Science.gov

Sample records for advanced prostate cancers

  1. Advanced Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... if it has spread to: • Bones • Lungs • Liver • Brain • Lymph nodes outside the pelvis • Other organs You may be diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer when you are first diagnosed, after having completed ...

  2. Multifunctional Nanotherapeutic System for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    therapy for drug resistant prostate cancer cells. In addition the findings from this study can be extended to the combinatorial therapy involving...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0571 TITLE: “Multifunctional Nanotherapeutic System for Advanced Prostate Cancer ...29September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Multifunctional Nanotherapeutic System for Advanced Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0571 5b

  3. [Markers of prostate cancer stem cells: research advances].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shun-Qi; Huang, Sheng-Song

    2013-12-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most seriously malignant diseases threatening men's health, and the mechanisms of its initiation and progression are not yet completely understood. Recent years have witnessed distinct advances in researches on prostate cancer stem cells in many aspects using different sources of materials, such as human prostate cancer tissues, human prostate cancer cell lines, and mouse models of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer stem cell study offers a new insight into the mechanisms of the initiation and progression of prostate cancer and contributes positively to its treatment. This article presents an overview on the prostate cancer stem cell markers utilized in the isolation and identification of prostate cancer stem cells.

  4. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    PubMed Central

    Jaworska, Dagmara; Król, Wojciech; Szliszka, Ewelina

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease. PMID:26593898

  5. Targeted Approach to Overcoming Treatment Resistance in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    therapy -­‐resistant   prostate   cancer  cells  and  in  combination   therapy  (SOW...treatment resistance in advanced prostate cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Karin Scarpinato CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Georgia Southern...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The purpose of this project is to determine if rescinnamine is effective against prostate cancer and

  6. Synthetic Lethality as a Targeted Approach to Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    target for therapy of prostate cancer , but approaches aimed at Ras itself, or its critical signaling pathways, which are required in normal tissues...Impact: Current therapies for prostate cancer are inadequate, and aberrant activation of Ras or Ras pathways are common. A novel therapeutic modality...to Advanced Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Douglas V. Faller, PhD, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Trustees of Boston University

  7. Sipuleucel-T for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Frohlich, Mark W

    2012-06-01

    Sipuleucel-T is an autologous cellular immunotherapy designed to stimulate an immune response to prostate cancer that prolongs the overall survival of men with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The clinical development program and key efficacy, safety, and immune response findings from the phase III studies are presented. The integration of sipuleucel-T into the treatment paradigm of advanced prostate cancer and future directions for research are discussed.

  8. Radium-223 for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from a phase III trial that compared radium-223 dichloride plus the best standard of care versus a placebo plus the best standard of care in men with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  9. Drug discovery in advanced prostate cancer: translating biology into therapy.

    PubMed

    Yap, Timothy A; Smith, Alan D; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Al-Lazikani, Bissan; Workman, Paul; de Bono, Johann S

    2016-10-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is associated with a poor prognosis and poses considerable therapeutic challenges. Recent genetic and technological advances have provided insights into prostate cancer biology and have enabled the identification of novel drug targets and potent molecularly targeted therapeutics for this disease. In this article, we review recent advances in prostate cancer target identification for drug discovery and discuss their promise and associated challenges. We review the evolving therapeutic landscape of CRPC and discuss issues associated with precision medicine as well as challenges encountered with immunotherapy for this disease. Finally, we envision the future management of CRPC, highlighting the use of circulating biomarkers and modern clinical trial designs.

  10. Integrative clinical genomics of advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Robinson; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Wu, Yi-Mi; Schultz, Nikolaus; Lonigro, Robert J.; Mosquera, Juan-Miguel; Montgomery, Bruce; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Pritchard, Colin C; Attard, Gerhardt; Beltran, Himisha; Abida, Wassim M.; Bradley, Robert K.; Vinson, Jake; Cao, Xuhong; Vats, Pankaj; Kunju, Lakshmi P.; Hussain, Maha; Feng, Felix Y.; Tomlins, Scott A.; Cooney, Kathleen A.; Smith, David C.; Brennan, Christine; Siddiqui, Javed; Mehra, Rohit; Chen, Yu; Rathkopf, Dana E.; Morris, Michael J.; Solomon, Stephen B.; Durack, Jeremy C.; Reuter, Victor E.; Gopalan, Anuradha; Gao, Jianjiong; Loda, Massimo; Lis, Rosina T.; Bowden, Michaela; Balk, Stephen P.; Gaviola, Glenn; Sougnez, Carrie; Gupta, Manaswi; Yu, Evan Y.; Mostaghel, Elahe A.; Cheng, Heather H.; Mulcahy, Hyojeong; True, Lawrence D.; Plymate, Stephen R.; Dvinge, Heidi; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Flohr, Penny; Miranda, Susana; Zafeiriou, Zafeiris; Tunariu, Nina; Mateo, Joaquin; Lopez, Raquel Perez; Demichelis, Francesca; Robinson, Brian D.; Schiffman, Marc A.; Nanus, David M.; Tagawa, Scott T.; Sigaras, Alexandros; Eng, Kenneth W.; Elemento, Olivier; Sboner, Andrea; Heath, Elisabeth I.; Scher, Howard I.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Kantoff, Philip; de Bono, Johann S.; Rubin, Mark A.; Nelson, Peter S.; Garraway, Levi A.; Sawyers, Charles L.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Toward development of a precision medicine framework for metastatic, castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), we established a multi-institutional clinical sequencing infrastructure to conduct prospective whole exome and transcriptome sequencing of bone or soft tissue tumor biopsies from a cohort of 150 mCRPC affected individuals. Aberrations of AR, ETS genes, TP53 and PTEN were frequent (40–60% of cases), with TP53 and AR alterations enriched in mCRPC compared to primary prostate cancer. We identified novel genomic alterations in PIK3CA/B, R-spondin, BRAF/RAF1, APC, β-catenin and ZBTB16/PLZF. Aberrations of BRCA2, BRCA1 and ATM were observed at substantially higher frequencies (19.3% overall) than seen in primary prostate cancers. 89% of affected individuals harbored a clinically actionable aberration including 62.7% with aberrations in AR, 65% in other cancer-related genes, and 8% with actionable pathogenic germline alterations. This cohort study provides evidence that clinical sequencing in mCRPC is feasible and could impact treatment decisions in significant numbers of affected individuals. PMID:26000489

  11. Sipuleucel-T: immunotherapy for advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Olson, Brian M; McNeel, Douglas G

    2011-05-03

    Prostate cancer continues to be one of the most serious afflictions of men of advanced age, remaining the most commonly diagnosed and second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in American men. The treatment options for patients with incurable metastatic, castrate-resistant disease have long focused on various chemotherapeutic approaches, which provide a slight survival benefit while being associated with potentially significant side effects. However, the recent approval of sipuleucel-T has given patients with advanced disease an additional treatment option that has demonstrated benefit without the side effects associated with chemotherapy. Sipuleucel-T is an antigen-presenting cell-based active immunotherapy that utilizes a patient's own immune cells, presumably to activate an antigen-specific immune response against tumor cells. This review focuses on the development and implementation of sipuleucel-T as a therapy for prostate cancer. Specifically, we present some of the issues associated with the management of advanced prostate cancer, the research and development that led to the approval of sipuleucel-T, how the approval of sipuleucel-T could change the clinical management of prostate cancer, and current and future areas of investigation that are being pursued with regard to sipuleucel-T and other treatments for advanced prostate cancer.

  12. Prostate cancer: 9. Treatment of advanced disease

    PubMed Central

    Gleave, M E; Bruchovsky, N; Moore, M J; Venner, P

    1999-01-01

    A 70-year-old man is referred to a urologist for recommendations on the management of metastatic prostate cancer. His cancer was diagnosed 5 years ago, and he underwent radical prostatectomy at that time. The tumour was confined to the prostate gland (Gleason score 7), and during surgery the lymph nodes were assessed as being clear of cancer. Before the surgery, the patient's prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level had been 8 ng/mL. After the prostatectomy, PSA was at first undetectable, but recently the PSA level rose to 2 ng/mL and then, at the most recent test, to 16 ng/mL. A bone scan was ordered to investigate back discomfort, which has been persistent but easily controlled with acetaminophen. Unfortunately, the bone scan shows several sites of metastatic disease. The man's medical history includes type 2 diabetes, which has developed during the past 3 years and which is controlled by diet, as well as asymptomatic hypertension, which is managed by means of a thiazide diuretic. The patient asks what treatments are available, what impact they are likely to have on his disease and what risks are associated with the therapies. PMID:9951446

  13. Evolving treatment paradigms for locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Dorff, Tanya B; Quek, Marcus L; Daneshmand, Siamak; Pinski, Jacek

    2006-11-01

    While men with early stage prostate cancer typically enjoy long-term survival after definitive management, for those who present with locally advanced or metastatic disease, survival is compromised. Multimodality therapy can prolong survival in these patients, with state-of-the-art options including intensity-modulated radiation or brachytherapy in conjunction with androgen ablation, adjuvant androgen ablation and/or chemotherapy with radical retropubic prostatectomy. In addition, novel biological therapies are being explored to target the unique molecular changes in prostate cancer cells and their interactions with the microenvironment. With these advances the outlook will undoubtedly improve, even for patients presenting with advanced disease. Careful application of these emerging therapies to a select group of prostate cancer patients most likely to obtain benefit from them is the challenge for urologists, medical oncologists and radiation oncologists for the future.

  14. Multifunctional Nanotherapeutic System for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    delivery of eIF4E siRNA and DTX using dendrimer as a nanocarrier. To this end the objective of this study is to prepare, characterize and test the...multifunctional delivery system by conjugating DTX to dendrimer and complexing eIF4E siRNA to the resulting conjugate. The DTX- dendrimer conjugate...formed complex with siRNA at 20:1 ratio. The dendrimer - siRNA complex was taken up by the prostate cancer cells while the free siRNA was not taken up by

  15. Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back After Treatment Prostate Cancer Treating Prostate Cancer Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer Sipuleucel-T (Provenge) is ... less advanced prostate cancer. Possible side effects of vaccine treatment Side effects from the vaccine tend to ...

  16. Navigating the evolving therapeutic landscape in advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Crawford, E David; Petrylak, Daniel; Sartor, Oliver

    2017-03-07

    Prostate cancer is the most common cause of cancer in men, with 137.9 new cases per 100,000 men per year. The overall 5-year survival rate for prostate cancer is very high. Up to 20% of men who undergo state-of-the art treatment for prostate cancer will develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) within 5 years, with median survival for those with metastatic CRPC ranging from approximately 15 to 36 months in recent studies. With the advent of several new drugs in the past 5 years to treat CRPC, the challenge facing clinicians is how to best sequence or combine therapies or both to optimize outcomes. A better understanding of the disease process and the role of the androgen receptor as a target for both therapy and resistance have led to the consideration of biomarkers as an approach to aid in selecting the appropriate agent for a given patient as patients respond to or tolerate different drugs differently. Research to identify new prognostic biomarkers, which are associated with outcome measures, as well as predictive biomarkers, which predict response or resistance to therapy is ongoing. The treatment of advanced prostate cancer and the research related to biomarkers are discussed.

  17. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Prostate Cancer What is Prostate Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... the Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) How Prostate Cancer Occurs Prostate cancer occurs when a tumor forms ...

  18. Locally advanced prostate cancer: current controversies and optimisation opportunities.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, S; Dal Pra, A; Catton, C; Bristow, R G; Warde, P

    2013-08-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men worldwide. The rate of patients presenting with locally advanced prostate cancer has declined in recent decades, mainly due to prostate-specific antigen screening, but the management of these patients still remains controversial. Current literature suggests that the standard of care for these patients is a combination approach with radiation therapy and androgen deprivation therapy. However, there remain many unresolved issues, including the role of dose-escalated radiation therapy, the additional benefit of surgery and the role of systemic therapy, both standard chemotherapeutic agents and novel agents. Furthermore, in the era of personalised medicine, additional research is needed to evaluate the role of biomarkers to better predict the risk of local and systemic relapse in this population.

  19. Management of patients with advanced prostate cancer: recommendations of the St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) 2015

    PubMed Central

    Gillessen, S.; Omlin, A.; Attard, G.; de Bono, J. S.; Efstathiou, E.; Fizazi, K.; Halabi, S.; Nelson, P. S.; Sartor, O.; Smith, M. R.; Soule, H. R.; Akaza, H.; Beer, T. M.; Beltran, H.; Chinnaiyan, A. M.; Daugaard, G.; Davis, I. D.; De Santis, M.; Drake, C. G.; Eeles, R. A.; Fanti, S.; Gleave, M. E.; Heidenreich, A.; Hussain, M.; James, N. D.; Lecouvet, F. E.; Logothetis, C. J.; Mastris, K.; Nilsson, S.; Oh, W. K.; Olmos, D.; Padhani, A. R.; Parker, C.; Rubin, M. A.; Schalken, J. A.; Scher, H. I.; Sella, A.; Shore, N. D.; Small, E. J.; Sternberg, C. N.; Suzuki, H.; Sweeney, C. J.; Tannock, I. F.; Tombal, B.

    2015-01-01

    The first St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) Expert Panel identified and reviewed the available evidence for the ten most important areas of controversy in advanced prostate cancer (APC) management. The successful registration of several drugs for castration-resistant prostate cancer and the recent studies of chemo-hormonal therapy in men with castration-naïve prostate cancer have led to considerable uncertainty as to the best treatment choices, sequence of treatment options and appropriate patient selection. Management recommendations based on expert opinion, and not based on a critical review of the available evidence, are presented. The various recommendations carried differing degrees of support, as reflected in the wording of the article text and in the detailed voting results recorded in supplementary Material, available at Annals of Oncology online. Detailed decisions on treatment as always will involve consideration of disease extent and location, prior treatments, host factors, patient preferences as well as logistical and economic constraints. Inclusion of men with APC in clinical trials should be encouraged. PMID:26041764

  20. Reducing Toxicity of Radiation Treatment of Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    malignant tissues. A major effort focused on the effects these drugs on myeloid (bone marrow-derived) cells. This is based on our finding that...the last progress report we further presented data supporting the notion that the radioprotecive effect of RTA 408 is a ‘class’ effect of drugs that...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Toxicity is a major impediment to effective radiation therapy of locally advanced prostate cancer

  1. [Locally advanced prostate cancer: definition, prognosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Plantade, Anne; Massard, Christophe; de Crevoisier, Renaud; Fizazi, Karim

    2007-07-01

    According to d'Amico's criteria, high-risk localized prostate cancer are defined either by an extracapsular extension (T3 or T4), either by a high Gleason score (> 7) or a PSA rate higher than 20 ng/ml. Pelvic lymph node involvement also corresponds to locally advanced prostate cancer. Statistical models called nomograms have been developed to predict the probability of prostate cancer recurrence and are also used to define locally advanced patients. Prostate MRI may help to detect an extracapsular extension or a seminal vesicles involvement but remains still discussed. A bone scan, an abdominal and pelvic CT scan have to be performed in order to detect metastases. A pelvic lymph node dissection is recommended in order to adapt the treatment of these patients. Standard treatment for high-risk localized prostate cancer without lymph node involvement is now well defined. The association of both local radiation and a long androgen deprivation (GnHR agonist) showed an overall survival benefit (more than 10%). The radiation dose of 74 Gy is recommended. Other questions are still debating : the optimal duration of the hormonotherapy , the use of the bicalutamide 150 mg instead of GnRH agonists, the optimal radiation dose. Radical prostatectomy is no more considered as a standard treatment for these patients. Since the use of chemotherapy for metastatic patients showed a benefit in overall survival, the place of chemotherapy as adjuvant or neo-adjuvant treatment is questionned in several randomized phase III studies. Sometimes high-risk disease is diagnosed after performance of a radical prostatectomy. A postoperative radiation may be performed in order to decrease clinical and biochemical progression. The use of bicalutamide 150 mg in this situation may have a positive impact too on progression free survival. In case of lymph node involvement, androgen deprivation is the standard treatment with an overall survival benefit. The place of local radiation therapy is still

  2. [Contemporary methods of treatment in local advanced prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Brzozowska, Anna; Mazurkiewicz, Maria; Starosławska, Elzbieta; Stasiewicz, Dominika; Mocarska, Agnieszka; Burdan, Franciszek

    2012-10-01

    The prostate cancer is one of the most often cancers amongst males. Its frequency is increasing with age. Thanks to widespread of screening denomination of specific prostate specific antigen (PSA), ultrasonography including the one in transrectal (TRUS), computed tomography, magnetic resonance and especially the awareness of society, the number of patients with low local advance of illness is increasing. The basic method of treatment in such cases is still the surgical removal of prostate with seminal bladder or radiotherapy. To this purpose tele-(IMRT, VMAT) or brachytherapy (J125, Ir192, Pa103) is used. In patients with higher risk of progression the radiotherapy may be associated with hormonotherapy (total androgen blockage-LH-RH analog and androgen). Despite numerous clinical researches conducted there is still no selection of optimal sequence of particular methods. Moreover, no explicit effectiveness was determined. The general rule of treatment in patients suffering from prostate cancer still remains individual selection of therapeutic treatment depending on the age of a patient, general condition and especially patient's general preferences. In case of elderly patients and patients with low risk of progression, recommendation of direct observation including systematical PSA denomination, clinical transrectal examination, TRUS, MR of smaller pelvis or scintigraphy of the whole skeleton may be considered.

  3. Recent Advances in Metabolic Profiling And Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Roopa; Titus, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a metabolic disease. Cancer cells, being highly proliferative, show significant alterations in metabolic pathways such as glycolysis, respiration, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, lipid metabolism, and amino acid metabolism. Metabolites like peptides, nucleotides, products of glycolysis, the TCA cycle, fatty acids, and steroids can be an important read out of disease when characterized in biological samples such as tissues and body fluids like urine, serum, etc. The cancer metabolome has been studied since the 1960s by analytical techniques such as mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Current research is focused on the identification and validation of biomarkers in the cancer metabolome that can stratify high-risk patients and distinguish between benign and advanced metastatic forms of the disease. In this review, we discuss the current state of prostate cancer metabolomics, the biomarkers that show promise in distinguishing indolent from aggressive forms of the disease, the strengths and limitations of the analytical techniques being employed, and future applications of metabolomics in diagnostic imaging and personalized medicine of prostate cancer. PMID:25632377

  4. Molecular Engineering of Vector-Based Oncolytic and Imaging Approaches for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    Oncolytic and Imaging Approaches for Advanced Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Lily Wu, M.D., Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...SUBTITLE Molecular Engineering of Vector-based Oncolytic and Imaging Approaches for 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Advanced Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT...reproductions will be in black and white. 14. ABSTRACT Hormone refractory and metastatic prostate cancer are not well understood. Better animal models

  5. Prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, D; Waxman, J

    2002-01-01

    It is a paradigm in cancer treatment that early detection and treatment improves survival. However, although screening measures lead to a higher rate of detection, for small bulk localised prostate cancer it remains unclear whether early detection and early treatment will lead to an overall decrease in mortality. The management options include surveillance, radiotherapy, and radical prostatectomy but there is no evidence base to evaluate the benefits of each approach. Advanced prostate cancer is managed by hormonal therapy. There have been major changes in treatment over the last two decades with the use of more humane treatment and developments in both chemotherapy and radiation. In this article we review the natural history and management of prostate cancer. PMID:12415080

  6. What is Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research? Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer What Is Prostate Cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... through the center of the prostate. Types of prostate cancer Almost all prostate cancers are adenocarcinomas . These cancers ...

  7. Liquid biopsy: ready to guide therapy in advanced prostate cancer?

    PubMed

    Hegemann, Miriam; Stenzl, Arnulf; Bedke, Jens; Chi, Kim N; Black, Peter C; Todenhöfer, Tilman

    2016-12-01

    The identification of molecular markers associated with response to specific therapy is a key step for the implementation of personalised treatment strategies in patients with metastatic prostate cancer. Only in a low proportion of patients biopsies of metastatic tissue are performed. Circulating tumour cells (CTC), cell-free DNA (cfDNA) and RNA offer the potential for non-invasive characterisation of disease and molecular stratification of patients. Furthermore, a 'liquid biopsy' approach permits longitudinal assessments, allowing sequential monitoring of response and progression and the potential to alter therapy based on observed molecular changes. In prostate cancer, CTC enumeration using the CellSearch© platform correlates with survival. Recent studies on the presence of androgen receptor (AR) variants in CTC have shown that such molecular characterisation of CTC provides a potential for identifying patients with resistance to agents that inhibit the androgen signalling axis, such as abiraterone and enzalutamide. New developments in CTC isolation, as well as in vitro and in vivo analysis of CTC will further promote the use of CTC as a tool for retrieving molecular information from advanced tumours in order to identify mechanisms of therapy resistance. In addition to CTC, nucleic acids such as RNA and cfDNA released by tumour cells into the peripheral blood contain important information on transcriptomic and genomic alterations in the tumours. Initial studies have shown that genomic alterations of the AR and other genes detected in CTC or cfDNA of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer correlate with treatment outcomes to enzalutamide and abiraterone. Due to recent developments in high-throughput analysis techniques, it is likely that CTC, cfDNA and RNA will be an important component of personalised treatment strategies in the future.

  8. Prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R., Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results.

  9. Association of the innate immunity and inflammation pathway with advanced prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Kazma, Rémi; Mefford, Joel A; Cheng, Iona; Plummer, Sarah J; Levin, Albert M; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Casey, Graham; Witte, John S

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequent and second most lethal cancer in men in the United States. Innate immunity and inflammation may increase the risk of prostate cancer. To determine the role of innate immunity and inflammation in advanced prostate cancer, we investigated the association of 320 single nucleotide polymorphisms, located in 46 genes involved in this pathway, with disease risk using 494 cases with advanced disease and 536 controls from Cleveland, Ohio. Taken together, the whole pathway was associated with advanced prostate cancer risk (P = 0.02). Two sub-pathways (intracellular antiviral molecules and extracellular pattern recognition) and four genes in these sub-pathways (TLR1, TLR6, OAS1, and OAS2) were nominally associated with advanced prostate cancer risk and harbor several SNPs nominally associated with advanced prostate cancer risk. Our results suggest that the innate immunity and inflammation pathway may play a modest role in the etiology of advanced prostate cancer through multiple small effects.

  10. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  11. Sipuleucel-T (Provenge): active cellular immunotherapy for advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    McKarney, I

    2007-09-01

    (1) Sipuleucel-T (Provenge) is an active cellular immunotherapy (therapeutic vaccine) that is designed to stimulate the patient's T-cells to recognize and attack prostate cancer cells that express prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) antigen. (2) Sipuleucel-T demonstrated a survival benefit in men with advanced androgen-independent prostate cancer (AIPC), although this preliminary finding requires confirmation in larger trials. (3) Mild to moderate myalgia, chills, fever, and tremor are the most commonly reported adverse events for patients receiving sipuleucel-T. These events generally resolve quickly. (4) More studies are needed to evaluate sipuleucel-T in the earlier stages of prostate cancer and in combination with conventional therapies.

  12. Targeting monoamine oxidase A in advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Flamand, Vincent; Zhao, Hongjuan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Inhibitors of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA), a mitochondrial enzyme that degrades neurotransmitters including serotonin and norepinephrine, are commonly used to treat neurological conditions including depression. Recently, we and others identified high expression of MAOA in normal basal prostatic epithelium and high-grade primary prostate cancer (PCa). In contrast, MAOA is low in normal secretory prostatic epithelium and low-grade PCa. An irreversible inhibitor of MAOA, clorgyline, induced secretory differentiation in primary cultures of normal basal epithelial cells and high-grade PCa. Furthermore, clorgyline inhibited several oncogenic pathways in PCa cells, suggesting clinical value of MAOA inhibitors as a pro-differentiation and anti-oncogenic therapy for high-risk PCa. Here, we extended our studies to a model of advanced PCa, VCaP cells, which were derived from castration-resistant metastatic PCa and express a high level of MAOA. Methods Growth of VCaP cells in the presence or absence of clorgyline was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Gene expression changes in response to clorgyline were determined by microarray and validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Treatment with clorgyline in vitro inhibited growth and altered the transcriptional pattern of VCaP cells in a manner consistent with the pro-differentiation and anti-oncogenic effects seen in treated primary PCa cells. Src, beta-catenin, and MAPK oncogenic pathways, implicated in androgen-independent growth and metastasis, were significantly downregulated. Clorgyline treatment of mice bearing VCaP xenografts slowed tumor growth and induced transcriptome changes similar to those noted in vitro. Conclusion Our results support the possibility that anti-depressant drugs that target MAOA might find a new application in treating PCa. PMID:20204405

  13. Controversies in the management of advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tyrrell, C J

    1999-01-01

    For advanced prostate cancer, the main hormone treatment against which other treatments are assessed is surgical castration. It is simple, safe and effective, however it is not acceptable to all patients. Medical castration by means of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) analogues such as goserelin acetate provides an alternative to surgical castration. Diethylstilboestrol, previously the only non-surgical alternative to orchidectomy, is no longer routinely used. Castration reduces serum testosterone by around 90%, but does not affect androgen biosynthesis in the adrenal glands. Addition of an anti-androgen to medical or surgical castration blocks the effect of remaining testosterone on prostate cells and is termed combined androgen blockade (CAB). CAB has now been compared with castration alone (medical and surgical) in numerous clinical trials. Some trials show advantage of CAB over castration, whereas others report no significant difference. The author favours the view that CAB has an advantage over castration. No study has reported that CAB is less effective than castration. Of the anti-androgens which are available for use in CAB, bicalutamide may be associated with a lower incidence of side-effects compared with the other non-steroidal anti-androgens and, in common with nilutamide, has the advantage of once-daily dosing. Only one study has compared anti-androgens within CAB: bicalutamide plus LH-RH analogue and flutamide plus LH-RH analogue. At 160-week follow-up, the groups were equivalent in terms of survival and time to progression. However, bicalutamide caused significantly less diarrhoea than flutamide. Withdrawal and intermittent therapy with anti-androgens extend the range of treatment options. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10408706

  14. Characterizing the Hypermutated Subtype of Advanced Prostate Cancer as a Predictive Biomarker for Precision Medicine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    hypermutated advanced prostate cancers. Using a targeted deep sequencing assay that includes intronic and flanking regions we discovered DNA mismatch...subtype of advanced prostate cancer, most likely mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes. To test this hypothesis we performed targeted deep ...have adapted the mSINGS method to both the BROCA and UW-OncoPlex genomic deep sequencing platforms to accurately detect both phenotypic MSI and

  15. [Corticosteroids in the management of advanced prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kübler, H

    2017-02-01

    Corticosteroids have been widely used for decades in cancer therapy, predominantly due to their anti-inflammatory activity. In the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), corticosteroids play an important role both in the management of tumor-related symptoms, especially bone metastasis-related pain, and as concomitant treatment to counteract side effects associated with approved active prostatic anticancer agents such as docetaxel, cabazitaxel, and abiraterone acetate. In association with abiraterone acetate, low-dose corticosteroids (prednisone or prednisolone) reduce the mineralocorticoid side effects of abiraterone. In addition, corticosteroids may exert direct antitumoral activities, resulting in PSA decline.

  16. New Players for Advanced Prostate Cancer and the Rationalisation of Insulin-Sensitising Medication

    PubMed Central

    Gunter, Jennifer H.; Sarkar, Phoebe L.; Lubik, Amy A.; Nelson, Colleen C.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are recognised risk factors for the development of some cancers and, increasingly, predict more aggressive disease, treatment failure, and cancer-specific mortality. Many factors may contribute to this clinical observation. Hyperinsulinaemia, dyslipidaemia, hypoxia, ER stress, and inflammation associated with expanded adipose tissue are thought to be among the main culprits driving malignant growth and cancer advancement. This observation has led to the proposal of the potential utility of “old players” for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome as new cancer adjuvant therapeutics. Androgen-regulated pathways drive proliferation, differentiation, and survival of benign and malignant prostate tissue. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) exploits this dependence to systemically treat advanced prostate cancer resulting in anticancer response and improvement of cancer symptoms. However, the initial therapeutic response from ADT eventually progresses to castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) which is currently incurable. ADT rapidly induces hyperinsulinaemia which is associated with more rapid treatment failure. We discuss current observations of cancer in the context of obesity, diabetes, and insulin-lowering medication. We provide an update on current treatments for advanced prostate cancer and discuss whether metabolic dysfunction, developed during ADT, provides a unique therapeutic window for rapid translation of insulin-sensitising medication as combination therapy with antiandrogen targeting agents for the management of advanced prostate cancer. PMID:23573093

  17. A profile of enzalutamide for the treatment of advanced castration resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Greasley, Rosa; Khabazhaitajer, Mohammad; Rosario, Derek J

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of castration resistant prostate cancer from androgen-sensitive prostate cancer have provided new avenues exploring efficacious therapies in a disease which is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men in the western world. In the evolution of second generation anti-androgens, enzalutamide, a novel androgen-receptor signaling inhibitor, has emerged targeting multiple steps within the androgenic stimulation pathway. This review discusses what is currently known of the mechanisms surrounding castration resistant prostate cancer development and the current human clinical trials to determine whether enzalutamide presents a new hope for men with advanced prostate cancer. The issues of therapy resistance, withdrawal effects and cross-resistance are briefly touched upon. PMID:26109877

  18. Concept and Viability of Androgen Annihilation for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mohler, James L.

    2014-01-01

    There remains no standard of care for patients with a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) after radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy but who have no radiographic metastases, even though this is the second largest group of prostate cancer (CaP) patients in the United States. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) may cure some men with advanced CaP based on single institution series and a randomized clinical trial of immediate versus delayed ADT for men found to have pelvic lymph node metastasis at the time of radical prostatectomy. ADT may be more effective when initiated for minimal disease burden, which can be detected using PSA after radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy, and if more complete disruption of the androgen axis using newer agents decreases the chance that androgen-sensitive cells survive to adapt to a low androgen environment. Androgens may be “annihilated” sing simultaneously a luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) antagonist or agonist to inhibit testicular production of testosterone, a cytochrome P45017A1 (CYP17A1) inhibitor to diminish metabolism of testosterone via the adrenal pathway and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) via the backdoor pathway, a 5α-reductase inhibitor to diminish testosterone reduction to DHT and backdoor metabolism of progesterone substrates to DHT, and a newer anti-androgen to compete better with DHT for the androgen receptor ligand-binding domain. Early initiation of androgen annihilation for induction as part of planned intermittent ADT should be safe, may reduce tumor burden below a threshold that allows eradication by the immune system, and may cure many men who have failed definitive local therapy. PMID:24771515

  19. Screening for prostate cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weirich, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    Despite recent advances in both the survival and cure rates for many forms of cancer, unfortunately the same has not been true for prostate cancer. In fact, the age-adjusted death rate from prostate cancer has not significantly improved since 1949, and prostate cancer remains the most common cancer in American men, causing the second highest cancer mortality rate. Topics discussed include the following: serum testosterone levels; diagnosis; mortality statistics; prostate-sppecific antigen (PSA) tests; and the Occupational Medicine Services policy at LeRC.

  20. New Action of Inhibin Alpha Subunit in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    Preetika. Final Report Award: W81XWH-07-1-0112 25 Christofori, G., and Pepper , M. S. Vascular endothelial growth factor-C-mediated...prostate cancer. Clin Cancer Res., 10: 5137-5144, 2004. 13. Risbridger, G. P., Shibata, A., Ferguson , K. L., Stamey, T. A., McNeal, J. E., and Peehl, D...Christofori G, Pepper MS (2001) Vascular endothelial growth factor-C-mediated lymphangiogenesis promotes tumour metastasis. EMBO J 20: 672 – 682

  1. Frequently rearranged in advanced T-cell lymphomas-1 demonstrates oncogenic properties in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Xiong, Hua; Zou, Yanmei; Xu, Sanpeng; Quan, Lanping; Yuan, Xianglin; Xu, Ningzhi; Wang, Yihua

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the fifth most common cause of cancer-associated mortality for males worldwide. Although dysregulation of the β-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF) pathway has been previously reported in prostate cancer, the mechanisms underlying this process remain unknown. Frequently rearranged in advanced T-cell lymphomas-1 (FRAT1) functions as a positive regulator of the β-catenin/TCF signaling pathway. However, to the best of our knowledge, the molecular association between FRAT1 and the β-catenin/TCF pathway in prostate cancer has not been investigated. In the present study, FRAT1 expression was analyzed in normal prostate tissues and prostate adenocarcinoma samples using publicly available databases, a commercial tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry techniques. In addition, FRAT1 expression levels were altered by overexpression or RNA interference-mediated depletion in prostate cancer cells. The effects of FRAT1 expression on tumor growth were determined using cell growth curves in vitro and xenografts in nude mice in vivo. The effects of FRAT1 on β-catenin/TCF activity were measured using the TOPFLASH reporter assay. FRAT1 was expressed exclusively in the nuclei of normal prostate basal cells, and nuclear FRAT1 was detected in 68% (40/59) of prostate adenocarcinoma samples. In addition, FRAT1 activated the TCF luciferase reporter gene promoter in prostate cancer cells, and was observed to promote the growth of prostate cancer cells in vitro. Furthermore, FRAT1 expression was sufficient to transform NIH3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells and lead to tumor formation in vivo. These results suggest that FRAT1 demonstrates oncogenic properties in prostate cancer, potentially by suppressing the inhibitory effect of nuclear glycogen synthase 3β against β-catenin/TCF activity, thus activating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and promoting cell growth. PMID:27599661

  2. Future of bisphosphonates and denosumab for men with advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iranikhah, Maryam; Stricker, Steve; Freeman, Maisha Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer occurring in American men of all races. It is also the second leading cause of cancer death among men in the USA. Bone metastasis is a frequent occurrence in men with advanced prostate cancer, with skeletal-related events being a common complication and having negative consequences, leading to severe pain, increased health care costs, increased risk of death, and decreased quality of life for patients. Bone loss can also result from antiandrogen therapy, which can further contribute to skeletal-related events. Treatment with antiresorptive agents bisphosphonates, and the newly approved denosumab, a receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANK-L) inhibitor, has been shown to reduce the risk of skeletal-related complications and prevent treatment-induced bone loss in patients with advanced prostate cancer. This review discusses the role of antiresorptive agents bisphosphonates and RANK-L inhibitor in the current treatment of advanced prostate cancer by examining the primary literature and also focuses on the likely role of the bisphosphonates in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer in the future. PMID:24833918

  3. New Action of Inhibin Alpha Subunit in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    LYVE-1 on the primary prostate tumors will determine lymph vessel density ( LVD ) in the intratumoral, peritumoral and normal regions in the tissues...Changes to LVD and lymphangiogenesis are often associated with metastatic spread of cancer cells to the LNs (1, 2). To understand the mechanisms and...and human mitochondrial antibody to determine LVD and the degree of invasion of tumor cells into lymphatic vessels (lymphatic invasion) in the

  4. New Action of Inhibin Alpha Subunit in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    metastatic ability. Increase in metastasis was further evident by increase lymph vessel density ( LVD ) and lymphatic invasion by the cancer cells. This...primary prostate tumors will determine lymph vessel density ( LVD ) in the intratumoral, peritumoral and normal regions in the tissues. We have...completed the aims of Task 1a during the first six months of the project. Changes to LVD and lymphangiogenesis are often associated with metastatic spread of

  5. New Prostate Cancer Treatment Target

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have identified a potential alternative approach to blocking a key molecular driver of an advanced form of prostate cancer, called androgen-independent or castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  6. [Strategy in advanced castration-resistant prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Gross-Goupil, Marine; Roca, Sophie; Pasticier, Gilles; Ravaud, Alain

    2012-07-01

    If androgen deprivation, chemical with LH-RH analogs or surgical with bilateral orchiectomy, still remains the stone edge of treatment of prostate cancer, in the metastatic setting, this hormonosensitivity, most of the time long, finally move on in hormonal-failure. If rare changes in the therapeutic strategy have been achieved in this setting since 2004 and the arrival of docetaxel, it is the global perception of the disease that has been modified and the definition of one specific entity: the castrate-resistant prostate cancer. This new definition and the changes of design and end-points of clinical trials testing new agents with strong recruitment during the past years have conducted to a real revolution in the management of castrate-refractory prostate cancer. The place of secondary hormonal manipulations, such as withdrawal of the anti-androgen, oestrogen or ketoconazole, still exists for a selected group of patients. In case of aggressive disease and symptoms, chemotherapy should be selected, docetaxel, in a three weeks schedule, and may be combined with Estracyt. It is time to consider the revolution of the post-chemotherapy setting with the arrival of two new drugs ; a cytotoxic one, the cabazitaxel and hormonal for the second one, the abiraterone acetate. The place of the immunotherapy with the sipuleucel-T may be more difficult to precise, especially in Europe, even if it has been finally indicated in the United States in the metastatic setting. Concerning bone metastasis, zoledronic acid was during a long time the only bone-targeted agent, effective in reducing the incidence of skeletal related events, and was recently exceeded by the denosumab, an anti-RANK ligand. Finally, let us hope that other changes will be achieved in the near future, with the cabazitaxel-docetaxel confrontation in the first-line setting, and the introduction of the abiraterone acetate before chemotherapy with docetaxel, already tested in ongoing trials.

  7. Prostate cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate cancer screening - PSA; Prostate cancer screening - digital rectal exam; Prostate cancer screening - DRE ... level of PSA could mean you have prostate cancer. But other conditions can also cause a high ...

  8. Cancer Related Fatigue and Quality of Life in Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Charalambous, Andreas; Kouta, Christiana

    2016-01-01

    Cancer related fatigue (CRF) is a common and debilitating symptom that can influence quality of life (QoL) in cancer patients. The increase in survival times stresses for a better understanding of how CRF affects patients' QoL. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study with 148 randomly recruited prostate cancer patients aiming to explore CRF and its impact on QoL. Assessments included the Cancer Fatigue Scale, EORTC QLQ-C30, and EORTC QLQ-PR25. Additionally, 15 in-depth structured interviews were performed. Quantitative data were analyzed with simple and multiple regression analysis and independent samples t-test. Qualitative data were analyzed with the use of thematic content analysis. The 66.9% of the patients experienced CRF with higher levels being recorded for the affective subscale. Statistically significant differences were found between the patients reporting CRF and lower levels of QoL (mean = 49.1) and those that did not report fatigue and had higher levels of QoL (mean = 72.1). The interviews emphasized CRF's profound impact on the patients' lives that was reflected on the following themes: “dependency on others,” “loss of power over decision making,” and “daily living disruption.” Cancer related fatigue is a significant problem for patients with advanced prostate cancer and one that affects their QoL in various ways. PMID:26981530

  9. Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Monitor Prostate Response to Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, Anna Lia; Gui, Benedetta; D'Agostino, Giuseppe Roberto; Mattiucci, Giancarlo; Clementi, Valeria; Di Molfetta, Ippolita Valentina; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Mantini, Giovanna

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To correlate results of three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and time since external beam irradiation (EBRT) in patients treated with long-term hormone therapy (HT) and EBRT for locally advanced disease to verify successful treatment by documenting the achievement of metabolic atrophy (MA). Methods and Materials: Between 2006 and 2008, 109 patients were consecutively enrolled. MA was assessed by choline and citrate peak area-to-noise-ratio <5:1. Cancerous metabolism (CM) was defined by choline-to-creatine ratio >1.5:1 or choline signal-to-noise-ratio >5:1. To test the strength of association between MRSI results and the time elapsed since EBRT (TEFRT), PSA levels, Gleason score (GS), and stage, logistic regression (LR) was performed. p value <0.05 was statistically significant. The patients' outcomes were verified in 2011. Results: MRSI documented MA in 84 of 109 and CM in 25 of 109 cases. LR showed that age, GS, stage, and initial and recent PSA had no significant impact on MRSI results which were significantly related to PSA values at the time of MRSI and to TEFRT. Patients were divided into three groups according to TEFRT: <1 year, 1-2 years, and >2 years. MA was detected in 54.1% of patients of group 1, 88.9% of group 2, and in 94.5% of group 3 (100% when PSA nadir was reached). CM was detected in 50% of patients with reached PSA nadir in group 1. Local relapse was found in 3 patients previously showing CM at long TEFRT. Conclusion: MA detection, indicative of successful treatment because growth of normal or abnormal cells cannot occur without metabolism, increases with decreasing PSA levels and increasing time on HT after EBRT. This supports long-term HT in advanced prostate cancer. Larger study series are needed to assess whether MRSI could predict local relapse by detecting CM at long TEFRT.

  10. Design of clinical trials in advanced prostate cancer: avoiding the dead ends.

    PubMed

    Debruyne, Frans M J

    2005-12-01

    Despite more than 30 years of clinical trials, investigations in prostate cancer have not succeeded in making advances comparable to those in other branches of research, such as breast cancer. Indeed, prostate cancer trials have repeatedly run into a series of "dead ends", as investigators face the problems of inadequate funding for research, treatments that result in only minimal improvements in survival, and lack of treatment options that have sufficient prospects for success. This article briefly reviews the strategies behind clinical investigations into prostate cancer over the last three decades, evaluates the pitfalls that have hindered research, and makes suggestions for the appropriate design of clinical trials that are safe and beneficial to patients while maintaining cost-effectiveness and accountability to patients and society.

  11. Learning about Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gene Mapped To X Chromosome 1998 Researchers Link Gene to Hereditary Form of Prostate Cancer 2002 Get Email Updates Advancing human health through genomics research Privacy Copyright Contact Accessibility Plug-ins Site Map Staff Search FOIA Share Top

  12. [Prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Bey, P; Beckendorf, V; Stinès, J

    2001-10-01

    Radiation therapy of prostate carcinoma with a curative intent implies to treat the whole prostate at high dose (at least 66 Gy). According to clinical stage, PSA level, Gleason's score, the clinical target volume may include seminal vesicles and less often pelvic lymph nodes. Microscopic extracapsular extension is found in 15 to 60% of T1-T2 operated on, specially in apex tumors. On contrary, cancers developing from the transitional zone may stay limited to the prostate even with a big volume and with a high PSA level. Zonal anatomy of the prostate identifies internal prostate, including the transitional zone (5% of the prostate in young people). External prostate includes central and peripheral zones. The inferior limit of the prostate is not lower than the inferior border of the pubic symphysis. Clinical and radiological examination: ultrasonography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), CT-scan identify prognostic factors as tumor volume, capsule effraction, seminal vesicles invasion and lymph node extension. The identification of the clinical target volume is now done mainly by CT-Scan which identifies prostate and seminal vesicles. NMR could be helpful to identify more precisely prostate apex. The definition of margins around the clinical target volume has to take in account daily reproducibility and organ motion and of course the maximum tolerable dose for organs at risk.

  13. Association of Type 2 Diabetes Susceptibility Variants With Advanced Prostate Cancer Risk in the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Machiela, Mitchell J.; Lindström, Sara; Allen, Naomi E.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Albanes, Demetrius; Barricarte, Aurelio; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Chanock, Stephen; Gaziano, J. Michael; Gapstur, Susan M.; Giovannucci, Edward; Henderson, Brian E.; Jacobs, Eric J.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Krogh, Vittorio; Ma, Jing; Stampfer, Meir J.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Stram, Daniel O.; Tjønneland, Anne; Travis, Ruth; Willett, Walter C.; Hunter, David J.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kraft, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Observational studies have found an inverse association between type 2 diabetes (T2D) and prostate cancer (PCa), and genome-wide association studies have found common variants near 3 loci associated with both diseases. The authors examined whether a genetic background that favors T2D is associated with risk of advanced PCa. Data from the National Cancer Institute's Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium, a genome-wide association study of 2,782 advanced PCa cases and 4,458 controls, were used to evaluate whether individual single nucleotide polymorphisms or aggregations of these 36 T2D susceptibility loci are associated with PCa. Ten T2D markers near 9 loci (NOTCH2, ADCY5, JAZF1, CDKN2A/B, TCF7L2, KCNQ1, MTNR1B, FTO, and HNF1B) were nominally associated with PCa (P < 0.05); the association for single nucleotide polymorphism rs757210 at the HNF1B locus was significant when multiple comparisons were accounted for (adjusted P = 0.001). Genetic risk scores weighted by the T2D log odds ratio and multilocus kernel tests also indicated a significant relation between T2D variants and PCa risk. A mediation analysis of 9,065 PCa cases and 9,526 controls failed to produce evidence that diabetes mediates the association of the HNF1B locus with PCa risk. These data suggest a shared genetic component between T2D and PCa and add to the evidence for an interrelation between these diseases. PMID:23193118

  14. The Future in Advanced Prostate Cancer: Take Your Partners or Is the Last Dance for Me?

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, David I

    2004-01-01

    Recent therapeutic initiatives have improved quality of life and survival for patients with advanced prostate cancer. This review focuses predominantly on prostate cancer that has become refractory to standard androgen ablation treatment. Planned trials will answer further questions on the optimal use and sequencing of currently available hormonal agents, cytotoxic therapies, and radiolabeled nucleotides. Future therapeutic advances are likely to come in 2 areas: targeted therapies and response prediction. Molecular targeted agents will be most useful in combination with each other or with established systemic therapies. The selection of combinations will require the application of paradigms targeting key biochemical pathways and specific microenvironments in prostate cancer. Response prediction for individual patients may be assisted by either pretreatment or sequential molecular profiling, or sequential imaging, or biochemical studies that predicate outcome prior to or soon after treatment has been initiated. To bring these advances to the metastatic prostate cancer patient, a series of well-designed clinical trials is needed that integrates the lessons learned through laboratory, translational, and clinical studies in recent years. PMID:16985929

  15. Exome sequencing identifies a spectrum of mutation frequencies in advanced and lethal prostate cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Akash; White, Thomas A.; MacKenzie, Alexandra P.; Clegg, Nigel; Lee, Choli; Dumpit, Ruth F.; Coleman, Ilsa; Ng, Sarah B.; Salipante, Stephen J.; Rieder, Mark J.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Corey, Eva; Lange, Paul H.; Morrissey, Colm; Vessella, Robert L.; Nelson, Peter S.; Shendure, Jay

    2011-01-01

    To catalog protein-altering mutations that may drive the development of prostate cancers and their progression to metastatic disease systematically, we performed whole-exome sequencing of 23 prostate cancers derived from 16 different lethal metastatic tumors and three high-grade primary carcinomas. All tumors were propagated in mice as xenografts, designated the LuCaP series, to model phenotypic variation, such as responses to cancer-directed therapeutics. Although corresponding normal tissue was not available for most tumors, we were able to take advantage of increasingly deep catalogs of human genetic variation to remove most germline variants. On average, each tumor genome contained ∼200 novel nonsynonymous variants, of which the vast majority was specific to individual carcinomas. A subset of genes was recurrently altered across tumors derived from different individuals, including TP53, DLK2, GPC6, and SDF4. Unexpectedly, three prostate cancer genomes exhibited substantially higher mutation frequencies, with 2,000–4,000 novel coding variants per exome. A comparison of castration-resistant and castration-sensitive pairs of tumor lines derived from the same prostate cancer highlights mutations in the Wnt pathway as potentially contributing to the development of castration resistance. Collectively, our results indicate that point mutations arising in coding regions of advanced prostate cancers are common but, with notable exceptions, very few genes are mutated in a substantial fraction of tumors. We also report a previously undescribed subtype of prostate cancers exhibiting “hypermutated” genomes, with potential implications for resistance to cancer therapeutics. Our results also suggest that increasingly deep catalogs of human germline variation may challenge the necessity of sequencing matched tumor-normal pairs. PMID:21949389

  16. A Novel Therapeutic Modality for Advanced-Stage Prostate Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    There is an urgent need to develop effective therapies for the treatment of advanced stage prostate cancer (PrCa) due to their limited or no response to...metastatic PrCa. Our results illustrated that ORM treatment effectively inhibited invasion and motility of PrCa cells. Further, we observed that ORM... effectively inhibits metastasis associated protein 1 (MTA1) in PrCa cells. MTA1 has been reported to be very tightly associated with cancer metastasis in

  17. Prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... If the cancer has not spread outside the prostate gland, common treatments include: Surgery ( radical prostatectomy ) Radiation therapy , including brachytherapy and proton therapy If you are older, your doctor may recommend simply monitoring the cancer with PSA tests and biopsies. Hormone therapy is ...

  18. Inhibition of Notch pathway arrests PTEN-deficient advanced prostate cancer by triggering p27-driven cellular senescence

    PubMed Central

    Revandkar, Ajinkya; Perciato, Maria Luna; Toso, Alberto; Alajati, Abdullah; Chen, Jingjing; Gerber, Hermeto; Dimitrov, Mitko; Rinaldi, Andrea; Delaleu, Nicolas; Pasquini, Emiliano; D'Antuono, Rocco; Pinton, Sandra; Losa, Marco; Gnetti, Letizia; Arribas, Alberto; Fraering, Patrick; Bertoni, Francesco; Nepveu, Alain; Alimonti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Activation of NOTCH signalling is associated with advanced prostate cancer and treatment resistance in prostate cancer patients. However, the mechanism that drives NOTCH activation in prostate cancer remains still elusive. Moreover, preclinical evidence of the therapeutic efficacy of NOTCH inhibitors in prostate cancer is lacking. Here, we provide evidence that PTEN loss in prostate tumours upregulates the expression of ADAM17, thereby activating NOTCH signalling. Using prostate conditional inactivation of both Pten and Notch1 along with preclinical trials carried out in Pten-null prostate conditional mouse models, we demonstrate that Pten-deficient prostate tumours are addicted to the NOTCH signalling. Importantly, we find that pharmacological inhibition of γ-secretase promotes growth arrest in both Pten-null and Pten/Trp53-null prostate tumours by triggering cellular senescence. Altogether, our findings describe a novel pro-tumorigenic network that links PTEN loss to ADAM17 and NOTCH signalling, thus providing the rational for the use of γ-secretase inhibitors in advanced prostate cancer patients. PMID:27941799

  19. Monitoring the clinical outcomes in advanced prostate cancer: what imaging modalities and other markers are reliable?

    PubMed

    Morris, Michael J; Autio, Karen A; Basch, Ethan M; Danila, Daniel C; Larson, Steven; Scher, Howard I

    2013-06-01

    these classes of novel biomarkers--imaging, CTC, and PROs--in regard to the quality of data supporting their use to monitor clinical outcomes in advanced prostate cancer.

  20. Prostate cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - prostate cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on prostate cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/prostatecancer/index National Cancer Institute -- www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/ ...

  1. Prognostic Value of Survivin in Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Study Based on RTOG 8610

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Min; Ho, Alex; Hammond, Elizabeth H.; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Bermudez, R. Scott; Lee, R. Jeffrey; Pilepich, Michael; Shipley, William U.; Sandler, Howard; Khor, Li-Yan; Pollack, Alan; Chakravarti, Arnab

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To examine the prognostic value of nuclear and cytoplasmic survivin expression in men with locally advanced prostate cancer who were enrolled in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 8610. Methods and Materials: RTOG 8610 was a Phase III randomized study comparing the effect of radiotherapy plus short-term androgen deprivation with radiotherapy alone. Of the 456 eligible patients, 68 patients had suitably stained tumor material for nuclear survivin analysis and 65 patients for cytoplasmic survivin. Results: Compared with patients with nuclear survivin intensity scores of {<=}191.2, those with intensity scores >191.2 had significantly improved prostate cancer survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.45; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.20-1.00, p = 0.0452). On multivariate analysis, nuclear survivin intensity scores >191.2 were significantly associated with improved overall survival (HR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.25-0.86; p = 0.0156) and prostate cancer survival (HR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.16-0.84; p = 0.0173). On univariate analysis, compared with patients with cytoplasmic survivin integrated optical density {<=}82.7, those with an integrated optical density >82.7 showed a significantly increased risk of local progression (HR, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.03-6.01; p = 0.0421). Conclusion: Nuclear overexpression of survivin was associated with improved overall and prostate cancer survival on multivariate analysis, and cytoplasmic overexpression of survivin was associated with increased rate of local progression on univariate analysis in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer treated on RTOG 8610. Our results might reflect the different functions of survivin and its splice variants, which are known to exist in distinct subcellular compartments.

  2. Sun exposure, vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms, and risk of advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    John, Esther M; Schwartz, Gary G; Koo, Jocelyn; Van Den Berg, David; Ingles, Sue A

    2005-06-15

    Substantial experimental evidence indicates that the hormonal form of vitamin D promotes the differentiation and inhibits the proliferation, invasiveness, and metastasis of human prostatic cancer cells. Results from epidemiologic studies of vitamin D status and/or vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphisms and prostate cancer risk have been mixed. We conducted a population-based, case-control study of advanced prostate cancer among men ages 40 to 79 years from the San Francisco Bay area. Interview data on lifetime sun exposure and other risk factors were collected for 905 non-Hispanic White men (450 cases and 455 controls). Using a reflectometer, we measured constitutive skin pigmentation on the upper underarm (a sun-protected site) and facultative pigmentation on the forehead (a sun-exposed site) and calculated a sun exposure index from these measurements. Biospecimens were collected for 426 cases and 440 controls. Genotyping was done for VDR polymorphisms in the 5' regulatory region (Cdx-2), exon 2 (FokI), and the 3' region (TaqI and BglI). Reduced risk of advanced prostate cancer was associated with high sun exposure determined by reflectometry [odds ratio (OR), 0.51; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.33-0.80] and high occupational outdoor activity (OR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.48-1.11). Significant risk reductions with the high-activity alleles FokI FF or Ff, TaqI tt, and BglI BB genotypes and a nonsignificant reduction with Cdx-2 AG or AA genotype were observed in the presence of high sun exposure, with ORs ranging from 0.46 to 0.67. Our findings support the hypothesis that sun exposure and VDR polymorphisms together play important roles in the etiology of prostate cancer.

  3. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... early screening. Photo: AP Photo/Danny Moloshok Prostate Cancer The prostate gland is a walnut-sized structure ...

  4. Hedgehog Proteins Consume Steroidal CYP17A1 Antagonists: Potential Therapeutic Significance in Advanced Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bordeau, Brandon M; Ciulla, Daniel A; Callahan, Brian P

    2016-09-20

    Abiraterone, a potent inhibitor of the human enzyme CYP17A1 (cytochrome P450c17), provides a last line of defense against ectopic androgenesis in advanced prostate cancer. Herein we report an unprecedented off-target interaction between abiraterone and oncogenic hedgehog proteins. Our experiments indicate that abiraterone and its structural congener, galeterone, can replace cholesterol as a substrate in a specialized biosynthetic event of hedgehog proteins, known as cholesterolysis. The off-target reaction generates covalent hedgehog-drug conjugates. Cell-based reporter assays indicate that these conjugates activate hedgehog signaling when present in the low nanomolar range. Because hedgehog signaling is implicated in prostate cancer progression, and abiraterone is administered to treat advanced stages of the disease, this off-target interaction may have therapeutic significance.

  5. New Combination Therapies for Advanced Prostate Cancer Based on the Radiosensitizing Potential of 5-azacytidine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    prostate cancer cells and xenografts by modulation of NHEJ-mediated DNA break repair , the experiments performed in year 1 of this project have not...response of prostate to radiation therapy by repressing the ability of prostate cancer cells to repair radiation induced DNA breaks. This is likely...epigenetic drug 5-azacytidine increases the responsiveness of prostate cancer cells and xenografts to radiation therapy by impairment of DNA double

  6. Effectiveness of Androgen-Deprivation Therapy and Radiotherapy for Older Men With Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bekelman, Justin E.; Mitra, Nandita; Handorf, Elizabeth A.; Uzzo, Robert G.; Hahn, Stephen A.; Polsky, Daniel; Armstrong, Katrina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We examined whether the survival advantage of androgen-deprivation therapy with radiotherapy (ADT plus RT) relative to ADT alone for men with locally advanced prostate cancer reported in two randomized trials holds in real-world clinical practice and extended the evidence to patients poorly represented in the trials. Methods We conducted nonrandomized effectiveness studies of ADT plus RT versus ADT in three groups of patients diagnosed between 1995 and 2007 and observed through 2009 in the SEER-Medicare data set: (1) the randomized clinical trial (RCT) cohort, which included men age 65 to 75 years and was most consistent with participants in the randomized trials; (2) the elderly cohort, which included men age > 75 years with locally advanced prostate cancer; and (3) the screen-detected cohort, which included men age ≥ 65 years with screen-detected high-risk prostate cancer. We evaluated cause-specific and all-cause mortality using propensity score, instrumental variable (IV), and sensitivity analyses. Results In the RCT cohort, ADT plus RT was associated with reduced cause-specific and all-cause mortality relative to ADT alone (cause-specific propensity score–adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.43; 95% CI, 0.37 to 0.49; all-cause propensity score–adjusted HR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.59 to 0.67). Effectiveness estimates for the RCT cohort were not significantly different from those from randomized trials (P > .1). In the elderly and screen-detected cohorts, ADT plus RT was also associated with reduced cause-specific and all-cause mortality. IV analyses produced estimates similar to those from propensity score–adjusted methods. Conclusion Older men with locally advanced or screen-detected high-risk prostate cancer who receive ADT alone risk decrements in cause-specific and overall survival. PMID:25559808

  7. Prostate Cancer Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF? Featured Blue Jacket Fashion Show Contact Us Prostate Cancer Symptoms The conversation about PSA screening really applies ... That’s why screening is such an important topic. Prostate Cancer Basics About the Prostate Risk Factors Prevention Symptoms ...

