Science.gov

Sample records for advanced pressurized water

  1. Advanced fuels for plutonium management in pressurized water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile, A.; Dufour, Ph; Golfier, H.; Grouiller, J. P.; Guillet, J. L.; Poinot, Ch; Youinou, G.; Zaetta, A.

    2003-06-01

    Several fuel concepts are under investigation at CEA with the aim of manage plutonium inventories in pressurized water reactors. This options range from the use of mature technologies like MOX adapted in the case of MOX-EUS (enriched uranium support) and COmbustible Recyclage A ILot (CORAIL) assemblies to more innovative technologies using IMF like DUPLEX and advanced plutonium assembly (APA). The plutonium burning performances reported to the electrical production go from 7 to 60 kg (TW h) -1. More detailed analysis covering economic, sustainability, reliability and safety aspects and their integration in the whole fuel cycle would allow identifying the best candidate.

  2. Drinking water treatment of priority pesticides using low pressure UV photolysis and advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Sanches, Sandra; Barreto Crespo, Maria T; Pereira, Vanessa J

    2010-03-01

    This study reports the efficiency of low pressure UV photolysis for the degradation of pesticides identified as priority pollutants by the European Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC. Direct low pressure UV photolysis and advanced oxidation processes (using hydrogen peroxide and titanium dioxide) experiments were conducted in laboratory grade water, surface water, and groundwater. LP direct photolysis using a high UV fluence (1500 mJ/cm(2)) was found to be extremely efficient to accomplish the degradation of all pesticides except isoproturon, whereas photolysis using hydrogen peroxide and titanium dioxide did not significantly enhance their removal. In all matrices tested the experimental photolysis of the pesticides followed the same trend: isoproturon degradation was negligible, alachlor, pentachlorophenol, and atrazine showed similar degradation rate constants, whereas diuron and chlorfenvinphos were highly removed. The degradation trend observed for the selected compounds followed the decadic molar absorption coefficients order with exception of isoproturon probably due to its extremely low quantum yield. Similar direct photolysis rate constants were obtained for each pesticide in the different matrices tested, showing that the water components did not significantly impact degradation. Extremely similar photolysis rate constants were also obtained in surface water for individual compounds when compared to mixtures. The model fluence and time-based rate constants reported were very similar to the direct photolysis experimental results obtained, while overestimating the advanced oxidation results. This model was used to predict how degradation of isoproturon, the most resilient compound, could be improved.

  3. TRAC-PF1: an advanced best-estimate computer program for pressurized water reactor analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.

    1984-02-01

    The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) is being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light water reactors. The TRAC-PF1 program provides this capability for pressurized water reactors and for many thermal-hydraulic experimental facilities. The code features either a one-dimensional or a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and its associated internals; a two-phase, two-fluid nonequilibrium hydrodynamics model with a noncondensable gas field; flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment; optional reflood tracking capability for both bottom flood and falling-film quench fronts; and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. This report describes the thermal-hydraulic models and the numerical solution methods used in the code. Detailed programming and user information also are provided.

  4. European pressurized water reactor (EPR) - an advanced LWR to fit the needs of European utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Teichel, H.; Pouget-Abadie, X.

    1997-12-01

    The European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) is a project for the development of an advanced PWR pursued by Electricite de France and the major German utilities (RWEE, PreussenElektra, BAG et. al.) together with SIEMENS, Framatome and their common subsidiary NPI. In this project, the experience gained through the design, the erection, the commissioning and the operation of the existing PWR in France and Germany are combined and the existing technical solutions were carefully checked before adopted for the EPR. The deep involvement of the future operators since the beginning of the project guarantees an optimized operational behaviour and easy maintainability. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Advanced alkaline water electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, N.; Torikai, E.; Kawami, Y.; Takenaka, H.

    Results are presented of experimental studies of possible separators and electrodes for use in advanced, high-temperature, high-pressure alkaline water electrolyzers. Material evaluations in alkaline water electrolyzers at temperatures from 100 to 120 C have shown a new type polytetrafluoroethylene membrane impregnated with potassium titanate to be the most promising when the separator is prepared by the hydrothermal treatment of a porous PFTE membrane impregnated with hydrated titanium oxide. Measurements of cell voltages in 30% KOH at current densities from 5 to 100 A/sq dm at temperatures up to 120 C with nickel electrodes of various structures have shown the foamed nickel electrode, with an average pore size of 1-1.5 mm, to have the best performance. When the foamed nickel is coated by fine powdered nickel, carbonyl nickel or Raney nickel to increase electrode surface areas, even lower cell voltages were found, indicating better performance.

  6. Advanced surface cleaning methods: three years of experience with high pressure ultrapure water rinsing of superconducting cavaties

    SciTech Connect

    Kneisel, P.; Lewis, B.

    1995-01-01

    In the last three years we have carried out a large number of tests ofn single cell and multi-cell niobium and Nb{sub 3}Sn cavities at L- band frequencies, which as a final surface cleaning step had been rinsed with high pressure jets of ultrapure water. This treatment resulted in an unprecedented quality and reproducibility of cavity performance. Field emission free surfaces up to peak surface electric fields of E{sup peak} {ge} 45 MV/m were achieved nearly routinely after buffered chemical polishing of niobium surfaces. In addition, residual surface resistances below R{sub res} {le} 10 n{Omega} and as low as R{sub res} = 2 n{Omega} were not uncommon. In 5-cell production cavities of the Cornell/CEBAF shape gradients as high as E{sub acc} =21.5 MV/m corresponding to peak surface fields of E{sub peak} {approx} 55 MV/m have been measured after post purification with Ti without the need for rf-processing. Several Nb{sub 3}Sn - cavities exhibited no field emission loading after high pressure ultrapure water rinsing up to the maximum achievable surface fields of E{sup peak} {approx} 33 MV/m; the field limits were given by the available rf-power. The unprecedented reproducibility of the cavities permitted serial testing of various parameters affecting cavity performance such as the influence of residual gas inside the cavities prior to cooldown, the removal of the surface damage layer or the impact of peripheral parts such as rf-windows. The major portion of this paper summarizes several of the results obtained from investigations carried out during the last three years. The second part discusses possibilities for further improvements in cavity cleaning.

  7. High Pressure Industrial Water Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    In conjunction with Space Shuttle Main Engine testing at Stennis, the Nordberg Water Pumps at the High Pressure Industrial Water Facility provide water for cooling the flame deflectors at the test stands during test firings.

  8. Pressure Safety: Advanced Live 11459

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, George

    2016-03-02

    Many Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) operations use pressure equipment and systems. Failure to follow proper procedures when designing or operating pressure systems can result in injuries to personnel and damage to equipment and/or the environment. This manual presents an overview of the requirements and recommendations that address the safe design and operation of pressure systems at LANL.

  9. TRAC-PF1/MOD1: an advanced best-estimate computer program for pressurized water reactor thermal-hydraulic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.

    1986-07-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light-water reactors. The TRAC-PF1/MOD1 program provides this capability for pressurized water reactors and for many thermal-hydraulic test facilities. The code features either a one- or a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and its associated internals, a two-fluid nonequilibrium hydrodynamics model with a noncondensable gas field and solute tracking, flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment, optional reflood tracking capability for bottom-flood and falling-film quench fronts, and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. The stability-enhancing two-step (SETS) numerical algorithm is used in the one-dimensional hydrodynamics and permits this portion of the fluid dynamics to violate the material Courant condition. This technique permits large time steps and, hence, reduced running time for slow transients.

  10. Water Pressure. Water in Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Carly Sporer

    The Water in Africa Project was realized over a 2-year period by a team of Peace Corps volunteers. As part of an expanded, detailed design, resources were collected from over 90 volunteers serving in African countries, photos and stories were prepared, and standards-based learning units were created for K-12 students. This unit, "Water…

  11. High pressure water jet mining machine

    DOEpatents

    Barker, Clark R.

    1981-05-05

    A high pressure water jet mining machine for the longwall mining of coal is described. The machine is generally in the shape of a plowshare and is advanced in the direction in which the coal is cut. The machine has mounted thereon a plurality of nozzle modules each containing a high pressure water jet nozzle disposed to oscillate in a particular plane. The nozzle modules are oriented to cut in vertical and horizontal planes on the leading edge of the machine and the coal so cut is cleaved off by the wedge-shaped body.

  12. High-pressure water facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA Test Operations Group employees, from left, Todd Pearson, Tim Delcuze and Rodney Wilkinson maintain a water pump in Stennis Space Center's high-pressure water facility. The three were part of a group of employees who rode out Hurricane Katrina at the facility and helped protect NASA's rocket engine test complex.

  13. High-pressure water facility

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-02-15

    NASA Test Operations Group employees, from left, Todd Pearson, Tim Delcuze and Rodney Wilkinson maintain a water pump in Stennis Space Center's high-pressure water facility. The three were part of a group of employees who rode out Hurricane Katrina at the facility and helped protect NASA's rocket engine test complex.

  14. High-pressure water facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA Test Operations Group employees, from left, Todd Pearson, Tim Delcuze and Rodney Wilkinson maintain a water pump in Stennis Space Center's high-pressure water facility. The three were part of a group of employees who rode out Hurricane Katrina at the facility and helped protect NASA's rocket engine test complex.

  15. Advances in water resources technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The presentation of technological advances in the field of water resources will be the focus of Advances in Water Resources Technology, a conference to be held in Athens, Greece, March 20-23, 1991. Organized by the European Committee for Water Resources Management, in cooperation with the National Technical University of Athens, the conference will feature state-of-the art papers, contributed original research papers, and poster papers. Session subjects will include surface water, groundwater, water resources conservation, water quality and reuse, computer modeling and simulation, real-time control of water resources systems, and institutions and methods for technology.The official language of the conference will be English. Special meetings and discussions will be held for investigating methods of effective technology transfer among European countries. For this purpose, a wide representation of research institutions, universities and companies involved in water resources technology will be attempted.

  16. Water cooled static pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagen, Nicholas T. (Inventor); Eves, John W. (Inventor); Reece, Garland D. (Inventor); Geissinger, Steve L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved static pressure probe containing a water cooling mechanism is disclosed. This probe has a hollow interior containing a central coolant tube and multiple individual pressure measurement tubes connected to holes placed on the exterior. Coolant from the central tube symmetrically immerses the interior of the probe, allowing it to sustain high temperature (in the region of 2500 F) supersonic jet flow indefinitely, while still recording accurate pressure data. The coolant exits the probe body by way of a reservoir attached to the aft of the probe. The pressure measurement tubes are joined to a single, larger manifold in the reservoir. This manifold is attached to a pressure transducer that records the average static pressure.

  17. Pressure Safety: Advanced Self-Study 30120

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, George

    2016-02-29

    Pressure Safety Advance Self-Study (Course 30120) consists of an introduction, five modules, and a quiz. To receive credit in UTrain for completing this course, you must score 80% or better on the 15-question quiz (check UTrain). Directions for initiating the quiz are appended to the end of this training manual. This course contains several links to LANL websites. UTrain might not support active links, so please copy links into the address line in your browser.

  18. Modifications of water chemistry for pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, W.D.

    1987-01-01

    For commercial pressurized water reactors, the evolution of the water chemistry for both the reactor coolant systems (RCS) and the balance of plant (BOP) systems has been in concert with or responsive to the changes in specified materials and operating experience. Much of the early reactor coolant chemistry was identified within a program to develop the use of boric acid as a water soluble neutron absorber for chemical shim. Boric acid was selected as the absorber. The BOP steam and feedwater cycle chemistry was largely a translation from conventional low-pressure boiler water chemistry with specific changes to account for new materials in major components. Today's chemistry for the reactor and BOP systems has undergone significant changes since circa 1950. With advances in the design duty of the plant components and with a much better understanding of the mechanisms of corrosion of component materials, the water chemistry practices and methods of control are more successfully aimed at plant reliability than ever before. This paper presents a review of several important advances in water chemistry, as applied to both the RCS and the BOP and the basis for their adoption.

  19. Advanced Extravehicular Activity Pressure Garment Requirements Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center advanced pressure garment technology development team is addressing requirements development for exploration missions. Lessons learned from the Z-2 high fidelity prototype development have reiterated that clear low-level requirements and verification methods reduce risk to the government, improve efficiency in pressure garment design efforts, and enable the government to be a smart buyer. The expectation is to provide requirements at the specification level that are validated so that their impact on pressure garment design is understood. Additionally, the team will provide defined verification protocols for the requirements. However, in reviewing exploration space suit high level requirements there are several gaps in the team's ability to define and verify related lower level requirements. This paper addresses the efforts in requirement areas such as mobility/fit/comfort and environmental protection (dust, radiation, plasma, secondary impacts) to determine the by what method the requirements can be defined and use of those methods for verification. Gaps exist at various stages. In some cases component level work is underway, but no system level effort has begun, in other cases no effort has been initiated to close the gap. Status of ongoing efforts and potential approaches to open gaps are discussed.

  20. Vapor pressure of water nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Factorovich, Matías H; Molinero, Valeria; Scherlis, Damián A

    2014-03-26

    Classical thermodynamics is assumed to be valid up to a certain length-scale, below which the discontinuous nature of matter becomes manifest. In particular, this must be the case for the description of the vapor pressure based on the Kelvin equation. However, the legitimacy of this equation in the nanoscopic regime can not be simply established, because the determination of the vapor pressure of very small droplets poses a challenge both for experiments and simulations. In this article we make use of a grand canonical screening approach recently proposed to compute the vapor pressures of finite systems from molecular dynamics simulations. This scheme is applied to water droplets, to show that the applicability of the Kelvin equation extends to unexpectedly small lengths, of only 1 nm, where the inhomogeneities in the density of matter occur within spatial lengths of the same order of magnitude as the size of the object. While in principle this appears to violate the main assumptions underlying thermodynamics, the density profiles reveal, however, that structures of this size are still homogeneous in the nanosecond time-scale. Only when the inhomogeneity in the density persists through the temporal average, as it is the case for clusters of 40 particles or less, do the macroscopic thermodynamics and the molecular descriptions depart from each other.

  1. Using Advanced Tensiometers to Monitor Temporal Variations in Pore Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, R. L.; Young, M. H.; Dixon, K. L.; Rossabi, J.; Hyde, W. K.; Holmes-Burns, H.

    2002-12-01

    The Savannah River Site has installed a comprehensive vadose zone monitoring system (VZMS) at it's low level radioactive waste disposal facility to collect the necessary information to calculate contaminant flux. The VZMS includes water content reflectometers, suction lysimeters, advanced tensiometers (ATs), water flux meters, access ports for neutron probes, and a tipping bucket rain gauge. Forty one ATs were installed from 1999 to 2001 at depths ranging from 2 to 60 feet and have been operated continuously. The installation depths were based on a hydrostatigraphic model developed from core logs, cone penetrometer logs, moisture content profiles, water retention curves model that were obtained during the phased installation of the VZMS. An AT consists of a porous cup installed at a prescribed depth with casing back to the surface and a pressure transducer that is lowered into the casing and connects with the porous cup. The pressure transducer transmits it's signal to a datalogger where the data is stored for future retrieval using a cellular phone communications package. Results from the 2 year operating period show that the AT calibrations are stable and t ATs are capable of extended monitoring of pore pressures in the 0 to 300 cm H2 O range. The ATs had sufficient resolution to detect the naturally occurring fluctuations in pore pressure (1 to 100 cm H2 O over 1 to 72 hours) that resulted from infiltration events at the site. The stable performance of the ATs combined with their ability to detect naturally occurring fluctuations in pore pressure make the ATs a useful tool in measuring temporal pore pressure variations for use in calibrating numerical models of fluid flow in variably saturated porous media.

  2. Lunar Advanced Volatile Analysis Subsystem: Pressure Transducer Trade Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Edward Shinuk

    2017-01-01

    In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) is a key factor in paving the way for the future of human space exploration. The ability to harvest resources on foreign astronomical objects to produce consumables and propellant offers potential reduction in mission cost and risk. Through previous missions, the existence of water ice at the poles of the moon has been identified, however the feasibility of water extraction for resources remains unanswered. The Resource Prospector (RP) mission is currently in development to provide ground truth, and will enable us to characterize the distribution of water at one of the lunar poles. Regolith & Environment Science and Oxygen & Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE) is the primary payload on RP that will be used in conjunction with a rover. RESOLVE contains multiple instruments for systematically identifying the presence of water. The main process involves the use of two systems within RESOLVE: the Oxygen Volatile Extraction Node (OVEN) and Lunar Advanced Volatile Analysis (LAVA). Within the LAVA subsystem, there are multiple calculations that depend on accurate pressure readings. One of the most important instances where pressure transducers (PT) are used is for calculating the number of moles in a gas transfer from the OVEN subsystem. As a critical component of the main process, a mixture of custom and commercial off the shelf (COTS) PTs are currently being tested in the expected operating environment to eventually down select an option for integrated testing in the LAVA engineering test unit (ETU).

  3. Advanced Raman water vapor lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Melfi, S. Harvey; Ferrare, Richard A.; Evans, Keith A.; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis; Staley, O. Glenn; Disilvestre, Raymond W.; Gorin, Inna; Kirks, Kenneth R.; Mamakos, William A.

    1992-01-01

    Water vapor and aerosols are important atmospheric constituents. Knowledge of the structure of water vapor is important in understanding convective development, atmospheric stability, the interaction of the atmosphere with the surface, and energy feedback mechanisms and how they relate to global warming calculations. The Raman Lidar group at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) developed an advanced Raman Lidar for use in measuring water vapor and aerosols in the earth's atmosphere. Drawing on the experience gained through the development and use of our previous Nd:YAG based system, we have developed a completely new lidar system which uses a XeF excimer laser and a large scanning mirror. The additional power of the excimer and the considerably improved optical throughput of the system have resulted in approximately a factor of 25 improvement in system performance for nighttime measurements. Every component of the current system has new design concepts incorporated. The lidar system consists of two mobile trailers; the first (13m x 2.4m) houses the lidar instrument, the other (9.75m x 2.4m) is for system control, realtime data display, and analysis. The laser transmitter is a Lambda Physik LPX 240 iCC operating at 400 Hz with a XeF gas mixture (351 nm). The telescope is a .75m horizontally mounted Dall-Kirkham system which is bore sited with a .8m x 1.1m elliptical flat which has a full 180 degree scan capability - horizon to horizon within a plane perpendicular to the long axis of the trailer. The telescope and scan mirror assembly are mounted on a 3.65m x .9m optical table which deploys out the rear of the trailer through the use of a motor driven slide rail system. The Raman returns from water vapor (403 nm), nitrogen (383 nm) and oxygen (372 nm) are measured in addition to the direct Rayleigh/Mie backscatter (351). The signal from each of these is split at about a 5/95 ratio between two photomultiplier detectors. The 5 percent detector is used for

  4. Advanced Raman water vapor lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Melfi, S. Harvey; Ferrare, Richard A.; Evans, Keith A.; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis; Staley, O. Glenn; Disilvestre, Raymond W.; Gorin, Inna; Kirks, Kenneth R.; Mamakos, William A.

    1992-01-01

    Water vapor and aerosols are important atmospheric constituents. Knowledge of the structure of water vapor is important in understanding convective development, atmospheric stability, the interaction of the atmosphere with the surface, and energy feedback mechanisms and how they relate to global warming calculations. The Raman Lidar group at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) developed an advanced Raman Lidar for use in measuring water vapor and aerosols in the earth's atmosphere. Drawing on the experience gained through the development and use of our previous Nd:YAG based system, we have developed a completely new lidar system which uses a XeF excimer laser and a large scanning mirror. The additional power of the excimer and the considerably improved optical throughput of the system have resulted in approximately a factor of 25 improvement in system performance for nighttime measurements. Every component of the current system has new design concepts incorporated. The lidar system consists of two mobile trailers; the first (13m x 2.4m) houses the lidar instrument, the other (9.75m x 2.4m) is for system control, realtime data display, and analysis. The laser transmitter is a Lambda Physik LPX 240 iCC operating at 400 Hz with a XeF gas mixture (351 nm). The telescope is a .75m horizontally mounted Dall-Kirkham system which is bore sited with a .8m x 1.1m elliptical flat which has a full 180 degree scan capability - horizon to horizon within a plane perpendicular to the long axis of the trailer. The telescope and scan mirror assembly are mounted on a 3.65m x .9m optical table which deploys out the rear of the trailer through the use of a motor driven slide rail system. The Raman returns from water vapor (403 nm), nitrogen (383 nm) and oxygen (372 nm) are measured in addition to the direct Rayleigh/Mie backscatter (351). The signal from each of these is split at about a 5/95 ratio between two photomultiplier detectors. The 5 percent detector is used for

  5. Water-Based Pressure-Sensitive Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Jeffrey D.; Watkins, A. Neal; Oglesby, Donald M.; Ingram, JoAnne L.

    2006-01-01

    Water-based pressure-sensitive paints (PSPs) have been invented as alternatives to conventional organic-solvent-based pressure-sensitive paints, which are used primarily for indicating distributions of air pressure on wind-tunnel models. Typically, PSPs are sprayed onto aerodynamic models after they have been mounted in wind tunnels. When conventional organic-solvent-based PSPs are used, this practice creates a problem of removing toxic fumes from inside the wind tunnels. The use of water-based PSPs eliminates this problem. The waterbased PSPs offer high performance as pressure indicators, plus all the advantages of common water-based paints (low toxicity, low concentrations of volatile organic compounds, and easy cleanup by use of water).

  6. Water Delivery--It's All about Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2005-01-01

    There is a great deal of wisdom in the old saying "water seeks its level." In fact, the concept has bearing on a very practical side of human life as well, since the public water delivery system is based on it. In this article, the author discusses the concept behind water pressure and describes how the water systems work based on this concept.…

  7. Water Delivery--It's All about Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2005-01-01

    There is a great deal of wisdom in the old saying "water seeks its level." In fact, the concept has bearing on a very practical side of human life as well, since the public water delivery system is based on it. In this article, the author discusses the concept behind water pressure and describes how the water systems work based on this concept.…

  8. Noninvasive Intracranial Pressure Monitoring Using Advanced Machine Learning Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    This project explored the use of advanced machine learning techniques to noninvasively estimate real-time intracranial pressure (ICP) in traumatic...brain injury patients from continuous electronic physiological monitoring data. We hypothesized that advanced machine learning techniques could process...provide a valid analytic platform for the noninvasive monitoring of ICP for defined periods and clinical needs. We developed a machine learning algorithm

  9. Advanced Diagnostics for High Pressure Spray Combustion.

    SciTech Connect

    Skeen, Scott A.; Manin, Julien Luc; Pickett, Lyle M.

    2014-06-01

    The development of accurate predictive engine simulations requires experimental data to both inform and validate the models, but very limited information is presently available about the chemical structure of high pressure spray flames under engine- relevant conditions. Probing such flames for chemical information using non- intrusive optical methods or intrusive sampling techniques, however, is challenging because of the physical and optical harshness of the environment. This work details two new diagnostics that have been developed and deployed to obtain quantitative species concentrations and soot volume fractions from a high-pressure combusting spray. A high-speed, high-pressure sampling system was developed to extract gaseous species (including soot precursor species) from within the flame for offline analysis by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A high-speed multi-wavelength optical extinction diagnostic was also developed to quantify transient and quasi-steady soot processes. High-pressure sampling and offline characterization of gas-phase species formed following the pre-burn event was accomplished as well as characterization of gas-phase species present in the lift-off region of a high-pressure n-dodecane spray flame. For the initial samples discussed in this work several species were identified, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH); however, quantitative mole fractions were not determined. Nevertheless, the diagnostic developed here does have this capability. Quantitative, time-resolved measurements of soot extinction were also accomplished and the novel use of multiple incident wavelengths proved valuable toward characterizing changes in soot optical properties within different regions of the spray flame.

  10. Water-Based Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oglesby, Donald M.; Ingram, JoAnne L.; Jordan, Jeffrey D.; Watkins, A. Neal; Leighty, Bradley D.

    2004-01-01

    Preparation and performance of a water-based pressure sensitive paint (PSP) is described. A water emulsion of an oxygen permeable polymer and a platinum porphyrin type luminescent compound were dispersed in a water matrix to produce a PSP that performs well without the use of volatile, toxic solvents. The primary advantages of this PSP are reduced contamination of wind tunnels in which it is used, lower health risk to its users, and easier cleanup and disposal. This also represents a cost reduction by eliminating the need for elaborate ventilation and user protection during application. The water-based PSP described has all the characteristics associated with water-based paints (low toxicity, very low volatile organic chemicals, and easy water cleanup) but also has high performance as a global pressure sensor for PSP measurements in wind tunnels. The use of a water-based PSP virtually eliminates the toxic fumes associated with the application of PSPs to a model in wind tunnels.

  11. Water pressure and flow regulation for water-cooled lasers.

    PubMed

    Chambers, J K; Talansky, M L

    1988-05-01

    We experienced laser water valve failure resulting from poor water quality, frequent laser shutdowns from low water flow rates, and unnecessary service calls shortly after installing a new laser. The water valve failure resulted from deposits and corrosion. A dirt/rust water filter was installed, and no further water valve failure has occurred. A flow meter was added to the water system to adjust flow rates. It clearly shows when laser shutdowns are caused by low flow rates and indicates the need for water filter changes. Water pressure was monitored and is most affected by use of the laser. A convenient electric water control, activated by the laser key switch, has proved to be reliable. The water control is kept open by a timer ten minutes after the laser is shut off. We determined that our laser shutdowns were related to transient drops in water flow rates and possibly to draw off of water in other parts of the hospital.

  12. Technology advancement of the static feed water electrolysis process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Wynveen, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    A program to advance the technology of oxygen- and hydrogen-generating subsystems based on water electrolysis was studied. Major emphasis was placed on static feed water electrolysis, a concept characterized by low power consumption and high intrinsic reliability. The static feed based oxygen generation subsystem consists basically of three subassemblies: (1) a combined water electrolysis and product gas dehumidifier module; (2) a product gas pressure controller and; (3) a cyclically filled water feed tank. Development activities were completed at the subsystem as well as at the component level. An extensive test program including single cell, subsystem and integrated system testing was completed with the required test support accessories designed, fabricated, and assembled. Mini-product assurance activities were included throughout all phases of program activities. An extensive number of supporting technology studies were conducted to advance the technology base of the static feed water electrolysis process and to resolve problems.

  13. PWR (pressurized water reactor) pressurizer transient response: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, S.I.

    1987-08-01

    To predict PWR pressurizer transients, Ahl proposed a three region model with a universal coefficient to represent condensation on the water surface. Specifically, this work checks the need for three regions and the modeling of the interfacial condensation coefficient. A computer model has been formulated using the basic mass and energy conservation laws. A two region vapor and liquid model was first used to predict transients run on a one-eleventh scale Freon pressurizer. These predictions verified the need for a second liquid region. As a result, a three region model was developed and used to predict full-scale pressurizer transients at TMI-2, Shippingport, and Stade. Full-scale pressurizer predictions verified the three region model and pointed out the shortcomings of Ahl's universal condensation coefficient. In addition, experiments were run using water at low pressure to study interface condensation. These experiments showed interface condensation to be significant only when spray flow is turned on; this result was incorporated in the final three region model.

  14. Advanced water iodinating system. [for potable water aboard manned spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davenport, R. J.; Schubert, F. H.; Wynveen, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Potable water stores aboard manned spacecraft must remain sterile. Suitable sterilization techniques are needed to prevent microbial growth. The development of an advanced water iodinating system for possible application to the shuttle orbiter and other advanced spacecraft, is considered. The AWIS provides a means of automatically dispensing iodine and controlling iodination levels in potable water stores. In a recirculation mode test, simulating application of the AWIS to a water management system of a long term six man capacity space mission, noniodinated feed water flowing at 32.2 cu cm min was iodinated to 5 + or - ppm concentrations after it was mixed with previously iodinated water recirculating through a potable water storage tank. Also, the AWIS was used to successfully demonstrate its capability to maintain potable water at a desired I2 concentration level while circulating through the water storage tank, but without the addition of noniodinated water.

  15. Water solubility in pyrope at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mookherjee, M.; Karato, S.-

    2006-12-01

    To address how much water is stored within the Earth's mantle, we need to understand the water solubility in the nominally anhydrous minerals. Much is known about olivine and pyroxene. Garnet is another important component, approaching 40% by volume in the transition zone. Only two studies on water solubility in pyrope at high-pressures exist which contradict each other. Lu and Keppler (1997) observed increase in water solubility in a natural pyrope up to 200 ppm wt of water, till 10 GPa. They concluded that the proton is located in the interstitial site. Withers et al. (1998) on the contrary, observed increasing water content in Mg-rich pyrope till 6 GPa, then sudden decrease of water, beyond detection, at 7 GPa. Based on infrared spectra, Withers et al. (1998), concluded hydrogarnet (Si^{4+} replaced by 4H+ to form O4H4) substitution in synthetic magnesium rich pyrope. They argued that at high pressure owing to larger volume, hydrogarnet substitution is unstable and water is expelled out of garnet. In transition zone conditions, however, majorite garnet seems to contain around 600-700 ppm wt of water (Bolfan-Casanova et al. 2000; Katayama et al. 2003). The cause for such discrepancy is not clear and whether garnet could store a significant amount of water at mantle condition is unconstrained. In order to understand the solubility mechanism of water in pyrope at high-pressure, we have conducted high- pressure experiments on naturally occurring single crystals of pyrope garnet (from Arizona, Aines and Rossman, 1984). To ascertain water-saturated conditions, we use olivine single-crystal as an internal standard. Preliminary results indicate that natural pyrope is capable of dissolving water at high-pressures, however, water preferentially enters olivine than in pyrope. We are undertaking systematic study to estimate the solubility of water in pyrope as a function of pressure. This will enable us to develop solubility models to understand the defect mechanisms

  16. EPA Water Strategy: Advancing Technologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    National Risk Management Research Laboratory conducts innovative research to manage contaminants in water supplies that pose a threat to human health and the environment, and to develop approaches and tools to monitor, treat, characterize, protect, and restore impaired waterways,...

  17. Water-Pressure Distribution on Seaplane Float

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, F L

    1929-01-01

    The investigation presented in this report was conducted for the purpose of determining the distribution and magnitude of water pressures likely to be experienced on seaplane hulls in service. It consisted of the development and construction of apparatus for recording water pressures lasting one one-hundredth second or longer and of flight tests to determine the water pressures on a UO-1 seaplane float under various conditions of taxiing, taking off, and landing. The apparatus developed was found to operate with satisfactory accuracy and is suitable for flight tests on other seaplanes. The tests on the UO-1 showed that maximum pressures of about 6.5 pounds per square inch occur at the step for the full width of the float bottom. Proceeding forward from the step the maximum pressures decrease in magnitude uniformly toward the bow, and the region of highest pressures narrows toward the keel. Immediately abaft the step the maximum pressures are very small, but increase in magnitude toward the stern and there once reached a value of about 5 pounds per square inch. (author)

  18. Next Steps: Water Technology Advances (Research)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project will focus on contaminants and their impact on health, adequate removal of contaminants from various water systems, and water and resource recovery within treatment systems. It will develop the next generation of technological advances to provide guidance in support ...

  19. Next Steps: Water Technology Advances (Research)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project will focus on contaminants and their impact on health, adequate removal of contaminants from various water systems, and water and resource recovery within treatment systems. It will develop the next generation of technological advances to provide guidance in support ...

  20. Dynamics of nanoconfined water under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diallo, S. O.; Jażdżewska, M.; Palmer, J. C.; Mamontov, E.; Gubbins, K. E.; Śliwińska-Bartkowiak, M.

    2013-08-01

    We report a study of the effects of pressure on the diffusivity of water molecules confined in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with average mean pore diameter of ˜16 Å. The measurements were carried out using high-resolution neutron scattering, over the temperature range 220≤T≤260 K, and at two pressure conditions: ambient and elevated pressure. The high pressure data were collected at constant volume on cooling, with P varying from ˜1.92 kbar at temperature T=260 K to ˜1.85 kbar at T=220 K. Analysis of the observed dynamic structure factor S(Q,E) reveals the presence of two relaxation processes, a faster diffusion component (FC) associated with the motion of “caged” or restricted molecules, and a slower component arising from the free water molecules diffusing within the SWNT matrix. While the temperature dependence of the slow relaxation time exhibits a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law and is non-Arrhenius in nature, the faster component follows an Arrhenius exponential law at both pressure conditions. The application of pressure remarkably slows down the overall molecular dynamics, in agreement with previous observations, but most notably affects the slow relaxation. The faster relaxation shows marginal or no change with pressure within the experimental conditions.

  1. High pressure water jet cutting and stripping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, David T.; Babai, Majid K.

    1991-01-01

    High pressure water cutting techniques have a wide range of applications to the American space effort. Hydroblasting techniques are commonly used during the refurbishment of the reusable solid rocket motors. The process can be controlled to strip a thermal protective ablator without incurring any damage to the painted surface underneath by using a variation of possible parameters. Hydroblasting is a technique which is easily automated. Automation removes personnel from the hostile environment of the high pressure water. Computer controlled robots can perform the same task in a fraction of the time that would be required by manual operation.

  2. Low cost sonoluminescence experiment in pressurized water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, L.; Insabella, M.; Bilbao, L.

    2012-06-01

    We present a low cost design for demostration and mesurements of light emmision from a sonoluminescence experiment. Using presurized water introduced in an acrylic cylinder and one piezoelectric from an ultrasonic cleaner, we are able to generate cavitacion zones with emission of light. The use of argon to pressurize the water improves the emission an the light can be seen at naked eye in a softlit ambient.

  3. Advanced piggyback water power generator

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggs, B.R.

    1988-02-16

    A power generating system is described including: a central boat containing gearing and electric and/or power generation equipment, with a forward angled-back deflection screen and a rear non-angled deflection screen, with a smaller outrigger pontoon on each respective side of the central boat, with closed cell, waterproof, plastic foam filling in the central boat and pontoons, and with the bow of the respective outrigger pontoons angled so as to completely turn water away from, and to the outside of, the space and/or incoming water area between each such respective pontooon and the central boat. There are legs with cone shaped bottoms and with wheels attached, with the wheels extending slightly below the cone shaped bottoms; paddle wheels on each side of the central boat, between the central boat, and respective outrigger pontoons, with 90 degree spaced, flat, paddle blades, and with a solid, disk division vertically dividing each respective side paddle wheel in half and extending at right angles to, and from, the central axle, to the outside extreme end of the paddle blades, with each such half of the equally divided paddle wheel being constructed so that the 90 degree spaced paddle blades in one half are offset by 45 degrees from the 90 degree space paddle blades in the other half, and with the extreme ends of each such set of divided paddle wheels being enclosed via a similar solid.

  4. Tritiated Water on Molecular Sieve: Water Dynamics and Pressure Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, R.T.

    1999-04-23

    The production of fusion energy in a Tokamak using deuterium and tritium requires the safe handling and processing of exhaust gases that contain various amounts of tritium. Initial operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, oxidized exhaust gases for tritium recovery or long-term storage. One of the most efficient and safest ways to contain tritiated water is to sorb it onto a pelletized 4A molecular sieve. A Disposable Molecular Sieve Bed (DMSB) was designed as a pressure vessel because of the possibility of pressure generation from the radiolysis of tritiated water on molecular sieve. Hydrogen production contributes to the complexity of the containers used to transport and store tritiated water, and increases the fabrication costs. Two months after removing a DMSB from the process at TFTR, a pressure in excess of that predicted from self-radiolysis was observed. Interestingly, pressure measurements at longer times (up to 2.5 years) showed less pressure than expected. Pressure was not being generated in the DMSBs at the predicted rate. This was unexpected and prompted an investigation into the mechanism responsible for the anomalous pressure measurements.

  5. Tongue pressure patterns during water swallowing.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Daniel; Kieser, Jules; Bolter, Chris; Swain, Michael; Singh, Bhavia; Waddell, J Neil

    2010-03-01

    Bolus propulsion during the normal oral phase of swallowing is thought to be characterised by the sequential elevation of the front, middle, and posterior regions of the dorsum of the tongue. However, the coordinated orchestration of lingual movement is still poorly understood. This study examined how pressures generated by the tongue against the hard palate differed between three points along the midline of the tongue. Specifically, we tested three hypotheses: (1) that there are defined individual patterns of pressure change within the mouth during liquid swallowing; (2) that there are significant negative pressures generated at defined moments during normal swallowing; and, (3) that liquid swallowing is governed by the interplay of pressures generated in an anteroposterior direction in the mouth. Using a metal appliance described previously, we measured absolute pressures during water swallows in six healthy volunteers (4 male, 2 female) with an age range of 25-35 years. Participants performed three 10-ml water swallows from a small cup on five separate days, thus providing data for a total of 15 separate water swallows. There was a distinct pattern to the each of the pressure signals, and this pattern was preserved in the mean obtained when the data were pooled. Furthermore, raw signals from the same subjects presented consistent patterns at each of the five testing sessions. In all subjects, pressure at the anterior and hind palate tended to be negative relative to the preswallow value; at mid-palate, however, pressure changes were less consistent between individuals. When the pressure differences between the sites were calculated, we found that during the swallow a net negative pressure difference developed between anterior and mid-palate and a net positive pressure difference developed between mid-palate and hind palate. Large, rapid fluctuations in pressure occurred at all sites and these varied several-fold between subjects. When the brief sharp reduction

  6. Advanced High Pressure O2/H2 Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morea, S. F. (Editor); Wu, S. T. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Activities in the development of advanced high pressure oxygen-hydrogen stage combustion rocket engines are reported. Particular emphasis is given to the Space Shuttle main engine. The areas of engine technology discussed include fracture and fatigue in engine components, manufacturing and producibility engineering, materials, bearing technology, structure dynamics, fluid dynamics, and instrumentation technology.

  7. Advanced Atmospheric Water Vapor DIAL Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.; DeYoung, Russell J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Measurement of atmospheric water vapor is very important for understanding the Earth's climate and water cycle. The remote sensing Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique is a powerful method to perform such measurement from aircraft and space. This thesis describes a new advanced detection system, which incorporates major improvements regarding sensitivity and size. These improvements include a low noise advanced avalanche photodiode detector, a custom analog circuit, a 14-bit digitizer, a microcontroller for on board averaging and finally a fast computer interface. This thesis describes the design and validation of this new water vapor DIAL detection system which was integrated onto a small Printed Circuit Board (PCB) with minimal weight and power consumption. Comparing its measurements to an existing DIAL system for aerosol and water vapor profiling validated the detection system.

  8. Advancing Water Science through Data Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Troy, T.

    2014-12-01

    As water scientists, we are increasingly handling larger and larger datasets with many variables, making it easy to lose ourselves in the details. Advanced data visualization will play an increasingly significant role in propelling the development of water science in research, economy, policy and education. It can enable analysis within research and further data scientists' understanding of behavior and processes and can potentially affect how the public, whom we often want to inform, understands our work. Unfortunately for water scientists, data visualization is approached in an ad hoc manner when a more formal methodology or understanding could potentially significantly improve both research within the academy and outreach to the public. Firstly to broaden and deepen scientific understanding, data visualization can allow for more analyzed targets to be processed simultaneously and can represent the variables effectively, finding patterns, trends and relationships; thus it can even explores the new research direction or branch of water science. Depending on visualization, we can detect and separate the pivotal and trivial influential factors more clearly to assume and abstract the original complex target system. Providing direct visual perception of the differences between observation data and prediction results of models, data visualization allows researchers to quickly examine the quality of models in water science. Secondly data visualization can also improve public awareness and perhaps influence behavior. Offering decision makers clearer perspectives of potential profits of water, data visualization can amplify the economic value of water science and also increase relevant employment rates. Providing policymakers compelling visuals of the role of water for social and natural systems, data visualization can advance the water management and legislation of water conservation. By building the publics' own data visualization through apps and games about water

  9. Pressurized water reactor flow skirt apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kielb, John F.; Schwirian, Richard E.; Lee, Naugab E.; Forsyth, David R.

    2016-04-05

    A pressurized water reactor vessel having a flow skirt formed from a perforated cylinder structure supported in the lower reactor vessel head at the outlet of the downcomer annulus, that channels the coolant flow through flow holes in the wall of the cylinder structure. The flow skirt is supported at a plurality of circumferentially spaced locations on the lower reactor vessel head that are not equally spaced or vertically aligned with the core barrel attachment points, and the flow skirt employs a unique arrangement of hole patterns that assure a substantially balanced pressure and flow of the coolant over the entire underside of the lower core support plate.

  10. NTTC Course 315: Advanced Water Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Navy, Washington, DC.

    This publication is the examination booklet used for a home study course in water treatment. This course is the advanced part of a series produced by the Department of the Navy. This publication is designed to be used in conjunction with a course textbook. Each of the four examinations contained in this document are referenced to a specific…

  11. NTTC Course 315: Advanced Water Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Navy, Washington, DC.

    This publication is the examination booklet used for a home study course in water treatment. This course is the advanced part of a series produced by the Department of the Navy. This publication is designed to be used in conjunction with a course textbook. Each of the four examinations contained in this document are referenced to a specific…

  12. Advance prototype silver ion water bactericide system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasionowski, W. J.; Allen, E. T.

    1974-01-01

    An advance prototype unit was designed and fabricated to treat anticipated fuel cell water. The unit is a single canister that contains a membrane-type prefilter and a silver bromide contacting bed. A seven day baseline simulated mission test was performed; the performance was satisfactory and the effluent water was within all specifications for potability. After random vibrations another seven day simulated mission test was performed, and results indicate that simulated launch vibrations have no effects on the design and performance of the advanced prototype. Bench tests and accelerated breadboard tests were conducted to define the characteristics of an upgraded model of the advance prototype unit which would have 30 days of operating capability. A preliminary design of a silver ion generator for the shuttle orbiter was also prepared.

  13. Advances and synergy of high pressure sciences at synchrotron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.; Ehm, L.; Duffy, T.; Crichton, W.; Aoki, K.

    2009-01-01

    Introductory overview to the special issue papers on high-pressure sciences and synchrotron radiation. High-pressure research in geosciences, materials science and condensed matter physics at synchrotron sources is experiencing growth and development through synergistic efforts around the world. A series of high-pressure science workshops were organized in 2008 to highlight these developments. One of these workshops, on 'Advances in high-pressure science using synchrotron X-rays', was held at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA, on 4 October 2008. This workshop was organized in honour of Drs Jingzhu Hu and Quanzhong Guo in celebration of their retirement after up to 18 years of dedicated service to the high-pressure community as beamline scientists at X17 of NSLS. Following this celebration of the often unheralded role of the beamline scientist, a special issue of the Journal of Synchrotron Radiation on Advances and Synergy of High-Pressure Sciences at Synchrotron Sources was proposed, and we were pleased to invite contributions from colleagues who participated in the workshop as well as others who are making similar efforts at synchrotron sources worldwide.

  14. Tritium issues in commercial pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.

    2008-07-15

    Tritium has become an important radionuclide in commercial Pressurized Water Reactors because of its mobility and tendency to concentrate in plant systems as tritiated water during the recycling of reactor coolant. Small quantities of tritium are released in routine regulated effluents as liquid water and as water vapor. Tritium has become a focus of attention at commercial nuclear power plants in recent years due to inadvertent, low-level, chronic releases arising from routine maintenance operations and from component failures. Tritium has been observed in groundwater in the vicinity of stations. The nuclear industry has undertaken strong proactive corrective measures to prevent recurrence, and continues to eliminate emission sources through its singular focus on public safety and environmental stewardship. This paper will discuss: production mechanisms for tritium, transport mechanisms from the reactor through plant, systems to the environment, examples of routine effluent releases, offsite doses, basic groundwater transport and geological issues, and recent nuclear industry environmental and legal ramifications. (authors)

  15. High-Pressure Design of Advanced BN-Based Materials.

    PubMed

    Kurakevych, Oleksandr O; Solozhenko, Vladimir L

    2016-10-20

    The aim of the present review is to highlight the state of the art in high-pressure design of new advanced materials based on boron nitride. Recent experimental achievements on the governing phase transformation, nanostructuring and chemical synthesis in the systems containing boron nitride at high pressures and high temperatures are presented. All these developments allowed discovering new materials, e.g., ultrahard nanocrystalline cubic boron nitride (nano-cBN) with hardness comparable to diamond, and superhard boron subnitride B13N₂. Thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of high-pressure synthesis are described based on the data obtained by in situ and ex situ methods. Mechanical and thermal properties (hardness, thermoelastic equations of state, etc.) are discussed. New synthetic perspectives, combining both soft chemistry and extreme pressure-temperature conditions are considered.

  16. PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR CORE WITH PLUTONIUM BURNUP

    DOEpatents

    Puechl, K.H.

    1963-09-24

    A pressurized water reactor is described having a core containing Pu/sup 240/ in which the effective microscopic neutronabsorption cross section of Pu/sup 240/ in unconverted condition decreases as the time of operation of the reactor increases, in order to compensate for loss of reactivity resulting from fission product buildup during reactor operation. This means serves to improve the efficiency of the reactor operation by reducing power losses resulting from control rods and burnable poisons. (AEC)

  17. Pressure broadening of oxygen by water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouin, Brian J.; Payne, Vivienne; Oyafuso, Fabiano; Sung, Keeyoon; Mlawer, Eli

    2014-01-01

    A need for precise air-mass retrievals utilizing the near-infrared O2 A-band has motivated measurements of the water-broadening in oxygen. Experimental challenges have resulted in very little water broadened oxygen data. Existing water broadening data for the O2 A-band is of insufficient precision for application to the atmospheric data. Line shape theory suggests that approximate O2 pressure broadening parameters for one spectral region, such as the A-band, may be obtained from comparable spectral regions such as the O2 60 GHz Q-branch, which is also used prominently in remote sensing. We have measured precise O2-H2O broadening for the 60 GHz Q-branch and the pure-rotational transitions at room temperature with a Zeeman-modulated absorption cell using a frequency-multiplier spectrometer. Intercomparisons of these data and other O2 pressure broadening data sets confirm the expectation of only minor band-to-band scaling of pressure broadening. The measurement provides a basis for fundamental parameterization of retrieval codes for the long-wavelength atmospheric measured values. Finally, we demonstrate the use of these measurements for retrievals of air-mass via remote sensing of the oxygen A-band.

  18. Advancing Water Science through Improved Cyberinfrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, B. J.; Miles, B.; Rai, A.; Ahalt, S.; Band, L. E.; Minsker, B.; Palmer, M.; Williams, M. R.; Idaszak, R.; Whitton, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    Major scientific advances are needed to help address impacts of climate change and increasing human-mediated environmental modification on the water cycle at global and local scales. However, such advances within the water sciences are limited in part by inadequate information infrastructures. For example, cyberinfrastructure (CI) includes the integrated computer hardware, software, networks, sensors, data, and human capital that enable scientific workflows to be carried out within and among individual research efforts and across varied disciplines. A coordinated transformation of existing CI and development of new CI could accelerate the productivity of water science by enabling greater discovery, access, and interoperability of data and models, and by freeing scientists to do science rather than create and manage technological tools. To elucidate specific ways in which improved CI could advance water science, three challenges confronting the water science community were evaluated: 1) How does ecohydrologic patch structure affect nitrogen transport and fate in watersheds?, 2) How can human-modified environments emulate natural water and nutrient cycling to enhance both human and ecosystem well-being?, 3) How do changes in climate affect water availability to support biodiversity and human needs? We assessed the approaches used by researchers to address components of these challenges, identified barriers imposed by limitations of current CI, and interviewed leaders in various water science subdisciplines to determine the most recent CI tools employed. Our preliminary findings revealed four areas where CI improvements are likely to stimulate scientific advances: 1) sensor networks, 2) data quality assurance/quality control, 3) data and modeling standards, 4) high performance computing. In addition, the full potential of a re-envisioned water science CI cannot be realized without a substantial training component. In light of these findings, we suggest that CI

  19. Influence of temperature and pressure on quartz-water-CO₂ contact angle and CO₂-water interfacial tension.

    PubMed

    Sarmadivaleh, Mohammad; Al-Yaseri, Ahmed Z; Iglauer, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    We measured water-CO2 contact angles on a smooth quartz surface (RMS surface roughness ∼40 nm) as a function of pressure and temperature. The advancing water contact angle θ was 0° at 0.1 MPa CO2 pressure and all temperatures tested (296-343 K); θ increased significantly with increasing pressure and temperature (θ=35° at 296 K and θ=56° at 343 K at 20 MPa). A larger θ implies less structural and residual trapping and thus lower CO2 storage capacities at higher pressures and temperatures. Furthermore we did not identify any significant influence of CO2-water equilibration on θ. Moreover, we measured the CO2-water interfacial tension γ and found that γ strongly decreased with increasing pressure up to ∼10 MPa, and then decreased with a smaller slope with further increasing pressure. γ also increased with increasing temperature.

  20. Advanced Synchrotron Techniques at High Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HPCAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, G.; Sinogeikin, S. V.; Chow, P.; Kono, Y.; Meng, Y.; Park, C.; Popov, D.; Rod, E.; Smith, J.; Xiao, Y.; Mao, H.

    2012-12-01

    High Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HPCAT) is dedicated to advancing cutting-edge, multidisciplinary, high-pressure science and technology using synchrotron radiation at Sector 16 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) of Argonne National Laboratory. At HPCAT an array of novel x-ray diffraction and spectroscopic techniques has been integrated with high pressure and extreme temperature instrumentation for studies of structure and materials properties at extreme conditions.. HPCAT consists of four active independent beamlines performing a large range of various experiments at extreme conditions. 16BM-B beamline is dedicated to energy dispersive and white Laue X-ray diffraction. The majority of experiments are performed with a Paris-Edinburgh large volume press (to 7GPa and 2500K) and include amorphous and liquid structure measurement, white beam radiography, elastic sound wave velocity measurement of amorphous solid materials, with viscosity and density measurement of liquid being under development. 16BM-D is a monochromatic diffraction beamline for powder and single crystal diffraction at high pressure and high (resistive heating) / low (cryostats) temperature. The additional capabilities include high-resolution powder diffraction and x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The insertion device beamline of HPCAT has two undulators in canted mode (operating independently) and LN cooled Si monochromators capable of providing a large range of energies. 16IDB is a microdiffraction beamline mainly focusing on high-pressure powder and single crystal diffraction in DAC at high temperatures (double-sided laser heating and resistive heating) and low temperature (various cryostats). The modern instrumentation allows high-quality diffraction at megabar pressures from light element, fast experiments with pulsed laser heating, fast dynamic experiments with Pilatus detector, and so on. 16ID-D beamline is dedicated to x-ray scattering and spectroscopy research

  1. How Water Advances on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellenberger, Frank; Encinas, Noemí; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Superliquid repellency can be achieved by nano- and microstructuring surfaces in such a way that protrusions entrap air underneath the liquid. It is still not known how the three-phase contact line advances on such structured surfaces. In contrast to a smooth surface, where the contact line can advance continuously, on a superliquid-repellent surface, the contact line has to overcome an air gap between protrusions. Here, we apply laser scanning confocal microscopy to get the first microscopic videos of water drops advancing on a superhydrophobic array of micropillars. In contrast to common belief, the liquid surface gradually bends down until it touches the top face of the next micropillars. The apparent advancing contact angle is 180°. On the receding side, pinning to the top faces of the micropillars determines the apparent receding contact angle. Based on these observations, we propose that the apparent receding contact angle should be used for characterizing superliquid-repellent surfaces rather than the apparent advancing contact angle and hysteresis.

  2. NIR intensity sensor for water pressure monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Chih; Wu, Chun-Wei; Chen, Ling-Chih

    2017-04-01

    Secondary cooling presents control challenges. Conventional feedback control systems cannot be used effectively due to the insufficient reliability of temperature sensors. Here we propose a simple optical technique in placing intensity based portable optical sensor for a rapid nondestructive calibration of water distribution and pressure on dummy bar from nozzles in the secondary cooling system. For non-destructive testing, the proposed system would make use of the data collected by the optical sensor array to help calibrate the water nozzles in temperature control in cooling system. In this paper, we will present the design and characterization a new optical water pressure sensor. Initial field test shows this NIR intensity sensor is capable of operating in the specified range with good repeatability and low hysteresis. Experiment result shows that the impedance of sensing material changes relative linearly with relative humidity, and also features fast response ( 4s). The overall sensing range of the sensor is from 20 to 80% and the sensitivity is about 2%.

  3. Numerical simulation of high pressure water jet impacting concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jialiang; Wang, Mengjin; Zhang, Di

    2017-08-01

    High pressure water jet technology is an unconventional concrete crushing technology. In order to reveal the mechanism of high pressure water jet impacting concrete, it built a three-dimensional numerical model of high pressure water jet impacting concrete based on fluid mechanics and damage mechanics. And the numerical model was verified by theoretical analysis and experiments. Based on this model, it studied the stress characteristics in concrete under high pressure water jet impacting at different time, and quantified the damage evolution rules in concrete along the water jet radial direction. The results can provide theoretical basis and guidance for the high pressure water jet crushing concrete technology.

  4. Exponential Boundary Observers for Pressurized Water Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermine Som, Idellette Judith; Cocquempot, Vincent; Aitouche, Abdel

    2015-11-01

    This paper deals with state estimation on a pressurized water pipe modeled by nonlinear coupled distributed hyperbolic equations for non-conservative laws with three known boundary measures. Our objective is to estimate the fourth boundary variable, which will be useful for leakage detection. Two approaches are studied. Firstly, the distributed hyperbolic equations are discretized through a finite-difference scheme. By using the Lipschitz property of the nonlinear term and a Lyapunov function, the exponential stability of the estimation error is proven by solving Linear Matrix Inequalities (LMIs). Secondly, the distributed hyperbolic system is preserved for state estimation. After state transformations, a Luenberger-like PDE boundary observer based on backstepping mathematical tools is proposed. An exponential Lyapunov function is used to prove the stability of the resulted estimation error. The performance of the two observers are shown on a water pipe prototype simulated example.

  5. Performance of Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Components for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rector, Tony; Peyton, Barbara M.; Steele, John W.; Makinen, Janice; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Water loop maintenance components to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop have undergone a comparative performance evaluation with a recirculating control loop which had no water quality maintenance. Results show that periodic water maintenance can improve performance of the SWME. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage of this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing sublimator technology. The driver for the evaluation of water recirculation maintenance components was to enhance the robustness of the SWME through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A patented bed design that was developed for a United Technologies Aerospace System military application provided a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in the SWME recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The maintenance cycle included the use of a biocide delivery component developed for the ISS to introduce a biocide in a microgravity compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  6. Design of Recycle Pressurized Water Reactor with Heavy Water Moderation

    SciTech Connect

    Hibi, Koki; Uchita, Masato

    2004-03-15

    This study presents the conceptual design of the recycle pressurized water reactor (RPWR), which is an innovative PWR fueled with mixed oxide, moderated by heavy water, and having breeding ratios around 1.1. Most of the systems of RPWR can employ those of PWRs. The RPWR has no boric acid systems and has a small tritium removal system. The construction and operation costs would be similar to those of current PWRs. Heavy water cost has decreased drastically with up-to-date producing methods. The reliability of the systems of the RPWR is high, and the research and development cost for RPWR is very low because the core design is fundamentally based on the current PWR technology.

  7. Hydrodynamic model of advanced pressurized fluidized bed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Horio, Masayuki; Lei, H.W.

    1997-12-31

    A hydrodynamic model was developed for the advanced pressurized fluidized bed combustion (A-PFBC) process. The particular system investigated here is composed of a pressurized circulating fluidized bed (PCFB) for coal gasification/desulfurization and a PCFB for combustion with the gas-solid counter-current flow through the two PCFBs. One of the most important parameters may be the material seal height (MSH) in the downcomer connecting the gasifier/desulfurizer and the combustor, which is thought to strongly influence the safe and stable operation of the process. In this mode, MSH was determined according to the pressure balance between the gasifier/desulfurizer and the combustor. The solid flux in the lower dense region of the two PCFBs was estimated by considering the clustering suspension and core-annulus flow. The mean cluster size and voidage in the cluster phase were predicted by the cluster size model of Horio-Ito (1996). Solid flux of the gasifier and combustor was calculated based on mass balances of limestone, char and ash in the system. Based on this model, the whole pressure profile loop in the system was predicted, and the effects of operating conditions on MSH between the gasifier and the combustor were investigated. The feasibility of the A-PCFB system with PCFBs both for the gasifier/desulfurizer and for the combustor was successfully confirmed.

  8. Pressure-Sensitive Paints Advance Rotorcraft Design Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    The rotors of certain helicopters can spin at speeds as high as 500 revolutions per minute. As the blades slice through the air, they flex, moving into the wind and back out, experiencing pressure changes on the order of thousands of times a second and even higher. All of this makes acquiring a true understanding of rotorcraft aerodynamics a difficult task. A traditional means of acquiring aerodynamic data is to conduct wind tunnel tests using a vehicle model outfitted with pressure taps and other sensors. These sensors add significant costs to wind tunnel testing while only providing measurements at discrete locations on the model's surface. In addition, standard sensor solutions do not work for pulling data from a rotor in motion. "Typical static pressure instrumentation can't handle that," explains Neal Watkins, electronics engineer in Langley Research Center s Advanced Sensing and Optical Measurement Branch. "There are dynamic pressure taps, but your costs go up by a factor of five to ten if you use those. In addition, recovery of the pressure tap readings is accomplished through slip rings, which allow only a limited amount of sensors and can require significant maintenance throughout a typical rotor test." One alternative to sensor-based wind tunnel testing is pressure sensitive paint (PSP). A coating of a specialized paint containing luminescent material is applied to the model. When exposed to an LED or laser light source, the material glows. The glowing material tends to be reactive to oxygen, explains Watkins, which causes the glow to diminish. The more oxygen that is present (or the more air present, since oxygen exists in a fixed proportion in air), the less the painted surface glows. Imaged with a camera, the areas experiencing greater air pressure show up darker than areas of less pressure. "The paint allows for a global pressure map as opposed to specific points," says Watkins. With PSP, each pixel recorded by the camera becomes an optical pressure

  9. Advancing Water Science through Data Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, R. P.; Maidment, D. R.; Tarboton, D. G.; Zaslavksy, I.

    2009-05-01

    Collection of field data on water and water quality is expensive. Vast quantities of data are collected by research, monitoring, and operational projects in North America, yet only monitoring data are routinely available. The Hydrologic Information System (HIS) project of the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc (CUAHSI) has developed Water Data Services (WDS) using a services-oriented architecture to aid in the publication, discovery and access to time-series data collected at a fixed point. The underlying technological developments include WaterML, an XML-based language for transmission of time-series data, and WaterOneFlow, a set of web services that can provide access to data and metadata using standard web protocols. These technologies form the basis for an easy-to-use data publication system. WDS also includes a registration service for published web services and maintains a metadata catalogue of all services. An ontology of hydrologic concepts is included as part of this central service to enable variables to be mapped to a common set of concepts. A map-based discovery tool, Hydroseek (http://www.hydroseek.net/), has been developed using the ontology and metadata catalogue. CUAHSI has been working with US government agencies, such as the US Geological Survey, on providing access to their data holdings using web services and transmitting data using WaterML. Metadata from these agencies has been included in the central metadata catalogue, thereby enabling seamless access to both government and academic environmental data. This system could be expanded through the participation of other national governments, provinces, states and cities, as well as entities engaged in operational monitoring. All software is freely available.

  10. Pulse pressure can predict mortality in advanced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana Rita; Mendes, Sofia; Leite, Luís; Monteiro, Sílvia; Pego, Mariano

    2016-04-01

    Pulse pressure (PP) is the difference between systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP). PP rises markedly after the fifth decade of life. High PP is a risk factor for the development of coronary heart disease and heart failure. The aim of this study was to assess whether PP can be used as a prognostic marker in advanced heart failure. We retrospectively studied patients in NYHA class III-IV who were hospitalized in a single heart failure unit between January 2003 and August 2012. Demographic characteristics, laboratory tests, and cardiovascular risk factors were recorded. PP was calculated as the difference between systolic and diastolic BP at admission, and the patients were divided into two groups (group 1: PP >40 mmHg and group 2: PP ≤40 mmHg). Median follow-up was 666 ± 50 days for the occurrence of cardiovascular death and heart transplantation. During follow-up 914 patients in NYHA class III-IV were hospitalized, 520 in group 1 and 394 in group 2. The most important difference between the groups was in left ventricular dysfunction, which was greater in patients with lower PP. On Kaplan-Meier analysis, group 2 had higher mortality (38 vs. 24 patients, log-rank p=0.002). PP is easily calculated, and enables prediction of cardiovascular death in patients with advanced heart failure. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  11. Advanced Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sean Emerson; Thomas Vanderspurt; Susanne Opalka; Rakesh Radhakrishnan; Rhonda Willigan

    2009-01-07

    The overall objectives for this project were: (1) to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane with high stability and commercially relevant hydrogen permeation in the presence of trace amounts of carbon monoxide and sulfur; and (2) to identify and synthesize a water gas shift catalyst with a high operating life that is sulfur and chlorine tolerant at low concentrations of these impurities. This work successfully achieved the first project objective to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane composition, Pd{sub 0.47}Cu{sub 0.52}G5{sub 0.01}, that was selected based on atomistic and thermodynamic modeling alone. The second objective was partially successful in that catalysts were identified and evaluated that can withstand sulfur in high concentrations and at high pressures, but a long operating life was not achieved at the end of the project. From the limited durability testing it appears that the best catalyst, Pt-Re/Ce{sub 0.333}Zr{sub 0.333}E4{sub 0.333}O{sub 2}, is unable to maintain a long operating life at space velocities of 200,000 h{sup -1}. The reasons for the low durability do not appear to be related to the high concentrations of H{sub 2}S, but rather due to the high operating pressure and the influence the pressure has on the WGS reaction at this space velocity.

