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Sample records for advanced proximal gastric

  1. Current status of proximal gastric vagotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Schirmer, B D

    1989-01-01

    Proximal gastric vagotomy is nearing its twentieth year in clinical use as an operation for peptic ulcer disease. No other acid-reducing operation has undergone as much scrutiny or study. At this time, the evidence of such studies and long-term follow-up strongly supports the use of proximal gastric vagotomy as the treatment of choice for chronic duodenal ulcer in patients who have failed medical therapy. Its application in treating the complications of peptic ulcer disease, which recently have come to represent an increasingly greater percentage of all operations done for peptic ulcer disease, is well-tested. However, initial series suggest that it should probably occupy a prominent role in treating some of these complications, particularly in selected patients, in the future. The operation has the well-documented ability to reduce gastric acid production, not inhibit gastric bicarbonate production, and also minimally inhibit gastric motility. The combination of these physiologic results after proximal gastric vagotomy, along with preservation of the normal antropyloroduodenal mechanism of gastrointestinal control, serve to allow patients with proximal gastric vagotomy the improved benefits of significantly fewer severe gastrointestinal side effects than are seen after other operations for peptic ulcer disease. PMID:2644897

  2. Laparoscopic Proximal Gastrectomy With Gastric Tube Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Norio; Toujigamori, Manabu; Shiroshita, Hidefumi; Etoh, Tsuyoshi; Inomata, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: There is no standardized method of reconstruction in laparoscopic proximal gastrectomy (LPG). We present a novel technique of reconstruction with a long, narrow gastric tube in LPG for early gastric cancer (EGC). Methods: During the laparoscopic procedure, the upper part of the stomach is fully mobilized with perigastric and suprapancreatic lymphadenectomy, and then the abdominal esophagus is transected. After a minilaparotomy is created, the entire stomach is pulled outside. A long, narrow gastric tube (20 cm long, 3 cm wide) is created with a linear stapler. The proximal part of the gastric tube is formed into a cobra head shape for esophagogastric tube anastomosis, which is then performed with a 45-mm linear stapler under laparoscopic view. The end of the esophagus is fixed on the gastric tube to prevent postoperative esophageal reflux. Results: Thirteen patients with early proximal gastric cancer underwent the procedure. The mean operative time was 283 min, and median blood loss was 63 ml. There were no conversions to open surgery, and no intraoperative complications. Conclusion: This new technique of reconstruction after LPG is simple and feasible. The procedure has the potential of becoming a standard reconstruction technique after LPG for proximal EGC. PMID:27547027

  3. DO PROXIMAL AND DISTAL GASTRIC TUMOURS BEHAVE DIFFERENTLY?

    PubMed

    Costa, Laurence Bedin da; Toneto, Marcelo Garcia; Moreira, Luis Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Although the incidence of gastric (adenocarcinoma) cancer has been decreasing over time, it is still one of the most common malignancies worldwide, and proximal tumours tend to have a worse prognosis. To compare surgical outcomes and prognosis between proximal - excluding tumours of the cardia - and distal gastric cancer. Out of 293 cases reviewed - 209 with distal and 69 with proximal gastric cancer - were compared for clinical and pathological features, stage, surgical outcome, mortality and survival. Statistically, there was no significant difference between patients in both groups regarding mortality (p=0.661), adjuvant chemotherapy (p 0.661), and radiation (p=1.000). However, there was significant difference in the degree of lymph node dissection employed (p=0.002) and the number of positive lymph nodes resected (p=0.038) between the two groups. The odds of death at five years for patients who had a D0 dissection was three times greater (odds ratio 2.78; (95%CI 1.33-5.82) than that for patients who had a D2 dissection, while for patients who had a D1 dissection the odds ratio was only 1.41 (95%CI 0.71-2.83) compared to D2-dissected patients. Although no significant differences were found between proximal and distal gastric cancer, the increased risk of death in D0- and D1-dissected patients clearly suggests an important role of radical D2 lymph node dissection in survival. Embora a incidência do câncer gástrico esteja diminuindo nas últimas décadas, ele ainda aparece como uma das neoplasias malignas mais comuns, e tumores proximais tendem a ter pior prognóstico. Comparar os resultados cirúrgicos e o prognóstico entre o câncer gástrico proximal, excluindo os tumores da cárdia e junção esofagogástrica, e o distal. De 293 casos revistos - 209 distais e 69 proximais - foram comparados quanto aos achados clínicos e patológicos, estágio, resultados cirúrgicos, mortalidade e sobrevida. Estatisticamente não houve diferença entre pacientes em ambos

  4. Chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Anna Dorothea; Syn, Nicholas Lx; Moehler, Markus; Grothe, Wilfried; Yong, Wei Peng; Tai, Bee-Choo; Ho, Jingshan; Unverzagt, Susanne

    2017-08-29

    Gastric cancer is the fifth most common cancer worldwide. In "Western" countries, most people are either diagnosed at an advanced stage, or develop a relapse after surgery with curative intent. In people with advanced disease, significant benefits from targeted therapies are currently limited to HER-2 positive disease treated with trastuzumab, in combination with chemotherapy, in first-line. In second-line, ramucirumab, alone or in combination with paclitaxel, demonstrated significant survival benefits. Thus, systemic chemotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment for advanced gastric cancer. Uncertainty remains regarding the choice of the regimen. To assess the efficacy of chemotherapy versus best supportive care (BSC), combination versus single-agent chemotherapy and different chemotherapy combinations in advanced gastric cancer. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE and Embase up to June 2016, reference lists of studies, and contacted pharmaceutical companies and experts to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We considered only RCTs on systemic, intravenous or oral chemotherapy versus BSC, combination versus single-agent chemotherapy and different chemotherapy regimens in advanced gastric cancer. Two review authors independently identified studies and extracted data. A third investigator was consulted in case of disagreements. We contacted study authors to obtain missing information. We included 64 RCTs, of which 60 RCTs (11,698 participants) provided data for the meta-analysis of overall survival. We found chemotherapy extends overall survival (OS) by approximately 6.7 months more than BSC (hazard ratio (HR) 0.3, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.24 to 0.55, 184 participants, three studies, moderate-quality evidence). Combination chemotherapy extends OS slightly (by an additional month) versus single-agent chemotherapy (HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.79 to 0.89, 4447 participants, 23 studies, moderate-quality evidence), which is

  5. Functional association between proximal and distal gastric motility during fasting and duodenal nutrient stimulation in humans.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, N Q; Fraser, R J; Bryant, L K; Holloway, R H

    2007-08-01

    A functional integration exists between proximal and distal gastric motor activity in dogs but has not been demonstrated in humans. To determine the relationship between proximal and distal gastric motor activity in humans. Concurrent proximal (barostat) and distal (antro-pyloro-duodenal (APD) manometry) gastric motility were recorded in 10 healthy volunteers (28 +/- 3 years) during (i) fasting and (ii) two 60-min duodenal infusions of Ensure((R)) (1 and 2 kcal min(-1)) in random order. Proximal and APD motor activity and the association between fundic and propagated antral waves (PAWs) were determined. During fasting, 32% of fundic waves (FWs) were followed by a PAW. In a dose-dependent fashion, duodenal nutrients (i) increased proximal gastric volume, (ii) reduced fundic and antral wave (total and propagated) activity, and (iii) increased pyloric contractions. The proportion of FWs followed by a distal PAW was similar between both infusions and did not differ from fasting. During nutrient infusion, nearly all PAWs were antegrade, propagated over a shorter distance and less likely to traverse the pylorus, compared with fasting. In humans, a functional association exists between proximal and distal gastric motility during fasting and duodenal nutrient stimulation. This may have a role in optimizing intra-gastric meal distribution.

  6. New advances in targeted gastric cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lazăr, Daniela Cornelia; Tăban, Sorina; Cornianu, Marioara; Faur, Alexandra; Goldiş, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Despite a decrease in incidence over past decades, gastric cancer remains a major global health problem. In the more recent period, survival has shown only minor improvement, despite significant advances in diagnostic techniques, surgical and chemotherapeutic approaches, the development of novel therapeutic agents and treatment by multidisciplinary teams. Because multiple genetic mutations, epigenetic alterations, and aberrant molecular signalling pathways are involved in the development of gastric cancers, recent research has attempted to determine the molecular heterogeneity responsible for the processes of carcinogenesis, spread and metastasis. Currently, some novel agents targeting a part of these dysfunctional molecular signalling pathways have already been integrated into the standard treatment of gastric cancer, whereas others remain in phases of investigation within clinical trials. It is essential to identify the unique molecular patterns of tumours and specific biomarkers to develop treatments targeted to the individual tumour behaviour. This review analyses the global impact of gastric cancer, as well as the role of Helicobacter pylori infection and the efficacy of bacterial eradication in preventing gastric cancer development. Furthermore, the paper discusses the currently available targeted treatments and future directions of research using promising novel classes of molecular agents for advanced tumours. PMID:27570417

  7. Proximal gastric motility in critically ill patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nam Q; Fraser, Robert J; Bryant, Laura K; Chapman, Marianne; Holloway, Richard H

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the proximal gastric motor response to duodenal nutrients in critically ill patients with long-standing type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS: Proximal gastric motility was assessed (using a barostat) in 10 critically ill patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (59 ± 3 years) during two 60-min duodenal infusions of Ensure® (1 and 2 kcal/min), in random order, separated by 2 h fasting. Data were compared with 15 non-diabetic critically ill patients (48 ± 5 years) and 10 healthy volunteers (28 ± 3 years). RESULTS: Baseline proximal gastric volumes were similar between the three groups. In diabetic patients, proximal gastric relaxation during 1 kcal/min nutrient infusion was similar to non-diabetic patients and healthy controls. In contrast, relaxation during 2 kcal/min infusion was initially reduced in diabetic patients (p < 0.05) but increased to a level similar to healthy humans, unlike non-diabetic patients where relaxation was impaired throughout the infusion. Duodenal nutrient stimulation reduced the fundic wave frequency in a dose-dependent fashion in both the critically ill diabetic patients and healthy subjects, but not in critically ill patients without diabetes. Fundic wave frequency in diabetic patients and healthy subjects was greater than in non-diabetic patients. CONCLUSION: In patients with diabetes mellitus, proximal gastric motility is less disturbed than non-diabetic patients during critical illness, suggesting that these patients may not be at greater risk of delayed gastric emptying. PMID:17226907

  8. Risk factors of early proximal gastric carcinoma in Chinese diagnosed using WHO criteria.

    PubMed

    Fang, Cheng; Huang, Qin; Lu, Lin; Shi, Jiong; Sun, Qi; Xu, Gui Fang; Gold, Jason; Mashimo, Hiroshi; Zou, Xiao Ping

    2015-06-01

    The incidence of proximal gastric carcinoma (PGC) is rising worldwide for unknown reasons. Herein we compare the risk factors of early PGC with distal gastric carcinoma (DGC) in patients treated at a single tertiary hospital in China. Risk factors of 379 consecutive surgically resected early gastric carcinoma (EGC) diagnosed according to the 2010 World Health Organization criteria were studied by reviewing their medical records and esophagogastroduodenoscopy/biopsy findings and interviewing patients and family members for the patients' history of environmental toxin exposure (ETE), dietary habits, family (FCH) and personal cancer history (PCH) and survival. Differences between PGC (n = 115), DGC (n = 264) and age-matched and gender-matched controls (n = 225) were compared. Proportion of early PGC in all EGC patients was increased significantly (P < 0.05). The independent risk factors for both PGC and DGC identified by multivariate analysis were intake of preserved food and little fruit, and gastric mucosal intestinal metaplasia and atrophy (all P < 0.05). Advanced age (odds ratio [OR] 9.83, P < 0.01), PCH (OR 5.09, P < 0.05), a high body mass index (>24 kg/m(2) ) (OR 2.79, P < 0.01) and ETE (OR 2.31, P < 0.05) were independent risk factors for PGC, but not male gender, tobacco or alcohol abuse, hiatus hernia, gastroesophageal reflux disease or columnar-lined esophagus. In contrast, FCH (OR 2.34, P < 0.01) and Helicobacter pylori infection (OR 2.81, P < 0.001) were independent risk factors for DGC. Independent risk factors for PGC in Chinese patients differ from those of DGC or esophageal adenocarcinoma, supporting the classification of PGC as a separate gastric carcinoma entity in the Chinese populations. © 2015 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Patients with Old Age or Proximal Tumors Benefit from Metabolic Syndrome in Early Stage Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Liu, Jian-xin; Yu, Hong-mei; Liang, Wei-ping; Jin, Ying; Ren, Chao; He, Ming-ming; Chen, Wei-wei; Luo, Hui-yan; Wang, Zhi-qiang; Zhang, Dong-sheng; Wang, Feng-hua; Li, Yu-hong; Xu, Rui-hua

    2014-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome and/or its components have been demonstrated to be risk factors for several cancers. They are also found to influence survival in breast, colon and prostate cancer, but the prognostic value of metabolic syndrome in gastric cancer has not been investigated. Methods Clinical data and pre-treatment information of metabolic syndrome of 587 patients diagnosed with early stage gastric cancer were retrospectively collected. The associations of metabolic syndrome and/or its components with clinical characteristics and overall survival in early stage gastric cancer were analyzed. Results Metabolic syndrome was identified to be associated with a higher tumor cell differentiation (P = 0.036). Metabolic syndrome was also demonstrated to be a significant and independent predictor for better survival in patients aged >50 years old (P = 0.009 in multivariate analysis) or patients with proximal gastric cancer (P = 0.047 in multivariate analysis). No association was found between single metabolic syndrome component and overall survival in early stage gastric cancer. In addition, patients with hypertension might have a trend of better survival through a good control of blood pressure (P = 0.052 in univariate analysis). Conclusions Metabolic syndrome was associated with a better tumor cell differentiation in patients with early stage gastric cancer. Moreover, metabolic syndrome was a significant and independent predictor for better survival in patients with old age or proximal tumors. PMID:24599168

  10. Patients with old age or proximal tumors benefit from metabolic syndrome in early stage gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiao-li; Qiu, Miao-zhen; Lin, Huan-xin; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Jian-xin; Yu, Hong-mei; Liang, Wei-ping; Jin, Ying; Ren, Chao; He, Ming-ming; Chen, Wei-wei; Luo, Hui-yan; Wang, Zhi-qiang; Zhang, Dong-sheng; Wang, Feng-hua; Li, Yu-hong; Xu, Rui-hua

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome and/or its components have been demonstrated to be risk factors for several cancers. They are also found to influence survival in breast, colon and prostate cancer, but the prognostic value of metabolic syndrome in gastric cancer has not been investigated. Clinical data and pre-treatment information of metabolic syndrome of 587 patients diagnosed with early stage gastric cancer were retrospectively collected. The associations of metabolic syndrome and/or its components with clinical characteristics and overall survival in early stage gastric cancer were analyzed. Metabolic syndrome was identified to be associated with a higher tumor cell differentiation (P=0.036). Metabolic syndrome was also demonstrated to be a significant and independent predictor for better survival in patients aged >50 years old (P=0.009 in multivariate analysis) or patients with proximal gastric cancer (P=0.047 in multivariate analysis). No association was found between single metabolic syndrome component and overall survival in early stage gastric cancer. In addition, patients with hypertension might have a trend of better survival through a good control of blood pressure (P=0.052 in univariate analysis). Metabolic syndrome was associated with a better tumor cell differentiation in patients with early stage gastric cancer. Moreover, metabolic syndrome was a significant and independent predictor for better survival in patients with old age or proximal tumors.

  11. Proximal gastric vagotomy with carbon dioxide laser: Experimental studies in animals

    SciTech Connect

    Kadota, T.; Mimura, K.; Kanabe, S.; Ohsaki, Y.; Tamakuma, S. )

    1990-06-01

    Proximal gastric vagotomy has been widely used as a surgical treatment for peptic ulcer disease. However, it is technically complex and time-consuming. Moreover, it may cause circulatory problems in the gastric mucosa. We have reported a new method of blood flow-preserving vagotomy with a carbon dioxide laser (CO2 laser vagotomy) developed in our laboratory. To assess its efficacy, we used cysteamine-induced ulcer and measured gastric mucosal blood flow in rats. The incidence of cysteamine-induced ulcer formation was reduced significantly in the group that underwent CO{sub 2} laser vagotomy compared with a group treated with proximal gastric vagotomy. Gastric mucosal blood flow was significantly better in the CO{sub 2} laser vagotomy group. Long-term follow-up of acid reduction was evaluated in dogs by the pentagastrin-stimulation test. Acid reduction in dogs was satisfactory during the 12 months of this study. CO{sub 2} laser vagotomy is a new, easy, time-saving, and circulatory-preserving technique for peptic ulcer disease.

  12. Advanced endoscopic imaging in gastric neoplasia and preneoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jonathan W J; Lim, Lee Guan; Yeoh, Khay Guan

    2017-01-01

    Conventional white light endoscopy remains the current standard in routine clinical practice for early detection of gastric cancer. However, it may not accurately diagnose preneoplastic gastric lesions. The technological advancements in the field of endoscopic imaging for gastric lesions are fast growing. This article reviews currently available advanced endoscopic imaging modalities, in particular chromoendoscopy, narrow band imaging and confocal laser endomicroscopy, and their corresponding evidence shown to improve diagnosis of preneoplastic gastric lesions. Raman spectrometry and polarimetry are also introduced as promising emerging technologies. PMID:28176895

  13. Radiation therapy for advanced gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukiyama, I.; Akine, Y.; Kajiura, Y.; Ogino, T.; Yamashita, K.; Egawa, S.; Hijikata, J.; Kitagawa, T.

    1988-07-01

    A retrospective study of 75 patients with advanced inoperable gastric cancers, referred to the National Cancer Center Hospital between 1962 and 1982, was performed. According to the Borrmann classification based on X ray findings, Type 1 was found in 3 patients, Type 2 in 5, Type 3 in 40, and Type 4 in 15. Twelve patients could not be classified. The histological type was papillary adenocarcinoma in 7 patients, tubular adenocarcinoma in 23, mucinous carcinoma in 6, poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma in 14, signet ring cell carcinoma in 12 and others in 13. The site of remote metastasis in 19 patients was Virchow's lymph node in 8 patients, Douglas pouch in 3, liver and lung in 2 each and others in 4. All patients were treated by a either telecobalt 60 unit or a linear accelerator using 6 Mv photon and the total dose to primary lesion was 4000 cGy in 5 weeks to 7000 cGy in 8-9 weeks. Complete response (CR) was achieved in 6 patients or 8.0%, partial response (PR) in 46 or 61.3%, and no change (NC) in 23 or 30.7%. The response rate based on the sum of CR and PR was about 70%. The 50% survival period in months was 26.5, 7.3, and 3.2, respectively for patients with CR, PR, and NC. For the response of advanced gastric cancer to chemotherapy in the National Cancer Center Hospital, the combined use of UFT and Mitomycin C gave the highest rate, 46%. As for as local response is concerned, the response rate to radiation was 70%, a better result than that of chemotherapy alone.

  14. Advanced gastric adenocarcinoma: optimizing therapy options.

    PubMed

    Mizrak Kaya, Dilsa; Harada, Kazuto; Shimodaira, Yusuke; Amlashi, Fatemeh G; Lin, Quan; Ajani, Jaffer A

    2017-03-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC) is the fifth most common cancer and third leading cause of cancer related mortality worldwide. When localized, cure is achievable with surgery and adjunctive therapies in some patients, however, once advanced, GAC is not a curable condition. Only two targeted agents (trastuzumab and ramucirumab) have been approved and apatinib was approved only in China. Because of the heterogeneous nature of GAC, it is not possible to assess a standard therapeutic approach. Areas covered: In this review, we aimed to describe the optimal systemic therapy regimens for advanced GAC. A literature search was performed to identify all phase II-III studies about advanced GAC from PubMed, clinicaltrials.gov, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) websites. Expert commentary: A combination of a platinum compound and a fluoropyrimidine is ideal as first line therapy. Trastuzumab should be added if the tumor is HER2 positive. In the second line setting, paclitaxel/ramucirumab is preferred over ramucirumab alone. Recently, two similar molecular classifications for GAC have been proposed. A better understanding of molecular and immune biology of GAC could identify new therapeutic targets.

  15. [Impact of splenectomy and/or distal pancreatectomy in the prognosis of the proximal gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Mori Gonzales, Edmundo; Celis, Juan; Ruiz, Eloy; Payet, Eduardo; Berrospi, Francisco; Chavez, Iván; Young, Frank; Luque, Carlos; Montes, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    Identify prognostic factors associated to total or proximal gastrectomy with or without splenectomy and / or distal pancreatectomy in patient with proximal gastric cancer. Evaluate the frequency of lymph node metastasis to the hilum and splenic artery, postoperative morbidity and mortality and the impact of lymphadenectomy of group 10 and 11 on long term survival. We performed an observational, descriptive, longitudinal and retrospective study analyzing patients with diagnostic of proximal third gastric adenocarcinoma subjected to total or proximal gastrectomy with or without splenectomy or distal pancreatectomy in the service of Abdomen of the Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplásicas between 1990 and 2005. Overall survival for each of the groups was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, prognostic factors were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analysis. We studied 219 patients with proximal third gastric adenocarcinoma (cardias and bottom), of wich, according to inclusion criteria, only qualify 129 (N=129): 22 (17.1%) were treated by gastrectomy alone, 79 (61.2%) gastrectomy associated witch splenectomy and 28 (21.7%) gastrectomy with distal pancreatosplenectomy, constituting three treatment groups. We compared the survival of each group and each factor analyzed, determining the following prognostic factors: lymph node metastasis (N2-N3), degree of differentiation, undifferentiated tumors and Borrmann III and IV tumors. Neither splenectomy or distal pancreatectosplenectomy improved survival compared to the gastrectomy alone. The morbidity and mortality was higher in patients with more aggressive but more aggressive surgery without significant value. The number of nodes removed in patients who had pancreatosplenectomy and /or splenectomy was higher, however, had no impact on survival at 5 years.

  16. Differences in Clinicopathology of Early Gastric Carcinoma between Proximal and Distal Location in 438 Chinese Patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qin; Fang, Cheng; Shi, Jiong; Sun, Qi; Wu, Hongyan; Gold, Jason S; Weber, H Christian; Guan, Wenyan; Zhang, Yifen; Yu, Chenggong; Zou, Xiaoping; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    2015-08-27

    Early gastric carcinoma (EGC) in Chinese patients remains poorly understood and endoscopic therapy has not been well established. Here, we compared endoscopic and clinicopathologic features between early proximal gastric carcinoma (PGC, n = 131) and distal gastric carcinoma (DGC, n = 307) in consecutive 438 EGCs diagnosed with the WHO criteria. By endoscopy, PGCs showed protruding and elevated patterns in 61.9%, while depressed and excavated patterns in 33.6%, which were significantly different from those (32.6% and 64.5%) in DGCs. PGCs were significantly smaller (1.9 cm in average, versus 2.2 cm in DGCs), invaded deeper (22.9% into SM2, versus 13% in DGCs), but had fewer (2.9%, versus 16.7% in DGCs) lymph node metastases. Papillary adenocarcinoma was significantly more frequent (32.1%, versus 12.1% in DGCs), as were mucinous and neuroendocrine carcinomas, carcinoma with lymphoid stroma (6.9%, versus 1.6% in DGCs); but poorly cohesive carcinoma was significantly less frequent (5.3%, versus 35.8% in DGCs). The overall 5-year survival rate was 92.9% in EGCs, and PGC patients showed shorter (42.4 months, versus 48.3 in DGCs) survival. Papillary and micropapillary adenocarcinomas and nodal metastasis were independent risk factors for worse survival in EGCs. EGCs in Chinese were heterogeneous with significant differences in endoscopy and clinicopathology between PGC and DGC.

  17. Advanced gastric cancer: Current treatment landscape and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Digklia, Antonia; Wagner, Anna Dorothea

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer currently ranks fourth in cancer-related mortality worldwide. In the western world, it is most often diagnosed at an advanced stage, after becoming metastatic at distant sites. Patients with advanced disease (locally advanced or metastatic) have a somber prognosis, with a median overall survival of 10-12 mo, and palliative chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment. In recent years, novel approaches using inhibition of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) have demonstrated significant improvements in progression-free and overall survival, compared with chemotherapy alone, in first-line treatment of patients with overexpression of HER2. In addition, both second-line chemotherapy and treatment with the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-inhibitor ramucirumab demonstrated significant benefits in terms of overall survival, compared with best supportive care, in randomized studies. Moreover, ramucirumab in combination with chemotherapy demonstrated further significant benefits in terms of progression-free and overall survival, compared with chemotherapy alone, in second-line treatment for patients with metastatic gastric cancer. A recently published molecular classification of gastric cancer is expected to improve patient stratification and selection for clinical trials and provide a roadmap for future drug development. Nevertheless, despite these developments the prognosis of patients with advanced gastric cancer remains poor. In this review we discuss current standards of care and outline major topics of drug development in gastric cancer. PMID:26937129

  18. Concurrent apatinib and local radiation therapy for advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming; Deng, Weiye; Cao, Xiaoci; Shi, Xiaoming; Zhao, Huanfen; Duan, Zheping; Lv, Bonan; Liu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Apatinib is a novel anti-angiogenic agent targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, which is effective in patients with chemotherapy-refractory gastric cancer. There are no reports of concurrent apatinib with local radiation therapy in elderly patients with advanced gastric cancer. Patient concerns and Diagnoses: we present the first published report of a 70-year-old male patient with advanced gastric cancer who received concurrent apatinib and local radiation therapy after failure of oxaliplatin and S-1 chemotherapy. Interventions and Outcomes: The patient received concurrent apatinib and local radiation therapy and was followed up 7 months after therapy without disease progress, 14 months later indicated extensive metastasis and this patient died of pulmonary infection. Lessons: Elderly patients with advanced gastric cancer may benefit from concurrent apatinib with local radiation therapy when chemotherapy is not tolerated or successful. Further studies are needed to investigate the clinical outcomes and toxicities associated with concurrent apatinib and radiation therapy in gastric cancer. PMID:28248891

  19. Feasibility and Nutritional Benefits of Laparoscopic Proximal Gastrectomy for Early Gastric Cancer in the Upper Stomach.

    PubMed

    Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Komatsu, Shuhei; Okamoto, Kazuma; Konishi, Hirotaka; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Otsuji, Eigo

    2015-12-01

    Laparoscopic proximal gastrectomy (LPG) has recently been applied for early gastric cancer (EGC) in the upper stomach as a minimally invasive and function-preserving surgery. This study aimed to clarify the feasibility and nutritional benefits of LPG over laparoscopic total gastrectomy (LTG). This was a retrospective study of 77 patients with clinical stage I gastric cancer in the upper stomach. Of these patients, 25 underwent LPG, while 52 underwent LTG. Surgical outcomes and postoperative nutritional status such as changes in body weight and blood chemistries were compared between LPG and LTG. Intraoperative blood loss and C-reactive protein levels at 3 and 7 days after surgery were significantly lower in LPG than in LTG (p = 0.018, 0.036, and 0.042, respectively). No significant differences were observed in postoperative early or late complication rates between LPG and LTG. The incidence of Los Angeles Grade B or more severe reflux esophagitis after LPG was 9.1 %, which was similar to that after LTG (9.3 %). Postoperative changes in body weight at 6 months and 1 and 2 years after surgery were consistently less in LPG than in LTG (p = 0.001, 0.022, and 0.001, respectively). Moreover, postoperative levels of hemoglobin and serum albumin and total lymphocyte count were also higher in LPG than in LTG. LPG may be a better choice for EGC in the upper stomach than LTG because it has distinct advantages in terms of surgical invasiveness and postoperative nutritional status.