  8. Localized Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a decision aid for men with clinically localized prostate cancer (available at http://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/prostate_da) ... A Decision Aid for Men With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Page 1 of 24 Introduction Men with clinically ...

  9. A Case of Advanced Gastric Cancer with Para-Aortic Lymph Node Metastasis from Co-Occurring Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Miyeong; Lee, Young-Joon; Park, Ji-Ho; Choi, Sang-Kyung; Hong, Soon-Chan; Jung, Eun-Jung; Ju, Young-tae; Jeong, Chi-Young; Lee, Jeong-Hee; Ha, Woo-Song

    2017-01-01

    An 84-year-old man was diagnosed with two synchronous adenocarcinomas, a Borrmann type IV advanced gastric adenocarcinoma in his antrum and a well-differentiated Borrmann type I carcinoma on the anterior wall of the higher body of his stomach. Pre-operatively, computed tomography of the abdomen revealed the presence of advanced gastric cancer with peri-gastric and para-aortic lymph node (LN) metastasis. He planned for palliative total gastrectomy owing to the risk of obstruction by the antral lesion. We performed a frozen biopsy of a para-aortic LN during surgery and found that the origin of the para-aortic LN metastasis was from undiagnosed prostate cancer. Thus, we performed radical total gastrectomy and D2 LN dissection. Post-operatively, his total prostate-specific antigen levels were high (227 ng/mL) and he was discharged 8 days after surgery without any complications. PMID:28337367

  10. Efficacy of switching therapy of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogue for advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yuan-Chi; Kang, Chih-Hsiung; Chiang, Po-Hui

    2016-11-01

    This study was conducted to determine the efficacy of switching therapy with a second-line luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analogue after prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression for advanced prostate cancer. We enrolled 200 patients, from December 2005 to September 2013, with nodal positive, metastatic prostate cancer or disease progression after definite treatment receiving continuous LHRH analogue therapy with monthly depot leuprorelin(sc) acetate 3.75 mg/vial (LA) or goserelin acetate(sc) 3.6 mg/vial (GA). If the patients had castration-resistant prostate cancer, the treatment choice of switching therapy (from LA to GA or from GA to LA) prior to starting chemotherapy was given. The LH, testosterone level, and PSA change were recorded. The records showed that there were 127 patients receiving LA as initial ADT therapy, whereas the other 73 patients were in GA therapy. A total of 92 patients received LHRH analogue switching therapy (54 patients switched from LA to GA and 38 switched from GA to LA). The effect of LH and testosterone reduction prior to and after switching therapy was comparable between the two groups, and increased PSA level after 3 months of treatment was seen in both groups (median PSA: 15.7-67.7 ng/mL in the LA to GA group; 15.2-71.4 ng/mL in the GA to LA group). This study concluded that switching therapy for patients with PSA progression after ADT has no efficacy of further PSA response.

  11. Spirituality in men with advanced prostate cancer: "it's a holistic thing . . . it's a package".

    PubMed

    Lepherd, Laurence

    2014-06-01

    Spirituality is often regarded as being helpful during an unwell person's journey but definitions of the concept can be confusing, and its use synonymously with religion can be misleading. This research sought to answer the question, "What is the nature of spirituality in men with advanced prostate cancer," and to discover the role spirituality may have in these men as they face the challenges of living with their disease. A qualitative approach and narrative method was used to explore the spirituality of nine men with advanced prostate cancer who volunteered to participate and to tell the story of their cancer journey with particular focus on their spirituality. The study found that spirituality for these men, who were all Caucasians, was a "holistic thing" that involved physical, psychosocial, and spiritual matters that enabled them to transcend the everyday difficulties of their journey. Through their spirituality they obtained greater comfort and peace of mind during what was for many of them a very traumatic time. The central theme in the men's stories was that of connectedness-to themselves, to their partners, sometimes to a higher being, to other people such as their family and friends, and to other aspects of their lives.

  12. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein is associated with advanced-stage prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wan, Fangning; Qin, Xiaojian; Zhang, Guiming; Lu, Xiaolin; Zhu, Yao; Zhang, Hailiang; Dai, Bo; Shi, Guohai; Ye, Dingwei

    2015-05-01

    Clinical and epidemiological data suggest coronary artery disease shares etiology with prostate cancer (PCa). The aim of this work was to assess the effects of several serum markers reported in cardiovascular disease on PCa. Serum markers (oxidized low-density lipoprotein [ox-LDL], apolipoprotein [apo] B100, and apoB48) in peripheral blood samples from 50 patients from Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center (FUSCC) with localized or lymph node metastatic PCa were investigated in this study. Twenty-five samples from normal individuals were set as controls. We first conducted enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis to select candidate markers that were significantly different between these patients and controls. Then, the clinical relevance between OLR1 (the ox-LDL receptor) expression and PCa was analyzed in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) cohort. We also investigated the function of ox-LDL in PCa cell lines in vitro. Phosphorylation protein chips were used to analyze cell signaling pathways in ox-LDL-treated PC-3 cells. The ox-LDL level was found to be significantly correlated with N stage of prostate cancer. OLR1 expression was correlated with lymph node metastasis in the TCGA cohort. In vitro, ox-LDL stimulated the proliferation, migration, and invasion of LNCaP and PC-3 in a dose-dependent manner. The results of phosphoprotein microarray illustrated that ox-LDL could influence multiple signaling pathways of PC-3. Activation of proliferation promoting signaling pathways (including β-catenin, cMyc, NF-κB, STAT1, STAT3) as well as apoptosis-associating signaling pathways (including p27, caspase-3) demonstrated that ox-LDL had complicated effects on prostate cancer. Increased serum ox-LDL level and OLR1 expression may indicate advanced-stage PCa and lymph node metastasis. Moreover, ox-LDL could stimulate PCa proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro.

  13. Multinucleation and Mesenchymal-to-Epithelial-Transition Alleviate Resistance to Combined Cabazitaxel and Antiandrogen Therapy in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Sarah K.; Pu, Hong; Penticuff, Justin C.; Cao, Zheng; Horbinski, Craig; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Patients with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) frequently develop therapeutic resistance to taxane chemotherapy and antiandrogens. Cabazitaxel (CBZ) is a second-line taxane chemotherapeutic agent that provides additional survival benefits to patients with advanced disease. In this study we sought to identify the mechanism of action of combined CBZ and androgen receptor (AR) targeting, in pre-clinical models of advanced prostate cancer. We found tha CBZ induced mitotic spindle collapse and multi-nucleation by targeting the microtubule de-polymerizing kinesins and inhibiting AR. In androgen responsive tumors, treatment with the AR inhibitor, Enzalutamide, overcame resistance to CBZ. Combination treatment of human CRPC xenografts with CBZ and Enzalutamide reversed epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) to mesenchymal-epithelial-transition (MET) and led to multi-nucleation, while retaining nuclear AR. In a transgenic mouse model of androgen-responsive prostate cancer, CBZ treatment induced MET, glandular re-differentiation and AR nuclear localization that was inhibited by androgen deprivation. Collectively, our pre-clinical studies demonstrate that prostate tumor resistance to Cabazitaxel can be overcome by antiandrogen-mediated EMT-MET cycling in androgen-sensitive tumors, but not in CRPC. Moreover, AR splice variants may preclude patients with advanced disease from responding to Cabazitaxel chemotherapy and antiandrogen combination therapy. This evidence enables a significant insight into therapeutic cross-resistance to taxane chemotherapy and androgen-deprivation therapy in advanced prostate cancer. PMID:26645563

  14. Hyaluronan Biosynthesis in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT: Despite advances in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer in the last several years, metastasis represents the... metastasis to lymph nodes and bone. Metastasis to bone is especially noteworthy, not only because it reflects more advanced tumors, but also because of the...the growth and metastasis of androgen-independent tumors, it may be possible to better diagnose and treat prostate cancers by inhibiting growth of

  15. Inhibition of AKR1C3 Activation Overcomes Resistance to Abiraterone in Advanced Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengfei; Armstrong, Cameron M; Lou, Wei; Lombard, Alan; Evans, Christopher P; Gao, Allen C

    2017-01-01

    Abiraterone suppresses intracrine androgen synthesis via inhibition of CYP17A1. However, clinical evidence suggests that androgen synthesis is not fully inhibited by abiraterone and the sustained androgen production may lead to disease relapse. In the present study, we identified AKR1C3, an important enzyme in the steroidogenesis pathway, as a critical mechanism driving resistance to abiraterone through increasing intracrine androgen synthesis and enhancing androgen signaling. We found that overexpression of AKR1C3 confers resistance to abiraterone while downregulation of AKR1C3 resensitizes resistant cells to abiraterone treatment. In abiraterone-resistant prostate cancer cells, AKR1C3 is overexpressed and the levels of intracrine androgens are elevated. In addition, AKR1C3 activation increases intracrine androgen synthesis and enhances androgen receptor (AR) signaling via activating AR transcriptional activity. Treatment of abiraterone-resistant cells with indomethacin, an AKR1C3 inhibitor, overcomes resistance and enhances abiraterone therapy both in vitro and in vivo by reducing the levels of intracrine androgens and diminishing AR transcriptional activity. These results demonstrate that AKR1C3 activation is a critical mechanism of resistance to abiraterone through increasing intracrine androgen synthesis and enhancing androgen signaling. Furthermore, this study provides a preclinical proof-of-principle for clinical trials investigating the combination of targeting AKR1C3 using indomethacin with abiraterone for advanced prostate cancer. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(1); 35-44. ©2016 AACR.

  16. Intraoperative Radiotherapy During Radical Prostatectomy for Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Technical and Dosimetric Aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Krengli, Marco; Terrone, Carlo; Ballare, Andrea; Loi, Gianfranco; Tarabuzzi, Roberto; Marchioro, Giansilvio; Beldi, Debora; Mones, Eleonora; Bolchini, Cesare R.T.; Volpe, Alessandro; Frea, Bruno

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To analyze the feasibility of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer and candidates for radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: A total of 38 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer were enrolled. No patients had evidence of lymph node or distant metastases, probability of organ-confined disease >25%, or risk of lymph node involvement >15% according to the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Nomogram. The IORT was delivered after exposure of the prostate by a dedicated linear accelerator with beveled collimators using electrons of 9 to 12 MeV to a total dose of 10-12 Gy. Rectal dose was measured in vivo by radiochromic films placed on a rectal probe. Administration of IORT was followed by completion of radical prostatectomy and regional lymph node dissection. All cases with extracapsular extension and/or positive margins were scheduled for postoperative radiotherapy. Patients with pT3 to pT4 disease or positive nodes received adjuvant hormonal therapy. Results: Mean dose detected by radiochromic films was 3.9 Gy (range, 0.4-8.9 Gy) to the anterior rectal wall. The IORT procedure lasted 31 min on average (range, 15-45 min). No major intra- or postoperative complications occurred. Minor complications were observed in 10/33 (30%) of cases. Of the 27/31 patients who completed the postoperative external beam radiotherapy, 3/27 experienced Grade 2 rectal toxicity and 1/27 experienced Grade 2 urinary toxicity. Conclusions: Use of IORT during radical prostatectomy is feasible and allows safe delivery of postoperative external beam radiotherapy to the tumor bed without relevant acute rectal toxicity.

  17. Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat. There is no standard screening test for prostate cancer. Researchers are studying different tests to find those ... PSA level may be high if you have prostate cancer. It can also be high if you have ...

  18. Cryotherapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000907.htm Cryotherapy for prostate cancer To use the sharing features ... first treatment for prostate cancer. What Happens During Cryotherapy Before the procedure, you will be given medicine ...

  19. Outcomes and predictors of localized or locally-advanced prostate cancer treated by radiotherapy in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Supit, Wempy; Mochtar, Chaidir Arif; Santoso, Rachmat Budi; Umbas, Rainy

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Presently there is no published data on the outcomes of localized or locally-advanced prostate cancer (PCa) treated by external-beam radiotherapy (RT) in Indonesia. Methods: This study retrospectively analyzed 96 patients with localized or locally-advanced PCa treated by RT from year 1995 to 2009, at the national referral hospital and the national cancer hospital of Indonesia. Cumulative prostate and pelvic radiation dose/type was <70 Gy conventional RT in 84.4% patients, and ≥70 Gy Three dimensional-conformal or intensity modulated RT in 15.6% patients. Overall survival (OS) and biochemical progression-free survival (BFS) were estimated by Kaplan-Meier. Predictors of OS and biochemical recurrence were analyzed by multivariate Cox regressions. Results: The median follow-up was 61 months (range, 24 to 169 months). There were 3.1% low-risk, 26% intermediate-risk, and 70.8% high-risk cases. More than half of the patients (52.1%) had pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) >20 ng/mL. The 5-year survival outcome of low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk patients were: OS, 100%, 94.7%, and 67.9% (P=0.297); and BFS, 100%, 94.1%, and 57.1% (P=0.016), respectively. In the high-risk group, the 5-year OS was 88.3% in patients who received adjuvant hormonal androgen deprivation therapy (HT), compared to 53% in RT only, P=0.08. Significant predictors of OS include high-risk group (hazard Ratio [HR], 9.35; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.52 to 57.6; P=0.016), adjuvant therapy (HR, 0.175; 95% CI, 0.05 to 0.58; P=0.005), detection by transurethral resection of the prostate (TUR-P) (HR, 6.81; 95% CI, 2.28 to 20.33; P=0.001), and pretreatment PSA (HR, 1.003; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.005; P=0.039). The sole predictor of biochemical failure was pretreatment PSA (P=0.04), with odds ratio of 4.52 (95% CI, 1.61 to 12.65) for PSA >20 ng/mL. Conclusions: RT is an effective treatment modality for localized or locally-advanced PCa in Indonesian patients, with outcomes and

  20. Health-related quality of life in patients with advanced prostate cancer: a multinational perspective.

    PubMed

    Cleary, P D; Morrissey, G; Oster, G

    1995-06-01

    To explore the value of antiandrogen therapy for advanced prostate cancer, two clinical trials of similar design were recently conducted in six countries throughout Europe. A total of 550 patients with previously untreated metastatic prostate cancer were randomized either to treatment with an antiandrogen or castration. While time to treatment failure, objective tumour response and survival were expected to be similar between study treatments, their effects on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) were expected to differ and were therefore a focus of concern in this trial. To assess these effects, we developed a brief self-administered patient questionnaire covering 10 domains of HRQOL (general health perceptions, pain, emotional well-being, vitality, social functioning, physical capacity, sexual interest, sexual functioning, activity limitation and bed disability), which we translated from English into several other languages. In this paper, we describe the development, content and translation of this survey instrument and report on its reliability and validity in six countries based on data collected for the first 487 patients to complete questionnaires at study entry.

  1. Galeterone for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer: the evidence to date

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Diogo A; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S

    2016-01-01

    Major advances have been achieved recently in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, resulting in significant improvements in quality of life and survival with the use of several new agents, including the next-generation androgen receptor (AR)-targeted drugs abiraterone and enzalutamide. However, virtually all patients will eventually progress on these therapies and most will ultimately die of treatment-refractory metastatic disease. Recently, several mechanisms of resistance to AR-directed therapies have been uncovered, including the AR splice variant 7 (AR-V7), which is a ligand-independent constitutionally-active form of the AR that has been associated with poor outcomes to abiraterone and enzalutamide. Galeterone, a potent anti-androgen with three modes of action (CYP17 lyase inhibition, AR antagonism, and AR degradation), is a novel agent under clinical development that could potentially target both full-length AR and aberrant AR, including AR-V7. In this manuscript, we will first discuss the biological mechanisms of action of galeterone and then review the safety and efficacy data from Phase I and II clinical studies of galeterone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. A Phase III study of galeterone (compared against enzalutamide) in AR-V7-positive patients is currently underway, and represents the first pivotal trial using a biomarker-selection design in this disease. PMID:27486306

  2. The Importance of Supportive Care in Optimizing Treatment Outcomes of Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Optimal oncologic care of older men with prostate cancer, including effective prevention and management of the disease and treatment side effects (so-called best supportive care measures) can prolong survival, improve quality of life, and reduce depressive symptoms. In addition, the proportion of treatment discontinuations can be reduced through early reporting and management of side effects. Pharmacologic care may be offered to manage the side effects of androgen-deprivation therapy and chemotherapy, which may include hot flashes, febrile neutropenia, fatigue, and diarrhea. Nonpharmacologic care (e.g., physical exercise, acupuncture, relaxation) has also been shown to benefit patients. At the Georges Pompidou European Hospital, the Program of Optimization of Chemotherapy Administration has demonstrated that improved outpatient follow-up by supportive care measures can reduce the occurrence of chemotherapy-related side effects, reduce cancellations and modifications of treatment, reduce chemotherapy wastage, and reduce the length of stay in the outpatient unit. The importance of supportive care measures to optimize management and outcomes of older men with advanced prostate cancer should not be overlooked. PMID:23015682

  3. Denosumab Reduces Risk of Bone Side Effects in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    The biological agent denosumab (Xgeva) is more effective than zoledronic acid at decreasing the risk of bone fractures and other skeletal-related events (SRE) in men with castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer, according to results from a randomi

  4. Living with Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer treatment and can improve many aspects of health, including muscle strength, balance, fatigue, cardiovascular fitness, and depression. Physical activity after a prostate cancer diagnosis is linked to ...

  5. Understanding requirements of novel healthcare information systems for management of advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wagholikar, Amol S; Fung, Maggie; Nelson, Colleen C

    2012-01-01

    Effective management of chronic diseases is a global health priority. A healthcare information system offers opportunities to address challenges of chronic disease management. However, the requirements of health information systems are often not well understood. The accuracy of requirements has a direct impact on the successful design and implementation of a health information system. Our research describes methods used to understand the requirements of health information systems for advanced prostate cancer management. The research conducted a survey to identify heterogeneous sources of clinical records. Our research showed that the General Practitioner was the common source of patient's clinical records (41%) followed by the Urologist (14%) and other clinicians (14%). Our research describes a method to identify diverse data sources and proposes a novel patient journey browser prototype that integrates disparate data sources.

  6. The modern role of androgen deprivation therapy in the management of localised and locally advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gunner, Charlotte; Gulamhusein, Aziz; Rosario, Derek J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Approximately 50% of men diagnosed with prostate cancer will be exposed to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) at some stage. The role of ADT in the management of metastatic disease has long been recognised, and its place in the management of localised and locally advanced disease has become clearer in the past few years. Nevertheless, concerns remain that some men might not benefit from ADT in earlier-stage disease. The purpose of the current article is to provide a brief narrative review of the role of ADT as part of a strategy of treatment with curative intent, concentrating mainly on key recent developments in the area. Methods: Narrative literature review of key publications in the English language relating to ADT in the management of localised and locally advanced prostate cancer. Results: In locally advanced and high-risk localised prostate cancer, the use of ADT in combination with radiotherapy improves disease-specific and overall survival. There is no evidence to support the use of ADT in the treatment of low-risk localised prostate cancer. There appears to be an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists, particularly in men with pre-existing cardiovascular disease, but the relevance of this in the adjuvant/neoadjuvant setting is currently unclear. Conclusions: Future studies should focus on identification of men who are at risk from cardiovascular complications associated with ADT and on the comparison of radiotherapy with ADT versus surgery in the management of localised and locally advanced prostate cancer, particularly with regards to men with pre-existing comorbidities.

  7. Engagement of Patients With Advanced Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-15

    End of Life; Advanced Cancer; Lung Neoplasm; Gastric Cancer; Colon Cancer; Glioblastoma Multiforme; Head and Neck Neoplasms; Rectum Cancer; Melanoma; Kidney Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Testicular Neoplasms; Liver Cancer; Cancer of Unknown Origin

  8. Selenoprotein gene variants, toenail selenium levels, and risk for advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Geybels, Milan S; van den Brandt, Piet A; Schouten, Leo J; van Schooten, Frederik J; van Breda, Simone G; Rayman, Margaret P; Green, Fiona R; Verhage, Bas A J

    2014-03-01

    Lower selenium levels have been associated with increased risk of prostate cancer (PCa), and genetic variation in the selenoprotein genes selenoprotein P (SEPP1) and glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1) is thought to modify this relationship. We investigated whether the association between toenail selenium levels and advanced PCa risk in the prospective Netherlands Cohort Study is modified by common genetic variation in SEPP1 and GPX1. Toenail clippings were used to determine selenium levels and to isolate DNA for genotyping. This case-cohort study, which included 817 case subjects with advanced PCa and 1048 subcohort members, was analyzed with Cox regression models. All statistical tests were two-sided. Three genetic variants were associated with advanced (stage III/IV or IV) PCa risk: SEPP1 rs7579 (lower risk; P trend = .01), GPX1 rs17650792 (higher risk; P trend = .03), and GPX1 rs1800668 (lower risk; P trend = .005). Toenail selenium levels were inversely associated with advanced PCa risk, independently of common genetic variation in SEPP1 and GPX1.

  9. Detection of genetic alterations in advanced prostate cancer by comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Kotaro; Taguchi, Takahiro; Yamasaki, Ichiro; Kamada, Masayuki; Yuri, Kazunari; Shuin, Taro

    2002-08-01

    In this study, we examined nine cases of advanced Japanese prostate cancer by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to detect chromosomal imbalances across the entire genome and to identify several new regions likely to contain genes important to the development and progression of this disease. These cases had been previously examined for numerical chromosomal aberrations by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). By CGH, the following regions were found to be over-represented (gains), with fluorescence ratio values higher than the threshold: 4p, 6p, 8q, 11q, 12q, 15q, 16p, 17q, 20, and 21 (>4 cases); underrepresentation (losses) involved: 1q, 4q, 5q, 6q, 13q, 14q, and 22 (>4 cases). The shortest regions of overlap (SRO) of gains were noted at 8q24.1 through q24.3, 12q23, and 17q23 through q24 (>5 cases). The SRO of losses were seen at 5q14 through q21, 6q16.1 through q21, 13q21.3 through q22, and 14q21 (>5 cases). Notably, the gain of chromosomes 8 and 12 by CGH was in agreement with the FISH data, suggesting that the gain of chromosomes 8 and 12 may play an important role in prostate carcinogenesis. The genes on the SRO regions were also discussed in relation to oncogenes and bone metastases.

  10. Urinary Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tosoian, Jeffrey J; Ross, Ashley E; Sokoll, Lori J; Partin, Alan W; Pavlovich, Christian P

    2016-02-01

    In light of the overdiagnosis and overtreatment associated with widespread prostate-specific antigen-based screening, controversy persists surrounding the detection and diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa). Given its anatomic proximity to the prostate, urine has been proposed as a noninvasive substrate for prostatic biomarkers. With greater understanding of the molecular pathways of carcinogenesis and significant technological advances, the breadth of potential biomarkers is substantial. In this review, the authors aim to provide an evidence-based assessment of current and emerging urinary biomarkers used in the detection and prognostication of PCa and high-grade PCa, with particular attention on clinically relevant findings.

  11. Xanthohumol impairs human prostate cancer cell growth and invasion and diminishes the incidence and progression of advanced tumors in TRAMP mice.

    PubMed

    Venè, Roberta; Benelli, Roberto; Minghelli, Simona; Astigiano, Simonetta; Tosetti, Francesca; Ferrari, Nicoletta

    2012-12-06

    Despite recent advances in understanding the biological basis of prostate cancer, management of the disease, especially in the phase resistant to androgen ablation, remains a significant challenge. The long latency and high incidence of prostate carcinogenesis provides the opportunity to intervene with chemoprevention to prevent or eradicate prostate malignancies. In this study, we have used human hormone-resistant prostate cancer cells, DU145 and PC3, as an in vitro model to assess the efficacy of xanthohumol (XN) against cell growth, motility and invasion. We observed that treatment of prostate cancer cells with low micromolar doses of XN inhibits proliferation and modulates focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and AKT phosphorylation leading to reduced cell migration and invasion. Oxidative stress by increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was associated with these effects. Transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) transgenic mice were used as an in vivo model of prostate adenocarcinoma. Oral gavage of XN, three times per week, beginning at 4 wks of age, induced a decrease in the average weight of the urogenital (UG) tract, delayed advanced tumor progression and inhibited the growth of poorly differentiated prostate carcinoma. The ability of XN to inhibit prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo suggests that XN may be a novel agent for the management of prostate cancer.

  12. Can Prostate Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prostate Cancer Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Can Prostate Cancer Be Found Early? Screening is testing to find ... Health Care Team About Prostate Cancer? More In Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  13. Prostate cancer - treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... well. Proton therapy is another kind of radiation therapy used to treat prostate cancer. Proton beams target the tumor precisely, so there is less damage to the surrounding tissue. This therapy is not widely accepted or used. Prostate Brachytherapy ...

  14. [Options of hypofractionation of proton boost in locally advanced prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Khmelevskiĭ, E V; Pan'shin, G A; Kancheli, I N; Khoroshkov, V S

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of various fractionation proton boost in the proton-photon radiation therapy of locally advanced prostate cancer. The study included 272 patients with prostate cancer and intermediate-to-high risk of progression. 114 patients received 3-D conformal local irradiation of the prostate by proton beam 220Mev. The focal dose of 28-28,8 SoGy-eq was fed to the prostate for 8, 5 or 3 fractions for 3, 4 or 5.5 Gy-eq, respectively. Given the photon component (44 Gy in 22 fractions to the whole volume of the pelvis), the dose to the prostate was 72.8., 72 and 72SoGr-eq, respectively. In 158 patients in the control group the similar doses to the pelvis were supplemented by local 4-dipole photon irradiation of the prostate to 68-72 Gy in 12-14 fractions of 2 Gy. Acute gastro-intestinal (GI) toxicity maximum, 2 St expression, were found significantly less frequently after the proton-photon therapy: in 54.4% of cases, versus 69.2% in the controls (p <0,01). Differences between acute genito-urinary (GU) toxicity were not observed. The frequency of late GI damage of 2 St. was 3 times less frequently observed in the study group: 10.2% versus 34,8 +/-% in controls. Damages of 3-4 St. were found in 1 patient of the main group and in 2 patients in the control group. GU damages of 2 St. were equally common after the proton-photon or just photon irradiation in 8.3% and 9.1% of patients respectively. Damages of 3-4 St. were diagnosed in 2.8% and 3.8%, respectively (p> 0.05). A 5-year survival without biochemical recurrence was in the study and control groups 60,0 +/- 5,4% and 61,9 +/- 4,4%, and a 9-year survival--45,5 +/- 8,5% and 42,8 +/- 7 1%, respectively (p > 0.05). Thus, precise local irradiation by a proton beam with ROD 3-5.5 Gy-eq. and SOD 28-28,8 Gy-eq supplementing photon irradiation of total small pelvis significantly reduces the severity of early and late post-radiation proctitis but does not reduce the risk of damage to the lower

  15. Prostate cancer immunotherapy: beyond immunity to curability.

    PubMed

    Simons, Jonathan W

    2014-11-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the United States. It is the first prevalent cancer in which overall survival in advanced disease is modestly, but objectively, improved with outpatient delivered dendritic cell-based immunotherapy. More prostate cancer patients have enrolled through Facebook and trusted-site Internet searches in clinical trials for prostate cancer vaccine-based immunotherapy than in immunotherapy trials for lung, breast, colon, pancreas, ovarian, and bladder cancer combined in the past 7 years. Exceptional responses to anti-CTLA-4 treatment have been documented in clinics, and prostate cancer neoantigen characterization and T-cell clonotyping are in their research ascendancy. The prostate is an accessory organ; it is not required for fertility, erectile function, or urinary continence. The true evolutionary advantage of having a prostate for male mammalian physiology is a topic of speculation in seminar rooms and on bar stools, but it remains unknown. Hundreds of prostate lineage-unique proteins (PLUP) exist among the >37,000 normal human prostate lineage-unique open reading frames that can be targeted for immunologic ablation of PLUP(+) prostate cancer cells by prostate-specific autoimmunity. This bioengineered graft-versus-prostate disease is a powerful strategy that can eliminate deaths from prostate cancer. Immunologic tolerance to prostate cancer can be overcome at every clinical stage of presentation. This Cancer Immunology at the Crossroads article aims to present advances in the past two decades of basic, translational, and clinical research in prostate cancer, including bioengineering B-cell and T-cell responses, and ongoing prostate cancer immunotherapy trials.

  16. Tobacco smoking, polymorphisms in carcinogen metabolism enzyme genes, and risk of localized and advanced prostate cancer: results from the California Collaborative Prostate Cancer Study.

    PubMed

    Shahabi, Ahva; Corral, Román; Catsburg, Chelsea; Joshi, Amit D; Kim, Andre; Lewinger, Juan Pablo; Koo, Jocelyn; John, Esther M; Ingles, Sue A; Stern, Mariana C

    2014-12-01

    The relationship between tobacco smoking and prostate cancer (PCa) remains inconclusive. This study examined the association between tobacco smoking and PCa risk taking into account polymorphisms in carcinogen metabolism enzyme genes as possible effect modifiers (9 polymorphisms and 1 predicted phenotype from metabolism enzyme genes). The study included cases (n = 761 localized; n = 1199 advanced) and controls (n = 1139) from the multiethnic California Collaborative Case-Control Study of Prostate Cancer. Multivariable conditional logistic regression was performed to evaluate the association between tobacco smoking variables and risk of localized and advanced PCa risk. Being a former smoker, regardless of time of quit smoking, was associated with an increased risk of localized PCa (odds ratio [OR] = 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0-1.6). Among non-Hispanic Whites, ever smoking was associated with an increased risk of localized PCa (OR = 1.5; 95% CI = 1.1-2.1), whereas current smoking was associated with risk of advanced PCa (OR = 1.4; 95% CI = 1.0-1.9). However, no associations were observed between smoking intensity, duration or pack-year variables, and advanced PCa. No statistically significant trends were seen among Hispanics or African-Americans. The relationship between smoking status and PCa risk was modified by the CYP1A2 rs7662551 polymorphism (P-interaction = 0.008). In conclusion, tobacco smoking was associated with risk of PCa, primarily localized disease among non-Hispanic Whites. This association was modified by a genetic variant in CYP1A2, thus supporting a role for tobacco carcinogens in PCa risk.

  17. Tobacco smoking, polymorphisms in carcinogen metabolism enzyme genes, and risk of localized and advanced prostate cancer: results from the California Collaborative Prostate Cancer Study

    PubMed Central

    Shahabi, Ahva; Corral, Román; Catsburg, Chelsea; Joshi, Amit D; Kim, Andre; Lewinger, Juan Pablo; Koo, Jocelyn; John, Esther M; Ingles, Sue A; Stern, Mariana C

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between tobacco smoking and prostate cancer (PCa) remains inconclusive. This study examined the association between tobacco smoking and PCa risk taking into account polymorphisms in carcinogen metabolism enzyme genes as possible effect modifiers (9 polymorphisms and 1 predicted phenotype from metabolism enzyme genes). The study included cases (n = 761 localized; n = 1199 advanced) and controls (n = 1139) from the multiethnic California Collaborative Case–Control Study of Prostate Cancer. Multivariable conditional logistic regression was performed to evaluate the association between tobacco smoking variables and risk of localized and advanced PCa risk. Being a former smoker, regardless of time of quit smoking, was associated with an increased risk of localized PCa (odds ratio [OR] = 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0–1.6). Among non-Hispanic Whites, ever smoking was associated with an increased risk of localized PCa (OR = 1.5; 95% CI = 1.1–2.1), whereas current smoking was associated with risk of advanced PCa (OR = 1.4; 95% CI = 1.0–1.9). However, no associations were observed between smoking intensity, duration or pack-year variables, and advanced PCa. No statistically significant trends were seen among Hispanics or African-Americans. The relationship between smoking status and PCa risk was modified by the CYP1A2 rs7662551 polymorphism (P-interaction = 0.008). In conclusion, tobacco smoking was associated with risk of PCa, primarily localized disease among non-Hispanic Whites. This association was modified by a genetic variant in CYP1A2, thus supporting a role for tobacco carcinogens in PCa risk. PMID:25355624

  18. GTI-2040 and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Metastatic, or Unresectable Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Prostate Cancer, or Other Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  19. Phase I Trial of Adenovirus-Mediated IL-12 Gene Transduction in Patients with Recurrent Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer Following Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    radiation therapy who are presently not on hormonal therapy. An important part of the screening process is a needle biopsy of the prostate to confirm the...has been amended (see below) to also include patients who had their locally advanced prostate cancer treated with hormonal ablative therapy...the lack of effective therapies for men who have failed definitive radiotherapy or who have locally advanced cancer despite hormone ablative therapy

  20. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 and Hydroxychloroquine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors, Melanoma, Prostate or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-06

    Adult Solid Neoplasm; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  1. Infections and inflammation in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sfanos, Karen S; Isaacs, William B; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2013-12-25

    The frequent observation of both acute and chronic inflammation of unknown stimulus in the adult prostate has motivated a large body of research aimed at identifying potential infectious agents that may elicit prostatic inflammation. The overarching hypothesis is that infection-induced inflammation may be associated with prostate cancer development or progression, as inflammation is known to serve as an "enabling characteristic" of cancer. With recent advances in molecular techniques for microorganism identification, a panoply of microorganisms has been scrutinized in prostate tissues and in relation to prostate carcinogenesis. The aim of this review is to summarize the current literature on the evidence for infectious agents as a contributing factor to prostatic inflammation and prostate cancer, and to highlight recent literature suggesting an infectious etiology to the biogenesis of prostatic corpora amylacea and on the development of mouse models of prostatic infections.

  2. Infections and inflammation in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sfanos, Karen S; Isaacs, William B; Marzo, Angelo M De

    2013-01-01

    The frequent observation of both acute and chronic inflammation of unknown stimulus in the adult prostate has motivated a large body of research aimed at identifying potential infectious agents that may elicit prostatic inflammation. The overarching hypothesis is that infection-induced inflammation may be associated with prostate cancer development or progression, as inflammation is known to serve as an “enabling characteristic” of cancer. With recent advances in molecular techniques for microorganism identification, a panoply of microorganisms has been scrutinized in prostate tissues and in relation to prostate carcinogenesis. The aim of this review is to summarize the current literature on the evidence for infectious agents as a contributing factor to prostatic inflammation and prostate cancer, and to highlight recent literature suggesting an infectious etiology to the biogenesis of prostatic corpora amylacea and on the development of mouse models of prostatic infections. PMID:25110720

  3. A prospective study of the efficacy of magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging for predicting locally advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Razi, Ali; Parizi, Mehdi Kardoust; Kazemeini, Seid Mohammad; Abedi, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging (MRSI) for predicting locally advanced prostate cancer (PC). Materials and methods: Between April 2009 and July 2012, 80 consecutive patients with clinically localized PC had undergone endorectal MRSI before radical retropubic prostatectomy. Clinicopathological parameters, including age, preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA), Gleason score (GS) at biopsy, perinural invasion at biopsy, prostate weight at surgery, GS of surgical specimen, and pathological staging were recorded. The MRSI findings were compared with the histopathological findings of the radical prostatectomy. The diagnostic accuracy measures consisting of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) of MRSI, and other variables in the diagnosis of locally advanced PC (Pathology Stages pT3a, pT3b, or pT4) were evaluated. Results: Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of MRSI in detecting locally advanced PC is 42.4%, 93.6%, 82.3%, and 69.8%, respectively [area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve=0.658, p value <0.0001]. MRSI, cancer-positive core percentage at biopsy, and GS at biopsy are more accurate factors among all the predictive variables in predicting locally advanced PC. Conclusion: MRSI may be considered as a complementary diagnostic modality with high specificity and moderate sensitivity in predicting locally advanced PC. Combination of this modality with other predictive factors helps the surgeon and patient to select an appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:26328204

  4. Denosumab treatment in the management of patients with advanced prostate cancer: clinical evidence and experience

    PubMed Central

    Hegemann, Miriam; Bedke, Jens; Stenzl, Arnulf; Todenhöfer, Tilman

    2017-01-01

    Osteoprotective therapies have become an essential component in the management of advanced prostate cancer (PC) patients as bone metastases (BMs) have a major impact on morbidity and mortality. Denosumab is a fully humanized antibody targeting the receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL), which has been approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in Europe and the United States (US) Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the US for prevention of skeletal-related events (SREs) in patients with solid tumors and BMs, including PC. The clinical settings in which PC patients should be treated with denosumab are still discussed controversially. In a phase III study, denosumab significantly delayed SREs compared with zoledronic acid (ZA) in patients with metastatic castration-resistant PC (CRPC). In addition, denosumab showed superior effects on pain and health-related quality of life (QoL) in these patients. In patients with nonmetastatic CRPC, denosumab has been proven to significantly increase bone metastases-free survival. However, no significant benefits on cancer-specific and overall survival were observed and denosumab was not approved by the US FDA and EMA in this context. The effectiveness of denosumab in patients with castration-sensitive PC (CSPC) and BMs is also under discussion, as clinical trials with ZA in these patients have not shown significant benefits. Clinical data on the use of denosumab in CSPC are urgently needed. PMID:28392837

  5. Combined androgen deprivation therapy and radiation therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer: a randomised, phase 3 trial

    PubMed Central

    Warde, Padraig; Mason, Malcolm; Ding, Keyue; Kirkbride, Peter; Brundage, Michael; Cowan, Richard; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Sanders, Karen; Kostashuk, Edmund; Swanson, Greg; Barber, Jim; Hiltz, Andrea; Parmar, Mahesh KB; Sathya, Jinka; Anderson, John; Hayter, Charles; Hetherington, John; Sydes, Matthew R; Parulekar, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Whether the addition of radiation therapy (RT) improves overall survival in men with locally advanced prostate cancer managed with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is unclear. Our aim was to compare outcomes in such patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. Methods Patients with: locally advanced (T3 or T4) prostate cancer (n=1057); or organ-confined disease (T2) with either a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration more than 40 ng/mL (n=119) or PSA concentration more than 20 ng/mL and a Gleason score of 8 or higher (n=25), were randomly assigned (done centrally with stratification and dynamic minimisation, not masked) to receive lifelong ADT and RT (65–69 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles, 45 Gy to the pelvic nodes). The primary endpoint was overall survival. The results presented here are of an interim analysis planned for when two-thirds of the events for the final analysis were recorded. All efficacy analyses were done by intention to treat and were based on data from all patients. This trial is registered at controlledtrials.com as ISRCTN24991896 and Clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00002633. Results Between 1995 and 2005, 1205 patients were randomly assigned (602 in the ADT only group and 603 in the ADT and RT group); median follow-up was 6·0 years (IQR 4·4–8·0). At the time of analysis, a total of 320 patients had died, 175 in the ADT only group and 145 in the ADT and RT group. The addition of RT to ADT improved overall survival at 7 years (74%, 95% CI 70–78 vs 66%, 60–70; hazard ratio [HR] 0·77, 95% CI 0·61–0·98, p=0·033). Both toxicity and health-related quality-of-life results showed a small effect of RT on late gastrointestinal toxicity (rectal bleeding grade >3, three patients (0·5%) in the ADT only group, two (0·3%) in the ADT and RT group; diarrhoea grade >3, four patients (0·7%) vs eight (1·3%); urinary toxicity grade >3, 14 patients (2·3%) in both groups). Interpretation The benefits of combined

  6. Management Options in Advanced Prostate Cancer: What is the Role for Sipuleucel-T?

    PubMed

    Bitting, Rhonda L; Armstrong, Andrew J; George, Daniel J

    2011-01-01

    Most prostate cancer-related deaths occur in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Until recently, only therapy with docetaxel and prednisone has been shown to prolong survival in men with metastatic CRPC. With the United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) approvals of sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, and abiraterone acetate, all based on improvement in overall survival, the landscape for management of men with metastatic CRPC has dramatically changed. In this review we will discuss the pivotal clinical trial data leading to these approvals, with particular focus on the unique indication for sipuleucel-T and the implications for optimal management and sequencing of treatment in this patient population.

  7. Benefits of intermittent/continuous androgen deprivation in patients with advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    MURESANU, HORIA

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims In 1941 Huggins described the effect of castration on prostate cancer. gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH) analogues were introduced in 1985. Complete androgen blockade (association of GNRH analogue with antiandrogen) was introduced by Fernand Labrie to achieve suppression of suprarenal testosterone. Long time androgen deprivation lead to androgen independence of the prostate cancer cell. Our principal aim was to demonstrate longer survival rates on prostate cancer patients with intermittent androgen deprivation. Methods 82 patients in the Urology Department of Vasile Goldis West University Arad were included into two groups, with continuous and intermittent androgen deprivation. Treatment efficiency was assessed by the level of testosterone and PSA. Adverse events (AE) and serious adverse events were reported according to Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events (CTCAE) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Results Evolution towards castrate resistant prostate cancer: 12.5% from the intermittent androgen deprivation group and 23.8% from the continuous androgen deprivation group Mortality rate: 15% of patients from the intermittent androgen deprivation group; 19% of patients from the continuous androgen deprivation group Conclusions Better quality of life (Qol) in periods without treatment due to testosteron recovery; Less AE’s and metabolic syndrome (MS) related complications; Better survival and longer time of disease control and Cost reduction. PMID:27547063

  8. Increased risk of advanced prostate cancer associated with MnSOD Ala-9-Val gene polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Kucukgergin, Canan; Sanli, Oner; Tefik, Tzevat; Aydın, Makbule; Ozcan, Faruk; Seckin, Sule

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the association between manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) Ala-9-Val gene polymorphism and the initiation and/or progression of prostate cancer (PCa) as well as to evaluate its potential interactions with advanced age and smoking status. MnSOD Ala-9-Val gene polymorphism was carried out in 134 (mean age 64.1±7.48) PCa patients and 159 (mean age 62.5±7.53) healthy controls with serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels (<4 ng/ml) and normal digital rectal examination (DRE) findings in this prospectively designed study. PCa patients were classified as low stage disease (T1 or T2 and N0M0 stages) and high stage disease (T3 or T4 and N0M0 or N1 or M1 stages). Genotypes for MnSOD Ala-9-Val gene polymorphism were identified by using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFPL). Despite lack of association between different genotypes of MnSOD Ala-9-Val gene polymorphism and the presence of PCa, patients with Ala/Ala genotype were at an increased risk of high stage disease compared with those with the Val/Val genotype [odds ratio (OR), 3.77; 95% CI, 1.30-10.94; P=0.012]. However, no significant difference was observed in the distribution of each genotype among PCa patients, with respect to tumor grade. On the other hand, smoking status and aging did not seem to change the association between genotypes and PCa risk. Ala/Ala genotype of MnSOD polymorphism may have an effect on adverse features of PCa such as high stage disease.

  9. Lipids and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suburu, Janel; Chen, Yong Q.

    2012-01-01

    The role of lipid metabolism has gained particular interest in prostate cancer research. A large body of literature has outlined the unique upregulation of de novo lipid synthesis in prostate cancer. Concordant with this lipogenic phenotype is a metabolic shift, in which cancer cells use alternative enzymes and pathways to facilitate the production of fatty acids. These newly synthesized lipids may support a number of cellular processes to promote cancer cell proliferation and survival. Hence, de novo lipogenesis is under intense investigation as a therapeutic target. Epidemiologic studies suggest dietary fat may also contribute to prostate cancer; however, whether dietary lipids and de novo synthesized lipids are differentially metabolized remains unclear. Here, we highlight the lipogenic nature of prostate cancer, especially the promotion of de novo lipid synthesis, and the significance of various dietary lipids in prostate cancer development and progression. PMID:22503963

  10. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancers that don't respond to hormone therapy. Biological therapy Biological therapy (immunotherapy) uses your body's immune system to fight cancer cells. One type of biological therapy called sipuleucel-T (Provenge) has been developed ...

  11. Potent Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus for the Therapy of Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    strategies are urgently needed. We proposed to develop a novel virotherapy for prostate cancer during the funding period. Our working hypothesis was...animals. The extension of this studies demonstrates that co-administration of fusogenic virotherapy with cyclophosphamide, an approved anticancer...chemotherapy drug that also has immunosuppressive activities, can significantly increase the therapeutic effect of virotherapy , possibly by inhibiting the

  12. Targeted, On-Demand Charge Conversional Nanotherapeutics for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    hypothesis, nanoparticles were prepared via dialysis method by using Pep-b-PEG-b-PTMC or mPEG-PTMC polymers . Cathepsin K was pre-incubated at 37°C for 5...evaluated by measuring cell proliferation using MTT assay in cultured C4-2 prostate cancer cells. After 48-h incubation period, blank polymer without

  13. Therapeutic Rationales, Progresses, Failures, and Future Directions for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wadosky, Kristine M; Koochekpour, Shahriar

    2016-01-01

    Patients with localized prostate cancer (PCa) have several therapeutic options with good prognosis. However, survival of patients with high-risk, advanced PCa is significantly less than patients with early-stage, organ-confined disease. Testosterone and other androgens have been directly linked to PCa progression since 1941. In this review, we chronicle the discoveries that led to modern therapeutic strategies for PCa. Specifically highlighted is the biology of androgen receptor (AR), the nuclear receptor transcription factor largely responsible for androgen-stimulated and castrate-recurrent (CR) PCa. Current PCa treatment paradigms can be classified into three distinct but interrelated categories: targeting AR at pre-receptor, receptor, or post-receptor signaling. The continuing challenge of disease relapse as CR and/or metastatic tumors, destined to occur within three years of the initial treatment, is also discussed. We conclude that the success of PCa therapies in the future depends on targeting molecular mechanisms underlying tumor recurrence that still may affect AR at pre-receptor, receptor, and post-receptor levels. PMID:27019626

  14. Screening for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... for prostate cancer. It concluded that the expected harms of PSA screening are greater than the potential ... exam or other screening tests. Potential Benefits and Harms The main goal of a cancer screening test ...

  15. Prostate cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... test. A faster increase could show a more aggressive tumor. A prostate biopsy is done in your ... suggest the cancer is slow growing and not aggressive. Higher numbers indicate a faster growing cancer that ...

  16. Anti-GnRH antibodies can induce castrate levels of testosterone in patients with advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Simms, M S; Scholfield, D P; Jacobs, E; Michaeli, D; Broome, P; Humphreys, J E; Bishop, M C

    2000-01-01

    D17DT consists of the GnRH decapeptide linked to diphtheria toxoid. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the tolerance of D17DT and the production of anti-GnRH antibodies from two doses, 30 and 100 μg, in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. Twelve patients with histologically proven prostate cancer in whom hormonal therapy was indicated were recruited. Patients received either 30 or 100 μg given intramuscularly on three separate occasions over six weeks. Patients were followed up and blood was taken for estimation of serum testosterone, PSA and anti-GnRH antibody titre. Overall the drug was well tolerated. In 5 patients a significant reduction in serum testosterone and PSA was seen. Castrate levels of testosterone were achieved in 4 and maintained for up to 9 months. Patients with the highest antibody titre had the best response in terms of testosterone suppression. This study shows that it is possible to immunize a patient with prostate cancer against GnRH to induce castrate levels of testosterone. This state appears to be reversible. This novel form of immunotherapy may have advantages over conventional forms of hormonal therapy and further studies are warranted in order to try and increase the proportion of responders. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10945488

  17. Defining the radiobiology of prostate cancer progression: An important question in translational prostate cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Vourganti, Srinivas; Donaldson, Jeffrey; Johnson, Linda; Turkbey, Baris; Bratslavsky, Gennady; Kotula, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting men worldwide. High mortality rates from advanced and metastatic prostate cancer in the United States are contrasted by a relatively indolent course in the majority of cases. This gives hope for finding methods that could direct personalized diagnostic, preventative, and treatment approaches to patients with prostate cancer. Recent advances in multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MP-MRI) offer a noninvasive diagnostic intervention which allows correlation of prostate tumor image characteristics with underlying biologic evidence of tumor progression. The power of MP-MRI includes examination of both local invasion and nodal disease and might overcome the challenges of analyzing the multifocal nature of prostate cancer. Future directions include a careful analysis of the genomic signature of individual prostatic lesions utilizing image-guided biopsies. This review examines the diagnostic potential of MRI in prostate cancer. PMID:24879423

  18. Chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Vemana, Goutham; Hamilton, Robert J; Andriole, Gerald L; Freedland, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Large prospective randomized trials, such as the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT), Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events (REDUCE) trial, and Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT), have provided practitioners with considerable data regarding methods of treatment and prevention of prostate cancer. The best-studied medications for prevention are 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors. Their efficacy and side effects are well characterized. Other medications, dietary nutrients, and supplements have not been as well studied and generally do not demonstrate efficacy for disease prevention with an acceptable level of evidence.

  19. Cryosurgery for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Fahmy, W E; Bissada, N K

    2003-01-01

    Choice of management for patients with prostate cancer is influenced by patient and disease characteristics and life expectancy. Management options include expectance (watchful waiting), radical prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and cryosurgical ablation of the prostate (CSAP). The role of cryotherapy in the management of prostate cancer is still evolving. Continued research has allowed the introduction of efficient and safe cryosurgical equipment exemplified by the current third-generation cryosurgical machines. CSAP can be performed in an ambulatory surgery setting or as inpatient surgery with overnight stay. The procedure is performed under continuous ultrasonic monitoring. Mature data from the use of second-generation cryosurgical equipment indicate that CSAP is an effective therapeutic modality for managing patients with prostate cancer. Current data with the third-generation cryosurgical equipment are not mature. However, the favorable side effect profile and the good early responses seem to indicate that this modality will have a prominent role in the management of patients with prostate cancer.

  20. New Combination Therapies for Advanced Prostate Cancer Based on the Radiosensitizing Potential of 5-Azacytidine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    drug is known to impair the activity of DNA- methyltransferases, which blocks promoter cytosine methylation and alters gene expression on an epigenetic...repair genes . In addition, we have analyzed the effects of 5-azacytidine exposure on regulatory miRNA levels in prostate cancer cells. In the...third, final year. Effects of 5-azacytidine on epigenetic modulation of DNA repair genes . As discussed in our previous reports, we first

  1. Expression of Ki-67 (MIB-1) and GLUT-1 proteins in non-advanced prostatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Luczynska, Elzbieta; Gasinska, Anna; Wilk, Waclaw

    2012-12-01

    The expression of Ki-67 (MIB-1) and glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) were evaluated in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer (PC) who had undergone radical prostatectomy with curative intent. 140 low advanced PC specimens were studied. Protein expression was assessed immunohistochemically on tumour sections and expressed as a labelling index, i.e. the percentage of positively stained cells. In the case of Ki-67 nuclear staining and in the case of GLUT-1 membrane and cytoplasmic staining was considered as positive. The patients' mean age was 62.9 ±6.2 years. There were 13 (9.3%) at pTNM stage 1, 78 (55.7%) at stage 2, 40 (28.6%) at stage 3 and 9 (6.4%) at stage 4, respectively. 75 (53.6%) tumours were well differentiated (Gleason score ≤6), 52 (37.1%) moderately differentiated (Gleason score of 7) and 13 (9.3%) poorly differentiated (Gleason score 8-10). The mean pre-operative serum PSA was 9.9 ± SE 0.5 ng/ml, and the mean LI was equal to 8.1 ±0.6% and 29.7 ±2.0%, for MIB-1 and GLUT-1, respectively. Increase of pathological tumor volume and tumor grade was associated with statistically significant growth of PSA (p < 0.011) and MIB-1LI (p < 0.003), however, for GLUT-1 LI the relation was not significant. Ki-67 expression was correlated with PSA levels (p = 0.013) and GLUT-1 scores (p = 0.04). In PC, an increase in the proliferation rate (higher MIB-1LI) in higher pTNM stages and tumour grades may point to Ki-67 as a good marker of biological aggressiveness useful in selecting patients for more aggressive treatment. A correlation between proliferation and GLUT-1 score may be the evidence of active glycolytic metabolism in hypoxic regions.

  2. Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer Abiraterone Acetate Bicalutamide Cabazitaxel Casodex (Bicalutamide) Degarelix Docetaxel ...

  3. Chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Brand, Timothy C; Canby-Hagino, Edith D; Pratap Kumar, A; Ghosh, Rita; Leach, Robin J; Thompson, Ian M

    2006-08-01

    Prostate cancer is a common malignancy with multiple potential opportunities for cancer prevention. As the genetic basis of this malignancy is further understood, prevention strategies will be developed for individual patients based on specific risk factors and pathways of carcinogenesis. The PCPT has conclusively proven that prostate cancer prevention is possible. The results of the SELECT should be available within several years. An enormous challenge for the medical community will be the development of an efficient strategy to evaluate the substantial number of dietary, behavioral, and pharmacologic prevention opportunities. Ultimately, the goal of prostate can-cer prevention is to (1) identify men who are destined to develop clinically significant prostate cancer, and (2) provide individualized agents to prevent disease development.

  4. Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Recent Advances, Lessons Learned, and Areas for Further Research

    PubMed Central

    Gulley, James L.; Drake, Charles G.

    2012-01-01

    A surge of interest in therapeutic cancer vaccines has arisen in the wake of recent clinical trials suggesting statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvements in overall survival—with substantially limited side effects compared with chemotherapy—in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. One of these trials led to the registration of sipuleucel-T, the first approved therapeutic vaccine for cancer patients. This review highlights emerging patterns from clinical trials suggesting more appropriate patient populations (i.e., lower tumor volume, less aggressive disease) and endpoints (i.e., overall survival) for studies of immunotherapy alone, as well as biologically plausible explanations for these findings. We also explore the rationale for ongoing and planned studies combining therapeutic vaccines with other modalities. Finally, we attempt to put these findings into a practical clinical context and suggest fertile areas for future study. While our discussion focuses on prostate cancer, the concepts we address most likely have broad applicability to immunotherapy for other cancers as well. PMID:21680544

  5. Cabozantinib Eradicates Advanced Murine Prostate Cancer by Activating Anti-Tumor Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Akash; Swanson, Kenneth D; Csizmadia, Eva; Solanki, Aniruddh; Landon-Brace, Natalie; Gehring, Marina P; Helenius, Katja; Olson, Brian M; Pyzer, Athalia R; Wang, Lily C; Elemento, Olivier; Novak, Jesse; Thornley, Thomas B; Asara, John M; Montaser, Laleh; Timmons, Joshua J; Morgan, Todd M; Wang, Yugang; Levantini, Elena; Clohessy, John G; Kelly, Kathleen; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Rosenblatt, Jacalyn M; Avigan, David E; Ye, Huihui; Karp, Jeffrey M; Signoretti, Sabina; Balk, Steven P; Cantley, Lewis C

    2017-03-08

    Several kinase inhibitors that target aberrant signaling pathways in tumor cells have been deployed in cancer therapy. However, their impact on the tumor immune microenvironment remains poorly understood. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor cabozantinib showed striking responses in cancer clinical trial patients across several malignancies. Here we show that cabozantinib rapidly eradicates invasive, poorly-differentiated PTEN/p53 deficient murine prostate cancer. This was associated with enhanced release of neutrophil chemotactic factors from tumor cells, including CXCL12 and HMGB1, resulting in robust infiltration of neutrophils into the tumor. Critically, cabozantinib-induced tumor clearance in mice was abolished by antibody-mediated granulocyte depletion or HMGB1 neutralization or blockade of neutrophil chemotaxis with the CXCR4 inhibitor, plerixafor. Collectively, these data demonstrate that cabozantinib triggers a neutrophil-mediated anti-cancer innate immune response, resulting in tumor clearance.

  6. Is whole gland salvage cryotherapy effective as palliative treatment of haematuria in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer? Results of a preliminary case series

    PubMed Central

    Mucciardi, Giuseppe; Galì, Alessandro; Pappalardo, Rosa; Lembo, Francesco; Anastasi, Giuseppina; Butticè, Salvatore; Ascenti, Giorgio; Lugnani, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Locally advanced prostate cancer may cause several complications such as haematuria, bladder outlet obstruction, and renal failure due to the ureteral obstruction. Various treatments have been suggested, including radiotherapy, antifibrinolytics, bladder irrigation with alum solution, transurethral surgery and angioembolization, none of which have proven effectiveness. In the last years cryoablation has become a valid therapeutic option for prostate cancer. In our experience we used this ‘new’ technique as haemostatic therapy. Methods: We selected four patients with gross haematuria affected by locally advanced hormone refractory prostate cancer, who had already been treated with primary radiotherapy. We used third-generation cryotherapy: under ultrasonographic guidance, we inserted six cryoprobes, two in each of the vascular pedicles reaching at least −60°C, and three thermometers. We then induced two freeze–thaw cycles. Results: After the operation the haematuria stopped in all patients and at 9-month follow up we observed a mean of four red cells (range three to five) in the urinary sediment with no evidence of bacteriuria. Prostate volume, prostate-specific antigen and postmicturition residue were significantly reduced. Qmax improved significantly too. Conclusion: Our experience has given us good results with minimal intra- and postoperative complications. We think that haemostatic cryotherapy as a palliative approach for locally advanced prostate cancer could represent a valid treatment option and more consideration could be given to its use. PMID:26425138

  7. Development of Personalized Cancer Therapy for Men with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Representative sagittal MR images of femurs. Images were acquired using T2- weighted fast spin echo sequence with fat suppression of femurs bearing MDA PCa 118b...Nearest person month worked: 3 calendar months Contribution to Project: Ms. Wang is responsible for preparing cell and tumor lines for the planned...therapies in the mouse model and in paired patient biopsy samples. Prime: PR110555 ( Wang ); CPRIT Subaward: S110092 Title: Activation of Prostate

  8. Development of Personalized Cancer Therapy for Men with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    sequence with fat suppression of femurs bearing MDA PCa 118b derived tumors in control and treated mice. Arrows indicate tumor. (B) Tumor volume...person month worked: 3 calendar months Contribution to Project: Ms. Wang is responsible for preparing cell and tumor lines for the planned experiments...therapies in the mouse model and in paired patient biopsy samples. Prime: PR110555 ( Wang ); CPRIT Subaward: S110092 Title: Activation of Prostate

  9. Sequencing therapy in advanced prostate cancer: focus on sipuleucel-T.

    PubMed

    Quinn, David I; Vaishampayan, Ulka; Higano, Celestia S; Lin, Daniel W; Shore, Neal D; Beer, Tomasz M

    2014-01-01

    Immunotherapies such as sipuleucel-T present new and unique challenges for the optimal timing and sequencing of therapies for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Key considerations for the sequencing of sipuleucel-T are its unique proposed mechanism of action, the time required to generate a clinically relevant immune response, and the observed efficacy in Phase III trials in 'early' or asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic mCRPC. There are three broad timing and sequencing options for sipuleucel-T in patients with rising prostate-specific antigen and radiologic evidence of disease: immediately after androgen-deprivation therapy failure, after failure of secondary hormonal maneuvers, or after chemotherapy. There are several other agents in Phase III development in mCRPC and any future approvals will impact on the current treatment algorithm, and raise further questions regarding how to optimize sequencing and timing of therapies for better clinical outcomes.