  12. Advanced Extra-Vehicular Activity Pressure Garment Requirements Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy; Aitchison, Lindsay; Rhodes, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center advanced pressure garment technology development team is addressing requirements development for exploration missions. Lessons learned from the Z-2 high fidelity prototype development have reiterated that clear low-level requirements and verification methods reduce risk to the government, improve efficiency in pressure garment design efforts, and enable the government to be a smart buyer. The expectation is to provide requirements at the specification level that are validated so that their impact on pressure garment design is understood. Additionally, the team will provide defined verification protocols for the requirements. However, in reviewing exploration space suit high level requirements there are several gaps in the team's ability to define and verify related lower level requirements. This paper addresses the efforts in requirement areas such as mobility/fit/comfort and environmental protection (dust, radiation, plasma, secondary impacts) to determine the method by which the requirements can be defined and use of those methods for verification. Gaps exist at various stages. In some cases component level work is underway, but no system level effort has begun; in other cases no effort has been initiated to close the gap. Status of on-going efforts and potential approaches to open gaps are discussed.

  13. Advanced ceramic cladding for water reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Feinroth, H.

    2000-07-01

    Under the US Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiatives (NERI) program, continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs) are being developed as cladding for water reactor fuel elements. The purpose is to substantially increase the passive safety of water reactors. A development effort was initiated in 1991 to fabricate CFCC-clad tubes using commercially available fibers and a sol-gel process developed by McDermott Technologies. Two small-diameter CFCC tubes were fabricated using pure alumina and alumina-zirconia fibers in an alumina matrix. Densities of {approximately}60% of theoretical were achieved. Higher densities are required to guarantee fission gas containment. This NERI work has just begun, and only preliminary results are presented herein. Should the work prove successful, further development is required to evaluate CFCC cladding and performance, including in-pile tests containing fuel and exploring a marriage of CFCC cladding materials with suitable advanced fuel and core designs. The possibility of much higher temperature core designs, possibly cooled with supercritical water, and achievement of plant efficiencies {ge}50% would be examined.

  14. Water Pressure Distribution on a Flying Boat Hull

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, F L

    1931-01-01

    This is the third in a series of investigations of the water pressures on seaplane floats and hulls, and completes the present program. It consisted of determining the water pressures and accelerations on a Curtiss H-16 flying boat during landing and taxiing maneuvers in smooth and rough water.

  15. Advanced Pressure Coring System for Deep Earth Sampling (APRECOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, E.; Rothfuss, M.; Müller, W. H.

    2009-04-01

    Nowadays the recovery of cores from boreholes is a standard operation. However, during that process the mechanical, physical, and chemical properties as well as living conditions for microorganisms are significantly altered. In-situ sampling is one approach to overcome the severe scientific limitations of conventional, depressurized core investigations by recovering, processing, and conducting experiments in the laboratory, while maintaining unchanged environmental parameters. The most successful equipment today is the suite of tools developed within the EU funded projects HYACE (Hydrate Autoclave Coring Equipment) and HYACINTH (Deployment of HYACE tools In New Tests on Hydrates) between 1997 and 2005. Within several DFG (German Research Foundation) projects the Technical University Berlin currently works on concepts to increase the present working pressure of 250 bar as well as to reduce logistical and financial expenses by merging redundant and analogous procedures and scaling down the considerable size of key components. It is also proposed to extend the range of applications for the wireline rotary pressure corer and the sub-sampling and transfer system to all types of soil conditions (soft to highly-consolidated). New modifications enable the tools to be used in other pressure related fields of research, such as unconventional gas exploration (coal-bed methane, tight gas, gas hydrate), CO2 sequestration, and microbiology of the deep biosphere. Expedient enhancement of an overall solution for pressure core retrieval, process and investigation will open the way for a complete on-site, all-purpose, in-situ equipment. The advanced assembly would allow for executing the whole operation sequences of coring, non-destructive measurement, sub-sampling and transfer into storage, measurement and transportation chambers, all in sterile, anaerobic conditions, and without depressurisation in quick succession. Extensive post-cruise handling and interim storage would be

  16. Biogenic metals in advanced water treatment.

    PubMed

    Hennebel, Tom; De Gusseme, Bart; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy

    2009-02-01

    Microorganisms can change the oxidation state of metals and concomitantly deposit metal oxides and zerovalent metals on or into their cells. The microbial mechanisms involved in these processes have been extensively studied in natural environments, and researchers have recently gained interest in the applications of microbe-metal interactions in biotechnology. Because of their specific characteristics, such as high specific surface areas and high catalytic reactivity, biogenic metals offer promising perspectives for the sorption and (bio)degradation of contaminants. In this review, the precipitation of biogenic manganese and iron species and the microbial reduction of precious metals, such as palladium, platinum, silver and gold, are discussed with specific attention to the application of these biogenic metals in innovative remediation technologies in advanced water treatment.

  17. Use of submersible pressure transducers in water-resources investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freeman, Lawrence A.; Carpenter, Michael C.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; Rousseau, Joseph P.; Unger, Randy; McLean, John S.

    2004-01-01

    Submersible pressure transducers, developed in the early 1960s, have made the collection of water-level and pressure data much more convenient than former methods. Submersible pressure transducers, when combined with electronic data recorders have made it possible to collect continuous or nearly continuous water-level or pressure data from wells, piezometers, soil-moisture tensiometers, and surface water gages. These more frequent measurements have led to an improved understanding of the hydraulic processes in streams, soils, and aquifers. This manual describes the operational theory behind submersible pressure transducers and provides information about their use in hydrologic investigations conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey.

  18. Performance of Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Components for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rector, Tony; Peyton, Barbara M.; Steele, John W.; Makinen, Janice; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Water loop maintenance components to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop have undergone a comparative performance evaluation with a second SWME water recirculation loop with no water quality maintenance. Results show the benefits of periodic water maintenance. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the evaluation of water recirculation maintenance components was to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a UTAS military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provided a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The maintenance cycle included the use of a biocide delivery component developed for ISS to introduce a biocide in a microgravity compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  19. Performance of Water Recirculation Loop Maintentance Components for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rector, Tony; Peyton, Barbara; Steele, John W.; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

    2014-01-01

    Water loop maintenance components to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop have undergone a comparative performance evaluation with a second SWME water recirculation loop with no water quality maintenance. Results show the benefits of periodic water maintenance. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the evaluation of water recirculation maintenance components was to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessonslearned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a UTAS military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provided a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The maintenance cycle included the use of a biocide delivery component developed for ISS to introduce a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  20. Ambulatory pulmonary artery pressure monitoring in advanced heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Yandrapalli, Srikanth; Raza, Anoshia; Tariq, Sohaib; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is an emerging epidemic associate with significant morbidity, mortality, and health care expenditure. Although there were major advances in pharmacologic and device based therapies for the management of HF, mortality of this condition remains high. Accurate monitoring of HF patients for exacerbations is very important to reduce recurrent hospitalizations and its associated complications. With the failure of clinical signs, tele-monitoring, and laboratory bio-markers to function as early markers of HF exacerbations, more sophisticated techniques were sought to accurately predict the circulatory status in HF patients in order to execute timely pharmacological intervention to reduce frequent hospitalizations. CardioMEMSTM (St. Jude Medical, Inc., Saint Paul, Minnesota) is an implantable, wireless pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) monitoring system which transmits the patient’s continuous PAPs to the treating health care provider in the ambulatory setting. PAP-guided medical therapy modification has been shown to significantly reduce HF-related hospitalization and overall mortality. In advanced stages of HF, wireless access to hemodynamic information correlated with earlier left ventricular assist device implantation and shorter time to heart transplantation. PMID:28163833

  1. Advances in Positive Airway Pressure Treatment Modalities for Hypoventilation Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Combs, Dan; Shetty, Safal; Parthasarathy, Sairam

    2014-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Rationale Positive airway pressure therapy for hypoventilation syndromes can significantly improve health-related quality of life (HR-QOL), healthcare costs, and even mortality. The sleep-disordered breathing in such individuals are quite complex and require sophisticated devices with algorithms that are designed to accurately detect and effectively treat respiratory events that includes hypoventilation, upper airway obstruction, lower airway obstruction, central apneas and central hypopneas and reduce the work of breathing while maintaining breathing comfort. Objectives The therapeutic physiological rationale for the various advanced PAP modalities and the details about the principles of operation and technology implementation are provided here. Conclusions The physiological rationale for advanced PAP modalities is sound considering the complexity of sleep-disordered breathing in patients with hypoventilation syndromes. Although such devices are increasingly used in clinical practice, the supporting clinical evidence – specifically comparative-effectiveness studies in real-life conditions -- needs to be performed. Moreover, there is much opportunity for further refining these devices that include the ability of the device to reliably monitor gas-exchange, sleep-wakefulness state, and for reducing variability in device efficacy due to provider-selected device-settings. PMID:25346650

  2. Determining Atmospheric Pressure Using a Water Barometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohrengel, C. Frederick, II; Larson, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    The atmosphere is an envelope of compressible gases that surrounds Earth. Because of its compressibility and nonuniform heating by the Sun, it is in constant motion. The atmosphere exerts pressure on Earth's surface, but that pressure is in constant flux. This experiment allows students to directly measure atmospheric pressure by measuring the…

  3. Determining Atmospheric Pressure Using a Water Barometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohrengel, C. Frederick, II; Larson, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    The atmosphere is an envelope of compressible gases that surrounds Earth. Because of its compressibility and nonuniform heating by the Sun, it is in constant motion. The atmosphere exerts pressure on Earth's surface, but that pressure is in constant flux. This experiment allows students to directly measure atmospheric pressure by measuring the…

  4. High-pressure propulsion - advanced concepts for cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoerman, Leonard

    The state-of-the-art liquid propellant cooled combustion chambers utilized in the space shuttle are third-generation designs which have evolved from a continuing demand for higher operating pressure and aircraft-type reusability. History has shown that major advances in cooling occur in approximately ten-year cycles, with each cycle providing a nominal 400% increase in operating pressure and/or a higher degree of reusability. The previous technologies include the first-generation double-wall steel jackets used in the 220 psi V-2 and Aerobee, and the second generation wire-wrapped double tapered tubular assemblies typical of the 800 psi Titan I, II, and III, and 1000 psi F-1 engines. The third-generation designs utilize milled slot, high thermal conductivity liners and electrodeposited nickel closures. The space shuttle main engine operating at 3200 psia is adequate for individual flights; however, the desired goal of 55 service-free missions has yet to be realized. Future single-stage-to-orbit propulsion concepts can benefit from a further increase in operating pressures to 6000 to 10,000 psi combined with engine reuse capabilities in excess of the 55 flight goals of the space shuttle. A fourth-generation approach will be required to attain these more ambitious goals. These new designs will require a combination of cooling processes, including regenerative and transpiration, combined with improved high-temperature materials and new fabrication techniques. The limitations of the third-generation designs, the impact of propellant/coolant selection, and the approaches for the coming fourth-generation cooling technologies are discussed.

  5. 22. Fire Protection Water Pump (low pressure), view to the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Fire Protection Water Pump (low pressure), view to the southwest. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, North Bank of Clark Fork River at Cabinet Gorge, Cabinet, Bonner County, ID

  6. Stress and Fracture Mechanics Analyses of Boiling Water Reactor and Pressurized Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Shengjun; Bass, Bennett Richard; Stevens, Gary; Kirk, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes stress analysis and fracture mechanics work performed to assess boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) nozzles located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Various RPV nozzle geometries were investigated: 1. BWR recirculation outlet nozzle; 2. BWR core spray nozzle3 3. PWR inlet nozzle; ; 4. PWR outlet nozzle; and 5. BWR partial penetration instrument nozzle. The above nozzle designs were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-license (EOL) to require evaluation as part of establishing the allowed limits on heatup, cooldown, and hydrotest (leak test) conditions. These nozzles analyzed represent one each of the nozzle types potentially requiring evaluation. The purpose of the analyses performed on these nozzle designs was as follows: To model and understand differences in pressure and thermal stress results using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) versus a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for all nozzle types. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated; To verify the accuracy of a selected linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solution for stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for both thermal and pressure loading for all nozzle types; To assess the significance of attached piping loads on the stresses in the nozzle corner region; and To assess the significance of applying pressure on the crack face with respect to the stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack.

  7. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ronaldo Szilard; Hongbin Zhang; Doug Kothe; Paul Turinsky

    2011-10-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub for modeling and simulation of nuclear reactors. It brings together an exceptionally capable team from national labs, industry and academia that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated as the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA), will incorporate science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, modern computational science and engineering practices, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) and validation against data from operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It will couple state-of-the-art fuel performance, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics (T-H), and structural models with existing tools for systems and safety analysis and will be designed for implementation on both today's leadership-class computers and the advanced architecture platforms now under development by the DOE. CASL focuses on a set of challenge problems such as CRUD induced power shift and localized corrosion, grid-to-rod fretting fuel failures, pellet clad interaction, fuel assembly distortion, etc. that encompass the key phenomena limiting the performance of PWRs. It is expected that much of the capability developed will be applicable to other types of reactors. CASL's mission is to develop and apply modeling and simulation capabilities to address three critical areas of performance for nuclear power plants: (1) reduce capital and operating costs per unit energy by enabling power uprates and plant lifetime extension, (2) reduce nuclear waste volume generated by enabling higher fuel burnup, and (3) enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability for component performance.

  8. The Effect of Pressure Ulcers on the Survival in Patients With Advanced Dementia and Comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Jaul, Efraim; Meiron, Oded; Menczel, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The mortality rates for many leading causes of death have declined over the past decade. Advanced dementia with comorbidities has steadily increased to become one of the leading causes of death in the elderly population. Therefore, this study examined the effect of pressure ulcers on the survival time of patients with advanced dementia and comorbidities. Data were reviewed from all the files of 147 patients hospitalized over a period of 3½ years. Ninety-nine tube-fed patients suffering from advanced dementia were assessed; 72 (66.5%) had pressure ulcers and 27 (33.5%) were without pressure ulcers at admission. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals for pressure ulcers group versus non-pressure ulcers group. Unadjusted Cox model and Cox proportional hazards model were used to assess the hazard ratio for pressure ulcers and the association between pressure ulcers and survival time, respectively. Kaplan-Meier model was used to visually confirm the existence of proportional hazards of pressure ulcers on survival. The median survival of advanced dementia patients with pressure ulcers was significantly shorter, compared with those without pressure ulcers (96 vs. 863 days). Significant lower hemoglobin and serum albumin levels were found in the patients with pressure ulcers. Advance dementia and pressure ulcers in the same patient results in earlier mortality. Advanced dementia patients with pressure ulcers had significantly lower survival expectancy in comparison with similar patients without pressure ulcers. Clinical and ethical implications are discussed.

  9. Pressurized water reactor fuel crud and corrosion modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshon, Jeff; Hussey, Dennis; Kendrick, Brian; McGurk, John; Secker, Jeff; Short, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Pressurized water reactors circulate high-temperature water that slowly corrodes Inconel and stainless steel system surfaces, and the nickel/iron based corrosion products deposit in regions of the fuel where sub-cooled nucleate boiling occurs. The deposited corrosion products, called `crud', can have an adverse impact on fuel performance. Boron can concentrate within the crud in the boiling regions of the fuel leading to a phenomenon known as axial offset anomaly (AOA). In rare cases, fuel clad integrity can be compromised because of crud-induced localized corrosion (CILC) of the zirconium-based alloy. Westinghouse and the Electric Power Research Institute have committed to understanding the crud transport process and develop a risk assessment software tool called boron-induced offset anomaly (BOA) to avoid AOA and CILC. This paper reviews the history of the BOA model development and new efforts to develop a micro-scale model called MAMBA for use in the Consortium for Advanced Light Water Reactor Simulation (CASL) program.

  10. Advanced research and technology programs for advanced high-pressure oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsik, S. J.; Morea, S. F.

    1985-03-01

    A research and technology program for advanced high pressure, oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion technology is presently being pursued by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to establish the basic discipline technologies, develop the analytical tools, and establish the data base necessary for an orderly evolution of the staged combustion reusable rocket engine. The need for the program is based on the premise that the USA will depend on the Shuttle and its derivative versions as its principal Earth-to-orbit transportation system for the next 20 to 30 yr. The program is focused in three principal areas of enhancement: (1) life extension, (2) performance, and (3) operations and diagnosis. Within the technological disciplines the efforts include: rotordynamics, structural dynamics, fluid and gas dynamics, materials fatigue/fracture/life, turbomachinery fluid mechanics, ignition/combustion processes, manufacturing/producibility/nondestructive evaluation methods and materials development/evaluation. An overview of the Advanced High Pressure Oxygen-Hydrogen Rocket Propulsion Technology Program Structure and Working Groups objectives are presented with highlights of several significant achievements.

  11. Advanced research and technology program for advanced high pressure oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsik, S. J.; Morea, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    A research and technology program for advanced high pressure, oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion technology is presently being pursued by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to establish the basic discipline technologies, develop the analytical tools, and establish the data base necessary for an orderly evolution of the staged combustion reusable rocket engine. The need for the program is based on the premise that the USA will depend on the Shuttle and its derivative versions as its principal Earth-to-orbit transportation system for the next 20 to 30 yr. The program is focused in three principal areas of enhancement: (1) life extension, (2) performance, and (3) operations and diagnosis. Within the technological disciplines the efforts include: rotordynamics, structural dynamics, fluid and gas dynamics, materials fatigue/fracture/life, turbomachinery fluid mechanics, ignition/combustion processes, manufacturing/producibility/nondestructive evaluation methods and materials development/evaluation. An overview of the Advanced High Pressure Oxygen-Hydrogen Rocket Propulsion Technology Program Structure and Working Groups objectives are presented with highlights of several significant achievements.

  12. Advanced research and technology programs for advanced high-pressure oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsik, S. J.; Morea, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    A research and technology program for advanced high pressure, oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion technology is presently being pursued by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to establish the basic discipline technologies, develop the analytical tools, and establish the data base necessary for an orderly evolution of the staged combustion reusable rocket engine. The need for the program is based on the premise that the USA will depend on the Shuttle and its derivative versions as its principal Earth-to-orbit transportation system for the next 20 to 30 yr. The program is focused in three principal areas of enhancement: (1) life extension, (2) performance, and (3) operations and diagnosis. Within the technological disciplines the efforts include: rotordynamics, structural dynamics, fluid and gas dynamics, materials fatigue/fracture/life, turbomachinery fluid mechanics, ignition/combustion processes, manufacturing/producibility/nondestructive evaluation methods and materials development/evaluation. An overview of the Advanced High Pressure Oxygen-Hydrogen Rocket Propulsion Technology Program Structure and Working Groups objectives are presented with highlights of several significant achievements.

  13. Self-Propagating Frontal Polymerization in Water at Ambient Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olten, Nesrin; Kraigsley, Alison; Ronney, Paul D.

    2003-01-01

    Advances in polymer chemistry have led to the development of monomers and initiation agents that enable propagating free-radical polymerization fronts to exist. These fronts are driven by the exothermicity of the polymerization reaction and the transport of heat from the polymerized product to the reactant monomer/solvent/initiator solution. The thermal energy transported to the reactant solution causes the initiator to decompose, yielding free radicals, which start the free radical polymerization process as discussed in recent reviews. The use of polymerization processes based on propagating fronts has numerous applications. Perhaps the most important of these is that it enables rapid curing of polymers without external heating since the polymerization process itself provides the high temperatures necessary to initiate and sustain polymerization. This process also enables more uniform curing of arbitrarily thick samples since it does not rely on heat transfer from an external source, which will necessarily cause the temperature history of the sample to vary with distance from the surface according to a diffusion-like process. Frontal polymerization also enables filling and sealing of structures having cavities of arbitrary shape without having to externally heat the structure. Water at atmospheric pressure is most convenient solvent to employ and the most important for practical applications (because of the cost and environmental issues associated with DMSO and other solvents). Nevertheless, to our knowledge, steady, self-propagating polymerization fronts have not been reported in water at atmospheric pressure. Currently, polymerization fronts require a high boiling point solvent (either water at high pressures or an alternative solvent such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) (boiling point 189 C at atmospheric pressure.) Early work on frontal polymerization, employed pressures up to 5000 atm in order to avoid boiling of the monomer/solvent/initiator solution. High

  14. Advanced Flat Top Laser Heating System for High Pressure Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakapenka, V.; Kantor, I.; Kuznetsov, A.; Dera, P. K.; Rivers, M. L.; Sutton, S. R.

    2009-12-01

    quality x-ray scattering data suitable for structure analysis even from low-Z molten materials such as Si, SiO2, Fe, Fe:C etc. The FT-LH method opens a new era in high temperature high pressure studies using diamond anvil cell with combination of advanced synchrotron as well as lab techniques, and will lead to superior quality high temperature measurements including equation of state, melting curve, phase transformation, element portioning, elastic, electronic and optical properties.

  15. Advances in crack-arrest technology for reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, B.R.; Pugh, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is continuing to improve the understanding of conditions that govern the initiation, rapid propagation, arrest, and ductile tearing of cracks in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. This paper describes recent advances in a coordinated effort being conducted under the HSST Program by ORNL and several subcontracting groups to develop the crack-arrest data base and the analytical tools required to construct inelastic dynamic fracture models for RPV steels. Large-scale tests are being carried out to generate crack-arrest toughness data at temperatures approaching and above the onset of Charpy upper-shelf behavior. Small- and intermediate-size specimens subjected to static and dynamic loading are being developed and tested to provide additional fracture data for RPV steels. Viscoplastic effects are being included in dynamic fracture models and computer programs and their utility validated through analyses of data from carefully controlled experiments. Recent studies are described that examine convergence problems associated with energy-based fracture parameters in viscoplastic-dynamic fracture applications. Alternative techniques that have potential for achieving convergent solutions for fracture parameters in the context of viscoplastic-dynamic models are discussed. 46 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Lattuce growth and water use in closed, low pressure environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, P.; Rygalov, V.; Wheeler, R.; Bucklin, R.; Schumacher, N.

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) cv. Waldmann's Green plants were grown in a clear, hemispherical enclosure at a reduced atmospheric pressure to study the potential for using low pressure greenhouses on planetary missions. The atmosphere was maintained at 25 kPa total pressure, with ˜20 kPa of N_2, ˜5 kPa of O_2, and between 0.1 and 0.2 kPa of CO_2, supplied by CO_2 injection and a feed-back control system. A closed water cycle was maintained inside the low pressure greenhouse by recycling condensed humidity back to the plants, and only adding external water to offset water vapor leakage and uptake in the plant tissue. All plants were grown in a granular, arcillite medium (calcined clay chips), with nutrients supplied by adding time-release fertilizer (Osmocote 20-20-20). Plants were harvested after 45 days, averaging 237 g fresh mass, and 23.7 g dry mass. No obvious adverse effects were noted on the plants, with the exception of some minor "tip-burn" injury to some leaves. Additional studies are planned to compare growth and water flux (evapotranspiration) rates at higher pressures. Preliminary results suggest that water fluxes should be lower at the higher pressures provided equal vapor pressure deficits can be maintained. The results suggest that vegetative crops such as lettuce should grow well at reduced pressures if adequate water, nutrients, and CO_2 are provided.

  17. Evaluation of pressurized water cleaning systems for hardware refurbishment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillard, Terry W.; Deweese, Charles D.; Hoppe, David T.; Vickers, John H.; Swenson, Gary J.; Hutchens, Dale E.

    1995-01-01

    Historically, refurbishment processes for RSRM motor cases and components have employed environmentally harmful materials. Specifically, vapor degreasing processes consume and emit large amounts of ozone depleting compounds. This program evaluates the use of pressurized water cleaning systems as a replacement for the vapor degreasing process. Tests have been conducted to determine if high pressure water washing, without any form of additive cleaner, is a viable candidate for replacing vapor degreasing processes. This paper discusses the findings thus far of Engineering Test Plan - 1168 (ETP-1168), 'Evaluation of Pressurized Water Cleaning Systems for Hardware Refurbishment.'

  18. An advanced regulator for the helium pressurization systems of the Space Shuttle OMS and RCS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichmann, H.

    1973-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbit Maneuvering System and Reaction Control System are pressure-fed rocket propulsion systems utilizing earth storable hypergolic propellants and featuring engines of 6000 lbs and 900 lbs thrust, respectively. The helium pressurization system requirements for these propulsion systems are defined and the current baseline pressurization systems are described. An advanced helium pressure regulator capable of meeting both OMS and RCS helium pressurization system requirements is presented and its operating characteristics and predicted performance characteristics are discussed.

  19. Importance of pressure reducing valves (PRVs) in water supply networks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signoreti, R. O. S.; Camargo, R. Z.; Canno, L. M.; Pires, M. S. G.; Ribeiro, L. C. L. J.

    2016-08-01

    Challenged with the high rate of leakage from water supply systems, these managers are committed to identify control mechanisms. In order to standardize and control the pressure Pressure Reducing Valves (VRP) are installed in the supply network, shown to be more effective and provide a faster return for the actual loss control measures. It is known that the control pressure is while controlling the occurrence of leakage. Usually the network is sectored in areas defined by pressure levels according to its topography, once inserted the VRP in the same system will limit the downstream pressure. This work aims to show the importance of VRP as loss reduction for tool.

  20. ADVANCES IN GROUND WATER SAMPLING PROCEDURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Obtaining representative ground water samples is important for site assessment and remedial performance monitoring objectives. Issues which must be considered prior to initiating a ground-water monitoring program include defining monitoring goals and objectives, sampling point...

  1. ADVANCES IN GROUND WATER SAMPLING PROCEDURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Obtaining representative ground water samples is important for site assessment and remedial performance monitoring objectives. Issues which must be considered prior to initiating a ground-water monitoring program include defining monitoring goals and objectives, sampling point...

  2. Performance Evaluation of Pressure Transducers for Water Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.; Stegall, David E.; Treadway, Sean

    2012-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle is being designed for water landings. In order to benchmark the ability of engineering tools to predict water landing loads, test programs are underway for scale model and full-scale water impacts. These test programs are predicated on the reliable measurement of impact pressure histories. Tests have been performed with a variety of pressure transducers from various manufacturers. Both piezoelectric and piezoresistive devices have been tested. Effects such as thermal shock, pinching of the transducer head, and flushness of the transducer mounting have been studied. Data acquisition issues such as sampling rate and anti-aliasing filtering also have been studied. The response of pressure transducers have been compared side-by-side on an impulse test rig and on a 20-inch diameter hemisphere dropped into a pool of water. The results have identified a range of viable configurations for pressure measurement dependent on the objectives of the test program.

  3. 11. August, 1971. TPV OF WATER TRANSMISSION FLUME TO PRESSURE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. August, 1971. TPV OF WATER TRANSMISSION FLUME TO PRESSURE HOUSE ALONG FACE OF MOUNTAIN. - Telluride Power Company, Olmsted Hydroelectric Plant, mouth of Provo River Canyon West of U.S. Route 189, Orem, Utah County, UT

  4. Applications of the compensating pressure theory of water transport.

    PubMed

    Canny, M

    1998-07-01

    Some predictions of the recently proposed theory of long-distance water transport in plants (the Compensating Pressure Theory) have been verified experimentally in sunflower leaves. The xylem sap cavitates early in the day under quite small water stress, and the compensating pressure P (applied as the tissue pressure of turgid cells) pushes water into embolized vessels, refilling them during active transpiration. The water potential, as measured by the pressure chamber or psychrometer, is not a measure of the pressure in the xylem, but (as predicted by the theory) a measure of the compensating pressure P. As transpiration increases, P is increased to provide more rapid embolism repair. In many leaf petioles this increase in P is achieved by the hydrolysis of starch in the starch sheath to soluble sugars. At night P falls as starch is reformed. A hypothesis is proposed to explain these observations by pressure-driven reverse osmosis of water from the ground parenchyma of the petiole. Similar processes occur in roots and are manifested as root pressure. The theory requires a pump to transfer water from the soil into the root xylem. A mechanism is proposed by which this pump may function, in which the endodermis acts as a one-way valve and a pressure-confining barrier. Rays and xylem parenchyma of wood act like the xylem parenchyma of petioles and roots to repair embolisms in trees. The postulated root pump permits a re-appraisal of the work done by evaporation during transpiration, leading to the proposal that in tall trees there is no hydrostatic gradient to be overcome in lifting water. Some published observations are re-interpreted in terms of the theory: doubt is cast on the validity of measurements of hydraulic conductance of wood; vulnerability curves are found not to measure the cavitation threshold of water in the xylem, but the osmotic pressure of the xylem parenchyma; if measures of xylem pressure and of hydraulic conductance are both suspect, the accepted

  5. Where Did the Water Go?: Boyle's Law and Pressurized Diaphragm Water Tanks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brimhall, James; Naga, Sundar

    2007-01-01

    Many homes use pressurized diaphragm tanks for storage of water pumped from an underground well. These tanks are very carefully constructed to have separate internal chambers for the storage of water and for the air that provides the pressure. One might expect that the amount of water available for use from, for example, a 50-gallon tank would be…

  6. Where Did the Water Go?: Boyle's Law and Pressurized Diaphragm Water Tanks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brimhall, James; Naga, Sundar

    2007-01-01

    Many homes use pressurized diaphragm tanks for storage of water pumped from an underground well. These tanks are very carefully constructed to have separate internal chambers for the storage of water and for the air that provides the pressure. One might expect that the amount of water available for use from, for example, a 50-gallon tank would be…

  7. Pressure Stagnation Line on a Planing Hull in Calm Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Christine; Judge, Carolyn

    2014-11-01

    High-speed planing boats are subjected to repeat impacts due to slamming, which can cause structural damage and discomfort or injury to passengers. An experimental study aimed at understanding and predicting the physics of a planing craft re-entering the water after becoming partially airborne was conducted. A subset of this experiment includes calm water analysis to gain an understanding of the pressure stagnation line and its correlation with the wetted surface on the planning craft in calm water conditions. A planing hull model was towed in a 116-m long, 8-m wide tow-tank with a water depth of 5 m. Hull models at 1/10 and 1/4 of full-scale were examined. These models, only free to move in heave and pitch, were instrumented to measure dynamic pressures with point-pressure sensors at 12 locations near the LCG (longitudinal center of gravity) and transom as well as a highly spatially resolved pressure mapping system. These pressure measurements were sampled at rates up to 20 kHz. Using these pressure measurements along with underwater photos of the wetted surface allowed for the v-shaped wetted line and stagnation line to be measured. Preliminary results show that the peak pressures occur before the wetted line and that atmospheric pressure is reached at the transom. Supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  8. Temperature of maximum density in water at negative pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, S.J.; Speedy, R.J.

    1987-05-21

    The locus of the temperature of maximum density in stretched water is reported to pressures below -200 bar for H/sub 2/O, D/sub 2/O, and an HDO mixture. The water samples were stretched in a fine helical capillary by the Berthelot tube principle. Pressure in the sample was measured by monitoring the unwinding of the helix, using the Bourdon tube principle.

  9. Pressure-induced gelatinization of starch in excess water.

    PubMed

    Vallons, Katleen J R; Ryan, Liam A M; Arendt, Elke K

    2014-01-01

    High pressure processing is a promising non-thermal technology for the development of fresh-like, shelf-stable foods. The effect of high pressure on starch has been explored by many researchers using a wide range of techniques. In general, heat and pressure have similar effects: if sufficiently high, they both induce gelatinization of starch in excess water, resulting in a transition of the native granular structure to a starch paste or gel. However, there are significant differences in the structural and rheological properties between heated and pressurized starches. These differences offer benefits with respect to new product development. However, in order to implement high-pressure technology to starch and starch-containing products, a good understanding of the mechanism of pressure-induced gelatinization is necessary. Studies that are published in this area are reviewed, and the similarities and differences between starches gelatinized by pressure and by temperature are summarized.

  10. Exploring the energy benefits of advanced water metering

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Michael A.; Hans, Liesel; Piscopo, Kate; Sohn, Michael D.

    2016-08-01

    Recent improvements to advanced water metering and communications technologies have the potential to improve the management of water resources and utility infrastructure, benefiting both utilities and ratepayers. The highly granular, near-real-time data and opportunity for automated control provided by these advanced systems may yield operational benefits similar to those afforded by similar technologies in the energy sector. While significant progress has been made in quantifying the water-related benefits of these technologies, the research on quantifying the energy benefits of improved water metering is underdeveloped. Some studies have quantified the embedded energy in water in California, however these findings are based on data more than a decade old, and unanimously assert that more research is needed to further explore how topography, climate, water source, and other factors impact their findings. In this report, we show how water-related advanced metering systems may present a broader and more significant set of energy-related benefits. We review the open literature of water-related advanced metering technologies and their applications, discuss common themes with a series of water and energy experts, and perform a preliminary scoping analysis of advanced water metering deployment and use in California. We find that the open literature provides very little discussion of the energy savings potential of advanced water metering, despite the substantial energy necessary for water’s extraction, conveyance, treatment, distribution, and eventual end use. We also find that water AMI has the potential to provide water-energy co-efficiencies through improved water systems management, with benefits including improved customer education, automated leak detection, water measurement and verification, optimized system operation, and inherent water and energy conservation. Our findings also suggest that the adoption of these technologies in the water sector has been slow

  11. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Aines, R D; Wolery, T J; Bourcier, W L; Wolfe, T; Haussmann, C

    2010-02-19

    Can we use the pressure associated with sequestration to make brine into fresh water? This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF). Possible products are: Drinking water, Cooling water, and Extra aquifer space for CO{sub 2} storage. The conclusions are: (1) Many saline formation waters appear to be amenable to largely conventional RO treatment; (2) Thermodynamic modeling indicates that osmotic pressure is more limiting on water recovery than mineral scaling; (3) The use of thermodynamic modeling with Pitzer's equations (or Extended UNIQUAC) allows accurate estimation of osmotic pressure limits; (4) A general categorization of treatment feasibility is based on TDS has been proposed, in which brines with 10,000-85,000 mg/L are the most attractive targets; (5) Brines in this TDS range appear to be abundant (geographically and with depth) and could be targeted in planning future CCS operations (including site selection and choice of injection formation); and (6) The estimated cost of treating waters in the 10,000-85,000 mg/L TDS range is about half that for conventional seawater desalination, due to the anticipated pressure recovery.

  12. Application of pulsed photoacoustics in water at high pressure.

    PubMed

    Freeborn, S S; Hannigan, J; MacKenzie, H A

    1999-08-20

    The application of pulsed photoacoustics to the study of liquids at pressures of up to 350 bars is discussed. The design and development of an in-line sensor for the subsea monitoring of crude oil concentrations in water is reported. Crude oil detection sensitivities at parts per million concentrations were achieved with prototype instrumentation. A comparison of experimental results and a theoretical prediction of the pressure dependence of the pulsed photoacoustic response from water is outlined. The results demonstrate that existing models that describe pulsed photoacoustic generation in liquids are applicable to high-pressure conditions.

  13. Application of Pulsed Photoacoustics in Water at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeborn, Scott S.; Hannigan, John; MacKenzie, Hugh A.

    1999-08-01

    The application of pulsed photoacoustics to the study of liquids at pressures of up to 350 bars is discussed. The design and development of an in-line sensor for the subsea monitoring of crude oil concentrations in water is reported. Crude oil detection sensitivities at parts per million concentrations were achieved with prototype instrumentation. A comparison of experimental results and a theoretical prediction of the pressure dependence of the pulsed photoacoustic response from water is outlined. The results demonstrate that existing models that describe pulsed photoacoustic generation in liquids are applicable to high-pressure conditions.

  14. High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

    2006-01-31

    The use of internally and externally cooled annular fule rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and econmic assessment. The investigation was donducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperatre. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasiblity issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density.

  15. Water dynamics and retrogradation of ultrahigh pressurized wheat starch.

    PubMed

    Doona, Christopher J; Feeherry, Florence E; Baik, Moo-Yeol

    2006-09-06

    The water dynamics and retrogradation kinetics behavior of gelatinized wheat starch by either ultrahigh pressure (UHP) processing or heat are investigated. Wheat starch completely gelatinized in the condition of 90, 000 psi at 25 degrees C for 30 min (pressurized gel) or 100 degrees C for 30 min (heated gel). The physical properties of the wheat starches were characterized in terms of proton relaxation times (T2 times) measured using time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and evaluated using commercially available continuous distribution modeling software. Different T2 distributions in both micro- and millisecond ranges between pressurized and heated wheat starch gels suggest distinctively different water dynamics between pressurized and heated wheat starch gels. Smaller water self-diffusion coefficients were observed for pressurized wheat starch gels and are indicative of more restricted translational proton mobility than is observed with heated wheat starch gels. The physical characteristics associated with changes taking place during retrogradation were evaluated using melting curves obtained with differential scanning calorimetry. Less retrogradation was observed in pressurized wheat starch, and it may be related to a smaller quantity of freezable water in pressurized wheat starch. Starches comprise a major constituent of many foods proposed for commercial potential using UHP, and the present results furnish insight into the effect of UHP on starch gelatinization and the mechanism of retrogradation during storage.

  16. Advanced High-Temperature, High-Pressure Transport Reactor Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Michael L. Swanson

    2005-08-30

    50 hours of gasification on a petroleum coke from the Hunt Oil Refinery and an additional 73 hours of operation on a high-ash coal from India. Data from these tests indicate that while acceptable fuel gas heating value was achieved with these fuels, the transport gasifier performs better on the lower-rank feedstocks because of their higher char reactivity. Comparable carbon conversions have been achieved at similar oxygen/coal ratios for both air-blown and oxygen-blown operation for each fuel; however, carbon conversion was lower for the less reactive feedstocks. While separation of fines from the feed coals is not needed with this technology, some testing has suggested that feedstocks with higher levels of fines have resulted in reduced carbon conversion, presumably due to the inability of the finer carbon particles to be captured by the cyclones. These data show that these low-rank feedstocks provided similar fuel gas heating values; however, even among the high-reactivity low-rank coals, the carbon conversion did appear to be lower for the fuels (brown coal in particular) that contained a significant amount of fines. The fuel gas under oxygen-blown operation has been higher in hydrogen and carbon dioxide concentration since the higher steam injection rate promotes the water-gas shift reaction to produce more CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} at the expense of the CO and water vapor. However, the high water and CO{sub 2} partial pressures have also significantly reduced the reaction of (Abstract truncated)

  17. The phase diagram of water at negative pressures: virtual ices.

    PubMed

    Conde, M M; Vega, C; Tribello, G A; Slater, B

    2009-07-21

    The phase diagram of water at negative pressures as obtained from computer simulations for two models of water, TIP4P/2005 and TIP5P is presented. Several solid structures with lower densities than ice Ih, so-called virtual ices, were considered as possible candidates to occupy the negative pressure region of the phase diagram of water. In particular the empty hydrate structures sI, sII, and sH and another, recently proposed, low-density ice structure. The relative stabilities of these structures at 0 K was determined using empirical water potentials and density functional theory calculations. By performing free energy calculations and Gibbs-Duhem integration the phase diagram of TIP4P/2005 was determined at negative pressures. The empty hydrates sII and sH appear to be the stable solid phases of water at negative pressures. The phase boundary between ice Ih and sII clathrate occurs at moderate negative pressures, while at large negative pressures sH becomes the most stable phase. This behavior is in reasonable agreement with what is observed in density functional theory calculations.

  18. Pressure: the politechnics of water supply in Mumbai.

    PubMed

    Anand, Nikhil

    2011-01-01

    In Mumbai, most all residents are delivered their daily supply of water for a few hours every day, on a water supply schedule. Subject to a more precarious supply than the city's upper-class residents, the city's settlers have to consistently demand that their water come on “time” and with “pressure.” Taking pressure seriously as both a social and natural force, in this article I focus on the ways in which settlers mobilize the pressures of politics, pumps, and pipes to get water. I show how these practices not only allow settlers to live in the city, but also produce what I call hydraulic citizenship—a form of belonging to the city made by effective political and technical connections to the city's infrastructure. Yet, not all settlers are able to get water from the city water department. The outcomes of settlers' efforts to access water depend on a complex matrix of socionatural relations that settlers make with city engineers and their hydraulic infrastructure. I show how these arrangements describe and produce the cultural politics of water in Mumbai. By focusing on the ways in which residents in a predominantly Muslim settlement draw water despite the state's neglect, I conclude by pointing to the indeterminacy of water, and the ways in which its seepage and leakage make different kinds of politics and publics possible in the city.

  19. Advances in water resources monitoring from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomonson, V. V.

    1974-01-01

    Nimbus-5 observations indicate that over the oceans the total precipitable water in a column of atmosphere can be estimated to within + or - 10%, the liquid water content of clouds can be estimated to within + or - 25%, areas of precipitation can be delineated, and broad estimates of the precipitation rate obtained. ERTS-1 observations permit the measurement of snow covered area to within a few percent of drainage basin area and snowline altitudes can be estimated to within 60 meters. Surface water areas as small as 1 hectare can be inventoried over large regions such as playa lakes region of West Texas and Eastern New Mexico. In addition, changes in land use on water-sheds occurring as a result of forest fires, urban development, clear cutting, or strip mining can be rapidly obtained.

  20. Advanced technology for minimum weight pressure vessel system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamstad, M. A.; Jessop, E. S.; Toland, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    Bosses were made of fiber/resin composite materials to evaluate their potential in lightweight pressure vessels. An approximate 25% weight savings over the standard aluminum boss was achieved without boss failures during burst tests. Polymer liners and metal liners are used in fiber composite pressure vessels for containment of gases. The internal support of these liners required during the filament winding process has previously been provided by dissolvable salt mandrels. An internal pressurization technique has been developed which allows overwinding the liner without other means of support and without collapse. Study was made of several additional concepts including styrene/Saran, styrene/flexible epoxy.

  1. ADVANCED STRIPPER GAS PRODUCED WATER REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Harry Bonner; Roger Malmquist

    2002-10-01

    Natural gas and oil production from stripper wells also produces water contaminated with hydrocarbons, and in most locations, salts and trace elements. The hydrocarbons are not generally present in concentrations that allow the operator to economically recover these liquids. Produced liquids, (Stripper Gas Water) which are predominantly water, present the operator with two options; purify the water to acceptable levels of contaminates, or pay for the disposal of the water. The project scope involves testing SynCoal as a sorbent to reduce the levels of contamination in stripper gas well produced water to a level that the water can be put to a productive use. Produced water is to be filtered with SynCoal, a processed sub-bituminous coal. It is expected that the surface area of and in the SynCoal would sorb the hydrocarbons and other contaminates and the effluent would be usable for agricultural purposes. Test plan anticipates using two well locations described as being disparate in the level and type of contaminates present. The loading capacity and the rate of loading for the sorbent should be quantified in field testing situations which include unregulated and widely varying liquid flow rates. This will require significant flexibility in the initial stages of the investigation. The scope of work outlined below serves as the guidelines for the testing of SynCoal carbon product as a sorbent to remove hydrocarbons and other contaminants from the produced waters of natural gas wells. A maximum ratio of 1 lb carbon to 100 lbs water treated is the initial basis for economic design. While the levels of contaminants directly impact this ratio, the ultimate economics will be dictated by the filter servicing requirements. This experimental program is intended to identify those treatment parameters that yield the best technological practice for a given set of operating conditions. The goal of this research is to determine appropriate guidelines for field trials by accurately

  2. ADVANCED STRIPPER GAS PRODUCED WATER REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Harry Bonner; Roger Malmquist

    2003-08-01

    Natural gas and oil production from stripper wells also produces water contaminated with hydrocarbons, and in most locations, salts and trace elements. The hydrocarbons are not generally present in concentrations that allow the operator to economically recover these liquids. Produced liquids, (Stripper Gas Water) which are predominantly water, present the operator with two options; purify the water to acceptable levels of contaminates, or pay for the disposal of the water. The project scope involves testing SynCoal as a sorbent to reduce the levels of contamination in stripper gas well produced water to a level that the water can be put to a productive use. Produced water is to be filtered with SynCoal, a processed sub-bituminous coal. It is expected that the surface area of and in the SynCoal would sorb the hydrocarbons and other contaminates and the effluent would be usable for agricultural purposes. Test plan anticipates using two well locations described as being disparate in the level and type of contaminates present. The loading capacity and the rate of loading for the sorbent should be quantified in field testing situations which include unregulated and widely varying liquid flow rates. This will require significant flexibility in the initial stages of the investigation. The scope of work outlined below serves as the guidelines for the testing of SynCoal carbon product as a sorbent to remove hydrocarbons and other contaminants from the produced waters of natural gas wells. A maximum ratio of 1 lb carbon to 100 lbs water treated is the initial basis for economic design. While the levels of contaminants directly impact this ratio, the ultimate economics will be dictated by the filter servicing requirements. This experimental program is intended to identify those treatment parameters that yield the best technological practice for a given set of operating conditions. The goal of this research is to determine appropriate guidelines for field trials by accurately

  3. ADVANCED STRIPPER GAS PRODUCED WATER REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ray W. Sheldon

    2001-09-01

    Natural gas and oil production from stripper wells also produces water contaminated with hydrocarbons, and in most locations, salts and trace elements. The hydrocarbons are not generally present in concentrations that allow the operator to economically recover these liquids. Produced liquids, (stripper gas water) which are predominantly water, present the operator with two options; purify the water to acceptable levels of contaminates, or pay for the disposal of the water. The project scope involves testing SynCoal as a sorbent to reduce the levels of contamination in stripper gas well produced water to a level that the water can be put to a productive use. Produced water is to be filtered with SynCoal, a processed sub-bituminous coal. It is expected that the surface area of and in the SynCoal would sorb the hydrocarbons and other contaminates and the effluent would be usable for agricultural purposes. Test plan anticipates using two well locations described as being disparate in the level and type of contaminates present. The loading capacity and the rate of loading for the sorbent should be quantified in field testing situations which include unregulated and widely varying liquid flow rates. This will require significant flexibility in the initial stages of the investigation. The scope of work outlined below serves as the guidelines for the testing of SynCoal carbon product as a sorbent to remove hydrocarbons and other contaminants from the produced waters of natural gas wells. A maximum ratio of 1 lb carbon to 100 lbs water treated is the initial basis for economic design. While the levels of contaminants directly impact this ratio, the ultimate economics will be dictated by the filter servicing requirements. This experimental program is intended to identify those treatment parameters that yield the best technological practice for a given set of operating conditions. The goal of this research is to determine appropriate guidelines for field trials by accurately

  4. ADVANCED STRIPPER GAS PRODUCED WATER REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Harry Bonner; Roger Malmquist

    2003-01-01

    Natural gas and oil production from stripper wells also produces water contaminated with hydrocarbons, and in most locations, salts and trace elements. The hydrocarbons are not generally present in concentrations that allow the operator to economically recover these liquids. Produced liquids, (Stripper Gas Water) which are predominately water, present the operator with two options; purify the water to acceptable levels of contaminates, or pay for the disposal of the water. The project scope involves testing SynCoal as a sorbent to reduce the levels of contamination in stripper gas well produced water to a level that the water can be put to a productive use. Produced water is to be filtered with SynCoal, a processed sub-bituminous coal. It is expected that the surface area of and in the SynCoal would sorb the hydrocarbons and other contaminates and the effluent would be usable for agricultural purposes. Test plan anticipates using two well locations described as being disparate in the level and type of contaminates present. The loading capacity and the rate of loading for the sorbent should be quantified in field testing situations which include unregulated and widely varying liquid flow rates. This will require significant flexibility in the initial stages of the investigation. The scope of work outlined below serves as the guidelines for the testing of SynCoal carbon product as a sorbent to remove hydrocarbons and other contaminants from the produced waters of natural gas wells. A maximum ratio of 1 lb carbon to 100 lbs water treated is the initial basis for economic design. While the levels of contaminants directly impact this ratio, the ultimate economics will be dictated by the filter servicing requirements. This experimental program is intended to identify those treatment parameters that yield the best technological practice for a given set of operating conditions. The goal of this research is to determine appropriate guidelines for field trials by accurately

  5. ADVANCED STRIPPER GAS PRODUCED WATER REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ray W. Sheldon, P.E.

    2001-11-01

    Natural gas and oil production from stripper wells also produces water contaminated with hydrocarbons, and in most locations, salts and trace elements. The hydrocarbons are not generally present in concentrations that allow the operator to economically recover these liquids. Produced liquids, (Stripper Gas Water) which are predominantly water, present the operator with two options; purify the water to acceptable levels of contaminates, or pay for the disposal of the water. The project scope involves testing SynCoal as a sorbent to reduce the levels of contamination in stripper gas well produced water to a level that the water can be put to a productive use. Produced water is to be filtered with SynCoal, a processed sub-bituminous coal. It is expected that the surface area of and in the SynCoal would sorb the hydrocarbons and other contaminates and the effluent would be usable for agricultural purposes. Test plan anticipates using two well locations described as being disparate in the level and type of contaminates present. The loading capacity and the rate of loading for the sorbent should be quantified in field testing situations which include unregulated and widely varying liquid flow rates. This will require significant flexibility in the initial stages of the investigation. The scope of work outlined below serves as the guidelines for the testing of SynCoal carbon product as a sorbent to remove hydrocarbons and other contaminants from the produced waters of natural gas wells. A maximum ratio of 1 lb carbon to 100 lbs water treated is the initial basis for economic design. While the levels of contaminants directly impact this ratio, the ultimate economics will be dictated by the filter servicing requirements. This experimental program is intended to identify those treatment parameters that yield the best technological practice for a given set of operating conditions. The goal of this research is to determine appropriate guidelines for field trials by accurately

  6. ADVANCED STRIPPER GAS PRODUCED WATER REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Harry Bonner; Roger Malmquist

    2002-01-01

    Natural gas and oil production from stripper wells also produces water contaminated with hydrocarbons, and in most locations, salts and trace elements. The hydrocarbons are not generally present in concentrations that allow the operator to economically recover these liquids. Produced liquids, (Stripper Gas Water) which are predominantly water, present the operator with two options; purify the water to acceptable levels of contaminates, or pay for the disposal of the water. The project scope involves testing SynCoal as a sorbent to reduce the levels of contamination in stripper gas well produced water to a level that the water can be put to a productive use. Produced water is to be filtered with SynCoal, a processed sub-bituminous coal. It is expected that the surface area of and in the SynCoal would sorb the hydrocarbons and other contaminates and the effluent would be usable for agricultural purposes. Test plan anticipates using two well locations described as being disparate in the level and type of contaminates present. The loading capacity and the rate of loading for the sorbent should be quantified in field testing situations which include unregulated and widely varying liquid flow rates. This will require significant flexibility in the initial stages of the investigation. The scope of work outlined below serves as the guidelines for the testing of SynCoal carbon product as a sorbent to remove hydrocarbons and other contaminants from the produced waters of natural gas wells. A maximum ratio of 1 lb carbon to 100 lbs water treated is the initial basis for economic design. While the levels of contaminants directly impact this ratio, the ultimate economics will be dictated by the filter servicing requirements. This experimental program is intended to identify those treatment parameters that yield the best technological practice for a given set of operating conditions. The goal of this research is to determine appropriate guidelines for field trials by accurately

  7. ADVANCED STRIPPER GAS PRODUCED WATER REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Harry Bonner; Roger Malmquist

    2002-04-01

    Natural gas and oil production from stripper wells also produces water contaminated with hydrocarbons, and in most locations, salts and trace elements. The hydrocarbons are not generally present in concentrations that allow the operator to economically recover these liquids. Produced liquids, (Stripper Gas Water) which are predominantly water, present the operator with two options; purify the water to acceptable levels of contaminates, or pay for the disposal of the water. The project scope involves testing SynCoal as a sorbent to reduce the levels of contamination in stripper gas well produced water to a level that the water can be put to a productive use. Produced water is to be filtered with SynCoal, a processed sub-bituminous coal. It is expected that the surface area of and in the SynCoal would sorb the hydrocarbons and other contaminates and the effluent would be usable for agricultural purposes. Test plan anticipates using two well locations described as being disparate in the level and type of contaminates present. The loading capacity and the rate of loading for the sorbent should be quantified in field testing situations which include unregulated and widely varying liquid flow rates. This will require significant flexibility in the initial stages of the investigation. The scope of work outlined below serves as the guidelines for the testing of SynCoal carbon product as a sorbent to remove hydrocarbons and other contaminants from the produced waters of natural gas wells. A maximum ratio of 1 lb carbon to 100 lbs water treated is the initial basis for economic design. While the levels of contaminants directly impact this ratio, the ultimate economics will be dictated by the filter servicing requirements. This experimental program is intended to identify those treatment parameters that yield the best technological practice for a given set of operating conditions. The goal of this research is to determine appropriate guidelines for field trials by accurately

  8. ADVANCED STRIPPER GAS PRODUCED WATER REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Harry Bonner; Roger Malmquist

    2002-07-01

    Natural gas and oil production from stripper wells also produces water contaminated with hydrocarbons, and in most locations, salts and trace elements. The hydrocarbons are not generally present in concentrations that allow the operator to economically recover these liquids. Produced liquids, (Stripper Gas Water) which are predominantly water, present the operator with two options; purify the water to acceptable levels of contaminates, or pay for the disposal of the water. The project scope involves testing SynCoal as a sorbent to reduce the levels of contamination in stripper gas well produced water to a level that the water can be put to a productive use. Produced water is to be filtered with SynCoal, a processed sub-bituminous coal. It is expected that the surface area of and in the SynCoal would sorb the hydrocarbons and other contaminates and the effluent would be usable for agricultural purposes. Test plan anticipates using two well locations described as being disparate in the level and type of contaminates present. The loading capacity and the rate of loading for the sorbent should be quantified in field testing situations which include unregulated and widely varying liquid flow rates. This will require significant flexibility in the initial stages of the investigation. The scope of work outlined below serves as the guidelines for the testing of SynCoal carbon product as a sorbent to remove hydrocarbons and other contaminants from the produced waters of natural gas wells. A maximum ratio of 1 lb carbon to 100 lbs water treated is the initial basis for economic design. While the levels of contaminants directly impact this ratio, the ultimate economics will be dictated by the filter servicing requirements. This experimental program is intended to identify those treatment parameters that yield the best technological practice for a given set of operating conditions. The goal of this research is to determine appropriate guidelines for field trials by accurately

  9. ADVANCED STRIPPER GAS PRODUCED WATER REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Harry Bonner; Roger Malmquist

    2003-11-01

    Natural gas and oil production from stripper wells also produces water contaminated with hydrocarbons, and in most locations, salts and trace elements. The hydrocarbons are not generally present in concentrations that allow the operator to economically recover these liquids. Produced liquids, (Stripper Gas Water) which are predominantly water, present the operator with two options; purify the water to acceptable levels of contaminates, or pay for the disposal of the water. The project scope involves testing SynCoal as a sorbent to reduce the levels of contamination in stripper gas well produced water to a level that the water can be put to a productive use. Produced water is to be filtered with SynCoal, a processed sub-bituminous coal. It is expected that the surface area of and in the SynCoal would sorb the hydrocarbons and other contaminates and the effluent would be usable for agricultural purposes. Test plan anticipates using two well locations described as being disparate in the level and type of contaminates present. The loading capacity and the rate of loading for the sorbent should be quantified in field testing situations which include unregulated and widely varying liquid flow rates. This will require significant flexibility in the initial stages of the investigation. The scope of work outlined below serves as the guidelines for the testing of SynCoal carbon product as a sorbent to remove hydrocarbons and other contaminants from the produced waters of natural gas wells. A maximum ratio of 1 lb carbon to 100 lbs water treated is the initial basis for economic design. While the levels of contaminants directly impact this ratio, the ultimate economics will be dictated by the filter servicing requirements. This experimental program was intended to identify those treatment parameters that yield the best technological practice for a given set of operating conditions. The goal of this research was to determine appropriate guidelines for field trials by

  10. VERA Core Simulator methodology for pressurized water reactor cycle depletion

    DOE PAGES

    Kochunas, Brendan; Collins, Benjamin; Stimpson, Shane; ...

    2017-01-12

    This paper describes the methodology developed and implemented in the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications Core Simulator (VERA-CS) to perform high-fidelity, pressurized water reactor (PWR), multicycle, core physics calculations. Depletion of the core with pin-resolved power and nuclide detail is a significant advance in the state of the art for reactor analysis, providing the level of detail necessary to address the problems of the U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Reactor Simulation Hub, the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). VERA-CS has three main components: the neutronics solver MPACT, the thermal-hydraulic (T-H) solver COBRA-TF (CTF), and the nuclidemore » transmutation solver ORIGEN. This paper focuses on MPACT and provides an overview of the resonance self-shielding methods, macroscopic-cross-section calculation, two-dimensional/one-dimensional (2-D/1-D) transport, nuclide depletion, T-H feedback, and other supporting methods representing a minimal set of the capabilities needed to simulate high-fidelity models of a commercial nuclear reactor. Results are presented from the simulation of a model of the first cycle of Watts Bar Unit 1. The simulation is within 16 parts per million boron (ppmB) reactivity for all state points compared to cycle measurements, with an average reactivity bias of <5 ppmB for the entire cycle. Comparisons to cycle 1 flux map data are also provided, and the average 2-D root-mean-square (rms) error during cycle 1 is 1.07%. To demonstrate the multicycle capability, a state point at beginning of cycle (BOC) 2 was also simulated and compared to plant data. The comparison of the cycle 2 BOC state has a reactivity difference of +3 ppmB from measurement, and the 2-D rms of the comparison in the flux maps is 1.77%. Lastly, these results provide confidence in VERA-CS’s capability to perform high-fidelity calculations for practical PWR reactor problems.« less

  11. Water Pressure Distribution on a Twin-Float Seaplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, F L

    1930-01-01

    This is the second of a series of investigations to determine water pressure distribution on various types of seaplane floats and hulls, and was conducted on a twin-float seaplane. It consisted of measuring water pressures and accelerations on a TS-1 seaplane during numerous landing and taxiing maneuvers at various speeds and angles. The results show that water pressures as great as 10 lbs. per sq. in.may occur at the step in various maneuvers and that pressures of approximately the same magnitude occur at the stern and near the bow in hard pancake landings with the stern way down. At the other parts of the float the pressures are less and are usually zero or slightly negative for some distance abaft the step. A maximum negative pressure of 0.87 lb. Per square inch was measured immediately abaft the step. The maximum positive pressures have a duration of approximately one-twentieth to one-hundredth second at any given location and are distributed over a very limited area at any particular instant.

  12. Water cycles in closed ecological systems: effects of atmospheric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rygalov, Vadim Y.; Fowler, Philip A.; Metz, Joannah M.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Bucklin, Ray A.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    In bioregenerative life support systems that use plants to generate food and oxygen, the largest mass flux between the plants and their surrounding environment will be water. This water cycle is a consequence of the continuous change of state (evaporation-condensation) from liquid to gas through the process of transpiration and the need to transfer heat (cool) and dehumidify the plant growth chamber. Evapotranspiration rates for full plant canopies can range from 1 to 10 L m-2 d-1 (1 to 10 mm m-2 d-1), with the rates depending primarily on the vapor pressure deficit (VPD) between the leaves and the air inside the plant growth chamber. VPD in turn is dependent on the air temperature, leaf temperature, and current value of relative humidity (RH). Concepts for developing closed plant growth systems, such as greenhouses for Mars, have been discussed for many years and the feasibility of such systems will depend on the overall system costs and reliability. One approach for reducing system costs would be to reduce the operating pressure within the greenhouse to reduce structural mass and gas leakage. But managing plant growth environments at low pressures (e.g., controlling humidity and heat exchange) may be difficult, and the effects of low-pressure environments on plant growth and system water cycling need further study. We present experimental evidence to show that water saturation pressures in air under isothermal conditions are only slightly affected by total pressure, but the overall water flux from evaporating surfaces can increase as pressure decreases. Mathematical models describing these observations are presented, along with discussion of the importance for considering "water cycles" in closed bioregenerative life support systems.

