Science.gov

Sample records for advanced pressurized fluid-bed

  1. METAL FILTERS FOR PRESSURIZED FLUID BED COMBUSTION (PFBC) APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Alvin

    2004-01-02

    Advanced coal and biomass-based gas turbine power generation technologies (IGCC, PFBC, PCFBC, and Hipps) are currently under development and demonstration. Efforts at the Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) have been focused on the development and demonstration of hot gas filter systems as an enabling technology for power generation. As part of the demonstration effort, SWPC has been actively involved in the development of advanced filter materials and component configuration, has participated in numerous surveillance programs characterizing the material properties and microstructure of field-tested filter elements, and has undertaken extended, accelerated filter life testing programs. This report reviews SWPC's material and component assessment efforts, identifying the performance, stability, and life of porous commercial metal, advanced alloy, and intermetallic filters under simulated, pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) conditions.

  2. Effluent characterization from a conical pressurized fluid bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priem, R. J.; Rollbuhler, R. J.; Patch, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    To obtain useable corrosion and erosion results it was necessary to have data with several levels of particulate matter in the hot gases. One level of particulate loading was as low as possible so that ideally no erosion and only corrosion occurred. A conical fluidized bed was used to obtain some degree of filtration through the top of the bed which would not be highly fluidized. This would minimize the filtration required for the hot gases or conversely the amount of particulate matter in the hot gases after a given level of filtration by cyclones and/or filters. The data obtained during testing characterized the effluent from the bed at different test conditions. A range of bed heights, coal flows, air flows, limestone flows, and pressure are represented. These tests were made to determine the best operating conditions prior to using the bed to determine erosion and corrosion rates of typical turbine blade materials.

  3. Test plan for valveless ash removal from pressurized fluid bed combustion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hauserman, W.B.

    1989-07-01

    This is a test plan to demonstrate a method of ash removal from pressurized fluid bed combustion (PFBC) systems through small beds of crushed rock rather than conventional pressure let-down valves and lock hoppers. The economic advantage of such a method is that process-inherent erosive damage will be inflicted upon the cheaply replaceable crushed rock, rather than upon expensive, fabricated valve trim components. The concept to be tested is an extension of the gravel bucket'' principle in which an erosive, high pressure slurry stream passes through a bed of crushed rock with an adjustable flow path and cross-section. The original gravel bucket concept was inspired by the costly valve erosion problems projected for coal liquefaction plants. This project extends the same approach to systems where solids are to be removed from PFBC systems, with more limited possibilities of application to some coal gasification processes. If proven successful, a hot-gas gravel bucket could offer an economic alternative to a lock hopper plus a pair of expensive block valves. 6 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Alumina calcination with the advanced circulating fluid bed technology: A design with increased efficiency combined with operating flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, H.W.; Stockhausen, W.; Silberberg, A.N.

    1996-10-01

    The Circulating Fluid Bed (CFB) technology has now been applied to alumina calcination for a quarter of a century. The combined capacity of the 32 units installed is greater than 10 million metric tons per year. The paper highlights the consistency of the product quality which is based upon the operating experience of the last decade and improvements to the calcination system which also provides lower heat consumption. The principal modifications are incorporated in the preheating and cooling sections of the plant. These design modifications have also reduced capital cost. Overall the plant retains its proven features of high flexibility, unique temperature control, high availability, reliable performance, and low maintenance cost. The design is applicable to single train units up to a capacity of 3,000 MTPD (alumina).

  5. Fluid bed material transfer method

    DOEpatents

    Pinske, Jr., Edward E.

    1994-01-01

    A fluidized bed apparatus comprising a pair of separated fluid bed enclosures, each enclosing a fluid bed carried on an air distributor plate supplied with fluidizing air from below the plate. At least one equalizing duct extending through sidewalls of both fluid bed enclosures and flexibly engaged therewith to communicate the fluid beds with each other. The equalizing duct being surrounded by insulation which is in turn encased by an outer duct having expansion means and being fixed between the sidewalls of the fluid bed enclosures.

  6. Preliminary evaluation of coal-fired fluid bed combustion-augmented compressed air energy storage power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessard, R. D.; Giramonti, A. J.; Merrick, D.

    1980-03-01

    This paper presents highlights of an ongoing study program to assess the technical and economic feasibility of advanced concepts for generating peak-load electric power from a compressed air energy storage (CAES) power plant incorporating a coal-fired fluid bed combustor (FBC). It reviews the analyses performed to select an FBC/CAES power plant system configuration for the subsequent conceptual design phase of the study. Included in this review are: the design and operating considerations involved with integrating either an atmospheric or a pressurized fluid bed combustor with a CAES system to yield practical system configurations; the integration of system configurations; the parametric performance of these system configurations; and the preliminary screening which considered performance, cost, and technical risk and led to the identification of an open-bed PFBC/CAES system as having the greatest near-term commercialization potential.

  7. Circulating fluid bed technology within Combustion Engineering Inc.

    SciTech Connect

    Treff, P.J.; Maitland, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    As the worldwide trend for more flexible, cost-effective CFB technology continues as an alternative to pulverized coal and combined cycle steam generation, Combustion Engineering Inc. has drawn on original scientific work and the operating history of numerous BFBs and CFBs worldwide as reported in publicly available literature to introduce many product enhancements for its next generation of circulating fluid bed boilers. The issues of in-furnace surface versus external fluid bed heat exchanger applicability, cyclone and loop seal design, refractory system design and operating requirements, and the suitability of regenerative air heaters for CFB applications will be among the topics discussed in this paper as Combustion Engineering Inc. answers the challenge to continuously advance CFB steam generation.

  8. Fluid bed solids heater. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Preuit, L. C.

    1980-01-01

    A solids heater which operates at up to 2000 F was designed, fabricated, installed and operated through checkout at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center at Morgantown, West Virginia. The system, designated the 2000 F Fluid Bed Solids Heater (FBSH) uses a fluidized bed to heat limestone to 600 F and aluminium oxide or silicon carbide to 2000 F and discharges heated solids upon demand. The FBSH with added valve handling and pressurization equipment is known as the Valve Hot Solids Test Unit and is intended for use by the US Department of Energy for testing of valves for severe service applications in coal conversion and utilization processes. The FBSH as designed and supplied by Combustion Power Company includes process equipment, controls, the enclosing building and other associated equipment. In the 600 F range of operation it can circulate limestone through two valve test trains simultaneously on a continuous basis. Only one valve test train is used for 2000 F solids and operation in that range is also continuous. Limestone, crushed to minus 5/16 size, is heated, discharged, and recycled at a maximum average rate of 250 lb/min while aluminum oxide or silicon carbide, No. 8 grit, is circulated at rates up to 167 lb/min. The FBSH control system is designed for automatic operation, and capability is included for external computerized data acquisition and/or supervisory control. An operating and maintenance manual and as-built drawings have been submitted. This report describes the FBSH equipment, its design basis, and its operation. It has been prepared and submitted in fulfillment of Contract Number DIAC05-77ET10499.

  9. An alternative circulating fluid bed bottom ash removal system

    SciTech Connect

    Barsin, J.A.; Carrea, A.

    1999-07-01

    Circulating fluid beds pose two challenges for the removal of spent or unreacted calcined limestone and coal ash from the bottom of the bed. The furnace operates under a positive pressure and thus a seal must be maintained between the ambient and the furnace and secondly the bottom ash is discharged at about 1600 F and must be cooled down before transported into a storage silo. In the higher bottom ash-loaded units (firing lignite or anthracite culm) this cooling represents a significant portion of the latent heat lost to the stream generator, thus affecting the overall heat rate. Also the material is abrasive traditionally which has had a negative effect upon the removal system life and maintenance costs. Now there is an alternative to the existing present water screw or auxiliary bed cooler systems applied in the past. This presentation reviews the successful application of a dry bottom ash removal system to pulverized coal (PC) fired units, the experimental and commercial scale developmental work to determine if that PC concept is applicable to Circulating Fluid Bed Units, and projected savings that might be realized if heat recovery, carbon recovery, reduction in parasitic power and maintenance costs all could be improved. The power generation industry typically demands at minimum a commercial demonstration of new technology prior to application and therefore a host site for dry bottom ash removal technology is sought.

  10. An alternative circulating fluid bed bottom ash removal system

    SciTech Connect

    Barsin, J.A.; Carrea, A.

    1999-11-01

    Circulating fluid beds pose two challenges for the removal of spent or unreacted calcined limestone and coal ash from the bottom of the bed. The furnace operates under a positive pressure and thus a seal must be maintained between the ambient and the furnace and secondly the bottom ash is discharged at about 1600 F and must be cooled down before transported into a storage silo. In the higher bottom ash-loaded units (firing lignite or anthracite culm) this cooling represents a significant portion of the latent heat lost to the steam generator, thus affecting the overall heat rate. Also the material is abrasive traditionally which has had a negative effect upon the removal system life and maintenance costs. Now there is an alternative to the existing present water screw or auxiliary bed cooler systems applied in the past. This presentation reviews the successful application of a dry bottom ash removal system to pulverized coal (PC) fired units, the experimental and commercial scale developmental work to determine if that PC concept is applicable to Circulating Fluid Bed Units, and projected savings that might be realized if heat recovery, carbon recovery, reduction in parasitic power and maintenance costs all could be improved. The power generation industry typically demands at minimum a commercial demonstration of new technology prior to application and therefore a host site for dry bottom ash removal technology is sought.

  11. Analysis and control of the METC fluid bed gasifier. Quarterly report, April 1995--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This document summarizes work performed for the period 4/1/95 to 7/31/95 on contract no. DE-FG21-94MC31384 (Work accomplished during the period 10/1/94 to 3/31/94 was summarized in the previous technical progress report included in the appendix of this report). In this work, three components will form the basis for design of a control scheme for the Fluidized Bed Gasifier (FBG) at METC: (1) a control systems analysis based on simple linear models derived from process data, (2) review of the literature on fluid bed gasifier operation and control, and (3) understanding of present FBG operation and real world considerations. Tasks accomplished during the present reporting period include: (1) Completion of a literature survey on Fluid Bed Gasifier control, (2) Observation of the FBG during the week of July 17 to July 21, and (3) Suggested improvements to the control of FBG backpressure and MGCR pressure.

  12. Bed inventory overturn in a circulating fluid bed riser with pant-leg structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jinjing Li; Wei Wang; Hairui Yang; Junfu Lv; Guangxi Yue

    2009-05-15

    The special phenomenon, nominated as bed inventory overturn, in circulating fluid bed (CFB) riser with pant-leg structure was studied with model calculation and experimental work. A compounded pressure drop mathematic model was developed and validated with the experimental data in a cold experimental test rig. The model calculation results agree well with the measured data. In addition, the intensity of bed inventory overturn is directly proportional to the fluidizing velocity and is inversely proportional to the branch point height. The results in the present study provide significant information for the design and operation of a CFB boiler with pant-leg structure. 15 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Nitrate destruction in an elutriated fluid-bed calciner

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, R.G.; Cash, R.J.; Owen, T.J.; Shook, G.E.

    1987-09-01

    Nitrate destruction was demonstrated using an elutriated fluid-bed calciner process developed for nuclear fuel mixed-oxide conversion. Testing was directed to treatment of sodium nitrate, a major waste component at the Hanford Site. One test was also performed with copper nitrate. All tests produced low concentrations of NO/sub x/ in the offgas. The chemistry developed for uranium and plutonium nitrate appears to apply to other metal nitrates. The copper nitrate test was successful, with over 90% of the nitrate converted to elemental nitrogen and water and with recovery of a granular, free-flowing copper product. Tests with sodium nitrate were not successful due to fusion of sodium carbonate in the calciner bed and plugging of the calciner. Further development of the elutriated fluid-bed system would be required to process high sodium nitrate waste solutions.

  14. Evaluation of fluid bed heat exchanger optimization parameters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    Uncertainty in the relationship of specific bed material properties to gas-side heat transfer in fluidized beds has inhibited the search for optimum bed materials and has led to over-conservative assumptions in the design of fluid bed heat exchangers. An experimental program was carried out to isolate the effects of particle density, thermal conductivity, and heat capacitance upon fluid bed heat transfer. A total of 31 tests were run with 18 different bed material loads on 12 material types; particle size variations were tested on several material types. The conceptual design of a fluidized bed evaporator unit was completed for a diesel exhaust heat recovery system. The evaporator heat transfer surface area was substantially reduced while the physical dimensions of the unit increased. Despite the overall increase in unit size, the overall cost was reduced. A study of relative economics associated with bed material selection was conducted. For the fluidized bed evaporator, it was found that zircon sand was the best choice among materials tested in this program, and that the selection of bed material substantially influences the overall system costs. The optimized fluid bed heat exchanger has an estimated cost 19% below a fin augmented tubular heat exchanger; 31% below a commercial design fluid bed heat exchanger; and 50% below a conventional plain tube heat exchanger. The comparisons being made for a 9.6 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/h waste heat boiler. The fluidized bed approach potentially has other advantages such as resistance to fouling. It is recommended that a study be conducted to develop a systematic selection of bed materials for fluidized bed heat exchanger applications, based upon findings of the study reported herein.

  15. Partitioning of sodium, chlorine and sulfur during coal and char combustion in a fluid bed

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, S.P.; He, Y.

    1998-12-31

    Advanced power generation technologies (IGCC, Advanced PFBC) using high moisture low-rank coals require gasification of coal followed by combustion of char in a fluid bed. A study was undertaken to investigate the bed behaviour of char during combustion in a fluid bed. Three high moisture Australian low-rank coals, which are currently used in Victorian power stations, were chosen for this study. These were air dried, ground and sieved to 1--4 mm size. Char was prepared from these coals by devolatilising in a 76-mm diameter spouted bed at 700 C in presence of nitrogen. Char samples were combusted in the same spouted bed under hydrodynamic conditions similar to that in an atmospheric circulating fluid bed at temperatures of 800 C and 900 C. The three coal samples were also combusted under similar conditions to compare with the combustion behaviour of the char. No significant agglomeration problems were observed during combustion of these coals for periods of up to four hours. For one char, the bed defluidized 70 minutes after combustion at 900 C, while the two remaining chars didn`t present any significant agglomeration during the test period of four hours. Ultimate and inorganic analyses were carried out for the coal and char samples before the tests. The bed materials and cyclone ash after each combustion test were analyzed for inorganics and phases using chemical analysis, XRD and DTA techniques. A significant separation of the sodium and chlorine in coal was observed during pyrolysis of the coal to char. During combustion of char, most of the sodium (in char) was captured in the bed materials. This information was used to explain the bed behaviour observed during char combustion. This paper discusses the results and suggest strategies for mitigation of defluidization, that are currently under trial.

  16. Granule size control and targeting in pulsed spray fluid bed granulation.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Henrik; Liu, Anchang; Räikkönen, Heikki; Hatara, Juha; Antikainen, Osmo; Airaksinen, Sari; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Lou, Honxiang; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2009-07-30

    The primary aim of the study was to investigate the effects of pulsed liquid feed on granule size. The secondary aim was to increase knowledge of this technique in granule size targeting. Pulsed liquid feed refers to the pump changing between on- and off-positions in sequences, called duty cycles. One duty cycle consists of one on- and off-period. The study was performed with a laboratory-scale top-spray fluid bed granulator with duty cycle length and atomization pressure as studied variables. The liquid feed rate, amount and inlet air temperature were constant. The granules were small, indicating that the powder has only undergone ordered mixing, nucleation and early growth. The effect of atomizing pressure on granule size depends on inlet air relative humidity, with premature binder evaporation as a reason. The duty cycle length was of critical importance to the end product attributes, by defining the extent of intermittent drying and rewetting. By varying only the duty cycle length, it was possible to control granule nucleation and growth, with a wider granule size target range in increased relative humidity. The present study confirms that pulsed liquid feed in fluid bed granulation is a useful tool in end product particle size targeting.

  17. Particle size, moisture, and fluidization variations described by indirect in-line physical measurements of fluid bed granulation.

    PubMed

    Lipsanen, Tanja; Närvänen, Tero; Räikkönen, Heikki; Antikainen, Osmo; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate an instrumentation system for a bench scale fluid bed granulator to determine the parameters expressing the changing conditions during the spraying phase of a fluid bed process. The study focused mainly on four in-line measurements (dependent variables): fluidization parameter (calculated by inlet air flow rate and rotor speed), pressure difference over the upper filters, pressure difference over the granules (lower filter), and temperature of the fluidizing mass. In-line particle size measured by the spatial filtering technique was an essential predictor variable. Other physical process measurements of the automated granulation system, 25 direct and 12 derived parameters, were also utilized for multivariate modeling. The correlation and partial least squares analyses revealed significant relationships between various process parameters highlighting the particle size, moisture, and fluidization effect. Fluidization parameter and pressure difference over upper filters were found to correlate with in-line particle size and therefore could be used as estimates of particle size during granulation. The pressure difference over the granules and the temperature of the fluidizing mass expressed the moisture conditions of wet granulation. The instrumentation system evaluated here is an invaluable aid to gaining more control for fluid bed processing to obtain repeatable granules for further processing.

  18. Six years of ABB-CE, petcoke and fluid beds

    SciTech Connect

    Tanca, M.

    1994-12-31

    Combustion Engineering, Inc. (ABB-CE) has constructed twenty circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers and 2 bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) boilers throughout North America. The units were designed to fire a wide range of fuels from anthracite culm to coals, lignites and biomasses. Based on fuels economics, some plants have decided to use petroleum coke as a replacement or supplemental fuel. The fluid bed boiler can inherently handle a wide range of fuel types without requiring modification or down-rating. ABB-CE units have a significant amount of petroleum coke operating experience firing 100% petroleum coke with no supplemental fuel ranging from the first commercial CFB unit at New Brunswick Power to the largest CFB unit at Texas New Mexico Power. Petroleum coke is also being co-fired with anthracite culm at the Scott Paper CFB. The world`s largest operating BFB, the 160 MWe unit at TVA`s Shawnee plant, has also been co-firing petroleum coke. The ability of the fluidized bed technology to fire low volatile fuels such as petroleum cokes, efficiently and in an environmentally acceptable manner will result in the use of this technology as a preferred means of power generation. This report gives a brief description of the petroleum coke firing experiences with ABB-CE fluid bed steam generators over the last six years.

  19. Development of controlled release captopril granules coated with ethylcellulose and methylcellulose by fluid bed dryer.

    PubMed

    Stulzer, Hellen Karine; Silva, Marcos Antonio Segatto; Fernandes, Daniel; Assreuy, Jamil

    2008-01-01

    Captopril granules of controlled release with different polymers as ethylcellulose, ethyl/methylcellulose, and immediate release with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) were developed by fluid bed dryer technique. The formulations were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, and dissolution profiles. To compare the formulations an in vivo setting rat blood pressure assay was performed, using angiotensin I as a vasoconstrictor agent. The scanning electron microscopy of granules showed differences in morphology, and X-ray powder diffraction technique presented some modification in crystalline structure of captopril in granules coated with PVP and ethyl/methylcellulose. The dissolution profile of granules coated with ethylcellulose showed a median time release of 4 hr whereas for granules coated with ethyl/methylcellulose, this time was 3.5 hr. The blockage of angiotensin I-induced hypertensive effect lasted 8 hr in granules coated with PVP and of more than 12 hr in the granules coated with ethylcellulose and ethyl/methylcellulose.

  20. Design Space Approach in Optimization of Fluid Bed Granulation and Tablets Compression Process

    PubMed Central

    Djuriš, Jelena; Medarević, Djordje; Krstić, Marko; Vasiljević, Ivana; Mašić, Ivana; Ibrić, Svetlana

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to optimize fluid bed granulation and tablets compression processes using design space approach. Type of diluent, binder concentration, temperature during mixing, granulation and drying, spray rate, and atomization pressure were recognized as critical formulation and process parameters. They were varied in the first set of experiments in order to estimate their influences on critical quality attributes, that is, granules characteristics (size distribution, flowability, bulk density, tapped density, Carr's index, Hausner's ratio, and moisture content) using Plackett-Burman experimental design. Type of diluent and atomization pressure were selected as the most important parameters. In the second set of experiments, design space for process parameters (atomization pressure and compression force) and its influence on tablets characteristics was developed. Percent of paracetamol released and tablets hardness were determined as critical quality attributes. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) were applied in order to determine design space. ANNs models showed that atomization pressure influences mostly on the dissolution profile, whereas compression force affects mainly the tablets hardness. Based on the obtained ANNs models, it is possible to predict tablet hardness and paracetamol release profile for any combination of analyzed factors. PMID:22919295

  1. Method for enhancing the desulfurization of hot coal gas in a fluid-bed coal gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Grindley, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A process and apparatus for providing additional desulfurization of the hot gas produced in a fluid-bed coal gasifier, within the gasifier. A fluid-bed of iron oxide is located inside the gasifier above the gasification bed in a fluid-bed coal gasifier in which in-bed desulfurization by lime/limestone takes place. The product gases leave the gasification bed typically at 1600.degree. to 1800.degree. F. and are partially quenched with water to 1000.degree. to 1200.degree. F. before entering the iron oxide bed. The iron oxide bed provides additional desulfurization beyond that provided by the lime/limestone.

  2. Use of a polishing scrubber with a fluid bed boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Toher, J.G.

    1996-12-31

    Once viewed as {open_quotes}competitive{close_quotes} technologies, the circulating dry scrubber (CDS){reg_sign} and circulating fluid bed (CFB) boiler are being used together to achieve enhanced performance with lower overall costs. The need to understand the synergy between these two technologies is driven by deregulation of the power industry and the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Deregulation of power production in the US has spurred the growth of Independent Power Producers (IPP) who are responding to Industry`s demand for lower cost fuels, and close attention to annual operating costs. Utilities have to provide {open_quotes}open{close_quotes} access to their transmission lines allowing various IPP`s to connect with the end user. Industrial users can now choose from one of several sources of electricity with prices per kilowatt hour that are much lower than what they are currently being charged. The race is on to reduce power production costs and fuel can be the key in many cases. IPP`s and industry are banding together in very logical ways that can benefit both. Industry`s byproducts with heating value can be sold {open_quotes}over the fence{close_quotes} to an IPP who provides the industry with low cost steam and or electricity in return. However, many alternative lower cost fuels also have a higher emissions potential for criteria pollutants such a SO{sub 2}, NO{sub X}, particulate, or other emissions such as VOC`s and mercury which are more recently receiving attention. Cost effective management of these environmental issues must be an integral part of the project planning process. Three such cases are examined that involve the use of CFB`s with the CDS{reg_sign} as a polishing scrubber for SO{sub 2}. The first two cases involve repowering of existing facilities with petroleum coke as the fuel. The last case involves a new facility powered with low sulfur coal.

  3. Fluid-bed fluoride volatility process recovers uranium from spent uranium alloy fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghusen, J. J.; Chilenskas, A. A.; Gunderson, G. E.; Holmes, J. T.; Jonke, A. A.; Kincinas, J. E.; Levitz, N. M.; Potts, G. L.; Ramaswami, D.; Stethers, H.; Turner, K. S.

    1967-01-01

    Fluid-bed fluoride volatility process recovers uranium from uranium fuels containing either zirconium or aluminum. The uranium is recovered as uranium hexafluoride. The process requires few operations in simple, compact equipment, and eliminates aqueous radioactive wastes.

  4. Relationship between fluid bed aerosol generator operation and the aerosol produced

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, R.L.; Yerkes, K.

    1980-12-01

    The relationships between bed operation in a fluid bed aerosol generator and aerosol output were studied. A two-inch diameter fluid bed aerosol generator (FBG) was constructed using stainless steel powder as a fluidizing medium. Fly ash from coal combustion was aerosolized and the influence of FBG operating parameters on aerosol mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD), geometric standard deviation (sigma/sub g/) and concentration was examined. In an effort to extend observations on large fluid beds to small beds using fine bed particles, minimum fluidizing velocities and elutriation constant were computed. Although FBG minimum fluidizing velocity agreed well with calculations, FBG elutriation constant did not. The results of this study show that the properties of aerosols produced by a FBG depend on fluid bed height and air flow through the bed after the minimum fluidizing velocity is exceeded.

  5. Pressure Safety: Advanced Live 11459

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, George

    2016-03-02

    Many Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) operations use pressure equipment and systems. Failure to follow proper procedures when designing or operating pressure systems can result in injuries to personnel and damage to equipment and/or the environment. This manual presents an overview of the requirements and recommendations that address the safe design and operation of pressure systems at LANL.

  6. Optimization and scale-up of a fluid bed tangential spray rotogranulation process.

    PubMed

    Bouffard, J; Dumont, H; Bertrand, F; Legros, R

    2007-04-20

    The production of pellets in the pharmaceutical industry generally involves multi-step processing: (1) mixing, (2) wet granulation, (3) spheronization and (4) drying. While extrusion-spheronization processes have been popular because of their simplicity, fluid-bed rotogranulation (FBRG) is now being considered as an alternative, since it offers the advantages of combining the different steps into one processing unit, thus reducing processing time and material handling. This work aimed at the development of a FBRG process for the production of pellets in a 4.5-l Glatt GCPG1 tangential spray rotoprocessor and its optimization using factorial design. The factors considered were: (1) rotor disc velocity, (2) gap air pressure, (3) air flow rate, (4) binder spray rate and (5) atomization pressure. The pellets were characterized for their physical properties by measuring size distribution, roundness and flow properties. The results indicated that: pellet mean particle size is negatively affected by air flow rate and rotor plate speed, while binder spray rate has a positive effect on size; pellet flow properties are enhanced by operating with increased air flow rate and worsened with increased binder spray rate. Multiple regression analysis enabled the identification of an optimal operating window for production of acceptable pellets. Scale-up of these operating conditions was tested in a 30-l Glatt GPCG15 FBRG.

  7. The characterization of fluidization behavior using a novel multichamber microscale fluid bed.

    PubMed

    Räsänen, Eetu; Rantanen, Jukka; Mannermaa, Jukka-Pekka; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2004-03-01

    In the preformulation stage, there is a special need to determine the process behavior of materials with smaller amounts of samples. The purpose of this study was to assemble a novel automated multichamber microscale fluid bed module with a process air control unit for the characterization of fluidization behavior in variable conditions. The results were evaluated on the basis of two common computational methods, the minimum fluidization velocity, and the Geldart classification. The materials studied were different particle sizes of glass beads, microcrystalline cellulose, and silicified microcrystalline cellulose. During processing, the different characteristic fluidization phases (e.g., plugging, bubbling, slugging, and turbulent fluidization) of the materials were observed by the pressure difference over the bed. When the moisture content of the process air was increased, the amount of free charge carriers increased and the fine glass beads fluidized on the limited range of velocity. The silicification was demonstrated to improve the fluidization behavior with two different particle sizes of cellulose powders. Due to the interparticle (e.g., electrostatic) forces of the fine solids, the utilization of the computational predictions was restricted. The presented setup is a novel approach for studying process behavior with only a few grams of materials.

  8. On-line monitoring of fluid bed granulation by photometric imaging.

    PubMed

    Soppela, Ira; Antikainen, Osmo; Sandler, Niklas; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2014-11-01

    This paper introduces and discusses a photometric surface imaging approach for on-line monitoring of fluid bed granulation. Five granule batches consisting of paracetamol and varying amounts of lactose and microcrystalline cellulose were manufactured with an instrumented fluid bed granulator. Photometric images and NIR spectra were continuously captured on-line and particle size information was extracted from them. Also key process parameters were recorded. The images provided direct real-time information on the growth, attrition and packing behaviour of the batches. Moreover, decreasing image brightness in the drying phase was found to indicate granule drying. The changes observed in the image data were also linked to the moisture and temperature profiles of the processes. Combined with complementary process analytical tools, photometric imaging opens up possibilities for improved real-time evaluation fluid bed granulation. Furthermore, images can give valuable insight into the behaviour of excipients or formulations during product development.

  9. Pressure Safety: Advanced Self-Study 30120

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, George

    2016-02-29

    Pressure Safety Advance Self-Study (Course 30120) consists of an introduction, five modules, and a quiz. To receive credit in UTrain for completing this course, you must score 80% or better on the 15-question quiz (check UTrain). Directions for initiating the quiz are appended to the end of this training manual. This course contains several links to LANL websites. UTrain might not support active links, so please copy links into the address line in your browser.

  10. Recent circulating fluid bed (CFB) boiler projects in the U. S. and Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, T.; Anders, R.; Capuano, L.; Fox, S.; Plass, L.

    1983-11-01

    Lurgi Chemie and Huettentechnik has developed the circulating fluid bed process for solid fuel combustion and steam generation. This process has been commercially proven at Luenen, West Germany. Lurgi Chemie is also currently building two additional CFB boilers in Germany which will produce 595,000 pph and 331,000 pph of steam, respectively. In the U.S., Lurgi Corporation and Combustion Engineering have signed an agreement to jointly design, manufacture and sell CFB plants in the U.S. and Canada. The circular fluid bed process itself is a system which can burn a wide variety of inexpensive, low grade solid fules efficiently, economically and in an environmentally acceptable manner. The details of these CFB boilers are examined in this article.

  11. Method and apparatus for enhancing the desulfurization of hot coal gas in a fluid-bed coal gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Grindley, T.

    1988-04-05

    A process and apparatus for providing additional desulfurization of the hot gas produced in a fluid-bed coal gasifier, within the gasifier is described. A fluid-bed of iron oxide is located inside the gasifier above the gasification bed in a fluid-bed coal gasifier in which in-bed desulfurization by lime/limestone takes place. The product gases leave the gasification bed typically at 1600 to 1800 F and are partially quenched with water to 1000 to 1200 F before entering the iron oxide bed. The iron oxide bed provides additional desulfurization beyond that provided by the lime /limestone. 1 fig.

  12. Use of North Dakota lignite in advanced power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Willson, W.G.; Hurley, J.P.; Sharp, L.

    1992-12-01

    In order to develop critical data for Department of Energy (DOE) and private industry for advanced high-efficiency power systems using North Dakota lignite in pressurized gasification and combustion systems, tests were performed in bench-scale equipment at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). The primary objectives were to (1) determine the conversion levels for Center ND lignite under pressurized fluid-bed gasification conditions with sorbent addition as a function of temperature, (2) determine the sulfur capture using limestone or dolomite under gasification conditions giving 90% or higher carbon conversion, (3) evaluate char/coal conversion and sulfur capture in a pressurized fluid-bed combustor, (4) assess the potential for bed agglomeration under the preferred operating conditions for both systems.

  13. Advanced Extravehicular Activity Pressure Garment Requirements Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center advanced pressure garment technology development team is addressing requirements development for exploration missions. Lessons learned from the Z-2 high fidelity prototype development have reiterated that clear low-level requirements and verification methods reduce risk to the government, improve efficiency in pressure garment design efforts, and enable the government to be a smart buyer. The expectation is to provide requirements at the specification level that are validated so that their impact on pressure garment design is understood. Additionally, the team will provide defined verification protocols for the requirements. However, in reviewing exploration space suit high level requirements there are several gaps in the team's ability to define and verify related lower level requirements. This paper addresses the efforts in requirement areas such as mobility/fit/comfort and environmental protection (dust, radiation, plasma, secondary impacts) to determine the by what method the requirements can be defined and use of those methods for verification. Gaps exist at various stages. In some cases component level work is underway, but no system level effort has begun, in other cases no effort has been initiated to close the gap. Status of ongoing efforts and potential approaches to open gaps are discussed.

  14. Analysis and control of the METC fluid bed gasifier. Quarterly progress report, January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    This document summarizes work performed for the period 10/1/94 to 3/31/95. In this work, three components will form the basis for design of a control scheme for the Fluidized Bed Gasifier (FBG) at METC: (1) a control systems analysis based on simple linear models derived from process data, (2) review of the literature on fluid bed gasifier operation and control, and (3) understanding of present FBG operation and real world considerations. Below we summarize work accomplished to data in each of these areas.

  15. Rapid formulation screening with a Multipart Microscale Fluid bed Powder processor.

    PubMed

    Kivikero, Niina; Murtomaa, Matti; Antikainen, Osmo; Hatara, Juha; Juppo, Anne-Mari; Sandler, Niklas

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate early formulation screening in small scale with a miniaturized fluid bed device. Altogether eight different batches were granulated in a Multipart Microscale Fluid bed Powder processor (MMFP) with constant process conditions using electrostatic atomization. Atomization voltage and granulation liquid flow rate were kept constant. Acid acetylsalicylic was used as model active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), lactose monohydrate, microcrystalline cellulose and polyvinylpyrrolidone were used as excipients. Granule size distributions were measured with spatial filtering technique. Friability test was performed by spinning granules in the mixer with glass beads. Compressibility of the granules was evaluated by tableting and the breaking force of the tablets was measured. Multivariate analysis, namely partial least squares regression and multilinear regression were applied to the data. It was possible to generate granules of different compositions rapidly employing MMFP with electrostatic atomization fast and acquire reliable and logical results with only small amount of material. However, a major challenge was to find suitable analytical methods for such small batches.

  16. Manufacturing Solid Dosage Forms from Bulk Liquids Using the Fluid-bed Drying Technology.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jianping; Lu, Y I; Wu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Solid dosage forms are better than liquid dosage forms in many ways, such as improved physical and chemical stability, ease of storage and transportation, improved handling properties, and patient compliance. Therefore, it is required to transform dosage forms of liquid origins into solid dosage forms. The functional approaches are to absorb the liquids by solid excipients or through drying. The conventional drying technologies for this purpose include drying by heating, vacuum-, freeze- and spray-drying, etc. Among these drying technologies, fluidbed drying emerges as a new technology that possesses unique advantages. Fluid-bed drying or coating is highly efficient in solvent removal, can be performed at relatively low temperatures, and is a one-step process to manufacture formulations in pellet forms. In this article, the status of the art of manufacturing solid dosage forms from bulk liquids by fluid-bed drying technology was reviewed emphasizing on its application in solid dispersion, inclusion complexes, self-microemulsifying systems, and various nanoscale drug delivery systems.

  17. Application of in-line near infrared spectroscopy and multivariate batch modeling for process monitoring in fluid bed granulation.

    PubMed

    Kona, Ravikanth; Qu, Haibin; Mattes, Robert; Jancsik, Bela; Fahmy, Raafat M; Hoag, Stephen W

    2013-08-16

    Fluid bed is an important unit operation in pharmaceutical industry for granulation and drying. To improve our understanding of fluid bed granulation, in-line near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and novel environmental temperature and RH data logger called a PyroButton(®) were used in conjunction with partial least square (PLS) and principal component analysis (PCA) to develop multivariate statistical process control charts (MSPC). These control charts were constructed using real-time moisture, temperature and humidity data obtained from batch experiments. To demonstrate their application, statistical control charts such as Scores, Distance to model (DModX), and Hotelling's T(2) were used to monitor the batch evolution process during the granulation and subsequent drying phase; moisture levels were predicted using a validated PLS model. Two data loggers were placed one near the bottom of the granulator bowl plenum where air enters the granulator and another inside the granulator in contact with the product in the fluid bed helped to monitor the humidity and temperature levels during the granulation and drying phase. The control charts were used for real time fault analysis, and were tested on normal batches and on three batches which deviated from normal processing conditions. This study demonstrated the use of NIRS and the use of humidity and temperature data loggers in conjunction with multivariate batch modeling as an effective tool in process understanding and fault determining method to effective process control in fluid bed granulation.

  18. Advanced Diagnostics for High Pressure Spray Combustion.

    SciTech Connect

    Skeen, Scott A.; Manin, Julien Luc; Pickett, Lyle M.

    2014-06-01

    The development of accurate predictive engine simulations requires experimental data to both inform and validate the models, but very limited information is presently available about the chemical structure of high pressure spray flames under engine- relevant conditions. Probing such flames for chemical information using non- intrusive optical methods or intrusive sampling techniques, however, is challenging because of the physical and optical harshness of the environment. This work details two new diagnostics that have been developed and deployed to obtain quantitative species concentrations and soot volume fractions from a high-pressure combusting spray. A high-speed, high-pressure sampling system was developed to extract gaseous species (including soot precursor species) from within the flame for offline analysis by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A high-speed multi-wavelength optical extinction diagnostic was also developed to quantify transient and quasi-steady soot processes. High-pressure sampling and offline characterization of gas-phase species formed following the pre-burn event was accomplished as well as characterization of gas-phase species present in the lift-off region of a high-pressure n-dodecane spray flame. For the initial samples discussed in this work several species were identified, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH); however, quantitative mole fractions were not determined. Nevertheless, the diagnostic developed here does have this capability. Quantitative, time-resolved measurements of soot extinction were also accomplished and the novel use of multiple incident wavelengths proved valuable toward characterizing changes in soot optical properties within different regions of the spray flame.

  19. Fluid bed drying of guarana (Paullinia cupana HBK) extract: effect of process factors on caffeine content.

    PubMed

    Pagliarussi, Renata S; Bastos, Jairo K; Freitas, Luis A P

    2006-06-16

    The aim of this study was to study the convective drying of the hydroalcoholic extracts obtained from powdered guarana seeds in a spouted bed dryer. The influence of process variables, such as the convective airflow rate, extract feed rate, and air inlet temperature, on the quality of the dry extract was determined using the caffeine and moisture content for the process evaluation. The caffeine content in the alcoholic and dried extracts was determined by capillary gas chromatography. The experiments were performed following a 3(3) factorial design and the data analyzed by response surface. The analysis of dry extract showed that the air and extract feed rates did not significantly affect (25% level) the caffeine content, but that drying temperature is a major factor to consider when the extract is submitted to fluid bed drying. Caffeine losses were significant (1% level) for drying temperatures above 120 degrees C, while moisture content was lower than 3% for temperatures above 120 degrees C. The data showed that there is an optimum temperature for the drying of guarana extracts in spouted beds, and under the conditions used in this study it was 120 degrees C.

  20. A quality by design study applied to an industrial pharmaceutical fluid bed granulation.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Vera; Lochmann, Dirk; Reich, Gabriele; Menezes, José C; Herdling, Thorsten; Schewitz, Jens

    2012-06-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is encouraged within Quality by Design (QbD) to apply science-based manufacturing principles to assure quality not only of new but also of existing processes. This paper presents how QbD principles can be applied to an existing industrial pharmaceutical fluid bed granulation (FBG) process. A three-step approach is presented as follows: (1) implementation of Process Analytical Technology (PAT) monitoring tools at the industrial scale process, combined with multivariate data analysis (MVDA) of process and PAT data to increase the process knowledge; (2) execution of scaled-down designed experiments at a pilot scale, with adequate PAT monitoring tools, to investigate the process response to intended changes in Critical Process Parameters (CPPs); and finally (3) the definition of a process Design Space (DS) linking CPPs to Critical to Quality Attributes (CQAs), within which product quality is ensured by design, and after scale-up enabling its use at the industrial process scale. The proposed approach was developed for an existing industrial process. Through enhanced process knowledge established a significant reduction in product CQAs, variability already within quality specifications ranges was achieved by a better choice of CPPs values. The results of such step-wise development and implementation are described.

  1. Bench-scale studies on fluid-bed pyrolysis of wood

    SciTech Connect

    Mudge, L.K.; Brown, M.D.; Wilcox, W.A.

    1988-08-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the effects of different contact gases and experimental conditions on product yields from fluid-bed wood pyrolysis. The yield of condensible hydrocarbons was of particular interest. The contact gases employed included carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/), methane (CH/sub 4/), and hydrogen (H/sub 2/). Reaction temperatures ranged from 650/degree/C to 800/degree/C, and gas contact time was between 1 and 2 s. Tests with CO/sub 2/ contact gas used a secondary vessel of catalyst for cracking of condensibles generated in the primary gasifier. Results of earlier studies at PNL showed the effectiveness of various catalysts for destruction of condensible hydrocarbons. Analyses of results on the effects of contact gas, reaction temperature, gas contact time, and wood feed rate are presented in this report, along with a description of experimental equipment and methods. Data were obtained from single tests at each set of experimental conditions. Conditions were not repeated to determine the amount of experimental error. Material balance closures were generally quite good for the experimental tests, within 10%. 9 refs., 15 figs., 16 tabs.

  2. In-line monitoring of particle size in a fluid bed granulator: investigations concerning positioning and configuration of the sensor.

    PubMed

    Roßteuscher-Carl, Katrin; Fricke, Sabine; Hacker, Michael C; Schulz-Siegmund, Michaela

    2014-05-15

    According to the ICH Q8 guideline, analytic technologies (PAT) are important tools for characterization and optimization of pharmaceutical manufacturing processes. Particle size as a critical quality attribute for granules is therefore an important parameter that should be monitored during the fluid bed granulation process. This work focusses on optimizing position and configuration of an SFT-sensor for the in-line measurement of particle size distribution in a Glatt GPCG 3 fluid bed granulator. As model-substances, different grades of microcrystalline cellulose were used. The in-line measured particle size and particle rate in the sensor were evaluated. A sensor position in the deceleration zone of the granulator was found to be promising for in-line particle size measurement. Most reliable data were generated in this position when the probe was placed in a distance of 11cm from the chamber wall to avoid bias by the inlet air stream. No major influence of rotation angle of the probe was found in this position. Furthermore, an entire fluid bed granulation process was successfully monitored with the sensor installed in the optimized setting.

  3. Microencapsulation of fish oil by spray granulation and fluid bed film coating.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Sri Haryani; Weissbrodt, Jenny; Kunz, Benno

    2010-08-01

    The stability of microencapsulated fish oil prepared with 2 production processes, spray granulation (SG) and SG followed by film coating (SG-FC) using a fluid bed equipment, was investigated. In the 1st process, 3 types of fish oil used were based on the ratios of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (10/50, 33/22, and 18/12). Each type was emulsified with soluble soybean polysaccharide (SSPS) and maltodextrin to produce 25% oil powders. In the 2nd process, 15% film coating of hydroxypropyl betacyclodextrin (HPBCD) was applied to the granules from the 1st process. The powder stability against oxidation was examined by measurement of peroxide values (PV) and headspace propanal after storage at room temperature and at 3 to 4 degrees C for 6 wk. Uncoated powder containing the lowest concentration of PUFA (18/12) was found to be stable during storage at room temperature with maximum PV of 3.98 +/- 0.001 meq/kg oil. The PV increased sharply for uncoated powder with higher concentration of omega-3 (in 33/22 and 10/50 fish oils) after 3 wk storage. The PVs were in agreement with the concentration of propanal, and these 2 parameters remained constant for most of the uncoated powders stored at low temperature. Unexpectedly, the outcomes showed that the coated powders had lower stability than uncoated powders as indicated by higher initial PVs; more hydroperoxides were detected as well as increasing propanal concentration. The investigation suggests that the film-coating by HPBCD ineffectively protected fish oil as the coating process might have induced further oxidation; however, SG is a good method for producing fish oil powder and to protect it from oxidation because of the "onion skin" structure of granules produced in this process.

  4. Advanced High Pressure O2/H2 Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morea, S. F. (Editor); Wu, S. T. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Activities in the development of advanced high pressure oxygen-hydrogen stage combustion rocket engines are reported. Particular emphasis is given to the Space Shuttle main engine. The areas of engine technology discussed include fracture and fatigue in engine components, manufacturing and producibility engineering, materials, bearing technology, structure dynamics, fluid dynamics, and instrumentation technology.

  5. Fluid-Bed Testing of Greatpoint Energy's Direct Oxygen Injection Catalytic Gasification Process for Synthetic Natural Gas and Hydrogen Coproduction Year 6 - Activity 1.14 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, Michael; Henderson, Ann

    2012-04-01

    The GreatPoint Energy (GPE) concept for producing synthetic natural gas and hydrogen from coal involves the catalytic gasification of coal and carbon. GPE’s technology “refines” coal by employing a novel catalyst to “crack” the carbon bonds and transform the coal into cleanburning methane (natural gas) and hydrogen. The GPE mild “catalytic” gasifier design and operating conditions result in reactor components that are less expensive and produce pipeline-grade methane and relatively high purity hydrogen. The system operates extremely efficiently on very low cost carbon sources such as lignites, subbituminous coals, tar sands, petcoke, and petroleum residual oil. In addition, GPE’s catalytic coal gasification process eliminates troublesome ash removal and slagging problems, reduces maintenance requirements, and increases thermal efficiency, significantly reducing the size of the air separation plant (a system that alone accounts for 20% of the capital cost of most gasification systems) in the catalytic gasification process. Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale gasification facilities were used to demonstrate how coal and catalyst are fed into a fluid-bed reactor with pressurized steam and a small amount of oxygen to “fluidize” the mixture and ensure constant contact between the catalyst and the carbon particles. In this environment, the catalyst facilitates multiple chemical reactions between the carbon and the steam on the surface of the coal. These reactions generate a mixture of predominantly methane, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. Product gases from the process are sent to a gas-cleaning system where CO{sub 2} and other contaminants are removed. In a full-scale system, catalyst would be recovered from the bottom of the gasifier and recycled back into the fluid-bed reactor. The by-products (such as sulfur, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2}) would be captured and could be sold to the chemicals and petroleum industries, resulting in

  6. Advances and synergy of high pressure sciences at synchrotron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.; Ehm, L.; Duffy, T.; Crichton, W.; Aoki, K.

    2009-01-01

    Introductory overview to the special issue papers on high-pressure sciences and synchrotron radiation. High-pressure research in geosciences, materials science and condensed matter physics at synchrotron sources is experiencing growth and development through synergistic efforts around the world. A series of high-pressure science workshops were organized in 2008 to highlight these developments. One of these workshops, on 'Advances in high-pressure science using synchrotron X-rays', was held at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA, on 4 October 2008. This workshop was organized in honour of Drs Jingzhu Hu and Quanzhong Guo in celebration of their retirement after up to 18 years of dedicated service to the high-pressure community as beamline scientists at X17 of NSLS. Following this celebration of the often unheralded role of the beamline scientist, a special issue of the Journal of Synchrotron Radiation on Advances and Synergy of High-Pressure Sciences at Synchrotron Sources was proposed, and we were pleased to invite contributions from colleagues who participated in the workshop as well as others who are making similar efforts at synchrotron sources worldwide.

  7. High-Pressure Design of Advanced BN-Based Materials.

    PubMed

    Kurakevych, Oleksandr O; Solozhenko, Vladimir L

    2016-10-20

    The aim of the present review is to highlight the state of the art in high-pressure design of new advanced materials based on boron nitride. Recent experimental achievements on the governing phase transformation, nanostructuring and chemical synthesis in the systems containing boron nitride at high pressures and high temperatures are presented. All these developments allowed discovering new materials, e.g., ultrahard nanocrystalline cubic boron nitride (nano-cBN) with hardness comparable to diamond, and superhard boron subnitride B13N₂. Thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of high-pressure synthesis are described based on the data obtained by in situ and ex situ methods. Mechanical and thermal properties (hardness, thermoelastic equations of state, etc.) are discussed. New synthetic perspectives, combining both soft chemistry and extreme pressure-temperature conditions are considered.

  8. Mandibular Advancing Positive Pressure Apnea Remediation Device (MAPPARD)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    wiki/Starling_resistor Lankford, D. A., Proctor, C. D., & Richard, R. (2005). Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) changes in bariatric surgery ...Mandibular Advancing Device (after Schlaflabor-Saletu, n.d.). ............ 8  Figure 4.  Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (before and after surgery ) (from...Lastly, when behavioral and medical techniques have been exhausted the last OSA reduction technique is surgery . Within the last 25 years, the

  9. Coupling scales for modelling heavy metal vaporization from municipal solid waste incineration in a fluid bed by CFD.

    PubMed

    Soria, José; Gauthier, Daniel; Flamant, Gilles; Rodriguez, Rosa; Mazza, Germán

    2015-09-01

    Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) in fluidized bed is a very interesting technology mainly due to high combustion efficiency, great flexibility for treating several types of waste fuels and reduction in pollutants emitted with the flue gas. However, there is a great concern with respect to the fate of heavy metals (HM) contained in MSW and their environmental impact. In this study, a coupled two-scale CFD model was developed for MSWI in a bubbling fluidized bed. It presents an original scheme that combines a single particle model and a global fluidized bed model in order to represent the HM vaporization during MSW combustion. Two of the most representative HM (Cd and Pb) with bed temperatures ranging between 923 and 1073K have been considered. This new approach uses ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 as the modelling platform for the simulations along with a complete set of self-developed user-defined functions (UDFs). The simulation results are compared to the experimental data obtained previously by the research group in a lab-scale fluid bed incinerator. The comparison indicates that the proposed CFD model predicts well the evolution of the HM release for the bed temperatures analyzed. It shows that both bed temperature and bed dynamics have influence on the HM vaporization rate. It can be concluded that CFD is a rigorous tool that provides valuable information about HM vaporization and that the original two-scale simulation scheme adopted allows to better represent the actual particle behavior in a fluid bed incinerator.

  10. Performance improvement of a converted fluid bed boiler (from traveling grate type) for agro waste combustion -- A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Sethumadhavan, R.; Karthikeyan, G.; Raviprakash, A.V.; Vasudevan, R.

    1997-12-31

    This paper investigates the operational difficulty encountered while operating a fluid bed boiler--which was earlier serving with a traveling grate for agrowaste combustion. This boiler, although operating on fluid bed technology principle, could not produce required combustion efficiency while burning any of the agrowastes such as rice husk, de-oiled bran, ground nut shell, etc. While carrying out the performance assessment study, it was found that, this inefficient combustion was mainly due to the improper operating parameters and partly due to incorrect furnace configuration. The drawbacks of the system have been attended to and set right incurring a very minor expenditure. This has led to an annual fuel saving of approximately US $40,000. The major results achieved are: (1) boiler thermal efficiency increased from 66--73%; (2) boiler was loaded uniformly and on-time operation has increased to 100% from earlier 60%; (3) boiler shut down time due to operational problems has come down from 35 hours per month to 15 hours per month; (4) very effective dust collection system was achieved resulting in reduced ID fan erosion; and (5) an annual saving of US $100,000 (both direct and indirect) was achieved.

  11. Advanced Synchrotron Techniques at High Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HPCAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, G.; Sinogeikin, S. V.; Chow, P.; Kono, Y.; Meng, Y.; Park, C.; Popov, D.; Rod, E.; Smith, J.; Xiao, Y.; Mao, H.

    2012-12-01

    High Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HPCAT) is dedicated to advancing cutting-edge, multidisciplinary, high-pressure science and technology using synchrotron radiation at Sector 16 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) of Argonne National Laboratory. At HPCAT an array of novel x-ray diffraction and spectroscopic techniques has been integrated with high pressure and extreme temperature instrumentation for studies of structure and materials properties at extreme conditions.. HPCAT consists of four active independent beamlines performing a large range of various experiments at extreme conditions. 16BM-B beamline is dedicated to energy dispersive and white Laue X-ray diffraction. The majority of experiments are performed with a Paris-Edinburgh large volume press (to 7GPa and 2500K) and include amorphous and liquid structure measurement, white beam radiography, elastic sound wave velocity measurement of amorphous solid materials, with viscosity and density measurement of liquid being under development. 16BM-D is a monochromatic diffraction beamline for powder and single crystal diffraction at high pressure and high (resistive heating) / low (cryostats) temperature. The additional capabilities include high-resolution powder diffraction and x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The insertion device beamline of HPCAT has two undulators in canted mode (operating independently) and LN cooled Si monochromators capable of providing a large range of energies. 16IDB is a microdiffraction beamline mainly focusing on high-pressure powder and single crystal diffraction in DAC at high temperatures (double-sided laser heating and resistive heating) and low temperature (various cryostats). The modern instrumentation allows high-quality diffraction at megabar pressures from light element, fast experiments with pulsed laser heating, fast dynamic experiments with Pilatus detector, and so on. 16ID-D beamline is dedicated to x-ray scattering and spectroscopy research

  12. Using Advanced Tensiometers to Monitor Temporal Variations in Pore Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, R. L.; Young, M. H.; Dixon, K. L.; Rossabi, J.; Hyde, W. K.; Holmes-Burns, H.