  10. Cholesterol and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Pelton, Kristine; Freeman, Michael R; Solomon, Keith R

    2012-12-01

    Prostate cancer risk can be modified by environmental factors, however the molecular mechanisms affecting susceptibility to this disease are not well understood. As a result of a series of recently published studies, the steroidal lipid, cholesterol, has emerged as a clinically relevant therapeutic target in prostate cancer. This review summarizes the findings from human studies as well as animal and cell biology models, which suggest that high circulating cholesterol increases risk of aggressive prostate cancer, while cholesterol lowering strategies may confer protective benefit. Relevant molecular processes that have been experimentally tested and might explain these associations are described. We suggest that these promising results now could be applied prospectively to attempt to lower risk of prostate cancer in select populations.

  11. Zinc and prostatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yang; Ho, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Aim to understand the connection between zinc and prostatic cancer, and to summarize the recent findings about the functions of zinc in the maintenance of prostate health. Recent findings Contradictory findings have been reported by epidemiologic studies examining the association between zinc intake and the risk of prostate cancer. However, a growing body of experimental evidence support that high zinc levels are essential for prostate health. The possible mechanisms include the effects of zinc on the inhibition of terminal oxidation, induction of mitochondrial apoptogenesis, and suppression of NFκB activity. The most recent finding is the effects of zinc in the maintenance of DNA integrity in normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) by modulating the expression and activity of DNA repair and damage response proteins, especially p53. Zinc depletion in PrEC increased p53 expression but compromised p53 DNA binding activity resulting an impaired DNA repair function. Moreover, recent findings support the role of zinc transporters as tumor suppressors in the prostate. Summary Future studies need to discover sensitive and specific zinc biomarkers and perform more in vivo studies on the effects of zinc on prostate functions in normal animals or prostate cancer models. PMID:19684515

  12. Oxidative Stress, DNA Repair, and Prostate Cancer Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    have concluded that DRC is not a risk factor for prostate cancer microRNA prostate cancer Hua.Zhao@RoswellPark.org Table of Contents...known and suspected risk factors for prostate cancer are associated with elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) (advancing age, inflammation...association between DNA repair capacity and prostate cancer risk might be due to the fact of using surrogate tissues , not the target tissues . In this study

  13. Particle radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Suefuji, Hiroaki; Sinoto, Makoto; Matsunobu, Akira; Toyama, Shingo; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Kudo, Sho

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in external beam radiotherapy have allowed us to deliver higher doses to the tumors while decreasing doses to the surrounding tissues. Dose escalation using high-precision radiotherapy has improved the treatment outcomes of prostate cancer. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy has been widely used throughout the world as the most advanced form of photon radiotherapy. In contrast, particle radiotherapy has also been under development, and has been used as an effective and non-invasive radiation modality for prostate and other cancers. Among the particles used in such treatments, protons and carbon ions have the physical advantage that the dose can be focused on the tumor with only minimal exposure of the surrounding normal tissues. Furthermore, carbon ions also have radiobiological advantages that include higher killing effects on intrinsic radio-resistant tumors, hypoxic tumor cells and tumor cells in the G0 or S phase. However, the degree of clinical benefit derived from these theoretical advantages in the treatment of prostate cancer has not been adequately determined. The present article reviews the available literature on the use of particle radiotherapy for prostate cancer as well as the literature on the physical and radiobiological properties of this treatment, and discusses the role and the relative merits of particle radiotherapy compared with current photon-based radiotherapy, with a focus on proton beam therapy and carbon ion radiotherapy.

  14. PSA and beyond: alternative prostate cancer biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of biomarkers for prostate cancer screening, diagnosis and prognosis has the potential to improve the clinical management of the patients. Owing to inherent limitations of the biomarker prostate-specific antigen (PSA), intensive efforts are currently directed towards a search for alternative prostate cancer biomarkers, particularly those that can predict disease aggressiveness and drive better treatment decisions. Methods A literature search of Medline articles focused on recent and emerging advances in prostate cancer biomarkers was performed. The most promising biomarkers that have the potential to meet the unmet clinical needs in prostate cancer patient management and/or that are clinically implemented were selected. Conclusions With the advent of advanced genomic and proteomic technologies, we have in recent years seen an enormous spurt in prostate cancer biomarker research with several promising alternative biomarkers being discovered that show an improved sensitivity and specificity over PSA. The new generation of biomarkers can be tested via serum, urine, or tissue-based assays that have either received regulatory approval by the US Food and Drug Administration or are available as Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-based laboratory developed tests. Additional emerging novel biomarkers for prostate cancer, including circulating tumor cells, microRNAs and exosomes, are still in their infancy. Together, these biomarkers provide actionable guidance for prostate cancer risk assessment, and are expected to lead to an era of personalized medicine. PMID:26790878

  15. Repurposing Itraconazole as a Treatment for Advanced Prostate Cancer: A Noncomparative Randomized Phase II Trial in Men With Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Elisabeth I.; Smith, David C.; Rathkopf, Dana; Blackford, Amanda L.; Danila, Daniel C.; King, Serina; Frost, Anja; Ajiboye, A. Seun; Zhao, Ming; Mendonca, Janet; Kachhap, Sushant K.; Rudek, Michelle A.; Carducci, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The antifungal drug itraconazole inhibits angiogenesis and Hedgehog signaling and delays tumor growth in murine prostate cancer xenograft models. We conducted a noncomparative, randomized, phase II study evaluating the antitumor efficacy of two doses of oral itraconazole in men with metastatic prostate cancer. Patients and Methods. We randomly assigned 46 men with chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) to receive low-dose (200 mg/day) or high-dose (600 mg/day) itraconazole until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary endpoint was the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression-free survival (PPFS) rate at 24 weeks; a 45% success rate in either arm was prespecified as constituting clinical significance. Secondary endpoints included the progression-free survival (PFS) rate and PSA response rate (Prostate Cancer Working Group criteria). Exploratory outcomes included circulating tumor cell (CTC) enumeration, serum androgen measurements, as well as pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses. Results. The high-dose arm enrolled to completion (n = 29), but the low-dose arm closed early (n = 17) because of a prespecified futility rule. The PPFS rates at 24 weeks were 11.8% in the low-dose arm and 48.0% in the high-dose arm. The median PFS times were 11.9 weeks and 35.9 weeks, respectively. PSA response rates were 0% and 14.3%, respectively. In addition, itraconazole had favorable effects on CTC counts, and it suppressed Hedgehog signaling in skin biopsy samples. Itraconazole did not reduce serum testosterone or dehydroepiandrostenedione sulfate levels. Common toxicities included fatigue, nausea, anorexia, rash, and a syndrome of hypokalemia, hypertension, and edema. Conclusion. High-dose itraconazole (600 mg/day) has modest antitumor activity in men with metastatic CRPC that is not mediated by testosterone suppression. PMID:23340005

  16. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy of Pelvic Lymph Nodes in Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Planning Procedures and Early Experiences

    SciTech Connect

    Muren, Ludvig Paul Wasbo, Ellen; Helle, Svein Inge; Hysing, Liv Bolstad; Karlsdottir, Asa; Odland, Odd Harald; Valen, Harald; Ekerold, Randi; Johannessen, Dag Clement

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: We present planning and early clinical outcomes of a study of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for locally advanced prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 43 patients initially treated with an IMRT plan delivering 50 Gy to the prostate, seminal vesicles, and pelvic lymph nodes, followed by a conformal radiotherapy (CRT) plan delivering 20 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles, were studied. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) data for the added plans were compared with dose-volume histogram data for the sum of two CRT plans for 15 cases. Gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity, based on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scoring system, was recorded weekly throughout treatment as well as 3 to 18 months after treatment and are presented. Results: Treatment with IMRT both reduced normal tissue doses and increased the minimum target doses. Intestine volumes receiving more than 40 and 50 Gy were significantly reduced (e.g., at 50 Gy, from 81 to 19 cm{sup 3}; p = 0.026), as were bladder volumes above 40, 50, and 60 Gy, rectum volumes above 30, 50, and 60 Gy, and hip joint muscle volumes above 20, 30, and 40 Gy. During treatment, Grade 2 GI toxicity was reported by 12 of 43 patients (28%), and Grade 2 to 4 GU toxicity was also observed among 12 patients (28%). With 6 to 18 months of follow-up, 2 patients (5%) experienced Grade 2 GI effects and 7 patients (16%) experienced Grade 2 GU effects. Conclusions: Use of IMRT for pelvic irradiation in prostate cancer reduces normal tissue doses, improves target coverage, and has a promising toxicity profile.

  17. Bone-targeting agents in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suzman, Daniel L.; Boikos, Sosipatros A.; Carducci, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Bone metastases are present in the vast majority of men with advanced prostate cancer, representing the main cause for morbidity and mortality. Recurrent or metastatic disease is managed initially with androgen deprivation but the majority of the patients eventually will progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer, with patients developing bone metastases in most of the cases. Survival and growth of the metastatic prostate cancer cells is dependent on a complex microenvironment (onco-niche) that includes the osteoblasts, the osteoclasts, the endothelium, and the stroma. This review summarizes agents that target the pathways involved in this complex interaction between prostate cancer and bone micro-environment and aim to transform lethal metastatic prostate cancer into a chronic disease. PMID:24398856

  18. Triptorelin in the Relief of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Advanced Prostate Cancer Patients: The RESULT Study.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Alexandre; Aoun, Fouad; De Ruyter, Vincent; Cabri, Patrick; Van Velthoven, Roland

    2015-01-01

    This prospective, noninterventional, open-label, multicentre, Belgian study assessed the prevalence of moderate to severe lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in patients with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer scheduled to receive triptorelin therapy and its effects on LUTS were evaluated focusing on symptom relief and changes in quality of life (QOL) related to urinary symptoms (November 2006 to May 2010). Inclusion criteria were age >18 years, histologically confirmed advanced or metastatic prostate cancer, and life expectancy ≥12 months. Exclusion criteria were treatment with any LHRH analogue within the last 6 months or any other investigational agent within the last 3 months before study entry. Patients who received one or more triptorelin doses and had one or more efficacy assessments were evaluated. In total, 325 patients were included with a median age of 74 years (50 to 95 years). Mean age at first diagnosis was 73 ± 8 years. Moderate (IPSS 8-19) to severe (IPSS ≥ 20) LUTS were observed in 62% of patients. Triptorelin reduced LUTS severity. This improvement was perceived within the first 24 weeks of treatment and was maintained after 48 weeks. A decrease in PSA level was also observed.

  19. Understanding your prostate cancer risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000931.htm Understanding your prostate cancer risk To use the sharing features on this ... enable JavaScript. Are you at risk for developing prostate cancer in your lifetime? Learn about the risk factors ...

  20. SRC family kinase FYN promotes the neuroendocrine phenotype and visceral metastasis in advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sievert, Margarit; Duan, Peng; Lichterman, Jake; Huang, Jen-Ming; Smith, Bethany; You, Sungyong; Nandana, Srinivas; Chu, Gina Chia-Yi; Mink, Sheldon; Josson, Sajni; Liu, Chunyan; Morello, Matteo; Jones, Lawrence W. M.; Kim, Jayoung; Freeman, Michael R.; Bhowmick, Neil; Zhau, Haiyen E.; Chung, Leland W.K.; Posadas, Edwin M.

    2015-01-01

    FYN is a SRC family kinase (SFK) that has been shown to be up-regulated in human prostate cancer (PCa) tissues and cell lines. In this study, we observed that FYN is strongly up-regulated in human neuroendocrine PCa (NEPC) tissues and xenografts, as well as cells derived from a NEPC transgenic mouse model. In silico analysis of FYN expression in prostate cancer cell line databases revealed an association with the expression of neuroendocrine (NE) markers such as CHGA, CD44, CD56, and SYP. The loss of FYN abrogated the invasion of PC3 and ARCaPM cells in response to MET receptor ligand HGF. FYN also contributed to the metastatic potential of NEPC cells in two mouse models of visceral metastasis with two different cell lines (PC3 and TRAMPC2-RANKL). The activation of MET appeared to regulate neuroendocrine (NE) features as evidenced by increased expression of NE markers in PC3 cells with HGF. Importantly, the overexpression of FYN protein in DU145 cells was directly correlated with the increase of CHGA. Thus, our data demonstrated that the neuroendocrine differentiation that occurs in PCa cells is, at least in part, regulated by FYN kinase. Understanding the role of FYN in the regulation of NE markers will provide further support for ongoing clinical trials of SFK and MET inhibitors in castration-resistant PCa patients. PMID:26624980

  1. The Present and Future of Biomarkers in Prostate Cancer: Proteomics, Genomics, and Immunology Advancements

    PubMed Central

    Gaudreau, Pierre-Olivier; Stagg, John; Soulières, Denis; Saad, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the second most common form of cancer in men worldwide. Biomarkers have emerged as essential tools for treatment and assessment since the variability of disease behavior, the cost and diversity of treatments, and the related impairment of quality of life have given rise to a need for a personalized approach. High-throughput technology platforms in proteomics and genomics have accelerated the development of biomarkers. Furthermore, recent successes of several new agents in PC, including immunotherapy, have stimulated the search for predictors of response and resistance and have improved the understanding of the biological mechanisms at work. This review provides an overview of currently established biomarkers in PC, as well as a selection of the most promising biomarkers within these particular fields of development. PMID:27168728

  2. Epigenetics of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    McKee, Tawnya C; Tricoli, James V

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of novel technologies that can be applied to the investigation of the molecular underpinnings of human cancer has allowed for new insights into the mechanisms associated with tumor development and progression. They have also advanced the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of cancer. These technologies include microarray and other analysis methods for the generation of large-scale gene expression data on both mRNA and miRNA, next-generation DNA sequencing technologies utilizing a number of platforms to perform whole genome, whole exome, or targeted DNA sequencing to determine somatic mutational differences and gene rearrangements, and a variety of proteomic analysis platforms including liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis to survey alterations in protein profiles in tumors. One other important advancement has been our current ability to survey the methylome of human tumors in a comprehensive fashion through the use of sequence-based and array-based methylation analysis (Bock et al., Nat Biotechnol 28:1106-1114, 2010; Harris et al., Nat Biotechnol 28:1097-1105, 2010). The focus of this chapter is to present and discuss the evidence for key genes involved in prostate tumor development, progression, or resistance to therapy that are regulated by methylation-induced silencing.

  3. The evolving biology and treatment of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taichman, Russel S.; Loberg, Robert D.; Mehra, Rohit; Pienta, Kenneth J.

    2007-01-01

    Since the effectiveness of androgen deprivation for treatment of advanced prostate cancer was first demonstrated, prevention strategies and medical therapies for prostate cancer have been based on understanding the biologic underpinnings of the disease. Prostate cancer treatment is one of the best examples of a systematic therapeutic approach to target not only the cancer cells themselves, but the microenvironment in which they are proliferating. As the population ages and prostate cancer prevalence increases, challenges remain in the diagnosis of clinically relevant prostate cancer as well as the management of the metastatic and androgen-independent metastatic disease states. PMID:17786228

  4. MYC and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Cheryl M.; Bieberich, Charles J.; Dang, Chi V.; Nelson, William G.; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; De Marzo, Angelo M.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer, the majority of which is adenocarcinoma, is the most common epithelial cancer affecting a majority of elderly men in Western nations. Its manifestation, however, varies from clinically asymptomatic insidious neoplasms that progress slowly and do not threaten life to one that is highly aggressive with a propensity for metastatic spread and lethality if not treated in time. A number of somatic genetic and epigenetic alterations occur in prostate cancer cells. Some of these changes, such as loss of the tumor suppressors PTEN and p53, are linked to disease progression. Others, such as ETS gene fusions, appear to be linked more with early phases of the disease, such as invasion. Alterations in chromosome 8q24 in the region of MYC have also been linked to disease aggressiveness for many years. However, a number of recent studies in human tissues have indicated that MYC appears to be activated at the earliest phases of prostate cancer (e.g., in tumor-initiating cells) in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, a key precursor lesion to invasive prostatic adenocarcinoma. The initiation and early progression of prostate cancer can be recapitulated in genetically engineered mouse models, permitting a richer understanding of the cause and effects of loss of tumor suppressors and activation of MYC. The combination of studies using human tissues and mouse models paints an emerging molecular picture of prostate cancer development and early progression. This picture reveals that MYC contributes to disease initiation and progression by stimulating an embryonic stem cell–like signature characterized by an enrichment of genes involved in ribosome biogenesis and by repressing differentiation. These insights pave the way to potential novel therapeutic concepts based on MYC biology. PMID:21779461

  5. Development of New Treatments for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    DiPaola, R. S.; Abate-Shen, C.; Hait, W. N.

    2005-02-01

    The Dean and Betty Gallo Prostate Cancer Center (GPCC) was established with the goal of eradicating prostate cancer and improving the lives of men at risk for the disease through research, treatment, education and prevention. GPCC was founded in the memory of Dean Gallo, a beloved New Jersey Congressman who died tragically of prostate cancer diagnosed at an advanced stage. GPCC unites a team of outstanding researchers and clinicians who are committed to high-quality basic research, translation of innovative research to the clinic, exceptional patient care, and improving public education and awareness of prostate cancer. GPCC is a center of excellence of The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, which is the only NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center in the state. GPCC efforts are now integrated well as part of our Prostate Program at CINJ, in which Dr. Robert DiPaola and Dr. Cory Abate-Shen are co-leaders. The Prostate Program unites 19 investigators from 10 academic departments who have broad and complementary expertise in prostate cancer research. The overall goal and unifying theme is to elucidate basic mechanisms of prostate growth and oncogenesis, with the ultimate goal of promoting new and effective strategies for the eradication of prostate cancer. Members' wide range of research interests collectively optimize the chances of providing new insights into normal prostate biology and unraveling the molecular pathophysiology of prostate cancer. Cell culture and powerful animal models developed by program members recapitulate the various stages of prostate cancer progression, including prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, adenocarcinoma, androgen-independence, invasion and metastases. These models promise to further strengthen an already robust program of investigator-initiated therapeutic clinical trials, including studies adopted by national cooperative groups. Efforts to translate laboratory results into clinical studies of early detection and chemoprevention

  6. [Sexuality and prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Colson, M-H; Lechevallier, E; Rambeaud, J-J; Alimi, J-C; Faix, A; Gravis, G; Hannoun-Levi, J-M; Quintens, H; Rébillard, X; Droupy, S

    2012-09-01

    All treatments of prostate cancer have a negative effect on both sexuality and male fertility. There is a specific profile of changes in the fields of quality of life, sexual, urinary, bowel and vitality according to the treatment modalities chosen. Maintain a satisfying sex is the main concern of a majority of men facing prostate cancer and its treatment. It is essential to assess the couple's sexuality before diagnosis of prostate cancer in order to deliver complete information and to consider early and appropriate treatment options at the request of the couple. Forms of sexuality sexual preference settings stored (orgasm) may, when the erection is not yet recovered, be an alternative to the couple to maintain intimacy and complicity. In all cases, a specific management and networking will in many cases to find a satisfactory sexuality. Consequences of the treatment on male fertility should be part of the information of patients with prostate cancer and their partners. The choice of treatment must take into account the desire of paternity of the couple. A semen analysis with sperm cryopreservation before any therapy should be routinely offered in men with prostate cancer, particularly among men under 55, with a partner under 43 years old or without children. If the desire for parenthood among couples, sperm cryopreservation before treatment and medical assisted reproduction are recommended.

  7. Promoter Hypermethylation in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background The prostate gland is the most common site of cancer and the second leading cause of cancer mortality in American men. It is well known that epigenetic alterations such as DNA methylation within the regulatory (promoter) regions of genes are associated with transcriptional silencing in cancer. Promoter hypermethylation of critical pathway genes could be potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for prostate cancer. Methods This review discusses current information on methylated genes associated with prostate cancer development and progression. Results Over 30 genes have been investigated for promoter methylation in prostate cancer. These methylated genes are involved in critical pathways, such as DNA repair, metabolism, and invasion/metastasis. The role of hypermethylated genes in regulation of critical pathways in prostate cancer is reviewed. Conclusions These findings may provide new information of the pathogenesis of prostate cancer. Certain epigenetic alterations in prostate tumors are being translated into clinical practice for therapeutic use. PMID:20861812

  8. The 21st Annual Prostate Cancer Foundation Scientific Retreat report.

    PubMed

    Miyahira, Andrea K; Simons, Jonathan W; Soule, Howard R

    2015-08-01

    The 21st Annual Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) Scientific Retreat was held from October 23-25, 2014, in Carlsbad, CA. This event is the world's foremost scientific meeting focusing on prostate cancer and brings together leading basic, translational and clinical researchers in prostate cancer and other diverse disciplines to discuss the newest findings most likely to advance the understanding of prostate cancer and the clinical care of prostate cancer patients. This year's meeting highlighted themes including: (i) research integrity and standards for scientific reproducibility; (ii) prostate cancer disparities; (iii) mechanisms and models of prostate cancer progression and dormancy; (iv) mechanisms of therapeutic resistance; and (v) advancements in precision medicine treatments, treatment models, and predictive and prognostic biomarkers.

  9. Prostate Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... HPV-Associated Lung Ovarian Skin Uterine Cancer Home Prostate Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity Language: English Español ( ... Tweet Share Compartir The rate of men getting prostate cancer or dying from prostate cancer varies by race ...

  10. Daily Pomegranate Intake Has No Impact on PSA Levels in Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer - Results of a Phase IIb Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Stenner-Liewen, Frank; Liewen, Heike; Cathomas, Richard; Renner, Christoph; Petrausch, Ulf; Sulser, Tullio; Spanaus, Katharina; Seifert, Hans Helge; Strebel, Räto Thomas; Knuth, Alexander; Samaras, Panagiotis; Müntener, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Pomegranate has been shown to prolong PSA doubling time in early prostate cancer, but no data from a placebo controlled trial has been published yet. The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the impact of pomegranate juice in patients with prostate cancer. We conducted a phase IIb, double blinded, randomized placebo controlled trial in patients with histologically confirmed prostate cancer. Only patients with a PSA value ≥ 5ng/ml were included. The subjects consumed 500 ml of pomegranate juice or 500 ml of placebo beverage every day for a 4 week period. Thereafter, all patients received 250 ml of the pomegranate juice daily for another 4 weeks. PSA values were taken at baseline, day 14, 28 and on day 56. The primary endpoint was the detection of a significant difference in PSA serum levels between the groups after one month of treatment. Pain scores and adherence to intervention were recorded using patient diaries. 102 patients were enrolled. The majority of patients had castration resistant prostate cancer (68%). 98 received either pomegranate juice or placebo between October 2008 and May 2011. Adherence to protocol was good, with 94 patients (96%) completing the first period and 87 patients (89%) completing both periods. No grade 3 or higher toxicities occurred within the study. No differences were detected between the two groups with regard to PSA kinetics and pain scores. Consumption of pomegranate juice as an adjunct intervention in men with advanced prostate cancer does not result in significant PSA declines compared to placebo. PMID:24069070

  11. Daily Pomegranate Intake Has No Impact on PSA Levels in Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer - Results of a Phase IIb Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Stenner-Liewen, Frank; Liewen, Heike; Cathomas, Richard; Renner, Christoph; Petrausch, Ulf; Sulser, Tullio; Spanaus, Katharina; Seifert, Hans Helge; Strebel, Räto Thomas; Knuth, Alexander; Samaras, Panagiotis; Müntener, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Pomegranate has been shown to prolong PSA doubling time in early prostate cancer, but no data from a placebo controlled trial has been published yet. The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the impact of pomegranate juice in patients with prostate cancer. We conducted a phase IIb, double blinded, randomized placebo controlled trial in patients with histologically confirmed prostate cancer. Only patients with a PSA value ≥ 5ng/ml were included. The subjects consumed 500 ml of pomegranate juice or 500 ml of placebo beverage every day for a 4 week period. Thereafter, all patients received 250 ml of the pomegranate juice daily for another 4 weeks. PSA values were taken at baseline, day 14, 28 and on day 56. The primary endpoint was the detection of a significant difference in PSA serum levels between the groups after one month of treatment. Pain scores and adherence to intervention were recorded using patient diaries. 102 patients were enrolled. The majority of patients had castration resistant prostate cancer (68%). 98 received either pomegranate juice or placebo between October 2008 and May 2011. Adherence to protocol was good, with 94 patients (96%) completing the first period and 87 patients (89%) completing both periods. No grade 3 or higher toxicities occurred within the study. No differences were detected between the two groups with regard to PSA kinetics and pain scores. Consumption of pomegranate juice as an adjunct intervention in men with advanced prostate cancer does not result in significant PSA declines compared to placebo.

  12. American Cancer Society Recommendations for Prostate Cancer Early Detection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prostate Cancer Prevention and Early Detection American Cancer Society Recommendations for Prostate Cancer Early Detection The American Cancer Society (ACS) recommends that men have a chance to ...

  13. State-of-the-art imaging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Marko, Jamie; Gould, C Frank; Bonavia, Grant H; Wolfman, Darcy J

    2016-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men. Modern medical imaging is intimately involved in the diagnosis and management of prostate cancer. Ultrasound is primarily used to guide prostate biopsy to establish the diagnosis of prostate carcinoma. Prostate magnetic resonance imaging uses a multiparametric approach, including anatomic and functional imaging sequences. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging can be used for detection and localization of prostate cancer and to evaluate for disease recurrence. Computed tomography and scintigraphic imaging are primarily used to detect regional lymph node spread and distant metastases. Recent advancements in ultrasound, multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, and scintigraphic imaging have the potential to change the way prostate cancer is diagnosed and managed. This article addresses the major imaging modalities involved in the evaluation of prostate cancer and updates the reader on the state of the art for each modality.

  14. Final Report of the Intergroup Randomized Study of Combined Androgen-Deprivation Therapy Plus Radiotherapy Versus Androgen-Deprivation Therapy Alone in Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Malcolm D.; Parulekar, Wendy R.; Sydes, Matthew R.; Brundage, Michael; Kirkbride, Peter; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Cowan, Richard; Kostashuk, Edmund C.; Anderson, John; Swanson, Gregory; Parmar, Mahesh K.B.; Hayter, Charles; Jovic, Gordana; Hiltz, Andrea; Hetherington, John; Sathya, Jinka; Barber, James B.P.; McKenzie, Michael; El-Sharkawi, Salah; Souhami, Luis; Hardman, P.D. John; Chen, Bingshu E.; Warde, Padraig

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We have previously reported that radiotherapy (RT) added to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) improves survival in men with locally advanced prostate cancer. Here, we report the prespecified final analysis of this randomized trial. Patients and Methods NCIC Clinical Trials Group PR.3/Medical Research Council PR07/Intergroup T94-0110 was a randomized controlled trial of patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. Patients with T3-4, N0/Nx, M0 prostate cancer or T1-2 disease with either prostate-specific antigen (PSA) of more than 40 μg/L or PSA of 20 to 40 μg/L plus Gleason score of 8 to 10 were randomly assigned to lifelong ADT alone or to ADT+RT. The RT dose was 64 to 69 Gy in 35 to 39 fractions to the prostate and pelvis or prostate alone. Overall survival was compared using a log-rank test stratified for prespecified variables. Results One thousand two hundred five patients were randomly assigned between 1995 and 2005, 602 to ADT alone and 603 to ADT+RT. At a median follow-up time of 8 years, 465 patients had died, including 199 patients from prostate cancer. Overall survival was significantly improved in the patients allocated to ADT+RT (hazard ratio [HR], 0.70; 95% CI, 0.57 to 0.85; P < .001). Deaths from prostate cancer were significantly reduced by the addition of RT to ADT (HR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.34 to 0.61; P < .001). Patients on ADT+RT reported a higher frequency of adverse events related to bowel toxicity, but only two of 589 patients had grade 3 or greater diarrhea at 24 months after RT. Conclusion This analysis demonstrates that the previously reported benefit in survival is maintained at a median follow-up of 8 years and firmly establishes the role of RT in the treatment of men with locally advanced prostate cancer. PMID:25691677

  15. Expectant Management (Watchful Waiting) and Active Surveillance for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prostate Cancer Watchful Waiting or Active Surveillance for Prostate Cancer Because prostate cancer often grows very slowly, some ... Away or Comes Back After Treatment More In Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  16. What Are the Key Statistics for Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Research? Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer Key Statistics for Prostate Cancer How common is prostate cancer? ... at some point are still alive today. For statistics related to survival, see Survival Rates for Prostate ...

  17. Molecular pathways and targets in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shtivelman, Emma; Beer, Tomasz M.; Evans, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer co-opts a unique set of cellular pathways in its initiation and progression. The heterogeneity of prostate cancers is evident at earlier stages, and has led to rigorous efforts to stratify the localized prostate cancers, so that progression to advanced stages could be predicted based upon salient features of the early disease. The deregulated androgen receptor signaling is undeniably most important in the progression of the majority of prostate tumors. It is perhaps because of the primacy of the androgen receptor governed transcriptional program in prostate epithelium cells that once this program is corrupted, the consequences of the ensuing changes in activity are pleotropic and could contribute to malignancy in multiple ways. Following localized surgical and radiation therapies, 20-40% of patients will relapse and progress, and will be treated with androgen deprivation therapies. The successful development of the new agents that inhibit androgen signaling has changed the progression free survival in hormone resistant disease, but this has not changed the almost ubiquitous development of truly resistant phenotypes in advanced prostate cancer. This review summarizes the current understanding of the molecular pathways involved in localized and metastatic prostate cancer, with an emphasis on the clinical implications of the new knowledge. PMID:25277175

  18. [Medical treatment of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Lobel, B; Cipolla, B; Labrador, J

    1994-03-01

    Hormone dependence of prostate cancer is well known. In 80% of cases with metastases, hormone suppression leads to the reduction of tumour volume and related disorders. However the treatment is generally palliative because malignant process recurs after about around 16 months. Mean survival is less than 3 years in these forms. Lack of response come always together with a poor prognosis, and there is 90% mortality at 2 years. Advanced prostatic cancer should not be treated with hormones if the patient has few symptoms and his quality of life is satisfactory. Symptomatic forms require hormone manipulation. Orchidectomy or LH-RH are recommended. Total androgen ablation (combined treatment) leads rapidly to more relief of symptoms, but its drawbacks and especially high cost indicate that its use should be weighed individually. Estramustine is not a first-lune treatment. Presently, there is no criteria to predict response to treatment.

  19. Vitamin E and Prostate Cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin E, its metabolites or its analogs, might help prevent prostate cancer initiation or progression. Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men in the United States, exceeded only by lung cancer. About 218,890 new cases of prost...

  20. [Grading of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, G; Roth, W; Helpap, B

    2016-07-01

    The current grading of prostate cancer is based on the classification system of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) following a consensus conference in Chicago in 2014. The foundations are based on the frequently modified grading system of Gleason. This article presents a brief description of the development to the current ISUP grading system.

  1. Survival in prostate cancer prevention trial detailed

    Cancer.gov

    In the NCI-sponsored Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial, initial findings from a decade ago showed that the drug finasteride significantly reduced the risk of prostate cancer, but among those who did develop prostate cancer, paradoxically, the drug was asso

  2. Tuberculous prostatitis: mimicking a cancer.

    PubMed

    Aziz, El Majdoub; Abdelhak, Khallouk; Hassan, Farih Moulay

    2016-01-01

    Genitourinary tuberculosis is a common type of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis . The kidneys, ureter, bladder or genital organs are usually involved. Tuberculosis of the prostate has mainly been described in immune-compromised patients. However, it can exceptionally be found as an isolated lesion in immune-competent patients. Tuberculosis of the prostate may be difficult to differentiate from carcinoma of the prostate and the chronic prostatitis when the prostate is hard and nodular on digital rectal examination and the urine is negative for tuberculosis bacilli. In many cases, a diagnosis of tuberculous prostatitis is made by the pathologist, or the disease is found incidentally after transurethral resection. Therefore, suspicion of tuberculous prostatitis requires a confirmatory biopsy of the prostate. We report the case of 60-year-old man who presented a low urinary tract syndrome. After clinical and biological examination, and imaging, prostate cancer was highly suspected. Transrectal needle biopsy of the prostate was performed and histological examination showed tuberculosis lesions.

  3. Degarelix for Treating Advanced Hormone-Dependent Prostate Cancer: An Evidence Review Group Perspective of a NICE Single Technology Appraisal.

    PubMed

    Uttley, Lesley; Whyte, Sophie; Gomersall, Timothy; Ren, Shijie; Wong, Ruth; Chambers, Duncan; Tappenden, Paul

    2016-12-10

    As part of its Single Technology Appraisal Process, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of degarelix (Ferring Pharmaceuticals) to submit evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of degarelix for the treatment of advanced hormone-dependent prostate cancer. The School of Health and Related Research Technology Appraisal Group at the University of Sheffield was commissioned to act as the independent Evidence Review Group (ERG). The ERG produced a critical review of the evidence contained within the company's submission to NICE. The evidence, which included a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of degarelix versus leuprorelin, found that degarelix was non-inferior to leuprorelin for reduction of testosterone levels and that degarelix achieved a more rapid suppression of prostate-specific antigen levels and subsequently decreased incidences of testosterone flare associated with luteinising hormone releasing-hormone (LHRH) agonists. However, protection against testosterone flare for the comparators in the clinical trials was not employed in line with UK clinical practice. Further claims surrounding overall survival, cardiovascular adverse events and clinical equivalence of the comparator drugs from six RCTs of degarelix should be regarded with caution because of flaws and inconsistencies in the pooling of trial data to draw conclusions. The cost-effectiveness evidence included a de novo economic model. Based on the ERG's preferred base case, the deterministic incremental cost-effectiveness analysis (ICER) for degarelix versus 3-monthly triptorelin was £14,798 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. Additional scenario analyses undertaken by the ERG resulted in ICERs for degarelix versus 3-monthly triptorelin ranging from £17,067 to £35,589 per QALY gained. Subgroup analyses undertaken using the Appraisal Committee's preferred assumptions suggested that degarelix was not cost effective for the subgroup with

  4. Cholesterol and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael R; Solomon, Keith R

    2004-01-01

    Cholesterol is a neutral lipid that accumulates in liquid-ordered, detergent-resistant membrane domains called lipid rafts. Lipid rafts serve as membrane platforms for signal transduction mechanisms that mediate cell growth, survival, and a variety of other processes relevant to cancer. A number of studies, going back many years, demonstrate that cholesterol accumulates in solid tumors and that cholesterol homeostasis breaks down in the prostate with aging and with the transition to the malignant state. This review summarizes the established links between cholesterol and prostate cancer (PCa), with a focus on how accumulation of cholesterol within the lipid raft component of the plasma membrane may stimulate signaling pathways that promote progression to hormone refractory disease. We propose that increases in cholesterol in prostate tumor cell membranes, resulting from increases in circulating levels or from dysregulation of endogenous synthesis, results in the coalescence of raft domains. This would have the effect of sequestering positive regulators of oncogenic signaling within rafts, while maintaining negative regulators in the liquid-disordered membrane fraction. This approach toward examining the function of lipid rafts in prostate cancer cells may provide insight into the role of circulating cholesterol in malignant growth and on the potential relationship between diet and aggressive disease. Large-scale characterization of proteins that localize to cholesterol-rich domains may help unveil signaling networks and pathways that will lead to identification of new biomarkers for disease progression and potentially to novel targets for therapeutic intervention.

  5. Novel actions of next-generation taxanes benefit advanced stages of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    de Leeuw, Renée; Berman-Booty, Lisa D; Schiewer, Matthew J; Ciment, Stephen J; Den, Robert B; Dicker, Adam P; Kelly, William K; Trabulsi, Edouard J; Lallas, Costas D; Gomella, Leonard G; Knudsen, Karen E

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To improve the outcomes of patients with castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), there is an urgent need for more effective therapies and approaches that individual specific treatments for patients with CRPC. The current studies compared the novel taxane, cabazitaxel with the previous generation docetaxel, and aimed to determine which tumors are most likely to respond. Experimental design Cabazitaxel (CBTX) and docetaxel (DCTX) were compared via in vitro modeling to determine molecular mechanism, biochemical and cell biological impact, and cell proliferation, which was further assessed ex vivo in human tumor explants. Isogenic pairs of RB knockdown and control cells were interrogated in vitro, and in xenograft tumors for cabazitaxel response. Results The data herein show that i. CBTX exerts stronger cytostatic and cytotoxic response compared to DCTX, especially in CRPC; ii. CBTX induces aberrant mitosis, leading to pyknotic and multinucleated cells; iii. taxanes do not act through the androgen receptor (AR); iv. Gene expression profiling reveals distinct molecular actions for CBTX v. tumors that have progressed to castration resistance via loss of RB show enhanced sensitivity to CBTX. Conclusions CBTX not only induces improved cytostatic and cytotoxic effects, but also impacts distinct molecular pathways, compared to DCTX, which could underlie its efficacy after DCTX treatment has failed in CRPC patients. Finally, RB is identified as the first potential biomarker that could define the therapeutic response to taxanes in metastatic CRPC. This would suggest that loss of RB function induces sensitization taxanes, which could benefit up to 50% of CRPC cases. PMID:25691773

  6. [Challenges to early diagnosis of prostate cancer in Peru].

    PubMed

    Pow-Sang, Mariela; Huamán, Marco A

    2013-03-01

    Early detection of prostate cancer in Peru is very uncommon, as patients usually arrive when the disease is locally advanced or advanced. There are no prostate cancer screening campaigns that allow us to detect this disease in early stages. The incidence rates, according to the Registry of Cancer in Metropolitan Lima, are increasing. However, there is probably an under register of cases in our country, since there are not any nation-wide records showing the real magnitude of this disease. It is imperative to develop prevention programs for the early diagnosis of prostate cancer through digital rectal exams and to perform the measurement of the prostate- specific antigen (PSA) in the blood.

  7. Oxidative Stress, DNA Repair and Prostate Cancer Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    progressed smoothly for all three specific aims. 15. SUBJECT TERMS microRNA ovarian cancer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION... factors for prostate cancer are associated with elevated levels of ROS (advancing age, inflammation, androgen, high-fat diet), or decreased...TITLE: Oxidative Stress, DNA Repair and Prostate Cancer Risk PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Hua Zhao, Ph.D

  8. Intense Uptake in Amyloidosis of the Seminal Vesicles on 68Ga-PSMA PET Mimicking Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Maximilian; Kim, David Insoo; Shepherd, Benjamin; Gustafson, Sonja; Thomas, Paul

    2017-02-01

    We report a case of benign senile seminal vesicle amyloidosis demonstrating intense Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) uptake on PET/CT. A 68-year-old man underwent staging PSMA PET/CT and MRI for biopsy-proven prostate adenocarcinoma. There was an intense focus of Ga-PSMA uptake in the primary malignancy, as well as symmetrical intense uptake in the seminal vesicles bilaterally that was reported as multifocal disease with local invasion. Final histology after radical prostatectomy showed amyloidosis of the seminal vesicles without any evidence of prostate cancer. Care should be taken in the interpretation of seminal vesicle PSMA uptake to avoid overstaging.

  9. Novel diagnostic biomarkers for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Madu, Chikezie O.; Lu, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in American men, and a more aggressive form of the disease is particularly prevalent among African Americans. The therapeutic success rate for prostate cancer can be tremendously improved if the disease is diagnosed early. Thus, a successful therapy for this disease depends heavily on the clinical indicators (biomarkers) for early detection of the presence and progression of the disease, as well as the prediction after the clinical intervention. However, the current clinical biomarkers for prostate cancer are not ideal as there remains a lack of reliable biomarkers that can specifically distinguish between those patients who should be treated adequately to stop the aggressive form of the disease and those who should avoid overtreatment of the indolent form. A biomarker is a characteristic that is objectively measured and evaluated as an indicator of normal biologic processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacologic responses to a therapeutic intervention. A biomarker reveals further information to presently existing clinical and pathological analysis. It facilitates screening and detecting the cancer, monitoring the progression of the disease, and predicting the prognosis and survival after clinical intervention. A biomarker can also be used to evaluate the process of drug development, and, optimally, to improve the efficacy and safety of cancer treatment by enabling physicians to tailor treatment for individual patients. The form of the prostate cancer biomarkers can vary from metabolites and chemical products present in body fluid to genes and proteins in the prostate tissues. Current advances in molecular techniques have provided new tools facilitating the discovery of new biomarkers for prostate cancer. These emerging biomarkers will be beneficial and critical in developing new and clinically reliable indicators that will have a high specificity for the diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer. The

  10. Feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of a technology-assisted psychosocial intervention for racially diverse men with advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yanez, Betina; McGinty, Heather L.; Mohr, David C.; Begale, Mark J.; Dahn, Jason R.; Flury, Sarah; Perry, Kent; Penedo, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The utility of psychosocial interventions in reducing symptom burden and improving health-related quality of life (HRQOL) for men with localized prostate cancer has been demonstrated. However, studies have yet to demonstrate the efficacy of interventions in advanced prostate cancer (APC). This study examined the feasibility, acceptability and preliminary efficacy of a technology-assisted 10-week group-based psychosocial intervention for diverse men with APC. Methods Participants were 74 men (mean age = 68.84 years, 57% Non-Hispanic White and 40.5% Black) who were randomized to a cognitive behavioral stress management treatment (CBSM) or health promotion (HP) attention control condition. Participants were assessed at baseline, weekly throughout the 10-week program, and 6 months post-baseline. Outcomes were assessed using the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System along with established measures of HRQOL, CBSM intervention targets (e.g., relaxation skills), and patient-reported acceptability. Results Feasibility was demonstrated through good retention rates (> 85%), acceptable average attendance rates (> 70%), and acceptability was demonstrated through very favorable weekly session evaluations (mean score 4/5) and exit surveys (mean score 3.6/4). Men randomized to the CBSM condition reported significant reductions (p < .05) in depressive symptoms and improvements in relaxation self-efficacy (p < .05) at the 6-month follow up. CBSM participants reported trends for improvement in distress and functional well-being (ps < .08) relative to those in the HP condition. Effect sizes ranged from medium (0.54) to large (1.87) and in some instances were clinically meaningful. Conclusions Technology-based CBSM interventions among diverse men with APC may be feasible, acceptable, and efficacious. PMID:26348661

  11. Anti-androgens inhibit ABCB1 efflux and ATPase activity and reverse docetaxel resistance in advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yezi; Liu, Chengfei; Armstrong, Cameron; Lou, Wei; Sandher, Amandeep; Gao, Allen C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies show that inhibition of ABCB1 expression overcomes acquired docetaxel resistance in C4-2B-TaxR cells. In this study, we examined if anti-androgens, such as bicalutamide and enzalutamide, could inhibit ABCB1 activity and overcome resistance to docetaxel. Experimental Design ABCB1 efflux activity was determined using a rhodamine efflux assay. ABCB1 ATPase activity was determined by Pgp-Glo™ assay systems. The effects of the anti-androgens bicalutamide and enzalutamide on docetaxel sensitivity were determined by cell growth assays and tumor growth in vivo. Results We found that bicalutamide and enzalutamide inhibit ABCB1 ATP-binding cassette transporter activity through blocking ABCB1 efflux activity. Bicalutamide inhibited ABCB1 efflux activity by 40%, while enzalutamide inhibited ABCB1 efflux activity by ~60%. Both bicalutamide and enzalutamide inhibit ABCB1 ATPase activity. In addition, bicalutamide and enzalutamide inhibit ABCB1 efflux activity and desensitize docetaxel resistant and androgen receptor (AR)-negative DU145 cells. Combination of bicalutamide with docetaxel had a significant anti-tumor effect in both AR-positive and AR-negative docetaxel resistant xenograft models, suggesting that bicalutamide desensitizes docetaxel resistant cells to docetaxel treatment independent of AR status. Conclusions We identified a novel mechanism of action for anti-androgens such as bicalutamide and enzalutamide as inhibitors of ABCB1 efflux and ATPase activity. Bicalutamide and enzalutamide desensitize docetaxel resistant prostate cancer cells to docetaxel treatment independent of AR status. These studies may lead to the development of combinational therapies with bicalutamide/enzalutamide and docetaxel as an effective regiment to treat advanced castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) independent of AR status. PMID:25995342

  12. Testosterone Therapy and Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Emily; Morgentaler, Abraham

    2016-05-01

    Changes in understanding regarding the relationship of androgens and prostate cancer have led to changes in the use of testosterone therapy. The evidence supports a finite ability of androgens to stimulate prostate cancer growth, with a maximum achieved at low testosterone concentrations, called the saturation model. The saturation point corresponds with maximal androgenic stimulation at 250 ng/dL. Evidence is reviewed herein regarding the relationship of testosterone to prostate cancer and the relatively new practice of offering testosterone therapy to men with a history of prostate cancer. Although no prospective controlled trials have been performed, results have been reassuring.

  13. Serum selenium levels and prostate cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Zhigang; Liu, Dezhong; Liu, Chun; Liu, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Some observational studies have shown that elevated serum selenium levels are associated with reduced prostate cancer risk; however, not all published studies support these results. A literature search of PubMed, Embase, Medline, and the Cochrane Library up until September 2016 identified 17 studies suitable for further investigation. A meta-analysis was conducted on these studies to investigate the association between serum selenium levels and subsequent prostate cancer risk. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to evaluate the overall OR of prostate cancer for the highest versus the lowest levels of serum selenium. We found a pooled OR (95% CI) of 0.76 (0.64, 0.91; P < 0.05). In subgroup analysis, an inverse association between serum selenium levels and prostate cancer risk was found in each of case–control studies, current and former smokers, high-grade cancer cases, advanced cancer cases, and different populations. Such correlations were not found for subgroups containing each of cohort studies, nonsmokers, low-grade cancer cases, and early stage cancer cases. In conclusion, our study suggests an inverse relationship between serum selenium levels and prostate cancer risk. However, further cohort studies and randomized control trials based on non-Western populations are required. PMID:28151881

  14. Evidence-based recommendations on androgen deprivation therapy for localized and advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Belsey, Jonathan; Drewa, Tomasz; Kołodziej, Anna; Skoneczna, Iwona; Milecki, Piotr; Dobruch, Jakub; Słojewski, Marcin; Chłosta, Piotr L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The management of prostate cancer (PC) is still evolving. Although, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is an established treatment option, particularly in patients with disseminated disease, important data regarding hormonal manipulation have recently emerged. The aim of this paper is to review the evidence on ADT, make recommendations and address areas of controversy associated with its use in men with PC. Material and methods An expert panel was convened. Areas related to the hormonal management of patients with PC requiring evidence review were identified and questions to be addressed by the panel were determined. Appropriate literature review was performed and included a search of online databases, bibliographic reviews and consultation with experts. Results The panel was able to provide recommendations on: 1) which patients with localised PC should receive androgen deprivation in conjunction with radiotherapy (RT); 2) what standard initial treatment should be used in metastatic hormone-naïve PC (MHNPC); 3) efficacy of androgen deprivation agents; 4) whether ADT should be continued in patients with castration resistant PC (CRPC). However, no recommendations could be made for combined ADT and very high-dose RT in patients with an intermediate-risk disease. Conclusions ADT remains the cornerstone of treatment for both metastatic hormone-naïve and castration-resistant PC. According to the expert panel's opinion, based on the ERG report, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists might not be equivalent but this needs to be confirmed in long-term data. The combined use of ADT and RT improves outcome and survival in men with high-risk localised disease. The benefits in patients with intermediate-risk disease, particularly those subject to escalated dose RT are controversial. PMID:27551549

  15. Prostate cancer immunology: biology, therapeutics, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Webster, W Scott; Small, Eric J; Rini, Brian I; Kwon, Eugene D

    2005-11-10

    A number of recently developed and promising approaches to antitumoral immunotherapy are being investigated as potential treatments for advanced prostate cancer. These approaches largely revolve around strategies to increase antigen-specific T-cell activation against prostate tumors as well as precise manipulations of critical co-regulatory receptors that help to maintain and prolong the activity of antigen-presenting cells and T cells that are capable of mediating tumor regression. Herein, we describe the experience with the most recent and promising approaches pertaining to prostate cancer immunotherapy. Additionally, we discuss the mechanistic basis for these approaches as well as current limitations that must still be addressed in order to propel immunotherapy into the forefront of prostate cancer treatment.

  16. Hypofractionated External-Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cho, L. Chinsoo; Timmerman, Robert; Kavanagh, Brian

    2013-01-01

    There are radiobiological rationales supporting hypofractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer. The recent advancements in treatment planning and delivery allow sophisticated radiation treatments to take advantage of the differences in radiobiology of prostate cancer and the surrounding normal tissues. The preliminary results from clinical studies indicate that abbreviated fractionation programs can result in successful treatment of localized prostate cancer without escalation of late toxicity. PMID:23533777

  17. Regulation of Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis by DKK1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    0030 TITLE: Regulation of Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis by DKK1 PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gregory A. Clines, MD, PhD CONTRACTING...of Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis by DKK1 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0030 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Osteoblastic bone metastasis is a common complication of advanced prostate cancer, resulting in pain and pathologic fracture. Dickkopf homolog 1 ( DKK1 ) is a

  18. Regulation of Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis by DKK1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    0030 TITLE: Regulation of Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis by DKK1 PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gregory A. Clines, MD, PhD CONTRACTING...AND SUBTITLE Regulation of Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis by DKK1 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0030 5b. GRANT NUMBER...metastasis is a common complication of advanced prostate cancer, resulting in pain and pathologic fracture. Dickkopf homolog 1 ( DKK1 ) is a secreted

  19. Prostate Cancer MR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fütterer, Jurgen J.

    With a total of 192,280 new cases predicted for 2009, prostate cancer (PC) now accounts for 25% of all new male cancers diagnosed in the United States [1]. Furthermore, in their lifetime, one in six men will be clinically diagnosed with having PC, although many more men are found to have histological evidence of PC at autopsy [2,3,4]. Presently, approximately 1 in 10 men will die of PC [5,6]. The ever-aging population and wider spread use of the blood prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test [7,8], as well as the tendency to apply lower cut-off levels for this test [9], will further increase the diagnosis of this disease [10].

  20. Radioisotopes in management of metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raval, Amar; Dan, Tu D.; Williams, Noelle L.; Pridjian, Andrew; Den, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Metastatic prostate cancer continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in men with prostate cancer. Over the last decade, the treatment landscape for patients with castrate-resistant disease has drastically changed, with several novel agents demonstrating an improvement in overall survival in large, multi-institutional randomized trials. Traditional treatment with radioisotopes has largely been in the palliative setting. However, the first in class radiopharmaceutical radium-223 has emerged as the only bone-directed treatment option demonstrating an improvement in overall survival. Methods: Medline publications from 1990 to 2016 were searched and reviewed to assess the use of currently approved radioisotopes in the management of prostate cancer including emerging data regarding integration with novel systemic therapies. New positron emission tomography-based radiotracers for advanced molecular imaging of prostate cancer were also queried. Results: Radioisotopes play a crucial role in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer in the definitive and metastatic setting. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer and theranostics are currently being investigated in the clinical arena. Conclusions: The use of modern radioisotopes in selected patients with mCRPC is associated with improvements in overall survival, pain control, and quality of life. PMID:27843209

  1. Mono-2-ethyhexyl phthalate advancing the progression of prostate cancer through activating the hedgehog pathway in LNCaP cells.

    PubMed

    Yong, Wang; Jiao, Chen; Jianhui, Wu; Yan, Zhao; Qi, Pan; Xiu, Wang; Zuyue, Sun; Yunhui, Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) pathway plays a critical role in the progression of prostate cancer (PCa), the most commonly diagnosed non-cutaneous cancer in male adults. Studies showed that di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) could interference with the Hh pathway. Di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), the congener of DBP, is the major plasticizer used in plastic materials that are inevitably exposed by patients with PCa. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate whether mono-2-ethyhexyl phthalate (MEHP, the active metabolite of DEHP) could activate the Hh pathway of LNCaP cells. Results showed that the expression of the critical gene of Hh pathway PTCH and androgen-regulated gene KLK3 was significantly decreased on 3, 6 and 9 days with Hh pathway inhibitor cyclopamine's treatment. MEHP notably up-regulated the expression of PTCH with a dose-response relationship in the presence of cyclopamine, which indicate that MEHP might target on the downstream components of Hh pathway and advance the progression of PCa through activating the Hh pathway.

  2. Tocotrienols and Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    factors [1-3]. Some evidence supports the protective effects of tomato products ( lycopene ), soy products (isoflavonoids) and fruits. Secondary...tocopherols and tocotrienols, have variable growth inhibitory effects on both types of prostate cancer cell line models. The gamma isoforms are more... effective than the alpha isoforms and the tocotrienols are more effective than the tocopherols. This study further showed that the vitamin E-mediated

  3. Challenges in Clinical Prostate Cancer: Role of Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kelloff, Gary J.; Choyke, Peter; Coffey, Donald S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective This article reviews a recent 2-day workshop on prostate cancer and imaging technology that was conducted by the Cancer Imaging Program of the National Cancer Institute. The workshop dealt with research trends and avenues for improving imaging and applications across the clinical spectrum of the disease. Conclusion After a summary of prostate cancer incidence and mortality, four main clinical challenges in prostate cancer treatment and management—diagnostic accuracy; risk stratification, initial staging, active surveillance, and focal therapy; prostate-specific antigen relapse after radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy; and assessing response to therapy in advanced disease—were discussed by the 55-member panel. The overarching issue in prostate cancer is distinguishing lethal from nonlethal disease. New technologies and fresh uses for established procedures make imaging effective in both assessing and treating prostate cancer. PMID:19457806

  4. Prostate Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system . The prostate is just below the bladder (the ... part of the semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  5. Update: Immunological Strategies for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death in US men. Along with initial therapy using surgery, radiotherapy, or cryotherapy, hormonal therapy is the mainstay of treatment. For men with advanced (metastatic) disease, docetaxel-based chemotherapy is US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved, and provides a significant survival advantage. This relative paucity of treatment options drives an ongoing quest for additional treatment modalities; among these is immunotherapy. The concept that prostate cancer is a malignancy that can be targeted by the immune system may seem counterintuitive; certainly kidney cancer and melanoma are more traditionally thought of as immune responsive cancers. However, prostate cancer arises in a relatively unique organ and may express a number of proteins (antigens) against which an immune response can be generated. More importantly, several of these agents have now demonstrated a significant survival benefit in randomized controlled clinical trials, and one agent in particular (Sipuleucel-T, Dendreon Corporation, Seattle, WA) could be FDA-approved in 2010. This update summarizes recent clinical developments in the field of prostate cancer immunotherapy, with a focus on dendritic cell vaccines, virus-based vaccines, DNA-based vaccines, and cell-based vaccines. In addition, the notion of agents that target immune checkpoints is introduced. Enthusiasm for prostate cancer immunotherapy is founded upon its potential to mediate targeted, specific, tumor cell destruction without significant systemic toxicity; however, this has yet to be fully realized in the clinical arena. PMID:20425628

  6. Update: immunological strategies for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Drake, Charles G; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S

    2010-05-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death in US men. Along with initial therapy using surgery, radiotherapy, or cryotherapy, hormonal therapy is the mainstay of treatment. For men with advanced (metastatic) disease, docetaxel-based chemotherapy is US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved, and provides a significant survival advantage. This relative paucity of treatment options drives an ongoing quest for additional treatment modalities; among these is immunotherapy. The concept that prostate cancer is a malignancy that can be targeted by the immune system may seem counterintuitive; certainly kidney cancer and melanoma are more traditionally thought of as immune responsive cancers. However, prostate cancer arises in a relatively unique organ and may express a number of proteins (antigens) against which an immune response can be generated. More importantly, several of these agents have now demonstrated a significant survival benefit in randomized controlled clinical trials, and one agent in particular (Sipuleucel-T, Dendreon Corporation, Seattle, WA) could be FDA-approved in 2010. This update summarizes recent clinical developments in the field of prostate cancer immunotherapy, with a focus on dendritic cell vaccines, virus-based vaccines, DNA-based vaccines, and cell-based vaccines. In addition, the notion of agents that target immune checkpoints is introduced. Enthusiasm for prostate cancer immunotherapy is founded upon its potential to mediate targeted, specific, tumor cell destruction without significant systemic toxicity; however, this has yet to be fully realized in the clinical arena.