  13. Water cycles in closed ecological systems: effects of atmospheric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rygalov, Vadim Y.; Fowler, Philip A.; Metz, Joannah M.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Bucklin, Ray A.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    In bioregenerative life support systems that use plants to generate food and oxygen, the largest mass flux between the plants and their surrounding environment will be water. This water cycle is a consequence of the continuous change of state (evaporation-condensation) from liquid to gas through the process of transpiration and the need to transfer heat (cool) and dehumidify the plant growth chamber. Evapotranspiration rates for full plant canopies can range from 1 to 10 L m-2 d-1 (1 to 10 mm m-2 d-1), with the rates depending primarily on the vapor pressure deficit (VPD) between the leaves and the air inside the plant growth chamber. VPD in turn is dependent on the air temperature, leaf temperature, and current value of relative humidity (RH). Concepts for developing closed plant growth systems, such as greenhouses for Mars, have been discussed for many years and the feasibility of such systems will depend on the overall system costs and reliability. One approach for reducing system costs would be to reduce the operating pressure within the greenhouse to reduce structural mass and gas leakage. But managing plant growth environments at low pressures (e.g., controlling humidity and heat exchange) may be difficult, and the effects of low-pressure environments on plant growth and system water cycling need further study. We present experimental evidence to show that water saturation pressures in air under isothermal conditions are only slightly affected by total pressure, but the overall water flux from evaporating surfaces can increase as pressure decreases. Mathematical models describing these observations are presented, along with discussion of the importance for considering "water cycles" in closed bioregenerative life support systems.

  14. Case history advanced coatings for water treatment plant components

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, L.D.; Kumar, A.

    2008-12-15

    Components of water treatment plants (WTPs) are susceptible to corrosion from constant immersion in water. A case history of corrosion and proximity to chlorine problems and their treatment at an Army WTP is presented. Solutions included using high micro-silica restoration mortar and advanced coal tar epoxy coatings.

  15. Recent advances in SPE (tm) water electrolyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, James F.

    1993-01-01

    A new cell structure has been introduced into the SPE Water Electrolyzer which has improved overall characteristics significantly. Weight, reliability, and efficiency are the characteristics that are improved the most, with volume having a second order improvement. This paper discusses the capabilities of the new cell structure and the impact it would have in various space applications.

  16. Advances in nitrogen management for water quality

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The creation of this book was inspired by collaborative discussions with some of the individuals who presented at the 7th annual symposium that was jointly held by the Soil and Water Conservation Society (SWCS) and Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) in 2006. These individuals were asked to work ...

  17. Advanced Water Removal via Membrane Solvent Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    2009-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project that will focus on further concept and technology development and verification at the pilot scale of an MSE technology developed by 3M. The technology shows great promise to substantially decrease energy and water consumption in bioethanol production.

  18. Thermodynamics of high-temperature, high-pressure water electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Devin; Schwager, Maximilian; Mérida, Walter

    2014-12-01

    We report on a thermodynamic analysis for water electrolysis from normal conditions (P = 0.1 MPa, T = 298 K) up to heretofore unaddressed temperatures of 1000 K and pressures of 100 MPa. Thermoneutral and reversible potentials are determined using equations-of-state published by the International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The need for using accurate property models at these elevated temperatures and pressures is exemplified by contrasting results with those obtained via ideal assumptions. The utility of our results is demonstrated by their application in an analysis comparing pressurized electrolysis versus mechanical gas compression. Within the limits of our analysis, pressurized electrolysis demonstrates lower energy requirements albeit with electrical work composing a greater proportion of the total energy input.

  19. Advances in wound healing: topical negative pressure therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jones, S; Banwell, P; Shakespeare, P

    2005-01-01

    In clinical practice many wounds are slow to heal and difficult to manage. The recently introduced technique of topical negative pressure therapy (TNP) has been developed to try to overcome some of these difficulties. TNP applies a controlled negative pressure to the surface of a wound that has potential advantages for wound treatment and management. Although the concept itself, of using suction in wound management is not new, the technique of applying a negative pressure at the surface of the wound is. This paper explores the origins and proposed mechanisms of action of TNP therapy and discusses the types of wounds that are thought to benefit most from use of this system. PMID:15937199

  20. Advanced composite fiber/metal pressure vessels for aircraft applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanicolopoulos, Aleck

    1993-06-01

    Structural Composites Industries has developed, qualified, and delivered a number of high performance carbon epoxy overwrapped/seamless aluminum liner pressure vessels for use in military aircraft where low weight, low cost, high operating pressure and short lead time are the primary considerations. This paper describes product design, development, and qualification for a typical program. The vessel requirements included a munitions insensitivity criterion as evidenced by no fragmentation following impact by a .50 cal tumbling bullet. This was met by the development of a carbon-Spectra hybrid composite overwrap on a thin-walled seamless aluminum liner. The same manufacturing, inspection, and test processes that are used to produce lightweight, thin walled seamless aluminum lined carbon/epoxy overwrapped pressure vessels for satellite and other space applications were used to fabricate this vessel. This report focuses on the results of performance in the qualification testing.

  1. Design of virtual SCADA simulation system for pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Wijaksono, Umar Abdullah, Ade Gafar; Hakim, Dadang Lukman

    2016-02-08

    The Virtual SCADA system is a software-based Human-Machine Interface that can visualize the process of a plant. This paper described the results of the virtual SCADA system design that aims to recognize the principle of the Nuclear Power Plant type Pressurized Water Reactor. This simulation uses technical data of the Nuclear Power Plant Unit Olkiluoto 3 in Finland. This device was developed using Wonderware Intouch, which is equipped with manual books for each component, animation links, alarm systems, real time and historical trending, and security system. The results showed that in general this device can demonstrate clearly the principles of energy flow and energy conversion processes in Pressurized Water Reactors. This virtual SCADA simulation system can be used as instructional media to recognize the principle of Pressurized Water Reactor.

  2. Design of virtual SCADA simulation system for pressurized water reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijaksono, Umar; Abdullah, Ade Gafar; Hakim, Dadang Lukman

    2016-02-01

    The Virtual SCADA system is a software-based Human-Machine Interface that can visualize the process of a plant. This paper described the results of the virtual SCADA system design that aims to recognize the principle of the Nuclear Power Plant type Pressurized Water Reactor. This simulation uses technical data of the Nuclear Power Plant Unit Olkiluoto 3 in Finland. This device was developed using Wonderware Intouch, which is equipped with manual books for each component, animation links, alarm systems, real time and historical trending, and security system. The results showed that in general this device can demonstrate clearly the principles of energy flow and energy conversion processes in Pressurized Water Reactors. This virtual SCADA simulation system can be used as instructional media to recognize the principle of Pressurized Water Reactor.

  3. Heat of freezing for supercooled water: measurements at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, Will; Kostinski, Alexander; Szedlak, Anthony; Johnson, Alexandria

    2011-06-16

    Unlike reversible phase transitions, the amount of heat released upon freezing of a metastable supercooled liquid depends on the degree of supercooling. Although terrestrial supercooled water is ubiquitous and has implications for cloud dynamics and nucleation, measurements of its heat of freezing are scarce. We have performed calorimetric measurements of the heat released by freezing water at atmospheric pressure as a function of supercooling. Our measurements show that the heat of freezing can be considerably below one predicted from a reversible hydrostatic process. Our measurements also indicate that the state of the resulting ice is not fully specified by the final pressure and temperature; the ice is likely to be strained on a variety of scales, implying a higher vapor pressure. This would reduce the vapor gradient between supercooled water and ice in mixed phase atmospheric clouds. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  4. Advanced Decontamination Technologies: High Hydrostatic Pressure on Meat Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garriga, Margarita; Aymerich, Teresa

    The increasing demand for “natural” foodstuffs, free from chemical additives, and preservatives has triggered novel approaches in food technology developments. In the last decade, practical use of high-pressure processing (HPP) made this emerging non-thermal technology very attractive from a commercial point of view. Despite the fact that the investment is still high, the resulting value-added products, with an extended and safe shelf-life, will fulfil the wishes of consumers who prefer preservative-free minimally processed foods, retaining sensorial characteristics of freshness. Moreover, unlike thermal treatment, pressure treatment is not time/mass dependant, thus reducing the time of processing.

  5. Editorial changes - Advances in Water Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, D. A.; D'Odorico, P.; Rinaldo, A.

    2015-10-01

    Prof. Miller's longevity of service as Editor is remarkable - he started this role in August 1997. During his nearly 18 years as Editor, he provided unstinting energy, attention to detail, and commitment to the water resources community. A hallmark of his stewardship of the journal is that he "led from the front". He undertook not only to sustain a suitable venue for high quality research, but also to foster special issues, especially in emerging research topics. Prof. Miller ensured that at all times the journal's core focus of fundamental water resources science was not diluted. Indeed, a major legacy of Prof. Miller's vision is that the journal is a destination of choice for such contributions.

  6. Solitary Water Waves of Large Amplitude Generated by Surface Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Miles H.

    2015-11-01

    We consider exact nonlinear solitary water waves on a shear flow with an arbitrary distribution of vorticity. Ignoring surface tension, we impose a non-constant pressure on the free surface. Starting from a uniform shear flow with a flat free surface and a supercritical wave speed, we vary the surface pressure and use a continuation argument to construct a global connected set of symmetric solitary waves. This set includes waves of depression whose profiles increase monotonically from a central trough where the surface pressure is at its lowest, as well as waves of elevation whose profiles decrease monotonically from a central crest where the surface pressure is at its highest. There may also be two waves in this connected set with identical surface pressure, only one of which is a wave of depression.

  7. Bioluminescence-based imaging technique for pressure measurement in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yasunori; Tanaka, Yasufumi

    2011-07-01

    The dinoflagellate Pyrocystis lunula emits light in response to water motion. We developed a new imaging technique for measuring pressure using plankton that emits light in response to mechanical stimulation. The bioluminescence emitted by P. lunula was used to measure impact water pressure produced using weight-drop tests. The maximum mean luminescence intensity correlated with the maximum impact pressure that the cells receive when the circadian and diurnal biological rhythms are appropriately controlled. Thus, with appropriate calibration of experimentally determined parameters, the dynamic impact pressure can be estimated by measuring the cell-flash distribution. Statistical features of the evolution of flash intensity and the probability distribution during the impacting event, which are described by both biological and mechanical response parameters, are also discussed in this paper. The practical applicability of this bioluminescence imaging technique is examined through a water drop test. The maximum dynamic pressure, occurring at the impact of a water jet against a wall, was estimated from the flash intensity of the dinoflagellate.

  8. Time Pressure and Phonological Advance Planning in Spoken Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damian, Markus F.; Dumay, Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    Current accounts of spoken production debate the extent to which speakers plan ahead. Here, we investigated whether the scope of phonological planning is influenced by changes in time pressure constraints. The first experiment used a picture-word interference task and showed that picture naming latencies were shorter when word distractors shared…

  9. Recent Advances in Food Processing Using High Hydrostatic Pressure Technology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chung-Yi; Huang, Hsiao-Wen; Hsu, Chiao-Ping; Yang, Binghuei Barry

    2016-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure is an emerging non-thermal technology that can achieve the same standards of food safety as those of heat pasteurization and meet consumer requirements for fresher tasting, minimally processed foods. Applying high-pressure processing can inactivate pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms and enzymes, as well as modify structures with little or no effects on the nutritional and sensory quality of foods. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) have approved the use of high-pressure processing (HPP), which is a reliable technological alternative to conventional heat pasteurization in food-processing procedures. This paper presents the current applications of HPP in processing fruits, vegetables, meats, seafood, dairy, and egg products; such applications include the combination of pressure and biopreservation to generate specific characteristics in certain products. In addition, this paper describes recent findings on the microbiological, chemical, and molecular aspects of HPP technology used in commercial and research applications.

  10. Time Pressure and Phonological Advance Planning in Spoken Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damian, Markus F.; Dumay, Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    Current accounts of spoken production debate the extent to which speakers plan ahead. Here, we investigated whether the scope of phonological planning is influenced by changes in time pressure constraints. The first experiment used a picture-word interference task and showed that picture naming latencies were shorter when word distractors shared…

  11. Dynamics of Nano-Confined Water under Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Omar Diallo, Souleymane; Jazdzewska, Monika; Palmer, Jeremy; Mamontov, Eugene; Gubbins, Dr. K. E.; Sliwinska-Bartkowiak, M

    2013-01-01

    We report a study of the effects of pressure on the diffusivity of water molecules confined in single- wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with average mean pore diameter of 16 A. The measurements were carried out using high-resolution neutron scattering, over the temperature range 220 T 260 K, and at two pressure conditions: ambient and elevated pressure. The high pressure data were collected at constant volume on cooling, with P varying from 1.92 kbar at temperature T = 260 K to 1.85 kbar at T = 220 K. Analysis of the observed dynamic structure factor S(Q, E) reveals the presence of two relaxation processes, a faster diffusion component (FC) associated with the motion of caged or restricted molecules, and a slower component arising from the free water molecules diffusing within the SWNT matrix. While the temperature dependence of the slow relaxation time exhibits a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law and is non-Arrhenius in nature, the faster component follows an Arrhenius exponential law at both pressure conditions. The application of pressure remarkably slows down the overall molecular dynamics, in agreement with previous observations, but most notably affects the slow relaxation. The faster relaxation shows marginal or no change with pressure within the experimental conditions.

  12. Application-specific integrated circuit design for a typical pressurized water reactor pressure channel trip

    SciTech Connect

    Battle, R.E.; Manges, W.W.; Emery, M.S.; Vendermolen, R.I.; Bhatt, S.

    1994-03-01

    This article discusses the use of application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) in nuclear plant safety systems. ASICs have certain advantages over software-based systems because they can be simple enough to be thoroughly tested, and they can be tailored to replace existing equipment. An architecture to replace a pressurized water reactor pressure channel trip is presented. Methods of implementing digital algorithms are also discussed.

  13. Nonlinear vibration of a hemispherical dome under external water pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, C. T. F.; McLennan, A.; Little, A. P. F.

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the behaviour of a hemi-spherical dome when vibrated under external water pressure, using the commercial computer package ANSYS 11.0. In order to achieve this aim, the dome was modelled and vibrated in air and then in water, before finally being vibrated under external water pressure. The results collected during each of the analyses were compared to the previous studies, and this demonstrated that ANSYS was a suitable program and produced accurate results for this type of analysis, together with excellent graphical displays. The analysis under external water pressure, clearly demonstrated that as external water pressure was increased, the resonant frequencies decreased and a type of dynamic buckling became likely; because the static buckling eigenmode was similar to the vibration eigenmode. ANSYS compared favourably with the in-house software, but had the advantage that it produced graphical displays. This also led to the identification of previously undetected meridional modes of vibration; which were not detected with the in-house software.

  14. Fracture analysis of axially cracked pressure tube of pressurized heavy water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, S.; Bhasin, V.; Mahajan, S.C.

    1997-04-01

    Three Dimensional (313) finite element elastic plastic fracture analysis was done for through wall axially cracked thin pressure tubes of 220 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor. The analysis was done for Zr-2 and Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes operating at 300{degrees}C and subjected to 9.5 Mpa internal pressure. Critical crack length was determined based on tearing instability concept. The analysis included the effect of crack face pressure due to the leaking fluid from tube. This effect was found to be significant for pressure tubes. The available formulae for calculating J (for axially cracked tubes) do not take into account the effect of crack face pressure. 3D finite element analysis also gives insight into variation of J across the thickness of pressure tube. It was observed that J is highest at the mid-surface of tube. The results have been presented in the form of across the thickness average J value and a peak factor on J. Peak factor on J is ratio of J at mid surface to average J value. Crack opening area for different cracked lengths was calculated from finite element results. The fracture assessment of pressure tubes was also done using Central Electricity Generating Board R-6 method. Ductile tearing was considered.

  15. Accident management for indian pressurized heavy water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hajela, S.; Grover, R.; Ghadge, S.G.; Bajaj, S.S.

    2006-07-01

    Indian nuclear power program as of now is mainly based on Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs). Operating Procedures for normal power operation and Emergency Operating Procedures for operational transients and accidents within design basis exist for all Indian PHWRs. In addition, on-site and off-site emergency response procedures are also available for these NPPs. The guidelines needed for severe accidents mitigation are now formally being documented for Indian PHWRs. Also, in line with International trend of having symptom based emergency handling, the work is in advanced stage for preparation of symptom-based emergency operating procedures. Following a plant upset condition; a number of alarms distributed in different information systems appear in the control room to aid operator to identify the nature of the event. After identifying the event, appropriate intervention in the form of event based emergency operating procedure is put into use by the operating staff. However, if the initiating event cannot be unambiguously identified or after the initial event some other failures take place, then the selected event based emergency operating procedure will not be optimal. In such a case, reactor safety is ensured by monitoring safety functions (depicted by selected plant parameters grouped together) throughout the event handling so that the barriers to radioactivity release namely, fuel and fuel cladding, primary heat transport system integrity and containment remain intact. Simultaneous monitoring of all these safety functions is proposed through status trees and this concept will be implemented through a computer-based system. For beyond design basis accidents, event sequences are identified which may lead to severe core damage. As part of this project, severe accident mitigation guidelines are being finalized for the selected event sequences. The paper brings out the details of work being carried out for Indian PHWRs for symptom based event handling and severe

  16. Durable Suit Bladder with Improved Water Permeability for Pressure and Environment Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Kuznetz, Larry; Orndoff, Evelyne; Tang, Henry; Aitchison, Lindsay; Ross, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Water vapor permeability is shown to be useful in rejecting heat and managing moisture accumulation in launch-and-entry pressure suits. Currently this is accomplished through a porous Gortex layer in the Advanced Crew and Escape Suit (ACES) and in the baseline design of the Constellation Suit System Element (CSSE) Suit 1. Non-porous dense monolithic membranes (DMM) that are available offer potential improvements for water vapor permeability with reduced gas leak. Accordingly, three different pressure bladder materials were investigated for water vapor permeability and oxygen leak: ElasthaneTM 80A (thermoplastic polyether urethane) provided from stock polymer material and two custom thermoplastic polyether urethanes. Water vapor, carbon dioxide and oxygen permeability of the DMM's was measured in a 0.13 mm thick stand-alone layer, a 0.08 mm and 0.05 mm thick layer each bonded to two different nylon and polyester woven reinforcing materials. Additional water vapor permeability and mechanical compression measurements were made with the reinforced 0.05 mm thick layers, further bonded with a polyester wicking and overlaid with moistened polyester fleece thermal underwear .This simulated the pressure from a supine crew person. The 0.05 mm thick nylon reinforced sample with polyester wicking layer was further mechanically tested for wear and abrasion. Concepts for incorporating these materials in launch/entry and Extravehicular Activity pressure suits are presented.

  17. Durable Suit Bladder with Improved Water Permeability for Pressure and Environment Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Kuznetz, Larry; Orndoff, Evelyne; Tang, Henry; Aitchison, Lindsay; Ross, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Water vapor permeability is shown to be useful in rejecting heat and managing moisture accumulation in launch-and-entry pressure suits. Currently this is accomplished through a porous Gortex layer in the Advanced Crew and Escape Suit (ACES) and in the baseline design of the Constellation Suit System Element (CSSE) Suit 1. Non-porous dense monolithic membranes (DMM) that are available offer potential improvements for water vapor permeability with reduced gas leak. Accordingly, three different pressure bladder materials were investigated for water vapor permeability and oxygen leak: ElasthaneTM 80A (thermoplastic polyether urethane) provided from stock polymer material and two custom thermoplastic polyether urethanes. Water vapor, carbon dioxide and oxygen permeability of the DMM's was measured in a 0.13 mm thick stand-alone layer, a 0.08 mm and 0.05 mm thick layer each bonded to two different nylon and polyester woven reinforcing materials. Additional water vapor permeability and mechanical compression measurements were made with the reinforced 0.05 mm thick layers, further bonded with a polyester wicking and overlaid with moistened polyester fleece thermal underwear .This simulated the pressure from a supine crew person. The 0.05 mm thick nylon reinforced sample with polyester wicking layer was further mechanically tested for wear and abrasion. Concepts for incorporating these materials in launch/entry and Extravehicular Activity pressure suits are presented.

  18. Performance of a Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Device and Process for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rector, Tony; Steele, John W.; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

    2012-01-01

    A water loop maintenance device and process to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop has been undergoing a performance evaluation. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the water recirculation maintenance device and process is to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons-learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a Hamilton Sundstrand military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provides a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The maintenance process further leverages a sorbent developed for ISS that introduces a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware. This

  19. MEMS pressure sensor fabricated by advanced bulk micromachining techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanko, Gabriel; Hudek, Peter; Zehetner, Johann; Dzuba, Jaroslav; Choleva, Pavlina; Vallo, Martin; Rýger, Ivan; Lalinský, Tibor

    2013-05-01

    We present the design and implementation of a MEMS pressure sensor with an operation potential under harsh conditions at high temperatures (T = 300 - 800°C). The sensor consists of a circular HEMT (C-HEMT) integrated on a circular AlGaN/GaN membrane. In order to realize MEMS for extreme conditions using AlGaN/GaN material system, two key issues should be solved: (a) realization of MEMS structures by etching of the substrate material and (b) formation of metallic contacts (both ohmic and Schottky) to be able to withstand high thermal loads. In this design concept the piezoresistive and piezoelectric effect of AlGaN/GaN heterostructure is used to sense the pressure under static and/or dynamic conditions. The backside bulk micromachining of our SiC wafer in the first experiment started with FS-laser ablation down to ~200 -270μm deep holes of 500μm in diameter. Because no additional intermediate layer can stop the ablation process, the number of laser pulses has to be optimized in order to reach the required ablation depth. 2D structural-mechanical and piezoelectric analyses were performed to verify the mechanical and piezoelectric response of the circular membrane pressure sensor to static pressure load (in the range between 20 and 100kPa). We suggested that suppressing the residual stress in the membrane can improve the sensor response. The parameters of the same devices previously fabricated on bulk substrates and/or membranes were compared. The maxima of drain currents of our C-HEMT devices on SiC exhibit more than four times higher values compared to those measured on silicon substrates.

  20. Advanced Water Vapor Lidar Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsayed-Ali, Hani

    1998-01-01

    In the present water vapor lidar system, the detected signal is sent over long cables to a waveform digitizer in a CAMAC crate. This has the disadvantage of transmitting analog signals for a relatively long distance, which is subjected to pickup noise, leading to a decrease in the signal to noise ratio. Generally, errors in the measurement of water vapor with the DIAL method arise from both random and systematic sources. Systematic errors in DIAL measurements are caused by both atmospheric and instrumentation effects. The selection of the on-line alexandrite laser with a narrow linewidth, suitable intensity and high spectral purity, and its operation at the center of the water vapor lines, ensures minimum influence in the DIAL measurement that are caused by the laser spectral distribution and avoid system overloads. Random errors are caused by noise in the detected signal. Variability of the photon statistics in the lidar return signal, noise resulting from detector dark current, and noise in the background signal are the main sources of random error. This type of error can be minimized by maximizing the signal to noise ratio. The increase in the signal to noise ratio can be achieved by several ways. One way is to increase the laser pulse energy, by increasing its amplitude or the pulse repetition rate. Another way, is to use a detector system with higher quantum efficiency and lower noise, on the other hand, the selection of a narrow band optical filter that rejects most of the day background light and retains high optical efficiency is an important issue. Following acquisition of the lidar data, we minimize random errors in the DIAL measurement by averaging the data, but this will result in the reduction of the vertical and horizontal resolutions. Thus, a trade off is necessary to achieve a balance between the spatial resolution and the measurement precision. Therefore, the main goal of this research effort is to increase the signal to noise ratio by a factor of

  1. Ultra-high pressure water jet: Baseline report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-31

    The ultra-high pressure waterjet technology was being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The ultra-high pressure waterjet technology acts as a cutting tool for the removal of surface substrates. The Husky{trademark} pump feeds water to a lance that directs the high pressure water at the surface to be removed. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure. These were dust and noise. The dust exposure was found to be minimal, which would be expected due to the wet environment inherent in the technology, but noise exposure was at a significant level. Further testing for noise is recommended because of the outdoor environment where the testing demonstration took place. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, lockout/tagout, fall hazards, slipping hazards, hazards associated with the high pressure water, and hazards associated with air pressure systems.

  2. Major vascular injury from high-pressure water jet.

    PubMed

    Harvey, R L; Ashley, D A; Yates, L; Dalton, M L; Solis, M M

    1996-01-01

    High-pressure water jets are used in industry as a cleaning and cutting tool. Penetrating injuries by these devices can produce minimal external evidence of extensive internal damage. We report a literature review and the case of a limb-threatening injury to the lower extremity caused by such a device.

  3. Current status of high conversion pressurized water reactor design studies

    SciTech Connect

    Umeoka, T.; Kono, T.; Toyoda, Y.; Ogino, M.; Iwai, S.; Hishida, H.

    1988-01-01

    Preliminary design studies on high conversion pressurized water reactors (HCPWRs) have been completed, and plant design studies are currently being performed to improve the feasibility of HCPWRs. The present status of the feasibility studies is covered, and the related validation tests to be conducted in the coming years are reviewed.

  4. Ultra-high pressure water jet: Baseline report; Greenbook (chapter)

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-31

    The ultra-high pressure waterjet technology was being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The ultra-high pressure waterjet technology acts as a cutting tool for the removal of surface substrates. The Husky{trademark} pump feeds water to a lance that directs the high pressure water at the surface to be removed. The technologies being tested for concrete decontamination are targeted for alpha contamination. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

  5. Design and Evaluation of a Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Device for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John W.; Rector, Tony; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

    2012-01-01

    A dual-bed device to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop has been designed and is undergoing testing. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing sublimator technology. The driver for the development of a water recirculation maintenance device is to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a Hamilton Sundstrand military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provides a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high-capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Transport Water Loop. The bed design further leverages a sorbent developed for the ISS that introduces a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System. The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of crewed spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System hardware.

  6. Design and Evaluation of a Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Device for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John W.; Rector, Tony; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

    2011-01-01

    A dual-bed device to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop has been designed and is undergoing testing. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the development of a water recirculation maintenance device is to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons-learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a Hamilton Sundstrand military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provides a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The bed design further leverages a sorbent developed for ISS that introduces a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a clear demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  7. Performance of a Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Device and Process for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John W.; Rector, Tony; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

    2013-01-01

    A dual-bed device to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop has been designed and is undergoing testing. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the development of a water recirculation maintenance device is to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons-learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a Hamilton Sundstrand military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provides a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The bed design further leverages a sorbent developed for ISS that introduces a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  8. Advanced Models of LWR Pressure Vessel Embrittlement for Low Flux-HighFluence Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Odette, G. Robert; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2013-06-17

    Neutron embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is an unresolved issue for light water reactor life extension, especially since transition temperature shifts (TTS) must be predicted for high 80-year fluence levels up to approximately 1,020 n/cm{sup 2}, far beyond the current surveillance database. Unfortunately, TTS may accelerate at high fluence, and may be further amplified by the formation of late blooming phases that result in severe embrittlement even in low-copper (Cu) steels. Embrittlement by this mechanism is a potentially significant degradation phenomenon that is not predicted by current regulatory models. This project will focus on accurately predicting transition temperature shifts at high fluence using advanced physically based, empirically validated and calibrated models. A major challenge is to develop models that can adjust test reactor data to account for flux effects. Since transition temperature shifts depend on synergistic combinations of many variables, flux-effects cannot be treated in isolation. The best current models systematically and significantly under-predict transition temperature at high fluence, although predominantly for irradiations at much higher flux than actual RPV service. This project will integrate surveillance, test reactor and mechanism data with advanced models to address a number of outstanding RPV embrittlement issues. The effort will include developing new databases and preliminary models of flux effects for irradiation conditions ranging from very low (e.g., boiling water reactor) to high (e.g., accelerated test reactor). The team will also develop a database and physical models to help predict the conditions for the formation of Mn-Ni-Si late blooming phases and to guide future efforts to fully resolve this issue. Researchers will carry out other tasks on a best-effort basis, including prediction of transition temperature shift attenuation through the vessel wall, remediation of embrittlement by annealing

  9. Advanced Concepts for Pressure-Channel Reactors: Modularity, Performance and Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffey, Romney B.; Pioro, Igor L.; Kuran, Sermet

    Based on an analysis of the development of advanced concepts for pressure-tube reactor technology, we adapt and adopt the pressure-tube reactor advantage of modularity, so that the subdivided core has the potential for optimization of the core, safety, fuel cycle and thermal performance independently, while retaining passive safety features. In addition, by adopting supercritical water-cooling, the logical developments from existing supercritical turbine technology and “steam” systems can be utilized. Supercritical and ultra-supercritical boilers and turbines have been operating for some time in coal-fired power plants. Using coolant outlet temperatures of about 625°C achieves operating plant thermal efficiencies in the order of 45-48%, using a direct turbine cycle. In addition, by using reheat channels, the plant has the potential to produce low-cost process heat, in amounts that are customer and market dependent. The use of reheat systems further increases the overall thermal efficiency to 55% and beyond. With the flexibility of a range of plant sizes suitable for both small (400 MWe) and large (1400 MWe) electric grids, and the ability for co-generation of electric power, process heat, and hydrogen, the concept is competitive. The choice of core power, reheat channel number and exit temperature are all set by customer and materials requirements. The pressure channel is a key technology that is needed to make use of supercritical water (SCW) in CANDU®1 reactors feasible. By optimizing the fuel bundle and fuel channel, convection and conduction assure heat removal using passive-moderator cooling. Potential for severe core damage can be almost eliminated, even without the necessity of activating the emergency-cooling systems. The small size of containment structure lends itself to a small footprint, impacts economics and building techniques. Design features related to Canadian concepts are discussed in this paper. The main conclusion is that development of

  10. Advanced High-Temperature, High-Pressure Transport Reactor Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Swanson; Daniel Laudal

    2008-03-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Coal and Environmental Systems has as its mission to develop advanced gasification-based technologies for affordable, efficient, zero-emission power generation. These advanced power systems, which are expected to produce near-zero pollutants, are an integral part of DOE's Vision 21 Program. DOE has also been developing advanced gasification systems that lower the capital and operating costs of producing syngas for chemical production. A transport reactor has shown potential to be a low-cost syngas producer compared to other gasification systems since its high-throughput-per-unit cross-sectional area reduces capital costs. This work directly supports the Power Systems Development Facility utilizing the KBR transport reactor located at the Southern Company Services Wilsonville, Alabama, site. Over 2800 hours of operation on 11 different coals ranging from bituminous to lignite along with a petroleum coke has been completed to date in the pilot-scale transport reactor development unit (TRDU) at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). The EERC has established an extensive database on the operation of these various fuels in both air-blown and oxygen-blown modes utilizing a pilot-scale transport reactor gasifier. This database has been useful in determining the effectiveness of design changes on an advanced transport reactor gasifier and for determining the performance of various feedstocks in a transport reactor. The effects of different fuel types on both gasifier performance and the operation of the hot-gas filter system have been determined. It has been demonstrated that corrected fuel gas heating values ranging from 90 to 130 Btu/scf have been achieved in air-blown mode, while heating values up to 230 Btu/scf on a dry basis have been achieved in oxygen-blown mode. Carbon conversions up to 95% have also been obtained and are highly dependent on the oxygen-coal ratio. Higher

  11. Advanced water resource management in ammonia and fertilizer industries

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, W.H.; Campmajo, C.

    1999-11-01

    Ammonia plants typically use high volumes of water, predominantly as make-up for process steam use and as cooling water. Water use minimization in the ammonia and fertilizer industries presents unique challenges related to the potential for ammonia contamination. This can lead to concerns with water or air discharge of ammonia, increased microbiological activity, and concern for ammonia-enhanced corrosion. Copper-based metallurgy is understandably rare in ammonia plants, consequently the last concern is of little practical importance. Developing an advanced water resource management strategy for the ammonia and fertilizer industries requires a plant audit with a complete water and contaminant mass balance. Analysis of this information allows development of potential conceptual design flowsheets, incorporating options for reduced water use. Attractive options for water use minimization in an ammonia plant often include the reuse of process condensates as make-up to the demineralization system or as make-up to the cooling water system. Modeling the water chemistry resulting from water reuse, as well as the effectiveness of any recommended treatment operations, allows for a technical and economic comparison of the options. Operations of particular interest to the ammonia industry include ammonia stripping across an open cooling tower and ammonia removal techniques such as air or steam stripping. This paper will outline the general approach to water resource management, and present case studies illustrating the effectiveness of this approach.

  12. Using CONFIG for Simulation of Operation of Water Recovery Subsystems for Advanced Control Software Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Flores, Luis; Fleming, Land; Throop, Daiv

    2002-01-01

    A hybrid discrete/continuous simulation tool, CONFIG, has been developed to support evaluation of the operability life support systems. CON FIG simulates operations scenarios in which flows and pressures change continuously while system reconfigurations occur as discrete events. In simulations, intelligent control software can interact dynamically with hardware system models. CONFIG simulations have been used to evaluate control software and intelligent agents for automating life support systems operations. A CON FIG model of an advanced biological water recovery system has been developed to interact with intelligent control software that is being used in a water system test at NASA Johnson Space Center

  13. Evaluation of Water Quality Renovation by Advanced Soil-Based Wastewater Treatment Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J.; Loomis, G.; Kalen, D.; Boving, T.; Morales, I.; DeLuca, J.; Amador, J.

    2013-12-01

    25% of US households utilize onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTS) for wastewater management. Advanced technologies were designed to overcome the inadequate wastewater treatment by conventional OWTS in critical shallow water table areas, such as coastal zones, in order to protect ground water quality. In addition to the septic tank and soil drainfield that comprise a conventional OWTS, advanced systems claim improved water renovation with the addition of sand filtration, timed dosing controls, and shallow placement of the infiltrative zone. We determined water quality renovation functions under current water table and temperature conditions, in anticipation of an experiment to measure OWTS response to a climate change scenario of 30-cm increase in water table elevation and 4C temperature increase. Replicate (n=3) intact soil mesocosms were used to evaluate the effectiveness of drainfields with a conventional wastewater delivery (pipe-and-stone) compared to two types of pressurized, shallow narrow drainfield. Results under steady state conditions indicate complete removal of fecal coliform bacteria, phosphorus and BOD by all soil-based systems. By contrast, removal of total nitrogen inputs was 16% in conventional and 11% for both advanced drainfields. Effluent waters maintained a steady state pH between 3.2 - 3.7 for all technologies. Average DO readings were 2.9mg/L for conventional drainfield effluent and 4.6mg/L for advanced, showing the expected oxygen uptake with shallow placement of the infiltrative zone. The conventional OWTS is outperforming the advanced with respect to nitrogen removal, but renovating wastewater equivalently for all other contaminants of concern. The results of this study are expected to facilitate development of future OWTS regulation and planning guidelines, particularly in coastal zones and in the face of a changing climate.

  14. Soil and Water Conservation Advances in the Northern Great Plains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    “Great American Desert” is what many maps often call the Great Plains of North America. This is where dryland agriculture practices for North America have their roots. The purpose of this part of the book was to determine the advances in soil and water conservation technology over the past century a...

  15. Solar radiation and water vapor pressure to forecast chickenpox epidemics.

    PubMed

    Hervás, D; Hervás-Masip, J; Nicolau, A; Reina, J; Hervás, J A

    2015-03-01

    The clear seasonality of varicella infections in temperate regions suggests the influence of meteorologic conditions. However, there are very few data on this association. The aim of this study was to determine the seasonal pattern of varicella infections on the Mediterranean island of Mallorca (Spain), and its association with meteorologic conditions and schooling. Data on the number of cases of varicella were obtained from the Network of Epidemiologic Surveillance, which is composed of primary care physicians who notify varicella cases on a compulsory basis. From 1995 to 2012, varicella cases were correlated to temperature, humidity, rainfall, water vapor pressure, atmospheric pressure, wind speed, and solar radiation using regression and time-series models. The influence of schooling was also analyzed. A total of 68,379 cases of varicella were notified during the study period. Cases occurred all year round, with a peak incidence in June. Varicella cases increased with the decrease in water vapor pressure and/or the increase of solar radiation, 3 and 4 weeks prior to reporting, respectively. An inverse association was also observed between varicella cases and school holidays. Using these variables, the best fitting autoregressive moving average with exogenous variables (ARMAX) model could predict 95 % of varicella cases. In conclusion, varicella in our region had a clear seasonality, which was mainly determined by solar radiation and water vapor pressure.

  16. Pressure dependence of Kapitza resistance at gold/water and silicon/water interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, An; Kim, BoHung; Barisik, Murat

    2013-12-28

    We conducted non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to investigate Kapitza length at solid/liquid interfaces under the effects of bulk liquid pressures. Gold and silicon were utilized as hydrophilic and hydrophobic solid walls with different wetting surface behaviors, while the number of confined liquid water molecules was adjusted to obtain different pressures inside the channels. The interactions of solid/liquid couples were reparameterized accurately by measuring the water contact angle of solid substrates. In this paper, we present a thorough analysis of the structure, normal stress, and temperature distribution of liquid water to elucidate thermal energy transport across interfaces. Our results demonstrate excellent agreement between the pressures of liquid water in nano-channels and published thermodynamics data. The pressures measured as normal stress components were characterized using a long cut-off distance reinforced by a long-range van der Waals tail correction term. To clarify the effects of bulk liquid pressures on water structure at hydrophilic and hydrophobic solid surfaces, we defined solid/liquid interface spacing as the distance between the surface and the peak value of the first water density layer. Near the gold surface, we found that interface spacing and peak value of first water density layer were constant and did not depend on bulk liquid pressure; near the silicon surface, those values depended directly upon bulk liquid. Our results reveal that the pressure dependence of Kapitza length strongly depends on the wettability of the solid surface. In the case of the hydrophilic gold surface, Kapitza length was stable despite increasing bulk liquid pressure, while it varied significantly at the hydrophobic silicon surface.

  17. System for water level measurement based on pressure transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paczesny, Daniel; Marzecki, Michał; Woyke, Michał; Tarapata, Grzegorz

    2016-09-01

    The paper reports system for water level measurement, which is designed to be used for measuring liquid levels in the tanks of an autonomous industrial cleaning robot. The selected method of measurement utilized by the designed system is based on pressure measurement. Such system is insensitive on vibrations, foams presence and liquid impurities. The influences of variable pressure on the measurements were eliminated by utilizing the differential method and as well as the system design. The system is capable of measuring water level in tanks up to 400 mm of height with accuracy of about 2,5%. The system was tested in a container during filling and emptying with various liquids. Performed tests exhibited the linearity of the sensor characteristic and the lack of hysteresis. Obtained sensitivity of the sensor prototype was approximately 6,2 mV/mm H2O.

  18. Advanced nickel/hydrogen dependent pressure vessel (DPV) cell and battery concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Dwight B.; Fox, C. L.; Miller, L. E.

    The dependent pressure vessel (DPV) nickel/hydrogen (NiH 2) design is being developed by Eagle-Picher Industries, Inc. (EPI) as an advanced battery for military and commercial aerospace and terrestrial applications. The DPV cell design offers high specific energy and energy density as well as reduced cost, while retaining the established individual pressure vessel (IPV) technology, flight heritage and database. This advanced DPV design also offers a more efficient mechanical, electrical and thermal cell and battery configuration and a reduced parts count. The DPV battery design promotes compact, minimum volume packaging and weight efficiency, and delivers cost and weight savings with minimal design risks.

  19. Advanced developments in NiH{sub 2} dependent pressure vessel (DPV) cell and battery technology

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, D.B.; Fox, C.L.

    1997-12-01

    The Dependent Pressure Vessel (DPV) Nickel-Hydrogen (NiH{sub 2}) design is being developed by Eagle-Picher Industries, Inc. (EPI) as an advanced battery for military and commercial, aerospace and terrestrial applications. The DPV cell design offers high specific energy and energy density as well as reduced cost, while retaining the established Individual Pressure Vessel (IPV) technology flight heritage and database. This advanced DPV design also offers a more efficient mechanical, electrical and thermal cell and battery configuration and a reduced parts count. The DPV battery design promotes compact, minimum volume packaging and weight efficiency, and delivers cost and weight savings with minimal design risks.

  20. Water-vapor pressure control in a volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The variation with time of the partial pressure of water in a volume that has openings to the outside environment and includes vapor sources was evaluated as a function of the purging flow and its vapor content. Experimental tests to estimate the diffusion of ambient humidity through openings and to validate calculated results were included. The purging flows required to produce and maintain a certain humidity in shipping containers, storage rooms, and clean rooms can be estimated with the relationship developed here. These purging flows are necessary to prevent the contamination, degradation, and other effects of water vapor on the systems inside these volumes.

  1. Constant-pressure measurement of steam-water relative permeability

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, Peter A.

    2001-06-01

    A series of steady-state experiments have established relative permeability curves for two-phase flow of water in a porous medium. These experiments have minimized uncertainty in pressure, heat loss, and saturation. By attempting to maintain a constant pressure gradient, the experiments have provided a baseline from which to determine the effect of temperature on relative permeability. The use of a flexible heater with an automatic control system made it possible to assume negligible phase change for the mobile fluid. X-ray computer tomography (CT) aided by measuring in-situ steam saturation more directly. Mobile steam mass fraction was established by separate steam and water inlets or by correlating with previous results. The measured steam-water relative permeability curves assume a shape similar to those obtained by Corey (1954) for the simultaneous flow of nitrogen and water. Close agreement between the curves by Satik (1998), Mahiya (1999), and this study establishes the reliability of the experimental method and instrumentation adopted in these experiments, though some differences may bear further investigation. In particular, the steam phase relative permeability appears to vary much more linearly with saturation than does the water phase relative permeability.

  2. Thermophysical properties of saturated light and heavy water for Advanced Neutron Source applications

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, A.; Siman-Tov, M.

    1993-05-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source is an experimental facility being developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. As a new nuclear fission research reactor of unprecedented flux, the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor will provide the most intense steady-state beams of neutrons in the world. The high heat fluxes generated in the reactor [303 MW(t) with an average power density of 4.5 MW/L] will be accommodated by a flow of heavy water through the core at high velocities. In support of this experimental and analytical effort, a reliable, highly accurate, and uniform source of thermodynamic and transport property correlations for saturated light and heavy water were developed. In order to attain high accuracy in the correlations, the range of these correlations was limited to the proposed Advanced Neutron Source Reactor`s nominal operating conditions. The temperature and corresponding saturation pressure ranges used for light water were 20--300{degrees}C and 0.0025--8.5 MPa, respectively, while those for heavy water were 50--250{degrees}C and 0.012--3.9 MPa. Deviations between the correlation predictions and data from the various sources did not exceed 1.0%. Light water vapor density was the only exception, with an error of 1.76%. The physical property package consists of analytical correlations, SAS codes, and FORTRAN subroutines incorporating these correlations, as well as an interactive, easy-to-use program entitled QuikProp.

  3. Thermophysical properties of saturated light and heavy water for advanced neutron source applications

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, A.; Siman-Tov, M.

    1993-05-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source is an experimental facility being developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. As a new nuclear fission research reactor of unprecedented flux, the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor will provide the most intense steady-state beams of neutrons in the world. The high heat fluxes generated in the reactor [303 MW(t) with an average power density of 4.5 MW/L] will be accommodated by a flow of heavy water through the core at high velocities. In support of this experimental and analytical effort, a reliable, highly accurate, and uniform source of thermodynamic and transport property correlations for saturated light and heavy water were developed. In order to attain high accuracy in the correlations, the range of these correlations was limited to the proposed Advanced Neutron Source Reactor's nominal operating conditions. The temperature and corresponding saturation pressure ranges used for light water were 20--300[degrees]C and 0.0025--8.5 MPa, respectively, while those for heavy water were 50--250[degrees]C and 0.012--3.9 MPa. Deviations between the correlation predictions and data from the various sources did not exceed 1.0%. Light water vapor density was the only exception, with an error of 1.76%. The physical property package consists of analytical correlations, SAS codes, and FORTRAN subroutines incorporating these correlations, as well as an interactive, easy-to-use program entitled QuikProp.

  4. Molecular dynamics of water at high temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodholt, John; Wood, Bernard

    1990-09-01

    There are currently no precise P-V-T data for water at pressures above 8.9 kbars and temperatures above 900°C. Many petrological processes in the lower crust and upper mantle take place under more extreme conditions, however and petrologists commonly rely on empirical equations of state such as the modified Redlich-Kwong equation (MRK) to extrapolate the low pressure data. In this study we have taken an alternative approach and attempted to simulate the P-V-T properties of water using molecular dynamics. The TIP4P intermolecular potential for H 2O ( JORGENSEN et al., 1983) has had considerable success predicting the properties of water at low temperatures and pressures up to 10 kbar ( MADURA et al., 1988). We have extended its application by making molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at a density of 1.0 g/cc from 300 to 2300 K and 0.5 to 40 kbars. The results agree with the P-V-T data of BURNHAM et al. (1969) (up to 10 kbars) with an average error of under 2%. This is a much better concordance than is obtained with any of the currently used versions of MRK. At 300 kbars and 2000 K the MD simulations predict densities within 8% of those obtained in the shock wave experiments of KORMER (1968). This is a very good agreement given the fact that water ionizes to some extent at high pressures ( MITCHELL and NELLIS, 1982) and we have made no provisions for this effect. We conclude that molecular dynamics simulations provide the possibility of estimating P-V-T properties in the upper mantle P-T regime with very good accuracy.

  5. Pressure induced breather overturning on deep water: Exact solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrashkin, A. A.; Oshmarina, O. E.

    2014-08-01

    A vortical model of breather overturning on deep water is proposed. The action of wind is simulated by nonuniform pressure on the free surface. The fluid motion is described by an exact solution of 2D hydrodynamic equations for an inviscid fluid in Lagrangian variables. Fluid particles rotate in circles of different radii. Formation of contraflexure points on the breather profile is studied. The mechanism of wave breaking and the role of flow vorticity are discussed.

  6. Water in Olivine and its High-Pressure Polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S. M.; Jacobsen, S. D.; Bina, C. R.; Reichart, P.; Moser, M.; Dollinger, G.; Hauri, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    Theory and high-pressure experiments imply a significant water storage capacity of nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs), such as olivine, wadsleyite and ringwoodite, composing the Earth's upper mantle and transition zone to a depth of 660 km. The presence of water, dissolved as OH into such nominally anhydrous high-pressure silicates, notably influences phase relations, melting behavior, conductivity, elasticity, viscosity and rheology. The first direct evidence for hydration of the transition zone has recently been reported by Pearson et al. (2014) and Schmandt et al. (2014). Knowledge of absolute water contents in NAMs is essential for modeling the Earth's interior water cycle. To take advantage of IR spectroscopy as highly sensitive water quantification tool, mineral-specific absorption coefficients are required. Such calibration constants can be derived from hydrogen concentrations determined by independent techniques, such as secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), Raman spectroscopy or proton-proton(pp)-scattering. Broad beam pp-scattering has been performed on double-polished mm-sized mineral platelets (Thomas et al. 2008), but until recently analysis was not feasible for smaller samples synthetized in high-pressure apparati. Here we present first results from pp-scattering microscopy studies on μm-sized single crystals of hydrous olivine, wadsleyite and ringwoodite, which were synthesized at various pressure-temperature conditions in a multi-anvil press. The method allows us to quantify 3D distributions of atomic hydrogen in μm dimensions. These self-calibrating measurements were carried out at the nuclear microprobe SNAKE at the Munich tandem accelerator lab using a 25 MeV proton microbeam. We provide hydrogen depth-profiles, hydrogen maps and H2O concentrations. Pp-scattering data and results from independent Raman and SIMS analyses are in good agreement. Water contents for a set of high-pressure polymorphs with varying Fe-concentrations range from 0

  7. Drinking water fluoride and blood pressure? An environmental study.

    PubMed

    Amini, Hassan; Taghavi Shahri, Seyed Mahmood; Amini, Mohamad; Ramezani Mehrian, Majid; Mokhayeri, Yaser; Yunesian, Masud

    2011-12-01

    The relationship between intakes of fluoride (F) from drinking water and blood pressure has not yet been reported. We examined the relationship of F in ground water resources (GWRs) of Iran with the blood pressure of Iranian population in an ecologic study. The mean F data of the GWRs (as a surrogate for F levels in drinking water) were derived from a previously conducted study. The hypertension prevalence and the mean of systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP & DBP) of Iranian population by different provinces and genders were also derived from the provincial report of non-communicable disease risk factor surveillance of Iran. Statistically significant positive correlations were found between the mean concentrations of F in the GWRs and the hypertension prevalence of males (r = 0.48, p = 0.007), females (r = 0.36, p = 0.048), and overall (r = 0.495, p = 0.005). Also, statistically significant positive correlations between the mean concentrations of F in the GWRs and the mean SBP of males (r = 0.431, p = 0.018), and a borderline correlation with females (r = 0.352, p = 0.057) were found. In conclusion, we found the increase of hypertension prevalence and the SBP mean with the increase of F level in the GWRs of Iranian population.

  8. Moisture-pressure dynamics above an oscillating water table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Nick

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a sand column dataset on the soil moisture-pressure dynamics above a simple harmonic oscillating water table. A total of 19 experiments were conducted in which all experimental parameters were held constant except for the oscillation period which ranged between 12.25 h down to 10 s. The data show clear evidence of hysteresis at longer oscillation periods where the unsaturated zone has sufficient time to adjust to the water table motion. At shorter periods the contrary exists with the extent of moisture-pressure variations greatly reduced and, for periods less than 15 min, the dynamics become non-hysteretic. The high frequency moisture-pressure loops, although non-hysteretic, do not follow the (non-hysteretic) static equilibrium wetting or drying curves but are consistent with the scanning loops generated by a commonly adopted hysteresis algorithm for numerical solution of the Richards (1931) equation. Thus, the data provides new physical insights behind the need to include hysteresis effects when simulating high frequency water table motions as found by previous researchers.

  9. Excess pore water pressure due to ground surface erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llewellyn Smith, Stefan; Gagniere, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Erosional unloading is the process whereby surface rocks and soil are removed by external processes, resulting in changes to water pressure within the underlying aquifer. We consider a mathematical model of changes in excess pore water pressure as a result of erosional unloading. Neuzil and Pollock (1983) studied this process in the case where the water table initially coincides with the surface. In contrast, we analyze an ideal aquifer which is initially separated from the ground surface by an unsaturated zone. The model is solved using Laplace Transform methods in conjunction with a boost operator derived by King (1985). The boost operator is used to boost the solution (in the Laplace domain) to a frame of reference moving at constant velocity with respect to the original frame. We use our solution to analyze the evolution of the pressure during erosion of the aquifer itself for small and large erosion rates. We also examine the flux at the upper boundary as a function of time and present a quasi-steady approximation valid for very small erosion rates in the appendix.

  10. Advanced Exploration Systems Water Architecture Study Interim Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargusingh, Miriam J.

    2013-01-01

    The mission of the Advanced Exploration System (AES) Water Recovery Project (WRP) is to develop advanced water recovery systems that enable NASA human exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). The primary objective of the AES WRP is to develop water recovery technologies critical to near-term missions beyond LEO. The secondary objective is to continue to advance mid-readiness-level technologies to support future NASA missions. An effort is being undertaken to establish the architecture for the AES Water Recovery System (WRS) that meets both near- and long-term objectives. The resultant architecture will be used to guide future technical planning, establish a baseline development roadmap for technology infusion, and establish baseline assumptions for integrated ground and on-orbit Environmental Control and Life Support Systems definition. This study is being performed in three phases. Phase I established the scope of the study through definition of the mission requirements and constraints, as well as identifying all possible WRS configurations that meet the mission requirements. Phase II focused on the near-term space exploration objectives by establishing an International Space Station-derived reference schematic for long-duration (>180 day) in-space habitation. Phase III will focus on the long-term space exploration objectives, trading the viable WRS configurations identified in Phase I to identify the ideal exploration WRS. The results of Phases I and II are discussed in this paper.

  11. Recent advances in semiconductors for photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical water splitting.

    PubMed

    Hisatomi, Takashi; Kubota, Jun; Domen, Kazunari

    2014-11-21

    Photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical water splitting under irradiation by sunlight has received much attention for production of renewable hydrogen from water on a large scale. Many challenges still remain in improving energy conversion efficiency, such as utilizing longer-wavelength photons for hydrogen production, enhancing the reaction efficiency at any given wavelength, and increasing the lifetime of the semiconductor materials. This introductory review covers the fundamental aspects of photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical water splitting. Controlling the semiconducting properties of photocatalysts and photoelectrode materials is the primary concern in developing materials for solar water splitting, because they determine how much photoexcitation occurs in a semiconductor under solar illumination and how many photoexcited carriers reach the surface where water splitting takes place. Given a specific semiconductor material, surface modifications are important not only to activate the semiconductor for water splitting but also to facilitate charge separation and to upgrade the stability of the material under photoexcitation. In addition, reducing resistance loss and forming p-n junction have a significant impact on the efficiency of photoelectrochemical water splitting. Correct evaluation of the photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical activity for water splitting is becoming more important in enabling an accurate comparison of a number of studies based on different systems. In the latter part, recent advances in the water splitting reaction under visible light will be presented with a focus on non-oxide semiconductor materials to give an overview of the various problems and solutions.

  12. Anomalies in bulk supercooled water at negative pressure.

    PubMed

    Pallares, Gaël; El Mekki Azouzi, Mouna; González, Miguel A; Aragones, Juan L; Abascal, José L F; Valeriani, Chantal; Caupin, Frédéric

    2014-06-03

    Water anomalies still defy explanation. In the supercooled liquid, many quantities, for example heat capacity and isothermal compressibility κT, show a large increase. The question arises if these quantities diverge, or if they go through a maximum. The answer is key to our understanding of water anomalies. However, it has remained elusive in experiments because crystallization always occurred before any extremum is reached. Here we report measurements of the sound velocity of water in a scarcely explored region of the phase diagram, where water is both supercooled and at negative pressure. We find several anomalies: maxima in the adiabatic compressibility and nonmonotonic density dependence of the sound velocity, in contrast with a standard extrapolation of the equation of state. This is reminiscent of the behavior of supercritical fluids. To support this interpretation, we have performed simulations with the 2005 revision of the transferable interaction potential with four points. Simulations and experiments are in near-quantitative agreement, suggesting the existence of a line of maxima in κT (LMκT). This LMκT could either be the thermodynamic consequence of the line of density maxima of water [Sastry S, Debenedetti PG, Sciortino F, Stanley HE (1996) Phys Rev E 53:6144-6154], or emanate from a critical point terminating a liquid-liquid transition [Sciortino F, Poole PH, Essmann U, Stanley HE (1997) Phys Rev E 55:727-737]. At positive pressure, the LMκT has escaped observation because it lies in the "no man's land" beyond the homogeneous crystallization line. We propose that the LMκT emerges from the no man's land at negative pressure.

  13. Anomalies in bulk supercooled water at negative pressure

    PubMed Central

    Pallares, Gaël; El Mekki Azouzi, Mouna; González, Miguel A.; Aragones, Juan L.; Abascal, José L. F.; Valeriani, Chantal; Caupin, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Water anomalies still defy explanation. In the supercooled liquid, many quantities, for example heat capacity and isothermal compressibility κT, show a large increase. The question arises if these quantities diverge, or if they go through a maximum. The answer is key to our understanding of water anomalies. However, it has remained elusive in experiments because crystallization always occurred before any extremum is reached. Here we report measurements of the sound velocity of water in a scarcely explored region of the phase diagram, where water is both supercooled and at negative pressure. We find several anomalies: maxima in the adiabatic compressibility and nonmonotonic density dependence of the sound velocity, in contrast with a standard extrapolation of the equation of state. This is reminiscent of the behavior of supercritical fluids. To support this interpretation, we have performed simulations with the 2005 revision of the transferable interaction potential with four points. Simulations and experiments are in near-quantitative agreement, suggesting the existence of a line of maxima in κT (LMκT). This LMκT could either be the thermodynamic consequence of the line of density maxima of water [Sastry S, Debenedetti PG, Sciortino F, Stanley HE (1996) Phys Rev E 53:6144–6154], or emanate from a critical point terminating a liquid–liquid transition [Sciortino F, Poole PH, Essmann U, Stanley HE (1997) Phys Rev E 55:727–737]. At positive pressure, the LMκT has escaped observation because it lies in the “no man’s land” beyond the homogeneous crystallization line. We propose that the LMκT emerges from the no man’s land at negative pressure. PMID:24843177

  14. Advancing Cyberinfrastructure to support high resolution water resources modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarboton, D. G.; Ogden, F. L.; Jones, N.; Horsburgh, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    Addressing the problem of how the availability and quality of water resources at large scales are sensitive to climate variability, watershed alterations and management activities requires computational resources that combine data from multiple sources and support integrated modeling. Related cyberinfrastructure challenges include: 1) how can we best structure data and computer models to address this scientific problem through the use of high-performance and data-intensive computing, and 2) how can we do this in a way that discipline scientists without extensive computational and algorithmic knowledge and experience can take advantage of advances in cyberinfrastructure? This presentation will describe a new system called CI-WATER that is being developed to address these challenges and advance high resolution water resources modeling in the Western U.S. We are building on existing tools that enable collaboration to develop model and data interfaces that link integrated system models running within an HPC environment to multiple data sources. Our goal is to enhance the use of computational simulation and data-intensive modeling to better understand water resources. Addressing water resource problems in the Western U.S. requires simulation of natural and engineered systems, as well as representation of legal (water rights) and institutional constraints alongside the representation of physical processes. We are establishing data services to represent the engineered infrastructure and legal and institutional systems in a way that they can be used with high resolution multi-physics watershed modeling at high spatial resolution. These services will enable incorporation of location-specific information on water management infrastructure and systems into the assessment of regional water availability in the face of growing demands, uncertain future meteorological forcings, and existing prior-appropriations water rights. This presentation will discuss the informatics

  15. Recent advances in lightweight, filament-wound composite pressure vessel technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lark, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    A review of recent advances is presented for lightweight, high performance composite pressure vessel technology that covers the areas of design concepts, fabrication procedures, applications, and performance of vessels subjected to single cycle burst and cyclic fatigue loading. Filament wound fiber/epoxy composite vessels were made from S glass, graphite, and Kevlar 49 fibers and were equipped with both structural and nonstructural liners. Pressure vessels structural efficiencies were attained which represented weight savings, using different liners, of 40 to 60 percent over all titanium pressure vessels. Significant findings in each area are summarized.

  16. Development of Advanced ISS-WPA Catalysts for Organic Oxidation at Reduced Pressure/Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Ping; Nalette, Tim; Kayatin, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The Water Processor Assembly (WPA) at International Space Station (ISS) processes a waste stream via multi-filtration beds, where inorganic and non-volatile organic contaminants are removed, and a catalytic reactor, where low molecular weight organics not removed by the adsorption process are oxidized at elevated pressure in the presence of oxygen and elevated temperature above the normal water boiling point. Operation at an elevated pressure requires a more complex system design compared to a reactor that could operate at ambient pressure. However, catalysts currently available have insufficient activity to achieve complete oxidation of the organic load at a temperature less than the water boiling point and ambient pressure. Therefore, it is highly desirable to develop a more active and efficient catalyst at ambient pressure and a moderate temperature that is less than water boiling temperature. This paper describes our efforts in developing high efficiency water processing catalysts. Different catalyst support structures and coating metals were investigated in subscale reactors and results were compared against the flight WPA catalyst. Detailed improvements achieved on alternate metal catalysts at ambient pressure and 200 F will also be presented in the paper.

  17. Issues affecting advanced passive light-water reactor safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Beelman, R.J.; Fletcher, C.D.; Modro, S.M.

    1992-08-01

    Next generation commercial reactor designs emphasize enhanced safety through improved safety system reliability and performance by means of system simplification and reliance on immutable natural forces for system operation. Simulating the performance of these safety systems will be central to analytical safety evaluation of advanced passive reactor designs. Yet the characteristically small driving forces of these safety systems pose challenging computational problems to current thermal-hydraulic systems analysis codes. Additionally, the safety systems generally interact closely with one another, requiring accurate, integrated simulation of the nuclear steam supply system, engineered safeguards and containment. Furthermore, numerical safety analysis of these advanced passive reactor designs wig necessitate simulation of long-duration, slowly-developing transients compared with current reactor designs. The composite effects of small computational inaccuracies on induced system interactions and perturbations over long periods may well lead to predicted results which are significantly different than would otherwise be expected or might actually occur. Comparisons between the engineered safety features of competing US advanced light water reactor designs and analogous present day reactor designs are examined relative to the adequacy of existing thermal-hydraulic safety codes in predicting the mechanisms of passive safety. Areas where existing codes might require modification, extension or assessment relative to passive safety designs are identified. Conclusions concerning the applicability of these codes to advanced passive light water reactor safety analysis are presented.