    2002-12-01

    The Savannah River Site has installed a comprehensive vadose zone monitoring system (VZMS) at it's low level radioactive waste disposal facility to collect the necessary information to calculate contaminant flux. The VZMS includes water content reflectometers, suction lysimeters, advanced tensiometers (ATs), water flux meters, access ports for neutron probes, and a tipping bucket rain gauge. Forty one ATs were installed from 1999 to 2001 at depths ranging from 2 to 60 feet and have been operated continuously. The installation depths were based on a hydrostatigraphic model developed from core logs, cone penetrometer logs, moisture content profiles, water retention curves model that were obtained during the phased installation of the VZMS. An AT consists of a porous cup installed at a prescribed depth with casing back to the surface and a pressure transducer that is lowered into the casing and connects with the porous cup. The pressure transducer transmits it's signal to a datalogger where the data is stored for future retrieval using a cellular phone communications package. Results from the 2 year operating period show that the AT calibrations are stable and t ATs are capable of extended monitoring of pore pressures in the 0 to 300 cm H2 O range. The ATs had sufficient resolution to detect the naturally occurring fluctuations in pore pressure (1 to 100 cm H2 O over 1 to 72 hours) that resulted from infiltration events at the site. The stable performance of the ATs combined with their ability to detect naturally occurring fluctuations in pore pressure make the ATs a useful tool in measuring temporal pore pressure variations for use in calibrating numerical models of fluid flow in variably saturated porous media.

  13. Advanced fuels for plutonium management in pressurized water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile, A.; Dufour, Ph; Golfier, H.; Grouiller, J. P.; Guillet, J. L.; Poinot, Ch; Youinou, G.; Zaetta, A.

    2003-06-01

    Several fuel concepts are under investigation at CEA with the aim of manage plutonium inventories in pressurized water reactors. This options range from the use of mature technologies like MOX adapted in the case of MOX-EUS (enriched uranium support) and COmbustible Recyclage A ILot (CORAIL) assemblies to more innovative technologies using IMF like DUPLEX and advanced plutonium assembly (APA). The plutonium burning performances reported to the electrical production go from 7 to 60 kg (TW h) -1. More detailed analysis covering economic, sustainability, reliability and safety aspects and their integration in the whole fuel cycle would allow identifying the best candidate.

  14. Hydrodynamic model of advanced pressurized fluidized bed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Horio, Masayuki; Lei, H.W.

    1997-12-31

    A hydrodynamic model was developed for the advanced pressurized fluidized bed combustion (A-PFBC) process. The particular system investigated here is composed of a pressurized circulating fluidized bed (PCFB) for coal gasification/desulfurization and a PCFB for combustion with the gas-solid counter-current flow through the two PCFBs. One of the most important parameters may be the material seal height (MSH) in the downcomer connecting the gasifier/desulfurizer and the combustor, which is thought to strongly influence the safe and stable operation of the process. In this mode, MSH was determined according to the pressure balance between the gasifier/desulfurizer and the combustor. The solid flux in the lower dense region of the two PCFBs was estimated by considering the clustering suspension and core-annulus flow. The mean cluster size and voidage in the cluster phase were predicted by the cluster size model of Horio-Ito (1996). Solid flux of the gasifier and combustor was calculated based on mass balances of limestone, char and ash in the system. Based on this model, the whole pressure profile loop in the system was predicted, and the effects of operating conditions on MSH between the gasifier and the combustor were investigated. The feasibility of the A-PCFB system with PCFBs both for the gasifier/desulfurizer and for the combustor was successfully confirmed.

  15. Field evaluation of a granular activated carbon fluid-bed bioreactor for treatment of chlorobenzene in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Klecka, G.M.; McDaniel, S.G.; Wilson, P.S.

    1996-12-31

    Although granular activated carbon (GAC), fluidized-bed bioreactors have been used for treatment of groundwater containing readily biodegradable organic compounds, there is only limited experience with treatment of chlorinated organics found at many industrial sites. This paper describes a field evaluation of a GAC fluid-bed bioreactor operated at various chlorobenzene concentrations and organic loading rates over a 7-month period. Microorganisms used to seed the bioreactor were provided by activated sludge form the site, as well as indigenous chlorobenzene-degrading bacteria present in the groundwater. Removal efficiencies exceeding 99.99% were achieved at organic loading rates between 6 and 10 pounds of total oxygen demand (lb TOD) per 25 cubic feet per day. Influent chlorobenzene concentrations ranging form 100 to 170 ppm were consistently reduced to below the detection limit of 10 ppb. Economic evaluation indicates that groundwater treatment costs for the bioreactor were lower than other conventional technologies. 44 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Flexibility of the Fluid-Bed Calciner Process in View of Changing Demands in the Alumina Market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Hans Werner; Beisswenger, Hans; Kämpf, Fritz

    1980-02-01

    The two most frequently used types of alumina are finegrained, high-calcined, "floury" alumina and coarse-grained, low-calcined, "sandy" alumina; they result from different calcining conditions. Because of the increasing exchange of alumina on the international market, there is a growing demand for a modern calcining system allowing the production of various qualities. The fluid-bed calciner process is optimally suited to these demands. As grain-size distribution is of great importance for the quality of weakly calcined alumina, extensive investigations have been made to determine the influence of calcination on aluminum hydroxide. It was found that, besides the mechanical strength of the aluminum hydroxide, local velocity rates, solids concentration, and details of design affect the grain size of calcined alumina. Results from pilot and industrial plants are presented and discussed with regard to consequences for layout and operating conditions of calcining plants.

  17. Fluid bed gasification – Plasma converter process generating energy from solid waste: Experimental assessment of sulphur species

    SciTech Connect

    Morrin, Shane; Lettieri, Paola; Chapman, Chris; Taylor, Richard

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • We investigate gaseous sulphur species whilst gasifying sulphur-enriched wood pellets. • Experiments performed using a two stage fluid bed gasifier – plasma converter process. • Notable SO{sub 2} and relatively low COS levels were identified. • Oxygen-rich regions of the bed are believed to facilitate SO{sub 2}, with a delayed release. • Gas phase reducing regions above the bed would facilitate more prompt COS generation. - Abstract: Often perceived as a Cinderella material, there is growing appreciation for solid waste as a renewable content thermal process feed. Nonetheless, research on solid waste gasification and sulphur mechanisms in particular is lacking. This paper presents results from two related experiments on a novel two stage gasification process, at demonstration scale, using a sulphur-enriched wood pellet feed. Notable SO{sub 2} and relatively low COS levels (before gas cleaning) were interesting features of the trials, and not normally expected under reducing gasification conditions. Analysis suggests that localised oxygen rich regions within the fluid bed played a role in SO{sub 2}’s generation. The response of COS to sulphur in the feed was quite prompt, whereas SO{sub 2} was more delayed. It is proposed that the bed material sequestered sulphur from the feed, later aiding SO{sub 2} generation. The more reducing gas phase regions above the bed would have facilitated COS – hence its faster response. These results provide a useful insight, with further analysis on a suite of performed experiments underway, along with thermodynamic modelling.

  18. Coupling scales for modelling heavy metal vaporization from municipal solid waste incineration in a fluid bed by CFD

    SciTech Connect

    Soria, José; Gauthier, Daniel; Flamant, Gilles; Rodriguez, Rosa; Mazza, Germán

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • A CFD two-scale model is formulated to simulate heavy metal vaporization from waste incineration in fluidized beds. • MSW particle is modelled with the macroscopic particle model. • Influence of bed dynamics on HM vaporization is included. • CFD predicted results agree well with experimental data reported in literature. • This approach may be helpful for fluidized bed reactor modelling purposes. - Abstract: Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) in fluidized bed is a very interesting technology mainly due to high combustion efficiency, great flexibility for treating several types of waste fuels and reduction in pollutants emitted with the flue gas. However, there is a great concern with respect to the fate of heavy metals (HM) contained in MSW and their environmental impact. In this study, a coupled two-scale CFD model was developed for MSWI in a bubbling fluidized bed. It presents an original scheme that combines a single particle model and a global fluidized bed model in order to represent the HM vaporization during MSW combustion. Two of the most representative HM (Cd and Pb) with bed temperatures ranging between 923 and 1073 K have been considered. This new approach uses ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 as the modelling platform for the simulations along with a complete set of self-developed user-defined functions (UDFs). The simulation results are compared to the experimental data obtained previously by the research group in a lab-scale fluid bed incinerator. The comparison indicates that the proposed CFD model predicts well the evolution of the HM release for the bed temperatures analyzed. It shows that both bed temperature and bed dynamics have influence on the HM vaporization rate. It can be concluded that CFD is a rigorous tool that provides valuable information about HM vaporization and that the original two-scale simulation scheme adopted allows to better represent the actual particle behavior in a fluid bed incinerator.

  19. Evaluation of extended-release applications for solid dispersion hot-melt fluid bed coatings utilizing hydrophobic coating agents.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, J P; Niebergall, P J

    1998-02-01

    A new hot-melt fluid bed coating method was evaluated for potential extended-release applications. Chlorpheniramine maleate (CPM) USP was chosen as a model drug. The assays for drug release and content uniformity were dictated by the USP Official Monograph for a Chlorpheniramine Maleate Extended-Release Capsule. The fluid bed chamber was charged with CPM-loaded nonpareils and hydrophobic coating agents in the solid state. The method consists of four processing stages: (a) warming, (b) preheating, (c) melting-spreading, and (d) cooling-congealing. Various hydrophobic coating agent candidates were evaluated for extended-release potential by a preliminary screen at a coating agent level of 1.5% (w/w). A beeswax coating agent was identified as the most promising candidate of the preliminary screen. After the level of beeswax was increased to 2.0%, the dissolution profile met all of the specifications of the USP Drug Release Test 1 for a CPM Extended-Release Capsule. The potency and content uniformity remained unchanged by the process. Dual coatings demonstrated a cumulative extension of release superior to the capability of a single coat. The new method is a viable alternative to hot-melt spray-coating methodologies. Organic solvents, spraying equipment, steam jackets, and/or heating tape are eliminated from the process. A reduction of equipment costs, setup time, and cleanup time may be realized. The method has demonstrated extended-release capabilities. No excessive attrition of potency or content uniformity has been noted. Additive, multiple coatings that have a cumulative effect on release retardation are feasible.

  20. Pressure-Sensitive Paints Advance Rotorcraft Design Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    The rotors of certain helicopters can spin at speeds as high as 500 revolutions per minute. As the blades slice through the air, they flex, moving into the wind and back out, experiencing pressure changes on the order of thousands of times a second and even higher. All of this makes acquiring a true understanding of rotorcraft aerodynamics a difficult task. A traditional means of acquiring aerodynamic data is to conduct wind tunnel tests using a vehicle model outfitted with pressure taps and other sensors. These sensors add significant costs to wind tunnel testing while only providing measurements at discrete locations on the model's surface. In addition, standard sensor solutions do not work for pulling data from a rotor in motion. "Typical static pressure instrumentation can't handle that," explains Neal Watkins, electronics engineer in Langley Research Center s Advanced Sensing and Optical Measurement Branch. "There are dynamic pressure taps, but your costs go up by a factor of five to ten if you use those. In addition, recovery of the pressure tap readings is accomplished through slip rings, which allow only a limited amount of sensors and can require significant maintenance throughout a typical rotor test." One alternative to sensor-based wind tunnel testing is pressure sensitive paint (PSP). A coating of a specialized paint containing luminescent material is applied to the model. When exposed to an LED or laser light source, the material glows. The glowing material tends to be reactive to oxygen, explains Watkins, which causes the glow to diminish. The more oxygen that is present (or the more air present, since oxygen exists in a fixed proportion in air), the less the painted surface glows. Imaged with a camera, the areas experiencing greater air pressure show up darker than areas of less pressure. "The paint allows for a global pressure map as opposed to specific points," says Watkins. With PSP, each pixel recorded by the camera becomes an optical pressure

  1. Advanced Extra-Vehicular Activity Pressure Garment Requirements Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy; Aitchison, Lindsay; Rhodes, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center advanced pressure garment technology development team is addressing requirements development for exploration missions. Lessons learned from the Z-2 high fidelity prototype development have reiterated that clear low-level requirements and verification methods reduce risk to the government, improve efficiency in pressure garment design efforts, and enable the government to be a smart buyer. The expectation is to provide requirements at the specification level that are validated so that their impact on pressure garment design is understood. Additionally, the team will provide defined verification protocols for the requirements. However, in reviewing exploration space suit high level requirements there are several gaps in the team's ability to define and verify related lower level requirements. This paper addresses the efforts in requirement areas such as mobility/fit/comfort and environmental protection (dust, radiation, plasma, secondary impacts) to determine the method by which the requirements can be defined and use of those methods for verification. Gaps exist at various stages. In some cases component level work is underway, but no system level effort has begun; in other cases no effort has been initiated to close the gap. Status of on-going efforts and potential approaches to open gaps are discussed.

  2. New ZnO-Based Regenerable Sulfur Sorbents for Fluid-Bed/Transport Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Slimane, R.B.; Lau, F.S.; Abbasian, J.; Ho, K.H.

    2002-09-19

    The overall objective of the ongoing sorbent development work at GTI is the advancement to the demonstration stage of a promising ZnO-TiO2 sulfur sorbent that has been developed under DCCA/ICCI and DOE/NETL sponsorship. This regenerable sorbent has been shown to possess an exceptional combination of excellent chemical reactivity, high effective capacity for sulfur absorption, high resistance to attrition, and regenerability at temperatures lower than required by typical zinc titanates.

  3. Advances in Positive Airway Pressure Treatment Modalities for Hypoventilation Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Combs, Dan; Shetty, Safal; Parthasarathy, Sairam

    2014-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Rationale Positive airway pressure therapy for hypoventilation syndromes can significantly improve health-related quality of life (HR-QOL), healthcare costs, and even mortality. The sleep-disordered breathing in such individuals are quite complex and require sophisticated devices with algorithms that are designed to accurately detect and effectively treat respiratory events that includes hypoventilation, upper airway obstruction, lower airway obstruction, central apneas and central hypopneas and reduce the work of breathing while maintaining breathing comfort. Objectives The therapeutic physiological rationale for the various advanced PAP modalities and the details about the principles of operation and technology implementation are provided here. Conclusions The physiological rationale for advanced PAP modalities is sound considering the complexity of sleep-disordered breathing in patients with hypoventilation syndromes. Although such devices are increasingly used in clinical practice, the supporting clinical evidence – specifically comparative-effectiveness studies in real-life conditions -- needs to be performed. Moreover, there is much opportunity for further refining these devices that include the ability of the device to reliably monitor gas-exchange, sleep-wakefulness state, and for reducing variability in device efficacy due to provider-selected device-settings. PMID:25346650

  4. Ambulatory pulmonary artery pressure monitoring in advanced heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Yandrapalli, Srikanth; Raza, Anoshia; Tariq, Sohaib; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is an emerging epidemic associate with significant morbidity, mortality, and health care expenditure. Although there were major advances in pharmacologic and device based therapies for the management of HF, mortality of this condition remains high. Accurate monitoring of HF patients for exacerbations is very important to reduce recurrent hospitalizations and its associated complications. With the failure of clinical signs, tele-monitoring, and laboratory bio-markers to function as early markers of HF exacerbations, more sophisticated techniques were sought to accurately predict the circulatory status in HF patients in order to execute timely pharmacological intervention to reduce frequent hospitalizations. CardioMEMSTM (St. Jude Medical, Inc., Saint Paul, Minnesota) is an implantable, wireless pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) monitoring system which transmits the patient’s continuous PAPs to the treating health care provider in the ambulatory setting. PAP-guided medical therapy modification has been shown to significantly reduce HF-related hospitalization and overall mortality. In advanced stages of HF, wireless access to hemodynamic information correlated with earlier left ventricular assist device implantation and shorter time to heart transplantation. PMID:28163833

  5. High-pressure propulsion - advanced concepts for cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoerman, Leonard

    The state-of-the-art liquid propellant cooled combustion chambers utilized in the space shuttle are third-generation designs which have evolved from a continuing demand for higher operating pressure and aircraft-type reusability. History has shown that major advances in cooling occur in approximately ten-year cycles, with each cycle providing a nominal 400% increase in operating pressure and/or a higher degree of reusability. The previous technologies include the first-generation double-wall steel jackets used in the 220 psi V-2 and Aerobee, and the second generation wire-wrapped double tapered tubular assemblies typical of the 800 psi Titan I, II, and III, and 1000 psi F-1 engines. The third-generation designs utilize milled slot, high thermal conductivity liners and electrodeposited nickel closures. The space shuttle main engine operating at 3200 psia is adequate for individual flights; however, the desired goal of 55 service-free missions has yet to be realized. Future single-stage-to-orbit propulsion concepts can benefit from a further increase in operating pressures to 6000 to 10,000 psi combined with engine reuse capabilities in excess of the 55 flight goals of the space shuttle. A fourth-generation approach will be required to attain these more ambitious goals. These new designs will require a combination of cooling processes, including regenerative and transpiration, combined with improved high-temperature materials and new fabrication techniques. The limitations of the third-generation designs, the impact of propellant/coolant selection, and the approaches for the coming fourth-generation cooling technologies are discussed.

  6. A Systematic Approach of Employing Quality by Design Principles: Risk Assessment and Design of Experiments to Demonstrate Process Understanding and Identify the Critical Process Parameters for Coating of the Ethylcellulose Pseudolatex Dispersion Using Non-Conventional Fluid Bed Process.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Bhaveshkumar H; Fahmy, Raafat; Claycamp, H Gregg; Moore, Christine M V; Chatterjee, Sharmista; Hoag, Stephen W

    2016-07-14

    The goal of this study was to utilize risk assessment techniques and statistical design of experiments (DoE) to gain process understanding and to identify critical process parameters for the manufacture of controlled release multiparticulate beads using a novel disk-jet fluid bed technology. The material attributes and process parameters were systematically assessed using the Ishikawa fish bone diagram and failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) risk assessment methods. The high risk attributes identified by the FMEA analysis were further explored using resolution V fractional factorial design. To gain an understanding of the processing parameters, a resolution V fractional factorial study was conducted. Using knowledge gained from the resolution V study, a resolution IV fractional factorial study was conducted; the purpose of this IV study was to identify the critical process parameters (CPP) that impact the critical quality attributes and understand the influence of these parameters on film formation. For both studies, the microclimate, atomization pressure, inlet air volume, product temperature (during spraying and curing), curing time, and percent solids in the coating solutions were studied. The responses evaluated were percent agglomeration, percent fines, percent yield, bead aspect ratio, median particle size diameter (d50), assay, and drug release rate. Pyrobuttons® were used to record real-time temperature and humidity changes in the fluid bed. The risk assessment methods and process analytical tools helped to understand the novel disk-jet technology and to systematically develop models of the coating process parameters like process efficiency and the extent of curing during the coating process.

  7. Online monitoring of particle mass flow rate in bottom spray fluid bed coating--development and application.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li Kun; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Liew, Celine Valeria

    2010-08-16

    The primary purpose of this study is to develop a visiometric process analyzer for online monitoring of particle mass flow rate in the bottom spray fluid bed coating process. The secondary purpose is to investigate the influences of partition gap and air accelerator insert size on particle mass flow rate using the developed visiometric process analyzer. Particle movement in the region between the product chamber and partition column was captured using a high speed camera. Mean particle velocity and number of particles in the images were determined by particle image velocimetry and morphological image processing method respectively. Mass flow rate was calculated using particle velocity, number of particles in the images, particle density and size information. Particle velocity and number findings were validated using image tracking and manual particle counting techniques respectively. Validation experiments showed that the proposed method was accurate. Partition gap was found to influence particle mass flow rate by limiting the rate of solids flux into the partition column; the air accelerator insert was found to influence particle mass flow rate by a Venturi effect. Partition gap and air accelerator insert diameter needed to be adjusted accordingly in relation to the other variability sources and diameter of coating cores respectively. The potential, challenges and possible solutions of the proposed visiometric process analyzer were further discussed.

  8. Development of a fluid bed granulation process control strategy based on real-time process and product measurements.

    PubMed

    Burggraeve, Anneleen; Silva, Ana F T; Van den Kerkhof, Tom; Hellings, Mario; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; Vander Heyden, Yvan; De Beer, Thomas

    2012-10-15

    This article describes the results of three case studies conducted consecutively, in order to develop a process control strategy for a top-spray fluid bed granulation process. The use of several real-time particle size (i.e., spatial filter velocimetry and focused beam reflectance measurement) and moisture (i.e., near infrared (NIR) and Lighthouse near infrared spectroscopy) analyzers was examined. A feed-forward process control method was developed, where in-line collected granulation information during the process spraying phase was used to determine the optimum drying temperature of the consecutive drying phase. Via real-time monitoring of process (i.e., spraying temperature and spray rate) and product (i.e., granule size distribution and moisture) parameters during the spraying period, the batch bulk density was predicted at the end of the spraying cycle, using a PLS model. When this predicted bulk density was not meeting the desired value, the developed control method allowed the calculation of an adjusted drying temperature leading to the desired batch bulk density at the end of the granulation process. Besides the development of the feed-forward control strategy, a quantitative PLS model for in-line moisture content prediction of the granulated end product was built using the NIR data.

  9. Fluid bed gasification--plasma converter process generating energy from solid waste: experimental assessment of sulphur species.

    PubMed

    Morrin, Shane; Lettieri, Paola; Chapman, Chris; Taylor, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Often perceived as a Cinderella material, there is growing appreciation for solid waste as a renewable content thermal process feed. Nonetheless, research on solid waste gasification and sulphur mechanisms in particular is lacking. This paper presents results from two related experiments on a novel two stage gasification process, at demonstration scale, using a sulphur-enriched wood pellet feed. Notable SO2 and relatively low COS levels (before gas cleaning) were interesting features of the trials, and not normally expected under reducing gasification conditions. Analysis suggests that localised oxygen rich regions within the fluid bed played a role in SO2's generation. The response of COS to sulphur in the feed was quite prompt, whereas SO2 was more delayed. It is proposed that the bed material sequestered sulphur from the feed, later aiding SO2 generation. The more reducing gas phase regions above the bed would have facilitated COS--hence its faster response. These results provide a useful insight, with further analysis on a suite of performed experiments underway, along with thermodynamic modelling.

  10. Advanced research and technology programs for advanced high-pressure oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsik, S. J.; Morea, S. F.

    1985-03-01

    A research and technology program for advanced high pressure, oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion technology is presently being pursued by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to establish the basic discipline technologies, develop the analytical tools, and establish the data base necessary for an orderly evolution of the staged combustion reusable rocket engine. The need for the program is based on the premise that the USA will depend on the Shuttle and its derivative versions as its principal Earth-to-orbit transportation system for the next 20 to 30 yr. The program is focused in three principal areas of enhancement: (1) life extension, (2) performance, and (3) operations and diagnosis. Within the technological disciplines the efforts include: rotordynamics, structural dynamics, fluid and gas dynamics, materials fatigue/fracture/life, turbomachinery fluid mechanics, ignition/combustion processes, manufacturing/producibility/nondestructive evaluation methods and materials development/evaluation. An overview of the Advanced High Pressure Oxygen-Hydrogen Rocket Propulsion Technology Program Structure and Working Groups objectives are presented with highlights of several significant achievements.

  11. Advanced research and technology program for advanced high pressure oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsik, S. J.; Morea, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    A research and technology program for advanced high pressure, oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion technology is presently being pursued by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to establish the basic discipline technologies, develop the analytical tools, and establish the data base necessary for an orderly evolution of the staged combustion reusable rocket engine. The need for the program is based on the premise that the USA will depend on the Shuttle and its derivative versions as its principal Earth-to-orbit transportation system for the next 20 to 30 yr. The program is focused in three principal areas of enhancement: (1) life extension, (2) performance, and (3) operations and diagnosis. Within the technological disciplines the efforts include: rotordynamics, structural dynamics, fluid and gas dynamics, materials fatigue/fracture/life, turbomachinery fluid mechanics, ignition/combustion processes, manufacturing/producibility/nondestructive evaluation methods and materials development/evaluation. An overview of the Advanced High Pressure Oxygen-Hydrogen Rocket Propulsion Technology Program Structure and Working Groups objectives are presented with highlights of several significant achievements.

  12. Advanced research and technology programs for advanced high-pressure oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsik, S. J.; Morea, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    A research and technology program for advanced high pressure, oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion technology is presently being pursued by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to establish the basic discipline technologies, develop the analytical tools, and establish the data base necessary for an orderly evolution of the staged combustion reusable rocket engine. The need for the program is based on the premise that the USA will depend on the Shuttle and its derivative versions as its principal Earth-to-orbit transportation system for the next 20 to 30 yr. The program is focused in three principal areas of enhancement: (1) life extension, (2) performance, and (3) operations and diagnosis. Within the technological disciplines the efforts include: rotordynamics, structural dynamics, fluid and gas dynamics, materials fatigue/fracture/life, turbomachinery fluid mechanics, ignition/combustion processes, manufacturing/producibility/nondestructive evaluation methods and materials development/evaluation. An overview of the Advanced High Pressure Oxygen-Hydrogen Rocket Propulsion Technology Program Structure and Working Groups objectives are presented with highlights of several significant achievements.

  13. Two stage fluid bed-plasma gasification process for solid waste valorisation: technical review and preliminary thermodynamic modelling of sulphur emissions.

    PubMed

    Morrin, Shane; Lettieri, Paola; Chapman, Chris; Mazzei, Luca

    2012-04-01

    Gasification of solid waste for energy has significant potential given an abundant feed supply and strong policy drivers. Nonetheless, significant ambiguities in the knowledge base are apparent. Consequently this study investigates sulphur mechanisms within a novel two stage fluid bed-plasma gasification process. This paper includes a detailed review of gasification and plasma fundamentals in relation to the specific process, along with insight on MSW based feedstock properties and sulphur pollutant therein. As a first step to understanding sulphur partitioning and speciation within the process, thermodynamic modelling of the fluid bed stage has been performed. Preliminary findings, supported by plant experience, indicate the prominence of solid phase sulphur species (as opposed to H(2)S) - Na and K based species in particular. Work is underway to further investigate and validate this.

  14. Microwave drying of granules containing a moisture-sensitive drug: a promising alternative to fluid bed and hot air oven drying.

    PubMed

    Chee, Sze Nam; Johansen, Anne Lene; Gu, Li; Karlsen, Jan; Heng, Paul Wan Sia

    2005-07-01

    The impact of microwave drying and binders (copolyvidone and povidone) on the degradation of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and physical properties of granules were compared with conventional drying methods. Moist granules containing ASA were prepared using a high shear granulator and dried with hot air oven, fluid bed or microwave (static or dynamic bed) dryers. Percent ASA degradation, size and size distribution, friability and flow properties of the granules were determined. Granules dried with the dynamic bed microwave dryer showed the least amount of ASA degradation, followed by fluid bed dryer, static bed microwave oven and hot air oven. The use of microwave drying with a static granular bed adversely affected ASA degradation and drying capability. Dynamic bed microwave dryer had the highest drying capability followed by fluid bed, static bed microwave dryer and conventional hot air oven. The intensity of microwave did not affect ASA degradation, size distribution, friability and flow properties of the granules. Mixing/agitating of granules during drying affected the granular physical properties studied. Copolyvidone resulted in lower amount of granular residual moisture content and ASA degradation on storage than povidone, especially for static bed microwave drying. In conclusion, microwave drying technology has been shown to be a promising alternative for drying granules containing a moisture-sensitive drug.

  15. Advanced technology for minimum weight pressure vessel system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamstad, M. A.; Jessop, E. S.; Toland, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    Bosses were made of fiber/resin composite materials to evaluate their potential in lightweight pressure vessels. An approximate 25% weight savings over the standard aluminum boss was achieved without boss failures during burst tests. Polymer liners and metal liners are used in fiber composite pressure vessels for containment of gases. The internal support of these liners required during the filament winding process has previously been provided by dissolvable salt mandrels. An internal pressurization technique has been developed which allows overwinding the liner without other means of support and without collapse. Study was made of several additional concepts including styrene/Saran, styrene/flexible epoxy.

  16. Advanced composite fiber/metal pressure vessels for aircraft applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanicolopoulos, Aleck

    1993-06-01

    Structural Composites Industries has developed, qualified, and delivered a number of high performance carbon epoxy overwrapped/seamless aluminum liner pressure vessels for use in military aircraft where low weight, low cost, high operating pressure and short lead time are the primary considerations. This paper describes product design, development, and qualification for a typical program. The vessel requirements included a munitions insensitivity criterion as evidenced by no fragmentation following impact by a .50 cal tumbling bullet. This was met by the development of a carbon-Spectra hybrid composite overwrap on a thin-walled seamless aluminum liner. The same manufacturing, inspection, and test processes that are used to produce lightweight, thin walled seamless aluminum lined carbon/epoxy overwrapped pressure vessels for satellite and other space applications were used to fabricate this vessel. This report focuses on the results of performance in the qualification testing.

  17. Recent Advances in Food Processing Using High Hydrostatic Pressure Technology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chung-Yi; Huang, Hsiao-Wen; Hsu, Chiao-Ping; Yang, Binghuei Barry

    2016-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure is an emerging non-thermal technology that can achieve the same standards of food safety as those of heat pasteurization and meet consumer requirements for fresher tasting, minimally processed foods. Applying high-pressure processing can inactivate pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms and enzymes, as well as modify structures with little or no effects on the nutritional and sensory quality of foods. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) have approved the use of high-pressure processing (HPP), which is a reliable technological alternative to conventional heat pasteurization in food-processing procedures. This paper presents the current applications of HPP in processing fruits, vegetables, meats, seafood, dairy, and egg products; such applications include the combination of pressure and biopreservation to generate specific characteristics in certain products. In addition, this paper describes recent findings on the microbiological, chemical, and molecular aspects of HPP technology used in commercial and research applications.

  18. Time Pressure and Phonological Advance Planning in Spoken Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damian, Markus F.; Dumay, Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    Current accounts of spoken production debate the extent to which speakers plan ahead. Here, we investigated whether the scope of phonological planning is influenced by changes in time pressure constraints. The first experiment used a picture-word interference task and showed that picture naming latencies were shorter when word distractors shared…

  19. MEMS pressure sensor fabricated by advanced bulk micromachining techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanko, Gabriel; Hudek, Peter; Zehetner, Johann; Dzuba, Jaroslav; Choleva, Pavlina; Vallo, Martin; Rýger, Ivan; Lalinský, Tibor

    2013-05-01

    We present the design and implementation of a MEMS pressure sensor with an operation potential under harsh conditions at high temperatures (T = 300 - 800°C). The sensor consists of a circular HEMT (C-HEMT) integrated on a circular AlGaN/GaN membrane. In order to realize MEMS for extreme conditions using AlGaN/GaN material system, two key issues should be solved: (a) realization of MEMS structures by etching of the substrate material and (b) formation of metallic contacts (both ohmic and Schottky) to be able to withstand high thermal loads. In this design concept the piezoresistive and piezoelectric effect of AlGaN/GaN heterostructure is used to sense the pressure under static and/or dynamic conditions. The backside bulk micromachining of our SiC wafer in the first experiment started with FS-laser ablation down to ~200 -270μm deep holes of 500μm in diameter. Because no additional intermediate layer can stop the ablation process, the number of laser pulses has to be optimized in order to reach the required ablation depth. 2D structural-mechanical and piezoelectric analyses were performed to verify the mechanical and piezoelectric response of the circular membrane pressure sensor to static pressure load (in the range between 20 and 100kPa). We suggested that suppressing the residual stress in the membrane can improve the sensor response. The parameters of the same devices previously fabricated on bulk substrates and/or membranes were compared. The maxima of drain currents of our C-HEMT devices on SiC exhibit more than four times higher values compared to those measured on silicon substrates.

  20. Combining microwave resonance technology to multivariate data analysis as a novel PAT tool to improve process understanding in fluid bed granulation.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Vera; Herdling, Thorsten; Reich, Gabriele; Menezes, José C; Lochmann, Dirk

    2011-08-01

    A set of 192 fluid bed granulation batches at industrial scale were in-line monitored using microwave resonance technology (MRT) to determine moisture, temperature and density of the granules. Multivariate data analysis techniques such as multiway partial least squares (PLS), multiway principal component analysis (PCA) and multivariate batch control charts were applied onto collected batch data sets. The combination of all these techniques, along with off-line particle size measurements, led to significantly increased process understanding. A seasonality effect could be put into evidence that impacted further processing through its influence on the final granule size. Moreover, it was demonstrated by means of a PLS that a relation between the particle size and the MRT measurements can be quantitatively defined, highlighting a potential ability of the MRT sensor to predict information about the final granule size. This study has contributed to improve a fluid bed granulation process, and the process knowledge obtained shows that the product quality can be built in process design, following Quality by Design (QbD) and Process Analytical Technology (PAT) principles.

  1. Advanced High-Temperature, High-Pressure Transport Reactor Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Swanson; Daniel Laudal

    2008-03-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Coal and Environmental Systems has as its mission to develop advanced gasification-based technologies for affordable, efficient, zero-emission power generation. These advanced power systems, which are expected to produce near-zero pollutants, are an integral part of DOE's Vision 21 Program. DOE has also been developing advanced gasification systems that lower the capital and operating costs of producing syngas for chemical production. A transport reactor has shown potential to be a low-cost syngas producer compared to other gasification systems since its high-throughput-per-unit cross-sectional area reduces capital costs. This work directly supports the Power Systems Development Facility utilizing the KBR transport reactor located at the Southern Company Services Wilsonville, Alabama, site. Over 2800 hours of operation on 11 different coals ranging from bituminous to lignite along with a petroleum coke has been completed to date in the pilot-scale transport reactor development unit (TRDU) at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). The EERC has established an extensive database on the operation of these various fuels in both air-blown and oxygen-blown modes utilizing a pilot-scale transport reactor gasifier. This database has been useful in determining the effectiveness of design changes on an advanced transport reactor gasifier and for determining the performance of various feedstocks in a transport reactor. The effects of different fuel types on both gasifier performance and the operation of the hot-gas filter system have been determined. It has been demonstrated that corrected fuel gas heating values ranging from 90 to 130 Btu/scf have been achieved in air-blown mode, while heating values up to 230 Btu/scf on a dry basis have been achieved in oxygen-blown mode. Carbon conversions up to 95% have also been obtained and are highly dependent on the oxygen-coal ratio. Higher

  2. Advanced developments in NiH{sub 2} dependent pressure vessel (DPV) cell and battery technology

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, D.B.; Fox, C.L.

    1997-12-01

    The Dependent Pressure Vessel (DPV) Nickel-Hydrogen (NiH{sub 2}) design is being developed by Eagle-Picher Industries, Inc. (EPI) as an advanced battery for military and commercial, aerospace and terrestrial applications. The DPV cell design offers high specific energy and energy density as well as reduced cost, while retaining the established Individual Pressure Vessel (IPV) technology flight heritage and database. This advanced DPV design also offers a more efficient mechanical, electrical and thermal cell and battery configuration and a reduced parts count. The DPV battery design promotes compact, minimum volume packaging and weight efficiency, and delivers cost and weight savings with minimal design risks.

  3. Advanced High-Temperature, High-Pressure Transport Reactor Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Michael L. Swanson

    2005-08-30

    50 hours of gasification on a petroleum coke from the Hunt Oil Refinery and an additional 73 hours of operation on a high-ash coal from India. Data from these tests indicate that while acceptable fuel gas heating value was achieved with these fuels, the transport gasifier performs better on the lower-rank feedstocks because of their higher char reactivity. Comparable carbon conversions have been achieved at similar oxygen/coal ratios for both air-blown and oxygen-blown operation for each fuel; however, carbon conversion was lower for the less reactive feedstocks. While separation of fines from the feed coals is not needed with this technology, some testing has suggested that feedstocks with higher levels of fines have resulted in reduced carbon conversion, presumably due to the inability of the finer carbon particles to be captured by the cyclones. These data show that these low-rank feedstocks provided similar fuel gas heating values; however, even among the high-reactivity low-rank coals, the carbon conversion did appear to be lower for the fuels (brown coal in particular) that contained a significant amount of fines. The fuel gas under oxygen-blown operation has been higher in hydrogen and carbon dioxide concentration since the higher steam injection rate promotes the water-gas shift reaction to produce more CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} at the expense of the CO and water vapor. However, the high water and CO{sub 2} partial pressures have also significantly reduced the reaction of (Abstract truncated)

  4. Recent advances in lightweight, filament-wound composite pressure vessel technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lark, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    A review of recent advances is presented for lightweight, high performance composite pressure vessel technology that covers the areas of design concepts, fabrication procedures, applications, and performance of vessels subjected to single cycle burst and cyclic fatigue loading. Filament wound fiber/epoxy composite vessels were made from S glass, graphite, and Kevlar 49 fibers and were equipped with both structural and nonstructural liners. Pressure vessels structural efficiencies were attained which represented weight savings, using different liners, of 40 to 60 percent over all titanium pressure vessels. Significant findings in each area are summarized.

  5. Advanced Computational Thermal Studies and their Assessment for Supercritical-Pressure Reactors (SCRs)

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. McEligot; J. Y. Yoo; J. S. Lee; S. T. Ro; E. Lurien; S. O. Park; R. H. Pletcher; B. L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J. M. Wallace

    2009-04-01

    The goal of this laboratory / university collaboration of coupled computational and experimental studies is the improvement of predictive methods for supercritical-pressure reactors. The general objective is to develop supporting knowledge needed of advanced computational techniques for the technology development of the concepts and their safety systems.

  6. Conceptual design and assessment of a pressurized circulating fluidized-bed boiler. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, F.T.; Payne, H.M.; Wechsler, A.T.; Saunders, W.H.; Berman, P.A.; Dille, J.C.

    1983-12-01

    This report presents a technical feasibility study of a turbocharged boiler employing a Lurgi circulating fluid bed combustion system operating at 10 atmospheres pressure. The study is based on a 250 MW(e) plant firing a high sulfur Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal. The basic design objective was to develop a plant with components that can be shop-assembled and transported to the plant site by barge on the nation's inland waterways. The study was jointly undertaken by Combustion Engineering, Inc., Lurgi Corporation, and Westinghouse Electric Corporation and included development of design parameters, a conceptual design and general arrangement, a control philosophy, and identification of areas where further development is needed. The methods utilized to determine the feasibility of the pressurized circulating fluid bed system and to develop system concepts were based on Lurgi's extensive experience in atmospheric circulating fluid bed technology. The system consists of the same components as used in an atmospheric circulating fluid bed system, but designed for operation at 10 atmospheres. The principal conclusions of the study are that the concept of burning coal in a circulating fluid bed can be applied to a system operating at 10 atmospheres, that shop fabrication can be maximized, and the system components can be barge shipped. The conclusions also indicate that this concept is a viable method for providing incremental steam generating capacity either in existing plants or in first generation steam plants.

  7. Hydrodynamics and energy consumption studies in a three-phase liquid circulating three-phase fluid bed contactor

    SciTech Connect

    Rusumdar, Ahmad J; Abuthalib, A.; Mohan, Vaka Murali; Srinivasa Kumar, C.; Sujatha, V.; Rajendra Prasad, P.

    2009-07-15

    The hydrodynamics and energy consumption have been studied in a cold flow, bubbling and turbulent, pressurized gas-liquid-solid three-phase fluidized bed (0.15 m ID x 1 m height) with concurrent gas-liquid up flow is proposed with the intention of increasing the gas hold up. The hydrodynamic behaviour is described and characterised by some specific gas and liquid velocities. Particles are easily fluidized and can be uniformly distributed over the whole height of the column. The effect of parameters like liquid flow rate, gas flow rate, particle loading, particle size, and solid density on gas hold up and effect of gas flow rate, solid density and particle size on solid hold up, energy consumption and minimum fluidization velocity has been studied. At the elevated pressures a superior method for better prediction of minimum fluidization velocity and terminal settling velocities has been adopted. The results have been interpreted with Bernoulli's theorem and Richardson-Zaki equation. Based on the assumption of the gas and liquid as a pretend fluid, a simplification has been made to predict the particle terminal settling velocities. The Richardson-Zaki parameter n' was compared with Renzo's results. A correlation has been proposed with the experimental results for the three-phase fluidization. (author)

  8. Management of severe obstructive sleep apnea using mandibular advancement devices with auto continuous positive airway pressures

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Rashmi; Dubey, Abhishek; Kant, Surya; Singh, Balendra Pratap

    2015-01-01

    The use of continuous positive airway pressures (CPAP) is considered standard treatment of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Treatment of the disease poses a great challenge not only for its diagnostic purpose but also for its treatment part. In about 29-83% of the patients, treatment is difficult because of non-compliance resulting due to high pressures, air leaks and other related issues. In such situations, alternative methods of treatment need to be looked for so as to ascertain better management. Mandibular advancement devices along with CPAP may show better treatment outcome in specific situations. PMID:25814802

  9. Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines (moving bed, fluid bed contactor/ceramic filter)

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1992-10-20

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of direct coal-fired turbine power plants as part of their Heat Engines program. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the direct coal-fired turbine is high-temperature combustion gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science Technology Center, is evaluating two Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meat this technical challenge: a baseline ceramic barrier filter ILEC concept, and a fluidized bed ILEC concept. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure combustion gases at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2300[degree]F. This document reports the status of a program in the nineteenth quarter to develop this ILEC technology for direct coal-fired turbine power plants.

  10. Advanced Damage Tolerance Analysis of International Space Station Pressure Wall Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.

    2006-01-01

    EM20/MSFC has sponsored technology in the area of advanced damage tolerance analysis tools used to analyze the International Space Station (ISS) pressure wall welds. The ISS European modules did not receive non-destructive evaluation (NDE) inspection after proof test. In final assembly configuration, most welds could only be inspected from one side, and some welds were uninspectible. Therefore, advanced damage tolerance analysis was required to determine the critical initial flaw sizes and predicted safe life for the pressure wall welds. EM20 sponsored the development of a new finite element tools using FEA-Crack and WARP3D to solve the problem. This presentation gives a brief overview of the new analytical tools and the analysis results.

  11. Unsteady blade-surface pressures on a large-scale advanced propeller: Prediction and data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, M.; Groeneweg, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    An unsteady 3-D Euler analysis technique is employed to compute the flow field of an advanced propeller operating at an angle of attack. The predicted blade pressure waveforms are compared with wind tunnel data at two Mach numbers, 0.5 and 0.2. The inflow angle is three degrees. For an inflow Mach number of 0.5, the predicted pressure response is in fair agreement with data: the predicted phases of the waveforms are in close agreement with data while the magnitudes are underpredicted. At the low Mach number of 0.2 (takeoff), the numerical solution shows the formation of a leading edge vortex which is in qualitative agreement with measurements. However, the highly nonlinear pressure response measured on the blade suction surface is not captured in the present inviscid analysis.

  12. Unsteady blade surface pressures on a large-scale advanced propeller - Prediction and data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, M.; Groeneweg, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    An unsteady three dimensional Euler analysis technique is employed to compute the flowfield of an advanced propeller operating at an angle of attack. The predicted blade pressure waveforms are compared with wind tunnel data at two Mach numbers, 0.5 and 0.2. The inflow angle is three degrees. For an inflow Mach number of 0.5, the predicted pressure response is in fair agreement with data: the predicted phases of the waveforms are in close agreement with data while the magnitudes are underpredicted. At the low Mach number of 0.2 (take-off) the numerical solution shows the formation of a leading edge vortex which is in qualitative agreement with measurements. However, the highly nonlinear pressure response measured on the blade suction surface is not captured in the present inviscid analysis.

  13. Recent advances in lightweight, filament-wound composite pressure vessel technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lark, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    A review of recent advances is presented for lightweight, high-performance composite pressure vessel technology that covers the areas of design concepts, fabrication procedures, applications, and performance of vessels subjected to single-cycle burst and cyclic fatigue loading. Filament-wound fiber/epoxy composite vessels were made from S-glass, graphite, and Kevlar 49 fibers and were equipped with both structural and nonstructural liners. Pressure vessel structural efficiencies were attained which represented weight savings, using different liners, of 40 to 60 percent over all-titanium pressure vessels. Significant findings in each area are summarized including data from current NASA-Lewis Research Center contractual and in-house programs.

  14. Advanced Computational Modeling of Vapor Deposition in a High-pressure Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Moore, Craig E.; McCall, Sonya D.; Cardelino, Carlos A.; Dietz, Nikolaus; Bachmann, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    In search of novel approaches to produce new materials for electro-optic technologies, advances have been achieved in the development of computer models for vapor deposition reactors in space. Numerical simulations are invaluable tools for costly and difficult processes, such as those experiments designed for high pressures and microgravity conditions. Indium nitride is a candidate compound for high-speed laser and photo diodes for optical communication system, as well as for semiconductor lasers operating into the blue and ultraviolet regions. But InN and other nitride compounds exhibit large thermal decomposition at its optimum growth temperature. In addition, epitaxy at lower temperatures and subatmospheric pressures incorporates indium droplets into the InN films. However, surface stabilization data indicate that InN could be grown at 900 K in high nitrogen pressures, and microgravity could provide laminar flow conditions. Numerical models for chemical vapor deposition have been developed, coupling complex chemical kinetics with fluid dynamic properties.

  15. Advanced Computational Modeling of Vapor Deposition in a High-Pressure Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Moore, Craig E.; McCall, Sonya D.; Cardelino, Carlos A.; Dietz, Nikolaus; Bachmann, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    In search of novel approaches to produce new materials for electro-optic technologies, advances have been achieved in the development of computer models for vapor deposition reactors in space. Numerical simulations are invaluable tools for costly and difficult processes, such as those experiments designed for high pressures and microgravity conditions. Indium nitride is a candidate compound for high-speed laser and photo diodes for optical communication system, as well as for semiconductor lasers operating into the blue and ultraviolet regions. But InN and other nitride compounds exhibit large thermal decomposition at its optimum growth temperature. In addition, epitaxy at lower temperatures and subatmospheric pressures incorporates indium droplets into the InN films. However, surface stabilization data indicate that InN could be grown at 900 K in high nitrogen pressures, and microgravity could provide laminar flow conditions. Numerical models for chemical vapor deposition have been developed, coupling complex chemical kinetics with fluid dynamic properties.

  16. Influence of binder properties, method of addition, powder type and operating conditions on fluid-bed melt granulation and resulting tablet properties.

    PubMed

    Abberger, T

    2001-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate melt granulation in a laboratory scale fluid-bed granulator with respect to granule growth, granule properties and resulting tablet properties. The parameters investigated were method of addition of PEG (spray-on or addition as flakes), binder concentration, PEG type (3000, 4000 and 6000, sprayed-on), size (PEG 4000, added as three different sized flakes), powder type (two different sized lactose types and corn starch) and operating conditions (volume air flow and heating temperature). Addition of binder as flakes led to layering as a growth mechanism when the size of the flakes was high. Coalescence occurred when the size was low. Coalescence also occurred when spraying was the method of addition. Due to the greater viscosity of the PEG 6000 melt it produced bigger granules than 3000 or 4000. The influence of volume air flow was moderate and the influence of heating temperature in the range of 70-90 degrees C was very low with both methods of addition. The disintegration time of tablets from granules where PEG was added as flakes was shorter than from granules where PEG was sprayed-on. The latter method of binder addition led to tablets which did not disintegrate but eroded. This was apparently caused by formation of a binder matrix, which could not be destroyed by the disintegrant.

  17. Cluster formation and drag reduction-proposed mechanism of particle recirculation within the partition column of the bottom spray fluid-bed coater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li Kun; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Liew, Celine Valeria

    2015-04-01

    Bottom spray fluid-bed coating is a common technique for coating multiparticulates. Under the quality-by-design framework, particle recirculation within the partition column is one of the main variability sources affecting particle coating and coat uniformity. However, the occurrence and mechanism of particle recirculation within the partition column of the coater are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to visualize and define particle recirculation within the partition column. Based on different combinations of partition gap setting, air accelerator insert diameter, and particle size fraction, particle movements within the partition column were captured using a high-speed video camera. The particle recirculation probability and voidage information were mapped using a visiometric process analyzer. High-speed images showed that particles contributing to the recirculation phenomenon were behaving as clustered colonies. Fluid dynamics analysis indicated that particle recirculation within the partition column may be attributed to the combined effect of cluster formation and drag reduction. Both visiometric process analysis and particle coating experiments showed that smaller particles had greater propensity toward cluster formation than larger particles. The influence of cluster formation on coating performance and possible solutions to cluster formation were further discussed.

  18. TRAC-PF1: an advanced best-estimate computer program for pressurized water reactor analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.

    1984-02-01

    The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) is being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light water reactors. The TRAC-PF1 program provides this capability for pressurized water reactors and for many thermal-hydraulic experimental facilities. The code features either a one-dimensional or a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and its associated internals; a two-phase, two-fluid nonequilibrium hydrodynamics model with a noncondensable gas field; flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment; optional reflood tracking capability for both bottom flood and falling-film quench fronts; and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. This report describes the thermal-hydraulic models and the numerical solution methods used in the code. Detailed programming and user information also are provided.

  19. High Pressure Research in the Large-Volume Press at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Shen, G.

    2013-05-01

    We present an overview of current status of high-pressure research using large-volume presses (LVP) at both GSECARS (Sector 13) and HPCAT (Sector 16) at the third-generation synchrotron facility of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne National Laboratory. These combined facilities provide a wide range of research capabilities for the high pressure community. The 230 ton Paris-Edinburgh device (jointly developed by HPCAT and GSECARS, with partial support from COMPRES) at the bending magnet (BM) beamline 16-BM-B has been used primarily for studies on liquids and glasses. We use the multi-angle energy-dispersive diffraction technique to probe structures of non-crystalline materials, and ultrasonic and falling sphere techniques to measure elasticity and viscosity of these materials. These capabilities allow us to examine the close link between structure and physical properties of non-crystalline metarials. The 1000 ton system at the insertion device (ID) beamline 13-ID-D is used extensively for acoustic velocity measurement for solids and melts. The newly developed DDIA-30 module, when used in a double-stage apparatus with sintered diamond anvils, can generate pressures in excess of 40 GPa routinely. DDIA-30 can also be used as a deformation device for larger samples or higher pressure experiments. The 250 ton system at beamline 13-BM-D as just been upgraded and can accommodate a variety of LVP techniques. Among them the D-DIA and the high-pressure x-ray tomography microscope (HPXTM) are at high demand. The D-DIA has been used for deformation at mantle conditions in both ductile and brittle regime, with acoustic emission detection. The HPXTM has been used to study volumetric properties of glasses and melts as well as 3D microstructure imaging under pressure. Latest scientific results will be highlighted.

  20. High-pressure hydrogen testing of single crystal superalloys for advanced rocket engine turbopump turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parr, R. A.; Alter, W. S.; Johnston, M. H.; Strizak, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    A screening program to determine the effects of high pressure hydrogen on selected candidate materials for advanced single crystal turbine blade applications is examined. The alloys chosen for the investigation are CM SX-2, CM SX-4C, Rene N-4, and PWA1480. Testing is carried out in hydrogen and helium at 34 MPa and room temperature, with both notched and unnotched single crystal specimens. Results show a significant variation in susceptibility to Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) among the four alloys and a marked difference in fracture topography between hydrogen and helium environment specimens.

  1. High-pressure hydrogen testing of single crystal superalloys for advanced rocket engine turbopump turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, W. S.; Parr, R. A.; Johnston, M. H.; Strizak, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    A screening program to determine the effects of high pressure hydrogen on selected candidate materials for advanced single crystal turbine blade applications is examined. The alloys chosen for the investigation are CM SX-2, CM SX-4C, Rene N-4, and PWA1480. Testing is carried out in hydrogen and helium at 34 MPa and room temperature, with both notched and unnotched single crystal specimens. Results show a significant variation in susceptibility to Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) among the four alloys and a marked difference in fracture topography between hydrogen and helium environment specimens.

  2. Advanced turboprop wing installation effects measured by unsteady blade pressure and noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidelberg, Laurence J.; Woodward, Richard P.

