: A View of Caring Praxis.

    PubMed

    Enzman Hines, Mary; Gaughan, Jennifer

    2017-07-01

    Advanced holistic nurses (AHNs), emerging as leaders in health care transformation, are described as caregivers, but caring and caring-within-practice are often difficult for AHNs to explicate. Nursing research that describes caring in advanced practice is limited. Only one study has been reported that focused on describing practice for advanced practice nurses. This article presents a secondary analysis of narratives from a larger qualitative study of holistic pediatric nursing practice. From that study, narratives provided by six holistic advanced practice nurse participants, working in a variety of settings, were extracted and analyzed to illuminate caring-within-practice. Participants were asked to write a reflective narrative on a patient exemplar of caring and use John's model for structured reflection to provide a deeper reflection on their narrative of caring. Researchers analyzed the extracted narratives to identify common themes of caring-within-practice. Seven themes emerged depicting AHNs caring-within-practice: normalizing the environment, creating sacred space, being rooted in compassion, the art of being present, establishing trust-caring, coaching the family as caregiver, and inspiration for the future. This article provides excerpts from the narratives that support the themes, discusses the findings, and presents implications of the study.

  10. Doctoral education for WOC nurses considering advanced practice nursing.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Barbara; Colwell, Janice

    2012-01-01

    Advanced practice nursing education is at a crossroads. Societal changes, increased health care demands, and leadership nursing organizations have identified the need of a doctor of nursing practice (DNP) degree as the advanced practice degree. WOC nurses need to examine DNP programs when considering returning for an advanced practice degree. This article explores nursing education at the doctorate level and areas the WOC nurse should consider when making a decision about attending a program. The WOC nurse needs to understand the similarities and differences of the doctor of philosophy and the DNP, issues about each program and its completion, personal factors, and the application process. Although selecting a doctoral program is a daunting experience, the education will provide opportunities for the WOC nurse to excel as a scholar, thus influencing the profession and the practice.

  11. Integrating Advance Care Planning Into Practice.

    PubMed

    Dingfield, Laura E; Kayser, Joshua B

    2017-06-01

    Advanced respiratory diseases progress over time and often lead to death. As the condition worsens, patients may lose medical decision-making ability. Advance care planning (ACP) is a process in which patients receive information about their diagnosis and prognosis; discuss values, goals, and fears; articulate preferences about life-sustaining treatments and end-of-life care; and appoint a surrogate medical decision maker. This process may result in written documentation of patient preferences or the appointment of a health-care power of attorney (HCPOA). ACP discussions have multiple benefits for patients and their surrogate decision makers, including ensuring that the care provided is aligned with the patient's goals and preferences and decreasing stress, anxiety, and burden in surrogates. Time and provider comfort are often cited barriers to ACP, so it may be necessary for clinicians to gain experience in conversations and identify the patients most likely to benefit from ACP discussions. Two new Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes, 99497 and 99498, have been recognized by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) as of January 1, 2016 and are intended to incentivize clinicians to engage in ACP discussions with their patients earlier and with more frequency. This manuscript reviews the benefits and barriers to ACP in patients with advanced respiratory disease and provides guidance on the use of the new CPT codes for reimbursement of these conversations. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Voices That Care: Licensed Practical Nurses and the Emotional Labour Underpinning Their Collaborative Interactions with Registered Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Truc; Alderson, Marie; Nadon, Michelle; Kershaw-Rousseau, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    Recognizing the emotional labour underlying interprofessional collaborations (IPCs) could be considered a crucial step towards building a cohesive nursing team. Although IPCs between registered nurses (RNs) and licensed practical nurses (LPNs) have been linked to quality nursing care, little is known about the emotions experienced by LPNs during their interactions with RNs or those factors that influence IPCs. A questionnaire administered to 309 LPNs found that (1) the professional identity of LPNs has evolved into a that of a unique social group; (2) LPNs define IPC as an interpersonal process of exploring similar or dissimilar assessments of a patient's status with RNs and, together, establishing a course of nursing actions; (3) the primary organizational factor facilitating IPCs is inclusive nursing leadership; (4) the interpersonal factor promoting IPCs is the level of trust RNs extend to LPNs; and (5) an LPN's emotional labour (i.e., internal emotional regulation) is most tangible during uncollaborative interactions with RNs. PMID:22135732

  13. Registered Nurses in Primary Care: Emerging New Roles and Contributions to Team-Based Care in High-Performing Practices.

    PubMed

    Flinter, Margaret; Hsu, Clarissa; Cromp, DeAnn; Ladden, MaryJoan D; Wagner, Edward H

    2017-03-20

    The years since the passage of the Affordable Care Act have seen substantial changes in the organization and delivery of primary care. These changes have emphasized greater team involvement in care and expansion of the roles of each team member including registered nurses (RNs). This study examined the roles of RNs in 30 exemplary primary care practices. We identified the emergence of new roles and activities for RNs characterized by greater involvement in face-to-face patient care and care management, their own daily schedule of patient visits and contacts, and considerable autonomy in the care of their patients.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  14. Does Moral Distress Differ Between California Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists in Independent Versus Medically Supervised Practice: An Exploratory Study.

    PubMed

    Dumouchel, Michael; Boytim, Michael; Gorman, Nicholas; Weismuller, Penny

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this exploratory, descriptive study was to determine if moral distress levels differed between certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) working in medically supervised versus independent practice in California. A 63-question survey was administered to 1,190 California CRNAs. Moral distress was measured by the included Ethics Stress Scale. The response rate was 14.7%, yielding demographic and Ethics Stress scores for 175 respondents. Sixty-five participants answered an open-ended question about moral distress yielding qualitative data. Medically supervised CRNAs had a lower mean moral distress scores (176.8) versus independent practice CRNAs (187.8) (p = .002). Lower scores on the ESS indicate higher moral distress. Qualitative data demonstrated that CRNAs experienced moral distress in the following situations: when pressured to give anesthesia to unoptimized patients, when differences of opinion regarding anesthetic plans occurred, in dealing with end-of-life issues, when working with incompetent providers, and during interprofessional struggles between CRNAs and anesthesiologists. In order to reduce moral distress among CRNAs, implications for practice include increased administrative support, increased communication and reciprocated collegial respect between anesthesiologists and CRNAs, and CRNA representation on ethics committees.

  15. AORN guidance statement: safe on-call practices in perioperative practice settings. Association of periOperative Registered Nurses.

    PubMed

    2005-05-01

    Call staffing and the associated long work hours can be challenging for both perioperative staff members and the health care organization. A change in culture is needed to recognize exhaustion as an unacceptable risk to patients and perioperative personnel safety. Perioperative health care providers have a personal responsibility to arrive at work fully rested. Health care organizations have a responsibility to create work and call schedules that consider the effect of long work hours on patient safety as well as perioperative staff members' welfare. The development of standardized safe work hours and call practices should reflect current recommendations emerging from authoritative sources, legislation, and empirical data. Prolonged work periods without adequate rest may contribute to diminished performance by perioperative personnel, placing both patients and workers at risk. This guidance statement may assist managers and clinicians in developing policies and procedures for safe call practices.

  16. Factors associated with evidence-based practice among registered nurses in Sweden: a national cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence-based practice (EBP) is emphasized to increase the quality of care and patient safety. EBP is often described as a process consisting of distinct activities including, formulating questions, searching for information, compiling the appraised information, implementing evidence, and evaluating the resulting practice. To increase registered nurses’ (RNs’) practice of EBP, variables associated with such activities need to be explored. The aim of the study was to examine individual and organizational factors associated with EBP activities among RNs 2 years post graduation. Methods A cross-sectional design based on a national sample of RNs was used. Data were collected in 2007 from a cohort of RNs, included in the Swedish Longitudinal Analyses of Nursing Education/Employment study. The sample consisted of 1256 RNs (response rate 76%). Of these 987 RNs worked in healthcare at the time of the data collection. Data was self-reported and collected through annual postal surveys. EBP activities were measured using six single items along with instruments measuring individual and work-related variables. Data were analyzed using logistic regression models. Results Associated factors were identified for all six EBP activities. Capability beliefs regarding EBP was a significant factor for all six activities (OR = 2.6 - 7.3). Working in the care of older people was associated with a high extent of practicing four activities (OR = 1.7 - 2.2). Supportive leadership and high collective efficacy were associated with practicing three activities (OR = 1.4 - 2.0). Conclusions To be successful in enhancing EBP among newly graduated RNs, strategies need to incorporate both individually and organizationally directed factors. PMID:23642173

  17. Broadening horizons: engaging advanced practice nursing students in faculty research.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Josie A

    2009-01-01

    Inviting advanced practice nursing students to participate in faculty research can be an innovative way to interest students in using current evidence as the basis for their practice. The author discusses strategies for effectively engaging graduate nursing students into research projects in ways that broaden the students' perspectives and strengthen their healthcare decision-making skills.

  18. Establishment of Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Advanced Practice Provider Services.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, Jill; Donnellan, Amy; Justice, Lindsey; Moake, Lindy; Mauney, Jennifer; Steadman, Page; Drajpuch, David; Tucker, Dawn; Storey, Jean; Roth, Stephen J; Koch, Josh; Checchia, Paul; Cooper, David S; Staveski, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    The addition of advanced practice providers (APPs; nurse practitioners and physician assistants) to a pediatric cardiac intensive care unit (PCICU) team is a health care innovation that addresses medical provider shortages while allowing PCICUs to deliver high-quality, cost-effective patient care. APPs, through their consistent clinical presence, effective communication, and facilitation of interdisciplinary collaboration, provide a sustainable solution for the highly specialized needs of PCICU patients. In addition, APPs provide leadership, patient and staff education, facilitate implementation of evidence-based practice and quality improvement initiatives, and the performance of clinical research in the PCICU. This article reviews mechanisms for developing, implementing, and sustaining advance practice services in PCICUs.

  19. Canadian educational approaches for the advancement of pharmacy practice.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Grace; Louizos, Christopher; Austin, Zubin

    2014-09-15

    Canadian faculties (schools) of pharmacy are actively engaged in the advancement and restructuring of their programs in response to the shift in pharmacy to pharmacists having/assuming an advanced practitioner role. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of evidence outlining optimal strategies for accomplishing this task. This review explores several educational changes proposed in the literature to aid in the advancement of pharmacy education such as program admission requirements, critical-thinking assessment and teaching methods, improvement of course content delivery, value of interprofessional education, advancement of practical experiential education, and mentorship strategies. Collectively, implementation of these improvements to pharmacy education will be crucial in determining the direction the profession will take.

  20. The current state of e-prescribing: Implications for advanced practice registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Villaseñor, Sally; Piscotty, Ronald J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review legislation, barriers and challenges, and current state of e-prescribing (eRx) in the United States. Literature search of CINAHL, MEDLINE, PubMed, and Google Scholar was performed. Challenges to eRx implementation and effective use include transcription, workflow issues, alert fatigue, educational and tangible reminders, and eRx of controlled substances. Further research could be best focused on user-friendly and interactive software improvements for both patient and provider use, bidirectional communication, and workflow studies to improve efficiency of eRx. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  1. Partners in research: building academic-practice partnerships to educate and mentor advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Harbman, Patricia; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Carter, Nancy; Covell, Christine L; Donald, Faith; Gibbins, Sharyn; Kilpatrick, Kelley; McKinlay, James; Rawson, Krista; Sherifali, Diana; Tranmer, Joan; Valaitis, Ruta

    2017-04-01

    Clinical practice is the primary focus of advanced practice nursing (APN) roles. However, with unprecedented needs for health care reform and quality improvement (QI), health care administrators are seeking new ways to utilize all dimensions of APN expertise, especially related to research and evidence-based practice. International studies reveal research as the most underdeveloped and underutilized aspect of these roles. To improve patient care by strengthening the capacity of advanced practice nurses to integrate research and evidence-based practice activities into their day-to-day practice. An academic-practice partnership was created among hospital-based advanced practice nurses, nurse administrators, and APN researchers to create an innovative approach to educate and mentor advanced practice nurses in conducting point-of-care research, QI, or evidence-based practice projects to improve patient, provider, and/or system outcomes. A practice-based research course was delivered to 2 cohorts of advanced practice nurses using a range of teaching strategies including 1-to-1 academic mentorship. All participants completed self-report surveys before and after course delivery. Through participation in this initiative, advanced practice nurses enhanced their knowledge, skills, and confidence in the design, implementation, and/or evaluation of research, QI, and evidence-based practice activities. Evaluation of this initiative provides evidence of the acceptability and feasibility of academic-practice partnerships to educate and mentor point-of-care providers on how to lead, implement, and integrate research, QI and evidence-based activities into their practices. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. How can a competency framework for advanced practice support care?

    PubMed

    Stanford, Pamela Elizabeth

    2016-11-10

    Aim To explore whether perception of nurse practitioners in relation to whether a competency framework for advanced practice can support their work. Method A qualitative cross-sectional design was used, embedded in an interpretative paradigm of research. A non-probability sample of eight experienced nurse practitioners took part in focus groups and answered questionnaires. A mixture of phenomenological and grounded theory approaches were used to collect the data. Findings Four major themes were identified: competency frameworks can identify individual strengths and weaknesses, they can be used to set clear goals and targets, they can improve how practice is organised, and they have the potential to limit practice in terms of narrowing boundaries. The study also found competency frameworks could provide an structure to guide the development and evaluation of educational programmes. Conclusion Competency frameworks can be used so to target the development of new advanced nurse practitioners. They can address workforce development and governance by ensuring nurse practitioners have the competencies to provide safe, autonomous practice. Competency frameworks have been shown to ensure consistency in clinical practice skills underpinned with nurse practitioners' theoretical knowledge. They provide a clear development structure for career development and advanced practice. However, internationally, there is still a lack of definition of advanced practice and its core competencies.

  3. [Consensus on competencies for advanced nursing practice in Spain].

    PubMed

    Sastre-Fullana, Pedro; De Pedro-Gómez, Joan E; Bennasar-Veny, Miquel; Fernández-Domínguez, Juan C; Sesé-Abad, Albert J; Morales-Asencio, José M

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of international consensus on the exact definition and core competencies of advanced practice nursing (APN) roles, a problem particularly acute in our national context due to the lack of APN role development, which has a significantly short history in our country. The main objective of this paper was the delineation of the competence framework for Advanced Practice Nurses in our national context based on expert consensus through the Delphi method Based on a preliminary literature review process, a conglomerate of 17 domains of competence (clusters of related competencies) were identified. This initial set was revised, refined and validated by a group of expert panellists on the subject (clinicians, researchers, managers, and teachers) through successive rounds in search of a suitable consensus on each of the various proposed items The results helped to establish a solid foundation in the form of a skills map that could identify those sets of more specific competencies for advanced practice roles, regardless of regulatory and professional practice context, identifying domains such as Research and Evidence Based Practice, Clinical and Professional Leadership, or Care Management This set of skills related to advanced practice roles in our environment can delineate competency standards common to this level of nursing practice, and serve as a reference for policy development, a review of roles, or the establishment of academic profiles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. A survey of threats and violent behaviour by patients against registered nurses in their first year of practice.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Brian G; Poole, Suzette J; Smith, Naumai A; Coverdale, John H; Gale, Chris K

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the prevalence of aggressive behaviours by patients against nurses in the first year of practice, and to determine the psychological impact of this behaviour. An anonymous survey was sent to registered nurses in their first year of practice. From the 1169 survey instruments that were distributed, 551 were returned completed (a response rate of 47%). The most common inappropriate behaviour by patients involved verbal threats (n = 192, 35%), verbal sexual harassment (n = 167, 30%) and physical intimidation (n = 161, 29%). There were 22 incidents of assault requiring medical intervention and 21 incidents of participants being stalked by patients. Male graduates and younger nurses were especially vulnerable. Mental health was the service area most at risk. A most distressing incident was described by 123 (22%) of respondents. The level of distress caused by the incident was rated by 68 of the 123 respondents (55%) as moderate or severe. Only half of those who described a most distressing event indicated they had some undergraduate training in protecting against assault or in managing potentially violent incidents (n = 63 of 123; 51%). After registration, 45 (37%) indicated they had had such training. The findings of this study indicate priorities for effective prevention programmes. The issues highlighted need to be addressed in undergraduate nursing curricula and in the development of orientation programmes supporting new graduates.

  5. Beyond competencies: using a capability framework in developing practice standards for advanced practice nursing.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Jane; Gardner, Glenn; Coyer, Fiona

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a discussion on the application of a capability framework for advanced practice nursing standards/competencies. There is acceptance that competencies are useful and necessary for definition and education of practice-based professions. Competencies have been described as appropriate for practice in stable environments with familiar problems. Increasingly competencies are being designed for use in the health sector for advanced practice such as the nurse practitioner role. Nurse practitioners work in environments and roles that are dynamic and unpredictable necessitating attributes and skills to practice at advanced and extended levels in both familiar and unfamiliar clinical situations. Capability has been described as the combination of skills, knowledge, values and self-esteem which enables individuals to manage change, be flexible and move beyond competency. A discussion paper exploring 'capability' as a framework for advanced nursing practice standards. Data were sourced from electronic databases as described in the background section. As advanced practice nursing becomes more established and formalized, novel ways of teaching and assessing the practice of experienced clinicians beyond competency are imperative for the changing context of health services. Leading researchers into capability in health care state that traditional education and training in health disciplines concentrates mainly on developing competence. To ensure that healthcare delivery keeps pace with increasing demand and a continuously changing context there is a need to embrace capability as a framework for advanced practice and education. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Portfolio use as a tool to demonstrate professional development in advanced nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Hespenheide, Molly; Cottingham, Talisha; Mueller, Gail

    2011-01-01

    A concrete way of recognizing and rewarding clinical leadership, excellence in practice, and personal and professional development of the advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) is lacking in the literature and healthcare institutions in the United States. This article presents the process of developing and evaluating a professional development program designed to address this gap. The program uses APRN Professional Performance Standards, Relationship-Based Care, and the Magnet Forces as a guide and theoretical base. A key tenet of the program is the creation of a professional portfolio. Narrative reflections are included that illustrate the convergence of theories. A crosswalk supports this structure, guides portfolio development, and operationalizes the convergence of theories as they specifically relate to professional development in advanced practice. Implementation of the program has proven to be challenging and rewarding. Feedback from APRNs involved in the program supports program participation as a meaningful method to recognize excellence in advanced practice and a clear means to foster ongoing professional growth and development.

  7. Population-based advanced practice nursing: where does oncology fit in?

    PubMed

    Lattimer, Jennie Greco

    2013-12-01

    A national work group met in 2004 to discuss the future of advanced practice nursing. The representatives were nursing education, certification, accreditation, and regulation experts, and the goal was to develop a consensus model for advanced practice nursing regulation (Nevidjon et al., 2010). As a result, a set of recommendations was published in an article that defined a new consensus model for advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) regulation (APRN Consensus Workgroup, 2008; Goudreau, 2009). The new model included six population-based focuses of practice (i.e., family and individual across the lifespan, adult and gerontology, neonatal, pediatrics, women's health- and gender-related, and psychiatric and mental health) (Johnson, Dawson, & Brassard, 2010). A goal of the new model was to standardize the licensure, certification, and regulation of nurse practitioners into specific focuses. State boards were facing an increasing number of requests to recognize nurse practitioner specialties (e.g., organ specific, body systems, diseases) (Johnson et al., 2010). The new model helped standardize education programs, which may help certifying agencies set up curriculum review processes to ensure appropriate credentials for APRNs (Johnson et al., 2010). It also supported the mission of nursing to meet future healthcare needs of the public and to protect the public (Johnson et al., 2010). Some advantages exist to delineating into population-based focuses, but the new model leaves out many specialties (e.g., oncology) that encompass the whole person as well as concentrate on certain diseases.

  8. The Experience of Advanced Practice Nurses in US Emergency Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Lisa A; Delao, Altair M; Perhats, Cydne; Moon, Michael D; Carman, Margaret J

    2017-09-01

    Little information has been published regarding the actual practice, training, and validation of basic skills and competencies needed by the advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) in the emergency care setting. The purpose of this study was to (1) identify skills being performed by APRNs practicing in emergency care settings (2); explore types of training; and (3) describe competency validation. Additionally, we explored frequency of skill use and facilitators and barriers to performing a skill to the full extent of training and education. An exploratory mixed-methods study was performed incorporating a self-report survey and focus group interviews. The educational path to advanced practice nursing in emergency care settings is not standardized. Few programs incorporate or address the need for APRNs to receive acute care training across the life span, which is the hallmark of emergency nursing practice. Similarly, training is reported as fragmented, and validation of skills for both nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists can vary. APRN practice autonomy is affected by the presence of other providers (specifically physicians), institutional culture, and state boards of nursing that regulate practice. Integrated educational and orientation programs are needed that address high-acuity patients across the life span. Additionally, a more nuanced approach to assessing APRN capabilities as a combination of hard (clinical emergency) and soft (communication and organizational) skills may be an appropriate framework within which to examine the advanced practice role. Future research should continue to evaluate training, competency assessment, and outcomes for APRNs in the emergency care setting. Copyright © 2017 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Aged over 50 years and practising: separation and changes in nursing practice among New Zealand's older Registered Nurses.

    PubMed

    North, Nicola; Leung, William; Lee, Rochelle

    2014-12-01

    To describe temporary and permanent separation patterns and changes in nursing practice over 5 years, for the 2006 cohort of nurses aged ≥50 years in New Zealand. As ageing populations increase demand on nursing services, workforce projections need better information on work and retirement decision-making of large 'baby-boomer' cohorts. Retrospective cohort analysis using the Nursing Council of New Zealand administrative dataset. A cohort of all nurses aged ≥50 years on the register and practising in 2006 (n = 12,606) was tracked until 2011. After 5 years, a quarter (n = 3161) of the cohort (equivalent to 8·4% of all 2006 practising nurses) was no longer practising. There were no significant differences in permanent separation rates between the ages of 50-58; between 18-54% of annual separations re-entered the workforce. On re-entry, 56% returned to the same clinical area. Annual separations from the workforce declined sharply during the global financial crisis and more of those leaving re-entered the workforce. In 2006, half the cohort worked in hospitals. After 5 years, the number of cohort nurses working in hospitals fell by 45%, while those in community settings increased by 12%. Over 5 years, weekly nursing practice hours declined significantly for every age-band. To retain the experience of older nurses for longer, workforce strategies need to take account of patterns of leaving and re-entering the workforce, preferences for work hours and the differences between the sub-groups across employment settings and practice areas. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Developing the scope of practice and education for advanced practice nurses in Finland.

    PubMed

    Fagerström, L

    2009-06-01

    The reorganization of Finnish healthcare services has required a restructuring of the areas of responsibility between healthcare professionals. To describe the need for Advanced Practice Nurses in Finland and the development process of a Master's programme in Health Promotion, Advanced Clinical Care. The study consisted of a survey of nurse managers (24) and focus group interviews with clinical nurse specialists (46). The expanded role includes advanced clinical skills and responsibility for health prevention and promotion, education, supervision, leadership, research and development. The legislation, scope and models have to be supported and further developed to promote the full scope of advanced practice.

  11. An examination of advanced practice nurses' job satisfaction internationally.

    PubMed

    Steinke, M K; Rogers, M; Lehwaldt, D; Lamarche, K

    2017-06-28

    To examine the level of job satisfaction of nurse practitioners/advanced practice nurses in developing and developed countries. The nurse practitioner/advanced practice nurse has the advanced, complex skills and experience to play an important role in providing equitable health care across all nations. Key factors that contribute to health disparities include lack of access to global health human resources, the right skill mix of healthcare providers and the satisfaction and retention of quality workers. The study utilized a descriptive analysis and cross-sectional survey methodology with quantitative and qualitative sections of 1419 job satisfaction survey respondents from an online survey. Age, number of hours worked in a week and length of time that nurse practitioners/advanced practice nurses worked in their current jobs were statistically significant in job satisfaction. A key barrier was the lack of respect from supervisors and physicians. It was clear from the number of comments in the qualitative section of the survey that having a wide scope of practice is rewarding and challenging to the nurse practitioner and advanced practice nurse. The challenges to transform healthcare gaps of access into a better distribution of health care in all countries would constitute a systematic change in policy including providing education and training for doctors and nurses that will match the skills needed in the workplace; emphasizing the right skill mix for the healthcare team; supporting advanced practice nurses in the workplace; and utilizing all healthcare providers to the fullest extent of their abilities. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  12. An overview of Medicare reimbursement regulations for advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Frakes, Michael A; Evans, Tracylain

    2006-01-01

    The federal government spends nearly 15% of the budget on Medicare services annually, and advanced practice nurses are eligible for reimbursement from that pool. The regulations governing reimbursement are complex because of the social, political, and financial pressures involved in their development. Although economic viability and due diligence considerations make it incumbent on advanced practice nurses to understand the rules, the profession, as a whole, has knowledge deficits in this area. The essentials of regulatory development and structure are reviewed and considerations for optimizing reimbursement are described.

  13. Professional development for an advanced practice nursing team.

    PubMed

    Pye, Sherry; Green, Angela

    2011-05-01

    Since its development in 1998, the Cardiology Advanced Practice Nurse team has been plagued by retention issues. The coordinator for the team developed this leadership project while participating in the 2008 to 2009 Maternal-Child Health Leadership Academy sponsored by Sigma Theta Tau International and Johnson & Johnson. The focus of this project was to develop, implement, and evaluate initiatives to empower the advanced practice nurse team, promote their professional development, and ultimately improve retention of team members. Although evaluation data show progress toward addressing work environment issues, retention remains an ongoing problem.

  14. On the night shift: advanced nurse practice in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Jennifer

    2016-05-01

    Advanced nurse practitioners in the author's emergency department (ED) work autonomously and as part of a team to assess, diagnose and treat patients with unexplained and undiagnosed illnesses and injuries over a 24-hour cycle of care. The complexity of the role in EDs is often not fully understood, and expectations can vary between trusts and between different clinical areas within trusts. This article describes one night shift in the author's ED to explain the complexity of advanced nurse practitioners' roles in this environment. The article focuses on autonomous decision-making skills and the use of advanced clinical skills in the context of evidence-based practice.

  15. Advance Notice for Transition-Related Problem Behavior: Practice Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Adam T; Strickland-Cohen, Kathleen; Dotson, Wesley; Williams, D Courtney

    2014-10-01

    Transitions between daily activities can occasion or elicit problem behavior in individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). Providing advance notice to signal an upcoming transition is a common practice in early and special education settings (e.g., Riffel 2010; Sandall et al. 2005). While the literature contains many demonstrations of the efficacy of various advance notice procedures, other studies have shown negative results. Practitioners are faced with the challenge of deciding whether advance notice is a viable treatment option for transition-related problem behavior in light of these contradictory findings. To assist the practitioner in this decision-making process, we provide a brief review of the advance notice literature, concentrating on the studies reporting that advance notice is ineffective at reducing transition-related problems. The goal is to provide practitioners with a better understanding of the environmental conditions under which advance notice is likely to be ineffective at decreasing problem behavior as well as the conditions under which it can be effective at reducing transition-related problem behavior. Discriminating these conditions may yield a useful set of practice guidelines for deciding when advance notice is a viable treatment option for decreasing transition-related problem behavior.

  16. The prescribing of buprenorphine by advanced practice addictions nurses.

    PubMed

    Strobbe, Stephen; Hobbins, Debra

    2012-02-01

    In order to increase safe access to buprenorphine treatment for patients with opioid dependence, it is the position of the International Nurses Society on Addictions (IntNSA) that the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 (DATA 2000) be amended to allow for the prescribing of buprenorphine by qualified advanced practice nurses who have both prescriptive authority and specialty certification in addictions nursing.

  17. Advancing Empirical Scholarship to Further Develop Evaluation Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    Good theory development is grounded in empirical inquiry. In the context of educational evaluation, the development of empirically grounded theory has important benefits for the field and the practitioner. In particular, a shift to empirically derived theory will assist in advancing more systematic and contextually relevant evaluation practice, as…

  18. Training Advanced Writing Skills: The Case for Deliberate Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellogg, Ronald T.; Whiteford, Alison P.

    2009-01-01

    The development of advanced writing skills has been neglected in schools of the United States, with even some college graduates lacking the level of ability required in the workplace (National Commission on Writing, 2003, 2004). The core problem, we argue, is an insufficient degree of appropriate task practice distributed throughout the secondary…

  19. Advancing Empirical Scholarship to Further Develop Evaluation Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    Good theory development is grounded in empirical inquiry. In the context of educational evaluation, the development of empirically grounded theory has important benefits for the field and the practitioner. In particular, a shift to empirically derived theory will assist in advancing more systematic and contextually relevant evaluation practice, as…

  20. Residency and Fellowship Programs for RNs and Advanced Practice RNs.

    PubMed

    Cosme, Sheryl

    2015-09-01

    In this month's column, the Senior Accreditation Operations Manager of the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) discusses the value of nursing residency programs and current discussion in the profession, along with criteria offered by the ANCC to support this imperative for both RNs and advanced practice RNs including new graduates and those transitioning between clinical settings.

  1. A Pilot of a Gerontological Advanced Practice Nurse Preventive Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, Joan Earle; Aronow, Harriet Udin

    2005-01-01

    Background: Persons with an intellectual and developmental disability frequently face barriers in accessing preventive services in community-based health care systems. As they age into middle years, they are at increased risk for functional decline. This paper presents a description of an advanced practice nurse (APN) intervention used in a pilot…

  2. Training Advanced Writing Skills: The Case for Deliberate Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellogg, Ronald T.; Whiteford, Alison P.

    2009-01-01

    The development of advanced writing skills has been neglected in schools of the United States, with even some college graduates lacking the level of ability required in the workplace (National Commission on Writing, 2003, 2004). The core problem, we argue, is an insufficient degree of appropriate task practice distributed throughout the secondary…

  3. Canadian Educational Approaches for the Advancement of Pharmacy Practice

    PubMed Central

    Louizos, Christopher; Austin, Zubin

    2014-01-01

    Canadian faculties (schools) of pharmacy are actively engaged in the advancement and restructuring of their programs in response to the shift in pharmacy to pharmacists having/assuming an advanced practitioner role. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of evidence outlining optimal strategies for accomplishing this task. This review explores several educational changes proposed in the literature to aid in the advancement of pharmacy education such as program admission requirements, critical-thinking assessment and teaching methods, improvement of course content delivery, value of interprofessional education, advancement of practical experiential education, and mentorship strategies. Collectively, implementation of these improvements to pharmacy education will be crucial in determining the direction the profession will take. PMID:25258448

  4. Understanding the inverse care law: a register and survey-based study of patient deprivation and burnout in general practice.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Anette Fischer; Vedsted, Peter

    2014-12-12

    According to the inverse care law, there is a mismatch between patients' medical needs and medical care supply. As an example, the number of doctors is often lower in areas with high deprivation compared to areas with no deprivation, and doctors with a deprived patient population may experience a high work pressure, have insufficient time for comprehensive tasks and be at higher risk for developing burnout. The mechanisms responsible for the inverse care law might be mutually reinforcing, but we know very little about this process. In this study, the association between patient deprivation and burnout in the general practitioners (GPs) was examined. Active GPs in the Central Denmark Region were invited to participate in a survey on job satisfaction and burnout and 601 GPs returned the questionnaire (72%). The Danish Regions provided information about which persons were registered with each practice, and information concerning socioeconomic characteristics for each patient on the list was obtained from Statistics Denmark. A composite deprivation index was also used. There was significantly more burnout among GPs in the highest quartile of the deprivation index compared to GPs in the lowest quartile (OR: 1.91; 95% CI: 1.06-3.44; p-value: 0.032). Among the eight variables included in the deprivation index, a high share of patients on social benefits was most strongly associated with burnout (OR: 2.62; 95% CI: 1.45-4.71; p-value: 0.001). A higher propensity of GP burnout was found among GPs with a high share of deprived patients on their lists compared to GPs with a low share of deprived patients. This applied in particular to patients on social benefits. This indicates that beside lower supply of GPs in deprived areas, people in these areas may also be served by GPs who are in higher risk of burnout and not performing optimally.

  5. South Carolina geologists must register

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The South Carolina General Assembly enacted legislation in 1986 that requires all geologists engaged in the public practice of geology in South Carolina to be registered. To avoid taking a state examination, anyone in the geosciences who mets the academic and work requirements that are set forth in the act (Act 507) is eligible to register before June 10, 1987.Those requirements include graduation from a standard 4-year curriculum or an advanced degree in geology or a related science, and a minimum of 5 years of full-time work experience in these areas. To be put on the mailing list for an application package, write to the South Carolina State Board of Registration for Geologists, 1213 Lady Street, Suite 201, Columbia, SC 29201.

  6. Establishing advanced practice for medical imaging in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Yielder, Jill; Young, Adrienne; Park, Shelley; Coleman, Karen

    2014-02-01

    IntroductionThis article presents the outcome and recommendations following the second stage of a role development project conducted on behalf of the New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology (NZIMRT). The study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that may be used to formulate Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession. It commenced in 2011, following on from initial research that occurred between 2005 and 2008 investigating role development and a possible career structure for medical radiation technologists (MRTs) in New Zealand (NZ). MethodsThe study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that could be used to develop Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession through inviting 12 specialist medical imaging groups in NZ to participate in a survey. ResultsFindings showed strong agreement on potential profiles and on generic criteria within them; however, there was less agreement on specific skills criteria within specialist areas. ConclusionsThe authors recommend that one Advanced Scope of Practice be developed for Medical Imaging, with the establishment of generic and specialist criteria. Systems for approval of the overall criteria package for any individual Advanced Practitioner (AP) profile, audit and continuing professional development requirements need to be established by the Medical Radiation Technologists Board (MRTB) to meet the local needs of clinical departments. It is further recommended that the NZIMRT and MRTB promote and support the need for an AP pathway for medical imaging in NZ.

  7. Establishing advanced practice for medical imaging in New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Yielder, Jill; Young, Adrienne; Park, Shelley; Coleman, Karen

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: This article presents the outcome and recommendations following the second stage of a role development project conducted on behalf of the New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology (NZIMRT). The study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that may be used to formulate Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession. It commenced in 2011, following on from initial research that occurred between 2005 and 2008 investigating role development and a possible career structure for medical radiation technologists (MRTs) in New Zealand (NZ). Methods: The study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that could be used to develop Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession through inviting 12 specialist medical imaging groups in NZ to participate in a survey. Results: Findings showed strong agreement on potential profiles and on generic criteria within them; however, there was less agreement on specific skills criteria within specialist areas. Conclusions: The authors recommend that one Advanced Scope of Practice be developed for Medical Imaging, with the establishment of generic and specialist criteria. Systems for approval of the overall criteria package for any individual Advanced Practitioner (AP) profile, audit and continuing professional development requirements need to be established by the Medical Radiation Technologists Board (MRTB) to meet the local needs of clinical departments. It is further recommended that the NZIMRT and MRTB promote and support the need for an AP pathway for medical imaging in NZ.

  8. Value of wireless personal digital assistants for practice: perceptions of advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Bernard; Klein, Gerri

    2008-08-01

    The aims were to explore advanced practice nurses' perceptions on wireless Personal Digital Assistant technologies, to establish the type and range of tools that would be useful to support their practice and to identify any requirements and limitations that may impact the implementation of wireless Personal Digital Assistants in practice. The wireless Personal Digital Assistant is becoming established as a hand-held computing tool for healthcare professionals. The reflections of advanced practice nurses' about the value of wireless Personal Digital Assistants and its potential to contribute to improved patient care has not been investigated. A qualitative interpretivist design was used to explore advanced practice nurses' perceptions on the value of wireless Personal Digital Assistant technologies to support their practice. The data were collected using survey questionnaires and individual and focus group interviews with nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists and information technology managers based in British Columbia, Canada. An open-coding content analysis was performed using qualitative data analysis software. Wireless Personal Digital Assistant's use supports the principles of pervasivity and is a technology rapidly being adopted by advanced practice nurses. Some nurses indicated a reluctance to integrate wireless Personal Digital Assistant technologies into their practices because of the cost and the short technological life cycle of these devices. Many of the barriers which precluded the use of wireless networks within facilities are being removed. Nurses demonstrated a complex understanding of wireless Personal Digital Assistant technologies and gave good rationales for its integration in their practice. Nurses identified improved client care as the major benefit of this technology in practice and the type and range of tools they identified included clinical reference tools such as drug and diagnostic/laboratory reference applications and wireless

  9. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Revised 2012 Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance for Registered Dietitians.

    PubMed

    2013-06-01

    RDs face complex situations every day. Competently addressing the unique needs of each situation and applying standards appropriately is essential to providing safe, timely, person-centered quality care and service. All RDs are advised to conduct their practice based on the most recent edition of the Academy's Code of Ethics and the Scope of Practice in Nutrition and Dietetics, the Scope of Practice for the Registered Dietitian, the 2012 Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance for RDs, and the applicable focus area SOP and SOPP for RDs. These resources provide minimum standards and tools for demonstrating competence and safe practice, and are used collectively to gauge and guide an RD's performance in nutrition and dietetics practice. The SOP and SOPP for the RD are self-evaluation tools that promote quality assurance and performance improvement. Self-assessment provides opportunities to identify areas for enhancement, new learning, and skill development, and to encourage progression of career growth. All RDs are advised to have in their personal libraries the most recent copy of the Academy's Scope of Practice in Nutrition and Dietetics and its components: The 2012 Academy Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance for Registered Dietitians; applicable focus area SOP and SOPP; the Code of Ethics; and the Scope of Practice for the Registered Dietitian. To ensure that credentialed dietetics practitioners always have access to the most current materials, each resource is maintained on the Academy's website. The documents will continue to be reviewed and updated as new trends in the profession of nutrition and dietetics and external influences emerge.

  10. Defining features of advance directives in law and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Olick, Robert S

    2012-01-01

    In the > 30 years since the New Jersey Supreme Court's seminal opinion in the case of Karen Ann Quinlan, all 50 states and the District of Columbia have enacted legislation to recognize the legal right of competent adults to write advance directives. The purpose of advance directives is to provide direction for health-care decisions near the end of life, when the ravages of illness, disease, or injury have taken the ability to decide for one's self. This article reviews the defining features of advance directives and the governing law, discusses some common practical concerns regarding the use and effectiveness of advance directives, and identifies several significant ethical-legal challenges for honoring advance directives at the bedside. With a primary focus on the health-care proxy, the anatomy of advance directives is analyzed under four general rubrics: formal requirements, decisional capacity and when the directive takes effect, rights and responsibilities of proxies and health-care providers, and the scope and limitations of decisions to forego life-sustaining treatment. There is much common ground among state laws, but particular legal provisions may vary from state to state. Physicians, nurses, social workers, and other health-care professionals should be familiar with the law of their home state.