  18. Issues affecting advanced passive light-water reactor safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Beelman, R.J.; Fletcher, C.D.; Modro, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    Next generation commercial reactor designs emphasize enhanced safety through improved safety system reliability and performance by means of system simplification and reliance on immutable natural forces for system operation. Simulating the performance of these safety systems will be central to analytical safety evaluation of advanced passive reactor designs. Yet the characteristically small driving forces of these safety systems pose challenging computational problems to current thermal-hydraulic systems analysis codes. Additionally, the safety systems generally interact closely with one another, requiring accurate, integrated simulation of the nuclear steam supply system, engineered safeguards and containment. Furthermore, numerical safety analysis of these advanced passive reactor designs wig necessitate simulation of long-duration, slowly-developing transients compared with current reactor designs. The composite effects of small computational inaccuracies on induced system interactions and perturbations over long periods may well lead to predicted results which are significantly different than would otherwise be expected or might actually occur. Comparisons between the engineered safety features of competing US advanced light water reactor designs and analogous present day reactor designs are examined relative to the adequacy of existing thermal-hydraulic safety codes in predicting the mechanisms of passive safety. Areas where existing codes might require modification, extension or assessment relative to passive safety designs are identified. Conclusions concerning the applicability of these codes to advanced passive light water reactor safety analysis are presented.

  19. Decomposition of Glycerine by Water Plasmas at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayuki, Watanabe; Narengerile

    2013-04-01

    High concentration of aqueous glycerine was decomposed using a direct current (DC) plasma torch at atmospheric pressure. The torch can generate the plasma with water as the plasma-supporting gas in the absence of any additional gas supply system and cooling devices. The results indicated that 5 mol% glycerine was completely decomposed by water plasmas at arc powers of 0.55~1.05 kW. The major products in the effluent gas were H2 (68.9%~71.1%), CO2 (18.9%~23.0%), and CO (0.2%~0.6%). However, trace levels of formic acid (HCOOH) and formaldehyde (HCHO) were observed in the liquid effluent. The results indicated that the water plasma waste treatment process is capable of being an alternative green technology for organic waste decomposition.

  20. Analysis of a small break loss-of-coolant accident of pressurized water reactor by APROS

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Falahi, A.; Haennine, M.; Porkholm, K.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the capability of APROS (Advanced PROcess Simulator) code to simulate the real plant thermal-hydraulic transient of a Small Break Loss-Of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) of Loss-Of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility. The LOFT is a scaled model of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). This work is a part of a larger validation of the APROS thermal-hydraulic models. The results of SBLOCA transient calculated by APROS showed a reasonable agreement with the measured data.

  1. The development of the fast-running simulation pressurized water reactor plant analyzer code (NUPAC-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, K.; Terashita, N.; Ogino, T. . Central Research Lab.)

    1989-06-01

    This article discusses a pressurized water reactor plant analyzer code (NUPAC-1) has been developed to apply to an operator support system or an advanced training simulator. The simulation code must produce reasonably accurate results as well as fun in a fast mode for realizing functions such as anomaly detection, estimation of unobservable plant internal states, and prediction of plant state trends. The NUPAC-1 code adopts fast computing methods, i.e., the table fitting method of the state variables, time-step control, and calculation control of heat transfer coefficients, in order to attain accuracy and fast-running capability.

  2. Advanced Computational Thermal Studies and their Assessment for Supercritical-Pressure Reactors (SCRs)

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. McEligot; J. Y. Yoo; J. S. Lee; S. T. Ro; E. Lurien; S. O. Park; R. H. Pletcher; B. L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J. M. Wallace

    2009-04-01

    The goal of this laboratory / university collaboration of coupled computational and experimental studies is the improvement of predictive methods for supercritical-pressure reactors. The general objective is to develop supporting knowledge needed of advanced computational techniques for the technology development of the concepts and their safety systems.

  3. Glass–liquid transition of water at high pressure

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Ove

    2011-01-01

    The knowledge of the existence of liquid water under extreme conditions and its concomitant properties are important in many fields of science. Glassy water has previously been prepared by hyperquenching micron-sized droplets of liquid water and vapor deposition on a cold substrate (ASW), and its transformation to an ultraviscous liquid form has been reported on heating. A densified amorphous solid form of water, high-density amorphous ice (HDA), has also been made by collapsing the structure of ice at pressures above 1 GPa and temperatures below approximately 140 K, but a corresponding liquid phase has not been detected. Here we report results of heat capacity Cp and thermal conductivity, in situ, measurements, which are consistent with a reversible transition from annealed HDA to ultraviscous high-density liquid water at 1 GPa and 140 K. On heating of HDA, the Cp increases abruptly by (3.4 ± 0.2) J mol-1 K-1 before crystallization starts at (153 ± 1) K. This is larger than the Cp rise at the glass to liquid transition of annealed ASW at 1 atm, which suggests the existence of liquid water under these extreme conditions. PMID:21690361

  4. Satellites and solid state electronics test concrete pressure water pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fumo, John; Worthington, Will

    2000-06-01

    Like all structures, water pressure pipelines have a finite life. Pipelines will eventually begin to fail, leaving the pipeline owner to deal with the quandary: what caused this to happen, can we prevent future failures, must we replace this structure now? The causes for pipeline failure include defects and anomalies which may occur in any phase of a pipeline's life: during the engineering, the manufacture, the construction, or the operation. Failure may simply be the result of environmental conditions or old age. In the past five years, passive acoustic emission detection technology has been adapted to concrete pressure pipelines. This method of inspection is based on the caustic emissions made by the prestressed reinforcing wire as it releases its energy. A recently patented method of using this technology relies on a series of remote, independent test stations to detect, record and time-stamp these acoustic emissions. A low-powered, high- performance embedded processor system makes use of global positioning system time signals to synchronize multiple stations. These methods are re-defining the standard of care of water pressure pipelines. This paper describes pipeline failure mechanisms and a state-of-the-art data sampling system which has been developed to evaluate pipeline structural integrity.

  5. High pressure partially ionic phase of water ice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanchao; Liu, Hanyu; Lv, Jian; Zhu, Li; Wang, Hui; Ma, Yanming

    2011-11-29

    Water ice dissociates into a superionic solid at high temperature (>2,000 K) and pressure, where oxygen forms the lattice, but hydrogen diffuses completely. At low temperature, however, the dissociation into an ionic ice of hydronium (H(3)O)(+) hydroxide (OH)(-) is not expected because of the extremely high energy cost (~1.5 eV) of proton transfer between H(2)O molecules. Here we show the pressure-induced formation of a partially ionic phase (monoclinic P2(1) structure) consisting of coupled alternate layers of (OH)(δ-) and (H(3)O)(δ+) (δ=0.62) in water ice predicted by particle-swarm optimization structural search at zero temperature and pressures of >14 Mbar. The occurrence of this ionic phase follows the break-up of the typical O-H covalently bonded tetrahedrons in the hydrogen symmetric atomic phases and is originated from the volume reduction favourable for a denser structure packing.

  6. 78 FR 56752 - Interim Staff Guidance Specific Environmental Guidance for Integral Pressurized Water Reactors...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Interim Staff Guidance Specific Environmental Guidance for Integral Pressurized Water Reactors... and operate integral pressurized water reactors (iPWR). This guidance applies to environmental reviews...

  7. Aging study of boiling water reactor high pressure injection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, D.A.; Edson, J.L.; Fineman, C.F.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of high pressure injection systems is to maintain an adequate coolant level in reactor pressure vessels, so that the fuel cladding temperature does not exceed 1,200{degrees}C (2,200{degrees}F), and to permit plant shutdown during a variety of design basis loss-of-coolant accidents. This report presents the results of a study on aging performed for high pressure injection systems of boiling water reactor plants in the United States. The purpose of the study was to identify and evaluate the effects of aging and the effectiveness of testing and maintenance in detecting and mitigating aging degradation. Guidelines from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program were used in performing the aging study. Review and analysis of the failures reported in databases such as Nuclear Power Experience, Licensee Event Reports, and the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, along with plant-specific maintenance records databases, are included in this report to provide the information required to identify aging stressors, failure modes, and failure causes. Several probabilistic risk assessments were reviewed to identify risk-significant components in high pressure injection systems. Testing, maintenance, specific safety issues, and codes and standards are also discussed.

  8. Advanced Nuclear Technology: Advanced Light Water Reactors Utility Requirements Document Small Modular Reactors Inclusion Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Loflin, Leonard; McRimmon, Beth

    2014-12-18

    This report summarizes a project by EPRI to include requirements for small modular light water reactors (smLWR) into the EPRI Utility Requirements Document (URD) for Advanced Light Water Reactors. The project was jointly funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The report covers the scope and content of the URD, the process used to revise the URD to include smLWR requirements, a summary of the major changes to the URD to include smLWR, and how to use the URD as revised to achieve value on new plant projects.

  9. Laboratory evaluation of the pressure water level data logger manufactured by Infinities USA, Inc.: results of pressure and temperature tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carnley, Mark V.

    2015-01-01

    The Pressure Water Level Data Logger manufactured by Infinities USA, Inc., was evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility for conformance with the manufacturer’s stated accuracy specifications for measuring pressure throughout the device’s operating temperature range and with the USGS accuracy requirements for water-level measurements. The Pressure Water Level Data Logger (Infinities Logger) is a submersible, sealed, water-level sensing device with an operating pressure range of 0 to 11.5 feet of water over a temperature range of −18 to 49 degrees Celsius. For the pressure range tested, the manufacturer’s accuracy specification of 0.1 percent of full scale pressure equals an accuracy of ±0.138 inch of water. Three Infinities Loggers were evaluated, and the testing procedures followed and results obtained are described in this report. On the basis of the test results, the device is poorly compensated for temperature. For the three Infinities Loggers, the mean pressure differences varied from –4.04 to 5.32 inches of water and were not within the manufacturer’s accuracy specification for pressure measurements made within the temperature-compensated range. The device did not meet the manufacturer’s stated accuracy specifications for pressure within its temperature-compensated operating range of –18 to 49 degrees Celsius or the USGS accuracy requirements of no more than 0.12 inch of water (0.01 foot of water) or 0.10 percent of reading, whichever is larger. The USGS accuracy requirements are routinely examined and reported when instruments are evaluated at the Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility. The estimated combined measurement uncertainty for the pressure cycling test was ±0.139 inch of water, and for temperature, the cycling test was ±0.127 inch of water for the three Infinities Loggers.

  10. Culinary and pressure irrigation water system hydroelectric generation

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, Cory

    2016-01-29

    Pleasant Grove City owns and operates a drinking water system that included pressure reducing stations (PRVs) in various locations and flow conditions. Several of these station are suitable for power generation. The City evaluated their system to identify opportunities for power generation that can be implemented based on the analysis of costs and prediction of power generation and associated revenue. The evaluation led to the selection of the Battle Creek site for development of a hydro-electric power generating system. The Battle Creek site includes a pipeline that carries spring water to storage tanks. The system utilizes a PRV to reduce pressure before the water is introduced into the tanks. The evaluation recommended that the PRV at this location be replaced with a turbine for the generation of electricity. The system will be connected to the utility power grid for use in the community. A pelton turbine was selected for the site, and a turbine building and piping system were constructed to complete a fully functional power generation system. It is anticipated that the system will generate approximately 440,000 kW-hr per year resulting in $40,000 of annual revenue.

  11. Microscopic structure of water at elevated pressures and temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Sahle, Christoph J.; Sternemann, Christian; Schmidt, Christian; Lehtola, Susi; Jahn, Sandro; Simonelli, Laura; Huotari, Simo; Hakala, Mikko; Pylkkänen, Tuomas; Nyrow, Alexander; Mende, Kolja; Tolan, Metin; Hämäläinen, Keijo; Wilke, Max

    2013-01-01

    We report on the microscopic structure of water at sub- and supercritical conditions studied using X-ray Raman spectroscopy, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, and density functional theory. Systematic changes in the X-ray Raman spectra with increasing pressure and temperature are observed. Throughout the studied thermodynamic range, the experimental spectra can be interpreted with a structural model obtained from the molecular dynamics simulations. A spatial statistical analysis using Ripley’s K-function shows that this model is homogeneous on the nanometer length scale. According to the simulations, distortions of the hydrogen-bond network increase dramatically when temperature and pressure increase to the supercritical regime. In particular, the average number of hydrogen bonds per molecule decreases to ≈0.6 at 600 °C and p = 134 MPa. PMID:23479639

  12. Pressurized water nuclear reactor system with hot leg vortex mitigator

    DOEpatents

    Lau, Louis K. S.

    1990-01-01

    A pressurized water nuclear reactor system includes a vortex mitigator in the form of a cylindrical conduit between the hot leg conduit and a first section of residual heat removal conduit, which conduit leads to a pump and a second section of residual heat removal conduit leading back to the reactor pressure vessel. The cylindrical conduit is of such a size that where the hot leg has an inner diameter D.sub.1, the first section has an inner diameter D.sub.2, and the cylindrical conduit or step nozzle has a length L and an inner diameter of D.sub.3 ; D.sub.3 /D.sub.1 is at least 0.55, D.sub.2 is at least 1.9, and L/D.sub.3 is at least 1.44, whereby cavitation of the pump by a vortex formed in the hot leg is prevented.

  13. Pressurized Testing of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Stacks with Advanced Electrode-Supported Cells

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G. K. Housley; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer; G. Tao

    2012-06-01

    A new facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for pressurized testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. Pressurized operation is envisioned for large-scale hydrogen production plants, yielding higher overall efficiencies when the hydrogen product is to be delivered at elevated pressure for tank storage or pipelines. Pressurized operation also supports higher mass flow rates of the process gases with smaller components. The test stand can accommodate cell dimensions up to 8.5 cm x 8.5 cm and stacks of up to 25 cells. The pressure boundary for these tests is a water-cooled spool-piece pressure vessel designed for operation up to 5 MPa. The stack is internally manifolded and operates in cross-flow with an inverted-U flow pattern. Feed-throughs for gas inlets/outlets, power, and instrumentation are all located in the bottom flange. The entire spool piece, with the exception of the bottom flange, can be lifted to allow access to the internal furnace and test fixture. Lifting is accomplished with a motorized threaded drive mechanism attached to a rigid structural frame. Stack mechanical compression is accomplished using springs that are located inside of the pressure boundary, but outside of the hot zone. Initial stack heatup and performance characterization occurs at ambient pressure followed by lowering and sealing of the pressure vessel and subsequent pressurization. Pressure equalization between the anode and cathode sides of the cells and the stack surroundings is ensured by combining all of the process gases downstream of the stack. Steady pressure is maintained by means of a backpressure regulator and a digital pressure controller. A full description of the pressurized test apparatus is provided in this paper.

  14. Water Pressure Effects on Strength and Deformability of Fractured Rocks Under Low Confining Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorian Bidgoli, Majid; Jing, Lanru

    2015-05-01

    The effect of groundwater on strength and deformation behavior of fractured crystalline rocks is one of the important issues for design, performance and safety assessments of surface and subsurface rock engineering problems. However, practical difficulties make the direct in situ and laboratory measurements of these properties of fractured rocks impossible at present, since effects of complex fracture system hidden inside the rock masses cannot be accurately estimated. Therefore, numerical modeling needs to be applied. The overall objective of this paper is to deepen our understanding on the validity of the effective stress concept, and to evaluate the effects of water pressure on strength and deformation parameters. The approach adopted uses discrete element methods to simulate the coupled stress-deformation-flow processes in a fractured rock mass with model dimensions at a representative elementary volume (REV) size and realistic representation of fracture system geometry. The obtained numerical results demonstrate that water pressure has significant influence on the strength, but with minor effects on elastic deformation parameters, compared with significant influence by the lateral confining pressure. Also, the classical effective stress concept to fractured rock can be quite different with that applied in soil mechanics. Therefore, one should be cautious when applying the classical effective stress concept to fractured rock media.

  15. Characterization of Advanced Avalanche Photodiodes for Water Vapor Lidar Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Halama, Gary E.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2000-01-01

    Development of advanced differential absorption lidar (DIAL) receivers is very important to increase the accuracy of atmospheric water vapor measurements. A major component of such receivers is the optical detector. In the near-infrared wavelength range avalanche photodiodes (APD's) are the best choice for higher signal-to-noise ratio, where there are many water vapor absorption lines. In this study, characterization experiments were performed to evaluate a group of silicon-based APD's. The APD's have different structures representative of different manufacturers. The experiments include setups to calibrate these devices, as well as characterization of the effects of voltage bias and temperature on the responsivity, surface scans, noise measurements, and frequency response measurements. For each experiment, the setup, procedure, data analysis, and results are given and discussed. This research was done to choose a suitable APD detector for the development of an advanced atmospheric water vapor differential absorption lidar detection system operating either at 720, 820, or 940 nm. The results point out the benefits of using the super low ionization ratio (SLIK) structure APD for its lower noise-equivalent power, which was found to be on the order of 2 to 4 fW/Hz(sup (1/2)), with an appropriate optical system and electronics. The water vapor detection systems signal-to-noise ratio will increase by a factor of 10.

  16. ADDITIONAL STRESS AND FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSES OF PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL NOZZLES

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, Matthew; Yin, Shengjun; Stevens, Gary; Sommerville, Daniel; Palm, Nathan; Heinecke, Carol

    2012-01-01

    In past years, the authors have undertaken various studies of nozzles in both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Those studies described stress and fracture mechanics analyses performed to assess various RPV nozzle geometries, which were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-life (EOL) to require evaluation of embrittlement as part of the RPV analyses associated with pressure-temperature (P-T) limits. In this paper, additional stress and fracture analyses are summarized that were performed for additional PWR nozzles with the following objectives: To expand the population of PWR nozzle configurations evaluated, which was limited in the previous work to just two nozzles (one inlet and one outlet nozzle). To model and understand differences in stress results obtained for an internal pressure load case using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) vs. a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for these PWR nozzles. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated. To investigate the applicability of previously recommended linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solutions for calculating the Mode I stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for pressure loading for these PWR nozzles. These analyses were performed to further expand earlier work completed to support potential revision and refinement of Title 10 to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Requirements, and are intended to supplement similar evaluation of nozzles presented at the 2008, 2009, and 2011 Pressure Vessels and Piping (PVP

  17. 76 FR 61118 - Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor...

  18. Pressure-driven ballistic Kelvin's water dropper for energy harvesting.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yanbo; de Boer, Hans L; Sprenkels, Ad J; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C T

    2014-11-07

    In this paper, we introduce a microfluidic-based self-excited energy conversion system inspired by Kelvin's water dropper but driven by inertia instead of gravity. Two micro water jets are produced by forcing water through two micropores by overpressure. The jets break up into microdroplets which are inductively charged by electrostatic gates. The droplets land on metal targets which are gradually charged up to high voltages. Targets and electrostatic gates are cross-connected in a way similar to Kelvin's water dropper. Application of pressure as driving force instead of gravity as in Kelvin's dropper allows for much higher energy densities. To prevent overcharging of the droplets by the inductive mechanism and consequent droplet loss by repulsion from the target as in Kelvin's water dropper, a voltage divider using inversely connected diodes was introduced in our system to control the charge induction providing self-limiting positive feedback by the diode characteristics. A maximal 18% energy conversion efficiency was obtained with the diode-gated system.

  19. Tritiated water on a molecular sieve: Water dynamics and anomalous pressure observations

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, R.T.

    1999-07-01

    The production of fusion energy in a tokamak using deuterium (D) and tritium (T) requires the safe handling and processing of exhaust gases that contain various amounts of tritium. Initial operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, oxidized exhaust gases for tritium recovery or long-term storage. One of the most efficient and safest ways to contain tritiated water is to sorb it onto a pelletized 4A molecular sieve. For that reason, a disposable molecular sieve bed (DMSB) was designed as a pressure vessel because of the possibility of pressure generation from the self-radiolysis of tritiated water. Two months after removing a DMSB from the process at TFTR, a pressure in excess of that predicted from self-radiolysis was observed. Interestingly, pressure measurements at longer times (up to 2.5 yr) showed less pressure than expected. Pressure was not being generated in the DMSBs at the predicted rate. This was unexpected and prompted an investigation into the mechanism responsible for the anomalous pressure measurements.

  20. Structural Integrity of Water Reactor Pressure Boundary Components.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    tests of reference steels of the NRC light water reactor, pressure vessel irradiation dosimetry program. SECURITY CLAS5IICATION 0PHiS PA6GMbn" Dfat ...multiple specimen R- curve approach; NRL emphasis was on the SSC procedure as it is being developed for hot- cell testing of irradiated materials. MULTIPLE...a second autoclave, capable of testing 50 or 100 mm (2T or 4T) thick CT or WOL specimens, was installed in a hot cell and a test was started on 2T-CT

  1. Space water electrolysis: Space Station through advance missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davenport, Ronald J.; Schubert, Franz H.; Grigger, David J.

    1991-01-01

    Static Feed Electrolyzer (SFE) technology can satisfy the need for oxygen (O2) and Hydrogen (H2) in the Space Station Freedom and future advanced missions. The efficiency with which the SFE technology can be used to generate O2 and H2 is one of its major advantages. In fact, the SFE is baselined for the Oxygen Generation Assembly within the Space Station Freedom's Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS). In the conventional SFE process an alkaline electrolyte is contained within the matrix and is sandwiched between two porous electrodes. The electrodes and matrix make up a unitized cell core. The electrolyte provides the necessary path for the transport of water and ions between the electrodes, and forms a barrier to the diffusion of O2 and H2. A hydrophobic, microporous membrane permits water vapor to diffuse from the feed water to the cell core. This membrane separates the liquid feed water from the product H2, and, therefore, avoids direct contact of the electrodes by the feed water. The feed water is also circulated through an external heat exchanger to control the temperature of the cell.

  2. Space water electrolysis: Space Station through advance missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davenport, Ronald J.; Schubert, Franz H.; Grigger, David J.

    1991-01-01

    Static Feed Electrolyzer (SFE) technology can satisfy the need for oxygen (O2) and Hydrogen (H2) in the Space Station Freedom and future advanced missions. The efficiency with which the SFE technology can be used to generate O2 and H2 is one of its major advantages. In fact, the SFE is baselined for the Oxygen Generation Assembly within the Space Station Freedom's Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS). In the conventional SFE process an alkaline electrolyte is contained within the matrix and is sandwiched between two porous electrodes. The electrodes and matrix make up a unitized cell core. The electrolyte provides the necessary path for the transport of water and ions between the electrodes, and forms a barrier to the diffusion of O2 and H2. A hydrophobic, microporous membrane permits water vapor to diffuse from the feed water to the cell core. This membrane separates the liquid feed water from the product H2, and, therefore, avoids direct contact of the electrodes by the feed water. The feed water is also circulated through an external heat exchanger to control the temperature of the cell.

  3. Space water electrolysis: Space Station through advance missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, Ronald J.; Schubert, Franz H.; Grigger, David J.

    1991-09-01

    Static Feed Electrolyzer (SFE) technology can satisfy the need for oxygen (O2) and Hydrogen (H2) in the Space Station Freedom and future advanced missions. The efficiency with which the SFE technology can be used to generate O2 and H2 is one of its major advantages. In fact, the SFE is baselined for the Oxygen Generation Assembly within the Space Station Freedom's Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS). In the conventional SFE process an alkaline electrolyte is contained within the matrix and is sandwiched between two porous electrodes. The electrodes and matrix make up a unitized cell core. The electrolyte provides the necessary path for the transport of water and ions between the electrodes, and forms a barrier to the diffusion of O2 and H2. A hydrophobic, microporous membrane permits water vapor to diffuse from the feed water to the cell core. This membrane separates the liquid feed water from the product H2, and, therefore, avoids direct contact of the electrodes by the feed water. The feed water is also circulated through an external heat exchanger to control the temperature of the cell.

  4. High Pressure Water Stripping Using Multi-Orifice Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, David T.

    1998-01-01

    The use of multi-orifice rotary nozzles not only increases the speed and stripping effectiveness of high pressure water blasting systems, but also greatly increases the complexity of selecting and optimizing the operating parameters. The rotational speed of the nozzle must be coupled with the transverse velocity of the nozzle as it passes across the surface of the substrate being stripped. The radial and angular positions of each orifice must be included in the analysis of the nozzle configuration. Since orifices at the outer edge of the nozzle head move at a faster rate than the orifice located near the center, the energy impact force of the water stream from the outer orifice is spread over a larger area than the water streams from the inner orifice. Utilizing a larger diameter orifice in the outer radial positions increases the energy impact to compensate for its wider force distribution. The total flow rate from the combination of orifices must be monitored and kept below the pump capacity while choosing an orifice to insert in each position. The energy distribution from the orifice pattern is further complicated since the rotary path of all orifices in the nozzle head pass through the center section, contributing to the stripping in this area while only the outer most orifice contributes to the stripping in the shell area at the extreme outside edge of the nozzle. From t he outer most shell to the center section, more orifices contribute to the stripping in each progressively reduced diameter shell. With all these parameters to configure and each parameter change affecting the others, a computer model was developed to track and coordinate these parameters. The computer simulation responds by graphically indicating the cumulative affect from each parameter selected. The results from the proper choices in parameters is a well designed, highly efficient stripping system. A poorly chosen set of parameters will cause the nozzle to strip aggressively in some areas

  5. High Pressure Water Stripping Using Multi-Orifice Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, David T.

    1998-01-01

    The use of multi-orifice rotary nozzles not only increases the speed and stripping effectiveness of high pressure water blasting systems, but also greatly increases the complexity of selecting and optimizing the operating parameters. The rotational speed of the nozzle must be coupled with the transverse velocity of the nozzle as it passes across the surface of the substrate being stripped. The radial and angular positions of each orifice must be included in the analysis of the nozzle configuration. Since orifices at the outer edge of the nozzle head move at a faster rate than the orifice located near the center, the energy impact force of the water stream from the outer orifice is spread over a larger area than the water streams from the inner orifice. Utilizing a larger diameter orifice in the outer radial positions increases the energy impact to compensate for its wider force distribution. The total flow rate from the combination of orifices must be monitored and kept below the pump capacity while choosing an orifice to insert in each position. The energy distribution from the orifice pattern is further complicated since the rotary path of all orifices in the nozzle head pass through the center section, contributing to the stripping in this area while only the outer most orifice contributes to the stripping in the shell area at the extreme outside edge of the nozzle. From t he outer most shell to the center section, more orifices contribute to the stripping in each progressively reduced diameter shell. With all these parameters to configure and each parameter change affecting the others, a computer model was developed to track and coordinate these parameters. The computer simulation responds by graphically indicating the cumulative affect from each parameter selected. The results from the proper choices in parameters is a well designed, highly efficient stripping system. A poorly chosen set of parameters will cause the nozzle to strip aggressively in some areas

  6. Water-Energy balance in pressure irrigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Raúl; Rodríguez-Sinobas, Leonor; Juana, Luis; Laguna, Francisco V.; Castañón, Guillermo; Gil, María; Benitez, Javier

    2013-04-01

    Modernization of irrigation schemes, generally understood as transformation of surface irrigation systems into pressure -sprinkler and trickle- irrigation systems, aims at, among others, improving irrigation efficiency and reduction of operation and maintenance efforts made by the irrigators. Automation techniques become easier after modernization, and operation management plays an important role in energy efficiency issues. Modern systems use to include elevated water reservoirs with enough capacity to irrigate during peak water demand period about 16 to 48 h. However, pressure irrigation systems, in contrast, carry a serious energy cost. Energy requirements depend on decisions taken on management strategies during the operation phase, which are conditioned by previous decisions taken on the design project of the different elements which compose the irrigation system. Most of the countries where irrigation activity is significant bear in mind that modernization irrigation must play a key role in the agricultural infrastructure policies. The objective of this study is to characterize and estimate the mean and variation of the energy consumed by common types of irrigation systems according to their management possibilities. Also is an objective to estimate the fraction of the water reservoirs available along the irrigation campaign for storing the energy from renewable sources during their availability periods. Simulation taking into account all elements comprising the irrigation system has been used to estimate the energy requirements of typical irrigation systems of several crop production systems. The simulation of various types of irrigation systems and management strategies, in the framework imposed by particular cropping systems, would help to develop criteria for improving the energy balance in relation to the irrigation water supply productivity and new opportunities in the renewable energy field.

  7. Intra-Abdominal Pressure Correlates with Extracellular Water Content

    PubMed Central

    Dąbrowski, Wojciech; Kotlinska-Hasiec, Edyta; Jaroszynski, Andrzej; Zadora, Przemyslaw; Pilat, Jacek; Rzecki, Ziemowit; Zaluska, Wojciech; Schneditz, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Background Secondary increase in intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) may result from extra-abdominal pathology, such as massive fluid resuscitation, capillary leak or sepsis. All these conditions increase the extravascular water content. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between IAP and body water volume. Material and Methods Adult patients treated for sepsis or septic shock with acute kidney injury (AKI) and patients undergoing elective pharyngolaryngeal or orthopedic surgery were enrolled. IAP was measured in the urinary bladder. Total body water (TBW), extracellular water content (ECW) and volume excess (VE) were measured by whole body bioimpedance. Among critically ill patients, all parameters were analyzed over three consecutive days, and parameters were evaluated perioperatively in surgical patients. Results One hundred twenty patients were studied. Taken together, the correlations between IAP and VE, TBW, and ECW were measured at 408 time points. In all participants, IAP strongly correlated with ECW and VE. In critically ill patients, IAP correlated with ECW and VE. In surgical patients, IAP correlated with ECW and TBW. IAP strongly correlated with ECW and VE in the mixed population. IAP also correlated with VE in critically ill patients. ROC curve analysis showed that ECW and VE might be discriminative parameters of risk for increased IAP. Conclusion IAP strongly correlates with ECW. PMID:25849102

  8. Acceptance test procedure for High Pressure Water Jet System

    SciTech Connect

    Crystal, J.B.

    1995-05-30

    The overall objective of the acceptance test is to demonstrate a combined system. This includes associated tools and equipment necessary to perform cleaning in the 105 K East Basin (KE) for achieving optimum reduction in the level of contamination/dose rate on canisters prior to removal from the KE Basin and subsequent packaging for disposal. Acceptance tests shall include necessary hardware to achieve acceptance of the cleaning phase of canisters. This acceptance test procedure will define the acceptance testing criteria of the high pressure water jet cleaning fixture. The focus of this procedure will be to provide guidelines and instructions to control, evaluate and document the acceptance testing for cleaning effectiveness and method(s) of removing the contaminated surface layer from the canister presently identified in KE Basin. Additionally, the desired result of the acceptance test will be to deliver to K Basins a thoroughly tested and proven system for underwater decontamination and dose reduction. This report discusses the acceptance test procedure for the High Pressure Water Jet.

  9. Achieve Continuous Injection of Solid Fuels into Advanced Combustion System Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Derek L. Aldred; Timothy Saunders

    2005-07-01

    The overall objective of this project is the development of a mechanical rotary-disk feeder, known as the Stamet Posimetric High Pressure Solids Feeder System, to feed dry granular coal continuously and controllably into pressurized environments of up to 35 kg/cm{sup 2} (500 psi). This was to be accomplished in two phases. The first task was to review materials handling experience in pressurized operations as it related to the target pressures for this project, and review existing coal preparation processes and specifications currently used in advanced combustion systems. Samples of existing fuel materials were obtained and tested to evaluate flow, sealing and friction properties. This provided input data for use in the design of the Stamet Feeders for the project, and ensured that the material specification used met the requirements of advanced combustion & gasification systems. Ultimately, Powder River Basin coal provided by the PSDF facility in Wilsonville, AL was used as the basis for the feeder design and test program. Based on the material property information, a Phase 1 feeder system was designed and built to accomplish feeding the coal to an intermediate pressure up to 21 kg/cm{sup 2} (300 psi) at feed rates of approximately 100 kilograms (220lbs) per hour. The pump & motor system was installed in a custom built test rig comprising an inlet vessel containing an active live-wall hopper mounted in a support frame, transition into the pump inlet, transition from pump outlet and a receiver vessel containing a receiver drum supported on weigh cells. All pressure containment on the rig was rated for the final pressure requirement of 35 kg/cm{sup 2} (500psi). A program of testing and modification was carried out in Stamet's facility in CA, culminating in successful feeding of coal into the Phase 1 target of 21 kg/cm{sup 2} (300psi) gas pressure in December 2003. Further testing was carried out at CQ Inc's facility in PA, providing longer run times and experience

  10. The Generation of Pressure Waves by the Implosion of Light Bulbs in a High-Pressure Water Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, C.; Czechanowski, M.; Duncan, J. H.

    2007-11-01

    The implosion of light bulbs in a high-pressure water environment was studied experimentally in a nearly spherical implosion tank with a nominal internal diameter of 1.77 m. During an experimental run, the light bulb was tethered in the center of the tank which was then filled with water and slowly pressurized by adding nitrogen gas into a small ullage above the water. The gas pressure in the ullage was measured with a slow response transducer and the high-frequency pressure waves in the water were recorded at 14 positions in the tank with underwater blast sensors. The motion of the light bulb was recorded with a high-speed digital movie camera. The implosions occurred at ambient pressures (Pa) ranging from 6.1 bar to 11.6 bar. The collapse times of the light bulbs were found to be about 1.3 times the theoretical collapse time of a spherical bubble at the same ambient pressure and with the same radius as the light bulb. The ratio of the peak pressure increase due to the pressure wave at a fixed distance (r) from the bubble to the ambient pressure at implosion ((P(r)-Pa)/Pa) increased from about 0.5 to 2.7 as the ambient pressure increased over the above-mentioned range.

  11. Management of severe obstructive sleep apnea using mandibular advancement devices with auto continuous positive airway pressures

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Rashmi; Dubey, Abhishek; Kant, Surya; Singh, Balendra Pratap

    2015-01-01

    The use of continuous positive airway pressures (CPAP) is considered standard treatment of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Treatment of the disease poses a great challenge not only for its diagnostic purpose but also for its treatment part. In about 29-83% of the patients, treatment is difficult because of non-compliance resulting due to high pressures, air leaks and other related issues. In such situations, alternative methods of treatment need to be looked for so as to ascertain better management. Mandibular advancement devices along with CPAP may show better treatment outcome in specific situations. PMID:25814802

  12. High Pressure Water Stripping Using Multi-Orifice Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, David

    1999-01-01

    The use of multi-orifice rotary nozzles greatly increases the speed and stripping effectiveness of high pressure water blasting systems, but also greatly increases the complexity of selecting and optimizing the operating parameters. The rotational speed of the nozzle must be coupled with its transverse velocity as it passes across the surface of the substrate being stripped. The radial and angular positions of each orifice must be included in the analysis of the nozzle configuration. Orifices at the outer edge of the nozzle head move at a faster rate than the orifices located near the center. The energy transmitted to the surface from the impact force of the water stream from an outer orifice is therefore spread over a larger area than energy from an inner orifice. Utilizing a larger diameter orifice in the outer radial positions increases the total energy transmitted from the outer orifice to compensate for the wider distribution of energy. The total flow rate from the combination of all orifices must be monitored and should be kept below the pump capacity while choosing orifice to insert in each position. The energy distribution from the orifice pattern is further complicated since the rotary path of all the orifices in the nozzle head pass through the center section. All orifices contribute to the stripping in the center of the path while only the outer most orifice contributes to the stripping at the edge of the nozzle. Additional orifices contribute to the stripping from the outer edge toward the center section. With all these parameters to configure and each parameter change affecting the others, a computer model was developed to track and coordinate these parameters. The computer simulation graphically indicates the cumulative affect from each parameter selected. The result from the proper choices in parameters is a well designed, highly efficient stripping system. A poorly chosen set of parameters will cause the nozzle to strip aggressively in some areas

  13. A Hydrological Perspective to Advance Understanding of the Water Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berghuijs, W.

    2014-12-01

    In principle hydrologists are scientists that study relationships within the water cycle. Yet, current technology makes it tempting for hydrology students to lose their "hydrological perspective" and become instead full-time computer programmers or statisticians. I assert that students should ensure their hydrological perspective thrives, notwithstanding the importance and possibilities of current technology. This perspective is necessary to advance the science of hydrology. As other hydrologists have pondered similar views before, I make no claims of originality here. I just hope that in presenting my perspective on this issue I may spark the interest of other early career hydrologists.

  14. Advanced water window x-ray microscope design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, D. L.; Wang, C.; Jiang, W.; Lin, J.

    1992-01-01

    The project was focused on the design and analysis of an advanced water window soft-x-ray microscope. The activities were accomplished by completing three tasks contained in the statement of work of this contract. The new results confirm that in order to achieve resolutions greater than three times the wavelength of the incident radiation, it will be necessary to use aspherical mirror surfaces and to use graded multilayer coatings on the secondary (to accommodate the large variations of the angle of incidence over the secondary when operating the microscope at numerical apertures of 0.35 or greater). The results are included in a manuscript which is enclosed in the Appendix.

  15. A simple method for locating the fresh water-salt water interface using pressure data.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kue-Young; Chon, Chul-Min; Park, Ki-Hwa

    2007-01-01

    Salt water intrusion is a key issue in dealing with exploitation, restoration, and management of fresh ground water in coastal aquifers. Constant monitoring of the fresh water-salt water interface is necessary for proper management of ground water resources. This study presents a simple method to estimate the depth of the fresh water-salt water interface in coastal aquifers using two sets of pressure data obtained from the fresh and saline zones within a single borehole. This method uses the density difference between fresh water and saline water and can practically be used at coastal aquifers that have a relatively sharp fresh water-salt water interface with a thin transition zone. The proposed method was applied to data collected from a coastal aquifer on Jeju Island, Korea, to estimate the variations in the depth of the interface. The interface varied with daily tidal fluctuations and heavy rainfall in the rainy season. The estimated depth of the interface showed a good agreement with the measured electrical conductivity profile.

  16. A flooding induced station blackout analysis for a pressurized water reactor using the RISMC toolkit

    DOE PAGES

    Mandelli, Diego; Prescott, Steven; Smith, Curtis; ...

    2015-05-17

    In this paper we evaluate the impact of a power uprate on a pressurized water reactor (PWR) for a tsunami-induced flooding test case. This analysis is performed using the RISMC toolkit: the RELAP-7 and RAVEN codes. RELAP-7 is the new generation of system analysis codes that is responsible for simulating the thermal-hydraulic dynamics of PWR and boiling water reactor systems. RAVEN has two capabilities: to act as a controller of the RELAP-7 simulation (e.g., component/system activation) and to perform statistical analyses. In our case, the simulation of the flooding is performed by using an advanced smooth particle hydrodynamics code calledmore » NEUTRINO. The obtained results allow the user to investigate and quantify the impact of timing and sequencing of events on system safety. The impact of power uprate is determined in terms of both core damage probability and safety margins.« less

  17. A flooding induced station blackout analysis for a pressurized water reactor using the RISMC toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Mandelli, Diego; Prescott, Steven; Smith, Curtis; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Cogliati, Joshua; Kinoshita, Robert

    2015-05-17

    In this paper we evaluate the impact of a power uprate on a pressurized water reactor (PWR) for a tsunami-induced flooding test case. This analysis is performed using the RISMC toolkit: the RELAP-7 and RAVEN codes. RELAP-7 is the new generation of system analysis codes that is responsible for simulating the thermal-hydraulic dynamics of PWR and boiling water reactor systems. RAVEN has two capabilities: to act as a controller of the RELAP-7 simulation (e.g., component/system activation) and to perform statistical analyses. In our case, the simulation of the flooding is performed by using an advanced smooth particle hydrodynamics code called NEUTRINO. The obtained results allow the user to investigate and quantify the impact of timing and sequencing of events on system safety. The impact of power uprate is determined in terms of both core damage probability and safety margins.

  18. A new flap alternative for trochanteric pressure sore coverage: distal gluteus maximus musculocutaneous advancement flap.

    PubMed

    Nisanci, Mustafa; Sahin, Ismail; Eski, Muhitdin; Alhan, Dogan

    2015-02-01

    Management of long-term bedridden patients experiencing pressure sores still represents a surgical challenge due to limited flap alternatives and high recurrence rates after the treatment. Fasciocutaneous, musculocutaneous, local perforator-based flaps, and free flaps have all been used for treatment of trochanteric pressure sores. This study presents a new use of distal gluteus maximus (GM) muscle as an advancement musculocutaneous flap for coverage of trochanteric pressure sores in 7 patients. The technique involves design of a long V-shaped skin island over the distal fibers of the GM muscle, beginning from the inferoposterior wound edge and extending inferomedially, almost parallel to the gluteal crease. After its harvest as an island flap on the distal fibers of the GM muscle, the skin paddle can be advanced onto the trochanteric defect, whereas the muscle itself is rotated after severing its insertion to femur. If a second triangular skin island is designed on the proximal fibers of GM muscle to cover an associated sacral defect, 2 coexisting pressure sores can be reconstructed concomitantly with 2 skin paddles on a single muscle belly at 1 surgical setting. Of the 7 patients, 3 had 3 (bilateral trochanteric and sacral), 2 had 2 (sacral and trochanteric), and 2 had 1 (only trochanteric) pressure sores. All ulcers were closed successfully and all of the flaps survived totally without any complication except the one in which we experienced minimal wound dehiscence in the early postoperative period. Conclusively, our current surgical method provided a reliable coverage for trochanteric pressure sores although it was technically straightforward and fast. Additionally, it offers simultaneous closure of 2 pressure ulcers with 2 skin islands on a single muscle flap.

  19. Advanced Damage Tolerance Analysis of International Space Station Pressure Wall Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.

    2006-01-01

    EM20/MSFC has sponsored technology in the area of advanced damage tolerance analysis tools used to analyze the International Space Station (ISS) pressure wall welds. The ISS European modules did not receive non-destructive evaluation (NDE) inspection after proof test. In final assembly configuration, most welds could only be inspected from one side, and some welds were uninspectible. Therefore, advanced damage tolerance analysis was required to determine the critical initial flaw sizes and predicted safe life for the pressure wall welds. EM20 sponsored the development of a new finite element tools using FEA-Crack and WARP3D to solve the problem. This presentation gives a brief overview of the new analytical tools and the analysis results.

  20. High-Pressure Combustion Testing Reveals Promise of Low-Emission Combustors for Advanced Subsonic Gas Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Valerie J.

    1997-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's new, world-class, 60-atm combustor research facility, the Advanced Subsonic Combustion Rig (ASCR), is in operation and producing highly unique research data. At operating pressures to 800 psia, emissions of nitrogen oxides were reduced by greater than 70 percent with an advanced fuel injector designed at NASA Lewis. Data, including exhaust emissions and pressure and temperature distributions, were acquired at high pressures and temperatures representative of future subsonic engines. Results to date represent an improved understanding of the formation of nitrogen oxides at these high pressures (twice the pressure of previous combustor tests) and temperatures.

  1. Temperature/pressure and water vapor sounding with microwave spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhleman, D. O.; Janssen, M. A.; Clancy, R. T.; Gulkis, S.; Mccleese, D. J.; Zurek, R.; Haberle, R. M.; Frerking, M.

    1992-01-01

    Two intense microwave spectra lines exist in the martian atmosphere that allow unique sounding capabilities: water vapor at 183 GHz and the (2-1) rotational line of CO at 230 GHz. Microwave spectra line sounding is a well-developed technique for the Earth's atmosphere for sounding from above from spacecraft and airplanes, and from below from fixed surface sites. Two simple instruments for temperature sounding on Mars (the CO line) and water vapor measurements are described. The surface sounder proposed for the MESUR sites is designed to study the boundary layer water vapor distribution and the temperature/pressure profiles with vertical resolution of 0.25 km up to 1 km with reduced resolution above approaching a scale height. The water channel will be sensitive to a few tenths of a micrometer of water and the temperature profile will be retrieved to an accuracy between 1 and 2 K. The latter is routinely done on the Earth using oxygen lines near 60 GHz. The measurements are done with a single-channel heterodyne receiver looking into a 10-cm mirror that is canned through a range of elevation angles plus a target load. The frequency of the receiver is sweep across the water and CO lines generating the two spectra at about 1-hr intervals throughout the mission. The mass and power for the proposed instrument are 2 kg and 5-8 W continuously. The measurements are completely immune to the atmospheric dust and ice particle loads. It was felt that these measurements are the ultimate ones to properly study the martian boundary layer from the surface to a few kilometers. Sounding from above requires an orbiting spacecraft with multichannel microwave spectrometers such as the instrument proposed for MO by a subset of the authors, a putative MESUR orbiter, and a proposed Discovery mission called MOES. Such an instrument can be built with less than 10 kg and use less than 15 W. The obvious advantage of this approach is that the entire atmosphere can be sounded for temperature and

  2. Advancements in water vapor electrolysis technology. [for Space Station ECLSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Heppner, Dennis B.; Sudar, Martin

    1988-01-01

    The paper describes a technology development program whose goal is to develop water vapor electrolysis (WVE) hardware that can be used selectively as localized topping capability in areas of high metabolic activity without oversizing the central air revitalization system on long-duration manned space missions. The WVE will be used primarily to generate O2 for the crew cabin but also to provide partial humidity control by removing water vapor from the cabin atmosphere. The electrochemically based WVE interfaces with cabin air which is controlled in the following ranges: dry bulb temperature of 292 to 300 K; dew point temperature of 278 to 289 K; relative humidity of 25 to 75 percent; and pressure of 101 + or - 1.4 kPa. Design requirements, construction details, and results for both single-cell and multicell module testing are presented, and the preliminary sizing of a multiperson subsystem is discussed.

  3. Hollow Fiber Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator Development and Testing for Advanced Spacesuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Trevino, Luis A.; Tsioulos, Gus; Settles, Joseph; Colunga, Aaron; Vogel, Matthew; Vonau, Walt

    2010-01-01

    The spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME) is being developed to perform the thermal control function for advanced spacesuits to take advantage of recent advances in micropore membrane technology in providing a robust heat-rejection device that is potentially less sensitive to contamination than is the sublimator. Principles of a sheet membrane SWME design were demonstrated using a prototypic test article that was tested in a vacuum chamber at JSC in July 1999. The Membrana Celgard X50-215 microporous hollow fiber (HoFi) membrane was selected after recent contamination tests as the most suitable candidate among commercial alternatives for HoFi SWME prototype development. A design that grouped the fiber layers into stacks, which were separated by small spaces and packaged into a cylindrical shape, was developed into a full-scale prototype consisting 14,300 tube bundled into 30 stacks, each of which are formed into a chevron shape and separated by spacers and organized into three sectors of ten nested stacks. Vacuum chamber testing has been performed characterize heat rejection as a function of inlet water temperature and water vapor backpressure and to show contamination resistance to the constituents expected to be found in potable water produced by the distillation processes. Other tests showed the tolerance to freezing and suitability to reject heat in a Mars pressure environment.

  4. Application of the failure assessment diagram to the evaluation of pressure-temperature limits for a pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, K.K.; Bloom, J.M.; Pavinich, W.A.; Slager, H.W.

    1984-06-01

    The failure assessment diagram approach, an elastic-plastic fracture mechanics procedure based on the J-integral concept, was used in the evaluation of pressure-temperature (P-T) limits for the beltline region of the vessel of a pressurized water reactor. The main objective of this paper is to illustrate the application of an alternate fracture mechanics method for the evaluation of pressure-temperature limits, as allowed by Title 10, Code of Federal Regulation Part 50 (10 CFR 50), Appendix G. The evaluation of P-T limits for the beltline region of a pressurized water reactor vessel was based on the following assumptions: ASME Pressure Vessel and Piping Code, Section III, Appendix G reference flaw End-of-life fluence level in the beltline region Longitudinal flaw in the beltline weld J-resistance material toughness curves obtained from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) program Other material properties obtained from the Babcock and Wilcox Integrated Reactor Vessel Material Surveillance Program The maximum allowable pressure levels were calculated at 33 time points along the given bulk coolant temperature history representing the normal operation of a pressurized water reactor. The results of the calculations showed that adequate margins of safety on operating pressure for the critical weld in the beltline of the pressurized water reactor vessel are assured.

  5. Storm-time plasma pressure distribution: First results from an advanced empirical geomagnetic field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, G. K.; Sitnov, M. I.; Merkin, V. G.; Ukhorskiy, S.; Brandt, P. C.; Gkioulidou, M.; Korth, H.; Redmon, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    Plasma pressure is a key parameter of the magnetosphere whose distribution is particularly important during storm times. At the same time, its first-principles description is still missing in the global MHD modeling. Here we present an alternative - empirical reconstruction of the plasma pressure, given the upstream solar wind and IMF parameters, from historical records of spaceborne magnetometers, assuming steady-state force balance between the magnetic field and the isotropic plasma pressure. The reconstruction is based on an advanced version of the TS07D geomagnetic field model, which has been improved by increasing the resolution of the equatorial current systems and the field aligned current systems and by incorporating new magnetometer datasets from the Van Allen Probes and THEMIS missions. These improvements allow the model, in particular, to resolve for the first time the structure of the innermost magnetosphere, including its eastward current region, which is critical for capturing the peak of the pressure distribution. We present the reconstructed plasma pressure from the upgraded TS07D model and compare its distribution with direct particle measurements including the energy spectra obtained from RBSPICE and HOPE instruments on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft, energetic neutral atom inversions from IMAGE/HENA observations, as well as the output of a coupled MHD and kinetic ring current model LFM-RCM. The obtained comprehensive pressure distribution are then considered as an input for assimilative models of the equation of state in global MHD codes.

  6. Advanced Computational Modeling of Vapor Deposition in a High-Pressure Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Moore, Craig E.; McCall, Sonya D.; Cardelino, Carlos A.; Dietz, Nikolaus; Bachmann, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    In search of novel approaches to produce new materials for electro-optic technologies, advances have been achieved in the development of computer models for vapor deposition reactors in space. Numerical simulations are invaluable tools for costly and difficult processes, such as those experiments designed for high pressures and microgravity conditions. Indium nitride is a candidate compound for high-speed laser and photo diodes for optical communication system, as well as for semiconductor lasers operating into the blue and ultraviolet regions. But InN and other nitride compounds exhibit large thermal decomposition at its optimum growth temperature. In addition, epitaxy at lower temperatures and subatmospheric pressures incorporates indium droplets into the InN films. However, surface stabilization data indicate that InN could be grown at 900 K in high nitrogen pressures, and microgravity could provide laminar flow conditions. Numerical models for chemical vapor deposition have been developed, coupling complex chemical kinetics with fluid dynamic properties.

  7. Unsteady blade surface pressures on a large-scale advanced propeller - Prediction and data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, M.; Groeneweg, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    An unsteady three dimensional Euler analysis technique is employed to compute the flowfield of an advanced propeller operating at an angle of attack. The predicted blade pressure waveforms are compared with wind tunnel data at two Mach numbers, 0.5 and 0.2. The inflow angle is three degrees. For an inflow Mach number of 0.5, the predicted pressure response is in fair agreement with data: the predicted phases of the waveforms are in close agreement with data while the magnitudes are underpredicted. At the low Mach number of 0.2 (take-off) the numerical solution shows the formation of a leading edge vortex which is in qualitative agreement with measurements. However, the highly nonlinear pressure response measured on the blade suction surface is not captured in the present inviscid analysis.

  8. Unsteady blade-surface pressures on a large-scale advanced propeller: Prediction and data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, M.; Groeneweg, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    An unsteady 3-D Euler analysis technique is employed to compute the flow field of an advanced propeller operating at an angle of attack. The predicted blade pressure waveforms are compared with wind tunnel data at two Mach numbers, 0.5 and 0.2. The inflow angle is three degrees. For an inflow Mach number of 0.5, the predicted pressure response is in fair agreement with data: the predicted phases of the waveforms are in close agreement with data while the magnitudes are underpredicted. At the low Mach number of 0.2 (takeoff), the numerical solution shows the formation of a leading edge vortex which is in qualitative agreement with measurements. However, the highly nonlinear pressure response measured on the blade suction surface is not captured in the present inviscid analysis.

  9. Recent advances in lightweight, filament-wound composite pressure vessel technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lark, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    A review of recent advances is presented for lightweight, high-performance composite pressure vessel technology that covers the areas of design concepts, fabrication procedures, applications, and performance of vessels subjected to single-cycle burst and cyclic fatigue loading. Filament-wound fiber/epoxy composite vessels were made from S-glass, graphite, and Kevlar 49 fibers and were equipped with both structural and nonstructural liners. Pressure vessel structural efficiencies were attained which represented weight savings, using different liners, of 40 to 60 percent over all-titanium pressure vessels. Significant findings in each area are summarized including data from current NASA-Lewis Research Center contractual and in-house programs.

  10. Advanced Computational Modeling of Vapor Deposition in a High-pressure Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Moore, Craig E.; McCall, Sonya D.; Cardelino, Carlos A.; Dietz, Nikolaus; Bachmann, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    In search of novel approaches to produce new materials for electro-optic technologies, advances have been achieved in the development of computer models for vapor deposition reactors in space. Numerical simulations are invaluable tools for costly and difficult processes, such as those experiments designed for high pressures and microgravity conditions. Indium nitride is a candidate compound for high-speed laser and photo diodes for optical communication system, as well as for semiconductor lasers operating into the blue and ultraviolet regions. But InN and other nitride compounds exhibit large thermal decomposition at its optimum growth temperature. In addition, epitaxy at lower temperatures and subatmospheric pressures incorporates indium droplets into the InN films. However, surface stabilization data indicate that InN could be grown at 900 K in high nitrogen pressures, and microgravity could provide laminar flow conditions. Numerical models for chemical vapor deposition have been developed, coupling complex chemical kinetics with fluid dynamic properties.

  11. Advanced Computational Modeling of Vapor Deposition in a High-Pressure Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Moore, Craig E.; McCall, Sonya D.; Cardelino, Carlos A.; Dietz, Nikolaus; Bachmann, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    In search of novel approaches to produce new materials for electro-optic technologies, advances have been achieved in the development of computer models for vapor deposition reactors in space. Numerical simulations are invaluable tools for costly and difficult processes, such as those experiments designed for high pressures and microgravity conditions. Indium nitride is a candidate compound for high-speed laser and photo diodes for optical communication system, as well as for semiconductor lasers operating into the blue and ultraviolet regions. But InN and other nitride compounds exhibit large thermal decomposition at its optimum growth temperature. In addition, epitaxy at lower temperatures and subatmospheric pressures incorporates indium droplets into the InN films. However, surface stabilization data indicate that InN could be grown at 900 K in high nitrogen pressures, and microgravity could provide laminar flow conditions. Numerical models for chemical vapor deposition have been developed, coupling complex chemical kinetics with fluid dynamic properties.

  12. Advanced Computational Modeling of Vapor Deposition in a High-pressure Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Moore, Craig E.; McCall, Sonya D.; Cardelino, Carlos A.; Dietz, Nikolaus; Bachmann, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    In search of novel approaches to produce new materials for electro-optic technologies, advances have been achieved in the development of computer models for vapor deposition reactors in space. Numerical simulations are invaluable tools for costly and difficult processes, such as those experiments designed for high pressures and microgravity conditions. Indium nitride is a candidate compound for high-speed laser and photo diodes for optical communication system, as well as for semiconductor lasers operating into the blue and ultraviolet regions. But InN and other nitride compounds exhibit large thermal decomposition at its optimum growth temperature. In addition, epitaxy at lower temperatures and subatmospheric pressures incorporates indium droplets into the InN films. However, surface stabilization data indicate that InN could be grown at 900 K in high nitrogen pressures, and microgravity could provide laminar flow conditions. Numerical models for chemical vapor deposition have been developed, coupling complex chemical kinetics with fluid dynamic properties.

  13. Unsteady blade surface pressures on a large-scale advanced propeller - Prediction and data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, M.; Groeneweg, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    An unsteady three dimensional Euler analysis technique is employed to compute the flowfield of an advanced propeller operating at an angle of attack. The predicted blade pressure waveforms are compared with wind tunnel data at two Mach numbers, 0.5 and 0.2. The inflow angle is three degrees. For an inflow Mach number of 0.5, the predicted pressure response is in fair agreement with data: the predicted phases of the waveforms are in close agreement with data while the magnitudes are underpredicted. At the low Mach number of 0.2 (take-off) the numerical solution shows the formation of a leading edge vortex which is in qualitative agreement with measurements. However, the highly nonlinear pressure response measured on the blade suction surface is not captured in the present inviscid analysis.

  14. Conceptual design of a pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control

    SciTech Connect

    Rachamin, R.; Fridman, E.; Galperin, A.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the development of innovative pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control. The core layout is derived from a CANDU line of reactors in general, and advanced ACR-1000 design in particular. It should be stressed however, that while some of the ACR-1000 mechanical design features are adopted, the core design basics of the reactor proposed here are completely different. First, the inter fuel channels spacing, surrounded by the calandria tank, contains a low pressure gas instead of heavy water moderator. Second, the fuel channel design features an additional/external tube (designated as moderator tube) connected to a separate moderator management system. The moderator management system is design to vary the moderator tube content from 'dry' (gas) to 'flooded' (light water filled). The dynamic variation of the moderator is a unique and very important feature of the proposed design. The moderator variation allows an implementation of the 'breed and burn' mode of operation. The 'breed and burn' mode of operation is implemented by keeping the moderator tube empty ('dry' filled with gas) during the breed part of the fuel depletion and subsequently introducing the moderator by 'flooding' the moderator tube for the 'burn' part. This paper assesses the conceptual feasibility of the proposed concept from a neutronics point of view. (authors)

  15. Detecting pin diversion from pressurized water reactors spent fuel assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Ham, Young S.; Sitaraman, Shivakumar

    2017-01-10

    Detecting diversion of spent fuel from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) by determining possible diversion including the steps of providing a detector cluster containing gamma ray and neutron detectors, inserting the detector cluster containing the gamma ray and neutron detectors into the spent fuel assembly through the guide tube holes in the spent fuel assembly, measuring gamma ray and neutron radiation responses of the gamma ray and neutron detectors in the guide tube holes, processing the gamma ray and neutron radiation responses at the guide tube locations by normalizing them to the maximum value among each set of responses and taking the ratio of the gamma ray and neutron responses at the guide tube locations and normalizing the ratios to the maximum value among them and producing three signatures, gamma, neutron, and gamma-neutron ratio, based on these normalized values, and producing an output that consists of these signatures that can indicate possible diversion of the pins from the spent fuel assembly.

  16. Neurocontrol of Pressurized Water Reactors in Load-Follow Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Chaung; Shen Chihming

    2000-12-15

    The neurocontrol technique was applied to control a pressurized water reactor (PWR) in load-follow operations. Generalized learning or direct inverse control architecture was adopted in which the neural network was trained off-line to learn the inverse model of the PWR. Two neural network controllers were designed: One provided control rod position, which controlled the axial power distribution, and the other provided the change in boron concentration, which adjusted core total power. An additional feedback controller was designed so that power tracking capability was improved. The time duration between control actions was 15 min; thus, the xenon effect is limited and can be neglected. Therefore, the xenon concentration was not considered as a controller input variable, which simplified controller design. Center target strategy and minimum boron strategy were used to operate the reactor, and the simulation results demonstrated the effectiveness and performance of the proposed controller.

  17. Upper internals arrangement for a pressurized water reactor

    DOEpatents

    Singleton, Norman R; Altman, David A; Yu, Ching; Rex, James A; Forsyth, David R

    2013-07-09

    In a pressurized water reactor with all of the in-core instrumentation gaining access to the core through the reactor head, each fuel assembly in which the instrumentation is introduced is aligned with an upper internals instrumentation guide-way. In the elevations above the upper internals upper support assembly, the instrumentation is protected and aligned by upper mounted instrumentation columns that are part of the instrumentation guide-way and extend from the upper support assembly towards the reactor head in hue with a corresponding head penetration. The upper mounted instrumentation columns are supported laterally at one end by an upper guide tube and at the other end by the upper support plate.

  18. Testing of a portable ultrahigh pressure water decontamination system (UHPWDS)

    SciTech Connect

    Lovell, A.; Dahlby, J.

    1996-02-01

    This report describes the tests done with a portable ultrahigh pressure water decontamination system (UHPWDS) on highly radioactively contaminated surfaces. A small unit was purchased, modified, and used for in-situ decontamination to change the waste level of the contaminated box from transuranic (TRU) waste to low- level waste (LLW). Low-level waste is less costly by as much as a factor of five or more if compared with TRU waste when handling, storage, and disposal are considered. The portable unit we tested is commercially available and requires minimal utilities for operation. We describe the UHPWDS unit itself, a procedure for its use, the results of the testing we did, and conclusions including positive and negative aspects of the UHPWDS.

  19. Pressurized water reactor fuel assembly subchannel void fraction measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, Yoshiei; Hori, Keiichi; Miyazaki, Keiji; Mishima, Kaichiro; Sugiyama, Shigekazu

    1995-12-01

    The void fraction measurement experiment of pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies has been conducted since 1987 under the sponsorship of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry as a Japanese national project. Two types of test sections are used in this experiment. One is a 5 x 5 array rod bundle geometry, and the other is a single-channel geometry simulating one of the subchannels in the rod bundle. Wide gamma-ray beam scanners and narrow gamma-ray beam computed tomography scanners are used to measure the subchannel void fractions under various steady-state and transient conditions. The experimental data are expected to be used to develop a void fraction prediction model relevant to PWR fuel assemblies and also to verify or improve the subchannel analysis method. The first series of experiments was conducted in 1992, and a preliminary evaluation of the data has been performed. The preliminary results of these experiments are described.