    1987-01-01

    A single rotation model propeller (SR-7A) was tested at simulated takeoff/approach conditions (Mach 0.2), in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-Ft Anechoic Wind Tunnel. Both unsteady blade surface pressures and noise measurements were made for a tractor configuration with propeller/straight wing and propeller alone configurations. The angle between the wing chord and propeller axis (droop angle) was varied along with the wing angle of attack to determine the effects on noise and unsteady loading. A method was developed that uses unsteady blade pressure measurements to provide a quantitative indication of propeller inflow conditions, at least for a uniform (across the propeller disk) inflow angle. The wing installation caused a nearly uniform upwash at the propeller inlet as evidenced by the domination of the pressure spectra by the first shaft order. This inflow angle increased at a rate of almost 150 percent of that of the wing angle-of-attack for a propeller-wing spacing of 0.54 wing chords at a constant droop angle. The flyover noise, as measured by the maximum blade passing frequency level, correlates closely with the propeller inflow angle (approx. 0.6 dB per degree of inflow angle) for all droop angles and wing angles of attack tested, including the propeller alone data. Large changes in the unsteady pressure responses on the suction surface of the blade were observed as the advance ratio was varied. The presence of a leading edge vortex may explain this behavior since changes in the location of this vortex would change with loading (advance ratio).

  3. Drinking water treatment of priority pesticides using low pressure UV photolysis and advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Sanches, Sandra; Barreto Crespo, Maria T; Pereira, Vanessa J

    2010-03-01

    This study reports the efficiency of low pressure UV photolysis for the degradation of pesticides identified as priority pollutants by the European Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC. Direct low pressure UV photolysis and advanced oxidation processes (using hydrogen peroxide and titanium dioxide) experiments were conducted in laboratory grade water, surface water, and groundwater. LP direct photolysis using a high UV fluence (1500 mJ/cm(2)) was found to be extremely efficient to accomplish the degradation of all pesticides except isoproturon, whereas photolysis using hydrogen peroxide and titanium dioxide did not significantly enhance their removal. In all matrices tested the experimental photolysis of the pesticides followed the same trend: isoproturon degradation was negligible, alachlor, pentachlorophenol, and atrazine showed similar degradation rate constants, whereas diuron and chlorfenvinphos were highly removed. The degradation trend observed for the selected compounds followed the decadic molar absorption coefficients order with exception of isoproturon probably due to its extremely low quantum yield. Similar direct photolysis rate constants were obtained for each pesticide in the different matrices tested, showing that the water components did not significantly impact degradation. Extremely similar photolysis rate constants were also obtained in surface water for individual compounds when compared to mixtures. The model fluence and time-based rate constants reported were very similar to the direct photolysis experimental results obtained, while overestimating the advanced oxidation results. This model was used to predict how degradation of isoproturon, the most resilient compound, could be improved.

  4. High-pressure Experimental Studies on Geo-liquids Using Synchrotron Radiation at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanbin; Shen, Guoyin

    2014-12-23

    Here, we review recent progress in studying silicate, carbonate, and metallic liquids of geological and geophysical importance at high pressure and temperature, using the large-volume high-pressure devices at the third-generation synchrotron facility of the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. These integrated high-pressure facilities now offer a unique combination of experimental techniques that allow researchers to investigate structure, density, elasticity, viscosity, and interfacial tension of geo-liquids under high pressure, in a coordinated and systematic fashion. Moreover, we describe experimental techniques, along with scientific highlights. Future developments are also discussed.

  5. Prediction of Unsteady Blade Surface Pressures on an Advanced Propeller at an Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, M.; Groeneweg, J. F.

    1989-01-01

    The numerical solution of the unsteady, three-dimensional, Euler equations is considered in order to obtain the blade surface pressures of an advanced propeller at an angle of attack. The specific configuration considered is the SR7L propeller at cruise conditions with a 4.6 deg inflow angle corresponding to the plus 2 deg nacelle tilt of the Propeller Test Assessment (PTA) flight test condition. The results indicate nearly sinusoidal response of the blade loading, with angle of attack. For the first time, detailed variations of the chordwise loading as a function of azimuthal angle are presented. It is observed that the blade is lightly loaded for part of the revolution and shocks appear from hub to about 80 percent radial station for the highly loaded portion of the revolution.

  6. Prediction of unsteady blade surface pressures on an advanced propeller at an angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, M.; Groeneweg, J. F.

    1989-01-01

    The paper considers the numerical solution of the unsteady, three-dimensional, Euler equations to obtain the blade surface pressures of an advanced propeller at an angle of attack. The specific configuration considered is the SR7L propeller at cruise conditions with a 4.6 deg inflow angle corresponding to the +2 deg nacelle tilt of the Propeller Test Assessment (PTA) flight test condition. The results indicate nearly sinusoidal response of the blade loading, with angle of attack. For the first time, detailed variations of the chordwise loading as a function of azimuthal angle are presented. It is observed that the blade is lightly loaded for part of the revolution and shocks appear from hub to about 80 percent radial station for the highly loaded portion of the revolution.

  7. Prestressed-concrete pressure vessels and their applicability to advanced-energy-system concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J

    1983-01-01

    Prestressed concrete pressure vessels (PCPVs) are, in essence, spaced steel structures since their strength is derived from a multitude of steel elements made up of deformed reinforcing bars and prestressing tendons which are present in sufficient quantities to carry tension loads imposed on the vessel. Other major components of a PCPV include the concrete, liner and cooling system, and insulation. PCPVs exhibit a number of advantages which make them ideally suited for application to advanced energy concepts: fabricability in virtually any size and shape using available technology, improved safety, reduced capital costs, and a history of proven performance. PCPVs have many applications to both nuclear- and non-nuclear-based energy systems concepts. Several of these concepts will be discussed as well as the research and development activities conducted at ORNL in support of PCPV development.

  8. Prestressed concrete pressure vessels and their applicability to advanced energy system concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Prestressed concrete pressure vessels (PCPVs) are, in essence, spaced steel structures since their strength is derived from a multitude of steel elements made up of deformed reinforcing bars and prestressing tendons which are present in sufficient quantities to carry tension loads imposed on the vessel. Other major components of a PCPV include the concrete, liner and cooling system, and insulation. PCPVs exhibit a number of advantages which make them ideally suited for application to advanced energy concepts: fabricability in virtually any size and shape using available technology, improved safety, reduced capital costs, and a history of proven performance. PCPVs have many applications to both nuclear- and non-nuclear-based energy systems concepts. Several of these concepts are discussed as well as the research and development activities conducted at ORNL in support of PCPV development.

  9. Optical Fuel Injector Patternation Measurements in Advanced Liquid-Fueled, High Pressure, Gas Turbine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, R. J.; Hicks, Y. R.; Anderson, R. C.; Zaller, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging and planar Mie scattering are used to examine the fuel distribution pattern (patternation) for advanced fuel injector concepts in kerosene burning, high pressure gas turbine combustors. Three fuel injector concepts for aerospace applications were investigated under a broad range of operating conditions. Fuel PLIF patternation results are contrasted with those obtained by planar Mie scattering. For one injector, further comparison is also made with data obtained through phase Doppler measurements. Differences in spray patterns for diverse conditions and fuel injector configurations are readily discernible. An examination of the data has shown that a direct determination of the fuel spray angle at realistic conditions is also possible. The results obtained in this study demonstrate the applicability and usefulness of these nonintrusive optical techniques for investigating fuel spray patternation under actual combustor conditions.

  10. Advanced Models of LWR Pressure Vessel Embrittlement for Low Flux-HighFluence Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Odette, G. Robert; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2013-06-17

    Neutron embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is an unresolved issue for light water reactor life extension, especially since transition temperature shifts (TTS) must be predicted for high 80-year fluence levels up to approximately 1,020 n/cm{sup 2}, far beyond the current surveillance database. Unfortunately, TTS may accelerate at high fluence, and may be further amplified by the formation of late blooming phases that result in severe embrittlement even in low-copper (Cu) steels. Embrittlement by this mechanism is a potentially significant degradation phenomenon that is not predicted by current regulatory models. This project will focus on accurately predicting transition temperature shifts at high fluence using advanced physically based, empirically validated and calibrated models. A major challenge is to develop models that can adjust test reactor data to account for flux effects. Since transition temperature shifts depend on synergistic combinations of many variables, flux-effects cannot be treated in isolation. The best current models systematically and significantly under-predict transition temperature at high fluence, although predominantly for irradiations at much higher flux than actual RPV service. This project will integrate surveillance, test reactor and mechanism data with advanced models to address a number of outstanding RPV embrittlement issues. The effort will include developing new databases and preliminary models of flux effects for irradiation conditions ranging from very low (e.g., boiling water reactor) to high (e.g., accelerated test reactor). The team will also develop a database and physical models to help predict the conditions for the formation of Mn-Ni-Si late blooming phases and to guide future efforts to fully resolve this issue. Researchers will carry out other tasks on a best-effort basis, including prediction of transition temperature shift attenuation through the vessel wall, remediation of embrittlement by annealing

  11. High Pressure Burner Rig Testing of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings for Si3N4 Turbine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Fox, Dennis S.; Pastel, Robert T.

    2007-01-01

    Advanced thermal and environmental barrier coatings are being developed for Si3N4 components for turbine engine propulsion applications. High pressure burner rig testing was used to evaluate the coating system performance and durability. Test results demonstrated the feasibility and durability of the coating component systems under the simulated engine environments.

  12. Advanced Dependent Pressure Vessel (DPV) nickel-hydrogen spacecraft cell and battery design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coates, Dwaine; Wright, Doug; Repplinger, Ron

    1995-01-01

    The dependent pressure vessel (DPV) nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) battery is being developed as a potential spacecraft battery design for both military and commercial satellites. Individual pressure vessel (IPV) NiH2 batteries are currently flying on more than 70 Earth orbital satellites and have accumulated more than 140,000,000 cell-hours in actual spacecraft operation. The limitations of standard NiH2 IPV flight battery technology are primarily related to the internal cell design and the battery packaging issues associated with grouping multiple cylindrical cells. The DPV cell design offers higher specific energy and reduced cost, while retaining the established IPV NiH2 technology flight heritage and database. The advanced cell design offers a more efficient mechanical, electrical and thermal cell configuration and a reduced parts count. The internal electrode stack is a prismatic flat-plate arrangement. The flat individual cell pressure vessel provides a maximum direct thermal path for removing heat from the electrode stack. The cell geometry also minimizes multiple-cell battery packaging constraints by using an established end-plateltie-rod battery design. A major design advantage is that the battery support structure is efficiently required to restrain only the force applied to a portion of the end cell. As the cells are stacked in series to achieve the desired system voltage, this increment of the total battery weight becomes small. The geometry of the DPV cell promotes compact, minimum volume packaging and places all cell terminals along the length of the battery. The resulting ability to minimize intercell wiring offers additional design simplicity and significant weight savings. The DPV battery design offers significant cost and weight savings advantages while providing minimal design risks. Cell and battery level design issues will be addressed including mechanical, electrical and thermal design aspects. A design performance analysis will be presented at both

  13. The Association for the Advancement of Wound Care (AAWC) venous and pressure ulcer guidelines.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Laura L; Girolami, Sue; Corbett, Lisa; van Rijswijk, Lia

    2014-11-01

    Guidelines based on best available evidence to support pressure ulcer (PU) or venous ulcer (VU) management decisions can improve outcomes. Historically, such guidelines were consensus-based and differed in content and development methods used. Since 2002, the Association for the Advancement of Wound Care (AAWC) Guideline Task Force has used a systematic approach for developing "guidelines of guidelines" that unify and blend recommendations from relevant published guidelines while meeting Institute of Medicine and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality standards. In addition to establishing the literature-based strength of each recommendation, guideline clinical relevance is examined using standard content validation procedures. All final recommendations included are clinically relevant and/or supported by the highest level of available evidence, cited with every recommendation. In addition, guideline implementation resources are provided. The most recent AAWC VU and PU guidelines and ongoing efforts for improving their clinical relevance are presented. The guideline development process must be transparent and guidelines must be updated regularly to maintain their relevance. In addition, end-user results and research studies to examine their construct and predictive validity are needed.

  14. Pressurized fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Isaksson, J.

    1996-03-19

    A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine. 1 fig.

  15. Pressurized fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Isaksson, Juhani

    1996-01-01

    A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine.

  16. Pressurized Testing of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Stacks with Advanced Electrode-Supported Cells

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G. K. Housley; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer; G. Tao

    2012-06-01

    A new facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for pressurized testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. Pressurized operation is envisioned for large-scale hydrogen production plants, yielding higher overall efficiencies when the hydrogen product is to be delivered at elevated pressure for tank storage or pipelines. Pressurized operation also supports higher mass flow rates of the process gases with smaller components. The test stand can accommodate cell dimensions up to 8.5 cm x 8.5 cm and stacks of up to 25 cells. The pressure boundary for these tests is a water-cooled spool-piece pressure vessel designed for operation up to 5 MPa. The stack is internally manifolded and operates in cross-flow with an inverted-U flow pattern. Feed-throughs for gas inlets/outlets, power, and instrumentation are all located in the bottom flange. The entire spool piece, with the exception of the bottom flange, can be lifted to allow access to the internal furnace and test fixture. Lifting is accomplished with a motorized threaded drive mechanism attached to a rigid structural frame. Stack mechanical compression is accomplished using springs that are located inside of the pressure boundary, but outside of the hot zone. Initial stack heatup and performance characterization occurs at ambient pressure followed by lowering and sealing of the pressure vessel and subsequent pressurization. Pressure equalization between the anode and cathode sides of the cells and the stack surroundings is ensured by combining all of the process gases downstream of the stack. Steady pressure is maintained by means of a backpressure regulator and a digital pressure controller. A full description of the pressurized test apparatus is provided in this paper.

  17. Advanced Production Surface Preparation Technology Development for Ultra-High Pressure Diesel Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, Marion B.

    2012-04-30

    In 2007, An Ultra High Injection Pressure (UHIP) fueling method has been demonstrated by Caterpillar Fuel Systems - Product Development, demonstrating ability to deliver U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA) Tier 4 Final diesel engine emission performance with greatly reduced emissions handling components on the engine, such as without NOx reduction after-treatment and with only a through-flow 50% effective diesel particulate trap (DPT). They have shown this capability using multiple multi-cylinder engine tests of an Ultra High Pressure Common Rail (UHPCR) fuel system with higher than traditional levels of CEGR and an advanced injector nozzle design. The system delivered better atomization of the fuel, for more complete burn, to greatly reduce diesel particulates, while CEGR or high efficiency NOx reduction after-treatment handles the NOx. With the reduced back pressure of a traditional DPT, and with the more complete fuel burn, the system reduced levels of fuel consumption by 2.4% for similar delivery of torque and horsepower over the best Tier 4 Interim levels of fuel consumption in the diesel power industry. The challenge is to manufacture the components in high-volume production that can withstand the required higher pressure injection. Production processes must be developed to increase the toughness of the injector steel to withstand the UHIP pulsations and generate near perfect form and finish in the sub-millimeter size geometries within the injector. This project resulted in two developments in 2011. The first development was a process and a machine specification by which a high target of compressive residual stress (CRS) can be consistently imparted to key surfaces of the fuel system to increase the toughness of the steel, and a demonstration of the feasibility of further refinement of the process for use in volume production. The second development was the demonstration of the feasibility of a process for imparting near perfect, durable geometry to

  18. Cost-utility analysis of an advanced pressure ulcer management protocol followed by trained wound, ostomy, and continence nurses.

    PubMed

    Kaitani, Toshiko; Nakagami, Gojiro; Iizaka, Shinji; Fukuda, Takashi; Oe, Makoto; Igarashi, Ataru; Mori, Taketoshi; Takemura, Yukie; Mizokami, Yuko; Sugama, Junko; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    The high prevalence of severe pressure ulcers (PUs) is an important issue that requires to be highlighted in Japan. In a previous study, we devised an advanced PU management protocol to enable early detection of and intervention for deep tissue injury and critical colonization. This protocol was effective for preventing more severe PUs. The present study aimed to compare the cost-effectiveness of the care provided using an advanced PU management protocol, from a medical provider's perspective, implemented by trained wound, ostomy, and continence nurses (WOCNs), with that of conventional care provided by a control group of WOCNs. A Markov model was constructed for a 1-year time horizon to determine the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of advanced PU management compared with conventional care. The number of quality-adjusted life-years gained, and the cost in Japanese yen (¥) ($US1 = ¥120; 2015) was used as the outcome. Model inputs for clinical probabilities and related costs were based on our previous clinical trial results. Univariate sensitivity analyses were performed. Furthermore, a Bayesian multivariate probability sensitivity analysis was performed using Monte Carlo simulations with advanced PU management. Two different models were created for initial cohort distribution. For both models, the expected effectiveness for the intervention group using advanced PU management techniques was high, with a low expected cost value. The sensitivity analyses suggested that the results were robust. Intervention by WOCNs using advanced PU management techniques was more effective and cost-effective than conventional care.

  19. An Experimental Study of Dynamic Stall on Advanced Airfoil Sections. Volume 2. Pressure and Force Data.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    pressure or to the tunnel total-pressure. By using positive gage pressures for cali- bration references, the transducer diaphragms were deformed in the...L aU CD 9; -~C C) -4. r 0~ ~ C _ __ z ~ - ~IE- - £ 1 0 i rN 0 o C0 NP 491) II oo 0x 0+ IIn C .:) U I-\\ 𔃺o Lil 0_ LPC ’ 0 cx N - Li C)-92 o o3 C, C

  20. Effects of combined lipoic acid and pyridoxine on albuminuria, advanced glycation end-products, and blood pressure in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Noori, Nazanin; Tabibi, Hadi; Hosseinpanah, Farhad; Hedayati, Mehdi; Nafar, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of combined administration of lipoic acid and pyridoxine on albuminuria, oxidative stress, blood pressure, serum advanced glycation end-products, nitric oxide (NO), and endothelin-1 in patients with diabetic nephropathy. Thirty-four patients were randomly assigned to either a supplement group or a placebo group. The patients in the supplement group received 800 mg lipoic acid and 80 mg pyridoxine daily for 12 weeks, whereas the placebo group received corresponding placebos. Urinary albumin, serum malondialdehyde (MDA), and systolic blood pressure decreased significantly in the supplement group compared to the placebo group (p < 0.05). Serum NO increased in the supplement group compared to the placebo group (p < 0.05). Serum pentosidine and carboxymethyl lysine decreased significantly in the supplement group at the end of week 12 compared to baseline (p < 0.05). No statistically significant differences were observed between the two groups in mean changes of serum endothelin-1, glucose, and diastolic blood pressure. The present study indicates that combined administration of lipoic acid and pyridoxine improves albuminuria in patients with diabetic nephropathy by reducing oxidative stress, advanced glycation end-products, and systolic blood pressure. The reduction in microalbuminuria may be of benefit in retarding the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  1. Advanced Packaging Technology Used in Fabricating a High-Temperature Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beheim, Glenn M.

    2003-01-01

    The development of new aircraft engines requires the measurement of pressures in hot areas such as the combustor and the final stages of the compressor. The needs of the aircraft engine industry are not fully met by commercially available high-temperature pressure sensors, which are fabricated using silicon. Kulite Semiconductor Products and the NASA Glenn Research Center have been working together to develop silicon carbide (SiC) pressure sensors for use at high temperatures. At temperatures above 850 F, silicon begins to lose its nearly ideal elastic properties, so the output of a silicon pressure sensor will drift. SiC, however, maintains its nearly ideal mechanical properties to extremely high temperatures. Given a suitable sensor material, a key to the development of a practical high-temperature pressure sensor is the package. A SiC pressure sensor capable of operating at 930 F was fabricated using a newly developed package. The durability of this sensor was demonstrated in an on-engine test. The SiC pressure sensor uses a SiC diaphragm, which is fabricated using deep reactive ion etching. SiC strain gauges on the surface of the diaphragm sense the pressure difference across the diaphragm. Conventionally, the SiC chip is mounted to the package with the strain gauges outward, which exposes the sensitive metal contacts on the chip to the hostile measurement environment. In the new Kulite leadless package, the SiC chip is flipped over so that the metal contacts are protected from oxidation by a hermetic seal around the perimeter of the chip. In the leadless package, a conductive glass provides the electrical connection between the pins of the package and the chip, which eliminates the fragile gold wires used previously. The durability of the leadless SiC pressure sensor was demonstrated when two 930 F sensors were tested in the combustor of a Pratt & Whitney PW4000 series engine. Since the gas temperatures in these locations reach 1200 to 1300 F, the sensors were

  2. A pilot study of quantitative assessment of mandible advancement using pressure-flow relationship during midazolam sedation.

    PubMed

    Ayuse, T; Hoshino, Y; Inazawa, T; Oi, K; Schneider, H; Schwartz, A R

    2006-11-01

    It has been proposed that a titration of the mandibular positioner would be a promising method for predicting the outcome of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. This study was carried out to test the hypothesis that mandible advancement could be evaluated by analysis of inspiratory flow limitation using a titration procedure. To explore its effect, we examined upper airway pressure-flow relationships using a titrated mandible positioner during midazolam sedation. Non-flow limited inspiration occurred when the mandible was advanced 7.1 +/- 1.2 mm from centric occlusion position. In the centric occlusion position (0 mm advancement), Pcrit was -1.9 +/- 2.9 cmH2O and Rua was 23.3 +/- 4.5 cmH2O L(-1) s(-1). In the eMAP position, Pcrit was -7.3 +/- 1.9 cmH2O and Rua was 27.8 +/- 3.3 cmH2O L(-1) s(-1). Essentially no CPAP was required to overcome flow limitation in eMAP position, whereas 3.7 +/- 2.2 cmH2O CPAP was required in centric occlusion position. We conclude that assessing inspiratory flow limitation using a titrated mandible positioner was effective for estimating individual-matched mandible positions.

  3. Comparison of transient and stationary neutral pressure response in the DIII-D advanced divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Klepper, C.C.; Hogan, J.T.; Owen, L.W.; Mioduszewski, P.K.; Maingi, R.; Hill, D.N.; Buchenauer, D.; Ali Mahdavi, M.; Schaffer, M.J.; Petrie, T.W.; Jackson, G.L.; Evans, T.E.; Haas, G.

    1992-05-01

    The DIII-D divertor baffle system was designed to facilitate density control in long pulse H-mode discharges by removing a particle flux equal to the neutral beam fueling rate ({approximately}20 Torr-1/s) with a {approximately}1mTorr neutral pressure under the baffle (p{sub 0}). Initial measurements of the baffle pressure indicated that p{sub 0}{approximately} 10 mTorr (without pumping or biasing), a value much in excess of that required for long pulse density control. Radial sweeps of the X-point position have been employed to determine the maximum p{sub 0}, as well as to establish the dependence of this pressure on geometry. An estimate of the particle equilibration time for the baffle system has been made by studying the baffle pressure response to ``giant`` ELM effects. ``Steady state`` experiments in which the X-point position was fixed for {approximately}2.5s have also been carried out and steady baffle pressures were observed. The scaling of baffle pressure with plasma parameters has been found to be similar under transient and ``steady state`` conditions. Detailed modeling of these experiments with the B2, DEGAS, and WDIFFUSE (wall model) codes has been made.

  4. Development of Advanced ISS-WPA Catalysts for Organic Oxidation at Reduced Pressure/Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Ping; Nalette, Tim; Kayatin, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The Water Processor Assembly (WPA) at International Space Station (ISS) processes a waste stream via multi-filtration beds, where inorganic and non-volatile organic contaminants are removed, and a catalytic reactor, where low molecular weight organics not removed by the adsorption process are oxidized at elevated pressure in the presence of oxygen and elevated temperature above the normal water boiling point. Operation at an elevated pressure requires a more complex system design compared to a reactor that could operate at ambient pressure. However, catalysts currently available have insufficient activity to achieve complete oxidation of the organic load at a temperature less than the water boiling point and ambient pressure. Therefore, it is highly desirable to develop a more active and efficient catalyst at ambient pressure and a moderate temperature that is less than water boiling temperature. This paper describes our efforts in developing high efficiency water processing catalysts. Different catalyst support structures and coating metals were investigated in subscale reactors and results were compared against the flight WPA catalyst. Detailed improvements achieved on alternate metal catalysts at ambient pressure and 200 F will also be presented in the paper.

  5. Achieve Continuous Injection of Solid Fuels into Advanced Combustion System Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Derek L. Aldred; Timothy Saunders

    2007-03-31

    The overall objective of this project is the development of a mechanical rotary-disk feeder, known as the Stamet Posimetric High Pressure Solids Feeder System, to demonstrate feeding of dry granular coal continuously and controllably into pressurized environments of up to 70 kg/cm2 (1,000 psi). This is the Phase III of the ongoing program. Earlier Phases 1 and II successfully demonstrated feeding into pressures up to 35 kg/cm{sup 2} (500 psi). The final report for those phases was submitted in April 2005. Based on the previous work done in Phases I & II using Powder River Basin coal provided by the PSDF facility in Wilsonville, AL, a Phase III feeder system was designed and built to accomplish the target of feeding the coal into a pressure of 70 kg/cm2 (1,000 psi) and to be capable of feed rates of up to 550 kilograms (1,200lbs) per hour. The drive motor system from Phase II was retained for use on Phase III since projected performance calculations indicated it should be capable of driving the Phase III pump to the target levels. The pump & motor system was installed in a custom built test rig comprising an inlet vessel containing an active live-wall hopper mounted on weigh cells in a support frame, transition into the pump inlet, transition from pump outlet and a receiver vessel containing a receiver drum supported on weigh cells. All pressure containment on the rig was rated to105 kg/cm{sup 2} (1,500psi) to accommodate the final pressure requirement of a proposed Phase IV of the program. A screw conveyor and batch hopper were added to transfer coal at atmospheric pressure from the shop floor up into the test rig to enable continuous feeding up to the capacity of the receiving vessel. Control & monitoring systems were up-rated from the Phase II system to cover the additional features incorporated in the Phase III rig, and provide closer control and expanded monitoring of the entire system. A program of testing and modification was carried out in Stamet's facility

  6. Advanced cooling techniques for high-pressure hydrocarbon-fueled engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, R. T.

    1979-01-01

    The regenerative cooling limits (maximum chamber pressure) for 02/hydrocarbon gas generator and staged combustion cycle rocket engines over a thrust range of 89,000 N (20,000lbf) to 2,669,000 N (600,000 lbf) for a reusable life of 250 missions were defined. Maximum chamber pressure limits were first determined for the three propellant combinations (O2/CH4, O2/C3H8, and O2/RP-1 without a carbon layer (unenhanced designs). Chamber pressure cooling enhancement limits were then established for seven thermal barriers. The thermal barriers evaluated for these designs were: carbon layer, ceramic coating, graphite liner, film cooling, transpiration cooling, zoned combustion, and a combination of two of the above. All fluid barriers were assessed a 3 percent performance loss. Sensitivity studies were then conducted to determine the influence of cycle life and RP-1 decomposition temperature on chamber pressure limits. Chamber and nozzle design parameters are presented for the unenahanced and enhanced designs. The maximum regenerative cooled chamber pressure limits were attained with the O2/CH4 propellant combination. The O2/RP-1 designs relied on a carbon layer and liquid gas injection chamber contours, short chamber, to be competitive with the other two propellant combinations. This was attributed to the low decomposition temperature of RP-1.

  7. Oxygen transport membrane based advanced power cycle with low pressure synthesis gas slip stream

    DOEpatents

    Kromer, Brian R.; Litwin, Michael M.; Kelly, Sean M.

    2016-09-27

    A method and system for generating electrical power in which a high pressure synthesis gas stream generated in a gasifier is partially oxidized in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor, expanded and thereafter, is combusted in an oxygen transport membrane based boiler. A low pressure synthesis gas slip stream is split off downstream of the expanders and used as the source of fuel in the oxygen transport membrane based partial oxidation reactors to allow the oxygen transport membrane to operate at low fuel pressures with high fuel utilization. The combustion within the boiler generates heat to raise steam to in turn generate electricity by a generator coupled to a steam turbine. The resultant flue gas can be purified to produce a carbon dioxide product.

  8. Temperature and pressure measurement techniques for an advanced turbine test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, F. G.; Cochran, R. P.

    1980-01-01

    A high pressure, high-temperature turbine test facility constructed for use in turbine cooling research is described. Several recently developed temperature and pressure measuring techniques are used in this facility. The measurement techniques, their status, previous applications and some results are discussed. Noncontact surface temperature measurements are made by optical methods. Radiation pyrometry principles combined with photoelectric scanning are used for rotating components and infrared photography for stationary components. Contact (direct) temperature and pressure measurements on rotating components are expected to be handled with an 80 channel rotary data package which mounts on and rotates with the turbine shaft at speeds up to 17,500 rpm. The data channels are time-division multiplexed and converted to digital words in the data package. A rotary transformer couples power and digital data to and from the shaft.

  9. Nanostructured anatase TiO2 densified at high pressure as advanced visible light photocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Carini, Giovanni; Parrino, Francesco; Palmisano, Giovanni; Scandura, Gabriele; Citro, Ilaria; Calogero, Giuseppe; Bartolotta, Antonino; Di Marco, Gaetano

    2015-09-26

    This study reports on characterization and photoactivity of nanostructured TiO2 samples, which have been permanently densified under high pressures, up to 2.1 GPa. Commercial Mirkat 211 anatase has been used as a benchmark sample, in order to investigate the effect of unidirectional high pressure on structural, optical and photocatalytic properties of TiO2. Vibrational Raman spectroscopy shows that the treatment does not cause transitions among the different crystalline phases of titanium dioxide. UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra reveal that increasing pressure gives rise to a shift of the absorption onset towards higher wavelength enhancing the photoactivity under visible radiation. Samples are also photo-electrochemically characterized and tested in the gas phase with partial oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde under visible irradiation. Compaction up to 0.8 GPa depresses both the alcohol conversion and the aldehyde yield, while samples treated under higher pressures show enhanced characteristics of conversion compared to the pristine material. Moreover, promising results in the reduction of CO2 are also obtained under UV-visible radiation.

  10. Development and Application of an Advanced Optical Based Pressure Instrument for Low-Speed Flows.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    and paint photodegradation . In the conventional approach, errors associated with these effects are minimized by relating pressure to the ratio of a...da*pcr electron configuration), strongly luminesces in the 511-517 nm region with the quantum yield of 0.52 approaching that of laser dyes [2]. The

  11. [Recent advances and applications of capillary electrochromatography and pressurized capillary electrochromatography].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi; Zhang, Xiaohui; Wei, Juan; Xue, Yunyun; Bahatibieke, Marjan; Wang, Yan; Yan, Chao

    2009-09-01

    Capillary electrochromatography (CEC), in which electroosmotic flow (EOF) created from the electrical double layer is made to act as a pump to drive the mobile phase in a capillary column packed with micro-particulates or coated with stationary phase. Both neutral and charged species can be resolved by CEC. It has been demonstrated that the efficiency of a separation obtained by electroosmotic propulsion is superior to that obtained by pressure-driven flow (as is the case in HPLC). CEC combines the best features of CE and versatile selectivity and large sample capacity of HPLC, promising high efficiency, high resolution, high selectivity and high peak capacity. However, in practice, when CEC is used without pressure, often used on a commercial CE instrument, there are problems and difficulties associated with bubbles formation and column dry-out. These difficulties can be overcome by a pressurized CEC (pCEC) system, in which a supplementary pressure is applied to the column in addition to the EOF. In such a system, a pressure can be applied to the capillary column to suppress bubbles formation. Quantitative sample introduction in pCEC can be easily achieved through a rotary-type injector. Most importantly, it is amenable for a solvent gradient mode, similar to that in HPLC, by programming the composition of mobile phase. The article brings a comprehensive survey of recent development of CEC and pCEC, including the development of instrumentation, capillary columns and stationary phase as well as CEC and pCEC applications in life science, biotechnology, pharmaceutical analysis, food safety and environmental security. Prospects for CEC and pCEC development and application are also discussed.

  12. Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines (moving bed, fluid bed contactor/ceramic filter). Twentieth quarterly status report, July--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1992-10-20

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of direct coal-fired turbine power plants as part of their Heat Engines program. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the direct coal-fired turbine is high-temperature combustion gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating two Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meat this technical challenge: a baseline ceramic barrier filter ILEC concept, and a fluidized bed ILEC concept. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure combustion gases at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2300{degree}F. This document reports the status of a program in the nineteenth quarter to develop this ILEC technology for direct coal-fired turbine power plants.

  13. Utilizing the VeraFlo™ Instillation Negative Pressure Wound Therapy System with Advanced Care for a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mankind has always suffered wounds throughout time due to trauma, disease, and lifestyles. Many wounds are non-healing and have continued to be challenging. However, utilizing advanced wound care treatments, such as negative pressure wound treatment with instillation and dwell time (NPWTi-d), has proven beneficial. NPWTi-d is indicated in a variety of wounds, such as trauma, surgical, acute, pressure injuries, diabetic foot ulcers, and venous leg ulcers. Bacteria and bioburden interrupts wound healing by increasing the metabolic needs, ingesting, and robbing the necessary nutrients and oxygen. Instillation therapy is the technique of intermittently washing out a wound with a liquid solution. The mechanism of action is instilling fluid into the wound bed, soaking for a determined time, loosening and cleaning of exudate, contaminants, and/or infection, removing fluid via negative pressure, thus promoting tissue growth. Case study: The patient was diagnosed with a large lymphedema mass on the right upper thigh. Surgical removal of the lymphedema mass was indicated due to interference with quality of life. After a failed flap and surgical debridement, NPWTi-d with normal saline was implemented. Results: The patient had excellent results, with obvious forming of red, beefy granulation, epithelization tissue development, and a cleaner, healthier wound bed. Settings for the NPWTi-d was 18 minutes dwell time, every 2.5 hours with a constant pressure of 125 mm/hg pressure. Conclusion: The NPWTi-d demonstrated to be an instrumental treatment in supporting and stimulating healing. Early application of the treatment with normal saline as the instillation fluid prepared the previously failed wound for quicker healing. PMID:28070472

  14. Advanced Liquid-Free, Piezoresistive, SOI-Based Pressure Sensors for Measurements in Harsh Environments.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Ha-Duong; Mukhopadhyay, Biswaijit; Ehrmann, Oswin; Lang, Klaus-Dieter

    2015-08-18

    In this paper we present and discuss two innovative liquid-free SOI sensors for pressure measurements in harsh environments. The sensors are capable of measuring pressures at high temperatures. In both concepts media separation is realized using a steel membrane. The two concepts represent two different strategies for packaging of devices for use in harsh environments and at high temperatures. The first one is a "one-sensor-one-packaging_technology" concept. The second one uses a standard flip-chip bonding technique. The first sensor is a "floating-concept", capable of measuring pressures at temperatures up to 400 °C (constant load) with an accuracy of 0.25% Full Scale Output (FSO). A push rod (mounted onto the steel membrane) transfers the applied pressure directly to the center-boss membrane of the SOI-chip, which is placed on a ceramic carrier. The chip membrane is realized by Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE or Bosch Process). A novel propertied chip housing employing a sliding sensor chip that is fixed during packaging by mechanical preloading via the push rod is used, thereby avoiding chip movement, and ensuring optimal push rod load transmission. The second sensor can be used up to 350 °C. The SOI chips consists of a beam with an integrated centre-boss with was realized using KOH structuring and DRIE. The SOI chip is not "floating" but bonded by using flip-chip technology. The fabricated SOI sensor chip has a bridge resistance of 3250 Ω. The realized sensor chip has a sensitivity of 18 mV/µm measured using a bridge current of 1 mA.

  15. Low pressure fabric filters advanced dedusting technology for high resistivity fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, H.F.; Weltz, E.; Horst, J.

    1998-07-01

    Power Generation organizations in Europe are making increased use of lower cost (costs are typically 20--25% lower than the lowest cost European sourced coals) and lower sulfur content Australian and South African coals to improve competitiveness. The higher resistivity of the particulate from combustion of these coals due to their relatively low sulphur content and somewhat higher ash content makes the particulate more difficult to collect with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and favors the use of pulse jet fabric filters (PJFF) to meet stringent emission requirements. The Lentjes Bischoff low pressure PJFF design--based on Lurgi technology--has been purposely designed and developed since the late 1980's for very large scale applications and has been successfully applied to over 11,000 MW of coal fired boilers in a number of countries with the majority of installations in Australia and South Africa. Coal fired boiler sizes range from 30 to 670 MW and include conventional pulverized coal (p.c.) fired boilers as well as stoker fired, fluidized bed and the latest circulating fluidized bed fired boiler technologies. These applications are on new large base load installations as well as retrofitted into existing ESP casings. The design, construction and operating experience with two major installations covering both the retrofit of a PJFF into an existing ESP casing to meet new more stringent emission requirements and a new large base load installation are examined in detail. Firstly, the authors look at the retrofit of low pressure PJFF to the existing 6 x 280 MW boiler ESP casings at Gladstone Power Station, Queensland, Australia and then the new base load low pressure PJFF for the 6 x 670 MW boilers for Majuba Power Station, South Africa. The development of the modern low pressure pulse jet fabric filter has significantly improved the cost competitiveness of PJFF versus alternative technologies.

  16. Advances in treating skin defects of the hand: skin substitutes and negative-pressure wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Watt, Andrew J; Friedrich, Jeffrey B; Huang, Jerry I

    2012-11-01

    Surgeons and scientists have been developing alternative methods of hand reconstruction that may play an adjunctive role to, or completely supplant, more traditional reconstructive modalities. This article provides an overview of these emerging techniques, with an emphasis on skin substitutes and negative-pressure wound therapy as they apply to the treatment of soft tissue defects of the hand. The indications, contraindications, and relative advantages and disadvantages of these techniques are discussed in detail.

  17. An experimental study of dynamic stall on advanced airfoil section. Volume 2: Pressure and force data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcalister, K. W.; Pucci, S. L.; Mccroskey, W. J.; Carr, L. W.

    1982-01-01

    Experimentally derived force and moment data are presented for eight airfoil sections that were tested at fixed and varying incidence in a subsonic two dimensional stream. Airfoil incidence was varied through sinusoidal oscillations in pitch over a wide range of amplitude and frequency. The surface pressure distribution, as well as the lift, drag, and pitching moment derived therefrom, are displayed in a uniform fashion to delineate the static and dynamic characteristics of each airfoil both in and out of stall.

  18. Advanced Liquid-Free, Piezoresistive, SOI-Based Pressure Sensors for Measurements in Harsh Environments

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Ha-Duong; Mukhopadhyay, Biswaijit; Ehrmann, Oswin; Lang, Klaus-Dieter

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present and discuss two innovative liquid-free SOI sensors for pressure measurements in harsh environments. The sensors are capable of measuring pressures at high temperatures. In both concepts media separation is realized using a steel membrane. The two concepts represent two different strategies for packaging of devices for use in harsh environments and at high temperatures. The first one is a “one-sensor-one-packaging_technology” concept. The second one uses a standard flip-chip bonding technique. The first sensor is a “floating-concept”, capable of measuring pressures at temperatures up to 400 °C (constant load) with an accuracy of 0.25% Full Scale Output (FSO). A push rod (mounted onto the steel membrane) transfers the applied pressure directly to the center-boss membrane of the SOI-chip, which is placed on a ceramic carrier. The chip membrane is realized by Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE or Bosch Process). A novel propertied chip housing employing a sliding sensor chip that is fixed during packaging by mechanical preloading via the push rod is used, thereby avoiding chip movement, and ensuring optimal push rod load transmission. The second sensor can be used up to 350 °C. The SOI chips consists of a beam with an integrated centre-boss with was realized using KOH structuring and DRIE. The SOI chip is not “floating” but bonded by using flip-chip technology. The fabricated SOI sensor chip has a bridge resistance of 3250 Ω. The realized sensor chip has a sensitivity of 18 mV/µm measured using a bridge current of 1 mA. PMID:26295235

  19. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUID BED BOILERS (Phase II--Evaluation of the Oxyfuel CFB Concept)

    SciTech Connect

    John L. Marion; Nsakala ya Nsakala

    2003-11-09

    The overall project goal is to determine if carbon dioxide can be captured and sequestered at a cost of about $10/ton of carbon avoided, using a newly constructed Circulating Fluidized Bed combustor while burning coal with a mixture of oxygen and recycled flue gas, instead of air. This project is structured in two Phases. Phase I was performed between September 28, 2001 and May 15, 2002. Results from Phase I were documented in a Topical Report issued on May 15, 2003 (Nsakala, et al., 2003), with the recommendation to evaluate, during Phase II, the Oxyfuel-fired CFB concept. DOE NETL accepted this recommendation, and, hence approved the project continuation into Phase II. Phase 2. The second phase of the project--which includes pilot-scale tests of an oxygen-fired circulating fluidized bed test facility with performance and economic analyses--is currently underway at ALSTOM's Power Plant Laboratories, located in Windsor, CT (US). The objective of the pilot-scale testing is to generate detailed technical data needed to establish advanced CFB design requirements and performance when firing coals and delayed petroleum coke in oxygen/carbon dioxide mixtures. Results will be used in the design of oxygen-fired CFB boilers--both retrofit and new Greenfield--as well as to provide a generic performance database for other researchers. At the conclusion of Phase 2, revised costs and performance will be estimated for both retrofit and new Greenfield design concepts with CO2 capture, purification, compression, and liquefaction.

  20. Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines (moving bed, fluid bed contactor/ceramic filter). Twenty-fifth quarterly report, October--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1993-12-31

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of direct coal-fired turbine power plants as part of their Heat Engines program. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the direct coal-fired turbine is high-temperature combustion gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating two Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been reconfigured to meet this technical challenge: a baseline ceramic barrier filter ILEC concept, and a fluidized bed ILEC concept. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure combustion gases at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2300{degree}F. This document reports the status of a program in the twenty-fifth quarter to develop this ILEC technology for direct coal-fired turbine power plants.

  1. A beamline for high-pressure studies at the Advanced Light Source with a superconducting bending magnet as the source.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Martin; MacDowell, Alastair A; Caldwell, Wendel A; Cambie, Daniella; Celestre, Richard S; Domning, Edward E; Duarte, Robert M; Gleason, Arianna E; Glossinger, James M; Kelez, Nicholas; Plate, David W; Yu, Tony; Zaug, Joeseph M; Padmore, Howard A; Jeanloz, Raymond; Alivisatos, A Paul; Clark, Simon M

    2005-09-01

    A new facility for high-pressure diffraction and spectroscopy using diamond anvil high-pressure cells has been built at the Advanced Light Source on beamline 12.2.2. This beamline benefits from the hard X-radiation generated by a 6 T superconducting bending magnet (superbend). Useful X-ray flux is available between 5 keV and 35 keV. The radiation is transferred from the superbend to the experimental enclosure by the brightness-preserving optics of the beamline. These optics are comprised of a plane parabola collimating mirror, followed by a Kohzu monochromator vessel with Si(111) crystals (E/DeltaE approximately equal 7000) and W/B4C multilayers (E/DeltaE approximately equal 100), and then a toroidal focusing mirror with variable focusing distance. The experimental enclosure contains an automated beam-positioning system, a set of slits, ion chambers, the sample positioning goniometry and area detector (CCD or image-plate detector). Future developments aim at the installation of a second endstation dedicated to in situ laser heating and a dedicated high-pressure single-crystal station, applying both monochromatic and polychromatic techniques.

  2. A Beamline for High-Pressure Studies at the Advanced Light Sourcewith a Superconducting Bending Magnet as the Source

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Martin; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Caldwell, Wendel A.; Cambie, Daniella; Celestre, Richard S.; Domning, Edward E.; Duarte,Robert M.; Gleason, Arianna E.; Glossinger, James M.; Kelez, Nicholas; Plate, David W.; Yu, Tony; Zaug, Joeseph M.; Padmore, Howard A.; Jeanloz,Raymond; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Clark, Simon M.

    2005-06-30

    A new facility for high-pressure diffraction andspectroscopy using diamond anvil high-pressure cells has been built atthe Advanced Light Source on Beamline 12.2.2. This beamline benefits fromthe hard X-radiation generated by a 6 Tesla superconducting bendingmagnet (superbend). Useful x-ray flux is available between 5 keV and 35keV. The radiation is transferred from the superbend to the experimentalenclosure by the brightness preserving optics of the beamline. Theseoptics are comprised of: a plane parabola collimating mirror (M1),followed by a Kohzu monochromator vessel with a Si(111) crystals (E/DE ~;7000) and a W/B4C multilayers (E/DE ~; 100), and then a toroidal focusingmirror (M2) with variable focusing distance. The experimental enclosurecontains an automated beam positioning system, a set of slits, ionchambers, the sample positioning goniometry and area detectors (CCD orimage-plate detector). Future developments aim at the installation of asecond end station dedicated for in situ laser-heating on one hand and adedicated high-pressure single-crystal station, applying bothmonochromatic as well as polychromatic techniques.

  3. A BEAMLINE FOR HIGH PRESSURE STUDIES AT THE ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE WITH A SUPERCONDUCTING BENDING MAGNET AS THE SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, M; MacDowell, A A; Caldwell, W A; Cambie, D; Celestre, R S; Domning, E E; Duarte, R M; Gleason, A; Glossinger, J; Kelez, N; Plate, D W; Yu, T; Zaug, J M; Padmore, H A; Jeanloz, R; Alivisatos, A P; Clark, S M

    2005-04-19

    A new facility for high-pressure diffraction and spectroscopy using diamond anvil high-pressure cells has been built at the Advanced Light Source on Beamline 12.2.2. This beamline benefits from the hard X-radiation generated by a 6 Tesla superconducting bending magnet (superbend). Useful x-ray flux is available between 5 keV and 35 keV. The radiation is transferred from the superbend to the experimental enclosure by the brightness preserving optics of the beamline. These optics are comprised of: a plane parabola collimating mirror (M1), followed by a Kohzu monochromator vessel with a Si(111) crystals (E/{Delta}E {approx} 7000) and a W/B{sub 4}C multilayer (E/{Delta}E {approx} 100), and then a toroidal focusing mirror (M2) with variable focusing distance. The experimental enclosure contains an automated beam positioning system, a set of slits, ion chambers, the sample positioning goniometry and area detectors (CCD or image-plate detector). Future developments aim at the installation of a second end station dedicated for in situ laser-heating on one hand and a dedicated high-pressure single-crystal station, applying both monochromatic as well as polychromatic techniques.

  4. A Beamline for High-Pressure Studies at the Advanced Light Sourcewith a Superconducting Bending Magnet as the Source

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Martin; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Caldwell, Wendel A.; Cambie, Daniella; Celestre, Richard S.; Domning, Edward E.; Duarte,Robert M.; Gleason, Arianna E.; Glossinger, James M.; Kelez, Nicholas; Plate, David W.; Yu, Tony; Zaug, Joeseph M.; Padmore, Howard A.; Jeanloz,Raymond; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Clark, Simon M.

    2005-06-30

    A new facility for high-pressure diffraction and spectroscopy using diamond anvil high-pressure cells has been built at the Advanced Light Source on Beamline 12.2.2. This beamline benefits from the hard X-radiation generated by a 6 Tesla superconducting bending magnet (superbend). Useful x-ray flux is available between 5 keV and 35 keV. The radiation is transferred from the superbend to the experimental enclosure by the brightness preserving optics of the beamline. These optics are comprised of: a plane parabola collimating mirror (M1), followed by a Kohzu monochromator vessel with a Si(111) crystals (E/DE {approx}7000) and a W/B4C multilayers (E/DE {approx} 100), and then a toroidal focusing mirror (M2) with variable focusing distance. The experimental enclosure contains an automated beam positioning system, a set of slits, ion chambers, the sample positioning goniometry and area detectors (CCD or image-plate detector). Future developments aim at the installation of a second end station dedicated for in situ laser-heating on one hand and a dedicated high-pressure single-crystal station, applying both monochromatic as well as polychromatic techniques.

  5. NIR spectroscopic method for the in-line moisture assessment during drying in a six-segmented fluid bed dryer of a continuous tablet production line: Validation of quantifying abilities and uncertainty assessment.

    PubMed

    Fonteyne, Margot; Arruabarrena, Julen; de Beer, Jacques; Hellings, Mario; Van Den Kerkhof, Tom; Burggraeve, Anneleen; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; De Beer, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    This study focuses on the thorough validation of an in-line NIR based moisture quantification method in the six-segmented fluid bed dryer of a continuous from-powder-to-tablet manufacturing line (ConsiGma™ 25, GEA Pharma Systems nv, Wommelgem, Belgium). The moisture assessment ability of an FT-NIR spectrometer (Matrix™-F Duplex, Bruker Optics Ltd, UK) equipped with a fiber-optic Lighthouse Probe™ (LHP, GEA Pharma Systems nv, Wommelgem, Belgium) was investigated. Although NIR spectroscopy is a widely used technique for in-process moisture determination, a minority of NIR spectroscopy methods is thoroughly validated. A moisture quantification PLS model was developed. Twenty calibration experiments were conducted, during which spectra were collected at-line and then regressed versus the corresponding residual moisture values obtained via Karl Fischer measurements. The developed NIR moisture quantification model was then validated by calculating the accuracy profiles on the basis of the analysis results of independent in-line validation experiments. Furthermore, as the aim of the NIR method is to replace the destructive, time-consuming Karl Fischer titration, it was statistically demonstrated that the new NIR method performs at least as good as the Karl Fischer reference method.

  6. Innovative and Efficient Manufacturing Technologies for Highly Advanced Composite Pressure Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, Birte; Regnet, Martin; Bickelaier, Stefan; Henne, Florian; Sause, Markus G. R.; Schmidt, Thomas; Geiss, Gunter

    2014-06-01

    The currently ongoing development project at MT Aerospace (MTA) deals with a cost efficient manufacturing process for space structures. Thermoplastic fibre placement, which was identified as one of the most forward-looking technologies, promises advantages such as shorter cycle times and a high level of automation. In addition to the manufacturing method, research activities on non-destructive inspection methods and on acoustic emission analysis are performed. The analysis of the components will also be improved using advanced modelling approaches. The capability of the processes and methods will be shown on the basis of a scaled solid rocket motor casing.

  7. Co-firing waste materials in an advanced pressurized fluidized-bed combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Rubow, L.N.; DeLallo, M.R.; Zaharchuk, R.

    1994-10-01

    A study has been undertaken to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of co-firing a pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) with coal and municipal or industrial wastes. Focus was placed on the production of electricity and the efficient disposal of wastes for application in a central power station and distributed locations. Wastes considered for co-firing include municipal solid waste (MSW), municipal sewage sludge, and industrial de-inking sludge. Issues concerning waste material preparation and feed, PFBC operation, plant emissions, and regulations are addressed. This paper describes the results of the performance evaluation completed as part of this study, and provides recommendations for further evaluation.

  8. A comparison of theoretical and experimental pressure distributions for two advanced fighter wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haney, H. P.; Hicks, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    A comparison was made between experimental pressure distributions measured during testing of the Vought A-7 fighter and the theoretical predictions of four transonic potential flow codes. Isolated wind and three wing-body codes were used for comparison. All comparisons are for transonic Mach numbers and include both attached and separate flows. In general, the wing-body codes gave better agreement with the experiment than did the isolated wing code but, because of the greater complexity of the geometry, were found to be considerably more expensive and less reliable.

  9. Advanced Dependent Pressure Vessel (DPV) Nickel-Hydrogen Spacecraft Cell and Battery Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coates, Dwaine K.; Wright, R. Doug; Repplinger, Ron S.

    1996-01-01

    The dependent pressure vessel (DPV) nickel-hydrogen (Ni-H2) battery is being developed as a potential spacecraft battery design for both military and commercial satellites. Individual pressure vessel (IPV) Ni-H2 batteries are currently flying on more than 70 Earth-orbiting satellites and have accumulated more that 140,000,000 cell-hours in actual spacecraft operation. The limitations of standard Ni-H2 IPV flight battery technology are primarily related to the internal cell design and the battery packaging issues associated with grouping multiple cylindrical cells. The DPV cell design offers higher specific energy and reduced cost, while retaining the established IPV Ni-H2 technology flight heritage and database. A design performance analysis is presented at both the cell and battery level. The DPV is capable of delivering up to 76 Watthours per kilogram (Wh/kg) at the cell level and 70 Wh/kg at the full battery level. This represents a 40 percent increase in specific energy at the cell level and a 60 percent increase in specific energy at the battery level compared to current IPV Ni-H2 technology.