  11. Goals and potential career advancement of licensed practical nurses in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Mari; Inoue, Katsuya; Kamibeppu, Kiyoko

    2008-10-01

    To investigate the effects of personal and professional variables on career advancement intentions of working Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs). In Japan, two levels of professional nursing licensures, the LPN and the registered nurse (RN), are likely to be integrated in the future. Therefore, it is important to know the career advancement intentions of LPNs. Questionnaires were sent to a sample of 356 LPNs. Analysis of variance (anova) and discriminative analysis were used. We found that those who had a positive image of LPNs along with a positive image of RNs were identified as showing interest in career advancement. The results of anova showed that age had a negative effect; however, discriminative analysis suggested that age is not as significant compared with other variables. Our results indicate that the 'image of RNs', and 'role-acceptance factors' have an effect on career advancement intentions of LPNs. Our results suggest that Nursing Managers should create a supportive working environment where the LPN would feel encouraged to carry out the nursing role, thereby creating a positive image of nursing in general which would lead to career motivation and pursuing RN status.

  12. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: standards of practice and standards of professional performance for registered dietitian nutritionists (competent, proficient, and expert) in adult weight management.

    PubMed

    Jortberg, Bonnie; Myers, Eileen; Gigliotti, Linda; Ivens, Barbara J; Lebre, Monica; Burke March, Susan; Nogueira, Isadora; Nwankwo, Robin; Parkinson, Meredith R; Paulsen, Barbara; Turner, Tonya

    2015-04-01

    Weight management encompasses the inter-relationship of nutrition, physical activity, and health behavior change. Nutrition is key for the prevention and treatment of obesity and chronic disease and maintenance of overall health. Thus, the Weight Management Dietetic Practice Group, with guidance from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Management Committee, has developed Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs) in Adult Weight Management as a resource for RDNs working in weight management. This document allows RDNs to assess their current skill levels and to identify areas for further professional development in this expanding practice area. This document describes the current standards for weight management practice for RDNs. The Standards of Practice represent the four steps in the Nutrition Care Process as applied to the care of patients/clients. The Standards of Professional Performance consist of six domains of professionalism: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. Within each standard, specific indicators provide measurable action statements that illustrate how the standard can be applied to practice. The indicators describe three skill levels (competent, proficient, and expert) for RDNs working in weight management. The Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance are complementary resources for the Registered Dietitian Nutritionist in weight management.

  13. Advanced practice nursing in performing arts health care.

    PubMed

    Weslin, Anna T; Silva-Smith, Amy

    2010-06-01

    Performing arts medicine is a growing health care profession specializing in the needs of performing artists. As part of the performing arts venue, the dancer, a combination of athlete and artist, presents with unique health care needs requiring a more collaborative and holistic health care program. Currently there are relatively few advanced practice nurses (APNs) who specialize in performing arts health care. APNs, with focus on collaborative and holistic health care, are ideally suited to join other health care professionals in developing and implementing comprehensive health care programs for the performing artist. This article focuses on the dancer as the client in an APN practice that specializes in performing arts health care.

  14. Writing an employer-focused resume for advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Welton, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    The most important new trend in resumes is the employer-focused resume. Writing one is not difficult, but it requires a change in focus. The focus of this type of resume is on the needs of prospective employers. This new resume format allows applicants to describe to prospective employers what they can provide related to the employer's needs as opposed to a simple listing of their academic and work experiences without relation to the prospective new job. This article provides advanced practice nurses with sources to guide construction of informative text about their advanced practice nursing skills and competencies using language familiar to employers. Resumes and curriculum vitae formats are compared, and advice is provided on developing content for either format. Guidelines are provided about listing credentials, identifying clinical proficiencies from student clinical practicum, using qualification summaries rather than an objective statement, choosing references, and including essential components in a cover letter.

  15. Ethics education in advanced practice nursing: respect for human dignity.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Kathleen A; O'Conner-Von, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Ethics education is an essential component of academic programs that prepare nurses for advanced practice; the concept of respect for human dignity is integral to this education. Sixty-three graduate students enrolled in their first course of a nurse practitioner program completed a researcher-developed Ethics Questionnaire that was designed to elicit their baseline ethics-related knowledge, including their understanding of the concept "respect for human dignity". Qualitative analysis of data yielded findings that validate the importance of using the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretive Statements as an essential foundation for ethics content and as a framework for understanding the meaning of human dignity in advanced practice nursing. Assessment and learning strategies are recommended.

  16. Integrating Spiritual Bereavement Skills Into an Advanced Practice Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Bristol, Shirley T; Lloyd, Susan L; Bristol, Alycia A

    2017-07-01

    When advanced practice nurses (APNs) encounter the need to address a bereaved individual's spirituality, gaps in educational preparation may prevent effective intervention. In addition, past and current research studies have not provided clear guidance for spiritually based bereavement care curricula within the graduate APN program. Graduate advanced practice faculty successfully introduced classroom-based spiritual bereavement care education modules for APN students. Course evaluations indicated student appreciation for the new content and practicum experiences provided. Students felt the new content to be essential in their development as expert practitioners. Through this innovation, the authors found that a variety of learning activities that addressed spiritual needs during the bereavement process was perceived as highly satisfactory by APNs. Within an ever increasingly diverse society, APNs have a significant role in performing responsibilities for bereaved individuals. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(7):439-442.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Cognitive therapy: a training model for advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Christine E; McDanel, Heather

    2005-05-01

    1. Mental health needs exist in medically underserved areas and can be addressed in nurse-managed, community-based health centers. 2. Cognitive therapy techniques can be used in community-based health centers to intervene and alleviate patients' distress and improve their adherence to treatment. 3. A training program in cognitive therapy can help advanced practice nurses and other health care providers implement the techniques needed to address many behavioral and mental health problems.

  18. Consultant pharmacists, advanced practice nurses, and the interdisciplinary team.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Barbara

    2014-03-01

    Although in geriatrics we are better than many other clinical disciplines in terms of providing interdisciplinary care to older adults, I hope that we will continue to recognize how much more could actually be done. Before addressing the relationship between advanced practice nurses (APNs) and consultant pharmacists in real world settings, I want to review teamwork in geriatrics in general. It is critical to define what we mean by team, what type of team, and what the goals are of this teamwork.

  19. [Advance Directives: theoretical concept and practical significance in the USA].

    PubMed

    Vollmann, J; Pfaff, M

    2003-07-04

    The article examines on the basic of empirical data the discrepancy between the theoretical demand and the practical role of advance directives. Often advance directives have no influence on medical decision-making in clinical care of critically ill patients. The vague language of the widely used standard living wills and the lack of physician-patient communication in the process of delivering an advance directives are contributing factors. However, many physicians even disregard patients' preferences in concrete and meaningful living wills at the end of life. Besides the lack of information many even seriously ill patients do not deliver an advance because they misjudge their medical prognosis and life expectancy. Often the communication between patients and doctors are blocked because they expect from the each other the first step to talk about end of life decisions and advance directives. In this context physicians claim lack of time, training in communication skills and their discomfort in talking about death and dying with their patients.

  20. [Anticoagulant therapy clinic: moving towards Advanced Nursing Practice].

    PubMed

    Romero Ruiz, Adolfo; Parrado Borrego, Gema; Rodríguez González, José; Caparrós Miranda, Isabel S; Vargas Lirio, M Isabel; Ortiz Fernández, Primitiva

    2014-01-01

    There is currently around one million people receiving oral anticoagulants in Spain. The drug most used is acenocoumarol, which requires coagulation monitoring to ensure that the patient is within its normal therapeutic range. Patients usually start this treatment in a hospital clinic and, when they are stabilised, they are referred to primary care, where they are followed-up by their community nurses. The usual practice is that nurses are responsible for changes in the dose when the patients are outside the range. This practice is not performed by hospital nurses, despite having sufficient experience and knowledge to adequately manage these types of patients. An Advanced Nursing Practice model has been introduced into the Haematology management unit of the Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Victoria, Málaga. This involves various aspects of attention and care of patients on anticoagulant therapy, and includes adjusting the doses of their treatment following a catalogue of therapeutic and diagnostic ranges.

  1. The advanced practice professionals' perspective: keys to a good working relationship between advanced practice professions and physicians.

    PubMed

    Polansky, Maura

    2013-01-01

    A strong working relationship between advanced practice professionals (APPs) and supervising oncologists is essential for reducing medical errors, retaining employees, and improving work environments. Although there is rather limited data on the unique relationship of the APP and physician, fundamental communication skills-including open communication, mutual respect, establishing expectations, and working with mutual purpose-should be the foundation of these relationships. This paper addresses various aspects of relationship building between APPs and physicians with suggestions for establishing successful working relationships.

  2. Mini Review of Integrated Care and Implications for Advanced Practice Nurse Role

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Diana; Startsman, Laura F.; Perraud, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Literature related to primary care and behavioral health integration initiatives is becoming abundant. The United States’ 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act included provisions encouraging increased collaboration of care for individuals with behavioral and physical health service needs in the public sector. There is relatively little known of Advanced Practice Registered Nurses’ (APRNs) roles with integrating primary and behavioral healthcare. The goal of this review article is to: (a) define integration of physical and behavioral healthcare and potential models; (b) answer the question as to what are effective evidence based models/strategies for integrating behavioral health and primary care; (c) explore the future role and innovations of APRNs in the integration of physical and behavioral healthcare. Results: The evidence- based literature is limited to three systematic reviews and six randomized controlled trials. It was difficult to generalize the data and the effective integration strategies varied from such interventions as care management to use of sertraline to depression management and to access. There were, though, implications for the integrated care advanced practice nurse to have roles inclusive of competencies, leadership, engagement, collaboration and advocacy. PMID:27347258

  3. Management of advanced pancreatic cancer in daily clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Jacopo; Piacentini, Paolo; Bonetti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this outcome study was to evaluate the management of advanced pancreatic cancer in a real-world clinical practice; few such experiences have been reported in the literature. A retrospective analysis was performed of all consecutive patients with advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma followed at our medical oncology unit between January 2003 and December 2013. We evaluated 78 patients, mostly with metastatic disease (64.1%). Median follow-up was 10.77 months, by which time 74 patients (94.9%) had died. Median overall survival was 8.29 months. Median age was 67 years. In univariate analysis, pain at onset (p = 0.020), ECOG performance status (p<0.001), stage (p = 0.047), first-line chemotherapy (p<0.001), second-line chemotherapy (p<0.001) and weight loss at diagnosis (p = 0.029) were factors that had an impact on overall survival. In multivariate analysis, the presence of pain at onset (p = 0.043), stage (p = 0.003) and second-line chemotherapy (p = 0.004) were confirmed as independent prognostic factors. Our data, derived from daily clinical practice, confirmed advanced pancreatic cancer as an aggressive malignant disease with a very short expected survival. Second-line treatment seems to provide an advantage in terms of overall survival in patients who showed a partial response as their best response to first-line treatment.

  4. Impact of advanced laparoscopy courses on present surgical practice.

    PubMed

    Houck, Jared; Kopietz, Courtni M; Shah, Bhavin C; Goede, Matthew R; McBride, Corrigan L; Oleynikov, Dmitry

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of new surgical techniques has made training in laparoscopic procedures a necessity for the practicing surgeon, but acquisition of new surgical skills is a formidable task. This study was conducted to assess the impact of advanced laparoscopic workshops on caseload patterns of practicing surgeons. After we obtained institutional review board approval, a survey of practicing surgeons who participated in advanced laparoscopic courses was distributed; the results were analyzed for statistical significance. The courses were held at the University of Nebraska Medical Center between January 2002 and December 2010. Questionnaires were mailed, faxed, and e-mailed to surgeons. Of the 109 surgeons who participated in the advanced laparoscopy courses, 79 received surveys and 30 were excluded from the survey because of their affiliation with the University of Nebraska Medical Center. A total of 47 responses (59%) were received from 41 male and 6 female surgeons. The median response time from completion of the course to completion of the survey was 13.2 months (range, 6.8-19.1 months). The mean age of participating surgeons was 39.2 years (range, 29-51 years). The mean time since residency was 8.4 years (range, 0.8-21 years). Eleven surgeons had completed a minimal number of laparoscopic cases in residency (<50), 17 surgeons had completed a moderate number of laparoscopic procedures in residency (50-200), and 21 surgeons had completed a significant number of cases during residency (>200). Of the surgeons who responded, 94% were in private practice. Fifty-seven percent of the participating surgeons who responded reported a change in laparoscopic practice patterns after the courses. Of these surgeons, 24% had a limited residency laparoscopy exposure of <50 cases. Surgeons who were exposed to ≥50 laparoscopic cases during their residency showed a statistically significant increase in the number of laparoscopic procedures performed after their class compared with

  5. Experiences of working as an advanced practice nurse in Finland--the substance of advanced nursing practice and promoting and inhibiting factors.

    PubMed

    Wisur-Hokkanen, Carola; Glasberg, Ann-Louise; Mäkelä, Carita; Fagerström, Lisbeth

    2015-12-01

    Evaluation of new advanced practice nursing roles, from different angles, is strongly recommended in the literature. New nurses' experiences of working in an advanced role may highlight problems and/or factors that promote or inhibit a successful implementation of new advanced nursing roles. To explore advanced practice nurses' experiences of the content of their nursing care and to describe promoting or inhibiting factors for working with a full scope of advanced nursing practice. The study design was explorative and descriptive. A total of 24 advanced practice nurses participated in focus group interviews (two were interviewed individually) about the processes, structure and outcome of working as advanced practice nurses. Qualitative manifest content analysis was used for data analysis. The substance of advanced practice nursing can be described with three main themes: a broader and deeper holistic view of patients' state of health, an independent and responsible manner of working and knowing own limits. Promoting factors were an identity as a nurse with advanced competency, feedback from satisfied patients and fruitful teamwork is a necessity. Inhibiting factors were a lack of organisational understanding for advanced nursing practice, poor planning leads to unsatisfactory advanced practice nursing models and advanced practice nurses' lack of courage in adopting new advanced roles. The participants experienced both a personal inner transition and a role transition that were either supported or opposed. Vague or nonexistent definitions and concepts, insufficient knowledge, insufficient support and undefined roles hindered participants' role transition. Two main strategies should be employed. The first is the realisation of more strategic leadership and support from organisations on all management levels, including nursing organisations/unions, while the second is to more realistically prepare future advanced practice nurses for the challenges they will face

  6. Evaluation of a Longitudinal Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience.

    PubMed

    Frasiolas, Jorie A; Wright, Kelly; Dzierba, Amy L

    2017-04-01

    Objective. To describe satisfaction and career path of students who participated in the longitudinal advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE). Methods. A 3-part survey was administered to students enrolled between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2013. The sections of the survey evaluated respondents' baseline characteristics, satisfaction, and career path. Results. Majority of the respondents had a GPA above 3.0 (91%), pharmacy school honors (84%), work experience in retail (16%) or multiple pharmacy sites (38%), and were members of at least one professional organization (76%). Sixty-nine percent reported that the program exceeded their expectations. Strengths included practice site consistency, rotation diversity, preceptors, presentations, and collaboration with health care professionals. Students gained approximately 76 hours of additional clinical experience, compared to if they completed rotations at individual sites. After graduation, more than half of the respondents accepted a pharmacy practice residency (67%). Conclusion. The results of this study support the need for APPE programs that prepare students to deliver advanced patient care, while providing them with professional development.

  7. Efficient and effective models for integrating advanced practice professionals into oncology practice.

    PubMed

    Shulman, Lawrence N

    2013-01-01

    Advanced practice professionals (APP), primarily nurse practitioners and physician assistants, are increasingly being integrated into oncology practices. The reasons are numerous, and models of care options are numerous as well. Models of care have developed without much forethought and are often the result of the relative interests of the physician, the APP, and the mutual "comfort" of practice style. The increasing complexity of oncology care, the pressures of the health care crisis and health care reform mean that it is necessary that we examine models of collaborative care in terms of both quality of care and productivity.

  8. Knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and practices in registered nurses and care aids about urinary incontinence in Korean nursing homes: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunah; De Gagne, Jennie C; So, Aeyoung; Palmer, Mary H

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and practices about urinary incontinence among Korean RNs and care aids and to identify correlates of continence care practices. A cross-sectional survey was used to gather self-reported data from 338 nursing staff, including 135 RNs and 203 care aids, from 61 nursing homes in Korea by using an existing instrument adapted for Korean nursing staff. The instrument consists of 18 items designed to measure knowledge about urinary incontinence, 18 items querying attitudes toward continence care, 17 items focusing on beliefs about undesirable consequences to older adults with urinary incontinence, and 28 items querying on continence care practice. Registered nurses had higher knowledge about urinary incontinence and they had more positive attitudes toward continence care practice than care aids. Attitudes, facility bed capacity, and continuing education on urinary incontinence were significantly related (P < .05) to RNs' continence care practice scores (R = 0.285; P < .001), while care aids' practice scores were associated with knowledge and attitudes (R = 0.163; P < .001). Attitude plays an important role in continence care practice for both RNs and care aids in Korean nursing homes. In addition, continence care practice of RNs may be influenced by updating clinical competencies. For care aids, continence care practice can be influenced by improving basic knowledge of urinary incontinence.

  9. The Experiences of Advanced Practice Nurses Caring for Patients with Substance Use Disorder and Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    St Marie, Barbara

    2016-10-01

    Management of chronic pain is a challenge shared by healthcare providers in various clinical settings. The epidemic of opioid misuse has escalated this challenge. A gap exists in understanding barriers and facilitators to practices of advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) caring for patients with chronic pain and substance use disorder (SUD). The purpose of this study was to examine the APRNs' experiences while caring for patients with coexisting SUD and chronic pain to help envision better ways to manage pain and direct educational initiatives. Qualitative narrative method. Telephone interviews. Twenty APRNs caring for patients with coexisting SUD and chronic pain were recruited nationwide through the American Society for Pain Management Nursing list serve. Semistructured interviews with thematic analysis. Participants identified 1) a shift of patients from other healthcare providers into the APRNs' practices; 2) barriers to accessing nonmedical modalities for managing pain, including insurance coverage, geographic location, and the patient's desire for only medication management; 3) the role of the APRN in caring for this population contained subthemes of educating and guiding patients through a process of change, applying risk strategies to keep patients safe, and educating colleagues on implementing risk management strategies while prescribing opioids. The APRNs identified barriers to providing care for patients with coexisting SUD and chronic pain. They also described the role of APRNs in providing focused education regarding risk management strategies for assessment, prescribing opioids to manage pain, and minimizing risk. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Economic benefits of less restrictive regulation of advanced practice nurses in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Conover, Chris; Richards, Robert

    2015-01-01

    With looming provider shortages and increased demand for health care, many states are looking for low-cost ways to alleviate the shortages. The purpose of this study was to assess the economic impact of less restrictive regulations for advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) in North Carolina. We use economic impact analysis to demonstrate the economic impacts of making state scope-of-practice regulations on APRNs less restrictive in North Carolina. Outcomes include economic output, value-added, payroll compensation, employment, and tax revenue for North Carolina and for various subregions. If North Carolina adopted the same approach to APRN regulation as the least restrictive states, its economy will benefit from substantial increases in economic output and employment. The state will also see increases in tax revenue. In addition to substantially shrinking the size of projected physician shortages, allowing full scope-of-practice for APRNs will bring significant economic benefits to the state of North Carolina. Our analysis should be helpful to policy makers considering ways to deal with provider shortages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction in Advanced Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Hants; Simmons, Leigh Ann; Tanabe, Paula

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss how advanced practice nurses (APNs) can incorporate mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) as a nonpharmacologic clinical tool in their practice. Over the last 30 years, patients and providers have increasingly used complementary and holistic therapies for the nonpharmacologic management of acute and chronic diseases. Mindfulness-based interventions, specifically MBSR, have been tested and applied within a variety of patient populations. There is strong evidence to support that the use of MBSR can improve a range of biological and psychological outcomes in a variety of medical illnesses, including acute and chronic pain, hypertension, and disease prevention. This article will review the many ways APNs can incorporate MBSR approaches for health promotion and disease/symptom management into their practice. We conclude with a discussion of how nurses can obtain training and certification in MBSR. Given the significant and growing literature supporting the use of MBSR in the prevention and treatment of chronic disease, increased attention on how APNs can incorporate MBSR into clinical practice is necessary. PMID:25673578

  12. Status of the Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) Phase 2, 1.5m ULE(Registered Trademark) Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egerman, Robert; Matthews, Gary W.; Johnson, Matthew; Ferland, Albert; Stahl, H. Philip; Eng, Ron; Effinger, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    The Decadal Survey stated that an advanced large-aperture ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared (UVOIR) telescope is required to enable the next generation of compelling astrophysics and exoplanet science; and, that present technology is not mature enough to affordably build and launch any potential UVOIR mission concept. Under Science and Technology funding, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Exelis have developed a more cost effective process to make up to 4m monolithic spaceflight UV quality, low areal density, thermally and dynamically stable primary mirrors. Under a Phase I program, a proof of concept mirror was completed at Exelis and tested down to 250K at MSFC which would allow imaging out to 2.5 microns. In 2014, Exelis and NASA started a Phase II program to design and build a 1.5m mirror to demonstrate lateral scalability to a 4m monolithic primary mirror. The current status of the Phase II development program will be provided along with a Phase II program summary.

  13. Levine's Conservation Model: A Framework for Advanced Gerontology Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Abumaria, Ibrahim Mahmoud; Hastings-Tolsma, Marie; Sakraida, Teresa J

    2015-01-01

    Growing numbers of older adults place increased demands on already burdened healthcare systems. The cost of managing chronic illnesses mandates greater emphasis on management and prevention. This article explores the adaptation of Levine's Conservation Model as a structure for providing care to the older adult by the adult-gerontology primary care nurse practitioner (AGNP). The AGNP role, designed to provide quality care to adult and older adult populations, offers the opportunity to not only manage health care of the elderly, but to also advocate, lead in collaborative care efforts, conduct advanced planning, and manage and negotiate health delivery systems. The use of nursing models can foster the design of effective interventions that promote health of the older adult, particularly in the long-term care environment. Levine's Conservation Model provides a useful structure for older adult care in the long-term care setting. As an ideal care manager, the AGNP would be well served to consider use of the model to guide advanced nursing practice. Recommendations for clinical practice, research, and health policy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Advanced Practice Nursing Competency Assessment Instrument (APNCAI): clinimetric validation

    PubMed Central

    Sastre-Fullana, Pedro; Morales-Asencio, Jose Miguel; Sesé-Abad, Albert; Fernández-Domínguez, Juan Carlos; De Pedro-Gómez, Joan

    2017-01-01

    Objective To describe the development and clinimetric validation of the Advanced Practice Nursing Competency Assessment Instrument (APNCAI) through several evidence sources about reliability and validity in the Spanish context. Design and setting APNCAI development was based on a multisequential and systematic process: literature review, instrument content consensus through qualitative Delphi method approach (a panel of 51 Advanced Practice in Nursing –APN– experts was selected) and the clinimetric validation process based on a sample of 600 nurses from the Balearic Islands public healthcare setting. Methods An initial step for tool's content development process based on Delphi method approach of expert consensus was implemented. A subsequent phase of tool validation started from the analysis of APN core competencies latent measurement model, including exploratory and confirmatory techniques. Reliability evidence for each latent factor was also obtained. Items' scores were submitted to descriptive analysis, plus univariate and multivariate normality tests. Results An eight-factor competency assessment latent model obtained adequate fit, and it was composed by ‘Research and Evidence-Based Practice’, ‘Clinical and Professional Leadership’, ‘Interprofessional Relationship and Mentoring’, ‘Professional Autonomy’, ‘Quality Management’, ‘Care Management’, ‘Professional Teaching and Education’ and ‘Health Promotion’. Conclusions Adequate empirical evidence of reliability and validity for APNCAI makes it useful for application in healthcare policy programmes for APN competency assessment in Spain. PMID:28235968

  15. Educating advanced level practice within complex health care workplace environments through transformational practice development.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Sally; Jackson, Carrie; Webster, Jonathan; Manley, Kim

    2013-10-01

    Over the past 20 years health care reform has influenced the development of advanced level practitioner roles and expectations. How advanced level practitioners work to survive the highly stimulating, yet sometimes overwhelming aspects of balancing high quality provision with political reform agendas, amidst economic constraint is considered. Transformational approaches (encompassing education and practice led service development) can provide, promote and 'provoke' a harnessing of complex issues workplace environment to produce creative solutions. Transformational Practice Development provides a structured, rigorous, systematic approach that practitioners, teams and health care consumers alike can utilise to achieve skills and attributes needed for successful innovation. The authors present case study materials from action orientated locally delivered Practice Development, as a complex strategic intervention approach to influence and promote advanced level practice expertise. Initiated through facilitation of transformational leadership, and resultant team based improvements, we present how strategic collaborative processes can harness work chaos and complexity to provide sustainable and productive workplace cultures of effectiveness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Partner for Promotion: An Innovative Advanced Community Pharmacy Practice Experience

    PubMed Central

    Legg, Julie E.; Casper, Kristin A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To implement the Partner for Promotion (PFP) program which was designed to enhance the skills and confidence of students and community pharmacy preceptors to deliver and expand advanced patient care services in community pharmacies and also to assess the program's impact. Design A 10-month longitudinal community advanced pharmacy practice experience was implemented that included faculty mentoring of students and preceptors via formal orientation; face-to-face training sessions; online monthly meetings; feedback on service development materials; and a web site offering resources and a discussion board. Pre- and post-APPE surveys of students and preceptors were used to evaluate perceptions of knowledge and skills. Assessment The skills survey results for the first 2 years of the PFP program suggest positive changes occurring from pre- to post-APPE survey in most areas for both students and preceptors. Four of the 7 pharmacies in 2005-2006 and 8 of the 14 pharmacies in 2006-2007 were able to develop an advanced patient care service and begin seeing patients prior to the conclusion of the APPE. As a result of the PFP program from 2005-2007, 14 new experiential sites entered into affiliation agreements with The Ohio State University College of Pharmacy. Conclusion The PFP program offers an innovative method for community pharmacy faculty members to work with students and preceptors in community pharmacies in developing patient care services. PMID:19325954

  17. Integration of advanced practice providers into the Israeli healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Aaron, Eliana Marcus; Andrews, Caryn Scheinberg

    2016-01-01

    Many countries around the world have integrated various types of Advanced Practice Providers (APPs) into their healthcare systems. The main motivating factors for recognizing and developing APPs worldwide include physician shortages and the need for improved access or delivery (US, France, Belgium, Scotland, Switzerland), reduced residency hours (US, UK), shortages in underserved regions (US, Canada, Finland, Australia), and cost containment (Germany, Netherlands, UK, US). Israel is experiencing a shortage of physicians in peripheral geographic regions and in critical medical specialties. Recent by-laws approved by the Knesset (Parliament), combined with Israel Ministry of Health (MOH) policies, have thus far been unable to fully address the shortages. To understand the potential contribution of APPs in Israel, we evaluated the international historical foundations and development of APP roles. We assessed how APPs have impacted healthcare in other countries by analyzing public data and published international research about APP education, safety, quality of care, motivators, barriers, and impact. We found that APPs are recognized in dozens of countries, and have similar scopes of practice, graduate level education requirements (in developed countries), and clinical training. At the same time, there is wide variability among countries in the actual function and independence of the advanced practice nurse (APN), particularly the nurse practitioner (NP). APPs have been established as cost effective, safe healthcare providers who improve healthcare access. Israel has begun to introduce APPs, specifically NPs, in a variety of fields, including geriatrics, palliative care and diabetic care. We recommend a rapid expansion of existing and new APP roles into the Israeli healthcare system based on evidence and the recommendations of international evaluations by non-government organizations. By shifting the education to a university setting, mirroring successful, evidence

  18. Differences in Pediatric Non-Interventional Radiology Procedural Sedation Practices and Adverse Events by Registered Nurses and Physicians.

    PubMed

    Crego, Nancy; Baernholdt, Marianne; Merwin, Elizabeth

    The purpose of this study was to determine differences in sedation-related adverse events according to the type of provider monitoring and delivering sedation. A retrospective, cross-sectional, correlational design using secondary data from the Pediatric Sedation Research Consortium database was used for this study. A sample of 36,352 cases (0-14 years of age) sedated and monitored for diagnostic radiology procedures by three types of providers (registered nurses [RNs] alone, physicians (MDs) alone, or registered nurse + physician [RN+MD sedation teams]) were compared. Patients sedated by RNs alone or MDs alone had lower odds of unanticipated adverse events (odds ratios 0.46 and 0.53, respectively; p<0.0001) compared with RN+MD sedation provider teams. Team skills may be an important competency for RN+MD sedation teams in the non-interventional radiology setting. This study can inform clinicians, administrators, and quality-improvement managers of the differences in adverse event outcomes of pediatric radiology procedures when RN+MD teams provide sedation compared with RNs or MDs alone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A Practice-Based Theory of Healing Through Therapeutic Touch: Advancing Holistic Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Mary Anne; Coppa, Denise; Shields, Deborah

    2017-08-01

    For nearly 50 years, Therapeutic Touch (TT) has contributed to advancing holistic nursing practice and has been recognized as a uniquely human approach to healing. This narrative explores the development of a practice-based theory of healing through TT, which occurred between 2010 and 2016. Through the in-depth self-inquiry of participatory reflective dialogue in concert with constant narrative analysis, TT practitioners revealed the meaning of healing within the context of their TT practice. As the community of TT experts participated in an iterative process of small group and community dialogues with analysis and synthesis of emerging themes, the assumptions and concepts central to a theory of healing emerged, were clarified and verified. Exemplars of practice illustrate the concepts. A model of the theory of healing illuminates the movement and relationship among concepts and evolved over time. Feedback from nursing and inter-professional practitioners indicate that the theory of healing, while situated within the context of TT, may be useful in advancing holistic nursing practice, informing healing and caring approaches, stimulating research and education, and contributing to future transformations in health care.

  20. Complete-block scheduling for advanced pharmacy practice experiences.

    PubMed

    Hatton, Randy C; Weitzel, Kristin W

    2013-12-01

    An innovative approach to meeting increased student demand for advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs) is described, including lessons learned during a two-year pilot project. To achieve more efficient allocation of preceptor resources, the University of Florida College of Pharmacy (UFCOP) adopted a new APPE rotation model in which 20 pharmacy students per year complete all required and elective APPEs at one practice site, an affiliated academic medical center. Relative to the prevailing model of experiential training for Pharm.D. students, the "complete-block scheduling" model offers a number of potential benefits to students, preceptors, and the pharmacy school. In addition to potentially reduced student housing expenses and associated conveniences, complete-block scheduling may enable (1) more efficient use of teaching resources, (2) increased collaboration among preceptors, (3) greater continuity and standardization of educational experiences, and (4) enhanced opportunities for students to engage in longer and more complex research projects. The single-site APPE rotation model also can provide value to the training site by enabling the extension of clinical pharmacy services; for example, UFCOP students perform anticoagulation monitoring and discharge medication counseling at the host institution. Despite logistical and other challenges encountered during pilot testing of the new scheduling model, the program has been well received by students and preceptors alike. Complete-block APPE scheduling is a viable model for some health systems to consider as a means of streamlining experiential education practices and helping to ensure high-quality clinical rotations for Pharm.D. students.

  1. Framework for Evaluating the Impact of Advanced Practice Nursing Roles.

    PubMed

    Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Spichiger, Elisabeth; Martin, Jacqueline; Stoll, Hansruedi; Kellerhals, Sabine Degen; Fliedner, Monica; Grossmann, Florian; Henry, Morag; Herrmann, Luzia; Koller, Antje; Schwendimann, René; Ulrich, Anja; Weibel, Lukas; Callens, Betty; De Geest, Sabina

    2016-03-01

    To address the gap in evidence-based information required to support the development of advanced practice nursing (APN) roles in Switzerland, stakeholders identified the need for guidance to generate strategic evaluation data. This article describes an evaluation framework developed to inform decisions about the effective utilization of APN roles across the country. A participatory approach was used by an international group of stakeholders. Published literature and an evidenced-based framework for introducing APN roles were analyzed and applied to define the purpose, target audiences, and essential elements of the evaluation framework. Through subsequent meetings and review by an expert panel, the framework was developed and refined. A framework to evaluate different types of APN roles as they evolve to meet dynamic population health, practice setting, and health system needs was created. It includes a matrix of key concepts to guide evaluations across three stages of APN role development: introduction, implementation, and long-term sustainability. For each stage, evaluation objectives and questions examining APN role structures, processes, and outcomes from different perspectives (e.g., patients, providers, managers, policy-makers) were identified. A practical, robust framework based on well-established evaluation concepts and current understanding of APN roles can be used to conduct systematic evaluations. The evaluation framework is sufficiently generic to allow application in developed countries globally, both for evaluation as well as research purposes. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  2. Advancing the practice of systems engineering at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansma, Patti A.; Jones, Ross M.

    2006-01-01

    In FY 2004, JPL launched an initiative to improve the way it practices systems engineering. The Lab's senior management formed the Systems Engineering Advancement (SEA) Project in order to "significantly advance the practice and organizational capabilities of systems engineering at JPL on flight projects and ground support tasks." The scope of the SEA Project includes the systems engineering work performed in all three dimensions of a program, project, or task: 1. the full life-cycle, i.e., concept through end of operations 2. the full depth, i.e., Program, Project, System, Subsystem, Element (SE Levels 1 to 5) 3. the full technical scope, e.g., the flight, ground and launch systems, avionics, power, propulsion, telecommunications, thermal, etc. The initial focus of their efforts defined the following basic systems engineering functions at JPL: systems architecture, requirements management, interface definition, technical resource management, system design and analysis, system verification and validation, risk management, technical peer reviews, design process management and systems engineering task management, They also developed a list of highly valued personal behaviors of systems engineers, and are working to inculcate those behaviors into members of their systems engineering community. The SEA Project is developing products, services, and training to support managers and practitioners throughout the entire system lifecycle. As these are developed, each one needs to be systematically deployed. Hence, the SEA Project developed a deployment process that includes four aspects: infrastructure and operations, communication and outreach, education and training, and consulting support. In addition, the SEA Project has taken a proactive approach to organizational change management and customer relationship management - both concepts and approaches not usually invoked in an engineering environment. This paper'3 describes JPL's approach to advancing the practice of

  3. Self-perception of readiness for clinical practice: A survey of accelerated Masters program graduate registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Cantlay, Andrew; Salamanca, Jennifer; Golaw, Cherie; Wolf, Daniel; Maas, Carly; Nicholson, Patricia

    2017-05-01

    Accelerated nursing programs are gaining momentum as a means of career transition into the nursing profession for mature age learners in an attempt to meet future healthcare workforce demands in Australia. With a gap in the literature on readiness for practice of graduates from accelerated nursing programs at the Masters level the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the program based on graduates' preparedness for practice and graduate outcomes. Using a descriptive, exploratory design an online survey was used to explore the perception of graduate nurses' readiness for clinical practice. Forty-nine graduates from a nursing Masters program at an Australian university completed the survey defining readiness for practice as knowledge of self-limitations and seeking help, autonomy in basic clinical procedures, exhibiting confidence, possessing theoretical knowledge and practicing safe care. Graduates perceived themselves as adequately prepared to work as a beginner practitioner with their perception of readiness for clinical practice largely positive. The majority of participants agreed that the program had prepared them for work as a beginner practitioner with respondents stating that they felt adequately prepared in most areas relating to clinical practice. This would suggest that educational preparation was adequate and effective in achieving program objectives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Collaborating across services to advance evidence-based nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Deborah J; Richard, Maggie L; Ceniceros, Xochitl; Blaize, Kelli

    2010-01-01

    Military medical treatment facilities offer a unique environment in which to develop a culture of evidence-based practice (EBP). Distinctive issues arise in the context of changed patient care demographics because of a war-injured population. These issues offer an opportunity to enhance the quality of care through the use and adaptation of research findings in this special nursing environment. In addition, the colocation of two military medical centers offers the prospect of collaborative efforts to create a regional culture for nursing EBP. The purposes of this study were to describe the processes of a collaborative project to train nurses in EBP and to share resources in developing and implementing evidence-based clinical nursing guidelines in two large military medical centers in the Northeastern United States and to discuss the collective efforts of nurse researchers, leadership, advanced practice nurses, and staff nurses in each hospital to facilitate the EBP process. A description of the organizational structure and the climate for EBP of each facility is provided followed by discussion of training efforts and the inculcation of an organizational culture for EBP. Contextual barriers and facilitators were encountered throughout the project. The two nurse researchers leading the projects were able to overcome the barriers and capitalize on opportunities to promote EBP. Three evidence-based clinical practice guidelines were developed at each facility and are currently in various stages of implementation. Despite the barriers, EBP continues to be at the forefront of military nursing practice in the U.S. National Capital Region. Clear communication and regular meetings were essential to the success of the collaborative project within and between the two military hospitals. Military-specific barriers to EBP included high team attrition and turnover because of the war mission and the usual high staff turnover at military hospitals. Military facilitators included a

  5. The Role of Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists in Patient Education

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    As advanced practice nurses, certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) have a responsibility to engage in patient education about health...Categories and themes include; engaging in perioperative patient education , focusing on explanations about anesthesia and surgery, prior nursing...experiences make patient education easier, documenting patient education is important and uncertainty about where to document it. Common topics and themes

  6. Advancing practice through prescribing: is there a better way?

    PubMed

    Harding, Stephen; Gardner, Andrew

    2006-07-01

    The literature demonstrates a clear relationship between the rate of adverse effects and the number of prescribers that a service consumer may consult. This brings into question the benefits, for the service consumer, of nurses prescribing. Given the complexities of care for certain population groups, for example older people, it is suggested that there is greater benefit in professionals working collaboratively toward the best outcome for the person in care, with nurses offering more informed advice to their partners in service delivery. Nurses who advance their practice through the development of an expert knowledge base relevant to their area of expertise can contribute to the diagnosis and management of particular client groups by providing specialist advice to primary and direct care professionals. It is proposed that this could be achieved using an 'academic detailing' approach rather than becoming another prescriber of pharmacotherapy.

  7. A Quality Improvement Course Review of Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Hornsby, Lori B.; Phillippe, Haley M.; Kelley, Kristi; McDonough, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. To determine strengths of and quality improvements needed in advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPE) through a systematic course review process. Design. Following the “developing a curriculum” (DACUM) format, course materials and assessments were reviewed by the curricular subcommittee responsible for experiential education and by key stakeholders. Course sequence overview and data were presented and discussed. A course review worksheet was completed, outlining strengths and areas for improvement. Assessment. Student feedback was positive. Strengths and areas for improvement were identified. The committee found reviewing the sequence of 8 APPE courses to be challenging. Conclusions. Course reviews are a necessary process in curricular quality improvement but can be difficult to accomplish. We found overall feedback about APPEs was positive and student performance was high. Areas identified as needing improvement will be the focus of continuous quality improvement of the APPE sequence. PMID:21931454

  8. Blueprint for development of the advanced practice psychiatric nurse workforce.

    PubMed

    Hanrahan, Nancy P; Delaney, Kathleen R; Stuart, Gail W

    2012-01-01

    The mental health system is inefficient and ineffective in providing behavioral health care services to the 1 in 4 Americans who have a mental illness or a substance abuse problem. Current health care reform initiatives present a significant opportunity for advanced practice psychiatric nurses-psychiatric mental health (APRN-PMH) to develop action-oriented recommendations for developing their workforce and thereby increasing access to high-quality and full-spectrum behavioral health care services. If endorsed by the professional nursing associations and the APRN-PMH workforce, the strategies presented in this paper provide a blueprint for developing the APRN-PMH workforce. Achieving these goals will significantly reform the APRN-PMH workforce, thereby contributing to the overall goal of supporting an integrated model of behavioral health care. No change has as much potential to influence the APRN-PMH workforce as the uniting of all APRN-PMHs in a "Blueprint for APRN-PMH Workforce Development."