  20. Major influencing factors of water flooding in abnormally high-pressure carbonate reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qingying, Hou; Kaiyuan, Chen; Zifei, Fan; Libing, Fu; Yefei, Chen

    2017-01-01

    The higher pressure coefficient is the major characteristics of the abnormal high pressure carbonate reservoirs, which the pressure coefficient generally exceeds 1.2 and the initial formation pressure is higher than normal sandstone reservoirs. Due to the large pressure difference between initial formation and saturated pressure, oil wells are capable to production with high flow rate by the natural energy at early production stage. When the formation pressure drops to the saturation pressure, the water or gas is usually injected to stabilize the well productivity and sustain the formation pressure. Based on the characteristics of Kenkiak oilfield, a typical abnormal high pressure carbonate reservoir, a well group model is designed to simulate and analyze the influence factors on water flooding. The conclusion is that permeability, interlayer difference and reserve abundance are the main three factors on the water flooding development in these reservoirs.

  1. Missiles caused by severe pressurized-water reactor accidients

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, R.

    1995-07-01

    For future pressurized-water reactors, which should be designed against core-meltdown accidents, missiles generated inside the containment present a severe problem for its integrity. The masses and geometries of the missiles, as well as their velocities, may vary to a great extent. Therefore a reliable proof of the containment integrity is very difficult. In this article the potential sources of missiles are discussed, and the conclusion was reached that the generation of heavy missiles must be prevented. Steam explosions must not damage the reactor vessel head. Thus fragments of the head cannot become missiles that endanger the containment shell. Furthermore, during a melt-through failure of the reactor vessel under high pressure, the resulting forces must not catapult the whole vessel against the containment shell. Only missiles caused by hydrogen explosions may be tolerable, but shielding structures that protect the containment shell may be required. Further investigations are necessary. Finally, measures are described showing that the generation of heavy missiles can indeed be prevented. Investigations are currently being carried out that will confirm the strength of the reactor vessel head. In addition, a device for retaining the fragments of a failing reactor vessel is discussed.

  2. Pressure effects on water vapour lines: beyond the Voigt profile.

    PubMed

    Ngo, N H; Tran, H; Gamache, R R; Hartmann, J M

    2012-06-13

    A short overview of recent results on the effects of pressure (collisions) regarding the shape of isolated infrared lines of water vapour is presented. The first part of this study considers the basic collisional quantities, which are the pressure-broadening and -shifting coefficients, central parameters of the Lorentzian (and Voigt) profile and thus of any sophisticated line-shape model. Through comparisons of measured values with semi-classical calculations, the influences of the molecular states (both rotational and vibrational) involved and of the temperature are analysed. This shows the relatively unusual behaviour of H(2)O broadening, with evidence of a significant vibrational dependence and the fact that the broadening coefficient (in cm(-1) atm(-1)) of some lines increases with temperature. In the second part of this study, line shapes beyond the Voigt model are considered, thus now taking 'velocity effects' into account. These include both the influence of collisionally induced velocity changes that lead to the so-called Dicke narrowing and the influence of the dependence of collisional parameters on the speed of the radiating molecule. Experimental evidence of deviations from the Voigt shape is presented and analysed. The interest of classical molecular dynamics simulations, to model velocity changes, together with semi-classical calculations of the speed-dependent collisional parameters for line-shape predictions from 'first principles', are discussed.

  3. Advanced treatment of sodium acetate in water by ozone oxidation.

    PubMed

    Yang, De-Min; Yuan, Jian-Mei

    2014-02-01

    Ozone oxidation is an advanced oxidation process for treatment of organic and inorganic wastewater. In this paper, sodium acetate (according to chemical oxygen demand [COD]) was selected as the model pollutant in water, and the degradation efficiencies and mechanism of sodium acetate in water by ozone oxidation were investigated. The results showed that the ozone oxidation was an effective treatment technology for advanced treatment of sodium acetate in water; the COD removal rate obtained the maximum value of 45.89% from sodium acetate solution when the pH value was 10.82, ozone concentration was 100 mg/L, reaction time was 30 minutes, and reaction temperature was 25 degrees C. The COD removal rate increased first and decreased subsequently with the bicarbonate (HCO3-) concentration from 0 to 200 mg/L, the largest decline being 20.35%. The COD removal rate declined by 25.38% with the carbonate (CO3(2-)) concentration from 0 to 200 mg/L; CO3(2-) has a more obvious scavenging effect to inhibit the formation of hydroxyl free radicals than HCO3-. Calcium chloride (CaCl2) and calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) could enhance the COD removal rate greatly; they could reach 77.35 and 96.53%, respectively, after a reaction time of 30 minutes, which was increased by 31.46 and 50.64%, respectively, compared with only ozone oxidation. It was proved that the main ozone oxidation product of sodium acetate was carbon dioxide (CO2), and the degradation of sodium acetate in the ozone oxidation process followed the mechanism of hydroxyl free radicals.

  4. Water-rich carbonatites at low pressures and kimberlites at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudfinnsson, G.; Keshav, S.; Presnall, D.

    2008-12-01

    than for water-free carbonate-bearing garnet lherzolite; (2) at these pressures, there is roughly 17-20 wt percent dissolved water in the melts, suggesting that carbonatitic melts can incorporate large amounts of water; (3) from 2.5 to roughly 3.5 GPa, melts coexisting with fo+opx+cpx+gt+dolomite+fluid are highly calcic and partly overlap calciocarbonatites found in nature; (4) a P-T invariant point occurs at 3.7 GPa/1125 C, at which fo+opx+cpx+gt+dolomite+magnesite+melt+fluid coexist, marking the beginning of the stability of magnesite at the hydrous, carbonated peridotite solidus; (5) with increasing pressure starting at this invariant point, the fluid-saturated solidus becomes considerably closer to the water-free, carbonated solidus in the model system CMAS-CO2. For instance, at 7 GPa, it lies only 125 C lower than that of water-free carbonated peridotite. At 6 and 7 GPa, the melt coexisting with the fo+opx+cpx+gt+magnesite+fluid phase assemblage, contains about 5-7 wt percent water, and is more akin to kimberlite (all in wt percent: 20-25 SiO2, 30-32 MgO, 19-20 CaO, 2-3 Al2O3) than carbonatite. At this stage it is not entirely clear what changes in the phase relations cause melts to attain this character.

  5. Water-bearing, high-pressure Ca-silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Péter; Leinenweber, Kurt; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Groy, Thomas; Domanik, Kenneth J.; Kovács, István J.; Kovács, Judit S.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2017-07-01

    Water-bearing minerals provide fundamental knowledge regarding the water budget of the mantle and are geophysically significant through their influence on the rheological and seismic properties of Earth's interior. Here we investigate the CaO-SiO2-H2O system at 17 GPa and 1773 K, corresponding to mantle transition-zone condition, report new high-pressure (HP) water-bearing Ca-silicates and reveal the structural complexity of these phases. We document the HP polymorph of hartrurite (Ca3SiO5), post-hartrurite, which is tetragonal with space group P4/ncc, a = 6.820 (5), c = 10.243 (8) Å, V = 476.4 (8) Å3, and Z = 4, and is isostructural with Sr3SiO5. Post-hartrurite occurs in hydrous and anhydrous forms and coexists with larnite (Ca2SiO4), which we find also has a hydrous counterpart. Si is 4-coordinated in both post-hartrurite and larnite. In their hydrous forms, H substitutes for Si (4H for each Si; hydrogrossular substitution). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy shows broad hydroxyl absorption bands at ∼3550 cm-1 and at 3500-3550 cm-1 for hydrous post-hartrurite and hydrous larnite, respectively. Hydrous post-hartrurite has a defect composition of Ca2.663Si0.826O5H1.370 (5.84 weight % H2O) according to electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA), and the Si deficiency relative to Ca is also observed in the single-crystal data. Hydrous larnite has average composition of Ca1.924Si0.851O4H0.748 (4.06 weight % H2O) according to EPMA, and it is in agreement with the Si occupancy obtained using X-ray data collected on a single crystal. Superlattice reflections occur in electron-diffraction patterns of the hydrous larnite and could indicate crystallographic ordering of the hydroxyl groups and their associated cation defects. Although textural and EPMA-based compositional evidence suggests that hydrous perovskite may occur in high-Ca-containing (or low silica-activity) systems, the FTIR measurement does not show a well-defined hydroxyl absorption band for this

  6. Water solubility in rhyolitic silicate melts at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Amy; Russell, Kelly; Nichols, Alexander; Porritt, Lucy; Friedlander, Elizabeth

    2014-05-01

    High temperature (900-1100 °C) experiments have been conducted to measure the solubility of water in a rhyolitic melt at atmospheric pressure (1 atm) and to quantify the magnitude of retrograde solubility at low pressure. Individual cores (1 cm x 1 cm) of crystal- and bubble-free rhyolitic obsidian from Hrafntinnugryggur, Krafla (Iceland) were held in a furnace at 900-1100 °C for 0.25 to 20 hours. During this time, the uniform bubble-free cores vesiculate to produce variably swollen bubble-rich run products. The volume change in each core reflects the volume of bubbles produced in each experiment and depends on the experimental temperature and the time held at that temperature. The run product volumes for isothermal experiments (e.g., 950 °C) increase non-linearly with increasing time (e.g., 0.18 cm3 at 1.5 h, 0.96 cm3 at 12.5 h) until reaching a maximum value, after which the volume does not change appreciably. We take this plateau in the isothermal volume:time curve as coinciding with the 1 atm. solubility limit for the rhyolite at this temperature. With increasing temperature, the slope and final horizontal plateaus of the volume:time curves increase such that samples from the higher temperature suites vesiculate more, as well as more rapidly (e.g., 0.85 cm3 after 0.5 hours, 1.78 cm3 after 1 hour at 1100 °C). The variations in the maximum volume of bubbles produced for each temperature constrain the retrograde solubility of water in the melt at 1 atm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses of the residual water content of the glass in the starting material and in the most vesiculated sample from each temperature suite shows a decrease in the water content of the glass from an initial 0.114 wt% (σ 0.013) to 0.098 wt% (σ 0.010), 0.087 wt% (σ 0.009), 0.093 wt% (σ 0.008), 0.090 wt% (σ 0.006) and 0.108 wt% (σ 0.010) for 900 °C, 950 °C, 1000 °C, 1050 °C and 1100 °C respectively. This change in the solubility of water at different

  7. Numerical Evaluation of Fluid Mixing Phenomena in Boiling Water Reactor Using Advanced Interface Tracking Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Takase, Kazuyuki

    Thermal-hydraulic design of the current boiling water reactor (BWR) is performed with the subchannel analysis codes which incorporated the correlations based on empirical results including actual-size tests. Then, for the Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible Fuel Cycle (FLWR) core, an actual size test of an embodiment of its design is required to confirm or modify such correlations. In this situation, development of a method that enables the thermal-hydraulic design of nuclear reactors without these actual size tests is desired, because these tests take a long time and entail great cost. For this reason, we developed an advanced thermal-hydraulic design method for FLWRs using innovative two-phase flow simulation technology. In this study, a detailed Two-Phase Flow simulation code using advanced Interface Tracking method: TPFIT is developed to calculate the detailed information of the two-phase flow. In this paper, firstly, we tried to verify the TPFIT code by comparing it with the existing 2-channel air-water mixing experimental results. Secondary, the TPFIT code was applied to simulation of steam-water two-phase flow in a model of two subchannels of a current BWRs and FLWRs rod bundle. The fluid mixing was observed at a gap between the subchannels. The existing two-phase flow correlation for fluid mixing is evaluated using detailed numerical simulation data. This data indicates that pressure difference between fluid channels is responsible for the fluid mixing, and thus the effects of the time average pressure difference and fluctuations must be incorporated in the two-phase flow correlation for fluid mixing. When inlet quality ratio of subchannels is relatively large, it is understood that evaluation precision of the existing two-phase flow correlations for fluid mixing are relatively low.

  8. Advanced Water Recovery Technologies for Long Duration Space Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Scan X.

    2005-01-01

    Extended-duration space travel and habitation require recovering water from wastewater generated in spacecrafts and extraterrestrial outposts since the largest consumable for human life support is water. Many wastewater treatment technologies used for terrestrial applications are adoptable to extraterrestrial situations but challenges remain as constraints of space flights and habitation impose severe limitations of these technologies. Membrane-based technologies, particularly membrane filtration, have been widely studied by NASA and NASA-funded research groups for possible applications in space wastewater treatment. The advantages of membrane filtration are apparent: it is energy-efficient and compact, needs little consumable other than replacement membranes and cleaning agents, and doesn't involve multiphase flow, which is big plus for operations under microgravity environment. However, membrane lifespan and performance are affected by the phenomena of concentration polarization and membrane fouling. This article attempts to survey current status of membrane technologies related to wastewater treatment and desalination in the context of space exploration and quantify them in terms of readiness level for space exploration. This paper also makes specific recommendations and predictions on how scientist and engineers involving designing, testing, and developing space-certified membrane-based advanced water recovery technologies can improve the likelihood of successful development of an effective regenerative human life support system for long-duration space missions.

  9. Behavior of stainless steels in pressurized water reactor primary circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Féron, D.; Herms, E.; Tanguy, B.

    2012-08-01

    Stainless steels are widely used in primary circuits of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Operating experience with the various grades of stainless steels over several decades of years has generally been excellent. Nevertheless, stress corrosion failures have been reported in few cases. Two main factors contributing to SCC susceptibility enhancement are investigated in this study: cold work and irradiation. Irradiation is involved in the stress corrosion cracking and corrosion of in-core reactor components in PWR environment. Irradiated assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a complex and multi-physics phenomenon for which a predictive modeling able to describe initiation and/or propagation is not yet achieved. Experimentally, development of initiation smart tests and of in situ instrumentation, also in nuclear reactors, is an important axis in order to gain a better understanding of IASCC kinetics. A strong susceptibility for SCC of heavily cold worked austenitic stainless steels is evidenced in hydrogenated primary water typical of PWRs. It is shown that for a given cold-working procedure, SCC susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels materials increases with increasing cold-work. Results have shown also strong influences of the cold work on the oxide layer composition and of the maximum stress on the time to fracture.

  10. Simulations of dissociation constants in low pressure supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halstead, S. J.; An, P.; Zhang, S.

    2014-09-01

    This article reports molecular dynamics simulations of the dissociation of hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide in water from ambient to supercritical temperatures at a fixed pressure of 250 atm. Corrosion of reaction vessels is known to be a serious problem of supercritical water, and acid/base dissociation can be a significant contributing factor to this. The SPC/e model was used in conjunction with solute models determined from density functional calculations and OPLSAA Lennard-Jones parameters. Radial distribution functions were calculated, and these show a significant increase in solute-solvent ordering upon forming the product ions at all temperatures. For both dissociations, rapidly decreasing entropy of reaction was found to be the controlling thermodynamic factor, and this is thought to arise due to the ions produced from dissociation maintaining a relatively high density and ordered solvation shell compared to the reactants. The change in entropy of reaction reaches a minimum at the critical temperature. The values of pKa and pKb were calculated and both increased with temperature, in qualitative agreement with other work, until a maximum value at 748 K, after which there was a slight decrease.

  11. Thermogravimetric study of water state in wheat starch gels obtained under high pressures.

    PubMed

    Orlowska, Marta; Utzig, Ewa; Randzio, Stanislaw L

    2010-02-01

    Wheat starch gels containing 56.0% of water were obtained during thermal gelatinization under isobaric conditions at different pressures ranging from 0.5 to 100 MPa. Thermogravimetric analysis allowed determination of pressure influence on water behavior in gel matrix. The vaporization rate indicated that water is released in two main steps. The first step corresponds to the diffusion of the water fraction (so-called nonbound water) from the porous structure of the amylose gel located between partially swollen starch granules. However, the second step that appears at higher temperature is related to the desorption of water molecules (bound water), included in the swollen granules. It was observed that the most important influence of pressure on water partitioning in the starch gel took place over a pressure range from 0.5 to 10 MPa. The results obtained indicate that pressure is a thermodynamical parameter, which stabilizes the native state of starch granules.

  12. The changes in resting anal pressure after performing full-thickness rectal advancement flaps.

    PubMed

    Balciscueta, Zutoia; Uribe, Natalia; Mínguez, Miguel; García-Granero, Eduardo

    2017-09-01

    Advancement flap is an accepted approach for treating complex fistula-in-ano.The purpose was to evaluate the changes in resting pressure along the anal canal after performing a full-thickness flap. Manometric review of patients who have undergone a full-thickness rectal advancement flap procedure for complex anal fistulas of cryptoglandular origin. Recurrence and continence were evaluated. Resting Anal Pressure was assessed along the anal canal by two measures: maximum resting pressure(MRP) and inferior resting pressure(IRP) at 0.5 cm from the anal verge. 119 patients were evaluated. Overall recurrence rate was5.9%. Anal continence was maintained intact in 76.5%. Manometric study showed a significant decrease in postoperative MRP(90.6 ± 31.9 to 45.2 ± 20 mmHg; p < 0.001), while IRP values did not differ significantly(28.2 ± 18.3 to 23.2 ± 13.5 mmHg; p = 0.1). Performing a full-thickness rectal flap causes a decrease of the MRP in the middle third of the anal canal, due to the inclusion of the internal sphincter in flap. It seems crucial to preserve the distal internal sphincter intact as it helps both to maintain the resting pressure in the lower third and avoid deformities of the anal margin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Development test report for the high pressure water jet system nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Takasumi, D.S.

    1995-09-28

    The high pressure water jet nozzle tests were conducted to identify optimum water pressure, water flow rate, nozzle orifice size and fixture configuration needed to effectively decontaminate empty fuel storage canisters in KE-Basin. This report gives the tests results and recommendations from the these tests.

  14. Acceptance Test Report for the high pressure water jet system canister cleaning fixture

    SciTech Connect

    Burdin, J.R.

    1995-10-25

    This Acceptance Test confirmed the test results and recommendations, documented in WHC-SD-SNF-DTR-001, Rev. 0 Development Test Report for the High Pressure Water Jet System Nozzles, for decontaminating empty fuel canisters in KE-Basin. Optimum water pressure, water flow rate, nozzle size and overall configuration were tested

  15. Piston slap induced pressure fluctuation in the water coolant passage of an internal combustion engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Kazuhide; Wang, Xiaoyu; Saeki, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Liner cavitation is caused by water pressure fluctuation in the water coolant passage (WCP). When the negative pressure falls below the saturated vapor pressure, the impulsive pressure following the implosion of cavitation bubbles causes cavitation erosion of the wet cylinder liner surface. The present work establishes a numerical model for structural-acoustic coupling between the crankcase and the acoustic field in the WCP considering their dynamic characteristics. The coupling effect is evaluated through mutual interaction terms that are calculated from the mode shapes of the acoustic field and of the crankcase vibration on the boundary. Water pressure fluctuations in the WCP under the action of piston slap forces are predicted and the contributions of the uncoupled mode shapes of the crankcase and the acoustic field to the pressure waveform are analyzed. The influence of sound speed variations on the water pressure response is discussed, as well as the pressure on the thrust sides of the four cylinders.

  16. Wash water reclamation technology for advanced manned spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, D. F.

    1977-01-01

    The results of an analytical study and assessment of state-of-the-art wash water reclamation technology for advanced manned spacecraft is presented. All non-phase-change unit operations, unit processes, and subsystems currently under development by NASA are considered. Included among these are: filtration, ultrafiltration, carbon adsorption, ion exchange, chemical pretreatment, reverse osmosis, hyperfiltration, and certain urea removal techniques. Performance data are given together with the projected weights and sizes of key components and subsystems. In the final assessment, a simple multifiltration approach consisting of surface-type cartridge filters, carbon adsorption and ion exchange resins receives the highest rating for six-man orbital missions of up to 10 years in duration.

  17. Wash water reclamation technology for advanced manned spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, D. F.

    1977-01-01

    The results of an analytical study and assessment of state-of-the-art wash water reclamation technology for advanced manned spacecraft is presented. All non-phase-change unit operations, unit processes, and subsystems currently under development by NASA are considered. Included among these are: filtration, ultrafiltration, carbon adsorption, ion exchange, chemical pretreatment, reverse osmosis, hyperfiltration, and certain urea removal techniques. Performance data are given together with the projected weights and sizes of key components and subsystems. In the final assessment, a simple multifiltration approach consisting of surface-type cartridge filters, carbon adsorption and ion exchange resins receives the highest rating for six-man orbital missions of up to 10 years in duration.

  18. Advancing Water and Water-Energy-Food Cluster Activities within Future Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawford, R. G.; Bhaduri, A.; Pahl-Wostl, C.

    2014-12-01

    In building its emerging program, Future Earth has encouraged former Earth System Science Partnership (ESSP) projects to redefine their objectives, priorities and problem approaches so they are aligned with those of Future Earth. These new projects will be characterized by more integrated applications of natural and social sciences as well as dialogue and science integrated across disciplinary boundaries to address a wide range of environmental and social issues. The Global Water System Project (GWSP) has had a heritage of integrating natural and social sciences, and recently started to also look at issues within the Water-Energy-Food (WEF) cluster using similar integrated approaches. As part of the growth of the scientific elements of this cluster, GWSP has approached Future Earth opportunities by addressing the sustainability for Water, Energy, and Food through integrated water information and improved governance.In this presentation the approaches being considered for promoting integration in both water and the WEF cluster will be discussed. In particular, potential contributions of Future Earth to research related to the use and management of water and to issues and science underpinning the W-E-F nexus deliberations will be identified. In both cases the increasing ability to utilize Earth observations and big data will advance this research agenda. In addition, the better understanding of the implications of governance structures in addressing these issues and the options for harmonizing the use of scientific knowledge and technological advances will be explored. For example, insights gained from water management studies undertaken within the GWSP are helping to focus plans for a "sustainable water futures" project and a WEF cluster within Future Earth. The potential role of the Sustainable Development Goals in bringing together the monitoring and science capabilities, and understanding of governance approaches, will be discussed as a framework for facilitating

  19. Recent Experimental Advances to Determine (noble) Gases in Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipfer, R.; Brennwald, M. S.; Huxol, S.; Mächler, L.; Maden, C.; Vogel, N.; Tomonaga, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In aquatic systems noble gases, radon, and bio-geochemically conservative transient trace gases (SF6, CFCs) are frequently applied to determine water residence times and to reconstruct past environmental and climatic conditions. Recent experimental breakthroughs now enable ● to apply the well-established concepts of terrestrial noble gas geochemistry in waters to the minute water amounts stored in sediment pore space and in fluid inclusions (A), ● to determine gas exchange processes on the bio-geochemical relevant time scales of minutes - hours (B), and ● to separate diffusive and advective gas transport in soil air (C). A. Noble-gas analysis in water samples (< 1 g) facilitates determining the solute transport in the pore space and identifying the origin of bio- and geogenic fluids in (un) consolidated sediments [1]. Advanced techniques that combine crushing and sieving speleothem samples in ultra-high-vacuum to a specific grain size allow to separate air and water-bearing fluid inclusions and thus enables noble-gas-based reconstruction of environmental conditions from water masses as small as 1mg [2]. B. The coupling of noble gas analysis with approaches of gas chromatography permits combined analysis of noble gases and other gases species (e.g., SF6, CFCs, O2, N2) from a single water sample. The new method substantially improves ground water dating by SF6 and CFCs as excess air is quantified from the same sample and hence can adequately be corrected for [3]. Portable membrane-inlet mass spectrometers enable the quasi-continuous and real-time analysis of noble gases and other dissolved gases directly in the field, allowing, for instance, quantification of O2 turnover rates on small time scales [4]. C. New technical developments perfect 222Rn analysis in water by the synchronous the determination of the short-lived 220Rn. The combined 220,222Rn analysis sheds light on the emanation behaviour of radon by identifying soil water content to be the crucial

  20. Advanced Packaging Technology Used in Fabricating a High-Temperature Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beheim, Glenn M.

    2003-01-01

    installed in water-cooled jackets, as shown. This was a severe test because the pressure-sensing chips were exposed to the hot combustion gases. Prior to the installation of the SiC pressure sensors, two high-temperature silicon sensors, installed in the same locations, did not survive a single engine run. The durability of the leadless SiC pressure sensor was demonstrated when both SiC sensors operated properly throughout the two runs that were conducted.

  1. Integrated landslide monitoring: rainfalls, pore water pressures and surface movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berti, M.; Casula, G.; Elmi, C.; Fabris, M.; Ghirotti, M.; Loddo, F.; Mora, P.; Pesci, A.; Simoni, A.

    2003-04-01

    Rainfall-induced landslides involving clay-rich soils are widely represented in the Apennines. They cover up to 30% of the slopes forming the relief constituted by chaotic clayey units and are typically subject to repeated reactivations of the movement which are often triggered by a series of discrete failures located in the upper part (headscarp). Failures and movement can then propagate downslope and reactivate the whole landslide deposit which displays a typical elongated body, limited depth and a fan-shaped toe as a result of successive slow earth-flow like movements. An experimental monitoring programme was designed and is currently operating on the Rocca Pitigliana landslide whose characteristics well represent the above described type of movements. Its last parossistic movement date back to 1999 and, since then, remedial works were realized on behalf of local authorities. They basically consist of surficial and deep drainage works located on the landslide body. Experimental activities focus on the main headscarp whose morphology and sub-surface water circulation scheme were unaffected by the interventions. The monitoring approach includes measuring rainfalls and pore-pressure responses in both saturated and unsaturated soils. Surficial movements are continuously measured by means of GPS permanent stations and by wire extensometers which allow real time control of headscarp activity. Main aim of the monitoring activities is to provide experimental data, which can be used to test various existing hydrologic models and to identify triggering conditions. Since the ‘70s, many hydrologic models have been proposed to describe the pore water pressure distribution within the soil and its response to precipitation. The topic has recently drawn growing attention because of the recognized importance in landslide triggering but still experimental data are very much needed in order to obtain and validate capable predicting tools. This is mostly due to the multiple and

  2. Identification and characterization of passive safety system and inherent safety feature building blocks for advanced light-water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is investigating passive and inherent safety options for Advanced Light-Water Reactors (ALWRs). A major activity in 1989 includes identification and characterization of passive safety system and inherent safety feature building blocks, both existing and proposed, for ALWRs. Preliminary results of this work are reported herein. This activity is part of a larger effort by the US Department of Energy, reactor vendors, utilities, and others in the United States to develop improved LWRs. The Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) program and the Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (APWR) program have as goals improved, commercially available LWRs in the early 1990s. The Advanced Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ASBWR) program and the AP-600 program are developing more advanced reactors with increased use of passive safety systems. It is planned that these reactors will become commercially available in the mid 1990s. The ORNL program is an exploratory research program for LWRs beyond the year 2000. Desired long-term goals for such reactors include: (1) use of only passive and inherent safety, (2) foolproof against operator errors, (3) malevolence resistance against internal sabotage and external assault and (4) walkaway safety. The acronym ''PRIME'' (Passive safety, Resilient operation, Inherent safety, Malevolence resistance, and Extended (walkaway) safety) is used to summarize these desired characteristics. Existing passive and inherent safety options are discussed in this document.

  3. Anticipatory Water Management in Phoenix using Advanced Scenario Planning and Analyses: WaterSim 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampson, D. A.; Quay, R.; White, D. D.; Gober, P.; Kirkwood, C.

    2013-12-01

    Complexity, uncertainty, and variability are inherent properties of linked social and natural processes; sustainable resource management must somehow consider all three. Typically, a decision support tool (using scenario analyses) is used to examine management alternatives under suspected trajectories in driver variables (i.e., climate forcing's, growth or economic projections, etc.). This traditional planning focuses on a small set of envisioned scenarios whose outputs are compared against one-another in order to evaluate their differing impacts on desired metrics. Human cognition typically limits this to three to five scenarios. However, complex and highly uncertain issues may require more, often much more, than five scenarios. In this case advanced scenario analysis provides quantitative or qualitative methods that can reveal patterns and associations among scenario metrics for a large ensemble of scenarios. From this analysis, then, a smaller set of heuristics that describe the complexity and uncertainty revealed provides a basis to guide planning in an anticipatory fashion. Our water policy and management model, termed WaterSim, permits advanced scenario planning and analysis for the Phoenix Metropolitan Area. In this contribution we examine the concepts of advanced scenario analysis on a large scale ensemble of scenarios using our work with WaterSim as a case study. For this case study we created a range of possible water futures by creating scenarios that encompasses differences in water supplies (our surrogates for climate change, drought, and inherent variability in riverine flows), population growth, and per capital water consumption. We used IPCC estimates of plausible, future, alterations in riverine runoff, locally produced and vetted estimates of population growth projections, and empirical trends in per capita water consumption for metropolitan cities. This ensemble consisted of ~ 30, 700 scenarios (~575 k observations). We compared and contrasted

  4. A case of quinsy following high-pressure water jet injury.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, C; Oosthuizen, J C; O'Dwyer, T

    2014-06-01

    High-pressure water injuries of the oropharynx are uncommon but can cause significant injury and airway compromise when they occur. A small number of cases of high-pressure water injury of the oropharynx have been presented in the literature, detailing a range of effects and outcomes. We describe the first reported case of high-pressure water injury of the oropharynx associated with peritonsillar abscess (quinsy) requiring surgical drainage.

  5. Hydrogen production from water: Recent advances in photosynthesis research

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.

    1997-12-31

    The great potential of hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting is predicated on quantitative measurement of the algae`s hydrogen-producing capability, which is based on the following: (1) the photosynthetic unit size of hydrogen production; (2) the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production; (3) thermodynamic efficiencies of conversion of light energy into the Gibbs free energy of molecular hydrogen; (4) photosynthetic hydrogen production from sea water using marine algae; (5) the potential for research advances using modern methods of molecular biology and genetic engineering to maximize hydrogen production. ORNL has shown that sustained simultaneous photoevolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen can be performed with mutants of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that lack a detectable level of the Photosystem I light reaction. This result is surprising in view of the standard two-light reaction model of photosynthesis and has interesting scientific and technological implications. This ORNL discovery also has potentially important implications for maximum thermodynamic conversion efficiency of light energy into chemical energy by green plant photosynthesis. Hydrogen production performed by a single light reaction, as opposed to two, implies a doubling of the theoretically maximum thermodynamic conversion efficiency from {approx}10% to {approx}20%.

  6. Water cooled metal optics for the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, W.R.; Irick, S.C.; Lunt, D.L.J.

    1991-10-28

    The program for providing water cooled metal optics for the Advanced Light Source at Berkeley is reviewed with respect to fabrication and metrology of the surfaces. Materials choices, surface figure and smoothness specifications, and metrology systems for measuring the plated metal surfaces are discussed. Results from prototype mirrors and grating blanks will be presented, which show exceptionally low microroughness and mid-period error. We will briefly describe out improved version of the Long Trace Profiler, and its importance to out metrology program. We have completely redesigned the mechanical, optical and computational parts of the profiler system with the cooperation of Peter Takacs of Brookhaven, Continental Optical, and Baker Manufacturing. Most important is that one of our profilers is in use at the vendor to allow testing during fabrication. Metrology from the first water cooled mirror for an ALS beamline is presented as an example. The preplating processing and grinding and polishing were done by Tucson Optical. We will show significantly better surface microroughness on electroless nickel, over large areas, than has been reported previously.

  7. Water cooled metal optics for the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, W.R.; Irick, S.C. ); Lunt, D.L.J. )

    1991-10-28

    The program for providing water cooled metal optics for the Advanced Light Source at Berkeley is reviewed with respect to fabrication and metrology of the surfaces. Materials choices, surface figure and smoothness specifications, and metrology systems for measuring the plated metal surfaces are discussed. Results from prototype mirrors and grating blanks will be presented, which show exceptionally low microroughness and mid-period error. We will briefly describe out improved version of the Long Trace Profiler, and its importance to out metrology program. We have completely redesigned the mechanical, optical and computational parts of the profiler system with the cooperation of Peter Takacs of Brookhaven, Continental Optical, and Baker Manufacturing. Most important is that one of our profilers is in use at the vendor to allow testing during fabrication. Metrology from the first water cooled mirror for an ALS beamline is presented as an example. The preplating processing and grinding and polishing were done by Tucson Optical. We will show significantly better surface microroughness on electroless nickel, over large areas, than has been reported previously.

  8. Effects of ambient temperature and water vapor on chamber pressure and oxygen level during low atmospheric pressure stunning of poultry.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Paul H; Pritchard, David G

    2017-05-17

    The characteristics of the vacuum used in a low atmospheric pressure stunning system to stun (render unconscious) poultry prior to slaughter are described. A vacuum chamber is pumped by a wet screw compressor. The vacuum pressure is reduced from ambient atmospheric pressure to an absolute vacuum pressure of ∼250 Torr (∼33 kPa) in ∼67 sec with the vacuum gate valve fully open. At ∼250 Torr, the sliding gate valve is partially closed to reduce effective pumping speed, resulting in a slower rate of decreasing pressure. Ambient temperature affects air density and water vapor pressure and thereby oxygen levels and the time at the minimum total pressure of ∼160 Torr (∼21 kPa) is varied from ∼120 to ∼220 sec to ensure an effective stun within the 280 seconds of each cycle. The reduction in total pressure results in a gradual reduction of oxygen partial pressure that was measured by a solid-state electrochemical oxygen sensor. The reduced oxygen pressure leads to hypoxia, which is recognized as a humane method of stunning poultry. The system maintains an oxygen concentration of <5% for at least 2 minutes, which ensures that birds are irreversibly stunned. Calculated pump down (pressure versus time) data match experimental data very closely because the programmable logic controller and the human machine interface enable precise and accurate control. The vacuum system operates in the turbulent viscous flow regime, and is best characterized by absolute vacuum pressure rather than gauge pressure. Neither the presence of broiler chickens nor different fore-line pipe designs of four parallel commercial systems affected the pressure-time data. Water in wet air always reduces the oxygen concentrations to a value lower than in dry air. The partial pressure of water and oxygen were found to depend on the pump down parameters due to the formation of fog in the chamber and desorption of water from the birds and the walls of the vacuum chamber. © The Author 2017

  9. High Pressure Research in the Large-Volume Press at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Shen, G.

    2013-05-01

    We present an overview of current status of high-pressure research using large-volume presses (LVP) at both GSECARS (Sector 13) and HPCAT (Sector 16) at the third-generation synchrotron facility of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne National Laboratory. These combined facilities provide a wide range of research capabilities for the high pressure community. The 230 ton Paris-Edinburgh device (jointly developed by HPCAT and GSECARS, with partial support from COMPRES) at the bending magnet (BM) beamline 16-BM-B has been used primarily for studies on liquids and glasses. We use the multi-angle energy-dispersive diffraction technique to probe structures of non-crystalline materials, and ultrasonic and falling sphere techniques to measure elasticity and viscosity of these materials. These capabilities allow us to examine the close link between structure and physical properties of non-crystalline metarials. The 1000 ton system at the insertion device (ID) beamline 13-ID-D is used extensively for acoustic velocity measurement for solids and melts. The newly developed DDIA-30 module, when used in a double-stage apparatus with sintered diamond anvils, can generate pressures in excess of 40 GPa routinely. DDIA-30 can also be used as a deformation device for larger samples or higher pressure experiments. The 250 ton system at beamline 13-BM-D as just been upgraded and can accommodate a variety of LVP techniques. Among them the D-DIA and the high-pressure x-ray tomography microscope (HPXTM) are at high demand. The D-DIA has been used for deformation at mantle conditions in both ductile and brittle regime, with acoustic emission detection. The HPXTM has been used to study volumetric properties of glasses and melts as well as 3D microstructure imaging under pressure. Latest scientific results will be highlighted.

  10. High-pressure hydrogen testing of single crystal superalloys for advanced rocket engine turbopump turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parr, R. A.; Alter, W. S.; Johnston, M. H.; Strizak, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    A screening program to determine the effects of high pressure hydrogen on selected candidate materials for advanced single crystal turbine blade applications is examined. The alloys chosen for the investigation are CM SX-2, CM SX-4C, Rene N-4, and PWA1480. Testing is carried out in hydrogen and helium at 34 MPa and room temperature, with both notched and unnotched single crystal specimens. Results show a significant variation in susceptibility to Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) among the four alloys and a marked difference in fracture topography between hydrogen and helium environment specimens.

  11. High-pressure hydrogen testing of single crystal superalloys for advanced rocket engine turbopump turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, W. S.; Parr, R. A.; Johnston, M. H.; Strizak, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    A screening program to determine the effects of high pressure hydrogen on selected candidate materials for advanced single crystal turbine blade applications is examined. The alloys chosen for the investigation are CM SX-2, CM SX-4C, Rene N-4, and PWA1480. Testing is carried out in hydrogen and helium at 34 MPa and room temperature, with both notched and unnotched single crystal specimens. Results show a significant variation in susceptibility to Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) among the four alloys and a marked difference in fracture topography between hydrogen and helium environment specimens.

  12. Advances in high-resolution RIXS for the study of excitation spectra under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jungho

    2016-07-09

    Hard x-ray resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) is a promising x-ray spectroscopic tool for measuring low-energy excitation spectra at high pressure which have been stymied heretofore by the technical difficulties inherent in measuring a sample held at high pressure in a diamond anvil cell. The currently available facilities of high resolution (< 200 meV) RIXS has been used to probe low-energy excitation spectra from the diamond anvil cell, by virtue of advanced photon detection instrumentations of high-brilliance synchrotron x-ray radiation sources. Compared to a structural elastic scattering and x-ray emission, RIXS is a photon hungry technique and high-resolution RIXS under high pressure is at its infancy stage. In this review, the fundamentals of RIXS including instrumentation of high-resolution RIXS are presented and then experimental details of diamond anvil cell, sample preparation and measurement geometry are discussed. Experimental data of 3d and 5d transition metal oxides are presented. Finally, future improvements in high-resolution RIXS instrumentation for the high pressure experiment is discussed.

  13. Advanced turboprop wing installation effects measured by unsteady blade pressure and noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidelberg, Laurence J.; Woodward, Richard P.

    1987-01-01

    A single rotation model propeller (SR-7A) was tested at simulated takeoff/approach conditions (Mach 0.2), in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-Ft Anechoic Wind Tunnel. Both unsteady blade surface pressures and noise measurements were made for a tractor configuration with propeller/straight wing and propeller alone configurations. The angle between the wing chord and propeller axis (droop angle) was varied along with the wing angle of attack to determine the effects on noise and unsteady loading. A method was developed that uses unsteady blade pressure measurements to provide a quantitative indication of propeller inflow conditions, at least for a uniform (across the propeller disk) inflow angle. The wing installation caused a nearly uniform upwash at the propeller inlet as evidenced by the domination of the pressure spectra by the first shaft order. This inflow angle increased at a rate of almost 150 percent of that of the wing angle-of-attack for a propeller-wing spacing of 0.54 wing chords at a constant droop angle. The flyover noise, as measured by the maximum blade passing frequency level, correlates closely with the propeller inflow angle (approx. 0.6 dB per degree of inflow angle) for all droop angles and wing angles of attack tested, including the propeller alone data. Large changes in the unsteady pressure responses on the suction surface of the blade were observed as the advance ratio was varied. The presence of a leading edge vortex may explain this behavior since changes in the location of this vortex would change with loading (advance ratio).

  14. Advanced turboprop wing installation effects measured by unsteady blade pressure and noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidelberg, Laurence J.; Woodward, Richard P.

    1987-01-01

    A single rotation model propeller (SR-7A) was tested at simulated takeoff/approach conditions (Mach 0.2), in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-Ft Anechoic Wind Tunnel. Both unsteady blade surface pressures and noise measurements were made for a tractor configuration with propeller/straight wing and propeller alone configurations. The angle between the wing chord and propeller axis (droop angle) was varied along with the wing angle of attack to determine the effects on noise and unsteady loading. A method was developed that uses unsteady blade pressure measurements to provide a quantitative indication of propeller inflow conditions, at least for a uniform (across the propeller disk) inflow angle. The wing installation caused a nearly uniform upwash at the propeller inlet as evidenced by the domination of the pressure spectra by the first shaft order. This inflow angle increased at a rate of almost 150 percent of that of the wing angle-of-attack for a propeller-wing spacing of 0.54 wing chords at a constant droop angle. The flyover noise, as measured by the maximum blade passing frequency level, correlates closely with the propeller inflow angle (approx. 0.6 dB per degree of inflow angle) for all droop angles and wing angles of attack tested, including the propeller alone data. Large changes in the unsteady pressure responses on the suction surface of the blade were observed as the advance ratio was varied. The presence of a leading edge vortex may explain this behavior since changes in the location of this vortex would change with loading (advance ratio).

  15. Study of Pu consumption in Advanced Light Water Reactors. Evaluation of GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor plants

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-13

    Timely disposal of the weapons plutonium is of paramount importance to permanently safeguarding this material. GE`s 1300 MWe Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) has been designed to utilize fill] core loading of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel. Because of its large core size, a single ABWR reactor is capable of disposing 100 metric tons of plutonium within 15 years of project inception in the spiking mode. The same amount of material could be disposed of in 25 years after the start of the project as spent fuel, again using a single reactor, while operating at 75 percent capacity factor. In either case, the design permits reuse of the stored spent fuel assemblies for electrical energy generation for the remaining life of the plant for another 40 years. Up to 40 percent of the initial plutonium can also be completely destroyed using ABWRS, without reprocessing, either by utilizing six ABWRs over 25 years or by expanding the disposition time to 60 years, the design life of the plants and using two ABWRS. More complete destruction would require the development and testing of a plutonium-base fuel with a non-fertile matrix for an ABWR or use of an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR). The ABWR, in addition, is fully capable of meeting the tritium target production goals with already developed target technology.

  16. Fuzzy power control algorithm for a pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hah, Y.J. ); Lee, B.W. )

    1994-05-01

    A fuzzy power control algorithm is presented for automatic reactor power control in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Automatic power shape control is complicated by the use of control rods with a conventional proportional-integral-differential controller because it is highly coupled with reactivity compensation. Thus, manual shape controls are usually employed even for the limited capability needed for load-following operations including frequency control. In an attempt to achieve automatic power shape control without any design modifications to the core, a fuzzy power control algorithm is proposed. For the fuzzy control, the rule base is formulated based on a multiple-input multiple-output system. The minimum operation rule and the center of area method are implemented for the development of the fuzzy algorithm. The fuzzy power control algorithm has been applied to Yonggwang Nuclear Unit 3. The simulation results show that the fuzzy control can be adapted as a practical control strategy for automatic reactor power control of PWRs during the load-following operations.

  17. Pressurized-water reactor internals aging degradation study. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Luk, K.H.

    1993-09-01

    This report documents the results of a Phase I study on the effects of aging degradations on pr internals. Primary stressers for internals an generated by the primary coolant flow in the they include unsteady hydrodynamic forces and pump-generated pressure pulsations. Other stressors are applied loads, manufacturing processes, impurities in the coolant and exposures to fast neutron fluxes. A survey of reported aging-related failure information indicates that fatigue, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and mechanical wear are the three major aging-related degradation mechanisms for PWR internals. Significant reported failures include thermal shield flow-induced vibration problems, SCC in guide tube support pins and core support structure bolts, fatigue-induced core baffle water-jet impingement problems and excess wear in flux thimbles. Many of the reported problems have been resolved by accepted engineering practices. Uncertainties remain in the assessment of long-term neutron irradiation effects and environmental factors in high-cycle fatigue failures. Reactor internals are examined by visual inspections and the technique is access limited. Improved inspection methods, especially one with an early failure detection capability, can enhance the safety and efficiency of reactor operations.

  18. Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of Supercritical Pressure Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, X.; Schulenberg, T.; Koshizuka, S.; Oka, Y.; Souyri, A.

    2002-07-01

    In the frame of the European project HPLWR, joined by European research institutions, industrial partners and the University of Tokyo, thermal-hydraulic analysis of supercritical pressure light water reactors has been carried out. A thorough literature survey on heat transfer of supercritical fluids indicates a large deficiency in the prediction of the heat transfer coefficient and the onset of heat transfer deterioration under the reactor condition. A CFD code for analysing the thermal-hydraulic behaviour of supercritical fluids was developed. Numerical results show that the heat transfer coefficient, including the heat transfer deterioration region, can be well predicted using this CFD code, at least for circular tube geometries. Such a CFD code is well suitable for understanding the heat transfer mechanism. Based on the numerical results, a new heat transfer correlation has been proposed. For the thermal-hydraulic design of an HPLWR fuel assembly, the subchannel analysis code STAR-SC has been developed with a high numerical efficiency and a high applicability to different kinds of fuel assembly configurations. The results show clearly that design of a HPLWR fuel assembly is a highly challenging task. At the same time, sub-channel analysis provides some important guidelines for the design of a HPLWR fuel assembly. (authors)

  19. Improved pressurized water reactor radial reflector modeling in nodal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, E.Z. )

    1991-10-01

    A one-dimensional method based on a combination of the nodal equivalence theory and response matrix homogenization methods was previously described for determining environment-insensitive equivalent few-group diffusion theory parameters for homogenized radial reflector nodes of a pressurized water reactor. This reflector model, called the NGET-RM model, yields equivalent nodal parameters that do not account for the two-dimensional structure of the baffle at core corners; this can lead to significant errors in computed two-dimensional core power distributions. A semi-empirical correction procedure is proposed for reducing the two-dimensional effects associated with this particular one-dimensional reflector model. Numerical two-group experiments are performed for a given reflector configuration (and soluble boron concentration) to determine optimal values of the two empirical factors defined by this model. In this paper it is shown that the resultant factors are rather insensitive to core configuration or core conditions and that their application yields improved two-group NGET-RM reflector parameters with which accurate nodal power distributions can be obtained. The results are also compared with those obtained with another one-dimensional environment-insensitive model that has an extra degree of freedom utilized here to reduce two-dimensional effects. Some practical aspects related to the application of the proposed correction procedure are briefly discussed.

  20. High protein flexibility and reduced hydration water dynamics are key pressure adaptive strategies in prokaryotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, N.; Michoud, G.; Cario, A.; Ollivier, J.; Franzetti, B.; Jebbar, M.; Oger, P.; Peters, J.

    2016-09-01

    Water and protein dynamics on a nanometer scale were measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering in the piezophile archaeon Thermococcus barophilus and the closely related pressure-sensitive Thermococcus kodakarensis, at 0.1 and 40 MPa. We show that cells of the pressure sensitive organism exhibit higher intrinsic stability. Both the hydration water dynamics and the fast protein and lipid dynamics are reduced under pressure. In contrast, the proteome of T. barophilus is more pressure sensitive than that of T. kodakarensis. The diffusion coefficient of hydration water is reduced, while the fast protein and lipid dynamics are slightly enhanced with increasing pressure. These findings show that the coupling between hydration water and cellular constituents might not be simply a master-slave relationship. We propose that the high flexibility of the T. barophilus proteome associated with reduced hydration water may be the keys to the molecular adaptation of the cells to high hydrostatic pressure.

  1. High protein flexibility and reduced hydration water dynamics are key pressure adaptive strategies in prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, N.; Michoud, G.; Cario, A.; Ollivier, J.; Franzetti, B.; Jebbar, M.; Oger, P.; Peters, J.

    2016-01-01

    Water and protein dynamics on a nanometer scale were measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering in the piezophile archaeon Thermococcus barophilus and the closely related pressure-sensitive Thermococcus kodakarensis, at 0.1 and 40 MPa. We show that cells of the pressure sensitive organism exhibit higher intrinsic stability. Both the hydration water dynamics and the fast protein and lipid dynamics are reduced under pressure. In contrast, the proteome of T. barophilus is more pressure sensitive than that of T. kodakarensis. The diffusion coefficient of hydration water is reduced, while the fast protein and lipid dynamics are slightly enhanced with increasing pressure. These findings show that the coupling between hydration water and cellular constituents might not be simply a master-slave relationship. We propose that the high flexibility of the T. barophilus proteome associated with reduced hydration water may be the keys to the molecular adaptation of the cells to high hydrostatic pressure. PMID:27595789

  2. Application of effect-directed analysis to identify mutagenic nitrogenous disinfection by-products of advanced oxidation drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Vughs, D; Baken, K A; Kolkman, A; Martijn, A J; de Voogt, P

    2016-07-22

    Advanced oxidation processes are important barriers for organic micropollutants in (drinking) water treatment. It is however known that medium pressure UV/H2O2 treatment may lead to mutagenicity in the Ames test, which is no longer present after granulated activated carbon (GAC) filtration. Many nitrogen-containing disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) result from the reaction of photolysis products of nitrate with (photolysis products of) natural organic material (NOM) during medium pressure UV treatment of water. Identification of the N-DBPs and the application of effect-directed analysis to combine chemical screening results with biological activity would provide more insight into the relation of specific N-DBPs with the observed mutagenicity and was the subject of this study. To this end, fractions of medium pressure UV-treated and untreated water extracts were prepared using preparative HPLC and tested using the Ames fluctuation test. In addition, high-resolution mass spectrometry was performed on all fractions to assess the presence of N-DBPs. Based on toxicity data and read across analysis, we could identify five N-DBPs that are potentially genotoxic and were present in relatively high concentrations in the fractions in which mutagenicity was observed. The results of this study offer opportunities to further evaluate the identity and potential health concern of N-DBPs formed during advanced oxidation UV drinking water treatment.

  3. Pressure dependence of viscosity in supercooled water and a unified approach for thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies of water.

    PubMed

    Singh, Lokendra P; Issenmann, Bruno; Caupin, Frédéric

    2017-04-12

    The anomalous decrease of the viscosity of water with applied pressure has been known for over a century. It occurs concurrently with major structural changes: The second coordination shell around a molecule collapses onto the first shell. Viscosity is thus a macroscopic witness of the progressive breaking of the tetrahedral hydrogen bond network that makes water so peculiar. At low temperature, water at ambient pressure becomes more tetrahedral and the effect of pressure becomes stronger. However, surprisingly, no data are available for the viscosity of supercooled water under pressure, in which dramatic anomalies are expected based on interpolation between ambient pressure data for supercooled water and high pressure data for stable water. Here we report measurements with a time-of-flight viscometer down to [Formula: see text] and up to [Formula: see text], revealing a reduction of viscosity by pressure by as much as 42%. Inspired by a previous attempt [Tanaka H (2000) J Chem Phys 112:799-809], we show that a remarkably simple extension of a two-state model [Holten V, Sengers JV, Anisimov MA (2014) J Phys Chem Ref Data 43:043101], initially developed to reproduce thermodynamic properties, is able to accurately describe dynamic properties (viscosity, self-diffusion coefficient, and rotational correlation time) as well. Our results support the idea that water is a mixture of a high density, "fragile" liquid, and a low density, "strong" liquid, the varying proportion of which explains the anomalies and fragile-to-strong crossover in water.

  4. The ISS Water Processor Catalytic Reactor as a Post Processor for Advanced Water Reclamation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalette, Tim; Snowdon, Doug; Pickering, Karen D.; Callahan, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Advanced water processors being developed for NASA s Exploration Initiative rely on phase change technologies and/or biological processes as the primary means of water reclamation. As a result of the phase change, volatile compounds will also be transported into the distillate product stream. The catalytic reactor assembly used in the International Space Station (ISS) water processor assembly, referred to as Volatile Removal Assembly (VRA), has demonstrated high efficiency oxidation of many of these volatile contaminants, such as low molecular weight alcohols and acetic acid, and is considered a viable post treatment system for all advanced water processors. To support this investigation, two ersatz solutions were defined to be used for further evaluation of the VRA. The first solution was developed as part of an internal research and development project at Hamilton Sundstrand (HS) and is based primarily on ISS experience related to the development of the VRA. The second ersatz solution was defined by NASA in support of a study contract to Hamilton Sundstrand to evaluate the VRA as a potential post processor for the Cascade Distillation system being developed by Honeywell. This second ersatz solution contains several low molecular weight alcohols, organic acids, and several inorganic species. A range of residence times, oxygen concentrations and operating temperatures have been studied with both ersatz solutions to provide addition performance capability of the VRA catalyst.

  5. EPA Science Matters Newsletter: Advancing Ways to Clean Up Drinking Water Systems (Published November 2013)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    To advance the science and engineering of decontaminating pipe systems and safely disposing of high-volumes of contaminated water, Agency homeland security researchers are developing a Water Security Test Bed (WSTB).

  6. Water Speciation and properties of hydrous model basalt melt at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajgain, S. K.; Karki, B. B.

    2013-12-01

    Silicate melts in the Earth's interior are known/expected to be hydrous. Water can make major impact on physical properties including the structure, density, and mobility of melts. The behavior of relevant hydrous melts over most of the mantle pressure regime is poorly constrained. Water solubility increases rapidly with increasing pressure at low pressure [1] and a complete miscibility of liquid MgSiO3 and H2O has been suggested based on high-pressure simulations [2]. We have recently performed first principle molecular dynamics simulations of hydrous model basalt melt at high pressure. Our results show that with increasing pressure, the partial molar volume of water in the melt asymptotically approaches to that of pure water, and both the volumes become identical after certain point. Water is predicted to dissolve in the form of hydroxyls and water molecules at low pressure and as more extended structures at high pressure. The simulated basalt-H2O system commences to behave ideally at pressures above 10 GPa. In contrast, the simulated SiO2-H2O and MgSiO3-H2O systems approach to an ideal limit at much higher pressures of 50 GPa or above. These results imply an unlimited solubility of water in in silicate melts and the water solubility rather appears to be insensitive of composition at high pressure. Existence of water-rich silicate melts over most of the mantle in early history could have made substantial contribution to the origin of hydrosphere [3]. [1] Shen, A. H., and H. Keppler (1997), Direct observation of complete miscibility in the Albite-H2O system, Nature, 385, 710-712. [2] Mookherjee, M., L. Stixrude, and B. Karki (2008), Hydrous silicate melt at high pressure, Nature, 452, 983-986. [3] Matsui, T., and Y. Abe (1986), Evolution of an impact-induced atmosphere and magma ocean on the accreting Earth, Nature, 319, 303-305.

  7. Water Vapor Permeability of the Advanced Crew Escape Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant; Kuzneth, Larry; Gillis, David; Jones, Jeffery; Daniel, Brian; Gernhardt, Michael; Hamilton, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) crewmembers are expected to return to earth wearing a suit similar to the current Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES). To ensure optimum cognitive performance, suited crewmembers must maintain their core body temperature within acceptable limits. There are currently several options for thermal maintenance in the post-landing phase. These include the current baseline, which uses an ammonia boiler, purge flow using oxygen in the suit, accessing sea water for liquid cooling garment (LCG) cooling and/or relying on the evaporative cooling capacity of the suit. These options vary significantly in mass, power, engineering and safety factors, with relying on the evaporative cooling capacity of the suit being the least difficult to implement. Data from previous studies indicates that the evaporative cooling capacity of the ACES was much higher than previously expected, but subsequent tests were performed for longer duration and higher metabolic rates to better define the water vapor permeability of the ACES. In these tests five subjects completed a series of tests performing low to moderate level exercise in order to control for a target metabolic rate while wearing the ACES in an environmentally controlled thermal chamber. Four different metabolic profiles at a constant temperature of 95 F and relative humidity of 50% were evaluated. These tests showed subjects were able to reject about twice as much heat in the permeable ACES as they were in an impermeable suit that had less thermal insulation. All of the heat rejection differential is attributed to the increased evaporation capability through the Gortex bladder of the suit.

  8. Water Vapor Permeability of the Advanced Crew Escape Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant; Kuzneth, Larry; Gillis, David; Jones, Jeffery; Daniel, Brian; Gernhardt, Michael; Hamilton, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) crewmembers are expected to return to earth wearing a suit similar to the current Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES). To ensure optimum cognitive performance, suited crewmembers must maintain their core body temperature within acceptable limits. There are currently several options for thermal maintenance in the post-landing phase. These include the current baseline, which uses an ammonia boiler, purge flow using oxygen in the suit, accessing sea water for liquid cooling garment (LCG) cooling and/or relying on the evaporative cooling capacity of the suit. These options vary significantly in mass, power, engineering and safety factors, with relying on the evaporative cooling capacity of the suit being the least difficult to implement. Data from previous studies indicates that the evaporative cooling capacity of the ACES was much higher than previously expected, but subsequent tests were performed for longer duration and higher metabolic rates to better define the water vapor permeability of the ACES. In these tests five subjects completed a series of tests performing low to moderate level exercise in order to control for a target metabolic rate while wearing the ACES in an environmentally controlled thermal chamber. Four different metabolic profiles at a constant temperature of 95 F and relative humidity of 50% were evaluated. These tests showed subjects were able to reject about twice as much heat in the permeable ACES as they were in an impermeable suit that had less thermal insulation. All of the heat rejection differential is attributed to the increased evaporation capability through the Gortex bladder of the suit.

  9. Effect of water pressure on absorbency of hydroentangled greige cotton nonwoven fabrics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A studied has been conducted to determine the effect of water pressure in a commercial-grade Fleissner MiniJet hydroentanglement system on the absorbency of greige (non-bleached) cotton lint-based nonwoven fabric. The study has shown that a water pressure of 125 Bar or higher on only two high-pressu...

  10. Ice speed of a calving glacier modulated by small fluctuations in basal water pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Shin; Skvarca, Pedro; Naito, Nozomu; Enomoto, Hiroyuki; Tsutaki, Shun; Tone, Kenta; Marinsek, Sebastián; Aniya, Masamu

    2011-09-01

    Ice flow acceleration has played a crucial role in the rapid retreat of calving glaciers in Alaska, Greenland and Antarctica. Glaciers that calve in water flow much faster than those that terminate on land, as a result of enhanced basal ice motion where basal water pressure is high. However, a scarcity of subglacial observations in calving glaciers limits a mechanistic understanding. Here we present high-frequency measurements of ice speed and basal water pressures from Glaciar Perito Moreno, a fast-flowing calving glacier in Patagonia. We measured water pressure in boreholes drilled at a site where the glacier is 515+/-5m thick, and where more than 60% of the ice is below the level of proglacial lakes. We found that the mean basal water pressure was about 95% of the pressure imposed by the weight of the overlying ice. Moreover, changes in basal water pressure by a few per cent drove nearly 40% of the variations in ice flow speed. The ice speed was strongly correlated to air temperature, suggesting that glacier motion was modulated by water pressure changes as meltwater entered the system. We conclude that basal water pressure in calving glaciers is important for glacier dynamics, and closely connected to climate conditions.

  11. Suboptimal projective control of a pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Saif, M. )

    1989-12-01

    The time- and oxide field-dependencies of interface trap (N{sub it}) formation in MOSFETs have been studied following pulsed ionizing radiation. Results are compared with the two-stage model for Nit formation involving slow drift of radiation-induced H{sup +} ions in the SiO{sub 2}. Detailed data on the gate oxide field dependence during each individual stage are presented and discussed. A model is developed for the production of H{sup +} throughout the oxide. Calculations based on this model correctly predict the complete time dependent N{sub it} formation is at a maximum near zero first stage gate bias. This unexpected behavior apparently arises from the oxide field dependence of the H{sup +} production during the first stage. A suboptimal output feedback approach for control of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) in the H. B. Robinson nuclear power plant is presented. Optimal state feedback linear quadratic regulator (LQR) theory with pole placement capability is extended to obtain a suboptimal projective controller for such cases where the entire state vector is inaccessible for measurement and feedback purposes. The appealing feature of the proposed approach is that it is possible to select the weighting matrices in the quadratic cost functional such that the resulting control law would nearly minimize the cost, and at the same time can assign a subspectrum of the closed-loop system to preassigned desired locations. Additionally, the design algorithm is computationally attractive, since regardless of the dimension of the PWR model the approach mainly involves low-order matrix computations.

  12. On the pressure field of nonlinear standing water waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, L. W.

    1980-01-01

    The pressure field produced by two dimensional nonlinear time and space periodic standing waves was calculated as a series expansion in the wave height. The high order series was summed by the use of Pade approximants. Calculations included the pressure variation at great depth, which was considered to be a likely cause of microseismic activity, and the pressure distribution on a vertical barrier or breakwater.

  13. Study and application of a high-pressure water jet multi-functional flow test system.

    PubMed

    Shi, Huaizhong; Li, Gensheng; Huang, Zhongwei; Li, Jingbin; Zhang, Yi

    2015-12-01

    As the exploration and development of oil and gas focus more and more on deeper formation, hydraulic issues such as high-pressure water jet rock breaking, wellbore multiphase flow law, cuttings carrying efficiency, and hydraulic fracturing technique during the drilling and completion process have become the key points. To accomplish related researches, a high-pressure water jet multi-functional flow test system was designed. The following novel researches are carried out: study of high-pressure water jet characteristics under confining pressure, wellbore multiphase flow regime, hydraulic pressure properties of down hole tools during jet fracturing and pulsed cavitation jet drilling, and deflector's friction in radial jet drilling. The validity and feasibility of the experimental results provided by the system with various test modules have proved its importance in the research of the high-pressure water jet and well completion technology.