  10. Advanced ultrasonic inspection system for the ID-inspection of reactor pressure vessels of BWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, E.; Wuestenberg, H.; Tagliamonte, M.; Dalichow, M.

    1994-12-31

    A newly-developed, modular ultrasonic examination system has been developed by Siemens for the ID inspection of BWR RPV`S. It is based on the phased-array technique with hybrid probes using the latest in manipulator and control equipment technology to allow the often hard-to-access weld areas of older reactor pressure vessels in US BWR plants to be examined within a very short time and with minimal radiation exposure of the examination personnel. New NRC stipulations requiring almost complete ultrasonic examination of all RPV welds can be fully satisfied using this system for the ID inspection of all longitudinal and circumferential welds above the jet pump baffle plate.

  11. Removal of C.I. Reactive Red 2 by low pressure UV/chlorine advanced oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qianyuan; Li, Yue; Wang, Wenlong; Wang, Ting; Hu, Hongying

    2016-03-01

    Azo dyes are commonly found as pollutants in wastewater from the textile industry, and can cause environmental problems because of their color and toxicity. The removal of a typical azo dye named C.I. Reactive Red 2 (RR2) during low pressure ultraviolet (UV)/chlorine oxidation was investigated in this study. UV irradiation at 254nm and addition of free chlorine provided much higher removal rates of RR2 and color than UV irradiation or chlorination alone. Increasing the free chlorine dose enhanced the removal efficiency of RR2 and color by UV/chlorine oxidation. Experiments performed with nitrobenzene (NB) or benzoic acid (BA) as scavengers showed that radicals (especially OH) formed during UV/chlorine oxidation are important in the RR2 removal. Addition of HCO3(-) and Cl(-) to the RR2 solution did not inhibit the removal of RR2 during UV/chlorine oxidation.

  12. Advanced high pressure engine study for mixed-mode vehicle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luscher, W. P.; Mellish, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    High pressure liquid rocket engine design, performance, weight, envelope, and operational characteristics were evaluated for a variety of candidate engines for use in mixed-mode, single-stage-to-orbit applications. Propellant property and performance data were obtained for candidate Mode 1 fuels which included: RP-1, RJ-5, hydrazine, monomethyl-hydrazine, and methane. The common oxidizer was liquid oxygen. Oxygen, the candidate Mode 1 fuels, and hydrogen were evaluated as thrust chamber coolants. Oxygen, methane, and hydrogen were found to be the most viable cooling candidates. Water, lithium, and sodium-potassium were also evaluated as auxiliary coolant systems. Water proved to be the best of these, but the system was heavier than those systems which cooled with the engine propellants. Engine weight and envelope parametric data were established for candidate Mode 1, Mode 2, and dual-fuel engines. Delivered engine performance data were also calculated for all candidate Mode 1 and dual-fuel engines.

  13. Evolutionary pressure on reproductive strategies in flatfish and groundfish: Relevant concepts and methodological advancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjesbu, O. S.; Witthames, P. R.

    2007-07-01

    Flatfish and groundfish show many similarities in reproductive strategies and tactics, both in types present and in responses to fishing pressure or changes in their environment. Over the last 20-30 years the reproduction of Atlantic cod Gadus morhua, Atlantic halibut Hippoglossus hippoglossus, plaice Pleuronectes platessa, sole Solea solea, and turbot Scophthalmus maximus have been extensively studied in the North Atlantic. For cod, halibut and turbot, the research has progressed rapidly due to interest from the aquaculture industry. Extensive overexploitation over many years in combination with climate change represents a potential evolutionary pressure towards changes in growth, lower age at maturity, increased fecundity, smaller egg size (and thereby larval size) and change in spawning time. Early sexual maturity/precocious maturation is also seen in aquaculture and is problematic economically due to a reduction in fillet production. In this paper information is reviewed from studies on both wild and captive populations in experiments, the latter considered important because overexploitation, such as observed in the North Sea, often reduces the natural dynamics in growth and reproduction and complicates collection of sufficiently large samples. Evidence from laboratory experiments demonstrates the inherent plasticity of fecundity production and how this is controlled by food availability and length of photoperiod, while recent information from field studies demonstrates the evolution of genotypes in response to fishing mortality. Today several laboratories have adopted modern techniques for analysis of reproductive investments (fecundity, atresia and sperm characterisation) in controlled experimental situations to explore the effect of temperature or other environmental parameters (such as salinity) on reproduction. These developments, in combination with the rapid implementation of molecular techniques, should make it possible in the future to present highly

  14. An Assessment of the Residual Stresses in Low Pressure Plasma Sprayed Coatings on an Advanced Copper Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Ghosn, L. J.; Agarwal, A.; Lachtrupp, T. P.

    2002-01-01

    Modeling studies were conducted on low pressure plasma sprayed (LPPS) NiAl top coat applied to an advanced Cu-8(at.%)Cr-4%Nb alloy (GRCop-84) substrate using Ni as a bond coat. A thermal analysis suggested that the NiAl and Ni top and bond coats, respectively, would provide adequate thermal protection to the GRCop-84 substrate in a rocket engine operating under high heat flux conditions. Residual stress measurements were conducted at different depths from the free surface on coated and uncoated GRCop-84 specimens by x-ray diffraction. These data are compared with theoretically estimated values assessed by a finite element analysis simulating the development of these stresses as the coated substrate cools down from the plasma spraying temperature to room temperature.

  15. Fuel Injector Patternation Evaluation in Advanced Liquid-Fueled, High Pressure, Gas Turbine Combustors, Using Nonintrusive Optical Diagnostic Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, R. J.; Hicks, Y. R.; Anderson, R. C.; Zaller, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging and planar Mie scattering are used to examine the fuel distribution pattern (patternation) for advanced fuel injector concepts in kerosene burning, high pressure gas turbine combustors. Three diverse fuel injector concepts for aerospace applications were investigated under a broad range of operating conditions. Fuel PLIF patternation results are contrasted with those obtained by planar Mie scattering. Further comparison is also made for one injector with data obtained through phase Doppler measurements. Differences in spray patterns for diverse conditions and fuel injector configurations are readily discernible. An examination of the data has shown that a direct determination of the fuel spray angle at realistic conditions is also possible. The results obtained in this study demonstrate the applicability and usefulness of these nonintrusive optical techniques for investigating fuel spray patternation under actual combustor conditions.

  16. Tissue Doppler Imaging in the Estimation of Intracardiac Filling Pressure in Decompensated Patients with Advanced Systolic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Mullens, Wilfried; Borowski, Allen G; Curtin, Ronan J; Thomas, James D; Tang, W. H. Wilson

    2011-01-01

    Background Early transmitral velocity / tissue Doppler mitral annular early diastolic velocity (E/Ea) has been correlated with pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) in a wide variety of cardiac conditions. The objective of this study was to determine the reliability of mitral E/Ea for predicting PCWP in patients admitted for advanced decompensated heart failure (ADHF). Methods and Results Prospective consecutive patients with ADHF (ejection fraction [EF] ≤30%, NYHA class III-IV symptoms) underwent simultaneous echocardiographic and hemodynamic evaluation on admission and after 48 hours of intensive medical therapy. A total of 106 patients were included (mean age 57 ±12 years, EF 24 ±8%, PCWP 21 ±7 mmHg, mitral E/Ea 20 ±12). There was a lack of correlation between mitral E/Ea and PCWP, particularly in those with larger LV volumes, more impaired cardiac indices, and the presence of cardiac resynchronization therapy. Overall, mitral E/Ea was similar among patients with PCWP > and ≤ 18 mmHg, and sensitivity and specificity for mitral E/Ea > 15 to identify a PCWP > 18 mmHg was 66% and 50%, respectively. Contrary to prior reports, we did not observe any direct association between changes in PCWP and changes in mitral E/Ea. Conclusion In decompensated patients with advanced systolic heart failure, tissue Doppler derived mitral E/Ea may not be as reliable in predicting intracardiac filling pressures, particularly in those with larger LV volumes, more impaired cardiac indices, and the presence of cardiac resynchronization therapy. PMID:19075104

  17. Mandibular Advancement Device as a Comparable Treatment to Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Positional Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Takaesu, Yoshikazu; Tsuiki, Satoru; Kobayashi, Mina; Komada, Yoko; Nakayama, Hideaki; Inoue, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Positional obstructive sleep apnea (P-OSA) is a clinically common phenotype of OSA, which can be treated effectively with mandibular advancement devices (MADs). We hypothesized that the efficacy of an MAD is comparable to that of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) in P-OSA patients. Methods: Among patients diagnosed with OSA at a single sleep center from January 2008 to May 2014, male subjects with moderate OSA were recruited and stringently categorized as having P-OSA when the ratio of their lateral apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) to supine AHI was ≤ 0.5, their lateral sleep time was > 60 minutes, and their lateral REM sleep time was longer than 10 minutes. Treatment efficacy was compared between P-OSA subjects with an MAD (n = 34) and those with nCPAP (n = 34) after matching for age, body-mass index, and baseline AHI. Results: There were no significant differences in baseline AHI (MAD: nCPAP = 20.6 ± 3.9/h: 21.3 ± 1.7/h, p = 0.35) or in follow-up AHI (MAD: nCPAP = 4.7 ± 3.5/h: 3.4 ± 3.7/h, p = 0.12) between the 2 treatment groups, and hence MADs lowered the AHI to the same extent as nCPAP. Conclusions: These findings suggest that an MAD is as efficacious as nCPAP for P-OSA patients. MAD treatment for this specific phenotype may be a promising patient-tailored and first-line approach to OSA. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 1079. Citation: Takaesu Y, Tsuiki S, Kobayashi M, Komada Y, Nakayama H, Inoue Y. Mandibular advancement device as a comparable treatment to nasal continuous positive airway pressure for positional obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(8):1113–1119. PMID:27250814

  18. Advanced fluid modeling and PIC/MCC simulations of low-pressure ccrf discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, M. M.; Kählert, H.; Sun, A.; Bonitz, M.; Loffhagen, D.

    2017-04-01

    Comparative studies of capacitively coupled radio-frequency discharges in helium and argon at pressures between 10 and 80 Pa are presented applying two different fluid modeling approaches as well as two independently developed particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision (PIC/MCC) codes. The focus is on the analysis of the range of applicability of a recently proposed fluid model including an improved drift-diffusion approximation for the electron component as well as its comparison with fluid modeling results using the classical drift-diffusion approximation and benchmark results obtained by PIC/MCC simulations. Main features of this time- and space-dependent fluid model are given. It is found that the novel approach shows generally quite good agreement with the macroscopic properties derived by the kinetic simulations and is largely able to characterize qualitatively and quantitatively the discharge behavior even at conditions when the classical fluid modeling approach fails. Furthermore, the excellent agreement between the two PIC/MCC simulation codes using the velocity Verlet method for the integration of the equations of motion verifies their accuracy and applicability.

  19. Advances in modeling the pressure correlation terms in the second moment equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Shabbir, Aamir; Lumley, John L.

    1991-01-01

    In developing turbulence models, various model constraints were proposed in an attempt to make the model equations more general (or universal). The most recent of these are the realizability principle, the linearity principle, the rapid distortion theory, and the material indifference principle. Several issues are discussed concerning these principles and special attention is payed to the realizability principle. Realizability (defined as the requirement of non-negative energy and Schwarz' inequality between any fluctuating quantities) is the basic physical and mathematical principle that any modeled equation should obey. Hence, it is the most universal, important and also the minimal requirement for a model equation to prevent it from producing unphysical results. The principle of realizability is described in detail, the realizability conditions are derived for various turbulence models, and the model forms are proposed for the pressure correlation terms in the second moment equations. Detailed comparisons of various turbulence models with experiments and direct numerical simulations are presented. As a special case of turbulence, the two dimensional two-component turbulence modeling is also discussed.

  20. Advances in Intracranial Pressure Monitoring and Its Significance in Managing Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kawoos, Usmah; McCarron, Richard M.; Auker, Charles R.; Chavko, Mikulas

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) measurements are essential in evaluation and treatment of neurological disorders such as subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage, ischemic stroke, hydrocephalus, meningitis/encephalitis, and traumatic brain injury (TBI). The techniques of ICP monitoring have evolved from invasive to non-invasive—with both limitations and advantages. Some limitations of the invasive methods include short-term monitoring, risk of infection, restricted mobility of the subject, etc. The invasiveness of a method limits the frequency of ICP evaluation in neurological conditions like hydrocephalus, thus hampering the long-term care of patients with compromised ICP. Thus, there has been substantial interest in developing noninvasive techniques for assessment of ICP. Several approaches were reported, although none seem to provide a complete solution due to inaccuracy. ICP measurements are fundamental for immediate care of TBI patients in the acute stages of severe TBI injury. In severe TBI, elevated ICP is associated with mortality or poor clinical outcome. ICP monitoring in conjunction with other neurological monitoring can aid in understanding the pathophysiology of brain damage. This review article presents: (a) the significance of ICP monitoring; (b) ICP monitoring methods (invasive and non-invasive); and (c) the role of ICP monitoring in the management of brain damage, especially TBI. PMID:26690122

  1. Advances in Thin Film Thermocouple Durability Under High Temperature and Pressure Testing Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Lisa C.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Taylor, Keith F.

    1999-01-01

    Thin film thermocouples for measuring material surface temperature have been previously demonstrated on several material systems and in various hostile test environments. A well-developed thin film fabrication procedure utilizing shadow masking for patterning the sensors elements had produced thin films with sufficient durability for applications in high temperature and pressure environments that exist in air-breathing and hydrogen-fueled burner rig and engine test facilities. However, while shadow masking had been a reliable method for specimens with flat and gently curved surfaces, it had not been consistently reliable for use on test components with sharp contours. This work reports on the feasibility of utilizing photolithography processing for patterning thin film thermocouples. Because this patterning process required changes in the thin film deposition process from that developed for shadow masking, the effect of these changes on thin film adherence during burner rig testing was evaluated. In addition to the results of changing the patterning method, the effects on thin film adherence of other processes used in the thin film fabrication procedure is also presented.

  2. Optimizing the electrical excitation of an atmospheric pressure plasma advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, P; Li, J F; Liu, D X; Walsh, J L

    2014-08-30

    The impact of pulse-modulated generation of atmospheric pressure plasma on the efficiency of organic dye degradation has been investigated. Aqueous samples of methyl orange were exposed to low temperature air plasma and the degradation efficiency was determined by absorbance spectroscopy. The plasma was driven at a constant frequency of 35kHz with a duty cycle of 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%. Relative concentrations of dissolved nitrogen oxides, pH, conductivity and the time evolution of gas phase ozone were measured to identify key parameters responsible for the changes observed in degradation efficiency. The results indicate that pulse modulation significantly improved dye degradation efficiency, with a plasma pulsed at 25% duty showing a two-fold enhancement. Additionally, pulse modulation led to a reduction in the amount of nitrate contamination added to the solution by the plasma. The results clearly demonstrate that optimization of the electrical excitation of the plasma can enhance both degradation efficiency and the final water quality.

  3. Humidity-independent conducting polyaniline films synthesized using advanced atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization with in-situ iodine doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Choon-Sang; Kim, Do Yeob; Kim, Dong Ha; Lee, Hyung-Kun; Shin, Bhum Jae; Tae, Heung-Sik

    2017-01-01

    This study reports on the synthesis and characterization of conducting polyaniline (PANI) thin films when using advanced atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs). A simple method for synthesizing conducting polymers (CPs) with humidity-independent characteristics is introduced using advanced APPJs and an in-situ iodine doping method. In the case of ex-situ I2 doping, a humidity effect study showed that increasing the relative humidity produced significant changes in the electrical resistance (R) of the PANI, indicating strong humidity-dependent characteristics similar to conventional CPs. In contrast, in the case of in-situ I2 doping, the R and sensitivity of the PANI remained essentially unchanged when increasing the relative humidity, except for a very low sensitivity of 0.5% under 94% relative humidity. In addition, the R for the PANI with in-situ I2 doping showed no aging effect, while the R for the ex-situ-doped PANI increased dramatically over time. Thus, it is anticipated that the use of in-situ doping during plasma polymerization can be widely used to design stable and high-performance CPs with humidity-independent characteristics for a variety of applications.

  4. Advanced Research on the Electrode Area of a Low Pressure Hg-Ar Discharge Lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jianou

    The phenomenon of electrical discharge in low pressure Hg-Ar vapor has been under continuous investigation since it was first discovered. Because much work has been done in the positive column, it is, therefore, that the electrode area of the lamp is the main focus of this thesis. To simulate the interface phenomena on a electrode surface, samples, with optically smooth tungsten-barium interfaces were fired in a high vacuum furnace at different temperatures. Measurements were made using surface characterization techniques. It is found that no Ba_3WO _6 is formed on the surface as previously reported in the powder mixing experiments, and the interface consists mainly of BaWO_4. It was discovered in the early 1950's that vaporization of the barium from the cathode in a fluorescent lamp could be reduced tremendously with the addition of 5% of ZrO _2 to the coating mix. However, the reason for this is poorly understood. A possible explanation has been found, and number of tests have been completed to simulate the formation of BaZO_3 under different lamp operating conditions. The measurements and simulation of barium atom and ion number densities are presented. Barium emitted from the electrode surface has a strong interaction with the local plasma. The number density distributions depend mainly on the discharge conditions. A Monte Carlo computer simulation for the barium ion number density is described and the results from the simulation compared to the experimental results obtained by absorption method. It is clear that the ion distribution and phosphor contamination in the electrode area are two closely related issues. XPS is used to measure the chemical composition on the phosphor surface of the lamp. A discussion of calibration methods and the possible compounds forming on the phosphors is then presented. A number of questions have been raised concerning the safety of the lamp and its affects on health related to radiation generated in the electrode area. Typically

  5. Fluid-bed air-supply system

    DOEpatents

    Atabay, Keramettin

    1979-01-01

    The air-supply system for a fluidized-bed furnace includes two air conduits for the same combustion zone. The conduits feed separate sets of holes in a distributor plate through which fluidizing air flows to reach the bed. During normal operation, only one conduit and set of holes is used, but the second conduit and set of holes is employed during start-up.

  6. Fluid bed technology in materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, C.K.; Sathiyamoorthy, D.

    1999-01-01

    The author explores the various aspects of fluidization engineering and examines its applications in a multitude of materials processing techniques. Topics include process metallurgy, fluidization in nuclear engineering, and the pros and cons of various fluidization equipment. Gupta emphasizes fluidization engineering in high temperature processing, and high temperature fluidized bed furnaces.

  7. Advanced retorting, microwave assisted thermal sterilization (MATS), and pressure assisted thermal sterilization (PATS) to process meat products.

    PubMed

    Barbosa-Cánovas, Gustavo V; Medina-Meza, Ilce; Candoğan, Kezban; Bermúdez-Aguirre, Daniela

    2014-11-01

    Conventional thermal processes have been very reliable in offering safe sterilized meat products, but some of those products are of questionable overall quality. Flavor, aroma, and texture, among other attributes, are significantly affected during such processes. To improve those quality attributes, alternative approaches to sterilizing meat and meat products have been explored in the last few years. Most of the new strategies for sterilizing meat products rely on using thermal approaches, but in a more efficient way than in conventional methods. Some of these emerging technologies have proven to be reliable and have been formally approved by regulatory agencies such as the FDA. Additional work needs to be done in order for these technologies to be fully adopted by the food industry and to optimize their use. Some of these emerging technologies for sterilizing meat include pressure assisted thermal sterilization (PATS), microwaves, and advanced retorting. This review deals with fundamental and applied aspects of these new and very promising approaches to sterilization of meat products.

  8. APFBC repowering could help meet Kyoto Protocol CO{sub 2} reduction goals[Advanced Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, R.E.; Tonnemacher, G.C.

    1999-07-01

    The Clinton Administration signed the 1997 Kyoto Protocol agreement that would limit US greenhouse gas emissions, of which carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is the most significant. While the Kyoto Protocol has not yet been submitted to the Senate for ratification, in the past, there have been few proposed environmental actions that had continued and wide-spread attention of the press and environmental activists that did not eventually lead to regulation. Since the Kyoto Protocol might lead to future regulation, its implications need investigation by the power industry. Limiting CO{sub 2} emissions affects the ability of the US to generate reliable, low cost electricity, and has tremendous potential impact on electric generating companies with a significant investment in coal-fired generation, and on their customers. This paper explores the implications of reducing coal plant CO{sub 2} by various amounts. The amount of reduction for the US that is proposed in the Kyoto Protocol is huge. The Kyoto Protocol would commit the US to reduce its CO{sub 2} emissions to 7% below 1990 levels. Since 1990, there has been significant growth in US population and the US economy driving carbon emissions 34% higher by year 2010. That means CO{sub 2} would have to be reduced by 30.9%, which is extremely difficult to accomplish. The paper tells why. There are, however, coal-based technologies that should be available in time to make significant reductions in coal-plant CO{sub 2} emissions. Th paper focuses on one plant repowering method that can reduce CO{sub 2} per kWh by 25%, advanced circulating pressurized fluidized bed combustion combined cycle (APFBC) technology, based on results from a recent APFBC repowering concept evaluation of the Carolina Power and Light Company's (CP and L) L.V. Sutton steam station. The replacement of the existing 50-year base of power generating units needed to meet proposed Kyoto Protocol CO{sub 2} reduction commitments would be a massive undertaking. It is

  9. Coal fired fluid bed module for a single elevation style fluid bed power plant

    DOEpatents

    Waryasz, Richard E.

    1979-01-01

    A fluidized bed for the burning of pulverized fuel having a specific waterwall arrangement that comprises a structurally reinforced framework of wall tubes. The wall tubes are reversely bent from opposite sides and then bonded together to form tie rods that extend across the bed to support the lateral walls thereof.

  10. Advancing a smart air cushion system for preventing pressure ulcers using projection Moiré for large deformation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Sheng-Lin; Tsai, Tsung-Heng; Lee, Carina Jean-Tien; Hsu, Yu-Hsiang; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2016-03-01

    A pressure ulcer is one of the most important concerns for wheelchair bound patients with spinal cord injuries. A pressure ulcer is a localized injury near the buttocks that bear ischial tuberosity oppression over a long period of time. Due to elevated compression to blood vessels, the surrounding tissues suffer from a lack of oxygen and nutrition. The ulcers eventually lead to skin damage followed by tissue necrosis. The current medical strategy is to minimize the occurrence of pressure ulcers by regularly helping patients change their posture. However, these methods do not always work effectively or well. As a solution to fundamentally prevent pressure ulcers, a smart air cushion system was developed to detect and control pressure actively. The air cushion works by automatically adjusting a patient's sitting posture to effectively relieve the buttock pressure. To analyze the correlation between the dynamic pressure profiles of an air cell with a patient's weight, a projection Moiré system was adopted to measure the deformation of an air cell and its associated stress distribution. Combining a full-field deformation imaging with air pressure measured within an air cell, the patient's weight and the stress distribution can be simultaneously obtained. By integrating a full-field optical metrology with a time varying pressure sensor output coupled with different active air control algorithms for various designs, we can tailor the ratio of the air cells. Our preliminary data suggests that this newly developed smart air cushion has the potential to selectively reduce localized compression on the tissues at the buttocks. Furthermore, it can take a patient's weight which is an additional benefit so that medical personnel can reference it to prescribe the correct drug dosages.

  11. Recent Advances in Design of Low Cost Film Concentrator and Low Pressure Free Piston Stirling Engines for Solar Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinwaechter, J.; Kleinwaechter, H.; Beale, W.

    1984-01-01

    The free piston Stirling-linear alternator was shown to be scalable to power levels of tens of kilowatts in a form which is simple, efficient, long lived and relatively inexpensive. It avoids entirely the vexing problem of high pressure shaft, and its control requirements are not severe nor do they represent a significant threat to durability. Linear alternators have demonstrated high efficiency and moderate weight, and are capable of delivering 3 phase power from single machines without great increases of cost or complexity. There remains no apparent impediments to the commercial exploitation of the free piston engine for solar electric power generation.

  12. Blood pressure and risk of all-cause mortality in advanced chronic kidney disease and hemodialysis: the chronic renal insufficiency cohort study.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Nisha; McCulloch, Charles E; Rahman, Mahboob; Kusek, John W; Anderson, Amanda H; Xie, Dawei; Townsend, Raymond R; Lora, Claudia M; Wright, Jackson; Go, Alan S; Ojo, Akinlolu; Alper, Arnold; Lustigova, Eva; Cuevas, Magda; Kallem, Radhakrishna; Hsu, Chi-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Studies of hemodialysis patients have shown a U-shaped association between systolic blood pressure (SBP) and mortality. These studies have largely relied on dialysis-unit SBP measures and have not evaluated whether this U-shape also exists in advanced chronic kidney disease, before starting hemodialysis. We determined the association between SBP and mortality at advanced chronic kidney disease and again after initiation of hemodialysis. This was a prospective study of Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort participants with advanced chronic kidney disease followed through initiation of hemodialysis. We studied the association between SBP and mortality when participants (1) had an estimated glomerular filtration rate <30 mL/min/1.73 m2 (n=1705), (2) initiated hemodialysis and had dialysis-unit SBP measures (n=403), and (3) initiated hemodialysis and had out-of-dialysis-unit SBP measured at a Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study visit (n=326). Cox models were adjusted for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, and dialysis parameters. A quadratic term for SBP was included to test for a U-shaped association. At advanced chronic kidney disease, there was no association between SBP and mortality (hazard ratio, 1.02 [95% confidence interval, 0.98-1.07] per every 10 mm Hg increase). Among participants who started hemodialysis, a U-shaped association between dialysis-unit SBP and mortality was observed. In contrast, there was a linear association between out-of-dialysis-unit SBP and mortality (hazard ratio, 1.26 [95% confidence interval, 1.14-1.40] per every 10 mm Hg increase). In conclusion, more efforts should be made to obtain out-of-dialysis-unit SBP, which may merit more consideration as a target for clinical management and in interventional trials.

  13. Recent advances in combustion flow-field imaging measurements in high-pressure liquid-fueled gas turbine combustor concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locke, Randy J.; Hicks, Yolanda R.; Zaller, Michelle M.; Anderson, Robert C.

    1999-12-01

    Future gas turbine combustor designs for aerospace applications will be required to meet severe restrictions on environmentally harmful emissions. To meet the target emission reduction goals, these combustors will operate at temperatures and pressures greatly exceeding those of present day aero-powerplants. New diagnostic methods are required to provide insight into understanding the complex physical and chemical processes extant at these conditions because traditional diagnostic methods are either insufficient or incapable of providing this knowledge. At NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), several optically accessible combustor rigs have been built which allow the implementation of a suite of optical diagnostic techniques that are capable of providing just this type of crucial information. The techniques employed in the GRC combustion research laboratory include planar laser-induced fluorescence and planar Mie scattering. Research efforts have been quite successful probing both non-reacting and reacting flowfields of many kerosene-fueled combustor and combustor subcomponent design at pressures approaching 2.0 MPa, and temperatures near 2100 K. Images that map out combustion intermediate species such as OH distribution, fuel spray patternation, and fuel to air ratio contour mapping have been obtained for many different fuel injector designs and configurations. A novel combination of multiple planar images and computational analysis allows a 3D capability that greatly enhances the evaluation of the combustion processes and flowfields examined in this study.

  14. Thin film deposition at atmospheric pressure using dielectric barrier discharges: Advances on three-dimensional porous substrates and functional coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanelli, Fiorenza; Bosso, Piera; Mastrangelo, Anna Maria; Fracassi, Francesco

    2016-07-01

    Surface processing of materials by atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) has experienced significant growth in recent years. Considerable research efforts have been directed for instance to develop a large variety of processes which exploit different DBD electrode geometries for the direct and remote deposition of thin films from precursors in gas, vapor and aerosol form. This article briefly reviews our recent progress in thin film deposition by DBDs with particular focus on process optimization. The following examples are provided: (i) the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of thin films on an open-cell foam accomplished by igniting the DBD throughout the entire three-dimensional (3D) porous structure of the substrate, (ii) the preparation of hybrid organic/inorganic nanocomposite coatings using an aerosol-assisted process, (iii) the DBD jet deposition of coatings containing carboxylic acid groups and the improvement of their chemical and morphological stability upon immersion in water.

  15. Advanced development of a pressurized ash agglomerating fluidized-bed coal gasification system: Topical report, Process analysis, FY 1983

    SciTech Connect

    1987-07-31

    KRW Energy Systems, Inc., is engaged in the continuing development of a pressurized, fluidized-bed gasification process at its Waltz Mill Site in Madison, Pennsylvania. The overall objective of the program is to demonstrate the viability of the KRW process for the environmentally-acceptable production of low- and medium-Btu fuel gas from a variety of fossilized carbonaceous feedstocks and industrial fuels. This report presents process analysis of the 24 ton-per-day Process Development Unit (PDU) operations and is a continuation of the process analysis work performed in 1980 and 1981. Included is work performed on PDU process data; gasification; char-ash separation; ash agglomeration; fines carryover, recycle, and consumption; deposit formation; materials; and environmental, health, and safety issues. 63 figs., 43 tabs.

  16. Design and overall performance of four highly loaded, high speed inlet stages for an advanced high-pressure-ratio core compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, L.; Moore, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    The detailed design and overall performances of four inlet stages for an advanced core compressor are presented. These four stages represent two levels of design total pressure ratio (1.82 and 2.05), two levels of rotor aspect ratio (1.19 and 1.63), and two levels of stator aspect ratio (1.26 and 1.78). The individual stages were tested over the stable operating flow range at 70, 90, and 100 percent of design speeds. The performances of the low aspect ratio configurations were substantially better than those of the high aspect ratio configurations. The two low aspect ratio configurations achieved peak efficiencies of 0.876 and 0.872 and corresponding stage efficiencies of 0.845 and 0.840. The high aspect ratio configurations achieved peak ratio efficiencies of 0.851 and 0.849 and corresponding stage efficiencies of 0.821 and 0.831.

  17. Influences of guide-tube and bluff-body on advanced atmospheric pressure plasma source for single-crystalline polymer nanoparticle synthesis at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Ha; Park, Choon-Sang; Kim, Won Hyun; Shin, Bhum Jae; Hong, Jung Goo; Park, Tae Seon; Seo, Jeong Hyun; Tae, Heung-Sik

    2017-02-01

    The use of a guide-tube and bluff-body with an advanced atmospheric pressure plasma source is investigated for the low-temperature synthesis of single-crystalline high-density plasma polymerized pyrrole (pPPy) nano-materials on glass and flexible substrates. Three process parameters, including the position of the bluff-body, Ar gas flow rate, and remoteness of the substrate from the intense and broadened plasma, are varied and examined in detail. Plus, for an in-depth understanding of the flow structure development with the guide-tube and bluff-body, various numerical simulations are also conducted using the same geometric conditions as the experiments. As a result, depending on both the position of the bluff-body and the Ar gas flow rate, an intense and broadened plasma as a glow-like discharge was produced in a large area. The production of the glow-like discharge played a significant role in increasing the plasma energy required for full cracking of the monomers in the nucleation region. Furthermore, a remote growth condition was another critical process parameter for minimizing the etching and thermal damage during the plasma polymerization, resulting in single- and poly-crystalline pPPy nanoparticles at a low temperature with the proposed atmospheric pressure plasma jet device.

  18. TRAC-PF1/MOD1: an advanced best-estimate computer program for pressurized water reactor thermal-hydraulic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.

    1986-07-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light-water reactors. The TRAC-PF1/MOD1 program provides this capability for pressurized water reactors and for many thermal-hydraulic test facilities. The code features either a one- or a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and its associated internals, a two-fluid nonequilibrium hydrodynamics model with a noncondensable gas field and solute tracking, flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment, optional reflood tracking capability for bottom-flood and falling-film quench fronts, and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. The stability-enhancing two-step (SETS) numerical algorithm is used in the one-dimensional hydrodynamics and permits this portion of the fluid dynamics to violate the material Courant condition. This technique permits large time steps and, hence, reduced running time for slow transients.

  19. Pressure Sensitive Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Bencic, T.; Sullivan, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews new advances and applications of pressure sensitive paints in aerodynamic testing. Emphasis is placed on important technical aspects of pressure sensitive paint including instrumentation, data processing, and uncertainty analysis.

  20. Anatoxin-a degradation by Advanced Oxidation Processes: vacuum-UV at 172 nm, photolysis using medium pressure UV and UV/H(2)O(2).

    PubMed

    Afzal, Atefeh; Oppenländer, Thomas; Bolton, James R; El-Din, Mohamed Gamal

    2010-01-01

    Two Advanced Oxidation Processes, namely vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photolysis at 172nm and ultraviolet/hydrogen peroxide (UV/H(2)O(2)) were investigated for the degradation of anatoxin-a in aqueous solutions. Solutions of anatoxin-a-fumarate were treated with VUV light at 172nm with a UV dose of 200 mJ/cm(2), where fumaric acid served as a reference compound for a competition kinetics analysis. The second-order rate constant for the reaction between anatoxin-a and the hydroxyl radical was found to be (5.2+/-0.3)x10(9)M(-1) s(-1) and was independent of pH, temperature, and initial concentration of anatoxin-a. The direct photolysis of anatoxin-a using a medium pressure (MP) UV lamp was also investigated, in which case a UV dose of 1285 mJ/cm(2) was required to degrade anatoxin-a by 88% and 50% at concentrations of 0.6mg/L and 1.8mg/L of toxin, respectively. Treatment of anatoxin-a with a low pressure (LP) UV lamp in the presence of 30mg/L of H(2)O(2) was examined, where it was found that more than 70% of toxin could be degraded at a UV dose of 200 mJ/cm(2). The degradation arises from the oxidation of the toxin by hydroxyl radicals. The addition of H(2)O(2) clearly enhanced the degradation of anatoxin-a, up to a concentration of 40mg/L, after which addition of more H(2)O(2) had little effect on the degradation kinetics of anatoxin-a. The effect of background constituents in the water on the degradation of anatoxin-a was also investigated using natural and synthetically produced model waters.

  1. Meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials of oral mandibular advancement devices and continuous positive airway pressure for obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea.

    PubMed

    Sharples, Linda D; Clutterbuck-James, Abigail L; Glover, Matthew J; Bennett, Maxine S; Chadwick, Rebecca; Pittman, Marcus A; Quinnell, Timothy G

    2016-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea (OSAH) causes excessive daytime sleepiness, impairs quality-of-life, and increases cardiovascular disease and road traffic accident risks. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment and mandibular advancement devices (MAD) have been shown to be effective in individual trials but their effectiveness particularly relative to disease severity is unclear. A MEDLINE, Embase and Science Citation Index search updating two systematic reviews to August 2013 identified 77 RCTs in adult OSAH patients comparing: MAD with conservative management (CM); MAD with CPAP; or CPAP with CM. Overall MAD and CPAP significantly improved apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) (MAD -9.3/hr (p < 0.001), CPAP -25.4 (p < 0.001)). In direct comparisons mean AHI and Epworth sleepiness scale score were lower (7.0/hr (p < 0.001) and 0.67 (p = 0.093) respectively) for CPAP. There were no CPAP vs. MAD trials in mild OSAH but in comparisons with CM, MAD and CPAP reduced ESS similarly (MAD 2.01 (p < 0.001); CPAP 1.23 (p = 0.012). Both MAD and CPAP are clinically effective in the treatment of OSAH. Although CPAP has a greater treatment effect, MAD is an appropriate treatment for patients who are intolerant of CPAP and may be comparable to CPAP in mild disease.

  2. Meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials of oral mandibular advancement devices and continuous positive airway pressure for obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea

    PubMed Central

    Sharples, Linda D.; Clutterbuck-James, Abigail L.; Glover, Matthew J.; Bennett, Maxine S.; Chadwick, Rebecca; Pittman, Marcus A.; Quinnell, Timothy G.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea (OSAH) causes excessive daytime sleepiness, impairs quality-of-life, and increases cardiovascular disease and road traffic accident risks. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment and mandibular advancement devices (MAD) have been shown to be effective in individual trials but their effectiveness particularly relative to disease severity is unclear. A MEDLINE, Embase and Science Citation Index search updating two systematic reviews to August 2013 identified 77 RCTs in adult OSAH patients comparing: MAD with conservative management (CM); MAD with CPAP; or CPAP with CM. Overall MAD and CPAP significantly improved apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) (MAD −9.3/hr (p < 0.001), CPAP −25.4 (p < 0.001)). In direct comparisons mean AHI and Epworth sleepiness scale score were lower (7.0/hr (p < 0.001) and 0.67 (p = 0.093) respectively) for CPAP. There were no CPAP vs. MAD trials in mild OSAH but in comparisons with CM, MAD and CPAP reduced ESS similarly (MAD 2.01 (p < 0.001); CPAP 1.23 (p = 0.012). Both MAD and CPAP are clinically effective in the treatment of OSAH. Although CPAP has a greater treatment effect, MAD is an appropriate treatment for patients who are intolerant of CPAP and may be comparable to CPAP in mild disease. PMID:26163056

  3. Eplerenone restores 24-h blood pressure circadian rhythm and reduces advanced glycation end-products in rhesus macaques with spontaneous hypertensive metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Zheng, Wen; Liu, Yuli; Wang, Jue; Peng, Ying; Shang, Haibao; Hou, Ning; Hu, Xiaomin; Ding, Yi; Xiao, Yao; Wang, Can; Zeng, Fanxin; Mao, Jiaming; Zhang, Jun; Ma, Dongwei; Sun, Xueting; Li, Chuanyun; Xiao, Rui-Ping; Zhang, Xiuqin

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is often associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS), and serves as a risk factor of MetS and its complications. Blood pressure circadian rhythm in hypertensive patients has been suggested to contribute to cardiovascular consequences and organ damage of hypertension. But circadian changes of BP and their response to drugs have not been clearly investigated in non-human primates (NHPs) of MetS with hypertension. Here, we identified 16 elderly, hypertensive MetS rhesus monkeys from our in-house cohort. With implanted telemetry, we investigate BP changes and its circadian rhythm, together with the effect of antihypertensive drugs on BP and its diurnal fluctuation. MetS hypertensive monkeys displayed higher BP, obesity, glucose intolerance, and dyslipidemia. We also confirmed impaired 24-h BP circadian rhythm in MetS hypertensive monkeys. Importantly, Eplerenone, a mineralocorticoid receptor blocker, exerts multiple beneficial effects in MetS hypertensive monkeys, including BP reduction, 24-h BP circadian rhythm restoration, and decreased plasma concentration of inflammation factors and advanced glycation end-products. In summary, we identified a naturally-developed hypertensive MetS NHP model, which is of great value in the studies on pathogenesis of MetS-associated hypertension and development of novel therapeutic strategies. We also provided multiple novel mechanistic insights of the beneficial effect of Eplerenone on MetS with hypertension. PMID:27032687

  4. Characterizing the effects of elevated temperature on the air void pore structure of advanced gas-cooled reactor pressure vessel concrete using x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, R. C.; Petkovski, M.; Engelberg, D. L.; Leonard, F.; Withers, P. J.

    2013-07-01

    X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT) has been applied to nondestructively characterise changes in the microstructure of a concrete used in the pressure vessel structure of Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGR) in the UK. Concrete specimens were conditioned at temperatures of 105 °C and 250 °C, to simulate the maximum thermal load expected to occur during a loss of coolant accident (LOCA). Following thermal treatment, these specimens along with an unconditioned control sample were characterised using micro-focus X-ray CT with a spatial resolution of 14.6 microns. The results indicate that the air void pore structure of the specimens experienced significant volume changes as a result of the increasing temperature. The increase in the porous volume was more prevalent at 250 °C. Alterations in air void size distributions were characterized with respect to the unconditioned control specimen. These findings appear to correlate with changes in the uni-axial compressive strength of the conditioned concrete.

  5. Eplerenone restores 24-h blood pressure circadian rhythm and reduces advanced glycation end-products in rhesus macaques with spontaneous hypertensive metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Zheng, Wen; Liu, Yuli; Wang, Jue; Peng, Ying; Shang, Haibao; Hou, Ning; Hu, Xiaomin; Ding, Yi; Xiao, Yao; Wang, Can; Zeng, Fanxin; Mao, Jiaming; Zhang, Jun; Ma, Dongwei; Sun, Xueting; Li, Chuanyun; Xiao, Rui-Ping; Zhang, Xiuqin

    2016-04-01

    Hypertension is often associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS), and serves as a risk factor of MetS and its complications. Blood pressure circadian rhythm in hypertensive patients has been suggested to contribute to cardiovascular consequences and organ damage of hypertension. But circadian changes of BP and their response to drugs have not been clearly investigated in non-human primates (NHPs) of MetS with hypertension. Here, we identified 16 elderly, hypertensive MetS rhesus monkeys from our in-house cohort. With implanted telemetry, we investigate BP changes and its circadian rhythm, together with the effect of antihypertensive drugs on BP and its diurnal fluctuation. MetS hypertensive monkeys displayed higher BP, obesity, glucose intolerance, and dyslipidemia. We also confirmed impaired 24-h BP circadian rhythm in MetS hypertensive monkeys. Importantly, Eplerenone, a mineralocorticoid receptor blocker, exerts multiple beneficial effects in MetS hypertensive monkeys, including BP reduction, 24-h BP circadian rhythm restoration, and decreased plasma concentration of inflammation factors and advanced glycation end-products. In summary, we identified a naturally-developed hypertensive MetS NHP model, which is of great value in the studies on pathogenesis of MetS-associated hypertension and development of novel therapeutic strategies. We also provided multiple novel mechanistic insights of the beneficial effect of Eplerenone on MetS with hypertension.

  6. Measurement of Unsteady Blade Surface Pressure on a Single Rotation Large Scale Advanced Prop-fan with Angular and Wake Inflow at Mach Numbers from 0.02 to 0.70

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, P.; Gruber, M.; Parzych, D.

    1988-01-01

    Unsteady blade surface pressure data for the Large-Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP) blade operation with angular inflow, wake inflow and uniform flow over a range of inflow Mach numbers of 0.02 to 0.70 is provided. The data are presented as Fourier coefficients for the first 35 harmonics of shaft rotational frequency. Also presented is a brief discussion of the unsteady blade response observed at takeoff and cruise conditions with angular and wake inflow.

  7. Fluid bed retorting process with multiple feed lines

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, G.B.

    1983-11-15

    Solid hydrocarbon-containing material, such as oil shale, coal or tar sand, is fed into a retort through a multiplicity of feed lines to enhance retorting efficiency, throughout and product yield. In the preferred form, larger particles of hydrocarbon-containing material gravitate downwardly through the retort in countercurrent relationship to an upward fluidized stream of smaller particles of hydrocarbon-containing material. This arrangement is especially useful to retort larger particles of hydrocarbon-containing material. One or more streams of intermediate size particles of hydrocarbon-containing material can also be fed into the retort.

  8. Users investing own funds in large fluid bed systems

    SciTech Connect

    Poplett, J.

    1984-11-05

    The successful performance of atmospheric fluidized bed (AFB) boilers funded by government grants has encouraged industrial users to invest their own capital for large AFB boilers as a means of safely switching to coal. The successful demonstrations, the corrections of corrosion problems, the ability of AFB boilers to comply with emission standards without needing costly pollution control equipment, the ability to burn low-grade coal or coal by-products, and quick paybacks triggered the interest despite stable oil and gas prices. However, interest in systems below 100,000 pounds per hour is dropping because of long payback periods. A directory lists 15 manufacturers of AFB boilers.

  9. The SEI facility for fluid-bed wood gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Bullpitt, W.S.; Rittenhouse, O.C. ); Masterson, L.D. )

    1989-09-01

    In mid 1985, construction was begun on the world's largest fluidized bed, wood gasification plant at the clay processing plant in Quincy, Fla. In March 1986, the plant was purchased by Southern Electric International (SEI). This paper describes how SEI coordinated the redesign of many of the plant systems and supervised the completion of construction and startup. In late 1986, the gasifier plant was sold. SEI remains involved as the operations and maintenance contractor on-site and is now responsible for design changes and equipment maintenance.

  10. Pressurized fluidized bed reactor and a method of operating the same

    DOEpatents

    Isaksson, J.

    1996-02-20

    A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine. 1 fig.

  11. Pressurized fluidized bed reactor and a method of operating the same

    DOEpatents

    Isaksson, Juhani

    1996-01-01

    A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine.

  12. In flight measurement of steady and unsteady blade surface pressure of a single rotation large scale advanced prop-fan installed on the PTA aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parzych, D.; Boyd, L.; Meissner, W.; Wyrostek, A.

    1991-01-01

    An experiment was performed by Hamilton Standard, Division of United Technologies Corporation, under contract by LeRC, to measure the blade surface pressure of a large scale, 8 blade model prop-fan in flight. The test bed was the Gulfstream 2 Prop-Fan Test Assessment (PTA) aircraft. The objective of the test was to measure the steady and periodic blade surface pressure resulting from three different Prop-Fan air inflow angles at various takeoff and cruise conditions. The inflow angles were obtained by varying the nacelle tilt angles, which ranged from -3 to +2 degrees. A range of power loadings, tip speeds, and altitudes were tested at each nacelle tilt angle over the flight Mach number range of 0.30 to 0.80. Unsteady blade pressure data tabulated as Fourier coefficients for the first 35 harmonics of shaft rotational frequency and the steady (non-varying) pressure component are presented.

  13. Measurement of the steady surface pressure distribution on a single rotation large scale advanced prop-fan blade at Mach numbers from 0.03 to 0.78

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Peter

    1988-01-01

    The aerodynamic pressure distribution was determined on a rotating Prop-Fan blade at the S1-MA wind tunnel facility operated by the Office National D'Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiale (ONERA) in Modane, France. The pressure distributions were measured at thirteen radial stations on a single rotation Large Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP/SR7) blade, for a sequence of operating conditions including inflow Mach numbers ranging from 0.03 to 0.78. Pressure distributions for more than one power coefficient and/or advanced ratio setting were measured for most of the inflow Mach numbers investigated. Due to facility power limitations the Prop-Fan test installation was a two bladed version of the eight design configuration. The power coefficient range investigated was therefore selected to cover typical power loading per blade conditions which occur within the Prop-Fan operating envelope. The experimental results provide an extensive source of information on the aerodynamic behavior of the swept Prop-Fan blade, including details which were elusive to current computational models and do not appear in the two-dimensional airfoil data.

  14. Proceedings of the advanced research and technology development direct utilization, instrumentation and diagnostics contractors' review meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Geiling, D.W. ); Goldberg, P.M. )

    1990-01-01

    The 1990 Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR TD) Direct Utilization, and Instrumentation and Diagnostics Contractors Review Meeting was held September 16--18, 1990, at the Hyatt at Chatham Center in Pittsburgh, PA. The meeting was sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, and the Pittsburgh and Morgantown Energy Technology Centers. Each year the meeting provides a forum for the exchange of information among the DOE AR TD contractors and interested parties. This year's meeting was hosted by the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center and was attended by 120 individuals from industry, academia, national laboratories, and other governmental agencies. Papers were presented on research addressing coal surface, science, devolatilization and combustion, ash behavior, emission controls for gases particulates, fluid bed combustion and utilization in diesels and turbines. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  15. Capture of alkali during pressurized fluidized-bed combustion using in-bed sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, M.D.; Ludlow, D.K.

    1997-12-31

    The primary focus of this research was the removal of alkali from PFBC flue gases to a level specified by turbine manufactures. The target level was less than 24 ppbw. Several of the aluminosilicate minerals have the potential to capture alkalis, especially sodium and potassium, under conditions typical of fluid-bed operation. Other goals of this work were to investigate the potential for simultaneously removing SO{sub 2} and Cl from the PFBC gas stream. The initial work focused primarily on one class of sorbents, sodalites, with the goal of determining whether sodalites can be used as an in-bed sorbent to simultaneously remove alkali and sulfur. Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to study the mechanism of alkali capture using sodalite. Further testing was performed on a 7.6 cm (3-in.)-diameter pressurized fluid-bed reactor (PFBR). Early results indicated that simultaneous removal of alkali and sulfur and/or chlorine was not practical under the conditions for commercial PFBC operations. Therefore, the focus of the latter part of this work was on sorbents that have been shown to capture alkali in other systems. The effectiveness of bauxite and kaolinite to reduce vapor-phase alkali concentrations was determined. In addition to studying the gettering capability of the sorbent, the impact of the getter on operational performance was evaluated. This evaluation included examining potential agglomeration of bed particles, deposition on heat-transfer surfaces, and the bridging and blinding of ceramic candle filters. The focus of this paper is on the work performed on the PFBR.

  16. Hydromechanical Advanced Coal Excavator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estus, Jay M.; Summers, David

    1990-01-01

    Water-jet cutting reduces coal dust and its hazards. Advanced mining system utilizes full-face, hydromechanical, continuous miner. Coal excavator uses high-pressure water-jet lances, one in each of cutting heads and one in movable lance, to make cuts across top, bottom and middle height, respectively, of coal face. Wedge-shaped cutting heads advance into lower and upper cuts in turn, thereby breaking coal toward middle cut. Thrust cylinders and walking pads advance excavator toward coal face.

  17. Advanced development of a pressurized ash agglomerating fluidized-bed coal gasification system. Quarterly progress report, October 1-December 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    1983-04-21

    The overall objective of the Westinghouse coal gasification program is to demonstrate the viability of the Westinghouse pressurized, fluidized bed, gasification system for the production of medium-Btu fuel gas for syngas, electrical power generation, chemical feedstocks, or industrial fuels and to obtain performance and scaleup data for the process and hardware. Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: (1) operation and maintenance of the process development unit (PDU); (2) process analysis; (3) cold flow scaleup facility; (4) process component engineering and design; and (5) laboratory support studies involving gas solids flow modeling and coal/ash behavior. 9 figures, 19 tables.

  18. Change in hydrophilicity of penicillins during advanced oxidation by radiolytically generated OH compromises the elimination of selective pressure on bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Szabó, László; Tóth, Tünde; Engelhardt, Tekla; Rácz, Gergely; Mohácsi-Farkas, Csilla; Takács, Erzsébet; Wojnárovits, László

    2016-05-01

    Advanced oxidation processes are promising technologies for removal of antibiotic residues from wastewater in terms of their high efficacy. However, recent studies have reported the remaining antibacterial activity of the products at early-stages of treatment. The present study investigates the effect of such products of model β-lactams (amoxicillin, ampicillin, cloxacillin) on bacteria introducing structure-based, and biological approaches involving Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. Chemical analysis revealed the destruction of the β-lactam pharmacophore in competition with the reaction at the aromatic ring. Multisite attack occurs on the penicillin skeleton producing OH-substituted products. The enhanced hydrophilicity confers higher diffusion rate through the porin channels of Gram-negative bacteria and through the hydrophilic cell wall of Gram-positive species. Accordingly, an increase in acute toxicity of treated samples was observed at the beginning of the treatment. The same tendency was observed for target-specific antimicrobial activity investigated with antibiotic susceptibility testing (agar-diffusion, bacterial growth). Prolonged treatments yielded products, e.g. polyhydroxylated phenolic compounds, being also deleterious for bacteria. Therefore, the advanced oxidation process should be judiciously optimized.

  19. Advanced development of a pressurized ash agglomerating fluidized-bed coal gasification system: Phase 2, Final report, May 1, 1983-July 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    1987-09-15

    KRW Energy Systems Inc. is engaged in the development of a pressurized, fluidized-bed, gasification process at its Waltz Mill Site in Madison, Pennsylvania. The overall objective of the program is to demonstrate the viability of the KRW process for the environmentally acceptable production of low- and medium-Btu fuel gas from a variety of fossilized, carbonaceous feedstocks for electrical power generation, substitute natural gas, chemical feedstocks, and industrial fuels. This report covers Phase II of the contract period (May 1, 1983 to July 31, 1984) and is a continuation of the work performed in 1983 and reported in the Phase I final report, FE-19122-30. Included is work performed in fiscal 1983 to 1984 on PDU testing, process analysis, cold flow scaleup facility, process and component engineering and design, and laboratory support studies.