  9. Comprehensive nursing case management. An advanced practice model.

    PubMed

    Taylor, P

    1999-01-01

    Under managed care and capitated reimbursement systems, case management is a core strategy for providing high-quality, cost-effective care by decreasing fragmentation, enhancing quality, ensuring efficient use of resources, and containing costs. Although case management is used in various areas of the healthcare arena, it suffers from a lack of consensus regarding its definition, essential components, and appropriate application. The purpose of this paper is to examine the components and limitations of existing case management models, outline the competencies of an effective case manager, and present a model of advanced practice nursing case management that focuses on a continuum of care that integrates medical and psychosocial resources to promote optimal clinical fiscal outcomes and enables patients to work as partners with the healthcare team in facilitating and maintaining their physical and emotional well-being.

  10. A collaborative and reflective academic advanced pharmacy practice experience.

    PubMed

    Roche, Victoria F; Limpach, Aimee L

    2011-08-10

    To implement a co-precepted advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) focused on traditional pharmacy faculty and administrative responsibilities and reflection opportunities. A multi-faceted, reflection-infused academic APPE was designed that exposed students to activities related to teaching, curriculum revision, scholarly writing, committee service, faculty role-modeling, mentorship and development, and school-level administrative decision-making. Two students completed the APPE in the first 2 semesters it was offered (1 in spring 2010 and 1 in fall 2010). Formative and summative evaluations confirmed that the students achieved the APPE goals and viewed the experience as valuable, informative, and enjoyable as expressed both in reflective journal submissions and survey comments. Co-precepting by pharmacy faculty members primarily engaged in traditional faculty- and administration-related responsibilities can provide students with a robust learning experience that surpasses that which could be achieved by a single mentor.

  11. Advanced nursing practice and Newton's three laws of motion.

    PubMed

    Sturgeon, David

    This article considers the reasons for the development of advanced practice roles among nurses and other healthcare professions. It explores the implications of financial constraints, consumer preferences and the development of new healthcare services on the reorganization of professional boundaries. It makes use of Sir Isaac Newton's three laws of motion to demonstrate how professional development in nursing has taken place in response to a number of external influences and demands. It also considers the significance of skill mix for the nursing profession, in particular the development and likely expansion of the physician assistant role. The application of different professionals and grades within a healthcare team or organization is central to the Government's Agenda for Change proposals and nurses have successfully adopted a number of roles traditionally performed by doctors. Nurses have demonstrated that they are capable of providing high quality care and contributing directly to positive patient outcome. Advanced nursing roles should not only reflect the changing nature of healthcare work, they should also be actively engaged in reconstructing healthcare boundaries.

  12. A Strategy to Develop Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Sam; Giles, Joel; Maffeo, Carrie; Hansen, Laura; Saseen, Joseph J.; Ulrich, Heather; Valdez, Connie; Altiere, Ralph; Bainbridge, Jacquelyn; Page, Robert; Sintek, Charles; Vondracek, Sheryl; Zadvorny, Emily; Fish, Douglas

    2007-01-01

    Objective To establish statewide medication, disease management, and other clinical programs to serve as advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) training sites for the University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center School of Pharmacy, and to guarantee year-round support for the programs by providing pharmacy students with the necessary competencies to carry a significant proportion of each program's workload. Methods Partnerships with pharmacies willing to use students to expand their scope of clinical practice or support existing programs were established. Partners were asked to choose the clinical program(s) they wished implemented or supported and were guaranteed that APPE students would contribute to carrying each program's clinical service workload for 48 week/year under the supervision of the partners' pharmacists. In addition, partners implementing new programs were offered other support, including equipment, supplies, and training and mentoring for their pharmacists. Evaluation Twenty-two partnerships involving anticoagulation, diabetes, immunization, medication reconciliation, and other clinical programs were established with hospital, community, and community health center pharmacies. The partnerships provided 213 APPE placements in the 2006-2007 academic year. Conclusion This work demonstrates that by using innovative approaches, a pharmacy school can form new partnerships with hospital, community health center, and community pharmacies, as well as work with existing clinical programs, to create a variety of medication, disease management, and other APPEs to meet its increasing placement needs and evolving accreditation standards. PMID:17619646

  13. An Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience in Sports Pharmacy

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Objective To establish and evaluate an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) in sports pharmacy. Design Students actively participated in a variety of activities for this new 6-week elective APPE, including drug-testing collections, delivering presentations, and providing drug information. Students also learned about assays, compounding, and dispensing medications specifically for athletes, and visited various athletic medical facilities. Student were given written and practical certification examinations for drug-testing collections, and their specimen measurements were compared to those obtained by the testing laboratory for validation; satisfaction surveys were obtained from testing sites; and presentation evaluations were obtained from audience participants. Assessment Students were able to accurately measure pH and specific gravity of urine samples and all students passed the certification examination. Students rated the APPE very high. Also, students received high satisfaction ratings on surveys administered to the officials of the schools where they tested and members of the groups to whom they gave presentations. Conclusion Students gained experience and insight into the various roles of pharmacists in sports pharmacy and developed confidence in their ability to conduct drug-testing collections. PMID:18322580

  14. A strategy to develop advanced pharmacy practice experiences.

    PubMed

    Turner, Christopher J; Ellis, Sam; Giles, Joel; Maffeo, Carrie; Hansen, Laura; Saseen, Joseph J; Ulrich, Heather; Valdez, Connie; Altiere, Ralph; Bainbridge, Jacquelyn; Page, Robert; Sintek, Charles; Vondracek, Sheryl; Zadvorny, Emily; Fish, Douglas

    2007-06-15

    To establish statewide medication, disease management, and other clinical programs to serve as advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) training sites for the University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center School of Pharmacy, and to guarantee year-round support for the programs by providing pharmacy students with the necessary competencies to carry a significant proportion of each program's workload. Partnerships with pharmacies willing to use students to expand their scope of clinical practice or support existing programs were established. Partners were asked to choose the clinical program(s) they wished implemented or supported and were guaranteed that APPE students would contribute to carrying each program's clinical service workload for 48 week/year under the supervision of the partners' pharmacists. In addition, partners implementing new programs were offered other support, including equipment, supplies, and training and mentoring for their pharmacists. Twenty-two partnerships involving anticoagulation, diabetes, immunization, medication reconciliation, and other clinical programs were established with hospital, community, and community health center pharmacies. The partnerships provided 213 APPE placements in the 2006-2007 academic year. This work demonstrates that by using innovative approaches, a pharmacy school can form new partnerships with hospital, community health center, and community pharmacies, as well as work with existing clinical programs, to create a variety of medication, disease management, and other APPEs to meet its increasing placement needs and evolving accreditation standards.

  15. Advancing technician practice: Deliberations of a regulatory board.

    PubMed

    Adams, Alex J

    2017-02-16

    In 2016, the Idaho State Board of Pharmacy (U.S.) undertook a major rulemaking initiative to advance pharmacy practice by broadening the ability of pharmacists to delegate tasks to pharmacy technicians. The new rules of the Board thus moved the locus of control in technician scope of practice from law to pharmacist delegation. Pharmacist delegation is individualistic and takes into account the individual technician's capabilities, the pharmacist's comfort level, facility policies, and the risk mitigation strategies present at the facility, among other factors. State law limits, by contrast, are rigid and can mean that pharmacists are unable to delegate tasks that are or could otherwise be within the abilities of their technicians. The expanded technician duties are in two domains: 1) medication dispensing support (e.g., tech-check-tech, accepting verbal prescriptions, transferring prescriptions, and performing remote data entry); and 2) technical support for pharmacist clinical services (e.g., administering immunizations). This commentary reviews the evidence behind these expanded duties, as well as the key regulatory decision points for each task. The Board's rules and approach may prove useful to other states and even other governing bodies outside the U.S. as they consider similar issues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Use of information technology by advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Gaumer, Gary L; Koeniger-Donohue, Rebecca; Friel, Christina; Sudbay, Mary Beth

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the use of information technology by advance practice nurses. A survey of 519 graduates of the Simmons College nurse practitioner program was conducted. Areas of investigation included the nurse practitioner's use of informatics technology, perception of information technology competence, adequacy of information technology training and support in the workplace, specific information technology health functions used in the workplace, and perceived benefits of using information technology. The data on the 249 usable responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics. These analyses compare the use of information technology by type of job, specialty, years of practice, and setting of work. Results indicate that more than 90% of nurse practitioners utilize computers at work, yet a large fraction of them still have low self-perception of information technology competence, believe initial training at the work site was inadequate, and believe that academic preparation for information technology was also inadequate. There is considerable variation in these measures across nurse practitioner specialties, settings of care, job characteristics, and experience.

  17. Supporting children whose parent has a mental health problem: an assessment of the education, knowledge, confidence and practices of registered psychiatric nurses in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Houlihan, D; Sharek, D; Higgins, A

    2013-04-01

    Health professionals, including nurses, stand accused of ignorance or oversight of children whose parent experience a mental health problem. Psychiatric nurses are in an ideal position to respond to children's needs and support their parents in a proactive and sensitive manner. The aim of this study was to explore psychiatric nurses' education, knowledge, confidence and practice with regard to the support needs of children whose parent has a mental health problem. This study employed a self-completion anonymous survey design with a sample of registered psychiatric nurses from one integrated mental health service in Ireland. The sample reported relatively low levels of education, knowledge, confidence and supportive clinical practice when it came to children whose parent has a mental health problem. There is an urgent need for education on family-focused care, and the development of guidelines and child focused services if the needs of parents and children are to be met.

  18. Advance Care Discussions: Pediatric Clinician Preparedness and Practices.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Amy; Hall, Amber M; Wolfe, Joanne

    2016-03-01

    Few data exist regarding clinician preparedness to participate in advance care discussions (ACD) and the practices surrounding these discussions for children with life-threatening conditions. We sought to understand pediatric clinician preparedness to participate in ACD and the practices surrounding these discussions. A survey was administered to assess clinician attitudes and behaviors regarding ACD. Two hundred sixty-six clinicians (107 physicians and 159 nurses) responded to the survey (response rate 53.6%). Seventy-five percent of clinicians felt prepared to participate in ACD. Most clinicians believed they were prepared to express empathy (98.8%), discuss goals of care for an adolescent patient (90.3%), and elicit a parent's hopes (90.3%). Conversely, several felt unprepared to discuss resuscitation status with school-aged (59.7%) and adolescent (48.5%) patients and to conduct a family conference (39.5%). The most frequent topics addressed were: parents' understanding of the patient's illness (75.5%), primary goals of the parent (75.1%), and the parents' understanding of prognosis (71.1%). Conversely, the topics least commonly discussed were as follows: belief system of the patient/family (22.0%), patient's hopes (21.2%), and the patient's perceptions of his/her quality of life (19.8%). Notably, 40% of clinicians believe that caring for patients with poor prognoses is depressing, and this was more common among less-experienced clinicians (P = 0.048). Many clinicians believe they are prepared to participate in ACD, but practices are not consistent with expert recommendations for optimal ACD. Educational interventions aimed at improving clinician knowledge, attitudes, and behavior, and greater clinician support may enhance health care provider ACD preparedness and skills. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 37 CFR 2.47 - Supplemental Register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Supplemental Register. 2.47... COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES The Written Application § 2.47 Supplemental Register. (a) In an application to register on the Supplemental Register under section 23 of the Act, the...

  20. 37 CFR 2.47 - Supplemental Register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Supplemental Register. 2.47... COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES The Written Application § 2.47 Supplemental Register. (a) In an application to register on the Supplemental Register under section 23 of the Act, the...

  1. 37 CFR 2.47 - Supplemental Register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Supplemental Register. 2.47... COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES The Written Application § 2.47 Supplemental Register. (a) In an application to register on the Supplemental Register under section 23 of the Act, the...

  2. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (Competent, Proficient, and Expert) in Public Health and Community Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Bruening, Meg; Udarbe, Adrienne Z; Yakes Jimenez, Elizabeth; Stell Crowley, Phyllis; Fredericks, Doris C; Edwards Hall, Leigh Ann

    2015-10-01

    The need and demand for population-level disease prevention has increased, especially with the passage of the Affordable Care Act, a worldwide increase in obesity and chronic disease, and a global emphasis on preventative health care that includes behavioral, environmental, and policy interventions. In response to these evolving needs, the Public Health and Community Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group, with guidance from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Management Committee, has developed Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance as tools for registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs) currently in practice or interested in working in public health and community nutrition, to assess their current skill levels and to identify areas for professional development. The Standards of Practice address the four steps of the Nutrition Care Process for community and public health RDNs, which are assessment, diagnosis, intervention, and evaluation/monitoring. The Standards of Professional Performance consist of the following six domains of professional performance for community and public health RDNs: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. Within each standard, specific indicators provide measurable action statements that illustrate the ways in which RDNs can address client and population nutrition and health. The indicators describe three skill levels (competent, proficient, and expert) for RDNs. These tools highlight the unique scope of expertise that RDNs provide to the field of public health and community nutrition.

  3. Primary total knee replacement: a comparison of a nationally agreed guide to best practice and current surgical technique as determined by the North West Regional Arthroplasty Register.

    PubMed Central

    Malik, M. H. A.; Chougle, A.; Pradhan, N.; Gambhir, A. K.; Porter, M. L.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 1999, a statement of best practice in primary total hip replacement was approved by the Council of the British Orthopaedic Association (BOA) and by the British Association for Surgery of the Knee (BASK) to provide a basis for regional and national auditable standards: we have compared practice in the North West of England to this document to ascertain adherence to this guide to best practice. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A direct comparison of data held on the North West Hip Arthroplasty Register for 2001/2002 and BASK/BOA guidelines was performed. 86 surgeons from 26 hospitals were included in the study. RESULTS: A mean of 93.3% of operations were performed in the surgeon's usual theatre. All of these theatres had vertical laminar air flow systems. 42.2% of respondents routinely used exhaust suits and 68.1% of respondents routinely used impermeable disposable gowns. All surgeons use some form of anti-thromboembolic prophylaxis; 66.2% use a combination of both mechanical and chemical means. All surgeons used antibiotic prophylaxis. The most popular choice of antibiotic was a cephalosporin. 93.7% of surgeons routinely use antibiotic-loaded cement. The PFC and Kinemax prostheses were the most commonly used prostheses. Interestingly, 97.7% of all first-choice implants were cemented. Only 2 surgeons used uncemented total knee replacement. 69.8% of surgeons used a posterior cruciate retaining design. A midline longitudinal skin incision is used by 87.2% of surgeons, a medial longitudinal skin incision by 7.0% and a lateral longitudinal skin incision by 5.8% of surgeons. A medial parapatellar capsular incision is preferred by 91.9% with the remainder using mid vastus or trivector retaining capsulotomy. Closure of capsulotomies is performed in flexion by 65.1% and in extension by 34.9%. In patients with osteoarthritis, 38.4% routinely resurfaced the patella, 34.9% never resurfaced the patella and 26.7% selectively resurfaced. This was in direct contrast to

  4. Advanced training for primary care and general practice nurses: enablers and outcomes of postgraduate education.

    PubMed

    Hallinan, Christine M; Hegarty, Kelsey L

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to understand enablers to participation in postgraduate education for primary care nurses (PCNs), and to explore how postgraduate education has advanced their nursing practice. Cross-sectional questionnaires were mailed out in April 2012 to current and past students undertaking postgraduate studies in primary care nursing at The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Questionnaires were returned by 100 out of 243 nurses (response rate 41%). Ninety-one per cent (91/100) of the respondents were first registered as nurses in Australia. Fifty-seven per cent were hospital trained and 43% were university educated to attain their initial nurse qualification. The respondents reported opportunities to expand scope of practice (99%; 97/98), improve clinical practice (98%; 97/99), increase work satisfaction (93%; 91/98) and increase practice autonomy (92%; 89/97) as factors that most influenced participation in postgraduate education in primary care nursing. Major enablers for postgraduate studies were scholarship access (75%; 71/95) and access to distance education (74%; 72/98). Many respondents reported an increased scope of practice (98%; 95/97) and increased job satisfaction (71%; 70/98) as an education outcome. Only 29% (28/97) cited an increase in pay-rate as an outcome. Of the 73 PCNs currently working in general practice, many anticipated an increase in time spent on the preparation of chronic disease management plans (63%; 45/72), multidisciplinary care plans (56%; 40/72) and adult health checks (56%; 40/72) in the preceding 12 months. Recommendations emerging from findings include: (1) increased access to scholarships for nurses undertaking postgraduate education in primary care nursing is imperative; (2) alternative modes of course delivery need to be embedded in primary care nursing education; (3) the development of Australian primary care policy, including policy on funding models, needs to more accurately reflect the

  5. The psychiatric advanced practice nurse with prescriptive authority: role development, practice issues, and outcomes measurement.

    PubMed

    Cornwell, C; Chiverton, P

    1997-04-01

    Within the rapidly changing health care system, there is an increased need for professionals who can provide cost-effective primary health care for mentally ill patients. This article discusses the role of the Psychiatric Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) with Prescriptive Authority as a cost-effective, high-quality component of comprehensive mental health care delivery. Historical aspects of the development of the Nurse Practitioner (NP) role are discussed, as well as issues specific to the role in psychiatric nursing. The implementation of this role at Rochester is described, followed by recommendations for studying the impact of the psychiatric NP on care delivery, including process and outcome variables.

  6. Providing a navigable route for acute medicine nurses to advance their practice: a framework of ascending levels of practice.

    PubMed

    Lees-Deutsch, Liz; Christian, Jan; Setchfield, Ian

    2016-01-01

    This article conveys concerns raised by delegates at the International SAM Conference (Manchester, 2015) regarding how to advance nursing practice in acute medicine. It endeavors to capture the essence of 'how to advance practice' and 'how to integrate advanced practice' within the workforce structures of an acute medicine unit (AMU). It addresses the production of tacit knowledge and the recognition and integration of this to developing the nursing workforce. The current context of NHS efficiencies and recruitment issues emphasize the value of retaining tacit knowledge. Uniquely, this article offers an early conceptual framework through which levels of advancement and potential transition points to advance nursing practice in acute medicine are articulated. Determining how to advance requires identification of prior accomplishments such as, tacit knowledge, experiential learning, CPD, specialist courses and management experience. This requires nurses to make judicious decisions to advance their practice and the distinction between 'amassing experience' and 'career progression'. It aims to stimulate thinking around the practicalities of advancement, the value of tacit knowledge and potential realization through the framework trajectory.

  7. 78 FR 28717 - Advancing Pay Equality in the Federal Government and Learning From Successful Practices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office #0; #0; #0; Presidential... Documents#0;#0; ] Memorandum of May 10, 2013 Advancing Pay Equality in the Federal Government and Learning... are a detriment to women, families, and our economy. The Federal Government is the Nation's...

  8. Assessment Practices at Diploma and Advanced Diploma Levels Within Training Packages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreman, David; Davis, Paul; Bone, John

    Researchers examined the management and conduct of assessments at the diploma and advanced diploma levels within training packages across Australia. The principal data collection activities were as follows: (1) a literature review; (2) examination of seven training packages; (3) a survey completed by 28 registered training organizations and 33…

  9. 28th Annual APRN Legislative Update: Advancements continue for APRN practice.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Susanne J

    2016-01-16

    The Annual Legislative Update discusses the legislative accomplishments in the areas of practice authority, reimbursement, and prescriptive authority that have the most impact on nurse practitioners and other advanced practice nurses across the country.

  10. Impact of an Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience on Students' Performance in an Advanced Practice Experience

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Thomas J.; Hedge, Dennis D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of an introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE) on students' clinical skills during their initial advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE). Design A 4-week First Steps course that focused on students developing pharmacy practice skills, clinical communications skills, and effective use of reference materials was introduced in 2006 at the end of the third-year curriculum, prior to students beginning their APPEs. Assessment During the third week of the first APPE, faculty members rated students' demonstration of 9 clinical skills on a 5-point Likert scale (1 being always and 5 being never). The evaluation was performed in 2005 prior to implementation of the course (control group) and again in 2006 after implementation of the course. Students who completed the First Steps course scored better on all 9 skills and had a better average clinical skills value (2.3) compared to the control group (2.6, p < 0.01). Conclusion Completion of an IPPE course that focused on critical pharmacy practice aspects, clinical communication skills, and use of reference materials resulted in increased frequency of desired clinical behaviors on a subsequent APPE. PMID:20221362

  11. The role of advanced practice providers in pediatric otolaryngology academic practices.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Brian K; Brandon, Gretchen; Shah, Rahul; Preciado, Diego; Zalzal, George

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the roles of Physician Assistants (PAs) and Nurse Practitioners (NPs) in pediatric academic otolaryngology programs to provide a better understanding of their scope of practice, levels of autonomy, clinical duties, teaching opportunities and research participation. An anonymous web-based electronic survey tool was sent to all pediatric otolaryngology fellowship program directors in the United States. Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants are utilized in approximately 3 out of every 4 pediatric otolaryngology practices. The top three job activities of both the PA and NP were: (1) seeing patients independently, (2) working alongside doctors in clinic, and (3) answering phone lines/parental calls. A higher percentage of PAs (83%), worked alongside doctors in clinic, as compared to NPs, where only 55% work alongside MDs. Over half of PAs round with the in-patient team and see consults as compared to just over one third of NPs who participate in such activities. Twenty-five percent of practices reported that PAs cover call and assist in the OR. Most PAs/NPs saw between 11 and 15 patients per clinic which provides a clear productivity advantage when looking to screen patients, provide medical care, generate surgical cases, and maximize billings. NPs and PAs have complimentary skill sets ideal for the pediatric otolaryngology workplace, although job activities and "best fit" are hospital and practice dependent. Our study suggests that the use of PAs and NPs will continue to grow to meet increased demand for services in the field of pediatric otolaryngology. Employing advanced practice providers enables academic centers to improve access, provide additional financial remuneration, reduce wait times for new patients, and allow attending physicians to meet increased practice demands. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Infusing gerontological nursing content into advanced practice nursing education.

    PubMed

    Kohlenberg, Eileen; Kennedy-Malone, Laurie; Crane, Patricia; Letvak, Susan

    2007-01-01

    The inclusion of gerontology content in the nursing curriculum is paramount as our population of older adults grows. As one of 10 recipients of the John A. Hartford Foundation/AACN awards for Enhancing Gerontological and Geriatric Nursing Education for Advanced Practice Nursing Programs, we successfully integrated gerontological/ geriatric content throughout core courses for all concentrations taught at the master's level. The Nurse Practitioner and Clinical Nurse Specialist Competencies for Older Adult Care were used as a guide to integrate gerontological nursing content across the core courses. We present examples of content, strategies, and evaluation methods that demonstrate infusion of gerontology in a nursing theory course, research course, and healthcare law and policy course. Twenty-two of the competencies are addressed in these core courses and provide a foundation for further development in the support and specialty courses for the nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist, nursing administrator, nurse educator, and nurse anesthetist. We also present helpful Web-based resources for older adult care.

  13. An advanced practice nursing program for foreign medical doctors: a practical approach.

    PubMed

    Alpert, Patricia T; Yucha, Carolyn B; Atienza, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    This article articulates lessons learned about an accelerated family nurse practitioner course offered to foreign medical doctors who also held baccalaureate nursing degrees (BSN). In the last decade, many physicians in the Philippines returned to school to obtain BSN degrees and licensure as registered nurses (referred to as nurse-medics) to emigrate to the United States in the hope of a better life. Once in the United States, many remain in nursing even though they prefer the practice of medicine. This fast-track master's degree program began in fall 2006 at a university in the southwestern United States in collaboration with St. Jude College in the Philippines. By the end of this program (2010), 76 students had graduated. All who sat for the FNP national certification exam passed on the first attempt. Due to a decrease in qualified applicants, the program eventually closed, but a number of important lessons were learned. Nursing programs planning to undertake accelerated programs to transition medical doctors to nurse practitioners should consider they retake courses such as physical assessment, pharmacology and pathophysiology.

  14. Energy Therapies in Advanced Practice Oncology: An Evidence-Informed Practice Approach

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Pamela J.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced practitioners in oncology want patients to receive state-of-the-art care and support for their healing process. Evidence-informed practice (EIP), an approach to evaluating evidence for clinical practice, considers the varieties of evidence in the context of patient preference and condition as well as practitioner knowledge and experience. This article offers an EIP approach to energy therapies, namely, Therapeutic Touch (TT), Healing Touch (HT), and Reiki, as supportive interventions in cancer care; a description of the author’s professional experience with TT, HT, and Reiki in practice and research; an overview of the three energy healing modalities; a review of nine clinical studies related to oncology; and recommendations for EIP. These studies demonstrate a response to previous research design critiques. Findings indicate a positive benefit for oncology patients in the realms of pain, quality of life, fatigue, health function, and mood. Directionality of healing in immune response and cell line studies affirms the usual explanation that these therapies bring harmony and balance to the system in the direction of health. Foremost, the research literature demonstrates the safety of these therapies. In order to consider the varieties of evidence for TT, HT, and Reiki, EIP requires a qualitative examination of patient experiences with these modalities, exploration of where these modalities have been integrated into cancer care and how the practice works in the oncology setting, and discovery of the impact of implementation on provider practice and self-care. Next steps toward EIP require fleshing out the experience of these modalities by patients and health-care providers in the oncology care setting. PMID:25031994

  15. Energy therapies in advanced practice oncology: an evidence-informed practice approach.

    PubMed

    Potter, Pamela J

    2013-05-01

    Advanced practitioners in oncology want patients to receive state-of-the-art care and support for their healing process. Evidence-informed practice (EIP), an approach to evaluating evidence for clinical practice, considers the varieties of evidence in the context of patient preference and condition as well as practitioner knowledge and experience. This article offers an EIP approach to energy therapies, namely, Therapeutic Touch (TT), Healing Touch (HT), and Reiki, as supportive interventions in cancer care; a description of the author's professional experience with TT, HT, and Reiki in practice and research; an overview of the three energy healing modalities; a review of nine clinical studies related to oncology; and recommendations for EIP. These studies demonstrate a response to previous research design critiques. Findings indicate a positive benefit for oncology patients in the realms of pain, quality of life, fatigue, health function, and mood. Directionality of healing in immune response and cell line studies affirms the usual explanation that these therapies bring harmony and balance to the system in the direction of health. Foremost, the research literature demonstrates the safety of these therapies. In order to consider the varieties of evidence for TT, HT, and Reiki, EIP requires a qualitative examination of patient experiences with these modalities, exploration of where these modalities have been integrated into cancer care and how the practice works in the oncology setting, and discovery of the impact of implementation on provider practice and self-care. Next steps toward EIP require fleshing out the experience of these modalities by patients and health-care providers in the oncology care setting.

  16. Factors influencing the development and implementation of advanced radiographer practice in Australia – a qualitative study using an interpretative phenomenological approach

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Barbara A; Bernoth, Maree; Davidson, Rob

    2014-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to explore the factors influencing the implementation or the lack of implementation of advanced practitioner role in Australia. This study uses an interpretative phenomenological approach to explore the in-depth real life issues, which surround the advanced practitioner as a solution to radiologist workforce shortages in Australia. Research participants are radiographers, radiation therapists and health managers registered with the Australian Institute of Radiography (AIR) and holding senior professional and AIR Board positions with knowledge of current advanced practice. In total, seven interviews were conducted revealing education, governance, technical, people issues, change management, government, costs and timing as critical factors influencing advanced practice in Australia. Seven participants in this study perceived an advanced practice role might have major benefits and a positive impact on the immediate and long-term management of patients. Another finding is the greater respect and appreciation of each other's roles and expertise within the multidisciplinary healthcare team. Engagement is required of the critical stakeholders that have been identified as ‘blockers’ (radiologists, health departments) as well as identified allies (e.g. emergency clinicians, supportive radiologists, patient advocacy groups). The research supports that the AIR has a role to play for the professional identity of radiographers and shaping the advanced practice role in Australia.

  17. Factors influencing the development and implementation of advanced radiographer practice in Australia – a qualitative study using an interpretative phenomenological approach

    PubMed Central

    Page, Barbara A; Bernoth, Maree; Davidson, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to explore the factors influencing the implementation or the lack of implementation of advanced practitioner role in Australia. Methods This study uses an interpretative phenomenological approach to explore the in-depth real life issues, which surround the advanced practitioner as a solution to radiologist workforce shortages in Australia. Research participants are radiographers, radiation therapists and health managers registered with the Australian Institute of Radiography (AIR) and holding senior professional and AIR Board positions with knowledge of current advanced practice. Results In total, seven interviews were conducted revealing education, governance, technical, people issues, change management, government, costs and timing as critical factors influencing advanced practice in Australia. Conclusions Seven participants in this study perceived an advanced practice role might have major benefits and a positive impact on the immediate and long-term management of patients. Another finding is the greater respect and appreciation of each other's roles and expertise within the multidisciplinary healthcare team. Engagement is required of the critical stakeholders that have been identified as ‘blockers’ (radiologists, health departments) as well as identified allies (e.g. emergency clinicians, supportive radiologists, patient advocacy groups). The research supports that the AIR has a role to play for the professional identity of radiographers and shaping the advanced practice role in Australia. PMID:26229650

  18. Advanced practice nursing in Latin America and the Caribbean: regulation, education and practice.

    PubMed

    Zug, Keri Elizabeth; Cassiani, Silvia Helena De Bortoli; Pulcini, Joyce; Garcia, Alessandra Bassalobre; Aguirre-Boza, Francisca; Park, Jeongyoung

    2016-08-08

    to identify the current state of advanced practice nursing regulation, education and practice in Latin America and the Caribbean and the perception of nursing leaders in the region toward an advanced practice nursing role in primary health care to support Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage initiatives. a descriptive cross-sectional design utilizing a web-based survey of 173 nursing leaders about their perceptions of the state of nursing practice and potential development of advanced practice nursing in their countries, including definition, work environment, regulation, education, nursing practice, nursing culture, and perceived receptiveness to an expanded role in primary health care. the participants were largely familiar with the advanced practice nursing role, but most were unaware of or reported no current existing legislation for the advanced practice nursing role in their countries. Participants reported the need for increased faculty preparation and promotion of curricula reforms to emphasize primary health care programs to train advanced practice nurses. The vast majority of participants believed their countries' populations could benefit from an advanced practice nursing role in primary health care. strong legislative support and a solid educational framework are critical to the successful development of advanced practice nursing programs and practitioners to support Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage initiatives. identificar o estado atual da regulação, educação e prática do enfermeiro de prática avançada na América Latina e no Caribe e a percepção de líderes de enfermagem na região quanto ao papel da enfermagem de prática avançada na atenção primaria à saúde em apoio às iniciativas de Acesso Universal à Saúde e Cobertura Universal de Saúde. o estudo descritivo transversal utilizou um survey online com 173 líderes de enfermagem questionando suas percepções sobre o estado atual da pr

  19. Advancing Mathematical Activity: A Practice-Oriented View of Advanced Mathematical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Chris; Zandieh, Michelle; King, Karen; Teppo, Anne

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to contribute to the dialogue about the notion of advanced mathematical thinking by offering an alternative characterization for this idea, namely advancing mathematical activity. We use the term advancing (versus advanced) because we emphasize the progression and evolution of students' reasoning in relation to their…

  20. Scheduling of advanced practice providers at Level 1 trauma centers.

    PubMed

    Myers, Robert A; Parikh, Pratik J; Ekeh, Akpofure Peter; Denlinger, Elizabeth; McCarthy, Mary C

    2014-07-01

    Advanced practice providers (APPs) are essential to the provision of trauma care services, particularly in the wake of residency hour restrictions. Demand for these APPs fluctuates with cyclic patient arrivals; however, most trauma teams continue to staff APPs in a linear fashion. Failure to plan for variable arrivals may contribute to excessive patient wait times and emergency department overcrowding. This study used both qualitative and quantitative approaches to evaluate the impact of APP scheduling on patient wait time and to find schedules minimizing delays in reaching the needed care at the right time. A retrospective observation of the availability of APPs and the flow of 2,249 trauma patients at a Level 1 trauma center, using both visual overlays and computer modeling, allowed us to evaluate the baseline condition, two what-if schedules, and two model-generated schedules minimizing patient time without any additional APP hours. A visual overlay of APP staffing on 2010 patient arrivals indicated substantial times of mismatch. Trauma managers considered adding an APP during weekday evenings that would have resulted in a 14.8% increase in APP hours and yielded a 27% reduction in patient wait times according to our model. An alternate schedule was developed and implemented in 2012 with a 10.5% increase in APP hours and yielding a 73% reduction in wait times. We also delineated two schedule options with 57% and 78% reductions in wait time and no increase in APP work hours. Evaluating alternate shift times and assignments using visual overlays and computer modeling can provide APP staffing solutions with up to 78% reduction in trauma patient wait time without additional APP labor. Knowing that care at the right time is crucial to arriving patients, making sure APP staffing is synchronized with arriving patients is something trauma center managers cannot ignore. Care management study, level IV.

  1. Advances in endodontics: Potential applications in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Kishen, Anil; Peters, Ove A.; Zehnder, Matthias; Diogenes, Anibal R.; Nair, Madhu K.

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary endodontics has seen an unprecedented advance in technology and materials. This article aimed to review some of the challenges and advances in the following sections: (1) endodontic imaging, (2) root canal preparation, (3) root canal disinfection, (4) root canal filling, and (4) regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs). Jointly, these advances are aimed at improving the state of the art and science of root canal treatment. PMID:27217630

  2. Advances in endodontics: Potential applications in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Kishen, Anil; Peters, Ove A; Zehnder, Matthias; Diogenes, Anibal R; Nair, Madhu K

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary endodontics has seen an unprecedented advance in technology and materials. This article aimed to review some of the challenges and advances in the following sections: (1) endodontic imaging, (2) root canal preparation, (3) root canal disinfection, (4) root canal filling, and (4) regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs). Jointly, these advances are aimed at improving the state of the art and science of root canal treatment.

  3. The Role of the Advanced Practice Nurse in the Academic Setting.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Tracy K; Dalton, Kerri A; Penne, Kara

    2015-11-01

    To explore how advanced practice nurses implement practice change in academic medical centers to support optimal patient and staff outcomes. Published peer reviewed literature, web-based resources, and professional society materials. Cancer care is rapidly evolving and advanced practice nurses can shape the future of how care is delivered as well as the setting it is delivered in. Advanced practice oncology nurses (Nurse Practitioners and Clinical Nurse Specialists) have an opportunity to significantly shape the patient experience by implementing programmatic changes across the continuum of care by engaging stakeholders in project design. Knowledge of change management and implementation science is critical to success. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Implementation of Advanced Access in a Family Medicine Residency Practice.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ann; Wiser, Eric; Barclay, Emily; Aiello, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Several models of scheduling have been documented in the literature, including the traditional model, the carve-out model, and the advanced access model. We describe the implementation of the advanced access model in our clinic, which has been very successful. Advanced access has decreased third next available appointments to less than seven days for many of our providers and has increased individual primary care physician continuity for 40% of our providers. Interestingly, we had no gains in patient satisfaction, which is consistent with other previously published studies on advanced access.

  5. Current coding practices and patterns of code use of registered dietitian nutritionists: the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics 2013 coding survey.

    PubMed

    Parrott, J Scott; White, Jane V; Schofield, Marsha; Hand, Rosa K; Gregoire, Mary B; Ayoob, Keith T; Pavlinac, Jessie; Lewis, Jaime Lynn; Smith, Karen

    2014-10-01

    Coding, coverage, and reimbursement for nutrition services are vital to the dietetics profession, particularly to registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs) who provide clinical care. The objective of this study was to assess RDN understanding and use of the medical nutrition therapy (MNT) procedure codes in the delivery of nutrition services. Its design was an Internet survey of all RDNs listed in the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy)/Commission on Dietetics Registration database as of September 2013 who resided in the United States and were not retired. Prior coding and coverage surveys provided a basis for survey development. Parameters assessed included knowledge and use of existing MNT and/or alternative procedure codes, barriers to code use, payer reimbursement patterns, complexity of the patient population served, time spent in the delivery of initial and subsequent care, and practice demographics and management. Results show that a majority of respondents were employed by another and provided outpatient MNT services on a part-time basis. MNT codes were used for the provision of individual services, with minimal use of the MNT codes for group services and subsequent care. The typical patient carries two or more diagnoses. The majority of RDNs uses internal billing departments and support staff in their practices. The payer mix is predominantly Medicare and private/commercial insurance. Managers and manager/providers were more likely than providers to carry malpractice insurance. Results point to the need for further education regarding the full spectrum of Current Procedural Terminology codes available for RDN use and the business side of ambulatory MNT practice, including the need to carry malpractice insurance. This survey is part of continuing Academy efforts to understand the complex web of relationships among clinical practice, coverage, MNT code use, and reimbursement so as to further support nutrition services codes revision and/or expansion.

  6. Does radiography advanced practice improve patient outcomes and health service quality? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Louise; Sharples, Rachael; Boynes, Stephen; Irving, Donna

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the impact of radiographer advanced practice on patient outcomes and health service quality. Methods: Using the World Health Organization definition of quality, this review followed the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination guidance for undertaking reviews in healthcare. A range of databases were searched using a defined search strategy. Included studies were assessed for quality using a tool specifically developed for reviewing studies of diverse designs, and data were systematically extracted using electronic data extraction pro forma. Results: 407 articles were identified and reviewed against the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Nine studies were included in the final review, the majority (n = 7) focusing on advanced radiography practice within the UK. Advanced practice activities considered were radiographer reporting, leading patient review clinics and barium enema examinations. The articles were generally considered to be of low-to-moderate quality, with most evaluating advanced practice within a single centre. With respect to specific quality dimensions, the included studies considered cost reduction, patient morbidity, time to treatment and patient satisfaction. No articles reported data relating to time to diagnosis, time to recovery or patient mortality. Conclusion: Radiographer advanced practice is an established activity both in the UK and internationally. However, evidence of the impact of advanced practice in terms of patient outcomes and service quality is limited. Advances in knowledge: This systematic review is the first to examine the evidence base surrounding advanced radiography practice and its impact on patient outcomes and health service quality. PMID:27008104

  7. Primary total hip replacement: a comparison of a nationally agreed guide to best practice and current surgical technique as determined by the North West Regional Arthroplasty Register.