  7. Genomic Rearrangements in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Christopher E.; Rubin, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Genomic instability is a fundamental feature of human cancer, leading to the activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressors. In prostate cancer, structural genomic rearrangements, resulting in gene fusions, amplifications and deletions, are a critical mechanism effecting these alterations. Here we review recent literature regarding the importance of genomic rearrangements in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer and the potential impact on patient care. Recent findings Next generation sequencing has revealed a striking abundance, complexity, and heterogeneity of genomic rearrangements in prostate cancer. These recent studies have nominated a number of processes in predisposing prostate cancer to genomic rearrangements, including androgen-induced transcription. Summary Structural rearrangements are the critical mechanism resulting in the characteristic genomic changes associated with prostate cancer pathogenesis and progression. Future studies will determine if the impact of these events on tumor phenotypes can be translated to clinical utility for patient prognosis and choices of management strategies. PMID:25393273

  8. RB Loss Promotes Prostate Cancer Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Thangavel, Chellappagounder; Boopathi, Ettickan; Liu, Yi; Haber, Alex; Ertel, Adam; Bhardwaj, Anshul; Addya, Sankar; Williams, Noelle; Ciment, Stephen J; Cotzia, Paolo; Dean, Jeffry L; Snook, Adam; McNair, Chris; Price, Matt; Hernandez, James R; Zhao, Shuang G; Birbe, Ruth; McCarthy, James B; Turley, Eva A; Pienta, Kenneth J; Feng, Felix Y; Dicker, Adam P; Knudsen, Karen E; Den, Robert B

    2017-02-15

    RB loss occurs commonly in neoplasia but its contributions to advanced cancer have not been assessed directly. Here we show that RB loss in multiple murine models of cancer produces a prometastatic phenotype. Gene expression analyses showed that regulation of the cell motility receptor RHAMM by the RB/E2F pathway was critical for epithelial-mesenchymal transition, motility, and invasion by cancer cells. Genetic modulation or pharmacologic inhibition of RHAMM activity was sufficient and necessary for metastatic phenotypes induced by RB loss in prostate cancer. Mechanistic studies in this setting established that RHAMM stabilized F-actin polymerization by controlling ROCK signaling. Collectively, our findings show how RB loss drives metastatic capacity and highlight RHAMM as a candidate therapeutic target for treating advanced prostate cancer. Cancer Res; 77(4); 982-95. ©2016 AACR.

  9. Translation and validation of the Cancer-Related Fatigue Scale in Greek in a sample of patients with advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaite, Charis; Constantinou, Marianna; Kouta, Christiana

    2016-01-01

    Objective To translate and validate the Cancer-Related Fatigue (CRF) Scale in the Greek language. Design A cross-sectional descriptive design was used in order to translate and validate the CRF Scale in Greek. Factor analyses were performed to understand the psychometric properties of the scale and to establish construct, criterion and convergent validity. Setting Outpatients' oncology clinics of two public hospitals in Cyprus. Participants 148 patients with advanced prostate cancer undergoing chemotherapy. Results The Cancer Fatigue Scale (CFS) had good stability (test–retest reliability r=0.79, p<0.001) and good internal consistency (Cronbach's α coefficient for all 15 items α=0.916). Furthermore, the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy (KMO value) was found to be 0.743 and considered to be satisfactory (>0.5). The correlations between the CFS physical scale (CFS-FS scale) and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 physical subscales were found to be significant (r=−0.715). The same occurred between CFS cognitive and EORTC cognitive subscale (r=−0.579). Overall, the criterion validity was verified. The same occurs for the convergent validity of the CFS since all correlations with the Global Health Status (q29–q30) were found to be significant. Conclusions This is the first validation study of the CRF Scale in Greek and warrant of its use in the assessment of prostate cancer patient's related fatigue. However, further testing and validation is needed in the early stages of the disease and in patients in later chemotherapy cycles. PMID:27913557

  10. A Promising Future for Prostate Cancer Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Assinder, Stephen J.; Bhoopalan, Vanitha

    2017-01-01

    It has been estimated that globally there is a death attributable to prostate cancer every four minutes. As life expectancy in all world regions increases, so too incidence of this disease of the ageing male will increase. For many men diagnosis occurs after presentation with symptoms of altered urinary dynamics. Unfortunately, these changes, whilst also associated with benign disease, are evident quite late in the aetiology of prostate cancer. Early detection provides for better management and prognosis. This Special Issue provides an up to date view of the advances made towards early diagnosis and prognosis. It provides reviews of advanced imaging techniques (e.g., multiparametric MRI and protocols), and of biomaterials and molecular biomarkers currently being explored (e.g., microRNAs, proteomics) and the technologies that are revolutionizing this field. It describes the multi-disciplinary approaches that are essential to inexpensive, deliverable and accurate platforms for prostate cancer diagnostics. PMID:28106714

  11. Necessity of re-evaluation of estramustine phosphate sodium (EMP) as a treatment option for first-line monotherapy in advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, T

    2001-02-01

    Estramustine phosphate sodium (EMP) was first introduced in the early 1970s for the treatment of prostate cancer, when EMP was supposed to have the dual effect of estrogenic activity and cytotoxicity. For the following decades, it was used mainly in hormone-refractory cases, with a conventional dosage of 4-9 capsules/day, which showed a 30-35% objective response rate. However, a very limited number of cases have been reported that used EMP as a first-line monotherapy in the conventional dosage. One study showed a response rate of 82%, which is at least as effective as conventional estrogen (diethylstilbestrol; DES) monotherapy. Nevertheless, EMP was almost abandoned for the treatment of prostate cancer because of severe adverse side-effects, especially in the cardiovascular system and gastrointestinal tract. Recently, two facts have become evident. First, EMP interferes with cellular microtubule dynamics but does not show alkylating effects. Second, EMP is able to produce a complex with calcium when dairy products are taken concomitantly with EMP, resulting in a decrease in the absorption rate of EMP from the gut. Many clinical trials have been undertaken without warning against concomitant dairy product intake since the introduction of EMP. This fact will jeopardize almost all the clinical trials performed before 1990. It is considered that response rates have been underestimated and better results could have been obtained because side-effects decrease dose-dependently. Low-dose EMP monotherapy (2 capsules/day) has been performed infrequently in previously untreated advanced prostate cancer. The only large trial by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer in 1984 was biased in selecting patients. Nevertheless, the response rate of EMP is comparable to that of DES. In this study, the adverse side-effects of EMP were less than that of DES. Recently, a study was conducted at the University of Tokyo of 11 patients with advanced prostate cancer on

  12. HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER RISK FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prostate cancer has the highest prevalence of any non-skin cancer in the human body, with similar likelihood of neoplastic foci found within the prostates of men around the world regardless of diet, occupation, lifestyle, or other factors. Essentially all men with circulating an...

  13. Discovery and Classification of Fusion Transcripts in Prostate Cancer and Normal Prostate Tissue.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian-Hua; Liu, Silvia; Zuo, Ze-Hua; Chen, Rui; Tseng, George C; Yu, Yan P

    2015-07-01

    Fusion transcript formation is one of the fundamental mechanisms that drives the development of prostate cancer. Because of the advance of high-throughput parallel sequencing, many fusion transcripts have been discovered. However, the discovery rate of fusion transcripts specific for prostate cancer is lagging behind the discoveries made on chromosome abnormalities of prostate cancer. Recent analyses suggest that many fusion transcripts are present in both benign and cancerous tissues. Some of these fusion transcripts likely represent important components of normal gene expression in cells. It is necessary to identify the criteria and features of fusion transcripts that are specific for cancer. In this review, we discuss optimization of RNA sequencing depth for fusion transcript discovery and the characteristics of fusion transcripts in normal prostate tissues and prostate cancer. We also propose a new classification of cancer-specific fusion transcripts on the basis of their tail gene fusion protein product and the roles that these fusions may play in cancer development.

  14. What's New in Prostate Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Research? Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer What’s New in Prostate Cancer Research? Research into the causes, ... in many medical centers throughout the world. Genetics New research on gene changes linked to prostate cancer ...

  15. The Genomic Evolution of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    addition, multiple genetic alterations are associated with disease evolution in response to therapy. This project aims to characterize evolution of...of castrate resistant metastatic cancer from primary foci. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Cancer genetics , tumor evolution, tumor heterogeneity, prostate cancer... genetic alterations are found more often in advanced disease. It is not known if these arise after metastases occur or are found in a subclone of the

  16. Family history and prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Lesko, S M; Rosenberg, L; Shapiro, S

    1996-12-01

    The authors examined the relation between family history of prostate cancer and the risk of this cancer in a population-based case-control study conducted in Massachusetts between December 1992 and October 1994. Cases were all incident cases of prostate cancer in men younger than 70 years (n = 563); controls were men with no history of the disease matched to the cases on age and town of residence (n = 703). Prostate cancer risk was increased among men who reported a history of this cancer in either their fathers or brothers (odds ratio (OR) = 2.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-3.3). Risk varied with the number of relatives affected and their relationship to the case. For a history of prostate cancer in one relative, the OR was 2.2 (95% CI 1.5-3.2); if two or more relatives were affected, it was 3.9 (95% CI 1.7-5.2). For prostate cancer in the father, the OR was 1.9 (95% CI 1.2-3.0); for prostate cancer in a brother, it was 3.0 (95% CI 1.8-4.9). Risk was inversely related to the subject's age and to age at diagnosis of prostate cancer in his affected relative. Among probands younger than 60 years, the OR was 5.3 (95% CI 2.5-12); for those 60-64 years of age, the OR was 2.7 (95% CI 1.3-5.5); and for those 65 years of age and older, the OR was 1.6 (95% CI 1.0-2.5). For prostate cancer diagnosed in a relative before age 65, the OR was 4.1 (95% CI 2.3-7.3); for detection of the disease after age 74, the OR was 0.76 (95% CI 0.38-1.5). The association was present both among men with local and advanced stage disease and among men whose prostate cancer was detected either by screening or because of symptoms. These data provide evidence that after controlling for diet and other potential confounders, familial factors are significantly associated with the risk of prostate cancer.

  17. National Cancer Institute Prostate Cancer Genetics Workshop.

    PubMed

    Catalona, William J; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Camp, Nicola J; Chanock, Stephen J; Cooney, Kathleen A; Easton, Douglas F; Eeles, Rosalind A; FitzGerald, Liesel M; Freedman, Matthew L; Gudmundsson, Julius; Kittles, Rick A; Margulies, Elliott H; McGuire, Barry B; Ostrander, Elaine A; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Stanford, Janet L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Witte, John S; Isaacs, William B

    2011-05-15

    Compelling evidence supports a genetic component to prostate cancer susceptibility and aggressiveness. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified more than 30 single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with prostate cancer susceptibility. It remains unclear, however, whether such genetic variants are associated with disease aggressiveness--one of the most important questions in prostate cancer research today. To help clarify this and substantially expand research in the genetic determinants of prostate cancer aggressiveness, the first National Cancer Institute Prostate Cancer Genetics Workshop assembled researchers to develop plans for a large new research consortium and patient cohort. The workshop reviewed the prior work in this area and addressed the practical issues in planning future studies. With new DNA sequencing technology, the potential application of sequencing information to patient care is emerging. The workshop, therefore, included state-of-the-art presentations by experts on new genotyping technologies, including sequencing and associated bioinformatics issues, which are just beginning to be applied to cancer genetics.

  18. Bioengineering Multifunctional Quantum Dot-Polypeptide Assemblies and Immunoconjugates for the Ablation of Advanced Prostate Cancer Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    disease [1]. Localized prostate cancer is generally treated with surgery (radical prostatectomy), radiation therapy, or cryotherapy [2]. However, disease...radiation therapy, or cryotherapy (3). However, disease relapse after surgery is a common occurrence, mainly due to the outgrowth of minimal residual disease

  19. Biomarkers in localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Matteo; Buonerba, Carlo; Terracciano, Daniela; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Cosimato, Vincenzo; Bottero, Danilo; Deliu, Victor M; Ditonno, Pasquale; Perdonà, Sisto; Autorino, Riccardo; Coman, Ioman; De Placido, Sabino; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; De Cobelli, Ottavio

    2016-02-01

    Biomarkers can improve prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment. Accuracy of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for early diagnosis of prostate cancer is not satisfactory, as it is an organ- but not cancer-specific biomarker, and it can be improved by using models that incorporate PSA along with other test results, such as prostate cancer antigen 3, the molecular forms of PSA (proPSA, benign PSA and intact PSA), as well as kallikreins. Recent reports suggest that new tools may be provided by metabolomic studies as shown by preliminary data on sarcosine. Additional molecular biomarkers have been identified by the use of genomics, proteomics and metabolomics. We review the most relevant biomarkers for early diagnosis and management of localized prostate cancer.

  20. Adenovirus-derived vectors for prostate cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    de Vrij, Jeroen; Willemsen, Ralph A; Lindholm, Leif; Hoeben, Rob C; Bangma, Chris H; Barber, Chris; Behr, Jean-Paul; Briggs, Simon; Carlisle, Robert; Cheng, Wing-Shing; Dautzenberg, Iris J C; de Ridder, Corrina; Dzojic, Helena; Erbacher, Patrick; Essand, Magnus; Fisher, Kerry; Frazier, April; Georgopoulos, Lindsay J; Jennings, Ian; Kochanek, Stefan; Koppers-Lalic, Daniela; Kraaij, Robert; Kreppel, Florian; Magnusson, Maria; Maitland, Norman; Neuberg, Patrick; Nugent, Regina; Ogris, Manfred; Remy, Jean-Serge; Scaife, Michelle; Schenk-Braat, Ellen; Schooten, Erik; Seymour, Len; Slade, Michael; Szyjanowicz, Pio; Totterman, Thomas; Uil, Taco G; Ulbrich, Karel; van der Weel, Laura; van Weerden, Wytske; Wagner, Ernst; Zuber, Guy

    2010-07-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of death among men in Western countries. Whereas the survival rate approaches 100% for patients with localized cancer, the results of treatment in patients with metastasized prostate cancer at diagnosis are much less successful. The patients are usually presented with a variety of treatment options, but therapeutic interventions in prostate cancer are associated with frequent adverse side effects. Gene therapy and oncolytic virus therapy may constitute new strategies. Already a wide variety of preclinical studies has demonstrated the therapeutic potential of such approaches, with oncolytic prostate-specific adenoviruses as the most prominent vector. The state of the art and future prospects of gene therapy in prostate cancer are reviewed, with a focus on adenoviral vectors. We summarize advances in adenovirus technology for prostate cancer treatment and highlight areas where further developments are necessary.

  1. Prostate cancer in dogs: comparative and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Bruce E; Northrup, Nicole

    2009-05-01

    The canine prostate gland shares many morphological and functional similarities with the human prostate and dogs are the only other large mammals that commonly develop spontaneous prostate cancer. However, the incidence of prostate cancer is much lower in dogs and the precise cell of origin is not known. Dogs with prostate cancer usually present with advanced disease that does not respond to androgen deprivation therapy. Similar to humans, affected dogs often develop osteoblastic bone metastases in the pelvis and/or lumbar spine with associated pain and neurological deficits. Other clinical signs include weight loss, lethargy, and abnormal urination and/or defecation. Surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation have been used to treat dogs with prostate cancer, but success has been limited by the location and aggressive nature of the disease. It is evident that better methods of early detection and more effective therapies are needed for prostate cancer in dogs and advanced prostate carcinoma in men. Dogs with naturally-occurring prostate cancer are relevant models for the disease in humans and pre-clinical studies of new diagnostics and therapies in dogs may benefit both humans and dogs with prostate cancer.

  2. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound for the Treatment of Localized and Locally Advanced Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer: 2,5 Year Outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovov, V. A.; Dvoynikov, S. Y.; Vozdvizhenskiy, M. O.

    2011-09-01

    Introduction & Objectives: High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has been shown to be a successful treatment for localised prostate cancer (PC). Here we have explored the effectiveness of the HIFU treatment for hormone-resistant prostate cancer (HRPC). Materials & Methods: 341 patients were treated in our center between September 2007 and December 2009; all of them showed treatment failure following hormone ablation. The median time before hormone-resistance was 20 (3-48) months. In the group with localised PC: number of patients 237, Gleason score ≤7, stage T1-2N0M0, age 69 (60-89) years, mean PSA before treatment 40,0 (5,8-92,9) ng/ml, mean prostate volume—39,3 (28-92) cc; in the group with locally advanced PC: number of patients 104, Gleason score ≤9, stage T2-3N0M0, age 72 (52-83) years, PSA before treatment 30,3 (20,1-60) ng/ml, mean prostate volume—41,2 (25-198) cc. HIFU was delivered under spinal anesthesia using the Ablatherm HIFU device (EDAP, France). Pre HIFU transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) was performed for all patients. Mean follow-up time 18 months (3-30). Results: The median PSA level 12 months after HIFU treatment was 0,04 (0-2,24) ng/ml—localised PC, and for locally advanced disease—0,05 (0-48,4) ng/ml, at 18 months after HIFU treatment this was 0,2 (0,02-2,0) ng/ml for localised PC, and for locally advanced disease 0,18 (0,04-7,45) ng/ml. Patients with localised PC has 4,5% recurrence, those with locally advanced PC 20%. Kaplan-Meir analyses of the total group indicated that the risk of recurrence after 1 year follow-up was 10%, the risk of recurrence was 19% after 2 years of follow-up. Conclusions: Our initial experience shows that ultrasound ablation is safe, minimally invasive and effective as a treatment for localised and locally advanced hormone-resistant prostate cancer.

  3. Development and exploitation of a novel mutant androgen receptor modelling strategy to identify new targets for advanced prostate cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Daniel; Jones, Dominic; Wade, Mark; Grey, James; Nakjang, Sirintra; Guo, Wenrui; Cork, David; Davies, Barry R; Wedge, Steve R; Robson, Craig N; Gaughan, Luke

    2015-09-22

    The persistence of androgen receptor (AR) signalling in castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) highlights the unmet clinical need for the development of more effective AR targeting therapies. A key mechanism of therapy-resistance is by selection of AR mutations that convert anti-androgens to agonists enabling the retention of androgenic signalling in CRPC. To improve our understanding of these receptors in advanced disease we developed a physiologically-relevant model to analyse the global functionality of AR mutants in CRPC. Using the bicalutamide-activated AR(W741L/C) mutation as proof of concept, we demonstrate that this mutant confers an androgenic-like signalling programme and growth promoting phenotype in the presence of bicalutamide. Transcriptomic profiling of AR(W741L) highlighted key genes markedly up-regulated by the mutant receptor, including TIPARP, RASD1 and SGK1. Importantly, SGK1 expression was found to be highly expressed in the KUCaP xenograft model and a CRPC patient biopsy sample both of which express the bicalutamide-activated receptor mutant. Using an SGK1 inhibitor, AR(W741L) transcriptional and growth promoting activity was reduced indicating that exploiting functional distinctions between receptor isoforms in our model may provide new and effective therapies for CRPC patients.

  4. Development and exploitation of a novel mutant androgen receptor modelling strategy to identify new targets for advanced prostate cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Daniel; Jones, Dominic; Wade, Mark; Grey, James; Nakjang, Sirintra; Guo, Wenrui; Cork, David; Davies, Barry R.; Wedge, Steve R.; Robson, Craig N.; Gaughan, Luke

    2015-01-01

    The persistence of androgen receptor (AR) signalling in castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) highlights the unmet clinical need for the development of more effective AR targeting therapies. A key mechanism of therapy-resistance is by selection of AR mutations that convert anti-androgens to agonists enabling the retention of androgenic signalling in CRPC. To improve our understanding of these receptors in advanced disease we developed a physiologically-relevant model to analyse the global functionality of AR mutants in CRPC. Using the bicalutamide-activated ARW741L/C mutation as proof of concept, we demonstrate that this mutant confers an androgenic-like signalling programme and growth promoting phenotype in the presence of bicalutamide. Transcriptomic profiling of ARW741L highlighted key genes markedly up-regulated by the mutant receptor, including TIPARP, RASD1 and SGK1. Importantly, SGK1 expression was found to be highly expressed in the KUCaP xenograft model and a CRPC patient biopsy sample both of which express the bicalutamide-activated receptor mutant. Using an SGK1 inhibitor, ARW741L transcriptional and growth promoting activity was reduced indicating that exploiting functional distinctions between receptor isoforms in our model may provide new and effective therapies for CRPC patients. PMID:26267320

  5. [Hormonal therapy for prostatic cancer--state of the art].

    PubMed

    Miyakita, Hideshi

    2005-02-01

    Following the studies of Huggins and colleagues in 1941, the hormonal treatment of prostatic cancer has been aimed at neutralizing the influence of testicular androgens through surgical castration or the administration of high dose estrogen. Labrie et al introduced combined use of a LHRH agonist and an androgen antagonist for prostatic cancer. Various reports demonstrated a beneficial effect for combined androgen blockade using nonsteroidal antiandrogens for advanced prostatic cancer through meta-analysis of published randomized control trials. In Japanese status, a combined androgen blockade is popular for advanced prostatic cancer as well as local cancer by J-Cap survey. There is a lot of controversy about adjuvant hormonal therapy for prostatic cancer including intermittent hormonal therapy, but the results are not gotten yet.

  6. Current state of prostate cancer treatment in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Belinda F; Aiken, William D; Mayhew, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the commonest cancer in Jamaica as well as the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. One report suggested that Jamaica has the highest incidence rate of prostate cancer in the world, with an age-standardised rate of 304/100,000 per year. The Caribbean region is reported to have the highest mortality rate of prostate cancer worldwide. Prostate cancer accounts for a large portion of the clinical practice for health-care practitioners in Jamaica. The Jamaica Urological Society is a professional body comprising 19 urologists in Jamaica who provide most of the care for men with prostate cancer in collaboration with medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, and a palliative care physician. The health-care system is structured in two tiers in Jamaica: public and private. The urologist-to-patient ratio is high, and this limits adequate urological care. Screening for prostate cancer is not a national policy in Jamaica. However, the Jamaica Urological Society and the Jamaica Cancer Society work synergistically to promote screening as well as to provide patient education for prostate cancer. Adequate treatment for localised prostate cancer is available in Jamaica in the forms of active surveillance, nerve-sparing radical retropubic prostatectomy, external beam radiation, and brachytherapy. However, there is a geographic maldistribution of centres that provide prostate cancer treatment, which leads to treatment delays. Also, there is difficulty in affording some treatment options in the private health-care sectors. Androgen deprivation therapy is available for treatment of locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer and is subsidised through a programme called the National Health Fund. Second-line hormonal agents and chemotherapeutic agents are available but are costly to most of the population. The infrastructure for treatment of prostate cancer in Jamaica is good, but it requires additional technological advances as well as additional specialist

  7. Advancing the Capabilities of an Authentic Ex Vivo Model of Primary Human Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    After five days in culture, slices were incubated in PBS with the ethidium homodimer-1 and calcein AM reagents that emit red fluorescence in dead...cells and green in viable cells, respectively. Visualization under a fluorescent microscope revealed primarily red (dead) cells in the benign slices...of the benign and malignant human prostate. Lab Invest 94, 208 (Feb, 2014). 3. S. A. Bigler, R. E. Deering , M. K. Brawer, Comparison of microscopic

  8. Frequent germline deleterious mutations in DNA repair genes in familial prostate cancer cases are associated with advanced disease

    PubMed Central

    Leongamornlert, D; Saunders, E; Dadaev, T; Tymrakiewicz, M; Goh, C; Jugurnauth-Little, S; Kozarewa, I; Fenwick, K; Assiotis, I; Barrowdale, D; Govindasami, K; Guy, M; Sawyer, E; Wilkinson, R; Antoniou, A C; Eeles, R; Kote-Jarai, Z

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer (PrCa) is one of the most common diseases to affect men worldwide and among the leading causes of cancer-related death. The purpose of this study was to use second-generation sequencing technology to assess the frequency of deleterious mutations in 22 tumour suppressor genes in familial PrCa and estimate the relative risk of PrCa if these genes are mutated. Methods: Germline DNA samples from 191 men with 3 or more cases of PrCa in their family were sequenced for 22 tumour suppressor genes using Agilent target enrichment and Illumina technology. Analysis for genetic variation was carried out by using a pipeline consisting of BWA, Genome Analysis Toolkit (GATK) and ANNOVAR. Clinical features were correlated with mutation status using standard statistical tests. Modified segregation analysis was used to determine the relative risk of PrCa conferred by the putative loss-of-function (LoF) mutations identified. Results: We discovered 14 putative LoF mutations in 191 samples (7.3%) and these mutations were more frequently associated with nodal involvement, metastasis or T4 tumour stage (P=0.00164). Segregation analysis of probands with European ancestry estimated that LoF mutations in any of the studied genes confer a relative risk of PrCa of 1.94 (95% CI: 1.56–2.42). Conclusions: These findings show that LoF mutations in DNA repair pathway genes predispose to familial PrCa and advanced disease and therefore warrants further investigation. The clinical utility of these findings will become increasingly important as targeted screening and therapies become more widespread. PMID:24556621

  9. Stages of Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system . It lies just below the bladder (the organ ... part of the semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  10. Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system located just below the bladder (the organ that ... up part of semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  11. Current clinical challenges in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Silberstein, Jonathan L.; Pal, Sumanta Kumar; Lewis, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer death in men in the United States. Close to $12 billion are spent annually on the treatment of prostate cancer in the US alone. Yet still there remain tremendous controversies and challenges that exist in all facets of the disease. This review and discussion will focus on issues and challenges for clinicians and patients diagnosed with the disease. Appropriate risk stratification for men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer is an appropriate first step for all patients. Once risk-stratified, for those with low-risk of death, it is increasingly recognized that overtreatment creates an unnecessary burden for many patients. This is particularly evident when put in the context of competing comorbidities in an elderly population. For those with advanced or high-risk localized disease, under-treatment remains too common. For those with a high-risk of recurrence or failure following primary treatment, adjuvant or salvage therapies are an option, but how and when to best deploy these treatments are controversial. Recently, tremendous progress has been made for those with advanced disease, in particular those with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Within the last 4 years, five novel FDA approved agents, acting through distinct mechanisms have been FDA approved for mCRPC. With the introduction of these new agents a host of new challenges have arisen. Timing, sequencing and combinations of these novel agents are welcomed challenges when compared with the lack of available therapies just a few years ago. In this summary of current clinical challenges in prostate cancer we review critical recent studies that have created or shifted the current paradigms of treatment for prostate cancer. We will also highlight ongoing issues that continue to challenge our field. PMID:26816735

  12. Metastatic Prostate Cancer to the Duodenum: A Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Kaswala, Dharmesh H.; Patel, Nitin; Jadallah, Sana; Wang, Weizheng

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the third most common cancer in man. About 1 in 6 males developed prostate cancer and 1 in 35 males die of this disease. Prostate cancer behavior ranges from microscopic tumors to aggressive cancer with metastatic potential. While metastasis to bone is relatively common, prostate cancer rarely metastasizes to the cecum, pituitary gland, small bowel, maxillary sinus and skin. Our case report presents a rare presentation of metastatic prostate cancer to the duodenum. Our search of the literature found only 2 cases of prostate metastases to duodenum published from 1966 to the present. To our knowledge this is the third case of metastatic prostate cancer presenting with duodenal metastasis. Although it is rare but in symptomatic patients small intestine metastasis should not be ignored with advanced prostate cancer. The case demonstrates a novel presentation of a common malignancy, and should raise awareness in clinicians and radiologists that prostate cancer can present with distant metastases in absence of any local lymphadenopathy. PMID:25161979

  13. Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map.

    PubMed

    Datta, Dipamoy; Aftabuddin, Md; Gupta, Dinesh Kumar; Raha, Sanghamitra; Sen, Prosenjit

    2016-08-01

    Human prostate cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease that mainly affects elder male population of the western world with a high rate of mortality. Acquisitions of diverse sets of hallmark capabilities along with an aberrant functioning of androgen receptor signaling are the central driving forces behind prostatic tumorigenesis and its transition into metastatic castration resistant disease. These hallmark capabilities arise due to an intense orchestration of several crucial factors, including deregulation of vital cell physiological processes, inactivation of tumor suppressive activity and disruption of prostate gland specific cellular homeostasis. The molecular complexity and redundancy of oncoproteins signaling in prostate cancer demands for concurrent inhibition of multiple hallmark associated pathways. By an extensive manual curation of the published biomedical literature, we have developed Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map (HPCHM), an onco-functional atlas of human prostate cancer associated signaling and events. It explores molecular architecture of prostate cancer signaling at various levels, namely key protein components, molecular connectivity map, oncogenic signaling pathway map, pathway based functional connectivity map etc. Here, we briefly represent the systems level understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with prostate tumorigenesis by considering each and individual molecular and cell biological events of this disease process.

  14. Risk of Pathologic Upgrading or Locally Advanced Disease in Early Prostate Cancer Patients Based on Biopsy Gleason Score and PSA: A Population-Based Study of Modern Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Caster, Joseph M.; Falchook, Aaron D.; Hendrix, Laura H.; Chen, Ronald C.

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation oncologists rely on available clinical information (biopsy Gleason score and prostate-specific antigen [PSA]) to determine the optimal treatment regimen for each prostate cancer patient. Existing published nomograms correlating clinical to pathologic extent of disease were based on patients treated in the 1980s and 1990s at select academic institutions. We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database to examine pathologic outcomes (Gleason score and cancer stage) in early prostate cancer patients based on biopsy Gleason score and PSA concentration. Methods and Materials: This analysis included 25,858 patients whose cancer was diagnosed between 2010 and 2011, with biopsy Gleason scores of 6 to 7 and clinical stage T1 to T2 disease, who underwent radical prostatectomy. In subgroups based on biopsy Gleason score and PSA level, we report the proportion of patients with pathologically advanced disease (positive surgical margin or pT3-T4 disease) or whose Gleason score was upgraded. Logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with pathologic outcomes. Results: For patients with biopsy Gleason score 6 cancers, 84% of those with PSA <10 ng/mL had surgical T2 disease with negative margins; this decreased to 61% in patients with PSA of 20 to 29.9 ng/mL. Gleason score upgrading was seen in 43% (PSA: <10 ng/mL) to 61% (PSA: 20-29.9 ng/mL) of biopsy Gleason 6 patients. Patients with biopsy Gleason 7 cancers had a one-third (Gleason 3 + 4; PSA: <10 ng/mL) to two-thirds (Gleason 4 + 3; PSA: 20-29.9 ng/mL) probability of having pathologically advanced disease. Gleason score upgrading was seen in 11% to 19% of patients with biopsy Gleason 4 + 3 cancers. Multivariable analysis showed that higher PSA and older age were associated with Gleason score upgrading and pathologically advanced disease. Conclusions: This is the first population-based study to examine pathologic extent of disease and pathologic Gleason score

  15. Prostate Cancer Relevant Antigens and Enzymes for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Barve, Ashutosh; Jin, Wei; Cheng, Kun

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the most widely used approaches in combating advanced prostate cancer, but its therapeutic efficacy is usually insufficient due to lack of specificity and associated toxicity. Lack of targeted delivery to prostate cancer cells is also the primary obstacles in achieving feasible therapeutic effect of other promising agents including peptide, protein, and nucleic acid. Consequently, there remains a critical need for strategies to increase the selectivity of anti-prostate cancer agents. This review will focus on various prostate cancer-specific antigens and enzymes that could be exploited for prostate cancer targeted drug delivery. Among various targeting strategies, active targeting is the most advanced approach to specifically deliver drugs to their designated cancer cells. In this approach, drug carriers are modified with targeting ligands that can specifically bind to prostate cancer-specific antigens. Moreover, there are several specific enzymes in the tumor microenvironment of prostate cancer that can be exploited for stimulus-responsive drug delivery systems. These systems can specifically release the active drug in the tumor microenvironment of prostate cancer, leading to enhanced tumor penetration efficiency. PMID:24878184

  16. Polyphenols and Prostate Cancer Chemoprevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    prostate chemoprevention are the soy isoflavone, genistein, and the tea catechin , (-)- epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). Another polyphenol that has...diet high in soy products have reduced incidence of clinically manifested prostate cancers. Likewise, Asians have a long history of drinking tea

  17. Prostate Cancer Skeletal Metastases: Pathobiology and Interventions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    in higher levels in prostate carcinoma than in benign prostatic hyperplasia [35, 36], and is found in human metastatic lesions in bone [37]. However...compared to normal controls, benign prostatic hyperplasia , prostatitis, and localized or recurrent disease. In an animal model, prostate tumor cells...Malakouti S, Antar S, Kukreja S. Enhanced expression of parathyroid hormone-related protein in prostate cancer as compared with benign prostatic hyperplasia . Hum

  18. Hormonal therapy and chemotherapy in hormone-naive and castration resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sternberg, Cora N.

    2015-01-01

    The management of advanced castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) has been rapidly changing and is still evolving. In the last years, there has been an increasing knowledge of prostate cancer biology. New therapeutic agents and approaches have been evaluated demonstrating benefits in survival and quality of life in patients with metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:26816835

  19. Clinical adenoviral gene therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Ellen; Essand, Magnus; Bangma, Chris H; Barber, Chris; Behr, Jean-Paul; Briggs, Simon; Carlisle, Robert; Cheng, Wing-Shing; Danielsson, Angelika; Dautzenberg, Iris J C; Dzojic, Helena; Erbacher, Patrick; Fisher, Kerry; Frazier, April; Georgopoulos, Lindsay J; Hoeben, Rob; Kochanek, Stefan; Koppers-Lalic, Daniela; Kraaij, Robert; Kreppel, Florian; Lindholm, Leif; Magnusson, Maria; Maitland, Norman; Neuberg, Patrick; Nilsson, Berith; Ogris, Manfred; Remy, Jean-Serge; Scaife, Michelle; Schooten, Erik; Seymour, Len; Totterman, Thomas; Uil, Taco G; Ulbrich, Karel; Veldhoven-Zweistra, Joke L M; de Vrij, Jeroen; van Weerden, Wytske; Wagner, Ernst; Willemsen, Ralph

    2010-07-01

    Prostate cancer is at present the most common malignancy in men in the Western world. When localized to the prostate, this disease can be treated by curative therapy such as surgery and radiotherapy. However, a substantial number of patients experience a recurrence, resulting in spreading of tumor cells to other parts of the body. In this advanced stage of the disease only palliative treatment is available. Therefore, there is a clear clinical need for new treatment modalities that can, on the one hand, enhance the cure rate of primary therapy for localized prostate cancer and, on the other hand, improve the treatment of metastasized disease. Gene therapy is now being explored in the clinic as a treatment option for the various stages of prostate cancer. Current clinical experiences are based predominantly on trials with adenoviral vectors. As the first of a trilogy of reviews on the state of the art and future prospects of gene therapy in prostate cancer, this review focuses on the clinical experiences and progress of adenovirus-mediated gene therapy for this disease.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... genes. Others act as tumor suppressors through different pathways. Changes in these genes probably make only a small contribution to overall prostate cancer risk. However, researchers suspect that the combined influence ...

  1. New considerations for ADT in advanced prostate cancer and the emerging role of GnRH antagonists.

    PubMed

    Shore, N D; Abrahamsson, P-A; Anderson, J; Crawford, E D; Lange, P

    2013-03-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is first-line treatment for metastatic prostate cancer (PCa). Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists are the most commonly used ADT but have several theoretical physiologic disadvantages (e.g. initial testosterone surge, potential microsurges upon repeat administration). Testosterone surge delays the intended serologic endpoint of testosterone suppression and may exacerbate clinical symptoms. GnRH antagonists were developed with a view toward overcoming these potential adverse physiologic events. This review evaluates GnRH agonists and antagonists, assessing the potential future role of antagonists in PCa and strategies to minimize ADT adverse events (AEs). Evidence was identified via PubMed search (by GnRH agent and other ADT-related terms), from review article bibliographies, and authors' therapy area knowledge, with articles included by author consensus. Degarelix shows similar efficacy to a GnRH agonist in achieving and maintaining castration, with faster onset and without testosterone surge/microsurges. Phase III data showed that, in the first treatment year, degarelix displayed a lower risk of PSA failure or death (composite endpoint), lower levels of the bone marker serum alkaline phosphatase (in baseline metastatic disease), and fewer musculoskeletal AEs than the agonist leuprolide. Also, crossing over from leuprolide to degarelix after 1 year reduced the risk of PSA failure or death. ADT displays an AE spectrum which can impact quality of life as well as causing significant morbidities. Strategies to improve ADT tolerability have become increasingly important including: a holistic management approach, improved diet and exercise, more specific monitoring to detect and prevent testosterone depletion toxicities, and intermittent ADT allowing hormonal recovery between treatment periods. Clinical studies suggest possible benefits of GnRH antagonists over agonists based on different mechanisms of action. Gn

  2. A Urologist’s Personal View of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schellhammer, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    A urologist’s personal experience with multiple surgical, hormonal, and radio/immunotherapeutic options for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer and thoughts on the role of old and new therapies. PMID:27635283

  3. Tuberculous prostatitis: mimicking a cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, El Majdoub; Abdelhak, Khallouk; Hassan, Farih Moulay

    2016-01-01

    Genitourinary tuberculosis is a common type of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis . The kidneys, ureter, bladder or genital organs are usually involved. Tuberculosis of the prostate has mainly been described in immune-compromised patients. However, it can exceptionally be found as an isolated lesion in immune-competent patients. Tuberculosis of the prostate may be difficult to differentiate from carcinoma of the prostate and the chronic prostatitis when the prostate is hard and nodular on digital rectal examination and the urine is negative for tuberculosis bacilli. In many cases, a diagnosis of tuberculous prostatitis is made by the pathologist, or the disease is found incidentally after transurethral resection. Therefore, suspicion of tuberculous prostatitis requires a confirmatory biopsy of the prostate. We report the case of 60-year-old man who presented a low urinary tract syndrome. After clinical and biological examination, and imaging, prostate cancer was highly suspected. Transrectal needle biopsy of the prostate was performed and histological examination showed tuberculosis lesions. PMID:28292092

  4. Targeting the Aberrant Androgen Receptor in Advanced Treatment Resistant Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    enhancing public understanding and increasing interest in learning and careers in science, technology, and the humanities. The Dame Roma Mitchell...conducted in the Dame Roma Mitchell Cancer Research Laboratories at the University of Adelaide, communicates research findings to the PI and other co...fellow Nearest person month worked: 6 Contribution to Project: Dr. Selth oversees all research being conducted in the Dame Roma Mitchell Cancer

  5. Nanoparticle therapeutics for prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Vanna; Sechi, Mario

    2012-09-01

    The application of nanotechnology in medicine is offering many exciting possibilities in healthcare. Engineered nanoparticles have the potential to revolutionize the diagnosis and the therapy of several diseases, particularly by targeted delivery of anticancer drugs and imaging contrast agents. Prostate cancer, the second most common cancer in men, represents one of the major epidemiological problems, especially for patients in the advanced age. There is a substantial interest in developing therapeutic options for treatment of prostate cancer based on use of nanodevices, to overcome the lack of specificity of conventional chemotherapeutic agents as well as for the early detection of precancerous and malignant lesions. Herein, we highlight on the recent development of nanotechnology strategies adopted for the management of prostate cancer. In particular, the combination of targeted and controlled-release polymer nanotechnologies has recently resulted in the clinical development of BIND-014, a promising targeted Docetaxel-loaded nanoprototype, which can be validated for use in the prostate cancer therapy. However, several limitations facing nanoparticle delivery to solid tumours, such as heterogeneity of intratumoural barriers and vasculature, cytotoxicity and/or hypersensitivity reactions to currently available cancer nanomedicines, and the difficult in developing targeted nanoparticles with optimal biophysicochemical properties, should be still addressed for a successful tumour eradication.

  6. Do Environmental Factors Modify the Genetic Risk of Prostate Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, Stacy; Peskoe, Sarah B.; Joshu, Corinne E.; Huang, Wen-Yi; Hayes, Richard B.; Carter, H. Ballentine; Isaacs, William B.; Platz, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many SNPs influence prostate cancer risk. To what extent genetic risk can be reduced by environmental factors is unknown. Methods We evaluated effect modification by environmental factors of the association between susceptibility SNPs and prostate cancer in 1,230 incident prostate cancer cases and 1,361 controls, all white and similar ages, nested in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Trial. Genetic risk scores were calculated as number of risk alleles for 20 validated SNPs. We estimated the association between higher genetic risk (≥ 12 SNPs) and prostate cancer within environmental factor strata and tested for interaction. Results Men with ≥12 risk alleles had 1.98, 2.04, and 1.91 times the odds of total, advanced, and nonadvanced prostate cancer, respectively. These associations were attenuated with the use of selenium supplements, aspirin, ibuprofen, and higher vegetable intake. For selenium, the attenuation was most striking for advanced prostate cancer: compared with <12 alleles and no selenium, the OR for ≥12 alleles was 2.06 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.67–2.55] in nonusers and 0.99 (0.38–2.58) in users (Pinteraction = 0.031). Aspirin had the most marked attenuation for nonadvanced prostate cancer: compared with <12 alleles and nonusers, the OR for ≥12 alleles was 2.25 (1.69–3.00) in nonusers and 1.70 (1.25–2.32) in users (Pinteraction = 0.009). This pattern was similar for ibuprofen (Pinteraction = 0.023) and vegetables (Pinteraction = 0.010). Conclusions This study suggests that selenium supplements may reduce genetic risk of advanced prostate cancer, whereas aspirin, ibuprofen, and vegetables may reduce genetic risk of nonadvanced prostate cancer. PMID:25342390

  7. Immunotherapy in metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Slovin, Susan F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Prostate cancer remains a challenge as a target for immunological approaches. The approval of the first cell-based immune therapy, Sipuleucel-T for prostate cancer introduced prostate cancer as a solid tumor with the potential to be influenced by the immune system. Methods: We reviewed articles on immunological management of prostate cancer and challenges that lie ahead for such strategies. Results: Treatments have focused on the identification of novel cell surface antigens thought to be unique to prostate cancer. These include vaccines against carbohydrate and blood group antigens, xenogeneic and naked DNA vaccines, and pox viruses used as prime-boost or checkpoint inhibitors. No single vaccine construct to date has resulted in a dramatic antitumor effect. The checkpoint inhibitor, anti-CTLA-4 has resulted in several long-term remissions, but phase III trials have not demonstrated an antitumor effect or survival benefit. Conclusions: Multiple clinical trials suggest that prostate cancer may not be optimally treated by single agent immune therapies and that combination with biologic agents, chemotherapies, or radiation may offer some enhancement of benefit. PMID:27843208

  8. Lycopene: redress for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Pisipati, Sai Venkata Vedavyas; Pathapati, Harshavardhan; Bhukya, Ganesh; Nuthakki, Suresh; Chandu, Baburao; Nama, SreeKanth; Adeps, RajDev

    2012-03-01

    Lycopene, a carotenoid is what that gives red colour to some fruits like pomegranate, tomato, papaya etc... People with a sound diet of lycopene may have a less risk of cancers especially prostate cancer which is most impedent for the males of age 40-50 years. So, in countries of north America and Europe food contains much of the lycopene supplements. In accordance with the American journal of epidemiology 2002 studies implies that men with crushed serum lycopene levels are more divulged to prostate cancer and those with sound diet of lycopene have a less risk of prostate cancer. In a care study conveyed by The British journal of urology, men with prostate cancer are subjected to surgery and the tumour is detonated. Amongst the men half a set were supplemented with lycopene supplements and half were not. Those subjected with lycopene supplements have less bone pains and live longer than those not supplemented. This paints a picture about importance of lycopene in treatment of prostate cancer. This article evokes the importance of lycopene and its way of destroying the cancer. Lycopene reduces the risk of cancer by diverging its effect on the plasma Insulin like growth factor, on Connexins , and the most acceptable one, by quench of free radicals.

  9. Lycopene: Redress for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pisipati, Sai Venkata Vedavyas; Pathapati, Harshavardhan; Bhukya, Ganesh; Nuthakki, Suresh; Chandu, Baburao; Nama, SreeKanth; Adeps, RajDev

    2012-01-01

    Lycopene, a carotenoid is what that gives red colour to some fruits like pomegranate, tomato, papaya etc... People with a sound diet of lycopene may have a less risk of cancers especially prostate cancer which is most impedent for the males of age 40-50 years. So, in countries of north America and Europe food contains much of the lycopene supplements. In accordance with the American journal of epidemiology 2002 studies implies that men with crushed serum lycopene levels are more divulged to prostate cancer and those with sound diet of lycopene have a less risk of prostate cancer. In a care study conveyed by The British journal of urology, men with prostate cancer are subjected to surgery and the tumour is detonated. Amongst the men half a set were supplemented with lycopene supplements and half were not. Those subjected with lycopene supplements have less bone pains and live longer than those not supplemented. This paints a picture about importance of lycopene in treatment of prostate cancer. This article evokes the importance of lycopene and its way of destroying the cancer. Lycopene reduces the risk of cancer by diverging its effect on the plasma Insulin like growth factor, on Connexins , and the most acceptable one, by quench of free radicals. PMID:24826034

  10. Height-related risk factors for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Norrish, A E; McRae, C U; Holdaway, I M; Jackson, R T

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that adult height is positively associated with the risk of prostate cancer. The authors carried out a population-based case-control study involving 317 prostate cancer cases and 480 controls to further investigate the possibility that height is more strongly associated with advanced, compared with localized forms of this disease. Since the inherited endocrine factors, which in part determine height attained during the growing years, may influence the risk of familial prostate cancer later in life, the relationship with height was also investigated for familial versus sporadic prostate cancers. Adult height was not related to the risk of localized prostate cancer, but there was a moderate positive association between increasing height and the risk of advanced cancer (relative risk (RR) = 1.62; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.97-2.73, upper versus lowest quartile, P-trend = 0.07). Height was more strongly associated with the risk of prostate cancer in men with a positive family history compared with those reporting a negative family history. The RR of advanced prostate cancer for men in the upper height quartile with a positive family history was 7.41 (95% CI 1.68-32.67, P-trend = 0.02) compared with a reference group comprised of men in the shortest height quartile with a negative family history. Serum insulin-like growth factor-1 levels did not correlate with height amongst men with familial or sporadic prostate cancers. These findings provide evidence for the existence of growth-related risk factors for prostate cancer, particularly for advanced and familial forms of this disease. The possible existence of inherited mechanisms affecting both somatic and tumour growth deserves further investigation.

  11. About the Prostate

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer growth or as a result of treatments. Prostate Cancer Basics About the Prostate Risk Factors Prevention Symptoms Early Detection & Screening Living with Prostate Cancer Newly Diagnosed Treatment Options Side Effects Recurrence Advanced ...

  12. Circulating tumor cells from patients with advanced prostate and breast cancer display both epithelial and mesenchymal markers.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Andrew J; Marengo, Matthew S; Oltean, Sebastian; Kemeny, Gabor; Bitting, Rhonda L; Turnbull, James D; Herold, Christina I; Marcom, Paul K; George, Daniel J; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A

    2011-08-01

    During cancer progression, malignant cells undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMT) and mesenchymal-epithelial transitions (MET) as part of a broad invasion and metastasis program. We previously observed MET events among lung metastases in a preclinical model of prostate adenocarcinoma that suggested a relationship between epithelial plasticity and metastatic spread. We thus sought to translate these findings into clinical evidence by examining the existence of EMT in circulating tumor cells (CTC) from patients with progressive metastatic solid tumors, with a focus on men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and women with metastatic breast cancer. We showed that the majority (> 80%) of these CTCs in patients with metastatic CRPC coexpress epithelial proteins such as epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), cytokeratins (CK), and E-cadherin, with mesenchymal proteins including vimentin, N-cadherin and O-cadherin, and the stem cell marker CD133. Equally, we found that more than 75% of CTCs from women with metastatic breast cancer coexpress CK, vimentin, and N-cadherin. The existence and high frequency of these CTCs coexpressing epithelial, mesenchymal, and stem cell markers in patients with progressive metastases has important implications for the application and interpretation of approved methods to detect CTCs.

  13. Long Term Progression-Free Survival in a Patient with Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer under Low Dose Intermittent Androgen Deprivation Therapy with Bicalutamide Only.

    PubMed

    Latz, Stefan; Fisang, Christian; Ebert, Wolfram; Orth, Stefan; Engehausen, Dirk G; Müller, Stefan C; Anding, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Androgen deprivation is a common treatment option in patients with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer. No case of long term treatment with an intermittent approach with only low dose bicalutamide (50 mg daily) has been described yet. We report a 60-year-old patient, initially presenting with a PSA elevation of 19.2 ng/mL in 1996. After diagnosis of well to moderately differentiated prostate cancer by transrectal biopsy, the patient underwent an open radical prostatectomy. Final diagnosis was adenocarcinoma of the prostate, classified as pT3a, pR1, pV0, and pL1. Adjuvant intermittent androgen deprivation therapy with flutamide 250 mg was applied, which was changed to bicalutamide 50 mg once daily when it became available in 2001. Six on-phases were performed and PSA values never exceeded 20 ng/mL. The patient did not experience any serious side effects. To date, there are no clinical or radiological signs of progression. Current PSA value is 3.5 ng/mL.

  14. Sirolimus, Docetaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Metastatic Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-10

    Castration Levels of Testosterone; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; PSA Progression; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  15. 2-Methoxyestradiol as a Chemotherapeutic for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    months 8-36). 1. Identify the in vitro growth condition (multicellular spheroids using polyhema) whereby prostate cancer cells are in a non...inhibit the growth of a variety of cancer cells, including advanced androgen- independent prostate cancer (AI-PC) [4,5] utilizing a remarkable number...A treated DU 145 cells. GADD45α mRNA (spot 4), a member of the growth arrest and DNA damage inducible family of proteins that inhibits CDK1 activity

  16. The Danish Prostate Cancer Database

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Nielsen, Mary; Høyer, Søren; Friis, Søren; Hansen, Steinbjørn; Brasso, Klaus; Jakobsen, Erik Breth; Moe, Mette; Larsson, Heidi; Søgaard, Mette; Nakano, Anne; Borre, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The Danish Prostate Cancer Database (DAPROCAdata) is a nationwide clinical cancer database that has prospectively collected data on patients with incident prostate cancer in Denmark since February 2010. The overall aim of the DAPROCAdata is to improve the quality of prostate cancer care in Denmark by systematically collecting key clinical variables for the purposes of health care monitoring, quality improvement, and research. Study population All Danish patients with histologically verified prostate cancer are included in the DAPROCAdata. Main variables The DAPROCAdata registers clinical data and selected characteristics for patients with prostate cancer at diagnosis. Data are collected from the linkage of nationwide health registries and supplemented with online registration of key clinical variables by treating physicians at urological and oncological departments. Main variables include Gleason scores, cancer staging, prostate-specific antigen values, and therapeutic measures (active surveillance, surgery, radiotherapy, endocrine therapy, and chemotherapy). Descriptive data In total, 22,332 patients with prostate cancer were registered in DAPROCAdata as of April 2015. A key feature of DAPROCAdata is the routine collection of patient-reported outcome measures (PROM), including data on quality-of-life (pain levels, physical activity, sexual function, depression, urine and fecal incontinence) and lifestyle factors (smoking, alcohol consumption, and body mass index). PROM data are derived from questionnaires distributed at diagnosis and at 1-year and 3-year follow-up. Hitherto, the PROM data have been limited by low completeness (26% among newly diagnosed patients in 2014). Conclusion DAPROCAdata is a comprehensive, yet still young clinical database. Efforts to improve data collection, data validity, and completeness are ongoing and of high priority. PMID:27843346

  17. Simultaneous integrated boost plan comparison of volumetric-modulated arc therapy and sliding window intensity-modulated radiotherapy for whole pelvis irradiation of locally advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Riou, Olivier; Regnault de la Mothe, Pauline; Azria, David; Aillères, Norbert; Dubois, Jean-Bernard; Fenoglietto, Pascal

    2013-07-08

    Concurrent radiotherapy to the pelvis plus a prostate boost with long-term androgen deprivation is a standard of care for locally advanced prostate cancer. IMRT has the ability to deliver highly conformal dose to the target while lowering irradiation of critical organs around the prostate. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy is able to reduce treatment time, but its impact on organ sparing is still controversial when compared to static gantry IMRT. We compared the two techniques in simultaneous integrated boost plans. Ten patients with locally advanced prostate cancer were included. The planning target volume (PTV) 1 was defined as the pelvic lymph nodes, the prostate, and the seminal vesicles plus setup margins. The PTV2 consisted of the prostate with setup margins. The prescribed doses to PTV1 and PTV2 were 54 Gy in 37 fractions and 74 Gy in 37 fractions, respectively. We compared simultaneous integrated boost plans by means of either a seven coplanar static split fields IMRT, or a one-arc (RA1) and a two-arc (RA2) RapidArc planning. All three techniques allowed acceptable homogeneity and PTV coverage. Static IMRT enabled a better homogeneity for PTV2 than RapidArc techniques. Sliding window IMRT and VMAT permitted to maintain doses to OAR within acceptable levels with a low risk of side effects for each organ. VMAT plans resulted in a clinically and statistically significant reduction in doses to bladder (mean dose IMRT: 50.1 ± 4.6Gy vs. mean dose RA2: 47.1 ± 3.9 Gy, p = 0.037), rectum (mean dose IMRT: 44± 4.5 vs. mean dose RA2: 41.6 ± 5.5 Gy, p = 0.006), and small bowel (V30 IMRT: 76.47 ± 14.91% vs. V30 RA2: 47.49 ± 16.91%, p = 0.002). Doses to femoral heads were higher with VMAT but within accepted constraints. Our findings suggest that simultaneous integrated boost plans using VMAT and sliding window IMRT allow good OAR sparing while maintaining PTV coverage within acceptable levels.

  18. What Tests Can Detect Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention and Early Detection What Tests Can Detect Prostate Cancer Early? The tests discussed below are used to ... also found in the blood. Most men without prostate cancer have PSA levels under 4 nanograms per milliliter ( ...

  19. A Changing Landscape of Advanced Prostate Cancer: Understanding Mechanisms of Resistance to Potent Hormonal Therapies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    and CpG DNA methylation integrative analyses point to key drivers of NEPC including loss of RB1 and TP53 and primarily epigenetic changes...sequencing (WES) and other molecular analyses of tumor and germline DNA from patients with advanced disease and to follow patients prospectively to...protein expression alterations involving DNA mismatch repair genes consistent with prior studies. The significant overlap between CRPC-Adeno and CRPC

  20. Nanotherapies for treating prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danquah, Michael

    -co-lactide) [PEG-b-P(CB-co-LA)] copolymers were synthesized and characterized by NMR and gel permeation chromatography. Micelles formulated using these copolymers had average diameter of 100 nm and distinct spherical shape. Drug loading studies revealed that adding the carbonate monomer could increase bicalutamide loading. Among the series, drug loading of micelles formulated with PEG-b-P(CB-co-LA) copolymer containing 20 mol% carbonate was about four-fold higher than PEG-b-PLLA and aqueous solubility of bicalutamide increased from 5 to 4000 μg/mL. CMC values for PEG-b-P(CB-co-LA) copolymers was up to 10-fold lower than those of PEG-b-PLLA. Bicalutamide-loaded PEG-b-P(CB-co-LA) micelles showed significant inhibition of LNCaP cell growth in a dose dependent manner which was similar to the methanol solution of free drug. Bicalutamide tends to act as an agonist rather than an antagonist after prolonged treatment. Hence, a second generation antiandrogen ((S)-N-(4-cyano-3-(trifluoromethyl) phenyl)-3-((4-cyanophenyl)(methyl)amino)-2-hydroxy-2-methylpropanamide) (CBDIV17)) was synthesized and its effect in combination with XIAP inhibitors for treating advanced prostate cancer was determined. CBDIV17 was more potent than bicalutamide and inhibited proliferation of C4-2 and LNCaP cells. CBDIV17-induced apoptosis more effectively compared to bicalutamide and significantly inhibited DNA replication. Combination of CBDIV17 and embelin resulted in supra-additive antiproliferative and apoptotic effects. Embelin downregulated AR expression and decreased androgen-mediated AR phosphorylation at Ser81. These hydrophobic drugs were solubilized using micelles prepared using polyethylene glycol-b-poly (carbonate-co-lactide) (PEG-b-p(CB-co-PLA)) copolymer. Combination therapy inhibited prostate tumor growth more effectively compared to control or monotherapy in vivo. The findings reported in this work demonstrate the potential benefit of combination therapy targeting AR and XIAP pathways for treating

  1. Proton therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Bradford; Henderson, Randal; Mendenhall, William M; Nichols, Romaine C; Li, Zuofeng; Mendenhall, Nancy P

    2011-06-01

    Proton therapy has been used in the treatment of cancer for over 50 years. Due to its unique dose distribution with its spread-out Bragg peak, proton therapy can deliver highly conformal radiation to cancers located adjacent to critical normal structures. One of the important applications of its use is in prostate cancer, since the prostate is located adjacent to the rectum and bladder. Over 30 years of data have been published on the use of proton therapy in prostate cancer; these data have demonstrated high rates of local and biochemical control as well as low rates of urinary and rectal toxicity. Although before 2000 proton therapy was available at only a couple of centers in the United States, several new proton centers have been built in the last decade. With the increased availability of proton therapy, research on its use for prostate cancer has accelerated rapidly. Current research includes explorations of dose escalation, hypofractionation, and patient-reported quality-of-life outcomes. Early results from these studies are promising and will likely help make proton therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer more cost-effective.