  20. Advanced Technologies for Monitoring CO2 Saturation and Pore Pressure in Geologic Formations: Linking the Chemical and Physical Effects to Elastic and Transport Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Mavko, G.; Vanorio, T.; Vialle, S.; Saxena, N.

    2014-03-31

    Ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities were measured over a range of confining pressures while injecting CO2 and brine into the samples. Pore fluid pressure was also varied and monitored together with porosity during injection. Effective medium models were developed to understand the mechanisms and impact of observed changes and to provide the means for implementation of the interpretation methodologies in the field. Ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities in carbonate rocks show as much as 20-50% decrease after injection of the reactive CO2-brine mixture; the changes were caused by permanent changes to the rock elastic frame associated with dissolution of mineral. Velocity decreases were observed under both dry and fluid-saturated conditions, and the amount of change was correlated with the initial pore fabrics. Scanning Electron Microscope images of carbonate rock microstructures were taken before and after injection of CO2-rich water. The images reveal enlargement of the pores, dissolution of micrite (micron-scale calcite crystals), and pitting of grain surfaces caused by the fluid- solid chemical reactivity. The magnitude of the changes correlates with the rock microtexture – tight, high surface area samples showed the largest changes in permeability and smallest changes in porosity and elastic stiffness compared to those in rocks with looser texture and larger intergranular pore space. Changes to the pore space also occurred from flow of fine particles with the injected fluid. Carbonates with grain-coating materials, such as residual oil, experienced very little permanent change during injection. In the tight micrite/spar cement component, dissolution is controlled by diffusion: the mass transfer of products and reactants is thus slow and the fluid is expected to be close to thermodynamical equilibrium with the calcite, leading to very little dissolution, or even precipitation. In the microporous rounded micrite and macropores, dissolution is controlled by

  1. Peer Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Peer Pressure KidsHealth > For Teens > Peer Pressure A A A ... for the school play. previous continue When the Pressure's On Sometimes, though, the stresses in your life ...

  2. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Normal blood pressure is important for proper blood flow to the body's organs and tissues. The force of the blood on the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both as the heart ...

  3. Advanced fuel chemistry for advanced engines.

    SciTech Connect

    Taatjes, Craig A.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Zador, Judit; Fernandes, Ravi X.; Miller, James A.

    2009-09-01

    Autoignition chemistry is central to predictive modeling of many advanced engine designs that combine high efficiency and low inherent pollutant emissions. This chemistry, and especially its pressure dependence, is poorly known for fuels derived from heavy petroleum and for biofuels, both of which are becoming increasingly prominent in the nation's fuel stream. We have investigated the pressure dependence of key ignition reactions for a series of molecules representative of non-traditional and alternative fuels. These investigations combined experimental characterization of hydroxyl radical production in well-controlled photolytically initiated oxidation and a hybrid modeling strategy that linked detailed quantum chemistry and computational kinetics of critical reactions with rate-equation models of the global chemical system. Comprehensive mechanisms for autoignition generally ignore the pressure dependence of branching fractions in the important alkyl + O{sub 2} reaction systems; however we have demonstrated that pressure-dependent 'formally direct' pathways persist at in-cylinder pressures.

  4. Blood Pressure Checker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    An estimated 30 million people in the United States have high blood pressure, or hypertension. But a great many of them are unaware of it because hypertension, in its initial stages, displays no symptoms. Thus, the simply-operated blood pressure checking devices now widely located in public places are useful health aids. The one pictured above, called -Medimax 30, is a direct spinoff from NASA technology developed to monitor astronauts in space. For manned space flights, NASA wanted a compact, highly-reliable, extremely accurate method of checking astronauts' blood pressure without the need for a physician's interpretive skill. NASA's Johnson Space Center and Technology, Inc., a contractor, developed an electronic sound processor that automatically analyzes blood flow sounds to get both systolic (contracting arteries) and diastolic (expanding arteries) blood pressure measurements. NASA granted a patent license for this technology to Advanced Life Sciences, Inc., New York City, manufacturers of Medimax 30.

  5. Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus

    Pressure sores are areas of damaged skin caused by staying in one position for too long. They ... wheelchair, or are unable to change your position. Pressure sores can cause serious infections, some of which ...

  6. Horizontal Advanced Tensiometer

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2004-06-22

    An horizontal advanced tensiometer is described that allows the monitoring of the water pressure of soil positions, particularly beneath objects or materials that inhibit the use of previous monitoring wells. The tensiometer includes a porous cup, a pressure transducer (with an attached gasket device), an adaptive chamber, at least one outer guide tube which allows access to the desired horizontal position, a transducer wire, a data logger and preferably an inner guide tube and a specialized joint which provides pressure on the inner guide tube to maintain the seal between the gasket of the transducer and the adaptive chamber.

  7. Barometric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of alterations in barometric pressure on human beings are described. Human tolerances for gaseous environments and low and high barometric pressure are discussed, including effects on specific areas, such as the ear, lungs, teeth, and sinuses. Problems due to trapped gas within the body, high dynamic pressures on the body, and blasts are also considered.

  8. Advanced extravehicular mobility unit study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elkins, W.

    1982-01-01

    Components of the advanced extravehicular mobility unit (suit) are described. Design considerations for radiation protection, extravehicular operational pressure, mobility effects, tool/glove/effector, anthropometric definition, lighting, and equipment turnaround are addressed.

  9. Blood Pressure Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Engineering Development Lab., Inc.'s E-2000 Neck Baro Reflex System was developed for cardiovascular studies of astronauts. It is regularly used on Space Shuttle Missions, and a parallel version has been developed as a research tool to facilitate studies of blood pressure reflex controls in patients with congestive heart failure, diabetes, etc. An advanced version, the PPC-1000, was developed in 1991, and the technology has been refined substantially. The PPC provides an accurate means of generating pressure for a broad array of laboratory applications. An improved version, the E2010 Barosystem, is anticipated.

  10. Pressure gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, S.

    1985-04-02

    A pressure receiving element for receiving an external pressure is attached to one end of a body and a temperature compensating diaphragm is attached to the other end of the body. A coupling shaft disposed in the body is fixed at both ends to the pressure receiving element and the diaphragm, respectively. A liquid is sealed in the body and means is provided for detecting displacement or force applied to the coupling shaft in accordance with a pressure received by the pressure receiving element. The diaphragm has corrugations of concentric circles and the crests of a plurality of them are made flat and one of the flat crests is fixed to the body. The effective area of the diaphragm inside of the flat crest that is fixed to the body is selected substantially to be equal to the effective area of the pressure receiving element.

  11. Pressure transient method for front tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, S.M.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1983-08-01

    A pressure transient technique for tracking the advance of cold water fronts during water flooding and goethermal injection operations has been developed. The technique is based on the concept that the steady state pressure buildup in the reservoir region inside the front can be calculated by a fluid skin factor. By analyzing successive pressure falloff tests, the advance of the front in the reservoir can be monitored. The validity of the methods is demonstrated by application to three numerically simulated data sets, a nonisothermal step-rate injection test, a series of pressure falloffs in a multilayered reservoir, and a series of pressure falloff tests in a water flooded oil reservoir.

  12. BIOMASS GASIFICATION AND POWER GENERATION USING ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    David Liscinsky

    2002-10-20

    A multidisciplined team led by the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) and consisting of Pratt & Whitney Power Systems (PWPS), the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), KraftWork Systems, Inc. (kWS), and the Connecticut Resource Recovery Authority (CRRA) has evaluated a variety of gasified biomass fuels, integrated into advanced gas turbine-based power systems. The team has concluded that a biomass integrated gasification combined-cycle (BIGCC) plant with an overall integrated system efficiency of 45% (HHV) at emission levels of less than half of New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) is technically and economically feasible. The higher process efficiency in itself reduces consumption of premium fuels currently used for power generation including those from foreign sources. In addition, the advanced gasification process can be used to generate fuels and chemicals, such as low-cost hydrogen and syngas for chemical synthesis, as well as baseload power. The conceptual design of the plant consists of an air-blown circulating fluidized-bed Advanced Transport Gasifier and a PWPS FT8 TwinPac{trademark} aeroderivative gas turbine operated in combined cycle to produce {approx}80 MWe. This system uses advanced technology commercial products in combination with components in advanced development or demonstration stages, thereby maximizing the opportunity for early implementation. The biofueled power system was found to have a levelized cost of electricity competitive with other new power system alternatives including larger scale natural gas combined cycles. The key elements are: (1) An Advanced Transport Gasifier (ATG) circulating fluid-bed gasifier having wide fuel flexibility and high gasification efficiency; (2) An FT8 TwinPac{trademark}-based combined cycle of approximately 80 MWe; (3) Sustainable biomass primary fuel source at low cost and potentially widespread availability-refuse-derived fuel (RDF); (4) An overall integrated

  13. Advanced expander test bed engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) is a key element in NASA's Space Chemical Engine Technology Program for development and demonstration of expander cycle oxygen/hydrogen engine and advanced component technologies applicable to space engines as well as launch vehicle upper stage engines. The AETB will be used to validate the high pressure expander cycle concept, study system interactions, and conduct studies of advanced mission focused components and new health monitoring techniques in an engine system environment. The split expander cycle AETB will operate at combustion chamber pressures up to 1200 psia with propellant flow rates equivalent to 20,000 lbf vacuum thrust.

  14. Advanced engine study program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, A. I.; Galler, D. E.; Denman, T. F.; Shied, R. A.; Black, J. R.; Fierstein, A. R.; Clark, G. L.; Branstrom, B. R.

    1993-01-01

    A design and analysis study was conducted to provide advanced engine descriptions and parametric data for space transfer vehicles. The study was based on an advanced oxygen/hydrogen engine in the 7,500 to 50,000 lbf thrust range. Emphasis was placed on defining requirements for high-performance engines capable of achieving reliable and versatile operation in a space environment. Four variations on the expander cycle were compared, and the advantages and disadvantages of each were assessed. Parametric weight, envelope, and performance data were generated over a range of 7,500 to 50,000 lb thrust and a wide range of chamber pressure and nozzle expansion ratio.

  15. Automated Blood Pressure Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The Vital-2 unit pictured is a semi-automatic device that permits highly accurate blood pressure measurement, even by untrained personnel. Developed by Meditron Instrument Corporation, Milford, New Hampshire, it is based in part on NASA technology found in a similar system designed for automatic monitoring of astronauts' blood pressure. Vital-2 is an advancement over the familiar arm cuff, dial and bulb apparatus customarily used for blood pressure checks. In that method, the physician squeezes the bulb to inflate the arm cuff, which restricts the flow of blood through the arteries. As he eases the pressure on the arm, he listens, through a stethoscope, to the sounds of resumed blood flow as the arteries expand and contract. Taking dial readings related to sound changes, he gets the systolic (contracting) and diastolic (expanding) blood pressure measurements. The accuracy of the method depends on the physician's skill in interpreting the sounds. Hospitals sometimes employ a more accurate procedure, but it is "invasive," involving insertion of a catheter in the artery.

  16. Pressure Drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Mike Lawson briefly discussed pressure drop for aerospace applications and presented short stories about adventures experienced while working at NASA and General Dynamics, including exposure to technologies like the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart and the SWME.

  17. Pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Mee, David K.; Ripley, Edward B.; Nienstedt, Zachary C.; Nienstedt, Alex W.; Howell, Jr., Layton N.

    2015-09-29

    Disclosed is a passive, in-situ pressure sensor. The sensor includes a sensing element having a ferromagnetic metal and a tension inducing mechanism coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The tension inducing mechanism is operable to change a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal based on a change in pressure in the sensing element. Changes in pressure are detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal when subjected to an alternating magnetic field caused by the change in the tensile stress. The sensing element is embeddable in a closed system for detecting pressure changes without the need for any penetrations of the system for power or data acquisition by detecting changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  18. Pressure regulator

    DOEpatents

    Ebeling, Jr., Robert W.; Weaver, Robert B.

    1979-01-01

    The pressure within a pressurized flow reactor operated under harsh environmental conditions is controlled by establishing and maintaining a fluidized bed of uniformly sized granular material of selected density by passing the gas from the reactor upwardly therethrough at a rate sufficient to fluidize the bed and varying the height of the bed by adding granular material thereto or removing granular material therefrom to adjust the backpressure on the flow reactor.

  19. PRESSURE TRANSDUCER

    DOEpatents

    Sander, H.H.

    1959-10-01

    A pressure or mechanical force transducer particularly adaptable to miniature telemetering systems is described. Basically the device consists of a transistor located within a magnetic field adapted to change in response to mechanical force. The conduction characteristics of the transistor in turn vary proportionally with changes in the magnetic flux across the transistor such that the output (either frequency of amplitude) of the transistor circuit is proportional to mechanical force or pressure.

  20. Filament wound pressure vessels - Effects of using liner tooling of low pressure vessels for high pressure vessels development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Krishna M.

    High performance pressure vessels have been recently demanded for aerospace and defense applications. Filament wound pressure vessels consist of a metallic thin liner, which also acts as a mandrel, and composite/epoxy overwrap. Graphite/epoxy overwrapped vessels have been developed to obtain the performance ratio, PV/W, as high as one million inches. Under very high pressure the isotropic metallic liner deforms elasto-plastically, and orthotropic composite fibers deform elastically. Sometimes, for the development of ultra high pressure vessels, composite pressure vessels industry uses the existing liner tooling developed for low burst pressure capacity composite vessels. This work presents the effects of various design variables including the low pressure liner tooling for the development of the high burst pressure capacity Brilliant Pebbles helium tanks. Advance stress analysis and development of an ultra high pressure helium tank.

  1. TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    James T. Cobb, Jr.

    2003-09-12

    Metal-laden wastes can be stabilized and solidified using advanced clean coal technology by-products (CCTBs)--fluid bed combustor ash and spray drier solids. These utility-generated treatment chemicals are available for purchase through brokers, and commercial applications of this process are being practiced by treaters of metal-laden hazardous waste. A complex of regulations governs this industry, and sensitivities to this complex has discouraged public documentation of treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with CCTBs. This report provides a comprehensive public documentation of laboratory studies that show the efficacy of the stabilization and solidification of metal-laden hazardous wastes--such as lead-contaminated soils and sandblast residues--through treatment with CCTBs. It then describes the extensive efforts that were made to obtain the permits allowing a commercial hazardous waste treater to utilize CCTBs as treatment chemicals and to install the equipment required to do so. It concludes with the effect of this lengthy process on the ability of the treatment company to realize the practical, physical outcome of this effort, leading to premature termination of the project.

  2. Advanced Chemical Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Leslie, Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Advanced Chemical Propulsion (ACP) provides near-term incremental improvements in propulsion system performance and/or cost. It is an evolutionary approach to technology development that produces useful products along the way to meet increasingly more demanding mission requirements while focusing on improving payload mass fraction to yield greater science capability. Current activities are focused on two areas: chemical propulsion component, subsystem, and manufacturing technologies that offer measurable system level benefits; and the evaluation of high-energy storable propellants with enhanced performance for in-space application. To prioritize candidate propulsion technology alternatives, a variety of propulsion/mission analyses and trades have been conducted for SMD missions to yield sufficient data for investment planning. They include: the Advanced Chemical Propulsion Assessment; an Advanced Chemical Propulsion System Model; a LOx-LH2 small pumps conceptual design; a space storables propellant study; a spacecraft cryogenic propulsion study; an advanced pressurization and mixture ratio control study; and a pump-fed vs. pressure-fed study.

  3. Advanced composites technology

    SciTech Connect

    DeTeresa, S J; Groves, S E; Sanchez, R J

    1998-10-01

    The development of fiber composite components in next-generation munitions, such as sabots for kinetic energy penetrators and lightweight cases for advanced artillery projectiles, relies on design trade-off studies using validated computer code simulations. We are developing capabilities to determine the failure of advanced fiber composites under multiaxial stresses to critically evaluate three-dimensional failure models and develop new ones if necessary. The effects of superimposed hydrostatic pressure on failure of composites are being investigated using a high-pressure testing system that incorporates several unique features. Several improvements were made to the system this year, and we report on the first tests of both isotropic and fiber composite materials. The preliminary results indicate that pressure has little effect on longitudinal compression strength of unidirectional composites, but issues with obtaining reliable failures in these materials still remain to be resolved. The transverse compression strength was found to be significantly enhanced by pressure, and the trends observed for this property and the longitudinal strength are in agreement with recent models for failure of fiber composites.

  4. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. High Blood Pressure What Is High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a common disease in ... at higher than normal pressures. What Is Blood Pressure? Click for more information Blood pressure is the ...

  5. Blood pressure measurement

    MedlinePlus

    ... reading; Measuring blood pressure; Hypertension - blood pressure measurement; High blood pressure - blood pressure measurement ... High blood pressure has no symptoms so you may not know if you have this problem. High blood pressure ...

  6. Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Nassar, Basant R.; Lippa, Carol F.

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) is a potentially reversible neurodegenerative disease commonly characterized by a triad of dementia, gait, and urinary disturbance. Advancements in diagnosis and treatment have aided in properly identifying and improving symptoms in patients. However, a large proportion of iNPH patients remain either undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Using PubMed search engine of keywords “normal pressure hydrocephalus,” “diagnosis,” “shunt treatment,” “biomarkers,” “gait disturbances,” “cognitive function,” “neuropsychology,” “imaging,” and “pathogenesis,” articles were obtained for this review. The majority of the articles were retrieved from the past 10 years. The purpose of this review article is to aid general practitioners in further understanding current findings on the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of iNPH. PMID:28138494

  7. Advanced Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coles, Mike; Nelms, Rick

    1996-01-01

    Describes a study that explores the depth and breadth of scientific facts, principles, and procedures which are required in the Advanced General National Vocational Qualifications (GNVQ) science through comparison with GCE Advanced level. The final report takes account of the updated 1996 version of GNVQ science. (DDR)

  8. Advanced expander test bed program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, A. I.; Mitchell, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) is a key element in NASA's Chemical Transfer Propulsion Program for development and demonstration of expander cycle oxygen/hydrogen engine technology component technology for the next space engine. The AETB will be used to validate the high-pressure expander cycle concept, investigate system interactions, and conduct investigations of advanced missions focused components and new health monitoring techniques. The split-expander cycle AETB will operate at combustion chamber pressures up to 1200 psia with propellant flow rates equivalent to 20,000 lbf vacuum thrust.

  9. Advanced technology composite aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilcewicz, Larry B.; Walker, Thomas H.

    1991-01-01

    Work performed during the 25th month on NAS1-18889, Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures, is summarized. The main objective of this program is to develop an integrated technology and demonstrate a confidence level that permits the cost- and weight-effective use of advanced composite materials in primary structures of future aircraft with the emphasis on pressurized fuselages. The period from 1-31 May 1991 is covered.

  10. Pressure Alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Kate E; Yesudian, PD

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative or pressure alopecia (PA) is an infrequently reported group of scarring and non-scarring alopecias. It has been reported after immobilization of the head during surgery and following prolonged stays on intensive care units, and may be analogous to a healed pressure ulcer. This review presents a summary of cases published in pediatrics and after cardiac, gynecological, abdominal and facial surgeries. PA may manifest as swelling, tenderness, and ulceration of the scalp in the first few postoperative days; in other cases, the alopecia may be the presenting feature with a history of scalp immobilization in the previous four weeks. The condition may cause considerable psychological distress in the long term. Regular head turning schedules and vigilance for the condition should be used as prophylaxis to prevent permanent alopecia. A multi-center study in high-risk patients would be beneficial to shed further light on the etiology of the condition. PMID:23180911

  11. Pressure transducer

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Thomas T.; Roop, Conard J.; Schmidt, Kenneth J.; Gunchin, Elmer R.

    1989-01-01

    A pressure transducer suitable for use in high temperature environments includes two pairs of induction coils, each pair being bifilarly wound together, and each pair of coils connected as opposite arms of a four arm circuit; an electrically conductive target moveably positioned between the coil pairs and connected to a diaphragm such that deflection of the diaphragm causes axial movement of the target and an unbalance in the bridge output.

  12. Pressure transducer

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, T.T.; Roop, C.J.; Schmidt, K.J.; Gunchin, E.R.

    1987-02-13

    A pressure transducer suitable for use in high temperature environments includes two pairs of induction coils, each pair being bifilarly wound together, and each pair of coils connected as opposite arms of a four arm circuit; an electrically conductive target moveably positioned between the coil pairs and connected to a diaphragm such that deflection of the diaphragm causes axial movement of the target and an unbalance in the bridge output. 7 figs.

  13. Pressurized hopper

    SciTech Connect

    Densley, P.J.; Goldmann, L.H. Jr.

    1980-04-01

    A Secure Automated Fuel Fabrication Line is being developed to reduce personnel exposure and to improve safeguards. Fertile and fissile fuel powders are blended in the line for making fuel pellets. A pressurized hopper was developed for use not only as a blender, but also as a storage and feeding device. It works with or without injection tubes to produce a well-blended powder with reduced agglomerate population. Results of blending experiments using dry Kaolin clay and Tempra pigment are given. (DLC)

  14. Advanced Microsensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This video looks at a spinoff application of the technology from advanced microsensors -- those that monitor and determine conditions of spacecraft like the Space Shuttle. The application featured is concerned with the monitoring of the health of premature babies.

  15. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. Description of High Blood Pressure Español High blood pressure is a common disease ... arteries) at higher than normal pressures. Measuring Blood Pressure Blood pressure is the force of blood pushing ...

  16. Advanced solid propellant motor insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. L.; Russ, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    An advanced lightweight insulation system suitable for use in long duration, low pressure planetary orbiter-type motor applications was developed. Experiments included the screening of various filler and binder materials with optimization studies combining the best of each. Small scale test motor data were used to judge the degree of success.

  17. Advanced expander test bed program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccardi, D. P.; Mitchell, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) is a key element in NASA's Space Chemical Engine Technology Program for development and demonstration of expander cycle oxygen/hydrogen engine and advanced component technologies applicable to space engines as well as launch vehicle upper stage engines. The AETB will be used to validate the high-pressure expander cycle concept, investigate system interactions, and conduct investigations of advanced mission focused components and new health monitoring techniques in an engine system environment. The split expander cycle AETB will operate at combustion chamber pressures up to 1200 psia with propellant flow rates equivalent to 20,000 lbf vacuum thrust. Contract work began 27 Apr. 1990. During 1992, a major milestone was achieved with the review of the final design of the oxidizer turbopump in Sep. 1992.

  18. Electrical Transport Experiments at High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, S

    2009-02-11

    High-pressure electrical measurements have a long history of use in the study of materials under ultra-high pressures. In recent years, electrical transport experiments have played a key role in the study of many interesting high pressure phenomena including pressure-induced superconductivity, insulator-to-metal transitions, and quantum critical behavior. High-pressure electrical transport experiments also play an important function in geophysics and the study of the Earth's interior. Besides electrical conductivity measurements, electrical transport experiments also encompass techniques for the study of the optoelectronic and thermoelectric properties of materials under high pressures. In addition, electrical transport techniques, i.e., the ability to extend electrically conductive wires from outside instrumentation into the high pressure sample chamber have been utilized to perform other types of experiments as well, such as high-pressure magnetic susceptibility and de Haas-van Alphen Fermi surface experiments. Finally, electrical transport techniques have also been utilized for delivering significant amounts of electrical power to high pressure samples, for the purpose of performing high-pressure and -temperature experiments. Thus, not only do high-pressure electrical transport experiments provide much interesting and valuable data on the physical properties of materials extreme compression, but the underlying high-pressure electrical transport techniques can be used in a number of ways to develop additional diagnostic techniques and to advance high pressure capabilities.

  19. Combustion of high-sulfur coal and anthracite wastes in a rotary kiln combustor with an advanced internal air distributor

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, J.T. Jr. ); Ahn, Y.K. ); Angelo, J.F. )

    1990-01-01

    Fluid bed combustors have received extensive testing with both high-sulfur coal and anthracite wastes. Rotary kilns are effective and popular devices for waste combustion. The Angelo Rotary Furnace{trademark} has been developed to improve the operation of rotary pyrolyzer/combustor systems through enhanced air distribution, which in this process is defined as staged, swirled combustion air injection. Fourteen of these new furnaces have been installed worldwide. Two units in Thailand, designed for rice hull feed with occasional lignite feed, have been recently started up. An older unit in Pennsylvania is being upgraded with a new, more advanced air distribution system for a series of tests this fall in which inexpensive high-sulfur coal and anthracite wastes will be fired with limestone. The purposes of these tests are to determine the burning characteristics of these two fuels in this system, to discover the Ca/S ratios necessary for operation of a rotary kiln combusting these fuels, and to observe the gas-borne emissions from the furnace. An extensive preliminary design study will be performed on a commercial installation for combustion of anthracite wastes. 14 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. On scattering of a material over the Ostwald-de Waele fluid bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Abuzar A.; Ahmad, Salman; Aqeel, Muhammad

    2016-12-01

    We formulated mathematically, the scattering and sliding of a material (colloid, oil, gasoline etc.) over the Ostwald-de Waele fluid. Ostwald-de Waele fluid model is used to get a boundary value problem (BVP). This BVP comprises coupled nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs). These PDEs are further transformed into an ordinary differential equation (ODE) under the stream of similarity transform for the high Reynolds number flow assumption. The developed similarity solution is validated. The influence of fluid speed and drag is observed to be intensified in the vicinity of interface.

  1. ZnO-based regenerable sulfur sorbents for fluid-bed/transport reactor applications

    DOEpatents

    Slimane, Rachid B.; Abbasian, Javad; Williams, Brett E.

    2004-09-21

    A method for producing regenerable sulfur sorbents in which a support material precursor is mixed with isopropanol and a first portion of deionized water at an elevated temperature to form a sol mixture. A metal oxide precursor comprising a metal suitable for use as a sulfur sorbent is dissolved in a second portion of deionized water, forming a metal salt solution. The metal salt solution and the sol mixture are mixed with a sol peptizing agent while heating and stirring, resulting in formation of a peptized sol mixture. The metal oxide precursor is dispersed substantially throughout the peptized sol mixture, which is then dried, forming a dry peptized sol mixture. The dry peptized sol mixture is then calcined and the resulting calcined material is then converted to particles.

  2. Oxidation of advanced steam turbine alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2006-03-01

    Advanced or ultra supercritical (USC) steam power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.

  3. Advancing Reflectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-21

    transmissions, was first demonstrated using Global Navigation Satellite System ( GNSS ) reflections. Recently, reflectometry has been extended to digital... GNSS +R workshop provided an opportunity for engineers and Earth scientists to assess the state of the art, demonstrate new applications, and discuss...18 Eos, Vol. 94, No. 21, 21 May 2013 MEETING -.~ Advancing Reflectometry Workshop on Renectometry Using GNSS and Other Signals of Opportunity

  4. Technological Advancements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The influx of technology has brought significant improvements to school facilities. Many of those advancements can be found in classrooms, but when students head down the hall to use the washrooms, they are likely to find a host of technological innovations that have improved conditions in that part of the building. This article describes modern…

  5. Research Advances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2004-01-01

    Research advances, a new feature in Journal of Chemical Engineering that brings information about innovations in current areas of research to high school and college science faculty with an intent to provide educators with timely descriptions of latest progress in research that can be integrated into existing courses to update course content and…

  6. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in children.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajiv; Dionne, Janis

    2011-02-01

    Recently there have been great advances in the use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in children. A major boost has been the publication of normative data for blood pressure in children. ABPM has been able to detect significant differences in blood pressure in many disease states including chronic renal failure, polycystic kidney disease and post renal transplantation and has helped in identifying both white coat hypertension and masked hypertension. Current evidence does suggest that sole reliance on clinic blood pressure might not be always appropriate and ABPM has a definite role in pediatric hypertension.

  7. Blade Tip Pressure Measurements Using Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Oliver D.; Watkins, Anthony Neal; Goodman, Kyle Z.; Crafton, James; Forlines, Alan; Goss, Larry; Gregory, James W.; Juliano, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of pressure sensitive paint using laser-based excitation for measurement of the upper surface pressure distribution on the tips of rotor blades in hover and simulated forward flight. The testing was conducted in the Rotor Test Cell and the 14- by 22-ft Subsonic Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center on the General Rotor Model System (GRMS) test stand. The Mach-scaled rotor contained three chordwise rows of dynamic pressure transducers for comparison with PSP measurements. The rotor had an 11 ft 1 in. diameter, 5.45 in. main chord and a swept, tapered tip. Three thrust conditions were examined in hover, C(sub T) = 0.004, 0.006 and 0.008. In forward flight, an additional thrust condition, C(sub T) = 0.010 was also examined. All four thrust conditions in forward flight were conducted at an advance ratio of 0.35.

  8. Low Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... a problem. Sometimes blood pressure that is too low can also cause problems. Blood pressure is the ... reading is 90/60 or lower, you have low blood pressure. Some people have low blood pressure ...

  9. PRESSURE TRANSDUCER RESEARCH.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PIEZOELECTRIC TRANSDUCERS, PRESSURE), UNDERGROUND EXPLOSIONS, ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE, SEEBECK EFFECT , PRESSURE GAGES, SHOCK WAVES, STRESSES, COMPUTER PROGRAMMING, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS, NUCLEAR RADIATION.

  10. Advanced Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  11. Advanced Subsonic Combustion Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chi-Ming

    1998-01-01

    Researchers from the NASA Lewis Research Center have obtained the first combustion/emissions data under extreme future engine operating conditions. In Lewis' new world-class 60-atm combustor research facility--the Advanced Subsonic Combustion Rig (ASCR)--a flametube was used to conduct combustion experiments in environments as extreme as 900 psia and 3400 F. The greatest challenge for combustion researchers is the uncertainty of the effects of pressure on the formation of nitrogen oxides (NOx). Consequently, U.S. engine manufacturers are using these data to guide their future combustor designs. The flametube's metal housing has an inside diameter of 12 in. and a length of 10.5 in. The flametube can be used with a variety of different flow paths. Each flow path is lined with a high-temperature, castable refractory material (alumina) to minimize heat loss. Upstream of the flametube is the injector section, which has an inside diameter of 13 in. and a length of 0.5-in. It was designed to provide for quick changeovers. This flametube is being used to provide all U.S. engine manufacturers early assessments of advanced combustion concepts at full power conditions prior to engine production. To date, seven concepts from engine manufacturers have been evaluated and improved. This collaborated development can potentially give U.S. engine manufacturers the competitive advantage of being first in the market with advanced low-emission technologies.

  12. Advanced scale conditioning agents

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Jeff; Battaglia, Philip J.

    2004-06-01

    A technical description of Advanced Scale Conditioning Agents (ASCA) technology was published in the May-June 2003 edition of the Nuclear Plant Journal. That article described the development of programs of advanced scale conditioning agents and specific types to maintain the secondary side of steam generators within a pressurized water reactor free of deposited corrosion products and corrosion-inducing contaminants to ensure their long-term operation. This article describes the first two plant applications of advanced scale conditioning agents implemented at Southern Nuclear Operating Company's Vogtle Units 1 and 2 during their 2002 scheduled outages to minimize tube degradation and maintain full power operation using the most effective techniques while minimizing outage costs. The goal was to remove three to four fuel cycles of deposits from each steam generator so that after future chemical cleaning activities, ASCAs could be used to maintain the cleanliness of the steam generators without the need for additional chemical cleaning efforts. The goal was achieved as well as several other benefits that resulted in cost savings to the plant.

  13. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

    2003-01-30

    This is the second quarterly progress report for Year-4 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between October 1, 2002 and December 30, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks. (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System, Task 4: Addition of a Pipe Rotation System. (b) New research project (Task 9b): ''Development of a Foam Generator/Viscometer for Elevated Pressure and Elevated Temperature (EPET) Conditions''. (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''. (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), and Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b). (f) New Research project (Task 13): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''. (g) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (h) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  14. Central blood pressure and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yoichi; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Takenaka, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we focused on the relationship between central blood pressure and chronic kidney diseases (CKD). Wave reflection is a major mechanism that determines central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Recent medical technology advances have enabled non-invasive central blood pressure measurements. Clinical trials have demonstrated that compared with brachial blood pressure, central blood pressure is a stronger risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) and renal diseases. CKD is characterized by a diminished renal autoregulatory ability, an augmented direct transmission of systemic blood pressure to glomeruli, and an increase in proteinuria. Any elevation in central blood pressure accelerates CKD progression. In the kidney, interstitial inflammation induces oxidative stress to handle proteinuria. Oxidative stress facilitates atherogenesis, increases arterial stiffness and central blood pressure, and worsens the CV prognosis in patients with CKD. A vicious cycle exists between CKD and central blood pressure. To stop this cycle, vasodilator antihypertensive drugs and statins can reduce central blood pressure and oxidative stress. Even in early-stage CKD, mineral and bone disorders (MBD) may develop. MBD promotes oxidative stress, arteriosclerosis, and elevated central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Early intervention or prevention seems necessary to maintain vascular health in patients with CKD. PMID:26788468

  15. Advanced Capacitors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    capacitors themselves were baked under vacuum at 850 C for at least 72 hours prior to the actual filling operation. The pressure was typically S 30...being heated under vacuum , and the exposure to vacuum during filling . This was a simple process imprwvement with consequences which are much more... pulse capacitors made from three different kinds of dielectric, the field in dielectric A can easily be shown to be: EBcV (V) (2-5) A f: A BBC + A CtB

  16. New developments in micro-X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy for high-pressure research at 16-BM-D at the Advanced Photon Source.

    PubMed

    Park, Changyong; Popov, Dmitry; Ikuta, Daijo; Lin, Chuanlong; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Rod, Eric; Bommannavar, Arunkumar; Shen, Guoyin

    2015-07-01

    The monochromator and focusing mirrors of the 16-BM-D beamline, which is dedicated to high-pressure research with micro-X-ray diffraction (micro-XRD) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) (6-45 keV) spectroscopy, have been recently upgraded. Monochromatic X-rays are selected by a Si (111) double-crystal monochromator operated in an artificial channel-cut mode and focused to 5 μm × 5 μm (FWHM) by table-top Kirkpatrick-Baez type mirrors located near the sample stage. The typical X-ray flux is ∼5 × 10(8) photons/s at 30 keV. The instrumental resolution, Δq/qmax, reaches to 2 × 10(-3) and is tunable through adjustments of the detector distance and X-ray energy. The setup is stable and reproducible, which allows versatile application to various types of experiments including resistive heating and cryogenic cooling as well as ambient temperature compression. Transmission XANES is readily combined with micro-XRD utilizing the fixed-exit feature of the monochromator, which allows combined XRD-XANES measurements at a given sample condition.

  17. New developments in micro-X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy for high-pressure research at 16-BM-D at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Changyong Popov, Dmitry; Ikuta, Daijo; Lin, Chuanlong; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Rod, Eric; Bommannavar, Arunkumar; Shen, Guoyin

    2015-07-15

    The monochromator and focusing mirrors of the 16-BM-D beamline, which is dedicated to high-pressure research with micro-X-ray diffraction (micro-XRD) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) (6-45 keV) spectroscopy, have been recently upgraded. Monochromatic X-rays are selected by a Si (111) double-crystal monochromator operated in an artificial channel-cut mode and focused to 5 μm × 5 μm (FWHM) by table-top Kirkpatrick-Baez type mirrors located near the sample stage. The typical X-ray flux is ∼5 × 10{sup 8} photons/s at 30 keV. The instrumental resolution, Δq/q{sub max}, reaches to 2 × 10{sup −3} and is tunable through adjustments of the detector distance and X-ray energy. The setup is stable and reproducible, which allows versatile application to various types of experiments including resistive heating and cryogenic cooling as well as ambient temperature compression. Transmission XANES is readily combined with micro-XRD utilizing the fixed-exit feature of the monochromator, which allows combined XRD-XANES measurements at a given sample condition.

  18. Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barclay, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Behnke, B.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Biwer, C.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, Sukanta; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Bridges, D. O.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Buonanno, A.; Cadonati, L.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cepeda, C.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chen, Y.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Collette, C.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; Danzmann, K.; Dartez, L.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; DeBra, D.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; D´ıaz, M.; Di Palma, I.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferreira, E. C.; Fisher, R. P.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fuentes-Tapia, S.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gaonkar, S.; Gehrels, N.; Gergely, L. Á.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Hee, S.; Heintze, M.; Heinzel, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Islas, G.; Isler, J. C.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; Jang, H.; Jawahar, S.; Ji, Y.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Keiser, G. M.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N. G.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Le, J.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leong, J. R.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lormand, M.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macarthur, J.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R.; Mageswaran, M.; Maglione, C.; Mailand, K.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McLin, K.; McWilliams, S.; Meadors, G. D.; Meinders, M.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Miao, H.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Miller, A.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moore, B.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A. H.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega, W.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Pai, S.; Palashov, O.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Patrick, Z.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J.; Post, A.; Poteomkin, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Pürrer, M.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quiroga, G.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K.; Raymond, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Reula, O.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V.; Romano, J. D.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Sawadsky, A.; Scheuer, J.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Staley, A.; Stebbins, J.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sutton, P. J.; Szczepanczyk, M.; Szeifert, G.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Tellez, G.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tomlinson, C.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Tshilumba, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Xie, S.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, Q.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S.; Zweizig, J.

    2015-04-01

    The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are second-generation instruments designed and built for the two LIGO observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA, USA. The two instruments are identical in design, and are specialized versions of a Michelson interferometer with 4 km long arms. As in Initial LIGO, Fabry-Perot cavities are used in the arms to increase the interaction time with a gravitational wave, and power recycling is used to increase the effective laser power. Signal recycling has been added in Advanced LIGO to improve the frequency response. In the most sensitive frequency region around 100 Hz, the design strain sensitivity is a factor of 10 better than Initial LIGO. In addition, the low frequency end of the sensitivity band is moved from 40 Hz down to 10 Hz. All interferometer components have been replaced with improved technologies to achieve this sensitivity gain. Much better seismic isolation and test mass suspensions are responsible for the gains at lower frequencies. Higher laser power, larger test masses and improved mirror coatings lead to the improved sensitivity at mid and high frequencies. Data collecting runs with these new instruments are planned to begin in mid-2015.

  19. Advanced Subsonic Combustion Rig Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced Subsonic Combustion Rig (ASCR), a unique, state-of-the-art facility for conducting combustion research, is located at the NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The ASCR, which was nearing completion at the close of 1995, will be capable of simulating the very high pressure and high temperature conditions that are expected to exist in future, advanced subsonic gas turbine (jet) engines. Future environmental regulations will require much cleaner burning (more environmentally friendly) aircraft engines. The ASCR is critical to the development of these cleaner engines. It will allow NASA and U.S. aircraft engine industry researchers to identify and test promising clean-burning gas turbine engine combustion concepts under the pressure and temperature conditions that are expected for those future engines. Combustion processes will be investigated for a variety of next-generation aircraft engine sizes, including engines for large, long-range aircraft (with typical trip lengths of about 3000 mi) and for regional aircraft (with typical trip lengths of about 400 mi). The ASCR design was conceived and initiated in 1993, and fabrication and construction of the rig, including the buildup of an advanced control room, took place throughout 1994 and 1995. In early 1996, the ASCR will be operational for obtaining research data. The ASCR is an intricate part of the NASA Advanced Subsonic Technology Propulsion Program, which is aimed at developing technologies critical to the next generation of gas turbine engines. This effort is in collaboration with the U.S. aircraft gas turbine engine industry. A goal of the Advanced Subsonic Technology Propulsion Program is to develop combustion concepts and technologies that will result in gas turbine engines that produce 50 percent less nitrous oxide (NO_x) pollutants than current engines do. This facility is unique in its capability to simulate advanced subsonic engine pressure, temperature, and air flow rate conditions

  20. Dealing with Peer Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Happens in the Operating Room? Dealing With Peer Pressure KidsHealth > For Kids > Dealing With Peer Pressure A ... talk about how to handle it. Defining Peer Pressure Peers influence your life, even if you don' ...

  1. Dealing with Peer Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Video: Getting an X-ray Dealing With Peer Pressure KidsHealth > For Kids > Dealing With Peer Pressure Print ... talk about how to handle it. Defining Peer Pressure Peers influence your life, even if you don' ...

  2. Yield-pressure determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakefield, M. E.

    1977-01-01

    Stress/strain relationship of complex-shape vessel is recorded under hydrostatic pressure. Technique is used to test pressurized gas cylinders and tubular transition joints made of dissimilar metals and to determine burst or system-failure pressures.

  3. Intracranial pressure monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... head. The monitor senses the pressure inside the skull and sends measurements to a recording device. ... are 3 ways to monitor pressure in the skull (intracranial pressure). INTRAVENTRICULAR CATHETER The intraventricular catheter is ...

  4. High blood pressure medicines

    MedlinePlus

    Hypertension - medicines ... blood vessel diseases. You may need to take medicines to lower your blood pressure if lifestyle changes ... blood pressure to the target level. WHEN ARE MEDICINES FOR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE USED Most of the ...

  5. Advanced Pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Synchrony, developed by St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division (formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc.) is an advanced state-of-the-art implantable pacemaker that closely matches the natural rhythm of the heart. The companion element of the Synchrony Pacemaker System is the Programmer Analyzer APS-II which allows a doctor to reprogram and fine tune the pacemaker to each user's special requirements without surgery. The two-way communications capability that allows the physician to instruct and query the pacemaker is accomplished by bidirectional telemetry. APS-II features 28 pacing functions and thousands of programming combinations to accommodate diverse lifestyles. Microprocessor unit also records and stores pertinent patient data up to a year.

  6. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Ergun Kuru; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Len Volk; Mark Pickell; Evren Ozbayoglu; Barkim Demirdal; Paco Vieira; Affonso Lourenco

    1999-10-15

    This report includes a review of the progress made in ACTF Flow Loop development and research during 90 days pre-award period (May 15-July 14, 1999) and the following three months after the project approval date (July15-October 15, 1999) The report presents information on the following specific subjects; (a) Progress in Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility design and development, (b) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (c) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (e) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Progress report on the instrumentation tasks (Tasks 11 and 12) (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with oil and service company members.

  7. Advanced turbine study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of an advanced convective cooling concept applied to rocket turbine airfoils which operate in a high pressure hydrogen and methane environment was investigated. The concept consists of a central structural member in which grooves are machined. The grooves are temporarily filled with a removable filler and the entire airfoil is covered with a layer of electroformed nickel, or nickel base alloy. After removal of the filler, the low thermal resistance of the nickel closure causes the wall temperature to be reduced by heat transfer to the coolant. The program is divided in the following tasks: (1) turbine performance appraisal; (2) coolant geometry evaluation; (3) test hardware design and analysis; and (4) test airfoil fabrication.

  8. Advanced alkaline water electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, N.; Torikai, E.; Kawami, Y.; Takenaka, H.

    Results are presented of experimental studies of possible separators and electrodes for use in advanced, high-temperature, high-pressure alkaline water electrolyzers. Material evaluations in alkaline water electrolyzers at temperatures from 100 to 120 C have shown a new type polytetrafluoroethylene membrane impregnated with potassium titanate to be the most promising when the separator is prepared by the hydrothermal treatment of a porous PFTE membrane impregnated with hydrated titanium oxide. Measurements of cell voltages in 30% KOH at current densities from 5 to 100 A/sq dm at temperatures up to 120 C with nickel electrodes of various structures have shown the foamed nickel electrode, with an average pore size of 1-1.5 mm, to have the best performance. When the foamed nickel is coated by fine powdered nickel, carbonyl nickel or Raney nickel to increase electrode surface areas, even lower cell voltages were found, indicating better performance.

  9. The Advanced LIGO photon calibrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karki, S.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Kandhasamy, S.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, T. D.; Anders, E. H.; Berliner, J.; Betzwieser, J.; Cahillane, C.; Canete, L.; Conley, C.; Daveloza, H. P.; De Lillo, N.; Gleason, J. R.; Goetz, E.; Izumi, K.; Kissel, J. S.; Mendell, G.; Quetschke, V.; Rodruck, M.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Schwinberg, P. B.; Sottile, A.; Wade, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; West, M.; Savage, R. L.

    2016-11-01

    The two interferometers of the Laser Interferometry Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) recently detected gravitational waves from the mergers of binary black hole systems. Accurate calibration of the output of these detectors was crucial for the observation of these events and the extraction of parameters of the sources. The principal tools used to calibrate the responses of the second-generation (Advanced) LIGO detectors to gravitational waves are systems based on radiation pressure and referred to as photon calibrators. These systems, which were completely redesigned for Advanced LIGO, include several significant upgrades that enable them to meet the calibration requirements of second-generation gravitational wave detectors in the new era of gravitational-wave astronomy. We report on the design, implementation, and operation of these Advanced LIGO photon calibrators that are currently providing fiducial displacements on the order of 1 0-18m /√{Hz } with accuracy and precision of better than 1%.

  10. NASA Advanced Propeller Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, John F.; Bober, Lawrence J.

    1988-01-01

    Acoustic and aerodynamic research at NASA Lewis Research Center on advanced propellers is reviewed including analytical and experimental results on both single and counterrotation. Computational tools used to calculate the detailed flow and acoustic i e l d s a r e described along with wind tunnel tests to obtain data for code verification . Results from two kinds of experiments are reviewed: ( 1 ) performance and near field noise at cruise conditions as measured in the NASA Lewis 8-by 6-Foot Wind Tunnel and ( 2 ) farfield noise and performance for takeoff/approach conditions as measured in the NASA Lewis 9-by 15-Font Anechoic Wind Tunnel. Detailed measurements of steady blade surface pressures are described along with vortex flow phenomena at off design conditions . Near field noise at cruise is shown to level out or decrease as tip relative Mach number is increased beyond 1.15. Counterrotation interaction noise is shown to be a dominant source at take off but a secondary source at cruise. Effects of unequal rotor diameters and rotor-to-rotor spacing on interaction noise a real so illustrated. Comparisons of wind tunnel acoustic measurements to flight results are made. Finally, some future directions in advanced propeller research such as swirl recovery vanes, higher sweep, forward sweep, and ducted propellers are discussed.

  11. NASA advanced propeller research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, John F.; Bober, Lawrence J.

    1988-01-01

    Acoustic and aerodynamic research at NASA Lewis Research Center on advanced propellers is reviewed including analytical and experimental results on both single and counterrotation. Computational tools used to calculate the detailed flow and acoustic fields are described along with wind tunnel tests to obtain data for code verification. Results from two kinds of experiments are reviewed: (1) performance and near field noise at cruise conditions as measured in the NASA Lewis 8- by 6-foot Wind Tunnel; and (2) far field noise and performance for takeoff/approach conditions as measured in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot Anechoic Wind Tunnel. Detailed measurements of steady blade surface pressures are described along with vortex flow phenomena at off-design conditions. Near field noise at cruise is shown to level out or decrease as tip relative Mach number is increased beyond 1.15. Counterrotation interaction noise is shown to be a dominant source at takeoff but a secondary source at cruise. Effects of unequal rotor diameters and rotor-to-rotor spacing on interaction noise are also illustrated. Comparisons of wind tunnel acoustic measurements to flight results are made. Finally, some future directions in advanced propeller research such as swirl recovery vanes, higher sweep, forward sweep, and ducted propellers are discussed.

  12. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira; Lei Zhou

    2000-01-30

    This is the second quarterly progress report for Year 2 of the ACTS project. It includes a review of progress made in Flow Loop development and research during the period of time between Oct 1, 2000 and December 31, 2000. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility (Task 2: Addition of a foam generation and breaker system), (b) Research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (c) Research project (Task 7): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Research project (Task 8): ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (e) Research project (Task 9): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (g) Research on instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), and Foam properties while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), (h) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (i) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members. The tasks Completed During This Quarter are Task 7 and Task 8.

  13. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira

    2000-10-30

    This is the first quarterly progress report for Year 2 of the ACTS project. It includes a review of progress made in Flow Loop development and research during the period of time between July 14, 2000 and September 30, 2000. This report presents information on the following specific tasks: (a) Progress in Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility design and development (Task 2), (b) Progress on research project (Task 8): ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (c) Progress on research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Progress on research project (Task 7): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (e) Progress on research project (Task 9): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Initiate research on project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (g) Progress on instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution (Tasks 11), and Foam properties (Task 12), (h) Initiate a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. Since the previous Task 1 has been completed, we will now designate this new task as: (Task 1S). (i) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  14. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk, Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

    2002-10-30

    This is the first quarterly progress report for Year-4 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between July 1, 2002 and Sept. 30, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System, Task 4: Addition of a Pipe Rotation System, (b) New Research project (Task 9b): ''Development of a Foam Generator/Viscometer for Elevated Pressure and Elevated Temperature (EPET) Conditions'', (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings (Task 12), Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b). (f) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  15. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolos A. Nikolopoulos; Santosh K. Gangwal; William J. McMichael; Jeffrey W. Portzer

    2003-01-01

    Conventional sulfur removal in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants involves numerous steps: COS (carbonyl sulfide) hydrolysis, amine scrubbing/regeneration, Claus process, and tail-gas treatment. Advanced sulfur removal in IGCC systems involves typically the use of zinc oxide-based sorbents. The sulfides sorbent is regenerated using dilute air to produce a dilute SO{sub 2} (sulfur dioxide) tail gas. Under previous contracts the highly effective first generation Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for catalytic reduction of this SO{sub 2} tail gas to elemental sulfur was developed. This process is currently undergoing field-testing. In this project, advanced concepts were evaluated to reduce the number of unit operations in sulfur removal and recovery. Substantial effort was directed towards developing sorbents that could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur in an Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP). Development of this process has been described in detail in Appendices A-F. RTI began the development of the Single-step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP) to eliminate the use of sorbents and multiple reactors in sulfur removal and recovery. This process showed promising preliminary results and thus further process development of AHGP was abandoned in favor of SSRP. The SSRP is a direct Claus process that consists of injecting SO{sub 2} directly into the quenched coal gas from a coal gasifier, and reacting the H{sub 2}S-SO{sub 2} mixture over a selective catalyst to both remove and recover sulfur in a single step. The process is conducted at gasifier pressure and 125 to 160 C. The proposed commercial embodiment of the SSRP involves a liquid phase of molten sulfur with dispersed catalyst in a slurry bubble-column reactor (SBCR).

  16. Advanced stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, Arnulf

    1983-03-01

    Toroidal confinement of a plasma by an external magnetic field is not compatible with axisymmetry, in contrast to confinement by the pinch effect of induced electric currents as in a tokomak or by the reversed field pinch configuration. The existence of magnetic surfaces throughout the region in which grad p ≠ 0 is therefore not guaranteed in such configurations, though it is necessary for MHD-equilibrium when the lines of force possess a finite twist (or "rotational transform"). These twisted equilibria are called stellarators. The other type of external confinement requires all lines of force to be closed upon themselves and p to be function of the well defined quantity Q = φ d l/ B only. The resulting "bumpy" tori are sometimes also referred to as being M + S like. By discussing specific examples it is shown that stellarator configurations exist which retain as much as possible the properties of M + S like configurations, combine these with the magnetic well, and with an approximation to the isodynamic requirement of D. Palumbo. These so-called Advanced Stellarators shown an improvement in predicted particle confinement and beta-limit compared to the classical stellarators. They can also be viewed as forming a system of linked stabilized mirrors of small mirror ratio. These fields can be produced by modular coils. A prototype of such a configuration is being designed by the stellarator division of IPP under the name of Wendelstein VII-AS. Expected physical data and technical details of W VII-AS are given.

  17. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) A ... rest temperature diet emotions posture medicines Why Is High Blood Pressure Bad? High blood pressure means a person's heart ...

  18. Oxidation of alloys for advanced steam turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Alman, David E.

    2005-01-01

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.

  19. Constant-pressure Blowers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, E

    1940-01-01

    The conventional axial blowers operate on the high-pressure principle. One drawback of this type of blower is the relatively low pressure head, which one attempts to overcome with axial blowers producing very high pressure at a given circumferential speed. The Schicht constant-pressure blower affords pressure ratios considerably higher than those of axial blowers of conventional design with approximately the same efficiency.

  20. Elasticity of orthoenstatite at high-pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Jackson, J. M.; Chen, B.; Zhao, J.; Yan, J.