    PubMed Central

    Malik, M. H. A.; Gambhir, A. K.; Bale, L.; Pradhan, N.; Porter, M. L.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 1999, a statement of best practice in primary total hip replacement was approved by the Council of the British Orthopaedic Association (BOA) and by the British Hip Society (BHS) to provide a basis for regional and national auditable standards. We have compared practice in the North West Region of England to this document to ascertain adherence to this guide to best practice. METHODS: A total of 86 surgeons from 26 hospitals were included in a questionnaire study. RESULTS: A mean of 93.3% of operations were performed in the surgeon's usual theatre. All of these theatres had vertical laminar air flow systems. Of respondents, 42.2% routinely used exhaust suits, 68.1% routinely used impermeable disposable gowns, and 26.1% used impermeable re-usable gowns. The Charnley femoral and acetabular prostheses were the most commonly used prostheses. All surgeons used some form of anti-thromboembolic prophylaxis: 66.2% use a combination of both mechanical and chemical means. All surgeons used antibiotic prophylaxis. The most popular choice of antibiotic was a cephalosporin--70.7% used a 3-dose regimen over 24 h, 2.6% of surgeons continued antibiotic prophylaxis for 48 h after surgery, and 93.7% of surgeons routinely use antibiotic-loaded cement. All surgeons routinely cleaned, irrigated and dried the acetabulum and femur before cement insertion. Only one surgeon did not use any form of femoral canal occlusion. 69.4% used an intramedullary bone block. Retrograde filling of the femoral shaft by means of a cement gun was practised by 65.1%. CONCLUSIONS: This study has demonstrated considerable variation of practice in total hip arthroplasty across the North West Region and significant divergence from the statement of best practice approved by the BOA and BHS. The introduction of a properly funded national hip register will surely help to clarify the effect of such diverse practice on patient outcome. We would recommend that all trusts locally audit their practices

  8. Evolution: Advancing Communities of Practice in Naval Intelligence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    and determine which ones will be included in the overall lessons learned message to other units. A certain amount of self -censorship takes place...Communities of Practice will be examined. The self - organizing Community of Practice is found at one end of the spectrum and the sponsored Community of...Practice is located at the other. Successful Communities of Practice exist at both ends and many places in between. a) Self Organizing 32 Self

  9. Listening Instruction and Practice for Advanced ESL Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godfrey, Dennis

    This paper attempts to enact Rivers' (1971 and 1972) urgings to base ESL listening instruction on both psychological and linguistic findings and contends that advanced ESL students' listening needs call for improvement in processing spoken English discourse. Psychological data on memory span is cited to demonstrate that advanced ESL students…

  10. Relationship between work context and adherence to a clinical practice guideline for peripheral venous catheters among registered nurses in pediatric care.

    PubMed

    Förberg, Ulrika; Wallin, Lars; Johansson, Eva; Ygge, Britt-Marie; Backheden, Magnus; Ehrenberg, Anna

    2014-08-01

    It is known that registered nurses' (RNs') work context is related to their use of research and that it can affect nurse and patient satisfaction, as well as the outcomes of care. However, little is known about the relationship between work context and nurses' adherence to clinical practice guidelines. The aim of this study was to describe RNs' adherence to a clinical practice guideline (CPG) on the management of peripheral venous catheters (PVCs), their perceptions of work context, and how nurses' work context and characteristics relate to guideline adherence. This cross-sectional survey was conducted at a large pediatric university hospital in Sweden. Data were collected through a questionnaire on RNs' adherence to components of a CPG and by using the Alberta Context Tool to assess the nurses' perceptions of work context, including leadership, culture, feedback processes, and other organizational characteristics. Work context--in the form of structural and electronic resources, information sharing activities, and feedback processes--was in different ways associated with the adherence to the CPG components. The RNs' adherence on unit level varied: half the units demonstrated complete adherence on disinfection of hands, whereas a majority of the units reported less than 70% adherence on the use of disposable gloves and the daily inspection of a PVC site. Our findings indicate that components in one CPG might require diverse implementation strategies because they are linked to different contextual factors. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  11. Practical use of advanced mouse models for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Safari, Roghaiyeh; Meuwissen, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    To date a variety of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) mouse models have been developed that mimic human lung cancer. Chemically induced or spontaneous lung cancer in susceptible inbred strains has been widely used, but the more recent genetically engineered somatic mouse models recapitulate much better the genotype-phenotype correlations found in human lung cancer. Additionally, improved orthotopic transplantation of primary human cancer tissue fragments or cells into lungs of immune-compromised mice can be valuable tools for preclinical research such as antitumor drug tests. Here we give a short overview of most somatic mouse models for lung cancer that are currently in use. We accompany each different model with a description of its practical use and application for all major lung tumor types, as well as the intratracheal injection or direct injection of fresh or freeze-thawed tumor cells or tumor cell lines into lung parenchyma of recipient mice. All here presented somatic mouse models are based on the ability to (in) activate specific alleles at a time, and in a tissue-specific cell type, of choice. This spatial-temporal controlled induction of genetic lesions allows the selective introduction of main genetic lesions in an adult mouse lung as found in human lung cancer. The resulting conditional somatic mouse models can be used as versatile powerful tools in basic lung cancer research and preclinical translational studies alike. These distinctively advanced lung cancer models permit us to investigate initiation (cell of origin) and progression of lung cancer, along with response and resistance to drug therapy. Cre/lox or FLP/frt recombinase-mediated methods are now well-used techniques to develop tissue-restricted lung cancer in mice with tumor-suppressor gene and/or oncogene (in)activation. Intranasal or intratracheal administration of engineered adenovirus-Cre or lentivirus-Cre has been optimized for introducing Cre

  12. Factors influencing advanced practice nurses' ability to promote evidence-based practice among frontline nurses.

    PubMed

    Gerrish, Kate; Nolan, Mike; McDonnell, Ann; Tod, Angela; Kirshbaum, Marilyn; Guillaume, Louise

    2012-02-01

    Advanced practice nurses (APNs) have an important role in promoting evidence-based practice (EBP) among frontline nurses (FLNs). Factors influencing FLNs' engagement with EBP are well documented but little is known about factors that affect APNs' ability to facilitate evidence in practice. To identify factors that influence APNs' ability to promote EBP among FLNs. A multiple case study of 23 APNs from hospital and primary care settings across seven English health authorities was undertaken. Data collection comprised interviews and observation of APNs and interviews with FLNs and other healthcare professionals. Data were analysed using the Framework approach. Four groups of influencing factors were identified: (1) Personal attributes of APNs included knowledge and skills in EBP, clinical credibility with frontline staff and leadership style. (2) Relationships with stakeholders included APNs' interactions with FLNs and the level of support from managers and medical colleagues. (3) Aspects of the APN role included their sphere of responsibility and workload. (4) Organisational context included the organisational culture, FLNs' workload, professional networks and available resources. Educational preparation for APNs should enable them to develop expertise in EBP plus interpersonal and leadership skills to manage relational dynamics in clinical settings. APN role specifications should provide the opportunity to promote EBP. The organisational culture should be conducive to enabling EBP with managers supportive of this aspect of the APNs' role. APNs need to be supported to address the individual, interpersonal and organisational factors, which influence their ability to promote EBP. Organisational commitment at the highest level is key to APNs' ability to fulfil this aspect of their role. ©2011 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  13. Documenting Student Engagement Using an Intention/Reflection Exercise during an Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fierke, Kerry K.; Lepp, Gardner A.

    2015-01-01

    The article shares the outcomes of a practice called Intention/Reflection (I/R) when applied to a group of ten students in a five-week course involving an international advanced pharmacy practice experience. Developed by the authors and founded on a combination of theoretical principles, this practice is unique because of the blend of formative…

  14. Documenting Student Engagement Using an Intention/Reflection Exercise during an Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fierke, Kerry K.; Lepp, Gardner A.

    2015-01-01

    The article shares the outcomes of a practice called Intention/Reflection (I/R) when applied to a group of ten students in a five-week course involving an international advanced pharmacy practice experience. Developed by the authors and founded on a combination of theoretical principles, this practice is unique because of the blend of formative…

  15. Assuring Quality and Access in Advanced Practice Nursing: A Challenge to Nurse Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundinger, Mary O.; Cook, Sarah Sheets; Lenz, Elizabeth R.; Piacentini, Karen; Auerhahn, Carolyn; Smith, Jennifer

    2000-01-01

    Advanced practice nurses are assuming increasingly accountable roles in primary health care. A doctor of nursing practice degree would signify the high level of competency they achieve. Columbia University's training model is an example of the preparation needed for this level of professional practice. (SK)

  16. Does radiography advanced practice improve patient outcomes and health service quality? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Maryann; Johnson, Louise; Sharples, Rachael; Boynes, Stephen; Irving, Donna

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the impact of radiographer advanced practice on patient outcomes and health service quality. Using the World Health Organization definition of quality, this review followed the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination guidance for undertaking reviews in healthcare. A range of databases were searched using a defined search strategy. Included studies were assessed for quality using a tool specifically developed for reviewing studies of diverse designs, and data were systematically extracted using electronic data extraction pro forma. 407 articles were identified and reviewed against the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Nine studies were included in the final review, the majority (n = 7) focusing on advanced radiography practice within the UK. Advanced practice activities considered were radiographer reporting, leading patient review clinics and barium enema examinations. The articles were generally considered to be of low-to-moderate quality, with most evaluating advanced practice within a single centre. With respect to specific quality dimensions, the included studies considered cost reduction, patient morbidity, time to treatment and patient satisfaction. No articles reported data relating to time to diagnosis, time to recovery or patient mortality. Radiographer advanced practice is an established activity both in the UK and internationally. However, evidence of the impact of advanced practice in terms of patient outcomes and service quality is limited. This systematic review is the first to examine the evidence base surrounding advanced radiography practice and its impact on patient outcomes and health service quality.

  17. Differences in Innovative Behavior Among Hospital-Based Registered Nurses.

    PubMed

    Dy Bunpin, Jose J; Chapman, Susan; Blegen, Mary; Spetz, Joanne

    2016-03-01

    The 2010 Institute of Medicine report, 'The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health', advocated for nurses to innovate in their practice, research, and education. However, little is known about the innovative behavior of registered nurses or whether there are differences in innovative behavior among registered nurses. The purpose of this article is to describe the innovative behavior of hospital-based registered nurses and understand the differences in innovative behavior when registered nurses are categorized into various demographic groups. A survey of 251 hospital-based registered nurses from 9 hospitals in California was administered to assess demographic characteristics and innovative behavior, measured through Scott and Bruce's Individual Innovative Behavior Scale. Hospital-based registered nurses, on average, reported moderate levels of innovative behavior. There were statistically significant differences in innovative behavior when registered nurses were categorized according to specialty certification, role, level of education, hospital size, and hospital innovativeness. To support innovative behavior, organizations should provide opportunities for specialty certification and increasing levels of education.

  18. Advanced practice in maternal/child nursing: history, current status, and thoughts about the future.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J A

    2000-01-01

    Advanced practice nursing has undergone dramatic growth and change in during the past quarter century. Specialization in maternal/child health started with hospital-developed postlicensure programs which evolved into formal master's level programs. The first nurse-practitioner program in pediatrics was begun in 1965 at the University of Colorado. The last 25 years has seen an increase in clinical specialization and in advanced practice roles within the specialties. The growth of credentials and types of certification available have provided opportunities for nurses, but have also created confusion for consumers and other health care professionals. Current challenges facing advanced practice nurses include issues related to legal authority for scope of practice, direct reimbursement for services, and prescriptive authority. The current health care climate provides challenges and opportunities for nurses in advanced practice.

  19. Telemedicine: benefits to advanced practice nursing and the communities they serve.

    PubMed

    Reed, Kirby

    2005-05-01

    To review the use of telemedicine in a variety of advanced nursing practice settings, its contribution in expanding the service and role of the nurse practitioner, and the regulatory issues of reimbursement and licensure. Literature review of relevant journals, research articles, case examples, and web searches. Although telemedicine has been utilized for many years, it has historically been used primarily by physicians. In recent years, telemedicine has been demonstrating its growing potential in advanced nursing practice in terms of economy, efficacy, and quality of care. When used appropriately, telemedicine complements advanced nursing practice in cost-effective ways and improves healthcare access to the populations served. Incorporating telemedicine into the advanced nursing practice can be rewarding for both clinicians and their patients. Because of the high variability that exists among state regulations and payer reimbursements, clinicians are advised to verify their respective Board of Nursing Examiners, State, and payers' policies prior to investing in the establishment of telemedicine in practice.

  20. Reasons Why Physicians and Advanced Practice Clinicians Work While Sick: A Mixed-Methods Analysis.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Julia E; Smathers, Sarah; Hoegg, Cindy; Klieger, Sarah; Coffin, Susan E; Sammons, Julia S

    2015-09-01

    When clinicians work with symptoms of infection, they can put patients and colleagues at risk. Little is known about the reasons why attending physicians and advanced practice clinicians (APCs) work while sick. To identify a comprehensive understanding of the reasons why attending physicians and APCs work while sick. We performed a mixed-methods analysis of a cross-sectional, anonymous survey administered from January 15 through March 20, 2014, in a large children's hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Data were analyzed from April 1 through June 1, 2014. The survey was administered to 459 attending physicians and 470 APCs, including certified registered nurse practitioners, physician assistants, clinical nurse specialists, certified registered nurse anesthetists, and certified nurse midwives. Self-reported frequency of working while experiencing symptoms of infection, perceived importance of various factors that encourage working while sick, and free-text comments written in response to open-ended questions. Of those surveyed, we received responses from 280 attending physicians (61.0%) and 256 APCs (54.5%). Most of the respondents (504 [95.3%]) believed that working while sick put patients at risk. Despite this belief, 446 respondents (83.1%) reported working sick at least 1 time in the past year, and 50 (9.3%) reported working while sick at least 5 times. Respondents would work with significant symptoms, including diarrhea (161 [30.0%]), fever (86 [16.0%]), and acute onset of significant respiratory symptoms (299 [55.6%]). Physicians were more likely to report working with each of these symptoms than APCs (109 [38.9%] vs 51 [19.9%], 61 [21.8%] vs 25 [9.8%], and 168 [60.0%] vs 130 [50.8%], respectively [P < .05]). Reasons deemed important in deciding to work while sick included not wanting to let colleagues down (521 [98.7%]), staffing concerns (505 [94.9%]), not wanting to let patients down (494 [92.5%]), fear of ostracism by colleagues (342 [64.0%]), and

  1. 37 CFR 2.46 - Principal Register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Principal Register. 2.46... COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES The Written Application § 2.46 Principal Register. All applications will be treated as seeking registration on the Principal Register unless otherwise stated in the...

  2. 37 CFR 2.46 - Principal Register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Principal Register. 2.46... COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES The Written Application § 2.46 Principal Register. All applications will be treated as seeking registration on the Principal Register unless otherwise stated in the...

  3. 37 CFR 2.46 - Principal Register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Principal Register. 2.46... COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES The Written Application § 2.46 Principal Register. All applications will be treated as seeking registration on the Principal Register unless otherwise stated in...

  4. 37 CFR 2.46 - Principal Register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Principal Register. 2.46... COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES The Written Application § 2.46 Principal Register. All applications will be treated as seeking registration on the Principal Register unless otherwise stated in...

  5. 31 CFR 8.27 - Enrollment registers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Enrollment registers. 8.27 Section 8... ALCOHOL, TOBACCO AND FIREARMS Enrollment Procedures § 8.27 Enrollment registers. The Director shall maintain, for public inspection, a register of all persons enrolled to practice before the Bureau and...

  6. 37 CFR 2.46 - Principal Register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Principal Register. 2.46... COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES The Written Application § 2.46 Principal Register. All applications will be treated as seeking registration on the Principal Register unless otherwise stated in...

  7. 31 CFR 8.27 - Enrollment registers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Enrollment registers. 8.27 Section 8... ALCOHOL, TOBACCO AND FIREARMS Enrollment Procedures § 8.27 Enrollment registers. The Director shall maintain, for public inspection, a register of all persons enrolled to practice before the Bureau and...

  8. 31 CFR 8.27 - Enrollment registers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Enrollment registers. 8.27 Section 8... ALCOHOL, TOBACCO AND FIREARMS Enrollment Procedures § 8.27 Enrollment registers. The Director shall maintain, for public inspection, a register of all persons enrolled to practice before the Bureau and...

  9. 31 CFR 8.27 - Enrollment registers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Enrollment registers. 8.27 Section 8... ALCOHOL, TOBACCO AND FIREARMS Enrollment Procedures § 8.27 Enrollment registers. The Director shall maintain, for public inspection, a register of all persons enrolled to practice before the Bureau and...

  10. A System Approach to Advanced Practice Clinician Standardization and High Reliability.

    PubMed

    Okuno-Jones, Susan; Siehoff, Alice; Law, Jennifer; Juarez, Patricia

    Advanced practice clinicians (APCs) are an integral part of the health care team. Opportunities exist within Advocate Health Care to standardize and optimize APC practice across the system. To enhance the role and talents of APCs, an approach to role definition and optimization of practice and a structured approach to orientation and evaluation are shared. Although in the early stages of development, definition and standardization of accountabilities in a framework to support system changes are transforming the practice of APCs.

  11. Advance directive communications practices:social worker's contributions to the interdisciplinary health care team.

    PubMed

    Black, Kathy

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a comparative study about social workers' interdisciplinary advance directive communication practices with patients at several hospitals located in upstate New York. The sample consisted of physicians (n=32), nurses (n=74), and social workers (n=29). The research surveyed advance directive communication practices by discipline utilizing a self-administered questionnaire. Advance directive communication was operationalized as a cumulative process incorporating the following phases that were measured as scales: initiation of the topic, disclosure of information, identification of a surrogate decision-maker, discussion of treatment options, elicitation of patient values, interaction with family members, and collaboration with other health care professionals. Results suggest that social workers offer distinct skills in their advance directive communication practices and discuss advance directives more frequently than either physicians or nurses.

  12. Current Practices in Global/International Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences: Preceptor and Student Considerations.

    PubMed

    Dornblaser, Emily K; Ratka, Anna; Gleason, Shaun E; Ombengi, David N; Tofade, Toyin; Wigle, Patricia R; Zapantis, Antonia; Ryan, Melody; Connor, Sharon; Jonkman, Lauren J; Ochs, Leslie; Jungnickel, Paul W; Abrons, Jeanine P; Alsharif, Naser Z

    2016-04-25

    The objective of this article is to describe the key areas of consideration for global/international advanced pharmacy practice experience (G/I APPE) preceptors, students and learning objectives. At the 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP), the GPE SIG prepared and presented an initial report on the G/IAPPE initiatives. Round table discussions were conducted at the 2014 AACP Annual Meeting to document GPE SIG member input on key areas in the report. Literature search of PubMed, Google Scholar and EMBASE with keywords was conducted to expand this report. In this paper, considerations related to preceptors and students and learning outcomes are described. Preceptors for G/I APPEs may vary based on the learning outcomes of the experience. Student learning outcomes for G/I APPEs may vary based on the type of experiential site. Recommendations and future directions for development of G/IAPPEs are presented. Development of a successful G/I APPE requires significant planning and consideration of appropriate qualifications for preceptors and students.

  13. Current Practices in Global/International Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences: Preceptor and Student Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Ratka, Anna; Gleason, Shaun E.; Ombengi, David N.; Tofade, Toyin; Wigle, Patricia R.; Zapantis, Antonia; Ryan, Melody; Connor, Sharon; Jonkman, Lauren J.; Ochs, Leslie; Jungnickel, Paul W.; Abrons, Jeanine P.; Alsharif, Naser Z.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this article is to describe the key areas of consideration for global/international advanced pharmacy practice experience (G/I APPE) preceptors, students and learning objectives. At the 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP), the GPE SIG prepared and presented an initial report on the G/IAPPE initiatives. Round table discussions were conducted at the 2014 AACP Annual Meeting to document GPE SIG member input on key areas in the report. Literature search of PubMed, Google Scholar and EMBASE with keywords was conducted to expand this report. In this paper, considerations related to preceptors and students and learning outcomes are described. Preceptors for G/I APPEs may vary based on the learning outcomes of the experience. Student learning outcomes for G/I APPEs may vary based on the type of experiential site. Recommendations and future directions for development of G/IAPPEs are presented. Development of a successful G/I APPE requires significant planning and consideration of appropriate qualifications for preceptors and students. PMID:27170810

  14. Neuroscience critical care: the role of the advanced practice nurse in patient safety.

    PubMed

    Phillips, JoAnne

    2005-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine report published in 1999 described a healthcare system in which 44,000 to 98,000 patients die each year from preventable medical errors. The healthcare industry has been charged with identifying and ameliorating risks to patients. The advanced practice nurse is in the optimal position to influence the patient care environment and contribute to a culture of patient safety. This article will review the role of the advanced practice nurse in the care of the neuroscience patient in identifying risks unique to this at-risk population. There will be a discussion of risk factors that contribute to errors, with advanced practice nurse-driven, evidence-based solutions. A case presentation of the role of the advanced practice nurse in reducing the incidence of deep vein thrombosis in the craniotomy patients with malignant tumors will be discussed.

  15. Development of a conceptual policy framework for advanced practice nursing: an ethnographic study.

    PubMed

    Schober, Madrean M; Gerrish, Kate; McDonnell, Ann

    2016-06-01

    To report on a study examining policy development for advanced practice nursing from intent of policy to realization in practice. Inclusion of advanced practice nursing roles in the healthcare workforce is a worldwide trend. Optimal advanced nursing practice requires supportive policies. Little is known about how policy is developed and implemented. Ethnography using an instrumental case study approach was selected to give an in-depth understanding of the experiences of one country (Singapore) to contribute to insight into development elsewhere. The four-phase study was conducted from 2008-2012 and included document analysis (n = 47), interviews with key policy decision makers (n = 12), interviews with nursing managers and medical directors (n = 11), interviews and participant observation with advanced practice nurses (n = 15). Key policymakers in positions of authority were able to promote policy development. However, this was characterized by lack of strategic planning for implementation. A vague understanding by nursing managers and medical directors of policies, the role and its position in the healthcare workforce led to indecision and uncertainty in execution. Advanced practice nurses developed their role based on theory acquired in their academic programme but were unsure what role to assume in practice. Lack of clear guidelines led to unanticipated difficulties for institutions and healthcare systems. Strategic planning could facilitate integration of advanced practice nurses into the healthcare workforce. A Conceptual Policy Framework is proposed as a guide for a coordinated approach to policy development and implementation for advanced practice nursing. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Building foundations for the future: the NHS Scotland advanced practice succession planning development pathway.

    PubMed

    Currie, Kay; Grundy, Maggie

    2011-10-01

    To highlight implications for managers from the implementation of a national advanced practice succession planning development pathway within Scotland. Internationally, advanced practice posts have often developed in an ad-hoc manner, with little organizational attention to succession planning. Evaluation of a pilot national succession planning development pathway identified mechanisms which facilitate or hamper effective planning for advanced practice roles. A responsive evaluation design incorporating semi-structured questionnaires to pathway participants (n = 15) and semi-structured telephone interviews with case-site pathway participants (n = 7) and their line managers. Managers believed the development pathway was worthwhile; however, there was limited strategic planning to match individuals' development to service need. Practitioners generally perceived managers as interested in their development, although levels of practical support varied. There is concern from both managers and practitioners regarding ongoing funding for advanced practice development. The present evaluation study reiterates the need for organizational commitment to succession planning including robust service needs analysis mechanisms and adequate funding for development processes. Nurse managers are viewed as the 'gatekeepers' to opportunities for developing advanced nurse practitioners; scare resources must be targeted effectively to support succession planning through the development of selected individuals for future advanced practice posts, justified by service need. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Nothing out of the ordinary: advanced fertility nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Allan, Helen; Barber, Debbie

    2004-12-01

    This paper discusses data from a case study of fertility nursing practice. An ethnographic case study approach using participant observation and nine semi-structured interviews with staff and patients was undertaken. The data were analysed thematically and these themes are discussed in this paper. We present the meaning a small group of nurses working in a fertility unit in the UK attach to new roles and the ways in which changes in practice may be influenced. The nurses in this study believed that nature of the task demanded changes to practice and they identified personal, interpersonal and socio-cultural factors which influenced these changes. These new roles facilitated greater continuity of care for patients. This paper discusses the effects of these new roles on knowing and intimacy in nurse - patient relationships. The data suggests that new nursing roles, which are based on "traditional" nursing and "new" technical skills, are fragile and may not be shared across a professional community.

  18. Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum: emerging practice patterns and treatment advances.

    PubMed

    Warwick, David; Arandes-Renú, José M; Pajardi, Giorgio; Witthaut, Jörg; Hurst, Lawrence C

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to provide a comprehensive review of the role of Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum (CCH). This review is based on a literature review and practical experience. This review provides practical management strategies for using collagenase by sharing clinical experiences over the past few years; logistical aspects of in-clinic treatment, lessons learned, and novel approaches to correct traditionally hard-to-treat contractures are discussed. In addition a brief, yet comprehensive overview is provided on the pathophysiology of the disease, the mechanism of collagenase action and results of clinical studies. CCH has an evolving role as one of the tools available for treating Dupuytren's disease.

  19. Time to clarify--the value of advanced practice nursing roles in health care.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Grainne; Plummer, Virginia; O'Brien, Anthony Paul; Boyd, Leanne

    2012-03-01

    This article presents a discussion of the importance of providing meaningful advanced practice nursing role definition and clarity to improve international standards of nursing titles and scopes of practice. A plethora of international literature exists discussing advanced practice nursing roles and their contribution to healthcare delivery in various countries. However, lack of consistency around title, role definition and scope of practice remains. CINAHL and Medline databases were searched using 'nurse practitioner', 'nurse practitioner role', 'nurse practitioner practice', 'nurse practitioner in public health', 'advanced practice nursing roles' and 'development of new nursing roles' with articles limited to years 1995-2010. Citations used in those articles were also explored. All cited articles were in the English language. This article supports the need to strengthen the Nurse Practitioner role in health care and professional clarity is identified as a strategy to enhance this. Themes around role clarity, professional identity, ability to enhance healthcare provision and inter-professional issues are examined. The need to more clearly articulate advanced nursing roles in light of the evolution of the Nurse Practitioner role is highlighted. Much work has already occurred in this domain and a means of adapting and broadening these developments for a wider, more global audience whilst maintaining local context is discussed. Although evidence exists that advanced practice nursing roles are increasing internationally, uncertainty around role clarity remains. This is problematic because the valuable contribution of nursing roles is lost, if the ability to clearly express their function does not exist. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Translating Advances in Reading Comprehension Research to Educational Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Danielle S.; Kendeou, Panayiota

    2011-01-01

    The authors review five major findings in reading comprehension and their implications for educational practice. First, research suggests that comprehension skills are separable from decoding processes and important at early ages, suggesting that comprehension skills should be targeted early, even before the child learns to read. Second, there is…

  1. Advancing Counselor Education in Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Michael T.; Lee, Hsin-Hua; Bartoli, Eleonora; Gillem, Angela R.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a core priority in counselor education. This paper details one United States' counselor education program's self-assessment of its EBP curriculum. Faculty members collaborated to identify challenges and generate solutions to strengthen the EBP emphasis within the program. This paper is intended as a resource for…

  2. Integrating Social Neuroscience and Social Work: Innovations for Advancing Practice-Based Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matto, Holly C.; Strolin-Goltzman, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Throughout the social work profession, there is ongoing interest in building a social science agenda that can address the complex practice-based questions faced by social work professionals today. Methodological innovations and unique funding opportunities have already significantly advanced research on social work practice. Still, there is…

  3. Cost-effectiveness of a WOC Advanced Practice Nurse in the Acute Care and Outpatient Setting

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Increasing numbers of advanced practice nurses who practice within the WOC specialty are challenged by the need to justify their role by demonstrating clinical and fiscal benefits to the employing agency. This View From Here column describes the steps I took while completing such an analysis for a position for a nurse practitioner with WOC certification in upstate New York. PMID:24918767

  4. Integrating Social Neuroscience and Social Work: Innovations for Advancing Practice-Based Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matto, Holly C.; Strolin-Goltzman, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Throughout the social work profession, there is ongoing interest in building a social science agenda that can address the complex practice-based questions faced by social work professionals today. Methodological innovations and unique funding opportunities have already significantly advanced research on social work practice. Still, there is…

  5. Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum : emerging practice patterns and treatment advances

    PubMed Central

    Warwick, David; Arandes-Renú, José M.; Pajardi, Giorgio; Witthaut, Jörg; Hurst, Lawrence C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study aims to provide a comprehensive review of the role of Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum (CCH). Methods: This review is based on a literature review and practical experience. Results: This review provides practical management strategies for using collagenase by sharing clinical experiences over the past few years; logistical aspects of in-clinic treatment, lessons learned, and novel approaches to correct traditionally hard-to-treat contractures are discussed. In addition a brief, yet comprehensive overview is provided on the pathophysiology of the disease, the mechanism of collagenase action and results of clinical studies. Conclusion: CCH has an evolving role as one of the tools available for treating Dupuytren's disease. PMID:27050718

  6. Unpacking University-Community Partnerships to Advance Scholarship of Practice.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Balcazar, Yolanda; Mirza, Mansha Parven; Hansen, Anne Marie Witchger

    2015-01-01

    Today, more than ever, occupational therapists are engaged in close partnerships with community organizations and community settings such as service agencies, refugee and immigrant enclaves, and faith-based organizations, to name a few, for the purpose of engaging in scholarship of practice. However, we know little about the views of community partners regarding the development and sustainability of university-community partnerships. The purpose of this article is twofold: First, we will describe a pilot study in which we gathered qualitative data from community partners engaged in scholarship of practice with faculty and students, regarding their views about benefits of partnerships, challenges, and characteristics of sustainable partnerships. Second, based on this pilot study and extensive experience of the authors, we propose a revised version of a partnerships model available in the literature. We illustrate the model through examples of the authors' collective experiences developing and sustaining successful university-community partnerships.

  7. Prosthodontics in a general practice program of advanced dental education.

    PubMed

    Plekavich, E J

    1976-01-01

    The problems involved in teaching prosthodontics in a general practice program outwardly appear to be due to the lack of sufficient basic prosthodontic training dispensed by the dental schools. This lack of sufficient training is not the fault of dental school faculties. The students are not learning what they are taught. What they need is more repetition, which means more time. The problems are not insurmountable. We just must find the route.

  8. Simulation training in neurosurgery: advances in education and practice

    PubMed Central

    Konakondla, Sanjay; Fong, Reginald; Schirmer, Clemens M

    2017-01-01

    The current simulation technology used for neurosurgical training leaves much to be desired. Significant efforts are thoroughly exhausted in hopes of developing simulations that translate to give learners the “real-life” feel. Though a respectable goal, this may not be necessary as the application for simulation in neurosurgical training may be most useful in early learners. The ultimate uniformly agreeable endpoint of improved outcome and patient safety drives these investments. We explore the development, availability, educational taskforces, cost burdens and the simulation advancements in neurosurgical training. The technologies can be directed at achieving early resident milestones placed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. We discuss various aspects of neurosurgery disciplines with specific technologic advances of simulation software. An overview of the scholarly landscape of the recent publications in the realm of medical simulation and virtual reality pertaining to neurologic surgery is provided. We analyze concurrent concept overlap between PubMed headings and provide a graphical overview of the associations between these terms. PMID:28765716

  9. Monitoring for opioid-induced advancing sedation and respiratory depression: ASPMN membership survey of current practice.

    PubMed

    Jungquist, Carla R; Willens, Joyce S; Dunwoody, Danielle R; Klingman, Karen J; Polomano, Rosemary C

    2014-09-01

    Adverse events secondary to opioid-induced advancing sedation and respiratory depression continue to occur during hospitalizations despite efforts to increase awareness and clinical practice guidelines to address prevention strategies. In 2009, ASPMN surveyed membership on current practices surrounding this topic. ASPMN clinical practice guidelines were then published in 2011. In winter of 2013, ASPMN membership was again surveyed to assess progress in preventing adverse events. This is a report of the follow-up membership survey. In general, monitoring practices are slowly improving over time, but there are many facilities that have not instituted best practices for avoiding adverse events.

  10. Meeting report: advancing practical applications of biodiversity ontologies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We describe the outcomes of three recent workshops aimed at advancing development of the Biological Collections Ontology (BCO), the Population and Community Ontology (PCO), and tools to annotate data using those and other ontologies. The first workshop gathered use cases to help grow the PCO, agreed upon a format for modeling challenging concepts such as ecological niche, and developed ontology design patterns for defining collections of organisms and population-level phenotypes. The second focused on mapping datasets to ontology terms and converting them to Resource Description Framework (RDF), using the BCO. To follow-up, a BCO hackathon was held concurrently with the 16th Genomics Standards Consortium Meeting, during which we converted additional datasets to RDF, developed a Material Sample Core for the Global Biodiversity Information Framework, created a Web Ontology Language (OWL) file for importing Darwin Core classes and properties into BCO, and developed a workflow for converting biodiversity data among formats.

  11. Impact of advanced manufacturing technology on prosthetic and orthotic practice.

    PubMed

    Jones, D

    1988-04-01

    Radical changes in the technology applied to prosthetics and orthotics are being proposed. This paper attempts to define the scope and character of advanced manufacturing technology and examines the rehabilitation problems which are or could be tackled. Lower-limb prosthetics has been the major area under investigation so far, but orthopaedic footwear, spinal orthotics and custom seating for the disabled have also been investigated using similar technological approaches. The whole process of patient measurement, device design, and component manufacture is conceived as an integrated system relying upon shape or tissue property sensing, computer based device design and computer-numerically-controlled or robot manufacturing processes. The aim is to retain flexibility for custom design which is necessary to provide for individual patients, and yet improve the rapidity and precision of overall device manufacture and service delivery.

  12. Review: Coastal groundwater optimization—advances, challenges, and practical solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketabchi, Hamed; Ataie-Ashtiani, Behzad

    2015-09-01

    Decision models are essential tools for coastal groundwater management (CGM). A combined simulation-optimization framework is employed to develop these models. One of the main barriers in the widespread application of these models for real-world cases is their large computational burden. Recent advances in efficient computational approaches and robust optimization methods can crack this barrier. This study surveys the scientific basis of CGM to provide an overview on this subject and reviews the-state-of-the-art to clarify recent developments and to outline ideas for improving the computational performance. Key details are presented on the performance and choice of possible robust tools such as efficient evolutionary algorithms (EAs), surrogate models, and parallel processing techniques. Then, the potential challenges remaining in this context are scrutinized, demonstrating open fields for further research, which include issues related to advances in simulating and optimizing phases such as introducing new robust algorithms and considering multi-objective purposes, implementing novel and high-performance tools, considering global concerns (e.g. climate change impacts), enhancing the existing models to fit the real world, and taking into account the complexities of real-world applications (e.g. uncertainties in the modeling parameters, and data acquisition). Finally, the outcomes of the systematic review are applied to solve a real-world CGM problem in Iran, to quantitatively examine the performance of combined implementation of some of the suggested tools. It is revealed that the required computational time is considerably reduced by as much as three orders of magnitude when correct combinations of robust EAs, surrogate model, and parallelization technique are utilized.

  13. Advancing the Practice of Health Coaching: Differentiation From Wellness Coaching.

    PubMed

    Huffman, Melinda H

    2016-09-01

    The increasing demand for health coaches and wellness coaches in worksite health promotion and the marketplace has resulted in a plethora of training programs with wide variations in coaching definitions, content, attributes, and eligibility of those who may train. It is in the interest of public awareness and safety that those in clinical practice take the lead in this discussion and offer a reasonable contrast and comparison focusing on the risks and responsibilities of health coaching in particular. With the endorsement of the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses (AAOHN), the National Society of Health Coaches, whose membership is primarily nurses, discusses the issue and states its position here.

  14. Practical advance in obtaining an emergency airway via cricothyroidotomy.

    PubMed

    Huber, William G; Dahman, Marc H; Thomas, Deanna; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2007-05-01

    By the time a cricothyroidotomy is deemed necessary, the patient is in critical need of an emergency airway before anoxic damage ensues. Two things are necessary for the delivery of the requisite oxygen. First, an airway must be rapidly established. Second, the airway must be large enough to facilitate ventilation. Present methods for emergency cricothyroidotomy include needle cricothyroidotomy, which suffers from difficulties in both establishment and ventilation. We describe here a practical and widely available method for establishing a timely effective airway that has been used successfully for five patients since 1992.

  15. The lived experience of nurse practitioners practicing within the Transformational Advanced Professional Practice Model: A phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Elizabeth C; Walden, Marlene; Young, Anne; Symes, Lene; Fredland, Nina

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the lived experiences of nurse practitioners (NPs) practicing within the Transformational Advanced Professional Practice (TAPP) Model, a professional practice model (PPM). A descriptive phenomenological analysis using semistructured interviews of 11 NPs across multiple inpatient and outpatient clinical areas at Texas Children's Hospital. Member checking and theming data occurred using Colaizzi's Method concurrently with Mind Mapping technique. Main themes included: (a) transforming professional practice, (b) cultivating the inner self, and (c) mentoring professional transitions. The findings of this study provide qualitative evidence that the TAPP Model influences role transition and professional development. Transforming NP practice within organizations and within the nursing profession itself will take mindfulness with an intentional approach to design PPMs specifically for NPs. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  16. Advancing nursing practice through social media: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Barry, Jean; Hardiker, Nicholas R

    2012-08-14

    Social media has been used globally as a key vehicle for communication. As members of an innovative profession, many nurses have embraced social media and are actively utilizing its potential to enhance practice and improve health. The ubiquity of the Internet provides social media with the potential to improve both access to health information and services and equity in health care. Thus there are a number of successful nurse-led initiatives. However, the open and democratising nature of social media creates a number of potential risks, both individual and organisational. This article considers the use of social media within nursing from a global perspective, including discussion of policy and guidance documents. The impact of social media on both healthcare consumers and nurses is reviewed, followed by discussion of selected risks associated with social media. To help nurses make the most of social media tools and avoid potential pitfalls, the article conclusion suggests implications appropriate for global level practice based on available published guidance.

  17. Advanced materials for magnetic cooling: Fundamentals and practical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balli, M.; Jandl, S.; Fournier, P.; Kedous-Lebouc, A.

    2017-06-01

    Over the last two decades, the research activities on magnetocalorics have been exponentially increased, leading to the discovery of a wide category of materials including intermetallics and oxides. Even though the reported materials were found to show excellent magnetocaloric properties on a laboratory scale, only a restricted family among them could be upscaled toward industrial levels and implemented as refrigerants in magnetic cooling devices. On the other hand, in the most of the reported reviews, the magnetocaloric materials are usually discussed in terms of their adiabatic temperature and entropy changes (ΔTad and ΔS), which is not enough to get more insight about their large scale applicability. In this review, not only the fundamental properties of the recently reported magnetocaloric materials but also their thermodynamic performance in functional devices are discussed. The reviewed families particularly include Gd1-xRx alloys, LaFe13-xSix, MnFeP1-xAsx, and R1-xAxMnO3 (R = lanthanide and A = divalent alkaline earth)-based compounds. Other relevant practical aspects such as mechanical stability, synthesis, and corrosion issues are discussed. In addition, the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters that play a crucial role in the control of magnetic and magnetocaloric properties are regarded. In order to reproduce the needed magnetocaloric parameters, some practical models are proposed. Finally, the concepts of the rotating magnetocaloric effect and multilayered magnetocalorics are introduced.