  2. Active surveillance for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Romero-Otero, Javier; García-Gómez, Borja; Duarte-Ojeda, José M; Rodríguez-Antolín, Alfredo; Vilaseca, Antoni; Carlsson, Sigrid V; Touijer, Karim A

    2016-03-01

    It is worth distinguishing between the two strategies of expectant management for prostate cancer. Watchful waiting entails administering non-curative androgen deprivation therapy to patients on development of symptomatic progression, whereas active surveillance entails delivering curative treatment on signs of disease progression. The objectives of the two management strategies and the patients enrolled in either are different: (i) to review the role of active surveillance as a management strategy for patients with low-risk prostate cancer; and (ii) review the benefits and pitfalls of active surveillance. We carried out a systematic review of active surveillance for prostate cancer in the literature using the National Center for Biotechnology Information's electronic database, PubMed. We carried out a search in English using the terms: active surveillance, prostate cancer, watchful waiting and conservative management. Selected studies were required to have a comprehensive description of the demographic and disease characteristics of the patients at the time of diagnosis, inclusion criteria for surveillance, and a protocol for the patients' follow up. Review articles were included, but not multiple papers from the same datasets. Active surveillance appears to reduce overtreatment in patients with low-risk prostate cancer without compromising cancer-specific survival at 10 years. Therefore, active surveillance is an option for select patients who want to avoid the side-effects inherent to the different types of immediate treatment. However, inclusion criteria for active surveillance and the most appropriate method of monitoring patients on active surveillance have not yet been standardized.

  3. Counseling the Client with Prostate Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Russell C.; Juhnke, Gerald A.

    2003-01-01

    Prostate cancer is prevalent in the United States and has a far-reaching effect on men and their relationships. Being diagnosed with and treated for prostate cancer often causes men to experience side effects that induce physical, emotional, and social change. Counselors need to be aware of prostate cancer's impact on men and their families.…

  4. Microtubule Control of Metabolism in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Lynne Cassimeris CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...Microtubule Control of Metabolism in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0071 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The current standard chemotherapy treatment for metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer is the microtubule

  5. Microtubule Control of Metabolism in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Lynne Cassimeris CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Lehigh University Bethlehem, PA 18015-3008 REPORT...Control of Metabolism in Prostate Cancer Dr. Lynne Cassimeris lc07@lehigh.edu Lehigh University 526 Brodhead Avenue Bethlehem, PA 18015-3008 U.S...tested whether metabolic inhibitors, metformin or 2-deoxy-glucose, function synergistically with docetaxel to block prostate cancer cell proliferation

  6. Reduction of Racial Disparities in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    JF, Levine AC. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 suppresses angiogenesis and the growth of prostate cancer in vivo. J Urol 2000:164:820-5 10. Mahmud...Tzivony Y, Flescher E. Contrasting effects of aspirin on prostate cancer cells: suppression of proliferation and induction of drug resistance...TITLE: Reduction of Racial Disparities in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Nicholas Daniels, MD MPH, Principal Investigator

  7. Prostate cancer brachytherapy: guidelines overview

    PubMed Central

    Białas, Brygida

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer, due to wide availability of PSA tests, is very often diagnosed in early stage, nowadays. This makes management of this disease even harder in every day oncology care. There is a wide range of treatment options including surgery, radiotherapy and active surveillance, but essential question is which treatment patient and oncologist should decide for. Due to recent publication of Prostate Cancer Results Study Group, in which brachytherapy is one of supreme curative options for prostate cancer, we decided to overview most present european and north american recommendations. National Comprehensive Cancer Network, American Society for Radiation Oncology, American Brachytherapy Society, European Association of Urology and Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie of European Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology guidelines are overviewed, particularly focusing on HDR and LDR brachytherapy. PMID:23349655

  8. Prostate cancer brachytherapy: guidelines overview.

    PubMed

    Wojcieszek, Piotr; Białas, Brygida

    2012-06-01

    Prostate cancer, due to wide availability of PSA tests, is very often diagnosed in early stage, nowadays. This makes management of this disease even harder in every day oncology care. There is a wide range of treatment options including surgery, radiotherapy and active surveillance, but essential question is which treatment patient and oncologist should decide for. Due to recent publication of Prostate Cancer Results Study Group, in which brachytherapy is one of supreme curative options for prostate cancer, we decided to overview most present european and north american recommendations. National Comprehensive Cancer Network, American Society for Radiation Oncology, American Brachytherapy Society, European Association of Urology and Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie of European Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology guidelines are overviewed, particularly focusing on HDR and LDR brachytherapy.

  9. The Relationship between Statins and Prostate Cancer Prevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    In 2011, it is estimated that 240,890 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and 33,720 men will die from prostate cancer. Few prevention ...strategies for prostate cancer exist. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, statins, may prevent prostate cancer incidence and progression. We previously...prostate cancer in the Physicians’ Health Study and Early Stage Prostate Cancer Cohort study. Prostate cancer is commonly diagnosed and prevention

  10. Prostate Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing prostate cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  11. [11C]Choline PET/CT in therapy response assessment of a neoadjuvant therapy in locally advanced and high risk prostate cancer before radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzenböck, Sarah M.; Knieling, Anna; Souvatzoglou, Michael; Kurth, Jens; Steiger, Katja; Eiber, Matthias; Esposito, Irene; Retz, Margitta; Kübler, Hubert; Gschwend, Jürgen E.; Schwaiger, Markus; Krause, Bernd J.; Thalgott, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies have shown promising results of neoadjuvant therapy in prostate cancer (PC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of [11C]Choline PET/CT in therapy response monitoring after combined neoadjuvant docetaxel chemotherapy and complete androgen blockade in locally advanced and high risk PC patients. Results In [11C]Choline PET/CT there was a significant decrease of SUVmax and SUVmean (p = 0.004, each), prostate volume (p = 0.005) and PSA value (p = 0.003) after combined neoadjuvant therapy. MRI showed a significant prostate and tumor volume reduction (p = 0.003 and 0.005, respectively). Number of apoptotic cells was significantly higher in prostatectomy specimens of the therapy group compared to pretherapeutic biopsies and the control group (p = 0.02 and 0.003, respectively). Methods 11 patients received two [11C]Choline PET/CT and MRI scans before and after combined neoadjuvant therapy followed by radical prostatectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection. [11C]Choline uptake, prostate and tumor volume, PSA value (before/after neoadjuvant therapy) and apoptosis (of pretherapeutic biopsy/posttherapeutic prostatectomy specimens of the therapy group and prostatectomy specimens of a matched control group without neoadjuvant therapy) were assessed and tested for differences and correlation using SPSS. Conclusions The results showing a decrease in choline uptake after combined neoadjuvant therapy (paralleled by regressive and apoptotic changes in histopathology) confirm the potential of [11C]Choline PET/CT to monitor effects of neoadjuvant therapy in locally advanced and high risk PC patients. Further studies are recommended to evaluate its use during the course of neoadjuvant therapy for early response assessment. PMID:27572317

  12. Comparison of prostate-specific promoters and the use of PSP-driven virotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Zhang, Yu; Chang, Guimin; Zhang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men today. Although virus-based gene therapy is a promising strategy to combat advanced prostate cancer, its current effectiveness is limited partially due to inefficient cellular transduction in vivo. To overcome this obstacle, conditional oncolytic viruses (such as conditional replication adenovirus (CRAD)) are developed to specifically target prostate without (or with minimal) systemic toxicity due to viral self-replication. In this study, we have analyzed and compared three prostate-specific promoters (PSA, probasin, and MMTV LTR) for their specificity and activity both in vitro and in vivo. Both mice model with xenograft prostate tumor model and canine model were used. The best PSP was selected to construct a prostate-specific oncolytic adenovirus (CRAD) by controlling the adenoviral E1 region. The efficacy and specificity of CRAD on prostate cancer cells were examined in cell culture and animal models.

  13. LuCaP Prostate Cancer Patient‐Derived Xenografts Reflect the Molecular Heterogeneity of Advanced Disease an­­d Serve as Models for Evaluating Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Holly M.; Vessella, Robert L.; Morrissey, Colm; Brown, Lisha G.; Coleman, Ilsa M.; Higano, Celestia S.; Mostaghel, Elahe A.; Zhang, Xiaotun; True, Lawrence D.; Lam, Hung‐Ming; Roudier, Martine; Lange, Paul H.; Nelson, Peter S.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Metastatic prostate cancer is a common and lethal disease for which there are no therapies that produce cures or long‐term durable remissions. Clinically relevant preclinical models are needed to increase our understanding of biology of this malignancy and to evaluate new agents that might provide effective treatment. Our objective was to establish and characterize patient‐derived xenografts (PDXs) from advanced prostate cancer (PC) for investigation of biology and evaluation of new treatment modalities. METHODS Samples of advanced PC obtained from primary prostate cancer obtained at surgery or from metastases collected at time of death were implanted into immunocompromised mice to establish PDXs. Established PDXs were propagated in vivo. Genomic, transcriptomic, and STR profiles were generated. Responses to androgen deprivation and docetaxel in vivo were characterized. RESULTS We established multiple PDXs (LuCaP series), which represent the major genomic and phenotypic features of the disease in humans, including amplification of androgen receptor, PTEN deletion, TP53 deletion and mutation, RB1 loss, TMPRSS2‐ERG rearrangements, SPOP mutation, hypermutation due to MSH2/MSH6 genomic aberrations, and BRCA2 loss. The PDX models also exhibit variation in intra‐tumoral androgen levels. Our in vivo results show heterogeneity of response to androgen deprivation and docetaxel, standard therapies for advanced PC, similar to the responses of patients to these treatments. CONCLUSIONS The LuCaP PDX series reflects the diverse molecular composition of human castration‐resistant PC and allows for hypothesis‐driven cause‐and‐effect studies of mechanisms underlying treatment response and resistance. Prostate 77: 654–671, 2017. © 2017 The Authors. The Prostate Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:28156002

  14. Targeting the Prostate Cancer Microenvironment to Improve Therapeutic Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    malignancies. However, a subset of localized cancers resist genotoxic treatments, and most advanced cancers treated with such therapies eventually progress...NF-κB, and found the physical interaction between these molecules when cells are exposed to genotoxicity . We anticipate that targeting such a key...PCa medicine. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate cancer, microenvironment, DNA damage, genotoxicity , stroma, secretion, therapy resistance, outcome. 16

  15. Detection of DNA viruses in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Smelov, Vitaly; Bzhalava, Davit; Arroyo Mühr, Laila Sara; Eklund, Carina; Komyakov, Boris; Gorelov, Andrey; Dillner, Joakim; Hultin, Emilie

    2016-04-28

    We tested prostatic secretions from men with and without prostate cancer (13 cases and 13 matched controls) or prostatitis (18 cases and 18 matched controls) with metagenomic sequencing. A large number (>200) of viral reads was only detected among four prostate cancer cases (1 patient each positive for Merkel cell polyomavirus, JC polyomavirus and Human Papillomavirus types 89 or 40, respectively). Lower numbers of reads from a large variety of viruses were detected in all patient groups. Our knowledge of the biology of the prostate may be furthered by the fact that DNA viruses are commonly shed from the prostate and can be readily detected by metagenomic sequencing of expressed prostate secretions.

  16. Targeting Prostate Cancer with Multifunctional Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    4 Fig 1. Characterization of three prostate cancer cell lines by western blot. COXIV is used as a loading control...characterize our three prostate cancer cell lines , LNCaP, DU145 and PC3, which are being used in this project. We showed that prostate specific antigen...PSA) is expressed in the LNCaP cells, but absent in the DU145 cells whereas AMACR (P504S) is expressed in all prostate cancer cell lines (Fig 1

  17. Metastatic Prostate Cancer of Hand

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Koji; Ishimaru, Daichi; Nishimoto, Yutaka; Ohno, Yoshiyuki; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissue metastases of prostate cancer to other sites are extremely rare, and, to our best knowledge, there have been no reports of metastasis to soft tissue of the hand. A 63-year-old man was diagnosed with prostatic cancer. During treatment, bone and soft tissue metastases to the right hand, appearing in the first web space, were observed. The tumor was resected, along with both the first and second metacarpal bones. The thumb was reconstructed by pollicization of the remaining index finger, enabling the patient to use the pollicized thumb for activities of daily living. This is the first case report of prostate cancer metastasizing to the soft tissue in hand. After wide resection, pollicization was able to reconstruct a functional hand and thumb. PMID:27843661

  18. The Prostate Health Index Selectively Identifies Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, Stacy; Sanda, Martin G.; Broyles, Dennis L.; Shin, Sanghyuk S.; Bangma, Chris H.; Wei, John T.; Partin, Alan W.; Klee, George G.; Slawin, Kevin M.; Marks, Leonard S.; van Schaik, Ron H. N.; Chan, Daniel W.; Sokoll, Lori J.; Cruz, Amabelle B.; Mizrahi, Isaac A.; Catalona, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Prostate Health Index (phi) is a new test combining total, free and [-2]proPSA into a single score. It was recently approved by the FDA and is now commercially available in the U.S., Europe and Australia. We investigate whether phi improves specificity for detecting clinically significant prostate cancer and can help reduce prostate cancer over diagnosis. Materials and Methods From a multicenter prospective trial we identified 658 men age 50 years or older with prostate specific antigen 4 to 10 ng/ml and normal digital rectal examination who underwent prostate biopsy. In this population we compared the performance of prostate specific antigen, % free prostate specific antigen, [-2]proPSA and phi to predict biopsy results and, specifically, the presence of clinically significant prostate cancer using multiple criteria. Results The Prostate Health Index was significantly higher in men with Gleason 7 or greater and “Epstein significant” cancer. On receiver operating characteristic analysis phi had the highest AUC for overall cancer (AUCs phi 0.708, percent free prostate specific antigen 0.648, [-2]proPSA 0.550 and prostate specific antigen 0.516), Gleason 7 or greater (AUCs phi 0.707, percent free prostate specific antigen 0.661, [-2]proPSA 0.558, prostate specific antigen 0.551) and significant cancer (AUCs phi 0.698, percent free prostate specific antigen 0.654, [-2]proPSA 0.550, prostate specific antigen 0.549). At the 90% sensitivity cut point for phi (a score less than 28.6) 30.1% of patients could have been spared an unnecessary biopsy for benign disease or insignificant prostate cancer compared to 21.7% using percent free prostate specific antigen. Conclusions The new phi test outperforms its individual components of total, free and [-2]proPSA for the identification of clinically significant prostate cancer. Phi may be useful as part of a multivariable approach to reduce prostate biopsies and over diagnosis. PMID:25463993

  19. Racial Disparities in the Quality of Prostate Cancer Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    whether the quality of care received by minority men with locally advanced prostate cancer differs from the care received by white men controlling for...Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0540 TITLE: Racial Disparities in the Quality of Prostate Cancer Care PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Nina Bickell CONTRACTING...to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE

  20. Hormonal therapy of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Labrie, Fernand

    2010-01-01

    Of all cancers, prostate cancer is the most sensitive to hormones: it is thus very important to take advantage of this unique property and to always use optimal androgen blockade when hormone therapy is the appropriate treatment. A fundamental observation is that the serum testosterone concentration only reflects the amount of testosterone of testicular origin which is released in the blood from which it reaches all tissues. Recent data show, however, that an approximately equal amount of testosterone is made from dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) directly in the peripheral tissues, including the prostate, and does not appear in the blood. Consequently, after castration, the 95-97% fall in serum testosterone does not reflect the 40-50% testosterone (testo) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) made locally in the prostate from DHEA of adrenal origin. In fact, while elimination of testicular androgens by castration alone has never been shown to prolong life in metastatic prostate cancer, combination of castration (surgical or medical with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist) with a pure anti-androgen has been the first treatment shown to prolong life. Most importantly, when applied at the localized stage, the same combined androgen blockade (CAB) can provide long-term control or cure of the disease in more than 90% of cases. Obviously, since prostate cancer usually grows and metastasizes without signs or symptoms, screening with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is absolutely needed to diagnose prostate cancer at an 'early' stage before metastasis occurs and the cancer becomes non-curable. While the role of androgens was believed to have become non-significant in cancer progressing under any form of androgen blockade, recent data have shown increased expression of the androgen receptor (AR) in treatment-resistant disease with a benefit of further androgen blockade. Since the available anti-androgens have low affinity for AR and cannot block androgen action completely

  1. Inflammation in prostate cancer progression and therapeutic targeting

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Timothy; Livas, Lydia

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation contributes to the onset and progression of human cancer, via modifications in the tumor microenvironment by remodeling the extracellular matrix (ECM) and initiating epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). At the biological level, chronically inflamed cells release cytokines that are functionally dictating a constitutively active stroma, promoting tumor growth and metastasis. In prostate cancer, inflammation correlates with increased development of “risk factor” lesions or proliferative inflammatory atrophy (PIA). Chronic inflammation in benign prostate biopsy specimens can be associated with high-grade prostate tumors in adjacent areas. In this article, we discuss the current understanding of the incidence of inflammation in prostate cancer progression and the significance of the process in therapeutic targeting of specific inflammatory signaling pathways and critical effectors during tumor progression. Further understanding of the process of chronic inflammation in prostate tumor progression to metastasis will enable development and optimization of novel therapeutic modalities for the treatment of high-risk patients with advanced disease. PMID:26816843

  2. ABO Blood Group Alleles and Prostate Cancer Risk: Results from the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    PubMed Central

    Markt, Sarah C.; Shui, Irene M.; Unger, Robert H.; Urun, Yuksel; Berg, Christine D.; Black, Amanda; Brennan, Paul; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Gapstur, Susan M.; Giovannucci, Edward; Haiman, Christopher; Henderson, Brian; Hoover, Robert N.; Hunter, David J.; Key, Timothy J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Canzian, Federico; Larranga, Nerea; Le Marchand, Loic; Ma, Jing; Naccarati, Alessio; Siddiq, Afshan; Stampfer, Meir J.; Stattin, Par; Stevens, Victoria L.; Stram, Daniel O.; Tjønneland, Anne; Travis, Ruth C.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Ziegler, Regina G.; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Choueiri, Toni K.; Wilson, Kathryn M.

    2015-01-01

    Background ABO blood group has been associated with risk of cancers of the pancreas, stomach, ovary, kidney and skin, but has not been evaluated in relation to risk of aggressive prostate cancer. Methods We used three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs8176746, rs505922, and rs8176704) to determine ABO genotype in 2,774 aggressive prostate cancer cases and 4,443 controls from the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate age and study adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association between blood type, genotype and risk of aggressive prostate cancer (Gleason score ≥8 or locally advanced/metastatic disease (stage T3/T4/N1/M1). Results We found no association between ABO blood type and risk of aggressive prostate cancer (Type A: OR=0.97, 95% CI=0.87-1.08; Type B: OR=0.92, 95% CI=0.77-1.09; Type AB: OR=1.25, 95% CI=0.98-1.59, compared to Type O, respectively). Similarly, there was no association between ‘dose’ of A or B alleles and aggressive prostate cancer risk. Conclusions ABO blood type was not associated with risk of aggressive prostate cancer. PMID:26268879

  3. The hallmarks of castration-resistant prostate cancers.

    PubMed

    Katsogiannou, Maria; Ziouziou, Hajer; Karaki, Sara; Andrieu, Claudia; Henry de Villeneuve, Marie; Rocchi, Palma

    2015-07-01

    Prostate cancer has become a real public health issue in industrialized countries, mainly due to patients' relapse by castration-refractory disease after androgen ablation. Castration-resistant prostate cancer is an incurable and highly aggressive terminal stage of prostate cancer, seriously jeopardizing the patient's quality of life and lifespan. The management of castration-resistant prostate cancer is complex and has opened new fields of research during the last decade leading to an improved understanding of the biology of the disease and the development of new therapies. Most advanced tumors resistant to therapy still maintain the androgen receptor-pathway, which plays a central role for survival and growth of most castration-resistant prostate cancers. Many mechanisms induce the emergence of the castration resistant phenotype through this pathway. However some non-related AR pathways like neuroendocrine cells or overexpression of anti-apoptotic proteins like Hsp27 are described to be involved in CRPC progression. More recently, loss of expression of tumor suppressor gene, post-transcriptional modification using miRNA, epigenetic alterations, alternatif splicing and gene fusion became also hallmarks of castration-resistant prostate cancer. This review presents an up-to-date overview of the androgen receptor-related mechanisms as well as the latest evidence of the non-AR-related mechanisms underlying castration-resistant prostate cancer progression.

  4. Screening spectroscopy of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolenko, S. B.; Voloshynskyy, D. I.; Fedoruk, O. S.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to establish objective parameters of the field of laser and incoherent radiation of different spectral ranges (UV, visible, IR) as a non-invasive optical method of interaction with different samples of biological tissues and fluids of patients to determine the state of prostate cancer and choosing the best personal treatment. The objects of study were selected venous blood plasma of patient with prostate cancer, histological sections of rat prostate gland in the postoperative period. As diagnostic methods have been used ultraviolet spectrometry samples of blood plasma in the liquid state, infrared spectroscopy middle range (2,5-25 microns) dry residue of plasma by spectral diagnostic technique of thin histological sections of biological tissues.

  5. Early hormonal data from a multicentre phase II trial using transdermal oestrogen patches as first-line hormonal therapy in patients with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Langley, Ruth E.; Godsland, Ian F.; Kynaston, Howard; Clarke, Noel W.; Rosen, Stuart D.; Morgan, Rachel C.; Pollock, Philip; Kockelbergh, Roger; Lalani, El-Nasir; Dearnaley, David; Parmar, Mahesh; Abel, Paul D.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the hormonal effects of Fem7® (Merck, KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany) 100 μg transdermal oestrogen patches on men undergoing first-line androgen-deprivation therapy for prostate cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS PATCH is a multicentre, randomized, phase II trial for men with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer, comparing luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist therapy with oestrogen patches. To assess the dosing schedule for the patches, as this was the first time that this brand of patch had been used in men, and to reassure patients and participating clinicians, the Independent Data Monitoring Committee agreed to early release of hormonal data from this study. RESULTS Oestradiol, testosterone and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels are presented for the first group of 14 patients who received the patches (with 1 withdrawal) and for whom there were ≥12 weeks of follow-up by March 2007. After 12 weeks, testosterone levels (nmol/L) in eight of the 13 patients were <1.7, two were 1.7–2 and three were >2. The median (range) serum oestradiol levels was 442 (52.1–1542) pmol/L and all patients had a PSA response, with eight having a PSA level of <4 ng/mL. CONCLUSION These results confirm that oestrogen patches produce castrate levels of testosterone and concomitant PSA responses. They also highlighted the potential differences between different brands of oestrogen patches, and the need to monitor hormonal response, toxicity and efficacy until more experience with oestrogen patches for this clinical indication is obtained. The number of patches recommended in the PATCH study has now been increased. PMID:18422771

  6. Weekly administration of docetaxel in combination with estramustine and celecoxib in patients with advanced hormone-refractory prostate cancer: final results from a phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Carles, J; Font, A; Mellado, B; Domenech, M; Gallardo, E; González-Larriba, J L; Catalan, G; Alfaro, J; Gonzalez del Alba, A; Nogué, M; Lianes, P; Tello, J M

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety profile of weekly docetaxel, estramustine and celecoxib in patients with advanced hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Forty-eight patients received 35 mg m−2 of weekly docetaxel for 3 out of every 4 weeks, 280 mg of estramustine twice daily on days 1–3, 8–10, 15–17 and 400 mg of celecoxib twice daily until progression or toxicity. Cycles were repeated every 28 days for at least six cycles. Patients were evaluated for response and toxicity. Patients received a median of four cycles (range: 1–9). On an intention-to-treat analysis, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was decreased greater than 50% in 28 out of 48 patients (overall response rate: 58%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 44–72) and median duration of PSA response was 8.0 months (95% CI: 6.9–9.0). After a median follow-up of 11.3 months, the median time to progression was 7.1 months and the median overall survival was 19.2 months. The most frequent severe toxicity was asthenia (15% of patients), diarrhoea and stomatitis (8% of patients, each). Grade 3/4 neutropenia was reported in two patients. There was a toxic death during the study due to a gastric perforation. Celecoxib with weekly docetaxel and estramustine is an effective and safe treatment for patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer, but it does not seem to add any benefit to docetaxel. PMID:17955053

  7. Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer Enters Its Golden Age

    PubMed Central

    Boikos, Sosipatros A.; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.

    2012-01-01

    In the United States, prostate cancer is the most frequent malignancy in men and ranks second in terms of mortality. Although recurrent or metastatic disease can be managed initially with androgen ablation, most patients eventually develop castration-resistant disease within a number of years, for which conventional treatments (eg, chemotherapy) provide only modest benefits. In the last few years, immunotherapy has emerged as an exciting therapeutic modality for advanced prostate cancer, and this field is evolving rapidly. Encouragingly, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has recently approved two novel immunotherapy agents for patients with advanced cancer: the antigen presenting cell-based product sipuleucel-T and the anti-CTLA4 (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4) antibody ipilimumab, based on improvements in overall survival in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer and metastatic melanoma, respectively. Currently, a number of trials are investigating the role of various immunological approaches for the treatment of prostate cancer, many of them with early indications of success. As immunotherapy for prostate cancer enters its golden age, the challenge of the future will be to design rational combinations of immunotherapy agents with each other or with other standard prostate cancer treatments in an effort to improve patient outcomes further. PMID:22844202

  8. Clinical outcomes of anti-androgen withdrawal and subsequent alternative anti-androgen therapy for advanced prostate cancer following failure of initial maximum androgen blockade.

    PubMed

    Momozono, Hiroyuki; Miyake, Hideaki; Tei, Hiromoto; Harada, Ken-Ichi; Fujisawa, Masato

    2016-05-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the significance of anti-androgen withdrawal and/or subsequent alternative anti-androgen therapy in patients with advanced prostate cancer (PC) who relapsed after initial maximum androgen blockade (MAB). The present study evaluated the clinical outcomes of 272 consecutive advanced PC patients undergoing anti-androgen withdrawal and/or subsequent alternative anti-androgen therapy with flutamide following the failure of initial MAB using bicalutamide. With the exception of 41 patients (15.1%) who did not undergo anti-androgen withdrawal due to the characteristics of PC suggesting aggressive diseases, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) declined from the baseline value in 83 patients (35.9%), including 18 (7.8%) with PSA decline >50%, but not in the remaining 148 (64.1%). No significant difference in the overall survival (OS) or cancer-specific survival (CSS) among the three groups was observed based on the response to anti-androgen withdrawal. Following the introduction of alternative anti-androgen therapy with flutamide, PSA decline was observed in 185 patients (68.0%), including 103 (37.9%) who achieved a PSA reduction of >50%; however, the PSA level continued to elevate in the remaining 87 (32.0%). Furthermore, of the numerous factors examined, only the duration of the initial MAB therapy was shown to be significantly correlated with the PSA decline following alternative anti-androgen therapy. Multivariate analysis of several factors identified revealed that only PSA decline following alternative anti-androgen therapy was an independent predictor of CSS and OS. If initial MAB is effective, the introduction of alternative anti-androgen therapy may be considered; however, anti-androgen withdrawal should be omitted, irrespective of the characteristics of advanced PC.

  9. Progress and controversies: Radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Martin, Neil E; D'Amico, Anthony V

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy remains a standard treatment option for men with localized prostate cancer. Alone or in combination with androgen-deprivation therapy, it represents a curative treatment and has been shown to prolong survival in selected populations. In this article, the authors review recent advances in prostate radiation-treatment techniques, photon versus proton radiation, modification of treatment fractionation, and brachytherapy-all focusing on disease control and the impact on morbidity. Also discussed are refinements in the risk stratification of men with prostate cancer and how these are better for matching patients to appropriate treatment, particularly around combined androgen-deprivation therapy. Many of these advances have cost and treatment burden implications, which have significant repercussions given the prevalence of prostate cancer. The discussion includes approaches to improve value and future directions for research.

  10. Vaccine Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    Center IRB, and the I owa City VA Medical Center Research and Development Committee. During the second and t hird years we have been recruiting pa...American Urologic Association (AUA). (3) Talks to prostate cancer survivor support groups in at the University of I owa , Mercy Medical Center in Cedar

  11. Sanguinarine: A Novel Agent Against Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    surgical approaches have not been successful in the management of prostate cancer (CaP). Natural plant - based products have shown promise as anticancer...or treatment of prostate cancer . Several studies have shown that plant -derived alkaloids possess remarkable anticancer effects. Sanguinarine, an...Preclinical evaluation of plant alkaloid sanguinarine against prostate cancer development in a nude mice xenograft model. Proc Amer Assoc Cancer

  12. Regulation of the Prostate Cancer Tumor Microenvironment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    epithelium , stroma, as well as immune system, and the fixed nature of the prostate model with expression of the large T antigen, which may have...prostate cancer glandular architecture formed (Figure 10). Figure 10. Subcutanous TRAMP Model to Recapitulate Prostate Cancer. TRAMP C2 cells...specifically modulate the TLR signaling pathway in prostate epithelium , stroma, and immune system. To parse out the role of TLR signaling in

  13. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Tang, Dean G

    2016-02-29

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features.

  14. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Tang, Dean G.

    2016-01-01

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features. PMID:26924072

  15. Prostate Cancer Research Training Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    setting of cancer. Current efforts are focused on selecting RNA aptamers to receptors expressed on the surface of target cells with...institutions. A major project in the lab is targeted therapy of prostate cancer using PSMA-guided aptamers . Prabhat Goswami, PhD; Professor...participate. The Schultz lab also works to identify key cell-surface receptor residues as targets for novel peptide- and aptamer -based receptor

  16. Targeting prostate cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Crea, Francesco; Mathews, Lesley A; Farrar, William L; Hurt, Elaine M

    2009-12-01

    Cancer stem cells are the sub-population of cells present within tumors responsible for tumorigenesis. These cells have unique biological properties including self-renewal and the ability to differentiate. Furthermore, it is thought that these cells are more resistant to conventional chemotherapy and, as a result, are responsible for patient relapse. We will discuss the identification of prostate cancer stem cells, their unique properties and how these cells may be targeted for more efficacious therapies.

  17. Early Detection of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    effective marker for diagnosis and detection of prostate cancer. Low concentrations of PSA would be detected using acoustic wave sensors because of...associated electrical field. For biological sensors, binding of a substance onto the resonating membrane surface causes a decrease in the acoustic...of diverse conditions and diseases including those that affect the thyroid, HIV, diabetes , pregnancy, and several types of cancer. In clinical

  18. G protein-coupled receptors provide survival signals in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Yowell, Charles W; Daaka, Yehia

    2002-12-01

    Prostate cancer is the leading cause for noncutaneous cancer-related deaths among men in the United States. The disease is biologically characterized as being either androgen dependent or androgen independent. Whereas androgen-dependent prostate cancer can be successfully treated with androgen ablative therapy, to date no cure exists for androgen-independent disease. Mechanisms involved in the progression of prostate cancer to androgen independence are not known. Here we present evidence that in addition to growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases, G protein- coupled receptors can mediate survival signals in prostate cancer cells. The G protein- coupled receptors exert their effects by activating multiple intracellular signal transduction networks that promote prostate cancer cell survival, including the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, protein kinase B (Akt) and nuclear factor-kB. Prostate-expressed G protein- coupled receptors and their downstream effectors may prove to be effective targets in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

  19. Progress Against Prostate Cancer | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Prostate Cancer Progress Against Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Winter 2010 Table of Contents Click ... This can narrow the urethra, decreasing urine flow. Prostate cancer is made up of cells the body does ...

  20. The 22nd annual prostate cancer foundation scientific retreat report.

    PubMed

    Miyahira, Andrea K; Simons, Jonathan W; Soule, Howard R

    2016-09-01

    The 22nd Annual Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) Scientific Retreat was convened in Washington, D.C. from October 8 to 10, 2015. This event is the foremost scientific conference in the world focusing on basic, translational, and clinical prostate cancer research with the highest potential for accelerating the understanding of prostate cancer biology and improving the lives and outcomes of prostate cancer patients. Topics highlighted during the 2015 Retreat included: (i) new strategies and treatments for localized high-risk, hormone-naïve, oligometastatic, castrate-resistant, and treatment-refractory prostate cancer settings; (ii) the biology and genomics of tumor heterogeneity and tumor evolution; (iii) new understandings on the mechanisms and targeting of oncogenic drivers of prostate cancer; (iv) bioengineering of novel therapies and drug delivery methods; (v) innovative approaches to tumor immunotherapy; (vi) emerging molecular imaging technologies with improved sensitivity and specificity; and (vii) advancements in prognostic and predictive biomarkers and precision medicine strategies. Prostate 76:1037-1052, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) from diagnostic to therapeutic target: radionuclide therapy comes of age in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Violet, John A; Hofman, Michael S

    2017-04-05

    Without doubt, molecular imaging using PET/CT directed against prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has generated much interest for its impressive accuracy in detecting prostate cancer, particularly for biochemical recurrence[1]. PSMA expression is up regulated in advanced prostate cancer, including metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), and provides a novel therapeutic target for radionuclide therapy directed towards PSMA-avid disease. Radionuclide therapy relies on the identification of a suitable tumour associated 'target' and an appropriate 'vehicle' that can bind to this with high selectivity and specificity to allow delivery of a therapeutic radionuclide. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. The epigenome as a therapeutic target in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Perry, Antoinette S; Watson, R William G; Lawler, Mark; Hollywood, Donal

    2010-12-01

    During cancer development and progression, tumor cells undergo abnormal epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation, histone deacetylation and nucleosome remodeling. Collectively, these aberrations promote genomic instability and lead to silencing of tumor-suppressor genes and reactivation of oncogenic retroviruses. Epigenetic modifications, therefore, provide exciting new avenues for prostate cancer research. Promoter hypermethylation is widespread during neoplastic transformation of prostate cells, which suggests that restoration of a 'normal' epigenome through treatment with inhibitors of the enzymes involved could be clinically beneficial. Global patterns of histone modifications are also being defined and have been associated with clinical and pathologic predictors of prostate cancer outcome. Although treatment for localized prostate cancer can be curative, the development of successful therapies for the management of castration-resistant metastatic disease is urgently needed. Reactivation of tumor-suppressor genes by demethylating agents and histone deacetylase inhibitors could be a potential treatment option for patients with advanced disease.

  3. Virus, Oncolytic virus and Human Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guang Bin; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Lifang; Zhao, Kong-Nan

    2016-12-15

    Prostate cancer (PCa), a disease, is characterized by abnormal cell growth in the prostate - a gland in the male reproductive system. PCa is one of the leading causes of cancer death among men of all races. Although older age and a family history of the disease have been recognized as the risk factors of PCa, the cause of this cancer remains unclear. Mounting evidence suggests that infections with various viruses are causally linked to PCa pathogenesis. Published studies have provided strong evidence that at least two viruses (RXMV and HPV) contribute to prostate tumourigenicity and impact on the survival of patients with malignant PCa. Traditional therapies including chemotherapy and radiotherapy are unable to distinguish cancer cells from normal cells, which are a significant drawback and leads to toxicities for PCa patients undergoing treatment. So far, few other options are available for treating patients with advanced PCa. Virotherapy is being developed to be a novel therapy for cancers, which uses oncotropic and oncolytic viruses with their abilities to find and destroy malignant cells in the body. For PCa treatment, oncolytic virotherapy appears to be much more attractive, which uses live viruses to selectively kill cancer cells. Oncolytic viruses can be genetically engineered to induce cancer cell lysis through virus replication and expression of cytotoxic proteins. As oncolytic viruses are a relatively new class of anti-cancer immunotherapy agents, several important barriers still exist on the road to the use of oncolytic viruses for PCa therapy. In this review, we first discuss the controversy of the contribution of virus infection to PCa, and subsequently summarize the development of oncolytic virotherapy for PCa in the past several years.

  4. Granulomatous prostatitis after intravesical immunotherapy mimicking prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Białek, Waldemar; Rudzki, Sławomir; Iberszer, Paweł; Wronecki, Lech

    2016-12-01

    Intravesical immunotherapy with attenuated strains of Mycobacterium bovis is a widely used therapeutic option in patients with non-muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. A rare complication of intravesical therapy with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine is granulomatous prostatitis, which due to increasing levels of prostate-specific antigen and abnormalities found in transrectal examination of the prostate may suggest concomitant prostate cancer. A case of extensive granulomatous prostatitis in a 61-year-old patient which occurred after the first course of a well-tolerated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy is presented. Due to abnormalities found in rectal examination and an abnormal transrectal ultrasound image of the prostate with extensive infiltration mimicking neoplastic hyperplasia a core biopsy of the prostate was performed. Histopathological examination revealed inflammatory infiltration sites of tuberculosis origin.

  5. Granulomatous prostatitis after intravesical immunotherapy mimicking prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rudzki, Sławomir; Iberszer, Paweł; Wronecki, Lech

    2016-01-01

    Intravesical immunotherapy with attenuated strains of Mycobacterium bovis is a widely used therapeutic option in patients with non-muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. A rare complication of intravesical therapy with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine is granulomatous prostatitis, which due to increasing levels of prostate-specific antigen and abnormalities found in transrectal examination of the prostate may suggest concomitant prostate cancer. A case of extensive granulomatous prostatitis in a 61-year-old patient which occurred after the first course of a well-tolerated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy is presented. Due to abnormalities found in rectal examination and an abnormal transrectal ultrasound image of the prostate with extensive infiltration mimicking neoplastic hyperplasia a core biopsy of the prostate was performed. Histopathological examination revealed inflammatory infiltration sites of tuberculosis origin. PMID:28138411

  6. Risk and preventive factors for prostate cancer in Japan: The Japan Public Health Center-based prospective (JPHC) study

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Norie

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of prostate cancer is much lower in Asian than in Western populations. Lifestyle and dietary habits may play a major role in the etiology of this cancer. Given the possibility that risk factors for prostate cancer differ by disease aggressiveness, and the fact that 5-year relative survival rate of localized prostate cancer is 100%, identifying preventive factors against advanced prostate cancer is an important goal. Using data from the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study, the author elucidates various lifestyle risk factors for prostate cancer among Japanese men. The results show that abstinence from alcohol and tobacco might be important factors in the prevention of advanced prostate cancer. Moreover, the isoflavones and green tea intake in the typical Japanese diet may decrease the risk of localized and advanced prostate cancers, respectively. PMID:28135193

  7. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) of Prostatic Fluids for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    most widely used marker of prostate cancer - and prostate cancer risk. Moreover, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), which is also strongly associated...Vigneron, D.B., Konety, B., Nelson, S.J., Narayan, P., and Hricak, H. Citrate as in vivo marker to discriminate prostate cancer from benign prostatic hyperplasia and

  8. Assessing the Role of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) Relative to IMRT and Helical Tomotherapy in the Management of Localized, Locally Advanced, and Post-Operative Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Melanie T.M.; Blake, Samuel J.; Batchelar, Deidre L.; Cheung, Patrick; Mah, Katherine

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To quantify differences in treatment delivery efficiency and dosimetry between step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) for prostate treatment. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five prostate cancer patients were selected retrospectively for this planning study. Treatment plans were generated for: prostate alone (n = 5), prostate + seminal vesicles (n = 5), prostate + seminal vesicles + pelvic lymph nodes (n = 5), prostate bed (n = 5), and prostate bed + pelvic lymph nodes (n = 5). Target coverage, dose homogeneity, integral dose, monitor units (MU), and sparing of organs at risk (OAR) were compared across techniques. Time required to deliver each plan was measured. Results: The dosimetric quality of IMRT, VMAT, and HT plans were comparable for target coverage (planning target volume V95%, clinical target volume V100% all >98.7%) and sparing of organs at risk (OAR) for all treatment groups. Although HT resulted in a slightly higher integral dose and mean doses to the OAR, it yielded a lower maximum dose to all OAR examined. VMAT resulted in reductions in treatment times over IMRT (mean = 75%) and HT (mean = 70%). VMAT required 15-38% fewer monitor units than IMRT over all treatment volumes, with the reduction per fraction ranging from 100-423 MU from the smallest to largest volumes. Conclusions: VMAT improves efficiency of delivery for equivalent dosimetric quality as IMRT and HT across various prostate cancer treatment volumes in the intact and postoperative settings.

  9. Nonmetastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jun Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    After the introduction of prostate cancer screening with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test, we have witnessed a dramatic stage migration. As a result, an increasing number of patients are diagnosed at earlier stages and receive local treatments including surgery or radiation. When these local treatments fail by the definition of increasing PSA levels, patients are usually treated with androgen-deprivation therapy. A fraction of these patients will finally reach a state of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) even without radiological evidence of metastasis, which is referred to as nonmetastatic CRPC (NM-CRPC). Most men with advanced or metastatic prostate cancer initially respond to various types of androgen ablation, but a considerable portion of them eventually progress to NM-CRPC. Among patients with NM-CPRC, about one-third will develop bone metastasis within 2 years. In these patients, PSA kinetics is the most powerful indicator of progression and is usually used to trigger further imaging studies and enrollment in clinical trials. Although CRPC remains largely driven by the androgen receptor, the benefit of second-line hormonal manipulations, including first-generation antiandrogens, adrenal synthesis inhibitors, and steroids, has not been investigated in men with NM-CRPC. To date, denosumab is the only agent that has been shown to delay the onset of bone metastasis. However, overall survival did not differ. In treating NM-CRPC patients, physicians should recognize the heterogeneity of the disease and acknowledge that the recently approved second-line treatments have been studied only in advanced stages of the disease. PMID:24648868

  10. BRCA1 loss pre-existing in small subpopulations of prostate cancer is associated with advanced disease and metastatic spread to lymph nodes and peripheral blood

    SciTech Connect

    Bednarz, Natalia; Eltze, Elke; Semjonow, Axel; Rink, Michael; Andreas, Antje; Mulder, Lennart; Hannemann, Juliane; Fisch, Margit; Pantel, Klaus; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Bielawski, Krzysztof P.; Brandt, Burkhard

    2010-03-19

    A recent study concluded that serum prostate specific antigen (PSA)-based screening is beneficial for reducing the lethality of PCa, but was also associated with a high risk of 'overdiagnosis'. Nevertheless, also PCa patients who suffered from organ confined tumors and had negative bone scans succumb to distant metastases after complete tumor resection. It is reasonable to assume that those tumors spread to other organs long before the overt manifestation of metastases. Our current results confirm that prostate tumors are highly heterogeneous. Even a small subpopulation of cells bearing BRCA1 losses can initiate PCa cell regional and distant dissemination indicating those patients which might be at high risk of metastasis. A preliminary study performed on a small cohort of multifocal prostate cancer (PCa) detected BRCA1 allelic imbalances (AI) among circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The present analysis was aimed to elucidate the biological and clinical role of BRCA1 losses on metastatic spread and tumor progression in prostate cancer patients. Experimental Design: To map molecular progression in PCa outgrowth we used FISH analysis of tissue microarrays (TMA), lymph node sections and CTC from peripheral blood. We found that 14% of 133 tested patients carried monoallelic BRCA1 loss in at least one tumor focus. Extended molecular analysis of chr17q revealed that this aberration was often a part of larger cytogenetic rearrangement involving chr17q21 accompanied by AI of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN and lack of the BRCA1 promoter methylation. The BRCA1 losses correlated with advanced T stage (p < 0.05), invasion to pelvic lymph nodes (LN, p < 0.05) as well as BR (p < 0.01). Their prevalence was twice as high within 62 LN metastases (LNMs) as in primary tumors (27%, p < 0.01). The analysis of 11 matched primary PCa-LNM pairs confirmed the suspected transmission of genetic abnormalities between those two sites. In 4 of 7 patients with metastatic disease, BRCA1 losses

  11. [Prostate cancer brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Pommier, P; Guérif, S; Peiffert, D; Créhange, G; Hannoun-Lévi, J-M; de Crevoisier, R

    2016-09-01

    Prostate brachytherapy techniques are described, concerning both Iodine 125 high dose rate brachytherapy. The following parts are presented: brachytherapy indications, technical description, immediate postoperative management and post-treatment evaluation, and 4 to 6 weeks as well as long-term follow-up.

  12. A Pilot Study of Catheter-Based Ultrasound Hyperthermia with HDR Brachytherapy for Treatment of Locally Advanced Cancer of the Prostate and Cervix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, Chris J.; Wootton, Jeff; Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant; Juang, Titania; Scott, Serena; Chen, Xin; Cunha, Adam; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I. C.

    2011-09-01

    Interstitial and endocavity ultrasound devices have been developed specifically for applying hyperthermia within temporary HDR brachytherapy implants during radiation therapy. Catheter-based ultrasound applicators are capable of 3D spatial control of heating in both angle and length of the devices, with enhanced radial penetration of heating compared to other hyperthermia technologies. A pilot study of the combination of catheter based ultrasound with HDR brachytherapy for locally advanced prostate and cervical cancer has been initiated, and preliminary results of the performance and heating distributions are reported herein. The treatment delivery platform consists of a 32 channel RF amplifier and a 48 channel thermocouple monitoring system. Controlling software can monitor and regulate frequency and power to each transducer section as required during the procedure. Interstitial applicators consist of multiple transducer sections of 2-4 cm length×180 deg and 3-4 cm×360 deg. heating patterns to be inserted in specific placed 13g implant catheters. The endocavity device, designed to be inserted within a 6 mm OD plastic tandem catheter within the cervix, consists of 2-3 transducers x dual 180 or 360 deg sectors. 3D temperature based treatment planning and optimization is dovetailed to the HDR optimization based planning to best configure and position the applicators within the catheters, and to determine optimal base power levels to each transducer section. To date we have treated eight cervix implants and four prostate implants. 100% of treatments achieved a goal of >60 min duration, with therapeutic temperatures achieved in all cases. Thermal dosimetry within the hyperthermia target volume (HTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) are reported. Catheter-based ultrasound hyperthermia with HDR appears feasible with therapeutic temperature coverage of the target volume within the prostate or cervix while sparing surrounding more sensitive regions.

  13. Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0226 TITLE: Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Rafael Fridman...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0226 Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15...DDRs in prostate cancer . During the first funding period, we conducted immunohistochemical studies by staining a 200 case Grade/Stage tissue

  14. Imaging Prostate Cancer with Positron Emission Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0125 TITLE: Imaging Prostate Cancer with Positron Emission Tomography...ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE 2014 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 01 Sept 2013-31 Aug 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Imaging Prostate Cancer ...proposal is to develop peptide based radiopharmaceuticals and evaluate them as PET imaging agents in preclinical animal models of prostate cancer

  15. Prostate Cancer Presenting with Parietal Bone Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Pare, Abdoul Karim; Abubakar, Babagana Mustapha; Kabore, Moussa

    2017-01-01

    Bone metastases from prostate cancer are very common. They are usually located on the axial skeleton. However, cranial bone metastases especially to the parietal bone are rare. We report a case of metastatic prostate cancer presenting with left parietal bone metastasis in a patient with no urological symptoms or signs. We should consider prostate cancer in any man above 60 years presenting unusual bone lesions.

  16. Prostate Cancer Disparities in an Incarcerated Community

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Florida Department of Corrections (FDOC) as a model for elucidating the genetic, epigenetic , and socio-environmental etiologies of prostate cancer . 9 | P...TITLE: Prostate Cancer Disparities in an Incarcerated Community PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Meghan E. Borysova, Ph.D...1 Sep 2011 - 31 Aug 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Prostate Cancer Disparities in an Incarcerated Community 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  17. The Infectious Pathogenesis of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    al. Plasma antibodies against Trichomonas vaginalis and subsequent risk of prostate cancer. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention 2006;15...infectious agents with respect to prostate cancer: T vaginalis , the most common non-viral sexually transmitted infection, and the recently identified...To characterize the role of the infectious protozoa T. vaginalis in prostate carcinogenesis and progression. The current study is nested within the

  18. Utility of Ultrasound in the Diagnosis, Treatment, and Follow-up of Prostate Cancer: State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Chen, Frank K; de Castro Abreu, Andre Luis; Palmer, Suzanne L

    2016-10-01

    Prostate cancer screening currently consists of serum prostate-specific antigen and digital rectal examination, followed by transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy for diagnostic confirmation. Although the current paradigm of prostate cancer screening has led to a decrease in advanced disease and cancer-related mortality, these techniques have limitations in terms of sensitivity and specificity, resulting in missed cancers that are clinically significant and the overdetection of clinically insignificant cancers. New imaging techniques and technologies are required to improve the detection of prostate cancer. This article summarizes the use of novel ultrasound techniques and technologies in the detection, biopsy, and treatment of prostate cancer.

  19. Roles of Eicosanoids in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nithipatikom, Kasem; Campbell, William B.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Eicosanoids, the metabolites of arachidonic acid, have diverse functions in the regulation of cancer including prostate cancer. This review will provide an overview of the roles of eicosanoids and endocannabinoids and their potential as therapeutic targets for prostate cancer treatment. PMID:24563660

  20. Radiation Induced Immune Response in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    trials of antibodies to TIP-1 in patients receiving radiotherapy for radiation. Publications, Abstracts, and Presentations none Inventions...therapy. Because radiotherapy is a primary mode of treatment of both localized prostate cancer and metastatic prostate cancer. These antigens are...antigens that are specifically over- expressed in cancer resulting in too few molecular targets and small percentages of patients who can be treated

  1. Vitamin D, Sunlight and Prostate Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Donkena, Krishna Vanaja; Young, Charles Y. F.

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second common cancer in men worldwide. The prevention of prostate cancer remains a challenge to researchers and clinicians. Here, we review the relationship of vitamin D and sunlight to prostate cancer risk. Ultraviolet radiation of the sunlight is the main stimulator for vitamin D production in humans. Vitamin D's antiprostate cancer activities may be involved in the actions through the pathways mediated by vitamin D metabolites, vitamin D metabolizing enzymes, vitamin D receptor (VDR), and VDR-regulated genes. Although laboratory studies including the use of animal models have shown that vitamin D has antiprostate cancer properties, whether it can effectively prevent the development and/or progression of prostate cancer in humans remains to be inconclusive and an intensively studied subject. This review will provide up-to-date information regarding the recent outcomes of laboratory and epidemiology studies on the effects of vitamin D on prostate cancer prevention. PMID:21991434

  2. Prostate and Urologic Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    [[{"fid":"183","view_mode":"default","fields":{"format":"default","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Prostate and Urologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"Prostate and Urologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","field_folder[und]":"15"},"type":"media","attributes":{"alt":"Prostate and Urologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","title":"Prostate and Urologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","height":"266","width":"400","clas | Conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of prostate, bladder, and skin cancers.

  3. The Infectious Pathogenesis of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    progression; 2-) To characterize the role of the infectious protozoa T. vaginalis in prostate carcinogenesis and progression. The current study is...understanding of the infectious pathogenesis of prostate cancer. Aim II. To characterize the role of the infectious protozoa T. vaginalis in prostate

  4. Microsatellite instability in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, A.L.; Wick, M.J.; Persons, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    Microsatellite instability (MIN) has been documented in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) as well as in sporadic forms of human cancers. Two of the genes which appear to be responsible for this particular tumor phenotype, hMSH2 and hMLH1, have now been identified. To determine the potential role of these mutator genes in prostate cancer, we have examined 95 prostate adenocarcinomas (40 paraffin embedded and 55 fresh frozen) for the presence of genetic instability at four microsatellite markers. The markers are localized to chromosome arms 5q(APC-CA1), 8p(Mfd 210Z), 15q(635/636), and 17q(p53-CA). Patients from whom paraffin embedded material was obtained were divided into short term (<3 years, n=18), and long term (>3 years, n=22) survivors. Of the 95 tumors examined, only four tumors (4%) demonstrated MIN: two tumors demonstrated MIN at 3 loci (p53-CA, APC-CA1, 635/636), one tumor demonstrated MIN at 2 loci (APC-CA1 and 635/636), and one tumor demonstrated instability at 635/636 only. All tumors exhibiting MIN had Gleason scores of {ge} 4+4. A correlation between MIN and survival was not observed. Information on family history was limited. However, of the two patients demonstrating MIN at three loci, one patient was diagnosed with a second malignancy (TCC of the ureter), but otherwise had a negative family history, while the second patient had one first degree relative with esophageal cancer. The patient demonstrating MIN at two loci had a negative family history, while the remaining patient had two first degree relatives with cancer (prostate and stomach). These results suggest that hMSH2 and hMLH1 (as reflected by the small percentage of tumors displaying MIN) do not play a prominent role in the process of prostate tumorigenesis.

  5. Cytoprotective Mitochondrial Chaperone TRAP-1 As a Novel Molecular Target in Localized and Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leav, Irwin; Plescia, Janet; Goel, Hira Lal; Li, Jing; Jiang, Zhong; Cohen, Ronald J.; Languino, Lucia R.; Altieri, Dario C.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular chaperones of the heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90) family promote cell survival, but the molecular requirements of this pathway in tumor progression are not understood. Here, we show that a mitochondria-localized Hsp90 chaperone, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein-1 (TRAP-1), is abundantly and ubiquitously expressed in human high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, Gleason grades 3 through 5 prostatic adenocarcinomas, and metastatic prostate cancer, but largely undetectable in normal prostate or benign prostatic hyperplasia in vivo. Prostate lesions formed in genetic models of the disease, including the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate and mice carrying prostate-specific deletion of the phosphatase tensin homolog tumor suppressor (Ptenpc−/−), also exhibit high levels of TRAP-1. Expression of TRAP-1 in nontransformed prostatic epithelial BPH-1 cells inhibited cell death, whereas silencing of TRAP-1 in androgen-independent PC3 or DU145 prostate cancer cells by small interfering RNA enhanced apoptosis. Targeting TRAP-1 with a novel class of mitochondria-directed Hsp90 inhibitors, ie, Gamitrinibs, caused rapid and complete killing of androgen-dependent or -independent prostate cancer, but not BPH-1 cells, whereas reintroduction of TRAP-1 in BPH-1 cells conferred sensitivity to Gamitrinib-induced cell death. These data identify TRAP-1 as a novel mitochondrial survival factor differentially expressed in localized and metastatic prostate cancer compared with normal prostate. Targeting this pathway with Gamitrinibs could be explored as novel molecular therapy in patients with advanced prostate cancer. PMID:19948822

  6. Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    FAS activity in prostatectomy samples, intraprostatic lipid as measured by MRSI and prostate tumor aggressiveness. 3) To quantify key metabolic ...intermediates involved in lipid metabolism , mitochondrial function, inflammation, and apoptosis in the prostatectomy samples. 15. SUBJECT TERMS : none...vivo intraprostatic fat as measured by 1H MRSI, metabolic signatures of lipid oxidation and metabolism , and prostate cancer aggressiveness, our

  7. Simulated prostate biopsy: prostate cancer distribution and clinical correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, John J.; Zeng, Jianchao; Zhang, Wei; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Dean, Robert; Moul, Judd W.; Mun, Seong K.

    2000-04-01

    Our group has recently obtained data based upon whole- mounted step-sectioned radical prostatectomy specimens using a 3D computer assisted prostate biopsy simulator that suggests an increased detection rate is possible using laterally placed biopsies. A new 10-core biopsy pattern was demonstrated to be superior to the traditional sextant biopsy. This patter includes the traditional sextant biopsy cores and four laterally placed biopsies in the right and left apex and mid portion of the prostate gland. The objective of this study is to confirm the higher prostate cancer defection rate obtained using our simulated 10-core biopsy pattern in a small clinical trial. We retrospectively reviewed 35 consecutive patients with a pathologic diagnosis of prostate cancer biopsied by a single urologist using the 10-core prostate biopsy patterns were compared with respect to prostate cancer detection rate. Of the 35 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer, 54.3 percent were diagnosed when reviewing the sextant biopsy data only. Review of the 10-core pattern revealed that an additional 45.7 percent were diagnosed when reviewing the sextant biopsy data only. Review of the 10-core pattern revealed that an additional 45.7 percent of patients were diagnosed solely with the laterally placed biopsies. Our results suggest that biopsy protocols that use laterally placed biopsies based upon a five region anatomical model are superior to the routinely used sextant prostate biopsy pattern.

  8. Mitochondria, prostate cancer, and biopsy sampling error.

    PubMed

    Parr, Ryan L; Mills, John; Harbottle, Andrew; Creed, Jennifer M; Crewdson, Gregory; Reguly, Brian; Guimont, François S

    2013-04-01

    Mitochondria and their associated genome are emerging as sophisticated indicators of prostate cancer biology. Alterations in the mitochondrial genome (mtgenome) have been implicated in cell proliferation, metastatic behavior, androgen independence, as a signal for apoptosis, and as a predictor of biochemical recurrence. Somatic mutation patterns in complete mtgenomes are associated with prostate specific antigen levels (PSA) in prostate cancer patients and a large-scale mtgenome deletion (3.4 kb) is consistent with a prostate "cancerization" field effect. This review will focus on the biological characteristics of mitochondria and their direct clinical application to prostate cancer. Mitochondrial science is currently influencing clinical prostate cancer diagnostics and the rapid progress in this area indicates future, break-through contributions in the general field of oncology.