    2011-12-01

    Orthoenstatite is an abundant yet complex mineral in Earth's upper mantle. Despite its abundance, the properties of orthopyroxene at high pressure remain ambiguous (e.g., Zhang et al. 2011; Jahn 2008; Kung et al. 2004). We explored select properties of a synthetic powdered orthoenstatite (Mg0.8757Fe0.13)2Si2O6 sample by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and nuclear resonance inelastic X-ray scattering (NRIXS) as a function of pressure in a neon pressure medium at 300 K. The XRD measurements were carried out at beamline 12.2.2 of the Advanced Light Source (Berkeley, CA), and the sample was studied up to 34 GPa. NRIXS measurements were carried out at sector 3ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source (Chicago, IL) in the pressure range of 3 to 17 GPa. From the raw NRIXS data, the partial phonon density of states (DOS) was derived (e.g., Sturhahn 2004). The volume (or pressure) dependence of several properties, such as the Lamb-Mössbauer factor, mean force constant, specific heat, vibrational entropy, and vibrational kinetic energy were determined from the DOS. We will discuss our results from these combined studies and the implications for Earth's upper mantle. References Zhang, D., J.M. Jackson, W. Sturhahn, and Y. Xiao (2011): Local structure variations observed in orthoenstatite at high-pressures. American Mineralogist, in press. Jahn, S. (2008) High-pressure phase transitions in MgSiO3 orthoenstatite studied by atomistic computer simulation. American Mineralogist, 93(4), 528-532. Kung, J., Li, B., Uchida, T., Wang, Y., Neuville, D., and Liebermann, R. (2004) In situ measurements of sound velocities and densities across the orthopyroxene high-pressure clinopyroxene transition in MgSiO3 at high pressure. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, 147(1), 27-44. Sturhahn, W. (2004): Nuclear Resonant Spectroscopy. J. Phys. Condens. Matter, 16, S497-S530.

  1. [Effect of angiotensin II receptor antagonist (losartan) on renal function, serum potassium and blood pressure in patients with advanced renal failure: differences between patients with a serum creatinine (SCr) level higher than 3 mg/dl and those with a lower SCr level].

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Masaaki; Tanno, Yudo; Otsuka, Yasushi; Takahashi, Hajime; Ikeda, Masato; Katoh, Naohiko; Yokoyama, Keitaro; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Tokutome, Goro; Hosoya, Tatsuo

    2002-10-01

    The administration of angiotensin II receptor antagonist(AIIA) to patients with advanced chronic renal failure(CRF) is not actively recommended. This study was performed to verify the appropriateness of this situation and to determine if there are any substantial differences between patients with a serum creatinine(SCr) level higher than 3 mg/dl and those with a lower SCr level in terms of the clinical effects such as renal function, serum potassium level and systemic blood pressure(BP) after the administration of AIIA. Sixteen patients with advanced CRF who were admitted to the out-patient clinic in Jikei University Hospital(1998/1-1999/12) were enrolled(average age: 65 years, underlying renal disease: diabetic nephropathy 6, CGN 5, and other 1). They had never been administered AIIA before. The patients were classified into two groups in accordance with their level of SCr: group A(SCr lower than 3.0 mg/dl; n = 11), and Group B(SCr higher than 3.0 mg/dl; n = 5). Losartan(50 mg/day) administration was started in order to examine parameters such as the SCr, potassium, BP at the out-patient clinic, and urinary protein excretion at the 0, 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 month time points. Although the 1/SCr values provided negative slopes with time in both groups, no significant difference was found between the two slopes. There were no changes in the serum potassium levels or urinary protein excretion during the study period in either group, and no statistical difference was found between the two groups. Although the serum potassium level exceeded 5.5 mEq/l in two patients each in both groups, the level was controlled by diet therapy with restricted potassium. BP was reduced significantly in both groups during the study period, and no statistical difference in BP reduction was observed between the two groups. In conclusion, the results indicate there were no differences in the effect on renal function, serum potassium levels or systemic BP between the patients with a SCr level

  2. Pressure Dome for High-Pressure Electrolyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Timothy; Schmitt, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    A high-strength, low-weight pressure vessel dome was designed specifically to house a high-pressure [2,000 psi (approx. = 13.8 MPa)] electrolyzer. In operation, the dome is filled with an inert gas pressurized to roughly 100 psi (approx. = 690 kPa) above the high, balanced pressure product oxygen and hydrogen gas streams. The inert gas acts to reduce the clamping load on electrolyzer stack tie bolts since the dome pressure acting axially inward helps offset the outward axial forces from the stack gas pressure. Likewise, radial and circumferential stresses on electrolyzer frames are minimized. Because the dome is operated at a higher pressure than the electrolyzer product gas, any external electrolyzer leak prevents oxygen or hydrogen from leaking into the dome. Instead the affected stack gas stream pressure rises detectably, thereby enabling a system shutdown. All electrical and fluid connections to the stack are made inside the pressure dome and require special plumbing and electrical dome interfaces for this to be accomplished. Further benefits of the dome are that it can act as a containment shield in the unlikely event of a catastrophic failure. Studies indicate that, for a given active area (and hence, cell ID), frame outside diameter must become ever larger to support stresses at higher operating pressures. This can lead to a large footprint and increased costs associated with thicker and/or larger diameter end-plates, tie-rods, and the frames themselves. One solution is to employ rings that fit snugly around the frame. This complicates stack assembly and is sometimes difficult to achieve in practice, as its success is strongly dependent on frame and ring tolerances, gas pressure, and operating temperature. A pressure dome permits an otherwise low-pressure stack to operate at higher pressures without growing the electrolyzer hardware. The pressure dome consists of two machined segments. An O-ring is placed in an O-ring groove in the flange of the bottom

  3. The measurement of maximum cylinder pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Chester W

    1929-01-01

    The work presented in this report was undertaken at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics to determine a suitable method for measuring the maximum pressures occurring in aircraft engine cylinders. The study and development of instruments for the measurement of maximum cylinder pressures has been conducted in connection with carburetor and oil engine investigations on a single cylinder aircraft-type engine. Five maximum cylinder-pressure devices have been designed, and tested, in addition to the testing of three commercial indicators. Values of maximum cylinder pressures are given as obtained with various indicators for the same pressures and for various kinds and values of maximum cylinder pressures, produced chiefly by variation of the injection advance angle in high-speed oil engine. The investigations indicate that the greatest accuracy in determining maximum cylinder pressures can be obtained with an electric, balanced-pressure, diaphragm or disk-type indicator so constructed as to have a diaphragm or disk of relatively large area and minimum seat width and mass.

  4. Plasma Processing of Advanced Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Heberlein, Joachim, V.R.; Pfender, Emil; Kortshagen, Uwe

    2005-02-28

    Plasma Processing of Advanced Materials The project had the overall objective of improving our understanding of the influences of process parameters on the properties of advanced superhard materials. The focus was on high rate deposition processes using thermal plasmas and atmospheric pressure glow discharges, and the emphasis on superhard materials was chosen because of the potential impact of such materials on industrial energy use and on the environment. In addition, the development of suitable diagnostic techniques was pursued. The project was divided into four tasks: (1) Deposition of superhard boron containing films using a supersonic plasma jet reactor (SPJR), and the characterization of the deposition process. (2) Deposition of superhard nanocomposite films in the silicon-nitrogen-carbon system using the triple torch plasma reactor (TTPR), and the characterization of the deposition process. (3) Deposition of films consisting of carbon nanotubes using an atmospheric pressure glow discharge reactor. (4) Adapting the Thomson scattering method for characterization of atmospheric pressure non-uniform plasmas with steep spatial gradients and temporal fluctuations. This report summarizes the results.

  5. SCIENCE BRIEF: ADVANCED CONCEPTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research on advanced concepts will evaluate and demonstrate the application of innovative infrastructure designs, management procedures and operational approaches. Advanced concepts go beyond simple asset management. The infusion of these advanced concepts into established wastew...

  6. Nutrition for Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... peanut oil canola oil Why is knowing about sodium important for someone with advanced CKD? Too much ... who have high blood pressure. High- and Low-sodium Foods High-sodium Foods Low-sodium Alternatives Salt ...

  7. [Advances in the treatment of hypertension].

    PubMed

    Román, O

    1999-04-01

    This review describes the most recent advances in the treatment of essential hypertension, from non pharmacological measures and changes in lifestyles to new blood pressure lowering drugs. A blood pressure lower tha 130/80 mmHg, has been established as the new goal for optimal treatment. In the last two consensus a new range of blood pressure, denominated "high normal" (130-139/85-89 mm Hg) has been incorporated. People with other cardiovascular risk factors and a blood pressure within this range, should be treated. The HOT study recently demonstrated that a reduction to less than 90 mmHg of diastolic pressure is associated with a reduction on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The importance of the peak/valley relationship in the election of anti hypertensive medication is also reviewed.

  8. Atmospheric Pressure Indicator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salzsieder, John C.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses observable phenomena related to air pressure. Describes a simple, unobtrusive, semiquantitative device to monitor the changes in air pressure that are associated with altitude, using a soft-drink bottle and a balloon. (JRH)

  9. Blood Pressure Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... high blood pressure can lead to… stroke. kidney failure. heart attack and heart failure. all of the above. ... high blood pressure can lead to stroke, kidney failure, heart attack and heart failure A is the correct ...

  10. High Blood Pressure Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. High Blood Pressure Prevention Steps You Can Take You can take steps to prevent high blood pressure by adopting these healthy lifestyle habits. Follow a ...

  11. Low blood pressure

    MedlinePlus

    Hypotension; Blood pressure - low; Postprandial hypotension; Orthostatic hypotension; Neurally mediated hypotension; NMH ... Blood pressure varies from one person to another. A drop as little as 20 mmHg, can cause problems for ...

  12. High blood pressure - infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007329.htm High blood pressure - infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. High blood pressure (hypertension) is an increase in the force of ...

  13. Blood Pressure Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... a minute to complete a single blood pressure measurement. After the procedure The nurse or technician taking ... online record. You can learn your blood pressure measurement as soon as your test is over. A ...

  14. Blood Pressure Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... reducing sodium in your diet, you may need medicines. Blood pressure medicines work in different ways to lower blood pressure. ... and widen blood vessels. Often, two or more medicines work better than one. NIH: National Heart, Lung, ...

  15. Pressure surge attenuator

    DOEpatents

    Christie, Alan M.; Snyder, Kurt I.

    1985-01-01

    A pressure surge attenuation system for pipes having a fluted region opposite crushable metal foam. As adapted for nuclear reactor vessels and heads, crushable metal foam is disposed to attenuate pressure surges.

  16. The Root Pressure Phenomenon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, A. R.

    1972-01-01

    Describes experiments demonstrating that root pressure in plants is probably controlled by a circadian rhythm (biological clock). Root pressure phenomenon plays significant part in water transport in contradiction with prevalent belief. (PS)

  17. Tests Of Advanced Nickel/Hydrogen Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1994-01-01

    Individual-pressure-vessel (IPV) nickel-hydrogen technology adanced with intention of improving cycle life and performance. One advancement to use 26 percent potassium hydroxide electrolyte to improve cycle life. Another to modify state-of-art cell design to eliminate identified failure modes.

  18. Underwater Adhesives Retrofit Pipelines with Advanced Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Houston-based Astro Technology Inc. used a partnership with Johnson Space Center to pioneer an advanced fiber-optic monitoring system for offshore oil pipelines. The company's underwater adhesives allow it to retrofit older deepwater systems in order to measure pressure, temperature, strain, and flow properties, giving energy companies crucial data in real time and significantly decreasing the risk of a catastrophe.

  19. Design for pressure regulating components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichmann, H.

    1973-01-01

    The design development for Pressure Regulating Components included a regulator component trade-off study with analog computer performance verification to arrive at a final optimized regulator configuration for the Space Storable Propulsion Module, under development for a Jupiter Orbiter mission. This application requires the pressure regulator to be capable of long-term fluorine exposure. In addition, individual but basically identical (for purposes of commonality) units are required for separate oxidizer and fuel pressurization. The need for dual units requires improvement in the regulation accuracy over present designs. An advanced regulator concept was prepared featuring redundant bellows, all metallic/ceramic construction, friction-free guidance of moving parts, gas damping, and the elimination of coil springs normally used for reference forces. The activities included testing of actual size seat/poppet components to determine actual discharge coefficients and flow forces. The resulting data was inserted into the computer model of the regulator. Computer simulation of the propulsion module performance over two mission profiles indicated satisfactory minimization of propellant residual requirements imposed by regulator performance uncertainties.

  20. Ultrahigh Temperature Capacitive Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harsh, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Robust, miniaturized sensing systems are needed to improve performance, increase efficiency, and track system health status and failure modes of advanced propulsion systems. Because microsensors must operate in extremely harsh environments, there are many technical challenges involved in developing reliable systems. In addition to high temperatures and pressures, sensing systems are exposed to oxidation, corrosion, thermal shock, fatigue, fouling, and abrasive wear. In these harsh conditions, sensors must be able to withstand high flow rates, vibration, jet fuel, and exhaust. In order for existing and future aeropropulsion turbine engines to improve safety and reduce cost and emissions while controlling engine instabilities, more accurate and complete sensor information is necessary. High-temperature (300 to 1,350 C) capacitive pressure sensors are of particular interest due to their high measurement bandwidth and inherent suitability for wireless readout schemes. The objective of this project is to develop a capacitive pressure sensor based on silicon carbon nitride (SiCN), a new class of high-temperature ceramic materials, which possesses excellent mechanical and electric properties at temperatures up to 1,600 C.

  1. The genetics of intraocular pressure.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Pallavi; Wiggs, Janey L; Pasquale, Louis R

    2013-01-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible blindness. Intraocular pressure (IOP) is the only modifiable risk factor for glaucoma, yet there is little known about the molecular events that regulate IOP. Genetic and genomic studies have helped identify genes that influence IOP and could lead to the identification of biological pathways that serve as targets for novel pressure-modifying therapies. Genetic linkage studies resulted in the identification of several genes that cause Mendelian (autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive) forms of high-pressure glaucoma, including MYOC. PITX2, FOXC1, and CYP1B1. Classical twin studies suggest that IOP is a heritable trait. More recently, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have shown that common genetic variants in the GAS7 and TMCO1 genomic regions are associated with elevated IOP. TMCO1 has also been associated with primary open-angle glaucoma in patients with advanced disease. A further study identifying additional genes contributing to IOP will be necessary to fully define the underlying genetic architecture of IOP.

  2. Noninvasive Intracranial Pressure Monitoring Using Advanced Machine Learning Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    training regression models using VS features for given time durations. Our regression model of minimally invasive ICP monitoring predicts ICP in...TBI. Included were adult patients (older than 17 years) admitted to the STC with GCS ɡ and a clinically determined requirement for ICP monitoring...were eligible for the study, i.e., adults (>17 years old; 42 female and 149 male). Details of the electronic data capture, storage, and data point

  3. Pressure-sensitive optrode

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for sensing changes in pressure and for generating optical signals related to said changes in pressure. Light from a fiber optic illuminates a fluorescent composition causing it to fluoresce. The fluorescent composition is caused to more relative to the end of the fiber optic in response to changes in pressure so that the intensity of fluorescent emissions collected by the same fiber optic used for illumination varies monotonically with pressure.

  4. Pressure-sensitive optrode

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1986-07-15

    An apparatus is provided for sensing changes in pressure and for generating optical signals related to said changes in pressure. Light from a fiber optic illuminates a fluorescent composition causing it to fluoresce. The fluorescent composition is caused to fluoresce more relative to the end of the fiber optic in response to changes in pressure so that the intensity of fluorescent emissions collected by the same fiber optic used for illumination varies monotonically with pressure. 10 figs.

  5. Recent advances in vacuum sciences and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozetič, M.; Ostrikov, K.; Ruzic, D. N.; Curreli, D.; Cvelbar, U.; Vesel, A.; Primc, G.; Leisch, M.; Jousten, K.; Malyshev, O. B.; Hendricks, J. H.; Kövér, L.; Tagliaferro, A.; Conde, O.; Silvestre, A. J.; Giapintzakis, J.; Buljan, M.; Radić, N.; Dražić, G.; Bernstorff, S.; Biederman, H.; Kylián, O.; Hanuš, J.; Miloševič, S.; Galtayries, A.; Dietrich, P.; Unger, W.; Lehocky, M.; Sedlarik, V.; Stana-Kleinschek, K.; Drmota-Petrič, A.; Pireaux, J. J.; Rogers, J. W.; Anderle, M.

    2014-04-01

    Recent advances in vacuum sciences and applications are reviewed. Novel optical interferometer cavity devices enable pressure measurements with ppm accuracy. The innovative dynamic vacuum standard allows for pressure measurements with temporal resolution of 2 ms. Vacuum issues in the construction of huge ultra-high vacuum devices worldwide are reviewed. Recent advances in surface science and thin films include new phenomena observed in electron transport near solid surfaces as well as novel results on the properties of carbon nanomaterials. Precise techniques for surface and thin-film characterization have been applied in the conservation technology of cultural heritage objects and recent advances in the characterization of biointerfaces are presented. The combination of various vacuum and atmospheric-pressure techniques enables an insight into the complex phenomena of protein and other biomolecule conformations on solid surfaces. Studying these phenomena at solid-liquid interfaces is regarded as the main issue in the development of alternative techniques for drug delivery, tissue engineering and thus the development of innovative techniques for curing cancer and cardiovascular diseases. A review on recent advances in plasma medicine is presented as well as novel hypotheses on cell apoptosis upon treatment with gaseous plasma. Finally, recent advances in plasma nanoscience are illustrated with several examples and a roadmap for future activities is presented.

  6. Brain Pressure Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A transducer originally used to measure air pressure in aircraft wind tunnel tests is the basis for a development important in diagnosis and treatment of certain types of brain damage. A totally implantable device, tbe intracranial pressure monitor measures and reports brain pressure by telemetry.

  7. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... En Español Who is at risk? How is high blood pressure treated? Understanding your blood pressure: What do the ...

  8. Understanding Blood Pressure Readings

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Understanding Blood Pressure Readings Updated:Mar 22,2017 What do your ... it’s too high for blood pressure High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  9. Low Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Low Blood Pressure - When Blood Pressure Is Too Low Updated:Dec 13,2016 How ... content was last reviewed October 2016 High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP Introduction What ...

  10. Treating High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    About High Blood Pressure Many people in the United States die from high blood pressure. This condition usually does not cause symptoms. Most ... until it is too late. A person has high blood pressure when the blood pushes against Visit your doctor ...

  11. A soundproof pressure chamber.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, M; Kodama, A; Ozawa, H; Inoue, S

    1994-01-01

    For neurotological research we designed a soundproof pressure chamber in which pressure can be adjusted +/- 1000 mmH2O at the rate of less than 100 mmH2O per second. Noise in the chamber can be maintained under 30-35 dB while pressure is kept at a given level.

  12. Skin (Pressure) Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatments and Side Effects Managing Cancer-related Side Effects Skin Problems Pressure Sores A skin or pressure sore ... Content Usage Policy . Skin Problems Dry Skin Itching Skin Color Changes Pressure Sores Scars ... and Paying for Treatment Treatments and Side Effects Survivorship: During and After Treatment Caregivers and Family ...

  13. Managing advanced unilateral pseudoexfoliative glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Marques, André

    2014-05-21

    The only proven therapy for glaucoma is intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction, which can be accomplished by different means. Each should be properly discussed with patients in order to best preserve visual function and quality of life. We report a case of unilateral pseudoexfoliative glaucoma, treated for years with triple topical IOP-lowering drugs. The patient presented with advanced optic neuropathy and important ocular side effects secondary to the treatment. Having discussed his options and prognosis, laser trabeculoplasty was performed while maintaining the remaining therapy considering the advanced stage of glaucoma. His IOP was effectively reduced and no progression was noted after 1-year follow-up. Although medical therapy is the mainstream in glaucoma management, its side effects should not be ignored, especially in unilateral cases. Surgery might have been a better solution, but we chose to perform laser trabeculoplasty, an effective and safer alternative, considering the unlikely but serious risk of the "wipe-out phenomenon" in this case.

  14. High pressure turbomachinery ground test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuermann, Patrick E.

    1992-01-01

    Turbomachinery test facilities are at present scarce to non-existent world-wide. The turbomachinery test facility at Stennis Space Center will provide for advanced development and research and development capabilities for liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen propellant rocket engine components. The facility will provide ultra-high pressure via gas generators to deliver the needed turbine drive on various turbomachinery. State of the art process control systems will provide the vital pressure, temperature and flow requirements during tests. These systems will better control adverse transient conditions during start-up and shutdown, and by using advanced control theory, as well as incorporate test article health monitoring. Also, digital data acquisition systems will obtain high frequency (up to 20 KHz) and low frequency (up to 1 KHz) data during the test. Pressures of up to 15,000 psi will be generated to pressurize high pressure tanks supplying cryogens to various test article inlets thus pushing turbopump materials and manufacturing processes to their limits. By planning for future projects the test facility will be easily adaptable to multi-program test configurations over a range of thermodynamic positions.

  15. Pressure Relief Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manha, William D.

    2010-09-01

    Pressure relief devices are used in pressure systems and on pressure vessels to prevent catastrophic rupture or explosion from excessive pressure. Pressure systems and pressure vessels have manufacturers maximum rated operating pressures or maximum design pressures(MDP) for which there are relatively high safety factors and minimum risk of rupture or explosion. Pressure systems and pressure vessels that have a potential to exceed the MDP by being connected to another higher pressure source, a compressor, or heat to water(boiler) are required to have over-pressure protecting devices. Such devices can be relief valves and/or burst discs to safely relieve potentially excessive pressure and prevent unacceptable ruptures and explosions which result in fail-safe pressure systems and pressure vessels. Common aerospace relief valve and burst disc requirements and standards will be presented. This will include the NASA PSRP Interpretation Letter TA-88-074 Fault Tolerance of Systems Using Specially Certified Burst Disks that dictates burst disc requirements for payloads on Shuttle. Two recent undesirable manned space payloads pressure relief devices and practices will be discussed, as well as why these practices should not be continued. One example for discussion is the use of three burst discs that have been placed in series to comply with safety requirements of three controls to prevent a catastrophic hazard of the over-pressurization and rupture of pressure system and/or vessels. The cavities between the burst discs are evacuated and are the reference pressures for activating the two upstream burst discs. If the upstream burst disc leaks into the reference cavity, the reference pressure increases and it can increase the burst disc activating pressure and potentially result in the burst disc assembly being ineffective for over pressure protection. The three burst discs-in-series assembly was found acceptable because the burst discs are designed for minimum risk(DFMR) of

  16. Dynamic Pressure Calibration Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutte, P. C.; Cate, K. H.; Young, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Vibrating columns of fluid used to calibrate transducers. Dynamic pressure calibration standard developed for calibrating flush diaphragm-mounted pressure transducers. Pressures up to 20 kPa (3 psi) accurately generated over frequency range of 50 to 1,800 Hz. System includes two conically shaped aluminum columns one 5 cm (2 in.) high for low pressures and another 11 cm (4.3 in.) high for higher pressures, each filled with viscous fluid. Each column mounted on armature of vibration exciter, which imparts sinusoidally varying acceleration to fluid column. Signal noise low, and waveform highly dependent on quality of drive signal in vibration exciter.

  17. Intracardiac pressures in the human fetus

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, P; Maxwell, D; Tynan, M; Allan, L

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To obtain normal values for intracardiac pressures in the human
 fetus.
DESIGN—Intracardiac pressures were measured directly in the four chambers of the human fetal heart during clinically indicated invasive obstetric procedures.
SETTING—Department of fetal medicine in a tertiary referral centre.
PATIENTS—39 fetuses between 16 and 29 weeks of gestation.
RESULTS—The ventricular waveforms obtained were similar to those found in postnatal life. There was an increase in ventricular systolic and end diastolic pressures with advancing gestation. There was no difference between left and right ventricular pressures. Atrial pressures were equal and remained constant in the gestational age range studied.
CONCLUSIONS—Fetal cardiovascular pressure measurements in the normal fetus assist in understanding the fetal circulation, and provide a basis for the assessment of cases of congenital heart disease that may be amenable to intrauterine treatment.


Keywords: fetus; ventricular pressure; congenital heart disease PMID:10862590

  18. Accurate, reproducible measurement of blood pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, N R; Chockalingam, A; Fodor, J G; McKay, D W

    1990-01-01

    The diagnosis of mild hypertension and the treatment of hypertension require accurate measurement of blood pressure. Blood pressure readings are altered by various factors that influence the patient, the techniques used and the accuracy of the sphygmomanometer. The variability of readings can be reduced if informed patients prepare in advance by emptying their bladder and bowel, by avoiding over-the-counter vasoactive drugs the day of measurement and by avoiding exposure to cold, caffeine consumption, smoking and physical exertion within half an hour before measurement. The use of standardized techniques to measure blood pressure will help to avoid large systematic errors. Poor technique can account for differences in readings of more than 15 mm Hg and ultimately misdiagnosis. Most of the recommended procedures are simple and, when routinely incorporated into clinical practice, require little additional time. The equipment must be appropriate and in good condition. Physicians should have a suitable selection of cuff sizes readily available; the use of the correct cuff size is essential to minimize systematic errors in blood pressure measurement. Semiannual calibration of aneroid sphygmomanometers and annual inspection of mercury sphygmomanometers and blood pressure cuffs are recommended. We review the methods recommended for measuring blood pressure and discuss the factors known to produce large differences in blood pressure readings. PMID:2192791

  19. Management of Chronic Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    significant differences in complete healing were detected among other modern dressings. There is evidence that polyurethane foam dressings and hydrocellular dressings are more absorbent and easier to remove than hydrocolloid dressings in ulcers with moderate to high exudates. In deeper ulcers (stage III and IV), the use of alginate with hydrocolloid resulted in significantly greater reduction in the size of the ulcers compared to hydrocolloid alone. Studies on sustained silver-releasing dressing demonstrated a tendency for reducing the risk of infection and promoting faster healing, but the sample sizes were too small for statistical analysis or for drawing conclusions. Biological Therapies The efficacy of platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs), fibroblast growth factor, and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor in improving complete healing of chronic pressure ulcers has not been established. Presently only Regranex, a recombinant PDGF, has been approved by Health Canada and only for treatment of diabetic ulcers in the lower extremities. A March 2008 US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) communication reported increased deaths from cancers in people given three or more prescriptions for Regranex. Limited low-quality evidence on skin matrix and engineered skin equivalent suggests a potential role for these products in healing refractory advanced chronic pressure ulcers, but the evidence is insufficient to draw a conclusion. Adjunctive Physical Therapy There is evidence that electrical stimulation may result in a significantly greater reduction in the surface area and more complete healing of stage II to IV ulcers compared with sham therapy. No conclusion on the efficacy of electrotherapy can be drawn because of significant statistical heterogeneity, small sample sizes, and methodological flaws. The efficacy of other adjunctive physical therapies [electromagnetic therapy, low-level laser (LLL) therapy, ultrasound therapy, ultraviolet light therapy, and negative

  20. Seasonal buffering of atmospheric pressure on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dzurisin, D.; Ingersoll, A. P.

    1975-01-01

    An isothermal reservoir of carbon dioxide in gaseous contact with the Martian atmosphere would reduce the amplitude and advance the phase of global atmospheric pressure fluctuations caused by seasonal growth and decline of polar CO2 frost caps. Adsorbed carbon dioxide in the upper roughly 10 m of Martian regolith is sufficient to buffer the present atmosphere on a seasonal basis. Available observations and related polar cap models do not confirm or refute the operation of such a mechanism. Implications for the amplitude and phase of seasonal pressure fluctuations are subject to direct test by the upcoming Viking mission to Mars.

  1. High pressure water jet mining machine

    DOEpatents

    Barker, Clark R.

    1981-05-05

    A high pressure water jet mining machine for the longwall mining of coal is described. The machine is generally in the shape of a plowshare and is advanced in the direction in which the coal is cut. The machine has mounted thereon a plurality of nozzle modules each containing a high pressure water jet nozzle disposed to oscillate in a particular plane. The nozzle modules are oriented to cut in vertical and horizontal planes on the leading edge of the machine and the coal so cut is cleaved off by the wedge-shaped body.

  2. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, J.C.; Dilgard, L.W.

    1995-10-10

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure is disclosed. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes. 10 figs.

  3. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, John C.; Dilgard, Lemoyne W.

    1995-01-01

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes.

  4. Miniaturized pressurization system

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, John C.; Swink, Don G.

    1991-01-01

    The invention uses a fluid stored at a low pressure and provides the fluid at a high pressure. The invention allows the low pressure fluid to flow to a fluid bore of a differential pump and from the pump to a fluid pressure regulator. After flowing through the regulator the fluid is converted to a gas which is directed to a gas bore of the differential pump. By controlling the flow of gas entering and being exhausted from the gas bore, the invention provides pressure to the fluid. By setting the regulator, the high pressure fluid can be set at predetermined values. Because the invention only needs a low pressure fluid, the inventive apparatus has a low mass, and therefore would be useful in rocket propulsion systems.

  5. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan Miska; Troy Reed; Ergun Kuru

    2004-09-30

    The Advanced Cuttings Transport Study (ACTS) was a 5-year JIP project undertaken at the University of Tulsa (TU). The project was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and JIP member companies. The objectives of the project were: (1) to develop and construct a new research facility that would allow three-phase (gas, liquid and cuttings) flow experiments under ambient and EPET (elevated pressure and temperature) conditions, and at different angle of inclinations and drill pipe rotation speeds; (2) to conduct experiments and develop a data base for the industry and academia; and (3) to develop mechanistic models for optimization of drilling hydraulics and cuttings transport. This project consisted of research studies, flow loop construction and instrumentation development. Following a one-year period for basic flow loop construction, a proposal was submitted by TU to the DOE for a five-year project that was organized in such a manner as to provide a logical progression of research experiments as well as additions to the basic flow loop. The flow loop additions and improvements included: (1) elevated temperature capability; (2) two-phase (gas and liquid, foam etc.) capability; (3) cuttings injection and removal system; (4) drill pipe rotation system; and (5) drilling section elevation system. In parallel with the flow loop construction, hydraulics and cuttings transport studies were preformed using drilling foams and aerated muds. In addition, hydraulics and rheology of synthetic drilling fluids were investigated. The studies were performed under ambient and EPET conditions. The effects of temperature and pressure on the hydraulics and cuttings transport were investigated. Mechanistic models were developed to predict frictional pressure loss and cuttings transport in horizontal and near-horizontal configurations. Model predictions were compared with the measured data. Predominantly, model predictions show satisfactory agreements with the measured data. As a

  6. Pressure (Or No Royal Road)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, J.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses how difficult the various problems of pressure, partial pressure, gas laws, and vapor pressure are for students. Outlines the evolution of the concept of pressure, the gas equation for a perfect gas, partial pressures, saturated vapor pressure, Avogadro's hypothesis, Raoult's law, and the vapor pressure of ideal solutions. (JR)

  7. Advanced propeller research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, John F.; Bober, Lawrence J.

    1987-01-01

    Resent results of aerodynamic and acoustic research on both single and counter-rotation propellers are reviewed. Data and analytical results are presented for three propellers: SR-7A, the single rotation design used in the NASA Propfan Test Assessment (PTA); and F7-A7, the 8+8 counterrotating design used in the proof-of-concept Unducted Fan (UDF) engine. In addition to propeller efficiencies, cruise and takeoff noise, and blade pressure data, off-design phenomena involving formation of leading edge vortices are described. Aerodynamic and acoustic computational results derived from three-dimensional Euler and acoustic radiation codes are presented. Research on unsteady flows, which are particularly important for understanding counterrotation interaction noise, unsteady loading effects on acoustics, and flutter or forced response is described. The first results of three-dimensional unsteady Euler solutions are illustrated for a single rotation propeller at an angle of attack and for a counterrotation propeller. Basic experimental and theoretical results from studies of the unsteady aerodynamics of oscillating cascades are outlined. Finally, advanced concepts involving swirl recovery vanes and ultra bypass ducted propellers are discussed.

  8. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Evren Ozbayoglu; Lei Zhou

    2002-04-30

    This is the third quarterly progress report for Year 3 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between Jan. 1, 2002 and Mar. 31, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility (Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System), (b) Research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (c) Research project (Task 9b): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), and Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b); (f) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop, progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S); and (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  9. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Lei Zhou

    2002-01-30

    This is the second quarterly progress report for Year 3 of the ACTS project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between Oct 1, 2001 and Dec. 31, 2001. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility (Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Collection System), (b) Research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (c) Research project (Task 9): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (e) Research on instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), and Foam properties while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), (f) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  10. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Evren Ozbayoglu; Lei Zhou

    2002-07-30

    This is the fourth quarterly progress report for Year-3 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between April 1, 2002 and June 30, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility (Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System), (b) Research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)''; (c) Research project (Task 9b): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions''; (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''; (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), and Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b); (f) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S); (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  11. Pressure locking test results

    SciTech Connect

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; McKellar, M.G.; Bramwell, D.

    1996-12-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is funding the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in performing research to provide technical input for their use in evaluating responses to Generic Letter 95-07, {open_quotes}Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves.{close_quotes} Pressure locking and thermal binding are phenomena that make a closed gate valve difficult to open. This paper discusses only the pressure locking phenomenon in a flexible-wedge gate valve; the authors will publish the results of their thermal binding research at a later date. Pressure locking can occur when operating sequences or temperature changes cause the pressure of the fluid in the bonnet (and, in most valves, between the discs) to be higher than the pressure on the upstream and downstream sides of the disc assembly. This high fluid pressure presses the discs against both seats, making the disc assembly harder to unseat than anticipated by the typical design calculations, which generally consider friction at only one of the two disc/seat interfaces. The high pressure of the bonnet fluid also changes the pressure distribution around the disc in a way that can further contribute to the unseating load. If the combined loads associated with pressure locking are very high, the actuator might not have the capacity to open the valve. The results of the NRC/INEL research discussed in this paper show that the relationship between bonnet pressure and pressure locking stem loads appears linear. The results also show that for this valve, seat leakage affects the bonnet pressurization rate when the valve is subjected to thermally induced pressure locking conditions.

  12. High-resolution, high-pressure NMR studies of proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, J; Ballard, L; Nash, D

    1998-01-01

    Advanced high-resolution NMR spectroscopy, including two-dimensional NMR techniques, combined with high pressure capability, represents a powerful new tool in the study of proteins. This contribution is organized in the following way. First, the specialized instrumentation needed for high-pressure NMR experiments is discussed, with specific emphasis on the design features and performance characteristics of a high-sensitivity, high-resolution, variable-temperature NMR probe operating at 500 MHz and at pressures of up to 500 MPa. An overview of several recent studies using 1D and 2D high-resolution, high-pressure NMR spectroscopy to investigate the pressure-induced reversible unfolding and pressure-assisted cold denaturation of lysozyme, ribonuclease A, and ubiquitin is presented. Specifically, the relationship between the residual secondary structure of pressure-assisted, cold-denatured states and the structure of early folding intermediates is discussed. PMID:9649405

  13. Reduced atmospheric pressure in Radish: Alteration of NCER and transpiration at decreased oxygen partial pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehkamp, Cara Ann; Stasiak, Michael; Wheeler, Raymond; Dixon, Mike

    Fundamental to the future of space exploration is the development of advanced life support systems capable of maintaining crews for significant periods without re-supply from Earth. Significant research is focused on the development of bioregenerative life support systems to be used in conjunction with the current physico-chemical methods. These bioregenerative life support systems harness natural ecosystem processes and employ plant photosynthesis and transpiration to produce food, oxygen and regenerate water while consuming carbon dioxide. The forthcoming exploration of the Moon and Mars has prompted interest into the effects of hypobaria on plant development. Reduced atmospheric pressures will lessen the pressure gradient between the structure and the local environment thereby decreasing gas leakage and possibly the structural mass of the plant growth facility. In order to establish the optimal specifications for reduced pressure plant growth structures it is essential to determine the atmospheric pressure limits required for conventional plant development and growth. Due to its physiological importance, oxygen will compose a significant portion of these minimal environments. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that reduced atmospheric pressure and decreased oxygen partial pressures had no effect on radish productivity. Radishes (Raphanus sativa L. cv. Cherry Bomb II) were grown from seed in the University of Guelph's Hypobaric Plant Growth Chambers for a period of 21 days. Treatments included total pressures of 10, 33, 66 and 96 kPa and oxygen partial pressures of 2, 7, 14 and 20 kPa. Experiments demonstrated that reduced partial pressures of oxygen had a greater effect on radish growth than hypobaria. Results showed a reduction in net carbon exchange rate and transpiration with decreasing oxygen partial pressures leading to diminished productivity. Keywords: hypobaric, radish, oxygen partial pressure, variable pressure chamber

  14. Bubbles Responding to Ultrasound Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Bubble and Drop Nonlinear Dynamics (BDND) experiment was designed to improve understanding of how the shape and behavior of bubbles respond to ultrasound pressure. By understanding this behavior, it may be possible to counteract complications bubbles cause during materials processing on the ground. This 12-second sequence came from video downlinked from STS-94, July 5 1997, MET:3/19:15 (approximate). The BDND guest investigator was Gary Leal of the University of California, Santa Barbara. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced fluid dynamics experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (435KB, 13-second MPEG, screen 160 x 120 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300162.html.

  15. Blade pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivers, J. W. H.

    Three measurement techniques which enable rotating pressures to be measured during the normal operation of a gas turbine or a component test rig are described. The first technique was developed specifically to provide steady and transient blade surface pressure data to aid both fan flutter research and general fan performance development. This technique involves the insertion of miniature high frequency response pressure transducers into the fan blades of a large civil gas turbine. The other two techniques were developed to measure steady rotating pressures inside and on the surface of engine or rig turbine blades and also rotating pressures in cooling feed systems. These two low frequency response systems are known as the "pressure pineapple' (a name which resulted from the shape of the original prototype) and the rotating scanivalve.

  16. Measurement of endolymphatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Mom, T; Pavier, Y; Giraudet, F; Gilain, L; Avan, P

    2015-04-01

    Endolymphatic pressure measurement is of interest both to researchers in the physiology and pathophysiology of hearing and ENT physicians dealing with Menière's disease or similar conditions. It is generally agreed that endolymphatic hydrops is associated with Menière's disease and is accompanied by increased hydrostatic pressure. Endolymphatic pressure, however, cannot be measured precisely without endangering hearing, making the association between hydrops and increased endolymphatic pressure difficult to demonstrate. Several integrated in vivo models have been developed since the 1960s, but only a few allow measurement of endolymphatic hydrostatic pressure. Models associating measurement of hydrostatic pressure and endolymphatic potential and assessment of cochlear function are of value to elucidate the pathophysiology of endolymphatic hydrops. The present article presents the main types of models and discusses their respective interest.

  17. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pressure vessels and pressure piping. 197.462 Section... Diving Equipment § 197.462 Pressure vessels and pressure piping. (a) The diving supervisor shall ensure that each pressure vessel, including each volume tank, cylinder and PVHO, and each pressure...

  18. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure vessels and pressure piping. 197.462 Section... Diving Equipment § 197.462 Pressure vessels and pressure piping. (a) The diving supervisor shall ensure that each pressure vessel, including each volume tank, cylinder and PVHO, and each pressure...

  19. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure vessels and pressure piping. 197.462 Section... Diving Equipment § 197.462 Pressure vessels and pressure piping. (a) The diving supervisor shall ensure that each pressure vessel, including each volume tank, cylinder and PVHO, and each pressure...

  20. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure vessels and pressure piping. 197.462 Section... Diving Equipment § 197.462 Pressure vessels and pressure piping. (a) The diving supervisor shall ensure that each pressure vessel, including each volume tank, cylinder and PVHO, and each pressure...

  1. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pressure vessels and pressure piping. 197.462 Section... Diving Equipment § 197.462 Pressure vessels and pressure piping. (a) The diving supervisor shall ensure that each pressure vessel, including each volume tank, cylinder and PVHO, and each pressure...

  2. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Chae Un; Gruner, Sol M.

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  3. Postoperative permanent pressure alopecia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zi Yun; Ngian, Jan; Chong, Claudia; Chong, Chin Ted; Liew, Qui Yin

    2016-04-01

    A 49-year-old Chinese female underwent elective laparoscopic assisted Whipple's surgery lasting 12 h. This was complicated by postoperative pressure alopecia at the occipital area of the scalp. Pressure-induced hair loss after general anaesthesia is uncommon and typically temporary, but may be disconcerting to the patient. We report this case of postoperative permanent pressure alopecia due to its rarity in the anaesthesia/local literature, and review the risk factors for its development.

  4. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOEpatents

    Echtler, J. Paul; Scandrol, Roy O.

    1981-01-01

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  5. Controlling your high blood pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000101.htm Controlling your high blood pressure To use the sharing features on this page, ... blood pressure goes up. When is Your Blood Pressure a Concern? If your blood pressure is high, ...

  6. Attachment Fitting for Pressure Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III (Inventor); Carrigan, Robert W. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    This invention provides sealed access to the interior of a pressure vessel and consists of a tube. a collar, redundant seals, and a port. The port allows the seals to be pressurized and seated before the pressure vessel becomes pressurized.

  7. Sapphire tube pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Outwater, J.O.

    2000-05-23

    A pressure vessel is provided for observing corrosive fluids at high temperatures and pressures. A transparent Teflon bag contains the corrosive fluid and provides an inert barrier. The Teflon bag is placed within a sapphire tube, which forms a pressure boundary. The tube is received within a pipe including a viewing window. The combination of the Teflon bag, sapphire tube and pipe provides a strong and inert pressure vessel. In an alternative embodiment, tie rods connect together compression fittings at opposite ends of the sapphire tube.

  8. Pressure-sensitive optrode

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1982-09-30

    Apparatus and method for sensing changes in pressure and for generating optical signals related to changes in pressure. Light from a fiber optic is directed to a movable surface which is coated with a light-responsive material, and which moves relative to the end of the fiber optic in response to changes in pressure. The same fiber optic collects a portion of the reflected or emitted light from the movable surface. Changes in pressure are determined by measuring changes in the amount of light collected.

  9. Pressure-sensitive optrode

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1985-01-01

    Apparatus and method for sensing changes in pressure and for generating optical signals related to changes in pressure. Light from a fiber optic is directed to a movable surface which is coated with a light-responsive material, and which moves relative to the end of the fiber optic in response to changes in pressure. The same fiber optic collects a portion of the reflected or emitted light from the movable surface. Changes in pressure are determined by measuring changes in the amount of light collected.

  10. Pressure-sensitive optrode

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1985-04-09

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for sensing changes in pressure and for generating optical signals related to changes in pressure. Light from a fiber optic is directed to a movable surface which is coated with a light-responsive material, and which moves relative to the end of the fiber optic in response to changes in pressure. The same fiber optic collects a portion of the reflected or emitted light from the movable surface. Changes in pressure are determined by measuring changes in the amount of light collected. 5 figs.

  11. Increased intracranial pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain. Many conditions can increase intracranial pressure. Common causes include: Aneurysm rupture and subarachnoid hemorrhage Brain tumor Encephalitis Head injury Hydrocephalus (increased fluid around ...

  12. Atracurium and intraocular pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, D F; Eustace, P; Unwin, A; Magner, J B

    1985-01-01

    The effect of atracurium on intraocular pressure was studied by comparing it with pancuronium in a randomised controlled trial. The intraocular pressure was measured in patients undergoing cataract surgery before administration of the muscle relaxant, at 1, 3, and 5 minutes after its administration, and at 1 minute after tracheal intubation. Atracurium was found to decrease intraocular pressure to a significantly greater degree than pancuronium. The intraocular pressure after tracheal intubation was found to be significantly higher than that measured immediately after induction of anaesthesia. The authors conclude that atracurium provides an acceptable alternative to pancuronium for ophthalmic surgery but does not overcome the ocular hypertensive effect of tracheal intubation. PMID:3899166

  13. Blood Pressure Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Engineering Development Laboratory developed a system for the cardiovascular study of weightless astronauts. This was designed to aid people with congestive heart failure and diabetes. While in space, astronauts' blood pressure rises, heart rate becomes unstable, and there are sometimes postflight lightheadedness or blackouts. The Baro-Cuff studies the resetting of blood pressure. When a silicone rubber chamber is strapped to the neck, the Baro-Cuff stimulates the carotid arteries by electronically controlled pressure application. Blood pressure controls in patients may be studied.

  14. Sapphire tube pressure vessel

    DOEpatents

    Outwater, John O.

    2000-01-01

    A pressure vessel is provided for observing corrosive fluids at high temperatures and pressures. A transparent Teflon bag contains the corrosive fluid and provides an inert barrier. The Teflon bag is placed within a sapphire tube, which forms a pressure boundary. The tube is received within a pipe including a viewing window. The combination of the Teflon bag, sapphire tube and pipe provides a strong and inert pressure vessel. In an alternative embodiment, tie rods connect together compression fittings at opposite ends of the sapphire tube.

  15. Electrolytic pressure transduction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, G. H.

    1985-12-01

    This invention is directed to a Wheatstone bridge circuit for measuring pressure in the distal esophageal sphincter (D.E.S.) as well as in other organs and bodily cavities. A flexible hollow tube having three spaced electrodes is lodged in the esophagus. The tube is partly filled with a saline solution to cover the electrodes, thereby producing two series connected, pressure sensitive resistors. The electrolytic resistors are coupled to two series connected fixed resistors to complete the bridge circuit. Electrical imbalances in the bridge circuit are measured in terms of the pressure corresponding to the pressure applied by the D.E.S.

  16. Novel reduced pressure-balance syringe for chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Windom, Bret C; Bruno, Thomas J

    2010-11-19

    When withdrawing a fluid sample (for additional chromatographic analyses) from an apparatus operated at a reduced pressure, a typical syringe proves to be ineffective (even if it is equipped with a gas tight plunger). It simply does not create enough pressure differential to remove a fluid sample from a reduced pressure environment. We encountered such a situation as part of efforts to extend the operation of the advanced distillation curve protocol to reduced pressures. The problem was solved by the development of a pressure balance syringe that allows reliable and precise sampling from an apparatus operating at sub-ambient pressures. This new device uses an external vacuum source to evacuate a syringe barrel, allowing a user to withdraw fluid samples from environments with pressures as low as 0.5kPa. To demonstrate the operation of the newly developed device, distillate analyses were performed on two fluids at low pressure: a predefined validation mixture, and a commercial soy based biodiesel fuel. The pressure balance syringe was used successfully for sampling in both cases. The use of the pressure balance syringe is not limited to reduced pressure distillations; indeed it can be used for a variety of applications in which chemical/compositional analyses are desired on a fluid contained in a reduced pressure environment.

  17. Brain tissue pressure measurements in perinatal and adult rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hornig, G W; Lorenzo, A V; Zavala, L M; Welch, K

    1987-12-01

    Brain tissue pressure (BTP) in pre- and post-natal anesthetized rabbits, held in a stereotactic head holder, was measured with a fluid filled 23 gauge open-ended cannula connected distally to a pressure transducer. By advancing the cannula step wise through a hole in the cranium it was possible to sequentially measure pressure from the cranial subarachnoid space, cortex, ventricle and basal ganglia. Separate cannulas and transducers were used to measure CSFP from the cisterna magna and arterial and/or venous pressure. Pressure recordings obtained when the tip of the BTP cannula was located in the cranial subarachnoid space or ventricle exhibited respiratory and blood pressure pulsations equivalent to and in phase with CSF pulsations recorded from the cisterna magna. When the tip was advanced into brain parenchymal sites such pulsations were suppressed or non-detectable unless communication with a CSF compartment had been established inadvertently. Although CSF pressures in the three spinal fluid compartments were equivalent, in most animals BTP was higher than CSFP. However, after momentary venting of the system BTP equilibrated at a pressure below that of CSFP. We speculate that venting of the low compliance system (1.20 x 10(-5) ml/mmHg) relieves the isometric pressure build-up due to insertion of the cannula into brain parenchyma. Under these conditions, and at all ages examined, BTP in the rabbit is consistently lower than CSFP and, as with CSFP, it increases as the animal matures.

  18. Dual shell pressure balanced vessel

    DOEpatents

    Fassbender, Alexander G.

    1992-01-01

    A dual-wall pressure balanced vessel for processing high viscosity slurries at high temperatures and pressures having an outer pressure vessel and an inner vessel with an annular space between the vessels pressurized at a pressure slightly less than or equivalent to the pressure within the inner vessel.

  19. The world's first practical flight pressure suit.

    PubMed

    Mohler, S R

    1998-08-01

    The first practical flight pressure suit was developed in 1934 by Wiley Post of global flight fame. B.F. Goodrich Company assisted in the development. The final pressure suit used a liquid oxygen source and had arm and leg joints that permitted easy operation of the flight controls and also enabled walking to and from the aircraft. In his Lockheed Vega, the "Winnie May," Post set unofficial altitude records (as high as 50,000 ft), discovering the jet stream in the process. In March 1935, Post flew from Burbank, CA, to Cleveland, OH, in the stratosphere using the jet stream. At times, his ground speed exceeded 340 mph in a 179 mph aircraft. Post's pioneering accomplishments were the first major practical advance in pressurized flight.

  20. Advanced Electrophysiologic Mapping Systems

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    arrhythmias (e.g., typical atrial flutter and atrial ventricular nodal re-entrant tachycardia), for which the success rates using the fluoroscopy approach were extremely high and unlikely to be improved upon using nonfluoroscopic mapping. By age 50, almost 100% of people who have had surgery for congenital heart disease will develop arrhythmia. Some centres are under greater pressure because of expertise in complex ablation procedures for subsets of patients. The use of advanced mapping systems requires the support of additional electrophysiologic laboratory time and nursing time. Conclusions For patients suffering from symptomatic, drug-refractory atrial fibrillation and are otherwise healthy, catheter ablation offers a treatment option that is less invasive than is open surgical ablation. Small RCTs that may have been limited by type 2 errors showed significant reductions in fluoroscopy exposure in nonfluoroscopy-guided ablation and a trend toward lower overall failure rate that did not reach statistical significance. Pooled analysis suggests that advanced mapping systems may reduce the overall failure rate in the ablation of atrial fibrillation. Observational studies suggest that ablation guided by complex mapping/navigation systems is a promising treatment for complex arrhythmias such as highly symptomatic, drug-refractory atrial fibrillation for which rate control is not an option In people with atrial fibrillation, ablation guided by advanced nonfluoroscopy mapping resulted in arrhythmia free rates of 80% or higher, reduced mortality, and better quality of life at experienced centres. Although generally safe, serious complications such as stroke, atrial-esophageal, and pulmonary vein stenosis had been reported following ablation procedures. Experts advised that advanced mapping systems are also required for catheter ablation of: Hemodynamically unstable ventricular tachycardia from ischemic heart disease Macro re-entrant atrial tachycardia after surgical correction of

  1. Pressure Testing of a Minimum Gauge PRSEUS Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew J.; Rouse, Marshall; Linton, Kim A.; Li, Victor P.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced aircraft configurations that have been developed to increase fuel efficiency require advanced, novel structural concepts capable of handling the unique load conditions that arise. One such concept is the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) developed by the Boeing Company. The PRSEUS concept is being investigated by NASA s Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program for use in a hybrid-wing body (HWB) aircraft. This paper summarizes the analysis and test of a PRSEUS panel subjected to internal pressure, the first such pressure test for this structural concept. The pressure panel used minimum gauge skin, with stringer and frame configurations consistent with previous PRSEUS tests. Analysis indicated that for the minimum gauge skin panel, the stringer locations exhibit fairly linear response, but the skin bays between the stringers exhibit nonlinear response. Excellent agreement was seen between nonlinear analysis and test results in the critical portion at the center of the panel. The pristine panel was capable of withstanding the required 18.4 psi pressure load condition without exhibiting any damage. The impacted panel was capable of withstanding a pressure load in excess of 28 psi before initial failure occurred at the center stringer, and the panel was capable of sustaining increased pressure load after the initial failure. This successful PRSEUS panel pressure panel test was a critical step in the building block approach for enabling the use of this advanced structural concept on future aircraft, such as the HWB.