  18. Advanced-practice pharmacists: practice characteristics and reimbursement of pharmacists certified for collaborative clinical practice in New Mexico and North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Murawski, Matthew; Villa, Kristin R; Dole, Ernest J; Ives, Timothy J; Tinker, Dale; Colucci, Vincent J; Perdiew, Jeffrey

    2011-12-15

    PURPOSE The results of a survey assessing the practice settings, clinical activities, and reimbursement experiences of pharmacists with advanced-practice designations are reported. METHODS A questionnaire was sent to all certified Pharmacist Clinicians in New Mexico and all Clinical Pharmacist Practitioners in North Carolina (a total of 189 pharmacists at the time of the survey in late 2008) to elicit information on practice settings, billing and reimbursement methods, collaborative drug therapy management (CDTM) protocols, and other issues. RESULTS Of the 189 targeted pharmacists, 64 (34%) responded to the survey. On average, the reported interval from pharmacist licensure to certification as an advanced practitioner was 11 years. The majority of survey participants were practicing in community or institutional settings, most often hospital clinics or physician offices. About two thirds of the respondents indicated that their employer handled the billing of their services using standard evaluation and management codes, with estimated total monthly billings averaging $6500. At the time of the survey, about 80% of the respondents were engaged in a CDTM protocol. The survey results suggest that pharmacists with advanced-practice designations are perceived favorably by patients and physicians and their services are in high demand, but more than one third of respondents indicated a need to justify their advanced-practice positions to administrators. CONCLUSION Pharmacists with advanced-practice designations are providing clinical services in various settings under collaborative practice arrangements that include prescribing privileges. Despite growing patient and physician acceptance, reimbursement challenges continue to be a barrier to wider use of CDTM programs.

  19. Advanced practice clinicians as abortion providers: current developments in the United States.

    PubMed

    Joffe, Carole; Yanow, Susan

    2004-11-01

    A hopeful note in the contemporary abortion environment in the United States is the expanding role of advanced practice clinicians--nurse practitioners, physician assistants and nurse-midwives--in first trimester abortion provision. A large percentage of primary health care in the U.S. is currently provided by these non-physicians but their involvement in abortion care is promising, especially in light of the shortage of physician providers. Two national symposia in 1990 and 1996 approved the expansion of early abortion care to non-physicians. As of January 2004, trained advanced practice clinicians were providing medical, and in some cases, early surgical abortion in 14 states. This has required not only medical training but also political organising to achieve the necessary legal and regulatory changes, state by state, by groups such as Clinicians for Choice and the Abortion Access Project, described here in examples in two states and the reflections of three advanced practice clinicians. Recent surveys in three states show a substantial interest among advanced practice clinicians in abortion training, leading to cautious optimism about the possibility of increased abortion access for women. Most encouraging, advanced practice clinicians, like their physician counterparts, show a level of passionate commitment to the work that is rare elsewhere in health care in the U.S. today.

  20. Advances and Practices of Bioprocess Scale-up.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jianye; Wang, Guan; Lin, Jihan; Wang, Yonghong; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping; Zhang, Siliang

    2016-01-01

    : This chapter addresses the update progress in bioprocess engineering. In addition to an overview of the theory of multi-scale analysis for fermentation process, examples of scale-up practice combining microbial physiological parameters with bioreactor fluid dynamics are also described. Furthermore, the methodology for process optimization and bioreactor scale-up by integrating fluid dynamics with biokinetics is highlighted. In addition to a short review of the heterogeneous environment in large-scale bioreactor and its effect, a scale-down strategy for investigating this issue is addressed. Mathematical models and simulation methodology for integrating flow field in the reactor and microbial kinetics response are described. Finally, a comprehensive discussion on the advantages and challenges of the model-driven scale-up method is given at the end of this chapter.

  1. Advances in athlete development: understanding conditions of and constraints on optimal practice.

    PubMed

    Baker, Joseph; Young, Bradley W; Mann, David

    2017-08-01

    The development of elite, high performance athletes reflects the complex interaction of biological and genetic factors with important environmental influences. Over the past two decades, discussions of athlete development have largely focused on the role of 'deliberate' practice, and more recently, researchers have begun exploring the means by which practice can be best used to maximize the rate of talent development across the different stages of athlete development. In this article, we summarize recent developments in understanding how athletes maximize practice including (a) antecedents of practice involvement, (b) environmental constraints of practice involvement, (c) the value of diversification for athlete development, (d) and methodological advancements in this area. Collectively, sustained focus on issues of athlete development and researchers' use of more advanced approaches to novel questions extend our understanding of the nuances associated with this process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Advance market commitment for pneumococcal vaccines: putting theory into practice.

    PubMed

    Cernuschi, Tania; Furrer, Eliane; Schwalbe, Nina; Jones, Andrew; Berndt, Ernst R; McAdams, Susan

    2011-12-01

    Markets for life-saving vaccines do not often generate the most desired outcomes from a public health perspective in terms of product quantity, quality, affordability, programmatic suitability and/or sustainability for use in the lowest income countries. The perceived risks and uncertainties about sustainably funded demand from developing countries often leads to underinvestment in development and manufacturing of appropriate products. The pilot initiative Advance Market Commitment (AMC) for pneumococcal vaccines, launched in 2009, aims to remove some of these market risks by providing a legally binding forward commitment to purchase vaccines according to predetermined terms. To date, 14 countries have already introduced pneumococcal vaccines through the AMC with a further 39 countries expected to introduce before the end of 2013.This paper describes early lessons learnt on the selection of a target disease and the core design choices for the pilot AMC. It highlights the challenges faced with tailoring the AMC design to the specific supply situation of pneumococcal vaccines. It points to the difficulty - and the AMC's apparent early success - in establishing a long-term, credible commitment in a constantly changing unpredictable environment. It highlights one of the inherent challenges of the AMC: its dependence on continuous donor funding to ensure long-term purchases of products. The paper examines alternative design choices and aims to provide a starting point to inform discussions and encourage debate about the potential application of the AMC concept to other fields.

  3. Advance Care Planning: practicalities, legalities, complexities and controversies.

    PubMed

    Horridge, Karen A

    2015-04-01

    Increasing numbers, complexities and technology dependencies of children and young people with life-limiting conditions require paediatricians to be well prepared to meet their changing needs. Paediatric Advance Care Planning provides a framework for paediatricians, families and their multidisciplinary teams to consider, reflect and record the outcome of their conversations about what might happen in the future in order to optimise quality of clinical care and inform decision-making. For some children and young people this will include discussions about the possibility of death in childhood. This may be unexpected and sudden, in the context of an otherwise active management plan or may be expected and necessitate discussions about the process of dying and attention to symptoms. Decision-making about appropriate levels of intervention must take place within a legal and ethical framework, recognising that the UK Equality Act (2010) protects the rights of disabled children and young people and infants and children of all ages to the same high quality healthcare as anyone else. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. Illuminating the clinical nurse specialist role of advanced practice nursing: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Canam, Connie

    2005-12-01

    As the advanced practice nursing initiative in Canada gains momentum, effort is being directed towards clarifying and defining advanced practice roles. A qualitative study was undertaken to increase understanding of the clinical nurse specialist role of advanced practice. Sixteen nurses who worked in advanced practice roles, organizing and providing healthcare for children with complex health needs and their families across the continuum of care, participated in in-depth conversations about the nature of their practice, the knowledge that informs it and the factors that influence it. Findings suggest that clinical nurse specialists have a unique role in the organization and delivery of healthcare for specialized populations with complex health needs in their dual focus on the system level of healthcare and on population health needs. Initiatives directed to children and families within the study participants' specialties included program development, consultation and educational outreach and the development of clinical guidelines and policies. Although the nurses described their practice as focusing both on individual children and families and on the population of children and families within their specialty, it is at the population level that they see their greatest potential for contributing to the delivery of high-quality, cost-effective healthcare.

  5. Identifying landmark articles for advancing the practice of geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Camille P; Fowler, Rachel; Goodman, Richard A; Graves, Taylor R; Flacker, Jonathan M; Johnson, Theodore M

    2014-11-01

    Landmark articles from the peer-reviewed literature can be used to teach the fundamental principles of geriatric medicine. Three approaches were used in sequential combination to identify landmark articles as a resource for geriatricians and other healthcare practitioners. Candidate articles were identified first through a literature review and expert opinion survey of geriatric medicine faculty. Candidate articles in a winnowed list (n = 30) were then included in a bibliometric analysis that incorporated the journal impact factor and average monthly citation index. Finally, a consensus panel reviewed articles to assess each manuscript's clinical relevance. For each article, a final score was determined by averaging, with equal weight, the opinion survey, bibliometric analysis, and consensus panel review. This process ultimately resulted in the identification of 27 landmark articles. Overall, there was weak correlation between articles that the expert opinion survey and bibliometric analysis both rated highly. This process demonstrates a feasible method combining subjective and objective measures that can be used to identify landmark papers in geriatric medicine for the enhancement of geriatrics education and practice. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  6. Psychological Well-Being Revisited: Advances in Science and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Ryff, Carol D.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the research and interventions that have grown up around a model of psychological well-being (Ryff, 1989) generated more than two decades ago to address neglected aspects of positive functioning, such as purposeful engagement in life, realization of personal talents and capacities, and enlightened self-knowledge. The conceptual origins of this formulation are revisited and scientific products emerging from six thematic areas are examined: (1) how well-being changes across adult development and later life, (2) what are the personality correlates of well-being, (3) how well-being is linked with experiences in family life, (4) how well-being relates to work and other community activities, (5) what are the connections between well-being and health, including biological risk factors, (6) and via clinical and intervention studies, how psychological well-being can be promoted for ever greater segments of society. Together, these topics illustrate flourishing interest across diverse scientific disciplines in understanding adults as striving, meaning-making, proactive organisms who are actively negotiating the challenges of life. A take-home message is that increasing evidence supports the health protective features of psychological well-being in reducing risk for disease and promoting length of life. A recurrent and increasingly important theme is resilience – the capacity to maintain or regain well-being in the face of adversity. Implications for future research and practice are considered. PMID:24281296

  7. The Vanderbilt Professional Nursing Practice Program, part 2: Integrating a professional advancement and performance evaluation system.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Nancy F; Duvanich, Mary; Foss, Julie; Wells, Nancy

    2003-10-01

    Developing a performance-based advancement system requires evaluation tools that capture essential behaviors and outcomes reflective of key nursing functions. To ensure relevance to clinical practice and enhance buy-in from nursing staff, the behaviors and outcomes were defined by a broad cross-section of nursing staff and administrators. The first article (September 2003) in this 3-part series described the foundation for and the philosophical background of the Vanderbilt Professional Nursing Practice Program (VPNPP), the career advancement program under way at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. This second article describes the development of the evaluation tools used in the VPNPP, the implementation and management of this new system, program evaluation, and improvements since the inception of the program. Additionally, the authors present the challenges and lessons we learned in development and implementation of a dynamic evaluation system that supports our career advancement program. The process of advancing within the program will be described in part 3.

  8. Practice Paper of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Role of the Registered Dietitian Nutritionist in the Diagnosis and Management of Food Allergies.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sherry Coleman

    2016-10-01

    Incidence of food allergy has increased significantly over the past decade and represents an important health issue for millions of Americans. Diagnosis of immunoglobulin E-mediated food allergies is sometimes difficult because blood and skin tests have high rates of false positives, and oral food challenges are uncommon due to the expense and potential for serious reactions. Accurate diagnosis is crucial to avoid unnecessary dietary restriction, especially in children. Because registered dietitian nutritionists often work independently, receiving referrals for dietary education and guidance for a patient who is followed by one or several other practitioners, navigating the data available and making the appropriate follow-up contact optimizes treatment. The purpose of this paper is to provide guidance to the registered dietitian nutritionists and nutrition and dietetics technician, registered on appropriate and evidence-based nutrition counseling for diagnosis and management of food allergies.

  9. Guest Editors' Reflections on Progress in the Development of Advanced Practice Nursing in Canada.

    PubMed

    Martin-Misener, Ruth; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise

    2016-01-01

    This 2016 special edition on advanced practice nursing (APN) roles in Canada builds on earlier role progress reported in the first special edition in 2010. Advancements in role development and innovative models that utilize APN roles are highlighted. The need for further efforts to support health systems integration of APN roles related to funding, research and decision-maker understanding of the roles, and to learn from international experience in APN role implementation are described.

  10. Community Engagement to Drive Best Practices and Scientific Advancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goring, S. J.; Williams, J. W.; Uhen, M. D.; McClennen, M.; Jenkins, J.; Peters, S. E.; Grimm, E. C.; Anderson, M.; Fils, D.; Lehnert, K.; Carter, M.

    2016-12-01

    The development of databases, data models, and tools around Earth Science data requires constant feedback from user communities. Users must be engaged in all aspects of data upload and access, curation and governance, and, particularly, in highlighting future opportunities for scientific discovery using the data resources. A challenge for data repositories, many of which have evolved organically and independently, is moving from Systems of Record - data silos with only limited input and output options - to Systems of Engagement, that respond to users and interact with other user communities and data repositories across the geosciences and beyond. The Cyber4Paleo Community Development Workshop (http://cyber4paleo.github.io), held June 20 & 21st in Boulder, CO, was organized by the EarthCube Research Coordination Network C4P (Cyber4Paleo) to bring together disciplinary researchers and Principles within data collectives in an effort to drive scientific applications of the collective data resources. C4P focuses on coordinating data and user groups within the allied paleogeoscientific disciplines. Over the course of two days researchers developed research projects that examined standards of 210Pb dating in the published literature, a framework for implementing a common geological time scale across resources, the continued development of underlying data resources, tools to integrate climate and occupation data from paleoecological resources, and the implementation of harmonizing standards across databases. Scientific outcomes of the workshop serve to underpin our understanding of the interrelations between paleoecological data and geophysical components of the Earth System at short and long time scales. These tools enhance our ability to understand connections between and among proxies, across space and time, the serve as outreach tools for training and education, and, importantly, they help to define and improve best practices within the databases, by engaging directly

  11. Premature rupture of the fetal membranes. An update for advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Weitz, B W

    2001-01-01

    Advanced practice nurses in obstetric settings are frequently required to diagnose premature rupture of fetal membranes; co-management of care with physicians is becoming more common in many health care facilities. Therefore, Advanced practice nurses must have an in-depth understanding of this potentially severe obstetric complication. This article presents a review of the current literature focusing on the epidemiology, physiology, pathophysiology, prevention measures, subjective and objective assessment, diagnostic tests, and management of premature rupture of membranes. Psychosocial aspects of this event, often upsetting for the family, are also discussed.

  12. The Vanderbilt Professional Nursing Practice Program, part 3: managing an advancement process.

    PubMed

    Steaban, Robin; Fudge, Mitzie; Leutgens, Wendy; Wells, Nancy

    2003-11-01

    Consistency of performance standards across multiple clinical settings is an essential component of a credible advancement system. Our advancement process incorporates a central committee, composed of nurses from all clinical settings within the institution, to ensure consistency of performance in inpatient, outpatient, and procedural settings. An analysis of nurses advanced during the first 18 months of the program indicates that performance standards are applicable to nurses in all clinical settings. The first article (September 2003) in this 3-part series described the foundation for and the philosophical background of the Vanderbilt Professional Nursing Practice Program (VPNPP), the career advancement program underway at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Part 2 described the development of the evaluation tools used in the VPNPP, the implementation and management of this new system, program evaluation, and improvements since the program's inception. The purpose of this article is to review the advancement process, review the roles of those involved in the process, and to describe outcomes and lessons learned.

  13. Making the Grade through the Front Door: Evaluation and Innovation in a Registered Practical Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffey, Sue; Lindsay, Gail M.; Cochrane, Marianne; Cummings, Katherine; Macdonald, Karen; Mairs, Sandra; Sproul, Susan; Bouchard, Shelley; Lulat, Zainab; Salamat, Nadia; Bell, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Background: Education of nurses from a diploma to a degree is a global phenomenon. However, bridging is often seen as a "backdoor" route to becoming a Registered Nurse and very little evaluation data exists to challenge this notion. Objectives: This research project was undertaken to explore student characteristics, academic performance,…

  14. Moral Perception and Judgment and a Truly Radical Change of Social Practices: A Reply to Paul Standish's "Registers of the Religious"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeyers, Paul

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to Paul Standish's "Registers of the Religious". Addressing what he calls the "global", Paul Standish starts from MacIntyre's observation that people live in a world characterized by a vocabulary of value whose purchase on life is no longer authentically experienced: "MacIntyre's diagnosis of the…

  15. Practice Leadership at the Front Line in Supporting People with Intellectual Disabilities and Challenging Behaviour: A Qualitative Study of Registered Managers of Community-Based, Staffed Group Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deveau, Roy; McGill, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background: The front-line management role in services for people with intellectual disabilities remains rather under-researched. The aim of this study was to examine the experiences of registered managers in services for adults with intellectual disability who exhibit challenging behaviour. Method: Interviews, primarily focussed upon staff…

  16. Moral Perception and Judgment and a Truly Radical Change of Social Practices: A Reply to Paul Standish's "Registers of the Religious"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeyers, Paul

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to Paul Standish's "Registers of the Religious". Addressing what he calls the "global", Paul Standish starts from MacIntyre's observation that people live in a world characterized by a vocabulary of value whose purchase on life is no longer authentically experienced: "MacIntyre's diagnosis of the…

  17. Practice Leadership at the Front Line in Supporting People with Intellectual Disabilities and Challenging Behaviour: A Qualitative Study of Registered Managers of Community-Based, Staffed Group Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deveau, Roy; McGill, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background: The front-line management role in services for people with intellectual disabilities remains rather under-researched. The aim of this study was to examine the experiences of registered managers in services for adults with intellectual disability who exhibit challenging behaviour. Method: Interviews, primarily focussed upon staff…

  18. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and National Kidney Foundation: revised 2014 Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance for registered dietitian nutritionists (competent, proficient, and expert) in nephrology nutrition.

    PubMed

    Kent, Pamela S; McCarthy, Maureen P; Burrowes, Jerrilynn D; McCann, Linda; Pavlinac, Jessie; Goeddeke-Merickel, Catherine M; Wiesen, Karen; Kruger, Sarah; Byham-Gray, Laura; Pace, Rory C; Hannahs, Valarie; Benner, Debbie

    2014-09-01

    Compelling evidence indicates that the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing because of an aging population and a higher prevalence of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and hypertension. Nutrition management of patients with CKD requires early disease recognition, appropriate interpretation of the markers and stages of CKD, and collaboration with other health care practitioners. Better management of CKD can slow its progression, prevent metabolic complications, and reduce cardiovascular related outcomes. Caring for patients with CKD necessitates specialized knowledge and skills to meet the challenges associated with this growing epidemic. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Renal Dietitians Practice Group and the National Kidney Foundation Council on Renal Nutrition, with guidance from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Management Committee, have updated the 2009 Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance as a tool for registered dietitian nutritionists working in nephrology nutrition to assess their current skill levels and to identify areas for additional professional development in this practice area. The Standards of Practice apply to the care of patients/clients with kidney disease. The Standards of Professional Performance consist of six domains of professionalism, including: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. Within each standard, specific indicators provide measurable action statements that illustrate how nephrology nutrition principles can be applied to practice. The indicators describe three skill levels (ie, competent, proficient, and expert) for registered dietitian nutritionists working in nephrology nutrition.

  19. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and National Kidney Foundation: revised 2014 standards of practice and standards of professional performance for registered dietitian nutritionists (competent, proficient, and expert) in nephrology nutrition.

    PubMed

    Kent, Pamela S; McCarthy, Maureen P; Burrowes, Jerrilynn D; McCann, Linda; Pavlinac, Jessie; Goeddeke-Merickel, Catherine M; Wiesen, Karen; Kruger, Sarah; Byham-Gray, Laura; Pace, Rory C; Hannahs, Valarie; Benner, Debbie

    2014-09-01

    Compelling evidence indicates that the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing because of an aging population and a higher prevalence of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and hypertension. Nutrition management of patients with CKD requires early disease recognition, appropriate interpretation of the markers and stages of CKD, and collaboration with other health care practitioners. Better management of CKD can slow its progression, prevent metabolic complications, and reduce cardiovascular related outcomes. Caring for patients with CKD necessitates specialized knowledge and skills to meet the challenges associated with this growing epidemic. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Renal Dietitians Practice Group and the National Kidney Foundation Council on Renal Nutrition, with guidance from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Management Committee, have updated the 2009 Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance as a tool for registered dietitian nutritionists working in nephrology nutrition to assess their current skill levels and to identify areas for additional professional development in this practice area. The Standards of Practice apply to the care of patients/clients with kidney disease. The Standards of Professional Performance consist of six domains of professionalism, including: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. Within each standard, specific indicators provide measurable action statements that illustrate how nephrology nutrition principles can be applied to practice. The indicators describe three skill levels (ie, competent, proficient, and expert) for registered dietitian nutritionists working in nephrology nutrition.

  20. Advanced practice nurse entrepreneurs in a multidisciplinary surgical-assisting partnership.

    PubMed

    DeCarlo, Linda

    2005-09-01

    CHANGES IN THE HEALTH CARE environment and reimbursement practices are creating opportunities for nurse entrepreneurs to be partners with other professional nurses and physicians. Advanced practice nurses (APNs) who want to step into an entrepreneurial role must have strong clinical expertise, specific personal characteristics, interpersonal skills, and business acumen. ESTABLISHING A MULTIDISCIPLINARY partnership for providing surgical assisting services has many benefits and presents many challenges.

  1. Primary Care Advanced Practice RNs' Knowledge of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Screening.

    PubMed

    Link, Kimberly A; Smith, Lynette S

    2017-09-01

    Individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may seek treatment for their symptoms within the primary care setting. Research suggests PTSD often goes undiagnosed in primary care. Primary care providers (PCPs) might have deficiencies in their knowledge of PTSD screening and screening practices. A descriptive cross-sectional study design was used to examine primary care advanced practice RNs' (APRN) knowledge of PTSD screening and screening practices, along with subjective norms, attitudes, and self-efficacy regarding PTSD screening. Deficiencies in knowledge of PTSD screening and screening practices were identified. Discrepancies were found between reported subjective norms and screening practices, and most participants reported low self-efficacy and stated screening was not important. Numerous barriers to screening were identified. Additional education and training may be needed to improve primary care APRNs' PTSD screening knowledge and screening practices. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(9), 23-32.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. [Advanced nursing practice: a must for the quality of care and mental health services].

    PubMed

    Ricard, Nicole; Page, Claire; Laflamme, France

    2014-01-01

    New professional legislation and reorganization of mental health services have had a significant influence on mental health nursing practice. Many nurses have demonstrated clinical leadership and have been able to adapt their services to the needs of the population specially in the primary health care setting. However, many believe that the role of nurses is not sufficiently known and optimally utilized in mental health services. In this article we take a critical look at the mental health nursing practice in Quebec and at the essential requirements for its development. This review aims to: 1) describe current trends in the changing roles and the modernization of mental health nursing practice in Quebec, 2) provide an overview of the development of advanced nursing practice and its impact on the quality of mental health services; 3) clarify the concept of advanced nursing practice and position its development in Quebec and 4) propose various strategies for optimizing the role of nurses and their complementarity with other professionals providing mental health services. This review presents innovative practices developed by nurses in the context of the restructuring of mental health services. For example, new nursing roles have been developed to improve the collaboration with general practitioners groups in primary care settings and facilitate the evaluation and monitoring of patient presenting medical and psychological problems. Another interesting innovation was set up by nurses in developing a new service to allow timely access to integrated care for patients with substance abuse and mental health problems. The various testimonies reported in this article illustrate the potential contribution of these nursing innovations in improving the mental health services in Quebec. Also, in few countries, the reform of mental health services has been a good time to recognize this potential. Thus, some countries have repositioned the role of mental health nurses and

  3. The emergence of forensic nursing and advanced nursing practice in Switzerland: an innovative case study consultation.

    PubMed

    Romain-Glassey, Nathalie; Ninane, Françoise; de Puy, Jacqueline; Abt, Maryline; Mangin, Patrice; Morin, Diane

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this article were to systematically describe and examine the novel roles and responsibilities assumed by nurses in a forensic consultation for victims of violence at a University Hospital in French-speaking Switzerland. Utilizing a case study methodology, information was collected from two main sources: (a) discussion groups with nurses and forensic pathologists and (b) a review of procedures and protocols. Following a critical content analysis, the roles and responsibilities of the forensic nurses were described and compared with the seven core competencies of advanced nursing practice as outlined by Hamric, Spross, and Hanson (2009). Advanced nursing practice competencies noted in the analysis included "direct clinical practice," "coaching and guidance," and "collaboration." The role of the nurse in terms of "consultation," "leadership," "ethics," and "research" was less evident in the analysis. New forms of nursing are indeed practiced in the forensic clinical setting, and our findings suggest that nursing practice in this domain is following the footprints of an advanced nursing practice model. Further reflections are required to determine whether the role of the forensic nurse in Switzerland should be developed as a clinical nurse specialist or that of a nurse practitioner.

  4. Prehospital advanced airway management by ambulance technicians and paramedics: is clinical practice sufficient to maintain skills?

    PubMed

    Deakin, C D; King, P; Thompson, F

    2009-12-01

    Ambulance paramedics are now trained routinely in advanced airway skills, including tracheal intubation. Initial training in this skill requires the insertion of 25 tracheal tubes, and further ongoing training is attained through clinical practice and manikin-based practice. In contrast, training standards for hospital-based practitioners are considerably greater, requiring approximately 200 tracheal intubations before practice is unsupervised. With debate growing regarding the efficacy of paramedic intubation, there is a need to assess current paramedic airway practice in order to review whether initial training and maintenance of skills provide an acceptable level of competence with which to practice advanced airway skills. All ambulance patient report forms (anonymised) for the period 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2007 were reviewed, and data relating to airway management were collected. Paramedic and technician identification codes were used to determine the number of airway procedures undertaken on an individual basis. Of the 269 paramedics, 128 (47.6%) had undertaken no intubation and 204 (75.8%) had undertaken one or less intubation in the 12-month study period. The median number of intubations per paramedic during the 12-month period was 1.0 (range 0-11). A total of 76 laryngeal mask insertion attempts were recorded by 41 technicians and 30 paramedics. The median number of laryngeal mask insertions per paramedic/technician during the 12-month period was 0 (range 0-2). A survey of ongoing continuing professional development across all ambulance trusts demonstrated no provision for adequate training to compensate for the lack of clinical exposure to advanced airway skills. Paramedics use advanced airway skills infrequently. Continuing professional development programmes within ambulance trusts do not provide the necessary additional practice to maintain tracheal intubation skills at an acceptable level. Advanced airway management delivered by ambulance crews

  5. The evolution of the advanced practice role in psychiatric mental health in New Jersey: 1960-2010.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Barbara A; Sclafani, Michael; Piren, Karen; Torre, Carolyn

    2012-04-01

    This historical perspective is focused on the contribution of Hildegard E. Peplau in laying the foundation for advanced practice nursing and the development of the roles of clinical nurse specialists and psychiatric nurse practitioners. An overview is provided of legal developments within the state that enabled Advanced Practice Nurses to provide mental health services. A description of a recent specialized state-funded initiative is outlined, focused on the development and contributions of psychiatric advanced practice nurses in community settings in New Jersey. Implications for the advanced practice nursing role in New Jersey are presented based on national and state initiatives.

  6. Advancing general practice nursing in Australia: roles and responsibilities of primary healthcare organisations.

    PubMed

    Lane, Riki; Halcomb, Elizabeth; McKenna, Lisa; Zwar, Nicholas; Naccarella, Lucio; Davies, Gawaine Powell; Russell, Grant

    2016-04-21

    Objectives Given increased numbers and enhanced responsibilities of Australian general practice nurses, we aimed to delineate appropriate roles for primary health care organisations (PHCOs) to support this workforce.Methods A two-round online Delphi consensus process was undertaken between January and June 2012, informed by literature review and key informant interviews. Participants were purposively selected and included decision makers from government and professional organisations, educators, researchers and clinicians from five Australian states and territoriesResults Of 56 invited respondents, 35 (62%) and 31 (55%) responded to the first and second invitation respectively. Participants reached consensus on five key roles for PHCOs in optimising nursing in general practice: (1) matching workforce size and skills to population needs; (2) facilitating leadership opportunities; (3) providing education and educational access; (4) facilitating integration of general practice with other primary care services to support interdisciplinary care; and (5) promoting advanced nursing roles. National concerns, such as limited opportunities for postgraduate education and career progression, were deemed best addressed by national nursing organisations, universities and peak bodies.Conclusions Advancement of nursing in general practice requires system-level support from a range of organisations. PHCOs play a significant role in education and leadership development for nurses and linking national nursing organisations with general practices.What is known about the topic? The role of nurses in Australian general practice has grown in the last decade, yet they face limited career pathways and opportunities for career advancement. Some nations have forged interprofessional primary care teams that use nurses' skills to the full extent of their scope of practice. PHCOs have played important roles in the development of general practice nursing in Australia and internationally

  7. Integration of an Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience With an Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience in Adult Internal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Matthew L.; Vesta, Kimi S.; Harrison, Donald L.; Dennis, Vincent C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To describe the development, implementation, and assessment of an internal medicine introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE) that was integrated with an existing advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) in internal medicine. Design. A structured IPPE was designed for first-, second-, and third-year pharmacy (P1, P2, and P3) students. Activities for the IPPE were based on the established APPE and the individual learner's educational level. Assessment. Students reported a greater understanding of clinical pharmacists’ roles, increased confidence in their clinical skills, and better preparation for APPEs. Peers viewed the approach as innovative and transferable to other practice settings. Participating faculty members provided a greater number of contact hours compared to traditional one-time site visits. Conclusions. Integrating an IPPE with an existing APPE is an effective and efficient way to provide patient care experiences for students in the P1-P3 years in accordance with accreditation standards. PMID:22544969

  8. Delta's Key to the TOEFL iBT[R]: Advanced Skill Practice. Revised Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Delta's Key to the TOEFL iBT: Advanced Skill Practice is a revised and updated edition of Delta's Key to the Next Generation TOEFL Test. Since the introduction of the TOEFL iBT in 2005, there have been significant changes to some of the test questions, particularly the integrated writing and integrated speaking tasks. The new 2011 edition of…

  9. Literacy Agents Online: E-Discussion Forums for Advancing Adults' Literacy Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzzetti, Barbara J.; Foley, Leslie M.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored how adults used a self-selected online forum to advance their own and others' literacy practices. The study was a discourse-centered online ethnography using triangulated methods, including analysis of list archives, semi-structured and informal interviews, and document collection. These data were analyzed by discourse…

  10. Delta's Key to the TOEFL iBT[R]: Advanced Skill Practice. Revised Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Delta's Key to the TOEFL iBT: Advanced Skill Practice is a revised and updated edition of Delta's Key to the Next Generation TOEFL Test. Since the introduction of the TOEFL iBT in 2005, there have been significant changes to some of the test questions, particularly the integrated writing and integrated speaking tasks. The new 2011 edition of…

  11. Addressing Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Advanced Practice Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nokes, Kathleen M.; Stein, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 23 advanced practice nursing programs showed only 3 had HIV-specific graduate-level nursing courses. Recommendations were made for HIV-specific courses, integration of HIV content into other courses, use of Centers for Disease Control and Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines, and subspecialties in HIV nursing. (SK)

  12. Advances in circulating tumor cells (ACTC): from basic research to clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The first 'Advances in Circulating Tumor Cells (ACTC): from Basic Research to Clinical Practice' meeting was held in Athens, Greece, September 26–29, 2012 (abstracts, presentations and a more detailed meeting report are freely available online: http://www.actc2012.org). We summarize in this report most major findings presented and the main conclusions derived during the expert panel sessions. PMID:24314311

  13. Addressing Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Advanced Practice Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nokes, Kathleen M.; Stein, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 23 advanced practice nursing programs showed only 3 had HIV-specific graduate-level nursing courses. Recommendations were made for HIV-specific courses, integration of HIV content into other courses, use of Centers for Disease Control and Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines, and subspecialties in HIV nursing. (SK)

  14. A Qualitative Analysis of an Advanced Practice Nurse-Directed Transitional Care Model Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradway, Christine; Trotta, Rebecca; Bixby, M. Brian; McPartland, Ellen; Wollman, M. Catherine; Kapustka, Heidi; McCauley, Kathleen; Naylor, Mary D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe barriers and facilitators to implementing a transitional care intervention for cognitively impaired older adults and their caregivers lead by advanced practice nurses (APNs). Design and Methods: APNs implemented an evidence-based protocol to optimize transitions from hospital to home. An…

  15. Enhancing Success in Advanced Practice Nursing: a grant-funded project.

    PubMed

    McNeal, Gloria J; Walker, Donita

    2006-01-01

    The Enhancing Success in Advanced Practice Nursing (ESAPN) Project is designed to improve access to a diverse and culturally competent and sensitive health professions workforce by increasing the number of Hispanic, African-American and Asian nurses recruited, enrolled in and graduated from the MSN program at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-School of Nursing (UMDNJ-SN). In addition, the project plan includes the development and implementation of a comprehensive program that incorporates academic support services, career advisement and mentoring activities to retain and graduate an increased number of culturally, racially and ethnically diverse advanced practice nurses for the State of New Jersey. The project also seeks to improve the quality of care by preparing advanced practice nurses to provide culturally competent and sensitive care by assuring that the MSN curriculum includes content and clinical experiences relevant to the development of cultural competence. Faculty participation in workshops, designed to increase knowledge of cultural competence, is a key component. The success of the project will be evaluated using a variety of measures that track increases in the number of diverse students recruited and enrolled, the number of students accessing services associated with the ESAPN program, and increased retention and graduation of Hispanic, African-American and Asian nurses prepared as advanced practice nurses.

  16. Literacy Agents Online: E-Discussion Forums for Advancing Adults' Literacy Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzzetti, Barbara J.; Foley, Leslie M.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored how adults used a self-selected online forum to advance their own and others' literacy practices. The study was a discourse-centered online ethnography using triangulated methods, including analysis of list archives, semi-structured and informal interviews, and document collection. These data were analyzed by discourse…

  17. Educators' expectations of roles, employability and career pathways of registered and enrolled nurses in Australia.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Elisabeth R; McKenna, Lisa; D'Amore, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    In Australia, like other countries, two levels of nurse are registered for entry to practice. Educational changes for second level nurses in Australia have led to questions regarding roles and career options. This paper reports on interviews with nursing course coordinators to examine educator expectations of roles and career pathways of registered and enrolled nurses. Coordinators of eight degree (registered) and diploma (enrolled) nursing programs were interviewed to determine their opinions on roles and careers that students were prepared for. Transcripts were thematically analysed. Educators reported similar graduate roles, although high acuity care was primarily the role of registered nurses. Career expectations differed with enrolled nurses having limited advancement opportunity, and registered nurses greater career options. Health organisations were unprepared to accommodate increased practice scope of enrolled nurses and limited work practice through policies stipulating who could perform procedures. Organisational health policies need to accommodate increased enrolled nurse skill base. Education of practising nurses is necessary regarding increased scope of enrolled nurse practice to ensure they are used to their full potential. Increasing patient acuity requires more registered nurses, as enrolled nurses are unprepared to care for complex or deteriorating patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. 31 CFR 8.27 - Enrollment registers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Enrollment registers. 8.27 Section 8.27 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury PRACTICE BEFORE THE BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO AND FIREARMS Enrollment Procedures § 8.27 Enrollment registers. The Director shall...

  19. Redefining perioperative advanced practice. Scope of practice: measuring impact and sustainability.

    PubMed

    Radford, Mark; Abbassi, Ann; Williamson, Alastair; Johnston, Paul

    2003-12-01

    There are increasing demands placed upon the modern NHS, particularly in emergency care. In combating these demands, new approaches to practice will form an overall strategy for improving care delivered to patients. This is the second in a series by authors from the Good Hope Hospital NHS Trust and explains their experience of developing an innovative approach to the management of surgical emergencies through the specialist nurse role in anaesthesia and emergency surgery. It examines the scope of practice, clinical and operational impact of the role, and future developments.

  20. Comparison of Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) Measure Adherence Between Oncology Fellows, Advanced Practice Providers, and Attending Physicians.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jason; Zhang, Tian; Shah, Radhika; Kamal, Arif H; Kelley, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Quality improvement measures are uniformly applied to all oncology providers, regardless of their roles. Little is known about differences in adherence to these measures between oncology fellows, advance practice providers (APP), and attending physicians. We investigated conformance across Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) measures for oncology fellows, advance practice providers, and attending physicians at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center (DVAMC). Using data collected from the Spring 2012 and 2013 QOPI cycles, we abstracted charts of patients and separated them based on their primary provider. Descriptive statistics and the chi-square test were calculated for each QOPI measure between fellows, advanced practice providers (APPs), and attending physicians. A total of 169 patients were reviewed. Of these, 31 patients had a fellow, 39 had an APP, and 99 had an attending as their primary oncology provider. Fellows and attending physicians performed similarly on 90 of 94 QOPI metrics. High-performing metrics included several core QOPI measures including documenting consent for chemotherapy, recommending adjuvant chemotherapy when appropriate, and prescribing serotonin antagonists when prescribing emetogenic chemotherapies. Low-performing metrics included documentation of treatment summary and taking action to address problems with emotional well-being by the second office visit. Attendings documented the plan for oral chemotherapy more often (92 vs. 63%, P=0.049). However, after the chart audit, we found that fellows actually documented the plan for oral chemotherapy 88% of the time (p=0.73). APPs and attendings performed similarly on 88 of 90 QOPI measures. The quality of oncology care tends to be similar between attendings and fellows overall; some of the significant differences do not remain significant after a second manual chart review, highlighting that the use of manual data collection for QOPI analysis is an imperfect system, and there may

  1. Integrating social neuroscience and social work: innovations for advancing practice-based research.

    PubMed

    Matto, Holly C; Strolin-Goltzman, Jessica

    2010-04-01

    Throughout the social work profession, there is ongoing interest in building a social science agenda that can address the complex practice-based questions faced by social work professionals today. Methodological innovations and unique funding opportunities have already significantly advanced research on social work practice. Still, there is enthusiastic discussion of how to ensure that such capacity development helps the profession move forward in ways that make use of the biological sciences and that facilitate social work-specific contributions to the larger interdisciplinary scientific community. This article describes how the social work profession can make use of biomedical knowledge and technological advances from social neuroscience to inform psychosocial treatment development, and it illustrates an application to social work practice by giving an example of a substance abuse treatment development process built on social neuroscientific research.