  20. Evaluation of rational extent lymphadenectomy for local advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Han; Deng, Jingyu

    2016-01-01

    Based upon studies from randomized clinical trials, the extended (D2) lymph node dissection is now recommended as a standard procedure for local advanced gastric cancer worldwide. However, the rational extent lymphadenectomy for local advanced gastric cancer has remained a topic of debate in the past decades. Due to the limitation of low metastatic rate in para-aortic nodes (PAN) in JCOG9501, the clinical benefit of D2+ para-aortic nodal dissection (PAND) for patients with stage T4 and/or stage N3 disease, which is very common in China and other countries except Japan and Korea, cannot be determined. Furthermore, the role of splenectomy for complete resection of No.10 and No.11 nodes has been controversial, and however, the final results from the randomized trial of JCOG0110 have yet to be completed. Gastric cancer with the No.14 and No.13 lymph node metastasis is defined as M1 stage in the current version of the Japanese classification. We propose that D2+No.14v and +No.13 lymphadenectomy may be an option in a potentially curative gastrectomy for tumors with apparent metastasis to the No.6 nodes or infiltrate to duodenum. The examined lymph node and extranodal metastasis are significantly associated with the survival of gastric cancer patients. PMID:27647967

  1. Clinical significance of heterotopic gastric mucosal patch of the proximal esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Vui Heng

    2013-01-01

    Heterotopic gastric mucosa of the proximal esophagus (HGMPE), also referred to as “inlet patch” or “cervical inlet patch”, is a salmon colored patch that is usually located just distal to the upper esophageal sphincter. HGMPE is uncommon with endoscopic studies reporting a prevalence ranging from less than one percent to 18%. Most HGMPE are asymptomatic and are detected incidentally during endoscopy for evaluations of other gastrointestinal complaints. Most consider HGMPE as clinically irrelevant entity. The clinical significance of HGMPE is mainly acid related or neoplastic transformation. The reported prevalence of laryngopharyngeal reflux symptoms varies from less than 20% to as high as 73.1%. However, most of these symptoms are mild. Clinically significant acid related complications such as bleeding, ulcerations, structure and fistulization have been reported. Although rare, dysplastic changes and malignancies in association with HGMPE have also been reported. Associations with Barrett’s esophagus have also been reported but the findings so far have been conflicting. There are still many areas that are unknown or not well understood and these include the natural history of HGMPE, risk factors for complications, role of Helicobacter pylori infection and factors associated with malignant transformations. Follow-up may need to be considered for patients with complications of HGMPE and surveillance if biopsies show intestinal metaplasia or dysplastic changes. Despite the overall low incidence of clinically relevant manifestations reported in the literature, HGMPE is a clinically significant entity but further researches are required to better understand its clinical significance. PMID:23372354

  2. Laparoscopic proximal gastrectomy with jejunal interposition for gastric cancer in the proximal third of the stomach: a retrospective comparison with open surgery.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Takahiro; Gotohda, Naoto; Kato, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Konishi, Masaru; Kinoshita, Taira

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of cancer in the proximal third of the stomach is increasing. Laparoscopic proximal gastrectomy (LPG) seems an attractive option for the treatment of early-stage proximal gastric cancer but has not gained wide acceptance because of technical difficulties, including the prevention of severe reflux. In this study, we describe our technique for LPG with jejunal interposition (LPG-IP) and evaluate its safety and feasibility. In this retrospective analysis, we reviewed the data of patients with proximal gastric cancer who underwent LPG-IP (n = 22) or the same procedure with open surgery (OPG-IP; n = 68) between January 2008 and September 2011. Short-term surgical variables and outcomes were compared between the groups. The reconstruction method was the same in both groups, with creation of a 15 cm, single-loop, jejunal interposition for anastomosis. There were no differences in patient or tumor characteristics between the groups. Operation time was longer in the LGP-IP group (233 vs. 201 min, p = 0.0002) and estimated blood loss was significantly less (20 vs. 242 g, p < 0.0001). The average number of harvested lymph nodes did not differ between the two groups (17 vs. 20). There also were no differences in the incidence of leakage at the esophagojejunostomy anastomosis (9.1 vs. 7.4%) or other postoperative complications (27 vs. 32%). The number of times additional postoperative analgesia was required was significantly less in the LPG-IP group compared with the OPG-IP group (2 vs. 4, p < 0.0001). LPG-IP has equivalent safety and curability compared with OPG-IP. Our results imply that LPG-IP may lead to faster recovery, better cosmesis, and improved quality of life in the short-term compared with OPG-IP. Because of the limitations of retrospective analysis, a further study should be conducted to obtain definitive conclusions.

  3. Targeted therapy in advanced gastric carcinoma: the future is beginning.

    PubMed

    Schinzari, G; Cassano, A; Orlandi, A; Basso, M; Barone, C

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer represents one of the most common cancer worldwide. Unfortunately, the majority of patients present in advanced stage and outcome still remains poor with high mortality rate despite decreasing incidence and new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Although utility of classical chemotherapy agents has been widely explored, advances have been slow and the efficacy of these agents has reached a plateau of median overall survival not higher than 12 months. Therefore, researchers focused their attention on better understanding molecular biology of carcinogenesis and deeper knowledge of the cancer cell phenotype, as well on development of rationally designed drugs that would target specific molecular aberrancies in signal transduction pathways. These targets include cell surface receptors, circulating growth and angiogenic factors and other molecules involved in downstream intracellular signaling pathways, including receptor tyrosine kinases. However, therapeutic advances in gastric cancer are not so encouraging when compared to other solid organ malignancies such as breast and colorectal cancer. This article reviews the role of targeted agents in gastric cancer as single-agent therapy or in combination regimens, including their rational and emerging mechanism of action, current and emerging data. We focused our attention mainly on published phase III studies, therefore cornerstone clinical trials with trastuzumab and bevacizumab have been largely discussed. Phase III studies presented in important international meetings are also reviewed as well phase II published studies and promising new therapies investigated in preclinical or phase I studies. Today, in first-line treatment only trastuzumab has shown significantly increased survival in combination with chemotherapy, whereas ramucirumab as single agent resulted effective in progressing patients, but - despite several disappointing results - these are the proof of principle that targeting the proper

  4. Advances in Laparoscopic and Robotic Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Sheng-Han; Liu, Chien-An; Huang, Kuo-Hung; Lan, Yuan-Tzu; Chen, Ming-Huang; Chao, Yee; Lo, Su-Shun; Li, Anna Fen-Yau; Wu, Chew-Wun; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Yang, Muh-Hwa; Shyr, Yi-Ming; Fang, Wen-Liang

    2017-01-01

    Robot-assisted gastrectomy has been reported to be a safe alternative to both conventional laparoscopy and the open approach for treating early gastric carcinoma. Currently, there are a limited number of published reports on this technique in the literature. We assessed the current status of robotic and laparoscopic surgery in the treatment of gastric cancer and compared the operative outcomes, learning curves, and oncological outcome of the two approaches. Robotic gastrectomy offers benefits that include increased ease of performing D2 lymph node dissection and reduced blood loss compared with laparoscopic gastrectomy. However, the operative time is longer, and robotic gastrectomy is more costly for the patients. Regarding to the operative and oncological outcomes, there appears to be no significant differences between laparoscopic and robotic gastrectomies after the surgeon overcomes the associated learning curves. Sharing the available knowledge regarding laparoscopic and robotic gastrectomies could shorten these learning curves. For elder patients, minimally invasive surgery that decreases the postoperative recovery time should be considered the preferred treatment. Prospective randomized studies are required to compare the surgical and oncological outcomes among laparoscopic, robotic, and open surgeries for both early and advanced gastric cancer.

  5. Localization of thymidine phosphorylase in advanced gastric and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Michiya; Okamoto, Ken; Akimori, Toyokazu; Tochika, Naoshige; Yoshimoto, Tadashi; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Sugimoto, Takeki; Araki, Keijiro

    2004-01-01

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) is known to be more concentrated in human cancer tissues than in adjacent normal tissue based on findings using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunohistochemistry. However, the ultrastructural localization of TP in cancer tissues has not previously been demonstrated. We investigated the localization of TP in gastric cancer and colorectal cancer tissue by ELISA, immunohistochemistry, and immunoelectron microscopy. Between April 1997 and May 2000, we obtained surgically resected specimens from 42, 46, and 36 cases of advanced gastric, colon, and rectal cancer, respectively. ELISA demonstrated that the TP level was higher in cancer tissues than in adjacent normal tissue. Immunohistochemically, cancer cells were positive for the enzyme in some cases. However, in a number of cases immunopositive inflammatory cells were also present in cancerous tissues. At the electron microscope level, TP was diffusely distributed in the cytoplasm of cancer cells and in the mitochondria of the neutrophil in gastric cancer tissue. In rectal cancer tissues, cytoplasmic granules in macrophages in cancer tissues were immunoreactive for the TP. These findings suggest that TP is produced by macrophages and exists in neutrophils and cancer cells.

  6. Incarceration of a large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma arising from the proximal stomach with an organoaxial gastric volvulus through an esophageal hiatal hernia: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Iso, Yukihiro; Tagaya, Nobumi; Nemoto, Takehiko; Kita, Junji; Sawada, Tokihiko; Kubota, Keiichi

    2009-01-01

    An 86-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital to undergo an examination for tarry stools. Laboratory tests showed hypoproteinemia and renal dysfunction. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy demonstrated a type 5 tumor located in the upper body of the stomach. An upper gastrointestinal series and computed tomography revealed an organoaxial gastric volvulus and the dislocation of the proximal stomach through an esophageal hiatal hernia. The preoperative diagnosis was the incarceration of a gastric carcinoma arising from the proximal stomach with an organoaxial gastric volvulus through an esophageal hiatal hernia. A total gastrectomy and hernia repair were performed. A microscopic examination of the surgical specimen revealed a gastric large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (GLCNEC). The patient was discharged 22 days after the surgery. Although the prognosis of GLCNEC is significantly worse than that of a conventional adenocarcinoma, the patient was doing well without recurrence at 15 months after surgery. The details of this case are reported with some bibliographical comments.

  7. Surgical palliation of gastric outlet obstruction in advanced malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Potz, Brittany A; Miner, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) is a common problem associated with advanced malignancies of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Palliative treatment of patients’ symptoms who present with GOO is an important aspect of their care. Surgical palliation of malignancy is defined as a procedure performed with the intention of relieving symptoms caused by an advanced malignancy or improving quality of life. Palliative treatment for GOO includes operative (open and laparoscopic gastrojejunostomy) and non-operative (endoscopic stenting) options. The performance status and medical condition of the patient, the extent of the cancer, the patients prognosis, the availability of a curative procedure, the natural history of symptoms of the disease (primary and secondary), the durability of the procedure, and the quality of life and life expectancy of the patient should always be considered when choosing treatment for any patient with advanced malignancy. Gastrojejunostomy appears to be associated with better long term symptom relief while stenting appears to be associated with lower immediate procedure related morbidity. PMID:27648158

  8. Effectiveness of laparoscopic stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy for patients with gastric outlet obstruction caused by advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Suda, Koichi; Satoh, Seiji; Kawamura, Yuichiro; Inaba, Kazuki; Ishida, Yoshinori; Uyama, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    Distal advanced gastric cancer (AGC) occasionally causes gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). We developed a laparoscopic stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy (LSPGJ) to restore the ability of food intake. This was a retrospective study performed at a single institution. Of consecutive 78 patients with GOO caused by AGC between 2006 and 2012, 43 patients who underwent LSPGJ were enrolled. The procedure was performed in an antiperistaltic Billroth II fashion, and the afferent loop was elevated and fixed along the staple line of the proximal partitioned stomach. Then, patients for whom R0 resection was planned received chemotherapy prior to laparoscopic gastrectomy. The primary end point was food intake at the time of discharge, which was evaluated using the GOO scoring system (GOOSS). Short- and long-term outcomes were assessed as secondary end points. Overall survival was estimated and compared between the groups who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery (NAC group), definitive chemotherapy followed by curative resection (Conversion group), and best supportive care (BSC group). The median operative time was 92 min, blood loss did not exceed 30 g in any patient, and postoperative complications (Clavien-Dindo grade ≥2) were only seen in four patients (9.3 %). The median time to food intake was 3 days, and GOOSS scores were significantly improved in 41 patients (95.3 %). Chemotherapy was administered to 38 patients (88.4 %), of whom 11 later underwent radical resection, and 4 of 11 patients underwent conversion surgery following definitive chemotherapy. Median survival times were significantly superior in the NAC (n = 7; 46.8 months) and Conversion (n = 4; 35.9 months) groups than in the BSC group (n = 26; 12.2 months); however, the difference was not significant between the Conversion and NAC groups. LSPGJ is a feasible and safe minimally invasive induction surgery for patients with GOO from surgical and oncological perspectives.

  9. New Advances in the Study of the Proximal Point Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroşanu, Gheorghe

    2010-09-01

    Consider in a real Hilbert space H the inexact, Halpern-type, proximal point algorithm xn+1 = αnu+(1-αn)Jβnxn+en, n = 0,1,…, (H—PPA) where u, x∈H are given points, Jβn = (I+βna) for a given maximal monotone operator A, and (en) is the error sequence, under new assumptions on αn∈(0,1) and βn∈(0,1). Several strong convergence results for the H—PPA are presented under the general condition that the error sequence converges strongly to zero, thus improving the classical Rockafellar's summability condition on (‖en‖) that has been extensively used so far for different versions of the proximal point algorithm. Our results extend and improve some recent ones. These results can be applied to approximate minimizers of convex functionals. Convergence rate estimates are established for a sequence approximating the minimum value of such a functional.

  10. [A comparative study of laparoscopic-assisted and open distal gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Ye, Min-feng; Tao, Feng; Xu, Guan-gen; Xu, Guo-quan; Jing, Yuan-ming; Lü, Jie-qing; Sun, Ai-jing

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the safety, feasibility and the long-term outcomes of laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy (LAG) for advanced gastric cancer (AGC). The clinical and follow-up data of 46 cases after LAG from June 2008 to December 2009 were analyzed, and compared with 85 cases after conventional open gastrectomy (OG) for advanced gastric cancer at the same period at our hospital. The surgical safety, postoperative recovery, complications, radical degree, survival rate were compared. As compared with OG group, operation time was longer in LATG group ((274 ± 78) min vs. ( 217 ± 41) min, t = 4.635, P = 0.000). Estimated blood loss in the LAG group ((254 ± 112) ml) was significantly less than in the OG group (t = 3.942, P = 0.000). Time to ambulation ((63 ± 16) hours), first flatus ((77 ± 20) hours), resumed liquid diet ((88 ± 15) hours), duration of analgesic medication ((53 ± 20) hours) and postoperative hospital stay ((11.1 ± 4.6) days) were significantly shorter in the LAG group (t = 5.549, 6.508, 9.436, 9.464 and 2.980 respectively, all P < 0.01). The distance of the proximal and distal resection margin were (5.7 ± 1.4) cm and (3.9 ± 1.5) cm in LAG group, (5.8 ± 1.1) cm and (4.7 ± 1.5) cm in OG group respectively, but the difference was not significant. The number of lymph node dissections was also similar, (30.5 ± 10.4) in LAG group and (32.6 ± 12.3) in OG group (t = 0.960, P = 0.339). The incidence of postoperative complications and mortality rate in LAG group (8.7% and 0 respectively) were also lower than in the OG group, with no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). The mean follow-up was 31.0 months (range 6-48 months), and the cumulative survival of the 2 groups was similar (χ(2) = 1.594, P = 0.207). Laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer is not significantly different with open surgery in surgical safety, radical degree, and survival rate. It is less traumatic and of fewer complications.

  11. Improvements in diagnosis have changed the incidence of histological types in advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Y.; Mori, M.; Kamakura, T.; Haraguchi, Y.; Saku, M.; Sugimachi, K.

    1995-01-01

    The data on 912 patients with early cancer and 1245 with advanced cancer who were seen between 1971 and 1990 were compared. The incidence of undifferentiated-type cancer increased significantly in patients with advanced gastric cancer, but not in patients with early gastric cancer. When the histological types were compared with regard to sex, age and location in patients with early gastric cancer the undifferentiated type was found to increase only in males, while in patients with advanced gastric cancer the undifferentiated type increased in both sexes as well as in younger patients and in both the upper and middle third of the stomach. These differences in the trends between early and advanced cancers are probably due to the different degrees of diagnostic accuracy for the early detection of histological types. PMID:7640228

  12. Estimation of 1D proximity budget impacts due to light source for advanced node design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, R. C.; Wu, Tony; Liu, H. H.

    2014-03-01

    The laser impacts on the proximity error are well known in many previous studies and papers. The proximity budget control is more and more important for advanced node design. The goal of this paper is to describe the laser spectral bandwidth and wavelength stability contributions to the proximity budget by considering general line/space and trench pattern design. We performed experiments and modeled the photolithography response using Panoramic Technology HyperLith simulation over a range of laser bandwidth and wavelength stability conditions to quantify the long term and short term stability contributions on wafer-to-wafer and field-to-field proximity variation. Finally, we determine the requirements for current system performance to meet patterning requirements and minimize the laser contribution on proximity error and within 4% of target CD Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) budget process requirement [2]. This paper also discusses how the wafer lithography drivers are enabled by ArFi light source technologies.

  13. MLN0264 in Previously Treated Asian Participants With Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma or Metastatic or Recurrent Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma Expressing Guanylyl Cyclase C

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-08

    Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma; Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoma

  14. The economic burden of advanced gastric cancer in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jihyung; Tsai, Yiling; Novick, Diego; Hsiao, Frank Chi-Huang; Cheng, Rebecca; Chen, Jen-Shi

    2017-09-16

    Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths in both sexes worldwide, especially in Eastern Asia. This study aimed to estimate the economic burden of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) in Taiwan. The costs of AGC in 2013 were estimated using resource use data from a chart review study (n = 122 with AGC) and national statistics. Annual per-patient costs, where patients' follow-up periods were adjusted for, were estimated with 82 patients who had complete resource use data. The costs were composed of direct medical costs, direct non-medical costs (healthcare travel and caregiver costs), morbidity costs, and mortality costs. Relevant unit costs were retrieved mainly from literature and national statistics, and applied to the resource use data. A broad definition of morbidity and mortality costs was employed to value the productivity loss in patients with unpaid employment, economically inactive and unemployed as well as the life years after the age of retirement. Their narrow definitions were also used in sensitivity analyses, using age- and/or sex-specific employment rates. Forgone future earnings/productivity loss were discounted at 3%. Annual per-patient costs were projected to estimate the total costs of AGC at the national level with an estimated number of patients with AGC (N = 2611) in Taiwan in 2013. The mean age of the 82 patients was 59.3 (SD: 11.9) years, and 67.1% were male. Per-patient costs were US$26,431 for direct medical costs, US$4669 for direct non-medical costs, US$5758 for morbidity costs, and US$145,990 for mortality costs (per death). These per-patient costs were projected to incur total AGC costs of US$423 million at the national-level. Mortality costs accounted for 77.3% of the total costs, followed by direct medical costs (16.3%), morbidity costs (3.6%), and direct non-medical costs (2.9%). AGC was found to exert a significant economic burden in Taiwan, incurring US$423 million in 2013. This represents about 0.08% of

  15. Advanced endoscopic imaging for gastric cancer assessment: new insights with new optics?

    PubMed

    Serrano, M; Kikuste, I; Dinis-Ribeiro, M

    2014-12-01

    The most immediate strategy for improving survival of gastric cancer patients is secondary prevention through diagnosis of early gastric cancer either through screening or follow-up of individuals at high risk. Endoscopy examination is therefore of paramount importance and two general steps are to be known in assessing gastric mucosa - detection and characterization. Over the past decade, the advent of advanced endoscopic imaging technology led to diverse descriptions of these modalities reporting them to be useful in this setting. In this review, we aim at summarizing the current evidence on the use of advance imaging in individuals at high-risk (i.e., advance stages of gastric atrophy/intestinal metaplasia) and in those harbouring neoplastic lesions, and address its potential usefulness providing the readers a framework to use in daily practice. Further research is also suggested.

  16. The proximal gastric corpus is the most responsive site of motilin-induced contractions in the stomach of the Asian house shrew.

    PubMed

    Dudani, Amrita; Aizawa, Sayaka; Zhi, Gong; Tanaka, Toru; Jogahara, Takamichi; Sakata, Ichiro; Sakai, Takafumi

    2016-07-01

    The migrating motor complex (MMC) is responsible for emptying the stomach during the interdigestive period, in preparation for the next meal. It is known that gastric phase III of MMC starts from the proximal stomach and propagates the contraction downwards. We hypothesized that a certain region of the stomach must be more responsive to motilin than others, and that motilin-induced strong gastric contractions propagate from that site. Stomachs of the Suncus or Asian house shrew, a small insectivorous mammal, were dissected and the fundus, proximal corpus, distal corpus, and antrum were examined to study the effect of motilin using an organ bath experiment. Motilin-induced contractions differed in different parts of the stomach. Only the proximal corpus induced gastric contraction even at motilin 10(-10) M, and strong contraction was induced by motilin 10(-9) M in all parts of the stomach. The GPR38 mRNA expression was also higher in the proximal corpus than in the other sections, and the lowest expression was observed in the antrum. GPR38 mRNA expression varied with low expression in the mucosal layer and high expression in the muscle layer. Additionally, motilin-induced contractions in each dissected part of the stomach were inhibited by tetrodotoxin and atropine pretreatment. These results suggest that motilin reactivity is not consistent throughout the stomach, and an area of the proximal corpus including the cardia is the most sensitive to motilin.

  17. Recent advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Changwon; Lee, Yejin; Lee, J Eugene

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed remarkable technological advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics. The development of proteomics techniques has enabled the reliable analysis of complex proteomes, leading to the identification and quantification of thousands of proteins in gastric cancer cells, tissues, and sera. This quantitative information has been used to profile the anomalies in gastric cancer and provide insights into the pathogenic mechanism of the disease. In this review, we mainly focus on the advances in mass spectrometry and quantitative proteomics that were achieved in the last five years and how these up-and-coming technologies are employed to track biochemical changes in gastric cancer cells. We conclude by presenting a perspective on quantitative proteomics and its future applications in the clinic and translational gastric cancer research. PMID:27729735

  18. Role of gastric bypass in patients with unresectable advanced carcinoma of stomach.

    PubMed

    Maturu, Nagarjuna V; Pai, Dinker R; Prasad, Vishnu N R

    2008-12-01

    Role of bypass as a palliative surgery for advanced gastric cancer remains controversial. To determine the role of bypass in advanced gastric cancer in comparision to resection as gold standard. Hospital-based retrospective outcome as study. Patients were divided into three groups: group I (gastric resection), group II (bypass) and group III (exploratory laparotomy alone). The three groups were analysed for palliation of symptoms, operative morbidity and mortality and survival. Chi-square, Fischer, One-way Anova, Unpaired-t, Kaplan-Meier analysis. In-hospital morbidity was 19.38% (19 patients) for the entire study group. Bypass group had a lower morbidity rate as compared to the resection group (p=0.029). In-hospital mortality rate was 6.12% (6 patients) for the entire study group. Mortality rates did not differ between the groups. Patient satisfaction with palliation of symptoms was similar between gastric bypass and resection. Gastric resection group had significantly better survival (p=0.002) compared to the nonresective procedures. However, gastric bypass did not confer any survival benefit over exploratory laparotomy (p=0.501). Gastric bypass can be done when resection is not possible as it palliates symptoms on par with resection and is associated with low operative morbidity though it does not improve the survival outlook of patients.

  19. Advances in Understanding How Heavy Metal Pollution Triggers Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wenzhen; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    With the development of industrialization and urbanization, heavy metals contamination has become a major environmental problem. Numerous investigations have revealed an association between heavy metal exposure and the incidence and mortality of gastric cancer. The mechanisms of heavy metals (lead, cadmium, mercury, chromium, and arsenic) contamination leading to gastric cancer are concluded in this review. There are four main potential mechanisms: (1) Heavy metals disrupt the gastric mucosal barrier by decreasing mucosal thickness, mucus content, and basal acid output, thereby affecting the function of E-cadherin and inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) damage. (2) Heavy metals directly or indirectly induce ROS generation and cause gastric mucosal and DNA lesions, which subsequently alter gene regulation, signal transduction, and cell growth, ultimately leading to carcinogenesis. Exposure to heavy metals also enhances gastric cancer cell invasion and metastasis. (3) Heavy metals inhibit DNA damage repair or cause inefficient lesion repair. (4) Heavy metals may induce other gene abnormalities. In addition, heavy metals can induce the expression of proinflammatory chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) and microRNAs, which promotes tumorigenesis. The present review is an effort to underline the human health problem caused by heavy metal with recent development in order to garner a broader perspective. PMID:27803929

  20. Towards personalized perioperative treatment for advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Ru-Lin; Wu, Ai-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers worldwide. Although the rate of gastric cancer has declined dramatically over the past decades in most developed Western countries, it has not declined in East Asia. Currently, a radical gastrectomy is still the only curative treatment for gastric cancer. Over the last twenty years, however, surgery alone has been replaced by a multimodal perioperative approach. To achieve the maximum benefit from the perioperative treatment, a thorough evaluation of the tumor must first be performed. A complete assessment of gastric cancer is divided into two parts: staging and histology. According to the stage and histology of the cancer, perioperative chemotherapy or radiochemotherapy can be implemented, and perioperative targeted therapies such as trastuzumab may also play a role in this field. However, perioperative treatment approaches have not been widely accepted until a series of clinical trials were performed to evaluate the value of perioperative treatment. Although multimodal perioperative treatment has been widely applied in clinical practice, personalization of perioperative treatment represents the next stage in the treatment of gastric cancer. Genomic-guided treatment and efficacy prediction using molecular biomarkers in perioperative treatment are of great importance in the evolution of treatment and may become an ideal treatment method. PMID:25206266

  1. Advances in Understanding How Heavy Metal Pollution Triggers Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wenzhen; Yang, Ning; Li, Xiangkai

    2016-01-01

    With the development of industrialization and urbanization, heavy metals contamination has become a major environmental problem. Numerous investigations have revealed an association between heavy metal exposure and the incidence and mortality of gastric cancer. The mechanisms of heavy metals (lead, cadmium, mercury, chromium, and arsenic) contamination leading to gastric cancer are concluded in this review. There are four main potential mechanisms: (1) Heavy metals disrupt the gastric mucosal barrier by decreasing mucosal thickness, mucus content, and basal acid output, thereby affecting the function of E-cadherin and inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) damage. (2) Heavy metals directly or indirectly induce ROS generation and cause gastric mucosal and DNA lesions, which subsequently alter gene regulation, signal transduction, and cell growth, ultimately leading to carcinogenesis. Exposure to heavy metals also enhances gastric cancer cell invasion and metastasis. (3) Heavy metals inhibit DNA damage repair or cause inefficient lesion repair. (4) Heavy metals may induce other gene abnormalities. In addition, heavy metals can induce the expression of proinflammatory chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) and microRNAs, which promotes tumorigenesis. The present review is an effort to underline the human health problem caused by heavy metal with recent development in order to garner a broader perspective.

  2. Advanced Gastric Cancer Perforation Mimicking Abdominal Wall Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jinbeom; Park, Ilyoung; Lee, Dosang; Sung, Kiyoung; Baek, Jongmin

    2015-01-01

    Surgeons occasionally encounter a patient with a gastric cancer invading an adjacent organ, such as the pancreas, liver, or transverse colon. Although there is no established guideline for treatment of invasive gastric cancer, combined resection with radical gastrectomy is conventionally performed for curative purposes. We recently treated a patient with a large gastric cancer invading the abdominal wall, which was initially diagnosed as a simple abdominal wall abscess. Computed tomography showed that an abscess had formed adjacent to the greater curvature of the stomach. During surgery, we made an incision on the abdominal wall to drain the abscess, and performed curative total gastrectomy with partial excision of the involved abdominal wall. The patient received intensive treatment and wound management postoperatively with no surgery-related adverse events. However, the patient could not receive adjuvant chemotherapy and expired on the 82nd postoperative day. PMID:26468420

  3. [Morbidity and mortality related to gastroenteroanastomosis in advanced gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Berrospi, F; Ruiz, E; Morante, C; Celis, J; Montalbelti, J A

    1995-01-01

    Determination of the postoperative morbidity and mortality after gastroenterostomy in patients with unresectable gastric cancer. Retrospective review of clinical records of all patients with obstructive distal gastric cancer who underwent gastroenterostomy at the Instituto de Enfermedades Neoplásicas between 1980 and 1993. The following factors were analyzed: age, sex, hemoglobin, albumin, preoperative risk, ascites, extent of disease, operative time, hospital stay, morbidity and mortality. 198 gastroenterostomy were done with a morbidity and mortality rates of 20% and 10%, respectively. Pneumonia was the principal cause of postoperative morbidity and mortality. High operative risk, adjacent organ invasion by the tumor and peritoneal metastasis were factors associated with increased postoperative morbidity (p > 0.05). High operative risk was the only prognostic factor for postoperative mortality (p < 0.01). Because of high postoperative morbidity and mortality, gastroenterostomy should not be done in patients with unresectable gastric cancer and high preoperative risk.