  2. Low NOx Advanced Vortex Combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Edmonds, R.G.; Williams, J.T.; Steele, R.C.; Straub, D.L.; Casleton, K.H.; Bining, Avtar

    2008-05-01

    A lean-premixed advanced vortex combustor (AVC) has been developed and tested. The natural gas fueled AVC was tested at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory in Morgantown, WV. All testing was performed at elevated pressures and inlet temperatures and at lean fuel-air ratios representative of industrial gas turbines. The improved AVC design exhibited simultaneous NOx /CO/unburned hydrocarbon (UHC) emissions of 4/4/0 ppmv (all emissions corrected to 15% O2 dry). The design also achieved less than 3 ppmv NOx with combustion efficiencies in excess of 99.5%. The design demonstrated marked acoustic dynamic stability over a wide range of operating conditions, which potentially makes this approach significantly more attractive than other lean-premixed combustion approaches. In addition, the measured 1.75% pressure drop is significantly lower than conventional gas turbine combustors, which could translate into an overall gas turbine cycle efficiency improvement. The relatively high velocities and low pressure drop achievable with this technology make the AVC approach an attractive alternative for syngas fuel applications.

  3. Neonatal Pressure Ulcer Prevention.

    PubMed

    Scheans, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of pressure ulcers in acutely ill infants and children ranges up to 27 percent in intensive care units, with a range of 16-19 percent in NICUs. Anatomic, physiologic, and developmental factors place ill and preterm newborns at risk for skin breakdown. Two case studies illustrate these factors, and best practices for pressure ulcer prevention are described.

  4. Pressure vessel flex joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Jon B. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An airtight, flexible joint is disclosed for the interfacing of two pressure vessels such as between the Space Station docking tunnel and the Space Shuttle Orbiter bulkhead adapter. The joint provides for flexibility while still retaining a structural link between the two vessels required due to the loading created by the internal/external pressure differential. The joint design provides for limiting the axial load carried across the joint to a specific value, a function returned in the Orbiter/Station tunnel interface. The flex joint comprises a floating structural segment which is permanently attached to one of the pressure vessels through the use of an inflatable seal. The geometric configuration of the joint causes the tension between the vessels created by the internal gas pressure to compress the inflatable seal. The inflation pressure of the seal is kept at a value above the internal/external pressure differential of the vessels in order to maintain a controlled distance between the floating segment and pressure vessel. The inflatable seal consists of either a hollow torus-shaped flexible bladder or two rolling convoluted diaphragm seals which may be reinforced by a system of straps or fabric anchored to the hard structures. The joint acts as a flexible link to allow both angular motion and lateral displacement while it still contains the internal pressure and holds the axial tension between the vessels.

  5. Pseudophakia and intraocular pressure.

    PubMed

    Radius, R L; Schultz, K; Sobocinski, K; Schultz, R O; Easom, H

    1984-06-01

    We studied the change in intraocular pressure in 373 consecutive eyes undergoing cataract extraction with intraocular lens implantation between Jan. 1, 1981, and May 31, 1982. There was a mean increase in intraocular pressure of 0.1 mm Hg following this surgery. This increase, however, was not statistically significant (P greater than .5). There was a mean rise in pressure of 0.8 mm Hg in the eyes undergoing intracapsular surgery and a mean fall in pressure of 0.6 mm Hg in the eyes undergoing extracapsular surgery (P less than .05). The change in pressure was unrelated to age, surgeon, or lens type. The results of a separate analysis of 16 eyes with a preoperative diagnosis of glaucoma and eight eyes with ocular hypertension were similar.

  6. Analysis of an advanced technology subsonic turbofan incorporating revolutionary materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knip, Gerald, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Successful implementation of revolutionary composite materials in an advanced turbofan offers the possibility of further improvements in engine performance and thrust-to-weight ratio relative to current metallic materials. The present analysis determines the approximate engine cycle and configuration for an early 21st century subsonic turbofan incorporating all composite materials. The advanced engine is evaluated relative to a current technology baseline engine in terms of its potential fuel savings for an intercontinental quadjet having a design range of 5500 nmi and a payload of 500 passengers. The resultant near optimum, uncooled, two-spool, advanced engine has an overall pressure ratio of 87, a bypass ratio of 18, a geared fan, and a turbine rotor inlet temperature of 3085 R. Improvements result in a 33-percent fuel saving for the specified misssion. Various advanced composite materials are used throughout the engine. For example, advanced polymer composite materials are used for the fan and the low pressure compressor (LPC).

  7. Advanced planetary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Results of planetary advanced studies and planning support are summarized. The scope of analyses includes cost estimation research, planetary mission performance, penetrator advanced studies, Mercury mission transport requirements, definition of super solar electric propulsion/solar sail mission discriminators, and advanced planning activities.

  8. Advances in forefoot trauma.

    PubMed

    Clements, J Randolph; Schopf, Robert

    2013-07-01

    Forefoot traumas, particularly involving the metatarsals, are commonly occurring injuries. There have been several advances in management of these injuries. These advances include updates in operative technique, internal fixation options, plating constructs, and external fixation. In addition, the advances of soft tissue management have improved outcomes. This article outlines these injuries and provides an update on techniques, principles, and understanding of managing forefoot trauma.

  9. Electrochemical carbon dioxide concentrator advanced technology tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, J. J.; Schubert, F. H.; Hallick, T. M.; Woods, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    Technology advancement studies are reported on the basic electrochemical CO2 removal process to provide a basis for the design of the next generation cell, module and subsystem hardware. An Advanced Electrochemical Depolarized Concentrator Module (AEDCM) is developed that has the characteristics of low weight, low volume, high CO2, removal, good electrical performance and low process air pressure drop. Component weight and noise reduction for the hardware of a six man capacity CO2 collection subsystem was developed for the air revitalization group of the Space Station Prototype (SSP).

  10. Computational analysis of aircraft pressure relief doors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schott, Tyler

    Modern trends in commercial aircraft design have sought to improve fuel efficiency while reducing emissions by operating at higher pressures and temperatures than ever before. Consequently, greater demands are placed on the auxiliary bleed air systems used for a multitude of aircraft operations. The increased role of bleed air systems poses significant challenges for the pressure relief system to ensure the safe and reliable operation of the aircraft. The core compartment pressure relief door (PRD) is an essential component of the pressure relief system which functions to relieve internal pressure in the core casing of a high-bypass turbofan engine during a burst duct over-pressurization event. The successful modeling and analysis of a burst duct event are imperative to the design and development of PRD's to ensure that they will meet the increased demands placed on the pressure relief system. Leveraging high-performance computing coupled with advances in computational analysis, this thesis focuses on a comprehensive computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study to characterize turbulent flow dynamics and quantify the performance of a core compartment PRD across a range of operating conditions and geometric configurations. The CFD analysis was based on a compressible, steady-state, three-dimensional, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes approach. Simulations were analyzed, and results show that variations in freestream conditions, plenum environment, and geometric configurations have a non-linear impact on the discharge, moment, thrust, and surface temperature characteristics. The CFD study revealed that the underlying physics for this behavior is explained by the interaction of vortices, jets, and shockwaves. This thesis research is innovative and provides a comprehensive and detailed analysis of existing and novel PRD geometries over a range of realistic operating conditions representative of a burst duct over-pressurization event. Further, the study provides aircraft

  11. ASDA - Advanced Suit Design Analyzer computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Conger, Bruce C.; Iovine, John V.; Chang, Chi-Min

    1992-01-01

    An ASDA model developed to evaluate the heat and mass transfer characteristics of advanced pressurized suit design concepts for low pressure or vacuum planetary applications is presented. The model is based on a generalized 3-layer suit that uses the Systems Integrated Numerical Differencing Analyzer '85 in conjunction with a 41-node FORTRAN routine. The latter simulates the transient heat transfer and respiratory processes of a human body in a suited environment. The user options for the suit encompass a liquid cooled garment, a removable jacket, a CO2/H2O permeable layer, and a phase change layer.

  12. Magnetic and Superconducting Materials at High Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Struzhkin, Viktor V.

    2015-03-24

    transitions from magnetic to nonmagnetic phases in a broad pressure-temperature range; using X-ray methods including the newly developed RIXS high-pressure technique to explore pressure-tuned electronic excitations in strongly correlated 3d-materials; and advancing transport and magnetic techniques for measurements on small samples at very high pressures in a wide temperature range, with the application of focused ion beam technology and photolithography tailored to the design of microcircuits down to a nanoscale size, thus expanding the horizon in the search for novel physical phenomena at ultrahigh pressures. Apply new optical magnetic sensing techniques with NV- centers in diamond to detect superconductivity and magnetic transitions with unprecedented spatial resolution.

  13. Session: CSP Advanced Systems -- Advanced Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Mehos, M.

    2008-04-01

    The project description is: (1) it supports crosscutting activities, e.g. advanced optical materials, that aren't tied to a single CSP technology and (2) it supports the 'incubation' of new concepts in preliminary stages of investigation.

  14. METC/3M Cooperative Agreement CRADA 94-024 high temperature high pressure filter materials exposure test program. Volume 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    In conjunction with shakedown, operation, and desulfurization testing at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) 10 in. Fluid Bed Gasification and Cleanup facility, a series of tests was completed in cooperation with the Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company (3M). This cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between METC and 3M was to evaluate exposure of 3M SICONEX{trademark} fiber-reinforced ceramic and NEXTEL{trademark} 312 and 550 ceramic fabric materials to a gasifying environment at high temperatures (1000--1100{degree}F) and high pressure (300 psia). Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company (3M) provided two 60 mm I.D. {times} 0.5 m SICONEX{trademark} spools and one each of the NEXTEL{trademark} 312 and 550 ceramic fabrics for exposure to coal gas from the METC gasifier. METC installed the materials in a vessel existing in the METC Cleanup Facility and provided process data in exchange for ceramic filter and ash/char characterization. Details of the CRADA are found in CRADA 94-024. This report contains METC`s contribution to CRADA 94-024. Four gasifier runs were conducted over a five month period to accumulate 483 hours of operation. During this time, 2 LayCer{trademark} 70/3 filters were used for filtering the coal gas while the SICONEX{trademark} and NEXTEL{trademark} were exposed along side of the filters. During one 89 hour test, one Laycer{trademark} 70/3 candle was installed with a 3M ceramic composite filter. The face velocity through the candles was maintained nominally at 2.5 ft/min throughout the testing.

  15. A high-pressure NMR probe for aqueous geochemistry.

    PubMed

    Pautler, Brent G; Colla, Christopher A; Johnson, Rene L; Klavins, Peter; Harley, Stephen J; Ohlin, C André; Sverjensky, Dimitri A; Walton, Jeffrey H; Casey, William H

    2014-09-08

    A non-magnetic piston-cylinder pressure cell is presented for solution-state NMR spectroscopy at geochemical pressures. The probe has been calibrated up to 20 kbar using in situ ruby fluorescence and allows for the measurement of pressure dependencies of a wide variety of NMR-active nuclei with as little as 10 μL of sample in a microcoil. Initial (11)B NMR spectroscopy of the H3BO3-catechol equilibria reveals a large pressure-driven exchange rate and a negative pressure-dependent activation volume, reflecting increased solvation and electrostriction upon boron-catecholate formation. The inexpensive probe design doubles the current pressure range available for solution NMR spectroscopy and is particularly important to advance the field of aqueous geochemistry.

  16. Pressurization and expulsion of a flightweight liquid hydrogen tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dresar, N. T.; Stochl, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for pressurization and expulsion of a flightweight 4.89 cu m liquid hydrogen storage tank under normal gravity conditions. Pressurization and expulsion times were parametrically varied to study the effects of longer transfer times expected in future space flight applications. It was found that the increase in pressurant consumption with increased operational time is significant at shorter pressurization or expulsion durations and diminishes as the duration lengthens. Gas-to-wall heat transfer in the ullage was the dominant mode of energy exchange, with more than 50 percent of the pressurant energy being lost to tank wall heating in expulsions and the long duration pressurizations. Advanced data analysis will require a multidimensional approach combined with improved measurement capabilities of liquid-vapor interfacial transport phenomena.

  17. Pressurization and expulsion of a flightweight liquid hydrogen tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandresar, N. T.; Stochl, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for pressurization and expulsion of a flight-weight 4.89 cu m liquid hydrogen storage tank under normal gravity conditions. Pressurization and expulsion times are parametrically varied to study the effects of longer transfer times expected in future space flight applications. It is found that the increase in pressurant consumption with increased operational time is significant at shorter pressurization or expulsion durations and diminishes as the duration lengthens. Gas-to-wall heat transfer in the ullage is the dominant mode of energy exchange, with more than 50 percent of the pressurant energy being lost to tank wall heating in expulsions and the long duration pressurizations. Advanced data analysis will require a multidimensional approach combined with improved measurement capabilities of liquid-vapor interfacial transport phenomena.

  18. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect

    Joesph Fadok

    2008-01-01

    advanced hydrogen turbine that meets the aggressive targets set forth for the advanced hydrogen turbine, including increased rotor inlet temperature (RIT), lower total cooling and leakage air (TCLA) flow, higher pressure ratio, and higher mass flow through the turbine compared to the baseline. Maintaining efficiency with high mass flow Syngas combustion is achieved using a large high AN2 blade 4, which has been identified as a significant advancement beyond the current state-of-the-art. Preliminary results showed feasibility of a rotor system capable of increased power output and operating conditions above the baseline. In addition, several concepts were developed for casing components to address higher operating conditions. Rare earth modified bond coat for the purpose of reducing oxidation and TBC spallation demonstrated an increase in TBC spallation life of almost 40%. The results from Phase 1 identified two TBC compositions which satisfy the thermal conductivity requirements and have demonstrated phase stability up to temperatures of 1850 C. The potential to join alloys using a bonding process has been demonstrated and initial HVOF spray deposition trials were promising. The qualitative ranking of alloys and coatings in environmental conditions was also performed using isothermal tests where significant variations in alloy degradation were observed as a function of gas composition. Initial basic system configuration schematics and working system descriptions have been produced to define key boundary data and support estimation of costs. Review of existing materials in use for hydrogen transportation show benefits or tradeoffs for materials that could be used in this type of applications. Hydrogen safety will become a larger risk than when using natural gas fuel as the work done to date in other areas has shown direct implications for this type of use. Studies were conducted which showed reduced CO{sub 2} and NOx emissions with increased plant efficiency. An approach to

  19. Recent Advances in Lighting Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapatovich, Walter P.

    2004-10-01

    Lighting is a global industry supplying a wide array of devices and systems that emit light ranging from incandescent lamps to light emitting diodes to electric discharge lamps. Electric discharge lamps are the most familiar plasma devices to most people. This work focuses on plasma light sources, some advances in this area and recent trends. Plasma light sources fall into two broad categories, namely low pressure and high pressure. The low-pressure lamps operate in the range of 40 to 500 Pa while the high-pressure lamps operate in the range of 0.1 to 15 MPa. The corresponding electron temperatures are about 1eV and 0.5 eV for the low and high-pressure lamps respectively. High-pressure lamps are treated under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium wherein the gas temperature is equilibrated with the electron temperature. They are often called high intensity discharge lamps because of their intrinsically high radiance. Within these two broad categories are many subgroups, perhaps the most important being mercury and non-mercury containing lamps. An example of a low pressure, mercury-containing lamp is the ubiquitous fluorescent lamp. Attempts to improve the efficiency of these lamps center around inductive excitation techniques and two-photon phosphor development. The plasma research on mercury-free low-pressure lamps is focused on finding substitutes for a mercury-rare gas discharge. Several ultraviolet emitting candidates have been explored which emit both UV and visible. Longer wavelength UV is of interest because of the parallel development of phosphors mated with LED excitation wavelengths around 380nm. Several examples will be discussed. There have been major advances in high intensity discharge lamps with and without mercury. Mercury containing metal halide lamps are now being fabricated from translucent ceramic envelopes instead of the conventional vitreous silica. The higher temperature tolerant envelope materials permit using discharges in

  20. Wavenumber-frequency Spectra of Pressure Fluctuations Measured via Fast Response Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Roozeboom, N. H.; Ross, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    The recent advancement in fast-response Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PSP) allows time-resolved measurements of unsteady pressure fluctuations from a dense grid of spatial points on a wind tunnel model. This capability allows for direct calculations of the wavenumber-frequency (k-?) spectrum of pressure fluctuations. Such data, useful for the vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, are difficult to obtain otherwise. For the present work, time histories of pressure fluctuations on a flat plate subjected to vortex shedding from a rectangular bluff-body were measured using PSP. The light intensity levels in the photographic images were then converted to instantaneous pressure histories by applying calibration constants, which were calculated from a few dynamic pressure sensors placed at selective points on the plate. Fourier transform of the time-histories from a large number of spatial points provided k-? spectra for pressure fluctuations. The data provides first glimpse into the possibility of creating detailed forcing functions for vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, albeit for a limited frequency range.

  1. Pressurizer tank upper support

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Tod H.; Ott, Howard L.

    1994-01-01

    A pressurizer tank in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is mounted between structural walls of the reactor on a substructure of the reactor, the tank extending upwardly from the substructure. For bearing lateral loads such as seismic shocks, a girder substantially encircles the pressurizer tank at a space above the substructure and is coupled to the structural walls via opposed sway struts. Each sway strut is attached at one end to the girder and at an opposite end to one of the structural walls, and the sway struts are oriented substantially horizontally in pairs aligned substantially along tangents to the wall of the circular tank. Preferably, eight sway struts attach to the girder at 90.degree. intervals. A compartment encloses the pressurizer tank and forms the structural wall. The sway struts attach to corners of the compartment for maximum stiffness and load bearing capacity. A valve support frame carrying the relief/discharge piping and valves of an automatic depressurization arrangement is fixed to the girder, whereby lateral loads on the relief/discharge piping are coupled directly to the compartment rather than through any portion of the pressurizer tank. Thermal insulation for the valve support frame prevents thermal loading of the piping and valves. The girder is shimmed to define a gap for reducing thermal transfer, and the girder is free to move vertically relative to the compartment walls, for accommodating dimensional variation of the pressurizer tank with changes in temperature and pressure.

  2. Pressurizer tank upper support

    DOEpatents

    Baker, T.H.; Ott, H.L.

    1994-01-11

    A pressurizer tank in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is mounted between structural walls of the reactor on a substructure of the reactor, the tank extending upwardly from the substructure. For bearing lateral loads such as seismic shocks, a girder substantially encircles the pressurizer tank at a space above the substructure and is coupled to the structural walls via opposed sway struts. Each sway strut is attached at one end to the girder and at an opposite end to one of the structural walls, and the sway struts are oriented substantially horizontally in pairs aligned substantially along tangents to the wall of the circular tank. Preferably, eight sway struts attach to the girder at 90[degree] intervals. A compartment encloses the pressurizer tank and forms the structural wall. The sway struts attach to corners of the compartment for maximum stiffness and load bearing capacity. A valve support frame carrying the relief/discharge piping and valves of an automatic depressurization arrangement is fixed to the girder, whereby lateral loads on the relief/discharge piping are coupled directly to the compartment rather than through any portion of the pressurizer tank. Thermal insulation for the valve support frame prevents thermal loading of the piping and valves. The girder is shimmed to define a gap for reducing thermal transfer, and the girder is free to move vertically relative to the compartment walls, for accommodating dimensional variation of the pressurizer tank with changes in temperature and pressure. 10 figures.

  3. New developments in high pressure x-ray spectroscopy beamline at High Pressure Collaborative Access Team

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Y. M. Chow, P.; Boman, G.; Bai, L. G.; Rod, E.; Bommannavar, A.; Kenney-Benson, C.; Sinogeikin, S.; Shen, G. Y.

    2015-07-15

    The 16 ID-D (Insertion Device - D station) beamline of the High Pressure Collaborative Access Team at the Advanced Photon Source is dedicated to high pressure research using X-ray spectroscopy techniques typically integrated with diamond anvil cells. The beamline provides X-rays of 4.5-37 keV, and current available techniques include X-ray emission spectroscopy, inelastic X-ray scattering, and nuclear resonant scattering. The recent developments include a canted undulator upgrade, 17-element analyzer array for inelastic X-ray scattering, and an emission spectrometer using a polycapillary half-lens. Recent development projects and future prospects are also discussed.

  4. Large-Volume High-Pressure Mineral Physics in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebermann, Robert C.; Prewitt, Charles T.; Weidner, Donald J.

    American high-pressure research with large sample volumes developed rapidly in the 1950s during the race to produce synthetic diamonds. At that time the piston cylinder, girdle (or belt), and tetrahedral anvil devices were invented. However, this development essentially stopped in the late 1950s, and while the diamond anvil cell has been used extensively in the United States with spectacular success for high-pressure experiments in small sample volumes, most of the significant technological advances in large-volume devices have taken place in Japan. Over the past 25 years, these technical advances have enabled a fourfold increase in pressure, with many important investigations of the chemical and physical properties of materials synthesized at high temperatures and pressures that cannot be duplicated with any apparatus currently available in the United States.

  5. [Measuring blood pressure].

    PubMed

    Estrada Reventos, Dolors; Pujol Navarro, Ester

    2008-09-01

    High blood pressure is one of the main factors which lead to cardiovascular cerebral-vascular and kidney diseases; therefore, nursing professionals should have enough basic knowledge to enable them to carry out a precocious diagnosis and correct follow-up procedures. Although students in nursing schools are taught how to correctly measure blood pressure, often this teaching does not meet the recommendations provided by different national and international guidelines. Thus it is important to know how to use the correct methodology to measure blood pressure.

  6. Atmospheric Pressure During Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This figure shows the variation with time of pressure (dots) measured by the Pathfinder MET instrument during the landing period shown in image PIA00797. The two diamonds indicate the times of bridal cutting and 1st impact. The overall trend in the data is of pressure increasing with time. This is almost certainly due to the lander rolling downhill by roughly 10 m. The spacing of the horizontal dotted lines indicates the pressure change expected from 10 m changes in altitude. Bounces may also be visible in the data.

  7. SENSITIVE PRESSURE GAUGE

    DOEpatents

    Ball, W.P.

    1961-01-01

    An electron multiplier device is described. It has a plurality of dynodes between an anode and cathode arranged to measure pressure, temperature, or other environmental physical conditions that proportionately iinfuences the quantity of gas molecules between the dynodes. The output current of the device is influenced by the reduction in electron multiplication at the dynodes due to energy reducing collisions of the electrons with the gas molecules between the dynodes. More particularly, the current is inversely proportional to the quantity of gas molecules, viz., the gas pressure. The device is, hence, extremely sensitive to low pressures.

  8. Planets under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanloz, Raymond

    2009-04-01

    Deep inside the planet Jupiter, diamonds hail down from hydrocarbon clouds as intense atmospheric pressures break methane into its atomic components. Further in - but still only 15% of the way to the planet's centre - the pressure reaches a million times that of the Earth's atmosphere. This is enough to transform hydrogen from the transparent, insulating gas we know at our planet's surface into a metallic fluid that sustains Jupiter's huge magnetic field. Even diamond is not forever: at pressures of 8-10 million atmospheres it is transformed into an opaque, metallic form of carbon, rather than the familiar transparent crystal.

  9. Magnetism In 3d Transition Metals at High Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Iota, V

    2006-02-09

    This research project examined the changes in electronic and magnetic properties of transition metals and oxides under applied pressures, focusing on complex relationship between magnetism and phase stability in these correlated electron systems. As part of this LDRD project, we developed new measurement techniques and adapted synchrotron-based electronic and magnetic measurements for use in the diamond anvil cell. We have performed state-of-the-art X-ray spectroscopy experiments at the dedicated high-pressure beamline HP-CAT (Sector 16 Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory), maintained in collaboration with of University of Nevada, Las Vegas and Geophysical Laboratory of The Carnegie Institution of Washington. Using these advanced measurements, we determined the evolution of the magnetic order in the ferromagnetic 3d transition metals (Fe, Co and Ni) under pressure, and found that at high densities, 3d band broadening results in diminished long range magnetic coupling. Our experiments have allowed us to paint a unified picture of the effects of pressure on the evolution of magnetic spin in 3d electron systems. The technical and scientific advances made during this LDRD project have been reported at a number of scientific meetings and conferences, and have been submitted for publication in technical journals. Both the technical advances and the physical understanding of correlated systems derived from this LDRD are being applied to research on the 4f and 5f electron systems under pressure.

  10. The development of an integrated multistaged fluid-bed retorting process. Final report, September 1990--August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, S.D.; Taulbee, D.N.; Stehn, J.L.; Vego, A.; Robl, T.L.

    1995-02-01

    This summarizes the development of the KENTORT II retorting process, which includes integral fluidized bed zones for pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion of oil shale. Purpose was to design and test the process at the 50-lb/hr scale. The program included bench- scale studies of coking and cracking reactions of shale oil vapors over processed shale particles to address issues of scaleup associated with solid-recycle retorting. The bench-scale studies showed that higher amounts of carbon coverage reduce the rate of subsequent carbon deposition by shale oil vapors onto processed shale particles; however carbon-covered materials were also active in terms of cracking and coking. Main focus was the 50-lb/hr KENTORT II PDU. Cold-flow modeling and shakedown were done before the PDU was made ready for operation. Seven mass-balanced, steady-state runs were completed within the window of design operating conditions. Goals were achieved: shale feedrate, run duration (10 hr), shale recirculation rates (4:1 to pyrolyzer and 10:1 to combustor), bed temperatures (pyrolyzer 530{degree}C, gasifier 750{degree}C, combustor 830{degree}C), and general operating stability. Highest oil yields (up to 109% of Fischer assay) were achieved for runs lasting {ge} 10 hours. High C content of the solids used for heat transfer to the pyrolysis zone contributed to the enhanced oil yield achieved.

  11. The development of an integrated multistaged fluid bed retorting process. Annual report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, S.; Taulbee, D.; Vego, A.; Stehn, J.; Fei, Y.; Robl, T.; Derbyshire, F.

    1993-11-01

    This report summarizes the progress made on the development of an integrated multistage fluidized bed retorting process (KENTORT II) during the period of October 1, 1992 through September 30, 1993 under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC27286 with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center, US Department of Energy. The KENTORT II process includes integral fluidized bed zones for pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion of the oil shale. The purpose of this program is to design and test the KENTORT II process at the 50-lb/hr scale. The PDU was assembled, instrumented and tested during this fiscal year. Along with the major activity of commissioning the 50-lb/hr retort, work was also completed in other areas. Basic studies of the cracking and coking kinetics of model compounds in a fixed bed reactor were continued. Additionally, as part of the effort to investigate niche market applications for KENTORT II-derived products, a study of the synthesis of carbon fibers from the heavy fraction of KENTORT II shale oil was initiated.

  12. The development of an integrated multistaged fluid bed retorting process. Technical report, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Taulbee, D.; Fei, Y.; Carter, S.

    1993-01-01

    The KENTORT II process includes integral fluidized bed zones for pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion of the oil shale. The purpose of this program is to design and test the KENTORT II process at the 50-lb/hr scale. Along with the major activity of assembling the components of the 50-lb/hr retort, work was also completed in other areas this quarter. Basic studies of the cracking and coking kinetics of model compounds in a fixed bed reactor were continued. Additionally, as part of the effort to investigate niche market applications for KENTORT II-derived products, a study of the synthesis of carbon fibers from the heavy fraction of KENTORT II shale oil was initiated.

  13. PAT-Based Control of Fluid Bed Coating Process Using NIR Spectroscopy to Monitor the Cellulose Coating on Pharmaceutical Pellets.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Venkata Ramana; Deshpande, Rucha S; Syed, Moinuddin R; Deoghare, Piyush; Singh, Dharamvir; Wakte, Pravin S

    2016-12-19

    Current endeavor was aimed towards monitoring percent weight build-up during functional coating process on drug-layered pellets. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is an emerging process analytical technology (PAT) tool which was employed here within quality by design (QbD) framework. Samples were withdrawn after spraying every 15-Kg cellulosic coating material during Wurster coating process of drug-loaded pellets. NIR spectra of these samples were acquired using cup spinner assembly of Thermoscientific Antaris II, followed by multivariate analysis using partial least squares (PLS) calibration model. PLS model was built by selecting various absorption regions of NIR spectra for Ethyl cellulose, drug and correlating the absorption values with actual percent weight build up determined by HPLC. The spectral regions of 8971.04 to 8250.77 cm(-1), 7515.24 to 7108.33 cm(-1), and 5257.00 to 5098.87 cm(-1) were found to be specific to cellulose, where as the spectral region of 6004.45 to 5844.14 cm(-1)was found to be specific to drug. The final model gave superb correlation co-efficient value of 0.9994 for calibration and 0.9984 for validation with low root mean square of error (RMSE) values of 0.147 for calibration and 0.371 for validation using 6 factors. The developed correlation between the NIR spectra and cellulose content is useful in precise at-line prediction of functional coat value and can be used for monitoring the Wurster coating process.

  14. Granular activated carbon adsorption and fluid-bed reactivation at Manchester, New Hampshire. Final report Mar 77-Apr 82

    SciTech Connect

    Kittredge, D.; Beaurivage, R.; Paris, D.

    1983-10-01

    Treatment performances of virgin and reactivated GAC were evaluated during three reactivation-exhaustion cycles by measuring total organic carbon (TOC), trihalomethanes (THM), and trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP). GAC adsorptive capacity was measured using traditional test parameters including iodine number, molasses decolorizing index, BET, and pore-size distribution. The GAC was reactivated on-site by a 500 lb/hr fluidized-bed unit. Results of this study demonstrated that onsite reactivation was a cost-effective method of restoring the adsorptive properties of spent GAC. During a 10-month period, more than 1.8 million lb of GAC was reactivated at a total cost of less than 22 cents/lb as compared with a delivered cost of 61.5 cents/lb for virgin GAC. The average total carbon loss resulting from transportation and reactivation was 11.5% by volume.

  15. The development of an integrated multistage fluid bed retorting process. [Kentort II process--50-lb/hr

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, S.; Stehn, J.; Vego, A.; Taulbee, D.

    1992-05-01

    This report summarizes the progress made on the development of an integrated multistage fluidized bed retorting process (KENTORT II) during the period of January 1, 1992 through March 31, 1992. The KENTORT II process includes integral fluidized bed zones for pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion of the oil shale. The purpose of this program is to design and test the KENTORT II process at the 50-lb/hr scale. The design of the 50-lb/hr KENTORT II retort was completed and fabrication is ready to begin. Data from the cold-flow model of the system and operating experience from the 5-lb/hr unit were used as the basis for the design. In another aspect of the program, a study of the cracking and coking kinetics of shale oil vapors was continued. A mathematical model was implemented to characterize the important mass transfer effects of the system. This model will be eventually broadened to become a general fluidized bed coking model. In addition, experiments were performed to examine the effects of surface area, initial carbon content and steam treatment on coking activity. From the data that has been collected to-date, it appears that the coking activity of the tested substrates can be explained in terms of porosity (surface area and pore volume) and the initial carbon content of the solid.

  16. The development of an integrated multistage fluid bed retorting process. Technical report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, S.; Stehn, J.; Vego, A.; Taulbee, D.

    1992-05-01

    This report summarizes the progress made on the development of an integrated multistage fluidized bed retorting process (KENTORT II) during the period of January 1, 1992 through March 31, 1992. The KENTORT II process includes integral fluidized bed zones for pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion of the oil shale. The purpose of this program is to design and test the KENTORT II process at the 50-lb/hr scale. The design of the 50-lb/hr KENTORT II retort was completed and fabrication is ready to begin. Data from the cold-flow model of the system and operating experience from the 5-lb/hr unit were used as the basis for the design. In another aspect of the program, a study of the cracking and coking kinetics of shale oil vapors was continued. A mathematical model was implemented to characterize the important mass transfer effects of the system. This model will be eventually broadened to become a general fluidized bed coking model. In addition, experiments were performed to examine the effects of surface area, initial carbon content and steam treatment on coking activity. From the data that has been collected to-date, it appears that the coking activity of the tested substrates can be explained in terms of porosity (surface area and pore volume) and the initial carbon content of the solid.

  17. Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis (anticipated pubicstion date - mid-2009) Purpose A pressure ulcer, also known as a pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, or bedsore, is defined as a localized injury to the skin/and or underlying tissue occurring most often over a bony prominence and caused by pressure, shear, or friction, alone or in combination. (1) Those at risk for developing pressure ulcers include the elderly and critically ill as well as persons with neurological impairments and those who suffer conditions associated with immobility. Pressure ulcers are graded or staged with a 4-point classification system denoting severity. Stage I represents the beginnings of a pressure ulcer and stage IV, the severest grade, consists of full thickness tissue loss with exposed bone, tendon, and or muscle. (1) In a 2004 survey of Canadian health care settings, Woodbury and Houghton (2) estimated that the prevalence of pressure ulcers at a stage 1 or greater in Ontario ranged between 13.1% and 53% with nonacute health care settings having the highest prevalence rate (Table 1). Executive Summary Table 1: Prevalence of Pressure Ulcers* Setting Canadian Prevalence,% (95% CI) Ontario Prevalence,Range % (n) Acute care 25 (23.8–26.3) 23.9–29.7 (3418) Nonacute care† 30 (29.3–31.4) 30.0–53.3 (1165) Community care 15 (13.4–16.8) 13.2 (91) Mixed health care‡ 22 (20.9

  18. Development of the Low-Pressure Hydride/Dehydride Process

    SciTech Connect

    Rueben L. Gutierrez

    2001-04-01

    The low-pressure hydride/dehydride process was developed from the need to recover thin-film coatings of plutonium metal from the inner walls of an isotope separation chamber located at Los Alamos and to improve the safety operation of a hydride recovery process using hydrogen at a pressure of 0.7 atm at Rocky Flats. This process is now the heart of the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) project.

  19. Introduction to High-Pressure Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dera, Przemyslaw

    To a common person pressure is just one of the parameters that describe a thermodynamic state. We all hear about it in everyday weather forecasts, and most of us do not associate it with anything particularly unique. Probably the most intuitive idea of the effect of high-pressure comes from movies, where submarine sinking to the bottom of the ocean is gradually crushed by the surrounding water, until its hull implodes. Why, then hundreds of scientists throughout the world spent their lifelong careers studying high-pressure phenomena? Despite all the developments in experimental technologies and instrumentation, modern scientist has very few tools that allow him or her to "grab" two atoms and bring them, in a very controllable way, closer together. Being able to achieve this task means the ability to directly probe interatomic interaction potentials and can cause transformations as dramatic as turning of a common gas into solid metal. Before the reader delves into more advanced topics described later in this book, this introductory chapter aims to explain several elementary, but extremely important concepts in high-pressure science. We will start with a brief discussion of laboratory devices used to produce pressure, address the issue of hydrostaticity, elastic and plastic compression, and will conclude with a short discussion of unique effects of anisotropic stress.

  20. Computational Analyses of Pressurization in Cryogenic Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, Vineet; Hosangadi, Ashvin; Mattick, Stephen; Lee, Chun P.; Field, Robert E.; Ryan, Harry

    2008-01-01

    A) Advanced Gas/Liquid Framework with Real Fluids Property Routines: I. A multi-fluid formulation in the preconditioned CRUNCH CFD(Registered TradeMark) code developed where a mixture of liquid and gases can be specified: a) Various options for Equation of state specification available (from simplified ideal fluid mixtures, to real fluid EOS such as SRK or BWR models). b) Vaporization of liquids driven by pressure value relative to vapor pressure and combustion of vapors allowed. c) Extensive validation has been undertaken. II. Currently working on developing primary break-up models and surface tension effects for more rigorous phase-change modeling and interfacial dynamics B) Framework Applied to Run-time Tanks at Ground Test Facilities C) Framework Used For J-2 Upper Stage Tank Modeling: 1) NASA MSFC tank pressurization: a) Hydrogen and oxygen tank pre-press, repress and draining being modeled at NASA MSFC. 2) NASA AMES tank safety effort a) liquid hydrogen and oxygen are separated by a baffle in the J-2 tank. We are modeling pressure rise and possible combustion if a hole develops in the baffle and liquid hydrogen leaks into the oxygen tank. Tank pressure rise rates simulated and risk of combustion evaluated.

  1. Blood pressure in head‐injured patients

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Patrick; Gregson, Barbara A; Piper, Ian; Citerio, Giuseppe; Mendelow, A David; Chambers, Iain R

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine the statistical characteristics of blood pressure (BP) readings from a large number of head‐injured patients. Methods The BrainIT group has collected high time‐resolution physiological and clinical data from head‐injured patients who require intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring. The statistical features of this dataset of BP measurements with time resolution of 1 min from 200 patients is examined. The distributions of BP measurements and their relationship with simultaneous ICP measurements are described. Results The distributions of mean, systolic and diastolic readings are close to normal with modest skewing towards higher values. There is a trend towards an increase in blood pressure with advancing age, but this is not significant. Simultaneous blood pressure and ICP values suggest a triphasic relationship with a BP rising at 0.28 mm Hg/mm Hg of ICP, for ICP up to 32 mm Hg, and 0.9 mm Hg/mm Hg of ICP for ICP from 33 to 55 mm Hg, and falling sharply with rising ICP for ICP >55 mm Hg. Conclusions Patients with head injury appear to have a near normal distribution of blood pressure readings that are skewed towards higher values. The relationship between BP and ICP may be triphasic. PMID:17138594

  2. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the results of observational studies further strengthened the causal relationship between high blood pressure and CVD, and ... disease, and those who have additional known risk factors for CVD. SPRINT will also provide information on ...

  3. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... already been diagnosed with high blood pressure. Try yoga and meditation. Yoga and meditation not only can strengthen your body ... Accessed Sept. 21, 2015. Hu B, et al. Effects of psychological stress on hypertension in middle-aged ...

  4. Low Differential Pressure Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, Stephen J. (Inventor); Deyoe, Richard T. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for evaluating low differential pressure transducers includes a pressure generator in the form of a piston-cylinder assembly having a piston that may be manually positioned precisely within the cylinder to change the volume and thus the pressure at respective sides of the piston. At one side of the piston the cylinder communicates with a first chamber and at the other side of the piston the cylinder communicates with a second chamber, the first and second chambers being formed within a common tank by a partition wall. The chambers each communicate with the transducer to be evaluated and a standard pre-calibrated transducer the transducers being connected fluidly in parallel so that a pressure differential between air in the two chambers resulting from movement of the piston within the cylinder is communicated to both the transducer to be evaluated and the standard transducer, and the outputs of the transducers is observed and recorded.

  5. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neuropathy Foot Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Stroke Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic Nonketotic Syndrome (HHNS) Gastroparesis Heart Disease Mental Health Pregnancy Related Conditions donate en -- Make Your Donation Count - ...

  6. Preventing pressure ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin in this area. If you use a Wheelchair Make sure your wheelchair is the right size for you. Have your ... physical therapist to check how you fit your wheelchair. If you feel pressure anywhere, have your doctor ...

  7. Nonlinear optomechanical pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Claudio; Boyd, Robert

    2014-03-01

    A transparent material exhibits ultrafast optical nonlinearity and is subject to optical pressure if irradiated by a laser beam. However, the effect of nonlinearity on optical pressure is often overlooked, even if a nonlinear optical pressure may be potentially employed in many applications, such as optical manipulation, biophysics, cavity optomechanics, quantum optics, and optical tractors, and is relevant in fundamental problems such as the Abraham-Minkoswky dilemma or the Casimir effect. Here, we show that an ultrafast nonlinear polarization gives indeed a contribution to the optical pressure that also is negative in certain spectral ranges; the theoretical analysis is confirmed by first-principles simulations. An order-of-magnitude estimate shows that the effect can be observable by measuring the deflection of a membrane made by graphene.

  8. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Practice healthy coping techniques, such as muscle relaxation, deep breathing or meditation. Getting regular physical activity and ... blood pressure at home. Practice relaxation or slow, deep breathing. Practice taking deep, slow breaths to help ...

  9. On Time Performance Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Linda; Wichner, David; Jakey, Abegael

    2013-01-01

    Within many operations, the pressures for on-time performance are high. Each month, on-time statistics are reported to the Department of Transportation and made public. There is a natural tendency for employees under pressure to do their best to meet these objectives. As a result, pressure to get the job done within the allotted time may cause personnel to deviate from procedures and policies. Additionally, inadequate or unavailable resources may drive employees to work around standard processes that are seen as barriers. However, bypassing practices to enable on-time performance may affect more than the statistics. ASRS reports often highlight on-time performance pressures which may result in impact across all workgroups in an attempt to achieve on-time performance. Reporters often provide in-depth insights into their experiences which can be used by industry to identify and focus on the implementation of systemic fixes.

  10. Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the brain that affects brain function. However, the pressure of the fluid is usually ... shunt that does not work well) Loss of brain function ( dementia ) that becomes worse over time Injury from ...

  11. Pressurized Vessel Slurry Pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Pound, C.R.

    2001-09-17

    This report summarizes testing of an alternate ''pressurized vessel slurry pumping'' apparatus. The principle is similar to rural domestic water systems and ''acid eggs'' used in chemical laboratories in that material is extruded by displacement with compressed air.

  12. Internal pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dowalo, James A [Blackfoot, ID

    2010-03-16

    A pressure sensor for sensing changes in pressure in an enclosed vessel may include a first chamber having at least one expandable section therein that allows that first chamber to change in length. A reference member mounted within the first chamber moves as a result of changes in length of the first chamber. A second chamber having an expandable section therein allows the second chamber to change in length in response to changes in pressure in the enclosed vessel. The second chamber is operatively associated with the first chamber so that changes in length of the second chamber result in changes in length of the first chamber. A sensor operatively associated with the reference member detects changes in position of the reference member. Changes in position of the reference member are related to changes in pressure in the enclosed vessel.

  13. Capacitance pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Eaton, William P.; Staple, Bevan D.; Smith, James H.

    2000-01-01

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) capacitance pressure sensor integrated with electronic circuitry on a common substrate and a method for forming such a device are disclosed. The MEM capacitance pressure sensor includes a capacitance pressure sensor formed at least partially in a cavity etched below the surface of a silicon substrate and adjacent circuitry (CMOS, BiCMOS, or bipolar circuitry) formed on the substrate. By forming the capacitance pressure sensor in the cavity, the substrate can be planarized (e.g. by chemical-mechanical polishing) so that a standard set of integrated circuit processing steps can be used to form the electronic circuitry (e.g. using an aluminum or aluminum-alloy interconnect metallization).

  14. Choosing Blood Pressure Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor might first suggest diuretics, which remove excess water and sodium from your body. That decreases the amount of fluid flowing through your blood vessels, which reduces pressure on your vessel walls. There are three types of diuretics: thiazide, loop ...

  15. Gasoline Reid Vapor Pressure

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA regulates the vapor pressure of gasoline sold at retail stations during the summer ozone season to reduce evaporative emissions from gasoline that contribute to ground-level ozone and diminish the effects of ozone-related health problems.

  16. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    MedlinePlus

    ... techniques and neuroimaging, and finding improved treatments and preventions. Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus × What research is being ...

  17. Low Blood Pressure (Hypotension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alpha blockers, such as prazosin (Minipress) and labetalol Beta blockers, such as atenolol (Tenormin), propranolol (Inderal, Innopran XL, ... drugs used to treat high blood pressure — diuretics, beta blockers, calcium channel blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) ...

  18. Fluid pressure balanced seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. W. (Inventor)

    1966-01-01

    A seal which increases in effectiveness with increasing pressure is presented. The seal's functional capability throughout both static and dynamic operation makes it particularly useful for sealing ball valve ports. Other features of the seal include the ability to seal two opposed surfaces simultaneously, tolerance of small misalignments, tolerance of wide temperature ranges, ability to maintain positive sealing contact under conditions of internal or external pressurization, and ability to conform to slight irregularities in seal or surface contours.

  19. Radial pressure flange seal

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, Thomas H.; Call, Wayne R.

    1989-01-01

    This invention provides an all metal seal for vacuum or pressure vessels or systems. This invention does not use gaskets. The invention uses a flange which fits into a matching groove. Fluid pressure is applied in a chamber in the flange causing at least one of the flange walls to radially press against a side of the groove creating the seal between the flange wall and the groove side.

  20. Radial pressure flange seal

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    1989-01-24

    This invention provides an all metal seal for vacuum or pressure vessels or systems. This invention does not use gaskets. The invention uses a flange which fits into a matching groove. Fluid pressure is applied in a chamber in the flange causing at least one of the flange walls to radially press against a side of the groove creating the seal between the flange wall and the groove side. 5 figs.

  1. Pressure multiplying dispenser

    DOEpatents

    DeFord, Henry S.; Moss, Owen R.

    1986-01-01

    A pressure multiplying dispenser for delivering fluid, preferably as a spray to the atmosphere, from a source of fluid, preferably a spray bottle, is described. The dispenser includes in combination a hollow cylindrical member, a nozzle delivery tube within the cylindrical member and a hollow actuator piston slideable within the cylindrical member which acts to multiply the pressure of a squeeze applied to the spray bottle.

  2. Pressure ulcers in palliative ward patients: hyponatremia and low blood pressure as indicators of risk

    PubMed Central

    Sternal, Danuta; Wilczyński, Krzysztof; Szewieczek, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Background Prevention strategies for pressure ulcer formation remain critical in patients with an advanced illness. We analyzed factors associated with the development of pressure ulcers in patients hospitalized in a palliative care ward setting. Patients and methods This study was a retrospective analysis of 329 consecutive patients with a mean age (± standard deviation) of 70.4±11.8 years (range: 30–96 years, median 70.0 years; 55.3% women), who were admitted to the Palliative Care Department between July 2012 and May 2014. Results Patients were hospitalized for mean of 24.8±31.4 days (1–310 days, median 14 days). A total of 256 patients (77.8%) died in the ward and 73 patients (22.2%) were discharged. Two hundred and six patients (62.6%) did not develop pressure ulcers during their stay in the ward, 84 patients (25.5%) were admitted with pressure ulcers, and 39 patients (11.9%) developed pressure ulcers in the ward. Four factors assessed at admission appear to predict the development of pressure ulcers in the multivariate logistic regression model: Waterlow score (odds ratio [OR] =1.140, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.057–1.229, P=0.001), transfer from other hospital wards (OR =2.938, 95% CI =1.339–6.448, P=0.007), hemoglobin level (OR =0.814, 95% CI =0.693–0.956, P=0.012), and systolic blood pressure (OR =0.976, 95% CI =0.955–0.997, P=0.023). Five other factors assessed during hospitalization appear to be associated with pressure ulcer development: mean evening body temperature (OR =3.830, 95% CI =1.729–8.486, P=0.001), mean Waterlow score (OR =1.194, 95% CI =1.092–1.306, P<0.001), the lowest recorded sodium concentration (OR =0.880, 95% CI =0.814–0.951, P=0.001), mean systolic blood pressure (OR =0.956, 95% CI =0.929–0.984, P=0.003), and the lowest recorded hemoglobin level (OR =0.803, 95% CI =0.672–0.960, P=0.016). Conclusion Hyponatremia and low blood pressure may contribute to the formation of pressure ulcers in patients with an

  3. Pressure Core Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamarina, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates form under high fluid pressure and low temperature, and are found in permafrost, deep lakes or ocean sediments. Hydrate dissociation by depressurization and/or heating is accompanied by a multifold hydrate volume expansion and host sediments with low permeability experience massive destructuration. Proper characterization requires coring, recovery, manipulation and testing under P-T conditions within the stability field. Pressure core technology allows for the reliable characterization of hydrate bearing sediments within the stability field in order to address scientific and engineering needs, including the measurement of parameters used in hydro-thermo-mechanical analyses, and the monitoring of hydrate dissociation under controlled pressure, temperature, effective stress and chemical conditions. Inherent sampling effects remain and need to be addressed in test protocols and data interpretation. Pressure core technology has been deployed to study hydrate bearing sediments at several locations around the world. In addition to pressure core testing, a comprehensive characterization program should include sediment analysis, testing of reconstituted specimens (with and without synthetic hydrate), and in situ testing. Pressure core characterization technology can be used to study other gas-charged formations such as deep sea sediments, coal bed methane and gas shales.

  4. ECN Pressure Test

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.; /Fermilab

    1991-07-18

    This note describes: the rationale for the test pressure of the inner ECN cryostat vessel, the equipment to be used in this test, the test procedure, the status of the vessel prior to the test, the actual test results, and a schematic diagram of the testing set up and the pressure testing permit. The test, performed in the evening of July 17, 1991, was a major success. Based on a neglible pressure drop indicated on the pressure gages (1/4 psi), the vessel appeared to be structurally sound throughout the duration of the test (approx. 1.5 hrs.). No pressure increases were observed on the indicators looking at the beam tube bellows volumes. There was no indication of bubbles form the soap test on the welds and most of the fittings that were checked. There were some slight deviations in the actual procedure used. The UO filter was removed after the vessel had bled down to about 18 psig in order to speed up that aspect of the test. The rationale was that the higher velocity gas had already passed through at the higher pressures and there was no visible traces of the black uo particles. The rate of 4 psi/10 minutes seemed incredibly slow and often that time was reduced to just over half that rate. The testing personnel was allowed to stay in the pit throughout the duration of the test; this was a slight relaxation of the rules.

  5. High-pressure microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjort, K.

    2015-03-01

    When using appropriate materials and microfabrication techniques, with the small dimensions the mechanical stability of microstructured devices allows for processes at high pressures without loss in safety. The largest area of applications has been demonstrated in green chemistry and bioprocesses, where extraction, synthesis and analyses often excel at high densities and high temperatures. This is accessible through high pressures. Capillary chemistry has been used since long but, just like in low-pressure applications, there are several potential advantages in using microfluidic platforms, e.g., planar isothermal set-ups, large local variations in geometries, dense form factors, small dead volumes and precisely positioned microstructures for control of reactions, catalysis, mixing and separation. Other potential applications are in, e.g., microhydraulics, exploration, gas driven vehicles, and high-pressure science. From a review of the state-of-art and frontiers of high pressure microfluidics, the focus will be on different solutions demonstrated for microfluidic handling at high pressures and challenges that remain.

  6. Fluctuating shells under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Paulose, Jayson; Vliegenthart, Gerard A.; Gompper, Gerhard; Nelson, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal fluctuations strongly modify the large length-scale elastic behavior of cross-linked membranes, giving rise to scale-dependent elastic moduli. Whereas thermal effects in flat membranes are well understood, many natural and artificial microstructures are modeled as thin elastic shells. Shells are distinguished from flat membranes by their nonzero curvature, which provides a size-dependent coupling between the in-plane stretching modes and the out-of-plane undulations. In addition, a shell can support a pressure difference between its interior and its exterior. Little is known about the effect of thermal fluctuations on the elastic properties of shells. Here, we study the statistical mechanics of shape fluctuations in a pressurized spherical shell, using perturbation theory and Monte Carlo computer simulations, explicitly including the effects of curvature and an inward pressure. We predict novel properties of fluctuating thin shells under point indentations and pressure-induced deformations. The contribution due to thermal fluctuations increases with increasing ratio of shell radius to thickness and dominates the response when the product of this ratio and the thermal energy becomes large compared with the bending rigidity of the shell. Thermal effects are enhanced when a large uniform inward pressure acts on the shell and diverge as this pressure approaches the classical buckling transition of the shell. Our results are relevant for the elasticity and osmotic collapse of microcapsules. PMID:23150558

  7. Diaphragmatic function in advanced Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Beck, Jennifer; Weinberg, Jan; Hamnegård, Carl-Hugo; Spahija, Jadranka; Olofson, Jan; Grimby, Gunnar; Sinderby, Christer

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess diaphragm electrical activation and diaphragm strength in patients with advanced Duchenne muscular dystrophy during resting conditions. Eight patients with advanced Duchenne muscular dystrophy (age of 25 +/- 2 years) were studied during tidal breathing, maximal inspiratory capacity, maximal sniff inhalations, and magnetic stimulation of the phrenic nerves. Six patients were prescribed home mechanical ventilation (five non-invasive and one tracheotomy). Transdiaphragmatic pressure and diaphragm electrical activation were measured using an esophageal catheter. During tidal breathing (tidal volume 198 +/- 83 ml, breathing frequency 25 +/- 7), inspiratory diaphragm electrical activation was clearly detectable in seven out of eight patients and was 12 +/- 7 times above the noise level, and represented 45 +/- 19% of the maximum diaphragm electrical activation. Mean inspiratory transdiaphragmatic pressure during tidal breathing was 1.5 +/- 1.2 cmH2O, and during maximal sniff was 7.6 +/- 3.6 cmH2O. Twitch transdiaphragmatic pressure deflections could not be detected. This study shows that despite near complete loss of diaphragm strength in advanced Duchenne muscular dystrophy, diaphragm electrical activation measured with an esophageal electrode array remains clearly detectable in all but one patient.