  9. WITHDRAWN: Can the conventional sextant prostate biopsy reliably diagnose unilateral prostate cancer in low-risk, localized, prostate cancer?

    PubMed

    Mayes, J M; Mouraviev, V; Sun, L; Madden, J F; Polascik, T J

    2008-05-13

    The authors hereby retract the e-publication dated 13 May 2008 and entitled, 'Can the conventional sextant prostate biopsy reliably diagnose unilateral prostate cancer in low-risk, localized, prostate cancer?' The authors are submitting a revised version with the same title. This article's statistics were performed for predicting bilateral prostate cancer outcomes. The article was written to help predict unilateral prostate cancer. Although the statistical numbers are correct, they are backwards. We apologize that the statistics indicate a contrary outcome (eg predicting bilateral cancer instead of unilateral disease).

  10. Novel concepts for risk stratification in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Patel, Keval M; Gnanapragasam, Vincent J

    2016-12-01

    Since Partin introduced the analysis of prostate-specific antigen, clinical T-stage and Gleason scores to estimate the risk of progression in men with localised prostate cancer, our understanding of factors that modify this risk has changed drastically. There are now multiple risk stratification tools available, including look-up tables, risk stratification/classification analyses, regression-tree analyses, nomograms and artificial neural networks. Concurrently, descriptions of novel biopsy strategies, imaging modalities and biomarkers are frequently published with the aim of improving risk stratification. With an abundance of new information available, incorporating advances into clinical practice can be confusing. This article aims to outline the major novel concepts in prostate cancer risk stratification for men with biopsy confirmed prostate cancer. We will detail which of these novel techniques and tools are likely to be adopted to aid treatment decisions and enable more accurate post-diagnosis, pretreatment risk stratification.

  11. Novel concepts for risk stratification in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Keval M; Gnanapragasam, Vincent J

    2016-01-01

    Since Partin introduced the analysis of prostate-specific antigen, clinical T-stage and Gleason scores to estimate the risk of progression in men with localised prostate cancer, our understanding of factors that modify this risk has changed drastically. There are now multiple risk stratification tools available, including look-up tables, risk stratification/classification analyses, regression-tree analyses, nomograms and artificial neural networks. Concurrently, descriptions of novel biopsy strategies, imaging modalities and biomarkers are frequently published with the aim of improving risk stratification. With an abundance of new information available, incorporating advances into clinical practice can be confusing. This article aims to outline the major novel concepts in prostate cancer risk stratification for men with biopsy confirmed prostate cancer. We will detail which of these novel techniques and tools are likely to be adopted to aid treatment decisions and enable more accurate post-diagnosis, pretreatment risk stratification.

  12. Olaparib With or Without Cediranib in Treating Patients With Metastatic Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    Castration-Resistant Prostate Carcinoma; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma With Focal Neuroendocrine Differentiation; Prostate Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; Prostate Small Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Adenocarcinoma

  13. The p202 Gene as a Tumor Suppressor in Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    prostate for advanced prostate cancer patients after hormone cancer, but this study points out that finasteride also increases the deprivation. A growing...prostate outcome may have resulted from the fact that finasteride reduced cancer phenotype. Notably, androgen receptor (AR) not only ntraprostatic... finasteride survival of C3(1)/SV40 transgenic mice in vivo. Emodin as a preventive agent due to the potential high risk for treatment resulted in

  14. The Role of the Co-Chaperone, CHIP, in Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-06-1-0285 TITLE: The Role of the Co-Chaperone, CHIP, in Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer ...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER The Role of the Co-Chaperone, CHIP, in Androgen Independent Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1...ADT), is the mainstay of treatment for patients with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer . This therapy is only temporizing, however

  15. What is the role of sipuleucel-T in the treatment of patients with advanced prostate cancer? An update on the evidence.

    PubMed

    Hu, Rachel; George, Daniel J; Zhang, Tian

    2016-08-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men and the second most deadly. About one-third of patients with prostate cancer will develop metastatic disease. We discuss the six United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved treatments for metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) with a strong focus on sipuleucel-T. Sipuleucel-T is the first immunotherapy shown to improve survival in asymptomatic or minimally-symptomatic mCRPC. Herein, we discuss the proposed mechanism of sipuleucel-T and its synthesis. We describe in detail the three randomized controlled trials (RTCs) that led to its approval. We also compiled the newest research regarding use of sipuleucel-T with other agents and in different patient populations. Finally, we discuss the current ongoing trials.

  16. Functional Angiogenic Mediators in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    FUNDING NUMBERS Functional Angiogenic Mediators in Prostate Cancer DAMD17-99- 1 -9521 6. AUTHOR(S) Jennifer A. Doll, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME...transition in the prostate by 1 ) identifying the key angiogenic mediators , 2) investigating the clinical significance of mediator levels in prostatic fluid...our proposal, we set out to 1 ) identify such mediators in the prostate, 2) assess the clinical usefulness of measuring angiogenic mediator levels in

  17. Nebraska Prostate Cancer Research Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    Effect of Metal Ion Chelators on Mannose 6-Phosphate/Insulin-like Growth Factor II Receptor in DU145 Prostate Cancer Cells. UNMC Summer Undergraduate...Lynnette Lefall Date Published: Friday, August 6, 2010 Keidra Bryant – Abstract Effect of Metal Ion Chelators on Mannose 6-Phosphate/Insulin...cleaved at the cell surface by a protease that is inhibited by metal ion chelators. This work was done in a human embryonic kidney cell line. The goal

  18. Prostate Cancer Research Training Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    this laboratory concentrates on the area of tumor immunology with an emphasis on immunotherapy. We have constructed microbial vaccines to be used...to the transgene product induced by the vaccine are underway. Additionally, we are carrying our "translational" research in the form of clinical...trials of our adenovirus vaccine in men with prostate cancer. Important in these trials is the safety of the vaccine and its ability to induce anti

  19. Prostate Cancer Research Training Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    i mmunology with an emphasis on immunotherapy. We ha ve constructed microbial vaccines to be used for the investigation of gene and immunotherapy... vaccine are underway. Additionally, we are carrying our "translational" research in the fo rm of clinical trials of our adenovirus vaccine in men with...prostate cancer. Important in thes e trials is the safety of the vaccine and its ability to in duce anti-tumor immunity. We have recently completed

  20. Vaccine Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE...growth of androgen-dependent cancer cells, and result in clinical tumor control . After a median time of 2 years, patients progress into a clinical...calculogenesis. Finally, Bischoff and Goerttler (38) used Gelfoam in human prostate therapeutic embolization with success. Our laboratory, in collaboration

  1. Protease Profiling in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-01

    acid synthase, which contains a serine hydrolase domain. We identified a lead inhibitor of this domain of fatty acid synthase, called Orlistat, which...SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Prostate cancer, tumor biology, protease, proteomics, transgenic, 20 animal model, fatty acid synthase, orlistat 16...the enzymes we identified is fatty acid synthase. Fatty acid synthase is the sole enzyme responsible for the cellular synthesis of fatty acids . This

  2. BRCA1 loss pre-existing in small subpopulations of prostate cancer is associated with advanced disease and metastatic spread to lymph nodes and peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    Bednarz, Natalia; Eltze, Elke; Semjonow, Axel; Rink, Michael; Andreas, Antje; Mulder, Lennart; Hannemann, Juliane; Fisch, Margit; Pantel, Klaus; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Bielawski, Krzysztof P.; Brandt, Burkhard

    2011-01-01

    Purpose A preliminary study performed on a small cohort of multifocal prostate cancer (PCa) detected BRCA1 allelic imbalances (AI) among circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The present analysis was aimed to elucidate the biological and clinical role of BRCA1 losses on metastatic spread and tumor progression in prostate cancer patients. Experimental Design To map molecular progression in PCa outgrowth we used FISH analysis of tissue microarrays (TMA), lymph node sections and CTC from peripheral blood. Results We found that 14% of 133 tested patients carried monoallelic BRCA1 loss in at least one tumor focus. Extended molecular analysis of chr17q revealed that this aberration was often a part of larger cytogenetic rearrangement involving chr17q21 accompanied by AI of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN and lack of the BRCA1 promoter methylation. The BRCA1 losses correlated with advanced T stage (p < 0.05), invasion to pelvic lymph nodes (LN, p < 0.05) as well as BR (p < 0.01). Their prevalence was twice as high within 62 LN metastases (LNMs) as in primary tumors (27%, p < 0.01). The analysis of 11 matched primary PCa – LNM pairs confirmed the suspected transmission of genetic abnormalities between those two sites. In 4 of 7 patients with metastatic disease, BRCA1 losses appeared in a minute fraction of cytokeratin- and vimentin-positive CTCs. Conclusions Small subpopulations of PCa cells bearing BRCA1 losses might be one confounding factor initiating tumor dissemination and might provide an early indicator of shortened disease-free survival. PMID:20592016

  3. Prostate cancer: state of the art imaging and focal treatment.

    PubMed

    Woodrum, D A; Kawashima, A; Gorny, K R; Mynderse, L A

    2017-04-03

    In 2016, it is estimated 180,890 men are newly diagnosed with prostate cancer and 3,306,760 men live with prostate cancer in the United States. The introduction of multiparametric (mp) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate, standardised interpretation guidelines such as Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS version 2), and MRI-based targeted biopsy has improved detection of clinically significant prostate cancer. Accurate risk stratification (Gleason grade/score and tumour stage) using imaging and image-guided targeted biopsy has become critical for the management of patients with prostate cancer. Recent advances in MRI-guided minimally invasive ablative treatment (MIAT) utilising cryoablation, laser ablation, high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation, have allowed accurate focal or regional delivery of optimal thermal energy to the biopsy proven, MRI-detected tumour, under real-time or near simultaneous MRI monitoring of the ablation zone. A contemporary review on prostate mpMRI, MRI-based targeted biopsy, and MRI-guided ablation techniques is presented.

  4. Targeted prodrug approaches for hormone refractory prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Aloysius, Herve; Hu, Longqin

    2015-05-01

    Due to the propensity of relapse and resistance with prolonged androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), there is a growing interest in developing non-hormonal therapeutic approaches as alternative treatment modalities for hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC). Although the standard treatment for HRPC consists of a combination of ADT with taxanes and anthracyclines, the clinical use of chemotherapeutics is limited by systemic toxicity stemming from nondiscriminatory drug exposure to normal tissues. In order to improve the tumor selectivity of chemotherapeutics, various targeted prodrug approaches have been explored. Antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT) and gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) strategies leverage tumor-specific antigens and transcription factors for the specific delivery of cytotoxic anticancer agents using various prodrug-activating enzymes. In prostate cancer, overexpression of tumor-specific proteases such as prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is being exploited for selective activation of anticancer prodrugs designed to be activated through proteolysis by these prostate cancer-specific enzymes. PSMA- and PSA-activated prodrugs typically comprise an engineered high-specificity protease peptide substrate coupled to a potent cytotoxic agent via a linker for rapid release of cytotoxic species in the vicinity of prostate cancer cells following proteolytic cleavage. Over the past two decades, various such prodrugs have been developed and they were effective at inhibiting prostate tumor growth in rodent models; several of these prodrug approaches have been advanced to clinical trials and may be developed into effective therapies for HRPC.

  5. Utility of ADC measurement on diffusion-weighted MRI in differentiation of prostate cancer, normal prostate and prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Esen, Meltem; Onur, Mehmet Ruhi; Akpolat, Nusret; Orhan, Irfan; Kocakoc, Ercan

    2013-08-01

    To determine the utility of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in differentiation of prostate cancer from normal prostate parenchyma and prostatitis we obtained ADC values of 50 patients at b 100, 600 and 1,000 s/mm(2) diffusion gradients. The ADC values of prostate cancer group were significantly lower than normal prostate and prostatitis group at b 600 and 1,000 s/mm(2) gradients. The ADC values at high diffusion gradients may be used in differentiation prostate cancer from normal prostate and prostatitis.

  6. Molecular genetics of prostate cancer: new prospects for old challenges

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Michael M.; Abate-Shen, Cory

    2010-01-01

    Despite much recent progress, prostate cancer continues to represent a major cause of cancer-related mortality and morbidity in men. Since early studies on the role of the androgen receptor that led to the advent of androgen deprivation therapy in the 1940s, there has long been intensive interest in the basic mechanisms underlying prostate cancer initiation and progression, as well as the potential to target these processes for therapeutic intervention. Here, we present an overview of major themes in prostate cancer research, focusing on current knowledge of principal events in cancer initiation and progression. We discuss recent advances, including new insights into the mechanisms of castration resistance, identification of stem cells and tumor-initiating cells, and development of mouse models for preclinical evaluation of novel therapuetics. Overall, we highlight the tremendous research progress made in recent years, and underscore the challenges that lie ahead. PMID:20844012

  7. Therapeutic efficacy of nanomedicines for prostate cancer: An update

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in cancer nanomedicine have attracted remarkable attention in medical sectors. Pharmacologic research on nanomedicines, including targeted cancer therapy, has increased dramatically in the past 5 years. The success stories of nanomedicines in the clinical field include the fabrication of nanomedicines that show maximum loading efficiency into carriers, maximal release kinetics, and minimum toxicity to healthy cells. Nanoparticle-mediated medicines have been developed to specifically target prostate cancer tissue by use of aptamers, antibody targeting, and sustained release of nanomedicines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Nanomedicines have been developed for therapeutic application in combination with image-guided therapy in real time. The scope of one of these nanomedicines, Abraxane (paclitaxel), may be extended to prostate cancer therapeutic applications for better quality of patient life and longer survival. This review provides an update on the latest directions and developments in nanomedicines for prostate cancer. PMID:26966723

  8. DNA Vaccines for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McNeel, Douglas G.; Becker, Jordan T.; Johnson, Laura E.; Olson, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding an antigen of interest has been demonstrated to be an effective means of immunization, capable of eliciting antigen-specific T cells. Plasmid DNA vaccines offer advantages over other anti-tumor vaccine approaches in terms of simplicity, manufacturing, and possibly safety. The primary disadvantage is their poor transfection efficiency and subsequent lower immunogenicity relative to other genetic vaccine approaches. However, multiple preclinical models demonstrate anti-tumor efficacy, and many efforts are underway to improve the immunogenicity and anti-tumor effect of these vaccines. Clinical trials using DNA vaccines as treatments for prostate cancer have begun, and to date have demonstrated safety and immunological effect. This review will focus on DNA vaccines as a specific means of antigen delivery, advantages and disadvantages of this type of immunization, previous experience in preclinical models and human trials specifically conducted for the treatment of prostate cancer, and future directions for the application of DNA vaccines to prostate cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24587772

  9. Arachidonic acid metabolism in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    YANG, PEIYING; CARTWRIGHT, CARRIE A.; LI, JIN; WEN, SIJIN; PROKHOROVA, INA N.; SHUREIQI, IMAD; TRONCOSO, PATRICIA; NAVONE, NORA M.; NEWMAN, ROBERT A.; KIM, JERI

    2012-01-01

    The arachidonic acid pathway is important in the development and progression of numerous malignant diseases, including prostate cancer. To more fully evaluate the role of individual cyclooxygenases (COXs), lipoxygenases (LOXs) and their metabolites in prostate cancer, we measured mRNA and protein levels of COXs and LOXs and their arachidonate metabolites in androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and androgen-independent (PC-3 and DU145) prostate cancer cell lines, bone metastasis-derived MDA PCa 2a and MDA PCa 2b cell lines and their corresponding xenograft models, as well as core biopsy specimens of primary prostate cancer and nonneoplastic prostate tissue taken ex vivo after prostatectomy. Relatively high levels of COX-2 mRNA and its product PGE2 were observed only in PC-3 cells and their xenografts. By contrast, levels of the exogenous 12-LOX product 12-HETE were consistently higher in MDA PCa 2b and PC-3 cells and their corresponding xenograft tissues than were those in LNCaP cells. More strikingly, the mean endogenous level of 12-HETE was significantly higher in the primary prostate cancers than in the nonneoplastic prostate tissue (0.094 vs. 0.010 ng/mg protein, respectively; p=0.019). Our results suggest that LOX metabolites such as 12-HETE are critical in prostate cancer progression and that the LOX pathway may be a target for treating and preventing prostate cancer. PMID:22895552

  10. Caveolin-1 and prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael R; Yang, Wei; Di Vizio, Dolores

    2012-01-01

    Caveolin-1 was identified in the 1990s as a marker of aggressive prostate cancer. The caveolin-1 protein localizes to vesicular structures called caveolae and has been shown to bind and regulate many signaling proteins involved in oncogenesis. Caveolin-1 also has lipid binding properties and mediates aspects of cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism and can elicit biological responses in a paracrine manner when secreted. Caveolin-1 is also present in the serum of prostate cancer patients and circulating levels correlate with extent of disease. Current evidence indicates that increased expression of caveolin-1 in prostate adenocarcinoma cells and commensurate downregulation of the protein in prostate stroma, mediate progression to the castration-resistant phase of prostate cancer through diverse pathways. This chapter summarizes the current state of our understanding of the cellular and physiologic mechanisms in which caveolin-1 participates in the evolution of prostate cancer cell phenotypes.

  11. Prevention and Early Detection of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cuzick, Jack; Thorat, Mangesh A.; Andriole, Gerald; Brawley, Otis W.; Brown, Powel H.; Culig, Zoran; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Ford, Leslie G.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Holmberg, Lars; Ilic, Dragan; Key, Timothy J.; La Vecchia, Carlo; Lilja, Hans; Marberger, Michael; Meyskens, Frank L.; Minasian, Lori M.; Parker, Chris; Parnes, Howard L.; Perner, Sven; Rittenhouse, Harry; Schalken, Jack; Schmid, Hans-Peter; Schmitz-Dräger, Bernd J.; Schröder, Fritz H.; Stenzl, Arnulf; Tombal, Bertrand; Wilt, Timothy J.; Wolk, Alicja

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men and the global burden of this disease is rising. Lifestyle modifications like smoking cessation, exercise and weight control offer opportunities to decrease the risk of developing prostate cancer. Early detection of prostate cancer by PSA screening remains controversial; yet, changes in PSA threshold, frequency of screening, and addition of other biomarkers have potential to minimise overdiagnosis associated with PSA screening. Several new biomarkers appear promising in individuals with elevated PSA levels or those diagnosed with prostate cancer, these are likely to guide in separating individuals who can be spared of aggressive treatment from those who need it. Several pharmacological agents like 5α-reductase inhibitors, aspirin etc. have a potential to prevent development of prostate cancer. In this review, we discuss the current evidence and research questions regarding prevention, early detection of prostate cancer and management of men either at high risk of prostate cancer or diagnosed with low-grade prostate cancer. PMID:25281467

  12. Linking Estrogens, Prostatitis and Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    provide the first direct evidence linking phy siologic estr ogen up- regulation an d pr ostate ma lignancy via inflammation. Ellem, Stuart J...inflammation and malignancy in the prostate. The identification of estr ogen as a cause of prostatitis, as well as a fac tor in the development of

  13. Genetic variation: effect on prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sissung, Tristan M.; Price, Douglas K.; Del Re, Marzia; Ley, Ariel M.; Giovannetti, Elisa; Danesi, Romano

    2014-01-01

    Summary The crucial role of androgens in the development of prostate cancer is well established. The aim of this review is to examine the role of constitutional (germline) and tumor-specific (somatic) polymorphisms within important regulatory genes of prostate cancer. These include genes encoding enzymes of the androgen biosynthetic pathway, the androgen receptor gene, genes that encode proteins of the signal transduction pathways that may have a role in disease progression and survival, and genes involved in prostate cancer angiogenesis. Characterization of deregulated pathways critical to cancer cell growth have lead to the development of new treatments, including the CYP17 inhibitor abiraterone and clinical trials using novel drugs that are ongoing or recently completed [1]. The pharmacogenetics of the drugs used to treat prostate cancer will also be addressed. This review will define how germline polymorphisms are known affect a multitude of pathways, and therefore phenotypes, in prostate cancer etiology, progression, and treatment. PMID:25199985

  14. Review of selenium and prostate cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Pascal, Mouracade; Wu, Xiao-Hou

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men in the United States. Surgery or radiation are sometimes unsatisfactory treatments because of the complications such as incontinence or erectile dysfunction. Selenium was found to be effective to prevent prostate cancer in the Nutritional Prevention of Cancer Trial (NPC), which motivated two other clinical trials: the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) and a Phase III trial of selenium to prevent prostate cancer in men with high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. However, these two trials failed to confirm the results of the NPC trial and indicated that the selenium may not be preventive of prostate cancer. In this article we review the three clinical trials and discuss some different points which might be potential factors underlying variation in results obtained.

  15. Prostate Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  16. Prognostic factors in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Braeckman, Johan; Michielsen, Dirk

    2007-01-01

    In the nineteenth century the main goal of medicine was predictive: diagnose the disease and achieve a satisfying prognosis of the patient's chances. Today the effort has shifted to cure the disease. Since the twentieth century, the word prognosis has also been used in nonmedical contexts, for example in corporate finance or elections. The most accurate form of prognosis is achieved statistically. Based on different prognostic factors it should be possible to tell patients how they are expected to do after prostate cancer has been diagnosed and how different treatments may change this outcome. A prognosis is a prediction. The word prognosis comes from the Greek word (see text) and means foreknowing. In the nineteenth century this was the main goal of medicine: diagnose the disease and achieve a satisfying prognosis of the patient's chances. Today the effort has shifted towards seeking a cure. Prognostic factors in (prostate) cancer are defined as "variables that can account for some of the heterogeneity associated with the expected course and outcome of a disease". Bailey defined prognosis as "a reasoned forecast concerning the course, pattern, progression, duration, and end of the disease. Prognostic factors are not only essential to understand the natural history and the course of the disease, but also to predict possible different outcomes of different treatments or perhaps no treatment at all. This is extremely important in a disease like prostate cancer where there is clear evidence that a substantial number of cases discovered by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing are unlikely ever to become clinically significant, not to mention mortal. Furthermore, prognostic factors are of paramount importance for correct interpretation of clinical trials and for the construction of future trials. Finally, according to WHO national screening committee criteria for implementing a national screening programme, widely accepted prognostic factors must be defined before

  17. [Second cancer after starting treatment for prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Mikata, Noriharu; Imao, Sadao; Fukasawa, Ritu

    2002-08-01

    The subjects for the present study were 270 patients with prostate cancer who underwent initial treatment at our hospital over the 14 years from 1986 to 1999. They were investigated to assess the relationship between their treatment and metachronous tumors. Sixteen patients (5.9%) developed cancer of other organs after starting treatment for prostate cancer. These metachronous tumors included gastric cancer in six patients as well as lung cancer, esophageal cancer, colorectal cancer, liver cancer, renal cancer, bladder cancer, skin cancer, leukemia, and mediastinal adenocarcinoma. Treatment for prostate cancer other than surgery included radiotherapy in eight patients, administration of estramustine phosphate sodium in nine patients, and LH-RH analogues in six patients. The chi-square test showed no significant difference in the incidence of metachronous cancer in relation to the presence/absence of these three therapies. The present study therefore ruled out the possible induction of other tumors by treatment for prostate cancer.

  18. Regulation of the Prostate Cancer Tumor Microenvironment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    epithelium , stroma, as well as immune system, and the fixed nature of the prostate model with expression of the large T antigen, which may have limited...cancer glandular architecture formed (Figure 8). Figure 8. Subcutanous TRAMP Model to Recapitulate Prostate Cancer. TRAMP C2 cells with and...model to be able to alter the aggressiveness of the tumor and specifically modulate the TLR signaling pathway in prostate epithelium , stroma, and immune

  19. A Randomised Comparison Evaluating Changes in Bone Mineral Density in Advanced Prostate Cancer: Luteinising Hormone-releasing Hormone Agonists Versus Transdermal Oestradiol

    PubMed Central

    Langley, Ruth E.; Kynaston, Howard G.; Alhasso, Abdulla A.; Duong, Trinh; Paez, Edgar M.; Jovic, Gordana; Scrase, Christopher D.; Robertson, Andrew; Cafferty, Fay; Welland, Andrew; Carpenter, Robin; Honeyfield, Lesley; Abel, Richard L.; Stone, Michael; Parmar, Mahesh K.B.; Abel, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Luteinising hormone-releasing hormone agonists (LHRHa), used as androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in prostate cancer (PCa) management, reduce serum oestradiol as well as testosterone, causing bone mineral density (BMD) loss. Transdermal oestradiol is a potential alternative to LHRHa. Objective To compare BMD change in men receiving either LHRHa or oestradiol patches (OP). Design, setting, and participants Men with locally advanced or metastatic PCa participating in the randomised UK Prostate Adenocarcinoma TransCutaneous Hormones (PATCH) trial (allocation ratio of 1:2 for LHRHa:OP, 2006–2011; 1:1, thereafter) were recruited into a BMD study (2006–2012). Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans were performed at baseline, 1 yr, and 2 yr. Interventions LHRHa as per local practice, OP (FemSeven 100 μg/24 h patches). Outcome measurements and statistical analysis The primary outcome was 1-yr change in lumbar spine (LS) BMD from baseline compared between randomised arms using analysis of covariance. Results and limitations A total of 74 eligible men (LHRHa 28, OP 46) participated from seven centres. Baseline clinical characteristics and 3-mo castration rates (testosterone ≤1.7 nmol/l, LHRHa 96% [26 of 27], OP 96% [43 of 45]) were similar between arms. Mean 1-yr change in LS BMD was −0.021 g/cm3 for patients randomised to the LHRHa arm (mean percentage change −1.4%) and +0.069 g/cm3 for the OP arm (+6.0%; p < 0.001). Similar patterns were seen in hip and total body measurements. The largest difference between arms was at 2 yr for those remaining on allocated treatment only: LS BMD mean percentage change LHRHa −3.0% and OP +7.9% (p < 0.001). Conclusions Transdermal oestradiol as a single agent produces castration levels of testosterone while mitigating BMD loss. These early data provide further supporting evidence for the ongoing phase 3 trial. Patient summary This study found that prostate cancer patients treated with transdermal oestradiol

  20. Targeting angiogenesis for the treatment of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Antonarakis, Emmanuel S; Carducci, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Introduction While multiple therapies exist that prolong the lives of men with advanced prostate cancer, none are curative. This had led to a search to uncover novel targets for prostate cancer therapy, distinct from those of traditional hormonal approaches, chemotherapies, immunotherapies and bone-targeting approaches. The process of tumor angiogenesis is one target that is being exploited for therapeutic gain. Areas covered The most promising anti-angiogenic approaches for treatment of prostate cancer, focusing on clinical development of selected agents. These include VEGF-directed therapies, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, tumor-vascular disrupting agents, immunomodulatory drugs and miscellaneous anti-angiogenic agents. While none of these drugs have yet entered the market for the treatment of prostate cancer, several are now being tested in Phase III registrational trials. Expert opinion The development of anti-angiogenic agents for prostate cancer has met with several challenges. This includes discordance between traditional prostate-specific antigen responses and clinical responses, which have clouded clinical trial design and interpretation, potential inadequate exposure to anti-angiogenic therapies with premature discontinuation of study drugs and the development of resistance to anti-angiogenic monotherapies. These barriers will hopefully be overcome with the advent of more potent agents, the use of dual angiogenesis inhibition and the design of more informative clinical trials. PMID:22413953

  1. Circadian Genes and Risk for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    a randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial to determine if finasteride (an inhibitor of androgen bioactivation) could prevent prostate cancer... finasteride  (an inhibitor of androgen bioactivation) could  prevent prostate cancer. Included in our study are approximately 1,800 case‐control pairs

  2. Circadian Genes and Risk for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    placebo-controlled clinical trial to determine if finasteride (an inhibitor of androgen bioactivation) could prevent prostate cancer. In Year 3 of the...risk. Our study is nested within the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT), a randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial to determine if finasteride

  3. Validation of Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer Prognosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    developing cancer diagnostic biomarkers. Genome Research 22: 183-187, 2012. Sarah Hawley, Ladan Fazli , Jesse K. McKenney, Jeff Simko, Dean Troyer, Marlo...MUC1 in human prostate cancers. Prostate 74: 1059-1067, 2014. Troyer D, Jamaspishvili T, Wei W, Feng Z, Good J, Hawley S, Fazli L, McKenney J

  4. A history of prostate cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Denmeade, Samuel R.; Isaacs, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The increased incidence of prostate cancer has led to remarkable changes in diagnosis and treatment over the past century. What were the first ways in which prostate cancer was treated, and how did these evolve into the variety of therapeutic strategies from which patients have to choose today? PMID:12044015

  5. Prostate Cancer Genetics in African Americans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    receiving appropriate education, genetic counseling , and/or referral. During each interview the research coordinator identifies at risk family members...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0566 TITLE: Prostate Cancer Genetics in African...ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 15 Aug 2013 – 14 Aug 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Prostate Cancer Genetics in

  6. Prostate Cancer Genetics in African Americans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-11-1-0566 TITLE: Prostate Cancer Genetics in African Americans PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Henry T. Lynch, MD CONTRACTING...W81XWH-11-1-0566 November 2015 Final 15Aug2011 - 14Aug2015 Prostate Cancer Genetics in African Americans Henry T. Lynch Nothing listed 36

  7. PET/CT and radiotherapy in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    De Jong, I J; De Haan, T D; Wiegman, E M; Van Den Bergh, A C M; Pruim, J; Breeuwsma, A J

    2010-10-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the corner stone treatments for patients with prostate cancer. Especially for locally advanced tumors radiotherapy +/- adjuvant androgen deprivation treatment is standard of care. This brings up the need for accurate assessment of extra prostatic tumor growth and/or the presence of nodal metastases for selection of the optimal radiation dose and treatment volume. Morphological imaging like transrectal ultra sound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are routinely used but are limited in their accuracy in detecting extra prostatic extension and nodal metastases. In this article we present a structured review of the literature on positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and radiotherapy in prostate cancer patients with emphasis on: 1) the pretreatment assessment of extra prostatic tumor extension, nodal and distant metastases; 2) the intraprostatic tumor characterization and radiotherapy treatment planning; and 3) treatment evaluation and the use of PET/CT in guidance of salvage treatment. PET/CT is not an appropriate imaging technique for accurate T-staging of prostate cancer prior to radiotherapy. Although macroscopic disease beyond the prostatic capsule and into the periprostatic fat or in seminal vesicle is often accurately detected, the microscopic extension of prostate cancer remains undetected. Choline PET/CT holds a great potential as a single step diagnostic procedure of lymph nodes and skeleton, which could facilitate radiotherapy treatment planning. At present the use of PET/CT for treatment planning in radiotherapy is still experimental. Choline PET based tumor delineation is not yet standardized and different segmentation-algorithms are under study. However, dose escalation using dose-painting is feasible with only limited increases of the doses to the bladder and rectum wall. PET/CT using either acetate or choline is able to detect recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy but stratification of patients

  8. Pretreatment Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio: A Predictor of Advanced Prostate Cancer and Biochemical Recurrence in Patients Receiving Radical Prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gui-Ming; Zhu, Yao; Ma, Xiao-Cheng; Qin, Xiao-Jian; Wan, Fang-Ning; Dai, Bo; Sun, Li-Jiang; Ye, Ding-Wei

    2015-10-01

    The pretreatment neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is reportedly associated with the clinical outcomes of many cancers. However, it has not been widely investigated whether the pretreatment NLR is associated with the pathological characteristics of prostate cancer (PCa) and biochemical recurrence in PCa patients receiving radical prostatectomy (RP).In this cohort study, a total of 1688 PCa patients who had undergone RP were analyzed retrospectively, and a subset of 237 of these patients were evaluated to determine the relationship between pretreatment NLR and biochemical recurrence. Patients were divided into a high-NLR group (NLR ≥2.36) and a low-NLR group (NLR < 2.36) according to the pretreatment NLR. The association between the pretreatment NLR and pathological stage and lymph node involvement was evaluated using logistic regression analysis. Time of biochemical recurrence was determined using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox's proportional hazard regression model was used to compare the time of biochemical recurrence between the groups.As compared with patients in the low-NLR group, those in the high-NLR group had an increased risk of pT3-4 disease (odds ratio (OR), 1.883; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.419-2.500; P < 0.001), and a 1.7-fold increased risk of lymph node involvement (OR, 1.685; 95% CI, 1.101-2.579; P = 0.016). For the subset of 237 patients, those with a high NLR showed a significantly shorter median biochemical recurrence-free survival time (51.9 months) than those with a low NLR (76.5 months; log-rank test, P = 0.019). However, multivariate analysis indicated that the NLR was not an independent predictor of biochemical recurrence (hazard ratio, 1.388; 95% CI, 0.909-2.118; P = 0.129).Our findings suggest that the pretreatment NLR may be associated with pathological stage and lymph node involvement in PCa patients receiving RP, and that PCa patients with a high NLR may have a higher rate of biochemical recurrence following

  9. The curative management of synchronous rectal and prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kavanagh, Dara O; Martin, Joseph; Small, Cormac; Joyce, Myles R; Faul, Clare M; Kelly, Paul J; O'Riordain, Michael; Gillham, Charles M; Armstrong, John G; Salib, Osama; McNamara, Deborah A; McVey, Gerard; O'Neill, Brian D P

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Neoadjuvant “long-course” chemoradiation is considered a standard of care in locally advanced rectal cancer. In addition to prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy with or without androgen suppression (AS) are well established in prostate cancer management. A retrospective review of ten cases was completed to explore the feasibility and safety of applying these standards in patients with dual pathology. To our knowledge, this is the largest case series of synchronous rectal and prostate cancers treated with curative intent. Methods: Eligible patients had synchronous histologically proven locally advanced rectal cancer (defined as cT3-4Nx; cTxN1-2) and non-metastatic prostate cancer (pelvic nodal disease permissible). Curative treatment was delivered to both sites simultaneously. Follow-up was as per institutional guidelines. Acute and late toxicities were reviewed, and a literature search performed. Results: Pelvic external beam radiotherapy (RT) 45–50.4 Gy was delivered concurrent with 5-fluorouracil (5FU). Prostate total dose ranged from 70.0 to 79.2 Gy. No acute toxicities occurred, excluding AS-induced erectile dysfunction. Nine patients proceeded to surgery, and one was managed expectantly. Three relapsed with metastatic colorectal cancer, two with metastatic prostate cancer. Five patients have no evidence of recurrence, and four remain alive with metastatic disease. With a median follow-up of 2.2 years (range 1.2–6.3 years), two significant late toxicities occurred; G3 proctitis in a patient receiving palliative bevacizumab and a G3 anastomotic stricture precluding stoma reversal. Conclusion: Patients proceeding to synchronous radical treatment of both primary sites should receive 45–50.4 Gy pelvic RT with infusional 5FU. Prostate dose escalation should be given with due consideration to the potential impact of prostate cancer on patient survival, as increasing dose may result in significant late morbidity

  10. Detection of DNA viruses in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smelov, Vitaly; Bzhalava, Davit; Arroyo Mühr, Laila Sara; Eklund, Carina; Komyakov, Boris; Gorelov, Andrey; Dillner, Joakim; Hultin, Emilie

    2016-01-01

    We tested prostatic secretions from men with and without prostate cancer (13 cases and 13 matched controls) or prostatitis (18 cases and 18 matched controls) with metagenomic sequencing. A large number (>200) of viral reads was only detected among four prostate cancer cases (1 patient each positive for Merkel cell polyomavirus, JC polyomavirus and Human Papillomavirus types 89 or 40, respectively). Lower numbers of reads from a large variety of viruses were detected in all patient groups. Our knowledge of the biology of the prostate may be furthered by the fact that DNA viruses are commonly shed from the prostate and can be readily detected by metagenomic sequencing of expressed prostate secretions. PMID:27121729

  11. Castration Induced Neuroendocrine Mediated Progression of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    androgen -insensitive prostate cancer patients based upon our work. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate Cancer , Neuroendocrine, Progression...two androgen - ines PC-3 and DU-145 by examining the status of publication. a Src kinase inhibitor AZ independent prostate cancer cell l...differentiation in prostate cancer . AR activation. Together with our studies in the chimeric growth of androgen -sensitive and androgen -insensitive cells,

  12. Prostate cancer magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): multidisciplinary standpoint.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Wang, Liang; Feng, Zhaoyan; Hu, Zhiquan; Wang, Guoping; Yuan, Xianglin; Wang, He; Hu, Daoyu

    2013-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in men and a leading cause of death. Accurate assessment is a prerequisite for optimal clinical management and therapy selection of prostate cancer. There are several parameters and nomograms to differentiate between patients with clinically insignificant disease and patients in need of treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a technique which provides more detailed anatomical images due to high spatial resolution, superior contrast resolution, and multiplanar capability. State-of-the-art MRI techniques, such as diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), improve interpretation of prostate cancer imaging. In this article, we review the major role of MRI in the advanced management of prostate cancer to noninvasively improve tumor staging, biologic potential, treatment planning, therapy response, local recurrence, and to guide target biopsy for clinical suspected cancer with previous negative biopsy. Finally, future challenges and opportunities in prostate cancer management in the area of functional MRI are discussed as well.

  13. Prostate Cancer Genetics in African Americans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    grant from the U.S. Department of Defense to study the role heredity plays in prostate cancer among African Americans. "Prostate cancer is the...visit our website at: www.creighton.edu. Creighton gets grant to study heredity -cancer link - Houston Chronicle Coogle offers Google Offers Deals on...traffic Nahan & world Politics Health News bizarre Deaths Hurncanes Creighton gets grant to study heredity -cancer link Published 04 :40a.m., Monday

  14. Sanguinarine: A Novel Agent Against Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    The traditional therapeutic and surgical approaches have not been successful in the management of prostate cancer (CaP). Natural plant - based...Natural plant -based products have shown promise as anticancer agents. Ideally, the anti- cancer drugs should specifically target the neoplastic cells... plant alkaloid sanguinarine against prostate cancer development in a nude mice xenograft model. Proc Amer Assoc Cancer Res 46: 1012-1013, 2005. 3

  15. Methylphenidate for Fatigue in Ambulatory Men with Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Andrew J.; Nelson, Christian; Rosenfeld, Barry; Scher, Howard; Slovin, Susan; Morris, Michael; Arauz, Gabrielle; Breitbart, William

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Fatigue is a highly prevalent and clinically significant symptom of advanced prostate cancer. To date, however, there are no published controlled trials of interventions for fatigue in men with prostate cancer. Method This six-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, evaluated the efficacy of methylphenidate to treat fatigue in prostate cancer patients. Inclusion criteria included men with advanced prostate cancer and the presence of moderate to severe fatigue. Patients with major depression, hypothyroidism, uncontrolled hypertension, arrhythmia or anemia were excluded. Fatigue levels, blood pressure, pulse and other safety concerns were monitored regularly. Results Thirty-two subjects were randomized to methylphenidate (N=16) or placebo (N=16). Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI) total scores significantly decreased for both groups, however the methylphenidate group, as compared to placebo, reported greater decrease on BFI severity scores (p=.03) and a trend toward greater decrease on BFI total scores (p=.07). A significantly greater number of subjects in the methylphenidate group vs. the placebo group demonstrated clinically significant improvement in fatigue on total BFI scores (7/10 vs. 3/13) and BFI severity scores (8/10 vs. 3/13). Importantly, six subjects in the methylphenidate group discontinued due to increased blood pressure or tachycardia. There were no serious adverse events. Conclusions Methylphenidate is effective in treating fatigue in men with prostate cancer; however, oncologists need to monitor for possible pulse and blood pressure elevations. PMID:20665492

  16. Endometase in Androgen-Repressed Human Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    intraepithelial neoplasia from multiple patients were significantly higher than those in prostatitis, benign prostate hyperplasia, and normal prostate glandular...prostate cancer cell invasion. 3. We showed that the levels of MMP-26 protein in human prostate carcinomas from multiple patients were significantly...inhibitors of MMP-26 block prostate cancer invasion. We have showed that the levels of MMP-26 protein in human prostate carcinomas from multiple patients were

  17. A Large Study of Androgen Receptor Germline Variants and Their Relation to Sex Hormone Levels and Prostate Cancer Risk. Results from the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, Sara; Ma, Jing; Altshuler, David; Giovannucci, Edward; Riboli, Elio; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Boeing, Heiner; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Chanock, Stephen J.; Dunning, Alison M.; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Gaziano, J. Michael; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hunter, David J.; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Le Marchand, Loic; Martínez, Carmen; Overvad, Kim; Siddiq, Afshan; Stampfer, Meir; Stattin, Pär; Stram, Daniel O.; Thun, Michael J.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tumino, Rosario; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Yeager, Meredith; Kraft, Peter; Freedman, Matthew L.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Androgens are key regulators of prostate gland maintenance and prostate cancer growth, and androgen deprivation therapy has been the mainstay of treatment for advanced prostate cancer for many years. A long-standing hypothesis has been that inherited variation in the androgen receptor (AR) gene plays a role in prostate cancer initiation. However, studies to date have been inconclusive and often suffered from small sample sizes. Objective and Methods: We investigated the association of AR sequence variants with circulating sex hormone levels and prostate cancer risk in 6058 prostate cancer cases and 6725 controls of Caucasian origin within the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium. We genotyped a highly polymorphic CAG microsatellite in exon 1 and six haplotype tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms and tested each genetic variant for association with prostate cancer risk and with sex steroid levels. Results: We observed no association between AR genetic variants and prostate cancer risk. However, there was a strong association between longer CAG repeats and higher levels of testosterone (P = 4.73 × 10−5) and estradiol (P = 0.0002), although the amount of variance explained was small (0.4 and 0.7%, respectively). Conclusions: This study is the largest to date investigating AR sequence variants, sex steroid levels, and prostate cancer risk. Although we observed no association between AR sequence variants and prostate cancer risk, our results support earlier findings of a relation between the number of CAG repeats and circulating levels of testosterone and estradiol. PMID:20534771

  18. Identification of Androgen Receptor and Beta-Catenin Target Genes in Prostate and Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Transdisciplinary Research in Epigenetics and Cancer Journal Clubs and Transdisciplinary Science Meetings, biweekly and monthly 3. To gain expertise...Target Genes in Prostate and Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Laura Lamb CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Washington University...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Identification of Androgen Receptor and Beta-Catenin Target Genes in Prostate and Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Genes in

  19. A prospective study of calcium intake and incident and fatal prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Giovannucci, Edward; Liu, Yan; Stampfer, Meir J; Willett, Walter C

    2006-02-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common incident cancer and the second leading cause of cancer mortality in U.S. males. Higher milk intake has been relatively consistently associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer, especially advanced prostate cancer. Some data suggest that high intake of calcium might account for this association, but this relationship remains controversial. We hypothesized that high calcium intake, possibly by lowering 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D levels, is associated with poorer differentiation in prostate cancer and thereby with fatal prostate cancer. We examined calcium intake in relation to prostate cancer risk using data from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, a prospective cohort study of 47,750 male health professionals with no history of cancer other than nonmelanoma skin cancer at baseline. We assessed total, dietary, and supplementary calcium intake in 1986, 1990, 1994, and 1998, using a validated food frequency questionnaire. We calculated the multivariable relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) using Cox proportional hazards regression. Over 16 years of follow-up, we identified 3,544 total cases of prostate cancer, 523 advanced (extraprostatic) cases, and 312 fatal cases. Higher calcium intake was not appreciably associated with total or nonadvanced prostate cancer but was associated with a higher risk of advanced and fatal prostate cancer [for fatal prostate cancer, compared with men whose long-term calcium intake was 500-749 mg/d (excluding supplement use of <5 years); those with intakes of 1,500-1,999 mg/d had a RR, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.17-3.01; and those with > or = 2,000 mg/d had a RR, 2.43; 95% CI, 1.32-4.48; P(trend) = 0.003]. Dietary calcium and supplementary calcium were independently associated with an increased risk. For high-grade prostate cancer (Gleason > or = 7), an association was observed for high versus low calcium intake (RR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.32-2.71; P(trend) = 0.005), but a nonsignificant, inverse

  20. Diagnosis of prostate cancer via nanotechnological approach.

    PubMed

    Kang, Benedict J; Jeun, Minhong; Jang, Gun Hyuk; Song, Sang Hoon; Jeong, In Gab; Kim, Choung-Soo; Searson, Peter C; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths among the Caucasian adult males in Europe and the USA. Currently available diagnostic strategies for patients with prostate cancer are invasive and unpleasant and have poor accuracy. Many patients have been overly or underly treated resulting in a controversy regarding the reliability of current conventional diagnostic approaches. This review discusses the state-of-the-art research in the development of novel noninvasive prostate cancer diagnostics using nanotechnology coupled with suggested diagnostic strategies for their clinical implication.

  1. Prostate cancer vaccines in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Lubaroff, David M

    2012-07-01

    This review presents important information about the current state of the art for vaccine immunotherapy of prostate cancer. It includes important preclinical research for each of the important prostate cancer vaccines to have reached clinical trials. To date, the only prostate cancer vaccine that has completed Phase III trials and has been approved and licensed by the US FDA is Sipuleucel-T, which immunizes patients against the prostate-associated antigen prostatic acid phosphatase. The benefits and concerns associated with the vaccine are presented. A current Phase III trial is currently underway using the vaccinia-based prostate-specific antigen vaccine Prostvac-TRICOM. Other immunotherapeutic vaccines in trials include the Ad/prostate-specific antigen vaccine Ad5-prostate-specific antigen and the DNA/prostatic acid phosphatase vaccine. A cellular vaccine, GVAX, has been in clinical trials but has not seen continuous study. This review also delves into the multiple immune regulatory elements that must be overcome in order to obtain strong antitumor-associated antigen immune responses capable of effectively destroying prostate tumor cells.

  2. ETS fusion genes in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Gasi Tandefelt, Delila; Boormans, Joost; Hermans, Karin; Trapman, Jan

    2014-06-01

    Prostate cancer is very common in elderly men in developed countries. Unravelling the molecular and biological processes that contribute to tumor development and progressive growth, including its heterogeneity, is a challenging task. The fusion of the genes ERG and TMPRSS2 is the most frequent genomic alteration in prostate cancer. ERG is an oncogene that encodes a member of the family of ETS transcription factors. At lower frequency, other members of this gene family are also rearranged and overexpressed in prostate cancer. TMPRSS2 is an androgen-regulated gene that is preferentially expressed in the prostate. Most of the less frequent ETS fusion partners are also androgen-regulated and prostate-specific. During the last few years, novel concepts of the process of gene fusion have emerged, and initial experimental results explaining the function of the ETS genes ERG and ETV1 in prostate cancer have been published. In this review, we focus on the most relevant ETS gene fusions and summarize the current knowledge of the role of ETS transcription factors in prostate cancer. Finally, we discuss the clinical relevance of TMRPSS2-ERG and other ETS gene fusions in prostate cancer.

  3. The Role of c-FLIP(L) in Regulating Apoptotic Pathways in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    treatment of advanced prostate cancer is a rational approach. TRAIL-agonist compounds, like HGS-ETR2, which are effective against cancer cells but spare ...effectively with surgery or radiotherapy and for carefully selected cases with watchful waiting (34). However, advanced hormone refractory prostate Fig. 4...been employed to overcome TRAIL resistance in cancer cells, notably by combination therapy of TRAIL with chemotherapy or radiotherapy (40–42). A concern

  4. Prostate Cancer and Bone: The Elective Affinities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The onset of metastases dramatically changes the prognosis of prostate cancer patients, determining increased morbidity and a drastic fall in survival expectancy. Bone is a common site of metastases in few types of cancer, and it represents the most frequent metastatic site in prostate cancer. Of note, the prevalence of tumor relapse to the bone appears to be increasing over the years, likely due to a longer overall survival of prostate cancer patients. Bone tropism represents an intriguing challenge for researchers also because the preference of prostate cancer cells for the bone is the result of a sequential series of targetable molecular events. Many factors have been associated with the peculiar ability of prostate cancer cells to migrate in bone marrow and to determine mixed osteoblastic/osteolytic lesions. As anticipated by the success of current targeted therapy aimed to block bone resorption, a better understanding of molecular affinity between prostate cancer and bone microenvironment will permit us to cure bone metastasis and to improve prognosis of prostate cancer patients. PMID:24971315

  5. Thermal dosimetry analysis combined with patient-specific thermal modeling of clinical interstitial ultrasound hyperthermia integrated within HDR brachytherapy for treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Wootton, Jeff; Prakash, Punit; Scott, Serena; Hsu, I. C.; Diederich, Chris J.

    2017-03-01

    This study presents thermal dosimetry analysis from clinical treatments where ultrasound hyperthermia (HT) was administered following high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment for locally advanced prostate cancer as part of a clinical pilot study. HT was administered using ultrasound applicators from within multiple 13-g brachytherapy catheters implanted along the posterior periphery of the prostate. The heating applicators were linear arrays of sectored tubular transducers (˜7 MHz), with independently powered array elements enabling energy deposition with 3D spatial control. Typical heat treatments employed time-averaged peak acoustic intensities of 1 - 3 W/cm2 and lasted for 60 - 70 minutes. Throughout the treatments, temperatures at multiple points were monitored using multi-junction thermocouples, placed within available brachytherapy catheters throughout mid-gland prostate and identified as the hyperthermia target volume (HTV). Clinical constraints allowed placement of 8 - 12 thermocouple sensors in the HTV and patient-specific 3D thermal modeling based on finite element methods (FEM) was used to supplement limited thermometry. Patient anatomy, heating device positions, orientations, and thermometry junction locations were obtained from patient CT scans and HDR and hyperthermia planning software. The numerical models utilized the applied power levels recorded during the treatments. Tissue properties such as perfusion and acoustic absorption were varied within physiological ranges such that squared-errors between measured and simulated temperatures were minimized. This data-fitting was utilized for 6 HT treatments to estimate volumetric temperature distributions achieved in the HTV and surrounding anatomy devoid of thermocouples. For these treatments, the measured and simulated T50 values in the hyperthermia target volume (HTV) were between 40.1 - 43.9 °C and 40.3 - 44.9 °C, respectively. Maximum temperatures between 46.8 - 49.8 °C were measured during

  6. Immunotherapy and gene therapy in prostate cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Grozescu, T; Popa, F

    2017-01-01

    There are few methods bringing several relatively recent advances in therapy of certain types of prostate cancer. Belonging to personalized therapies, they use cells (normal or pathologic) from the patient, modify and reintroduce them in the patient’s body, leading to an increased efficiency against the neoplastic tissue, proving to increase the patient’s lifespan and/ or tumor progression. PMID:28255378

  7. PTEN Regulates Beta-Catenin in Androgen Signaling: Implication in Prostate Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    of androgens, whereas purified Wnt3a showed a pronounced effect in the presence of low concentrations of ligands. We also showed that Wnt3a-CM and the...that the effect of PI3K/Akt in prostate cells is mediated through androgen signaling. The PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, and a tumor suppressor, PTEN...progression of prostate cancer remain largely unknown. Androgen ablation is an effective treatment for the majority of advanced prostate cancer patients

  8. Risks of Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system located just below the bladder (the organ that ... up part of semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  9. Treatment Option Overview (Prostate Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system . It lies just below the bladder (the organ ... part of the semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  10. General Information about Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system . It lies just below the bladder (the organ ... part of the semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  11. Gastrointestinal metastases from prostate cancer: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Maines, Francesca; Caffo, Orazio; Veccia, Antonello; Galligioni, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    The availability of active new drugs for the treatment of advanced castration-resistant prostate cancer has significantly prolonged overall survival, thus changing the natural history of the disease and raising the likelihood of observing metastases in atypical sites. This review of the literature describes the frequency, clinical-pathological features and presenting symptoms of non-liver gastrointestinal metastases (GIm) from prostate cancer. Its purpose is to increase clinical awareness of the increasing incidence of such GIm, contributing to the early detection, accurate diagnosis and, when feasible, appropriate management.

  12. Management of high-risk localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Marciscano, Ariel E; Hardee, Matthew E; Sanfilippo, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer have been an extremely challenging group to manage due to a significant likelihood of treatment failure and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). The results of multiple large, prospective, randomized trials have demonstrated that men with high-risk features who are treated in a multimodal fashion at the time of initial diagnosis have improved overall survival. Advances in local treatments such as dose-escalated radiotherapy in conjunction with androgen suppression and postprostatectomy adjuvant radiotherapy have also demonstrated benefits to this subset of patients. However, therapeutic enhancement with the addition of chemotherapy to the primary treatment regimen may help achieve optimal disease control.

  13. Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    saturation bands (six for fat and two for water) were used to minimize lipid/water contamination to the VOI. The 2D MRSI sequence details are: TR/TE... fat as measured by in-vivo imaging using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging in the prediction of prostate disease aggressiveness...histology, in-vivo intraprostatic fat as measured by 1H MRSI, metabolic signatures of lipid oxidation and metabolism, and prostate cancer

  14. Incidence of prostate cancer in Lithuania after introduction of the Early Prostate Cancer Detection Programme.

    PubMed

    Smailyte, G; Aleknaviciene, B

    2012-12-01

    In Lithuania, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing is offered to healthy asymptomatic men as a screening test in the population-based Early Prostate Cancer Detection Programme (EPCDP). The aim of this study was to analyse the incidence of prostate cancer before and after introduction of the EPCDP in Lithuania. Prostate cancer incidence and mortality data from the Lithuanian Cancer Registry were analysed for the period 1990-2008. Age-specific incidence and mortality data were adjusted to the European Standard Population. There have been extraordinary changes in the incidence of prostate cancer in Lithuania following introduction of the EPCDP, and there is strong evidence that these changes are the result of increased detection rates, especially in men of screening age. Further observation of changes in prostate cancer incidence and mortality in Lithuania may help to determine the extent to which PSA testing at the population level influences incidence and mortality in the general population.

  15. Presence of PSA auto-antibodies in men with prostate abnormalities (prostate cancer/benign prostatic hyperplasia/prostatitis).

    PubMed

    Lokant, M T; Naz, R K

    2015-04-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), produced by the prostate, liquefies post-ejaculate semen. PSA is detected in semen and blood. Increased circulating PSA levels indicate prostate abnormality [prostate cancer (PC), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), prostatitis (PTIS)], with variance among individuals. As the prostate has been proposed as an immune organ, we hypothesise that variation in PSA levels among men may be due to presence of auto-antibodies against PSA. Sera from healthy men (n = 28) and men having prostatitis (n = 25), BPH (n = 30) or PC (n = 29) were tested for PSA antibody presence using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) values converted to standard deviation (SD) units, and Western blotting. Taking ≥2 SD units as cut-off for positive immunoreactivity, 0% of normal men, 0% with prostatitis, 33% with BPH and 3.45% with PC demonstrated PSA antibodies. One-way analysis of variance (anova) performed on the mean absorbance values and SD units of each group showed BPH as significantly different (P < 0.01) compared with PC and prostatitis. All others were nonsignificant (P < 0.05). Men (33%) with BPH had PSA antibodies by ELISA and Western blot. These discoveries may find clinical application in differential diagnosis among prostate abnormalities, especially differentiating BPH from prostate cancer and prostatitis.

  16. Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer – Recent Developments and Future Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Michael T.; Drake, Charles G.

    2014-01-01

    Since the approval of sipuleucel-T for men with metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer in 2010, great strides in the development of anti-cancer immunotherapies have been made. Current drug development in this area has focused primarily on antigen specific [i.e. cancer vaccines and antibody based therapies)] or checkpoint inhibitor therapies, with the checkpoint inhibitors perhaps gaining the most attention as of late. Indeed, drugs blocking the inhibitory signal generated by the engagement of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) found on T-cells has emerged as potent means to combat the immunosuppressive milieu. The anti-CTLA-4 monoclonal antibody ipilimumab has already been approved in advanced melanoma and two phase III trials evaluating ipilimumab in men with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer are underway. A phase III trial evaluating ProstVac-VF, a poxvirus-based therapeutic prostate cancer vaccine, is also underway. While there has been reason for encouragement over the past few years, many questions regarding the use of immunotherapies remain. Namely it is unclear what stage of disease is most likely to benefit from these approaches, how best to incorporate said treatments with each other and into our current treatment regimens and which therapy is most appropriate for which disease. Herein we review some of the recent advances in immunotherapy as related to the treatment of prostate cancer and outline some of the challenges that lie ahead. PMID:24477411

  17. Biomarkers of Prostatic Cancer: An Attempt to Categorize Patients into Prostatic Carcinoma, Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia, or Prostatitis Based on Serum Prostate Specific Antigen, Prostatic Acid Phosphatase, Calcium, and Phosphorus

    PubMed Central

    Sarwar, Shahana; Nyamath, Parveen; Ishaq, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Prostatitis, BPH, and P.Ca are the most frequent pathologies of the prostate gland that are responsible for morbidity in men. Raised levels of PSA are seen in different pathological conditions involving the prostate. PAP levels are altered in inflammatory or infectious or abnormal growth of the prostate tissue. Serum calcium and phosphorus levels were also found to be altered in prostate cancer and BPH. The present study was carried out to study the levels of PSA, PAP, calcium, and phosphorus in serum of patients with Prostatitis, BPH, or P.Ca and also to evaluate the relationship between them. Males in the age group of 50–85 years with LUTS disease symptoms and with PSA levels more than 4 ng/mL were included. A total of 114 patients were analyzed including 30 controls. Prostatitis in 35.7% of cases, BPH in 35.7% of the cases, and P.Ca in 28.57% of the cases were observed. Thus, the nonmalignant cases constitute a majority. PSA, a marker specific for prostatic conditions, was significantly high in all the diseases compared to controls. A rise in serum PSA and PAP indicates prostatitis or, in combination with these two tests, decreased serum calcium shows advanced disease. PMID:28168057

  18. Biomarkers of Prostatic Cancer: An Attempt to Categorize Patients into Prostatic Carcinoma, Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia, or Prostatitis Based on Serum Prostate Specific Antigen, Prostatic Acid Phosphatase, Calcium, and Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, Shahana; Adil, Mohammed Abdul Majid; Nyamath, Parveen; Ishaq, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Prostatitis, BPH, and P.Ca are the most frequent pathologies of the prostate gland that are responsible for morbidity in men. Raised levels of PSA are seen in different pathological conditions involving the prostate. PAP levels are altered in inflammatory or infectious or abnormal growth of the prostate tissue. Serum calcium and phosphorus levels were also found to be altered in prostate cancer and BPH. The present study was carried out to study the levels of PSA, PAP, calcium, and phosphorus in serum of patients with Prostatitis, BPH, or P.Ca and also to evaluate the relationship between them. Males in the age group of 50-85 years with LUTS disease symptoms and with PSA levels more than 4 ng/mL were included. A total of 114 patients were analyzed including 30 controls. Prostatitis in 35.7% of cases, BPH in 35.7% of the cases, and P.Ca in 28.57% of the cases were observed. Thus, the nonmalignant cases constitute a majority. PSA, a marker specific for prostatic conditions, was significantly high in all the diseases compared to controls. A rise in serum PSA and PAP indicates prostatitis or, in combination with these two tests, decreased serum calcium shows advanced disease.