  4. Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of gastric neuroendocrine neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Tan, Huangying

    2016-01-01

    Gastric neuroendocrine neoplasms (g-NENs) are a group of heterogeneous tumors arising from the endocrine cells of stomach. Most g-NENs progresses slowly and have a long disease course; however, some other g-NENs grow rapidly, similar to the progression of gastric adenocarcinoma. g-NENs have complex and diverse clinical manifestations and their prognosis and treatment strategies depend highly on clinical subtype, pathological grade, tumour stage, and other factors. Due to their low prevalence, most clinicians have limited knowledge about g-NENs. Missed diagnosis and excessive/inadequate treatment is common in clinical settings. Thus, the diagnosis and treatment of g-NENs needs to be further standardized.

  5. Trastuzumab: a review of its use in HER2-positive advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Mark

    2013-09-01

    Trastuzumab (Herceptin(®)) is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds selectively to human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2), interfering with its downstream cancer-promoting effects. This article focuses on the efficacy and tolerability of trastuzumab in HER2-positive advanced gastric cancer. The potential of trastuzumab as a cytotoxic for use in gastric cancer was confirmed by in vitro studies in HER2-positive gastric cancer cell lines and gastric cancer xenograft models. In a randomized, controlled, open-label, multinational trial in patients with HER2-positive advanced gastric cancer, trastuzumab plus chemotherapy (cisplatin plus capecitabine or 5-fluorouracil) was significantly more efficacious than chemotherapy alone, in terms of a longer median overall survival (13.8 vs. 11.1 months in the chemotherapy alone group) [primary endpoint], a longer median progression-free survival, and a higher response rate. Trastuzumab was efficacious across patient subgroups, although stronger effects were observed in a subgroup with high HER2 overexpression (immunohistochemistry 2+/fluorescence in-situ hybridization positive or immunohistochemistry 3+). There was a slightly higher tolerability burden in the trastuzumab plus chemotherapy group than with chemotherapy alone, based on small between-group numerical differences in rates of common gastrointestinal and general adverse events. Most individual adverse events reported in this trial were at a grade 1 or 2 level of severity. However, in both treatment groups approximately half of the haematological adverse were at a grade 3 or 4 level of severity, with no marked between-group differences. Trastuzumab in combination with cisplatin and a fluoropyrimidine is an effective regimen for patients with HER2-positive advanced gastric cancer, has acceptable tolerability and represents an important advance in the treatment of gastric cancer.

  6. [Ectopic pancreas mimicking advanced gastric malignancy--case report].

    PubMed

    Zawada, Iwona; Lewosiuk, Agnieszka; Hnatyszyn, Krzysztof; Patalan, Michał; Woyke, Stanisław; Kostyrka, Roman; Marlicz, Krzysztof; Starzyńska, Teresa

    2012-04-01

    Ectopic pancreas is the most common type of ectopic tissue in gastrointestinal tract. It is typically asymptomatic, presenting as a small submucosal lesion in prepyloric region of stomach. The diagnosis is usually incidental, during gastroscopy. The patient with symptomatic heterotropic pancreas, mimicking gastric malignancy was described.

  7. Effects of proximal gastric vagotomy (PGV) followed by total vagotomy (TV) on postprandial and fasting myoelectrical activity of the canine stomach and duodenum.

    PubMed Central

    Aeberhard, P; Bedi, B S

    1977-01-01

    Experiments were designed to study the effect of proximal gastric vagotomy (PGV) followed by total vagotomy (TV) on the myoelectrical activity of the canine stomach and duodenum after a meat meal and during fasting. Dogs were prepared with chronically implanted Ag-AgCl-electrodes on the stomach and duodenum. Recordings of electrical activity were made for one hour after the ingestion of a meat meal and records of four to six hours were taken on the fasting animals. In the postprandial records no effect on co-ordination of antral and duodenal myoelectrical activity was found after either PGV or TV. These results suggest that the co-ordinating mechanism is not dependent on vagal innervation. Impairment of gastric emptying after TV does not appear to be due to disturbance of antral-duodenal conduction. Normal patterns of fasting activity were found in control and after PGV. They were grossly disturbed after TV, probably because of delayed gastric emptying. These findings suggest that PGV does not delay gastric emptying as does TV, and that the proximal vagal supply to the stomach is unimportant in the control of fasting activity. PMID:873332

  8. Endoscopic therapy for early gastric cancer: Standard techniques and recent advances in ESD

    PubMed Central

    Kume, Keiichiro

    2014-01-01

    The technique of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is now a well-known endoscopic therapy for early gastric cancer. ESD was introduced to resect large specimens of early gastric cancer in a single piece. ESD can provide precision of histologic diagnosis and can also reduce the recurrence rate. However, the drawback of ESD is its technical difficulty, and, consequently, it is associated with a high rate of complications, the need for advanced endoscopic techniques, and a lengthy procedure time. Various advances in the devices and techniques used for ESD have contributed to overcoming these drawbacks. PMID:24914364

  9. Polymorphisms of interleukin-10 promoter are not associated with prognosis of advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Song, Bao; Wang, Jia-Lin; Li, Zeng-Jun; Li, Wan-Hu; Wang, Zhe-Hai

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the association between of the interleukin-10 (IL-10) promoter polymorphisms and survival of advanced gastric cancer (GC) patients. METHODS: The IL-10 (-1082, rs1800896; -819, rs1800871; and-592, rs1800896) genotypes in 234 patients with advanced gastric cancer and in 243 healthy controls were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by unconditional logistic regression for the associations between IL-10 genotypes and the risk of GC. The Kaplan-Meier method with log-rank testing was used to evaluate the association between genotype and survival of the patients. RESULTS: The IL-10 -1082 G allele and GCC (-1082, -819 and -592) haplotype were associated with increased gastric cancer risks (OR 1.2, 95% CI 0.6-3.2, P = 0.007, for -1082 G allele, OR = 2.3, 95% CI, 1.2-4.1, P = 0.005, for GCC haplotype, respectively). However, none of the three IL-10 gene polymorphisms (-1082, -819 and -592) was correlated with gastric cancer survival (P > 0.05), and none of the genotypes of the three IL-10 sites was found as independent prognostic risk factors in the multivariate test. CONCLUSION: IL-10 gene promoter polymorphisms may not be associated with the prognosis of advanced gastric cancer. PMID:21455338

  10. Anti-angiogenic Therapy in Patients with Advanced Gastric and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Tzong; Oh, Do-Youn; Ryu, Min-Hee; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Yeo, Winnie; Carlesi, Roberto; Cheng, Rebecca; Kim, Jongseok; Orlando, Mauro; Kang, Yoon-Koo

    2017-01-03

    Despite advancements in therapy for advanced gastric and gastroesophageal junction cancers, their prognosis remains dismal. Tumor angiogenesis plays a key role in cancer growth and metastasis, and recent studies indicate that pharmacologic blockade of angiogenesis is a promising approach to therapy. In this systematic review, we summarize current literature on the clinical benefit of anti-angiogenic agents in advanced gastric cancer. We conducted a systematic search of PubMed and conference proceedings including the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the European Society for Medical Oncology, and the European Cancer Congress. Included studies aimed to prospectively evaluate the efficacy and safety of anti-angiogenic agents in advanced gastric or gastroesophageal junction cancer. Each trial investigated at least one of the following endpoints: overall survival, progression-free survival/time to progression, and/or objective response rate. Our search yielded 139 publications. Forty-two met the predefined inclusion criteria. Included studies reported outcomes with apatinib, axitinib, bevacizumab, orantinib, pazopanib, ramucirumab, regorafenib, sorafenib, sunitinib, telatinib, and vandetanib. Second-line therapy with ramucirumab and third-line therapy with apatinib are the only anti-angiogenic agents so far shown to significantly improve survival of patients with advanced gastric cancer. Overall, agents that specifically target the vascular endothelial growth factor ligand or receptor have better safety profile compared to multi-target tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

  11. Rate of detection of advanced neoplasms in proximal colon by simulated sigmoidoscopy vs fecal immunochemical tests.

    PubMed

    Castells, Antoni; Quintero, Enrique; Álvarez, Cristina; Bujanda, Luis; Cubiella, Joaquín; Salas, Dolores; Lanas, Angel; Carballo, Fernando; Morillas, Juan Diego; Hernández, Cristina; Jover, Rodrigo; Hijona, Elizabeth; Portillo, Isabel; Enríquez-Navascués, José M; Hernández, Vicent; Martínez-Turnes, Alfonso; Menéndez-Villalva, Carlos; González-Mao, Carmen; Sala, Teresa; Ponce, Marta; Andrés, Mercedes; Teruel, Gloria; Peris, Antonio; Sopeña, Federico; González-Rubio, Francisca; Seoane-Urgorri, Agustín; Grau, Jaume; Serradesanferm, Anna; Pozo, Àngels; Pellisé, Maria; Balaguer, Francesc; Ono, Akiko; Cruzado, José; Pérez-Riquelme, Francisco; Alonso-Abreu, Inmaculada; Carrillo-Palau, Marta; de la Vega-Prieto, Mariola; Iglesias, Rosario; Amador, Javier; Blanco, José Manuel; Sastre, Rocio; Ferrándiz, Juan; González-Hernández, Ma José; Andreu, Montserrat; Bessa, Xavier

    2014-10-01

    We compared the ability of biennial fecal immunochemical testing (FIT) and one-time sigmoidoscopy to detect colon side-specific advanced neoplasms in a population-based, multicenter, nationwide, randomized controlled trial. We identified asymptomatic men and women, 50-69 years old, through community health registries and randomly assigned them to groups that received a single colonoscopy examination or biennial FIT. Sigmoidoscopy yield was simulated from results obtained from the colonoscopy group, according to the criteria proposed in the UK Flexible Sigmoidoscopy Trial for colonoscopy referral. Patients who underwent FIT and were found to have ≥75 ng hemoglobin/mL were referred for colonoscopy. Data were analyzed from 5059 subjects in the colonoscopy group and 10,507 in the FIT group. The main outcome was rate of detection of any advanced neoplasm proximal to the splenic flexure. Advanced neoplasms were detected in 317 subjects (6.3%) in the sigmoidoscopy simulation group compared with 288 (2.7%) in the FIT group (odds ratio for sigmoidoscopy, 2.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.93-2.70; P = .0001). Sigmoidoscopy also detected advanced distal neoplasia in a higher percentage of patients than FIT (odds ratio, 2.61; 95% confidence interval, 2.20-3.10; P = .0001). The methods did not differ significantly in identifying patients with advanced proximal neoplasms (odds ratio, 1.17; 95% confidence interval, 0.78-1.76; P = .44). This was probably due to the lower performance of both strategies in detecting patients with proximal lesions (sigmoidoscopy detected these in 19.1% of patients and FIT in 14.9% of patients) vs distal ones (sigmoidoscopy detected these in 86.8% of patients and FIT in 33.5% of patients). Sigmoidoscopy, but not FIT, detected proximal lesions in lower percentages of women (especially those 50-59 years old) than men. Sigmoidoscopy and FIT have similar limitations in detecting advanced proximal neoplasms, which depend on patients' characteristics

  12. Effect of pravastatin on the survival of patients with advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bujanda, Luis; Rodríguez-González, Araceli; Sarasqueta, Cristina; Eizaguirre, Emma; Hijona, Elizabeth; Marín, José J.G.; Perugorria, María J.; Banales, Jesús M.; Cosme, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A fluoropyrimidine plus cisplatin combined with surgery is standard first-line treatment for advanced gastric cancer. We evaluated the effect of pravastatin on overall survival in patients with advanced gastric cancer in a prospective cohort study. Methods At the time of surgery, we assigned 60 patients with advanced gastric cancer (stage III or IV) to receive standard first-line treatment (control group) or standard first-line treatment plus pravastatin at a dose of 40 mg once daily (pravastatin group). The minimum follow-up period was 4 years and the maximum of 6 years. Results The mean of age was 66 years and the TNM stage was III and IV in 65% and 35% of patients, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups (control vs pravastatin) in median overall survival (15 vs 14 months; P = 0.8). Predictors of survival were the stage (hazard ratio of death stage IV (III stage as reference): 4.4; 95% CI: 2–9.7; p < 0.05) and older age (hazard ratio of death ≥ 65 years (< 65 years as reference): 2.8; 95% CI: 1.3–6; p < 0.05). Conclusions Pravastatin did not improve outcome in patients with advanced gastric cancer. PMID:26735890

  13. Why a D2 gastrectomy plus adjuvant chemotherapy is insufficient in locally advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sebastián Solé, Z; Larsen, Francisco E; Solé, Claudio V

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses all the important published evidence regarding adjuvant treatments in locally advanced gastric cancer. In this process it revealed facts that demonstrate the superiority of radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy to chemotherapy alone. Some outstanding work that has not yet been published is also discussed. PMID:28105077

  14. Why a D2 gastrectomy plus adjuvant chemotherapy is insufficient in locally advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Sebastián Solé, Z; Larsen, Francisco E; Solé, Claudio V

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses all the important published evidence regarding adjuvant treatments in locally advanced gastric cancer. In this process it revealed facts that demonstrate the superiority of radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy to chemotherapy alone. Some outstanding work that has not yet been published is also discussed.

  15. FOLFOX versus EOX as a neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimen for patients with advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenjun; Shen, Jianguo; Pan, Tao; Hu, Wenxian; Jiang, Zinong; Yuan, Xiaoming; Wang, Linbo

    2014-02-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is the preferred treatment of advanced gastric cancer. However, the choice of an optimal regimen remains controversial. The present study aimed to assess the effectiveness of preoperative chemotherapy with EOX and FOLFOX in Chinese patients with advanced gastric cancer. A total of 87 and 26 patients underwent FOLFOX and EOX regimens, respectively, for advanced gastric cancer between July 2004 and September 2012. Clinicopathological characteristics, pathological T stage, N stage and pathological response to tumour regression were retrospectively compared between the two groups. Following neoadjuvant chemotherapy, a higher number of patients manifested deeper invasive cancer in the FOLFOX group than those in the EOX group (P=0.047). In addition, a higher number of patients also exhibited metastatic lymph nodes in the FOLFOX group (67.8%) than in the EOX group (57.7%) (P=0.000). In the FOLFOX and EOX groups, 4 (4.6%) and 3 (11.5%) cases of complete regression were observed, respectively. A higher number of patients (38.5%) also exhibited tumour regression grades of 3 and 4 in the EOX group than in the FOLFOX group (19.5%) (P=0.047). Results of the present study suggest that the EOX regimen may be more effective than the FOLFOX regimen as preoperative chemotherapy for Chinese patients with advanced gastric cancer. The EOX regimen may be suitable for younger patients subjected to individual neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

  16. Five biopsy specimens from the proximal part of the tumor reliably determine HER2 protein expression status in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Naoyuki; Gotoda, Takuji; Hara, Megumi; Hale, Matthew D; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Matsubayashi, Jun; Kono, Shin; Kusano, Chika; Itoi, Takao; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Moriyasu, Fuminori; Grabsch, Heike I

    2016-04-01

    National guidelines recommend trastuzumab for treatment of patients with metastatic HER2-positive gastric cancer (GC). There is currently no guideline indicating the number of biopsy specimens and the location from which they should be obtained to reliably determine the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status in GC. The aim of this pilot study was (a) to quantify HER2-positive tumor cells in different tumor regions to assess the spatial heterogeneity of HER2 expression and (b) to establish the required number of biopsy specimens and the location from which they should be obtained within the tumor to achieve concordance between HER2 expression status in the biopsy specimens and the resection specimen. HER2 expression was quantified in six different regions of 24 HER2-positive GC and in six virtual biopsy specimens from different luminal regions. Intratumoral regional heterogeneity and concordance between HER2 status in the biopsy specimens and the resection specimen were analyzed. HER2-positive cells were more frequent in the luminal tumor surface compared with deeper layers (p < 0.001). GCs with differentiated histological features were more commonly HER2 positive (p < 0.001). Assessment of HER2 expression status in five biopsy specimens was sufficient to achieve 100 % concordance between the biopsy specimens and the resection specimen. This is the first study to suggest preferential HER2 positivity at the luminal surface in GC and to establish a minimum number of biopsy specimens needed to obtain a biopsy HER2 result which is identical to that from the whole tumor. Our study suggests that HER2 testing in five tumor-containing endoscopic biopsy specimens from the proximal (oral) part of the tumor is advisable. The results from this pilot study require validation in a prospective study.

  17. Docetaxel: its role in current and future treatments for advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Masahiko; Wada, Satoru

    2009-01-01

    A globally accepted standard chemotherapy remains undetermined in gastric cancer, but the recent introduction of active "new-generation agents" such as taxanes, irinotecan (CPT-11), oxaliplatin, S-1, and capecitabine, offers hope for markedly improving patient outcomes. Docetaxel, as well as the other new-generation agents, plays a key role in the development of the new-era chemotherapy, and the incorporation of taxanes has provided several regimens, such as docetaxel/cisplatin/5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (DCF), that could become standard treatment. The DCF regimen is now regarded as a standard treatment option in advanced gastric cancer in selected patients in good condition. Many institutions and cooperative groups continue to study a variety of docetaxel-based combinations with "new-generation cytotoxic agents" in various treatment settings, and recent attention has been focused on the incorporation of biological agents, such as cetuximab, bevacizumab, everolimus, and sunitinib, into docetaxel-containing combinations as another innovative approach. The ongoing clinical trials of a number of new regimens will clarify their clinical benefits in gastric cancer treatment. Along with the development of more active docetaxel combination regimens, the identification of predictive biomarkers for each regimen has been intensively studied recently. This review focuses on docetaxel as a key agent in gastric cancer chemotherapy, and discusses the role of this taxane in current and future treatments for advanced gastric cancer.

  18. Perioperative Epirubicin, Oxaliplatin, and Capecitabine Chemotherapy in Locally Advanced Gastric Cancer: Safety and Feasibility in an Interim Survival Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Arvind; Ramaswamy, Anant; Sirohi, Bhawna; Bose, Subhadeep; Talreja, Vikas; Goel, Mahesh; Patkar, Shraddha; Desouza, Ashwin; Shrikhande, Shailesh V.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Perioperative chemotherapy improves survival outcomes in locally advanced (LA) gastric cancer. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed patients with LA gastric cancer who were offered perioperative chemotherapy consisting of epirubicin, oxaliplatin, and capecitabine (EOX) from May 2013 to December 2015 at Tata Memorial Hospital in Mumbai. Results Among the 268 consecutive patients in our study, 260 patients (97.0%) completed neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 200 patients (74.6%) underwent D2 lymphadenectomy, and 178 patients (66.4%) completed adjuvant chemotherapy. The median follow-up period was 17 months. For the entire cohort, the median overall survival (OS), 3-year OS rate, median progression-free survival (PFS), and 3-year PFS rate were 37 months, 64.4%, 31 months, and 40%, respectively. PFS and OS were significantly inferior in patients who presented with features of obstruction than in those who did not (P=0.0001). There was no difference in survival with respect to tumor histology (well to moderately differentiated vs. poorly differentiated, signet ring vs. non-signet ring histology) or location (proximal vs. distal). Survival was prolonged in patients with an early pathological T stage and a pathological node-negative status. In a multivariate analysis, postoperative pathological nodal status and gastric outlet obstruction on presentation significantly correlated with survival. Conclusions EOX chemotherapy with curative resection and D2 lymphadenectomy is a suggested alternative to the existing perioperative regimens. The acceptable postoperative complication rate and relatively high resection, chemotherapy completion, and survival rates obtained in this study require further evaluation and validation in a clinical trial. PMID:28337360

  19. Short-term outcomes and nutritional status after laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy with a very small remnant stomach for cStage I proximal gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Haruna; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Takiguchi, Shuji; Tanaka, Koji; Miyazaki, Yasuhiro; Makino, Tomoki; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Yamasaki, Makoto; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2017-08-20

    Total or proximal gastrectomy is usually performed for early proximal gastric carcinoma, but the optimal type of gastrectomy is still unknown. We evaluated short-term outcomes and nutritional status after laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy (LsTG) in comparison with laparoscopic total gastrectomy (LTG) and laparoscopic proximal gastrectomy (LPG). We analyzed 113 patients who underwent LsTG (n = 38), LTG (n = 48), or LPG (n = 27) for cStage I gastric cancer located in the upper third of the stomach. Postoperative morbidities, nutritional status including body weight, serum albumin, hemoglobin, the prognostic nutritional index (PNI), and endoscopic findings at 1 year after surgery were compared between LsTG and both LTG and LPG. Operation time and intraoperative blood loss were similar among the three groups. The incidence of postoperative morbidities was lower in LsTG than in LTG. The degree of body weight loss was significantly smaller in LsTG than in LTG at 6 and 12 months. At 12 months, LsTG resulted in better serum albumin and PNI than LPG, and better hemoglobin than LTG. Endoscopic examination demonstrated that one LsTG patient and two LPG patients had reflux esophagitis. Remnant gastritis was observed more frequently in LPG than in LsTG. No LsTG patient had bile reflux, although it was observed in four LPG patients. LsTG with a very small remnant stomach had favorable short-term outcomes and nutritional status compared with LTG and LPG, so it may be a better treatment option for cStage I proximal gastric carcinoma.

  20. Phase II Study of Oxaliplatin, Irinotecan, and Capecitabine in Advanced Gastric/Gastroesophageal Junction Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  1. The first European family with gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Repak, Rudolf; Kohoutova, Darina; Podhola, Miroslav; Rejchrt, Stanislav; Minarik, Marek; Benesova, Lucie; Lesko, Michal; Bures, Jan

    2016-10-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach (GAPPS) has to date been recognized in only 8 families worldwide. Recently, different point mutations within the Ying Yang 1 (YY1) binding motif in promoter 1B of the APC gene were assigned as causal in 6 families with GAPPS. We diagnosed GAPPS across 3 generations in a Czech white family. The proband's mother died of gastric cancer at 49 years of age. The proband died of gastric cancer at 56 years of age. All 3 of the proband's daughters inherited polyposis, involving exclusively the gastric fundus and body, with relative sparing of the lesser curve. The daughters have all been regularly surveyed endoscopically. Polyposis progressed rapidly with intestinal differentiated low-grade and high-grade dysplasia present on polypectomy specimens 5 years after the original diagnosis. On this basis, all 3 of the proband's daughters were scheduled for prophylactic total gastrectomy. Unfortunately, the middle daughter presented with generalized gastric adenocarcinoma and died at the age of 26 years. The other 2 daughters (aged 30 and 23 years) underwent total gastrectomy within 6 weeks of their sister's death; histology of surgical specimens showed gastric adenocarcinoma stage IA (pT1a, N0, M0) in both cases. Bi-directional Sanger sequencing of promoter 1B revealed a point mutation (c.-191 T>C) in all 3 daughters of the proband. Atypical endoscopic progression of the fundic gland polyposis, with the presence of dysplasia on polypectomy specimens and genetic testing with recently discovered mutations in promoter 1B of the APC gene might help clinicians to decide whether prophylactic gastrectomy should be performed. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Recent advances in the molecular diagnostics of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Mitsuro; Kodera, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in the world, representing a major global health issue. Although the incidence of GC is declining, the outcomes for GC patients remain dismal because of the lack of effective biomarkers to detect early GC and predict both recurrence and chemosensitivity. Current tumor markers for GC, including serum carcinoembryonic antigen and carbohydrate antigen 19-9, are not ideal due to their relatively low sensitivity and specificity. Recent improvements in molecular techniques are better able to identify aberrant expression of GC-related molecules, including oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs, and DNA methylation, as novel molecular markers, although the molecular pathogenesis of GC is complicated by tumor heterogeneity. Detection of genetic and epigenetic alterations from gastric tissue or blood samples has diagnostic value in the management of GC. There are high expectations for molecular markers that can be used as new screening tools for early detection of GC as well as for patient stratification towards personalized treatment of GC through prediction of prognosis and drug-sensitivity. In this review, the studies of potential molecular biomarkers for GC that have been reported in the publicly available literature between 2012 and 2015 are reviewed and summarized, and certain highlighted papers are examined. PMID:26379391

  3. Anti-angiogenic therapies for advanced esophago-gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Elisa; Sclafani, Francesco; Cunningham, David

    2014-01-01

    Neo-vascularization is a vital process for tumor growth and development which involves the interaction between tumor cells and stromal endothelial cells through several growth factors and membranous receptors which ultimately activate pro-angiogenic intracellular signaling pathways. Inhibition of angiogenesis has become a standard treatment option for several tumor types including colorectal cancer, glioblastoma and ovarian cancer. In gastric cancer, the therapeutic role of anti-angiogenic agents is more controversial. Bevacizumab and ramucirumab, two monoclonal antibodies, which target vascular endothelial growth factor-A and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, respectively, have been demonstrated antitumor activity in patients with tumors of the stomach or esophagogastric junction. However, especially for bevacizumab, this antitumor activity has not consistently translated into a survival advantage over standard treatment in randomized trials. In this article, we provide an overview of the role of angiogenesis in gastric cancer and discuss the results of clinical trials that investigated safety and effectiveness of antiangiogenic therapies in this disease. A review of the literature has been done using PubMed, ClinicalTrials.gov website and the ASCO Annual Meeting Library. PMID:25538401

  4. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Drainage of Intra-Abdominal Abscess after Gastric Perforation in a Patient Receiving Ramucirumab and Paclitaxel for Advanced Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mandai, Koichiro; Shirakawa, Atsushi; Uno, Koji; Yasuda, Kenjiro

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal perforation is a serious adverse event that occurs in approximately 1% of patients receiving ramucirumab and paclitaxel. A 67-year-old man with unresectable advanced gastric cancer was admitted to our hospital and treated with ramucirumab and paclitaxel. Gastric perforation occurred during the second cycle of chemotherapy. Although the patient's condition improved without surgery, an abscess developed in the intra-abdominal fluid collection resulting from the perforation. We performed endoscopic ultrasound-guided abscess drainage. The patient improved and was discharged in satisfactory condition. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage is a treatment option for patients with intra-abdominal abscess following gastric perforation due to ramucirumab. PMID:28203161

  5. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Drainage of Intra-Abdominal Abscess after Gastric Perforation in a Patient Receiving Ramucirumab and Paclitaxel for Advanced Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mandai, Koichiro; Shirakawa, Atsushi; Uno, Koji; Yasuda, Kenjiro

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal perforation is a serious adverse event that occurs in approximately 1% of patients receiving ramucirumab and paclitaxel. A 67-year-old man with unresectable advanced gastric cancer was admitted to our hospital and treated with ramucirumab and paclitaxel. Gastric perforation occurred during the second cycle of chemotherapy. Although the patient's condition improved without surgery, an abscess developed in the intra-abdominal fluid collection resulting from the perforation. We performed endoscopic ultrasound-guided abscess drainage. The patient improved and was discharged in satisfactory condition. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage is a treatment option for patients with intra-abdominal abscess following gastric perforation due to ramucirumab.