  14. Study and application of a high-pressure water jet multi-functional flow test system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Huaizhong; Li, Gensheng; Huang, Zhongwei; Li, Jingbin; Zhang, Yi

    2015-12-01

    As the exploration and development of oil and gas focus more and more on deeper formation, hydraulic issues such as high-pressure water jet rock breaking, wellbore multiphase flow law, cuttings carrying efficiency, and hydraulic fracturing technique during the drilling and completion process have become the key points. To accomplish related researches, a high-pressure water jet multi-functional flow test system was designed. The following novel researches are carried out: study of high-pressure water jet characteristics under confining pressure, wellbore multiphase flow regime, hydraulic pressure properties of down hole tools during jet fracturing and pulsed cavitation jet drilling, and deflector's friction in radial jet drilling. The validity and feasibility of the experimental results provided by the system with various test modules have proved its importance in the research of the high-pressure water jet and well completion technology.

  15. Fuzzy logic control of steam generator water level in pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kuan, C.C.; Lin, C.; Hsu, C.C. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1992-10-01

    In this paper a fuzzy logic controller is applied to control the steam generator water level in a pressurized water reactor. The method does not require a detailed mathematical mode of the object to be controlled. The design is based on a set of linguistic rules that were adopted from the human operator's experience. After off-line fuzzy computation, the controller is a lookup table, and thus, real-time control is achieved. Shrink-and-swell phenomena are considered in the linguistic rules, and the simulation results show that their effect is dramatically reduced. The performance of the control system can also be improved by changing the input and output scaling factors, which is convenient for on-line tuning.

  16. HEADCO: a program for converting observed water levels and pressure measurements to formation pressure and standard hydraulic head

    SciTech Connect

    Spane, F.A. Jr.; Mercer, R.B.

    1985-10-01

    Static water-level and fluid pressure measurements are commonly converted in hydrologic studies to formation pressure and hydraulic head, which are used to determine groundwater flow characteristics of aquifer systems. While the direct use of field measurements is usually adequate for determining formation pressure and hydraulic head for shallow flow systems (i.e., <1000 ft), corrections and conversion parameters must be used to properly account for fluid-column density effects, which commonly occur with deep systems. This report presents a program, HEADCO, for converting static water-level and pressure measurements to formation pressure and standard hydraulic head. The HEADCO program corrects field measurements for the effects of fluid-density variation and selected external stresses. Factors that affect density of the fluid column, in which field measurements are made, include temperature, pressure, salinity, suspended solids, and multiphase conditions. External stresses examined in HEADCO include barometric and earth tide fluctuations, and gravitational acceleration variation. A program description and procedures for converting field measurements obtained using field test arrangements commonly employed in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project field program are provided in this report. The report includes user instructions and an illustrative test example. Results of a field example comparison are also provided. This comparison examines observed and HEADCO-calculated pressures for 30 pressure probes recently calibrated in a laboratory and tested under field conditions at borehole DC-8. The test case and field example comparisons indicate that HEADCO provides accurate estimates of formation pressure and standard hydraulic head that are well within the accuracy range of downhole pressure-measuring instrumentation. 44 refs., 14 figs., 8 tabs.

  17. Decomposition of water-insoluble organic waste by water plasma at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S.; Watanabe, T.

    2012-12-01

    The water plasma was generated in atmospheric pressure with the emulsion state of 1-decanol which is a source of soil and ground water pollution. In order to investigate effects of operating conditions on the decomposition of 1-decanol, generated gas and liquid from the water plasma treatment were analysed in different arc current and 1-decanol concentration. The 1-decanol was completely decomposed generating hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, treated liquid and solid carbon in all experimental conditions. The feeding rate of 1- decanol emulsion was increased with increasing the arc current in virtue of enhanced input power. The generation rate of gas and the ratio of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide were increased in the high arc current, while the generation rate of solid carbon was decreased due to enhanced oxygen radicals in the high input power. Generation rates of gas and solid carbon were increased at the same time with increasing the concentration of 1-decanol, because carbon radicals were increased without enhancement of oxygen radicals in a constant power level. In addition, the ratio of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide was increased along with the concentration of 1-decanol due to enhanced carbon radicals in the water plasma flame.

  18. 77 FR 3009 - Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Advanced Boiling Water Reactors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ... COMMISSION Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Advanced Boiling Water Reactors..., ``Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Advanced Boiling Water Reactors.'' DATES... developed using this Catalog along with the Operator Licensing Examination Standards for Power Reactors...

  19. Increased Levels of Modified Advanced Oxidation Protein Products Are Associated with Central and Peripheral Blood Pressure in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong; Cabezas-Rodriguez, Ivan; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Heimburger, Olof; Barany, Peter; Snaedal, Sunna; Anderstam, Björn; Helin, Ann-Christin Bragfors; Carrero, Juan Jesus; Stenvinkel, Peter; Lindholm, Bengt

    2015-01-01

    ♦ Background and aims: Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Central blood pressure (BP) is thought to be more relevant than peripheral BP for the pathogenesis of CVD. Advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) are markers of oxidative stress. This study investigated the relationship between AOPP and central BP in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. ♦ Methods: In a cross-sectional study of 75 PD patients (67% men), we analyzed two oxidative stress markers, AOPP (modified assay, mAOPP, correcting for the impact of triglycerides) and pentosidine, three inflammation markers, interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). All patients underwent measurement of central systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) by applanation tonometry. ♦ Results: Patients with mAOPP levels above the median had a higher central SBP and DBP than those below the median values. In univariate analysis, the levels of mAOPP associated with central SBP and central DBP. Multiple regression analysis, adjusting for age, gender, diabetes, CVD, protein-energy wasting (PEW), hs-CRP and extracellular water by multi-frequency bioimpedance or N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), confirmed independent associations between mAOPP and central SBP and central DBP respectively. ♦ Conclusions: The mAOPP level is independently associated with the central SBP and DBP in PD patients. This finding suggests that oxidative stress may be involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension or that hypertension itself or factors associated with hypertension such as fluid overload may have an additional effect on oxidative stress in PD patients. PMID:24584606

  20. Monte Carlo simulations of the pressure dependence of the water-acid gas interfacial tensions.

    PubMed

    Biscay, F; Ghoufi, A; Lachet, V; Malfreyt, P

    2009-10-29

    We report two-phase Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the binary water-acid gas mixtures at high temperature and high pressure. Simulations are performed in the Np(N)AT ensemble in order to reproduce the pressure dependence of the interfacial tensions of the water-CO(2) and water-H(2)S mixtures. The interfacial tension of the binary water-CO(2) mixture is determined from 5 to 45 MPa along the isotherm T = 383 K. Water-H(2)S interfacial tensions are computed along one supercritical isotherm (T = 393 K) in a pressure range of 1-15 MPa. The temperature and pressure conditions investigated here by the MC simulations are typical of the geological storage conditions of these acid gases. The coexisting densities and the compositions of the water-rich and acid-gas-rich phases are compared with experiments and with data calculated from Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo (GEMC) simulations.

  1. Evaluation of anticipatory signal to steam generator pressure control program for 700 MWe Indian pressurized heavy water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pahari, S.; Hajela, S.; Rammohan, H. P.; Malhotra, P. K.; Ghadge, S. G.

    2012-07-01

    700 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (IPHWR) is horizontal channel type reactor with partial boiling at channel outlet. Due to boiling, it has a large volume of vapor present in the primary loops. It has two primary loops connected with the help of pressurizer surge line. The pressurizer has a large capacity and is partly filled by liquid and partly by vapor. Large vapor volume improves compressibility of the system. During turbine trip or load rejection, pressure builds up in Steam Generator (SG). This leads to pressurization of Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS). To control pressurization of SG and PHTS, around 70% of the steam generated in SG is dumped into the condenser by opening Condenser Steam Dump Valves (CSDVs) and rest of the steam is released to the atmosphere by opening Atmospheric Steam Discharge Valves (ASDVs) immediately after sensing the event. This is accomplished by adding anticipatory signal to the output of SG pressure controller. Anticipatory signal is proportional to the thermal power of reactor and the proportionality constant is set so that SG pressure controller's output jacks up to ASDV opening range when operating at 100% FP. To simulate this behavior for 700 MWe IPHWR, Primary and secondary heat transport system is modeled. SG pressure control and other process control program have also been modeled to capture overall plant dynamics. Analysis has been carried out with 3-D neutron kinetics coupled thermal hydraulic computer code ATMIKA.T to evaluate the effect of the anticipatory signal on PHT pressure and over all plant dynamics during turbine trip in 700 MWe IPHWR. This paper brings out the results of the analysis with and without considering anticipatory signal in SG pressure control program during turbine trip. (authors)

  2. High-pressure Experimental Studies on Geo-liquids Using Synchrotron Radiation at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanbin; Shen, Guoyin

    2014-12-23

    Here, we review recent progress in studying silicate, carbonate, and metallic liquids of geological and geophysical importance at high pressure and temperature, using the large-volume high-pressure devices at the third-generation synchrotron facility of the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. These integrated high-pressure facilities now offer a unique combination of experimental techniques that allow researchers to investigate structure, density, elasticity, viscosity, and interfacial tension of geo-liquids under high pressure, in a coordinated and systematic fashion. Moreover, we describe experimental techniques, along with scientific highlights. Future developments are also discussed.

  3. The initial responses of hot liquid water released under low atmospheric pressures: Experimental insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargery, Alistair Simon; Lane, Stephen J.; Barrett, Alexander; Wilson, Lionel; Gilbert, Jennie S.

    2010-11-01

    Experiments have been performed to simulate the shallow ascent and surface release of water and brines under low atmospheric pressure. Atmospheric pressure was treated as an independent variable and water temperature and vapor pressure were examined as a function of total pressure variation down to low pressures. The physical and thermal responses of water to reducing pressure were monitored with pressure transducers, temperature sensors and visible imaging. Data were obtained for pure water and for solutions with dissolved NaCl or CO 2. The experiments showed the pressure conditions under which the water remained liquid, underwent a rapid phase change to the gas state by boiling, and then solidified because of removal of latent heat. Liquid water is removed from phase equilibrium by decompression. Solid, liquid and gaseous water are present simultaneously, and not at the 611 Pa triple point, because dynamic interactions between the phases maintain unstable temperature gradients. After phase changes stop, the system reverts to equilibrium with its surroundings. Surface and shallow subsurface pressure conditions were simulated for Mars and the icy satellites of the outer Solar System. Freezing by evaporation in the absence of wind on Mars is shown to be unlikely for pure water at pressures greater than c. 670 Pa, and for saline solutions at pressures greater than c. 610 Pa. The physical nature of ice that forms depends on the salt content. Ice formed from saline water at pressures less than c. 610 Pa could be similar to terrestrial sea ice. Ice formed from pure water at pressures less than c. 100 Pa develops a low thermal conductivity and a 'honeycomb' structure created by sublimation. This ice could have a density as low as c. 450 kg m -3 and a thermal conductivity as low as 1.6 W m -1 K -1, and is highly reflective, more akin to snow than the clear ice from which it grew. The physical properties of ice formed from either pure or saline water at low pressures will

  4. Advanced high pressure engine study for mixed-mode vehicle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luscher, W. P.; Mellish, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    High pressure liquid rocket engine design, performance, weight, envelope, and operational characteristics were evaluated for a variety of candidate engines for use in mixed-mode, single-stage-to-orbit applications. Propellant property and performance data were obtained for candidate Mode 1 fuels which included: RP-1, RJ-5, hydrazine, monomethyl-hydrazine, and methane. The common oxidizer was liquid oxygen. Oxygen, the candidate Mode 1 fuels, and hydrogen were evaluated as thrust chamber coolants. Oxygen, methane, and hydrogen were found to be the most viable cooling candidates. Water, lithium, and sodium-potassium were also evaluated as auxiliary coolant systems. Water proved to be the best of these, but the system was heavier than those systems which cooled with the engine propellants. Engine weight and envelope parametric data were established for candidate Mode 1, Mode 2, and dual-fuel engines. Delivered engine performance data were also calculated for all candidate Mode 1 and dual-fuel engines.

  5. Prestressed-concrete pressure vessels and their applicability to advanced-energy-system concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J

    1983-01-01

    Prestressed concrete pressure vessels (PCPVs) are, in essence, spaced steel structures since their strength is derived from a multitude of steel elements made up of deformed reinforcing bars and prestressing tendons which are present in sufficient quantities to carry tension loads imposed on the vessel. Other major components of a PCPV include the concrete, liner and cooling system, and insulation. PCPVs exhibit a number of advantages which make them ideally suited for application to advanced energy concepts: fabricability in virtually any size and shape using available technology, improved safety, reduced capital costs, and a history of proven performance. PCPVs have many applications to both nuclear- and non-nuclear-based energy systems concepts. Several of these concepts will be discussed as well as the research and development activities conducted at ORNL in support of PCPV development.

  6. Prediction of unsteady blade surface pressures on an advanced propeller at an angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, M.; Groeneweg, J. F.

    1989-01-01

    The paper considers the numerical solution of the unsteady, three-dimensional, Euler equations to obtain the blade surface pressures of an advanced propeller at an angle of attack. The specific configuration considered is the SR7L propeller at cruise conditions with a 4.6 deg inflow angle corresponding to the +2 deg nacelle tilt of the Propeller Test Assessment (PTA) flight test condition. The results indicate nearly sinusoidal response of the blade loading, with angle of attack. For the first time, detailed variations of the chordwise loading as a function of azimuthal angle are presented. It is observed that the blade is lightly loaded for part of the revolution and shocks appear from hub to about 80 percent radial station for the highly loaded portion of the revolution.

  7. Prediction of Unsteady Blade Surface Pressures on an Advanced Propeller at an Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, M.; Groeneweg, J. F.

    1989-01-01

    The numerical solution of the unsteady, three-dimensional, Euler equations is considered in order to obtain the blade surface pressures of an advanced propeller at an angle of attack. The specific configuration considered is the SR7L propeller at cruise conditions with a 4.6 deg inflow angle corresponding to the plus 2 deg nacelle tilt of the Propeller Test Assessment (PTA) flight test condition. The results indicate nearly sinusoidal response of the blade loading, with angle of attack. For the first time, detailed variations of the chordwise loading as a function of azimuthal angle are presented. It is observed that the blade is lightly loaded for part of the revolution and shocks appear from hub to about 80 percent radial station for the highly loaded portion of the revolution.

  8. Prestressed concrete pressure vessels and their applicability to advanced energy system concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Prestressed concrete pressure vessels (PCPVs) are, in essence, spaced steel structures since their strength is derived from a multitude of steel elements made up of deformed reinforcing bars and prestressing tendons which are present in sufficient quantities to carry tension loads imposed on the vessel. Other major components of a PCPV include the concrete, liner and cooling system, and insulation. PCPVs exhibit a number of advantages which make them ideally suited for application to advanced energy concepts: fabricability in virtually any size and shape using available technology, improved safety, reduced capital costs, and a history of proven performance. PCPVs have many applications to both nuclear- and non-nuclear-based energy systems concepts. Several of these concepts are discussed as well as the research and development activities conducted at ORNL in support of PCPV development.

  9. Optical Fuel Injector Patternation Measurements in Advanced Liquid-Fueled, High Pressure, Gas Turbine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, R. J.; Hicks, Y. R.; Anderson, R. C.; Zaller, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging and planar Mie scattering are used to examine the fuel distribution pattern (patternation) for advanced fuel injector concepts in kerosene burning, high pressure gas turbine combustors. Three fuel injector concepts for aerospace applications were investigated under a broad range of operating conditions. Fuel PLIF patternation results are contrasted with those obtained by planar Mie scattering. For one injector, further comparison is also made with data obtained through phase Doppler measurements. Differences in spray patterns for diverse conditions and fuel injector configurations are readily discernible. An examination of the data has shown that a direct determination of the fuel spray angle at realistic conditions is also possible. The results obtained in this study demonstrate the applicability and usefulness of these nonintrusive optical techniques for investigating fuel spray patternation under actual combustor conditions.

  10. Toxicity of irradiated advanced heavy water reactor fuels.

    PubMed

    Priest, N D; Richardson, R B; Edwards, G W R

    2013-02-01

    The good neutron economy and online refueling capability of the CANDU® heavy water moderated reactor (HWR) enable it to use many different fuels such as low enriched uranium (LEU), plutonium, or thorium, in addition to its traditional natural uranium (NU) fuel. The toxicity and radiological protection methods for these proposed fuels, unlike those for NU, are not well established. This study uses software to compare the fuel composition and toxicity of irradiated NU fuel against those of two irradiated advanced HWR fuel bundles as a function of post-irradiation time. The first bundle investigated is a CANFLEX® low void reactor fuel (LVRF), of which only the dysprosium-poisoned central element, and not the outer 42 LEU elements, is specifically analyzed. The second bundle investigated is a heterogeneous high-burnup (LEU,Th)O(2) fuelled bundle, whose two components (LEU in the outer 35 elements and thorium in the central eight elements) are analyzed separately. The LVRF central element was estimated to have a much lower toxicity than that of NU at all times after shutdown. Both the high burnup LEU and the thorium fuel had similar toxicity to NU at shutdown, but due to the creation of such inhalation hazards as (238)Pu, (240)Pu, (242)Am, (242)Cm, and (244)Cm (in high burnup LEU), and (232)U and (228)Th (in irradiated thorium), the toxicity of these fuels was almost double that of irradiated NU after 2,700 d of cooling. New urine bioassay methods for higher actinoids and the analysis of thorium in fecal samples are recommended to assess the internal dose from these two fuels.

  11. Impact of radiation embrittlement on integrity of pressure vessel supports for two PWR (pressurized-water-reactor) plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.; Pennell, W.E.; Robinson, G.C.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1988-01-01

    Recent pressure-vessel surveillance data from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) indicate an embrittlement fluence-rate effect that is applicable to the evaluation of the integrity of light-water reactor (LWR) pressure vessel supports. A preliminary evaluation using the HFIR data indicated increases in the nil ductility transition temperature at 32 effective full-power years (EFPY) of 100 to 130/degree/C for pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) vessel supports located in the cavity at midheight of the core. This result indicated a potential problem with regard to life expectancy. However, an accurate assessment required a detailed, specific-plant, fracture-mechanics analysis. After a survey and cursory evaluation of all LWR plants, two PWR plants that appeared to have a potential problem were selected. Results of the analyses indicate minimum critical flaw sizes small enough to be of concern before 32 EFPY. 24 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Pressure suppression containment system for boiling water reactor

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Nesbitt, Loyd B.

    1997-01-01

    A system for suppressing the pressure inside the containment of a BWR following a postulated accident. A piping subsystem is provided which features a main process pipe that communicates the wetwell airspace to a connection point downstream of the guard charcoal bed in an offgas system and upstream of the main bank of delay charcoal beds which give extensive holdup to offgases. The main process pipe is fitted with both inboard and outboard containment isolation valves. Also incorporated in the main process pipe is a low-differential-pressure rupture disk which prevents any gas outflow in this piping whatsoever until or unless rupture occurs by virtue of pressure inside this main process pipe on the wetwell airspace side of the disk exceeding the design opening (rupture) pressure differential. The charcoal holds up the radioactive species in the noncondensable gas from the wetwell plenum by adsorption, allowing time for radioactive decay before the gas is vented to the environs.

  13. Pressure suppression containment system for boiling water reactor

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.; Nesbitt, L.B.

    1997-01-21

    A system is disclosed for suppressing the pressure inside the containment of a BWR following a postulated accident. A piping subsystem is provided which features a main process pipe that communicates the wetwell airspace to a connection point downstream of the guard charcoal bed in an offgas system and upstream of the main bank of delay charcoal beds which give extensive holdup to offgases. The main process pipe is fitted with both inboard and outboard containment isolation valves. Also incorporated in the main process pipe is a low-differential-pressure rupture disk which prevents any gas outflow in this piping whatsoever until or unless rupture occurs by virtue of pressure inside this main process pipe on the wetwell airspace side of the disk exceeding the design opening (rupture) pressure differential. The charcoal holds up the radioactive species in the noncondensable gas from the wetwell plenum by adsorption, allowing time for radioactive decay before the gas is vented to the environs. 3 figs.

  14. Effects of surface pressure on the properties of Langmuir monolayers and interfacial water at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei; Clark, Anthony J; Paesani, Francesco

    2015-02-24

    The effects of surface pressure on the physical properties of Langmuir monolayers of palmitic acid (PA) and dipalmitoylphosphatidic acid (DPPA) at the air/water interface are investigated through molecular dynamics simulations with atomistic force fields. The structure and dynamics of both monolayers and interfacial water are compared across the range of surface pressures at which stable monolayers can form. For PA monolayers at T = 300 K, the untilted condensed phase with a hexagonal lattice structure is found at high surface pressure, while the uniformly tilted condensed phase with a centered rectangular lattice structure is observed at low surface pressure, in agreement with the available experimental data. A state with uniform chain tilt but no periodic spatial ordering is observed for DPPA monolayers on a Na(+)/water subphase at both high and low surface pressures. The hydrophobic acyl chains of both monolayers pack efficiently at all surface pressures, resulting in a very small number of gauche defects. The analysis of the hydrogen-bonding structure/dynamics at the monolayer/water interface indicates that water molecules hydrogen-bonded to the DPPA head groups reorient more slowly than those hydrogen-bonded to the PA head groups, with the orientational dynamics becoming significantly slower at high surface pressure. Possible implications for physicochemical processes taking place on marine aerosols in the atmosphere are discussed.

  15. The transpiration of water at negative pressures in a synthetic tree.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Tobias D; Stroock, Abraham D

    2008-09-11

    Plant scientists believe that transpiration-the motion of water from the soil, through a vascular plant, and into the air-occurs by a passive, wicking mechanism. This mechanism is described by the cohesion-tension theory: loss of water by evaporation reduces the pressure of the liquid water within the leaf relative to atmospheric pressure; this reduced pressure pulls liquid water out of the soil and up the xylem to maintain hydration. Strikingly, the absolute pressure of the water within the xylem is often negative, such that the liquid is under tension and is thermodynamically metastable with respect to the vapour phase. Qualitatively, this mechanism is the same as that which drives fluid through the synthetic wicks that are key elements in technologies for heat transfer, fuel cells and portable chemical systems. Quantitatively, the differences in pressure generated in plants to drive flow can be more than a hundredfold larger than those generated in synthetic wicks. Here we present the design and operation of a microfluidic system formed in a synthetic hydrogel. This synthetic 'tree' captures the main attributes of transpiration in plants: transduction of subsaturation in the vapour phase of water into negative pressures in the liquid phase, stabilization and flow of liquid water at large negative pressures (-1.0 MPa or lower), continuous heat transfer with the evaporation of liquid water at negative pressure, and continuous extraction of liquid water from subsaturated sources. This development opens the opportunity for technological uses of water under tension and for new experimental studies of the liquid state of water.

  16. SSWR Water Systems Project 2: Next Steps – Technology Advances

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is responsible for protecting America’s water resources under the Clean Water Act (CWA) and for ensuring that the Nation’s drinking water is safe under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). Further, it is the responsibility of EPA to conduct research and analyses t...

  17. SSWR Water Systems Project 2: Next Steps – Technology Advances

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is responsible for protecting America’s water resources under the Clean Water Act (CWA) and for ensuring that the Nation’s drinking water is safe under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). Further, it is the responsibility of EPA to conduct research and analyses t...

  18. New ambient pressure photoemission endstation at Advanced Light Source beamline 9.3.2

    SciTech Connect

    Grass, Michael E.; Karlsson, Patrik G.; Lundqvist, Maans; Aksoy, Funda; Wannberg, Bjoern; Mun, Bongjin S.; Hussain, Zahid; Liu, Zhi

    2010-05-15

    During the past decade, the application of ambient pressure photoemission spectroscopy (APPES) has been recognized as an important in situ tool to study environmental and materials science, energy related science, and many other fields. Several APPES endstations are currently under planning or development at the USA and international light sources, which will lead to a rapid expansion of this technique. The present work describes the design and performance of a new APPES instrument at the Advanced Light Source beamline 9.3.2 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This new instrument, Scienta R4000 HiPP, is a result of collaboration between Advanced Light Source and its industrial partner VG-Scienta. The R4000 HiPP provides superior electron transmission as well as spectromicroscopy modes with 16 {mu}m spatial resolution in one dimension and angle-resolved modes with simulated 0.5 deg. angular resolution at 24 deg. acceptance. Under maximum transmission mode, the electron detection efficiency is more than an order of magnitude better than the previous endstation at beamline 9.3.2. Herein we describe the design and performance of the system, which has been utilized to record spectra above 2 mbar.

  19. Preliminary fracture analysis of the core pressure boundary tube for the Advanced Neutron Source Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, K.C.; Yahr, G.T.

    1995-08-01

    The outer core pressure boundary tube (CPBT) of the Advanced neutron Source (ANS) reactor being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is currently specified as being composed of 6061-T6 aluminum. ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code fracture analysis rules for nuclear components are based on the use of ferritic steels; the expressions, tables, charts and equations were all developed from tests and analyses conducted for ferritic steels. Because of the nature of the Code, design with thin aluminum requires analytical approaches that do not directly follow the Code. The intent of this report is to present a methodology comparable to the ASME Code for ensuring the prevention of nonductile fracture of the CPBT in the ANS reactor. 6061-T6 aluminum is known to be a relatively brittle material; the linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) approach is utilized to determine allowable flaw sizes for the CPBT. A J-analysis following the procedure developed by the Electric Power Research Institute was conducted as a check; the results matched those for the LEFM analysis for the cases analyzed. Since 6061-T6 is known to embrittle when irradiated, the reduction in K{sub Q} due to irradiation is considered in the analysis. In anticipation of probable requirements regarding maximum allowable flaw size, a survey of nondestructive inspection capabilities is also presented. A discussion of probabilistic fracture mechanics approaches, principally Monte Carlo techniques, is included in this report as an introduction to what quantifying the probability of nonductile failure of the CPBT may entail.

  20. Simulation and experiment research on the proportional pressure control of water-assisted injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hua; Chen, Yinglong; Zhang, Zengmeng; Yang, Huayong

    2012-05-01

    Water-assisted injection molding (WAIM), a newly developed fluid-assisted injection molding technology has drawn more and more attentions for the energy saving, short cooling circle time and high quality of products. Existing research for the process of WAIM has shown that the pressure control of the injecting water is mostly important for the WAIM. However, the proportional pressure control for the WAIM system is quite complex due to the existence of nonlinearities in the water hydraulic system. In order to achieve better pressure control performance of the injecting water to meet the requirements of the WAIM, the proportional pressure control of the WAIM system is investigated both numerically and experimentally. A newly designed water hydraulic system for WAIM is first modeled in AMEsim environment, the load characteristics and the nonlinearities of water hydraulic system are both considered, then the main factors affecting the injecting pressure and load flow rate are extensively studied. Meanwhile, an open-loop model-based compensation control strategy is employed to regulate the water injection pressure and a feedback proportional integrator controller is further adopted to achieve better control performance. In order to verify the AMEsim simulation results WAIM experiment for particular Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) parts is implemented and the measured experimental data including injecting pressure and flow rate results are compared with the simulation. The good coincidence between experiment and simulation shows that the AMEsim model is accurate, and the tracking performance of the load pressure indicates that the proposed control strategy is effective for the proportional pressure control of the nonlinear WAIM system. The proposed proportional pressure control strategy and the conclusions drawn from simulation and experiment contribute to the application of water hydraulic proportional control and WAIM technology.

  1. Response of the water status of soybean to changes in soil water potentials controlled by the water pressure in microporous tubes.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, S L; Henninger, D L

    1997-12-01

    Water transport through a microporous tube-soil-plant system was investigated by measuring the response of soil and plant water status to step change reductions in the water pressure within the tubes. Soybeans were germinated and grown in a porous ceramic 'soil' at a porous tube water pressure of -0.5 kpa for 28 d. During this time, the soil matric potential was nearly in equilibrium with tube water pressure. Water pressure in the porous tubes was then reduced to either -1.0, -1.5 or -2.0 kPa. Sap flow rates, leaf conductance and soil, root and leaf water potentials were measured before and after this change. A reduction in porous tube water pressure from -0.5 to -1.0 or -1.5 kPa did not result in any significant change in soil or plant water status. A reduction in porous tube water pressure to -2.0 kPa resulted in significant reductions in sap flow, leaf conductance, and soil, root and leaf water potentials. Hydraulic conductance, calculated as the transpiration rate/delta psi between two points in the water transport pathway, was used to analyse water transport through the tube-soil-plant continuum. At porous tube water pressures of -0.5 to-1.5 kPa soil moisture was readily available and hydraulic conductance of the plant limited water transport. At -2.0 kPa, hydraulic conductance of the bulk soil was the dominant factor in water movement.

  2. Response of the water status of soybean to changes in soil water potentials controlled by the water pressure in microporous tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, S. L.; Henninger, D. L.

    1997-01-01

    Water transport through a microporous tube-soil-plant system was investigated by measuring the response of soil and plant water status to step change reductions in the water pressure within the tubes. Soybeans were germinated and grown in a porous ceramic 'soil' at a porous tube water pressure of -0.5 kpa for 28 d. During this time, the soil matric potential was nearly in equilibrium with tube water pressure. Water pressure in the porous tubes was then reduced to either -1.0, -1.5 or -2.0 kPa. Sap flow rates, leaf conductance and soil, root and leaf water potentials were measured before and after this change. A reduction in porous tube water pressure from -0.5 to -1.0 or -1.5 kPa did not result in any significant change in soil or plant water status. A reduction in porous tube water pressure to -2.0 kPa resulted in significant reductions in sap flow, leaf conductance, and soil, root and leaf water potentials. Hydraulic conductance, calculated as the transpiration rate/delta psi between two points in the water transport pathway, was used to analyse water transport through the tube-soil-plant continuum. At porous tube water pressures of -0.5 to-1.5 kPa soil moisture was readily available and hydraulic conductance of the plant limited water transport. At -2.0 kPa, hydraulic conductance of the bulk soil was the dominant factor in water movement.

  3. Response of the water status of soybean to changes in soil water potentials controlled by the water pressure in microporous tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, S. L.; Henninger, D. L.

    1997-01-01

    Water transport through a microporous tube-soil-plant system was investigated by measuring the response of soil and plant water status to step change reductions in the water pressure within the tubes. Soybeans were germinated and grown in a porous ceramic 'soil' at a porous tube water pressure of -0.5 kpa for 28 d. During this time, the soil matric potential was nearly in equilibrium with tube water pressure. Water pressure in the porous tubes was then reduced to either -1.0, -1.5 or -2.0 kPa. Sap flow rates, leaf conductance and soil, root and leaf water potentials were measured before and after this change. A reduction in porous tube water pressure from -0.5 to -1.0 or -1.5 kPa did not result in any significant change in soil or plant water status. A reduction in porous tube water pressure to -2.0 kPa resulted in significant reductions in sap flow, leaf conductance, and soil, root and leaf water potentials. Hydraulic conductance, calculated as the transpiration rate/delta psi between two points in the water transport pathway, was used to analyse water transport through the tube-soil-plant continuum. At porous tube water pressures of -0.5 to-1.5 kPa soil moisture was readily available and hydraulic conductance of the plant limited water transport. At -2.0 kPa, hydraulic conductance of the bulk soil was the dominant factor in water movement.

  4. Mandibular advancement decreases pressures in the tissues surrounding the upper airway in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kairaitis, Kristina; Stavrinou, Rosie; Parikh, Radha; Wheatley, John R; Amis, Terence C

    2006-01-01

    The pharyngeal airway can be considered as an airway luminal shape formed by surrounding tissues, contained within a bony enclosure formed by the mandible, skull base, and cervical vertebrae. Mandibular advancement (MA), a therapy for obstructive sleep apnea, is thought to increase the size of this bony enclosure and to decrease the pressure in the upper airway extraluminal tissue space (ETP). We examined the effect of MA on upper airway airflow resistance (Rua) and ETP in a rabbit model. We studied 11 male, supine, anesthetized, spontaneously breathing New Zealand White rabbits in which ETP was measured via pressure transducer-tipped catheters inserted into the tissues surrounding the lateral (ETPlat) and anterior (ETPant) pharyngeal wall. Airflow, measured via surgically inserted pneumotachograph in series with the trachea, and tracheal pressure were recorded while graded MA at 75 degrees and 100 degrees to the horizontal was performed using an external traction device. Data were analyzed using a linear mixed-effects statistical model. We found that MA at 100 degrees increased mouth opening from 4.7 +/- 0.4 to 6.6 +/- 0.4 (SE) mm (n = 7; P < 0.004), whereas mouth opening did not change from baseline (4.0 +/- 0.2 mm) with MA at 75 degrees . MA at both 75 degrees and 100 degrees decreased mean ETPlat and ETPant by approximately 0.1 cmH2O/mm MA (n = 7-11; all P < 0.0005). However, the fall in Rua (measured at 20 ml/s) with MA was greater for MA at 75 degrees (approximately 0.03 mmH2O.ml(-1).s.mm(-1)) than at 100 degrees (approximately 0.01 mmH2O.ml(-1).s.mm(-1); P < 0.02). From these findings, we conclude that MA decreases ETP and is more effective in reducing Rua without mouth opening.

  5. Preliminary development of an advanced modular pressure relief cushion: Testing and user evaluation.

    PubMed

    Freeto, Tyler; Mitchell, Steven J; Bogie, Kath M

    2017-03-20

    Effective pressure relief cushions are identified as a core assistive technology need by the World Health Organization Global Cooperation on Assistive Technology. High quality affordable wheelchair cushions could provide effective pressure relief for many individuals with limited access to advanced assistive technology. Value driven engineering (VdE) principles were employed to develop a prototype modular cushion. Low cost dynamically responsive gel balls were arranged in a close packed array and seated in bilayer foam for containment and support. Two modular cushions, one with high compliance balls and one with moderate compliance balls were compared with High Profile and Low Profile Roho(®) and Jay(®) Medical 2 cushions. ISO 16480-2 biomechanical standardized tests were applied to assess cushion performance. A preliminary materials cost analysis was carried out. A prototype modular cushion was evaluated by 12 participants who reported satisfaction using a questionnaire based on the Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with Assistive Technology (QUEST 2.0) instrument. Overall the modular cushions performed better than, or on par with, the most widely prescribed commercially available cushions under ISO 16480-2 testing. Users rated the modular cushion highly for overall appearance, size and dimensions, comfort, safety, stability, ease of adjustment and general ease of use. Cost-analysis indicated that every modular cushion component a could be replaced several times and still maintain cost-efficacy over the complete cushion lifecycle. A VdE modular cushion has the potential provide effective pressure relief for many users at a low lifetime cost. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Negative pressures and spallation in water drops subjected to nanosecond shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Stan, Claudiu A.; Willmott, Philip R.; Stone, Howard A.; Koglin, Jason E.; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew L.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Gumerlock, Karl L.; Blaj, Gabriel; Sierra, Raymond G.; Boutet, Sebastien; Guillet, Serge A. H.; Curtis, Robin H.; Vetter, Sharon L.; Loos, Henrik; Turner, James L.; Decker, Franz -Josef

    2016-05-16

    Most experimental studies of cavitation in liquid water at negative pressures reported cavitation at tensions significantly smaller than those expected for homogeneous nucleation, suggesting that achievable tensions are limited by heterogeneous cavitation. We generated tension pulses with nanosecond rise times in water by reflecting cylindrical shock waves, produced by X-ray laser pulses, at the internal surface of drops of water. Depending on the X-ray pulse energy, a range of cavitation phenomena occurred, including the rupture and detachment, or spallation, of thin liquid layers at the surface of the drop. When spallation occurred, we evaluated that negative pressures below –100 MPa were reached in the drops. As a result, we model the negative pressures from shock reflection experiments using a nucleation-and-growth model that explains how rapid decompression could outrun heterogeneous cavitation in water, and enable the study of stretched water close to homogeneous cavitation pressures.

  7. Negative pressures and spallation in water drops subjected to nanosecond shock waves

    DOE PAGES

    Stan, Claudiu A.; Willmott, Philip R.; Stone, Howard A.; ...

    2016-05-16

    Most experimental studies of cavitation in liquid water at negative pressures reported cavitation at tensions significantly smaller than those expected for homogeneous nucleation, suggesting that achievable tensions are limited by heterogeneous cavitation. We generated tension pulses with nanosecond rise times in water by reflecting cylindrical shock waves, produced by X-ray laser pulses, at the internal surface of drops of water. Depending on the X-ray pulse energy, a range of cavitation phenomena occurred, including the rupture and detachment, or spallation, of thin liquid layers at the surface of the drop. When spallation occurred, we evaluated that negative pressures below –100 MPamore » were reached in the drops. As a result, we model the negative pressures from shock reflection experiments using a nucleation-and-growth model that explains how rapid decompression could outrun heterogeneous cavitation in water, and enable the study of stretched water close to homogeneous cavitation pressures.« less

  8. Negative Pressures and Spallation in Water Drops Subjected to Nanosecond Shock Waves.

    PubMed

    Stan, Claudiu A; Willmott, Philip R; Stone, Howard A; Koglin, Jason E; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew L; Robinson, Joseph S; Gumerlock, Karl L; Blaj, Gabriel; Sierra, Raymond G; Boutet, Sébastien; Guillet, Serge A H; Curtis, Robin H; Vetter, Sharon L; Loos, Henrik; Turner, James L; Decker, Franz-Josef

    2016-06-02

    Most experimental studies of cavitation in liquid water at negative pressures reported cavitation at tensions significantly smaller than those expected for homogeneous nucleation, suggesting that achievable tensions are limited by heterogeneous cavitation. We generated tension pulses with nanosecond rise times in water by reflecting cylindrical shock waves, produced by X-ray laser pulses, at the internal surface of drops of water. Depending on the X-ray pulse energy, a range of cavitation phenomena occurred, including the rupture and detachment, or spallation, of thin liquid layers at the surface of the drop. When spallation occurred, we evaluated that negative pressures below -100 MPa were reached in the drops. We model the negative pressures from shock reflection experiments using a nucleation-and-growth model that explains how rapid decompression could outrun heterogeneous cavitation in water, and enable the study of stretched water close to homogeneous cavitation pressures.

  9. Negative pressures and spallation in water drops subjected to nanosecond shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Stan, Claudiu A.; Willmott, Philip R.; Stone, Howard A.; Koglin, Jason E.; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew L.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Gumerlock, Karl L.; Blaj, Gabriel; Sierra, Raymond G.; Boutet, Sebastien; Guillet, Serge A. H.; Curtis, Robin H.; Vetter, Sharon L.; Loos, Henrik; Turner, James L.; Decker, Franz -Josef

    2016-05-16

    Most experimental studies of cavitation in liquid water at negative pressures reported cavitation at tensions significantly smaller than those expected for homogeneous nucleation, suggesting that achievable tensions are limited by heterogeneous cavitation. We generated tension pulses with nanosecond rise times in water by reflecting cylindrical shock waves, produced by X-ray laser pulses, at the internal surface of drops of water. Depending on the X-ray pulse energy, a range of cavitation phenomena occurred, including the rupture and detachment, or spallation, of thin liquid layers at the surface of the drop. When spallation occurred, we evaluated that negative pressures below –100 MPa were reached in the drops. As a result, we model the negative pressures from shock reflection experiments using a nucleation-and-growth model that explains how rapid decompression could outrun heterogeneous cavitation in water, and enable the study of stretched water close to homogeneous cavitation pressures.

  10. Gray water recycle: Effect of pretreatment technologies on low pressure reverse osmosis treatment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gray water can be a valuable source of water when properly treated to reduce the risks associated with chemical and microbial contamination to acceptable levels for the intended reuse application. In this study, the treatment of gray water using low pressure reverse osmosis (RO) filtration after pre...

  11. Sink or swim: population pressures threaten the nation's water.

    PubMed

    Cline, T

    1995-01-01

    Since 1974, water in the US has been regulated through federal statutes such as the Clean Water Act and the Safe Drinking Water Act, which set standards for water quality. Usage regulations vary by state. The states of Texas, Arizona, Kansas, and Iowa use the "right to capture" as the basis of usage. This means any one can draw as much water as desired without cost or consideration for others' needs. This unrestricted use of water has resulted in the siphoning off of water from the Colorado River in Arizona and Southern California to the point where the Colorado River is a trickle at the river's mouth at the Gulf of California. Texans' use of the Edwards aquifer contributed to the drying up of springs that feed the San Pedro and San Antonio Rivers. Florida's main freshwater aquifer is being contaminated by seepage of deep ancient seawater. Agriculture uses about 85% of US ground water supplies for crops and livestock. Americans use about 1450 gallons per day per capita. If population reaches 500 million as expected by 2050, supply would be reduced to about 700 gallons per day per capita, which is considered the minimal amount for human needs. Almost 50% of water supplied by municipal water systems is used to flush toilets and water lawns. 15% is lost through leaky pipes. Agricultural water usage is problematic due to overuse and contamination from pollutants such as animal manures. Water for human consumption is polluted by pesticides, which are not biodegradable, and parasites. The Environmental Protection Agency in 1991 and 1992 reported 218,000 violations of standards. The Ogallala aquifer is half depleted under Kansas and is falling at a rate of 1.5 feet annually. The replenishment rate is only 0.02-0.07 inches per year. This decline could result in the lack of access to the Ogallala aquifer, which irrigates millions of acres of crops in the central plains.

  12. Association of ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate with advanced white matter lesions in ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyuk Sung; Lim, Young-Hyo; Kim, Hyun Young; Kim, Hee-Tae; Kwon, Hyung-Min; Lim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Young-Jun; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Young Seo

    2014-02-01

    White matter lesions (WMLs) are a common finding in stroke patients, and the most important risk factors are old age and hypertension. Although many studies have described the association between WMLs and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) parameters in healthy subjects and hypertensive patients, little is known about the association in hypertensive ischemic stroke patients. From July 2009 to June 2012, 169 consecutive hypertensive noncardioembolic ischemic stroke patients were recruited within 1 week of suffering a stroke, and ABPM was applied 1 or 2 weeks after stroke onset. The subjects were classified into 2 groups according to the presence of advanced WMLs, and their ABPM parameters were compared. Finally, multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate the independent relationships between WMLs and ABPM parameters. Seventy (41%) patients had advanced WMLs. In univariable analysis, higher 24-hour, awake, and asleep systolic blood pressure (SBP)/diastolic blood pressure levels and 24-hour pulse pressure were associated with advanced WMLs. However, circadian blood pressure parameters such as 24-hour BP variability, morning surge, and nocturnal dipping pattern were not associated with advanced WMLs. After adjustments, old age (odds ratio (OR) = 1.063; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.024-1.104; P = 0.002), high 24-hour SBP levels (OR = 1.055; 95% CI = 1.028-1.082; P < 0.001), and high 24-hour heart rate (OR = 1.041; 95% CI = 1.006-1.078; P = 0.023) were independently associated with advanced WMLs. In addition to old age and elevated 24-hour SBP, increased heart rate is associated with advanced WMLs in ischemic stroke patients. Heart rate deserves more attention in predicting advanced WMLs in those patients.

  13. [Research advances in simulating land water-carbon coupling].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Sun, Peng-Sen; Liu, Shi-Rong

    2012-11-01

    The increasing demand of adaptive management of land, forest, and water resources under the background of global change and water resources crisis has promoted the comprehensive study of coupling ecosystem water and carbon cycles and their restrictive relations. To construct the water-carbon coupling model and to approach the ecosystem water-carbon balance and its interactive response mechanisms under climate change at multiple spatiotemporal scales is nowadays a major concern. After reviewing the coupling relationships of water and carbon at various scales, this paper explored the implications and estimation methods of the key processes and related parameters of water-carbon coupling, the construction of evapotranspiration model at large scale based on RS, and the importance of this model in water-carbon coupling researches. The applications of assimilative multivariate data in water-carbon coupling researches under future climate change scenarios were also prospected.

  14. Population and climate pressures on global river water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Yingrong; Schoups, Gerrit; van de Giesen, Nick

    2015-04-01

    We present a global analysis of the combined effects of population growth and climate change on river water quality. In-stream Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD) concentration is calculated along global river networks using past, current and future information on gridded population and river discharge. Our model accounts for the accumulation (from populated areas), transport, dilution, and degradation of BOD to reveal the combined effects of population growth and climate change on river water quality. From 1950 to 2000, our analysis indicates that rivers that flow through regions with increasing population undergo a prominent deterioration of water quality, especially in developing countries with a lack of treatment plants. By 2050, population growth and climate change have varying effects on degradation of river water quality, with their combined effect amplified in region undergoing both population growth (more pollutant loading) and decrease in discharge (less dilution capacity). Keywords: Population growth, Climate change, River water quality, Space-time analysis, Water management

  15. Water loss control using pressure management: life-cycle energy and air emission effects.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Jennifer R; Horvath, Arpad; Sturm, Reinhard

    2013-10-01

    Pressure management is one cost-effective and efficient strategy for controlling water distribution losses. This paper evaluates the life-cycle energy use and emissions for pressure management zones in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Halifax, Nova Scotia. It compares water savings using fixed-outlet and flow-modulated pressure control to performance without pressure control, considering the embedded electricity and chemical consumption in the lost water, manufacture of pipe and fittings to repair breaks caused by excess pressure, and pressure management. The resulting energy and emissions savings are significant. The Philadelphia and Halifax utilities both avoid approximately 130 million liters in water losses annually using flow-modulated pressure management. The conserved energy was 780 GJ and 1900 GJ while avoided greenhouse gas emissions were 50 Mg and 170 Mg a year by Philadelphia and Halifax, respectively. The life-cycle financial and environmental performance of pressure management systems compares favorably to the traditional demand management strategy of installing low-flow toilets. The energy savings may also translate to cost-effective greenhouse gas emission reductions depending on the energy mix used, an important advantage in areas where water and energy are constrained and/or expensive and greenhouse gas emissions are regulated as in California, for example.

  16. Light Water Reactor-Pressure Vessel Surveillance project computer system

    SciTech Connect

    Merriman, S.H.

    1980-10-01

    A dedicated process control computer has been implemented for regulating the metallurgical Pressure Vessel Wall Benchmark Facility (PSF) at the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The purpose of the PSF is to provide reliable standards and methods by which to judge the radiation damage to reactor pressure vessel specimens. Benchmark data gathered from the PSF will be used to improve and standardize procedures for assessing the remaining safe operating lifetime of aging reactors. The computer system controls the pressure vessel specimen environment in the presence of gamma heating so that in-vessel conditions are simulated. Instrumented irradiation capsules, in which the specimens are housed, contain temperature sensors and electrical heaters. The computer system regulates the amount of power delivered to the electrical heaters based on the temperature distribution within the capsules. Time-temperature profiles are recorded along with reactor conditions for later correlation with specimen metallurgical changes.

  17. Ultra-high pressure water jet: Baseline report; Summary

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-31

    The Husky{trademark} is an ultra high pressure waterjet cutting tool system. The pump is mounted on a steel tube frame which includes slots for transport by a forklift. The Husky{trademark} features an automatic shutdown for several conditions such as low oil pressure and high oil temperature. Placement of the Husky{trademark} must allow for a three foot clearance on all sides for operation and service access. At maximum continuous operation, the output volume is 7.2 gallons per minute with an output pressure of 40,000 psi. A diesel engine provides power for the system. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

  18. Pore Water Pressure Response of a Soil Subjected to Traffic Loading under Saturated and Unsaturated Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cary, Carlos

    This study presents the results of one of the first attempts to characterize the pore water pressure response of soils subjected to traffic loading under saturated and unsaturated conditions. It is widely known that pore water pressure develops within the soil pores as a response to external stimulus. Also, it has been recognized that the development of pores water pressure contributes to the degradation of the resilient modulus of unbound materials. In the last decades several efforts have been directed to model the effect of air and water pore pressures upon resilient modulus. However, none of them consider dynamic variations in pressures but rather are based on equilibrium values corresponding to initial conditions. The measurement of this response is challenging especially in soils under unsaturated conditions. Models are needed not only to overcome testing limitations but also to understand the dynamic behavior of internal pore pressures that under critical conditions may even lead to failure. A testing program was conducted to characterize the pore water pressure response of a low plasticity fine clayey sand subjected to dynamic loading. The bulk stress, initial matric suction and dwelling time parameters were controlled and their effects were analyzed. The results were used to attempt models capable of predicting the accumulated excess pore pressure at any given time during the traffic loading and unloading phases. Important findings regarding the influence of the controlled variables challenge common beliefs. The accumulated excess pore water pressure was found to be higher for unsaturated soil specimens than for saturated soil specimens. The maximum pore water pressure always increased when the high bulk stress level was applied. Higher dwelling time was found to decelerate the accumulation of pore water pressure. In addition, it was found that the higher the dwelling time, the lower the maximum pore water pressure. It was concluded that upon further

  19. Vegetative Propagule Pressure and Water Depth Affect Biomass and Evenness of Submerged Macrophyte Communities.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Li; Wang, Yong-Yang; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Pu; Zhang, Ming-Xiang; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2015-01-01

    Vegetative propagule pressure may affect the establishment and structure of aquatic plant communities that are commonly dominated by plants capable of clonal growth. We experimentally constructed aquatic communities consisting of four submerged macrophytes (Hydrilla verticillata, Ceratophyllum demersum, Elodea nuttallii and Myriophyllum spicatum) with three levels of vegetative propagule pressure (4, 8 and 16 shoot fragments for communities in each pot) and two levels of water depth (30 cm and 70 cm). Increasing vegetative propagule pressure and decreasing water level significantly increased the growth of the submerged macrophyte communities, suggesting that propagule pressure and water depth should be considered when utilizing vegetative propagules to re-establish submerged macrophyte communities in degraded aquatic ecosystems. However, increasing vegetative propagule pressure and decreasing water level significantly decreased evenness of the submerged macrophyte communities because they markedly increased the dominance of H. verticillata and E. nuttallii, but had little impact on that of C. demersum and M. spicatum. Thus, effects of vegetative propagule pressure and water depth are species-specific and increasing vegetative propagule pressure under lower water level can facilitate the establishment success of submerged macrophyte communities.

  20. Vegetative Propagule Pressure and Water Depth Affect Biomass and Evenness of Submerged Macrophyte Communities

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-Li; Wang, Yong-Yang; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Pu; Zhang, Ming-Xiang; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2015-01-01

    Vegetative propagule pressure may affect the establishment and structure of aquatic plant communities that are commonly dominated by plants capable of clonal growth. We experimentally constructed aquatic communities consisting of four submerged macrophytes (Hydrilla verticillata, Ceratophyllum demersum, Elodea nuttallii and Myriophyllum spicatum) with three levels of vegetative propagule pressure (4, 8 and 16 shoot fragments for communities in each pot) and two levels of water depth (30 cm and 70 cm). Increasing vegetative propagule pressure and decreasing water level significantly increased the growth of the submerged macrophyte communities, suggesting that propagule pressure and water depth should be considered when utilizing vegetative propagules to re-establish submerged macrophyte communities in degraded aquatic ecosystems. However, increasing vegetative propagule pressure and decreasing water level significantly decreased evenness of the submerged macrophyte communities because they markedly increased the dominance of H. verticillata and E. nuttallii, but had little impact on that of C. demersum and M. spicatum. Thus, effects of vegetative propagule pressure and water depth are species-specific and increasing vegetative propagule pressure under lower water level can facilitate the establishment success of submerged macrophyte communities. PMID:26560705

  1. Water dynamics and population pressure in the Nepalese Himalayas.

    PubMed

    Schreier, H; Shah, P B

    1996-10-01

    The authors investigate the impact of water shortages, especially water for irrigation, on development in Nepal. "The problems associated with hydropower development will be illustrated by using the Kulekhani watershed project as a case study." The possible future effects on food supplies and health are discussed. excerpt

  2. Low-pressure water-cooled inductively coupled plasma torch

    DOEpatents

    Seliskar, C.J.; Warner, D.K.

    1984-02-16

    An inductively coupled plasma torch is provided which comprises an inner tube, including a sample injection port to which the sample to be tested is supplied and comprising an enlarged central portion in which the plasma flame is confined; an outer tube surrounding the inner tube and containing water therein for cooling the inner tube, the outer tube including a water inlet port to which water is supplied and a water outlet port spaced from the water inlet port and from which water is removed after flowing through the outer tube; and an rf induction coil for inducing the plasma in the gas passing into the tube through the sample injection port. The sample injection port comprises a capillary tube including a reduced diameter orifice, projecting into the lower end of the inner tube. The water inlet is located at the lower end of the outer tube and the rf heating coil is disposed around the outer tube above and adjacent to the water inlet.

  3. Low-pressure water-cooled inductively coupled plasma torch

    DOEpatents

    Seliskar, Carl J.; Warner, David K.

    1988-12-27

    An inductively coupled plasma torch is provided which comprises an inner tube, including a sample injection port to which the sample to be tested is supplied and comprising an enlarged central portion in which the plasma flame is confined; an outer tube surrounding the inner tube and containing water therein for cooling the inner tube, the outer tube including a water inlet port to which water is supplied and a water outlet port spaced from the water inlet port and from which water is removed after flowing through the outer tube; and an r.f. induction coil for inducing the plasma in the gas passing into the tube through the sample injection port. The sample injection port comprises a capillary tube including a reduced diameter orifice, projecting into the lower end of the inner tube. The water inlet is located at the lower end of the outer tube and the r.f. heating coil is disposed around the outer tube above and adjacent to the water inlet.

  4. Modeling and design of an advanced high pressure system for III-V compound synthesis and crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafri, Ijaz Hussain

    Indium Phosphide (InP) is an important substrate material for opto-electronics and light-wave communications. In many applications InP-based devices are found to be superior in performance than GaAs, Ge or Si based devices. However, its broad use has been limited because of the quality and cost of commercially available substrates. The primary objective of this research is to design and develop an advanced high pressure system to implement the novel technique of "one-step" in-situ synthesis and growth of InP crystals. Detailed numerical modeling and engineering analysis/design is performed to examine the critical issues associated with the growth of large diameter (up to 150 mm) III-V compound crystals. After design and fabrication, experimental work on conducted for InP synthesis. The research indicates that multiple hotzones are needed to reduce the thermal stresses in as-grown crystals. The hotzone insulation package should be strategically designed to allow more heat loss in the axial direction; a water-cooled shaft can help to accomplish this. To reduce gas convection, empty spaces should be minimized. To obtain uniform temperature and dopant distributions, a moderate rotation rate may be appropriate in the proposed configurations; higher rotation rates may cause the flow to become unsteady and turbulent. It may be desirable to use slightly higher rotation rates in the beginning and lower towards the end of growth. The modeling study also supports the use of a magnetic field to suppress flow oscillations and to control interface shape. Several innovations are proposed in the new design. The most significant are the independently-controlled injection system with its unique ball valve and multi-component arrangement that allows flexibility not seen in other high pressure systems, and a multi-span high-resolution weight monitoring system for crucible and crystal/injector. Experiments are conducted to study the effect of pressure, the thermal profiling, and the

  5. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON WATER BALANCE IN A NEGATIVE PRESSURE DIFFERENCE IRRIGATION SYSTEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniruzzaman, S. M.; Fukuhara, Teruyuki; Terasaki, Hiroaki

    Negative pressure difference irrigation (NPDI) is considered to be an attractive mode of irrigation because water use efficiency in this case is higher than that in conventional irrigation methods such as basin irrigation, furrow irrigation and sprinkler irrigation. In order to investigate the water balance in a NPDI system, experiments involving the use of a soil column, porous pipe and water reservoir were carried out in a temperature and humidity controlled room. The evaporation (Meva), supplied water (Msup), soil water storage (Msoil), wetted soil surface area and configuration of the wetted soil around the porous pipe were determined for three different negative pressures. Empirical equations were proposed for the calculation of Meva and Msoil. The proposed simple model could well reproduce the temporal variations in Meva and Msoil. With a decrease in the negative pressure, the water use efficiency increased and was in the range of 0.92 to 0.97.

  6. Detection by high pressure infrared spectrometry of hydrogen-bonding between water and triacetyl glycerol.

    PubMed

    Mushayakarara, E C; Wong, P T; Mantsch, H H

    1986-01-14

    The barotropic behavior of neat and aqueous 1,2,3-triacetyl glycerol was investigated by FT-IR spectroscopy over the pressure range 0.001 to 35 kbar. The infrared spectrum in the presence of water shows bands characteristic of hydrogen bonded carbonyl groups. An increase in hydrostatic pressure leads to a strengthening of the intermolecular hydrogen bond between water and the lipid ester C = O groups. The pressure-induced formation of ice VI at 9 kbar does not affect this hydrogen bond, however, the formation, at 20 kbar, of ice VII in which the water/water hydrogen bonds are stronger than the lipid C = O/water hydrogen bonds, frees the lipid carbonyl groups from the hydrogen-bonding to water.

  7. Effects of water compressibility on the pressure fluctuation prediction in pump turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, J. L.; Wang, D. Z.; Wang, L. Q.; Wu, Y. L.; Wei, X. Z.

    2012-11-01

    The compressible effect of water is a key factor in transient flows. However, it is always neglected in the unsteady simulations for hydraulic machinery. In light of this, the governing equation of the flow is deduced to combine the compressibility of water, and then simulations with compressible and incompressible considerations to the typical unsteady flow phenomenon (Rotor stator interaction) in a pump turbine model are carried out and compared with each other. The results show that water compressibility has great effects on the magnitude and frequency of pressure fluctuation. As the operating condition concerned, the compressibility of water will induce larger pressure fluctuation, which agrees better with measured data. Moreover, the lower frequency component of the pressure signal can only be captured with the combination of water compressibility. It can be concluded that water compressibility is a fatal factor, which cannot be neglected in the unsteady simulations for pump turbines.

  8. Advanced Decentralized Water/Energy Network Design for Sustainable Infrastructure

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to provide a water infrastructure that is more sustainable into and beyond the 21st century, drinking water distribution systems and wastewater collection systems must account for our diminishing water supply, increasing demands, climate change, energy cost and availabil...

  9. ADVANCES IN DRINKING WATER TREATMENT IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States drinking water public health protection goal is to provide water that meets all health-based standards to ninety-five percent of the population served by public drinking water supplies by 2005. In 2002, the level of compliance with some eighty-five health-based ...

  10. Advanced Decentralized Water/Energy Network Design for Sustainable Infrastructure

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to provide a water infrastructure that is more sustainable into and beyond the 21st century, drinking water distribution systems and wastewater collection systems must account for our diminishing water supply, increasing demands, climate change, energy cost and availabil...

  11. ADVANCES IN DRINKING WATER TREATMENT IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States drinking water public health protection goal is to provide water that meets all health-based standards to ninety-five percent of the population served by public drinking water supplies by 2005. In 2002, the level of compliance with some eighty-five health-based ...

  12. Soil Water: Advanced Crop and Soil Science. A Course of Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Larry E.

    The course of study represents the fourth of six modules in advanced crop and soil science and introduces the agriculture student to the topic of soil water. Upon completing the three day module, the student will be able to classify water as to its presence in the soil, outline the hydrological cycle, list the ways water is lost from the soil,…

  13. Maintenance Cycle Extension in the IRIS Advanced Light Water Reactor Plant Design

    SciTech Connect

    Galvin, Mark R.; Todreas, Neil E.; Conway, Larry E.

    2003-09-15

    New nuclear power generation in the United States will be realized only if the economic performance can be made competitive with other methods of electrical power generation. The economic performance of a nuclear power plant can be significantly improved by increasing the time spent on-line generating electricity relative to the time spent off-line conducting maintenance and refueling. Maintenance includes planned actions (surveillances) and unplanned actions (corrective maintenance) to respond to component degradation or failure. A methodology is described that can be used to resolve, in the design phase, maintenance-related operating cycle length barriers. A primary goal was to demonstrate the applicability and utility of the methodology in the context of the International Reactor, Innovative and Secure (IRIS) design. IRIS is an advanced light water nuclear power plant that is being designed to maximize this on-line generating time by increasing the operating cycle length. This is consequently a maintenance strategy paper using the IRIS plant as the example.Potential IRIS operating cycle length maintenance-related barriers, determined by modification of an earlier operating pressurized water reactor (PWR) plant cycle length analysis to account for differences between the design of IRIS and this operating PWR, are presented. The proposed methodology to resolve these maintenance-related barriers by the design process is described. The results of applying the methodology to two potential IRIS cycle length barriers, relief valve testing and emergency heat removal system testing, are presented.