  19. Humanin: A Novel Therapeutic Target in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH; n=107), prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN; n=41) and invasive prostate cancer (Cancer; n=574). Both cytoplasmic...expression was significantly higher in cancer (ProsCa) compared to normal (NL; p=0028), and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH; p=0.0017). Humanin expression

  20. Inorganic Arsenic and Human Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Benbrahim-Tallaa, Lamia; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Objective We critically evaluated the etiologic role of inorganic arsenic in human prostate cancer. Data sources We assessed data from relevant epidemiologic studies concerning environmental inorganic arsenic exposure. Whole animal studies were evaluated as were in vitro model systems of inorganic arsenic carcinogenesis in the prostate. Data synthesis Multiple studies in humans reveal an association between environmental inorganic arsenic exposure and prostate cancer mortality or incidence. Many of these human studies provide clear evidence of a dose–response relationship. Relevant whole animal models showing a relationship between inorganic arsenic and prostate cancer are not available. However, cellular model systems indicate arsenic can induce malignant transformation of human prostate epithelial cells in vitro. Arsenic also appears to impact prostate cancer cell progression by precipitating events leading to androgen independence in vitro. Conclusion Available evidence in human populations and human cells in vitro indicates that the prostate is a target for inorganic arsenic carcinogenesis. A role for this common environmental contaminant in human prostate cancer initiation and/or progression would be very important. PMID:18288312

  1. Targeting receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) expression induces apoptosis and inhibits prostate tumor growth

    SciTech Connect

    Elangovan, Indira; Thirugnanam, Sivasakthivel; Chen, Aoshuang; Zheng, Guoxing; Bosland, Maarten C.; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Gnanasekar, Munirathinam

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeting RAGE by RNAi induces apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing RAGE expression abrogates rHMGB1 mediated cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Down regulation of RAGE by RNAi inhibits PSA secretion of prostate cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knock down of RAGE abrogates prostate tumor growth in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disruption of RAGE expression in prostate tumor activates death receptors. -- Abstract: Expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) plays a key role in the progression of prostate cancer. However, the therapeutic potential of targeting RAGE expression in prostate cancer is not yet evaluated. Therefore in this study, we have investigated the effects of silencing the expression of RAGE by RNAi approach both in vitro and in vivo. The results of this study showed that down regulation of RAGE expression by RNAi inhibited the cell proliferation of androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and androgen-independent (DU-145) prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, targeting RAGE expression resulted in apoptotic elimination of these prostate cancer cells by activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3 death signaling. Of note, the levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA) were also reduced in LNCaP cells transfected with RAGE RNAi constructs. Importantly, the RAGE RNAi constructs when administered in nude mice bearing prostate tumors, inhibited the tumor growth by targeting the expression of RAGE, and its physiological ligand, HMGB1 and by up regulating death receptors DR4 and DR5 expression. Collectively, the results of this study for the first time show that targeting RAGE by RNAi may be a promising alternative therapeutic strategy for treating prostate cancer.

  2. Excellent Response to 177Lu-PSMA-617 Radioligand Therapy in a Patient With Advanced Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer Evaluated by 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Roll, Wolfgang; Bode, Axel; Weckesser, Matthias; Bögemann, Martin; Rahbar, Kambiz

    2017-02-01

    Recently radiolabeled ligands targeting prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) have been introduced for diagnostics and treatment of prostate cancer. Labeled with Lutetium, PSMA radioligand therapy (RLT) is one of the most promising new treatments of metastatic castration refractory prostate cancer. We present images of Ga-PSMA PET/CT and parameters of response of a 75-year-old heavily pretreated metastatic castration refractory prostate cancer patient with extended bone metastases, showing an extraordinary biochemical response in PSA-levels concordant to SUV decline in bone metastases. Furthermore, this case shows that CT is of no use in assessing response in bone metastases of prostate cancer.

  3. Targeting the Neural Microenvironment in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Prostate cancer (PCa) remains the most common malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related death for men in the...cancer (PCa) remains the most common malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related death for men in the United States. The tumor

  4. Primary and salvage cryotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Finley, David S; Pouliot, Frederic; Miller, David C; Belldegrun, Arie S

    2010-02-01

    Cryotherapy is a technique to ablate tissue by local induction of extremely cold temperatures. Recently, the American Urological Association Best Practice Statement recognized cryoablation of the prostate as an established treatment option for men with newly diagnosed or radiorecurrent organ-confined prostate cancer. Emerging data suggest that, in select cases, cryoablation may have a role in focal ablation of prostate. The current state of the art of cryoablation in these applications is reviewed.

  5. Long-Term Efficacy and Tolerability of Abdominal Once-Yearly Histrelin Acetate Subcutaneous Implants in Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Woolen, Sean; Holzmeyer, Cameron; Nesbitt, Emily; Siami, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Long-term assessment of the efficacy and tolerability of subcutaneous abdominal histrelin acetate implants that have been inserted for more than two years. Materials and Methods. Retrospective data collected over a six-year period at a single center from charts of 113 patients who received the subcutaneous abdominal histrelin acetate implant. Results. Following insertion of the first implant, 92.1% and 91.8% of patients had a serum testosterone level of ≤30 ng/dL at 24 and 48 weeks, respectively. Serum testosterone levels remained at <30 ng/dL for 96% of patients at two years and for 100% of patients at 3, 4, and 5 years. The testosterone levels remained significantly less than baseline (P < 0.05). Six patients (5.3%) had androgen-independent progression when followed up on the long term, increasing the mean serum PSA at 3, 4, and 5 years to 35.0 µg/L (n = 22), 30.7 µg/L (n = 13), and 132.9 µg/L (n = 8), respectively. The mean serum PSA was significantly greater than baseline during these years (P < 0.05). Eight patients (7.1%) experienced minor, but not serious, adverse events from the histrelin acetate. Conclusion. Subcutaneous abdominal histrelin acetate implants are an effective long-term and well-tolerated administration method for treating patients with advanced prostate cancer. PMID:25548680

  6. Studying circulating prostate cancer cells by in-vivo flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jin; Gu, Zhengqin; Chen, Tong; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Xunbin

    2011-11-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in American men and the second leading cause of deaths from cancer, after lung cancer. The tumor usually grows slowly and remains confined to the gland for many years. As the cancer advances, however, it can metastasize throughout other areas of the body, such as the bones, lungs, and liver. Surgical resection, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current prostate cancer therapies. Treatments for prostate cause both short- and long-term side effects that may be difficult to accept. Molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed to selectively target to unique characteristics of cancer cell growth and metastasis. We have developed the "in vivo microscopy" to study the mechanisms that govern prostate cancer cell spread through the microenvironment in vivo in real-time confocal near-infrared fluorescence imaging. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" and optical imaging are used to assess prostate cancer cell spreading and the circulation kinetics of prostate cancer cells. We have measured the depletion kinetics of cancer cells with different metastatic potential. Interestingly, more invasive PC-3 prostate cancer cells are depleted faster from the circulation than LNCaP cells.

  7. Studying circulating prostate cancer cells by in-vivo flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jin; Gu, Zhengqin; Chen, Tong; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Xunbin

    2012-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in American men and the second leading cause of deaths from cancer, after lung cancer. The tumor usually grows slowly and remains confined to the gland for many years. As the cancer advances, however, it can metastasize throughout other areas of the body, such as the bones, lungs, and liver. Surgical resection, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current prostate cancer therapies. Treatments for prostate cause both short- and long-term side effects that may be difficult to accept. Molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed to selectively target to unique characteristics of cancer cell growth and metastasis. We have developed the "in vivo microscopy" to study the mechanisms that govern prostate cancer cell spread through the microenvironment in vivo in real-time confocal near-infrared fluorescence imaging. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" and optical imaging are used to assess prostate cancer cell spreading and the circulation kinetics of prostate cancer cells. We have measured the depletion kinetics of cancer cells with different metastatic potential. Interestingly, more invasive PC-3 prostate cancer cells are depleted faster from the circulation than LNCaP cells.

  8. Anti-cancer activity of curcumin loaded nanoparticles in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yallapu, Murali M.; Khan, Sheema; Maher, Diane M.; Ebeling, Mara C.; Sundram, Vasudha; Chauhan, Neeraj; Ganju, Aditya; Balakrishna, Swati; Gupta, Brij K.; Zafar, Nadeem; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer disease in men in the Unites States and its management remains challenge in everyday oncology practice. Thus, advanced therapeutic strategies are required to treat prostate cancer patients. Curcumin (CUR) is a promising anticancer agent for various cancer types. The objective of this study was to evaluate therapeutic potential of novel poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)- CUR nanoparticles (PLGA-CUR NPs) for prostate cancer treatment. Our results indicate that PLGA-CUR NPs efficiently internalize in prostate cancer cells and release biologically active CUR in cytosolic compartment of cells for effective therapeutic activity. Cell proliferation (MTS), clonogenic, and Western blot analyses reveal that PLGA-CUR NPs can effectively inhibit proliferation and colony formation ability of prostate cancer cells than free CUR. PLGA-CUR NPs showed superior tumor regression compared to CUR in xenograft mice. Further investigations reveal that PLGA-CUR NPs inhibit nuclear β-catenin and AR expression in cells and in tumor xenograft tissues. It also suppresses STAT3 and AKT phosphorylation and leads to apoptosis via inhibition of key anti-apoptotic proteins, MCL-1, Bcl-xL and caused induction of PARP cleavage. Additionally, PLGA-CUR NPs significant downregulation of oncogenic miR21 and up-regulation of miR-205 was observed with PLGA-CUR NPs treatment as determined by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization analyses. A superior anti-cancer potential was attained with PSMA antibody conjugated PLGA-CUR NPs in prostate cancer cells and a significant tumor targeting of 131I labelled PSMA antibody was achieved with PLGA-CUR NPs in prostate cancer xenograft mice model. In conclusion, PLGA-CUR NPs can significantly accumulate and exhibit superior anticancer activity in prostate cancer. PMID:25028336

  9. AR-Signaling in Human Malignancies: Prostate Cancer and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Michael T.; Yu, Evan Y.

    2017-01-01

    In the 1940s Charles Huggins reported remarkable palliative benefits following surgical castration in men with advanced prostate cancer, and since then the androgen receptor (AR) has remained the main therapeutic target in this disease. Over the past couple of decades, our understanding of AR-signaling biology has dramatically improved, and it has become apparent that the AR can modulate a number of other well-described oncogenic signaling pathways. Not surprisingly, mounting preclinical and epidemiologic data now supports a role for AR-signaling in promoting the growth and progression of several cancers other than prostate, and early phase clinical trials have documented preliminary signs of efficacy when AR-signaling inhibitors are used in several of these malignancies. In this article, we provide an overview of the evidence supporting the use of AR-directed therapies in prostate as well as other cancers, with an emphasis on the rationale for targeting AR-signaling across tumor types. PMID:28085048

  10. AR-Signaling in Human Malignancies: Prostate Cancer and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Michael T; Yu, Evan Y

    2017-01-11

    In the 1940s Charles Huggins reported remarkable palliative benefits following surgical castration in men with advanced prostate cancer, and since then the androgen receptor (AR) has remained the main therapeutic target in this disease. Over the past couple of decades, our understanding of AR-signaling biology has dramatically improved, and it has become apparent that the AR can modulate a number of other well-described oncogenic signaling pathways. Not surprisingly, mounting preclinical and epidemiologic data now supports a role for AR-signaling in promoting the growth and progression of several cancers other than prostate, and early phase clinical trials have documented preliminary signs of efficacy when AR-signaling inhibitors are used in several of these malignancies. In this article, we provide an overview of the evidence supporting the use of AR-directed therapies in prostate as well as other cancers, with an emphasis on the rationale for targeting AR-signaling across tumor types.

  11. Evolving Recommendations on Prostate Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Brawley, Otis W; Thompson, Ian M; Grönberg, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Results of a number of studies demonstrate that the serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in and of itself is an inadequate screening test. Today, one of the most pressing questions in prostate cancer medicine is how can screening be honed to identify those who have life-threatening disease and need aggressive treatment. A number of efforts are underway. One such effort is the assessment of men in the landmark Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial that has led to a prostate cancer risk calculator (PCPTRC), which is available online. PCPTRC version 2.0 predicts the probability of the diagnosis of no cancer, low-grade cancer, or high-grade cancer when variables such as PSA, age, race, family history, and physical findings are input. Modern biomarker development promises to provide tests with fewer false positives and improved ability to find high-grade cancers. Stockholm III (STHLM3) is a prospective, population-based, paired, screen-positive, prostate cancer diagnostic study assessing a combination of plasma protein biomarkers along with age, family history, previous biopsy, and prostate examination for prediction of prostate cancer. Multiparametric MRI incorporates anatomic and functional imaging to better characterize and predict future behavior of tumors within the prostate. After diagnosis of cancer, several genomic tests promise to better distinguish the cancers that need treatment versus those that need observation. Although the new technologies are promising, there is an urgent need for evaluation of these new tests in high-quality, large population-based studies. Until these technologies are proven, most professional organizations have evolved to a recommendation of informed or shared decision making in which there is a discussion between the doctor and patient.

  12. Hormones and prostate cancer: what's next?

    PubMed

    Hsing, A W

    2001-01-01

    In summary, the hormonal hypothesis remains one of the most important hypotheses in prostate cancer etiology. Although epidemiologic data regarding the role of hormones are still inconclusive, there are many intriguing leads. Armed with more complete methodological data, state-of-the-art hormone assays, sound epidemiologic design, and a more thorough analytical approach, a new generation of studies should yield critical data and insights to help clarify further the role of hormones in prostate cancer. These new studies may determine ultimately whether racial/ethnic differences in hormonal levels and in genetic susceptibility to hormone-metabolizing genes can help explain the very large racial/ethnic differences in prostate cancer risk.

  13. Perioperative Search for Circulating Tumor Cells in Patients Undergoing Prostate Brachytherapy for Clinically Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsumura, Hideyasu; Satoh, Takefumi; Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Tabata, Ken-ichi; Takenaka, Kouji; Sekiguchi, Akane; Nakamura, Masaki; Kitano, Masashi; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Iwamura, Masatsugu

    2017-01-01

    Despite the absence of local prostate cancer recurrence, some patients develop distant metastases after prostate brachytherapy. We evaluate whether prostate brachytherapy procedures have a potential risk for hematogenous spillage of prostate cancer cells. Fifty-nine patients who were undergoing high-dose-rate (HDR) or low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy participated in this prospective study. Thirty patients with high-risk or locally advanced cancer were treated with HDR brachytherapy after neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Twenty-nine patients with clinically localized cancer were treated with LDR brachytherapy without neoadjuvant ADT. Samples of peripheral blood were drawn in the operating room before insertion of needles (preoperative) and again immediately after the surgical manipulation (intraoperative). Blood samples of 7.5 mL were analyzed for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) using the CellSearch System. While no preoperative samples showed CTCs (0%), they were detected in intraoperative samples in 7 of the 59 patients (11.8%; preoperative vs. intraoperative, p = 0.012). Positive CTC status did not correlate with perioperative variables, including prostate-specific antigen (PSA) at diagnosis, use of neoadjuvant ADT, type of brachytherapy, Gleason score, and biopsy positive core rate. We detected CTCs from samples immediately after the surgical manipulation. Further study is needed to evaluate whether those CTCs actually can survive and proliferate at distant sites. PMID:28085051

  14. Actions of estrogens and endocrine disrupting chemicals on human prostate stem/progenitor cells and prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wen-Yang; Shi, Guang-Bin; Hu, Dan-Ping; Nelles, Jason L; Prins, Gail S

    2012-05-06

    Estrogen reprogramming of the prostate gland as a function of developmental exposures (aka developmental estrogenization) results in permanent alterations in structure and gene expression that lead to an increased incidence of prostatic lesions with aging. Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) with estrogenic activity have been similarly linked to an increased prostate cancer risk. Since it has been suggested that stem cells and cancer stem cells are potential targets of cancer initiation and disease management, it is highly possible that estrogens and EDCs influence the development and progression of prostate cancer through reprogramming and transforming the prostate stem and early stage progenitor cells. In this article, we review recent literature highlighting the effects of estrogens and EDCs on prostate cancer risk and discuss recent advances in prostate stem/progenitor cell research. Our laboratory has recently developed a novel prostasphere model using normal human prostate stem/progenitor cells and established that these cells express estrogen receptors (ERs) and are direct targets of estrogen action. Further, using a chimeric in vivo prostate model derived from these normal human prostate progenitor cells, we demonstrated for the first time that estrogens initiate and promote prostatic carcinogenesis in an androgen-supported environment. We herein discuss these findings and highlight new evidence using our in vitro human prostasphere assay for perturbations in human prostate stem cell self-renewal and differentiation by natural steroids as well as EDCs. These findings support the hypothesis that tissue stem cells may be direct EDC targets which may underlie life-long reprogramming as a consequence of developmental and/or transient adult exposures.

  15. Prostate Cancer in Gay, Bisexual, and Other Men Who Have Sex with Men: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Merengwa, Enyinnaya; Capistrant, Benjamin D.; Iantaffi, Alex; Kilian, Gunna; Kohli, Nidhi; Konety, Badrinath R.; Mitteldorf, Darryl; West, William

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Prostate cancer in gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBM) is an emerging medical and public health concern. The purpose of this review is to summarize the literature on prostate cancer in GBM, including its epidemiology, clinical studies, and anecdotal reports. Methods: In 2015, we undertook a structured literature review of all studies from 2000 to 2015. Results: Despite prostate cancer being the most common cancer in GBM, the main finding of this review is that prostate cancer in GBM is very under-researched. With only 30 published articles in English (a rate of 1.9 articles per year), most of the literature is limited to case studies or anecdotal reports. There is some evidence of a link between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive status and prostate cancer, with early studies showing HIV infection as a risk factor and more recent studies as it being protective. Antiretroviral treatment appears protective. Globally, only four quantitative studies have been published. Based on this admittedly limited literature, GBM appear to be screened for prostate cancer less than other men and are diagnosed with prostate cancer at about the same rate, but have poorer sexual function and quality-of-life outcomes. Conclusion: Methodological challenges to advancing research include challenges in subject identification, recruitment, heterocentric definitions of dysfunction based on vaginal intercourse and penetrative sex, and inappropriate measures. Six future directions, to advance the study of the effects of prostate cancer in GBM and to improve treatment, are detailed.

  16. Statin Use in Prostate Cancer: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Babcook, Melissa A.; Joshi, Aditya; Montellano, Jeniece A.; Shankar, Eswar; Gupta, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, known as statins, are commonly prescribed for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and cardiovascular disease. A systematic review was conducted using the keywords “statin and prostate cancer” within the title search engines including PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library for relevant research work published between 2004 and December 2015. Although still premature, accumulating clinical evidence suggests that statin use may be beneficial in the prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer. These human studies consist of meta-analyses of secondary endpoints obtained from randomized, controlled cardiovascular disease clinical trials of statins, patient database, observational studies, and a few, small case–control studies, directly addressing statin use on prostate cancer pathology and recurrence. This review summarizes and discusses the recent clinical literature on statins and prostate cancer with a recommendation to move forward with randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials, investigating the use of statins. Additional preclinical testing of statins on prostate cancer cell lines and in vivo models is needed to elucidate pathways and determine its efficacy for prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer, more specifically, the difference in the effectiveness of lipophilic versus hydrophilic statins in prostate cancer. PMID:27441003

  17. Vaccine Therapy and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Hormone-Resistant, Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-23

    Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  18. Bioengineered viral vectors for targeting and killing prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai-xin; Jia, William; Rennie, Paul S

    2010-01-01

    Enabling the transduction of therapeutic gene expression exclusively in diseased sites is the key to developing more effective treatments for advanced prostate cancer using viral-based therapy. While prostate cancers that express high levels of HER-2 are resistant to the killing effects of trastuzumab, they can be targeted for selective gene expression and destruction by lentiviruses with envelope proteins engineered to bind to this therapeutic antibody. More importantly, after intravenous injection, this trastuzumab-bound lentivirus is able to target castration-resistant prostate tumor xenografts, albeit with low efficiency. This proof of principle opens up multiple possibilities for the prevention and treatment of prostate cancer using a viral-based therapy. However, to be safe and more effective, the viral vectors must target prostate cancer cells more selectively and efficiently. A higher degree of specificity and efficiency of cancer cell targeting can be achieved by engineering viral vectors to bind to a specific cell surface marker and by controlling the expression of the therapeutic payload at transcriptional level, with a tissue-specific promoter, and at the translational level, with a regulatory sequences inserted into either the 5'UTR or 3'UTR regions of the therapeutic gene(s). The latter would be designed to ensure that translation of this mRNA occurs exclusively in malignant cells. Furthermore, in order to obtain a potent anti-tumor effect, viral vectors would be engineered to express pro-apoptotic genes, intra-cellar antibodies/nucleotide aptamers to block critical proteins, or siRNAs to knockdown essential cellular mRNAs. Alternatively, controlled expression of an essential viral gene would restore replication competence to the virus and enable selective oncolysis of tumor cells. Successful delivery of such bioengineered viruses may provide a more effective way to treat advanced prostate cancer.

  19. Bioengineering Multifunctional Quantum Dot-Polypeptide Assemblies and Immunoconjugates for the Ablation of Advanced Prostate Cancer Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    glands , the level of expression in these tissues is 100-1000 fold less than in prostate tissue [11-15]. Alternate splicing of PSMA results in at least...dependent endocytosis leading to their transport as punctate structures in the perinuclear region of HeLa cells; larger sized (40 nm) nanoparticles...cells and the structure remained intact for at least 72 h (not shown). Higher concentrations of the QDs (1 nM) were required for the formation of

  20. Investigating Steroid Receptor Coactivator 3 (SRC3) as a Potential Therapeutic Target for Treating Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    Pten3CKO mice in which floxed Pten and SRC-3 genes are specifically and concomitantly deleted in prostate epithelial cells (PECs). We compared tumor mass...differentiated as evidenced by higher levels of Fkbp5, an AR-responsive gene that inhibits Akt signaling. These tumors also had lower levels of some...androgen-repressed genes like cyclin E2 and MMP10. These results reveal SRC-3 promotes CRPC by inducing proliferation, de-differentiation, and

  1. Tumor clone dynamics in lethal prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Suzanne; Romanel, Alessandro; Goodall, Jane; Grist, Emily; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Miranda, Susana; Prandi, Davide; Lorente, David; Frenel, Jean-Sebastien; Pezaro, Carmel; Omlin, Aurelius; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Flohr, Penelope; Tunariu, Nina; S de Bono, Johann; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2014-09-17

    It is unclear whether a single clone metastasizes and remains dominant over the course of lethal prostate cancer. We describe the clonal architectural heterogeneity at different stages of disease progression by sequencing serial plasma and tumor samples from 16 ERG-positive patients. By characterizing the clonality of commonly occurring deletions at 21q22, 8p21, and 10q23, we identified multiple independent clones in metastatic disease that are differentially represented in tissue and circulation. To exemplify the clinical utility of our studies, we then showed a temporal association between clinical progression and emergence of androgen receptor (AR) mutations activated by glucocorticoids in about 20% of patients progressing on abiraterone and prednisolone or dexamethasone. Resistant clones showed a complex dynamic with temporal and spatial heterogeneity, suggesting distinct mechanisms of resistance at different sites that emerged and regressed depending on treatment selection pressure. This introduces a management paradigm requiring sequential monitoring of advanced prostate cancer patients with plasma and tumor biopsies to ensure early discontinuation of agents when they become potential disease drivers.

  2. Tumor clone dynamics in lethal prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Suzanne; Romanel, Alessandro; Goodall, Jane; Grist, Emily; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Miranda, Susana; Prandi, Davide; Lorente, David; Frenel, Jean-Sebastien; Pezaro, Carmel; Omlin, Aurelius; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Flohr, Penelope; Tunariu, Nina; de Bono, Johann S.; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear whether a single clone metastasizes and remains dominant over the course of lethal prostate cancer. We describe the clonal architectural heterogeneity at different stages of disease progression by sequencing serial plasma and tumor samples from 16 ERG-positive patients. By characterizing the clonality of commonly occurring deletions at 21q22, 8p21, and 10q23, we identified multiple independent clones in metastatic disease that are differentially represented in tissue and circulation. To exemplify the clinical utility of our studies, we then showed a temporal association between clinical progression and emergence of androgen receptor (AR) mutations activated by glucocorticoids in about 20% of patients progressing on abiraterone and prednisolone or dexamethasone. Resistant clones showed a complex dynamic with temporal and spatial heterogeneity, suggesting distinct mechanisms of resistance at different sites that emerged and regressed depending on treatment selection pressure. This introduces a management paradigm requiring sequential monitoring of advanced prostate cancer patients with plasma and tumor biopsies to ensure early discontinuation of agents when they become potential disease drivers. PMID:25232177

  3. Studying depletion kinetics of circulating prostate cancer cells by in vivo flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guangda; Gu, Zhengqin; Guo, Jin; Li, Yan; Chen, Yun; Chen, Tong; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Xunbin

    2011-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in American men and the second leading cause of deaths from cancer, after lung cancer. The tumor usually grows slowly and remains confined to the gland for many years. During this time, the tumor produces little or no symptoms or outward signs. As the cancer advances, however, it can metastasize throughout other areas of the body, such as the bones, lungs, and liver. Surgical resection, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current prostate cancer therapies. Treatments for prostate cause both short- and long-term side effects that may be difficult to accept. Molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed to selectively target to unique characteristics of cancer cell growth and metastasis. We have developed the "in vivo microscopy" to study the mechanisms that govern prostate cancer cell spread through the microenvironment in vivo in real-time confocal near-infrared fluorescence imaging. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" and optical imaging are used to assess prostate cancer cell spreading and the circulation kinetics of prostate cancer cells. A real- time quantitative monitoring of circulating prostate cancer cells by the in vivo flow cytometer will be useful to assess the effectiveness of the potential therapeutic interventions.

  4. Depletion kinetics of circulating prostate cancer cells studied by in vivo flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guangda; Guo, Jin; Li, Yan; Chen, Yun; Gu, Zhengqin; Chen, Tong; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Xunbin

    2010-11-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in American men and the second leading cause of deaths from cancer, after lung cancer. The tumor usually grows slowly and remains confined to the gland for many years. During this time, the tumor produces little or no symptoms or outward signs. As the cancer advances, however, it can metastasize throughout other areas of the body, such as the bones, lungs, and liver. Surgical resection, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current prostate cancer therapies. Treatments for prostate cause both short- and long-term side effects that may be difficult to accept. Molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed to selectively target to unique characteristics of cancer cell growth and metastasis. We have developed the "in vivo microscopy" to study the mechanisms that govern prostate cancer cell spread through the microenvironment in vivo in real-time confocal nearinfrared fluorescence imaging. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" and optical imaging are used to assess prostate cancer cell spreading and the circulation kinetics of prostate cancer cells. A real- time quantitative monitoring of circulating prostate cancer cells by the in vivo flow cytometer will be useful to assess the effectiveness of the potential therapeutic interventions.

  5. Studies of a novel photosensitizer palladium-bacteriopheophorbide (Tookad) for the treatment of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zheng; Chen, Qun; Brun, Pierre-Herve; Wilson, Brian C.; Scherz, Avigdor; Salomon, Yoram; Luck, David L.; Beckers, Jill; Hetzel, Fred W.

    2003-06-01

    In this study, photodynamic therapy (PDT) mediated with a novel, second generation photosensitizer Tookad (palladium-bacteriopheophorbide, WST09, STEBA Biotech, France), is investigated as an alternative modality in the treatment of prostate cancer. In vivo normal canine prostate and spontaneous advanced prostate cancer are used as the animal model. PDT was performed by irradiating the surgically exposed prostates with a diode laser (763 nm, 150 mW/cm) to activate the i.v. infused photosensitizer. The effects of drug concentration, drug-light interval, and light fluence rate on the PDT efficacy were studied. The prostates and adjacent tissues (bladder and underlying colon) were harvested and subjected to histopathological examination. During the one-week to 3-month period post PDT treatment, the dogs recovered well with little or no urethral complications. Prostatic urethra and prostate adjacent tissues (bladder and underlying colon) were well preserved. Light irradiation delivered during drug infusion or within 15 min post drug infusion induced the similar extend of damages. PDT induced prostate lesions in both normal and cancerous prostate were characterized by marked hemorrhagic necrosis and atrophy. Maximum lesion size of over 3 cm in dimension could be achieved with a single 1-cm interstitial treatment, suggesting the therapy is very effective in ablating cancerous prostatic tissue. In conclusion, the second generation photosensitizer Tookad mediated PDT may provide an effective alternative to treat prostate cancer.

  6. A meta-analysis and systematic review of randomized controlled trials with degarelix versus gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists for advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sciarra, Alessandro; Fasulo, Andrea; Ciardi, Antonio; Petrangeli, Elisa; Gentilucci, Alessandro; Maggi, Martina; Innocenzi, Michele; Pierella, Federico; Gentile, Vincenzo; Salciccia, Stefano; Cattarino, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Our aim was to systematically evaluate the benefits of degarelix as antagonist versus agonists of gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH) for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer (PC). This comparison was performed either in terms of biochemical or oncological or safety profiles. To this end we, carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature. We selected only studies directly and prospectively analyzing the two treatments in the same population (randomized phase III studies). We followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and meta-analyses process for reporting studies. After we eliminated studies according to the exclusion criteria, 9 publications were considered relevant to this review. These articles described 5 clinical trials that were eligible for inclusion. The follow-up duration in all trials did not exceed 364 days. This meta-analysis and review comprised a total of 1719 men, 1061 randomized to degarelix versus 658 to GnRH agonists treatment for advanced PC. Oncological results were evaluated only in 1 trial (CS21:408 cases) and they were not the primary endpoints of the study. Treatment emerging adverse events were reported in 61.4% and 58.8% of patients in the degarelix and GnRH agonists group, respectively (odds ratio, OR = 1.17; 95% confidence interval, 95% CI: 0.78–1.77, P > 0.1). Treatment related severe cardiovascular side effects were reported (trial CS21-30-35) in 1.6% and 3.6% of patients in the degarelix and GnRH agonists group, respectively (OR = 0.55, 95% CI: 0.26–1.14, P > 0.1). Our analysis evidences relevant limitations in particular for the comparative evaluation of the efficacy and the oncological results related to degarelix. PMID:27399062

  7. Cancer Screening Among Patients With Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sima, Camelia S.; Panageas, Katherine S.; Schrag, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Context Cancer screening has been integrated into routine primary care but does not benefit patients with limited life expectancy. Objective To evaluate the extent to which patients with advanced cancer continue to be screened for new cancers. Design, Setting, and Participants Utilization of cancer screening procedures (mammography, Papanicolaou test, prostate-specific antigen [PSA], and lower gastrointestinal [GI] endoscopy) was assessed in 87 736 fee-for-service Medicare enrollees aged 65 years or older diagnosed with advanced lung, colorectal, pancreatic, gastroesophageal, or breast cancer between 1998 and 2005, and reported to one of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) tumor registries. Participants were followed up until death or December 31, 2007, whichever came first. A group of 87 307 Medicare enrollees without cancer were individually matched by age, sex, race, and SEER registry to patients with cancer and observed over the same period to evaluate screening rates in context. Demographic and clinical characteristics associated with screening were also investigated. Main Outcome Measure For each cancer screening test, utilization rates were defined as the percentage of patients who were screened following the diagnosis of an incurable cancer. Results Among women following advanced cancer diagnosis compared with controls, at least 1 screening mammogram was received by 8.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.6%-9.1%) vs 22.0% (95% CI, 21.7%-22.5%); Papanicolaou test screening was received by 5.8% (95% CI, 5.6%-6.1%) vs 12.5% (95% CI, 12.2%-12.8%). Among men following advanced cancer diagnosis compared with controls, PSA test was received by 15.0% (95% CI, 14.7%-15.3%) vs 27.2% (95% CI, 26.8%-27.6%). For all patients following advanced diagnosis compared with controls, lower GI endoscopy was received by 1.7% (95% CI, 1.6%-1.8%) vs 4.7% (95% CI, 4.6%-4.9%). Screening was more frequent among patients with a recent history of screening (16.2% [95

  8. Functional imaging for prostate cancer: therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Mari Aparici, Carina; Seo, Youngho

    2012-09-01

    Functional radionuclide imaging modalities, now commonly combined with anatomical imaging modalities computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (single photon emission computed tomography [SPECT]/CT, positron emission tomography [PET]/CT, and PET/magnetic resonance imaging), are promising tools for the management of prostate cancer, particularly for therapeutic implications. Sensitive detection capability of prostate cancer using these imaging modalities is one issue; however, the treatment of prostate cancer using the information that can be obtained from functional radionuclide imaging techniques is another challenging area. There are not many SPECT or PET radiotracers that can cover the full spectrum of the management of prostate cancer from initial detection to staging, prognosis predictor, and all the way to treatment response assessment. However, when used appropriately, the information from functional radionuclide imaging improves, and sometimes significantly changes, the whole course of the cancer management. The limitations of using SPECT and PET radiotracers with regard to therapeutic implications are not so much different from their limitations solely for the task of detecting prostate cancer; however, the specific imaging target and how this target is reliably imaged by SPECT and PET can potentially make significant impact in the treatment of prostate cancer. Finally, although the localized prostate cancer is considered manageable, there is still significant need for improvement in noninvasive imaging of metastatic prostate cancer, in treatment guidance, and in response assessment from functional imaging, including radionuclide-based techniques. In this review article, we present the rationale of using functional radionuclide imaging and the therapeutic implications for each of radionuclide imaging agent that have been studied in human subjects.

  9. Farming, reported pesticide use, and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ragin, Camille; Davis-Reyes, Brionna; Tadesse, Helina; Daniels, Dennis; Bunker, Clareann H; Jackson, Maria; Ferguson, Trevor S; Patrick, Alan L; Tulloch-Reid, Marshall K; Taioli, Emanuela

    2013-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the leading cancer type diagnosed in American men and is the second leading cancer diagnosed in men worldwide. Although studies have been conducted to investigate the association between prostate cancer and exposure to pesticides and/or farming, the results have been inconsistent. We performed a meta-analysis to summarize the association of farming and prostate cancer. The PubMed database was searched to identify all published case-control studies that evaluated farming as an occupational exposure by questionnaire or interview and prostate cancer. Ten published and two unpublished studies were included in this analysis, yielding 3,978 cases and 7,393 controls. Prostate cancer cases were almost four times more likely to be farmers compared with controls with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH; meta odds ratio [OR], crude = 3.83, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.96-7.48, Q-test p value = .352; two studies); similar results were obtained when non-BPH controls were considered, but with moderate heterogeneity between studies (meta OR crude = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.16-1.64, Q-test p value = .216, I (2) = 31% [95% CI = 0-73]; five studies). Reported pesticide exposure was inversely associated with prostate cancer (meta OR crude = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.49-0.96, Q-test p value = .331; four studies), whereas no association with exposure to fertilizers was observed. Our findings confirm that farming is a risk factor for prostate cancer, but this increased risk may not be due to exposure to pesticides.

  10. Management of Complications of Prostate Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Michaelson, M. Dror; Cotter, Shane E.; Gargollo, Patricio C.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Dahl, Douglas M.; Smith, Matthew R.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed noncutaneous cancer in men in the United States. Treatment of men with prostate cancer commonly involves surgical, radiation, or hormone therapy. Most men with prostate cancer live for many years after diagnosis and may never suffer morbidity or mortality attributable to prostate cancer. The short-term and long-term adverse consequences of therapy are, therefore, of great importance. Adverse effects of radical prostatectomy include immediate postoperative complications and long-term urinary and sexual complications. External beam or interstitial radiation therapy in men with localized prostate cancer may lead to urinary, gastrointestinal, and sexual complications. Improvements in surgical and radiation techniques have reduced the incidence of many of these complications. Hormone treatment typically consists of androgen deprivation therapy, and consequences of such therapy may include vasomotor flushing, anemia, and bone density loss. Numerous clinical trials have studied the role of bone antiresorptive therapy for prevention of bone density loss and fractures. Other long-term consequences of androgen deprivation therapy may include adverse body composition changes and increased risk of insulin resistance, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Ongoing and planned clinical trials will continue to address strategies to prevent treatment-related side effects and improve quality of life for men with prostate cancer. PMID:18502900

  11. Serum Autoantibodies in Chronic Prostate Inflammation in Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schlick, Bettina; Massoner, Petra; Lueking, Angelika; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Blattner, Mirjam; Schaefer, Georg; Marquart, Klaus; Theek, Carmen; Amersdorfer, Peter; Zielinski, Dirk; Kirchner, Matthias; Trajanoski, Zlatko; Rubin, Mark A.; Müllner, Stefan; Schulz-Knappe, Peter; Klocker, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation is frequently observed on histological analysis of malignant and non-malignant prostate specimens. It is a suspected supporting factor for prostate diseases and their progression and a main cause of false positive PSA tests in cancer screening. We hypothesized that inflammation induces autoantibodies, which may be useful biomarkers. We aimed to identify and validate prostate inflammation associated serum autoantibodies in prostate cancer patients and evaluate the expression of corresponding autoantigens. Methods Radical prostatectomy specimens of prostate cancer patients (N = 70) were classified into high and low inflammation groups according to the amount of tissue infiltrating lymphocytes. The corresponding pre-surgery blood serum samples were scrutinized for autoantibodies using a low-density protein array. Selected autoantigens were identified in prostate tissue and their expression pattern analyzed by immunohistochemistry and qPCR. The identified autoantibody profile was cross-checked in an independent sample set (N = 63) using the Luminex-bead protein array technology. Results Protein array screening identified 165 autoantibodies differentially abundant in the serum of high compared to low inflammation patients. The expression pattern of three corresponding antigens were established in benign and cancer tissue by immunohistochemistry and qPCR: SPAST (Spastin), STX18 (Syntaxin 18) and SPOP (speckle-type POZ protein). Of these, SPAST was significantly increased in prostate tissue with high inflammation. All three autoantigens were differentially expressed in primary and/or castration resistant prostate tumors when analyzed in an inflammation-independent tissue microarray. Cross-validation of the inflammation autoantibody profile on an independent sample set using a Luminex-bead protein array, retrieved 51 of the significantly discriminating autoantibodies. Three autoantibodies were significantly upregulated in both screens, MUT

  12. sEphB4-HSA Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Bladder Cancer, Prostate Cancer, or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-06

    Infiltrating Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage I Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer

  13. Efficacy of targeted AKT inhibition in genetically engineered mouse models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    De Velasco, Marco A; Kura, Yurie; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Nishio, Kazuto; Davies, Barry R; Uemura, Hirotsugu

    2016-03-29

    The PI3K/AKT pathway is frequently altered in advanced human prostate cancer mainly through the loss of functional PTEN, and presents as potential target for personalized therapy. Our aim was to determine the therapeutic potential of the pan-AKT inhibitor, AZD5363, in PTEN-deficient prostate cancer. Here we used a genetically engineered mouse (GEM) model of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer to evaluate the in vivo pharmacodynamic and antitumor activity of AZD5363 in castration-naïve and castration-resistant prostate cancer. An additional GEM model, based on the concomitant inactivation of PTEN and Trp53 (P53), was established as an aggressive model of advanced prostate cancer and was used to further evaluate clinically relevant endpoints after treatment with AZD5363. In vivo pharmacodynamic studies demonstrated that AZD5363 effectively inhibited downstream targets of AKT. AZD5363 monotherapy significantly reduced growth of tumors in castration-naïve and castration-resistant models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer. More importantly, AZD5363 significantly delayed tumor growth and improved overall survival and progression-free survival in PTEN/P53 double knockout mice. Our findings demonstrate that AZD5363 is effective against GEM models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer and provide lines of evidence to support further investigation into the development of treatment strategies targeting AKT for the treatment of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer.

  14. Clinical controversies: proton therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Mouw, Kent W; Trofimov, Alexei; Zietman, Anthony L; Efstathiou, Jason A

    2013-04-01

    Proton therapy has been used in the treatment of prostate cancer for several decades, and interest surrounding its use continues to grow. Proton-based treatment techniques have evolved significantly over this period, and several centers now routinely use technologies such as pencil-beam scanning. However, whether the theoretical dosimetric advantages of the proton beam translate into clinically meaningful improvements for prostate cancer patients is unknown, and outcomes from single-arm experiences using whole courses of proton beam therapy in the treatment of early-stage prostate cancer have shown mixed results when compared with contemporary intensity-modulated radiotherapy. A randomized trial comparing proton beam therapy with intensity-modulated radiotherapy in early-stage disease has been launched and will be important in defining the role for proton therapy in this setting. We review the available evidence and present the current state of proton beam therapy for prostate cancer.

  15. Abiraterone Improves Survival in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A multinational phase III trial found that the drug abiraterone acetate prolonged the median survival of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer by 4 months compared with patients who received a placebo.

  16. Do We Know What Causes Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... account for a small number of prostate cancers. DNA mismatch repair genes (such as MSH2 and MLH1 ): These genes normally help fix mistakes (mismatches) in DNA that are made when a cell is preparing ...

  17. Effects of Presurgical Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this study, men diagnosed with androgen-sensitive prostate cancer with intermediate- or high-risk features will be examined with mpMRI, undergo targeted biopsies, and be treated with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy.

  18. Validation of Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer Prognosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    incontinence and urinary urgency as well as sexual dysfunction. Furthermore, evidence from many sources suggests that most prostate cancers are...mainly surgery and radiation therapy, result in well documented significant morbidities, including significant lower urinary tract symptoms such as

  19. Testosterone therapy and prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pastuszak, Alexander W.; Rodriguez, Katherine M.; Nguyen, Taylor M.

    2016-01-01

    The use of exogenous testosterone to treat hypogonadism in the men with a history of prostate cancer (CaP) remains controversial due to fears of cancer recurrence or progression. Due to the detrimental impact of hypogonadism on patient quality of life, recent work has examined the safety of testosterone therapy (TTh) in men with a history of CaP. In this review, we evaluate the literature with regards to the safety of TTh in men with a history of CaP. TTh results in improvements in quality of life with little evidence of biochemical recurrence or progression in men with a history of CaP, or de novo cancer in unaffected men. An insufficient amount of evidence is currently available to truly demonstrate the safe use of TTh in men with low risk CaP. In men with high-risk cancer, more limited data suggest that TTh may be safe, but these findings remain inconclusive. Despite the historic avoidance of TTh in men with a history of CaP, the existing body of evidence largely supports the safe and effective use of testosterone in these men, although additional study is needed before unequivocal safety can be demonstrated. PMID:28078223

  20. Circadian Genes and Risk for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial to determine if finasteride (an inhibitor of androgen bioactivation) could prevent prostate cancer...and that this risk differed between men who took finasteride versus those who took the placebo. The strongest association was seen for a cluster of 9...SNPs in NPAS2, which was associated with total prostate cancer risk in the finasteride group but not in the placebo group. The most significant NPAS2

  1. Imaging Prostate Cancer (Pca) Phenotype and Evolution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    prostate cancer cells. To further investigate the effects of DFP on prostate cancer cells we carried out extracellular flux analysis experiments. Our...Extracellular flux analysis experiments with the Seahorse system showed a marked decrease in OCR after inhibition of ATP synthase by oligomycin...the means. Figure 5 – Extracellular flux analysis in TRAMP C2 cells incubated with different concentrations of DFP. Left: OCR measurements. Right

  2. Characterization of SPINK1 in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    rearrangement by FISH. A TMPRSS2:ERG rearrangement through intrachromosomal deletion is indicated by loss of one 50 ( green ) ERG signal. (B) Contingency tables...pancreatic juice, its normal function is thought to be the inhibition of serine proteases such as trypsin ( Greene et al., 1976; Haverback et al., 1960; Kazal...lesions to function in prostate cancer, we assayed prostate cancer cell lines by quan- titative PCR for SPINK1 (yellow), ERG (blue), and ETV1 ( green

  3. Targeting TMPRSS2-ERG in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    ABSTRACT About half of all prostate cancers are known to harbor a genetic mutation that fuses a gene known as ERG to the regulatory region of the gene...activity. We applied this technique to screen genetic and chemical libraries to study ERG mediated tumorigenesis and identify novel therapeutic...agents targeting ERG activity. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate cancer, ERG, gene expression, high throughput screening, small molecule microarray, genetic

  4. Enhancing Therapeutic Cellular Prostate Cancer Vaccines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    10-1-0225 TITLE: “Enhancing Therapeutic Cellular Prostate Cancer Vaccines ” PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Christian R. Gomez, Ph.D...SUBTITLE “Enhancing Therapeutic Cellular Prostate Cancer Vaccines ” 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0225 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...cell CaP vaccines by taking into consideration tumor-associated hypoxia as a relevant determinant of tumor antigenicity. Major Findings: Gene

  5. Metallated DNA Aptamers For Prostate Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    including a polydA tail in one aptamer complex and a polydT tail in a second aptamer complex, with dimerization occurring by Watson - Crick base pair...by ANSI Std. Z39.18 W81XWH-10-1-0132 Metallated DNA Aptamers for Prostate Cancer Treatment Dr. William Gmeiner Wake Forest University Winston...efficacious for prostate cancer treatment. Significant progress has been made on refining novel Zn2+-binding DNA motifs that utilize FdU

  6. Proteomics in prostate cancer research.

    PubMed

    Hellström, Magnus; Lexander, Helena; Franzén, Bo; Egevad, Lars

    2007-02-01

    The incidence of early prostate cancer (PCa) among middle-aged men has increased rapidly. For many of these men, curatively intended treatment does more harm than good. Established prognostic factors are tumor stage and grade. As a result of earlier detection a majority of patients now have nonpalpable tumors (T1c) of intermediate grade (Gleason score 6). Prostate specific antigen in serum in such cases is generally at a low level and not a reliable predictor of prognosis. Altogether there is an urgent need for adjunctive prognostic indicators. In the search for relevant tumor markers for improved patient selection an exploration of the proteome (the human proteins) could be fruitful. This paper critically reviews the use of 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) for proteome research. Additional steps such as image analysis and mass spectrometry are described. Techniques based on non-2-DE platforms: surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization (SELDI), isotope coded affinity tags (ICAT) and array-based technologies are also summarized. Although labor-intensive and time-consuming, 2-DE is presently the most powerful method for analysis of cellular protein phenotype and may potentially reveal gene regulations that cannot be detected on a genetic level.

  7. Prognostic value of PSA nadir {<=}4 ng/mL within 4 months of high-dose radiotherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nickers, Philippe . E-mail: philippe.nickers@skynet.be; Albert, Adelin; Waltregny, David; Deneufbourg, Jean-Marie

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate early prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics after high radiation doses of 85 Gy on locally advanced prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 201 patients were prospectively and consecutively treated with external beam radiotherapy and a brachytherapy boost. Of the 201 patients, 104 received concomitant hormonal therapy on the decision of the referring urologist and were excluded, yielding a study population of 97 patients. The first posttreatment PSA analysis was performed not earlier than 1 month after treatment completion but within the first 4 months, and then every 4 months. Analysis of PSA kinetics included the PSA nadir (nPSA) at values of {<=}4 ng/mL to {<=}0.5 ng/mL. The nPSA at {<=}4 ng/mL within 4 months (nPSA {<=}4/4m) was the variable of interest. Results: We established highly significant associations between an nPSA of {<=}1 and {<=}0.5 ng/mL and the nPSA {<=}4/4m (p <0.0001). A hazard ratio of 0.33 (95% Confidence Interval (CI), 0.12-0.91) underlined the lower risk of recurrence related to nPSA {<=}4/4m achievement (p = 0.033). Using time-dependent covariate models for patients who did not reach an nPSA {<=}4/4m, an nPSA of {<=}1 ng/mL remained without prognostic significance (p = 0.06). However, for patients who reached an nPSA {<=}4/4m, an nPSA of {<=}1 ng/mL did significantly improve the prognosis (p <0.001), but much later after treatment. The same analysis was repeated for nPSA {<=}0.5 ng/mL with similar conclusions as when nPSA {<=}4/4m was obtained (p <0.01). Conclusion: The nPSA {<=}4/4m has been demonstrated to be a significant predictor of biochemical no evidence of disease after high radiation doses of 85 Gy. Its major advantage is that it was available earlier than the other nadirs.

  8. Role of Foxm1 in the Pathogenesis of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    LADY transgenic (TG) mouse models of prostate cancer . Ubiquitous over-expression of Foxm1 accelerates development of PCa, as well as significantly...types in Rosa26-Foxm1 mice, the direct role of Foxm1 in prostate epithelial cells, the cells from which prostate cancer arises, remains unknown...prostate cancer by regulating genes critical for proliferation of prostate epithelial cells and (2) that Foxm1 is negatively regulated by p19ARF tumor

  9. TRICHOMONOSIS AND SUBSEQUENT RISK OF PROSTATE CANCER IN THE PROSTATE CANCER PREVENTION TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Alderete, John F.; Till, Cathee; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Hsing, Ann W.; Zenilman, Jonathan M.; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Platz, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    We previously observed a positive association between a history of trichomonosis, a sexually transmitted infection caused by the protozoan, Trichomonas vaginalis, and prostate cancer risk in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. To determine the reproducibility of this finding, we conducted a second, prospective investigation of trichomonosis and prostate cancer in the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial. Participants were men ≥55 years of age with no evidence of prostate cancer at enrollment (n=18,882). Men were screened annually for prostate cancer, and if not diagnosed during the trial, were offered an end-of-study prostate biopsy. Cases were a sample of men diagnosed with prostate cancer on any biopsy after visit 2 or on their end-of-study biopsy (n=616). Controls were men not diagnosed with prostate cancer during the trial or on their end-of-study biopsy (n=616). Controls were frequency-matched to cases by age, treatment arm, and family history of prostate cancer. Serum from visit 2 was tested for anti-T. vaginalis IgG antibodies. No association was observed between T. vaginalis serostatus and prostate cancer. 21.5% of cases and 24.8% of controls had low seropositivity, and 15.2% and 15.0% had high seropositivity. Compared to seronegative men, the odds ratio of prostate cancer for men with low seropositivity was 0.83 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.63–1.09), and that for men with high seropositivity was 0.97 (95% CI: 0.70–1.34). Given the original strong biologic rationale and potential for prevention, additional studies are warranted to help resolve discrepancies between study findings, and further investigate this hypothesis from a variety of different approaches. PMID:19117055

  10. Updates of prostate cancer staging: Prostate-specific membrane antigen

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Alastair; Nair, Rajesh; Geurts, Nicolas; Mitchell, Catherine; Lawrentschuk, Nathan L; Moon, Daniel A; Murphy, Declan G

    2016-01-01

    The ability to accurately stage prostate cancer in both the primary and secondary staging setting can have a major impact on management. Until recently radiological staging has relied on computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear bone scans to evaluate the extent of disease. However, the utility of these imaging technologies has been limited by their sensitivity and specificity especially in detecting early recurrence. Functional imaging using positron-emission tomography with a radiolabeled ligand targeted to prostate-specific membrane antigen has transformed the prostate cancer imaging landscape. Initial results suggest that it is a substantial improvement over conventional imaging in the setting of recurrence following primary therapy by having a superior ability to detect disease and to do so at an earlier stage. Additionally, it appears that the benefits seen in the secondary staging setting may also exist in the primary staging setting. PMID:27995218

  11. 75 FR 54453 - National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8552 of August 31, 2010 National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 2010 By the... the last decade, prostate cancer is still the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men in the United States. This year alone, nearly 218,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer, and more...

  12. Genetics of Prostate Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of prostate cancer, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about screening for prostate cancer and research aimed at prevention of this disease. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing and counseling of individuals who may have hereditary prostate cancer syndrome are also discussed.

  13. Management of Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lepor, Herbert

    2004-01-01

    Critics of screening have stated that early detection of prostate cancer does not necessarily reflect a diminishing death rate from the disease. However, several recent reports have demonstrated that the death rate from prostate cancer is decreasing, representing the most compelling validation for aggressive screening. Prostate cancer can be halted only if there is no evidence of systemic or regional metastases and the disease is confined to the surgical field or the radiation template. Surgeons and radiation oncologists must make a concerted effort to exclude men with regional and systemic metastases who are unlikely to benefit from treatment. With the widespread acceptance of prostate-specific antigen screening, a greater proportion of men are being diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer. Both radical prostatectomy and radiation therapy are able to halt disease spread in this significant subset of men, but survival outcomes indicate that radical prostatectomy is a more reliable treatment than radiation therapy for clinically localized prostate cancer. Overall, the immediate treatment-related morbidity of radical prostatectomy and radiation therapy in the modern era is quite low. Radical prostatectomy and radiation therapy appear to have a similar impact on continence and erectile function. There is a need for neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapies that can be utilized in those cases where radical prostatectomy and radiation are less likely to completely eradicate or destroy the cancer. PMID:16985859

  14. Prostate cancer and diet: food for thought?

    PubMed

    Hori, Satoshi; Butler, Elizabeth; McLoughlin, John

    2011-05-01

    • There is now increasing evidence that diet plays a major role in prostate cancer biology and tumorigenesis. • In a health conscious society, it is becoming increasingly common for Urologists to be asked about the impact of diet on prostate cancer. • In the present review, we explore the current evidence for the role of different dietary components and its' effect on prostate cancer prevention and progression. • A literature search was conducted using PubMed® to identify key studies. • There was some evidence to suggest that green tea, isoflavones, lycopenes, cruciferous vegetables and omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acid intake to be beneficial in the prevention and/or progression of prostate cancer. • There was also evidence to suggest that a high total fat, meat (especially well cooked) and multivitamin intake may be associated with an increased risk of developing prostate cancer. • To date publications have been highly heterogeneous and variable in quality and design. More robust, high quality research trials are needed to help us understand the complex relationship between diet and prostate cancer.

  15. Molecular targets of selenium in prostate cancer prevention (Review).

    PubMed

    Abdulah, Rizky; Kobayashi, Kenji; Yamazaki, Chiho; Koyama, Hiroshi

    2011-08-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths among males. Although use of the micro-nutrient selenium in prostate cancer clinical trials is limited, the outcomes indicate that selenium is a promising treatment. Furthermore, selenium inhibits prostate cancer through multiple mechanisms, and it is beneficial in controlling the development of this disease. This review highlights the latest epidemiological and biomolecular research on selenium in prostate cancer, as well as its prospects for future clinical use.

  16. Hypoxia, notch signalling, and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Marignol, Laure; Rivera-Figueroa, Karla; Lynch, Thomas; Hollywood, Donal

    2013-07-01

    The notch signalling pathway is involved in differentiation, proliferation, angiogenesis, vascular remodelling, and apoptosis. Deregulated expression of notch receptors, ligands, and targets is observed in many solid tumours, including prostate cancer. Hypoxia is a common feature of prostate tumours, leading to increased gene instability, reduced treatment response, and increased tumour aggressiveness. The notch signalling pathway is known to regulate vascular cell fate and is responsive to hypoxia-inducible factors. Evidence to date suggests similar, therapeutically exploitable, behaviour of notch-activated and hypoxic prostate cancer cells.