  6. Phase II study of capecitabine and irinotecan combination chemotherapy in patients with advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baek, J H; Kim, J G; Jeon, S B; Chae, Y S; Kim, D H; Sohn, S K; Lee, K B; Choi, Y J; Shin, H J; Chung, J S; Cho, G J; Jung, H Y; Yu, W

    2006-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a combination regimen of capecitabine plus irinotecan in patients with advanced gastric cancer. Patients with previously untreated metastatic or recurrent, measurable gastric cancer received oral capecitabine 1000 mg m−2 twice daily from day 1 to 14 and intravenous irinotecan 100 mg m−2 on days 1 and 8, based on a 3-week cycle. Forty-one patients were enrolled in the current study, among whom 38 were assessable for efficacy and 40 assessable for toxicity. Three complete responses and 16 partial responses were confirmed, giving an overall response rate of 46.3%. At a median follow-up of 269 days, the median time to progression and overall survival were 5.1 and 8.6 months, respectively. Grade 3/4 neutropenia occurred in four patients and grade 3 febrile neutropenia was observed in two patients. Grade 3 diarrhoea and grade 2 hand–foot syndrome occurred in six patients and eight patients, respectively. The combination of capecitabine and irinotecan was found to be well tolerated and effective in patients with advanced gastric cancer. Accordingly, this regimen can be regarded as one of first-line treatment options for advanced gastric cancer. PMID:16641916

  7. [Treatment of advanced gastric cancer with oxaliplatin plus 5-fluorouracil/ leucovorin (FOLFOX-4 chemotherapy)].

    PubMed

    Garrido, Marcelo; Melgoza, Geraldine; Galindo, Héctor; Madrid, Jorge; Sánchez, César; Nervi, Bruno; Alvarez, Manuel; Orellana, Eric

    2007-11-01

    Chemotherapy improves survival in advanced gastric cancer. However the most active combinations have a high level of toxicity that limits their use. To assess the response, toxicity and survival of patients with advanced gastric cancer, treated with oxaliplatin plus 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin (FOLFOX-4 chemotherapy). Patients with stage IV gastric cancer, according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer or with relapsed disease and functional capacity 0-2 of the South West Oncology Group, were included. FOLFOX-4 chemotherapy was used as first or second line treatment. The response to treatment and survival were assessed. Between 2003 and 2006, 29 patients (median age 52.5 years, 69% males) were treated. FOLFOX-4 was given as first line treatment in 65% patients and as second line in 35%. There was a complete response in 4.6%, partial response in 68%, stable disease in 20.6% and progression in 6.8%. Toxicity was observed in 51% of patients, that was hematological and non hematological grade 3/4 in 14%. Median survival was 12.5 months. FOLFOX-4 chemotherapy was active in advanced gastric cancer and had a low level of toxicity.

  8. The Relationship between RUNX3 Expression, Nursing Strategies and Nutritional Status in Elderly Patients with Advanced Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Wen; Teng, Wenhui; Shi, Xinyan; Liu, Xiaozhen; Cui, Zheng; Tian, Zibin

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between nutritional status and expression of RUNX3 in gastric cancer cells and to investigate the effects of nursing strategies on the nutritional status of elderly patients with advanced gastric cancer. Forty-eight elderly patients admitted at Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University with advanced gastric cancer and 30 healthy controls were selected as subjects from 2014-15. The correlation between RNX3 gene expression and nutritional status of the gastric cancer patients was investigated. The patients with advanced gastric cancer who had low expression of RUNX3 gene were treated with holistic nursing while routine nursing was taken for those patients who had normal or high expression of RUNX3 gene. The nutritional statuses of these patients were evaluated after 3 months of nursing. After a follow-up of 1 year, the influence of different nursing methods on the survival time was evaluated. Compared with normal gastric tissue, the expression of RUNX3 gene and protein in tissues of advanced gastric cancer were significantly decreased (P<0.01). Compared with patients with normal or high expressions of RUNX3, the nutritional statuses of advanced gastric cancer patients with low expressions of RUNX3 were lower (P<0.01). The nutritional statuses of patients with low expressions of RUNX3 were notably improved after holistic nursing, becoming equivalent to those with normal or high expression of RUNX3 who received routine nursing (P>0.05). The survival time of patients with low expression of RUNX3 who received holistic nursing were similar to patients with normal or high expression of RUNX3 who received routine nursing (P>0.05). RUNX3 is correlated with the occurrence and development of advanced gastric cancer. The low nutritional status of elderly advanced gastric cancer patients with low expressions of RUNX3 can be significantly enhanced by holistic nursing, thereby prolonging survival time.

  9. Reconstruction after proximal gastrectomy for gastric cancer in the upper third of the stomach: a review of the literature published from 2000 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masaki; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2016-05-01

    Proximal gastrectomy (PG) is occasionally performed to preserve the physiological function of the remnant stomach with the aim of maintaining a gastric reservoir for patients with early gastric cancer in the upper third of the stomach. Many reconstructive procedures after PG have been reported, including esophagogastrostomy (EG), jejunal interposition, jejunal pouch interposition, and double tract. However, no general agreement exists regarding the optimal reconstructive procedure. This article reviews the current reconstructive procedures available for PG. We examined the surgical outcomes, postoperative complications, endoscopic findings, and quality of life (QOL) according to the reconstructive procedures. We found no significant difference in anastomotic leakage and anastomotic stricture among the procedures. The frequency of reflux esophagitis was higher with simple EG compared with the other reconstructive procedures. Some additional procedures, such as fundoplication, the use of a narrow gastric conduit, and placement of a gastric tube in the lower mediastinum on EG, could decrease the frequency of reflux esophagitis and reflux symptoms. These additional procedures may improve the QOL; however, the previous studies were small and could not adequately compare the reconstructive procedures. Prospective randomized controlled trials that involve a longer trial period and more institutions are needed to clarify the optimal reconstructive procedures after PG.

  10. p16 Methylation is associated with chemosensitivity to fluorouracil in patients with advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingming; Li, Yilin; Gao, Jing; Li, Yanyan; Zhou, Jing; Gu, Liankun; Shen, Lin; Deng, Dajun

    2014-06-01

    No effective biomarkers have been confirmed to predict chemosensitivity for patients with gastric cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether DNA methylation is associated with chemosensitivity in patients with gastric cancer. Tumors and matched non-tumor biopsy tissues collected from 134 advanced gastric cancer (AGC) patients prior to fluorouracil-based chemotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. The methylation status of p16, E-cadherin (CDH1), MGMT (O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase), and human mutL homolog 1 (hMLH1) was evaluated using a Methylight assay, and the association between p16 methylation and the sensitivity of 5-fluorouracil in cell lines was determined by in vitro assay. The methylation of p16 (17.9 vs. 0 %, P = 0.002), CDH1 (20.9 vs. 2.2 %, P < 0.001), MGMT (17.9 vs. 0 %, P = 0.052), and hMLH1 (14.9 vs. 2.2 %, P = 0.024) was more common in gastric cancer tissues (n = 134) than in non-tumor tissues (n = 46). For all patients, a reverse correlation was only found between p16 methylation and clinical response (P = 0.017), which suggested that p16 methylation might be associated with chemosensitivity of fluorouracil in gastric cancer patients. Results from in vitro experiments demonstrated that p16 methylation was closely correlated with the sensitivity of 5-fluorouracil in gastric cancer cells. The present results indicated that the methylation of p16, CDH1, MGMT, and hMLH1 was both frequent and specific in gastric cancer tissues. p16 Methylation might be used to predict chemosensitivity of fluorouracil for patients with AGC when validated in large samples in the future.

  11. Point Mutations in Exon 1B of APC Reveal Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Proximal Polyposis of the Stomach as a Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Variant.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Woods, Susan L; Healey, Sue; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Lee, Jason S; Sivakumaran, Haran; Wayte, Nicci; Nones, Katia; Waterfall, Joshua J; Pearson, John; Patch, Anne-Marie; Senz, Janine; Ferreira, Manuel A; Kaurah, Pardeep; Mackenzie, Robertson; Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza; Hansford, Samantha; Lannagan, Tamsin R M; Spurdle, Amanda B; Simpson, Peter T; da Silva, Leonard; Lakhani, Sunil R; Clouston, Andrew D; Bettington, Mark; Grimpen, Florian; Busuttil, Rita A; Di Costanzo, Natasha; Boussioutas, Alex; Jeanjean, Marie; Chong, George; Fabre, Aurélie; Olschwang, Sylviane; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Bellos, Evangelos; Coin, Lachlan; Rioux, Kevin; Bathe, Oliver F; Wen, Xiaogang; Martin, Hilary C; Neklason, Deborah W; Davis, Sean R; Walker, Robert L; Calzone, Kathleen A; Avital, Itzhak; Heller, Theo; Koh, Christopher; Pineda, Marbin; Rudloff, Udo; Quezado, Martha; Pichurin, Pavel N; Hulick, Peter J; Weissman, Scott M; Newlin, Anna; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Sampson, Jone E; Hamman, Kelly; Goldgar, David; Poplawski, Nicola; Phillips, Kerry; Schofield, Lyn; Armstrong, Jacqueline; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Suthers, Graeme K; Huntsman, David G; Foulkes, William D; Carneiro, Fatima; Lindor, Noralane M; Edwards, Stacey L; French, Juliet D; Waddell, Nicola; Meltzer, Paul S; Worthley, Daniel L; Schrader, Kasmintan A; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2016-05-05

    Gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach (GAPPS) is an autosomal-dominant cancer-predisposition syndrome with a significant risk of gastric, but not colorectal, adenocarcinoma. We mapped the gene to 5q22 and found loss of the wild-type allele on 5q in fundic gland polyps from affected individuals. Whole-exome and -genome sequencing failed to find causal mutations but, through Sanger sequencing, we identified point mutations in APC promoter 1B that co-segregated with disease in all six families. The mutations reduced binding of the YY1 transcription factor and impaired activity of the APC promoter 1B in luciferase assays. Analysis of blood and saliva from carriers showed allelic imbalance of APC, suggesting that these mutations lead to decreased allele-specific expression in vivo. Similar mutations in APC promoter 1B occur in rare families with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Promoter 1A is methylated in GAPPS and sporadic FGPs and in normal stomach, which suggests that 1B transcripts are more important than 1A in gastric mucosa. This might explain why all known GAPPS-affected families carry promoter 1B point mutations but only rare FAP-affected families carry similar mutations, the colonic cells usually being protected by the expression of the 1A isoform. Gastric polyposis and cancer have been previously described in some FAP-affected individuals with large deletions around promoter 1B. Our finding that GAPPS is caused by point mutations in the same promoter suggests that families with mutations affecting the promoter 1B are at risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, regardless of whether or not colorectal polyps are present.

  12. Point Mutations in Exon 1B of APC Reveal Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Proximal Polyposis of the Stomach as a Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Variant

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Woods, Susan L.; Healey, Sue; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Lee, Jason S.; Sivakumaran, Haran; Wayte, Nicci; Nones, Katia; Waterfall, Joshua J.; Pearson, John; Patch, Anne-Marie; Senz, Janine; Ferreira, Manuel A.; Kaurah, Pardeep; Mackenzie, Robertson; Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza; Hansford, Samantha; Lannagan, Tamsin R.M.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Simpson, Peter T.; da Silva, Leonard; Lakhani, Sunil R.; Clouston, Andrew D.; Bettington, Mark; Grimpen, Florian; Busuttil, Rita A.; Di Costanzo, Natasha; Boussioutas, Alex; Jeanjean, Marie; Chong, George; Fabre, Aurélie; Olschwang, Sylviane; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Bellos, Evangelos; Coin, Lachlan; Rioux, Kevin; Bathe, Oliver F.; Wen, Xiaogang; Martin, Hilary C.; Neklason, Deborah W.; Davis, Sean R.; Walker, Robert L.; Calzone, Kathleen A.; Avital, Itzhak; Heller, Theo; Koh, Christopher; Pineda, Marbin; Rudloff, Udo; Quezado, Martha; Pichurin, Pavel N.; Hulick, Peter J.; Weissman, Scott M.; Newlin, Anna; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Sampson, Jone E.; Hamman, Kelly; Goldgar, David; Poplawski, Nicola; Phillips, Kerry; Schofield, Lyn; Armstrong, Jacqueline; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Suthers, Graeme K.; Huntsman, David G.; Foulkes, William D.; Carneiro, Fatima; Lindor, Noralane M.; Edwards, Stacey L.; French, Juliet D.; Waddell, Nicola; Meltzer, Paul S.; Worthley, Daniel L.; Schrader, Kasmintan A.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach (GAPPS) is an autosomal-dominant cancer-predisposition syndrome with a significant risk of gastric, but not colorectal, adenocarcinoma. We mapped the gene to 5q22 and found loss of the wild-type allele on 5q in fundic gland polyps from affected individuals. Whole-exome and -genome sequencing failed to find causal mutations but, through Sanger sequencing, we identified point mutations in APC promoter 1B that co-segregated with disease in all six families. The mutations reduced binding of the YY1 transcription factor and impaired activity of the APC promoter 1B in luciferase assays. Analysis of blood and saliva from carriers showed allelic imbalance of APC, suggesting that these mutations lead to decreased allele-specific expression in vivo. Similar mutations in APC promoter 1B occur in rare families with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Promoter 1A is methylated in GAPPS and sporadic FGPs and in normal stomach, which suggests that 1B transcripts are more important than 1A in gastric mucosa. This might explain why all known GAPPS-affected families carry promoter 1B point mutations but only rare FAP-affected families carry similar mutations, the colonic cells usually being protected by the expression of the 1A isoform. Gastric polyposis and cancer have been previously described in some FAP-affected individuals with large deletions around promoter 1B. Our finding that GAPPS is caused by point mutations in the same promoter suggests that families with mutations affecting the promoter 1B are at risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, regardless of whether or not colorectal polyps are present. PMID:27087319

  13. Methylation status of long interspersed element-1 in advanced gastric cancer and its prognostic implication.

    PubMed

    Song, Young Seok; Kim, Younghoon; Cho, Nam Yun; Yang, Han Kwang; Kim, Woo Ho; Kang, Gyeong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Reportedly, the pyrosequencing methylation assay can produce inconsistent results between paired snap-frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival tissue samples. In this study, we assayed the methylation levels at four individual CpG sites of L1 using pyrosequencing and found that the methylation levels at individual CpG sites were different but were closely correlated between paired snap-frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples. We aimed to determine whether low methylation status of L1 is associated with gastric cancer patient prognosis. We analyzed 434 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples of advanced gastric cancer for their methylation status at four CpG sites of L1 [nucleotide positions 328, 321, 318, and 306 of X58075 (Genbank)] using pyrosequencing, and correlated the L1 methylation level with clinicopathological features. Older age at onset, males, tumor location at antrum or lower body, intestinal type, and lymphatic or venous invasion were associated with a low average methylation level of L1 at the two CpG sites 1 and 4 combined. The average methylation level of L1 at CpG sites 1 and 4 combined was significantly lower in microsatellite-stable and EBV-negative gastric cancers than in EBV-positive or microsatellite-unstable gastric cancers. Low methylation status of L1 was independently correlated with shorter overall survival and disease-free survival time. Our findings indicate that the discrepancy in the methylation level of L1 between fresh tissue and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples depends on the CpG sites considered, and that the methylation status of L1 at CpG sites 1 and 4 combined could be utilized as a prognostic parameter for advanced gastric cancers.

  14. Prognostic Factors for Node-Negative Advanced Gastric Cancer after Curative Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Woo; Koo, Ho-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Lymph node (LN) metastasis is the best prognostic indicator in non-distant metastatic advanced gastric cancer. This study aimed to assess the prognostic value of various clinicopathologic factors in node-negative advanced gastric cancer. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed the clinical records of 254 patients with primary node-negative stage T2~4 gastric cancer. These patients were selected from a pool of 1,890 patients who underwent radical resection at Memorial Jin-Pok Kim Korea Gastric Cancer Center, Inje University Seoul Paik Hospital between 1998 and 2008. Results Of the 254 patients, 128 patients (50.4%), 88 patients (34.6%), 37 patients (14.6%), and 1 patient (0.4%) had T2, T3, T4a, and T4b tumors, respectively. In a univariate analysis, operation type, T-stage, venous invasion, tumor size, and less than 15 LNs significantly correlated with tumor recurrence and cumulative overall survival. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, tumor size, venous invasion, and less than 15 LNs significantly and independently correlated with recurrence. In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis, tumor size (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.926; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.173~7.300; P=0.021), venous invasion (HR: 3.985; 95% CI: 1.401~11.338; P=0.010), and less than 15 LNs (HR: 0.092; 95% CI: 0.029~0.290; P<0.001) significantly correlated with overall survival. Conclusions Node-negative gastric cancers recurred in 8.3% of the patients in our study. Tumor size, venous invasion, and less than 15 LNs reliably predicted recurrence as well as survival. Aggressive postoperative treatments and timely follow-ups should be considered in cases with these characteristics. PMID:27752393

  15. Surgical outcome after docetaxel-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally-advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Biffi, Roberto; Fazio, Nicola; Luca, Fabrizio; Chiappa, Antonio; Andreoni, Bruno; Zampino, Maria Giulia; Roth, Arnaud; Schuller, Jan Christian; Fiori, Giancarla; Orsi, Franco; Bonomo, Guido; Crosta, Cristiano; Huber, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate feasibility, morbidity and surgical mortality of a docetaxel-based chemotherapy regimen randomly administered before or after gastrectomy in patients suffering from locally-advanced resectable gastric cancer. METHODS: Patients suffering from locally-advanced (T3-4 any N M0 or any T N1-3 M0) gastric carcinoma, staged with endoscopic ultrasound, bone scan, computed tomography, and laparoscopy, were assigned to receive four 21 d/cycles of TCF (docetaxel 75 mg/m2 day 1, cisplatin 75 mg/m2 day 1, and fluorouracil 300 mg/m2 per day for days 1-14), either before (Arm A) or after (Arm B) gastrectomy. Operative morbidity, overall mortality, and severe adverse events were compared by intention-to-treat analysis. RESULTS: From November 1999 to November 2005, 70 patients were treated. After preoperative TCF (Arm A), thirty-two (94%) resections were performed, 85% of which were R0. Pathological response was complete in 4 patients (11.7%), and partial in 18 (55%). No surgical mortality and 28.5% morbidity rate were observed, similar to those of immediate surgery arm (P = 0.86). Serious chemotherapy adverse events tended to be more frequent in arm B (23% vs 11%, P = 0.07), with a single death per arm. CONCLUSION: Surgery following docetaxel-based chemotherapy was safe and with similar morbidity to immediate surgery in patients with locally-advanced resectable gastric carcinoma. PMID:20143466

  16. [A case of early gastric cancer completely responding to adjuvant chemotherapy for advanced colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryo; Kameyama, Hitoshi; Nakano, Mae; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Hanyu, Takaaki; Nakano, Masato; Ishikawa, Takashi; Shimada, Yoshifumi; Sakata, Jun; Kobayashi, Takashi; Kosugi, Shinichi; Minagawa, Masahiro; Koyama, Yu; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2014-11-01

    A 70-year-old man was referred to our hospital with ascending colon cancer (cT3N1M0, Stage IIIa), which was found during examinations following a positive fecal occult blood test. The patient was also diagnosed with early gastric cancer (cT1a, N0, M0, Stage IA)during a preoperative gastroscopy examination. A laparoscopically assisted right colectomy and D3 lymphadenectomy was performed for the ascending colon cancer. The postoperative pathological diagnosis was Stage IIIb (pT3N2), he was administered in combination with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (CapeOX) as adjuvant chemotherapy before the treatment for the colon cancer. After 6 months of adjuvant chemotherapy, we were unable to detect any gastric lesions at the same location using gastroscopy, and so diagnosed a clinical complete response. A follow-up gastroscopy 6 months later showed the same findings. The patient has had no recurrence of gastric cancer for 18 months after the initial operation. He will continue to be followed up closely using gastroscopy. In this case, CapeOX as adjuvant chemotherapy for advanced colon cancer was also effective for early gastric cancer.

  17. Strategies and Advancements in Harnessing the Immune System for Gastric Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Subhash, Vinod Vijay; Yeo, Mei Shi; Tan, Woei Loon; Yong, Wei Peng

    2015-01-01

    In cancer biology, cells and molecules that form the fundamental components of the tumor microenvironment play a major role in tumor initiation, and progression as well as responses to therapy. Therapeutic approaches that would enable and harness the immune system to target tumor cells mark the future of anticancer therapy as it could induce an immunological memory specific to the tumor type and further enhance tumor regression and relapse-free survival in cancer patients. Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortalities that has a modest survival benefit from existing treatment options. The advent of immunotherapy presents us with new approaches in gastric cancer treatment where adaptive cell therapies, cancer vaccines, and antibody therapies have all been used with promising outcomes. In this paper, we review the current advances and prospects in the gastric cancer immunotherapy. Special focus is laid on new strategies and clinical trials that attempt to enhance the efficacy of various immunotherapeutic modalities in gastric cancer. PMID:26579545

  18. Proactive nurse management guidelines for managing intensive chemotherapy regimens in patients with advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Baker, J; Ajani, J A

    2008-07-01

    Patients with advanced gastric cancer have a poor prognosis. Intensive chemotherapy regimens may be effective for the treatment of this disease but may be associated with a significant number of severe adverse events. Optimal management of these adverse events can improve outcome for the patient. Currently, there is little information in the literature about the nursing management of this particular group of patients. This American study involved the nursing management of all patients with gastric or gastroesophageal cancer enrolled in clinical trials at a single center. Patients had close contact with research nurses and received education about adverse events and how to deal with them. Patients completed a detailed treatment diary for each cycle of treatment. Protocols were established for the management of emergent adverse events. The guidelines developed during this study could help to underpin the role of the specialist oncology nurse and improve the management of patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy for gastric and gastroesophageal cancer, with the potential of improving outcome, or at least quality of life, for the patients. The nurses' role should be pivotal in the management of intensive chemotherapy for gastric and gastroesophageal cancer.

  19. The role of palliative radiation therapy in symptomatic locally advanced gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tey, Jeremy . E-mail: Jeremy_Tey@mail.nhg.com.sg; Back, Michael F.; Shakespeare, Thomas P.; Mukherjee, Rahul K.; Lu, Jiade J.; Lee, Khai Mun; Wong, Lea Choung; Leong, Cheng Nang; Zhu Ming

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To review the outcome of palliative radiotherapy (RT) alone in patients with symptomatic locally advanced or recurrent gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with symptomatic locally advanced or recurrent gastric cancer who were managed palliatively with RT at Cancer Institute, Singapore were retrospectively reviewed. Study end points included symptom response, median survival, and treatment toxicity (retrospectively scored using the Common Toxicity Criteria v3.0 [CTC]). Results: Between November 1999 and December 2004, 33 patients with locally advanced or recurrent gastric cancer were managed with palliative intent using RT alone. Median age was 76 years (range, 38-90 years). Twenty-one (64%) patients had known distant metastatic disease at time of treatment. Key index symptoms were bleeding (24 patients), obstruction (8 patients), and pain (8 patients). The majority of patients received 30 Gy/10 fractions (17 patients). Dose fractionation regimen ranged from an 8-Gy single fraction to 40 Gy in 16 fractions. Median survival was 145 days, actuarial 12-month survival 8%. A total of 54.3% of patients (13/24) with bleeding responded (median duration of response of 140 days), 25% of patients (2/8) with obstruction responded (median duration of response of 102 days), and 25% of patients (2/8) with pain responded (median duration of response of 105 days). No obvious dose-response was evident. One Grade 3 CTC equivalent toxicity was recorded. Conclusion: External beam RT alone is an effective and well tolerated modality in the local palliation of gastric cancer, with palliation lasting the majority of patients' lives.

  20. Advanced Endovascular Approaches in the Management of Challenging Proximal Aortic Neck Anatomy: Traditional Endografts and the Snorkel Technique

    PubMed Central

    Quatromoni, Jon G.; Orlova, Ksenia; Foley, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in endovascular technology, and access to this technology, have significantly changed the field of vascular surgery. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), in which endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has replaced the traditional open surgical approach in patients with suitable anatomy. However, approximately one-third of patients presenting with AAAs are deemed ineligible for standard EVAR because of anatomic constraints, the majority of which involve the proximal aneurysmal neck. To overcome these challenges, a bevy of endovascular approaches have been developed to either enhance stent graft fixation at the proximal neck or extend the proximal landing zone to allow adequate apposition to the aortic wall and thus aneurysm exclusion. This article is composed of two sections that together address new endovascular approaches for treating aortic aneurysms with difficult proximal neck anatomy. The first section will explore advancements in the traditional EVAR approach for hostile neck anatomy that maximize the use of the native proximal landing zone; the second section will discuss a technique that was developed to extend the native proximal landing zone and maintain perfusion to vital aortic branches using common, off-the-shelf components: the snorkel technique. While the techniques presented differ in terms of approach, the available clinical data, albeit limited, support the notion that they may both have roles in the treatment algorithm for patients with challenging proximal neck anatomy. PMID:26327748

  1. Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer: Long-term results of a phase I trial

    SciTech Connect

    Allal, Abdelkarim S. . E-mail: abdelkarim.allal@hcuge.ch; Zwahlen, Daniel; Bruendler, Marie-Anne; Peyer, Raymond de; Morel, Philippe; Huber, Olivier; Roth, Arnaud D.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the long-term results of radiation therapy (RT) when added preoperatively to systemic chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients presenting with T3-4 or N+ gastric cancer received two cycles of cisplatin 100 mg/m{sup 2} d1, 5FU 800 mg/m{sup 2} d1-4, and Leucovorin 60 mg twice daily d1-4; one cycle before and one concomitantly with hyperfractionated RT (median dose, 38.4; range, 31.2-45.6 Gy). All patients underwent a total or subtotal gastrectomy with D2 lymph node resection. Results: Nineteen patients were accrued and 18 completed the neoadjuvant therapeutic program. All patients were subsequently operated and no fatality occurred. At a mean follow-up of 8 years for the surviving patients, no severe late toxicity was observed. The 5-year locoregional control, disease-free, and overall survival were of 85%, 41%, and 35%, respectively. The peritoneum was the most frequent site of relapse. Among long terms survivors, no severe (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3-4) late complication was reported. Conclusions: The present neoadjuvant treatment does not seem to increase the operative risk, nor the late side effects. The encouraging locoregional control rate suggests that the neoadjuvant approach should be considered for future trials in locally advanced gastric cancer. Also, the frequency of peritoneal recurrence stresses the need for a more efficient systemic or intraperitoneal treatment.