  14. Role of transient water pressure in quarrying: A subglacial experiment using acoustic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, D.; Hooyer, T. S.; Iverson, N. R.; Thomason, J. F.; Jackson, M.

    2006-09-01

    Probably the most important mechanism of glacial erosion is quarrying: the growth and coalescence of cracks in subglacial bedrock and dislodgement of resultant rock fragments. Although evidence indicates that erosion rates depend on sliding speed, rates of crack growth in bedrock may be enhanced by changing stresses on the bed caused by fluctuating basal water pressure in zones of ice-bed separation. To study quarrying in real time, a granite step, 12 cm high with a crack in its stoss surface, was installed at the bed of Engabreen, Norway. Acoustic emission sensors monitored crack growth events in the step as ice slid over it. Vertical stresses, water pressure, and cavity height in the lee of the step were also measured. Water was pumped to the lee of the step several times over 8 days. Pumping initially caused opening of a leeward cavity, which then closed after pumping was stopped and water pressure decreased. During cavity closure, acoustic emissions emanating mostly from the vicinity of the base of the crack in the step increased dramatically. With repeated pump tests this crack grew with time until the step's lee surface was quarried. Our experiments indicate that fluctuating water pressure caused stress thresholds required for crack growth to be exceeded. Natural basal water pressure fluctuations should also concentrate stresses on rock steps, increasing rates of crack growth. Stress changes on the bed due to water pressure fluctuations will increase in magnitude and duration with cavity size, which may help explain the effect of sliding speed on erosion rates.

  15. Volume and structural analysis of super-cooled water under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duki, Solomon F.; Tsige, Mesfin

    2012-02-01

    Motivated by recent experimental study of super-cooled water at high pressure [1], we performed atomistic molecular dynamic simulations study on bulk water molecules at isothermal-isobaric ensemble. These simulations are performed at temperatures that range from 40 K to 380 K using two different cooling rates, 10K/ns and 10K/5ns, and pressure that ranges from 1atm to 10000 atm. Our analysis for the variation of the volume of the bulk sample against temperature indicates a downward concave shape for pressures above certain values, as reported in [1]. The same downward concave behavior is observed at high pressure on the mean-squared-displacements (MSD) of the water molecules when the MSD is plotted against time. To get further insight on the effect of the pressure on the sample we have also performed a structural analysis of the sample.[4pt] [1] O. Mishima, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 144503 (2010);

  16. Self-diffusion of lignite/water under different temperatures and pressure: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinjian; Jin, Yu; Huang, Congliang; He, Jingfeng; Rao, Zhonghao; Zhao, Yuemin

    2016-01-01

    Temperature and pressure have direct and remarkable implications for drying and dewatering effect of low rank coals such as lignite. To understand the microenergy change mechanism of lignite, the molecular dynamics simulation method was performed to study the self-diffusion of lignite/water under different temperatures and pressure. The results showed that high temperature and high pressure can promote the diffusion of lignite/water system, which facilitates the drying and dewatering of lignite. The volume and density of lignite/water system will increase and decrease with temperature increasing, respectively. Though the pressure within simulation range can make lignite density increase, the increasing pressure showed a weak impact on variation of density.

  17. Advanced Decentralized Water/Energy Network Design for ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In order to provide a water infrastructure that is more sustainable into and beyond the 21st century, drinking water distribution systems and wastewater collection systems must account for our diminishing water supply, increasing demands, climate change, energy cost and availability. Water efficiency must be equally addressed with energy efficiency going far beyond simply adding low flow toilets and faucets in new buildings and retro-fits. Thus, it is the goal of this research project to address these water-related issues as they relate to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) mission to safeguard human health and the environment. To inform the public.

  18. Eggs under pressure: components of water potential of chameleon eggs during incubation.

    PubMed

    Adams, Geoffrey K; Andrews, Robin M; Noble, Lydia M

    2010-01-01

    Water exchange of squamate eggs is driven by the difference between the water potentials of eggs and of their nest environment. While osmotic potential is generally assumed to dominate the net water potential of eggs, resistance of the eggshell to stretching also affects egg water potential. We therefore determined osmotic potentials and pressure potentials (mechanical pressure) of eggs of the veiled chameleon Chamaeleo calyptratus over the course of incubation. Because embryos are diapausing gastrulae when eggs are laid and diapause persists several months, the water potential of eggs can be evaluated before it is influenced by the developing embryo. Water uptake during the first 2 wk of incubation was rapid as a result of the large difference between the total water potential of the egg (-848 kPa) and that of its incubation substrate. After about 2 wk, water potential of the egg stabilized at -460 kPa. By day 80 of incubation, the developing embryo and allantois affected water exchange of the egg. The allantoic fluid was initially very dilute, but its osmotic potential decreased to about -200 kPa by the end of incubation. Pressure potential of the egg averaged 25 kPa, with no systematic trend during incubation. The pressure potential exerted by the eggshell reduced the difference between the water potential of the egg and the water potential of the environment, that is, the ability of eggs to take up water. At the time of oviposition, this effect was relatively small, producing a 4%-6% reduction in water potential difference. Once the yolk osmotic potential stabilized, however, the reduction was 12% or more. This observation means that the dynamics of water uptake by squamate eggs cannot be fully understood without consideration of the pressure that is exerted on the contents of eggs by their shells.

  19. Development and Validation of a Pressurization System Model for a Crossfeed Subscale Water Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Han; Mazurkivich, Pete

    2006-01-01

    A pressurization system model was developed for a crossfeed subscale water test article using the EASY5 modeling software. The model consisted of an integrated tank pressurization and pressurization line model. The tank model was developed using the general purpose library, while the line model was assembled from the gas dynamic library. The pressurization system model was correlated to water test data obtained from nine test runs conducted on the crossfeed subscale test article. The model was first correlated to a representative test run and frozen. The correlated model was then used to predict the tank pressures and compared with the test data for eight other runs. The model prediction showed excellent agreement with the test data, allowing it to be used in a later study to analyze the pressurization system performance of a full-scale bimese vehicle with cryogenic propellants.

  20. Conversion of urodynamic pressures measured simultaneously by air-charged and water-filled catheter systems.

    PubMed

    Awada, Hassan K; Fletter, Paul C; Zaszczurynski, Paul J; Cooper, Mitchell A; Damaser, Margot S

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the simultaneous responses of water-filled (WFC) and air-charged (ACC) catheters during simulated urodynamic pressures and develop an algorithm to convert peak pressures measured using an ACC to those measured by a WFC. Examples of cough leak point pressure and valsalva leak point pressure data (n = 4) were obtained from the literature, digitized, and modified in amplitude and duration to create a set of simulated data that ranged in amplitude from 15 to 220 cm H2 O (n = 25) and duration from 0.1 to 3.0 sec (n = 25) for each original signal. Simulated pressure signals were recorded simultaneously by WFCs, ACCs, and a reference transducer in a specially designed pressure chamber. Peak pressure and time to peak pressure were calculated for each simulated pressure signal and were used to develop an algorithm to convert peak pressures recorded with ACCs to corresponding peak pressures recorded with WFCs. The algorithm was validated with additional simulated urodynamic pressure signals and additional catheters that had not been utilized to develop the algorithm. ACCs significantly underestimated peak pressures of more rapidly changing pressures, as in coughs, compared to those measured by WFCs. The algorithm corrected 90% of peak pressures measured by ACCs to within 5% of those measured by WFCs when simultaneously exposed to the same pressure signals. The developed algorithm can be used to convert rapidly changing urodynamic pressures, such as cough leak point pressure, obtained using ACC systems to corresponding values expected from WFC systems. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Recent Advances in Water Analysis with Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacAskill, John A.; Tsikata, Edem

    2014-01-01

    We report on progress made in developing a water sampling system for detection and analysis of volatile organic compounds in water with a gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS). Two approaches are described herein. The first approach uses a custom water pre-concentrator for performing trap and purge of VOCs from water. The second approach uses a custom micro-volume, split-splitless injector that is compatible with air and water. These water sampling systems will enable a single GC-based instrument to analyze air and water samples for VOC content. As reduced mass, volume, and power is crucial for long-duration, manned space-exploration, these water sampling systems will demonstrate the ability of a GCMS to monitor both air and water quality of the astronaut environment, thereby reducing the amount of required instrumentation for long duration habitation. Laboratory prototypes of these water sampling systems have been constructed and tested with a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer as well as a thermal conductivity detector. Presented herein are details of these water sampling system with preliminary test results.

  2. Recent Advances in Water Analysis with Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacAskill, John A.; Tsikata, Edem

    2014-01-01

    We report on progress made in developing a water sampling system for detection and analysis of volatile organic compounds in water with a gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS). Two approaches are described herein. The first approach uses a custom water pre-concentrator for performing trap and purge of VOCs from water. The second approach uses a custom micro-volume, split-splitless injector that is compatible with air and water. These water sampling systems will enable a single GC-based instrument to analyze air and water samples for VOC content. As reduced mass, volume, and power is crucial for long-duration, manned space-exploration, these water sampling systems will demonstrate the ability of a GCMS to monitor both air and water quality of the astronaut environment, thereby reducing the amount of required instrumentation for long duration habitation. Laboratory prototypes of these water sampling systems have been constructed and tested with a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer as well as a thermal conductivity detector. Presented herein are details of these water sampling system with preliminary test results.

  3. Mitigation of steam generator tube rupture in a pressurized water reactor with passive safety systems

    DOEpatents

    McDermott, Daniel J.; Schrader, Kenneth J.; Schulz, Terry L.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of steam generator tube ruptures in a pressurized water reactor are mitigated by reducing the pressure in the primary loop by diverting reactor coolant through the heat exchanger of a passive heat removal system immersed in the in containment refueling water storage tank in response to a high feed water level in the steam generator. Reactor coolant inventory is maintained by also in response to high steam generator level introducing coolant into the primary loop from core make-up tanks at the pressure in the reactor coolant system pressurizer. The high steam generator level is also used to isolate the start-up feed water system and the chemical and volume control system to prevent flooding into the steam header. 2 figures.

  4. Mitigation of steam generator tube rupture in a pressurized water reactor with passive safety systems

    DOEpatents

    McDermott, D.J.; Schrader, K.J.; Schulz, T.L.

    1994-05-03

    The effects of steam generator tube ruptures in a pressurized water reactor are mitigated by reducing the pressure in the primary loop by diverting reactor coolant through the heat exchanger of a passive heat removal system immersed in the in containment refueling water storage tank in response to a high feed water level in the steam generator. Reactor coolant inventory is maintained by also in response to high steam generator level introducing coolant into the primary loop from core make-up tanks at the pressure in the reactor coolant system pressurizer. The high steam generator level is also used to isolate the start-up feed water system and the chemical and volume control system to prevent flooding into the steam header. 2 figures.

  5. Effects of Isotopic Composition, Temperature, Pressure, and Dissolved Gases on the Density of Liquid Water,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    precision in practical density measurements, and the effect of isotopic uncertainties on them. Appendix II treats the representation of the equation of state of water at slightly higher pressures. (Author)

  6. The Oxidation Rate of SiC in High Pressure Water Vapor Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Robinson, R. Craig

    1999-01-01

    CVD SiC and sintered alpha-SiC samples were exposed at 1316 C in a high pressure burner rig at total pressures of 5.7, 15, and 25 atm for times up to 100h. Variations in sample emittance for the first nine hours of exposure were used to determine the thickness of the silica scale as a function of time. After accounting for volatility of silica in water vapor, the parabolic rate constants for Sic in water vapor pressures of 0.7, 1.8 and 3.1 atm were determined. The dependence of the parabolic rate constant on the water vapor pressure yielded a power law exponent of one. Silica growth on Sic is therefore limited by transport of molecular water vapor through the silica scale.

  7. Exploration of Impinging Water Spray Heat Transfer at System Pressures Near the Triple Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golliher, Eric L.; Yao, Shi-Chune

    2013-01-01

    The heat transfer of a water spray impinging upon a surface in a very low pressure environment is of interest to cooling of space vehicles during launch and re-entry, and to industrial processes where flash evaporation occurs. At very low pressure, the process occurs near the triple point of water, and there exists a transient multiphase transport problem of ice, water and water vapor. At the impingement location, there are three heat transfer mechanisms: evaporation, freezing and sublimation. A preliminary heat transfer model was developed to explore the interaction of these mechanisms at the surface and within the spray.

  8. High Pressure Spectroscopic Study of the Action of N-Ethylamines and Water on the 2-Nitropropane/Nitric System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobin, C.; Lucas, H.; Marteau, P.; Hebert, P.; Petitet, J.-P.

    2004-07-01

    High pressure Raman spectroscopy measurements in a diamond anvil cell (0-50 GPa) on nitric acid (NA), 2-nitropropane (2NP), triethylamine (TEA), diethylamine (DEA) as well as the 2NP/NA, NA/H2O and 2NP/ethylamine mixtures are reported. 2NP/TEA and 2NP/DEA mixtures have also been studied by infrared spectroscopy at ambient pressure. The differences noticed at room pressure between the Raman and infrared spectra of the mixtures and those of the pure compounds are highlighted and discussed. The high pressure decomposition of the 2NP/NA mixture with oxygen balance (O.B.=0) has been observed. The role of the NO2 bonds in the intermolecular interactions in pure compounds and in the mixtures, and the reactivity of the 2NP/NA system is discussed. The influence of water and ethylamines on, respectively, the high pressure behaviour of NA and 2NP have also been studied. Several hypothesis are advanced concerning their sensitizing effect or no on the 2NP/NA mixture.

  9. Hydraulic Conductivity Recovery versus Water Pressure in Xylem of Acer saccharum1

    PubMed Central

    Tyree, Melvin T.; Yang, Shudong

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the influence of stem diameter, xylem pressure potential, and temperature on the rate of recovery of hydraulic conductivity in embolized stems of Acer saccharum Marsh. Recovery of conductivity was accompanied by an increase in stem water content as water replaced air bubbles and bubbles dissolved from vessels into the surrounding water. The time required for stems to go from less than 3 to 100% hydraulic conductivity increased approximately with the square of the stem diameter and increased with decreasing xylem pressure potential. Recovery was halted when xylem pressure potential decreased below −6 kPa. Increasing xylem pressure from 13 to 150 kPa reduced the time for recovery by a factor of 4. Temperature had little influence on the rate of recovery of hydraulic conductivity. All of these results are in accord with a theory of bubble dissolution in which it is assumed that: (a) the rate of bubble dissolution is rate limited by diffusion of air from the bubbles to the outer surface of the stems, (b) the equilibrium concentration of gases in liquid in stems is determined by Henry's law at all air-water interfaces, (c) the equilibrium solubility concentration is determined only by the partial pressure of the gas in the gas phase and not directly by the liquid-phase pressure, and (d) the gas pressure of an entrapped air bubble in the lumen of a cell can never be less than atmospheric pressure at equilibrium. PMID:16653045

  10. Nuclear Engineering Computer Modules, Thermal-Hydraulics, TH-1: Pressurized Water Reactors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reihman, Thomas C.

    This learning module is concerned with the temperature field, the heat transfer rates, and the coolant pressure drop in typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies. As in all of the modules of this series, emphasis is placed on developing the theory and demonstrating its use with a simplified model. The heart of the module is the PWR…

  11. Development of a quasi-adiabatic calorimeter for the determination of the water vapor pressure curve.

    PubMed

    Mokdad, S; Georgin, E; Hermier, Y; Sparasci, F; Himbert, M

    2012-07-01

    Progress in the knowledge of the water saturation curve is required to improve the accuracy of the calibrations in humidity. In order to achieve this objective, the LNE-CETIAT and the LNE-CNAM have jointly built a facility dedicated to the measurement of the saturation vapor pressure and temperature of pure water. The principle is based on a static measurement of the pressure and the temperature of pure water in a closed, temperature-controlled thermostat, conceived like a quasi-adiabatic calorimeter. A copper cell containing pure water is placed inside a temperature-controlled copper shield, which is mounted in a vacuum-tight stainless steel vessel immersed in a thermostated bath. The temperature of the cell is measured with capsule-type standard platinum resistance thermometers, calibrated with uncertainties below the millikelvin. The vapor pressure is measured by calibrated pressure sensors connected to the cell through a pressure tube whose temperature is monitored at several points. The pressure gauges are installed in a thermostatic apparatus ensuring high stability of the pressure measurement and avoiding any condensation in the tubes. Thanks to the employment of several technical solutions, the thermal contribution to the overall uncertainty budget is reduced, and the remaining major part is mainly due to pressure measurements. This paper presents a full description of this facility and the preliminary results obtained for its characterization.

  12. Recent Advances in Point-of-Access Water Quality Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korostynska, O.; Arshak, K.; Velusamy, V.; Arshak, A.; Vaseashta, Ashok

    Clean water is one of our most valuable natural resources. In addition to providing safe drinking water it assures functional ecosystems that support fisheries and recreation. Human population growth and its associated increased demands on water pose risks to maintaining acceptable water quality. It is vital to assess source waters and the aquatic systems that receive inputs from industrial waste and sewage treatment plants, storm water systems, and runoff from urban and agricultural lands. Rapid and confident assessments of aquatic resources form the basis for sound environmental management. Current methods engaged in tracing the presence of various bacteria in water employ bulky laboratory equipment and are time consuming. Thus, real-time water quality monitoring is essential for National and International Health and Safety. Environmental water monitoring includes measurements of physical characteristics (e.g. pH, temperature, conductivity), chemical parameters (e.g. oxygen, alkalinity, nitrogen and phosphorus compounds), and abundance of certain biological taxa. Monitoring could also include assays of biological activity such as alkaline phosphatase, tests for toxins such as microcystins and direct measurements of pollutants such as heavy metals or hydrocarbons. Real time detection can significantly reduce the level of damage and also the cost to remedy the problem. This paper presents overview of state-of-the-art methods and devices used for point-of-access water quality monitoring and suggest further developments in this area.

  13. Corrosion inhibiting media for pressurized water reactor steam generators

    SciTech Connect

    Panson, A.J.

    1988-08-16

    A method is described for inhibiting carbon steel corrosion in the secondary system of a nuclear steam generator comprising: providing a corrosion inhibiting quantity of boric acid in the secondary system water; and incorporating in the boric acid containing secondary system water, an activating amount of a polyhydric compound sufficient to increase the acid strength of the boric acid and improve the corrosion inhibiting characteristics thereof.

  14. Melting temperature of water at high pressure measured in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell with CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, T.; Kuwayama, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The phase relations and physical properties of water at high pressures and temperatures are important physical, geophysical, and planetary problems. For example, recent molecular dynamics calculations suggest that water is superionic at high densities relevant to planets such as Uranus and Neptune [1, 2], and this predicted property plays a key role in dynamo models to explain the unusual non-dipolar magnetic field structure of these planets [3, 4]. The advances in combining techniques such as synchrotron x-ray diffraction or in situ optical Raman spectroscopy with diamond anvil cell (DAC) technologies allow us to measure the melting temperature of water to within a few percent for pressures up to 20 GPa [5-8]. However, at pressures above 20 GPa, recently reported values of melting temperature exhibit significant differences with each other [7-10]. This discrepancy should be caused by a chemical reaction occurred between the metal absorber contained in the DAC and the dissociated water. By using CO2 laser for sample heating, the metal is not necessary because water has significant absorption in the wavelength range of CO2 laser (10.6 μm). We report the melting temperature of water in a diamond anvil cell more than 20 GPa using CO2 laser heating system. References [1] M. French et al., Phys. Rev. B 79, 054107 (2009). [2] M. French et al., Phys. Rev. B 82, 174108 (2010). [3] S. Stanley and J. Bloxham, Nature 428, 151 (2004). [4] R. Redmer et al., Icarus 211, 798 (2011). [5] F. Datch et al., Phys. Rev. B 61, 6335 (2000). [6] JF. Lin et al., J. Chem. Phys 121, 8423 (2004). [7] JF. Lin et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 32, L11306 (2005). [8] AF. Goncharov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 125504 (2005). [9] B. Schwager et al., J. Phys. Condens. Matter 16, 51177 (2004). [10] AF. Goncharov et al., J. Chem. Phys. 130, 124514 (2009).

  15. Method and apparatus for generating seismic impulses using high pressure water pump as the energizing source

    SciTech Connect

    Chelminski, S.V.

    1980-11-18

    A powerful seismic impulse is generated in a body of water by a slug of water propelled from a seismic source by expanding pressurized gas, but the gas is retained in the source for use in subsequent firings. The seismic energy source, which is called a ''hydro gun'', is recharged by pumping an incompressible liquid, preferably, water, at high pressure into the gun to compress the retained pressurized gas. The hydro gun includes a firing cylinder, and a piston follower in the firing cylinder divides it into a liquid-charge chamber and a gas-propulsion chamber. The liquid-charge chamber is closed from liquid discharge ports by a shuttle which is held closed by the high pressure of gas in an operating chamber. By pumping an incompressible liquid into the liquid-charge chamber, the follower is forced to compress the pressurized gas which is trapped in the gas-propulsion chamber. Then, to trigger the source, the gas pressure in the operating chamber acting on a front surface of an operating piston of the shuttle is suddenly applied to the reverse surface of the operating piston. With the shuttle thus released, the compressed pressurized gas in the gas-propulsion chamber expands against the follower to propel the liquid in the liquid-charge chamber through the liquid discharge ports into the surrounding body of water for generating a powerful seismic impulse in the water.

  16. Does temperature affect the accuracy of vented pressure transducer in fine-scale water level measurement?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Higgins, C. W.

    2015-03-01

    Submersible pressure transducers have been utilized for collecting water level data since the early 1960s. Together with a digital data logger, it is a convenient way to record water level fluctuations for long-term monitoring. Despite the wide use of pressure transducers for water level monitoring, little has been reported regarding their accuracy and performance under field conditions. The effects of temperature fluctuations on the output of vented pressure transducers were considered in this study. The pressure transducers were tested under both laboratory and field conditions. The results of this study indicate that temperature fluctuation has a strong effect on the transducer output. Rapid changes in temperature introduce noise and fluctuations in the water level readings under a constant hydraulic head while the absolute temperature is also related to sensor errors. The former is attributed to venting and the latter is attributed to temperature compensation effects in the strain gauges. Individual pressure transducers responded differently to the thermal fluctuations in the same testing environment. In the field of surface hydrology, especially when monitoring fine-scale water level fluctuations, ignoring or failing to compensate for the temperature effect can introduce considerable error into pressure transducer readings. It is recommended that a performance test for the pressure transducer is conducted before field deployment.

  17. Water pressure and ground vibrations induced by water guns at a backwater pond on the Illinois River near Morris, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koebel, Carolyn M.; Egly, Rachel M.

    2016-09-27

    Three different geophysical sensor types were used to characterize the underwater pressure waves and ground velocities generated by the underwater firing of seismic water guns. These studies evaluated the use of water guns as a tool to alter the movement of Asian carp. Asian carp are aquatic invasive species that threaten to move into the Great Lakes Basin from the Mississippi River Basin. Previous studies have identified a threshold of approximately 5 pounds per square inch (lb/in2) for behavioral modification and for structural limitation of a water gun barrier.Two studies were completed during August 2014 and May 2015 in a backwater pond connected to the Illinois River at a sand and gravel quarry near Morris, Illinois. The August 2014 study evaluated the performance of two 80-cubic-inch (in3) water guns. Data from the 80-in3 water guns showed that the pressure field had the highest pressures and greatest extent of the 5-lb/in2 target value at a depth of 5 feet (ft). The maximum recorded pressure was 13.7 lb/in2, approximately 25 ft from the guns. The produced pressure field took the shape of a north-south-oriented elongated sphere with the 5-lb/in2 target value extending across the entire study area at a depth of 5 ft. Ground velocities were consistent over time, at 0.0067 inches per second (in/s) in the transverse direction, 0.031 in/s in the longitudinal direction, and 0.013 in/s in the vertical direction.The May 2015 study evaluated the performance of one and two 100-in3 water guns. Data from the 100-in3 water guns, fired both individually and simultaneously, showed that the pressure field had the highest pressures and greatest extent of the 5-lb/in2 target value at a depth of 5 ft. The maximum pressure was 57.4 lb/in2, recorded at the underwater blast sensor closest to the water guns (at a horizontal distance of approximately 3 ft), as two guns fired simultaneously. Pressures and extent of the 5-lb/in2 target value decrease above and below this 5-ft depth

  18. Tracing nitrogenous disinfection byproducts after medium pressure UV water treatment by stable isotope labeling and high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kolkman, Annemieke; Martijn, Bram J; Vughs, Dennis; Baken, Kirsten A; van Wezel, Annemarie P

    2015-04-07

    Advanced oxidation processes are important barriers for organic micropollutants (e.g., pharmaceuticals, pesticides) in (drinking) water treatment. Studies indicate that medium pressure (MP) UV/H2O2 treatment leads to a positive response in Ames mutagenicity tests, which is then removed after granulated activated carbon (GAC) filtration. The formed potentially mutagenic substances were hitherto not identified and may result from the reaction of photolysis products of nitrate with (photolysis products of) natural organic material (NOM). In this study we present an innovative approach to trace the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) of MP UV water treatment, based on stable isotope labeled nitrate combined with high resolution mass spectrometry. It was shown that after MP UV treatment of artificial water containing NOM and nitrate, multiple nitrogen containing substances were formed. In total 84 N-DBPs were detected at individual concentrations between 1 to 135 ng/L bentazon-d6 equivalents, with a summed concentration of 1.2 μg/L bentazon-d6 equivalents. The chemical structures of three byproducts were confirmed. Screening for the 84 N-DBPs in water samples from a full-scale drinking water treatment plant based on MP UV/H2O2 treatment showed that 22 of the N-DBPs found in artificial water were also detected in real water samples.

  19. Synthesis of oxynitride materials for solar water splitting: investigations with ambient pressure and high pressure synthesis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmagunawardhane, Hingure Arachchilage Naveen

    Solar water splitting, a photocatalytic process where water is directly split into hydrogen and oxygen using sunlight absorbing semiconductor materials, is one of the most sought after methods to make hydrogen economy a reality. Oxynitrides containing d0 and d10 cations tend to have the appropriate band structure required for solar water splitting. So far, reported efficiencies are not high enough for practical use and synthesizing an oxynitride showing high enough efficiency remains necessary. In this dissertation, we discuss the synthesis of oxynitrides and studying their optical and photocatalytic properties with a particular emphasis on utilizing exploratory high pressure synthesis. High pressure synthesis is an interesting route to synthesize oxynitrides as this can stabilize reactants that tend to decompose at ambient pressure, helping to achieve the intended stoichiometry. For synthesis, we selected candidate compositions from published theoretical studies. Reactions were carried out at pressures around 1-3 GPa and at temperatures up to 1300°C in a multi-anvil large volume press. Phase changes were observed with in situ X-ray scattering. In these experiments, we found that most d0 and d10 cations tend to reduce in the high pressure reaction environment as temperature increases, but Zr4+, Hf4+ , and Ta5+ tend to retain their oxidation state. This information will be helpful in future theoretical studies to accurately predict stable oxynitrides synthesizable at high pressure. We synthesized (GaN)1-x(ZnO)x solid solution in the entire composition range at 1 GPa, 1150°C. The material showed photocatalytic H2 evolution activity even without surface modification with co catalysts, first such observed for this system. The minimum band gap of 2.65 eV and the highest H2 evolution activity of 2.31 mumol/h were observed at x = 0.51. On our initial investigation on the synthesis of gallium oxynitride spinel (Ga3O3N3) at high pressure, we found that the material could

  20. Liquid water-ice I phase diagrams under high pressure: sodium chloride and sucrose models for food systems.

    PubMed

    Guignon, Bérengère; Otero, Laura; Molina-García, Antonio D; Sanz, Pedro D

    2005-01-01

    The knowledge of high pressure and low temperature phase diagrams of aqueous systems is required in fields such as food sciences, biology, cryo-microscopy and geology, to reduce processing costs, improve treatments results or advance in physical phenomena understanding. The phase transition curve between liquid water and ice I for sucrose and sodium chloride solutions has been obtained for concentrations ranging from 16% to 36% and from 1.63% to 16.09% (w/w), respectively. An accurate experimental method, based on the pressurization of an ice-solution mixture, adequate to build the entire phase transition curve at constant concentration, has been developed. Simon-like equations have been used to empirically describe the phase transition curves, so that they allow easy data interpolation.

  1. Advanced Materials, Technologies, and Complex Systems Analyses: Emerging Opportunities to Enhance Urban Water Security.

    PubMed

    Zodrow, Katherine R; Li, Qilin; Buono, Regina M; Chen, Wei; Daigger, Glen; Dueñas-Osorio, Leonardo; Elimelech, Menachem; Huang, Xia; Jiang, Guibin; Kim, Jae-Hong; Logan, Bruce E; Sedlak, David L; Westerhoff, Paul; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2017-09-19

    Innovation in urban water systems is required to address the increasing demand for clean water due to population growth and aggravated water stress caused by water pollution, aging infrastructure, and climate change. Advances in materials science, modular water treatment technologies, and complex systems analyses, coupled with the drive to minimize the energy and environmental footprints of cities, provide new opportunities to ensure a resilient and safe water supply. We present a vision for enhancing efficiency and resiliency of urban water systems and discuss approaches and research needs for overcoming associated implementation challenges.

  2. [Evidence of discontinuous property of water: study of infrared spectra at high temperature and high pressure].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hai-fei; Sun, Qiang; Shen, Andy; Zhang, Ming

    2004-04-01

    The infrared spectra measurement for water has been conducted and investigated at the temperatures of 35-350 degrees C and the pressures of 1.7-2.7 GPa by using Hydrothermal Diamond Anvil Cell (HDAC). The result shows that the peak frequency and the full width at half height of the stretching vibration of water increases and decreases respectively with increasing pressure. It also shows that there is a discontinuousness at the pressure of 2. 1 GPa, that is, the frequency and the full width at half height of the peak have an obvious and discontinuous change from the pressures below and above 2.1 GPa, indicating that the property of water is discontinuous at high pressure. This is consistent with the discontinuous property of electrical conductivity from the previous studies for pure water and NaCl aqueous solution. Also it is consistent with the relationship between the temperature and the pressure of the dehydration of the bearing water minerals at about 2.0 GPa. It is expected that such a discontinuous property of water will play an important role on the minerals and rocks in the deep lithosphere and further detailed study needs to be done for them.

  3. High Pressure Burner Rig Testing of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings for Si3N4 Turbine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Fox, Dennis S.; Pastel, Robert T.

    2007-01-01

    Advanced thermal and environmental barrier coatings are being developed for Si3N4 components for turbine engine propulsion applications. High pressure burner rig testing was used to evaluate the coating system performance and durability. Test results demonstrated the feasibility and durability of the coating component systems under the simulated engine environments.

  4. 77 FR 62270 - Proposed Revision Treatment of Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ... Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Systems (RTNSS) for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors.'' The current SRP does not contain guidance on the proposed RTNSS for Passive Advance Light Water Reactors. DATES: Submit comments by November...

  5. 78 FR 41436 - Proposed Revision to Treatment of Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-10

    ... COMMISSION Proposed Revision to Treatment of Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors... Treatment of Non-Safety Systems (RTNSS) for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors.'' The NRC seeks public...- Safety Systems (RTNSS) for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors.'' This area includes a revised...

  6. Hydromechanical Advanced Coal Excavator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estus, Jay M.; Summers, David

    1990-01-01

    Water-jet cutting reduces coal dust and its hazards. Advanced mining system utilizes full-face, hydromechanical, continuous miner. Coal excavator uses high-pressure water-jet lances, one in each of cutting heads and one in movable lance, to make cuts across top, bottom and middle height, respectively, of coal face. Wedge-shaped cutting heads advance into lower and upper cuts in turn, thereby breaking coal toward middle cut. Thrust cylinders and walking pads advance excavator toward coal face.

  7. A pressure-packer system for conducting rising head tests in water table wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levy, Benjamin S.; Pannell, Lawrence J.; Dadoly, John P.

    1993-01-01

    The pressure system developed for fully-saturated well screens has been modified for conducting rising head tests in water table wells installed in highly permeable aquifers. The pressure system consists of a compressed air source and 1 inch diameter PVC piping with a packer attached at the end. The pressure system was evaluated in a series of rising head tests conducted in a well at a Superfund site in New England. The well was tested with slugs and with the pressure system. Within each technique, estimates of hydraulic conductivity showed no difference. Comparison of hydraulic conductivity estimates between techniques (slug test vs. pressure test) showed differences due to stratigraphy. The interval tested using slug tests crossed two stratigraphic units; the pressure system tested only one of these units. We conclude that the pressure system may be used to characterize the vertical hydraulic conductivity distribution in a series of successive tests by changing the packer position and the screened interval tested.

  8. Advanced Dependent Pressure Vessel (DPV) nickel-hydrogen spacecraft cell and battery design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, Dwaine; Wright, Doug; Repplinger, Ron

    1995-04-01

    The dependent pressure vessel (DPV) nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) battery is being developed as a potential spacecraft battery design for both military and commercial satellites. Individual pressure vessel (IPV) NiH2 batteries are currently flying on more than 70 Earth orbital satellites and have accumulated more than 140,000,000 cell-hours in actual spacecraft operation. The limitations of standard NiH2 IPV flight battery technology are primarily related to the internal cell design and the battery packaging issues associated with grouping multiple cylindrical cells. The DPV cell design offers higher specific energy and reduced cost, while retaining the established IPV NiH2 technology flight heritage and database. The advanced cell design offers a more efficient mechanical, electrical and thermal cell configuration and a reduced parts count. The internal electrode stack is a prismatic flat-plate arrangement. The flat individual cell pressure vessel provides a maximum direct thermal path for removing heat from the electrode stack. The cell geometry also minimizes multiple-cell battery packaging constraints by using an established end-plateltie-rod battery design. A major design advantage is that the battery support structure is efficiently required to restrain only the force applied to a portion of the end cell. As the cells are stacked in series to achieve the desired system voltage, this increment of the total battery weight becomes small. The geometry of the DPV cell promotes compact, minimum volume packaging and places all cell terminals along the length of the battery. The resulting ability to minimize intercell wiring offers additional design simplicity and significant weight savings. The DPV battery design offers significant cost and weight savings advantages while providing minimal design risks. Cell and battery level design issues will be addressed including mechanical, electrical and thermal design aspects. A design performance analysis will be presented at both

  9. Advanced Dependent Pressure Vessel (DPV) nickel-hydrogen spacecraft cell and battery design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coates, Dwaine; Wright, Doug; Repplinger, Ron

    1995-01-01

    The dependent pressure vessel (DPV) nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) battery is being developed as a potential spacecraft battery design for both military and commercial satellites. Individual pressure vessel (IPV) NiH2 batteries are currently flying on more than 70 Earth orbital satellites and have accumulated more than 140,000,000 cell-hours in actual spacecraft operation. The limitations of standard NiH2 IPV flight battery technology are primarily related to the internal cell design and the battery packaging issues associated with grouping multiple cylindrical cells. The DPV cell design offers higher specific energy and reduced cost, while retaining the established IPV NiH2 technology flight heritage and database. The advanced cell design offers a more efficient mechanical, electrical and thermal cell configuration and a reduced parts count. The internal electrode stack is a prismatic flat-plate arrangement. The flat individual cell pressure vessel provides a maximum direct thermal path for removing heat from the electrode stack. The cell geometry also minimizes multiple-cell battery packaging constraints by using an established end-plateltie-rod battery design. A major design advantage is that the battery support structure is efficiently required to restrain only the force applied to a portion of the end cell. As the cells are stacked in series to achieve the desired system voltage, this increment of the total battery weight becomes small. The geometry of the DPV cell promotes compact, minimum volume packaging and places all cell terminals along the length of the battery. The resulting ability to minimize intercell wiring offers additional design simplicity and significant weight savings. The DPV battery design offers significant cost and weight savings advantages while providing minimal design risks. Cell and battery level design issues will be addressed including mechanical, electrical and thermal design aspects. A design performance analysis will be presented at both

  10. Overview of advances in water management in agricultural production:Sensor based irrigation management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Technological advances in irrigated agriculture are crucial to meeting the challenge of increasing demand for agricultural products given limited quality and quantity of water resources for irrigation, impacts of climate variability, and the need to reduce environmental impacts. Multidisciplinary ap...

  11. ADVANCED TOOLS FOR ASSESSING SELECTED PRESCRIPTION AND ILLICIT DRUGS IN TREATED SEWAGE EFFLUENTS AND SOURCE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this poster is to present the application and assessment of advanced technologies in a real-world environment - wastewater effluent and source waters - for detecting six drugs (azithromycin, fluoxetine, omeprazole, levothyroxine, methamphetamine, and methylenedioxy...

  12. ADVANCED TOOLS FOR ASSESSING SELECTED PRESCRIPTION AND ILLICIT DRUGS IN TREATED SEWAGE EFFLUENTS AND SOURCE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this poster is to present the application and assessment of advanced technologies in a real-world environment - wastewater effluent and source waters - for detecting six drugs (azithromycin, fluoxetine, omeprazole, levothyroxine, methamphetamine, and methylenedioxy...

  13. Advanced Technology Used to Monitor Ground Water in a Restricted Access Area of Fort Riley, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breedlove, J.D.; Finnegan, P.J.; Myers, N.C.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this fact sheet is to describe how advanced communication technology is being used to overcome difficulties in collecting reliable ground-water data in areas with restricted access, such as at Fort Riley in northeast Kansas.

  14. The Association for the Advancement of Wound Care (AAWC) venous and pressure ulcer guidelines.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Laura L; Girolami, Sue; Corbett, Lisa; van Rijswijk, Lia

    2014-11-01

    Guidelines based on best available evidence to support pressure ulcer (PU) or venous ulcer (VU) management decisions can improve outcomes. Historically, such guidelines were consensus-based and differed in content and development methods used. Since 2002, the Association for the Advancement of Wound Care (AAWC) Guideline Task Force has used a systematic approach for developing "guidelines of guidelines" that unify and blend recommendations from relevant published guidelines while meeting Institute of Medicine and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality standards. In addition to establishing the literature-based strength of each recommendation, guideline clinical relevance is examined using standard content validation procedures. All final recommendations included are clinically relevant and/or supported by the highest level of available evidence, cited with every recommendation. In addition, guideline implementation resources are provided. The most recent AAWC VU and PU guidelines and ongoing efforts for improving their clinical relevance are presented. The guideline development process must be transparent and guidelines must be updated regularly to maintain their relevance. In addition, end-user results and research studies to examine their construct and predictive validity are needed.

  15. Gas Shale Capillary Pressure - Saturation Relations Determined using a Water Activity Meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perfect, E.; Donnelly, B.; McKay, L. D.; Lemiszki, P. J.; DiStefano, V. H.; Anovitz, L. M.; McFarlane, J.; Hale, R. E.; Cheng, C. L.

    2016-12-01

    Capillary pressure is the pressure difference across the interface between two immiscible fluids in a porous medium. It is related to properties of the fluids, properties of the solid matrix, and the history of wetting and drying (hysteresis). Capillary pressure increases as the degree of wetting fluid saturation decreases. The petroleum industry commonly employs parameters describing the air - water capillary pressure - saturation relationship in numerical reservoir models. Traditional methods of measuring this relationship are unsuitable for the characterization of gas shales due to their inability to measure the high capillary pressures associated with small pores. A possible alternative method is the water activity meter which is widely used in the soil sciences. However, its application to lithified material has been limited. This study utilized a water activity meter to measure air - water capillary pressures (ranging from 1.3 - 219.6 MPa) at several water saturation levels (measured gravimetrically) in both the wetting and drying directions. Seven types of gas producing shale with different porosities (2.5 - 13.6%) and total organic carbon contents (0.4 - 13.5%) were investigated. Nonlinear regression was used to fit the resulting capillary pressure - water saturation data pairs for each shale type to the Brooks and Corey (BC) equation. This equation successfully fitted data for 6 of the 7 shale types investigated (median R2 = 0.93) indicating the water activity meter is a viable method for characterizing capillary pressure - saturation relationships for inclusion in numerical reservoir models. As expected, the different shale types had statistically different BC parameters. However, there were no significant differences between the BC parameters for the wetting versus drying data sets suggesting hysteresis was negligible and can be ignored when simulating production and leakoff in gas shales.

  16. Advances in water resources assessment with SWAT - an overview

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper introduces a Special Issue containing 12 research articles which present current applications of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) for water resources assessment. Firstly, an overview of selected recently published articles with application of SWAT is given. The articles address ...

  17. Summary status of advanced water electrolysis and hydrogen storage/transport R and D

    SciTech Connect

    Mezzina, A.

    1984-04-01

    Major projects within the framework of the U.S. DOE Chemical/Hydrogen Energy Systems Program are described. Goals, accomplishments and status of investigations into advanced water electrolysis and hydrogen storage/transport are summarized. Electrolytic hydrogen production systems include: SPE electrolyzers; static feed water electrolysis; high temperature electrolysis; and other advanced concepts. Hydrogen transport studies have emphasized the characterization of hydrogen embrittlement effects on conventional natural gas pipeline steels.

  18. Mean-field equation of state of supercooled water and vapor pressure approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalová, Jana; Mareš, Radim

    2017-09-01

    An equation of state for supercooled water in the mean-field approximation is presented in the paper. The model describes experimental data in the supercooled region and satisfies a condition that for very low temperatures heat capacity of liquid water is close to the heat capacity of ice. The equation is used to calculate vapor pressure data at ambient pressure in the temperature interval from 123 K to 273 K. Based on the data, two very simple formulas for vapor pressure below 230 K and above 230 K are calculated.

  19. 2-D pressurized water reactor whole core benchmark problem development and MOCUM program verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oredeko, Ayoola Emmanuel

    The need to solve larger-scale and highly heterogeneous reactor problems is urgent nowadays; different computational codes are being developed to meet this demand. Method of characteristics unstructured meshing (MOCUM) is a transport theory code based on the method of characteristic as the flux solver with an advanced general geometry processor. The objective of this research was to use the MOCUM program to solve the whole core, highly heterogeneous pressurized water reactor (PWR) benchmark problem, to determine its efficiency in solving complicated benchmarks, the large scale full-core PWR benchmark problem presented in this work was modeled for high heterogeneity at the core and assembly level, and depicts a realistic reactor design. The design of the core is a 15x15 assembly arrangement and each assembly is based on the C5G7 assembly design, i.e, 17x17 fuel pins. The problem was simplified for faster computation time by using the 1/4 symmetry of the core. MATLAB is used for the visualization of the neutron flux for each group, and the fission rate. MOCUM result shows good agreement with monte carlo N-particles (MCNP6) solution with a -0.025% difference in eigenvalue (keff). The pin and assembly power calculated with MOCUM, shows good agreement with that of MCNP6; the maximum relative difference for pin and assembly power was -2.53% and -1.79% respectively. The power profiles from these two computational codes were compared and used to validate the MOCUM solutions.

  20. High pressure water electrolysis for space station EMU recharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, Nick; Puskar, Michael; Moulthrop, Lawrence; Zagaja, John

    1988-01-01

    A high pressure oxygen recharge system (HPORS), is being developed for application on board the Space Station. This electrolytic system can provide oxygen at up to 6000 psia without a mechanical compressor. The Hamilton standard HPORS based on a solid polymer electrolyte system is an extension of the much larger and succesful 3000 psia system of the U.S. Navy. Cell modules have been successfully tested under conditions beyond which spacecraft may encounter during launch. The control system with double redundancy and mechanical backups for all electronically controlled components is designed to ensure a safe shutdown.

  1. High pressure water electrolysis for space station EMU recharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, Nick; Puskar, Michael; Moulthrop, Lawrence; Zagaja, John

    1988-01-01

    A high pressure oxygen recharge system (HPORS), is being developed for application on board the Space Station. This electrolytic system can provide oxygen at up to 6000 psia without a mechanical compressor. The Hamilton standard HPORS based on a solid polymer electrolyte system is an extension of the much larger and succesful 3000 psia system of the U.S. Navy. Cell modules have been successfully tested under conditions beyond which spacecraft may encounter during launch. The control system with double redundancy and mechanical backups for all electronically controlled components is designed to ensure a safe shutdown.

  2. Study of Pu consumption in advanced light water reactors: Evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants - compilation of Phase 1B task reports

    SciTech Connect

    1993-09-15

    This report contains an extensive evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants prepared for United State Department of Energy. The general areas covered in this report are: core and system performance; fuel cycle; infrastructure and deployment; and safety and environmental approval.

  3. Effect of pressure on the ionic conductivity of Li+ and Cl- ions in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varanasi, Srinivasa R.; Kumar, Parveen; Subramanian, Yashonath

    2012-10-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation study of aqueous solution of LiCl is reported as a function of pressure. Experimental measurements of conductivity of Li+ ion as a function of pressure shows an increase in conductivity with pressure. Our simulations are able to reproduce the observed trend in conductivity. A number of relevant properties have been computed in order to understand the reasons for the increase in conductivity with pressure. These include radial distribution function, void and neck distributions, hydration or coordination numbers, diffusivity, velocity autocorrelation functions, angles between ion-oxygen and dipole of water as well as OH vector, mean residence time for water in the hydration shell, etc. These show that the increase in pressure acts as a structure breaker. The decay of the self part of the intermediate scattering function at small wave number k shows a bi-exponential decay at 1 bar which changes to single exponential decay at higher pressures. The k dependence of the ratio of the self part of the full width at half maximum of the dynamic structure factor to 2Dk2 exhibits trends which suggest that the void structure of water is playing a role. These support the view that the changes in void and neck distributions in water can account for changes in conductivity or diffusivity of Li+ with pressure. These results can be understood in terms of the levitation effect.

  4. Failure Mode of the Water-filled Fractures under Hydraulic Pressure in Karst Tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xin; Lu, Hao; Huang, Houxu; Hao, Yiqing; Xia, Yuanpu

    2017-06-01

    Water-filled fractures continue to grow after the excavation of karst tunnels, and the hydraulic pressure in these fractures changes along with such growth. This paper simplifies the fractures in the surrounding rock as flat ellipses and then identifies the critical hydraulic pressure values required for the occurrence of tensile-shear and compression-shear failures in water-filled fractures in the case of plane stress. The occurrence of tensile-shear fracture requires a larger critical hydraulic pressure than compression-shear failure in the same fracture. This paper examines the effects of fracture strike and lateral pressure coefficient on critical hydraulic pressure, and identifies compression-shear failure as the main failure mode of water-filled fractures. This paper also analyses the hydraulic pressure distribution in fractures with different extensions, and reveals that hydraulic pressure decreases along with the continuous growth of fractures and cannot completely fill a newly formed fracture with water. Fracture growth may be interrupted under the effect of hydraulic tensile shear.

  5. Advanced Water Purification System for In Situ Resource Utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, Stephen M.; Jolley, Scott T.; Captain, James G.

    2013-01-01

    A main goal in the field of In Situ Resource Utilization is to develop technologies that produce oxygen from regolith to provide consumables to an extraterrestrial outpost. The processes developed reduce metal oxides in the regolith to produce water, which is then electrolyzed to produce oxygen. Hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids are byproducts of the reduction processes, which must be removed to meet electrolysis purity standards. We previously characterized Nation, a highly water selective polymeric proton-exchange membrane, as a filtration material to recover pure water from the contaminated solution. While the membranes successfully removed both acid contaminants, the removal efficiency of and water flow rate through the membranes were not sufficient to produce large volumes of electrolysis-grade water. In the present study, we investigated electrodialysis as a potential acid removal technique. Our studies have shown a rapid and significant reduction in chloride and fluoride concentrations in the feed solution, while generating a relatively small volume of concentrated waste water. Electrodialysis has shown significant promise as the primary separation technique in ISRU water purification processes.

  6. Advanced Water Purification System for In Situ Resource Utilization Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    A main goal in the field of In Situ Resource Utilization is to develop technologies that produce oxygen from regolith to provide consumables to an extratrrestrial outpost. The processes developed reduce metal oxides in the regolith to produce water, which is then electrolyzed to produce oxygen. Hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids are byproducts of the reduction processes, which must be removed to meet electrolysis purity standards. We previously characterized Nation, a highly water selective polymeric proton-exchange membrane, as a filtrtion material to recover pure water from the contaminated solution. While the membranes successfully removed both acid contaminants, the removal efficiency of and water flow rate through the membranes were not sufficient to produce large volumes of electrolysis-grade water. In the present study, we investigated electrodialysis as a potential acid removable technique. Our studies have show a rapid and significant reduction in chloride and fluoride concentrations in the feed solution, while generating a relatively small volume of concentrated waste water. Electrodialysis has shown significant promise as the primary separation technique in ISRU water purification processes.

  7. Detachment of deposited colloids by advancing and receding air-water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B

    2011-08-16

    Moving air-water interfaces can detach colloidal particles from stationary surfaces. The objective of this study was to quantify the effects of advancing and receding air-water interfaces on colloid detachment as a function of interface velocity. We deposited fluorescent, negatively charged, carboxylate-modified polystyrene colloids (diameter of 1 μm) into a cylindrical glass channel. The colloids were hydrophilic with an advancing air-water contact angle of 60° and a receding contact angle of 40°. After colloid deposition, two air bubbles were sequentially introduced into the glass channel and passed through the channel at different velocities (0.5, 7.7, 72, 982, and 10,800 cm/h). The passage of the bubbles represented a sequence of receding and advancing air-water interfaces. Colloids remaining in the glass channel after each interface passage were visualized with confocal microscopy and quantified by image analysis. The advancing air-water interface was significantly more effective in detaching colloids from the glass surface than the receding interface. Most of the colloids were detached during the first passage of the advancing air-water interface, while the subsequent interface passages did not remove significant amounts of colloids. Forces acting on the colloids calculated from theory corroborate our experimental results, and confirm that the detachment forces (surface tension forces) during the advancing air-water interface movement were stronger than during the receding movement. Theory indicates that, for hydrophilic colloids, the advancing interface movement generally exerts a stronger detachment force than the receding, except when the hysteresis of the colloid-air-water contact angle is small and that of the channel-air-water contact angle is large.

  8. Crucial importance of water structure modification on trimethylamine N-oxide counteracting effect at high pressure.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Rahul; Paul, Sandip

    2013-01-17

    Penetration of water molecules into the protein interior under high hydrostatic pressure conditions, leading to protein structural transition, is a well-known phenomenon. The counteracting effect of a naturally occurring osmolyte, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), against pressure-induced protein denaturation is also well-established. But, what is largely unknown is the mechanism by which TMAO counteracts this protein denaturation. So to provide a molecular level understanding of how TMAO protects proteins at high pressure, we report here molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulation results for aqueous solutions of N-methylacetamide (NMA) with different TMAO concentrations over a wide range of pressures relevant to protein denaturation. Hydration behavior of NMA is analyzed at different conditions chosen. It is observed that hydrostatic pressure leads to a significant compression of hydration shell of nonpolar groups and increases hydration number. The compression is relatively insignificant in the vicinity of hydrogen bonding sites. TMAO can prevent pressure-induced enhanced hydration of NMA molecules. Interaction of TMAO with NMA and the structural and dynamical properties of water (site-site radial distribution function, coordination number, hydrogen-bond number, and lifetime) are also investigated to find the origin of the counteracting action of TMAO. Our results confirm that TMAO and pressure have counteracting effects on the water structural and dynamical properties, giving an explanation as to how TMAO counteracts pressure-conferred denaturation of proteins.

  9. Optimization of pressure gauge locations for water distribution systems using entropy theory.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Do Guen; Chang, Dong Eil; Jun, Hwandon; Kim, Joong Hoon

    2012-12-01

    It is essential to select the optimal pressure gauge location for effective management and maintenance of water distribution systems. This study proposes an objective and quantified standard for selecting the optimal pressure gauge location by defining the pressure change at other nodes as a result of demand change at a specific node using entropy theory. Two cases are considered in terms of demand change: that in which demand at all nodes shows peak load by using a peak factor and that comprising the demand change of the normal distribution whose average is the base demand. The actual pressure change pattern is determined by using the emitter function of EPANET to reflect the pressure that changes practically at each node. The optimal pressure gauge location is determined by prioritizing the node that processes the largest amount of information it gives to (giving entropy) and receives from (receiving entropy) the whole system according to the entropy standard. The suggested model is applied to one virtual and one real pipe network, and the optimal pressure gauge location combination is calculated by implementing the sensitivity analysis based on the study results. These analysis results support the following two conclusions. Firstly, the installation priority of the pressure gauge in water distribution networks can be determined with a more objective standard through the entropy theory. Secondly, the model can be used as an efficient decision-making guide for gauge installation in water distribution systems.

  10. Pressure Dependence of Hydrogen-Bond Dynamics in Liquid Water Probed by Ultrafast Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lapini, Andrea; Pagliai, Marco; Fanetti, Samuele; Citroni, Margherita; Scandolo, Sandro; Bini, Roberto; Righini, Roberto

    2016-09-15

    Clarifying the structure/dynamics relation of water hydrogen-bond network has been the aim of extensive research over many decades. By joining anvil cell high-pressure technology, femtosecond 2D infrared spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations, we studied, for the first time, the spectral diffusion of the stretching frequency of an HOD impurity in liquid water as a function of pressure. Our experimental and simulation results concordantly demonstrate that the rate of spectral diffusion is almost insensitive to the applied pressure. This behavior is in contrast with the previously reported pressure-induced speed up of the orientational dynamics, which can be rationalized in terms of large angular jumps involving sudden switching between two hydrogen-bonded configurations. The different trend of the spectral diffusion can be, instead, inferred considering that the first solvation shell preserves the tetrahedral structure with pressure and the OD stretching frequency is only slight perturbed.

  11. Study on the pressure self-adaptive water-tight junction box in underwater vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haocai; Ye, Yanying; Leng, Jianxing; Yuan, Zhuoli; Chen, Ying

    2012-09-01

    Underwater vehicles play a very important role in underwater engineering. Water-tight junction box (WJB) is one of the key components in underwater vehicle. This paper puts forward a pressure self-adaptive water-tight junction box (PSAWJB) which improves the reliability of the WJB significantly by solving the sealing and pressure problems in conventional WJB design. By redundancy design method, the pressure self-adaptive equalizer (PSAE) is designed in such a way that it consists of a piston pressure-adaptive compensator (PPAC) and a titanium film pressureadaptive compensator (TFPAC). According to hydro-mechanical simulations, the operating volume of the PSAE is more than or equal to 11.6 % of the volume of WJB liquid system. Furthermore, the required operating volume of the PSAE also increases as the gas content of oil, hydrostatic pressure or temperature difference increases. The reliability of the PSAWJB is proved by hyperbaric chamber tests

  12. Bending response of an artificial muscle in high-pressure water environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakabo, Yoshihiro; Takagi, Kentaro; Mukai, Toshiharu; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Asaka, Kinji

    2005-05-01

    Ionic Polymer-Metal Composites (IPMCs) are soft actuators, generally referred to as "artificial muscles" which are made out of high polymer gel films of perfluorosulfonic acid chemically plated with gold. These composites bend by applying a low voltage between electrodes on both sides. The actuator is soft and works in water. It bends silently, responds quickly and has a long life. In our previous work, snake-like swimming robots and a 3DOF 2-D manipulator have been developed. In this research we have investigated the bending response of an IPMC artificial muscle in high-pressure water environments, with future applications in deep-sea actuators and robots. The artificial muscles have an advantage over electric motors because they do not need sealing from water, which is difficult in high-pressure water environments. Bending responses of artificial muscles were measured at three different pressure levels, 30MPa, 70MPa and 100MPa. The maximum pressure, 100MPa is the same pressure as the deepest ocean on earth, (10,000m.) From experiments, there was found to be almost no difference with that at normal water pressure of 1Pa. We present detailed results of responses of these artificial muscles including current responses and videos of bending motion with respect to combinations of several different input voltages, frequencies and wave patterns.

  13. Pressurized hydrogenotrophic denitrification reactor for small water systems.

    PubMed

    Epsztein, Razi; Beliavski, Michael; Tarre, Sheldon; Green, Michal

    2017-03-15

    The implementation of hydrogenotrophic denitrification is limited due to safety concerns, poor H2 utilization and low solubility of H2 gas with the resulting low transfer rate. The current paper presents the main research work conducted on a pressurized hydrogenotrophic reactor for denitrification that was recently developed. The reactor is based on a new concept suggesting that a gas-liquid equilibrium is achieved in the closed headspace of denitrifying reactor, further produced N2 gas is carried out by the effluent and gas purging is not required. The feasibility of the proposed reactor was shown for two effluent concentrations of 10 and 1 mg NO3(-)-N/L. Hydrogen gas utilization efficiencies of 92.8% and 96.9% were measured for the two effluent concentrations, respectively. Reactor modeling predicted high denitrification rates above 4 g NO3(-)-N/(Lreactor·d) at reasonable operational conditions. Hydrogen utilization efficiency was improved up to almost 100% by combining the pressurized reactor with a following open-to-atmosphere polishing unit. Also, the potential of the reactor to remove ClO4(-) was shown.

  14. Numerical Analysis including Pressure Drop in Oscillating Water Column Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    das Neves Gomes, Mateus; Domingues dos Santos, Elizaldo; Isoldi, Liércio André; Rocha, Luiz Alberto Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    The wave energy conversion into electricity has been increasingly studied in the last years. There are several proposed converters. Among them, the oscillatingwater column (OWC) device has been widespread evaluated in literature. In this context, the main goal of this work was to perform a comparison between two kinds of physical constraints in the chimney of the OWC device, aiming to represent numerically the pressure drop imposed by the turbine on the air flow inside the OWC. To do so, the conservation equations of mass,momentumand one equation for the transport of volumetric fraction were solved with the finite volume method (FVM). To tackle thewater-air interaction, the multiphase model volume of fluid (VOF)was used. Initially, an asymmetric constraint inserted in chimney duct was reproduced and investigated. Subsequently, a second strategywas proposed,where a symmetric physical constraint with an elliptical shapewas analyzed. Itwas thus possible to establish a strategy to reproduce the pressure drop in OWC devices caused by the presence of the turbine, as well as to generate its characteristic curve.

  15. Free energy of solubility of non-polar particles in water: The role of pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrara, C. Gastón; Grigera, J. Raul

    2014-04-01

    The behavior of aqueous solutions of non-polar substances at different temperatures has been studied extensively. The interpretation of the behavior of these systems under pressure is somewhat controversial when the attempt is made to connect the hydrocarbon model with the folding-unfolding of proteins under pressure. We consider the free energy of solubility of non-polar substances in water by molecular dynamics simulation to compute changes in the free energy of transference of a Lennard-Jones particle to an existent cluster of such particles in water from 1 to1500 bar and 300 ± 4 K. The critical cluster size needed to form an aggregate increase with pressure. Using the values of the free energy of transference, an analytical expression is proposed to describe its behavior. The formation of clusters requires a tetrahedral structure to allow hydrophobic interaction, then, decrease of cluster size is due to the change of water properties under pressure.

  16. Low internal pressure in femtoliter water capillary bridges reduces evaporation rates.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kun; Hwang, In Gyu; Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Lim, Jun; Kim, Joon Heon; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2016-03-01

    Capillary bridges are usually formed by a small liquid volume in a confined space between two solid surfaces. They can have a lower internal pressure than the surrounding pressure for volumes of the order of femtoliters. Femtoliter capillary bridges with relatively rapid evaporation rates are difficult to explore experimentally. To understand in detail the evaporation of femtoliter capillary bridges, we present a feasible experimental method to directly visualize how water bridges evaporate between a microsphere and a flat substrate in still air using transmission X-ray microscopy. Precise measurements of evaporation rates for water bridges show that lower water pressure than surrounding pressure can significantly decrease evaporation through the suppression of vapor diffusion. This finding provides insight into the evaporation of ultrasmall capillary bridges.

  17. Low internal pressure in femtoliter water capillary bridges reduces evaporation rates

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kun; Hwang, In Gyu; Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Lim, Jun; Kim, Joon Heon; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2016-01-01

    Capillary bridges are usually formed by a small liquid volume in a confined space between two solid surfaces. They can have a lower internal pressure than the surrounding pressure for volumes of the order of femtoliters. Femtoliter capillary bridges with relatively rapid evaporation rates are difficult to explore experimentally. To understand in detail the evaporation of femtoliter capillary bridges, we present a feasible experimental method to directly visualize how water bridges evaporate between a microsphere and a flat substrate in still air using transmission X-ray microscopy. Precise measurements of evaporation rates for water bridges show that lower water pressure than surrounding pressure can significantly decrease evaporation through the suppression of vapor diffusion. This finding provides insight into the evaporation of ultrasmall capillary bridges. PMID:26928329

  18. Water Mediated Interactions and the Protein Folding Phase Diagram in the Temperature-Pressure Plane.

    PubMed

    Sirovetz, Brian J; Schafer, Nicholas P; Wolynes, Peter G

    2015-08-27

    The temperature-pressure behavior of two proteins, ubiquitin and λ-repressor, is explored using a realistically coarse-grained physicochemical model, the associative memory, water mediated, structure and energy model (AWSEM). The phase diagram across the temperature-pressure plane is obtained by perturbing the water mediated interactions in the Hamiltonian systematically. The phase diagrams calculated with direct simulations along with an extended bridge sampling estimator show the main features found experimentally, including both cold- and pressure-denaturation. The denatured ensembles in different parts of the phase diagram are characterized and found to be structurally distinct. The protein energy landscape is found to be funneled throughout the phase diagram, but modest changes in the entropy and free energy of the water are found to drive both cold and pressure induced denaturation.