  8. Advanced thermoplastic resins, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A. M.; Hill, S. G.; Falcone, A.

    1991-01-01

    High temperature structural resins are required for use on advanced aerospace vehicles as adhesives and composite matrices. NASA-Langley developed polyimide resins were evaluated as high temperature structural adhesives for metal to metal bonding and as composite matrices. Adhesive tapes were prepared on glass scrim fabric from solutions of polyamide acids of the semicrystalline polyimide LARC-CPI, developed at the NASA-Langley Research Center. Using 6Al-4V titanium adherends, high lap shear bond strengths were obtained at ambient temperature (45.2 MPa, 6550 psi) and acceptable strengths were obtained at elevated temperature (14.0 MPa, 2030 psi) using the Pasa-Jell 107 conversion coating on the titanium and a bonding pressure of 1.38 MPa (200 psi). Average zero degree composite tensile and compressive strengths of 1290 MPa (187 ksi) and 883 MPa (128 ksi) respectively were obtained at ambient temperature with unsized AS-4 carbon fiber reinforcement.

  9. Advance Care Planning.

    PubMed

    Stallworthy, Elizabeth J

    2013-04-16

    Advance care planning should be available to all patients with chronic kidney disease, including end-stage kidney disease on renal replacement therapy. Advance care planning is a process of patient-centred discussion, ideally involving family/significant others, to assist the patient to understand how their illness might affect them, identify their goals and establish how medical treatment might help them to achieve these. An Advance Care Plan is only one useful outcome from the Advance Care Planning process, the education of patient and family around prognosis and treatment options is likely to be beneficial whether or not a plan is written or the individual loses decision making capacity at the end of life. Facilitating Advance Care Planning discussions requires an understanding of their purpose and communication skills which need to be taught. Advance Care Planning needs to be supported by effective systems to enable the discussions and any resulting Plans to be used to aid subsequent decision making.

  10. Advanced techniques for future observations from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, E. D.

    1980-01-01

    Advanced remote sensing techniques for the study of global meteorology and the chemistry of the atmosphere are considered. Remote sensing from Spacelab/Shuttle and free-flying satellites will provide the platforms for instrumentation based on advanced technology. Several laser systems are being developed for the measurement of tropospheric winds and pressure, and trace species in the troposphere and stratosphere. In addition, a high-resolution passive infrared sensor shows promise for measuring temperature from sea level up through the stratosphere. Advanced optical and microwave instruments are being developed for wind measurements in the stratosphere and mesosphere. Microwave techniques are also useful for the study of meteorological parameters at the air-sea interface.

  11. Mechanical advances in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Lurie, K; Plaisance, P; Sukhum, P; Soleil, C

    2001-06-01

    Challenged by the continued high mortality rates for patients in cardiac arrest, the American Heart Association and the European Resuscitation Council developed a new set of guidelines in 2000 to help advance several new and promising cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques and devices. This is the first time these organizations have taken such a bold move, in part because of the poor results with standard closed-chest cardiac massage. The new techniques, interposed abdominal counterpulsation and active compression decompression CPR, each provide greater blood flow to the vital organs in animal models of CPR and lead to higher blood pressures in patients in cardiac arrest. In some clinical studies, both techniques have resulted in a significant increase in survival after cardiac arrest in comparison with standard CPR. Three of the four new CPR devices that were recommended in the new guidelines also provide superior vital organ blood flow and increased blood pressures in comparison with standard CPR. The three devices that improve the efficiency of CPR are the circumferential vest, an active compression decompression CPR device, and an inspiratory impedance valve used in combination with the active compression decompression CPR device. The fourth device type, one that compresses the thorax using an automated mechanical piston compression mechanism, was recommended to reduce the number of personnel required to perform CPR. However, no studies on the automated mechanical compression devices have showed an improvement in hemodynamic variables or survival in comparison with standard CPR. Taken together, these new technologies represent an important step forward in the evolution of CPR from a pair of hands to devices designed to enhance CPR efficiency. Each of these advances is described, and the recent literature about each of them is reviewed.

  12. Advancing Ethical Neuroscience Research.

    PubMed

    Borah, B Rashmi; Strand, Nicolle K; Chillag, Kata L

    2016-12-01

    As neuroscience research advances, researchers, clinicians, and other stakeholders will face a host of ethical challenges. The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) has published two reports that provide recommendations on how to advance research endeavors ethically. The commission addressed, among other issues, how to prioritize different types of neuroscience research and how to include research participants who have impaired consent capacity. The Bioethics Commission's recommendations provide a foundation for ethical guidelines as neuroscience research advances and progresses.

  13. Advanced echocardiographic techniques

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Echocardiography has advanced significantly since its first clinical use. The move towards more accurate imaging and quantification has driven this advancement. In this review, we will briefly focus on three distinct but important recent advances, three‐dimensional (3D) echocardiography, contrast echocardiography and myocardial tissue imaging. The basic principles of these techniques will be discussed as well as current and future clinical applications. PMID:28191159

  14. Helping Teens Resist Sexual Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Size Email Print Share Helping Teens Resist Sexual Pressure Page Content Article Body Teens are more likely ... time they had intercourse. Helping Teens Resist Sexual Pressure “The pressure on teenagers to have sex is ...

  15. Prevention of High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. Prevention of High Blood Pressure Healthy lifestyle habits, proper use of medicines, and ... blood pressure or its complications. Preventing High Blood Pressure Onset Healthy lifestyle habits can help prevent high ...

  16. Blood pressure monitors for home

    MedlinePlus

    ... type of blood pressure monitor for home use. DIGITAL BLOOD PRESSURE MONITORS A digital device will also have a cuff that wraps ... on its own. The screen will show a digital readout of your systolic and diastolic blood pressure. ...

  17. Advancing the educational agenda.

    PubMed

    Baker, Cynthia

    2010-12-01

    This timely paper provides a thought-provoking analysis of current advanced practice nursing education in Canada. It comes at a critical juncture in the evolution of Canadian healthcare services and the redefinition of nursing roles. Increasingly, multiple sectors of society are calling for more nurses with advanced practice preparation and for a wider range of advanced practice nursing specialties. Advanced practice nurses (APNs) are being proposed as a solution to a financially overburdened national healthcare system, the increasing complexity of healthcare services, and a crisis in access to primary healthcare. Thus, governments seeking greater fiscal efficiency, medical specialists needing sophisticated collaborative support, and healthcare consumers see APNs as the way forward.

  18. Cryogenic High Pressure Sensor Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  19. Cryogenic, Absolute, High Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams. Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  20. RELAP-7 Pressurizer Component Development Updates

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Haihua; Zhang, Hongbin; Zou, Ling; Martineau, Richard; Holten, Michael; Wu, Qiao

    2016-03-01

    RELAP-7 is a nuclear systems safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). RELAP-7 development began in 2011 to support the Risk Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program. The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical methods, and physical models in order to provide capabilities needed for the RISMC methodology and to support nuclear power safety analysis. The code is being developed based on Idaho National Laboratory’s modern scientific software development framework – MOOSE (the Multi-Physics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment). The initial development goal of the RELAP-7 approach focused primarily on the development of an implicit algorithm capable of strong (nonlinear) coupling of the dependent hydrodynamic variables contained in the 1-D/2-D flow models with the various 0-D system reactor components that compose various boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor nuclear power plants (NPPs). As part of the efforts to expand the capability for PWR simulation, an equilibrium single-region pressurizer model has been implemented in RELAP-7. The pressurizer component can simulate pressure and water level change through insurge, spray, and heating processes. Two simple tests – one for insurge process and another for outsurge process – have been reported to demonstrate and verify the functions of the pressurizer model. The typical single-phase PWR system model presented in the first RELAP-7 milestone report has been updated, as part of system level test for the new pressurizer model. The updated PWR system model with the pressurizer component can be used for more realistic transient simulations. The addition of the equilibrium single-region pressurizer model represents the first step of developing a suite of pressurizer models with

  1. Influence Of Lumbar Spine Kinematics On Feet Pressure Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Săftescu-Jescu, C.; Bereteu, L.

    2012-12-01

    Determining the center of pressure trajectories, as an indicator of postural stability or lumbar pathology, has been a challenging issue for researchers during the last decades. The paper advances an investigational method in order to determine a correlation between lumbar spine movements and feet center of pressure distribution. Five young healthy volunteers were simultaneously tested using an ultrasound based motion analyzing system and a force platform, while performing imposed tasks. Results showed specific patterns described by the center of pressure trajectories and a good coordination of angular amplitudes during lumbar spine movement.

  2. Achieving improved cycle efficiency via pressure gain combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Gemmen, R.S.; Janus, M.C.; Richards, G.A.; Norton, T.S.; Rogers, W.A.

    1995-04-01

    As part of the Department of Energy`s Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Program, an investigation is being performed to evaluate ``pressure gain`` combustion systems for gas turbine applications. This paper presents experimental pressure gain and pollutant emission data from such combustion systems. Numerical predictions for certain combustor geometries are also presented. It is reported that for suitable aerovalved pulse combustor geometries studied experimentally, an overall combustor pressure gain of nearly 1 percent can be achieved. It is also shown that for one combustion system operating under typical gas turbine conditions, NO{sub x} and CO emmissions, are about 30 ppmv and 8 ppmv, respectively.

  3. ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Zhuang; Stanley J. Miller; Michelle R. Olderbak; Rich Gebert

    2001-12-01

    A new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC), is being developed under funding from the U.S. Department of Energy. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in an entirely novel manner. The AHPC concept combines fabric filtration and electrostatic precipitation in the same housing, providing major synergism between the two methods, both in the particulate collection step and in transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and solves the problem of reentrainment and re-collection of dust in conventional baghouses. Phase I of the development effort consisted of design, construction, and testing of a 5.7-m{sup 3}/min (200-acfm) working AHPC model. Results from both 8-hr parametric tests and 100-hr proof-of-concept tests with two different coals demonstrated excellent operability and greater than 99.99% fine-particle collection efficiency. Since all of the developmental goals of Phase I were met, the approach was scaled up in Phase II to a size of 255 m{sup 3}/min (9000 acfm) (equivalent in size to 2.5 MW) and was installed on a slipstream at the Big Stone Power Plant. For Phase II, the AHPC at Big Stone Power Plant was operated continuously from late July 1999 until mid-December 1999. The Phase II results were highly successful in that ultrahigh particle collection efficiency was achieved, pressure drop was well controlled, and system operability was excellent. For Phase III, the AHPC was modified into a more compact configuration, and components were installed that were closer to what would be used in a full-scale commercial design. The modified AHPC was operated from April to July 2000. While operational results were acceptable during this time, inspection of bags in the summer of 2000 revealed some membrane damage to the fabric that appeared to be

  4. Mini pressurized logistics module (MPLM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallerani, E.; Brondolo, D.; Basile, L.

    1996-06-01

    The MPLM Program was initiated through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the United States' National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Italy's ASI, the Italian Space Agency, that was signed on 6 December 1991. The MPLM is a pressurized logistics module that will be used to transport supplies and materials (up to 20,000 lb), including user experiments, between Earth and International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) using the Shuttle, to support active and passive storage, and to provide a habitable environment for two people when docked to the Station. The Italian Space Agency has selected Alenia Spazio to develop MPLM modules that have always been considered a key element for the new International Space Station taking benefit from its design flexibility and consequent possible cost saving based on the maximum utilization of the Shuttle launch capability for any mission. In the frame of the very recent agreement between the U.S. and Russia for cooperation in space, that foresees the utilization of MIR 1 hardware, the Italian MPLM will remain an important element of the logistics system, being the only pressurized module designed for re-entry. Within the new scenario of anticipated Shuttle flights to MIR 1 during Space Station phase 1, MPLM remains a candidate for one or more missions to provide MIR 1 resupply capabilities and advanced ISSA hardware/procedures verification. Based on the concept of Flexible Carriers, Alenia Spazio is providing NASA with three MPLM flight units that can be configured according to the requirements of the Human-Tended Capability (HTC) and Permanent Human Capability (PHC) of the Space Station. Configurability will allow transportation of passive cargo only, or a combination of passive and cold cargo accommodated in R/F racks. Having developed and qualified the baseline configuration with respect to the worst enveloping condition, each unit could be easily configured to the passive or active version depending upon the

  5. Flow compensating pressure regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baehr, E. F. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for regulating pressure of treatment fluid during ophthalmic procedures is described. Flow sensing and pressure regulating diaphragms are used to modulate a flow control valve. The pressure regulating diaphragm is connected to the flow control valve to urge the valve to an open position due to pressure being applied to the diaphragm by bias means such as a spring. The flow sensing diaphragm is mechanically connected to the flow control valve and urges it to an opened position because of the differential pressure on the diaphragm generated by a flow of incoming treatment fluid through an orifice in the diaphragm. A bypass connection with a variable restriction is connected in parallel relationship to the orifice to provide for adjusting the sensitivity of the flow sensing diaphragm. A multiple lever linkage system is utilized between the center of the second diaphragm and the flow control valve to multiply the force applied to the valve by the other diaphragm and reverse the direction of the force.

  6. Passive blast pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    King, Michael J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.; Moss, William C.

    2013-03-19

    A passive blast pressure sensor for detecting blast overpressures of at least a predetermined minimum threshold pressure. The blast pressure sensor includes a piston-cylinder arrangement with one end of the piston having a detection surface exposed to a blast event monitored medium through one end of the cylinder and the other end of the piston having a striker surface positioned to impact a contact stress sensitive film that is positioned against a strike surface of a rigid body, such as a backing plate. The contact stress sensitive film is of a type which changes color in response to at least a predetermined minimum contact stress which is defined as a product of the predetermined minimum threshold pressure and an amplification factor of the piston. In this manner, a color change in the film arising from impact of the piston accelerated by a blast event provides visual indication that a blast overpressure encountered from the blast event was not less than the predetermined minimum threshold pressure.

  7. Advanced technology commercial fuselage structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilcewicz, L. B.; Smith, P. J.; Walker, T. H.; Johnson, R. W.

    1991-01-01

    Boeing's program for Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structure (ATCAS) has focused on the manufacturing and performance issues associated with a wide body commercial transport fuselage. The primary goal of ATCAS is to demonstrate cost and weight savings over a 1995 aluminum benchmark. A 31 foot section of fuselage directly behind the wing to body intersection was selected for study purposes. This paper summarizes ATCAS contract plans and review progress to date. The six year ATCAS program will study technical issues for crown, side, and keel areas of the fuselage. All structural details in these areas will be included in design studies that incorporate a design build team (DBT) approach. Manufacturing technologies will be developed for concepts deemed by the DBT to have the greatest potential for cost and weight savings. Assembly issues for large, stiff, quadrant panels will receive special attention. Supporting technologies and mechanical tests will concentrate on the major issues identified for fuselage. These include damage tolerance, pressure containment, splices, load redistribution, post-buckled structure, and durability/life. Progress to date includes DBT selection of baseline fuselage concepts; cost and weight comparisons for crown panel designs; initial panel fabrication for manufacturing and structural mechanics research; and toughened material studies related to keel panels. Initial ATCAS studies have shown that NASA's Advanced Composite Technology program goals for cost and weight savings are attainable for composite fuselage.

  8. Managing advanced unilateral pseudoexfoliative glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Marques, André

    2014-01-01

    The only proven therapy for glaucoma is intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction, which can be accomplished by different means. Each should be properly discussed with patients in order to best preserve visual function and quality of life. We report a case of unilateral pseudoexfoliative glaucoma, treated for years with triple topical IOP-lowering drugs. The patient presented with advanced optic neuropathy and important ocular side effects secondary to the treatment. Having discussed his options and prognosis, laser trabeculoplasty was performed while maintaining the remaining therapy considering the advanced stage of glaucoma. His IOP was effectively reduced and no progression was noted after 1-year follow-up. Although medical therapy is the mainstream in glaucoma management, its side effects should not be ignored, especially in unilateral cases. Surgery might have been a better solution, but we chose to perform laser trabeculoplasty, an effective and safer alternative, considering the unlikely but serious risk of the “wipe-out phenomenon” in this case. PMID:24850557

  9. Recent advance in patient monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Recent advance in technology has developed a lot of new aspects of clinical monitoring. We can monitor sedation levels during anesthesia using various electroencephalographic (EEG) indices, while it is still not useful for anesthesia depth monitoring. Some attempts are made to monitor the changes in sympathetic nerve activity as one of the indicators of stress, pain/analgesia, or anesthesia. To know the balance of sympathetic and parasympathetic activity, heart rate or blood pressure variability is investigated. For trend of cardiac output, low invasive monitors have been investigated. Improvement of ultrasound enables us to see cardiac structure and function continuously and clearer, increases success rate and decreases complication of central venous puncture and various kinds of nerve blocks. Without inserting an arterial catheter, trends of arterial oxygen tension or carbon dioxide tension can be monitored. Indirect visualization of the airway decreases difficult intubation and makes it easier to teach tracheal intubation. The changes in blood volume can be speculated non-invasively. Cerebral perfusion and metabolism are not ordinary monitored yet, but some studies show their usefulness in management of critically ill. This review introduces recent advances in various monitors used in anesthesia and critical care including some studies of the author, especially focused on EEG and cardiac output. However, the most important is that these new monitors are not almighty but should be used adequately in a limited situation where their meaning is confirmed. PMID:20877698

  10. High Pressure Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Development Tests at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, David M.; Greene, Nathanael J.; Revilock, Duane; Sneddon, Kirk; Anselmo, Estelle

    2008-01-01

    Development tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of 2 COPV designs at cryogenic temperatures. This allows for risk reductions for critical components for a Gaseous Helium (GHe) Pressurization Subsystem for an Advanced Propulsion System (APS) which is being proposed for NASA s Constellation project and future exploration missions. It is considered an advanced system since it uses Liquid Methane (LCH4) as the fuel and Liquid Oxygen (LO2) as the oxidizer for the propellant combination mixture. To avoid heating of the propellants to prevent boil-off, the GHe will be stored at subcooled temperatures equivalent to the LO2 temperature. Another advantage of storing GHe at cryogenic temperatures is that more mass of the pressurized GHe can be charged in to a vessel with a smaller volume, hence a smaller COPV, and this creates a significant weight savings versus gases at ambient temperatures. The major challenge of this test plan is to verify that a COPV can safely be used for spacecraft applications to store GHe at a Maximum Operating Pressure (MOP) of 4,500 psig at 140R to 160R (-320 F to -300 F). The COPVs for these tests were provided by ARDE , Inc. who developed a resin system to use at cryogenic conditions and has the capabilities to perform high pressure testing with LN2.

  11. Materials Advance Chemical Propulsion Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    In the future, the Planetary Science Division of NASA's Science Mission Directorate hopes to use better-performing and lower-cost propulsion systems to send rovers, probes, and observers to places like Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn. For such purposes, a new propulsion technology called the Advanced Materials Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) was developed under NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) project, located at Glenn Research Center. As an advanced chemical propulsion system, AMBR uses nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer and hydrazine fuel to propel a spacecraft. Based on current research and development efforts, the technology shows great promise for increasing engine operation and engine lifespan, as well as lowering manufacturing costs. In developing AMBR, ISPT has several goals: to decrease the time it takes for a spacecraft to travel to its destination, reduce the cost of making the propulsion system, and lessen the weight of the propulsion system. If goals like these are met, it could result in greater capabilities for in-space science investigations. For example, if the amount (and weight) of propellant required on a spacecraft is reduced, more scientific instruments (and weight) could be added to the spacecraft. To achieve AMBR s maximum potential performance, the engine needed to be capable of operating at extremely high temperatures and pressure. To this end, ISPT required engine chambers made of iridium-coated rhenium (strong, high-temperature metallic elements) that allowed operation at temperatures close to 4,000 F. In addition, ISPT needed an advanced manufacturing technique for better coating methods to increase the strength of the engine chamber without increasing the costs of fabricating the chamber.

  12. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.; Townsend, H.E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto. 6 figures.

  13. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Townsend, Harold E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto.

  14. Magnetostrictive Pressure Regulating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James A. (Inventor); Pickens, Herman L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A magnetostrictive pressure regulating system includes a magnetostrictive valve that incorporates a magnetostrictive actuator with at least one current-carrying coil disposed thereabout. A pressure force sensor, in fluid communication with the fluid exiting the valve, includes (i) a magnetostrictive material, (ii) a magnetic field generator in proximity to the magnetostrictive material for inducing a magnetic field in and surrounding the magnetostrictive material wherein lines of magnetic flux passing through the magnetostrictive material are defined, and (iii) a sensor positioned adjacent to the magnetostrictive material and in the magnetic field for measuring changes in at least one of flux angle and flux density when the magnetostrictive material experiences an applied force that is aligned with the lines of magnetic flux. The pressure of the fluid exiting the valve causes the applied force. A controller coupled to the sensor and to the current-carrying coil adjusts a current supplied to the current-carrying coil based on the changes so-measured.

  15. Pressure settling of mesophase

    SciTech Connect

    Romine, H.E.

    1989-05-23

    This patent describes a process for producing mesophase pitch wherein a heavy aromatic hydrocarbon feedstock is heat soaked at a first pressure until a substantial portion of the feedstock has been converted to optically anisotropic material, and in which mesophase pitch is recovered from the heat soaked material by gravity settling, the improvement comprises: subjecting and maintaining for a time of up to about 15 minutes the heat soaked material, prior to recovery of mesophase pitch therefrom, to a second pressure which is at least 30 kPa higher than the first pressure for a time of up to about 15 minutes, whereby boiling of the heat soaked material is reduced and settling of mesophase pitch is enhanced.

  16. Circumferential pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Harlan K. (Inventor); Moore, Thomas C. (Inventor); Fantl, Andrew J. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A probe for measuring circumferential pressure inside a body cavity is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, a urodynamic pressure measurement probe for evaluating human urinary sphincter function is disclosed. Along the length of the probe are disposed a multiplicity of deformable wall sensors which typically comprise support tube sections with flexible side wall areas. These are arranged along the length of the probe in two areas, one just proximal to the tip for the sensing of fluid pressure inside the bladder, and five in the sensing section which is positioned within the urethra at the point at which the urinary sphincter constricts to control the flow of urine. The remainder of the length of the probe comprises multiple rigid support tube sections interspersed with flexible support tube sections in the form of bellows to provide flexibility.

  17. PRESSURE SENSING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1959-12-15

    This device is primarily useful as a switch which is selectively operable to actuate in response to either absolute or differential predetermined pressures. The device generally comprises a pressure-tight housing divided by a movable impermeable diaphragm into two chambers, a reference pressure chamber and a bulb chamber containing the switching means and otherwise filled with an incompressible non-conducting fluid. The switch means comprises a normally collapsed bulb having an electrically conductive outer surface and a vent tube leading to the housing exterior. The normally collapsed bulb is disposed such that upon its inflation, respensive to air inflow from the vent, two contacts fixed within the bulb chamber are adapted to be electrically shorted by the conducting outer surface of the bulb.

  18. Pressure driven particulate flows

    SciTech Connect

    Ingher, M.S.; Mondy, L.A.

    1996-03-01

    Numerical simulations of pressure-driven particulate Stokes flows are performed in cylindrical and rectangular conduits using a parallel boundary element code. Spherical particles are randomly placed in the conduits and a pressure drop between the ends of the conduits is imposed by the boundary conditions to induce a Poiseuille-like flow field. The instantaneous velocities of the particles are then calculated, as well as the additional pressure drop necessary to maintain a constant flow rate. Because the results depend on the spatial distribution of the particles, several random configurations of particles are examined for each case. Depending on two different interpretations of the numerical results, the solid phase can be represented as either leading or lagging the fluid phase. Both of the analyses and interpretations are presented.

  19. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, D.W.

    1994-09-06

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured. 1 fig.

  20. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, Dennis W.

    1994-01-01

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured.

  1. HIGH PRESSURE GAS REGULATOR

    DOEpatents

    Ramage, R.W.

    1962-05-01

    A gas regulator operating on the piston and feedback principle is described. The device is particularly suitable for the delicate regulation of high pressure, i.e., 10,000 psi and above, gas sources, as well as being perfectly adaptable for use on gas supplies as low as 50 psi. The piston is adjustably connected to a needle valve and the movement of the piston regulates the flow of gas from the needle valve. The gas output is obtained from the needle valve. Output pressure is sampled by a piston feedback means which, in turn, regulates the movement of the main piston. When the output is other than the desired value, the feedback system initiates movement of the main piston to allow the output pressure to be corrected or to remain constant. (AEC)

  2. A Microwave Pressure Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, D. A.; Peckham, G. E.

    1978-01-01

    An instrument to measure atmospheric pressure at the earth's surface from an orbiting satellite would be a valuable addition to the expanding inventory of remote sensors. The subject of this report is such an instrument - the Microwave Pressure Sounder (MPS). It is shown that global-ocean coverage is attainable with sufficient accuracy, resolution and observational frequency for meteorological, oceanographic and climate research applications. Surface pressure can be deduced from a measurement of the absorption by an atmospheric column at a frequency in the wing of the oxygen band centered on 60 GHz. An active multifrequency instrument is needed to make this measurement with sufficient accuracy. The selection of optimum operating frequencies is based upon accepted models of surface reflection, oxygen, water vapor and cloud absorption. Numerical simulation using a range of real atmospheres defined by radiosonde observations were used to validate the frequency selection procedure. Analyses are presented of alternative system configurations that define the balance between accuracy and achievable resolution.

  3. Hemodynamic Correlates of Blood Pressure Across the Adult Age Spectrum: Noninvasive Evaluation in the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Gary F.; Wang, Na; Palmisano, Joseph N.; Larson, Martin G.; Hamburg, Naomi M.; Vita, Joseph A.; Levy, Daniel; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure are substantially higher in older adults. The relative contributions of increased forward versus reflected pressure wave amplitude or earlier arrival of the reflected wave to elevated pulse pressure remain controversial. Methods and Results We measured proximal aortic pressure and flow, forward pressure wave amplitude, global wave reflection, reflected wave timing and pulse wave velocity noninvasively in 6417 (age range, 19 to 90 years; 53% women) Framingham Heart Study Third Generation and Offspring participants. Variation in forward wave amplitude paralleled pulse pressure throughout adulthood. In contrast, wave reflection and pulse pressure were divergent across adulthood: in younger participants, pulse pressure was lower and wave reflection higher with advancing age whereas in older participants, pulse pressure was higher and wave reflection lower with age. Reflected wave timing differed modestly across age groups despite considerable differences in pulse wave velocity. Forward wave amplitude explained 80% (central) and 66% (peripheral) of the variance in pulse pressure in younger participants (<50 years) and 90% and 84% in the older participants (≥50 years, all P<0.0001). In a stepwise model that evaluated age-pulse pressure relations in the full sample, the late accelerated increases in central and peripheral pulse pressure were markedly attenuated when variation in forward wave amplitude was considered. Conclusions Higher pulse pressure at any age and higher pulse pressure with advancing age is predominantly associated with a larger forward pressure wave. The influence of wave reflection on age-related differences in pulse pressure was minor. PMID:20855656

  4. Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project

    SciTech Connect

    Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bolton, T.; Horton-Smith, G.; Maravin, Y.; Ratra, B.; Stanton, N.; von Toerne, E.; Wilson, G.

    2007-09-21

    KASP (Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project) completed the new Layer 0 upgrade for D0, assumed key electronics projects for the US CMS project, finished important new physics measurements with the D0 experiment at Fermilab, made substantial contributions to detector studies for the proposed e+e- international linear collider (ILC), and advanced key initiatives in non-accelerator-based neutrino physics.

  5. Drilling at Advanced Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Doug

    1977-01-01

    Instances where drilling is useful for advanced language are discussed. Several types of drills are recommended, with the philosophy that advanced level drills should have a lighter style and be regarded as a useful, occasional means of practicing individual new items. (CHK)

  6. Advanced Engineering Fibers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edie, Dan D.; Dunham, Michael G.

    1987-01-01

    Describes Clemson University's Advanced Engineered Fibers Laboratory, which was established to provide national leadership and expertise in developing the processing equipment and advance fibers necessary for the chemical, fiber, and textile industries to enter the composite materials market. Discusses some of the laboratory's activities in…

  7. Advanced Ceramic Armor Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-11

    materials, toughened alumina, fiber -reinforced glass matrix composites, and multilayer-gradient materials for ballistic testing. Fabrication and...material systems: Multilayer advanced armor materials consisting of a hard ceramic faceplate bonded to a graphite fiber -reinforced glass matrix...toughened alumina, and fiber - applied studies of advanced reinforced ceramic matrix glass and glass -ceramic composites for ballistic testing. technologies

  8. Advances in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Vacanti, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 30 years ago, we reported on a concept now known as Tissue Engineering. Here, we report on some of the advances in this now thriving area of research. In particular, significant advances in tissue engineering of skin, liver, spinal cord, blood vessels, and other areas are discussed. PMID:26711689

  9. Advanced Manufacturing Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fikes, John

    2016-01-01

    Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (AMT) is developing and maturing innovative and advanced manufacturing technologies that will enable more capable and lower-cost spacecraft, launch vehicles and infrastructure to enable exploration missions. The technologies will utilize cutting edge materials and emerging capabilities including metallic processes, additive manufacturing, composites, and digital manufacturing. The AMT project supports the National Manufacturing Initiative involving collaboration with other government agencies.

  10. Advanced Network Security Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    network. The network observed was the Abilene network of the University Consortium for Advanced Internet Development (UCAID), often known as “ Internet2 ...for Advanced Internet Development (UCAID), often known as “ Internet2 .” This contract was heavily operational in nature, as opposed to a contract

  11. Advances in dental materials.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Garry J P

    2014-05-01

    The dental market is replete with new resorative materials marketed on the basis of novel technological advances in materials chemistry, bonding capability or reduced operator time and/or technique sensitivity. This paper aims to consider advances in current materials, with an emphasis on their role in supporting contemporary clinical practice.

  12. Advanced Life Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambliss, Joe

    2004-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Advanced Life Support (ALS) Systems are presented. The topics include: 1) Fundamental Need for Advanced Life Support; 2) ALS organization; 3) Requirements and Rationale; 4) Past Integrated tests; 5) The need for improvements in life support systems; 6) ALS approach to meet exploration goals; 7) ALS Projects showing promise to meet exploration goals; and 9) GRC involvement in ALS.

  13. Variable pressure washer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, III, Stanley S. (Inventor); Estrada, Hector (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A variable pressure washer has two interlocking channel rings separated by a channel and retained by a captive set of fasteners. Within the channel between the rings are multiple rows of springs having at least two different spring moduli. The washer is particularly suited for use with a polar boss assembly secured to a bulkhead of a pressure vessel such as of propellent tank dome structure where the washer allows for the substantially uniform deflection of multiple O-rings as affected by the curved structure.

  14. Pressure thermal holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toxqui-Lopez, S.; Olivares-Perez, A.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.

    2005-04-01

    A new recorder material with the ability to store information by pressure and temperature parameters, computer phase holograms were obtained whit this material, which it is used a coating of polyester resin mixing with nitrocellulose. The major improvements from our material are: high diffraction efficiency (91.9 %), reduced cost, easily to apply on any substrate and the hologram is making with out develop process, and this does not need carefully controlled environment conditions. In this approach the hologram is formed under pressure and temperature.

  15. Wellbore pressure transducer

    DOEpatents

    Shuck, Lowell Z.

    1979-01-01

    Subterranean earth formations containing energy values are subjected to hydraulic fracturing procedures to enhance the recovery of the energy values. These fractures are induced in the earth formation by pumping liquid into the wellbore penetrating the earth formation until the pressure of the liquid is sufficient to fracture the earth formation adjacent to the wellbore. The present invention is directed to a transducer which is positionable within the wellbore to generate a signal indicative of the fracture initiation useful for providing a timing signal to equipment for seismic mapping of the fracture as it occurs and for providing a measurement of the pressure at which the fracture is initiated.

  16. Krypton oxides under pressure.

    PubMed

    Zaleski-Ejgierd, Patryk; Lata, Pawel M

    2016-02-02

    Under high pressure, krypton, one of the most inert elements is predicted to become sufficiently reactive to form a new class of krypton compounds; krypton oxides. Using modern ab-initio evolutionary algorithms in combination with Density Functional Theory, we predict the existence of several thermodynamically stable Kr/O species at elevated pressures. In particular, our calculations indicate that at approx. 300 GPa the monoxide, KrO, should form spontaneously and remain thermo- and dynamically stable with respect to constituent elements and higher oxides. The monoxide is predicted to form non-molecular crystals with short Kr-O contacts, typical for genuine chemical bonds.

  17. Managing the Research Function of the University: Pressures and Dilemmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintrom, Michael

    2008-01-01

    How should universities manage their research function? Today, research-based knowledge is viewed widely as fundamental to economic advancement. As a result, universities everywhere are facing pressure to rethink their research activities. A general model of the research process is presented here. Linkages are drawn between that process, other…

  18. Two Linguists on Freshman English: Pressure from Below.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, W. Nelson

    1964-01-01

    The importance of improving English instructors' attitudes toward three broadly classified forms of language expression is examined. The author notes an increased interest in languages among college freshmen and defines the differences between (1) artistic, (2) playful, and (3) intellectual expression. Pressure resulting from advanced teaching…

  19. Subharmonic Imaging and Pressure Estimation for Monitoring Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 Words) Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is currently the standard of care for locally advanced breast cancer ...improve the monitoring of breast cancer treatment response to neoadjuvant therapies in women diagnosed with LABC by imaging tumor angiogenesis with...changed their mind prior to starting the study). 15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast Cancer , Ultrasound Imaging, Ultrasound Contrast Agent, Pressure Estimation

  20. Advanced Chemical Propulsion Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodcock, Gordon; Byers, Dave; Alexander, Leslie A.; Krebsbach, Al

    2004-01-01

    A study was performed of advanced chemical propulsion technology application to space science (Code S) missions. The purpose was to begin the process of selecting chemical propulsion technology advancement activities that would provide greatest benefits to Code S missions. Several missions were selected from Code S planning data, and a range of advanced chemical propulsion options was analyzed to assess capabilities and benefits re these missions. Selected beneficial applications were found for higher-performing bipropellants, gelled propellants, and cryogenic propellants. Technology advancement recommendations included cryocoolers and small turbopump engines for cryogenic propellants; space storable propellants such as LOX-hydrazine; and advanced monopropellants. It was noted that fluorine-bearing oxidizers offer performance gains over more benign oxidizers. Potential benefits were observed for gelled propellants that could be allowed to freeze, then thawed for use.

  1. Pressure Loss in Ducts with Compound Elbows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1943-02-01

    Report LOSS IN DUCTS WITH COMPOUND ELBOWS By John R. Weske Case School of Applied Science NACA N A c JI LE&.lJ/J \\ 9 **Y @woti AERONAUT WASHINGTON...AEROHATJTICS ADVANCE RESTRICTED REPORT ● -. PRESWRE U)SS IN DUCTS WITH C-ND ELBOWS By John R; Weske SUMMARY . Results are presented of’measurmneut of the...pressure drop and, h some oases, of the velooity distribution in ocxupound elbows WRS undertaken for the purposo of furnishing to the designer of duetIng

  2. Advanced Sensors for TBI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    increases in intracranial pressure ( ICP ) combined with longer-term measurements of biological ICP and intracranial temperature during experimental TBI...Experiments will measure of acute transmission of pressure waves through the brain, longer-term changes in biological ICP , and intracranial temperature...measure the immediate increases in ICP combined with longer- term measurements of biological ICP and intracranial temperature. The experience

  3. VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS

    SciTech Connect

    Eric M. Suuberg; Vahur Oja

    1997-07-01

    This project had as its main focus the determination of vapor pressures of coal pyrolysis tars. It involved performing measurements of these vapor pressures and from them, developing vapor pressure correlations suitable for use in advanced pyrolysis models (those models which explicitly account for mass transport limitations). This report is divided into five main chapters. Each chapter is a relatively stand-alone section. Chapter A reviews the general nature of coal tars and gives a summary of existing vapor pressure correlations for coal tars and model compounds. Chapter B summarizes the main experimental approaches for coal tar preparation and characterization which have been used throughout the project. Chapter C is concerned with the selection of the model compounds for coal pyrolysis tars and reviews the data available to us on the vapor pressures of high boiling point aromatic compounds. This chapter also deals with the question of identifying factors that govern the vapor pressures of coal tar model materials and their mixtures. Chapter D covers the vapor pressures and heats of vaporization of primary cellulose tars. Chapter E discusses the results of the main focus of this study. In summary, this work provides improved understanding of the volatility of coal and cellulose pyrolysis tars. It has resulted in new experimentally verified vapor pressure correlations for use in pyrolysis models. Further research on this topic should aim at developing general vapor pressure correlations for all coal tars, based on their molecular weight together with certain specific chemical characteristics i.e. hydroxyl group content.

  4. PRSEUS Pressure Cube Test Data and Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.

    2013-01-01

    NASA s Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program is examining the hybrid wing body (HWB) aircraft, among others, in an effort to increase the fuel efficiency of commercial aircraft. The HWB design combines features of a flying wing with features of conventional transport aircraft, and has the advantage of simultaneously increasing both fuel efficiency and payload. Recent years have seen an increased focus on the structural performance of the HWB. The key structural challenge of a HWB airframe is the ability to create a cost and weight efficient, non-circular, pressurized shell. Conventional round fuselage sections react cabin pressure by hoop tension. However, the structural configuration of the HWB subjects the majority of the structural panels to bi-axial, in-plane loads in addition to the internal cabin pressure, which requires more thorough examination and analysis than conventional transport aircraft components having traditional and less complex load paths. To address this issue, while keeping structural weights low, extensive use of advanced composite materials is made. This report presents the test data and preliminary conclusions for a pressurized cube test article that utilizes Boeing's Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS), and which is part of the building block approach used for HWB development.

  5. Advanced nonpenetrating trabeculectomy (advanced NPT) and combined surgery of advanced NPT and phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, S; Mizoguchi, T; Terauchi, H; Nagata, M

    2001-09-01

    We have devised a new glaucoma surgery combining deep sclerectomy with nonpenetrating trabeculectomy (NPT); we call this surgery advanced NPT. We evaluated intraocular pressure (IOP) control, postoperative complication and visual acuity after combined advanced NPT and phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation (combined surgery), and advanced NPT alone. The mean preoperative IOP for the trabeculectomy only group was 22.4 +/- 6.3 mmHg(bleb+), 23.0 +/- 4.9 mmHg(bleb-), and that of the combined surgery group was 18.1 +/- 4.5 mmHg(bleb+), 18.5 +/- 2.6 mmHg(bleb-). Mean postoperative IOP for the two groups were 13.0 +/- 2.3 mmHg(bleb+), 15.0 +/- 1.5 mmHg(bleb-) and 12.9 +/- 2.7 mmHg(bleb+), 13.3 +/- 2.4 mmHg(bleb-), respectively. After 15 months, the success probability for postoperative IOP control were 63%(bleb+), 23%(bleb-) in the advanced NPT only group (advanced NPT only group, 70% in the combined surgery group (advanced NPT alone or combined surgery, an earlier recovery can be expected than with trabeculectomy. Advanced NPT and combined procedure is a reliable technique for glaucoma and cataract surgery.

  6. Pressure Fed Nuclear Thermal Rockets for space missions

    SciTech Connect

    Leyse, C.F. , Idaho Falls, ID ); Madsen, W.W.; Ramsthaler, J.H.; Schnitzler, B.G. )

    1989-08-01

    The National Space Policy includes a long range goal of expanding human presence and activity beyond Earth orbit into the solar system. This has renewed interest in the potential application of Nuclear Thermal Rockets (NTR) to space flight, particularly for human expeditions to the Moon and Mars. Recent NASA studies consider applications of the previously developed NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) technology and the more advanced gas core reactors and show their potential advantages in reducing the initial mass in Earth orbit (IMEO) compared to advanced chemical rocket engines. Application of NERVA technology will require reestablishing the prior technological base or extending it to an advanced NERVA type engine, while the gas core NTR will require an extensive high risk research and development program. A technology intermediate between NERVA and the gas core NTR is a low pressure engine based on solid fuel, a Pressure Fed NTR (PFNTR). In addition to the simplicity of the gas pressurized engine cycle, the PFNTR takes advantage of the dissociation of hydrogen-the increases in specific impulse become significant as the chamber pressure decreases below 1.0 MPa (10 atmospheres) and the chamber temperature increases above 3000 K. The developmental status of technology applicable to a Pressure Fed Nuclear Thermal Rocket (PFNTR) lies between that of the NERVA engine and the gas core NTR (GCNTR). This document investigates PFNTR performance and provides typical mission analyses.

  7. ADVANCED HOT GAS FILTER DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    RICHARD A. WAGNER

    1998-09-04

    This report describes the fabrication and testing of continuous fiber ceramic composite (CFCC) based hot gas filters. The fabrication approach utilized a modified filament winding method that combined both continuous and chopped fibers into a novel microstructure. The work was divided into five primary tasks. In the first task, a preliminary set of compositions was fabricated in the form of open end tubes and characterized. The results of this task were used to identify the most promising compositions for sub-scale filter element fabrication and testing. In addition to laboratory measurements of permeability and strength, exposure testing in a coal combustion environment was performed to asses the thermo-chemical stability of the CFCC materials. Four candidate compositions were fabricated into sub-scale filter elements with integral flange and a closed end. Following the 250 hour exposure test in a circulating fluid bed combustor, the retained strength ranged from 70 t 145 percent of the as-fabricated strength. The post-test samples exhibited non-catastrophic failure behavior in contrast to the brittle failure exhibited by monolithic materials. Filter fabrication development continued in a filter improvement and cost reduction task that resulted in an improved fiber architecture, the production of a net shape flange, and an improved low cost bond. These modifications were incorporated into the process and used to fabricate 50 full-sized filter elements for testing in demonstration facilities in Karhula, Finland and at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, AL. After 581 hours of testing in the Karhula facility, the elements retained approximately 87 percent of their as-fabricated strength. In addition, mechanical response testing at Virginia Tech provided a further demonstration of the high level of strain tolerance of the vacuum wound filter elements. Additional testing in the M. W. Kellogg unit at the PSDF has accumulated over 1800 hours of

  8. JV Task - 129 Advanced Conversion Test - Bulgarian Lignite

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Swanson; Everett Sondreal; Daniel Laudal; Douglas Hajicek; Ann Henderson; Brandon Pavlish

    2009-03-27

    The objectives of this Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) project were to evaluate Bulgarian lignite performance under both fluid-bed combustion and gasification conditions and provide a recommendation as to which technology would be the most technically feasible for the particular feedstock and also identify any potential operating issues (such as bed agglomeration, etc.) that may limit the applicability of a potential coal conversion technology. Gasification tests were run at the EERC in the 100-400-kg/hr transport reactor development unit (TRDU) on a 50-tonne sample of lignite supplied by the Bulgarian Lignite Power Project. The quality of the test sample was inferior to any coal previously tested in this unit, containing 50% ash at 26.7% moisture and having a higher heating value of 5043 kJ/kg after partial drying in preparation for testing. The tentative conclusion reached on the basis of tests in the TRDU is that oxygen-blown gasification of this high-ash Bulgarian lignite sample using the Kellogg, Brown, and Root (KBR) transport gasifier technology would not provide a syngas suitable for directly firing a gas turbine. After correcting for test conditions specific to the pilot-scale TRDU, including an unavoidably high heat loss and nitrogen dilution by transport air, the best-case heating value for oxygen-blown operation was estimated to be 3316 kJ/m{sup 3} for a commercial KRB transport gasifier. This heating value is about 80% of the minimum required for firing a gas turbine. Removing 50% of the carbon dioxide from the syngas would increase the heating value to 4583 kJ/m{sup 3}, i.e., to about 110% of the minimum requirement, and 95% removal would provide a heating value of 7080 kJ/m{sup 3}. Supplemental firing of natural gas would also allow the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology to be utilized without having to remove CO{sub 2}. If removal of all nitrogen from the input gas streams such as the coal transport air were

  9. A review of advanced turboprop transport aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Roy H.

    The application of advanced technologies shows the potential for significant improvement in the fuel efficiency and operating costs of future transport aircraft envisioned for operation in the 1990s time period. One of the more promising advanced technologies is embodied in an advanced turboprop concept originated by Hamilton Standard and NASA and known as the propfan. The propfan concept features a highly loaded multibladed, variable pitch propeller geared to a high pressure ratio gas turbine engine. The blades have high sweepback and advanced airfoil sections to achieve 80 percent propulsive efficiency at M=0.80 cruise speed. Aircraft system studies have shown improvements in fuel efficiency of 15-20 percent for propfan advanced transport aircraft as compared to equivalent turbofan transports. Beginning with the Lockheed C-130 and Electra turboprop aircraft, this paper presents an overview of the evolution of propfan aircraft design concepts and system studies. These system studies include possible civil and military transport applications and data on the performance, community and far-field noise characteristics and operating costs of propfan aircraft design concepts. NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) program propfan projects with industry are reviewed with respect to system studies of propfan aircraft and recommended flight development programs.

  10. Test Your Blood Pressure IQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... How High Blood Pressure is Diagnosed BP vs. Heart Rate Low Blood Pressure Resistant Hypertension Pulmonary Hypertension High Blood Pressure Myths ... Healthy 6 What are the Symptoms of High Blood Pressure? 7 All About Heart Rate (Pulse) 8 Tachycardia | Fast Heart Rate 9 Warning ...

  11. GOLD PRESSURE VESSEL SEAL

    DOEpatents

    Smith, A.E.

    1963-11-26

    An improved seal between the piston and die member of a piston-cylinder type pressure vessel is presented. A layer of gold, of sufficient thickness to provide an interference fit between the piston and die member, is plated on the contacting surface of at least one of the members. (AEC)

  12. Low pressure hydrocyclone separator

    SciTech Connect

    Flanigan, D.A.; Stolhand, J.E.

    1989-07-04

    This patent describes a method of separating a dispersed phase liquid from a bulk phase liquid of a liquid-liquid mixture, the dispersed phase and bulk phase liquids having different densities. The method comprises the steps of: providing a supply of the liquid-liquid mixture at a first pressure; providing a pump means including means for minimizing degradation of the volumetric means size of droplets of the dispersed phase further including a pump size for maintaining the pump means at substantially near maximum flow rate capacity; pumping the liquid-liquid mixture with at least one pump means to a second pressure such that a differential between the first and second pressures is not substantially greater than a differential pressure at which the pump means begins to substantially degrade the volumetric mean size of droplets of the dispersed phase liquid passing therethrough, the pumping without substantial droplet degradation being achieved by operating the pump means at relatively near its maximum flow rate capacity to substantially reduce on a percentage basis the effect of fluid slippage within the pump means; directing the liquid-liquid mixture from the pump means to a hydrocyclone; and separating a substantial portion of the dispersed phase liquid from the liquid-liquid mixture in the hydrocyclone.

  13. Arterial Pressure Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heusner, A. A.; Tracy, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a simple hydraulic analog which allows students to explore some physical aspects of the cardiovascular system and provides them with a means to visualize and conceptualize these basic principles. Simulates the behavior of arterial pressure in response to changes in heart rate, stroke volume, arterial compliance, and peripheral…

  14. Reactor pressure vessel nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, Roy C.; Upton, Hubert A.

    1994-01-01

    A nozzle for joining a pool of water to a nuclear reactor pressure vessel includes a tubular body having a proximal end joinable to the pressure vessel and a distal end joinable in flow communication with the pool. The body includes a flow passage therethrough having in serial flow communication a first port at the distal end, a throat spaced axially from the first port, a conical channel extending axially from the throat, and a second port at the proximal end which is joinable in flow communication with the pressure vessel. The inner diameter of the flow passage decreases from the first port to the throat and then increases along the conical channel to the second port. In this way, the conical channel acts as a diverging channel or diffuser in the forward flow direction from the first port to the second port for recovering pressure due to the flow restriction provided by the throat. In the backflow direction from the second port to the first port, the conical channel is a converging channel and with the abrupt increase in flow area from the throat to the first port collectively increase resistance to flow therethrough.

  15. Reactor pressure vessel nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, R.C.; Upton, H.A.

    1994-10-04

    A nozzle for joining a pool of water to a nuclear reactor pressure vessel includes a tubular body having a proximal end joinable to the pressure vessel and a distal end joinable in flow communication with the pool. The body includes a flow passage therethrough having in serial flow communication a first port at the distal end, a throat spaced axially from the first port, a conical channel extending axially from the throat, and a second port at the proximal end which is joinable in flow communication with the pressure vessel. The inner diameter of the flow passage decreases from the first port to the throat and then increases along the conical channel to the second port. In this way, the conical channel acts as a diverging channel or diffuser in the forward flow direction from the first port to the second port for recovering pressure due to the flow restriction provided by the throat. In the backflow direction from the second port to the first port, the conical channel is a converging channel and with the abrupt increase in flow area from the throat to the first port collectively increase resistance to flow therethrough. 2 figs.

  16. The Pressure Group Cooker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Bill

    1992-01-01

    Administrators across the nation have encountered vigorous challenges against textbooks, practices, and procedures that critics find laden with occult and New Age values. Attacks are becoming more aggressive, better organized, and well financed. This article and accompanying sidebars discuss pressure group tactics and ways to counter them. The…

  17. Putting oysters under pressure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High pressure processing (HPP) is the most commercially important food processing technology in use now and is anticipated to remain of equal or greater importance during the next five to 10 years. This month’s column reviews the theory and current applications of HPP for oysters to improve their sa...

  18. High Pressure Biomass Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Pradeep K

    2016-07-29

    According to the Billion Ton Report, the U.S. has a large supply of biomass available that can supplement fossil fuels for producing chemicals and transportation fuels. Agricultural waste, forest residue, and energy crops offer potential benefits: renewable feedstock, zero to low CO2 emissions depending on the specific source, and domestic supply availability. Biomass can be converted into chemicals and fuels using one of several approaches: (i) biological platform converts corn into ethanol by using depolymerization of cellulose to form sugars followed by fermentation, (ii) low-temperature pyrolysis to obtain bio-oils which must be treated to reduce oxygen content via HDO hydrodeoxygenation), and (iii) high temperature pyrolysis to produce syngas (CO + H2). This last approach consists of producing syngas using the thermal platform which can be used to produce a variety of chemicals and fuels. The goal of this project was to develop an improved understanding of the gasification of biomass at high pressure conditions and how various gasification parameters might affect the gasification behavior. Since most downstream applications of synags conversion (e.g., alcohol synthesis, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis etc) involve utilizing high pressure catalytic processes, there is an interest in carrying out the biomass gasification at high pressure which can potentially reduce the gasifier size and subsequent downstream cleaning processes. It is traditionally accepted that high pressure should increase the gasification rates (kinetic effect). There is also precedence from coal gasification literature from the 1970s that high pressure gasification would be a beneficial route to consider. Traditional approach of using thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) or high-pressure themogravimetric analyzer (PTGA) worked well in understanding the gasification kinetics of coal gasification which was useful in designing high pressure coal gasification processes. However

  19. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  20. Advanced electron microscopy for advanced materials.

    PubMed

    Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Bals, Sara; Van Aert, Sandra; Verbeeck, Jo; Van Dyck, Dirk

    2012-11-08

    The idea of this Review is to introduce newly developed possibilities of advanced electron microscopy to the materials science community. Over the last decade, electron microscopy has evolved into a full analytical tool, able to provide atomic scale information on the position, nature, and even the valency atoms. This information is classically obtained in two dimensions (2D), but can now also be obtained in 3D. We show examples of applications in the field of nanoparticles and interfaces.