  2. Changing trends in the proportions of small (≤ 2 cm) proximal and non-proximal gastric carcinomas treated at a high-volume tertiary medical center in China.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiong; Sun, Qi; Xu, Bi Yun; Yu, Hui Ping; Zhang, Yi Fen; Zou, Xiao Ping; Huang, Lily; Gold, Jason S; Mashimo, Hiroshi; Yu, Cheng Gong; Huang, Qin

    2014-07-01

    Guided by the recently established histological criteria of the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ), we aimed to investigate and compare trends in the proportions of small (≤ 2 cm) proximal gastric carcinoma (PGC) vs non-PGC (NPGC) in Chinese patients over an 8-year period. The study was conducted with consecutive surgical resected specimens of small PGC that was located within 3 cm below the GEJ and NPGC (located at all other gastric regions) treated at a single medical center in China. Differences in proportions between the two groups were compared. Among all 313 cases, 111 (35.5%) were classified as PGC and the remaining 202 (64.5%) as NPGC. Patients with PGC were significantly elder than those with NPGC, and none aged younger than 40 years. The proportions of PGC significantly and progressively increased from 16% in 2004 to 45% in 2011, in contrast to a steady decreasing trend for NPGC from 84% to 55% over the same period. The difference in trends between the two groups approached, but was not at a statistically significant level (P = 0.08). Proportions of small cancers in the gastric corpus and in female patients remained low and stable, in contrast to a significantly higher proportion in male patients (P < 0.05). Our data showed a significantly upward-shifting trend in the proportions of small PGC, primarily in elderly male patients, in contrast to a downward shifting trend in NPGC over the most recent 8-year period in Chinese patients. © 2014 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Recent Developments in Cytotoxic Therapy for Advanced Gastric or Gastroesophageal Carcinoma: The Phase III Trials

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains a significant health problem around the world. It is often diagnosed in late stages and almost 50% of patients have unresectable disease. Median survival, when cancer is in advanced stages, is often less than 9 months. Once metastatic, it is an incurable condition, and in most circumstances, fewer than 10% of patients survive 24 months. Most patients with metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal cancer have baseline symptoms, some of which are quite severe. Therapy for advanced gastric or gastroesophageal cancer is palliative in nature. For a long time, the number of randomized trials conducted in patients with gastric or gastroesophageal cancer had been unacceptably low; however, in the past 10 years, the number of phase III trials has increased and it is hoped that the momentum will continue to build and more trials will be completed. Several new classes of active agents have emerged, including taxanes, camptothecins, fluoropyrimidine analogs (particularly, capecitabine and S-1), and a platinum analog (oxaliplatin). The most recent phase III data suggest that docetaxel, when added to the reference regimen of cisplatin and 5-FU (CF), results in a statistically significant prolongation of time-to-progression and overall survival, higher response rate, doubling of the 2-year survival rate, better quality of life, improved clinical benefit, and a higher rate of complicated neutropenia. Other important phase III trials demonstrate that 5-FU can be substituted with capecitabine and cisplatin can be substituted with oxaliplatin. However, in a randomized phase III trial, irinotecan plus infusional 5-FU, when compared with CF, was not superior (it was noninferior), suggesting that irinotecan may be best suited for second-line treatment of these patients. Further developments in cytotoxic therapy will be driven by the use of more sophisticated oral agents (eg, S-1) and newer clinical algorithms that will employ therapy only until maximum response is

  4. Plasma mRNA as liquid biopsy predicts chemo-sensitivity in advanced gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Kong, Weiwei; Wu, Yuanna; Ren, Haozhen; Wei, Jia; Yang, Yang; Yang, Yan; Yu, Lixia; Guan, Wenxian; Liu, Baorui

    2017-01-01

    Predictive biomarkers based individualized chemotherapy can improve efficacy. However, for those advanced patients, it may be impossible to obtain the tissues from operation. Tissues from biopsy may not be always enough for gene detection. Thus, biomarker from blood could be a non-invasive and useful tool to provide real-time information in the procedure of treatment. To further understand the role of plasma mRNA in chemo-efficiency prediction, several mRNA expression levels were assessed in plasma and paired tumor tissues from 133 locally advanced gastric cancer patients (stage III), and mRNA levels were correlated with chemosensitivity to docetaxel, pemetrexed, platinum, and irinotecan. mRNA expression level in 64 advanced gastric cancer patients (stage IV) was also examined (55 in test group, and 9 in control), and chemotherapy in the test group were given according to the plasma gene detection. As a result, in the 133 patients with locally advanced gastric cancer (Stage III), correlations were observed between the mRNA expression of plasma/tumor BRCA1 levels and docetaxel sensitivity (P<0.001), plasma/tumor TS and pemetrexed sensitivity (P<0.001), plasma/tumor BRCA1 and platinum sensitivity (plasma, P=0.016; tumor, P<0.001), and plasma/tumor TOPO1 and irinotecan sensitivity (plasma, P=0.015; tumor, P=0.011). Among another 64 patients with advanced cancer (Stage IV), the median OS of test group was 15.5m (95% CI=10.1 to 20.9m), the PFS was 9.1m (95% CI=8.0 to 10.2m), which were significant longer than the control (P=0.047 for OS, P=0.038 for PFS). The mortality risk was higher in the control than patients treated according to the plasma gene detection (HR in the control=2.34, 95% CI=0.93 to 5.88, P=0.071). Plasma mRNA as liquid biopsy could be ideal recourse for examination to predict chemo-sensitivity in gastric cancer.

  5. Plasma mRNA as liquid biopsy predicts chemo-sensitivity in advanced gastric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Kong, Weiwei; Wu, Yuanna; Ren, Haozhen; Wei, Jia; Yang, Yang; Yang, Yan; Yu, Lixia; Guan, Wenxian; Liu, Baorui

    2017-01-01

    Predictive biomarkers based individualized chemotherapy can improve efficacy. However, for those advanced patients, it may be impossible to obtain the tissues from operation. Tissues from biopsy may not be always enough for gene detection. Thus, biomarker from blood could be a non-invasive and useful tool to provide real-time information in the procedure of treatment. To further understand the role of plasma mRNA in chemo-efficiency prediction, several mRNA expression levels were assessed in plasma and paired tumor tissues from 133 locally advanced gastric cancer patients (stage III), and mRNA levels were correlated with chemosensitivity to docetaxel, pemetrexed, platinum, and irinotecan. mRNA expression level in 64 advanced gastric cancer patients (stage IV) was also examined (55 in test group, and 9 in control), and chemotherapy in the test group were given according to the plasma gene detection. As a result, in the 133 patients with locally advanced gastric cancer (Stage III), correlations were observed between the mRNA expression of plasma/tumor BRCA1 levels and docetaxel sensitivity (P<0.001), plasma/tumor TS and pemetrexed sensitivity (P<0.001), plasma/tumor BRCA1 and platinum sensitivity (plasma, P=0.016; tumor, P<0.001), and plasma/tumor TOPO1 and irinotecan sensitivity (plasma, P=0.015; tumor, P=0.011). Among another 64 patients with advanced cancer (Stage IV), the median OS of test group was 15.5m (95% CI=10.1 to 20.9m), the PFS was 9.1m (95% CI=8.0 to 10.2m), which were significant longer than the control (P=0.047 for OS, P=0.038 for PFS). The mortality risk was higher in the control than patients treated according to the plasma gene detection (HR in the control=2.34, 95% CI=0.93 to 5.88, P=0.071). Plasma mRNA as liquid biopsy could be ideal recourse for examination to predict chemo-sensitivity in gastric cancer.

  6. Impact of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Among Patients with Pancreatic Fistula After Gastrectomy for Advanced Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Takashi; Akiyama, Hirotoshi; Makino, Hirochika; Kimura, Jun; Takagawa, Ryo; Ono, Hidetaka A; Kunisaki, Chikara; Endo, Itaru

    2016-04-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) has been widely adopted for patients with advanced gastric cancer; however, the safety of gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy followed by NAC has not yet been evaluated. We retrospectively analyzed the influence of NAC on morbidity and mortality after gastrectomy in patients with advanced gastric cancer. A series of 364 patients with advanced gastric cancer who underwent gastrectomy without pancreatectomy between January 2008 and December 2010 at eight hospitals registered to the Yokohama Clinical Oncology Group were studied retrospectively. There were 330 patients who underwent surgical treatment immediately after diagnosis (surgery alone group) and 34 patients (NAC group) who first received NAC and then underwent surgical resection. Although there were no significant differences in the morbidity rate between the two groups, postoperative pancreatic fistula was more often observed in NAC patients than in patients of the group treated with surgery alone [5 cases (14.7%) vs. 11 cases (3.3%); p=0.011]. In the univariate analysis, NAC (p=0.029), bursectomy (p<0.001) and operative bleeding (≥300 ml, p=0.002), were significantly correlated with postoperative pancreatic fistula, and NAC [odds ratio (OR)=4.901, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.455-16.67; p=0.010] and bursectomy (OR=11.2, 95% CI=3.460-37.04; p<0.001) were independent risk factors for postoperative pancreatic fistula by multivariate analysis. The incidence of postoperative pancreatic fistula was 40.0% among patients who underwent gastrectomy with bursectomy followed by NAC. The incidence of pancreatic fistula in patients treated with NAC and bursectomy was significantly higher than that in other patients. Bursectomy may be discouraged for the prevention of pancreatic fistula from gastrectomy following NAC. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  7. Second-line chemotherapy for patients with advanced gastric cancer: who may benefit?

    PubMed Central

    Catalano, V; Graziano, F; Santini, D; D'Emidio, S; Baldelli, A M; Rossi, D; Vincenzi, B; Giordani, P; Alessandroni, P; Testa, E; Tonini, G; Catalano, G

    2008-01-01

    No established second-line chemotherapy is available for patients with advanced gastric cancer failing to respond or progressing to first-line chemotherapy. However, 20–40% of these patients commonly receive second-line chemotherapy. We evaluated the influence of clinico-pathologic factors on the survival of 175 advanced gastric cancer patients, who received second-line chemotherapy at three oncology departments. Univariate and multivariate analyses found five factors which were independently associated with poor overall survival: performance status 2 (hazard ratio (HR), 1.79; 95% CI, 1.16–2.77; P=0.008), haemoglobin ⩽11.5 g l−1 (HR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.06–2.05; P=0.019), CEA level >50 ng ml−1 (HR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.21–2.88; P=0.004), the presence of greater than or equal to three metastatic sites of disease (HR, 1.72; 95% CI, 1.16–2.53; P=0.006), and time-to-progression under first-line chemotherapy ⩽6 months (HR, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.39–2.80; P<0.0001). A prognostic index was constructed dividing patients into low- (no risk factor), intermediate- (one to two risk factors), or high- (three to five risk factors) risk groups, and median survival times for each group were 12.7 months, 7.1 months, and 3.3 months, respectively (P<0.001). In the absence of data deriving from randomised trials, this analysis suggests that some easily available clinical factors may help to select patients with advanced gastric cancer who could derive more benefit from second-line chemotherapy. PMID:18971936

  8. Novel targets in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer: a perspective review

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Elisa; Smyth, Elizabeth C.

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is responsible for a high burden of disease globally. Although more extensive use of chemotherapy together with the recent introduction of the two targeted agents trastuzumab and ramucirumab have contributed to marginal outcome prolongation, overall survival for patients with advanced stage disease remains poor. Over the last decade, a number of novel agents have been examined in clinical trials with largely disappointing results. Potential explanations for this are the absence of molecularly selected trial populations or weak predictive biomarkers within the context of a highly heterogeneous disease. In the recently published gastric cancer The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project a new classification of four different tumour subtypes according to different molecular characteristics has been proposed. With some overlap, several relatively distinct and potentially targetable pathways have been identified for each subtype. In this perspective review we match recent trial results with the subtypes described in the gastric cancer TCGA aiming to highlight data regarding novel agents under evaluation and to discuss whether this publication might provide a framework for future drug development. PMID:26929787

  9. Could Adjuvant Chemotherapy after Surgery Benefit Elderly Patients with Advanced Gastric Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jin Woon; Kwon, In Gyu; Son, Young-Gil

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate tolerance to adjuvant chemotherapy, and to compare survival between treatments using only surgery and using surgery with adjuvant chemotherapy, in elderly patients with advanced gastric cancer who were ≥75 years of age. Materials and Methods Patients ≥75 years of age who were diagnosed with pathological stage II or III gastric cancer were identified retrospectively and categorized into the surgery only and surgery with adjuvant chemotherapy groups. Clinicopathological and survival data were compared between these two groups. Results Among the 130 patients studied, 67 patients underwent curative surgery only, and 63 patients received adjuvant chemotherapy after curative surgery. In the latter group, adverse events were reported in 24 patients (38.1%). The treatments were discontinued in 19 patients (30.2%) owing to any reason. The overall 5-year survival rates of the surgery only and the surgery with adjuvant chemotherapy groups did not differ significantly (44.1% vs. 30.7%, respectively; P=0.804). Among 90 death events, deaths from recurrences of gastric cancer occurred in 42 patients. Multivariate analyses revealed that the American Society of Anesthesiologists score and the depths of tumor invasions were related to survival, and the addition of adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery did not influence survival. Conclusions The decision for the addition of adjuvant chemotherapy for elderly patients should be taken after considering the condition of individual patients and their life expectancies. PMID:28053813

  10. Helicobacter pylori eradication for low-grade gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma is more successful in inducing remission in distal compared to proximal disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J S; Chung, S J; Choi, Y S; Cheon, J H; Kim, C W; Kim, S G; Jung, H C; Song, I S

    2007-01-01

    A series of studies has shown that Helicobacter pylori eradication induces remission in most patients with low-grade gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. However, there have been few reports about the effect of bacterial treatment on the gastric MALT lymphoma in Korea, a well-known H. pylori endemic area. A total of 111 H. pylori-infected patients were prospectively enrolled in Seoul National University Hospital and 99 among them were completely followed up according to our protocol. After H. pylori eradication, tumoural response was evaluated by endoscopy and histopathology every 2–3 months till complete remission (CR) and every 6 months after achieving CR. Median follow-up period was 41 months (range, 11–125 months). Helicobacter pylori was successfully eradicated in all 99 patients and CR was obtained in 84 (84.8%) of 99 patients. The median time to reach CR was 3 months and 94% of CR is in continuous complete remission. Five patients with CR relapsed after 10–22 months without the evidence of H. pylori reinfection. Cumulative recurrence rate was 2.3, 7.7 and 9.3% at 1, 2 and 3 years, respectively. Tumours were mainly located in distal stomach (67.7%) and tumours in distal stomach were associated with more favourable response than those in proximal stomach (P=0.001). Majority of patients with low-grade gastric MALT lymphoma treated by exclusive H. pylori eradication have a favourable long-term outcome, offering a real chance of cure. Tumour location could be a predictive factor for remission following H. pylori eradication. PMID:17406363

  11. Combined sleeve gastrectomy and mini-gastric bypass in a new bariatric procedure of mini-gastric bypass and proximal sleeve gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Peterko, Ana Car; Mazul-Sunko, Branka; Mirosević, Gorana; Bekavac-Beslin, Miroslav

    2013-09-01

    Surgery is the most effective method for the treatment of morbid obesity. Beneficial effects of bariatric surgery are due to both changed anatomy and consequential alterations in hormonal and metabolic status. Based on the experience with former standard bariatric procedures, the idea came out of a new combined bariatric procedure that could provide better control of glucose level and weight loss. The procedure is a hybrid of sleeve gastrectomy and mini-gastric bypass, therefore uniting advantages of both procedures: one anastomosis, achieved effects of restriction and malabsorption and affection of both dominant endocrine systems that result in an increase in incretin level and a decrease in ghrelin level. However, the procedure is yet a novel one and these hypotheses are about to be examined in the already announced research project.

  12. Gastric microbiome and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Brawner, Kyle M; Morrow, Casey D; Smith, Phillip D

    2014-01-01

    Cancer of the stomach is the fourth most common cancer worldwide. The single strongest risk factor for gastric cancer is Helicobacter pylori-associated chronic gastric inflammation. Among persons with H. pylori infection, strain-specific components, host immune responses, and environmental factors influence the risk for gastric disease, including adenocarcinoma of the stomach, although only a small proportion of infected persons develop the malignancy. Recent advances in DNA sequencing technology have uncovered a complex community of noncultivatable inhabitants of the human stomach. The interaction between these inhabitants, collectively referred to as the gastric microbiota, and H. pylori likely affects gastric immunobiology and possibly the sequelae of H. pylori infection. Thus, characterization of the gastric microbiota in subjects with and without H. pylori infection could provide new insight into gastric homeostasis and the pathogenesis of H. pylori-associated disease, including gastric cancer.

  13. Gastric Microbiome and Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brawner, Kyle M.; Morrow, Casey D.; Smith, Phillip D.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer of the stomach is the fourth most common cancer worldwide. The single strongest risk factor for gastric cancer is Helicobacter pylori-associated chronic gastric inflammation. Among persons with H. pylori infection, strain-specific components, host immune responses, and environmental factors influence the risk for gastric disease, including adenocarcinoma of the stomach, although only a small proportion of infected persons develop the malignancy. Recent advances in DNA sequencing technology have uncovered a complex community of non-cultivatable inhabitants of the human stomach. The interaction between these inhabitants, collectively referred to as the gastric microbiota, and H. pylori likely impacts gastric immunobiology and possibly the sequelae of H. pylori infection. Thus, characterization of the gastric microbiota in subjects with and without H. pylori infection could provide new insight into gastric homeostasis and the pathogenesis of H. pylori-associated disease, including gastric cancer. PMID:24855010

  14. Risk of advanced proximal neoplasms according to distal colorectal findings: comparison of sigmoidoscopy-based strategies.

    PubMed

    Castells, Antoni; Bessa, Xavier; Quintero, Enrique; Bujanda, Luis; Cubiella, Joaquín; Salas, Dolores; Lanas, Angel; Carballo, Fernando; Morillas, Juan Diego; Hernández, Cristina; Jover, Rodrigo; Montalvo, Isabel; Arenas, Juan; Cosme, Angel; Hernández, Vicent; Iglesias, Begoña; Castro, Inés; Cid, Lucía; Sala, Teresa; Ponce, Marta; Andrés, Mercedes; Teruel, Gloria; Peris, Antonio; Roncales, María-Pilar; González-Rubio, Francisca; Seoane-Urgorri, Agustín; Grau, Jaume; Serradesanferm, Anna; Pellisé, Maria; Ono, Akiko; Cruzado, José; Pérez-Riquelme, Francisco; Alonso-Abreu, Inmaculada; Carrillo-Palau, Marta; de la Vega-Prieto, Mariola; Iglesias, Rosario; Amador, Javier; Blanco, José Manuel; Sastre, Rocío; Ferrándiz, Juan; González-Hernández, M José; Andreu, Montserrat

    2013-06-19

    Screening for colorectal cancer with sigmoidoscopy benefits from the fact that distal findings predict the risk of advanced proximal neoplasms (APNs). This study was aimed at comparing the existing strategies of postsigmoidoscopy referral to colonoscopy in terms of accuracy and resources needed. Asymptomatic individuals aged 50-69 years were eligible for a randomized controlled trial designed to compare colonoscopy and fecal immunochemical test. Sigmoidoscopy yield was estimated from results obtained in the colonoscopy arm according to three sets of criteria of colonoscopy referral (from those proposed in the UK Flexible Sigmoidoscopy, Screening for COlon REctum [SCORE], and Norwegian Colorectal Cancer Prevention [NORCCAP] trials). Advanced neoplasm detection rate, sensitivity, specificity, and number of individuals needed to refer for colonoscopy to detect one APN were calculated. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify distal findings associated with APN. All statistical tests were two-sided. APN was found in 255 of 5059 (5.0%) individuals. Fulfillment of UK (6.2%), SCORE (12.0%), and NORCCAP (17.9%) criteria varied statistically significantly (P < .001). The NORCCAP strategy obtained the highest sensitivity for APN detection (36.9%), and the UK approach reached the highest specificity (94.6%). The number of individuals needed to refer for colonoscopy to detect one APN was 6 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4 to 7), 8 (95% CI = 6 to 9), and 10 (95% CI = 8 to 12) when the UK, SCORE, and NORCCAP criteria were used, respectively. The logistic regression analysis identified distal adenoma ≥10 mm (odds ratio = 3.77; 95% CI = 2.52 to 5.65) as the strongest independent predictor of APN. Whereas the NORCCAP criteria achieved the highest sensitivity for APN detection, the UK recommendations benefited from the lowest number of individuals needed to refer for colonoscopy.

  15. A Bayesian network meta-analysis on second-line systemic therapy in advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaofu; Ko, Yoo-Joung; Berry, Scott; Shah, Keya; Lee, Esther; Chan, Kelvin

    2017-07-01

    It is unclear which regimen is the most efficacious among the available therapies for advanced gastric cancer in the second-line setting. We performed a network meta-analysis to determine their relative benefits. We conducted a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) through the MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases and American Society of Clinical Oncology abstracts up to June 2014 to identify phase III RCTs on advanced gastric cancer in the second-line setting. Overall survival (OS) data were the primary outcome of interest. Hazard ratios (HRs) were extracted from the publications on the basis of reported values or were extracted from survival curves by established methods. A Bayesian network meta-analysis was performed with WinBUGS to compare all regimens simultaneously. Eight RCTs (2439 patients) were identified and contained extractable data for quantitative analysis. Network meta-analysis showed that paclitaxel plus ramucirumab was superior to single-agent ramucirumab [OS HR 0.51, 95 % credible region (CR) 0.30-0.86], paclitaxel (OS HR 0.81, 95 % CR 0.68-0.96), docetaxel (OS HR 0.56, 95 % CR 0.33-0.94), and irinotecan (OS HR 0.71, 95 % CR 0.52-0.99). Paclitaxel plus ramucirumab also had an 89 % probability of being the best regimen among all these regimens. Single-agent ramucirumab, paclitaxel, docetaxel, and irinotecan were comparable to each other with respect to OS and were superior to best supportive care. This is the first network meta-analysis to compare all second-line regimens reported in phase III gastric cancer trials. The results suggest the paclitaxel plus ramucirumab combination is the most effective therapy and should be the reference regimen for future comparative trials.

  16. Efficacy of chemotherapy combined with targeted arterial infusion of verapamil in patients with advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Ning, Zhongliang; Chen, Dong; Liu, Aiguo; Fan, Pingsheng; Duan, Qiaohong; Zhang, Tengyue; Fan, Gaofei

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluated the efficacy of chemotherapy combined with targeted arterial infusion of verapamil in patients with advanced gastric cancer. Forty patients were enrolled. Targeted arterial infusion of verapamil was done once a month, 3-5 times per patient, along with chemotherapy. After 2 bouts of combined treatment, the efficacy was evaluated. Primary gastric tumor was confirmed in 38/40 patients, and unconfirmed in 2/40 patients due to adhesion of tumors to surrounding tissue. Combined treatment was administered in 38 patients with defined tumors. Complete response to the treatment was in 5/38 (13.1 %) patients, partial response in 27/38 (71.1 %) patients, stable disease in 4/38 (10.5 %) patients, and progressive disease in 2/38 (5.26 %) patients. The effective rate (i.e., complete + partial response) comprised 84.2 %. There were 31 patients with liver metastases; 10/31 (32.3 %) patients showed complete response, 16/31 (51.6 %) patients showed partial response, 3/31 (9.7 %) patients had stable disease, and 2/31 (6.5 %) patients had progressive disease. The effective rate in these patients was 83.8 %. Thirty-seven patients were followed up, and 27/37 (73.0 %) patients were alive for 6 months or longer, 19/37 (51.3 %) for 12 months, 8 (35.1 %) for 18 months, and 8/37 (21.6 %) for 24 months. In conclusion, in patients with advanced gastric cancer, chemotherapy is more effective when combined with targeted arterial infusion of verapamil, leading to extended patients' survival and improved quality of life.

  17. Non-Randomized Confirmatory Trial of Laparoscopy-Assisted Total Gastrectomy and Proximal Gastrectomy with Nodal Dissection for Clinical Stage I Gastric Cancer: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study JCOG1401

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Kozo; Mizusawa, Junki; Katayama, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kenichi; Morita, Shinji; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Ito, Seiji; Kinoshita, Takahiro; Fukagawa, Takeo; Sasako, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Several prospective studies on laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer have been initiated, but no prospective study evaluating laparoscopy-assisted total gastrectomy or laparoscopy-assisted proximal gastrectomy has been completed to date. A non-randomized confirmatory trial was commenced in April 2015 to evaluate the safety of laparoscopy-assisted total gastrectomy and laparoscopy-assisted proximal gastrectomy for clinical stage I gastric cancer. A total of 245 patients will be accrued from 42 Japanese institutions over 3 years. The primary endpoint is the proportion of patients with anastomotic leakage. The secondary endpoints are overall survival, relapse-free survival, proportion of patients with completed laparoscopy-assisted total gastrectomy or laparoscopy-assisted proximal gastrectomy, proportion of patients with conversion to open surgery, adverse events, and short-term clinical outcomes. The UMIN Clinical Trials Registry number is UMIN000017155. PMID:27433394

  18. High expression of Wls is associated with lymph node metastasis and advanced TNM stage in gastric carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Tao, Hong; Chen, Xiao; Sugimura, Haruhiko; Wang, Jiandong; Zhou, Ping

    2017-03-01

    The roles of Wnt protein in carcinogenesis have been well documented in human cancers. Wls is a key modulator for the secretion of Wnt protein. We previously found that Wls was aberrantly expressed in colorectal carcinomas. Studies have revealed that dysregulation of Wnt signal transduction plays an important role in gastric carcinoma. We hypothesized that Wls may play a role in the development and progression of gastric carcinoma. In this study, three gastric cancer cell lines MGC-803, SGC-7901, and AGS, and a set of gastric carcinoma tissue specimens were subjected to immunohistochemistry. The relationship between the expression of Wls and clinicopathological parameters was analyzed. Wls was negatively detected in MGC-803, positively detected in SGC-7901 and AGS cell lines. Wls was weakly expressed in 9.7% (15/154), moderately in 33.1% (51/154), and strongly in 57.1% (88/154) of tested gastric carcinoma specimens. High expression of Wls was positively associated with well and moderately differentiated tumors (P = 0.035, rs  = 0.170), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.001, rs  = 0.276), and advanced TNM stage (P = 0.006, rs  = 0.219). Our data suggest that Wls protein is related to tumor metastasis and advanced TNM stage, and may be used as a new marker for prognosis of gastric carcinoma.

  19. [Combination Chemotherapy Using Oxaliplatin plus S-1 for Well-Advanced Gastric Cancer].

    PubMed

    Saito, Hiroyuki; Suematsu, Yuki; Yamagishi, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Miyuki; Nakayama, Mao; Fukabori, Michiko; Morita, Akihiko; Wakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Itoh, Yutaka

    2016-11-01

    We studied the clinical efficacy of pre-operative combination chemotherapy using S-1 plus oxaliplatin for advanced gastric cancer. Four patients hadclinical Stage IV disease, 1 patient had clinical Stage III C disease, 2 patients had clinical Stage III B disease, and 1 patient had clinical Stage III A disease. The patients received 2-8 courses of oxaliplatin(130mg/m2)on day 1, andS -1 on days 1-14 every 3 weeks. The response rate was 56%(5 PR, 1 PD, and2 SD), andthe disease control rate was 88%. Toxicities were Grade 2 anemia, Grade 1 peripheral neuropathy, Grade 1 fatigue, and anorexia. Five of the 8 patients underwent R0 surgery after SOX chemotherapy, and no severe complications occurred. Histological responses were Grade 3 for 2 cases, Grade 2 for 2 cases, andGrad e 1a for 1 case. The SOX regimen showeda high objective tumor response, andis one of the promising regimens in the neoadjuvant setting for well-advanced gastric cancer.