  2. Cervical cancer screening in adolescents: an evidence-based internet education program for practice improvement among advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Choma, Kim; McKeever, Amy E

    2015-02-01

    The literature reports great variation in the knowledge levels and application of the recent changes of cervical cancer screening guidelines into clinical practice. Evidence-based screening guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer offers healthcare providers the opportunity to improve practice patterns among female adolescents by decreasing psychological distress as well as reducing healthcare costs and morbidities associated with over-screening. The purpose of this pilot intervention study was to determine the effects of a Web-based continuing education unit (CEU) program on advanced practice nurses' (APNs) knowledge of current cervical cancer screening evidence-based recommendations and their application in practice. This paper presents a process improvement project as an example of a way to disseminate updated evidence-based practice guidelines among busy healthcare providers. This Web-based CEU program was developed, piloted, and evaluated specifically for APNs. The program addressed their knowledge level of cervical cancer and its relationship with high-risk human papillomavirus. It also addressed the new cervical cancer screening guidelines and the application of those guidelines into clinical practice. Results of the study indicated that knowledge gaps exist among APNs about cervical cancer screening in adolescents. However, when provided with a CEU educational intervention, APNs' knowledge levels increased and their self-reported clinical practice behaviors changed in accordance with the new cervical cancer screening guidelines. Providing convenient and readily accessible up-to-date electronic content that provides CEU enhances the adoption of clinical practice guidelines, thereby decreasing the potential of the morbidities associated with over-screening for cervical cancer in adolescents and young women. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  3. Developing clinical leaders: the impact of an action learning mentoring programme for advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Leggat, Sandra G; Balding, Cathy; Schiftan, Dan

    2015-06-01

    To determine whether a formal mentoring programme assists nurse practitioner candidates to develop competence in the clinical leadership competencies required in their advanced practice roles. Nurse practitioner candidates are required to show evidence of defined clinical leadership competencies when they apply for endorsement within the Australian health care system. Aiming to assist the candidates with the development or enhancement of these leadership skills, 18 nurse practitioner candidates participated in a mentoring programme that matched them with senior nurse mentors. A pre-postlongitudinal intervention study. Eighteen nurse practitioner candidates and 17 senior nurses participated in a voluntary mentoring programme that incorporated coaching and action learning over 18 months in 2012 and 2013. Participants completed a pen and paper questionnaire to document baseline measures of self-reported leadership practices prior to commencement of the programme and again at the end of the programme. The mentors and the nurse practitioner candidates qualitatively evaluated the programme as successful and quantitative data illustrated significant improvement in self-reported leadership practices among the nurse practitioner candidates. In particular, the nurse practitioner candidates reported greater competence in the transformational aspects of leadership, which is directly related to the nurse practitioner candidate clinical leadership standard. A formal, structured mentoring programme based on principles of action learning was successful in assisting Australian advanced practice nurses enhance their clinical leadership skills in preparation for formal endorsement as a nurse practitioner and for success in their advanced practice role. Mentoring can assist nurses to transition to new roles and develop knowledge and skills in clinical leadership essential for advanced practice roles. Nurse managers should make greater use of mentoring programmes to support nurses in

  4. The Role of the Advanced Practice Nurse in Geriatric Oncology Care.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Brianna; Tarbi, Elise

    2016-02-01

    To describe how the Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) is uniquely suited to meet the needs of older adults throughout the continuum of cancer, to explore the progress that APNs have made in gero-oncology care, and make suggestions for future directions. Google Scholar, PubMed, and CINAHL. Search terms included: "gero-oncology," "geriatric oncology," "Advanced Practice Nurse," "Nurse Practitioner," "older adult," "elderly," and "cancer." Over the last decade, APNs have made advances in caring for older adults with cancer by playing a role in prevention, screening, and diagnosis; through evidence-based gero-oncology care during cancer treatment; and in designing tailored survivorship care models. APNs must combat ageism in treatment choice for older adults, standardize comprehensive geriatric assessments, and focus on providing person-centered care, specifically during care transitions. APNs are well-positioned to help understand the complex relationship between risk factors, geriatric syndromes, and frailty and translate research into practice. Palliative care must expand beyond specialty providers and shift toward APNs with a focus on early advanced care planning. Finally, APNs should continue to establish multidisciplinary survivorship models across care settings, with a focus on primary care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. International Society for Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) flow cytometry shared resource laboratory (SRL) best practices.

    PubMed

    Barsky, Lora W; Black, Michele; Cochran, Matthew; Daniel, Benjamin J; Davies, Derek; DeLay, Monica; Gardner, Rui; Gregory, Michael; Kunkel, Desiree; Lannigan, Joanne; Marvin, James; Salomon, Robert; Torres, Carina; Walker, Rachael

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this document is to define minimal standards for a flow cytometry shared resource laboratory (SRL) and provide guidance for best practices in several important areas. This effort is driven by the desire of International Society for the Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) members in SRLs to define and maintain standards of excellence in flow cytometry, and act as a repository for key elements of this information (e.g. example SOPs/training material, etc.). These best practices are not intended to define specifically how to implement these recommendations, but rather to establish minimal goals for an SRL to address in order to achieve excellence. It is hoped that once these best practices are established and implemented they will serve as a template from which similar practices can be defined for other types of SRLs. Identification of the need for best practices first occurred through discussions at the CYTO 2013 SRL Forum, with the most important areas for which best practices should be defined identified through several surveys and SRL track workshops as part of CYTO 2014. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  6. [Chronic diseases and complexity: new roles in nursing. Advanced practice nurses and chronic patient].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martín, C Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    The increase in chronic diseases and the progressive ageing of the population is a source of concern for the different agencies with responsibility for health care. This has led to the creation of many documents focused on the analysis of the current situation and care of chronic diseases, including the WHO recommendations intended to assist countries and health services design and implement strategies that will address the existing demand, control and prevention of chronic diseases. In addition, there is a need to respond to the demand generated by chronic diseases in every sense, and from the different systems it is becoming more difficult to get enough support from multidisciplinary teams where the nurse has a central importance. While chronic diseases are becoming a threat due to the costs they generate, it is also an opportunity for nursing to be at the forefront for advanced care requirements, performed by professionals with recognized advanced clinical skills and ability for case management while monitoring and controlling complex chronic patients. The different services of the National Health System have introduced nurses that play different roles (cases managers, liaison nurses, advanced practice nurses and so on). However, it could be argued that they are not being trained to a desirable development level. It is therefore time for health care authorities to determine the role of the advanced practice nurse in relation to functional positions, and allow them to make an advance in the development of unified skills for the whole National Health System. From our experience we have learned that the advanced practice nurse is a resource that helps in the sustainability of services, thanks to the efficiency shown in the results obtained from the care given to both chronic and complex chronic patients.

  7. Teaching critical reflection skills for advanced mental health nursing practice: a deconstructive-reconstructive approach.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Marie T; O'Malley, Jane

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents a literature review conducted to establish what was already known about critical reflection in the nursing literature and what work had been done on using a critical social theory framework as the basis for critical reflection. Critical thinking emerged as a significant aspect of nursing education and practice in the late 1980s. It has been promoted as a means by which issues in clinical practice can be examined through a systematic process of exploration and reasoning. Traditionally, critical thinking has commonly involved an attempt to link practice with theory using a scenario or exemplar from practice to illustrate a practice dilemma. This process is often constructed as a retrospective narrative of events. This paper provides a deconstructive-reconstructive approach that differs from some traditional approaches by taking a critical social theory perspective with an emphasis on improving practice. The nursing literature reviewed was accessed through Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL). The search was restricted to English language and published between 1995 and 2005. Based on these findings, we developed a postgraduate advanced mental health nursing programme. There were 490 articles related to 'nursing' and 'critical thinking'; 34 articles related to 'nursing' and 'critical reflection'; 23 articles related to 'nursing' and 'critical social theory'; 15 articles related to 'mental health nursing' and 'critical thinking'; and two articles related to 'mental health nursing' and 'critical reflection'. In the programme we developed based on these findings, students were facilitated to deconstruct concepts and knowledge integral to their own practice. In the reconstructive phase, students implement a change project in clinical practice, supported by a mentor. The deconstructive-reconstructive approach to the development of critical thinking skills provides advanced practitioner with the opportunity to integrate

  8. Capacity Ratios to Assess the Solvency of a College’s Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience Program

    PubMed Central

    McClellan, Nicole H.; Byrd, Debbie C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To use the capacity ratio to determine solvency in 10 advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs) offered by a college of pharmacy. Methods. Availability in each APPE was determined based on preceptor responses, and student need was tabulated from 3 preference forms. Capacity ratios were calculated by dividing preceptor availability by the sum of student requests plus 20% of student requests; ratios ≥ 1 indicated solvency. For the 3 required APPEs, minimum capacity ratios were calculated by dividing availability by the sum of student number plus 20% of the student number. When possible, the capacity ratio for the APPE was calculated by geographic zone. Results. The 3 required APPEs had statewide minimum capacity ratios that were consistent with solvency: advanced community (2.8), advanced institutional (1.6), and ambulatory care (2.5). Only 3 of 7 elective APPEs demonstrated solvency. The elective APPEs for which requests exceeded availability were association management (0.8), emergency medicine (0.8), cardiology (0.6), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) ambulatory care clinic (0.4). Analysis by zone revealed additional insolvent practice experiences in some locations. Conclusions. The capacity ratio allowed for assessment of 10 APPEs and identification of practice experience areas that need expansion. While the capacity ratio is a proposed standardized assessment, it does have some limitations, such as an inability to account for practice experience quality, scheduling conflicts, and geographic zone issues. PMID:23519687

  9. Caring for Special Populations: Total Pain Theory in Advanced Heart Failure: Applications to Research and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Goebel, Joy R.; Doering, Lynn V.; Lorenz, Karl A.; Maliski, Sally L.; Nyamathi, Adeline M.; Evangelista, Lorraine S.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE Describe total pain theory and apply it to research and practice in advanced heart failure (HF). SOURCE OF INFORMATION Total pain theory provides a holistic perspective for improving care, especially at the end of life. In advanced HF, multiple domains of well-being known to influence pain perception are adversely affected by declining health and increasing frailty. A conceptual framework is suggested which addresses domains of well-being identified by total pain theory. CONCLUSION By applying total pain theory, providers may be more effective in mitigating the suffering of individuals with progressive, life-limiting diseases. PMID:19691653

  10. Registers for Networked Medical Research in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Stausberg, J.; Altmann, U.; Antony, G.; Drepper, J.; Sax, U.; Schütt, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Several disease specific registers are operated by members of the ‘TMF – Technology, Methods, and Infrastructure for Networked Medical Research’, an umbrella organization of research networks in Germany. Objective To describe the coverage and the current state as well as financial and organizational issues of registers operated by member networks of the TMF, to identify their requirements and needs, and to recommend best practice models. Methods A survey with a self-completion questionnaire including all 55 TMF member networks was carried out in winter 2007/2008. Interviews focusing on technological issues were conducted and analyzed in summer 2009 with a convenience sample of 10 registers. Results From 55 TMF member networks, 11 provided information about 14 registers. Six registers address diseases of the circulatory system with more than 150,000 registered patients. The interviews revealed a typical setting of “research registers”. Research registers are an important mean to generate hypotheses for clinical research, to identify eligible patients, and to share data with clinical trials. Concerning technical solutions, we found a remarkable heterogeneity. The analysis of the most efficient registers revealed a structure with five levels as best practice model of register management: executive, operations, IT-management, software, hardware. Conclusion In the last ten years, the TMF member networks established disease specific registers in Germany mainly to support clinical research. The heterogeneity of organizational and technical solutions as well as deficits in register planning motivated the development of respective recommendations. The TMF will continue to assist the registers in quality improvement. PMID:23616850

  11. Registered Nurse (Associate Degree).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of registered nurse (with an associate degree), lists technical competencies and competency builders for 19 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 5 units specific to the occupation of registered nurse. The following…

  12. Registered Nurse (Associate Degree).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of registered nurse (with an associate degree), lists technical competencies and competency builders for 19 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 5 units specific to the occupation of registered nurse. The following…

  13. On Vocal Registers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollien, Harry

    A vocal register is a series or range of consecutive frequencies that can be produced with nearly identical voice quality. On the basis of research three fundamental registers can be defined and described: pulse, a low range of phonation; modal, a middle or "normal" range; and loft, a high range, described by some as falsetto. These…

  14. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Revised 2012 Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance for Dietetic Technicians, Registered.

    PubMed

    2013-06-01

    DTRs face complex situations every day. Competently addressing the unique needs of each situation and applying standards appropriately is essential to providing safe, timely, person-centered quality care and service. All DTRs are advised to conduct their practice based on the most recent edition of the Academy's Code of Ethics and the Scope of Practice in Nutrition and Dietetics, the Scope of Practice for the DTR, the 2012 Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance for DTRs. These resources provide minimum standards and tools for demonstrating competence and safe practice, and are used collectively to gauge and guide a DTR's performance in nutrition and dietetics practice. The SOP and SOPP for the DTR are self-evaluation tools that promote quality assurance and performance improvement. Self-assessment provides opportunities to identify areas for enhancement, new learning and skill development, and to encourage progression of career growth. All DTRs are advised to have in their personal libraries the most recent copy of the Academy's Scope of Practice in Nutrition and Dietetics and its components: The 2012 Academy Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance for DTRs; the Code of Ethics; and the Scope of Practice for the DTR. To ensure that credentialed dietetics practitioners always have access to the most current materials, each resource is maintained on the Academy's website. The documents will continue to be reviewed and updated as new trends in the profession of nutrition and dietetics and external influences emerge.

  15. Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Advanced Practice Workforce: Capacity to Address Shortages of Mental Health Professionals.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Kathleen R

    2017-09-01

    There is a recognized shortage of mental health professionals licensed to provide the full scope of mental health services, including assessment, diagnosis, and prescribing. Psychiatric mental health advanced practice nurses (PMH APNs) have the education and licensure to provide these services, address provider shortages and increase access to services. Unfortunately, federal reports and mental health workforce studies inaccurately depict important characteristics of PMH APNs, particularly their scope of practice, a situation that creates misunderstanding and impedes workforce planning. This Open Forum provides an accurate depiction of the PMH APN workforce, its size, scope of practice, and its capacity to increase access to mental health services. Also considered are the implications of using integrated care to increase access to mental health treatment. PMH APNs could increase the reach of these collaborative care models, which require constructing interprofessional teams in which each provider practices to the top of his or her license.

  16. Optimizing Music Learning: Exploring How Blocked and Interleaved Practice Schedules Affect Advanced Performance.

    PubMed

    Carter, Christine E; Grahn, Jessica A

    2016-01-01

    Repetition is the most commonly used practice strategy by musicians. Although blocks of repetition continue to be suggested in the pedagogical literature, work in the field of cognitive psychology suggests that repeated events receive less processing, thereby reducing the potential for long-term learning. Motor skill learning and sport psychology research offer an alternative. Instead of using a blocked practice schedule, with practice completed on one task before moving on to the next task, an interleaved schedule can be used, in which practice is frequently alternated between tasks. This frequent alternation involves more effortful processing, resulting in increased long-term learning. The finding that practicing in an interleaved schedule leads to better retention than practicing in a blocked schedule has been labeled the "contextual interference effect." While the effect has been observed across a wide variety of fields, few studies have researched this phenomenon in a music-learning context, despite the broad potential for application to music practice. This study compared the effects of blocked and interleaved practice schedules on advanced clarinet performance in an ecologically valid context. Ten clarinetists were given one concerto exposition and one technical excerpt to practice in a blocked schedule (12 min per piece) and a second concerto exposition and technical excerpt to practice in an interleaved schedule (3 min per piece, alternating until a total of 12 min of practice were completed on each piece). Participants sight-read the four pieces prior to practice and performed them at the end of practice and again one day later. The sight-reading and two performance run-throughs of each piece were recorded and given to three professional clarinetists to rate using a percentage scale. Overall, whenever there was a ratings difference between the conditions, pieces practiced in the interleaved schedule were rated better than those in the blocked schedule

  17. Optimizing Music Learning: Exploring How Blocked and Interleaved Practice Schedules Affect Advanced Performance

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Christine E.; Grahn, Jessica A.

    2016-01-01

    Repetition is the most commonly used practice strategy by musicians. Although blocks of repetition continue to be suggested in the pedagogical literature, work in the field of cognitive psychology suggests that repeated events receive less processing, thereby reducing the potential for long-term learning. Motor skill learning and sport psychology research offer an alternative. Instead of using a blocked practice schedule, with practice completed on one task before moving on to the next task, an interleaved schedule can be used, in which practice is frequently alternated between tasks. This frequent alternation involves more effortful processing, resulting in increased long-term learning. The finding that practicing in an interleaved schedule leads to better retention than practicing in a blocked schedule has been labeled the “contextual interference effect.” While the effect has been observed across a wide variety of fields, few studies have researched this phenomenon in a music-learning context, despite the broad potential for application to music practice. This study compared the effects of blocked and interleaved practice schedules on advanced clarinet performance in an ecologically valid context. Ten clarinetists were given one concerto exposition and one technical excerpt to practice in a blocked schedule (12 min per piece) and a second concerto exposition and technical excerpt to practice in an interleaved schedule (3 min per piece, alternating until a total of 12 min of practice were completed on each piece). Participants sight-read the four pieces prior to practice and performed them at the end of practice and again one day later. The sight-reading and two performance run-throughs of each piece were recorded and given to three professional clarinetists to rate using a percentage scale. Overall, whenever there was a ratings difference between the conditions, pieces practiced in the interleaved schedule were rated better than those in the blocked schedule

  18. Advancing the practice of health impact assessment in Canada: Obstacles and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    McCallum, Lindsay C.; Ollson, Christopher A.; Stefanovic, Ingrid L.

    2015-11-15

    Health Impact Assessment (HIA) is recognized as a useful tool that can identify potential health impacts resulting from projects or policy initiatives. Although HIA has become an established practice in some countries, it is not yet an established practice in Canada. In order to enable broader support for HIA, this study provides a comprehensive review and analysis of the peer-reviewed and gray literature on the state of HIA practice. The results of this review revealed that, although there is an abundance of publications relating to HIA, there remains a lack of transparent, consistent and reproducible approaches and methods throughout the process. Findings indicate a need for further research and development on a number of fronts, including: 1) the nature of HIA triggers; 2) consistent scoping and stakeholder engagement approaches; 3) use of evidence and transparency of decision-making; 4) reproducibility of assessment methods; 5) monitoring and evaluation protocols; and, 6) integration within existing regulatory frameworks. Addressing these issues will aid in advancing the more widespread use of HIA in Canada. - Highlights: • Reviewed current state of practice in the field of HIA • Identified key obstacles and opportunities for HIA advancement • Major issues include lack of consistent approach and methodology. • No national regulatory driver hinders opportunity for widespread use of HIA. • Identified research opportunities vital to developing HIA practice in Canada.

  19. Developing a professional poster: four "ps" for advanced practice nurses to consider.

    PubMed

    Bindon, Susan L; Davenport, Joan M

    2013-01-01

    Professional posters play an important role in the dissemination of knowledge and the professional development of advanced practice nurses, graduate students, and clinical faculty. Posters should be considered an integral component in communication of professional work in practice, research, and education. The invitation to submit a poster abstract is an important opportunity for clinicians and faculty alike to consider. Though sometimes misperceived as less prestigious than a podium presentation, posters add a unique element to professional and academic events. The argument is made for posters as an equal among scholarly presentation formats. The poster serves as a tremendous opportunity for collaboration between partners and a way to communicate important findings and advertise the presenters' work. For the advanced practice nurse who is a novice in presenting best practice or evidence from research trials, the poster format may be less intimidating while allowing the invaluable sharing of results. Four critical elements of professional poster development are deciding on a clear Purpose, targeting the right People, outlining key steps in the Process, and delivering a memorable Presentation. Using the "4 Ps" as cornerstones for the work of developing, preparing, and delivering the poster to an audience, the authors aim to help organize the entire process into these essential considerations. The poster, as a means of scholarly work, is a viable and essential activity, as interdisciplinary collaboration and sharing of best practice becomes the expectation for all professional development.

  20. The effect of state laws on the supply of advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Kalist, David E; Spurr, Stephen J

    2004-12-01

    This paper considers how the decision to enter advanced practice nursing (e.g., the occupations of nurse practitioner, certified nurse-midwife, nurse anesthetist, and clinical nurse specialist) is affected by State laws on the scope of practice of APNs. We find that enrollments in APN programs are 30 percent higher in States where APNs have a high level of professional independence. Our work differs from previous studies by estimating a fixed effects model on cross-sectional and time series data, to avoid problems of endogeneity of State laws.

  1. Oncology Gold Standard™ practical consensus recommendations 2016 for treatment of advanced clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Batra, U; Parikh, PM; Prabhash, K; Tongaonkar, HB; Chibber, P; Dabkara, D; Deshmukh, C; Ghadyalpatil, N; Hingmire, S; Joshi, A; Raghunath, SK; Rajappa, S; Rajendranath, R; Rawal, SK; Singh, Manisha; Singh, R; Somashekhar, SP; Sood, R

    2016-01-01

    The Oncology Gold Standard (OGS) Expert Group on renal cell carcinoma (RCC) developed the consensus statement to provide community oncologists practical guidelines on the management of advanced clear cell (cc) RCC using published evidence, practical experience of experts in real life management, and results of a nationwide survey involving 144 health-care professionals. Six broad question categories containing 33 unique questions cover major situations in the routine management of RCC. This document serves as a ready guide for the standard of care to optimize outcome. The table of “Take Home Messages” at the end is a convenient tool for busy practitioners. PMID:28032079

  2. Evidence based practice and advanced competencies in a MHS-CLS program.

    PubMed

    Russell, Barbara; Kraj, Barbara; Pretlow, Lester; Ranne, Anne; Leibach, Elizabeth K

    2011-01-01

    The goals, curriculum, implementation, and immediate impacts of an entry-level Master of Health Science in Clinical Laboratory Science (MHS-CLS) degree are described as compared to the baccalaureate program (BS-CLS) in the same institution. The MHS-CLS program was instituted in fall semester, 2008; the inaugural class graduated in spring semester 2010. To document the need for the MHS-CLS, program statistics, such as the number of students entering the current BS-CLS program with previous baccalaureate degrees, numbers of students graduating with biology and chemistry degrees in the United States, CLS workforce shortages and pending retirement statistics were used. The shortage of CLS practitioners able to perform and publish evidence-based practice research also supported program need. The MHS-CLS curriculum includes advanced courses, advanced competencies incorporated into existing BS-CLS courses, and a capstone research project in evidence based practice.

  3. Donation after cardiac death: ethical dilemmas and implications for advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Everidge, Caryn S

    2012-01-01

    Donation after cardiac death has always presented ethical concerns among health care providers. As advanced practice nurses and critical care nurses, it is our responsibility to ensure that health care providers and families are educated about the process and that we remain advocates for the potential donors. This article reviews the donation after cardiac death process, provides a donation after cardiac death hypothetical case report and its outcome, and addresses the ethical concerns associated with donation after cardiac death from both opponents' and proponents' points of view. It will also discuss the benefits of obtaining a palliative care consult and the roles of the advanced practice nurse in the care of the potential donor.

  4. Advanced practice role characteristics of the community/public health nurse specialist.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Julie Fisher; Baldwin, Karen Brandt

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the advanced practice role of nurses with master's degrees in community/public health nursing using their experiences and perspectives. The purposive sample consisted of 10 nurses who had master's degrees in community/public health nursing and were working in a variety of community health settings. Data were collected using audiotaped interviews and 1-day observations of study participants in their workplaces. An editing analysis technique was used to analyze the data. Findings indicated that role characteristics included advocacy and policy setting at the organizational, community, and state levels; a leadership style centered on empowerment; a broad sphere of influence; and high-level skills in large-scale program planning, project management, and building partnerships. Results provide important descriptive data about significant aspects of the advanced practice role of nurses with master's degrees in community/public health nursing.

  5. Infusing informatics into interprofessional education: the iTEAM (Interprofessional Technology Enhanced Advanced practice Model) project.

    PubMed

    Skiba, Diane J; Barton, Amy J; Knapfel, Sarah; Moore, Gina; Trinkley, Katy

    2014-01-01

    The iTEAM goal is to prepare advanced practice nurses, physicians and pharmacists with the interprofessional (IP) core competencies (informatics, patient centric, quality-focused, evidence based care) to provide technology enhanced collaborative care by: offering technology enhanced learning opportunities through a required informatics course, advanced practice courses (team based experiences with both standardized and virtual patients) and team based clinical experiences including e-health experiences. The innovative features of iTEAM project will be achieved through use of social media strategies, a web accessible Electronic Health Records (EHRs) system, a Virtual Clinic/Hospital in Second Life, various e-health applications including traditional telehealth tools and consumer oriented tools such as patient portals, social media consumer groups and mobile health (m-health) applications for health and wellness functions. It builds upon the schools' rich history of IP education and includes clinical partners, such as the VA and other clinical sites focused on care for underserved patient populations.

  6. A successful practical application of Coverage with Evidence Development in Australia: Medical Services Advisory Committee interim funding and the PillCam Capsule Endoscopy Register.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Sue P; Selby, Warwick S; Jordan, Ernest

    2009-07-01

    In August 2002, an application for the listing on the Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) of PillCam Capsule Endoscopy (formally M2A) as a diagnostic procedure for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) was made to the Medical Services Advisory Committee (MSAC). As a result of this application, in May 2004 PillCam Capsule Endoscopy was approved with interim funding until April 2007. This funding was conditional on the collection of Australian data on the long-term safety, effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of capsule endoscopy. A review was conducted of how the data were collected, the methodological difficulties associated with the collection and analysis of the data, and the outcomes of the data. The PillCam Capsule Endoscopy Register ran from 2004 to 2007 and amassed data on 4,099 patients forming the largest database on PillCam in the world. Based on these data, in November 2007, MSAC recommended that full public funding be supported under the current MBS Item Number 11820 as capsule endoscopy is as safe as and more effective than comparable diagnostic tests. It is the preferred choice of patients and has the potential to reduce the number and cost of previous investigations. This form of CED proved to be ideally suited to PillCam Capsule Endoscopy. The PillCam Capsule Endoscopy Register provided data that made it possible to validate assumptions used in the economic modeling in the assessment carried out for MSAC in response to the application for funding. The use of interim funding requires both risk and cost sharing among the key players: industry, government, the medical profession, and the hospitals. Although the characteristics of PillCam Capsule Endoscopy proved to be suited to data collection, this may not be the case with other emerging health technologies. If interim funding coupled with data collection is to become an effective mechanism for bridging the evidence gap, work needs to be carried out by health technology assessment agencies to provide

  7. [Curriculum for additional advanced specialist training in psychotherapy--concept and initial experience in practice].

    PubMed

    Fritzsche, Kurt

    2008-01-01

    The regulations for advanced specialist training passed by the German Medical Council in May 2003 make it possible for any clinical physician to complete advanced training for "specialty-related psychotherapy". Critics see this as a "watering down" of medical psychotherapy. The majority applaud the greater proximity to practice and the possibility of achieving psychosomatic expertise. The new advanced specialist training regulations permit therapeutic interventions by the primary care physician beyond psychosomatic primary care. A curriculum has been developed in the Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy of the University Hospital Freiburg, which has completed the pilot phase and is now offered in block courses over a period of 2 years. We present here experience with the new concept and the results of the evaluation.

  8. Reflections on ethnocentrism and racism: a challenge for advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Harris, S H; Cummings, S H

    1996-01-01

    As nurses and patient populations increasingly reflect the changing demographics of the United States, it will be necessary for nurses to address the critical issues surrounding a multicultural society. Nurses have been relatively quiet on the topic of ethnocentric and racist behavior. If advanced practice nurses are to be successful in assisting nurses and organizations to embrace cultural diversity, understanding ethnocentric and racist behaviors is key to developing strategies to facilitate the provision of culturally competent care.

  9. Expert googling: best practices and advanced strategies for using google in health sciences libraries.

    PubMed

    Ripple, Ammon S

    2006-01-01

    Google is the search engine of choice for most Internet users. For a variety of reasons, librarians and other expert searchers do not always use Google to its full potential, even though it provides capabilities not possible in traditional bibliographic databases and other search engines. Applying expert searching principles and practices, such as the use of advanced search operators, information retrieval strategies, and search hedges to Google will allow health sciences librarians to find quality information on the Internet more efficiently and effectively.

  10. Implications for Advanced Nursing Practice in the Patient with Heat Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    systemic vascular resistance), while elderly patients are hypodynamic (increased heart rate, decreased cardiac output and decreased systemic vascular...resistance). By the time elderly patients are seen, massive volume deficits may exist, requiring hemodynamic monitoring to differentiate pump...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Implications for Advanced Nursing Practice in the Patient with Heat Stress 6. AUTHOR(S) Patricia A Skelton S 7

  11. Developing Structured-Learning Exercises for a Community Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Renee Ahrens

    2006-01-01

    The recent growth in the number of pharmacy schools across the nation has resulted in the need for high-quality community advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) sites. A vital part of a student's education, these APPEs should be structured and formalized to provide an environment conducive to student learning. This paper discusses how to use a calendar, structured-learning activities, and scheduled evaluations to develop students' knowledge, skills, and abilities in a community pharmacy setting. PMID:17136164

  12. In-memory interconnect protocol configuration registers

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, Kevin Y.; Roberts, David A.

    2017-09-19

    Systems, apparatuses, and methods for moving the interconnect protocol configuration registers into the main memory space of a node. The region of memory used for storing the interconnect protocol configuration registers may also be made cacheable to reduce the latency of accesses to the interconnect protocol configuration registers. Interconnect protocol configuration registers which are used during a startup routine may be prefetched into the host's cache to make the startup routine more efficient. The interconnect protocol configuration registers for various interconnect protocols may include one or more of device capability tables, memory-side statistics (e.g., to support two-level memory data mapping decisions), advanced memory and interconnect features such as repair resources and routing tables, prefetching hints, error correcting code (ECC) bits, lists of device capabilities, set and store base address, capability, device ID, status, configuration, capabilities, and other settings.

  13. Advance Care Planning Documentation Practices and Accessibility in the Electronic Health Record: Implications for Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    Walker, Evan; McMahan, Ryan; Barnes, Deborah; Katen, Mary; Lamas, Daniela; Sudore, Rebecca

    2017-09-21

    Documenting patients' advance care planning wishes is essential to providing value-aligned care, as is having this documentation readily accessible. Little is known about advance care planning documentation practices in the electronic health record. Describe advance care planning documentation practices and the accessibility of documented discussions in the electronic health record. Participants were primary care patients at the San Francisco VA Medical Center, were ≥60 years old, and had ≥2 chronic/serious health conditions. In this cross-sectional study, we assessed the prevalence of advance care planning documentation, including any legal forms/orders and discussions in the prior five years. We also determined accessibility of discussions (i.e., accessible centralized posting vs. inaccessible free-text in progress notes). The mean age of 414 participants was 71 years (SD ±8), 9% were women, 43% were non-white, and 51% had documented advance care planning including 149 (36%) with forms/orders and 138 (33%) with discussions. Seventy-four participants (50%) with forms/orders lacked accompanying explanatory documentation. Most (55%) discussions were not easily accessible, including 70% of those documenting changes in treatment preferences from prior forms/orders. Half of chronically ill, older participants had documented advance care planning, including one third with documented discussions. However, half of the patients with completed legal forms/orders had no accompanying documented explanatory discussions, and the majority of documented discussions were not easily accessible, even when wishes had changed. Ensuring that patients' preferences are documented and easily accessible is an important patient safety and quality improvement target to ensure patients' wishes are honored. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Advanced practice nursing for enduring health needs management: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Koskinen, Liisa; Mikkonen, Irma; Graham, Iain; Norman, Linda D; Richardson, Jim; Savage, Eileen; Schorn, Mavis

    2012-07-01

    Advanced practice nursing expertise has been acknowledged worldwide as one response to the challenges arising from changes in society and health care. The roots of advanced practice nursing education are at the University of Colorado where the first known programme started in 1965. In many countries advanced practice nurses (APNs) have taken responsibility for routine patient care formerly carried out by physicians in order to reduce their workload. However, more and more, APNs have taken responsibility for new service areas and quality programmes not previously provided. Chronic disease management is one of these new service areas because long-term diseases are increasingly challenging service systems globally. This article is based on an international APN partnership. The aim of the article is to describe how the partnership will design a 15 ECTS credit course on Enduring Health Need Management as a cross-cultural collaborative endeavour. The adaptation of an inquiry based learning framework will be described drawing on four main principles of the theory: authentic learning communities; student encouragement in analysing gradually more complicated problems; networking in knowledge creation and; student engagement and activity. The cross-cultural online course aims to increase APNs' intercultural competence as well as their global and international work orientation.

  15. Neighborhood geographical factors and the presence of advanced community pharmacy practice sites in Greater Chicago.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Charisse L; Crawford, Stephanie Y; Lin, Swu-Jane; Salmon, J Warren; Smith, Miriam Mobley

    2009-02-19

    To determine the availability of experiential learning opportunities in culturally diverse areas and to identify opportunities and barriers to attract and sustain sites for the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy. Utilizing variables of census tract income, racial/ethnicity composition and crime index, data analyses included descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression. Faculty members involved in experiential education were interviewed to identify other factors influencing site placement and selection for community-based advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs). Median family income and Asian population were significantly higher and black population was significantly lower in census tracts with community APPE sites than in census tracts without APPE sites (p < 0.05). No significant differences were found in the population variables of white and Latino populations and crime index. The Asian population variable was the only significant predictor of an APPE site (p = 0.0148) when controlling for other variables. Distance from the College, pharmacy staffing issues, goodwill, influence of district and corporate managers, and strategic initiatives were critical considerations in site establishment and overall sustainability. Advanced community pharmacy practice sites were fairly well distributed across metropolitan Chicago, indicating that exposure to diverse populations during the advanced community practice experiences parallels with strategic College objectives of expanding and diversifying experiential sites to enhance pharmacy students' abilities to meet emerging patient care challenges and opportunities.

  16. Neighborhood Geographical Factors and the Presence of Advanced Community Pharmacy Practice Sites in Greater Chicago

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Stephanie Y.; Lin, Swu-Jane; Salmon, J. Warren; Smith, Miriam Mobley

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To determine the availability of experiential learning opportunities in culturally diverse areas and to identify opportunities and barriers to attract and sustain sites for the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy. Methods Utilizing variables of census tract income, racial/ethnicity composition and crime index, data analyses included descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression. Faculty members involved in experiential education were interviewed to identify other factors influencing site placement and selection for community-based advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs). Results Median family income and Asian population were significantly higher and black population was significantly lower in census tracts with community APPE sites than in census tracts without APPE sites (p < 0.05). No significant differences were found in the population variables of white and Latino populations and crime index. The Asian population variable was the only significant predictor of an APPE site (p = 0.0148) when controlling for other variables. Distance from the College, pharmacy staffing issues, goodwill, influence of district and corporate managers, and strategic initiatives were critical considerations in site establishment and overall sustainability. Conclusion Advanced community pharmacy practice sites were fairly well distributed across metropolitan Chicago, indicating that exposure to diverse populations during the advanced community practice experiences parallels with strategic College objectives of expanding and diversifying experiential sites to enhance pharmacy students' abilities to meet emerging patient care challenges and opportunities. PMID:19513145

  17. Innovations in performance assessment: a criterion based performance assessment for advanced practice nurses using a synergistic theoretical nursing framework.

    PubMed

    Scarpa, Raymond; Connelly, Patricia E

    2011-01-01

    Health care organizations that employ advanced practice nurses are challenged to evaluate practice at this advanced level. Current evaluation methods tend to inter-mingle basic nursing competencies with competencies found in medical practice and organizational objectives that are typically derived from human resources departments. This article describes the development of a criterion-based job performance assessment for advanced nursing practice using a framework rooted in a nursing theory. A needs analysis; review of the literature, adaptation of nursing's Synergy Model, and input from various stakeholders guided the development of a generic job description. This job description progressed into a criterion-based performance assessment. Construct validity was tested using a questionnaire administered to a convenience sample of 9 practicing advanced practice nurses, 2 nurse executives, 1 PhD nurse educator, and 1 physician. Autonomy, job satisfaction, and quality improvement for advanced practice nurses are fostered by a review process that defines roles and competencies specific to advanced nursing practice. Peer review, a concept contributing to this process is explored as a means to monitor and improve practice.

  18. A descriptive study of point-of-care reference resource use by advanced practice RNs in Texas.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Whitney Rogers; Hinojosa, Rogelio H

    2013-11-01

    This descriptive study replicates and extends previous research on advanced practice RNs and the (1) reference resources available to them at the point of care, (2) resources they use to inform their clinical practice, and (3) resources they are accessing from handheld electronic devices such as PDAs, smartphones, and tablet computers during practice. These elements formed the purpose of the current study. A sample of advanced practice RNs from Texas Public Health Region 11 was surveyed. Available resources were current journals appropriate to setting and current clinical guidelines. These advanced practice RNs "always or frequently" based their professional practice on personal experience of caring for patients/clients over time, information learned in college/university, and information learned about each patient/client as an individual. Responses for Hispanic respondents as well as electronic device users were similar. Content and features accessed daily by handheld computer devices were reference materials, e-mail, address/phonebook, Internet access other than e-mail, calendar/date book, alarm/reminder, calculator, and memo pad. Software installed on handheld devices and used daily included drug references, medical text/reference book, medical math/formula calculator, practice guidelines, and language translator/dictionary. Respondents who did not report using handheld devices at work were older, had more years in advanced practice nursing, and were more likely to work in a hospital, birthing center, or institution such as a prison, school, or military facility. There was no difference in resource or electronic device use by Hispanic advanced practice RNs. Electronic resources for practice are growing and being used by advanced practice RNs. Consideration should be given to incorporating evaluation and implementation of electronic clinical resources into advanced practice RN educational programs. Future research should include greater detail about the origin of

  19. Advance care planning for nursing home residents with dementia: Influence of 'we DECide' on policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Ampe, Sophie; Sevenants, Aline; Smets, Tinne; Declercq, Anja; Van Audenhove, Chantal

    2017-01-01

    (1) To pilot 'we DECide' in terms of influence on advance care planning policy and practice in nursing home dementia care units. (2) To investigate barriers and facilitators for implementing 'we DECide'. This was a pre-test-post-test study in 18 nursing homes. Measurements included: compliance with best practice of advance care planning policy (ACP-audit); advance care planning practice (ACP criteria: degree to which advance care planning was discussed, and OPTION scale: degree of involvement of residents and families in conversations). Advance care planning policy was significantly more compliant with best practice after 'we DECide'; policy in the control group was not. Advance care planning was not discussed more frequently, nor were residents and families involved to a higher degree in conversations after 'we DECide'. Barriers to realizing advance care planning included staff's limited responsibilities; facilitators included support by management staff, and involvement of the whole organization. 'We DECide' had a positive influence on advance care planning policy. Daily practice, however, did not change. Future studies should pay more attention to long-term implementation strategies. Long-term implementation of advance care planning requires involvement of the whole organization and a continuing support system for health care professionals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Danish Adoption Register.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Liselotte; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2011-07-01

    The Danish Adoption Register was established in 1963-1964 to explore the genetic and environmental contribution to familial aggregation of schizophrenia. The register encompass information on all 14,425 non-familial adoptions of Danish children legally granted in Denmark 1924-1947. It includes name and date of birth of each adoptee and his or her biological and adoptive parents, date of transfer to adoptive parents and date of formal adoption. The linkage to biological and adoptive parents is close to complete, even biological fathers are registered for 91.4% of the adoptees. Adoption registers are a unique source allowing disentangling of genetic and familial environmental influences on traits, risk of diseases, and mortality.

  1. Improved feedback shift register

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlman, M.

    1972-01-01

    Design of feedback shift register with three tap feedback decoding scheme is described. Application for obtaining sequence synchronization patterns is examined. Operation of the circuitry is described and drawings of the systems are included.

  2. Molecular Electronic Shift Registers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beratan, David N.; Onuchic, Jose N.

    1990-01-01

    Molecular-scale shift registers eventually constructed as parts of high-density integrated memory circuits. In principle, variety of organic molecules makes possible large number of different configurations and modes of operation for such shift-register devices. Several classes of devices and implementations in some specific types of molecules proposed. All based on transfer of electrons or holes along chains of repeating molecular units.