  19. Vapour pressure deficit control in relation to water transport and water productivity in greenhouse tomato production during summer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dalong; Du, Qingjie; Zhang, Zhi; Jiao, Xiaocong; Song, Xiaoming; Li, Jianming

    2017-01-01

    Although atmospheric vapour pressure deficit (VPD) has been widely recognized as the evaporative driving force for water transport, the potential to reduce plant water consumption and improve water productivity by regulating VPD is highly uncertain. To bridge this gap, water transport in combination with plant productivity was examined in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) plants grown under contrasting VPD gradients. The driving force for water transport was substantially reduced in low-VPD treatment, which consequently decreased water loss rate and moderated plant water stress: leaf desiccation, hydraulic limitation and excessive negative water potential were prevented by maintaining water balance. Alleviation in water stress by reducing VPD sustained stomatal function and photosynthesis, with concomitant improvements in biomass and fruit production. From physiological perspectives, suppression of the driving force and water flow rate substantially reduced cumulative transpiration by 19.9%. In accordance with physiological principles, irrigation water use efficiency as criterions of biomass and fruit yield in low-VPD treatment was significantly increased by 36.8% and 39.1%, respectively. The reduction in irrigation was counterbalanced by input of fogging water to some extent. Net water saving can be increased by enabling greater planting densities and improving the evaporative efficiency of the mechanical system. PMID:28266524

  20. Vapour pressure deficit control in relation to water transport and water productivity in greenhouse tomato production during summer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dalong; Du, Qingjie; Zhang, Zhi; Jiao, Xiaocong; Song, Xiaoming; Li, Jianming

    2017-03-07

    Although atmospheric vapour pressure deficit (VPD) has been widely recognized as the evaporative driving force for water transport, the potential to reduce plant water consumption and improve water productivity by regulating VPD is highly uncertain. To bridge this gap, water transport in combination with plant productivity was examined in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) plants grown under contrasting VPD gradients. The driving force for water transport was substantially reduced in low-VPD treatment, which consequently decreased water loss rate and moderated plant water stress: leaf desiccation, hydraulic limitation and excessive negative water potential were prevented by maintaining water balance. Alleviation in water stress by reducing VPD sustained stomatal function and photosynthesis, with concomitant improvements in biomass and fruit production. From physiological perspectives, suppression of the driving force and water flow rate substantially reduced cumulative transpiration by 19.9%. In accordance with physiological principles, irrigation water use efficiency as criterions of biomass and fruit yield in low-VPD treatment was significantly increased by 36.8% and 39.1%, respectively. The reduction in irrigation was counterbalanced by input of fogging water to some extent. Net water saving can be increased by enabling greater planting densities and improving the evaporative efficiency of the mechanical system.

  1. Data quality assurance in pressure transducer-based automatic water level monitoring

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Submersible pressure transducers integrated with data loggers have become relatively common water-level measuring devices used in flow or well water elevation measurements. However, drift, linearity, hysteresis and other problems can lead to erroneous data. Researchers at the USDA-ARS in Watkinsvill...

  2. Th/U-233 multi-recycle in pressurized water reactors : feasibility study of multiple homogeneous and heterogeneous assembly designs.

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, D.; Taiwo, T. A.; Kim, T. K.; Mohamed, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-10-01

    The use of thorium in current or advanced light water reactors (LWRs) has been of interest in recent years. These interests have been associated with the need to increase nuclear fuel resources and the perceived non-proliferation advantages of the utilization of thorium in the fuel cycle. Various options have been considered for the use of thorium in the LWR fuel cycle. The possibility for thorium utilization in a multi-recycle system has also been considered in past literature, primarily because of the potential for near breeders with Th/U-233 in the thermal energy range. The objective of this study is to evaluate the potential of Th/U-233 fuel multi-recycle in current LWRs, focusing on pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Approaches for sustainable multi-recycle without the need for external fissile material makeup have been investigated. The intent is to obtain a design that allows existing PWRs to be used with minimal modifications.

  3. Recent advances in drinking water disinfection: successes and challenges.

    PubMed

    Ngwenya, Nonhlanhla; Ncube, Esper J; Parsons, James

    2013-01-01

    Drinking water is the most important single source of human exposure to gastroenteric diseases, mainly as a result of the ingestion of microbial contaminated water. Waterborne microbial agents that pose a health risk to humans include enteropathogenic bacteria, viruses, and protozoa. Therefore, properly assessing whether these hazardous agents enter drinking water supplies, and if they do, whether they are disinfected adequately, are undoubtedly aspects critical to protecting public health. As new pathogens emerge, monitoring for relevant indicator microorganisms (e.g., process microbial indicators, fecal indicators, and index and model organisms) is crucial to ensuring drinking water safety. Another crucially important step to maintaining public health is implementing Water Safety Plans (WSPs), as is recommended by the current WHO Guidelines for Drinking Water Quality. Good WSPs include creating health-based targets that aim to reduce microbial risks and adverse health effects to which a population is exposed through drinking water. The use of disinfectants to inactivate microbial pathogens in drinking water has played a central role in reducing the incidence of waterborne diseases and is considered to be among the most successful interventions for preserving and promoting public health. Chlorine-based disinfectants are the most commonly used disinfectants and are cheap and easy to use. Free chlorine is an effective disinfectant for bacteria and viruses; however, it is not always effective against C. parvum and G. lamblia. Another limitation of using chlorination is that it produces disinfection by-products (DBPs), which pose potential health risks of their own. Currently, most drinking water regulations aggressively address DBP problems in public water distribution systems. The DBPs of most concern include the trihalomethanes (THMs), the haloacetic acids (HAAs), bromate, and chlorite. However, in the latest edition of the WHO Guidelines for Drinking Water Quality

  4. Temporal and Spatial Pore Water Pressure Distribution Surrounding a Vertical Landfill Leachate Recirculation Well

    PubMed Central

    Kadambala, Ravi; Townsend, Timothy G.; Jain, Pradeep; Singh, Karamjit

    2011-01-01

    Addition of liquids into landfilled waste can result in an increase in pore water pressure, and this in turn may increase concerns with respect to geotechnical stability of the landfilled waste mass. While the impact of vertical well leachate recirculation on landfill pore water pressures has been mathematically modeled, measurements of these systems in operating landfills have not been reported. Pressure readings from vibrating wire piezometers placed in the waste surrounding a liquids addition well at a full-scale operating landfill in Florida were recorded over a 2-year period. Prior to the addition of liquids, measured pore pressures were found to increase with landfill depth, an indication of gas pressure increase and decreasing waste permeability with depth. When liquid addition commenced, piezometers located closer to either the leachate injection well or the landfill surface responded more rapidly to leachate addition relative to those far from the well and those at deeper locations. After liquid addition stopped, measured pore pressures did not immediately drop, but slowly decreased with time. Despite the large pressures present at the bottom of the liquid addition well, much smaller pressures were measured in the surrounding waste. The spatial variation of the pressures recorded in this study suggests that waste permeability is anisotropic and decreases with depth. PMID:21655145

  5. Temporal and spatial pore water pressure distribution surrounding a vertical landfill leachate recirculation well.

    PubMed

    Kadambala, Ravi; Townsend, Timothy G; Jain, Pradeep; Singh, Karamjit

    2011-05-01

    Addition of liquids into landfilled waste can result in an increase in pore water pressure, and this in turn may increase concerns with respect to geotechnical stability of the landfilled waste mass. While the impact of vertical well leachate recirculation on landfill pore water pressures has been mathematically modeled, measurements of these systems in operating landfills have not been reported. Pressure readings from vibrating wire piezometers placed in the waste surrounding a liquids addition well at a full-scale operating landfill in Florida were recorded over a 2-year period. Prior to the addition of liquids, measured pore pressures were found to increase with landfill depth, an indication of gas pressure increase and decreasing waste permeability with depth. When liquid addition commenced, piezometers located closer to either the leachate injection well or the landfill surface responded more rapidly to leachate addition relative to those far from the well and those at deeper locations. After liquid addition stopped, measured pore pressures did not immediately drop, but slowly decreased with time. Despite the large pressures present at the bottom of the liquid addition well, much smaller pressures were measured in the surrounding waste. The spatial variation of the pressures recorded in this study suggests that waste permeability is anisotropic and decreases with depth.

  6. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of water transport through carbon nanotube membranes at low pressure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Luying; Dumont, Randall S; Dickson, James M

    2012-07-28

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations are used to investigate pressure-driven water flow passing through carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes at low pressures (5.0 MPa) typical of real nanofiltration (NF) systems. The CNT membrane is modeled as a simplified NF membrane with smooth surfaces, and uniform straight pores of typical NF pore sizes. A NEMD simulation system is constructed to study the effects of the membrane structure (pores size and membrane thickness) on the pure water transport properties. All simulations are run under operating conditions (temperature and pressure difference) similar to a real NF processes. Simulation results are analyzed to obtain water flux, density, and velocity distributions along both the flow and radial directions. Results show that water flow through a CNT membrane under a pressure difference has the unique transport properties of very fast flow and a non-parabolic radial distribution of velocities which cannot be represented by the Hagen-Poiseuille or Navier-Stokes equations. Density distributions along radial and flow directions show that water molecules in the CNT form layers with an oscillatory density profile, and have a lower average density than in the bulk flow. The NEMD simulations provide direct access to dynamic aspects of water flow through a CNT membrane and give a view of the pressure-driven transport phenomena on a molecular scale.

  7. Applications of a total dissolved gas pressure probe in ground water studies.

    PubMed

    Manning, Andrew H; Solomon, D Kip; Sheldon, Amy L

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of dissolved gases have numerous applications in ground water hydrology, and it is now possible to measure the total dissolved gas pressure in situ using a probe. Dissolved gas pressure is measured by submerging a headspace volume with a gas-permeable membrane, allowing dissolved gases in the water to equilibrate with gases in the headspace, then measuring the pressure in the headspace with a pressure transducer. Total dissolved gas pressure (TGP) probes have many potential uses in ground water studies employing dissolved gases, including: (1) determining approximate excess air levels, which may provide information about the time and location of recharge; (2) screening wells for air contamination, which can compromise the accuracy of dissolved gas tracer techniques: (3) detecting a trapped gas phase, which can significantly reduce hydraulic conductivity and impede the transport of dissolved solutes and gases; (4) enabling the use of gas-filled passive diffusion samplers for determining accurate dissolved gas concentrations; and (5) determining relative concentrations of CH4 and CO2 when they are known to be highly abundant. Although TGP probes designed for surface water have been available for several years, TGP probes suitable for ground water applications have only recently become available. Herein we present what are, to our knowledge, the first reported ground water dissolved gas data collected using a TGP probe. We also explain the basic operating principles of these probes and discuss the potential applications listed.

  8. The Analysis of the Water-Expanded Rock Bolts Ruptures During Pressure Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawłowski, Bogdan; Krawczyk, Janusz; Bała, Piotr; Cios, Grzegorz; Tokarski, Tomasz

    2017-06-01

    This paper describe the investigation of a water-expanded rock bolts failed during pressure test (inner water pressure of 330 bar). A main objective of this work was to determine the cracks nucleation and propagation mechanism. It was found that the rock bolts failure was promoted by presence of non-metallic inclusions (mainly long sulphide inclusions) but the primary cause of cracking is strain ageing of steel. Suggestions for improving the behaviour of steel used for water-expanded rock belts by the modification of its chemical composition are proposed finally.

  9. The rose petal effect and the role of advancing water contact angles for drop confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofoed Mandsberg, Nikolaj; Taboryski, Rafael

    2017-06-01

    We studied the role of advancing water contact angles on superhydrophobic surfaces that exhibited strong pinning effects as known in nature from rose petals. Textured surfaces were engineered in silicon by lithographical techniques. The textures were comprised of hexagonal microstructures superimposed with randomly distributed nanospikes and were coated with a hydrophobic fluorocarbon agent. A step in the advancing water contact angle bounding specific areas was obtained by engineering a corresponding topographic step in the hexagonal micro-texture. This enabled a surface texture design confining drops to areas with a lower advancing contact angle.

  10. The function of advanced treatment process in a drinking water treatment plant with organic matter-polluted source water.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huirong; Zhang, Shuting; Zhang, Shenghua; Lin, Wenfang; Yu, Xin

    2017-04-01

    To understand the relationship between chemical and microbial treatment at each treatment step, as well as the relationship between microbial community structure in biofilms in biofilters and their ecological functions, a drinking water plant with severe organic matter-polluted source water was investigated. The bacterial community dynamics of two drinking water supply systems (traditional and advanced treatment processes) in this plant were studied from the source to the product water. Analysis by 454 pyrosequencing was conducted to characterize the bacterial diversity in each step of the treatment processes. The bacterial communities in these two treatment processes were highly diverse. Proteobacteria, which mainly consisted of beta-proteobacteria, was the dominant phylum. The two treatment processes used in the plant could effectively remove organic pollutants and microbial polution, especially the advanced treatment process. Significant differences in the detection of the major groups were observed in the product water samples in the treatment processes. The treatment processes, particularly the biological pretreatment and O3-biological activated carbon in the advanced treatment process, highly influenced the microbial community composition and the water quality. Some opportunistic pathogens were found in the water. Nitrogen-relative microorganisms found in the biofilm of filters may perform an important function on the microbial community composition and water quality improvement.

  11. Biological efficacy and toxic effect of emergency water disinfection process based on advanced oxidation technology.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yiping; Yuan, Xiaoli; Xu, Shujing; Li, Rihong; Zhou, Xinying; Zhang, Zhitao

    2015-12-01

    An innovative and removable water treatment system consisted of strong electric field discharge and hydrodynamic cavitation based on advanced oxidation technologies was developed for reactive free radicals producing and waterborne pathogens eliminating in the present study. The biological efficacy and toxic effects of this advanced oxidation system were evaluated during water disinfection treatments. Bench tests were carried out with synthetic microbial-contaminated water, as well as source water in rainy season from a reservoir of Dalian city (Liaoning Province, China). Results showed that high inactivation efficiency of Escherichia coli (>5 log) could be obtained for synthetic contaminated water at a low concentration (0.5-0.7 mg L(-1)) of total oxidants in 3-10 s. The numbers of wild total bacteria (108 × 10(3) CFU mL(-1)) and total coliforms (260 × 10(2) MPN 100 mL(-1)) in source water greatly reduced to 50 and 0 CFU mL(-1) respectively after treated by the advanced oxidation system, which meet the microbiological standards of drinking water, and especially that the inactivation efficiency of total coliforms could reach 100%. Meanwhile, source water qualities were greatly improved during the disinfection processes. The values of UV254 in particular were significantly reduced (60-80%) by reactive free radicals. Moreover, the concentrations of possible disinfection by-products (formaldehyde and bromide) in treated water were lower than detection limits, indicating that there was no harmful effect on water after the treatments. These investigations are helpful for the ecotoxicological studies of advanced oxidation system in the treatments of chemical polluted water or waste water. The findings of this work suggest that the developed water treatment system is ideal in the acute phases of emergencies, which also could offer additional advantages over a wide range of applications in water pollution control.

  12. Water permeability of nanoporous graphene at realistic pressures for reverse osmosis desalination

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen-Tanugi, David; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2014-08-21

    Nanoporous graphene (NPG) shows tremendous promise as an ultra-permeable membrane for water desalination thanks to its atomic thickness and precise sieving properties. However, a significant gap exists in the literature between the ideal conditions assumed for NPG desalination and the physical environment inherent to reverse osmosis (RO) systems. In particular, the water permeability of NPG has been calculated previously based on very high pressures (1000–2000 bars). Does NPG maintain its ultrahigh water permeability under real-world RO pressures (<100 bars)? Here, we answer this question by drawing results from molecular dynamics simulations. Our results indicate that NPG maintains its ultrahigh permeability even at low pressures, allowing a permeate water flux of 6.0 l/h-bar per pore, or equivalently 1041 ± 20 l/m{sup 2}-h-bar assuming a nanopore density of 1.7 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2}.

  13. Water permeability of nanoporous graphene at realistic pressures for reverse osmosis desalination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen-Tanugi, David; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2014-08-01

    Nanoporous graphene (NPG) shows tremendous promise as an ultra-permeable membrane for water desalination thanks to its atomic thickness and precise sieving properties. However, a significant gap exists in the literature between the ideal conditions assumed for NPG desalination and the physical environment inherent to reverse osmosis (RO) systems. In particular, the water permeability of NPG has been calculated previously based on very high pressures (1000-2000 bars). Does NPG maintain its ultrahigh water permeability under real-world RO pressures (<100 bars)? Here, we answer this question by drawing results from molecular dynamics simulations. Our results indicate that NPG maintains its ultrahigh permeability even at low pressures, allowing a permeate water flux of 6.0 l/h-bar per pore, or equivalently 1041 ± 20 l/m2-h-bar assuming a nanopore density of 1.7 × 1013 cm-2.

  14. The isobaric heat capacity of liquid water at low temperatures and high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troncoso, Jacobo

    2017-08-01

    Isobaric heat capacity for water shows a rather strong anomalous behavior, especially at low temperature. However, almost all experimental studies supporting this statement have been carried out at low pressure; very few experimental data were reported above 100 MPa. In order to explore the behavior of this magnitude for water up to 500 MPa, a new heat flux calorimeter was developed. With the aim of testing the experimental methodology and comparing with water results, isobaric heat capacity was also measured for methanol and hexane. Good agreement with indirect heat capacity estimations from the literature was obtained for the three liquids. Experimental results show large anomalies in water heat capacity. This is especially true as regards its temperature dependence, qualitatively different from that observed for other liquids. Heat capacity versus temperature curves show minima for most studied isobars, whose location decreases with the pressure up to around 100 MPa but increases at higher pressures.

  15. Water permeability of nanoporous graphene at realistic pressures for reverse osmosis desalination.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Tanugi, David; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2014-08-21

    Nanoporous graphene (NPG) shows tremendous promise as an ultra-permeable membrane for water desalination thanks to its atomic thickness and precise sieving properties. However, a significant gap exists in the literature between the ideal conditions assumed for NPG desalination and the physical environment inherent to reverse osmosis (RO) systems. In particular, the water permeability of NPG has been calculated previously based on very high pressures (1000-2000 bars). Does NPG maintain its ultrahigh water permeability under real-world RO pressures (<100 bars)? Here, we answer this question by drawing results from molecular dynamics simulations. Our results indicate that NPG maintains its ultrahigh permeability even at low pressures, allowing a permeate water flux of 6.1 × 10−15 l/h bar per pore [Corrected], or equivalently 1041 ± 20 l/m(2)-h-bar assuming a nanopore density of 1.7 × 10(13) cm(-2).

  16. The isobaric heat capacity of liquid water at low temperatures and high pressures.

    PubMed

    Troncoso, Jacobo

    2017-08-28

    Isobaric heat capacity for water shows a rather strong anomalous behavior, especially at low temperature. However, almost all experimental studies supporting this statement have been carried out at low pressure; very few experimental data were reported above 100 MPa. In order to explore the behavior of this magnitude for water up to 500 MPa, a new heat flux calorimeter was developed. With the aim of testing the experimental methodology and comparing with water results, isobaric heat capacity was also measured for methanol and hexane. Good agreement with indirect heat capacity estimations from the literature was obtained for the three liquids. Experimental results show large anomalies in water heat capacity. This is especially true as regards its temperature dependence, qualitatively different from that observed for other liquids. Heat capacity versus temperature curves show minima for most studied isobars, whose location decreases with the pressure up to around 100 MPa but increases at higher pressures.

  17. Temperature and water vapor pressure effects on the friction coefficient of hydrogenated diamondlike carbon films.

    SciTech Connect

    Dickrell, P. L.; Sawyer, W. G.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Erdemir, A.; Energy Technology; Univ. of Florida

    2009-07-01

    Microtribological measurements of a hydrogenated diamondlike carbon film in controlled gaseous environments show that water vapor plays a significant role in the friction coefficient. These experiments reveal an initial high friction transient behavior that does not reoccur even after extended periods of exposure to low partial pressures of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2}. Experiments varying both water vapor pressure and sample temperature show trends of a decreasing friction coefficient as a function of both the decreasing water vapor pressure and the increasing substrate temperature. Theses trends are examined with regard to first order gas-surface interactions. Model fits give activation energies on the order of 40 kJ/mol, which is consistent with water vapor desorption.

  18. Organic coal-water fuel: Problems and advances (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glushkov, D. O.; Strizhak, P. A.; Chernetskii, M. Yu.

    2016-10-01

    The study results of ignition of organic coal-water fuel (OCWF) compositions were considered. The main problems associated with investigation of these processes were identified. Historical perspectives of the development of coal-water composite fuel technologies in Russia and worldwide are presented. The advantages of the OCWF use as a power-plant fuel in comparison with the common coal-water fuels (CWF) were emphasized. The factors (component ratio, grinding degree of solid (coal) component, limiting temperature of oxidizer, properties of liquid and solid components, procedure and time of suspension preparation, etc.) affecting inertia and stability of the ignition processes of suspensions based on the products of coaland oil processing (coals of various types and metamorphism degree, filter cakes, waste motor, transformer, and turbine oils, water-oil emulsions, fuel-oil, etc.) were analyzed. The promising directions for the development of modern notions on the OCWF ignition processes were determined. The main reasons limiting active application of the OCWF in power generation were identified. Characteristics of ignition and combustion of coal-water and organic coal-water slurry fuels were compared. The effect of water in the composite coal fuels on the energy characteristics of their ignition and combustion, as well as ecological features of these processes, were elucidated. The current problems associated with pulverization of composite coal fuels in power plants, as well as the effect of characteristics of the pulverization process on the combustion parameters of fuel, were considered. The problems hindering the development of models of ignition and combustion of OCWF were analyzed. It was established that the main one was the lack of reliable experimental data on the processes of heating, evaporation, ignition, and combustion of OCWF droplets. It was concluded that the use of high-speed video recording systems and low-inertia sensors of temperature and gas

  19. Structure of hydrogen-bonded associates in supercritical water under low and high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipova, M. L.; Gurina, D. L.; Petrenko, V. E.

    2013-03-01

    The character and structural features of hydrogen-bonded associates in sub- and supercritical water are studied by analyzing distributions of the dipole moments of water molecules at P = 40, 80, and 100 MPa and T = 373-773 K, calculated using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics. The main types of hydrogen-bonded structures and their changes upon isobaric heating are determined. It is shown that clusters with tetrahedral configurations exist in supercritical water only under high pressure.

  20. Advances in the hydrogeochemistry and microbiology of acid mine waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordstrom, D. Kirk

    2000-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a plethora of research related to the hydrogeochemistry and microbiology of acid mine waters and associated tailings and waste-rock waters. Numerous books, reviews, technical papers, and proceedings have been published that examine the complex bio-geochemical process of sulfide mineral oxidation, develop and apply geochemical models to site characterization, and characterize the microbial ecology of these environments. This review summarizes many of these recent works, and provides references for those investigating this field. Comparisons of measured versus calculated Eh and measured versus calculated pH for water samples from several field sites demonstrate the reliability of some current geochemical models for aqueous speciation and mass balances. Geochemical models are not, however, used to predict accurately time-dependent processes but to improve our understanding of these systems and to constrain possible processes that contribute to actual or potential water quality issues. Microbiological studies are demonstrating that there is much we have yet to learn about the types of different microorganisms and their function and ecology in mine-waste environments. A broad diversity of green algae, bacteria, archaea, yeasts, and fungi are encountered in acid mine waters, and a better understanding of their ecology and function may potentially enhance remediation possibilities as well as our understanding of the evolution of life.

  1. Water absorption, dimensional change and radial pressure in resin matrix dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    McCabe, John F; Rusby, Sandra

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the relationship between water absorption, dimensional change (swelling) under cavity constraint and radial stress generation in resin matrix dental restorative materials. Water absorption was determined on disc specimens whilst swelling was determined on samples of materials restrained within cavities cut in cast polymethylmethacrylate and pressure generated was determined using a 'push-out' test. Four commercially available resin matrix materials were used. A giomer material gave significantly greater water absorption than two compomers and a fluoride releasing composite (p<0.05). The giomer material was the only material which produced a significant degree of swelling (p<0.05) when restrained within a cavity. The giomer product produced the greatest radial pressure (over 20 MPa in 1 month) following water storage, however a significant pressure generation was also observed for other materials despite their much lower water absorption values. The mechanism of water absorption and the amount of water absorbed determine the dimensional changes and radial pressure generated by resin matrix materials in a moist environment.

  2. Capillary pressure-saturation relationships for diluted bitumen and water in gravel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, S. Zubair; Mumford, Kevin G.

    2017-08-01

    Spills of diluted bitumen (dilbit) to rivers by rail or pipeline accidents can have serious long-term impacts on environment and ecology due to the submergence and trapping of oil within the river bed sediment. The extent of this problem is dictated by the amount of immobile oil available for mass transfer into the water flowing through the sediment pores. An understanding of multiphase (oil and water) flow in the sediment, including oil trapping by hysteretic drainage and imbibition, is important for the development of spill response and risk assessment strategies. Therefore, the objective of this study was to measure capillary pressure-saturation (Pc-Sw) relationships for dilbit and water, and air and water in gravel using a custom-made pressure cell. The Pc-Sw relationships obtained using standard procedures in coarse porous media are height-averaged and often require correction. By developing and comparing air-water and dilbit-water Pc-Sw curves, it was found that correction was less important in dilbit-water systems due to the smaller difference in density between the fluids. In both systems, small displacement pressures were needed for the entry of non-wetting fluid in gravel. Approximately 14% of the pore space was occupied by trapped dilbit after imbibition, which can serve as a source of long-term contamination. While air-water data can be scaled to reasonably predict dilbit-water behaviour, it cannot be used to determine the trapped amount.

  3. Structural Integrity of Water Reactor Pressure Boundary Components.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-20

    RES-79-103 UNCLASSIFIED NRL--- 400 NURE-CR-17B3 NL mnmmnuunin -’El-.--. IIIIIIINI ., *q. - - ,aM T? * NUREG /CI 73 NIL Iteof AW, SOIituA 1 nert of Water...Progress Report for July-September 1979," NUREG /CR-1197, Oak Ridge National Labora- tory, Oak Ridge, Tn., Oct. 1978. 2. F. J. Loss, Ed., "Structural...Progress Report for April-June 1976," ORNL/ NUREG /TM-49, Oak Ridge National Labora- tory, Oak Ridge, Tn., Oct. 1976, pp. 27-38. 5. R. G. Berggren

  4. Advanced Water Purification System for In Situ Resource Utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, Stephen M.; Jolley, Scott T.; Captain, James G.

    2013-01-01

    One of NASA's goals is to enable longterm human presence in space, without the need for continuous replenishment of consumables from Earth. In situ resource utilization (ISRU) is the use of extraterrestrial resources to support activities such as human life-support, material fabrication and repair, and radiation shielding. Potential sources of ISRU resources include lunar and Martian regolith, and Martian atmosphere. Water and byproducts (including hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids) can be produced from lunar regolith via a high-temperature hydrogen reduction reaction and passing the produced gas through a condenser. center dot Due to the high solubility of HCI and HF in water, these byproducts are expected to be present in the product stream (up to 20,000 ppm) and must be removed (less than 10 ppm) prior to water consumption or electrolysis.

  5. When immiscible becomes miscible—Methane in water at high pressures

    PubMed Central

    Pruteanu, Ciprian G.; Ackland, Graeme J.; Poon, Wilson C. K.; Loveday, John S.

    2017-01-01

    At low pressures, the solubility of gases in liquids is governed by Henry’s law, which states that the saturated solubility of a gas in a liquid is proportional to the partial pressure of the gas. As the pressure increases, most gases depart from this ideal behavior in a sublinear fashion, leveling off at pressures in the 1- to 5-kbar (0.1 to 0.5 GPa) range with solubilities of less than 1 mole percent (mol %). This contrasts strikingly with the well-known marked increase in solubility of simple gases in water at high temperature associated with the critical point (647 K and 212 bar). The solubility of the smallest hydrocarbon, the simple gas methane, in water under a range of pressure and temperature is of widespread importance, because it is a paradigmatic hydrophobe and occurs widely in terrestrial and extraterrestrial geology. We report measurements up to 3.5 GPa of the pressure dependence of the solubility of methane in water at 100°C—well below the latter’s critical temperature. Our results reveal a marked increase in solubility between 1 and 2 GPa, leading to a state above 2 GPa where the maximum solubility of methane in water exceeds 35 mol %. PMID:28845447

  6. When immiscible becomes miscible-Methane in water at high pressures.

    PubMed

    Pruteanu, Ciprian G; Ackland, Graeme J; Poon, Wilson C K; Loveday, John S

    2017-08-01

    At low pressures, the solubility of gases in liquids is governed by Henry's law, which states that the saturated solubility of a gas in a liquid is proportional to the partial pressure of the gas. As the pressure increases, most gases depart from this ideal behavior in a sublinear fashion, leveling off at pressures in the 1- to 5-kbar (0.1 to 0.5 GPa) range with solubilities of less than 1 mole percent (mol %). This contrasts strikingly with the well-known marked increase in solubility of simple gases in water at high temperature associated with the critical point (647 K and 212 bar). The solubility of the smallest hydrocarbon, the simple gas methane, in water under a range of pressure and temperature is of widespread importance, because it is a paradigmatic hydrophobe and occurs widely in terrestrial and extraterrestrial geology. We report measurements up to 3.5 GPa of the pressure dependence of the solubility of methane in water at 100°C-well below the latter's critical temperature. Our results reveal a marked increase in solubility between 1 and 2 GPa, leading to a state above 2 GPa where the maximum solubility of methane in water exceeds 35 mol %.

  7. Retrofittable Modifications to Pressurized Water Reactors for Improved Resource Utilization

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-01

    This report summarizes work performed for the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency under BOA AC9NX707 (Task Order 80-02), as part of the Agency's continuing program on improved fuel utilization in light water reactors. The objective of the study was to investigate improvements in fuel management and design of water reactors (PWRs) that could potentially increase the utilization of natural uranium resources in a once-through fuel cycle (i.e., without using spent fuel reprocessing and recycle). For the present study, potential improvements were limited to retrofittable concepts, i.e., those which could be modifications to the reactor system or balance of plant. The potential improvements considered were not necessarily restricted to those which might be economical under current uranium ore prices or to those which might be acceptable to the nuclear industry at the present time. A six-month fuel cycle, for example, although technically possible, would be neither economical nor accept able to the industry at the present time. Although all potential improvements are not necessarily compatible with each other, the target objective was to seek a composite system of compatible improvements that, if possible, could increase uranium resource utilization by 30% or more. Economic factors, risks involved in the introduction, and potential licensing concerns are also addressed in the report.

  8. Pressure probe study of the water relations of Phycomyces blakesleeanus sporangiophores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.; Ortega, J. K.; Shropshire, W. Jr

    1987-01-01

    The physical characteristics which govern the water relations of the giant-celled sporangiophore of Phycomyces blakesleeanus were measured with the pressure probe technique and with nanoliter osmometry. These properties are important because they govern water uptake associated with cell growth and because they may influence expansion of the sporangiophore wall. Turgor pressure ranged from 1.1 to 6.6 bars (mean = 4.1 bars), and was the same for stage I and stage IV sporangiophores. Sporangiophore osmotic pressure averaged 11.5 bars. From the difference between cell osmotic pressure and turgor pressure, the average water potential of the sporangiophore was calculated to be about -7.4 bars. When sporangiophores were submerged under water, turgor remained nearly constant. We propose that the low cell turgor pressure is due to solutes in the cell wall solution, i.e., between the cuticle and the plasma membrane. Membrane hydraulic conductivity averaged 4.6 x 10(-6) cm s-1 bar-1, and was significantly greater in stage I sporangiophores than in stage IV sporangiophores. Contrary to previous reports, the sporangiophore is separated from the supporting mycelium by septa which prevent bulk volume flow between the two regions. The presence of a wall compartment between the cuticle and the plasma membrane results in anomalous osmosis during pressure clamp measurements. This behavior arises because of changes in solute concentration as water moves into or out of the wall compartment surrounding the sporangiophore. Theoretical analysis shows how the equations governing transient water flow are altered by the characteristics of the cell wall compartment.

  9. Pressure probe study of the water relations of Phycomyces blakesleeanus sporangiophores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.; Ortega, J. K.; Shropshire, W. Jr

    1987-01-01

    The physical characteristics which govern the water relations of the giant-celled sporangiophore of Phycomyces blakesleeanus were measured with the pressure probe technique and with nanoliter osmometry. These properties are important because they govern water uptake associated with cell growth and because they may influence expansion of the sporangiophore wall. Turgor pressure ranged from 1.1 to 6.6 bars (mean = 4.1 bars), and was the same for stage I and stage IV sporangiophores. Sporangiophore osmotic pressure averaged 11.5 bars. From the difference between cell osmotic pressure and turgor pressure, the average water potential of the sporangiophore was calculated to be about -7.4 bars. When sporangiophores were submerged under water, turgor remained nearly constant. We propose that the low cell turgor pressure is due to solutes in the cell wall solution, i.e., between the cuticle and the plasma membrane. Membrane hydraulic conductivity averaged 4.6 x 10(-6) cm s-1 bar-1, and was significantly greater in stage I sporangiophores than in stage IV sporangiophores. Contrary to previous reports, the sporangiophore is separated from the supporting mycelium by septa which prevent bulk volume flow between the two regions. The presence of a wall compartment between the cuticle and the plasma membrane results in anomalous osmosis during pressure clamp measurements. This behavior arises because of changes in solute concentration as water moves into or out of the wall compartment surrounding the sporangiophore. Theoretical analysis shows how the equations governing transient water flow are altered by the characteristics of the cell wall compartment.

  10. The use of pneumatically generated water pressure signals for aquifer characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fort, M.; Roberts, R.; Chace, D.

    2013-12-01

    The use of pneumatically generated pressure signals for aquifer characterization Hydraulic tests are the most reliable method of obtaining estimates of hydrologic properties, such as conductivity, that are essential for flow and transport modeling. The use of a sinusoidal signal for hydraulic testing is well established, with Streltsova (1988), Rasmussen (2003) and others having developed analytic solutions. Sinusoidal tests provide a unique easily distinguished signal that reduces ambiguity during analysis and we show that a sinusoidal pressure signal propagates farther into the formation than a standard slug-test signal. If a sinusoidal test is combined with a slug and/or a constant rate test, it can further reduce uncertainty in the estimated parameter values. We demonstrate how pneumatic pressure can be used to generate all three of these signals. By positioning pressure transducers both below the water level and in the head space above the water, we can monitor the total pressure acting on the formation and the changes in water level. From the changes in water level, it is possible to calculate the flow rate in and out of the well, assuming that the well diameter and water density are known. Using gas flow controllers with a Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) system we are able to precisely control the pressures in the well. The use of pneumatic pressure has the advantage that it requires less equipment (no pumps) and produces no water. We also show how the numerical well test analysis program nSIGHTS can be used to analyze all three types of tests simultaneously and to assess the relative contribution of each type of test to the parameter estimation. nSIGHTS was recently released as open source by Sandia National Laboratories and is available for free.

  11. Optimizing the electrical excitation of an atmospheric pressure plasma advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, P; Li, J F; Liu, D X; Walsh, J L

    2014-08-30

    The impact of pulse-modulated generation of atmospheric pressure plasma on the efficiency of organic dye degradation has been investigated. Aqueous samples of methyl orange were exposed to low temperature air plasma and the degradation efficiency was determined by absorbance spectroscopy. The plasma was driven at a constant frequency of 35kHz with a duty cycle of 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%. Relative concentrations of dissolved nitrogen oxides, pH, conductivity and the time evolution of gas phase ozone were measured to identify key parameters responsible for the changes observed in degradation efficiency. The results indicate that pulse modulation significantly improved dye degradation efficiency, with a plasma pulsed at 25% duty showing a two-fold enhancement. Additionally, pulse modulation led to a reduction in the amount of nitrate contamination added to the solution by the plasma. The results clearly demonstrate that optimization of the electrical excitation of the plasma can enhance both degradation efficiency and the final water quality.

  12. Pressurized heavy water reactor fuel behaviour in power ramp conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu, S.; Uţă, O.; Pârvan, M.; Ohâi, D.

    2009-03-01

    In order to check and improve the quality of the Romanian CANDU fuel, an assembly of six CANDU fuel rods has been subjected to a power ramping test in the 14 MW TRIGA reactor at INR. After testing, the fuel rods have been examined in the hot cells using post-irradiation examination (PIE) techniques such as: visual inspection and photography, eddy current testing, profilometry, gamma scanning, fission gas release and analysis, metallography, ceramography, burn-up determination by mass spectrometry, mechanical testing. This paper describes the PIE results from one out of the six fuel rods. The PIE results concerning the integrity, dimensional changes, oxidation, hydriding and mechanical properties of the sheath, the fission-products activity distribution in the fuel column, the pressure, volume and composition of the fission gas, the burn-up, the isotopic composition and structural changes of the fuel enabled the characterization of the behaviour of the Romanian CANDU fuel in power ramping conditions performed in the TRIGA materials testing reactor.

  13. Development of Extended Period Pressure-Dependent Demand Water Distribution Models

    SciTech Connect

    Judi, David R.; Mcpherson, Timothy N.

    2015-03-20

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has used modeling and simulation of water distribution systems for N-1 contingency analyses to assess criticality of water system assets. Critical components considered in these analyses include pumps, tanks, and supply sources, in addition to critical pipes or aqueducts. A contingency represents the complete removal of the asset from system operation. For each contingency, an extended period simulation (EPS) is run using EPANET. An EPS simulates water system behavior over a time period, typically at least 24 hours. It assesses the ability of a system to respond and recover from asset disruption through distributed storage in tanks throughout the system. Contingencies of concern are identified as those in which some portion of the water system has unmet delivery requirements. A delivery requirement is defined as an aggregation of water demands within a service area, similar to an electric power demand. The metric used to identify areas of unmet delivery requirement in these studies is a pressure threshold of 15 pounds per square inch (psi). This pressure threshold is used because it is below the required pressure for fire protection. Any location in the model with pressure that drops below this threshold at any time during an EPS is considered to have unmet service requirements and is used to determine cascading consequences. The outage area for a contingency is the aggregation of all service areas with a pressure below the threshold at any time during the EPS.

  14. Advanced Detector and Waveform Digitizer for Water Vapor DIAL Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Luck, William S., Jr.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    1998-01-01

    Measurement of atmospheric water vapor has become a major requirement for understanding moist-air processes. Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) is a technique best suited for the measurement of atmospheric water vapor. NASA Langley Research Center is continually developing improved DIAL systems. One aspect of current development is focused on the enhancement of a DIAL receiver by applying state-of-the-art technology in building a new compact detection system that will be placed directly on the DIAL receiver telescope. The newly developed detection system has the capability of being digitally interfaced with a simple personal computer, using a discrete input/output interface. This has the potential of transmitting digital data over relatively long distances instead of analog signals, which greatly reduces measurement noise. In this paper, we discuss some results from the new compact water vapor DIAL detection system which includes a silicon based avalanche photodiode (APD) detector, a 14-bit, 10-MHz waveform digitizer, a microcontroller and other auxiliary electronics. All of which are contained on a small printed-circuit-board. This will significantly reduce the weight and volume over the current CAMAC system and eventually will be used in a water vapor DIAL system on an unpiloted atmospheric vehicle (UAV) aircraft, or alternatively on an orbiting spacecraft.

  15. Hydrogen embrittlement of duplex stainless steel and maraging steel in sea water: Effect of pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Pohjanne, P.; Festy, D.

    1994-12-31

    Hydrogen embrittlement behavior of cast super duplex stainless steel and cast maraging steel was examined as a function of electrode potential and hydrostatic pressure, i.e, the water depth, in synthetic sea water using fracture mechanics bolt-loaded wedge-opening (WOL) specimens. The experimental variables investigated included: (1) Electrode potential: free corrosion potential and cathodic protection; (2) Hydrostatic pressure: ambient and 10 MPa corresponding depth of 1,000 meters. The duplex stainless-,steel was not susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement with initial stress intensity values of 30 MPa{radical}m < K{sub i} < 45 MPa{radical}m at ambient pressure. However, at pressure of 10 MPa slight crack growth was observed at open circuit potential and the crack growth was enhanced by the cathodic protection. The maraging steel was susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement in all tests, with all examined initial stress intensity values, K{sub i} < 36 MPa{radical}m. At the open circuit potential the crack growth rate was almost independent of the pressure. Cathodic protection enhanced crack growth and lowered the threshold stress intensity value at ambient as well as at 10 MPa pressure and the crack growth rate increased clearly as pressure increased from 0.1 MPa to 10 MPa. According to these experimental results the combined effect of cathodic protection and hydrostatic pressure must be taken into consideration when designing new offshore structures and equipment especially for deep sea application.

  16. Multiple human pressures and their spatial patterns in European running waters

    PubMed Central

    Schinegger, Rafaela; Trautwein, Clemens; Melcher, Andreas; Schmutz, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Running water ecosystems of Europe are affected by various human pressures. However, little is known about the prevalence, spatial patterns, interactions with natural environment and co-occurrence of pressures. This study represents the first high-resolution data analysis of human pressures at the European scale, where important pressure criteria for 9330 sampling sites in 14 European countries were analysed. We identified 15 criteria describing major anthropogenic degradation and combined these into a global pressure index by taking additive effects of multiple pressures into account. Rivers are affected by alterations of water quality (59%), hydrology (41%) and morphology (38%). Connectivity is disrupted at the catchment level in 85% and 35% at the river segment level. Approximately 31% of all sites are affected by one, 29% by two, 28% by three and 12% by four pressure groups; only 21% are unaffected. In total, 47% of the sites are multi-impacted. Approximately 90% of lowland rivers are impacted by a combination of all four pressure groups. PMID:24899914

  17. Simultaneous Waste Heat and Water Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gases for Advanced Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dexin

    2016-12-31

    This final report presents the results of a two-year technology development project carried out by a team of participants sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this project is to develop a membrane-based technology to recover both water and low grade heat from power plant flue gases. Part of the recovered high-purity water and energy can be used directly to replace plant boiler makeup water as well as improving its efficiency, and the remaining part of the recovered water can be used for Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD), cooling tower water makeup or other plant uses. This advanced version Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) with lower capital and operating costs can be applied to existing plants economically and can maximize waste heat and water recovery from future Advanced Energy System flue gases with CO2 capture in consideration, which will have higher moisture content that favors the TMC to achieve higher efficiency.

  18. Crystal Structure of Calcium Silicate Perovskite Synthesized under Water Saturated Conditions at Mantle Related Pressure-Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Shim, S. H. D.; Leinenweber, K. D.; Meng, Y.; Prakapenka, V.

    2014-12-01

    Perovskite-structured CaSiO3 (Ca-Pv) is the third most abundant mineral in the lower mantle. However, its crystal structure is still under debate and the solubility of H2O in Ca-Pv is not well constrained. We have conducted in situ X-ray diffraction measurements on Ca-Pv under H2O saturated conditions in the laser-heated diamond-anvil cell at the GSECARS and HPCAT sectors of the Advanced Photon Source. Glass starting materials were mixed with platinum powder (10 wt%) for laser coupling and internal pressure scale. Cold compressed foils of the mixtures were loaded in the diamond-anvil cell together with Ne or water. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the Ca-Pv sample synthesized in a Ne medium are consistent with a cubic perovskite structure at both 300 K and high temperatures up to 2,400 K at 50 GPa. No clear peak splittings were observed within the resolution of the angle-dispersive powder diffraction technique. However, in the experiments with water, clear splitting of the 200 diffraction line appears during heating to temperatures over 2000 K and remain after temperature quench at 32 GPa. The peak splittings were clearly observed at high temperatures to 2400 K, which is close to the melting point of water at the pressure. The different structural behaviors of Ca-Pv depending on media (Ne and water) may suggest that OH might enter into the crystal structure of nominally anhydrous Ca-Pv phase at high pressure and high temperature.

  19. Determining soil hydrologic characteristics on a remote forest watershed by continuous monitoring of soil water pressures, rainfall and runoff.

    Treesearch

    L.R. Ahuja; S. A. El-Swaify

    1979-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of soil-water pressures, rainfall and runoff under natural conditions was tested as a technique for determining soil hydrologic characteristics of a remote forest watershed plot. A completely battery-powered (and thus portable) pressure transducer–scanner–recorder system was assembled for monitoring of soil-water pressures in...

  20. Spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of molecular hydrogen dissolved in water at pressures up to 200 MPa.

    PubMed

    Borysow, Jacek; del Rosso, Leonardo; Celli, Milva; Moraldi, Massimo; Ulivi, Lorenzo

    2014-04-28

    We have measured the Raman Q-branch of hydrogen in a solution with water at a temperature of about 280 K and at pressures from 20 to 200 MPa. From a least-mean-square fitting analysis of the broad Raman Q-branch, we isolated the contributions from the four lowest individual roto-vibrational lines. The vibrational lines were narrower than the pure rotational Raman lines of hydrogen dissolved in water measured previously, but significantly larger than in the gas. The separations between these lines were found to be significantly smaller than in gaseous hydrogen and their widths were slightly increasing with pressure. The lines were narrowing with increasing rotational quantum number. The Raman frequencies of all roto-vibrational lines were approaching the values of gas phase hydrogen with increasing pressure. Additionally, from the comparison of the integrated intensity signal of Q-branch of hydrogen to the integrated Raman signal of the water bending mode, we have obtained the concentration of hydrogen in a solution with water along the 280 K isotherm. Hydrogen solubility increases slowly with pressure, and no deviation from a smooth behaviour was observed, even reaching thermodynamic conditions very close to the transition to the stable hydrogen hydrate. The analysis of the relative hydrogen concentration in solution on the basis of a simple thermodynamic model has allowed us to obtain the molar volume for the hydrogen gas/water solution. Interestingly, the volume relative to one hydrogen molecule in solution does not decrease with pressure and, at high pressure, is larger than the volume pertinent to one molecule of water. This is in favour of the theory of hydrophobic solvation, for which a larger and more stable structure of the water molecules is expected around a solute molecule.

  1. Role of transient water pressure in quarrying: A subglacial experiment using acoustic emissions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohen, D.; Hooyer, T.S.; Iverson, N.R.; Thomason, J.F.; Jackson, M.

    2006-01-01

    Probably the most important mechanism of glacial erosion is quarrying: the growth and coalescence of cracks in subglacial bedrock and dislodgement of resultant rock fragments. Although evidence indicates that erosion rates depend on sliding speed, rates of crack growth in bedrock may be enhanced by changing stresses on the bed caused by fluctuating basal water pressure in zones of ice-bed separation. To study quarrying in real time, a granite step, 12 cm high with a crack in its stoss surface, was installed at the bed of Engabreen, Norway. Acoustic emission sensors monitored crack growth events in the step as ice slid over it. Vertical stresses, water pressure, and cavity height in the lee of the step were also measured. Water was pumped to the lee of the step several times over 8 days. Pumping initially caused opening of a leeward cavity, which then closed after pumping was stopped and water pressure decreased. During cavity closure, acoustic emissions emanating mostly from the vicinity of the base of the crack in the step increased dramatically. With repeated pump tests this crack grew with time until the step's lee surface was quarried. Our experiments indicate that fluctuating water pressure caused stress thresholds required for crack growth to be exceeded. Natural basal water pressure fluctuations should also concentrate stresses on rock steps, increasing rates of crack growth. Stress changes on the bed due to water pressure fluctuations will increase in magnitude and duration with cavity size, which may help explain the effect of sliding speed on erosion rates. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Crop yields response to water pressures in the Ebro basin in Spain: risk and water policy implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiroga, S.; Fernández-Haddad, Z.; Iglesias, A.

    2011-02-01

    The increasing pressure on water systems in the Mediterranean enhances existing water conflicts and threatens water supply for agriculture. In this context, one of the main priorities for agricultural research and public policy is the adaptation of crop yields to water pressures. This paper focuses on the evaluation of hydrological risk and water policy implications for food production. Our methodological approach includes four steps. For the first step, we estimate the impacts of rainfall and irrigation water on crop yields. However, this study is not limited to general crop production functions since it also considers the linkages between those economic and biophysical aspects which may have an important effect on crop productivity. We use statistical models of yield response to address how hydrological variables affect the yield of the main Mediterranean crops in the Ebro river basin. In the second step, this study takes into consideration the effects of those interactions and analyzes gross value added sensitivity to crop production changes. We then use Montecarlo simulations to characterize crop yield risk to water variability. Finally we evaluate some policy scenarios with irrigated area adjustments that could cope in a context of increased water scarcity. A substantial decrease in irrigated land, of up to 30% of total, results in only moderate losses of crop productivity. The response is crop and region specific and may serve to prioritise adaptation strategies.

  3. Biological assessment of bisphenol A degradation in water following direct photolysis and UV advanced oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Jen; Linden, Karl G; Hinton, David E; Kashiwada, Shosaku; Rosenfeldt, Erik J; Kullman, Seth W

    2006-11-01

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) are exogenous environmental chemicals that can interfere with normal hormone function and present a potential threat to both environmental and human health. The fate, distribution and degradation of EDCs is a subject of considerable investigation. To date, several studies have demonstrated that conventional water treatment processes are ineffective for removal of most EDCs and in some instances produce multiple unknown transformation products. In this study we have investigated the use of direct photolysis with low-pressure (LP) Hg UV lamps and UV+hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) advanced oxidation process (AOP) for the degradation of a prototypic endocrine disrupter, bisphenol A (BPA), in laboratory water. Removal rates of BPA and formation of degradation products were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Changes in estrogenic activity were evaluated using both in vitro yeast estrogen screen (YES) and in vivo vitellogenin (VTG) assays with Japanese medaka fish (Oryzias latipes). Our results demonstrate that UV alone did not effectively degrade BPA. However, UV in combination with H(2)O(2) significantly removed BPA parent compound and aqueous estrogenic activity in vitro and in vivo. Removal rates of in vivo estrogenic activity were significantly lower than those observed in vitro, demonstrating differential sensitivities of these bioassays and that certain UV/AOP metabolites may retain estrogenic activity. Furthermore, the UV/H(2)O(2) AOP was effective for reducing larval lethality in treated BPA solutions, suggesting BPA degradation occurred and that the degradation process did not result in the production of acutely toxic intermediates.

  4. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage: Annual Report FY09

    SciTech Connect

    Wolery, T; Aines, R; Hao, Y; Bourcier, W; Wolfe, T; Haussman, C

    2009-11-25

    This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF). The aquifer pressure resulting from the energy required to inject the carbon dioxide provides all or part of the inlet pressure for the desalination system. Residual brine is reinjected into the formation at net volume reduction, such that the volume of fresh water extracted balances the volume of CO{sub 2} injected into the formation. This process provides additional CO{sub 2} storage capacity in the aquifer, reduces operational risks (cap-rock fracturing, contamination of neighboring fresh water aquifers, and seismicity) by relieving overpressure in the formation, and provides a source of low-cost fresh water to offset costs or operational water needs. This multi-faceted project combines elements of geochemistry, reservoir engineering, and water treatment engineering. The range of saline formation waters is being identified and analyzed. Computer modeling and laboratory-scale experimentation are being used to examine mineral scaling and osmotic pressure limitations. Computer modeling is being used to evaluate processes in the storage aquifer, including the evolution of the pressure field. Water treatment costs are being evaluated by comparing the necessary process facilities to those in common use for seawater RO. There are presently limited brine composition data available for actual CCS sites by the site operators including in the U.S. the seven regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (CSPs). To work around this, we are building a 'catalog' of compositions representative of 'produced' waters (waters produced in the course of seeking or producing oil and gas), to which we are adding data from actual CCS sites as they become available. Produced waters comprise the most common examples of saline

  5. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of pressure-driven water transport through modified CNT membranes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Luying; Dumont, Randall S; Dickson, James M

    2013-03-28

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations are presented to investigate the effect of water-membrane interactions on the transport properties of pressure-driven water flow passing through carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes. The CNT membrane is modified with different physical properties to alter the van der Waals interactions or the electrostatic interactions between water molecules and the CNT membranes. The unmodified and modified CNT membranes are models of simplified nanofiltration (NF) membranes at operating conditions consistent with real NF systems. All NEMD simulations are run with constant pressure difference (8.0 MPa) temperature (300 K), constant pore size (0.643 nm radius for CNT (12, 12)), and membrane thickness (6.0 nm). The water flow rate, density, and velocity (in flow direction) distributions are obtained by analyzing the NEMD simulation results to compare transport through the modified and unmodified CNT membranes. The pressure-driven water flow through CNT membranes is from 11 to 21 times faster than predicted by the Navier-Stokes equations. For water passing through the modified membrane with stronger van der Waals or electrostatic interactions, the fast flow is reduced giving lower flow rates and velocities. These investigations show the effect of water-CNT membrane interactions on water transport under NF operating conditions. This work can help provide and improve the understanding of how these membrane characteristics affect membrane performance for real NF processes.

  6. Water infiltration into prewetted porous media: Dynamic capillary pressure and Green-Ampt modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Shao-Yiu; Huang, Vincent; Woo Park, Sang; Hilpert, Markus

    2017-08-01

    Experimental studies have shown that the modified Green-Ampt (GA) model, which accounts for a velocity-dependent capillary pressure, can describe water infiltration into dry sand columns better than the classical GA model. In this study, we performed a series of downward water infiltration experiments in prewetted sand columns for four different initial water contents (0, 3.3, 6.5 and 13.8%) and three different ponding heights (10, 20 and 40 cm). As expected, an increase in ponding height resulted in a monotonic increase in the infiltration rate. The infiltration rate decreased monotonically as the initial water content increased for initial water contents of 3.3, 6.5 and 13.8%. However, the infiltration rate in the dry sand columns was significantly smaller than in the prewetted sand columns. We linked this anomalous behavior to the strong dynamic effect of the capillary pressure on water infiltration into dry sand columns. The series of downward infiltration experiments were modeled by both the classical and modified GA models. The modified GA model can describe better the experimental results than the classical GA model for infiltration into both dry and prewetted sand columns. The modeling and parameter fitting results show that the magnitude of the dynamic effect on the capillary pressure depends on the initial water content and decreases exponentially as the initial water content increases. Consequently, the classical GA model significantly underestimates the equilibrium suction heads for the infiltration experiments in the dry sand columns.

  7. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of pressure-driven water transport through modified CNT membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luying; Dumont, Randall S.; Dickson, James M.

    2013-03-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations are presented to investigate the effect of water-membrane interactions on the transport properties of pressure-driven water flow passing through carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes. The CNT membrane is modified with different physical properties to alter the van der Waals interactions or the electrostatic interactions between water molecules and the CNT membranes. The unmodified and modified CNT membranes are models of simplified nanofiltration (NF) membranes at operating conditions consistent with real NF systems. All NEMD simulations are run with constant pressure difference (8.0 MPa) temperature (300 K), constant pore size (0.643 nm radius for CNT (12, 12)), and membrane thickness (6.0 nm). The water flow rate, density, and velocity (in flow direction) distributions are obtained by analyzing the NEMD simulation results to compare transport through the modified and unmodified CNT membranes. The pressure-driven water flow through CNT membranes is from 11 to 21 times faster than predicted by the Navier-Stokes equations. For water passing through the modified membrane with stronger van der Waals or electrostatic interactions, the fast flow is reduced giving lower flow rates and velocities. These investigations show the effect of water-CNT membrane interactions on water transport under NF operating conditions. This work can help provide and improve the understanding of how these membrane characteristics affect membrane performance for real NF processes.

  8. Watts nickel and rinse water recovery via an advanced reverse osmosis system

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, C.; White, I.E.; Ludwig, R.

    1993-08-01

    The report summarizes the results of an eight month test program conducted at the Hewlett Packard Printed Circuit Board Production Plant, Sunnyvale, CA (H.P.) to assess the effectiveness of an advanced reverse osmosis system (AROS). The AROS unit, manufactured by Water Technologies, Inc. (WTI) of Minneapolis, MN, incorporates membrane materials and system components designed to treat metal plating rinse water and produce two product streams; (1) a concentrated metal solution suitable for the plating bath, and (2) rinse water suitable for reuse as final rinse. Waste water discharge can be virtually eliminated and significant reductions realized in the need for new plating bath solution and rinse water.

  9. The initiation of boiling during pressure transients. [water boiling on metal surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisman, J.; Bussell, G.; Jashnani, I. L.; Hsieh, T.

    1973-01-01

    The initiation of boiling of water on metal surfaces during pressure transients has been investigated. The data were obtained by a new technique in which light beam fluctuations and a pressure signal were simultaneously recorded on a dual beam oscilloscope. The results obtained agreed with those obtained using high speed photography. It was found that, for water temperatures between 90-150 C, the wall superheat required to initiate boiling during a rapid pressure transient was significantly higher than required when the pressure was slowly reduced. This result is explained by assuming that a finite time is necessary for vapor to fill the cavity at which the bubble originates. Experimental measurements of this time are in reasonably good agreement with calculations based on the proposed theory. The theory includes a new procedure for estimating the coefficient of vaporization.

  10. Amorphization of ice by collapse under pressure, vibrational properties, and ultraviscous water at 1 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, Gyan P.; Andersson, Ove

    When subjected to a uniaxial pressure of 0.7 to 1.5GPa, structures of hexagonal and cubic ices at a temperature below 140K collapse and the ordered arrangement of molecules is lost. Another well-known (tetrahedrally bonded and open structure) crystal, SiO, also collapses and become amorphous but at 25-30GPa and 300K. This is known as pressure-induced amorphization of crystals. Here we report, (i) how the vibrational properties, e.g., molar volume V, limiting high frequency permittivity ɛ ∞, ultrasonic sound velocity, and thermal conductivity κ change during the pressure-amorphization, and (ii) how the amorphized ice relaxes to a lower energy state on heating to 140K, and becomes ultraviscous water of dielectric relaxation time of ~1κs at 1κGPa pressure. As the extent of amorphization increases on increasing the pressure to 1.5κGPa, V and κ irreversibly decrease and ɛ ∞ and the ultrasound velocity increase. Amorphization begins at a lower pressure for micron-size ice crystals than for larger crystals. It also begins at a lower pressure at high temperatures of ice. At a fixed pressure and temperature, ice continues to amorphize up to a period of several days according to a stretched exponential kinetics and a pressure- and temperature-dependent rate constant. It is proposed that lattice faults, which are also produced during pressure-deformation of ice cause a distribution of the Born instability pressures, and the amorphization process becomes pressure- and time-dependent. Pressure-induced amorphization of ice at 77K produces kinetically unstable high energy amorphs in the same manner as mechanical deformation of other crystals produces kinetically unstable, high energy amorphs which, on heating, become an ultraviscous liquid. But, in contrast, the ice amorphs are denser than the parent ices, and bulkier than ice VI the stable phase, and ice XII the metastable phase.

  11. Advanced Production Surface Preparation Technology Development for Ultra-High Pressure Diesel Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, Marion B.

    2012-04-30

    In 2007, An Ultra High Injection Pressure (UHIP) fueling method has been demonstrated by Caterpillar Fuel Systems - Product Development, demonstrating ability to deliver U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA) Tier 4 Final diesel engine emission performance with greatly reduced emissions handling components on the engine, such as without NOx reduction after-treatment and with only a through-flow 50% effective diesel particulate trap (DPT). They have shown this capability using multiple multi-cylinder engine tests of an Ultra High Pressure Common Rail (UHPCR) fuel system with higher than traditional levels of CEGR and an advanced injector nozzle design. The system delivered better atomization of the fuel, for more complete burn, to greatly reduce diesel particulates, while CEGR or high efficiency NOx reduction after-treatment handles the NOx. With the reduced back pressure of a traditional DPT, and with the more complete fuel burn, the system reduced levels of fuel consumption by 2.4% for similar delivery of torque and horsepower over the best Tier 4 Interim levels of fuel consumption in the diesel power industry. The challenge is to manufacture the components in high-volume production that can withstand the required higher pressure injection. Production processes must be developed to increase the toughness of the injector steel to withstand the UHIP pulsations and generate near perfect form and finish in the sub-millimeter size geometries within the injector. This project resulted in two developments in 2011. The first development was a process and a machine specification by which a high target of compressive residual stress (CRS) can be consistently imparted to key surfaces of the fuel system to increase the toughness of the steel, and a demonstration of the feasibility of further refinement of the process for use in volume production. The second development was the demonstration of the feasibility of a process for imparting near perfect, durable geometry to