  20. Management of advanced gastric cancer: An overview of major findings from meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Danxian; Li, Wende; Hui, Jialiang; Liu, Chuan; Zhao, Yanxia; Li, Guoxin

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to provide an overview of different treatment for advanced gastric cancer. In the present study, we systematically reviewed the major findings from relevant meta-analyses. A total of 54 relevant papers were searched via the PubMed, Web of Science, and Google scholar databases. They were classified according to the mainstay treatment modalities such as surgery, chemotherapy and others. Primary outcomes including overall survival, response rate, disease-free survival, recurrence-free survival, progression-free survival, time-to-progression, time-to failure, recurrence and safety were summarized. The recommendations and uncertainties regarding the treatment of advanced gastric cancer were also proposed. It was suggested that laparoscopic gastrectomy was a safe and technical alternative to open gastrectomy. Besides, neoadjuvant chemotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy were thought to benefit the survival over surgery alone. And it was demonstrated in the study that targeted therapy like anti-angiogenic and anti-HER2 agents but anti-EGFR agent might have a significant survival benefit. PMID:27655725

  1. Role of salvage radiotherapy for regional lymph node recurrence after radical surgery in advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byoung Hyuck; Kim, Jae-Sung; Kim, Hyung-Ho; Park, Do Joong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the role of salvage radiotherapy (RT) for the treatment of regional lymph node recurrence (RLNR) after radical surgery in advanced gastric cancer. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed medical records of 26 patients who underwent salvage treatment after diagnosis of RLNR between 2006 and 2011. Patients with peritoneal seeding or distant metastasis were excluded. Eighteen patients received RT with or without chemotherapy and the other 8 did chemotherapy only without RT. A three-dimensional conformal RT was performed with median dose of 56 Gy (range, 44 to 60 Gy). Sixteen patients had fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy, 5 did taxane-based chemotherapy, and irinotecan was applied in 4. Results With a median follow-up of 20 months (range, 5 to 57 months), median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) after diagnosis of RLNR were 29 months and 12 months in the entire patients, respectively. Radiotherapy (p = 0.007) and disease-free interval (p = 0.033) were statistically significant factors for OS in multivariate analysis. Median OS was 36 months in patients who received RT and 16 months in those who did not. Furthermore, delivery of RT (p < 0.001), complete remission after salvage treatment (p = 0.040) and performance status (p = 0.023) were associated with a significantly better PFS. Gastrointestinal toxicities from RT were mild in most patients. Conclusion Salvage RT combined with systemic chemotherapy may be an effective treatment managing RLNR from advanced gastric cancer. PMID:24137560

  2. Serum VEGFR-3 and survival of advanced gastric cancer patients treated with FOLFOX

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Xue-Feng; Wu, Chang-Ping; Jiang, Jing-Ting

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To explore if vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) can predict overall survival in advanced gastric cancer. METHODS: VEGFR-3 level was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and CEA was assessed by chemiluminescence immunoassay in the sera of 81 advanced gastric cancer patients before treatment with oxaliplatin plus 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid. RESULTS: Median survival time in patients with a low serum VEGFR-3 level was significantly longer than in those with a higher VEGFR-3 level (15.4 mo vs 7.7 mo, P < 0.001). Patients with a low CEA level had a longer survival than those with a higher CEA level (15.8 mo vs 8.6 mo, P < 0.001). Thirty-nine patients with low VEGFR-3 and low CEA levels had a median survival of 19.7 mo (P = 0.0006). The hazard ratio for patients with a high VEGFR-3 level was 2.443 (P = 0.002). CONCLUSION: High serum VEGFR-3 level is correlated significantly with poor survival. In patients with a high serum level of VEGFR-3, alternative chemotherapy regimens should be considered. PMID:20440858

  3. Initial Experience with Nab-Paclitaxel for Patients with Advanced Gastric Cancer: Safety and Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Yoshikazu; Fujita, Itsuo; Kakinuma, Diasuke; Arai, Hiroki; Matsuno, Kunihiko; Shimoda, Tomohiro; Ko, Kazuhide; Kato, Shunji; Uchida, Eiji

    2017-05-01

    Taxane-based chemotherapy is useful for peritoneal dissemination control in advanced/recurrent gastric cancer; however, insufficient relative dose intensity (RDI) may preclude disease control achievement. Nab-paclitaxel, with high tumour permeability, is a promising second- or later-line treatment. We retrospectively evaluated the clinical safety and efficacy of nab-paclitaxel for advanced/recurrent gastric cancer patients treated between April 2013 and December 2015. The response rate, RDI and survival outcomes were assessed. Of 14 evaluated patients, 4 achieved partial response. Overall response and the disease control rates were 28.5% and 64.2%, respectively. Nine patients developed peritoneal metastasis; their overall response and disease control rate were 22.2% and 66.6%. Patients with high RDI (≥80%) showed longer progression-free and overall survival than those with low RDI (≤80%) (11.8 vs. 4.0 months, p=0.02; and 14.3 vs. 8.2 months, p=0.03, respectively). Nab-paclitaxel, at an RDI ≥80%, was safe and beneficial for these patients. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  4. Genomic alterations in advanced gastric cancer endoscopic biopsy samples using targeted next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ge, Sai; Li, Beifang; Li, Yanyan; Li, Zhongwu; Liu, Zhentao; Chen, Zuhua; Wu, Jian; Gao, Jing; Shen, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) remains the second tumor caused death threat worldwide, and personalized medicine for GC is far from expectation. Finding novel, recurrently mutated genes through next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a powerful and productive approach. However, previous genomic data for GC are based on surgical resected samples while a large proportion of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) patients have already missed the chance for operation. The aim of this study is to assess frequent genomic alteration in AGC via biopsy samples. Here we performed targeted genomic sequencing of 78 AGC patients' tumor biopsies along with matched lymphocyte samples based on a 118 cancer related gene panel. In total, we observed 301 somatic nonsynonymous genomic alterations in 92 different genes, as well as 37 copy number gain events among 15 different genes (fold change 2-12), and validated the fold changes of ERBB2 copy number gains with IHC and FISH test showed an accuracy of 81.8%. Previously reported driver genes for gastric cancer (TP53, KMT2D, KMT2B, EGFR, PIK3CA, GNAQ, and ARID1A), and several unreported mutations (TGFBR2, RNF213, NF1, NSD1, and LRP2) showed high non-silent mutation prevalence (7.7%-34.6%). When comparing intestinal-type gastric cancer (IGC) with diffuse-type gastric cancer (DGC), TP53 and GNAQ appear to be more frequently mutated in IGC (P=0.028 and P=0.023, respectively), whereas LRP2, BRCA2 and FGFR3 mutations are not observed in IGC, but have 12.8%, 7.7% and 7.7% mutation rates, respectively, in DGC patients. Patients with one or more mutations in adherens junction pathway (CREBBP, EP300, CDH1, CTNNB1, EGFR, MET, TGFBR2 and ERBB2) or TGF-β signaling pathway (CREBBP, EP300, MYST4, KRAS and TGFBR2) showed significantly better overall survival (P=0.007 and P=0.014, respectively), consistent with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) cohort data. Importantly, 57 (73.1%) patients harbored at least one genomic alteration with potential treatments, making NGS-based drug

  5. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Second-Line Chemotherapy Agents for Advanced Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lam, Simon W; Wai, Maya; Lau, Jessica E; McNamara, Michael; Earl, Marc; Udeh, Belinda

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fifth most common malignancy and second leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Chemotherapy options for patients who fail first-line treatment are limited. Thus the objective of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of second-line treatment options for patients with advanced or metastatic gastric cancer. Cost-effectiveness analysis using a Markov model to compare the cost-effectiveness of six possible second-line treatment options for patients with advanced gastric cancer who have failed previous chemotherapy: irinotecan, docetaxel, paclitaxel, ramucirumab, paclitaxel plus ramucirumab, and palliative care. The model was performed from a third-party payer's perspective to compare lifetime costs and health benefits associated with studied second-line therapies. Costs included only relevant direct medical costs. The model assumed chemotherapy cycle lengths of 30 days and a maximum number of 24 cycles. Systematic review of literature was performed to identify clinical data sources and utility and cost data. Quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were calculated. The primary outcome measure for this analysis was the ICER between different therapies, where the incremental cost was divided by the number of QALYs saved. The ICER was compared with a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold that was set at $50,000/QALY gained, and an exploratory analysis using $160,000/QALY gained was also used. The model's robustness was tested by using 1-way sensitivity analyses and a 10,000 Monte Carlo simulation probabilistic sensitivity analysis (PSA). Irinotecan had the lowest lifetime cost and was associated with a QALY gain of 0.35 year. Docetaxel, ramucirumab alone, and palliative care were dominated strategies. Paclitaxel and the combination of paclitaxel plus ramucirumab led to higher QALYs gained, at an incremental cost of $86,815 and $1,056,125 per QALY gained, respectively. Based on our prespecified

  6. Evaluation of Outcome and Tolerability of Combination Chemotherapy with Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin as First Line Therapy in Advanced Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mashhadi, Mohammad Ali; Sepehri, Zahra; Bakhshipour, Ali Reza; Zivari, Ali; Danesh, Hossein Ali; Metanat, Hasan Ali; Karimkoshteh, Azra; Hashemi, Seyed Mehdi; Rahimi, Hossein; Kiani, Zohre

    2016-01-01

    Background: Combination chemotherapy is accepted as a high efficacy treatment for gastric cancer, whereas choice of standard treatment is unclear. Multiple chemotherapeutic regimens have been used to achieve higher efficacy and lower toxicity. This study was designed to evaluate the treatment results of advanced gastric cancer with Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin regimen. Subjects and Methods : All cases with documented gastric adenocarcinoma and advanced disease were candidates for receiving Xelox regimen (Capecitabine – 750 mg/m2/twice daily/ 1-14 days and Oxaliplatin 125 mg/m2 in 1st day). Results: Twenty five cases with advanced gastric cancer entered in study while 24 cases continued treatment protocol and were evaluated. Mean age was 59.5 ± 12.1 years (range: 20-75), male and female cases were 66.7% and 33.3%, respectively. All cases received at least four cycles of Xelox regimen. Overall response rate was 74.99% with 29.16% complete response. Overall survival rate was 13 ± 0.53 months and DFS (disease-free survival) was 6 ± 1.09 months. Extremities neuropathy (62.5%), headache (45.8%) and muscle cramps (29.2%) were the most common complains. Haematological changes were rare and 16.7% of cases had mild cytopenia. Treatment related death was not observed. Conclusion: Xelox regimen is a safe and highly effective first line treatment for gastric cancer; however, considering it as first line therapy needs larger studies. PMID:27928475

  7. Evaluation of Outcome and Tolerability of Combination Chemotherapy with Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin as First Line Therapy in Advanced Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mashhadi, Mohammad Ali; Sepehri, Zahra; Bakhshipour, Ali Reza; Zivari, Ali; Danesh, Hossein Ali; Metanat, Hasan Ali; Karimkoshteh, Azra; Hashemi, Seyed Mehdi; Rahimi, Hossein; Kiani, Zohre

    2016-10-01

    Background: Combination chemotherapy is accepted as a high efficacy treatment for gastric cancer, whereas choice of standard treatment is unclear. Multiple chemotherapeutic regimens have been used to achieve higher efficacy and lower toxicity. This study was designed to evaluate the treatment results of advanced gastric cancer with Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin regimen. Subjects and Methods: All cases with documented gastric adenocarcinoma and advanced disease were candidates for receiving Xelox regimen (Capecitabine - 750 mg/m(2)/twice daily/ 1-14 days and Oxaliplatin 125 mg/m(2) in 1st day). Results: Twenty five cases with advanced gastric cancer entered in study while 24 cases continued treatment protocol and were evaluated. Mean age was 59.5 ± 12.1 years (range: 20-75), male and female cases were 66.7% and 33.3%, respectively. All cases received at least four cycles of Xelox regimen. Overall response rate was 74.99% with 29.16% complete response. Overall survival rate was 13 ± 0.53 months and DFS (disease-free survival) was 6 ± 1.09 months. Extremities neuropathy (62.5%), headache (45.8%) and muscle cramps (29.2%) were the most common complains. Haematological changes were rare and 16.7% of cases had mild cytopenia. Treatment related death was not observed. Conclusion: Xelox regimen is a safe and highly effective first line treatment for gastric cancer; however, considering it as first line therapy needs larger studies.

  8. Evaluation of a risk index for advanced proximal neoplasia of the colon.

    PubMed

    Ruco, Arlinda; Stock, David; Hilsden, Robert J; McGregor, S Elizabeth; Paszat, Lawrence F; Saskin, Refik; Rabeneck, Linda

    2015-01-01

    A clinical risk index that uses distal colorectal findings at flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS) in conjunction with easily determined risk factors for advanced proximal neoplasia (APN) may be useful for tailoring or prioritizing screening with colonoscopy. To conduct an external evaluation of a previously published risk index in a large, well-characterized cohort. Cross-sectional. Teaching hospital and colorectal cancer screening center. A total of 5139 asymptomatic persons aged 50 to 74 (54.9% women) with a mean age (±SD) of 58.3 (±6.2) years. Between 2003 and 2011, all participants underwent a complete screening colonoscopy and removal of all polyps. Participants were classified as low, intermediate, or high risk for APN, based on their composite risk index scores. The concordance or c-statistic was used to measure discriminating ability of the risk index. A total of 167 persons (3.2%) had APN. The prevalence of those with APN among low-, intermediate-, and high-risk categories was 2.1%, 2.9%, and 6.5%, respectively. High-risk individuals were 3.2 times more likely to have APN compared with those in the low-risk category. The index did not discriminate well between those in the low- and intermediate-risk categories. The c-statistic for the overall index was 0.62 (95% confidence interval, 0.58-0.66). Distal colorectal findings were derived from colonoscopies and not FS itself. The risk index discriminated between those at low risk and those at high risk, but it had limited ability to discriminate between low- and intermediate-risk categories for prevalent APN. Information on other risk factors may be needed to tailor, or prioritize, access to screening colonoscopy. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of subjects at risk of proximal advanced neoplasia for colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Wong, Martin C S; Ching, Jessica Y L; Chan, Victor C W; Lam, Thomas Y T; Luk, Arthur K C; Wong, Sunny H; Ng, Siew C; Ng, Simon S M; Wu, Justin C Y; Chan, Francis K L; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2015-01-01

    Flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS) and colonoscopy are two commonly used screening tools for colorectal cancer (CRC), and FS mainly detects distal lesions. Colonoscopy resource is limited, yet there is no definite evidence on when flexible sigmoidoscopy is suitable as a screening alternative. This study evaluated the optimal cut-off score from a validated risk stratification system which best predicts proximal advanced neoplasia (PAN) by comparing the sensitivity, specificity and relative risk of PAN according to various cut-off scores. 5819 asymptomatic subjects aged between 50 and 70years (average age 57.7years, standard deviation (SD) 4.9) received colonoscopy between 2008 and 2014 in Hong Kong. Their prevalence of PAN was evaluated according to a prediction tool for colorectal neoplasia based on age, gender, smoking status, family history of CRC, body mass index (BMI) and diabetes (ranging from 0 to 6). One binary logistic regression model was performed with PAN as the outcome variable and the risk score as the variable tested for association. In multivariate regression analysis, risk score ⩾3 was associated with significantly higher risk of PAN (3.4-9.1%; AOR=3.18-8.09, p<0.001) when compared with those scoring 0. Risk scores 0-2 were associated with either insignificant or lower risks of PAN compared to the overall risk. Applying FS for screening those who scored 0-2 and colonoscopy for those who scored ⩾3 led to a very small proportion of PAN being missed (1.60%), whilst maintaining a high level of specificity (81.9%). Clinicians may use this scoring system to inform subjects and facilitate their choice between colonoscopy and FS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Benefits of Recurrent Colonic Stent Insertion in a Patient with Advanced Gastric Cancer with Carcinomatosis Causing Colonic Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Park, Semi; Shin, Sang Joon; Ahn, Joong Bae; Jeung, Hei-Cheul; Rha, Sun Young; Lee, Sang Kil

    2009-01-01

    Malignant obstruction develops frequently in advanced gastric cancer. Although it is primarily the gastric outlet that is obstructed, there are occasional reports of colonic obstruction. Treating intestinal obstruction usually requires emergency surgery or stent insertion. There are several kinds of complications with stent insertion, such as bowel perforation, stent migration, bleeding, abdominal pain and reobstruction. Nevertheless, endoscopic stent insertion could be a better treatment than emergency surgery in cases of malignant bowel obstruction in cancer patients with poor performance status. We report a case of advanced gastric cancer with carcinomatosis in which a recurrent colonic stent was inserted at the same site because of cancer growth into the stent. The patient maintained a good condition for chemotherapy, thus improving their chances for survival. PMID:19430568

  11. A Case of Advanced Gastric Cancer with Para-Aortic Lymph Node Metastasis from Co-Occurring Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Miyeong; Lee, Young-Joon; Park, Ji-Ho; Choi, Sang-Kyung; Hong, Soon-Chan; Jung, Eun-Jung; Ju, Young-tae; Jeong, Chi-Young; Lee, Jeong-Hee; Ha, Woo-Song

    2017-01-01

    An 84-year-old man was diagnosed with two synchronous adenocarcinomas, a Borrmann type IV advanced gastric adenocarcinoma in his antrum and a well-differentiated Borrmann type I carcinoma on the anterior wall of the higher body of his stomach. Pre-operatively, computed tomography of the abdomen revealed the presence of advanced gastric cancer with peri-gastric and para-aortic lymph node (LN) metastasis. He planned for palliative total gastrectomy owing to the risk of obstruction by the antral lesion. We performed a frozen biopsy of a para-aortic LN during surgery and found that the origin of the para-aortic LN metastasis was from undiagnosed prostate cancer. Thus, we performed radical total gastrectomy and D2 LN dissection. Post-operatively, his total prostate-specific antigen levels were high (227 ng/mL) and he was discharged 8 days after surgery without any complications. PMID:28337367

  12. Expression of Mismatch Repair Proteins in Early and Advanced Gastric Cancer in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Karpińska-Kaczmarczyk, Katarzyna; Lewandowska, Magdalena; Ławniczak, Małgorzata; Białek, Andrzej; Urasińska, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    Background Mutations in DNA of mismatch repair (MMR) genes result in failure to repair errors that occur during DNA replication in microsatellites, resulting in accumulation of frameshift mutations in these genes and leading to DNA mismatch replication errors and microsatellite instability. Gastric cancers (GCs) with high MSI (MSI-H) are a well-defined subset of carcinomas showing distinctive clinicopathological features. In this study we investigated the rate of MSI and the correlation between MSI status and clinicopathological features of GC. Material/Methods The study included 107 patients with GCs: 61 with advanced gastric cancers (AGC) and 46 with early gastric cancer (EGC). MSI deficiency in GCs was assessed by the immunohistochemical analysis of expression of MMR proteins – MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 – using formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue. Results A total of 6 (5.6%) MSI-H were observed. The loss of MMR proteins expression was associated with the intestinal type of GC in Lauren classification, and tubular and papillary architecture in WHO classification. There was no statistically significant association between negative MMR expression and other selected clinical parameters: age, sex, tumor location, depth of invasion (EGC and AGC), lymph nodes status, presence of the ulceration, and lymphocytic infiltrate. Conclusions In the present era of personalized medicine, the histological type of GC and MMR proteins status in cancer cells are very important for the proper surveillance of patients with familial GC and sporadic GCs, as well as for selecting the proper follow-up and treatment. Larger collaborative studies are needed to verify the features of MSI-H GCs in Poland. PMID:27527654

  13. Treatment of weight regain following roux-en-Y gastric bypass: revision of pouch, creation of new gastrojejunostomy and placement of proximal pericardial patch ring.

    PubMed

    Moon, Rena C; Teixeira, Andre F; Jawad, Muhammad A

    2014-06-01

    In the literature, weight regain or failure of weight loss has been reported in up to 35% of patients after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). Several revisional procedures have been suggested to reinitiate further weight loss in this group of patients, and placing a silastic ring around the pouch proximal to the gastrojejunostomy is one among those procedures. The aim of our study is to evaluate and compare the safety and efficacy of salvage banding using a pericardial patch after RYGB for further weight loss. Between December 2009 and April 2013, a total of 46 patients underwent revision with pericardial patch ring after RYGB for weight regain/failure of weight loss. A retrospective review of a prospectively collected database was performed, noting the outcomes and complications of the procedure. The mean body mass index at the time of revision was 40.1 ± 6.8 kg/m2. Mean percentage of excess weight loss was 23.4 ± 15.7%, 39.0 ± 27.4%, and 18.9 ± 20.5% at 6, 12 and 24 months after revision, respectively. Eight (17.4%) patients required a total of 11 readmissions due to nausea, vomiting, dysphagia and abdominal pain. Six (13.0%) patients underwent a total of six reoperations, including four patients with laparoscopic removal of the pericardial patch and another revision of RYGB, and two patients with repair of perforated ulcers. Revision with pericardial patch ring after gastric bypass for weight regain or failure of weight loss may not be feasible, safe and effective.

  14. Efficacy of Adoptive Immune-cell Therapy in Patients with Advanced Gastric Cancer: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Takimoto, Rishu; Kamigaki, Takashi; Okada, Sachiko; Matsuda, Eriko; Ibe, Hiroshi; Oguma, Eri; Naitoh, Keiko; Makita, Kaori; Goto, Shigenori

    2017-07-01

    Conventional therapy for advanced gastric cancer (GC) has limited survival benefits. In this retrospective study, we aimed to investigate the efficacy of immune-cell therapy, using in vitro-activated T-lymphocytes with and without dendritic cells (DCs), in combination with standard therapies in terms of the survival of patients with advanced GC. A total of 242 patients who were diagnosed as having stage-IV GC were enrolled in this study to receive immune-cell therapy with or without standard therapies, such as chemotherapy, surgery, or radiation therapy. Overall survival was analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier with log-rank test and Cox regression methods. Immune-cell therapy increased median survival time (21.5 months) in patients with advanced GC. The patients who underwent surgery with or without chemotherapy as a prior treatment showed better prognosis than those who received other therapies (p<0.001). Patients who showed stable disease or a partial response to immune-cell therapy had a better prognosis than those with progressive disease (p<0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that performance status, the type of immune-cell therapy, and prior treatment were independent prognostic factors for patients with GC. No serious adverse event was reported in immune-cell therapy. Immune-cell therapy might extend the survival of patients with advanced GC. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  15. Fulminant plasmapheresis-refractory thrombotic microangiopathy associated with advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Vasko, Radovan; Koziolek, Michael; Füzesi, Laszlo; König, Fatima; Strutz, Frank; Müller, Gerhard Anton

    2010-04-01

    We report a case of a 27-year-old female with thrombotic microangiopathy as an initial presentation of an unexpected disseminated gastric carcinoma. Based on clinical features and laboratory findings, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) was diagnosed and plasma exchange started. However, she had responded poorly to plasmapheresis, developed multiorgan failure and died 72 h after admission. Autopsy revealed a disseminated gastric adenocarcinoma with metastatic infiltration of dura mater and disseminated tumor cell emboli in the microcirculation of the liver and lungs. Genetic analysis revealed amplification of KRAS oncogene and aberrations in DCC tumor suppressor gene, which can explain the young age and advanced disease at presentation. The role of plasmapheresis in cancer-associated TTP is uncertain. Plasmapheresis delivers fresh coagulation factors and may theoretically promote microthrombi formation and lead to worsening of the disease. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura seems to be a late and prognostically poor manifestation of an underlying malignancy, with majority of patients dying soon after diagnosis. It is important to be aware of this possibility in thrombotic microangiopathy, especially with atypical features and poor response to standard treatment.

  16. Relationship between clinicopathological features and mucin phenotypes of advanced gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Toki, Fumiaki; Takahashi, Atsushi; Aihara, Ryusuke; Ogata, Kyoichi; Ando, Hiroyuki; Ohno, Tetsuro; Mochiki, Erito; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate a relationship between the clinicopathological features and mucin phenotypes in advanced gastric adenocarcinoma (AGA). METHODS: Immunohistochemical staining was performed to determine the mucin phenotypes in 38 patients with differentiated adenocarcinomas (DACs), 9 with signet-ring cell carcinomas (SIGs), and 48 with other diffuse-type adenocarcinomas (non-SIGs) of AGA. The mucin phenotypes were classified into 4 types: gastric (G), gastrointestinal (GI), intestinal, and unclassified. RESULTS: The G-related mucin phenotypes were highly expressed in all the histological subtypes of AGA. The expression of the GI phenotype in SIG patients was lower than that in DAC patients (P = 0.02), and this phenotype was observed in 56% of the non-SIG patients in the intramucosal layer. Among non-SIG cases, the expression of the GI phenotype was significantly higher in patients with extended adenocarcinomas and those with positive rates of lymph node metastasis. There was no difference between the expressions of the G and other GI phenotypes factors. Among DAC and non-SIG patients, there were no differences between the survival rates of the corresponding patient groups. CONCLUSION: The GI phenotype might possess more invasive characteristics than the G phenotype in non-SIG. Neither of the phenotypes indicated a poor prognosis of DAC and non-SIG. PMID:20533596

  17. Oxaliplatin/Irinotecan/Bevacizumab Followed by Docetaxel/Bevacizumab in Inoperable Locally Advanced or Metastatic Gastric Cancer Patients - AGMT_GASTRIC-3.

    PubMed

    Wöll, Ewald; Thaler, Josef; Keil, Felix; Gruenberger, Birgit; Hejna, Michael; Eisterer, Wolfgang; Fridrik, Michael A; Ulmer, Hanno; Trommet, Vera; Huemer, Florian; Weiss, Lukas; Greil, Richard

    2017-10-01

    Although high response rates using the doublet-chemotherapy of oxaliplatin and irinotecan as well as its combination with cetuximab in advanced gastric cancer were shown in previous trials, time to progression was short, suggesting acquired chemotherapy resistance. Sequential chemotherapy (oxaliplatin and irinotecan followed by docetaxel) combined with bevacizumab was investigated in the GASTRIC-3 trial. Patients achieving at least stable disease were continued on maintenance bevacizumab. Objective response rate was available in 33 patients: Complete response (CR) 12.1%, partial response (PR) 39.4%, stable disease (SD) 27.3%. Median time to progression was 7.0 months (95%CI=5.0-11.0) and median overall survival was 11 months (95%CI=9.0-15.0). Of note, two patients continue to receive bevacizumab maintenance therapy for more than 5 years with ongoing CR. Combining sequential chemotherapy with oxaliplatin/irinotecan and docetaxel with bevacizumab followed by bevacizumab maintenance is feasible and clinically active in advanced gastric cancer. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  18. Updates on surgical management of advanced gastric cancer: new evidence and trends. Insights from the First International Course on Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery--Varese (Italy), December 2, 2011.

    PubMed

    Rausei, Stefano; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Sano, Takeshi; Sasako, Mitsuru; Biondi, Alberto; Morgagni, Paolo; Garofalo, Alfredo; Boni, Luigi; Frattini, Francesco; D'Ugo, Domenico; Preston, Shaun; Marrelli, Daniele; Degiuli, Maurizio; Capella, Carlo; Sacco, Rosario; Ruspi, Laura; De Manzoni, Giovanni; Roviello, Franco; Pinotti, Graziella; Rovera, Francesca; Noh, Sung Hoon; Coit, Daniel; Dionigi, Renzo

    2013-11-01

    Between the Ninth International Gastric Cancer Congress (IGCC) in South-Korea (Seoul, 2011) and the Tenth IGCC in Italy (Verona, 2013), the Insubria University organized the First International Course on Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery (Varese, December 2, 2011), with the patronage of Italian Research Group for Gastric Cancer (IRGGC) and the International Gastric Cancer Association (IGCA). The Course was intended to be a comprehensive update and review on advanced gastric cancer (GC) staging and treatment from well-known international experts. Clinical, research, and educational aspects of the surgeon's role in the era of stage-adapted therapy were discussed. As highlighted in the meeting, in this final document we summarize and thoroughly analyze (with references only for well-acquired randomized control trials) the new and old open problems in surgical management of advanced GC. Between the Ninth (Seoul, 2011) and the Tenth (Verona,2013) International Gastric Cancer Congress, the First International Course on Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery (Varese, December 2, 2011) was organized by the University of Insubria. This congress received the patronage of the International Gastric Cancer Association and the Italian Research Group for Gastric Cancer. The aim was to discuss open issues in surgical management of advanced gastric malignancies. We considered the opinions of several recognized experts in the field from both the Eastern and Western world, focused on definition problems and oncological and technical issues to define the current principles of advanced gastric cancer (GC) surgery.

  19. Mycobacterium conceptionense Bloodstream Infection in a Patient with Advanced Gastric Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yaita, Kenichiro; Matsunaga, Mototsugu; Tashiro, Naotaka; Sakai, Yoshiro; Masunaga, Kenji; Miyoshi, Hiroaki; Oshima, Koichi; Chikamatsu, Kinuyo; Takaki, Akiko; Mitarai, Satoshi; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2017-01-24

    A 65-year-old Japanese male farmer with advanced gastric adenocarcinoma and multiple hepatic metastases was admitted to our hospital. Blood culture results were positive on day 5, and Gram-positive rods were detected. According to the results of Ziehl-Neelsen staining and a cultured colony of this bacterium, we suspected a mycobacterial infection. Suspecting a rapidly growing mycobacterium (RGM), we started multidrug therapy with levofloxacin, clarithromycin, and ethambutol, and the patient recovered from the bloodstream infection. Further gene examination (16S rRNA, hsp65, and sodA) revealed an isolate of Mycobacterium conceptionense. M. conceptionense was first identified as an RGM in 2006. Among previous case reports of M. conceptionense infections, bone and soft tissue infections in hosts with a disorder of the normal structure (e.g., surgical sites) were dominant. We report the characteristics of M. conceptionense infection in this first Japanese case report and a review of the literature.