  3. Molecular Electronic Shift Registers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beratan, David N.; Onuchic, Jose N.

    1990-01-01

    Molecular-scale shift registers eventually constructed as parts of high-density integrated memory circuits. In principle, variety of organic molecules makes possible large number of different configurations and modes of operation for such shift-register devices. Several classes of devices and implementations in some specific types of molecules proposed. All based on transfer of electrons or holes along chains of repeating molecular units.

  4. Assessing the Spread and Uptake of a Framework for Introducing and Evaluating Advanced Practice Nursing Roles.

    PubMed

    Boyko, Jennifer A; Carter, Nancy; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise

    2016-08-01

    Health system researchers must ensure that the products of their work meet the needs of various stakeholder groups (e.g., patients, practitioners, and policy makers). Evidence-based frameworks can support the uptake and spread of research evidence; however, their existence as knowledge translation tools does not ensure their uptake and it is difficult to ascertain their spread into research, practice, and policy using existing methods. The purpose of this article is to report results of a study on the spread and uptake of an evidence-based framework (i.e., the participatory, evidence-based, patient-focused process for advanced practice nursing [PEPPA] framework) into research, practice, and policies relevant to the introduction and evaluation of advanced practice nursing roles. We also reflect on the utility of using a modified citation methodology to evaluate knowledge translation efforts. We searched four databases for literature published between 2004 and 2014 citing the original paper in which the PEPPA framework was published, and carried out an Internet search for grey literature using keywords. Relevant data were extracted from sources and organized using NVivo software. We analysed results descriptively. Our search yielded 164 unique sources of which 69.5% were from published literature and the majority (83.4%) of these were published in nursing journals. Most frequently (71.5%), the framework was used by researchers and students in research studies. A smaller number of citations (11.3%) reflected use of the PEPPA framework in practice settings with a focus on role development, implementation, evaluation, or a combination of these. This study demonstrates that the PEPPA framework has been used to varying degrees as intended, and provides guidance on how to evaluate the spread and uptake of research outputs (e.g., theoretical frameworks). Further research is needed about ways to determine whether evidence-informed research tools such as frameworks have been

  5. Randomized clinical trial to evaluate mental practice in enhancing advanced laparoscopic surgical performance.

    PubMed

    Louridas, M; Bonrath, E M; Sinclair, D A; Dedy, N J; Grantcharov, T P

    2015-01-01

    Mental practice, the cognitive rehearsal of a task without physical movement, is known to enhance performance in sports and music. Investigation of this technique in surgery has been limited to basic operations. The purpose of this study was to develop mental practice scripts, and to assess their effect on advanced laparoscopic skills and surgeon stress levels in a crisis scenario. Twenty senior surgical trainees were randomized to either conventional training or mental practice groups, the latter being trained by an expert performance psychologist. Participants' skills were assessed while performing a porcine laparoscopic jejunojejunostomy as part of a crisis scenario in a simulated operating room, using the Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill (OSATS) and bariatric OSATS (BOSATS) instruments. Objective and subjective stress parameters were measured, as well as non-technical skills using the Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons rating tool. An improvement in OSATS (P = 0.003) and BOSATS (P = 0.003) scores was seen in the mental practice group compared with the conventional training group. Seven of ten trainees improved their technical performance during the crisis scenario, whereas four of the ten conventionally trained participants deteriorated. Mental imagery ability improved significantly following mental practice training (P = 0.011), but not in the conventional group (P = 0.083). No differences in objective or subjective stress levels or non-technical skills were evident. Mental practice improves technical performance for advanced laparoscopic tasks in the simulated operating room, and allows trainees to maintain or improve their performance despite added stress. © 2014 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Training Advanced Practice Providers to Collect Functional Outcomes After Fragility Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tiffany L.; Ames, Tyler D.; Le, Khoi M.; Wee, Corinne; Phieffer, Laura S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to determine whether advanced practice providers could learn to collect objective functional assessment data accurately and efficiently with commercially available devices that measure kinematics and kinetics (Nintendo Wii Balance Board [WBB] and Level Belt [LB]) to aid in the assessment of fall risk and outcomes after fragility fractures. Methods: Nine advanced practice providers participated in a 1-hour clinical assessment tools (CATs) training session on equipment use, providing standardized instructions, and practice of the testing procedures. Afterward, they participated in a skills demonstration evaluation and completed a postsession survey. Results: Participants successfully achieved a mean of 18.22 (standard deviation 1.56) of 20 performance measures. Of the incomplete or omitted tasks, the majority (10 of 16) occurred within the first of 3 CATs activities. Postsession survey results revealed that 9 of 9 participants reported that the 1 hour provided for training on the CATs was sufficient. All participants reported that after the training, they felt confident they could reliably carry out the tasks to test patients on both the WBB and the LB. The majority of participants reported that they believed that the WBB (7 of 9) and LB (8 out of 9) would be good assets to clinics in assessing patient functionality after fragility fractures. Conclusion: These results indicate that advanced practice providers can confidently learn and effectively test patients with the WBB and LB within 1 hour of training. In the future, adoption of CATs in the clinical setting may allow for objective, easy-to-use, portable, noninvasive, and relatively inexpensive measures to assess functional outcomes in patients with fragility fracture. PMID:26328225

  7. Exploring the opinions of registered nurses working in a clinical transfusion environment on the contribution of e-learning to personal learning and clinical practice: results of a small scale educational research study.

    PubMed

    Cottrell, Susan; Donaldson, Jayne H

    2013-05-01

    To explore the opinions of registered nurses on the Learnbloodtransfusion Module 1: Safe Transfusion Practice e-learning programme to meeting personal learning styles and learning needs. A qualitative research methodology was applied based on the principles of phenomenology. Adopting a convenience sampling plan supported the recruitment of participants who had successfully completed the e-learning course. Thematic analysis from the semi-structured interviews identified common emerging themes through application of Colaizzis framework. Seven participants of total sample population (89) volunteered to participate in the study. Five themes emerged which included learning preferences, interactive learning, course design, patient safety and future learning needs. Findings positively show the e-learning programme captures the learning styles and needs of learners. In particular, learning styles of a reflector, theorist and activist as well as a visual learner can actively engage in the online learning experience. In an attempt to bridge the knowledge practice gap, further opinions are offered on the course design and the application of knowledge to practice following completion of the course. The findings of the small scale research study have shown that the e-learning course does meet the diverse learning styles and needs of nurses working in a clinical transfusion environment. However, technology alone is not sufficient and a blended approach to learning must be adopted to meet bridging the theory practice gap supporting the integration of knowledge to clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Revised 2014 Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (Competent, Proficient, and Expert) in Nutrition Support.

    PubMed

    Brantley, Susan L; Russell, Mary K; Mogensen, Kris M; Wooley, Jennifer A; Bobo, Elizabeth; Chen, Yimin; Malone, Ainsley; Roberts, Susan; Romano, Michelle M; Taylor, Beth

    2014-12-01

    This 2014 revision of the Standards of Practice (SOP) and Standards of Professional Performance (SOPP) for Registered Dietitians Nutritionists (RDNs) in Nutrition Support represents an update of the 2007 Standards composed by content experts of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The revision is based upon the Revised 2012 SOP in Nutrition Care and SOPP for RDs, which incorporates the Nutrition Care Process and the six domains of professionalism: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. These SOP and SOPP are designed to promote the provision of safe, effective, and efficient nutrition support services, facilitate evidence-based practice, and serve as a professional evaluation resource for RDNs who specialize or wish to specialize in nutrition support therapy. These standards should be applied in all patient/client care settings in which RDNs in nutrition support provide care. These settings include, but are not limited to, acute care, ambulatory/outpatient care, and home and alternate site care. The standards highlight the value of the nutrition support RDN's roles in quality management, regulatory compliance, research, teaching, consulting, and writing for peer-reviewed professional publications. The standards assist the RDN in nutrition support to distinguish his or her level of practice (competent, proficient, or expert) and would guide the RDN in creating a personal development plan to achieve increasing levels of knowledge, skill, and ability in nutrition support practice.

  9. [Challenges and opportunities: contributions of the Advanced Practice Nurse in the chronicity. Learning from experiences].

    PubMed

    Appleby, Christine; Camacho-Bejarano, Rafaela

    2014-01-01

    Undoubtedly, our society is facing new economic, political, demographic, social and cultural challenges that require healthcare services able to meet the growing health needs of the population, especially in dealing with chronic conditions. In this new context, some countries such as the United Kingdom have made a firm commitment to develop new models for chronic patients care based on the introduction of new figures of Advanced Practice Nurses, which includes 4 cornerstones of professional practice: advanced clinical skills, clinical management, teaching and research. The implementation of this new figures implies a redefinition of professional competencies and has its own accreditation system and a specific catalogue of services adapted to the population requirements, in order to provide chronic care support from Primary Care settings. This trajectory allows us analysing the process of design and implementation of these new models and the organizational structure where it is integrated. In Spain, there are already experiences in some regions such as Andalucia and the Basque Country, focused on the creation of new advanced nursing roles. At present, it is necessary to consider suitable strategic proposals for the complete development of these models and to achieve the best results in terms of overall health and quality of life of patients with chronic conditions, improving the quality of services and cost-effectiveness through a greater cohesion and performance of healthcare teams towards the sustainability of healthcare services and patient satisfaction.

  10. Advancing geriatrics research, education, and practice: policy challenges after the great recession.

    PubMed

    Zerzan, Judy T; Rich, Eugene C

    2014-06-01

    The series of articles in this JGIM issue provides a number of policy-relevant recommendations for advancing geriatrics research, education and practice. Despite the unprecedented pressure to reduce state and federal spending, policymakers must concurrently address the challenges of a growing population of older individuals with increasingly complex health care problems. Thus, there may be opportunities to advance this agenda in creative ways. For example, without new spending, federal research agencies can make changes to encourage needed new directions in aging research, and the ACA provides new funding opportunities such as the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute. States and the federal government have an increasing need for the health professions workforce to have collaborative care skills and geriatrics clinical competencies, and are finding ways to invest in relevant initiatives. On the clinical program side, state and federal governments are initiating programs to promote delivery system changes that improve the care of older adults. Nonetheless, in the face of the policy challenges that have persisted after the "great recession," academic geriatrics and general internal medicine will need to join forces with public and private interests to secure the resources needed to advance this ambitious agenda for geriatrics research, education and practice.

  11. Improving student knowledge in medication management through an advanced pharmacy practice experience.

    PubMed

    Childress, Bc; Bosler, Julie N; Beck, Morgan

    2013-06-01

    To assess the impact of an advanced pharmacy practice rotation on student therapeutic knowledge, confidence in performing medication therapy management (MTM), and ability to use MTM documentation platforms. Pretest/post-test quasi-experiment. This study was conducted at the InterNational Center for Advanced Pharmacy Services (INCAPS), a licensed pharmacy that provides MTM services to geriatric patients in Louisville, Kentucky. This research evaluated 37 advanced pharmacy practice students who participated in the five-week learning rotation at INCAPS between October 1, 2011, and June 30, 2012. Thirty-seven students were tested before (pretest) beginning the rotation. During the rotation, students performed daily MTM consultations and participated in weekly topic discussions pertaining to relevant areas of chronic disease management and geriatric pharmacotherapy. Following the five-week rotation, a post-test was administered to these 37 students to analyze the changes in their knowledge. The primary outcome measure was the test score for the assessment of chronic disease management and geriatric pharmacotherapy. Compared with baseline, post-test scores showed a statistically significant improvement in the areas that were assessed-osteoporosis, hypertension, diabetes, asthma/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and inappropriate medication use in the elderly. A post-rotation survey also reflected positive improvements in student confidence when performing MTM consults for geriatric patients. The five-week MTM-focused rotation at INCAPS with weekly topic discussions and daily MTM consults showed a positive impact on students' ability to manage medication therapy for chronically ill and geriatric patients.

  12. Attitude, Knowledge, and Practice on Evidence-Based Nursing among Registered Nurses in Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospitals: A Multiple Center Cross-Sectional Survey in China

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yufang; Guo, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study was to describe RNs' attitude, knowledge, and practice on evidence-based practice (EBP) in traditional Chinese nursing field and to estimate the related sociodemographic and professional factors. Methods. A multiple institutional cross-sectional survey design with self-reported EBP Questionnaire (EBPQ) and self-designed questionnaires were used. Results. The average scores of the total EBPQ were with a mean of 4.24 (SD = 0.79). The score of attitude was the highest one, followed by the knowledge score, and the lowest one is practice. RNs with longer experience reported stronger EBP knowledge (H = 6.64, P < 0.05). And RNs under higher working pressure reported less positive attitudes (ρ = 0.17, P < 0.001), whereas RNs holding negative professional attitude reported lower scores (Spearman's ρ: 0.12 to 0.15, P < 0.001). Significant statistics were found between RNs with research experience and without in attitude (t = −2.40, P < 0.05) and knowledge (t = −2.43, P < 0.05). Conclusions. Respondents generally viewed EBP positively and their attitudes towards EBP tended to be more positive than knowledge and practice of EBP. Data also showed that longer working experience, having administrative position, research experience, lighter working load, and better professional attitude might facilitate EBP. PMID:27528882

  13. Integrating first-line treatment options into clinical practice: what's new in advanced melanoma?

    PubMed

    Dummer, Reinhard; Schadendorf, Dirk; Ascierto, Paolo A; Larkin, James; Lebbé, Celeste; Hauschild, Axel

    2015-12-01

    Melanoma remains a serious form of skin cancer in Europe and worldwide. Localized, early-stage melanomas can usually be treated with surgical excision. However, the prognosis is poorer for patients with advanced disease. Before 2011, treatment for advanced melanoma included palliative surgery and/or radiotherapy, and chemotherapy with or without immunotherapy, such as interleukin-2. As none of these treatments had shown survival benefits in patients with advanced melanoma, European guidelines had recommended that patients be entered into clinical trials. The lack of approved first-line options and varying access to clinical trials meant that European clinicians relied on experimental regimens and chemotherapy-based treatments when no other options were available. Since 2011, ipilimumab, an immuno-oncology therapy, and vemurafenib and dabrafenib, targeted agents that inhibit mutant BRAF, have been approved by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of advanced melanoma. More recently, the MEK inhibitor, trametinib, received European marketing authorization for use in patients with BRAF mutation-positive advanced melanoma. In 2014, the anti-PD-1 antibody nivolumab was approved as a first-line therapy in Japan. Whereas nivolumab and another anti-PD-1 antibody, pembrolizumab, were approved as second-line therapies in the USA, their recent approval in Europe are for first-line use based on new clinical trial data in this setting. Together these agents are changing clinical practice and making therapeutic decisions more complex. Here, we discuss current and emerging therapeutic options for the first-line treatment of advanced melanoma, and how these therapies can be optimized to provide the best possible outcomes for patients.

  14. 16 CFR 303.20 - Registered identification numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Registered identification numbers. 303.20... identification numbers. (a) Registered numbers for use as the required identification in lieu of the name on... the form set out in paragraph (d) of this section. (b)(1) Registered identification numbers shall be...

  15. 49 CFR 1103.1 - Register of practitioners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Register of practitioners. 1103.1 Section 1103.1... OF TRANSPORTATION RULES OF PRACTICE PRACTITIONERS General Information § 1103.1 Register of practitioners. The Board maintains a register containing the names of all non-attorneys entitled to...

  16. 49 CFR 1103.1 - Register of practitioners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Register of practitioners. 1103.1 Section 1103.1... OF TRANSPORTATION RULES OF PRACTICE PRACTITIONERS General Information § 1103.1 Register of practitioners. The Board maintains a register containing the names of all non-attorneys entitled to...

  17. 49 CFR 1103.1 - Register of practitioners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Register of practitioners. 1103.1 Section 1103.1... OF TRANSPORTATION RULES OF PRACTICE PRACTITIONERS General Information § 1103.1 Register of practitioners. The Board maintains a register containing the names of all non-attorneys entitled to...

  18. 49 CFR 1103.1 - Register of practitioners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Register of practitioners. 1103.1 Section 1103.1... OF TRANSPORTATION RULES OF PRACTICE PRACTITIONERS General Information § 1103.1 Register of practitioners. The Board maintains a register containing the names of all non-attorneys entitled to...

  19. 49 CFR 1103.1 - Register of practitioners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Register of practitioners. 1103.1 Section 1103.1... OF TRANSPORTATION RULES OF PRACTICE PRACTITIONERS General Information § 1103.1 Register of practitioners. The Board maintains a register containing the names of all non-attorneys entitled to...

  20. 16 CFR 303.20 - Registered identification numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Registered identification numbers. 303.20... identification numbers. (a) Registered numbers for use as the required identification in lieu of the name on... the form set out in paragraph (d) of this section. (b)(1) Registered identification numbers shall be...

  1. Registered Nurses in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Flinter, Margaret; Hsu, Clarissa; Cromp, DeAnn; Ladden, MaryJoan D.

    2017-01-01

    The years since the passage of the Affordable Care Act have seen substantial changes in the organization and delivery of primary care. These changes have emphasized greater team involvement in care and expansion of the roles of each team member including registered nurses (RNs). This study examined the roles of RNs in 30 exemplary primary care practices. We identified the emergence of new roles and activities for RNs characterized by greater involvement in face-to-face patient care and care management, their own daily schedule of patient visits and contacts, and considerable autonomy in the care of their patients. PMID:28323721

  2. Pharmacy Student Learning During Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences in Relation to the CAPE 2013 Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    May, Dianne W.; Kanmaz, Tina J.; Reidt, Shannon L.; Serres, Michelle L.; Edwards, Heather D.

    2016-01-01

    Outcomes from The Center for Advancement of Pharmacy Education (CAPE) are intended to represent the terminal knowledge, skills, and attitudes pharmacy students should possess and have guided delivery of pharmacy education for more than two decades. Advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs) are the endpoint of pharmacy curricula where demonstration and assessment of terminal learning occurs. This review examines published literature in relation to the most recent CAPE outcomes to determine the extent to which they have been addressed during APPEs since 1996. Details related to the APPE focus, intervention(s)/learning setting(s), and assessments are summarized according to the 15 CAPE outcomes. Further, the assessments are categorized according to the level of learning achieved using an available method. Common CAPE outcomes are highlighted, as well as those for which published reports are lacking for APPEs. The range and quality of assessments are discussed and emphasize the need for continuous improvement of scholarly design and assessment. PMID:27756935

  3. Current Practices in Global/International Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences: Home/Host Country or Site/Institution Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Dakkuri, Adnan; Abrons, Jeanine P.; Williams, Dennis; Ombengi, David N.; Zheng, HaiAn; Al-Dahir, Sara; Tofade, Toyin; Gim, Suzanna; O’Connell, Mary Beth; Ratka, Anna; Dornblaser, Emily

    2016-01-01

    International outreach by schools and colleges of pharmacy is increasing. In this paper, we provide current practice guidelines to establish and maintain successful global/international advanced pharmacy practice experiences (G/I APPEs) with specific recommendations for home/host country and host site/institution. The paper is based on a literature review (2000-2014) in databases and Internet searches with specific keywords or terms. Educational documents such as syllabi and memoranda of understanding (MoUs) from pharmacy programs were also examined. In addition, a preliminary draft was developed and the findings and recommendations were reviewed in a 90-minute roundtable discussion at the 2014 American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Annual Meeting. Recommendations for the host country include travel considerations (eg, passport, visa, air travel), safety, housing, transportation, travel alerts and warnings, health issues, and financial considerations. For the home country, considerations for establishment of G/I APPE site (eg, vetting process, MoU, site expectations) are described. The paper is a resource for development of new G/I APPEs and provides guidance for continuous quality improvement of partnerships focusing on G/I pharmacy education. PMID:27170809

  4. Current Practices in Global/International Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences: Home/Host Country or Site/Institution Considerations.

    PubMed

    Alsharif, Naser Z; Dakkuri, Adnan; Abrons, Jeanine P; Williams, Dennis; Ombengi, David N; Zheng, HaiAn; Al-Dahir, Sara; Tofade, Toyin; Gim, Suzanna; O'Connell, Mary Beth; Ratka, Anna; Dornblaser, Emily

    2016-04-25

    International outreach by schools and colleges of pharmacy is increasing. In this paper, we provide current practice guidelines to establish and maintain successful global/international advanced pharmacy practice experiences (G/I APPEs) with specific recommendations for home/host country and host site/institution. The paper is based on a literature review (2000-2014) in databases and Internet searches with specific keywords or terms. Educational documents such as syllabi and memoranda of understanding (MoUs) from pharmacy programs were also examined. In addition, a preliminary draft was developed and the findings and recommendations were reviewed in a 90-minute roundtable discussion at the 2014 American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Annual Meeting. Recommendations for the host country include travel considerations (eg, passport, visa, air travel), safety, housing, transportation, travel alerts and warnings, health issues, and financial considerations. For the home country, considerations for establishment of G/I APPE site (eg, vetting process, MoU, site expectations) are described. The paper is a resource for development of new G/I APPEs and provides guidance for continuous quality improvement of partnerships focusing on G/I pharmacy education.

  5. Pioneering a National Advanced Practice Leadership Council to Enhance Care Delivery in a Large 19-State Health System.

    PubMed

    Harms, Dixie; Ewen, Julianne Z; Metsker, Matt; Swanson, Jay; Oas, Kimberly H

    This article describes an innovative approach to enhancing the capacity of advanced practice clinicians (APCs) in a large faith-based health system consisting of multiple markets across the United States. With the challenges in health care today, promotion of advanced practice is vital to increasing quality and access to care while maintaining cost-effectiveness. The development of a national Advanced Practice Leadership Council led by the Vice President of Advanced Practice at Catholic Health Initiatives has been a progressive approach in mitigating the challenges facing APCs in today's health care arena. The success of the Council has led to its inclusion on the health system's national clinical governance structure. The authors discuss development of the Council along with specific information regarding various committee work, including APC state regulations, delineation of privileges, quality measures, and total compensation.

  6. Gaps in the supply of physicians, advance practice nurses, and physician assistants.

    PubMed

    Sargen, Michael; Hooker, Roderick S; Cooper, Richard A

    2011-06-01

    Based on the goals of health care reform, growth in the demand for health care will continue to increase the demand for physicians and, as physician shortages widen, advanced practice nurses (APNs) and physician assistants (PAs) will play larger roles. Together with physicians they constitute a workforce of "advanced clinicians." The objective of this study was to assess the capacity of this combined workforce to meet the future demand for clinical services. Projections were constructed to the year 2025 for the supply of physicians, APNs, and PAs, and these were compared with projections of the demand for advanced clinical services, based on federal estimates of future spending and historic relationships between spending and the health care labor force. If training programs for APNs and PAs grow as currently projected but physician residency programs are not further expanded, the aggregate per capita supply of advanced clinicians will remain close to its current level, which will be 20% less than the demand in 2025. Increasing the numbers of entry-level (PGY1) residents by 500 annually will narrow the gap, but it will remain >15%. The nation faces a substantial shortfall in its combined supply of physicians, APNs, and PAs, even under aggressive training scenarios, and deeper shortages if these scenarios are not achieved. Efforts must be made to expand the output of clinicians in all 3 disciplines, while also strengthening the infrastructure of clinical practice and facilitating the delegation of tasks to a broadened spectrum of caregivers in new models of care. Copyright © 2011 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Culture care theory: a major contribution to advance transcultural nursing knowledge and practices.

    PubMed

    Leininger, Madeleine

    2002-07-01

    This article is focused on the major features of the Culture Care Diversity and Universality theory as a central contributing theory to advance transcultural nursing knowledge and to use the findings in teaching, research, practice, and consultation. It remains one of the oldest, most holistic, and most comprehensive theories to generate knowledge of diverse and similar cultures worldwide. The theory has been a powerful means to discover largely unknown knowledge in nursing and the health fields. It provides a new mode to assure culturally competent, safe, and congruent transcultural nursing care. The purpose, goal, assumptive premises, ethnonursing research method, criteria, and some findings are highlighted.

  8. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide: Practical Ways to Improve Energy Performance; Grocery Stores (Revised) (Book)

    SciTech Connect

    Hendron, B.

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed the Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides (AERGs) to provide specific methodologies, information, and guidance to help energy managers and other stakeholders successfully plan and execute energy efficiency improvements. Detailed technical discussion is fairly limited in these guides. Instead, we emphasize actionable information, practical methodologies, diverse case studies, and unbiased evaluations of the most promising retrofit measures for each building type. A series of AERGs is under development, addressing key segments of the commercial building stock. Grocery stores were selected as one of the highest priority sectors, because they represent one of the most energy-intensive market segments.

  9. Advancing research and practice: the revised APA Division 30 definition of hypnosis.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Gary R; Barabasz, Arreed F; Council, James R; Spiegel, David

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the history, rationale, and guidelines for developing a new definition of hypnosis by the Society of Psychological Hypnosis, Division 30 of the American Psychological Association. The definition was developed with the aim of being concise, heuristic, and allowing for alternative theories of the mechanisms (to be determined in empirical scientific study). The definition of hypnosis is presented as well as definitions of the following related terms: hypnotic induction, hypnotizability, and hypnotherapy. The implications for advancing research and practice are discussed. The definitions are presented within the article.

  10. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide: Practical Ways to Improve Energy Performance, K-12 Schools (Book)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed the K-12 Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide to provide specific methodologies, information, and guidance to help energy managers and other stakeholders plan and execute energy efficiency improvements. We emphasize actionable information, practical methodologies, diverse case studies, and unbiased evaluation of the most promising retrofit measure for each building type. K-12 schools were selected as one of the highest priority building sectors, because schools affect the lives of most Americans. They also represent approximately 8% of the energy use and 10% of the floor area in commercial buildings.

  11. Advancing Research and Practice: The Revised APA Division 30 Definition of Hypnosis.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Gary R; Barabasz, Arreed F; Council, James R; Spiegel, David

    2015-04-01

    This article describes the history, rationale, and guidelines for developing a new definition of hypnosis by the Society of Psychological Hypnosis, Division 30 of the American Psychological Association. The definition was developed with the aim of being concise, being heuristic, and allowing for alternative theories of the mechanisms (to be determined in empirical scientific study). The definition of hypnosis is presented as well as definitions of the following related terms: hypnotic induction, hypnotizability, and hypnotherapy. The implications for advancing research and practice are discussed. The definitions are presented within the article.

  12. Three decades (1978-2008) of Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) practice revised and evidence revisited.

    PubMed

    Søreide, Kjetil

    2008-12-18

    The Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) Program was developed to teach doctors one safe, reliable method to assess and initially manage the trauma patient. The ATLS principles represents an organized approach for evaluation and management of seriously injured patients and offers a foundation of common knowledge for all members of the trauma team. After 3 decades of teaching (1978-2008) of ATLS worldwide one should intuitively perceive that the evidence for the effect of ATLS teaching on the improved management of the injured patient be well established. This editorial addresses aspects of trauma education with needs for further development of better evidence of best practice.

  13. Variables Affecting Pharmacy Students’ Patient Care Interventions during Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Brandon J.; Sen, Sanchita; Bingham, Angela L.; Bowen, Jane F.; Ereshefsky, Benjamin; Siemianowski, Laura A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To identify the temporal effect and factors associated with student pharmacist self-initiation of interventions during acute patient care advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPE). Methods. During the APPE, student pharmacists at an academic medical center recorded their therapeutic interventions and who initiated the intervention throughout clinical rotations. At the end of the APPE student pharmacists completed a demographic survey. Results. Sixty-two student pharmacists were included. Factors associated with lower rates of self-initiated interventions were infectious diseases and pediatrics APPEs and an intention to pursue a postgraduate residency. Timing of the APPE, previous specialty elective course completion, and previous hospital experience did not result in any significant difference in self-initiated recommendations. Conclusion. Preceptors should not base practice experience expectations for self-initiated interventions on previous student experience or future intentions. Additionally, factors leading to lower rates of self-initiated interventions on infectious diseases or pediatrics APPEs should be explored. PMID:27756924

  14. Variables Affecting Pharmacy Students' Patient Care Interventions during Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences.

    PubMed

    Bio, Laura L; Patterson, Brandon J; Sen, Sanchita; Bingham, Angela L; Bowen, Jane F; Ereshefsky, Benjamin; Siemianowski, Laura A

    2016-09-25

    Objective. To identify the temporal effect and factors associated with student pharmacist self-initiation of interventions during acute patient care advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPE). Methods. During the APPE, student pharmacists at an academic medical center recorded their therapeutic interventions and who initiated the intervention throughout clinical rotations. At the end of the APPE student pharmacists completed a demographic survey. Results. Sixty-two student pharmacists were included. Factors associated with lower rates of self-initiated interventions were infectious diseases and pediatrics APPEs and an intention to pursue a postgraduate residency. Timing of the APPE, previous specialty elective course completion, and previous hospital experience did not result in any significant difference in self-initiated recommendations. Conclusion. Preceptors should not base practice experience expectations for self-initiated interventions on previous student experience or future intentions. Additionally, factors leading to lower rates of self-initiated interventions on infectious diseases or pediatrics APPEs should be explored.

  15. WE-F-201-00: Practical Guidelines for Commissioning Advanced Brachytherapy Dose Calculation Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-15

    With the recent introduction of heterogeneity correction algorithms for brachytherapy, the AAPM community is still unclear on how to commission and implement these into clinical practice. The recently-published AAPM TG-186 report discusses important issues for clinical implementation of these algorithms. A charge of the AAPM-ESTRO-ABG Working Group on MBDCA in Brachytherapy (WGMBDCA) is the development of a set of well-defined test case plans, available as references in the software commissioning process to be performed by clinical end-users. In this practical medical physics course, specific examples on how to perform the commissioning process are presented, as well as descriptions of the clinical impact from recent literature reporting comparisons of TG-43 and heterogeneity-based dosimetry. Learning Objectives: Identify key clinical applications needing advanced dose calculation in brachytherapy. Review TG-186 and WGMBDCA guidelines, commission process, and dosimetry benchmarks. Evaluate clinical cases using commercially available systems and compare to TG-43 dosimetry.

  16. Chronic morbidities after traumatic brain injury: an update for the advanced practice nurse.

    PubMed

    Bay, Esther H; Chartier, Kattlynn S

    2014-06-01

    Emerging data suggest that traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a disease process with considerable long-range morbidities requiring lifelong monitoring and treatment. Multiple chronic morbidities develop across the life span after TBI, including mental health disorders, headaches, seizures, and neuroendocrine imbalances as well as chronic diseases. Still, there has been limited focus on effective guides and strategies for helping persons with TBI meet their chronic health needs as they live with the consequences of TBI. The advanced practice nurse is well positioned to participate collaboratively in practices that promote health screening and chronic disease management after TBI to ameliorate distress and enhance quality of life as persons with TBI live with lifelong consequences.

  17. Gerontology found me: gaining understanding of advanced practice nurses in geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Campbell-Detrixhe, Dia D; Grassley, Jane S; Zeigler, Vicki L

    2013-10-01

    Examining the meanings of the experiences of advanced practice nurses (APNs) who chose to work with older adults and why they continue to work with this population was the focus of this hermeneutic qualitative research study. Twelve geriatric APNs currently practicing in two South Central states were interviewed using an open-ended interview guide. Using Gadamerian hermeneutics, the researchers identified Gerontology Found Me as the significant expression that reflected the fundamental meaning of the experience as a whole. Four themes emerged that further described the meanings of the participants' personal, educational, and professional experiences: Becoming a Gerontology Nurse, Being a Gerontology Nurse, Belonging to Gerontology, and Bringing Others to Gerontology. This study concluded that APNs' personal and professional experiences were more influential than educational experiences to become geriatric nurses, and having these personal and professional experiences of being in relationship with older individuals further contributed to their choice of gerontology.

  18. Advancing the practice of online psychotherapy: An application of Rogers' diffusion of innovations theory.

    PubMed

    Lovejoy, Travis I; Demireva, Petya D; Grayson, Jessica L; McNamara, John R

    2009-03-01

    With the advancements of technology and its increasing use in all spheres of life, clinicians too are faced with the decision of whether to adopt or refrain from adopting certain innovations in their practice. This article discusses the process of adopting clinical innovations within a theoretical framework, namely diffusion of innovations theory (DIT; Rogers, 2003). DIT constructs are applied to the example of online therapy adoption into clinical practice. Nine adoption barriers are identified, including issues of dehumanizing the therapeutic environment, start-up cost and reimbursement, infrastructure and training, licensure and jurisdiction concerns, ethical guidelines, both client and clinician suitability factors, and professional reputation and acceptance within the field. The authors conclude with a theory-based discussion of activities that may help to accelerate the adoption of online therapy among professional psychologists. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Using focus groups to identify characteristics of an ideal work environment for Advanced Practice Clinicians.

    PubMed

    Motley, Robert J; Mazzaccaro, Richard J; Burmeister, David B; Land, Samuel D; Boulay, Richard M; Chung, Heiwon; Deitrick, Lynn; Sumner, Andrew D

    2016-09-01

    Advanced Practice Clinicians (APCs) in collaborative practice represent a diverse and valuable group of health care professionals, including nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurse anesthetists, and nurse midwives. Because these healthcare professionals have been identified as part of the solution to physician shortages, it is critical for health networks to examine and address issues affecting collaborative relationships. We invited our network APCs to participate in focus group sessions to determine both attributes and barriers to an ideal work environment. Four major themes emerged: (1) compensation, (2) network representation, (3) employment structure, and (4) workplace culture. While issues relating to compensation and representation were prevalent, discussions also revealed the importance of relationships and communication. To ensure successful collaboration and, thereby, reduce clinician turnover, leaders must address gaps between the existing and ideal states in structural factors affecting job satisfaction (Themes 1-3) as well as the behavioral factors represented in workplace culture (Theme 4). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A practical approach to nutritional support for patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Hill, D; Hart, K

    2001-07-01

    Palliative care can last from a few days to months and, in some cases, years. Consequently the nutritional needs of palliative care patients also vary, as does the extent to which nutrition intervention is pursued. Anorexia and cachexia are common side-effects of advanced cancer. They are characterized by physical depletion of the patients and an emotional drain on them, their families and carers. Pulling together the practical aspects of nutrition support and the emotional and social significance of food requires a skillful practitioner; an experienced dietitian can be a valued member of the palliative care team. This article examines the role of nutrition support in the palliative care setting, focusing upon practical advice including food modification, the use of oral supplements and enteral feeding.

  1. Processor register error correction management

    DOEpatents

    Bose, Pradip; Cher, Chen-Yong; Gupta, Meeta S.

    2016-12-27

    Processor register protection management is disclosed. In embodiments, a method of processor register protection management can include determining a sensitive logical register for executable code generated by a compiler, generating an error-correction table identifying the sensitive logical register, and storing the error-correction table in a memory accessible by a processor. The processor can be configured to generate a duplicate register of the sensitive logical register identified by the error-correction table.

  2. Quality of advance care planning policy and practice in residential aged care facilities in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Silvester, William; Fullam, Rachael S; Parslow, Ruth A; Lewis, Virginia J; Sjanta, Rebekah; Jackson, Lynne; White, Vanessa; Gilchrist, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To assess existing advance care planning (ACP) practices in residential aged care facilities (RACFs) in Victoria, Australia before a systematic intervention; to assess RACF staff experience, understanding of and attitudes towards ACP. Design Surveys of participating organisations concerning ACP-related policies and procedures, review of existing ACP-related documentation, and pre-intervention survey of RACF staff covering their role, experiences and attitudes towards ACP-related procedures. Setting 19 selected RACFs in Victoria. Participants 12 aged care organisations (representing 19 RACFs) who provided existing ACP-related documentation for review, 12 RACFs who completed an organisational survey and 45 staff (from 19 RACFs) who completed a pre-intervention survey of knowledge, attitudes and behaviour. Results Findings suggested that some ACP-related practices were already occurring in RACFs; however, these activities were inconsistent and variable in quality. Six of the 12 responding RACFs had written policies and procedures for ACP; however, none of the ACP-related documents submitted covered all information required to meet ACP best practice. Surveyed staff had limited experience of ACP, and discrepancies between self reported comfort, and levels of knowledge and confidence to undertake ACP-related activities, indicated a need for training and ongoing organisational support. Conclusions Surveyed organisations â policies and procedures related to ACP were limited and the quality of existing documentation was poor. RACF staff had relatively limited experience in developing advance care plans with facility residents, although attitudes were positive. A systematic approach to the implementation of ACP in residential aged care settings is required to ensure best practice is implemented and sustained. PMID:24644755

  3. Quality of advance care planning policy and practice in residential aged care facilities in Australia.

    PubMed

    Silvester, William; Fullam, Rachael S; Parslow, Ruth A; Lewis, Virginia J; Sjanta, Rebekah; Jackson, Lynne; White, Vanessa; Gilchrist, Jane

    2013-09-01

    To assess existing advance care planning (ACP) practices in residential aged care facilities (RACFs) in Victoria, Australia before a systematic intervention; to assess RACF staff experience, understanding of and attitudes towards ACP. Surveys of participating organisations concerning ACP-related policies and procedures, review of existing ACP-related documentation, and pre-intervention survey of RACF staff covering their role, experiences and attitudes towards ACP-related procedures. 19 selected RACFs in Victoria. 12 aged care organisations (representing 19 RACFs) who provided existing ACP-related documentation for review, 12 RACFs who completed an organisational survey and 45 staff (from 19 RACFs) who completed a pre-intervention survey of knowledge, attitudes and behaviour. Findings suggested that some ACP-related practices were already occurring in RACFs; however, these activities were inconsistent and variable in quality. Six of the 12 responding RACFs had written policies and procedures for ACP; however, none of the ACP-related documents submitted covered all information required to meet ACP best practice. Surveyed staff had limited experience of ACP, and discrepancies between self reported comfort, and levels of knowledge and confidence to undertake ACP-related activities, indicated a need for training and ongoing organisational support. Surveyed organisations â policies and procedures related to ACP were limited and the quality of existing documentation was poor. RACF staff had relatively limited experience in developing advance care plans with facility residents, although attitudes were positive. A systematic approach to the implementation of ACP in residential aged care settings is required to ensure best practice is implemented and sustained.

  4. Differences between clinical specialist and advanced practitioner clinical practice, leadership, and research roles, responsibilities, and perceived outcomes (the SCAPE study).

    PubMed

    Begley, Cecily; Elliott, Naomi; Lalor, Joan; Coyne, Imelda; Higgins, Agnes; Comiskey, Catherine M

    2013-06-01

    To report a study designed comparing the roles, responsibilities, and perceived outcomes of Clinical Nurse Specialists, Clinical Midwife Specialists, and Advanced Nurse Practitioners in Ireland. A clinical career pathway that encompasses progression from staff nurse or midwife through clinical specialist to advanced practitioner level was introduced in Ireland in 2000. Such roles are common internationally, but little evaluation has been conducted and few comparisons have been made between roles. A mixed-method case-study design was used. Following Research Ethics Committee Approval, data were collected in 2009-2010, using non-participant observation (92 hours) of 23 Clinical Specialists and Advanced Practitioners, interviews with 21 clinicians and 13 Directors of Nursing or Midwifery. A survey was completed by 154 service-users. A clear difference was seen between Clinical Specialist and Advanced Practitioners, with advanced practice roles providing improved service delivery, greater clinical and professional leadership, increased research, and a clear governance and accreditation structure. Clinical Midwife Specialists were rated at a similar level to Advanced Nurse Practitioners for certain aspects and rated more highly for 'continuity of care and carer'. Advanced Practitioners do give a higher level of care, particularly at a strategic level. Existing Clinical Specialists should therefore be encouraged to develop their skills and education to achieve advanced practice level and more specialist and advanced practice posts should be instituted. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Register file soft error recovery

    DOEpatents

    Fleischer, Bruce M.; Fox, Thomas W.; Wait, Charles D.; Muff, Adam J.; Watson, III, Alfred T.