  17. [An unusual presentation of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Joual, A; Rabii, R; Aboutaeib, R; el Moussaoui, A; Benjelloun, S

    1996-01-01

    The authors report an uncommon case of a 74-year old man with prostatic cancer revealed by pelvic mass. Ultrasound exam and CT-scan showed a bilateral laterorectal mass with high density. Presence of such a mass in an old patient is very suggestive of lymph nodes than retroperitoneal tumor. Serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) is rather helpful in such conditions. Biopsy of the mass allows confirmation of the prostatic cancer diagnosis. Bilateral Surgical pulpectomy is performed in combination with oral hormonal therapy. Follow-up after 6 months showed a good course or ultrasound exam and PSA level.

  18. The politics of prostate cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Kaffenberger, Samuel D; Penson, David F

    2014-05-01

    The controversial recent recommendation by the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) against prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening for early-stage prostate cancer has caused much debate. Whereas USPSTF recommendations against routine screening mammography in younger women resulted in fierce public outcry and eventual alteration in the language of the recommendation, the same public and political response has not been seen with PSA screening for prostate cancer. It is of paramount importance to ensure improved efficiency and transparency of the USPSTF recommendation process, and resolution of concerns with the current USPSTF recommendation against PSA screening for all ages.

  19. Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients With Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer After 76 Gy Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy vs. 70 Gy Conformal Radiotherapy in a Prospective and Longitudinal Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lips, Irene Dehnad, Human; Kruger, Arto Boeken; Moorselaar, Jeroen van; Heide, Uulke van; Battermann, Jan; Vulpen, Marco van

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To compare quality of life (QoL) after 70 Gy conformal radiotherapy with QoL after 76 Gy intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with locally advanced prostate carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Seventy-eight patients with locally advanced prostate cancer were treated with 70 Gy three-field conformal radiotherapy, and 92 patients received 76 Gy IMRT with fiducial markers for position verification. Quality of life was measured by RAND-36, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer core questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30(+3)), and the prostate-specific EORTC QLQ-PR25, before radiotherapy (baseline) and 1 month and 6 months after treatment. Quality of life changes in time (baseline vs. 1 month and baseline vs. 6 months) of {>=}10 points were considered clinically relevant. Results: Differences between the treatment groups for QoL changes over time occurred in several QoL domains. The 76-Gy group revealed no significant deterioration in QoL compared with the 70-Gy group. The IMRT 76-Gy group even demonstrated a significantly better change in QoL from baseline to 1 month in several domains. The conformal 70-Gy group revealed temporary deterioration in pain, role functioning, and urinary symptoms; for the IMRT 76-Gy group a better QoL in terms of change in health existed after 1 month, which persisted after 6 months. For both treatment groups temporary deterioration in physical role restriction occurred after 1 month, and an improvement in emotional role restriction occurred after 6 months. Sexual activity was reduced after treatment for both groups and remained decreased after 6 months. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and accurate position verification seem to provide a possibility to increase the radiation dose for prostate cancer without deterioration in QoL.

  20. New developments in ultrasonography for the detection of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    de la Rosette, J J; Aarnink, R G

    2001-02-01

    The introduction of contrast agents has changed the diagnostic role of ultrasonography dramatically. Advanced ultrasound techniques, although currently largely unexplored, especially for prostate applications, were introduced to improve, for example, differential diagnosis. Also, new technologies became available using the interaction of the angioemboli with the transmitted ultrasound waves, and sensitive methods to detect microbubbles were developed. As the traveling of microbubbles through the vascular system is a dynamic process, new information becomes available: when the concentration of the contrast agent can be determined as a function of time, a measure for the actual blood flow can be obtained that provides quantitative information. Initially developed to enhance the ultrasound examinations in cardiac applications, contrast agents can currently be found in radiologic applications as well. The first reports of enhanced Doppler examinations of prostatic blood flow have been published, and the results indicate that contrast agents are a promising addition to the conventional ultrasound examination. In this paper, we present a short overview of the status of transrectal ultrasound imaging in prostate cancer, background information on contrast agents and imaging modalities, and early results of enhanced Doppler studies of the prostate to identify cancer. The early results suggest the feasibility of using angioemboli to enhance ultrasound imaging of prostate diseases, and although many issues remain to be solved, angioemboli in combination with a dedicated imaging modality have the potential to improve the diagnostic application of ultrasound in evaluating the prostate for disease.

  1. Circulating tumor cells in prostate cancer: beyond enumeration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie-Fu; Lu, Yi-Tsung; Cheng, Shirley; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Figlin, Robert A; Posadas, Edwin M

    2017-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are a population of rare cancer cells that have detached from the primary tumor and/or metastatic lesions and entered the peripheral circulation. Enumeration of CTCs has demonstrated value as a prognostic biomarker, and newer studies have pointed to information beyond enumeration that is of critical importance in prostate cancer. Technologic advances that permit examination of the morphology, function, and molecular content of CTCs have made it possible to measure these factors as part of liquid biopsy. These advances provide a way to study tumor evolution and the development of resistance to therapy. Recent breakthroughs have created new applications for CTCs that will affect the care of patients with prostate cancer.

  2. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Breast Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Male Breast Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  3. New drug development in metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Andrew J; George, Daniel J

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, drug development in castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer (CRPC) remains challenging, due to the number of potentially viable molecular targets and clinical trials available, the lack of established surrogates for overall survival, and competing causes of mortality. This review will highlight the highest impact phase II and phase III trials of novel agents in the current CRPC landscape, and focus on both molecular targets and clinical trial designs that are more likely to demonstrate clinical benefit. The need for tissue correlative studies for target evaluation and drug mechanism is stressed to continue to advance the field and to define biomarkers that may identify patient populations that may derive a greater benefit from these molecular agents.

  4. Prostatic Fatty Acids and Cancer Recurrence Following Radical Prostatectomy for Early-Stage Prostate Cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Results from some observational studies suggest that diet and energy balance influence the clinical course of early-stage prostate cancer. To evaluate possible mechanisms, we prospectively examined the relation between prostatic concentrations of fatty acids at diagnosis and cancer recurr...

  5. Minimally invasive prostate cancer detection test using FISH probes

    PubMed Central

    Tinawi-Aljundi, Rima; Knuth, Shannon T; Gildea, Michael; Khal, Joshua; Hafron, Jason; Kernen, Kenneth; Di Loreto, Robert; Aurich-Costa, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The ability to test for and detect prostate cancer with minimal invasiveness has the potential to reduce unnecessary prostate biopsies. This study was conducted as part of a clinical investigation for the development of an OligoFISH® probe panel for more accurate detection of prostate cancer. Materials and methods One hundred eligible male patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound biopsies were enrolled in the study. After undergoing digital rectal examination with pressure, voided urine was collected in sufficient volume to prepare at least two slides using ThinPrep. Probe panels were tested on the slides, and 500 cells were scored when possible. From the 100 patients recruited, 85 had more than 300 cells scored and were included in the clinical performance calculations. Results Chromosomes Y, 7, 10, 20, 6, 8, 16, and 18 were polysomic in most prostate carcinoma cases. Of these eight chromosomes, chromosomes 7, 16, 18, and 20 were identified as having the highest clinical performance as a fluorescence in situ hybridization test and used to manufacture the fluorescence in situ hybridization probe panels. The OligoFISH® probes performed with 100% analytical specificity. When the OligoFISH® probes were compared with the biopsy results for each individual, the test results highly correlated with positive and negative prostate biopsy pathology findings, supporting their high specificity and accuracy. Probes for chromosomes 7, 16, 18, and 20 showed in the receiver operator characteristics analysis an area under the curve of 0.83, with an accuracy of 81% in predicting the biopsy result. Conclusion This investigation demonstrates the ease of use with high specificity, high predictive value, and accuracy in identifying prostate cancer in voided urine after digital rectal examination with pressure. The test is likely to have positive impact on clinical practice and advance approaches to the detection of prostate cancer. Further evaluation is warranted. PMID

  6. Prostate cancer stem cells: the role of androgen and estrogen receptors

    PubMed Central

    Di Zazzo, Erika; Galasso, Giovanni; Giovannelli, Pia; Di Donato, Marzia; Di Santi, Annalisa; Cernera, Gustavo; Rossi, Valentina; Abbondanza, Ciro; Moncharmont, Bruno; Sinisi, Antonio Agostino; Castoria, Gabriella; Migliaccio, Antimo

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in men, and androgen deprivation therapy still represents the primary treatment for prostate cancer patients. This approach, however, frequently fails and patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer, which is almost untreatable. Cancer cells are characterized by a hierarchical organization, and stem/progenitor cells are endowed with tumor-initiating activity. Accumulating evidence indicates that prostate cancer stem cells lack the androgen receptor and are, indeed, resistant to androgen deprivation therapy. In contrast, these cells express classical (α and/or β) and novel (GPR30) estrogen receptors, which may represent new putative targets in prostate cancer treatment. In the present review, we discuss the still-debated mechanisms, both genomic and non-genomic, by which androgen and estradiol receptors (classical and novel) mediate the hormonal control of prostate cell stemness, transformation, and the continued growth of prostate cancer. Recent preclinical and clinical findings obtained using new androgen receptor antagonists, anti-estrogens, or compounds such as enhancers of androgen receptor degradation and peptides inhibiting non-genomic androgen functions are also presented. These new drugs will likely lead to significant advances in prostate cancer therapy. PMID:26506594

  7. [Immunotherapy: a therapeutic revolution against prostate cancer?].

    PubMed

    Pracht, Marc; Herrera, Fernanda; Tawadros, Thomas; Berthold, Dominik

    2013-05-22

    The interaction between the immune system and cancer was an area of research interest for several decades. The recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of sipuleucel-T and ipilimumab stimulated broader interest in manipulating immunity to fight cancer. In the context of prostate cancer, the immunotherapy strategies under development are therapeutic vaccination strategies, such as sipuleucel-T and PROSTVAC-VF, or immune checkpoint blockade of CTLA-4. Improved understanding of the immune responses generated by the development of predictive biomarkers for patient selection will guide rational combinations of these treatments and provide new treatment options in prostate cancer.

  8. Genetic counseling for prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Nieder, A M; Taneja, S S; Zeegers, M P A; Ostrer, H

    2003-03-01

    Major risk factors for developing prostate cancer, including positive family history and African-American ethnicity, can be quantified for genetic counseling. Factors increasing familial risk for prostate cancer are closer degree of kinship, number of affected relatives, and early age of onset (< 50 years) among the affected relatives. Genetic testing may be useful for modification of risk, but currently should be performed only within the context of a well-designed research study that will determine penetrance and genotype-phenotype correlation of specific mutations. Even in the absence of genetic testing, African-American men and men with a strong family history of prostate cancer may opt to initiate screening by prostate specific antigen (PSA) and digital rectal exam (DRE) screening at age 40.

  9. Chemotherapy of prostate cancer: present and future.

    PubMed

    Trump, Donald; Lau, Yiu-Keung

    2003-06-01

    The role of chemotherapy in prostate cancer continues to evolve. In men with symptomatic androgen-independent prostate cancer, significant reduction in pain and analgesic requirements are achievable with mitoxantrone and glucocorticoid combinations compared with glucocorticoids alone. However, survival rates are not improved. Taxane-based combinations with estramustine phosphate or other new agents show promise. Prostate-specific antigen response rates with these combinations appear to be 1.5 to 2 times more frequent than with mitoxantrone-based combinations. Randomized trials of taxane versus mitoxantrone-based therapies are underway. New agents and applications of current agents in adjuvant settings should be explored if survival in men with prostate cancer is to be improved.

  10. Proteomic Profiling of Androgen-independent Prostate Cancer Cell Lines Reveals a Role for Protein S during the Development of High Grade and Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saraon, Punit; Musrap, Natasha; Cretu, Daniela; Karagiannis, George S.; Batruch, Ihor; Smith, Chris; Drabovich, Andrei P.; Trudel, Dominique; van der Kwast, Theodorus; Morrissey, Colm; Jarvi, Keith A.; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.

    2012-01-01

    Androgen deprivation constitutes the principal therapy for advanced and metastatic prostate cancers. However, this therapeutic intervention usually results in the transition to a more aggressive androgen-independent prostate cancer. The elucidation of molecular alterations during the progression to androgen independence is an integral step toward discovering more effective targeted therapies. With respect to identifying crucial mediators of this transition, we compared the proteomes of androgen-independent (PC3, DU145, PPC1, LNCaP-SF, and 22Rv1) and androgen-dependent (LNCaP and VCaP) and/or normal prostate epithelial (RWPE) cell lines using mass spectrometry. We identified more than 100 proteins that were differentially secreted in the androgen-independent cell lines. Of these, Protein S (PROS1) was elevated in the secretomes of all of the androgen-independent prostate cancer cell lines, with no detectable secretion in normal and androgen-dependent cell lines. Using quantitative PCR, we observed significantly higher (p < 0.05) tissue expression levels of PROS1 in prostate cancer samples, further indicating its importance in prostate cancer progression. Similarly, immunohistochemistry analysis revealed elevation of PROS1 in high grade prostate cancer (Gleason grade ≥8), and further elevation in castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer lesions. We also observed its significant (p < 0.05) elevation in high grade prostate cancer seminal plasma samples. Taken together, these results show that PROS1 is elevated in high grade and castration-resistant prostate cancer and could serve as a potential biomarker of aggressive disease. PMID:22908226

  11. Disruption of Prostate Epithelial Differentiation Pathways and Prostate Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Sander B.; Miranti, Cindy K.

    2013-01-01

    One of the foremost problems in the prostate cancer (PCa) field is the inability to distinguish aggressive from indolent disease, which leads to difficult prognoses and thousands of unnecessary surgeries. This limitation stems from the fact that the mechanisms of tumorigenesis in the prostate are poorly understood. Some genetic alterations are commonly reported in prostate tumors, including upregulation of Myc, fusion of Ets genes to androgen-regulated promoters, and loss of Pten. However, the specific roles of these aberrations in tumor initiation and progression are poorly understood. Likewise, the cell of origin for PCa remains controversial and may be linked to the aggressive potential of the tumor. One important clue is that prostate tumors co-express basal and luminal protein markers that are restricted to their distinct cell types in normal tissue. Prostate epithelium contains layer-specific stem cells as well as rare bipotent cells, which can differentiate into basal or luminal cells. We hypothesize that the primary oncogenic cell of origin is a transient-differentiating bipotent cell. Such a cell must maintain tight temporal and spatial control of differentiation pathways, thus increasing its susceptibility for oncogenic disruption. In support of this hypothesis, many of the pathways known to be involved in prostate differentiation can be linked to genes commonly altered in PCa. In this article, we review what is known about important differentiation pathways (Myc, p38MAPK, Notch, PI3K/Pten) in the prostate and how their misregulation could lead to oncogenesis. Better understanding of normal differentiation will offer new insights into tumor initiation and may help explain the functional significance of common genetic alterations seen in PCa. Additionally, this understanding could lead to new methods for classifying prostate tumors based on their differentiation status and may aid in identifying more aggressive tumors. PMID:24199173

  12. Nigerian foodstuffs with prostate cancer chemopreventive polyphenols

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Dietary polyphenols are antioxidants that can scavenge biological free radicals, and chemoprevent diseases with biological oxidation as their main etiological factor. In this paper, we review our laboratory data vis-ὰ-vis available literature on prostate cancer chemopreventive substances in Nigerian foodstuffs. Dacryodes edulis fruit, Moringa oleifera and Syzygium aromaticum contained prostate active polyphenols like ellagic acid, gallate, methylgallate, catechol, kaempferol quercetin and their derivatives. Also Canarium schweinfurthii Engl oil contained ten phenolic compounds and lignans, namely; catechol, p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, tyrosol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, dihydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, phloretic acid, pinoresinol, secoisolariciresinol. In addition, tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) which contains the powerful antioxidant and anti-prostate cancer agent, lycopene; cabbage (Brassica oleracea) containing indole-3-carbinol; citrus fruits containing pectin; Soursop (Annona muricata) containing annonaceous acetogenins; soya beans (Glycine max) containing isoflavones; chilli pepper (Capsicum annuum) containing capsaicin, and green tea (Camellia sinensis) containing (-) epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), (-) epicatechin, (-) epicatechin-3-gallate and (-) epigallocatechin -3-gallate which are widely reported to posses prostate cancer chemopreventive compounds are also grown in Nigeria and other African countries. Thus, the high incidence of prostate cancer among males of African extraction can be dramatically reduced, and the age of onset drastically increased, if the population at risk consumes the right kinds of foods in the right proportion, beginning early in life, especially as prostate cancer has a latency period of about 50 years. PMID:21992488

  13. Nigerian foodstuffs with prostate cancer chemopreventive polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Atawodi, Sunday Eneojo

    2011-09-23

    Dietary polyphenols are antioxidants that can scavenge biological free radicals, and chemoprevent diseases with biological oxidation as their main etiological factor. In this paper, we review our laboratory data vis-ὰ-vis available literature on prostate cancer chemopreventive substances in Nigerian foodstuffs. Dacryodes edulis fruit, Moringa oleifera and Syzygium aromaticum contained prostate active polyphenols like ellagic acid, gallate, methylgallate, catechol, kaempferol quercetin and their derivatives. Also Canarium schweinfurthii Engl oil contained ten phenolic compounds and lignans, namely; catechol, p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, tyrosol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, dihydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, phloretic acid, pinoresinol, secoisolariciresinol. In addition, tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) which contains the powerful antioxidant and anti-prostate cancer agent, lycopene; cabbage (Brassica oleracea) containing indole-3-carbinol; citrus fruits containing pectin; Soursop (Annona muricata) containing annonaceous acetogenins; soya beans (Glycine max) containing isoflavones; chilli pepper (Capsicum annuum) containing capsaicin, and green tea (Camellia sinensis) containing (-) epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), (-) epicatechin, (-) epicatechin-3-gallate and (-) epigallocatechin -3-gallate which are widely reported to posses prostate cancer chemopreventive compounds are also grown in Nigeria and other African countries. Thus, the high incidence of prostate cancer among males of African extraction can be dramatically reduced, and the age of onset drastically increased, if the population at risk consumes the right kinds of foods in the right proportion, beginning early in life, especially as prostate cancer has a latency period of about 50 years.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) of Prostatic Fluids for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    in part - to it’s strong positive association with age.6,7 Benign prostatic hyperplasia , which is also highly associated with age, contributes to...prostate cancer risk. Moreover, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), which is also strongly associated with age, can raise PSA levels and further muddy...contemporary referral series of men with prostate cancer. 60(4 Suppl 1):47-52, 2002 8. Fitzpatrick JM. The natural history of benign prostatic hyperplasia . BJU

  15. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) of Prostatic Fluids for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    strong positive association with age.6,7 Benign prostatic hyperplasia , which is also highly associated with age, contributes to increased PSA levels and...prostate cancer risk. Moreover, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), which is also strongly associated with age, can raise PSA levels and further muddy...contemporary referral series of men with prostate cancer. 60(4 Suppl 1):47-52, 2002 8. Fitzpatrick JM. The natural history of benign prostatic hyperplasia . BJU

  16. Prostate cancer as a model for tumour immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Charles G.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in basic immunology have led to an improved understanding of the interactions between the immune system and tumours, generating renewed interest in approaches that aim to treat cancer immunologically. As clinical and preclinical studies of tumour immunotherapy illustrate several immunological principles, a review of these data is broadly instructive and is particularly timely now that several agents are beginning to show evidence of efficacy. This is especially relevant in the case of prostate cancer, as recent approval of sipuleucel-T by the US Food and Drug Administration marks the first antigen-specific immunotherapy approved for cancer treatment. Although this Review focuses on immunotherapy for prostate cancer, the principles discussed are applicable to many tumour types, and the approaches discussed are highlighted in that context. PMID:20651745

  17. Radiosensitization in prostate cancer: mechanisms and targets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in American men over the age of 45 years and is the third most common cause of cancer related deaths in American men. In 2012 it is estimated that 241,740 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and 28,170 men will succumb to prostate cancer. Currently, radiation therapy is one of the most common definitive treatment options for localized prostate cancer. However, significant number of patients undergoing radiation therapy will develop locally persistent/recurrent tumours. The varying response rates to radiation may be due to 1) tumor microenvironment, 2) tumor stage/grade, 3) modality used to deliver radiation, and 4) dose of radiation. Higher doses of radiation has not always proved to be effective and have been associated with increased morbidity. Compounds designed to enhance the killing effects of radiation, radiosensitizers, have been extensively investigated over the past decade. The development of radiosensitizing agents could improve survival, improve quality of life and reduce costs, thus benefiting both patients and healthcare systems. Herin, we shall review the role and mechanisms of various agents that can sensitize tumours, specifically prostate cancer. PMID:23351141

  18. Prostate cancer in men of African origin.

    PubMed

    McGinley, Kathleen F; Tay, Kae Jack; Moul, Judd W

    2016-02-01

    Men of African origin are disproportionately affected by prostate cancer: prostate cancer incidence is highest among men of African origin in the USA, prostate cancer mortality is highest among men of African origin in the Caribbean, and tumour stage and grade at diagnosis are highest among men in sub-Saharan Africa. Socioeconomic, educational, cultural, and genetic factors, as well as variations in care delivery and treatment selection, contribute to this cancer disparity. Emerging data on single-nucleotide-polymorphism patterns, epigenetic changes, and variations in fusion-gene products among men of African origin add to the understanding of genetic differences underlying this disease. On the diagnosis of prostate cancer, when all treatment options are available, men of African origin are more likely to choose radiation therapy or to receive no definitive treatment than white men. Among men of African origin undergoing surgery, increased rates of biochemical recurrence have been identified. Understanding differences in the cancer-survivorship experience and quality-of-life outcomes among men of African origin are critical to appropriately counsel patients and improve cultural sensitivity. Efforts to curtail prostate cancer screening will likely affect men of African origin disproportionately and widen the racial disparity of disease.

  19. The Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer consensus statement on immunotherapy for the treatment of prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    McNeel, Douglas G; Bander, Neil H; Beer, Tomasz M; Drake, Charles G; Fong, Lawrence; Harrelson, Stacey; Kantoff, Philip W; Madan, Ravi A; Oh, William K; Peace, David J; Petrylak, Daniel P; Porterfield, Hank; Sartor, Oliver; Shore, Neal D; Slovin, Susan F; Stein, Mark N; Vieweg, Johannes; Gulley, James L

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy and second leading cause of cancer death among men in the United States. In recent years, several new agents, including cancer immunotherapies, have been approved or are currently being investigated in late-stage clinical trials for the management of advanced prostate cancer. Therefore, the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) convened a multidisciplinary panel, including physicians, nurses, and patient advocates, to develop consensus recommendations for the clinical application of immunotherapy for prostate cancer patients. To do so, a systematic literature search was performed to identify high-impact papers from 2006 until 2014 and was further supplemented with literature provided by the panel. Results from the consensus panel voting and discussion as well as the literature review were used to rate supporting evidence and generate recommendations for the use of immunotherapy in prostate cancer patients. Sipuleucel-T, an autologous dendritic cell vaccine, is the first and currently only immunotherapeutic agent approved for the clinical management of metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). The consensus panel utilized this model to discuss immunotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer, issues related to patient selection, monitoring of patients during and post treatment, and sequence/combination with other anti-cancer treatments. Potential immunotherapies emerging from late-stage clinical trials are also discussed. As immunotherapy evolves as a therapeutic option for the treatment of prostate cancer, these recommendations will be updated accordingly.

  20. Prostate Cancer Treatments Have Varying Side Effects, Study Shows

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164200.html Prostate Cancer Treatments Have Varying Side Effects, Study Shows Even ' ... News) -- The long-term side effects of different prostate cancer treatments vary -- and knowing that may help men ...

  1. Anxiety May Lead to Unneeded Prostate Cancer Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_163295.html Anxiety May Lead to Unneeded Prostate Cancer Treatments Researchers suggest that dealing with a patient's ... Jan. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Anxiety may prompt prostate cancer patients to opt for potentially unnecessary treatments, a ...

  2. Georgetown University and Hampton University Prostate Cancer Undergraduate Fellowship Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    TITLE: Georgetown University and Hampton University Prostate Cancer Undergraduate Fellowship Program PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Anatoly...University Prostate Cancer Undergraduate Fellowship Program 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  3. Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    Cancer.gov

    Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium collaborates with three genomic facilities, epidemiologists, population geneticists, and biostatisticians from multiple institutions to study hormone-related gene variants and environmental factors in breast and prostate cancers.

  4. Prostate cancer incidence in men with self-reported prostatitis after 15 years of follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Vaarala, Markku H.; Mehik, Aare; Ohtonen, Pasi; Hellström, Pekka A.

    2016-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding a possible association between prostatitis and prostate cancer. To further evaluate the incidence of prostate cancer following prostatitis, a study of prostate cancer incidence in a cohort of Finnish men was performed. The original survey evaluating self-reported prostatitis was conducted in 1996–1997. A database review was conducted focusing on prostate cancer diagnoses in the cohort. In 2012, there were 13 (5.2%) and 27 (1.8%) prostate cancer cases among men with (n=251) and without (n=1,521) prostatitis symptoms, respectively. There were no significant differences in age, primary therapy distribution, prostate-specific antigen levels, Gleason score, clinical T-class at the time of prostate cancer diagnosis, or time lag between the original survey and prostate cancer diagnosis. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of prostate cancer was 1.16 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.62–1.99] and 0.44 (95% CI, 0.29–0.64) among men with and without prostatitis symptoms, respectively. After 15 years of follow-up subsequent to self-reported prostatitis, no evident increase in incidence of prostate cancer was detected among Finnish men with prostatitis symptoms. The higher percentage of prostate cancer among men with prostatitis symptoms appears to be due to coincidentally low SIR of prostate cancer among men without prostatitis symptoms, and may additionally be due to increased diagnostic examinations. Further research is required to confirm this speculation. PMID:27446410

  5. Prostate cancer incidence in men with self-reported prostatitis after 15 years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Vaarala, Markku H; Mehik, Aare; Ohtonen, Pasi; Hellström, Pekka A

    2016-08-01

    Controversy exists regarding a possible association between prostatitis and prostate cancer. To further evaluate the incidence of prostate cancer following prostatitis, a study of prostate cancer incidence in a cohort of Finnish men was performed. The original survey evaluating self-reported prostatitis was conducted in 1996-1997. A database review was conducted focusing on prostate cancer diagnoses in the cohort. In 2012, there were 13 (5.2%) and 27 (1.8%) prostate cancer cases among men with (n=251) and without (n=1,521) prostatitis symptoms, respectively. There were no significant differences in age, primary therapy distribution, prostate-specific antigen levels, Gleason score, clinical T-class at the time of prostate cancer diagnosis, or time lag between the original survey and prostate cancer diagnosis. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of prostate cancer was 1.16 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.62-1.99] and 0.44 (95% CI, 0.29-0.64) among men with and without prostatitis symptoms, respectively. After 15 years of follow-up subsequent to self-reported prostatitis, no evident increase in incidence of prostate cancer was detected among Finnish men with prostatitis symptoms. The higher percentage of prostate cancer among men with prostatitis symptoms appears to be due to coincidentally low SIR of prostate cancer among men without prostatitis symptoms, and may additionally be due to increased diagnostic examinations. Further research is required to confirm this speculation.

  6. Role of GGAP/PIKE-A in prostate cancer progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    isoform which also contains a COOH-terminal Arf-GAP domain and two ankyrin repeats . Both of these proteins can bind PI3-K via their proline-rich...may contribute to increased activity of GGAP2 in prostate cancer. In summary, GGAP2 may promote prostate cancer growth and progression via...that they may contribute to the functions of GGAP2 in prostate cancer. In summary, GGAP2 may promote prostate cancer growth and progression via

  7. Prostate cancer epigenetics and its clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Normal cells have a level of epigenetic programming that is superimposed on the genetic code to establish and maintain their cell identity and phenotypes. This epigenetic programming can be thought as the architecture, a sort of cityscape, that is built upon the underlying genetic landscape. The epigenetic programming is encoded by a complex set of chemical marks on DNA, on histone proteins in nucleosomes, and by numerous context-specific DNA, RNA, protein interactions that all regulate the structure, organization, and function of the genome in a given cell. It is becoming increasingly evident that abnormalities in both the genetic landscape and epigenetic cityscape can cooperate to drive carcinogenesis and disease progression. Large-scale cancer genome sequencing studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding the enzymatic machinery for shaping the epigenetic cityscape are among the most common mutations observed in human cancers, including prostate cancer. Interestingly, although the constellation of genetic mutations in a given cancer can be quite heterogeneous from person to person, there are numerous epigenetic alterations that appear to be highly recurrent, and nearly universal in a given cancer type, including in prostate cancer. The highly recurrent nature of these alterations can be exploited for development of biomarkers for cancer detection and risk stratification and as targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we explore the basic principles of epigenetic processes in normal cells and prostate cancer cells and discuss the potential clinical implications with regards to prostate cancer biomarker development and therapy.

  8. Prostate cancer epigenetics and its clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Normal cells have a level of epigenetic programming that is superimposed on the genetic code to establish and maintain their cell identity and phenotypes. This epigenetic programming can be thought as the architecture, a sort of cityscape, that is built upon the underlying genetic landscape. The epigenetic programming is encoded by a complex set of chemical marks on DNA, on histone proteins in nucleosomes, and by numerous context-specific DNA, RNA, protein interactions that all regulate the structure, organization, and function of the genome in a given cell. It is becoming increasingly evident that abnormalities in both the genetic landscape and epigenetic cityscape can cooperate to drive carcinogenesis and disease progression. Large-scale cancer genome sequencing studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding the enzymatic machinery for shaping the epigenetic cityscape are among the most common mutations observed in human cancers, including prostate cancer. Interestingly, although the constellation of genetic mutations in a given cancer can be quite heterogeneous from person to person, there are numerous epigenetic alterations that appear to be highly recurrent, and nearly universal in a given cancer type, including in prostate cancer. The highly recurrent nature of these alterations can be exploited for development of biomarkers for cancer detection and risk stratification and as targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we explore the basic principles of epigenetic processes in normal cells and prostate cancer cells and discuss the potential clinical implications with regards to prostate cancer biomarker development and therapy. PMID:27212125

  9. Functional CT imaging of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Elizabeth; Milosevic, Michael F.; Haider, Masoom A.; Yeung, Ivan W. T.

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the distribution of blood flow (F), mean capillary transit time (Tc), capillary permeability (PS) and blood volume (vb) in prostate cancer using contrast-enhanced CT. Nine stage T2-T3 prostate cancer patients were enrolled in the study. Following bolus injection of a contrast agent, a time series of CT images of the prostate was acquired. Functional maps showing the distribution of F, Tc, PS and vb within the prostate were generated using a distributed parameter tracer kinetic model, the adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneity model. The precision of the maps was assessed using covariance matrix analysis. Finally, maps were compared to the findings of standard clinical investigations. Eight of the functional maps demonstrated regions of increased F, PS and vb, the locations of which were consistent with the results of standard clinical investigations. However, model parameters other than F could only be measured precisely within regions of high F. In conclusion functional CT images of cancer-containing prostate glands demonstrate regions of elevated F, PS and vb. However, caution should be used when applying a complex tracer kinetic model to the study of prostate cancer since not all parameters can be measured precisely in all areas.

  10. [The treatment options for localized prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Livne, Pinhas M

    2006-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a very common tumor in men. Today the disease is very often diagnosed early because of an elevated PSA without symptoms and the disease is localized to the prostate. Patients with prostate cancer can be divided into 3 subgroups for the carcinoma: favorable, moderate, and poorly. The grouping depends mainly on the Gleason score of the prostate biopsy. According to the Gleason score, favorable cancer is up to score 6 (3 + 3), moderate score 7, and poor--Gleason score 8-10. The other favorable clinical factors are PSA < 10 ng/ml, and clinical stage by DRE of T1C or T2 (no nodule or palpable nodule not extending beyond the prostatic capsule). The treatment options for cure when the prostate cancer is localized are either radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy (external or brachytherapy or combination). Each of these therapies has side effects and each has advantages and disadvantages. Sometimes the treatment choice is not for cure and the options are hormonal treatment or watchful waiting. Twenty to 30% of the patients treated for cure may fail the treatment and have elevation of PSA without any clinical symptoms, or signs of local recurrence or distant spread. Some of these patients with biochemical failure may be cured by salvage treatment: radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy and salvage radical prostatectomy or cryotherapy following failure of radiotherapy.

  11. How Precisely Can Prostate Cancer Be Managed?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Progress has been made in applying genetic information to disease management in the postgenomic era, and precision medicine is emerging in prostate cancer management. The prostate health index, the 4-kallikrein (4K) score, and the PCA3, TMPRSS2-ERG, and Prostarix tests have potential for refining prostate cancer screening in conjunction with traditional prostate-specific antigen testing. The Confirm MDx and PCA3 tests have shown promise in identifying men who need be rebiopsied after a primary negative biopsy. Oncotype DX, Prolaris, the biopsy-based Decipher prostate cancer test, and ProMark may improve predictive risk stratification in addition to the traditional Gleason score and tumor stage. Decipher and Prolaris may predict biochemical recurrence and metastasis after radical prostatectomy and possibly help identify patients who need adjuvant therapy. Androgen receptor splice variant 7 appears effective in guiding the selection of second hormonal manipulation with abiraterone or enzalutamide versus chemotherapy when treating metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. PMID:27915475

  12. TOPK is highly expressed in circulating tumor cells, enabling metastasis of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Changhong; Hu, Peizhen; Yan, Wei; Wang, Zhe; Duan, Qiuhong; Lu, Fan; Qin, Lipeng; Lu, Tao; Xiao, Juanjuan; Wang, Yingmei; Zhu, Feng; Shao, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are important for metastasis in prostate cancer. T-LAK cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK) is highly expressed in cancer cells. Herein, we established a xenograft animal model, isolated and cultured the CTCs, and found CTCs have significantly greater migratory capacity than parental cells. TOPK is more highly expressed in the CTCs than in parental cells and is also highly expressed in the metastatic nodules caused by CTCs in mice. Knocking down TOPK decreased the migration of CTCs both in vitro and in vivo. TOPK was modulated by the PI3K/PTEN and ERK pathways during the metastasis of prostate cancer. High levels of TOPK in the tumors of patients were correlated with advanced stages of prostate cancer, especially for high-risk patients of Gleason score≥8, PSA>20ng/ml. In summary, TOPK was speculated to be one of a potential marker and therapeutic target in advanced prostate cancer. PMID:25881543

  13. Extremely Early Diagnostic Test for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    James, Veronica Jean

    2011-11-17

    This article reports the results of a blinded fiber diffraction study of skin samples taken from TRAMP mice and age-matched controls to determine whether changes noted in fiber diffraction studies of human skin were present in these TRAMP mice studies. These mice are bred to progress to Gleeson Type 3 to Type 5 prostate cancer. Small strips, 1 mm x 5 mm, cut from the mouse skin samples were loaded into cells in the same way as human samples and slightly stretched to remove the crimp. They remained fully hydrated throughout exposure to the synchrotron beam. The added change that was reported for prostate cancer in 2009 was obtained for all TRAMP mice samples, indicating that this change can be read as High Grade Cancer in human diagnostic tests. These changes were evident for all 3 and 7 week old TRAMP mice samples but not for any of the control samples. This indicates that the changes in the fibre diffraction patterns appear much earlier than in any other available prostate cancer diagnostic test, as none of these can verify the presence of prostate cancer in the TRAMP mice before 10 weeks of age. The fiber diffraction test is therefore the most accurate and earliest test for high grade prostate cancer.

  14. Risk stratification in prostate cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Roobol, Monique J; Carlsson, Sigrid V

    2013-01-01

    Screening for prostate cancer is a controversial topic within the field of urology. The US Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial did not demonstrate any difference in prostate-cancer-related mortality rates between men screened annually rather than on an 'opportunistic' basis. However, in the world's largest trial to date--the European Randomised Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer--screening every 2-4 years was associated with a 21% reduction in prostate-cancer-related mortality rate after 11 years. Citing the uncertain ratio between potential harm and potential benefit, the US Preventive Services Task Force recently recommended against serum PSA screening. Although this ratio has yet to be elucidated, PSA testing--and early tumour detection--is undoubtedly beneficial for some individuals. Instead of adopting a 'one size fits all' approach, physicians are likely to perform personalized risk assessment to minimize the risk of negative consequences, such as anxiety, unnecessary testing and biopsies, overdiagnosis, and overtreatment. The PSA test needs to be combined with other predictive factors or be used in a more thoughtful way to identify men at risk of symptomatic or life-threatening cancer, without overdiagnosing indolent disease. A risk-adapted approach is needed, whereby PSA testing is tailored to individual risk.

  15. Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Prostate Which Was Initially Misdiagnosed as Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Osamu, Soma; Murasawa, Hiromi; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Koie, Takuya; Ohyama, Chikara

    2017-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the prostate is a very rare tumor. We report a case of 65-year-old man with SFT of the prostate which was initially misdiagnosed as prostate cancer. Finally, we performed total prostatectomy and the tumor was histologically diagnosed as SFT of the prostate. The patient's clinical course has progressed favorably with no obvious recurrence 18 months postoperatively.

  16. Exploiting a Molecular Gleason Grade for Prostate Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Exploiting a Molecular Gleason Grade for Prostate Cancer Therapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Peter S. Nelson, MD...Molecular Gleason Grade for Prostate Cancer Therapy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-07-1-0149 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT... levels of cognate serum proteins. #3 Write final report. (Note the original Aim 3 involving animal studies of altering prostate cancer grade

  17. Racial Disparities in Palliative Care for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    0802 TITLE: Racial Disparities in Palliative Care for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Alfred I. Neugut, MD, PhD...Disparities in Palliative Care for Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0802 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S... palliative treatments. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate cancer, palliative care , ureteral obstruction, cord compression 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  18. 76 FR 55551 - National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8706 of September 1, 2011 National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Prostate cancer is the second leading... only by the men living with and fighting prostate cancer, but also by their families, friends,...

  19. NCCU/BBRI-Duke/Urology Partnership In Prostate Cancer Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    endocannabinoid methanandamide- mediated cell proliferation and androgen receptor expression in EA006AA African American prostate cancer cells. 2...therapeutic intervention against prostate cancer Pilot Project #5: Feasibility of Endurance Exercise Training on Cardiovascular Risk Factors...endurance exercise training on exercise capacity following radical prostatectomy among with men with localized prostate cancer . 2. To assess the

  20. Exploiting the Immunological Effects of Standard Treatments in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Exploiting the Immunological Effects of Standard Treatments in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Brad H. Nelson, Ph.D...From - To) 1 MAR 2008 - 28 FEB 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Exploiting the immunological effects of standard treatments in 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...treatment of prostate cancer. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Tumor immunology , immunotherapy, prostate cancer, antibody, T cell, tumor antigen, hormone therapy

  1. Disparities in Prostate Cancer Treatment Modality and Quality of Life

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    producing hormones) 1 0 10 11 B8f. Watchful waiting (no treatment, wait and see if your prostate cancer grows) 1 0 10 11 B8g. Cryotherapy (process...your prostate cancer grows) 7 Cryotherapy (process to freeze and destroy prostate tissue) 8 Chemotherapy (use of anti-cancer drugs) 9 Any other

  2. Radiologic presentation of chronic granulomatous prostatitis mimicking locally advanced prostate adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su-Min; Joshi, Jay; Wolfe, Konrad; Acher, Peter; Liyanage, Sidath H

    2016-06-01

    We present a case of nonspecific granulomatous prostatitis (GP), a clinical mimic of prostate adenocarcinoma. A 54-year-old man presented with lower urinary tract symptoms and raised prostate-specific antigen. Magnetic resonance imaging showed features consistent with prostate cancer, including low T2-signal intensity in the peripheral and transition zones with signs of extracapsular extension. Diffusion-weighted imaging showed high-signal intensity, with low apparent diffusion coefficient values, whereas dynamic contrast enhancement demonstrated a type 3 washout curve, similar to that found in prostate cancer. Transperineal sector-guided prostate biopsy confirmed nonspecific GP, and the patient was treated conservatively. We discuss and compare nonspecific, chronic GP as a radiologic mimic of prostate adenocarcinoma patient.

  3. Mechanisms of VEGF Availability in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    the information obtained from this proposal has now been used to further understand resistance to VEGF 7 therapy in cancer progression. We...prostate cancer biology. Thanks to this training, Dr. Monvoisin is currently faculty at the Institut de Physiologie et Biologie Cellulaires , Université de

  4. Regulation of the Prostate Cancer Tumor Microenvironment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    are interested in understanding the mechanisms for development of TILs and how they modulate prostate cancer. Our hypothesis is that the innate ...growth can be altered through modulating the composition of TILs through innate immunity. Body Pathogens or cancerous cells alike can produce danger... innate immunity, including Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Thirteen mammalian TLRs have been identified to date with ligands ranging from

  5. Radical prostatectomy in high-risk prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ischia, Joseph; Gleave, Martin

    2013-03-01

    One consistent finding in the studies regarding treating men with prostate cancer is that men with high-risk disease have the most to gain from treatment with curative intent. Men with high-risk or locally-advanced prostate cancer require treatment to the primary cancer or risk dying prematurely from their disease. Increasingly, combined androgen deprivation therapy + radiation treatment is seen as the standard treatment as a result of prospective studies in this space, and the perceived increased morbidity of radical prostatectomy in the setting of a "low" cure rate as monotherapy. In the absence of a well-conducted randomized trial, there is no definite evidence that one treatment is superior to the other. The advantages of radical prostatectomy are that it provides excellent local control of the primary tumor without an increase in morbidity, accurately stages the disease to guide further therapy, and removes benign sources of prostate-specific antigen so that failures can be promptly identified and subsequent treatment can be initiated in a timely manner. Although several guidelines recommend radiation treatment over radical prostatectomy as first-line treatment, there is no evidence that surgery is inferior and radical prostatectomy should remain part of any informed discussion regarding treatment options for men with high-risk prostate cancer.

  6. Obesity, age, ethnicity, and clinical features of prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Victor J; Pang, Darren; Tang, Wendell W; Zhang, Xin; Li, Li; You, Zongbing

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 36.5% of the U.S. adults (≥ 20 years old) are obese. Obesity has been associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and several types of cancer. The present study included 1788 prostate cancer patients who were treated with radical prostatectomy at the Ochsner Health System, New Orleans, Louisiana, from January, 2001 to March, 2016. The patient’s medical records were retrospectively reviewed. Body mass index (BMI), age, ethnicity (Caucasians versus African Americans), clinical stage, Gleason score, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels were retrieved. The relative risk of the patients was stratified into low risk and high risk groups. Associative analyses found that BMI was associated with age, clinical stage, Gleason score, but not ethnicity, PSA levels, or the relative risk in this cohort. Age was associated with ethnicity, clinical stage, Gleason score, and PSA levels, as well as the relative risk. Ethnicity was associated with Gleason score and PSA levels as well as the relative risk, but not clinical stage. These findings suggest that obesity is associated with advanced prostate cancer with stage T3 or Gleason score ≥ 7 diseases, and age and ethnicity are important factors that are associated with the clinical features of prostate cancer patients. PMID:28337464

  7. The Cohesive Metastasis Phenotype in Human Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Harryman, William L; Hinton, James P; Rubenstein, Cynthia P; Singh, Parminder; Nagle, Raymond B; Parker, Sarah J; Knudsen, Beatrice S; Cress, Anne E

    2016-12-01

    A critical barrier for the successful prevention and treatment of recurrent prostate cancer is detection and eradication of metastatic and therapy-resistant disease. Despite the fall in diagnoses and mortality, the reported incidence of metastatic disease has increased 72% since 2004. Prostate cancer arises in cohesive groups as intraepithelial neoplasia, migrates through muscle and leaves the gland via perineural invasion for hematogenous dissemination. Current technological advances have shown cohesive-clusters of tumor (also known as microemboli) within the circulation. Circulating tumor cell (CTC) profiles are indicative of disseminated prostate cancer, and disseminated tumor cells (DTC) are found in cohesive-clusters, a phenotypic characteristic of both radiation- and drug-resistant tumors. Recent reports in cell biology and informatics, coupled with mass spectrometry, indicate that the integrin adhesome network provides an explanation for the biophysical ability of cohesive-clusters of tumor cells to invade thorough muscle and nerve microenvironments while maintaining adhesion-dependent therapeutic resistance. Targeting cohesive-clusters takes advantage of the known ability of extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion to promote tumor cell survival and represents an approach that has the potential to avoid the progression to drug- and radiotherapy-resistance. In the following review we will examine the evidence for development and dissemination of cohesive-clusters in metastatic prostate cancer.

  8. Role of Mitochondria in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    prostate epithelial cell line, PNT1A. This is consistent with the enzymatic activity and protein level of mGPDH. However, cytochrome c oxidase (COX...dehydrogenase; Reactive oxygen species; Cytochrome c oxidase ; Antioxidant enzymes; Liver tissues; Glycerophosphate shuttle; Prostate cancer...Although cytochrome c oxidase (COX) itself is not a source of ROS, inhibition of COX may facilitate ROS production from other complexes [11

  9. Beta Catenin in Prostate Cancer Apoptosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    insensitive cell types to determine whether this apoptosis pathway is only specific to androgen sensitive cell types. In order to determine the role of β...obtained: Effect of TRAIL-TZD combination on the apoptosis potential and β-catenin expression of androgen sensitive and androgen insensitive prostate...and 22RV1) and androgen insensitive (DU145 and PC3) prostate cancer cells were treated with either DMSO or a combination of 100ng/ml TRAIL and

  10. Tyrosine Kinase Display of Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    transdifferentiation . The fact that some prostate cancer cell lines, such as LNCaP, can undergo NE differentiation suggests that at least a subset of NE cells is...Katz, C. A. Olsson, and R. Buttyan. 1997. Transdifferentiation of cultured human prostate cells to a neuroendocrine cell phenotype in a hormone...in the above-mentioned cases 3), and some of these cells can be induced to transdifferentiate are tyrosine kinases, which are known initiators of

  11. The Prostate Cancer Biorepository Network (PCBN)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    and RNA ) from prostate cancer patients. These specimens are linked to clinical and outcome data and supported by an informatics infrastructure. In...models, manufactured and provided TMAs, and derived RNA and DNA where required. In addition, we have provided material to conduct biospecimen science...extensive collection of blood (serum, plasma, and buffy coat), prostatectomy tissues (frozen), and derived specimens (DNA and RNA ) from prostate

  12. The Infectious Pathogenesis of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    Press, 2002:385. 11. Sutcliffe S, Giovannucci E, Alderete JF, et al. Plasma antibodies against Trichomonas vaginalis and subsequent risk of...consistently been identified. In this project, we are examining two specific infectious agents with respect to prostate cancer: T vaginalis , the...of the newly identified XMRV virus in prostate carcinogenesis and progression; 2-) To characterize the role of the infectious protozoa T. vaginalis

  13. Androgen receptor profiling predicts prostate cancer outcome

    PubMed Central

    Stelloo, Suzan; Nevedomskaya, Ekaterina; van der Poel, Henk G; de Jong, Jeroen; van Leenders, Geert JLH; Jenster, Guido; Wessels, Lodewyk FA; Bergman, Andries M; Zwart, Wilbert

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most prevalent malignancy in men. Biomarkers for outcome prediction are urgently needed, so that high-risk patients could be monitored more closely postoperatively. To identify prognostic markers and to determine causal players in prostate cancer progression, we assessed changes in chromatin state during tumor development and progression. Based on this, we assessed genomewide androgen receptor/chromatin binding and identified a distinct androgen receptor/chromatin binding profile between primary prostate cancers and tumors with an acquired resistance to therapy. These differential androgen receptor/chromatin interactions dictated expression of a distinct gene signature with strong prognostic potential. Further refinement of the signature provided us with a concise list of nine genes that hallmark prostate cancer outcome in multiple independent validation series. In this report, we identified a novel gene expression signature for prostate cancer outcome through generation of multilevel genomic data on chromatin accessibility and transcriptional regulation and integration with publically available transcriptomic and clinical datastreams. By combining existing technologies, we propose a novel pipeline for biomarker discovery that is easily implementable in other fields of oncology. PMID:26412853

  14. Oncogenic herpesvirus HHV-8 promotes androgen-independent prostate cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Mygatt, Justin G; Singhal, Adit; Sukumar, Gauthaman; Dalgard, Clifton L; Kaleeba, Johnan A R

    2013-09-15

    Mechanisms underlying progression to androgen-independent prostate cancer following radical ablation therapy remain poorly defined. Although intraprostatic infections have been highlighted as potential cofactors, pathogen influences on pathways that support tumor regrowth are not known. To explore this provocative concept, we derived androgen-sensitive and -insensitive prostate epithelial cells persistently infected with human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), an oncogenic herpesvirus that has been detected in normal prostate epithelium, prostate adenocarcinoma, and biologic fluids of patients with prostate cancer, to explore its effects on transition to hormone-refractory disease. Strikingly, we found that HHV-8 infection of androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells conferred the capacity for androgen-independent growth. This effect was associated with altered expression and transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor (AR). However, HHV-8 infection bypassed AR signaling by promoting enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2)-mediated epigenetic silencing of tumor-suppressor genes, including MSMB and DAB2IP that are often inactivated in advanced disease. Furthermore, we found that HHV-8 triggered epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Although HHV-8 has not been linked etiologically to prostate cancer, virologic outcomes revealed by our study provide mechanistic insight into how intraprostatic infections could constitute risk for progression to androgen-independent metastatic disease where EZH2 has been implicated. Taken together, our findings prompt further evaluations of the relationship between HHV-8 infections and risk of advanced prostate cancer.

  15. Calcium and phosphorus intake and prostate cancer risk: a 24-y follow-up study123

    PubMed Central

    Shui, Irene M; Mucci, Lorelei A; Giovannucci, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Background: High calcium intake has been associated with an increased risk of advanced-stage and high-grade prostate cancer. Several studies have found a positive association between phosphorus intake and prostate cancer risk. Objective: We investigated the joint association between calcium and phosphorus and risk of prostate cancer in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, with a focus on lethal and high-grade disease. Design: In total, 47,885 men in the cohort reported diet data in 1986 and every 4 y thereafter. From 1986 to 2010, 5861 cases of prostate cancer were identified, including 789 lethal cancers (fatal or metastatic). We used Cox proportional hazards models to assess the association between calcium and phosphorus intake and prostate cancer, with adjustment for potential confounding. Results: Calcium intakes >2000 mg/d were associated with greater risk of total prostate cancer and lethal and high-grade cancers. These associations were attenuated and no longer statistically significant when phosphorus intake was adjusted for. Phosphorus intake was associated with greater risk of total, lethal, and high-grade cancers, independent of calcium and intakes of red meat, white meat, dairy, and fish. In latency analysis, calcium and phosphorus had independent effects for different time periods between exposure and diagnosis. Calcium intake was associated with an increased risk of advanced-stage and high-grade disease 12–16 y after exposure, whereas high phosphorus was associated with increased risk of advanced-stage and high-grade disease 0–8 y after exposure. Conclusions: Phosphorus is independently associated with risk of lethal and high-grade prostate cancer. Calcium may not have a strong independent effect on prostate cancer risk except with long latency periods. PMID:25527761

  16. miR-143 Interferes with ERK5 Signaling, and Abrogates Prostate Cancer Progression in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Clapé, Cyrielle; Fritz, Vanessa; Henriquet, Corinne; Apparailly, Florence; Fernandez, Pedro Luis; Iborra, François; Avancès, Christophe; Villalba, Martin; Culine, Stéphane; Fajas, Lluis

    2009-01-01

    Background Micro RNAs are small, non-coding, single-stranded RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Since miR-143 was found to be down-regulated in prostate cancer cells, we wanted to analyze its expression in human prostate cancer, and test the ability of miR-43 to arrest prostate cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Results Expression of miR-143 was analyzed in human prostate cancers by quantitative PCR, and by in situ hybridization. miR-143 was introduced in cancer cells in vivo by electroporation. Bioinformatics analysis and luciferase-based assays were used to determine miR-143 targets. We show in this study that miR-143 levels are inversely correlated with advanced stages of prostate cancer. Rescue of miR-143 expression in cancer cells results in the arrest of cell proliferation and the abrogation of tumor growth in mice. Furthermore, we show that the effects of miR-143 are mediated, at least in part by the inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-5 (ERK5) activity. We show here that ERK5 is a miR-143 target in prostate cancer. Conclusions miR-143 is as a new target for prostate cancer treatment. PMID:19855844

  17. Defective DNA repair mechanisms in prostate cancer: impact of olaparib

    PubMed Central

    De Felice, Francesca; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Marampon, Francesco; Musella, Angela; Marchetti, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    The field of prostate oncology has continued to change dramatically. It has truly become a field that is intensely linked to molecular genetic alterations, especially DNA-repair defects. Germline breast cancer 1 gene (BRCA1) and breast cancer 2 gene (BRCA2) mutations are implicated in the highest risk of prostate cancer (PC) predisposition and aggressiveness. Poly adenosine diphosphate ribose polymerase (PARP) proteins play a key role in DNA repair mechanisms and represent a valid target for new therapies. Olaparib is an oral PARP inhibitor that blocks DNA repair pathway and coupled with BRCA mutated-disease results in tumor cell death. In phase II clinical trials, including patients with advanced castration-resistant PC, olaparib seems to be efficacious and well tolerated. Waiting for randomized phase III trials, olaparib should be considered as a promising treatment option for PC. PMID:28280302

  18. Acne and risk of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Giovannucci, Edward; Isaacs, William B; Willett, Walter C; Platz, Elizabeth A

    2007-12-15

    In a recent study, prostatectomy specimens from which Propionibacterium acnes was cultured were more likely to have inflammation than culture-negative specimens or specimens positive for other bacteria, leading the authors to hypothesize that P. acnes-mediated inflammation may contribute to prostate carcinogenesis. To indirectly explore associations between P. acnes and prostate cancer, we investigated severe acne, as measured by tetracycline use for 4 or more years, in relation to incident prostate cancer in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. On the 1992 follow-up questionnaire, participants were asked whether they had ever used "tetracycline for at least 2 months at a time (e.g., for acne or other reason)" and their duration of use. Prostate cancer diagnoses were ascertained on each subsequent biennial questionnaire and confirmed by medical record review. Between 1992 and 2002, 2,147 cases of prostate cancer were reported among 34,629 eligible participants. Men who used tetracycline for 4 or more years had a significantly higher risk of prostate cancer (16 cases, 1,569 person-years) than men who did not use tetracycline (2,071 cases, 304,822 person-years, multivariable-adjusted RR = 1.70, 95% CI: 1.03-2.80). Although intriguing, this finding should be viewed cautiously because of the small number of exposed cases, indirect assessment of severe acne, and complex etiology of acne, which is not limited to P. acnes infection. Therefore, additional biologic and epidemiologic studies are necessary to determine and elucidate the possible role of P. acnes infection in prostate carcinogenesis.

  19. [Pharmaco and diet based prostate cancer prevention].

    PubMed

    Eisinger, François; Cancel-Tassin, Géraldine; Azzouzi, Abdel Rahmene; Gravis, Gwenaelle; Rossi, Dominique; Cussenot, Olivier

    2013-05-01

    In 2010, in France, 8,790 men died from prostate cancer despite a low and decreasing mortality rate. The individual risk/benefit ratio of prostate cancer screening is the focus of controversy and currently not in favor of a systematic screening program. Therefore, only prevention could reduce incidence, side effects of treatment and related mortality. Interestingly, prostate cancer prevention is also a field of controversy mainly about 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors. However, it could be expected that pharmaco- or diet-based prevention will be a huge tool for cancer control, even more for prostate cancer burden. This review comprehensively analyses which molecules or compounds could be used in preventive trials. With regard to pharmaco-prevention, three different kinds of drugs could be identified. First drugs, which aim at mainly or even solely reduce prostate cancer risk such as 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors and selective estrogen receptor modulators. Drugs, which aim at wider preventive impact such as: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or difluoromethylornithine. Lastly, drugs for which reducing prostate cancer incidence is merely a side effect such as statins, metformin or histones desacetylase inhibitors. With regard to diet-based prevention, two main approaches could be identified: aliments and nutriments, on one hand, and vitamin and minerals, on the other. Interestingly if compounds reach experimental plausibility, natural foods or even global diet seem to have a higher impact. Lastly, besides assessment of efficacy, effectiveness required the critical step of compliance, which might actually be the weakest link of the prevention chain.

  20. Androgen deprivation therapy in the treatment of locally advanced, nonmetastatic prostate cancer: practical experience and a review of the clinical trial evidence

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Fouad; Bourgi, Ali; Ayoub, Elias; El Rassy, Elie; van Velthoven, Roland; Peltier, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    Following new scientific insights, initial management for patients with high-risk nonmetastatic prostate cancer has changed considerably and rapidly over the last few years. Several clinical and pathologic variables should be taken into account when deciding the best treatment choice for those patients. These variables are summarized and discussed in detail. High radiation doses to the prostate are essential to achieve good local control in patients with high-risk nonmetastatic disease. Addition of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) to radiation therapy has significantly improved overall survival and cancer-specific survival compared with radiation therapy alone without significantly increasing toxicity. Long-term neo(adjuvant) ADT (2–3 years) to radiation therapy significantly improved cancer-specific survival compared with short-term ADT (4–6 months). Radical prostatectomy with extended pelvic lymph node dissection is considered a reasonable option in experienced hands. ADT alone is an inappropriate treatment option for patients with high-risk nonmetastatic disease. Management decisions for these patients should be discussed by a multidisciplinary team. PMID:28392836