  20. Intraperitoneal chemotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer to prevent and treat peritoneal carcinomatosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the leading causes of cancer death in both sexes in the world. The overall survival (OS) of GC patients is still unsatisfactory. The peritoneal dissemination is the most common type of recurrence in advanced GC. The rationale for administering chemotherapeutic drugs directly into peritoneal cavity is supported by the relative transport barrier that is formed by the tissue surrounding the peritoneal space. Intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy with taxanes is safe and feasible. Further randomized phase III clinical trials are needed to validate IP chemotherapy with taxanes for peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) from GC. Adjuvant hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) used as prophylaxis against peritoneal recurrence in patients with high risk GC is safe, significantly improves the survival and reduces the risk of peritoneal recurrence. A drug delivery system with anticancer drugs seem to be have a pharmacokinetic advantage but further randomized clinical trials are needed to validate its effect. PMID:28138628

  1. Intraoperative Radiotherapy Combined With Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Shen; Lu Jiade; Zhang Qing Yang Zhe; Peng Lihua; Xiong, Fei

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) followed by concurrent chemotherapy and external beam RT (EBRT) in the treatment of locally advanced gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 97 consecutive and nonselected patients with newly diagnosed Stage T3, T4, or N+ adenocarcinoma of the stomach underwent gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection between March 2003 and October 2005. Of the 97 patients, 51 received adjuvant concurrent chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, docetaxel, and cisplatin) and EBRT (EBRT group) and 46 received IORT (dose range, 12-15 Gy) immediately after gastrectomy and lymph node dissection before concurrent chemoradiotherapy (EBRT+IORT group). Results: After a median follow-up of 24 months, the 3-year locoregional control rate was 77% and 63% in the two groups with or without IORT, respectively (p = 0.05). The 3-year overall survival and disease-free survival rate was 47% and 36% in the EBRT group and 56% and 44% in the EBRT+IORT group, respectively (p > 0.05). Multivariate analyses revealed that the use of IORT, presence of residual disease after surgery, and pN category were independent prognostic factors for locoregional control and that IORT, pN, and pT categories were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (p < 0.05). Four patients experienced Grade 3 or 4 late complications, but no significant difference was observed between the two groups. Conclusions: Radical gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection and IORT followed by adjuvant chemoradiotherapy appeared to be feasible and well-tolerated in the treatment of locally advanced gastric cancer. The addition of IORT to the trimodality treatment significantly improved the 3-year locoregional control rate.

  2. Outcomes of Advanced Gastric Cancer Patients Treated with at Least Three Lines of Systemic Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fanotto, Valentina; Uccello, Mario; Pecora, Irene; Rimassa, Lorenza; Leone, Francesco; Rosati, Gerardo; Santini, Daniele; Giampieri, Riccardo; Di Donato, Samantha; Tomasello, Gianluca; Silvestris, Nicola; Pietrantonio, Filippo; Battaglin, Francesca; Avallone, Antonio; Scartozzi, Mario; Lutrino, Eufemia Stefania; Melisi, Davide; Antonuzzo, Lorenzo; Pellegrino, Antonio; Ferrari, Laura; Bordonaro, Roberto; Vivaldi, Caterina; Gerratana, Lorenzo; Bozzarelli, Silvia; Filippi, Roberto; Bilancia, Domenico; Russano, Marco; Aprile, Giuseppe

    2017-08-31

    Second-line therapy has consistently demonstrated survival benefit if compared with best supportive care; however, there is limited evidence whether further lines of treatment may improve the prognosis of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) patients. Starting from a real-world cohort of 868 AGC patients, we retrospectively analyzed baseline parameters, tumor characteristics, and treatment data of those treated with at least three lines. Categorical features were described through cross-tables and chi-square test. We explored the impact of treatment intensity and progression-free survival (PFS) experienced in previous lines on PFS and overall survival in third-line by uni- and multivariate Cox regression models and described by Kaplan-Meier estimator plot with log-rank test. Overall, 300 patients were included in the analysis. The most common site of primary tumor was gastric body; 45.3% of cancers had an intestinal histotype, 14% were human epidermal growth receptor 2 positive. In third-line, 45.7% of patients received a single-agent chemotherapy, 49.7% a combination regimen. Patients who had experienced a first-line PFS ≥6.9 months had a better prognosis compared with those who had achieved a shorter one. Consistently, a second-line PFS ≥3.5 months positively influenced the prognosis. Patients receiving a third-line combination regimen had better outcomes compared with those treated with a single-agent chemotherapy. Our real-world study confirms that selected AGC patients may receive third-line treatment. Longer PFS in previous lines or a more intense third-line treatment positively influenced prognosis. Further efforts are warranted to define the best therapeutic sequences, and to identify the optimal candidate for treatment beyond second-line. The benefit of third-line treatment to advanced gastric cancer patients is controversial. Our study depicts a real scenario of the clinical practice in Italy, confirming that a non-negligible proportion of patients receive a

  3. Reconstruction after proximal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer in the upper third of the stomach: an analysis of our 13-year experience.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masaki; Nakamori, Mikihito; Ojima, Toshiyasu; Katsuda, Masahiro; Iida, Takeshi; Hayata, Keiji; Matsumura, Shuuichi; Kato, Tomoya; Kitadani, Junya; Iwahashi, Makoto; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2014-07-01

    Fundoplication during esophagogastrostomy (EG) after proximal gastrectomy (PG) is a useful procedure to prevent reflux esophagitis, but it is unclear how much of the remnant stomach should be wrapped around the esophagus. We analyzed data from 101 patients who underwent PG for upper third early gastric cancer between 1999 and 2011. In all, 64 patients underwent EG, 25 underwent jejunal interposition (JI), and 12 underwent jejunal pouch interposition (JPI). We compared intraoperative details and postoperative outcomes, and investigated the relationships between the degree of the fundoplication during EG and endoscopic findings. The length of the operation was significantly shorter in the EG group than in the other 2 groups (P < .05), and the intraoperative blood loss was significantly less in the EG group (P < .05). The JI and the JPI groups had significantly greater rates of early complications than did the EG group (P = .01). Reflux esophagitis was present in 22% of patients in the EG group, 8% in the JPI group, and none in the JI group. In the EG group, reflux esophagitis was significantly less common in patients with a >180° wrap of the remnant stomach around the esophagus than in patients with a smaller wrap (P = .0008). The rate of body weight loss was significantly less in the EG group compared with the other 2 groups (P < .05). Considering the low invasiveness of the procedure and postoperative outcomes, we consider that EG with a >180° wrap as the optimal reconstructive procedure. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Pembrolizumab, Combination Chemotherapy, and Radiation Therapy Before Surgery in Treating Adult Patients With Locally Advanced Gastroesophageal Junction or Gastric Cardia Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-30

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Gastric Cardia Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer

  5. Prognostic value of circulating tumor cells in advanced gastric cancer patients receiving chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yongping; Ling, Yang; Qi, Qiufeng; Lan, Feng; Zhu, Ming; Zhang, Yaping; Bao, Yanqing; Zhang, Changsong

    2017-01-01

    The identification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) may provide important prognostic information in several types of solid tumors, including gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate whether CTC count may be used to predict survival in patients with advanced gastric cancer treated with chemotherapy. The CELLection™ Epithelial Enrich kit was used to isolate and purify CTCs from samples of peripheral blood. Immunofluorescent staining was used for CTC counting. High CTC counts were associated with poor tumor differentiation and high serum CEA levels (P=0.021 and 0.005, respectively). After 3 months, 16 patients with decreasing CTC counts after the first cycle of chemotherapy obtained complete response, partial response or stable disease, while 13 patients with increasing CTC counts developed progressive disease. The patients with decreasing CTC counts also exhibited longer progression-free survival (PFS) (P≤0.001) and overall survival (OS) (P=0.002) compared with those with increasing CTC counts. Among all 59 patients, those with a CTC count of ≤2 cells/5 ml blood exhibited longer PFS (P≤0.001) and OS (P≤0.001) compared with those with a CTC count of >2 cells/5 ml blood. The multivariate analysis suggested that an increase of the CTC count after the first cycle of chemotherapy was only an independent prognostic marker of poor PFS (P=0.019). However, a baseline CTC count of >2 cells/5 ml blood was an independent poor prognostic marker for PFS (P=0.008) and OS (P=0.001) in all 59 patients. Our study suggested that patients with a low baseline CTC count or decrease of the CTC count after the first cycle of chemotherapy may benefit significantly from palliative chemotherapy. In conclusion, CTC count may be a good chemotherapy monitoring marker and an ideal prognostic marker for patients receiving palliative chemotherapy. PMID:28357102

  6. [Prognostic factors for survival in patients with resectable advanced gastric adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Medrano-Guzmán, Rafael; Valencia-Mercado, Daniel; Luna-Castillo, Marisol; García-Ríos, Luis Enrique; González-Rodríguez, Domingo

    Patients under 45 years with gastric cancer are associated with a poor prognosis. Recent studies report that the 5-year survival is better in younger patients after curative resection. To determine if prognostic factors such as age under 45 years old, anaemia, weight loss, tumour differentiation, histological sub-type, depth of invasion, and lymph node involvement, reduce the survival of patients with resectable advanced gastric adenocarcinoma undergoing gastrectomy with limited and extended lymphadenectomy. This study included a cohort of consecutive cases treated in the Sarcomas Department of the Oncology Hospital of the Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI, of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, during the period between January 2000 and December 2006. Of the total of 588 patients evaluated, 112 (19%) were under 45 years, 43% classified as Borrmann IV, and 36% as Borrmann III. Metastatic disease was present in 39.3%, localised diffuse in 12.5%; lower resectability 52.7 vs. 61.3% in older than 45 years. At the end of the study 29.5% of patients under 45 years were alive; no recurrence in 26.8%, with an overall survival of 58.6±4.3 months, compared with 18.3% of patients alive over 45 years, 17.9% disease-free, and with overall survival 35.2±4.3 months resectable disease. Patients under 45 years have a better survival after a two-year disease-free period. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  7. Lectin microarray technology identifies specific lectins related to lymph node metastasis of advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Keishi; Kuno, Atsushi; Matsuda, Atsushi; Ikehata, Yuzuru; Katada, Natsuya; Hirabayashi, Jun; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-04-01

    Although various molecular profiling technologies have the potential to predict specific tumor phenotypes, the comprehensive profiling of lectin-bound glycans in human cancer tissues has not yet been achieved. We examined 242 advanced gastric cancer (AGC) patients without or with lymph node metastasis-N0 (n = 62) or N+ (n = 180)-by lectin microarray, and identified the specific lectins highly associated with AGC phenotypes. In seven gastric cancer cell lines, in contrast to expressed-in-cancer lectins, not-expressed-in-cancer (NEC) lectins were tentatively designated by lectin microarray. Binding signals of the specific lectins were robustly reduced in AGC patients with N+ status as compared with those with N0 status. The receiver operating characteristic curve determined the optimal cutoff value to differentiate N0 status from N+ status, and subsequent profiling of NEC lectins identified Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA) association with the significant other lectins involved in lymph node metastasis. VVA reaction was clearly found on cancer cells, suggesting that it may result from carcinoma-stroma interaction in primary AGC, because VVA is an NEC lectin. Most intriguingly, VVA reaction was remarkably attenuated in the tumor cells of the metastatic lymph nodes, even if it was recognized in primary AGC. In AGC, histological type was strongly associated with soybean agglutinin and Bauhinia purpurea lectin, whereas p53 mutation was the best correlated with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin II. Lectin microarrays can be used to very accurately quantify the reaction of glycans with tumor tissues, and such profiles may represent the specific phenotypes, including N+ status, histological type, or p53 mutation of AGC.

  8. Second-line chemotherapy versus supportive cancer treatment in advanced gastric cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, H S; Kim, H J; Kim, S Y; Kim, T Y; Lee, K W; Baek, S K; Kim, T Y; Ryu, M H; Nam, B H; Zang, D Y

    2013-11-01

    Many patients with refractory or relapsed gastric cancer after first-line chemotherapy have received salvage chemotherapy in routine clinical practice. However, there was no evidence to support this treatment until recent phase III trials demonstrated substantial prolongation of overall survival. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis of these trials and investigated whether second-line chemotherapy was more effective than best supportive care. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 1, 2013), MEDLINE (1950 to March week 4, 2013) and EMBASE (1980-2013, week 13). In addition, we searched all abstracts and virtual meeting presentations from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) conferences held between 2004 and 2013. The search process yielded 578 studies, two of which were randomized phase III trials that compared chemotherapy with supportive care. From the abstracts and virtual meeting presentations of ASCO held between 2004 and 2013, 127 abstracts were identified that evaluated second-line chemotherapy; only one relevant abstract was included in the meta-analysis. A total of 410 patients were eligible for analysis, of whom 150 received docetaxel chemotherapy, and 81 received irinotecan chemotherapy. A significant reduction in the risk of death [HR = 0.64, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.52-0.79, P < 0.0001] was observed with salvage chemotherapy. When the analysis was restricted to irinotecan or docetaxel, there was still significant reduction in the risk of death with each chemotherapeutic agent. The HR was 0.55 (95% CI 0.40-0.77, P = 0.0004) for irinotecan and 0.71 (95% CI 0.56-0.90, P = 0.004) for docetaxel. This meta-analysis demonstrated evidence to support second-line chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer.

  9. Spectral computed tomography in advanced gastric cancer: Can iodine concentration non-invasively assess angiogenesis?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Hua; Ren, Ke; Liang, Pan; Chai, Ya-Ru; Chen, Kui-Sheng; Gao, Jian-Bo

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the correlation of iodine concentration (IC) generated by spectral computed tomography (CT) with micro-vessel density (MVD) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in patients with advanced gastric carcinoma (GC). METHODS Thirty-four advanced GC patients underwent abdominal enhanced CT in the gemstone spectral imaging mode. The IC of the primary lesion in the arterial phase (AP) and venous phase (VP) were measured, and were then normalized against that in the aorta to provide the normalized IC (nIC). MVD and VEGF were detected by immunohistochemical assays, using CD34 and VEGF-A antibodies, respectively. Correlations of nIC with MVD, VEGF, and clinical-pathological features were analyzed. RESULTS Both nICs correlated linearly with MVD and were higher in the primary lesion site than in the normal control site, but were not correlated with VEGF expression. After stratification by clinical-pathological subtypes, nIC-AP showed a statistically significant correlation with MVD, particularly in the group with tumors at stage T4, without nodular involvement, of a mixed Lauren type, where the tumor was located at the antrum site, and occurred in female individuals. nIC-VP showed a positive correlation with MVD in the group with the tumor at stage T4 and above, had nodular involvement, was poorly differentiated, was located at the pylorus site, of a mixed and diffused Lauren subtype, and occurred in male individuals. nIC-AP and nIC-VP showed significant differences in terms of histological differentiation and Lauren subtype. CONCLUSION The IC detected by spectral CT correlated with the MVD. nIC-AP and nIC-VP can reflect angiogenesis in different pathological subgroups of advanced GC. PMID:28321168

  10. Spectral computed tomography in advanced gastric cancer: Can iodine concentration non-invasively assess angiogenesis?

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Hua; Ren, Ke; Liang, Pan; Chai, Ya-Ru; Chen, Kui-Sheng; Gao, Jian-Bo

    2017-03-07

    To investigate the correlation of iodine concentration (IC) generated by spectral computed tomography (CT) with micro-vessel density (MVD) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in patients with advanced gastric carcinoma (GC). Thirty-four advanced GC patients underwent abdominal enhanced CT in the gemstone spectral imaging mode. The IC of the primary lesion in the arterial phase (AP) and venous phase (VP) were measured, and were then normalized against that in the aorta to provide the normalized IC (nIC). MVD and VEGF were detected by immunohistochemical assays, using CD34 and VEGF-A antibodies, respectively. Correlations of nIC with MVD, VEGF, and clinical-pathological features were analyzed. Both nICs correlated linearly with MVD and were higher in the primary lesion site than in the normal control site, but were not correlated with VEGF expression. After stratification by clinical-pathological subtypes, nIC-AP showed a statistically significant correlation with MVD, particularly in the group with tumors at stage T4, without nodular involvement, of a mixed Lauren type, where the tumor was located at the antrum site, and occurred in female individuals. nIC-VP showed a positive correlation with MVD in the group with the tumor at stage T4 and above, had nodular involvement, was poorly differentiated, was located at the pylorus site, of a mixed and diffused Lauren subtype, and occurred in male individuals. nIC-AP and nIC-VP showed significant differences in terms of histological differentiation and Lauren subtype. The IC detected by spectral CT correlated with the MVD. nIC-AP and nIC-VP can reflect angiogenesis in different pathological subgroups of advanced GC.

  11. The Role of Non-Curative Surgery in Incurable, Asymptomatic Advanced Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-qiang; Luo, Hui-yan; Jin, Ying; Wei, Xiao-li; Xu, Rui-hua

    2013-01-01

    Background Although general agreement exists on palliative surgery with intent of symptom palliation in advanced gastric cancer (AGC), the role of non-curative surgery for incurable, asymptomatic AGC is hotly debated. We aim to clarify the role of non-curative surgery in patients with incurable, asymptomatic AGC under the first-line chemotherapy. Methods A total of 737 patients with incurable, asymptomatic advanced gastric adenocarcinoma between January 2008 and May 2012 at the Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center were retrospectively analyzed, comprising 414 patients with non-curative surgery plus first-line chemotherapy, and 323 patients with first-line chemotherapy only. The clinicopathologic data, survival, and prognosis were evaluated, with propensity score adjustment for selection bias. Results The median overall survival (OS) outcomes significantly favored non-curative surgery group over first-line chemotherapy only group in entire population (28.00 versus 10.37 months, P = 0.000), stage 4 patients (23.87 versus 10.37 months, P = 0.000), young patients (28.70 versus 10.37 months, P = 0.000) and elderly patients (23.07 versus 10.27 months, P = 0.031). The median OS advantages of non-curative surgery over first-line chemotherapy only were also maintained when the analyses were restricted to single organ metastasis (P = 0.001), distant lymph node metastasis (P = 0.002), peritoneal metastasis (P = 0.000), and multi-organ metastasis (P = 0.010). Significant OS advantages of non-curative surgery over chemotherapy only were confirmed solid by multivariate analyses before and after adjustment on propensity score (P = 0.000). Small subsets of patients with surgery of single metastatic lesion after previous curative gastrectomy, and with surgery of both primary and single metastatic sites showed sound median OS. Conclusions There is a role for non-curative surgery plus first-line chemotherapy for incurable, asymptomatic AGC, in

  12. Studies in prognostic factors relating to chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Lavin, P T; Bruckner, H W; Plaxe, S C

    1982-11-15

    The prognostic value of pretreatment information relating to prior treatment, demography, physical status, symptoms, disease involvement, pathologic, immunologic, and clinical chemistries were analyzed for a series of 322 patients with advanced gastric cancer. All patients received chemotherapy upon entry into Gastrointestinal Tumor Study Group protocols which were active between 1975 and 1978. Multivariate models were used to study relationships between prognostic factors and survival for all patients and objective tumor resonse for a subset of 137 patients with measurable disease. The initial performance status was a leading determinant of survival (P less than 0.0001). In addition, new summary measures relating to blood chemistries (P less than 0.01) and differential counts (P less than 0.001) were shown to influence patient survival. Blood chemistry parameters included SGOT, total serum protein, and total direct bilirubin while differential counts included absolute granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes. Thus, the initial performance status, measurable disease status, blood chemistries, and differential counts are recommended as stratification factors in the design and analysis of trials involving patients with advanced gastric cancer. The initial performance status was examined in relation to other pretreatment data. The performance status at study entry correlated independently with the degree of weight loss (P less than 0.001), blood chemistries (P less than 0.01), differential counts (P less than 0.05), and peritoneal metastases (P less than 0.05). The measurable and nonmeasurable subgroups were compared with respect to baseline characteristics. Patients with measurable disease had more liver metastases (56 versus 35%) and less peritoneal metastases (76 versus 49%) than patients with nonmeasurable disease. Controlling for the imbalance in liver and peritoneal metastases, the presence of measurable disease was less favorable than nonmeasurable disease with

  13. Helicobacter pylori-negative gastric cancer: advanced-stage undifferentiated adenocarcinoma located in the pyloric gland area.

    PubMed

    Okano, Akihiro; Kato, Shigeru; Ohana, Masaya

    2017-02-01

    The incidence of Helicobacter pylori-negative gastric cancer (HpNGC) is extremely low. A 78-year old female without H. pylori infection was diagnosed with type 4 advanced-stage gastric prepylorus cancer. Distal gastrectomy was performed as for HpNGC (cT3N0M0). Histological findings of the resected specimen showed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma and signet ring cell carcinoma, which were located in the pyloric gland area, diffusely invaded beyond the serosa without lymph node metastasis (pT4aN0M0). Most cases of undifferentiated-type HpNGC are diagnosed in the early stage and are located in the fundic gland area. We report the first case of advanced-stage undifferentiated HpNGC located in the pyloric gland area.

  14. Proximal Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Alters Drug Absorption Pattern But Not Systemic Exposure of CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lingtak-Neander; Lin, Yvonne S.; Tay-Sontheimer, Jessica C.; Trawick, Dorothy; Oelschlager, Brant K.; Flum, David R.; Patton, Kristen K.; Shen, Danny D.; Horn, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives To evaluate the effect of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) on the pharmacokinetics of midazolam (a CYP3A4 substrate) and digoxin (a P-glycoprotein substrate). Design Prospective, nonblinded, longitudinal, single-dose pharmacokinetic study in three phases: presurgery baseline and postoperative assessments at 3 and 12 months. Patients Twelve obese patients meeting current standards for bariatric surgery. Measurements and Main Results At each study visit, patients received a single dose of oral digoxin and midazolam at 8 a.m. Blood samples were collected at regular intervals for 24 hours after dosing. Continuous 12-lead electrocardiogram (EKG), heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory rate were monitored, and pharmacokinetic parameters from the three visits were compared. The peak plasma concentration (Cmax) of midazolam increased by 66% and 71% at 3- and 12-month post-RYGB (p=0.017 and p=0.001, respectively), whereas the median time to peak concentration (Tmax) was reduced by 50%. The mean Cmax for 1′-hydroxymidazolam increased by 87% and 80% at 3 and 12 months (p=0.001 and p<0.001, respectively). However, neither the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) for midazolam nor the metabolite-to-parent AUC ratio changed significantly over time. For digoxin, the median Tmax decreased from 40 minutes at baseline to 30 and 20 minutes at 3 and 12 months, respectively. The mean AUC for digoxin, heart rate, and EKG patterns were similar across the three study phases. Conclusion Contemporary proximal RYGB increases the rate of drug absorption without significantly changing the overall exposure to midazolam and digoxin. The Cmax of a CYP3A4 substrate with a high extraction ratio was substantially increased after RYGB. PMID:25757445

  15. An insertion/deletion polymorphism within the proximal promoter of EGLN2 is associated with susceptibility for gastric cancer in the Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Jinkun; Zhou, Chunxiao; Chen, Lei; Yu, Qiang

    2014-04-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is among the most common human malignancies and the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Accumulated evidence from molecular genetics indicates that an individual's genetic factors are involved in their susceptibility to GC. Hypoxia is a common feature of cancer and the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), a transcription factor that regulates oxygen homeostasis, plays key roles in the growth of solid tumors and regulating cellular responses to hypoxia. Prolyl hydroxylase (PHD1, also known as EGLN2) is one of the three enzymes capable of hydroxylating the alpha subunit of HIF and results in polyubiquitinylation and proteasomal degradation of HIF. A case-control study, including 415 GC patients and 830 healthy controls, was conducted to investigate the association between GC susceptibility with a 4-bp insertion/deletion polymorphism (rs10680577) in the proximal promoter of EGLN2. Logistic regression analysis showed that the heterozygote and the homozygote 4-bp del/del confer a significantly increased risk of GC after controlling for other covariates (adjusted odds ratio [OR]=1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-1.75, p=0.017; OR=2.19, 95% CI 1.15-4.18, p=0.009, respectively). Carriage of the 4-bp deletion allele was associated with a greatly increased risk of developing the disease (OR=1.38, 95% CI 1.12-1.70, p=0.002). Moreover, stratification analysis showed that the association was more prominent in smokers (adjusted OR=2.09, 95% CI=1.40-3.12, p for heterogeneity=0.01). Our data suggested that common genetic polymorphisms in EGLN2 may influence GC risk in the Chinese population. Considering the relative small sample size, replication in other populations with a larger sample size and further functional analysis are required for fully understanding the roles of EGLN2 polymorphisms in predisposition for GC.

  16. A genetic variant in proximity to the gene LYPLAL1 is associated with lower hunger feelings and increased weight loss following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bandstein, Marcus; Mwinyi, Jessica; Ernst, Barbara; Thurnheer, Martin; Schultes, Bernd; Schiöth, Helgi B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Bariatric surgery is the most efficient treatment of severe obesity. We investigated to what extent BMI- or waist-hip ratio (WHR)-related genetic variants are associated with excess BMI loss (EBMIL) two years after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery, and elucidated the affected biological pathways. Methods: Two-hundred fifty-one obese patients (age: 43 ± 10.7, preoperative BMI: 45.1 ± 6.1 kg/m2, 186 women) underwent RYGB surgery and were followed up after two years with regard to BMI. Patients were genotyped for 32 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were investigated with regard to their impact on response to RYGB and preoperatively measured Three Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ) scores. Results: Homozygous T carriers of the SNP rs4846567 in proximity to the Lysophospholipase-like 1 (LYPLAL1) gene showed a 7% higher EBMIL compared to wild-type and heterozygous carriers (p = 0.031). TT-allele carriers showed furthermore lower scores for Hunger (74%, p < 0.001), lower Disinhibition (53%, p < 0.001), and higher Cognitive restraint (21%, p = 0.017) than GG/GT carriers in the TFEQ. Patients within the lowest quartile of Hunger scores had a 32% greater EBMIL compared to patients in the highest quartile (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The LYPLAL1 genotype is associated with differences in eating behavior and loss of extensive body weight following RYGB surgery. Genotyping and the use of eating behavior-related questionnaires may help to estimate the RYGB-associated therapy success. PMID:27181159

  17. Everolimus for previously treated advanced gastric cancer: results of the randomized, double-blind, phase III GRANITE-1 study.

    PubMed

    Ohtsu, Atsushi; Ajani, Jaffer A; Bai, Yu-Xian; Bang, Yung-Jue; Chung, Hyun-Cheol; Pan, Hong-Ming; Sahmoud, Tarek; Shen, Lin; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Chin, Keisho; Muro, Kei; Kim, Yeul Hong; Ferry, David; Tebbutt, Niall C; Al-Batran, Salah-Eddin; Smith, Heind; Costantini, Chiara; Rizvi, Syed; Lebwohl, David; Van Cutsem, Eric

    2013-11-01

    The oral mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus demonstrated promising efficacy in a phase II study of pretreated advanced gastric cancer. This international, double-blind, phase III study compared everolimus efficacy and safety with that of best supportive care (BSC) in previously treated advanced gastric cancer. Patients with advanced gastric cancer that progressed after one or two lines of systemic chemotherapy were randomly assigned to everolimus 10 mg/d (assignment schedule: 2:1) or matching placebo, both given with BSC. Randomization was stratified by previous chemotherapy lines (one v two) and region (Asia v rest of the world [ROW]). Treatment continued until disease progression or intolerable toxicity. Primary end point was overall survival (OS). Secondary end points included progression-free survival (PFS), overall response rate, and safety. Six hundred fifty-six patients (median age, 62.0 years; 73.6% male) were enrolled. Median OS was 5.4 months with everolimus and 4.3 months with placebo (hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.75 to 1.08; P = .124). Median PFS was 1.7 months and 1.4 months in the everolimus and placebo arms, respectively (hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.56 to 0.78). Common grade 3/4 adverse events included anemia, decreased appetite, and fatigue. The safety profile was similar in patients enrolled in Asia versus ROW. Compared with BSC, everolimus did not significantly improve overall survival for advanced gastric cancer that progressed after one or two lines of previous systemic chemotherapy. The safety profile observed for everolimus was consistent with that observed for everolimus in other cancers.