    2013-10-15

    Register file soft error recovery including a system that includes a first register file and a second register file that mirrors the first register file. The system also includes an arithmetic pipeline for receiving data read from the first register file, and error detection circuitry to detect whether the data read from the first register file includes corrupted data. The system further includes error recovery circuitry to insert an error recovery instruction into the arithmetic pipeline in response to detecting the corrupted data. The inserted error recovery instruction replaces the corrupted data in the first register file with a copy of the data from the second register file.

  6. Research for the advancement of green chemistry practice: Studies in atmospheric and educational chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullipher, Steven Gene

    Green chemistry is a philosophy of chemistry that emphasizes a decreasing dependence on limited non-renewable resources and an increasing focus on preventing pollution byproducts of the chemical industry. In short, it is the discipline of chemistry practiced through the lens of environmental stewardship. In an effort to advance the practice of green chemistry, three studies will be described that have ramifications for the practice. The first study examines the atmospheric oxidation of a hydrofluorinated ether, a third-generation CFC replacement compound with primarily unknown atmospheric degradation products. Determination of these products has the potential to impact decisions on refrigerant usage in the future. The second study examines chemistry students' development of understanding benefits-costs-risks analysis when presented with two real-world scenarios: refrigerant choice and fuel choice. By studying how benefits-costs-risks thinking develops, curricular materials and instructional approaches can be designed to better foster the development of an ability that is both necessary for green chemists and important in daily decision-making for non-chemists. The final study uses eye tracking technology to examine students' abilities to interpret molecular properties from structural information in the context of global warming. Such abilities are fundamental if chemists are to appropriately assess risks and hazards of chemistry practice.

  7. Job satisfaction of advanced practice nurses in the Veterans Health Administration.

    PubMed

    Faris, Judith A; Douglas, Marilyn K; Maples, Deanna C; Berg, Laurie R; Thrailkill, Ann

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the level of job satisfaction and barriers to practice for advanced practice nurses (APNs) employed by the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). The Misener Nurse Practitioner Job Satisfaction Survey (MNPJSS) and an investigator-developed questionnaire were completed by a self-selected, convenience sample of 1,983 APNs who responded to an internal VHA email invitation (61% response rate) to participate in an anonymous on-line survey. Respondents reported being minimally satisfied with their job overall, most satisfied with their benefits and least satisfied with professional growth and intrapractice collegiality. They scored lower than their private sector peers for total job satisfaction and all subscales except benefits, as compared to samples of three smaller studies. Clinical nurse specialists reported greater job satisfaction then NPs. The most frequently cited barriers to practice were: too many non-APN tasks, lack of administrative support, and inadequate time to do research. Strategies for improving professional growth and intra-practice collegiality are needed. APNs' job satisfaction may be improved in these areas by mentoring of new APN graduates and administrative approval for participating in research. Additional administrative support is needed to decrease the amount of non-APN tasks and clerical duties.

  8. Empirical and pragmatic adequacy of grounded theory: Advancing nurse empowerment theory for nurses' practice.

    PubMed

    Udod, Sonia A; Racine, Louise

    2017-05-25

    To draw on the findings of a grounded theory study aimed at exploring how power is exercised in nurse-manager relationships in the hospital setting, this paper examines the empirical and pragmatic adequacy of grounded theory as a methodology to advance the concept of empowerment in the area of nursing leadership and management. The evidence on staff nurse empowerment has highlighted the magnitude of individual and organisational outcomes, but has not fully explicated the micro-level processes underlying how power is exercised, shared or created within the nurse-manager relationship. Although grounded theory is a widely adopted nursing research methodology, it remains less used in nursing leadership because of the dominance of quantitative approaches to research. Grounded theory methodology provides the empirical and pragmatic relevance to inform nursing practice and policy. Grounded theory is a relevant qualitative approach to use in leadership research as it provides a fine and detailed analysis of the process underlying complexity and bureaucracy. Discursive paper. A critical examination of the empirical and pragmatic relevance of grounded theory by (Corbin & Strauss, , ) as a method for analysing and solving problems in nurses' practice is provided. This paper provides evidence to support the empirical and pragmatic adequacy of grounded theory methodology. Although the application of the ontological, epistemological and methodological assumptions of grounded theory is challenging, this methodology is useful to address real-life problems in nursing practice by developing theoretical explanations of nurse empowerment, or lack thereof, in the workplace. Grounded theory represents a relevant methodology to inform nursing leadership research. Grounded theory is anchored in the reality of practice. The strength of grounded theory is to provide results that can be readily applied to clinical practice and policy as they arise from problems that affect practice and that

  9. Factors affecting incident reporting by registered nurses: the relationship of perceptions of the environment for reporting errors, knowledge of the nursing practice act, and demographics on intent to report errors.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, Terry; Etchegaray, Jason

    2007-12-01

    Patient safety has assumed an international focus. In the past, the focus on detecting and preventing errors was up to the individual clinician, often the registered nurse. With impetus from the Institute of Medicine and other national agencies, a shift to emphasis on systems and processes and near miss and error reporting has occurred. Information from caregiver reporting has taken on new importance. This study was conducted to explore nurses' willingness to report errors of varying degrees of severity and the factors that impacted that intent. Registered nurses were selected randomly from the Texas Board of Nurse Examiners' roster and surveyed regarding perceptions of the environment for reporting, perceptions of reasons for not reporting, knowledge of the nursing practice act, and demographic variables. A majority of nurses were willing to report all levels of errors. Primary position, reasons for not reporting, and years since initial licensure were predictors of intent to report incidents with no injury and those with minimal injury. All but four nurses (99%) indicated that they would report incidents resulting in moderate to severe injury or death.

  10. Hello! Are You Registered?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for Political/Legal Education, Sewell, NJ.

    Organizational procedures and appropriate forms for high school students to conduct a community survey of non-registered voters are provided. Duties for student coordinator, field staff, and clerical staff are described and a flow chart depicts the relationship of personnel to one another and to the community. Students are instructed to notify…

  11. INDUSTRIAL TRAINING RESEARCH REGISTER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Labour, London (England).

    IN THIS CLASSIFIED REGISTER OF CURRENT AND RECENTLY COMPLETED STUDIES OF INDUSTRIAL TRAINING IN GREAT BRITAIN, INDIVIDUAL PROJECTS ARE ARRANGED BY THE ITEM NUMBER JUDGED MOST IMPORTANT, AND THE NUMBERS OF OTHER RELEVANT INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH PROJECTS ARE INSERTED AT THE END OF EACH SECTION TO PROVIDE CROSS REFERENCES. DESCRIPTIONS INCLUDE THE TITLE…

  12. Hello! Are You Registered?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for Political/Legal Education, Sewell, NJ.

    Organizational procedures and appropriate forms for high school students to conduct a community survey of non-registered voters are provided. Duties for student coordinator, field staff, and clerical staff are described and a flow chart depicts the relationship of personnel to one another and to the community. Students are instructed to notify…

  13. Sequential advanced pharmacy practice experiences at one institution for students from three pharmacy schools.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Rebecca A; Wisneski, S Scott; Kaun, Megan A; Parteleno, Patricia; Williams, Jonathan; Goldman, Morton P

    2014-01-15

    The structure and implementation of an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) that was sequential in nature are described. In early 2008, the pharmacy department of the Cleveland Clinic began conversations with three partner pharmacy schools in the surrounding area to accommodate rotations for advanced practice experiences pharmacy students. The resulting sequential APPE (SAE) program is offered at each school for four or five months and incorporates a longitudinal student project component to be completed over the SAE's duration. Program coordination and scheduling are unique to this program, where rotations are set up outside of the typical rotation selection. Since 2009, 23 students have completed the program, and 10 are currently enrolled. The SAE program was implemented in 2009 and continues to provide a depth of experience for pharmacy students. Preceptors have reported that SAE students are more motivated, have goals that fit with the institution, and offer decreased orientation burden compared with traditional APPE students. Students report a maximum of 19 hours gained per month in decreased orientation time to the computer system and site, allowing them to focus more time on patient care. Over a five-month period, a student could gain 76 hours in clinical experience over the traditional APPE student due to the decreased orientation burden. SAEs at one institution have proven advantageous to preceptors, students, and the site. SAEs have provided enriching student rotations while increasing site efficiencies, allowing longitudinal projects, and enhancing the site's exposure to students as potential residency candidates.

  14. Reflections from Dutch advanced nursing practice students on psychiatric mental healthcare in the United States.

    PubMed

    Maas, Lillian Garcia; Ezeobele, Ifeoma Ezebuiro

    2014-12-01

    An international clinical learning experience is a unique opportunity to witness another nursing and healthcare system. The Master of Advanced Nursing Practice (MANP) program at Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences in the Netherlands, mandates an international experience. Semi-structured qualitative interviews, a focus group session and written reflections were used for data collection with 6 Dutch MANP nursing students who specialized in psychiatric mental healthcare. Five major themes were revealed from the data. The themes identified were as follows: (1) pride and passion for mental health profession (2) role diversity within psychiatric mental health nursing (3) nursing leadership at the organization level (4) comparable Westernized approaches to mental healthcare and (5) differences in access to care. Incorporating a mandatory international clinical experience is a beneficial tool to promote a global understanding of the unique advanced practice nursing student's academic and professional development. The international clinical learning experience is considered a highlight of the 2-year MANP program. The students are able to gain a new and broader vision of the APN role and a greater appreciation for the Dutch healthcare system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhancing presentation skills for the advanced practice nurse: strategies for success.

    PubMed

    Vollman, Kathleen M

    2005-01-01

    Professional speaking is a component of the professional practice role of the advanced practice nurse (APN). The skills to communicate effectively to one person or an audience of 100 provide the APN with the essential tools for implementing change, collaborating effectively, presenting information at professional meetings, or communicating the impact of clinical outcomes in the boardroom. Public speaking skills, a professional image, and improved communication can facilitate advancement along any career ladder. The greater your fear, the more self-confidence you will gain by stepping up to a challenge and conquering it. This article describes strategies for organizing and presenting your message in a clear and concise format. Techniques to manage the anxiety produced when attempting to articulate your thoughts is essential for effective communication. Skills for enhancing the delivery of your message through effective body language, professional image, voice modulation, and use of audiovisual aids are addressed. Creative techniques for fielding questions are key in promoting a dynamic closure and provide consistent reinforcement of the key message content.

  16. How Do General Practitioners Conceptualise Advance Care Planning in Their Practice? A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    De Vleminck, Aline; Pardon, Koen; Beernaert, Kim; Houttekier, Dirk; Vander Stichele, Robert; Deliens, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore how GPs conceptualise advance care planning (ACP), based on their experiences with ACP in their practice. Methods Five focus groups were held with 36 GPs. Discussions were analysed using a constant comparative method. Results Four overarching themes in the conceptualisations of ACP were discerned: (1) the organisation of professional care required to meet patients’ needs, (2) the process of preparing for death and discussing palliative care options, (3) the discussion of care goals and treatment decisions, (4) the completion of advance directives. Within these themes, ACP was both conceptualised in terms of content of ACP and/or in terms of tasks for the GP. A specific task that was mentioned throughout the discussion of the four different themes was (5) the task of actively initiating ACP by the GP versus passively waiting for patients’ initiation. Conclusions This study illustrates that GPs have varying conceptualisations of ACP, of which some are more limited to specific aspects of ACP. A shared conceptualisation and agreement on the purpose and goals of ACP is needed to ensure successful implementation, as well as a systematic integration of ACP in routine practice that could lead to a better uptake of all the important elements of ACP. PMID:27096846

  17. Provider Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Surrounding Conservative Management for Patients with Advanced CKD.

    PubMed

    Parvez, Sanah; Abdel-Kader, Khaled; Pankratz, V Shane; Song, Mi-Kyung; Unruh, Mark

    2016-05-06

    Despite the potential benefits of conservative management, providers rarely discuss it as a viable treatment option for patients with advanced CKD. This survey was to describe the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of nephrologists and primary care providers regarding conservative management for patients with advanced CKD in the United States. We developed a questionnaire on the basis of a literature review to include items assessing knowledge, attitudes, and self-reported practices of conservative management for patients with advanced CKD. Potential participants were identified using the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile. We then conducted a web-based survey between April and May of 2015. In total, 431 (67.6% nephrologists and 32.4% primary care providers) providers completed the survey for a crude response rate of 2.7%. The respondents were generally white, men, and in their 30s and 40s. Most primary care provider (83.5%) and nephrology (78.2%) respondents reported that they were likely to discuss conservative management with their older patients with advanced CKD. Self-reported number of patients managed conservatively was >11 patients for 30.6% of nephrologists and 49.2% of primary care providers. Nephrologists were more likely to endorse difficulty determining whether a patient with CKD would benefit from conservative management (52.8% versus 36.2% of primary care providers), whereas primary care providers were more likely to endorse limited information on effectiveness (49.6% versus 24.5% of nephrologists) and difficulty determining eligibility for conservative management (42.5% versus 14.3% of nephrologists). There were also significant differences in knowledge between the groups, with primary care providers reporting more uncertainty about relative survival rates with conservative management compared with different patient groups. Both nephrologists and primary care providers reported being comfortable with discussing conservative

  18. Consortium recommendations for advancing pharmacists' patient care services and collaborative practice agreements.

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    To develop consensus recommendations that provide principles and strategies for effectively implementing health care system changes, including an optimized role for pharmacists to engage in team-based, patient-centered care. An interdisciplinary group of stakeholders representing 12 states and 10 pharmacy practice settings. Consortium participants represented many areas of pharmacy, medicine, and nursing. The health care environment in the United States is undergoing unprecedented change, with myriad health care reform initiatives, mounting evidence for the positive contributions of pharmacists, and federal government interest in pharmacist-provided services from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Surgeon General. Many individuals and groups have asserted that pharmacists are a dramatically underused resource that could help improve outcomes within our health care delivery system, if properly engaged as essential members of the health care team. In January 2012, the American Pharmacists Association Foundation convened a roundtable consortium in Washington, DC, for dialogue on the role of pharmacists in patient care. The consortium participants' seven recommendations for advancing pharmacists' patient care services and collaborative practice agreements included (1) use of consistent terminology; (2) provider control over collaborative practice details; (3) infrastructure that embeds pharmacists' patient care services and collaborative practice agreements into care; (4) use of electronic health records and technology in patient care services; (5) relationships among the health care team that are strong, trusting, and mutually beneficial; (6) incentive alignments based on meaningful process and outcome measures; and (7) redesign of health professionals' practice acts, education curriculums, and operational policies. Pharmacists deliver many patient care services to sustain and improve health. In an era of

  19. Findings: Sector-Leading and Innovative Practice in Advancing Equality and Diversity. Report to HEFCE by the Equality Challenge Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Funding Council for England, 2017

    2017-01-01

    Following our "Call for evidence of sector-leading and innovative practice in advancing equality and diversity" (HEFCE Circular letter 16/2016), HEFCE commissioned the Equality Challenge Unit (ECU) to report back on the range of equality and diversity practice undertaken across the higher education sector. Of 120 submissions received,…

  20. Working with previously anonymous gamete donors and donor-conceived adults: recent practice experiences of running the DNA-based voluntary information exchange and contact register, UK DonorLink.

    PubMed

    Crawshaw, Marilyn; Gunter, Christine; Tidy, Christine; Atherton, Freda

    2013-03-01

    This article describes recent practice experiences with donor conceived adults, donors, non-donor-conceived adult children of donors using the voluntary DNA-based register, UK DonorLink. It highlights additional complexities faced when using DNA rather than paper records for searching, in particular from the risk of false positives, low chances of success and potential inclusion of biological parents' DNA. Professionals' experiences in supporting those being "linked" suggest challenges as well as rewards. Registration carries the potential to be therapeutic for donor-conceived adults and donors and to enhance their political awareness regardless of links being made. Registrants value both peer and professional support, providing the latter can respond flexibly and be delivered by staff experienced in intermediary work. Given that the majority of those affected by donor conception internationally come from anonymous donation systems, these findings are highly pertinent and argue the need for political and moral debate about such service provision.

  1. Factors influencing intentions to integrate tobacco education among advanced practice nursing faculty.

    PubMed

    Heath, Janie; Crowell, Nancy A

    2007-01-01

    We report on the findings of a national survey that examined factors that influence faculty's intentions to integrate tobacco education in their advanced practice nursing curricula. The addiction component of tobacco use is taking its toll on the health of 48 million smokers in the United States. Several national health authorities recommend and/or mandate that tobacco prevention and tobacco cessation be addressed at every point of entry in the health care delivery system. However, there is increasing evidence that health care providers may not be adequately prepared to meet national goals and/or standards. One hundred sixty-one advanced practice nursing faculty in the United States completed an 88-item survey regarding external factors (e.g., personal history of tobacco use, clinical practice, and current tobacco topics taught) and components of the Theory of Reasoned Action model (including perceived self-efficacy, behavioral beliefs, subjective norms, and control beliefs related to tobacco education). Descriptive statistics, chi(2) analysis, Pearson correlation, and linear regression were used to analyze the data. The findings revealed that sex (chi(2) = 7.949, P = .024), level of education (chi(2) = 26.853, P = .0005), years of academic teaching (chi(2) = 19.418, P = .013), and combined clinical and course responsibility (chi(2) = 10.430, P = .0236) were significant external (demographic) factors and that behavioral beliefs (attitude about tobacco education) demonstrated the strongest relationship with intention scores (r = 0.876, P < .0005). Overall, 62.7% of nurse practitioners reported high scores (>or=5, on a scale of 1-7) for intentions to integrate tobacco education, as compared with 37.5% of nurse midwives, 30.3% of clinical nurse specialists, and 8.7% of nurse anesthetists. This study adds to the growing body of evidence that nursing curricular gaps with tobacco education exist and that national efforts are needed to ensure that widespread changes occur

  2. Advanced practice physiotherapy in patients with musculoskeletal disorders: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Desmeules, François; Roy, Jean-Sébastien; MacDermid, Joy C; Champagne, François; Hinse, Odette; Woodhouse, Linda June

    2012-06-21

    The convergence of rising health care costs and physician shortages have made health care transformation a priority in many countries resulting in the emergence of new models of care that often involve the extension of the scope of practice for allied health professionals. Physiotherapists in advanced practice/extended scope roles have emerged as key providers in such new models, especially in settings providing services to patients with musculoskeletal disorders. However, evidence of the systematic evaluation of advance physiotherapy practice (APP) models of care is scarce. A systematic review was done to update the evaluation of physiotherapists in APP roles in the management of patients with musculoskeletal disorders. Structured literature search was conducted in 3 databases (Medline, Cinahl and Embase) for articles published between 1980 and 2011. Included studies needed to present original quantitative data that addressed the impact or the effect of APP care. A total of 16 studies met all inclusion criteria and were included. Pairs of raters used four structured quality appraisal methodological tools depending on design of studies to analyse included studies. Included studies varied in designs and objectives and could be categorized in four areas: diagnostic agreement or accuracy compared to medical providers, treatment effectiveness, economic efficiency or patient satisfaction. There was a wide range in the quality of studies (from 25% to 93%), with only 43% of papers reaching or exceeding a score of 70% on the methodological quality rating scales. Their findings are however consistent and suggest that APP care may be as (or more) beneficial than usual care by physicians for patients with musculoskeletal disorders, in terms of diagnostic accuracy, treatment effectiveness, use of healthcare resources, economic costs and patient satisfaction. The emerging evidence suggests that physiotherapists in APP roles provide equal or better usual care in comparison to

  3. A model to advance nursing science in trauma practice and injury outcomes research.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Therese S; Aitken, Leanne M

    2011-12-01

    This discussion paper reports development of a model to advance nursing science and practice in trauma care based on an analysis of the literature and expert opinion. The continuum of clinical care provided to trauma patients extends from the time of injury through to long-term recovery and final outcomes. Nurses bring a unique expertise to meet the complex physical and psychosocial needs of trauma patients and their families to influence outcomes across this entire continuum. Literature was obtained by searching CINAHL, PubMed and OvidMedline databases for 1990-2010. Search terms included trauma, nursing, scope of practice and role, with results restricted to those published in English. Manual searches of relevant journals and websites were undertaken. Core concepts in this trauma outcomes model include environment, person/family, structured care settings, long-term outcomes and nursing interventions. The relationships between each of these concepts extend across all phases of care. Intermediate outcomes are achieved in each phase of care and influence and have congruence with long-term outcomes. Implications for policy and practice.  This model is intended to provide a framework to assist trauma nurses and researchers to consider the injured person in the context of the social, economic, cultural and physical environment from which they come and the long-term goals that each person has during recovery. The entire model requires testing in research and assessment of its practical contribution to practice. Planning and integrating care across the trauma continuum and recognition of the role of the injured person's background, family and resources will lead to improved long-term outcomes. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: revised 2014 standards of practice and standards of professional performance for registered dietitian nutritionists (competent, proficient, and expert) in nutrition support.

    PubMed

    Brantley, Susan L; Russell, Mary K; Mogensen, Kris M; Wooley, Jennifer A; Bobo, Elizabeth; Chen, Yimin; Malone, Ainsley; Roberts, Susan; Romano, Michelle M; Taylor, Beth

    2014-12-01

    This 2014 revision of the Standards of Practice (SOP) and Standards of Professional Performance (SOPP) for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs) in Nutrition Support represents an update of the 2007 Standards composed by content experts of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The revision is based on the Revised 2012 SOP in Nutrition Care and SOPP for RDs, which incorporates the Nutrition Care Process and the following six domains of professionalism: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. These SOP and SOPP are designed to promote the provision of safe, effective, and efficient nutrition support services; facilitate evidence-based practice; and serve as a professional evaluation resource for RDNs who specialize in or wish to specialize in nutrition support therapy. These standards should be applied in all patient/client care settings in which RDNs in nutrition support provide care. These settings include, but are not limited to, acute care, ambulatory/outpatient care, and home and alternate site care. The standards highlight the value of the nutrition support RDN's roles in quality management, regulatory compliance, research, teaching, consulting, and writing for peer-reviewed professional publications. The standards assist the RDN in nutrition support to distinguish his or her level of practice (competent, proficient, or expert) and would guide the RDN in creating a personal development plan to achieve increasing levels of knowledge, skill, and ability in nutrition support practice. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Implementation of advanced practice nurse clinic for management of behavioral symptoms in dementia: a dyadic intervention (innovative practice).

    PubMed

    Barton, Cynthia; Merrilees, Jennifer; Ketelle, Robin; Wilkins, Sarah; Miller, Bruce

    2014-09-01

    Behavioral symptoms are common in all types of dementia and often result in significant caregiver stress and illness, institutionalization of the patient, and reduced quality of life for the patient and caregiver. Health care practitioners often lack the expertise or time to adequately assess behavioral symptoms or counsel caregivers about interventions. Our goal was to implement a specialty clinic managed by advanced practice nurses to assess and manage behavioral symptoms associated with dementia. The clinic evaluations consisted of an assessment of the patient by the Nurse Practitioner during the time that the family caregiver(s) was interviewed by the Clinical Nurse Specialist and focused on an assessment of the cognitive and functional abilities of the patient, identification of triggers for the problematic behaviors, and assessment of caregiver coping. We evaluated 66 dyads since implementation in February 2010. The patients were primarily female, Caucasian, 74.3 years of age with Alzheimer's disease. The majority of caregivers were spouses (n = 44) followed by adult children (n = 20) and then siblings (n = 2). Targeted interventions were developed and caregiver counseling, support, and education were an integral part of the consultation and included written information, video instruction, and internet resources. Evaluations indicated caregivers and referring providers found the appointment helpful in managing behavioral symptoms and caregiver stress. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  6. Health Care Reform and the Federal Transformation Initiatives: Capitalizing on the Potential of Advanced Practice Psychiatric Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Hanrahan, Nancy P.; Delaney, Kathleen; Merwin, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade the US federal government proposed a transformation vision of mental health service delivery; patient-centered, evidence-based and recovery oriented treatment models. Health care reform brings additional expectations for innovation in mental/substance use service delivery, particularly the idea of creating systems where physical health, mental health and substance use treatment is fully integrated. Psychiatric nurses, as one of the four core US mental health professions, have the potential to play a significant role in the both the transformation initiative and health care reform vision. However, psychiatric nurses, particularly advanced practice psychiatric nurses, are an untapped resource due in part to significant state regulatory barriers that limit their scope of practice in many states. The purpose of this paper is to document what is currently known about advanced practice psychiatric nurses and discuss policy implications for tapping into the strengths of this workforce. Strategies for facilitating utilization of advanced practice psychiatric nurses discussed. PMID:21233135

  7. Promoting direct patient care services at community pharmacies through advanced pharmacy practice experiences.

    PubMed

    Kassam, Rosemin; Kwong, Mona; Collins, John B

    2013-12-01

    To determine the relative benefits of three different models of advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) in successfully integrating the delivery of direct patient care into students' final year community pharmacy clerkships. All fourth-year pharmacy students at the University of British Columbia were divided into one of three study arms for their community APPE: a 2 × 4-week rotation in a traditional format, a 1 × 8-week rotation where their preceptors had experienced a 2-day education course and a 1 × 8-week rotation with both preceptor education plus a 5-day pre-APPE in-store orientation and peer debriefing. All 123 students conducted patient consultations and documented their care. Students in the pre-APPE + preceptor education arm provided nearly double the number of direct patient consultations than did students in the preceptor-education-only arm or the traditional 2 × 4-week arm. Numbers of drug-related problems identified and interventions performed per patient consult did not differ across study arms. Pre-APPE orientation activities provided an enhanced learning environment, promoted greater student engagement, provided care to more patients, increased preceptor preparedness and enhanced in-store patient-centred care practice. Certain of these learning activities can also form part of third- and fourth-year introductory pharmacy practice experiences to prepare students for their final-year APPE. © 2013 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  8. An Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience in Application of Evidence-Based Policy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jill T.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To determine the impact of an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) to develop skills needed to apply an evidence-based approach to population-level practice decisions. Design. A 4-week evidence-based medicine APPE was implemented that included active-learning techniques and online learning modules, participation in state drug-policy committee meetings, and completion of an evidence-based medicine review for a specific drug agent or class. Assessment. Students’ mean score on application of principles related to biostatistics and information mastery on posttests increased 15.8% from pretest to posttest. Students’ mean score on a 22-question information mastery quiz was 90.8%. Mean scores for course evaluation components ranged from 4.8 to 5.0 on a 5-point Likert scale. All respondents indicated they would recommend the APPE to other students. Conclusions. An APPE that incorporated content from active drug-policy committees increased students’ evidence-based medicine skills and enhanced their understanding of, appreciation for, and confidence in evidence-based practice. PMID:23049105

  9. Diagnosis and management of endometriosis: the role of the advanced practice nurse in primary care.

    PubMed

    Mao, Alexandra J; Anastasi, Joyce K

    2010-02-01

    To discuss the etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of endometriosis for the advanced practice nurse (APN) in primary care. Selected research, clinical studies, clinical practice guidelines, and review articles. Commonly encountered by the APN in primary care, endometriosis is a chronic, progressive inflammatory disease characterized by endometrial lesions, cysts, fibrosis, or adhesions in the pelvic cavity, causing chronic pelvic pain and infertility in women of reproductive age. Because of its frequently normal physical examination findings, variable clinical presentations, and nonspecific, overlapping symptoms with other conditions, endometriosis can be difficult to diagnose. As there currently are no accurate noninvasive diagnostic tests specific for endometriosis, it is imperative for the APN to become knowledgeable about the etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and current treatment options of this disease. The APN in primary care plays an essential role in health promotion through disease management and infertility prevention by providing support and much needed information to the patient with endometriosis. APNs can also facilitate quality of care and manage treatments effectively to improve quality of life, reduce pain, and prevent further progression of disease. Practice recommendations include timely diagnosis, pain management, infertility counseling, patient education, and support for quality of life issues.

  10. Innovative practice: exploring acculturation theory to advance rehabilitation from pediatric to adult "cultures" of care.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tram; Baptiste, Sue

    2015-01-01

    This perspective paper explores the application of acculturation and the inherent concepts and ideas associated with this theory in rehabilitation to provide a framework for interpreting patient circumstances, responses and behaviours as they move from one culture to the next. Traditionally acculturation theory has been use to examine changes in culture in an ethnic or country sense, however, this paper is among the first to apply acculturation theory to the rehabilitation service cultures from pediatric to adult care for youth with chronic health conditions. The objectives of this paper are threefold: (1) to critically appraise key literature in the development of acculturation theory, (2) to discuss how acculturation theory can be applied in rehabilitation practice through a clinical vignette, and finally (3) to discuss how acculturation theory can advance rehabilitation by enhancing client-centered practice. Acculturation theory can provide insight into how patients are experiencing a change in health care "cultures", in the context of their overarching life circumstances. This, coming from a broader societal perspective can in turn inform an optimal approach to client-centered practice, and the application of rehabilitation-specific team inputs. This theoretical framework can heighten practitioners' awareness of patients' unique worldviews related to their expectations for care and treatment thus reducing fear of diversity to establish positive partnerships between patients and clinicians. An understanding of patients' acculturation processes will add new insight into how we can best deliver services and supports to optimise health, opportunities and experiences for youth with chronic conditions.

  11. An American and Dutch partnership for psychiatric mental health advance nursing practice: nurturing a relationship across the ocean.

    PubMed

    Maas, Lillian; Ezeobele, I Ezebuiro; Tetteroo, Marieke

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the challenges and rewards of developing and nurturing an international clinical psychiatric mental health advanced nursing practice exchange between the Netherlands and the United States. Since 1997, Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences in the Netherlands has been participating in international clinical experiences for their psychiatric mental health (PMH) advanced practice nursing students. The international experience is mandatory prior to graduation and is the first of its kind in Europe to mandate such a unique experience. This study sample included eight Dutch PMH advanced practice nursing students enrolled in a full-time master's in advanced nursing practice program. The descriptive study included reflective reports and one-on-one discussions over a 3-year period. With proper planning, an international nursing experience provides a unique opportunity for nurses to think beyond their own culture and healthcare system. Solving problems together through different perspectives creates opportunities for creative solutions. International partnerships within PMH advanced practice nursing promotes sharing of knowledge and solutions as patients and diseases have no border. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Geographic Medical History: Advances in Geospatial Technology Present New Potentials in Medical Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faruque, F. S.; Finley, R. W.

    2016-06-01

    Genes, behaviour, and the environment are known to be the major risk factors for common diseases. When the patient visits a physician, typical questions include family history (genes) and lifestyle of the patient (behaviour), but questions concerning environmental risk factors often remain unasked. It is ironic that 25 centuries ago Hippocrates, known as the father of medicine, noted the importance of environmental exposure in medical investigation as documented in his classic work, "Airs, Waters, Places", yet the practice of routinely incorporating environmental risk factors is still not in place. Modern epigenetic studies have found that unhealthy lifestyle and environmental factors can cause changes to our genes that can increase disease risk factors. Therefore, attempting to solve the puzzle of diseases using heredity and lifestyle alone will be incomplete without accounting for the environmental exposures. The primary reason why environmental exposure has not yet been a routine part of the patient's medical history is mostly due to our inability to provide clinicians useful measures of environmental exposures suitable for their clinical practices. This presentation will discuss advances in geospatial technology that show the potential to catalyse a paradigm shift in medical practice and health research by allowing environmental risk factors to be documented as the patient's "Geographic Medical History". In order to accomplish this we need information on: a) relevant spatiotemporal environmental variables, and b) location of the individual in that person's dynamic environment. Common environmental agents that are known to interact with genetic make-up include air pollutants, mold spores, pesticides, etc. Until recently, the other component, location of an individual was limited to a static representation such as residential or workplace location. Now, with the development of mobile technology, changes in an individual's location can be tracked in real time if

  13. Tracking Patient Encounters and Clinical Skills to Determine Competency in Ambulatory Care Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Chrystian R.; Harris, Ila M.; Moon, Jean Y.; Westberg, Sarah M.; Kolar, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine if the amount of exposure to patient encounters and clinical skills correlates to student clinical competency on ambulatory care advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs). Design. Students in ambulatory care APPEs tracked the number of patients encountered by medical condition and the number of patient care skills performed. At the end of the APPE, preceptors evaluated students’ competency for each medical condition and skill, referencing the Dreyfus model for skill acquisition. Assessment. Data was collected from September 2012 through August 2014. Forty-six responses from a student tracking tool were matched to preceptor ratings. Students rated as competent saw more patients and performed more skills overall. Preceptors noted minimal impact on workload. Conclusions. Increased exposure to patient encounters and skills performed had a positive association with higher Dreyfus stage, which may represent a starting point in the conversation for more thoughtful design of ambulatory care APPEs. PMID:26941440

  14. Advancing universal coverage of healthcare in China: translating political will into policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shenglan; Brixi, Hana; Bekedam, Henk

    2014-01-01

    China launched its new health system reform plan in 2009 to advance its universal coverage of healthcare, after more than 4 years' consultations and discussions with various stakeholders including the public. This paper aims to introduce and discuss the context and process of China's current health system reform and analyse how political will in China has been translated into policy practice over the past decade. The paper also shares the insights of World Health Organization's contribution to China's health system reform, as the authors advised the Chinese government on the reform options and process. Furthermore, the paper describes and discusses key challenges in the implementation of the reform plan over the past 3 years and draws lessons for other countries. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. [Towards universal access to health care: incorporation of advanced practice nurses in primary care].

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Boza, Francisca; Achondo, Bernardita

    2016-10-01

    To move towards universal access to health, the Pan American Health Organization recommends strengthening primary health care (PHC). One of the strategies is to increase the number qualified professionals, both medical and non-medical, working in PHC. In Chile there is a lack of professionals in this level of care, hampering the provision of health. Physicians still prefer secondary and tertiary levels of health. International experience has shown that advanced practice nurses (APN), specialists in PHC are cost-effective professionals able to deliver a complete and quality care to patients. Strong evidence demonstrates the benefits that APN could provide to the population, delivering nursing care that incorporates medical tasks, for example in patients with chronic diseases, allowing greater availability of medical hours for patients requiring more complex management. The success in the implementation of this new role requires the support of the health team, especially PHC physicians, endorsing and promoting the benefits of the APN for the population.

  16. Factors Associated With Reflection Among Students After an Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Lindblad, Åsa Kettis; Gustavsson, Maria; Ring, Lena

    2009-01-01

    Objective To identify individual and social factors associated with pharmacy students' level of reflection in an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE). Methods A postal questionnaire, including a reflective assignment, was sent to all pharmacy interns (n=262) at Uppsala University, Sweden, for 4 semesters in 2005-2007. Results In a univariate analysis, 7 factors were found to be associated with students' level of reflection. After controlling for covariates, 3 social factors were found to be independently associated with reflection: having a formal preceptor (OR=5.3), being at a small pharmacy (OR=19.8), and students' perception of the importance of discussing critical thinking with the preceptor (OR=1.2). No correlation could be observed between level of reflection and critical thinking, nor learning style. Conclusion Social components seem to be of higher importance than individual components in students' reflective levels after pharmacy internship experience. Trained preceptors are important to foster reflection skills. PMID:19885076

  17. An Enhanced Community Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience Model to Improve Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Mona

    2009-01-01

    Objective To quantify the benefits of an enhanced advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) community pharmacy model compared to the traditional program by comparing basic and comprehensive pharmaceutical care provided by students and assessing preceptors’ perceptions of the APPE. Methods A pilot study consisting of 1 enhanced APPE arm and 2 traditional APPE (control) arms was conducted. The enhanced APPE consisted of a preceptor education program, a 5-day onsite student orientation, and an 8-week experience completed at 1 rather than 2 community sites. Results The level of interventions provided by students in the enhanced APPE arm significantly surpassed that of students in the control arms. In addition, preceptor questionnaires indicated overwhelming support for the enhanced model over the traditional APPE. Conclusions The study's findings demonstrated that the enhanced APPE model enabled the participating pharmacies to provide increased level of patient care (as compared to the control sites) and improved preceptor satisfaction with the APPE. PMID:19513163

  18. Advanced practice psychiatric mental health nursing, finding our core: the therapeutic relationship in 21st century.

    PubMed

    Perraud, Suzanne; Delaney, Kathleen R; Carlson-Sabelli, Linnea; Johnson, Mary E; Shephard, Rebekah; Paun, Olimpia

    2006-11-01

    Increasingly, students from various professional backgrounds are enrolling in Psychiatric Mental Health (PMH) Nursing graduate programs, especially at the post-master's level. Faculty must educate these students to provide increasingly complex care while socializing them as PMH advanced practitioners. To present how one online program is addressing these issues by reasserting the centrality of the relationship and by assuring it has at least equal footing with the application of a burgeoning knowledge base of neurobiology of mental illness. Published literature from nursing and psychology. The PMH graduate faculty believes that they have developed strategies to meet this challenge and to help build a PMH workforce that will maintain the centrality of the relationship in PMH practice.

  19. Factors associated with reflection among students after an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Wallman, Andy; Lindblad, Asa Kettis; Gustavsson, Maria; Ring, Lena

    2009-10-01

    To identify individual and social factors associated with pharmacy students' level of reflection in an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE). A postal questionnaire, including a reflective assignment, was sent to all pharmacy interns (n=262) at Uppsala University, Sweden, for 4 semesters in 2005-2007. In a univariate analysis, 7 factors were found to be associated with students' level of reflection. After controlling for covariates, 3 social factors were found to be independently associated with reflection: having a formal preceptor (OR=5.3), being at a small pharmacy (OR=19.8), and students' perception of the importance of discussing critical thinking with the preceptor (OR=1.2). No correlation could be observed between level of reflection and critical thinking, nor learning style. Social components seem to be of higher importance than individual components in students' reflective levels after pharmacy internship experience. Trained preceptors are important to foster reflection skills.

  20. Role of the advanced practice physiotherapist in decreasing surgical wait times.

    PubMed

    Aiken, Alice B; Harrison, Mark M; Hope, John

    2009-01-01

    The role of the advanced practice physiotherapist (APP) in outpatient orthopedic clinics has been present in Ontario for over five years. These professionals have additional duties beyond those of a regular physiotherapist in order to screen patients pre- and post-operatively, triage patients for surgery, prescribe conservative management and monitor patients on an ongoing basis. The purpose of this role is to improve patient access to timely surgical care by reducing wait times for hip and knee replacement surgeries. Several positive outcomes have been reported in the literature. It has been established that an APP can effectively manage over 30% of the patients referred to a surgeon for hip or knee replacement surgery because these patients do not require surgery; rather, they require conservative management.