  18. Identification of EGFR expression status association with metastatic lymph node density (ND) by expression microarray analysis of advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Ema, Akira; Waraya, Mina; Yamashita, Keishi; Kokubo, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Hirosuke; Hoshi, Keika; Shinkai, Yoshiko; Kawamata, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kazunori; Nishimiya, Hiroshi; Katada, Natsuya; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic lymph node density (ND) has been reproducibly proven to be a prognostic factor in gastric cancer. The molecular mechanisms that underlie this aggressiveness are underexplored. Here, we aimed to identify molecules associated with this unique phenotype. Tumor specimens from patients with stage III gastric cancer with high or low ND (n = 4 for both) were compared at the mRNA level using Affymetrix microarray (harboring 54,675 genes). The expression data were prioritized, and genes that correlated with ND were selected. Ultimately, the EGFR was validated as such a candidate molecule in patients with primary advanced gastric cancer who underwent standard treatment (n = 167). Expression data of the microarray were prioritized based on gene expression ratio and frequency of gene expression. The first priority genes to be selected were genes that are known to be amplified in cancer, which included NKX2.1, CHST9, CTNND2, SLC25A27, FGFR2, EGFR, and PTGER1. Of these genes, the EGFR gene was of particular interest. EGFR expression in primary gastric cancer was examined using immunohistochemistry (IHC). The Student's t-test elucidated a significant difference in EGFR expression between IHC 2+/3+ and IHC 1+ according to ND (P = 0.0035). The Chi-square test also indicated a significant difference between high and low levels of EGFR immunohistochemical staining (IHC2+/3+ and IHC1+, respectively) and ND status (P = 0.0023). According to the least squares method, as ND increased, the risk that EGFR staining levels changed from IHC 1+ to IHC 2+ also increased. In this study, we determined that high EGFR expression may underlie the aggressive mechanism of advanced gastric cancer with high ND. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Identification of EGFR expression status association with metastatic lymph node density (ND) by expression microarray analysis of advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ema, Akira; Waraya, Mina; Yamashita, Keishi; Kokubo, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Hirosuke; Hoshi, Keika; Shinkai, Yoshiko; Kawamata, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kazunori; Nishimiya, Hiroshi; Katada, Natsuya; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic lymph node density (ND) has been reproducibly proven to be a prognostic factor in gastric cancer. The molecular mechanisms that underlie this aggressiveness are underexplored. Here, we aimed to identify molecules associated with this unique phenotype. Tumor specimens from patients with stage III gastric cancer with high or low ND (n = 4 for both) were compared at the mRNA level using Affymetrix microarray (harboring 54,675 genes). The expression data were prioritized, and genes that correlated with ND were selected. Ultimately, the EGFR was validated as such a candidate molecule in patients with primary advanced gastric cancer who underwent standard treatment (n = 167). Expression data of the microarray were prioritized based on gene expression ratio and frequency of gene expression. The first priority genes to be selected were genes that are known to be amplified in cancer, which included NKX2.1, CHST9, CTNND2, SLC25A27, FGFR2, EGFR, and PTGER1. Of these genes, the EGFR gene was of particular interest. EGFR expression in primary gastric cancer was examined using immunohistochemistry (IHC). The Student's t-test elucidated a significant difference in EGFR expression between IHC 2+/3+ and IHC 1+ according to ND (P = 0.0035). The Chi-square test also indicated a significant difference between high and low levels of EGFR immunohistochemical staining (IHC2+/3+ and IHC1+, respectively) and ND status (P = 0.0023). According to the least squares method, as ND increased, the risk that EGFR staining levels changed from IHC 1+ to IHC 2+ also increased. In this study, we determined that high EGFR expression may underlie the aggressive mechanism of advanced gastric cancer with high ND. PMID:25154973

  20. Clinical and psychometric validation of the quality of life assessment system for advanced gastric cancer based on traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Quan, Peng; Zheng, Pei-Yong; You, Sheng-Fu; Hua, Yong-Qiang; Song, Yi; Liu, Tao; Wan, Chong-Hua; Lu, Jin-Gen

    2016-08-01

    To establish questionnaire scaling and reliability and examine the clinical and psychometric validity of the quality of life assessment based on Traditional Chinese Medicine for advanced gastric cancer (QLASTCM-Ga). The QLASTCM-Ga was developed based on programmed decision procedures with multiple nominal and focus group discussions, in-depth interview, pretesting and quantitative statistical procedures. The questionnaire was administered to 240 patients diagnosed with advanced gastric cancer before and after treatment. Structured group methods were employed to establish a general and a specifific module respectively. The psychometric properties of the scale were evaluated with respect to validity, reliability and responsiveness. The three identified scales of the QLASTCM-Ga and the total score demonstrated good psychometric properties. Test-retest reliability of the total scale and all domains ranged from 0.90 to 0.94, and internal consistency ranged from 0.86 to 0.93. Correlation and factor analysis demonstrated good construct validity. Signifificant difference in the subscales and the total score were found among groups differing in traditional Chinese medicine syndrome, supporting the clinical sensitivity of the QLASTCM-Ga. Statistically signifificant changes were found for each scale and the total score. Responsiveness was also good. The QLASTCM-Ga demonstrates good psychometric and clinical validity to assess quality of life in patients with advanced gastric cancer undergoing traditional Chinese medicine therapy. This study is an important fifirst step for future research in this area.

  1. Proximal row carpectomy: a motion-preserving procedure in the treatment of advanced Kienbock's disease.

    PubMed

    El-Mowafi, Hani; El-Hadidi, Mahmoud; El-Karef, Esam

    2006-10-01

    Kienbock's disease is an isolated disorder of the lunate bone resulting from vascular compromise to the bone. In stage IV, degenerative changes are present at the midcarpal joint, the radiocarpal joint, or both. The goal of proximal row carpectomy (PRC) is the creation of a new joint between the capitate and the radius. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the functional outcome after PRC in late stage Kienbock's disease. The evaluation included assessment of range of motion, grip strength, and pain reduction. Twelve wrists in 12 patients underwent proximal row carpectomy for the treatment of stage IV Kienbock's disease between 2002 and 2005. Objective and subjective function was assessed. The average length of follow-up was 2 years (range, 9 months to 4 years). There was one failure (8.3%) requiring fusion at three years. The eleven wrists that did not fail (91.7%) had an average flexion-extension are of 70 degrees, associated with an average grip strength of 80% of the contralateral side; all patients were very satisfied. The patients rated nine wrists as not painful, two as mildly painful, and one as moderately painful. Radiographs revealed reduced radiocapitate space in five and complete loss of the space in one. With the numbers available, there was no significant association between loss of joint space seen on radiographs and subjective and objective function. Overall, proximal row carpectomy had maintained a satisfactory range of motion, grip strength, and pain relief, and all twelve patients with Kienbock's disease, except one, were satisfied with the results and returned to their previous occupations. Caution should be exercised in performing the procedure in a young, heavy manual working patient.

  2. Clinical significance of phenotyping and karyotyping of circulating tumor cells in patients with advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Yilin; Zhang, Xiaotian; Ge, Sai; Gao, Jing; Gong, Jifang; Lu, Ming; Zhang, Qiyue; Cao, Yanshuo; Wang, Daisy Dandan; Lin, Peter Ping; Shen, Lin

    2014-08-30

    Karyotyping and phenotyping of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in therapeutic cancer patients is of particular clinical significance in terms of both identifying chemo-resistant CTC subtypes and understanding CTC evolution. The integrated subtraction enrichment (SET) and immunostaining-fluorescence in situ hybridization (iFISH) platform was applied to detect and characterize CTCs in patients with advanced gastric cancer (AGC). Status of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) expressing and aneuploidy of chromosome 8 in CTCs enriched from the patients was examined by SET-iFISH following clinical chemotherapy or HER2-targeted therapy. CellSearch system was applied as a reference control. Phenotyping of CTCs in HER2 positive AGC patients demonstrated that HER2⁺ CTCs could be effectively eliminated in response to HER2-targeted therapy. Karytotyping of CTCs indicated that distinct CTCs with different ploidies of chromosomes 8 in AGC patients correlated to either sensitivity or resistance of paclitaxel or cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Examination of the copy number of chromosome 8 in CTCs provides a potential approach for predicting chemotherapeutic efficacy and monitoring chemo-resistance. Phenotyping and karyotyping of the enriched CTCs upon ploidy of chromosome 8 or HER2 expression is of clinical potential for monitoring chemo-resistance and evaluating therapeutic efficacy for AGC patients.

  3. [Clinical trial of non-specific immunotherapy using Lentinan in advanced or recurrent gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Shigefumi; Oka, Masaaki

    2008-11-01

    Randomized phase III study of S-1 alone versus S-1 plus Lentinan (LNT) in advanced or recurrent gastric cancer started in February 2007 conducted by the Japanese Foundation for Multidisciplinary Treatment of Cancer. The objective of this study is to evaluate the superiority of S-1/LNT to S-1 alone. The primary end point is to compare over all survival between both treatment groups. Secondary end points include time to treatment failure, the grade and rate of the adverse events, the evaluation of quality of life (QOL), response rate evaluated by RECIST and immunological parameters. QOL is evaluated by Japanese version of FACT-BRM questionnaire. Immunological parameters include serum complements (CH50, C3) and beta-1, 3 binding monocytes. The sample size is estimated at 150 patients per arm. Registration period is 2 years with 2-year follow-up. This study has a chance to prove the efficacy of the non-specific biological response modifier. We will have to cooperate in order to make this study a success.

  4. Prognostic significance of performing universal HER2 testing in cases of advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Fonseca, Paula; Carmona-Bayonas, Alberto; Sánchez Lorenzo, Maria Luisa; Plazas, Javier Gallego; Custodio, Ana; Hernández, Raquel; Garrido, Marcelo; García, Teresa; Echavarría, Isabel; Cano, Juana María; Rodríguez Palomo, Alberto; Mangas, Monserrat; Macías Declara, Ismael; Ramchandani, Avinash; Visa, Laura; Viudez, Antonio; Buxó, Elvira; Díaz-Serrano, Asunción; López, Carlos; Azkarate, Aitor; Longo, Federico; Castañón, Eduardo; Sánchez Bayona, Rodrigo; Pimentel, Paola; Limón, Maria Luisa; Cerdá, Paula; Álvarez Llosa, Renata; Serrano, Raquel; Lobera, Maria Pilar Felices; Alsina, María; Hurtado Nuño, Alicia; Gómez-Martin, Carlos

    2017-05-01

    Trastuzumab significantly improves overall survival (OS) when added to cisplatin and fluoropyrimidine as a treatment for HER2-positive advanced gastric cancers (AGC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the gradual implementation of HER2 testing on patient prognosis in a national registry of AGC. This Spanish National Cancer Registry includes cases who were consecutively recruited at 28 centers from January 2008 to January 2016. The effect of missing HER2 status was assessed using stratified Cox proportional hazards (PH) regression. The rate of HER2 testing increased steadily over time, from 58.3 % in 2008 to 92.9 % in 2016. HER2 was positive in 194 tumors (21.3 %). In the stratified Cox PH regression, each 1 % increase in patients who were not tested for HER2 at the institutions was associated with an approximately 0.3 % increase in the risk of death: hazard ratio, 1.0035 (CI 95 %, 1.001-1.005), P = 0.0019. Median OS was significantly lower at institutions with the highest proportions of patients who were not tested for HER2. Patients treated at centers that took longer to implement HER2 testing exhibited worse clinical outcomes. The speed of implementation behaves as a quality-of-care indicator. Reviewed guidelines on HER2 testing should be used to achieve this goal in a timely manner.

  5. Pathological complete response in advanced gastric stromal tumor after imatinib mesylate therapy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are a rare neoplasm exhibiting, in most cases, mutations of c-kit. Imatinib mesylate is the standard treatment for patients who have advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Although the response rate in patients treated with imatinib mesylate in prospective clinical studies is above 50%, a complete response is very rare. We report the case of a patient with a gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor who had a pathological complete response after neoadjuvant treatment with imatinib mesylate. Case presentation We report the case of a 54-year-old Arab woman with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor who had a pathological complete response after neoadjuvant treatment with imatinib mesylate. Conclusion The pathological examination of our patient documented a complete pathological response after imatinib therapy. Recently, it has been confirmed that the kinase genotype of KIT and platelet-derived growth factor receptor α can accurately predict a good response to imatinib mesylate therapy. We propose that this patient had a mutation conferring high sensitivity to imatinib mesylate. PMID:21600007

  6. Early Versus Delayed Therapy of Advanced Gastric Cancer Patients – Does it make a difference?

    PubMed Central

    Elimova, Elena; Shiozaki, Hironori; Slack, Rebecca; Chen, Hsiang-Chun; Wadhwa, Roopma; Sudo, Kazuki; Charalampakis, Nikolaos; Hiremath, Adarsh; Estrella, Jeannelyn; Matamoros, Aurelio; Sagebiel, Tara; Das, Prajnan; Rogers, Jane E.; Garris, Jeana; Blum, Mariela A.; Badgwell, Brian; Ajani, Jaffer A.

    2015-01-01

    Background ~50% of patients are diagnosed with advanced gastric cancer (AGC). Therapy is palliative but results in ill effects. The median overall survival (OS) of AGC patients is often <12 months. It is unclear if the early initiation of therapy in all AGC patients is beneficial. Methods A retrospective analysis of AGC patients in our database was carried out. The patients were divided in two groups: asymptomatic or symptomatic. We sought to assess whether the delay of systemic therapy was harmful in asymptomatic patients. Results 135 patients were analyzed. Most patients were symptomatic (68%), males (67%), with low ECOG scores (0–1; 85%). In a univariate analysis, ECOG PS 0 (p=0.005), delayed initiation of therapy (p=0.03), and lack of symptoms (p=0.03) were associated with a longer OS. The multivariate model for OS identified only ECOG PS as an independent prognosticator of longer OS (p=0.02). Asymptomatic patients who had delayed (≥4 weeks) systemic therapy, had an OS rate of 77% at 1-year compared to 58% for patients treated within 4 weeks (p=0.47). Conclusion Symptomatic AGC patients had poor outcome compared to asymptomatic AGC patients. Asymptomatic patients with treatment delay had no detrimental effect on OS suggesting that timing of therapy can be based on patient selection. PMID:26159599

  7. Efficacy and safety of target combined chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer: a meta-analysis and system review.

    PubMed

    Zou, Kun; Yang, Shuailong; Zheng, Liang; Yang, Chaogang; Xiong, Bin

    2016-09-15

    The aim of our meta-analysis is to assess the efficacy and safety of the target combined chemotherapy for the patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent gastric cancer. In accordance with the standard meta-analysis procedures, the patients included in our study were with unresectable advanced or recurrent gastric cancer and allocated randomly to receive target combined chemotherapy or the traditional chemotherapy. The search was applied to PubMed, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, Cocran's library (from inception to February 2016). All analyses were performed by STATA 12.0, with the odds ratio, hazard ratio, and 95 % confidence interval as the effect measures. Fourteen studies were included in this meta-analysis. A total of 5067 patients with advanced gastric cancer were divided into two arms: traditional chemotherapy arm and target combined chemotherapy arm. A significant improvement for overall survival (hazard ratio was 0.89, 95 % confidence interval: 0.83-0.95) and overall response rate (odds ratio was 1.44, 95 % confidence interval: 1.15-1.81) was observed, but no significant difference was found for progression-free survival (hazard ratio was 0.89, 95 % confidence interval: 0.77-1.00) in the target combined chemotherapy arm. In subgroup analysis, increasing benefits regarding overall survival and progression-free survival were found in anti epidermal growth factor receptor target drugs for selected patients subgroup and anti vascular endothelial growth factor receptor target drugs for unselected patients subgroup, but not in anti epidermal growth factor receptor target drugs for unselected patients subgroup. Besides, some adverse events were increased in the target combined chemotherapy arm. The target combined chemotherapy represented a better overall survival benefit and treatment efficiency and higher incidence of some grade 3-4 adverse events than the traditional chemotherapy for patients with unresectable advanced or recurrence gastric

  8. [A Case of Advanced Gastric Cancer with Multiple Liver Metastases Successfully Treated with Capecitabine, Cisplatin, and Trastuzumab].

    PubMed

    Oneda, Yasuo; Tamura, Shigeyuki; Murakami, Kouhei; Takeno, Atsushi; Kuwahara, Ryuichi; Akiyama, Yasuki; Sakamoto, Takuya; Inatome, Junichi; Naito, Atushi; Katsura, Yoshiteru; Ohmura, Yoshiaki; Kagawa, Yoshinori; Egawa, Chiyomi; Takeda, Yutaka; Kato, Takeshi

    2016-11-01

    A 70-year-old-man, whose chief complaint was epigastric pain, was referred to our hospital and diagnosed with advanced gastric cancer with multiple liver metastases. Gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a tumor on the anterior wall of the gastric lower body. Histologically, biopsy specimens indicated adenocarcinoma, and immunohistochemistry showed positive expression of HER2(3+). Chest and abdominal computed tomography showed multiple liver metastases and lymph node metastases. We started chemotherapy with capecitabine, cisplatin, and trastuzumab. Abdominal CT showed the primary tumor and metastases to be reduced after 3 courses, but a ringed enhanced space occupying lesion in the liver had appeared, which was diagnosed as a liver abscess. After administering antibiotics and performing percutaneous transhepatic abscess drainage (PTAD), we continued XPT chemotherapy. The patient received 6 courses of XPT, 15 courses of capecitabine and trastuzumab, and 6 courses of trastuzumab alone, and has remained progression free in the 1 year and 5 months after diagnosis. We experienced a case of advanced gastric cancer with multiple liver metastases successfully treated with capecitabine, cisplatin, and trastuzumab.

  9. Postoperative chemoradiotherapy vs. preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced (operable) gastric cancer: clarifying the role and technique of radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Raymond; Darling, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Background Worldwide, almost one million new cases of stomach cancer were diagnosed in 2012, making it the fifth most common cancer, and the third leading cause of cancer deaths. The current tumor node metastasis (TNM) staging system represents a consensus between the East and the West, and will serve as a strong foundation upon which to build future evidence. In this review article, we first discuss the definition and optimal surgery for locally advanced gastric cancer, followed by the general principles when considering a pre vs. postoperative radiotherapy (RT) strategy. We then provide a synthesis of the existing randomized trial evidence in an attempt clarify the role of pre and postoperative RT in the management of locally advanced gastric cancer. Methods A Medline search 1966-Jun 2014 was undertaken. Randomized trials including patients with locally advanced gastric cancer (using established definitions), comparing RT [with or without chemotherapy (CT)], with surgery alone or other treatment modalities were included. Systematic reviews and evidence based practice guidelines that include this body of primary studies were preferentially discussed. Medline, Cochrane Library, Clinicaltrial.gov, Guidelines Clearinghouse were searched. Results Sixteen randomized trials, three systematic reviews and one practice guideline were included as the evidence base. In this group of studies, two reports compared postoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with surgery alone. Driven predominantly by INT0116, they established the role of postoperative CRT to provide a survival benefit in a patient group that underwent surgery with predominantly D0-1 dissections. Preoperative RT (four studies) showed promise for survival benefit but the risks of bias in these trials were high. Postoperative CRT compared with CT alone (eight trials) showed no survival benefit with the addition of radiation although some evidence of activity can be observed with improved local regional control

  10. [Gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Espejo Romero, H

    1991-01-01

    Gastric cancer, especially adenocarcinoma, is variable in incidence on the world. In this paper, there is a review of the epidemiology and the etiopathogenic factors of the disease: genetics, hereditary, immunologic and environmental and, also, of the so called precursor diseases: atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia, gastric adenoma, gastrectomized patients, pernicious anemia and Menetrier's disease. There is an explanation about the changes of the gastric epithelium related both with the intestinal and diffuse type of adenocarcinoma; the anatomo-pathological notion of macroscopic advanced-Borrmann and early cancer-Japanese classification and the clinical and diagnostic procedures are included with the fundamentals of therapeutic management.

  11. MicroRNA-146a affects the chemotherapeutic sensitivity and prognosis of advanced gastric cancer through the regulation of LIN52.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhifen; Li, Xiqing; Zhao, Zunlan; Yang, Xinglong; Xiao, Shengjun; Zhou, Yun

    2017-03-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the correlation between the expression of microRNA-146a (miR-146a) and its target gene, LIN52, in advanced gastric cancer, and determine their potential effects on chemotherapeutic sensitivity and prognosis. Total RNA was extracted from 93 tissue samples of advanced gastric cancer and corresponding adjacent non-tumor tissues to quantify the relative expression levels of miR-146a using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. The expression of LIN52 was detected in tumors and normal tissues using immunohistochemical analysis. Correlation analysis was performed to assess the correlation between the expression of miR-146a and LIN52 and clinicopathological parameters of gastric cancer, including clinical diagnostic specificity, clinical tumor-necrosis-metastasis staging, lymph node metastasis, differentiation grade, chemotherapeutic sensitivity and prognosis. The expression of miR-146a in advanced gastric cancer tissues was lower, compared with that in the adjacent non-tumor tissues, and was negatively correlated with lymph node metastasis (P<0.05). Gastric cancer tissues with a low expression level of miR146a exhibited an increased expression level of LIN52 (P<0.05). Receiver operating characteristic curve regression analysis showed that miR-146a had 98% sensitivity in distinguishing gastric cancer tissues and adjacent non-tumor tissues. A high expression of miR-146a in gastric cancer was associated with improved treatment efficacy in patients. The chemotherapeutic sensitivity of patients with tumors expressing high levels of miR-146a was significantly higher, compared with that of patients with tumors expressing low levels of miR-146a (P<0.05). The expression of miR-146a was low in advanced gastric cancer tissues. As a tumor suppressor gene in advanced gastric cancer, miR-146a had a significant negative correlation with LIN52. High expression levels of miR-146a in advanced gastric cancer tissue may be

  12. Body Composition as a Prognostic Factor of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Toxicity and Outcome in Patients with Locally Advanced Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Palmela, Carolina; Velho, Sónia; Agostinho, Lisa; Branco, Francisco; Santos, Marta; Santos, Maria Pia Costa; Oliveira, Maria Helena; Strecht, João; Maio, Rui; Cravo, Marília; Baracos, Vickie E

    2017-03-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been shown to improve survival in locally advanced gastric cancer, but it is associated with significant toxicity. Sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity have been studied in several types of cancers and have been reported to be associated with higher chemotherapy toxicity and morbi-mortality. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of sarcopenia/sarcopenic obesity in patients with gastric cancer, as well as its association with chemotherapy toxicity and long-term outcomes. A retrospective analysis was performed using an academic cancer center patient cohort diagnosed with locally advanced gastric cancer between January 2012 and December 2014 and treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We analyzed body composition (skeletal muscle and visceral fat index) in axial computed tomography images. A total of 48 patients met the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 68±10 years, and 33 patients (69%) were men. Dose-limiting toxicity was observed in 22 patients (46%), and treatment was terminated early owing to toxicity in 17 patients (35%). Median follow-up was 17 months. Sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity were found at diagnosis in 23% and 10% of patients, respectively. We observed an association between termination of chemotherapy and both sarcopenia (P=0.069) and sarcopenic obesity (P=0.004). On multivariate analysis, the odds of treatment termination were higher in patients with sarcopenia (odds ratio=4.23; P=0.050). Patients with sarcopenic obesity showed lower overall survival (median survival of 6 months [95% confidence interval {CI}=3.9-8.5] vs. 25 months [95% CI=20.2-38.2]; log-rank test P=0.000). Sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity were associated with early termination of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with gastric cancer; additionally, sarcopenic obesity was associated with poor survival.

  13. Body Composition as a Prognostic Factor of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Toxicity and Outcome in Patients with Locally Advanced Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Velho, Sónia; Agostinho, Lisa; Branco, Francisco; Santos, Marta; Santos, Maria Pia Costa; Oliveira, Maria Helena; Strecht, João; Maio, Rui; Cravo, Marília; Baracos, Vickie E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been shown to improve survival in locally advanced gastric cancer, but it is associated with significant toxicity. Sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity have been studied in several types of cancers and have been reported to be associated with higher chemotherapy toxicity and morbi-mortality. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of sarcopenia/sarcopenic obesity in patients with gastric cancer, as well as its association with chemotherapy toxicity and long-term outcomes. Materials and Methods A retrospective analysis was performed using an academic cancer center patient cohort diagnosed with locally advanced gastric cancer between January 2012 and December 2014 and treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We analyzed body composition (skeletal muscle and visceral fat index) in axial computed tomography images. Results A total of 48 patients met the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 68±10 years, and 33 patients (69%) were men. Dose-limiting toxicity was observed in 22 patients (46%), and treatment was terminated early owing to toxicity in 17 patients (35%). Median follow-up was 17 months. Sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity were found at diagnosis in 23% and 10% of patients, respectively. We observed an association between termination of chemotherapy and both sarcopenia (P=0.069) and sarcopenic obesity (P=0.004). On multivariate analysis, the odds of treatment termination were higher in patients with sarcopenia (odds ratio=4.23; P=0.050). Patients with sarcopenic obesity showed lower overall survival (median survival of 6 months [95% confidence interval {CI}=3.9–8.5] vs. 25 months [95% CI=20.2–38.2]; log-rank test P=0.000). Conclusions Sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity were associated with early termination of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with gastric cancer; additionally, sarcopenic obesity was associated with poor survival. PMID:28337365

  14. Clinicopathological features and prognostic roles of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA and NRAS mutations in advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK and PI3K-AKT pathways form a significant cascade for potential molecular target therapy in advanced cancer. The clinical significance of mutations in these genes in advanced gastric cancer (AGC) is uncertain. Methods We collected formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded and fresh frozen tumor samples from AGC patients and analyzed the KRAS, NRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA mutations by direct-sequencing. We retrospectively investigated the clinicopathological features of these mutations in AGC patients, and selected patients with metastatic gastric cancer. Results Among 167 AGC patients, mutations of KRAS codons 12/13 (N = 8/164, 4.9%), PIK3CA (N = 9/163, 5.5%), and NRAS codon 12/13(N = 3/159, 1.9%) were detected. Comparison of the clinicopathological features of the mutated KRAS, PIK3CA, NRAS genes with an all-wild type of these genes showed that the frequency of the intestinal type was significantly higher in patients whose tumor tissue contained KRAS mutations (P = 0.014). Among 125 patients with metastatic gastric cancer, patients with NRAS codon 12/13 mutations in their tumors had shorter overall survival compared with NRAS wild-type patients (MST: 14.7 vs 8.8 months, P = 0.011). By multivariate analyses, NRAS codon 12/13 mutation was an indicator for poor prognosis in patients with metastatic gastric cancer (adjusted HR 5.607, 95% CI: 1.637-19.203). Conclusions Our study indicated that mutations of KRAS, PIK3CA and NRAS were rare in AGC. NRAS mutations were likely to associate with poor prognosis in metastatic state of AGC patients, but further validation of other research is required. PMID:24774510

  15. Prognosis and treatment of patients with positive peritoneal cytology in advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Frattini, Francesco; Rausei, Stefano; Chiappa, Corrado; Rovera, Francesca; Boni, Luigi; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Positive peritoneal cytology in gastric cancer is classified as M1 disease by the 7th Edition of American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system. With the introduction of laparoscopy and peritoneal washing cytology in the staging of gastric cancer a new category of patients has been identified. These are patients with no macroscopic peritoneal metastases but with peritoneal cytology positive (P0C1). Prognosis and treatment of such patients represent a controversial issue. We evaluate the state of the art of staging system in gastric cancer and discuss standardisation in staging and treatment procedures. There is still a lack of uniformity in the use of laparoscopy with peritoneal cytology in clinical decision making and in the surgical treatment for gastric cancer. Survival of this patient subset remains poor. Multimodal therapies and new therapeutic strategies are required to improve the survival of these patients. PMID:23710290

  16. Prognosis and treatment of patients with positive peritoneal cytology in advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Frattini, Francesco; Rausei, Stefano; Chiappa, Corrado; Rovera, Francesca; Boni, Luigi; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo

    2013-05-27

    Positive peritoneal cytology in gastric cancer is classified as M1 disease by the 7(th) Edition of American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system. With the introduction of laparoscopy and peritoneal washing cytology in the staging of gastric cancer a new category of patients has been identified. These are patients with no macroscopic peritoneal metastases but with peritoneal cytology positive (P0C1). Prognosis and treatment of such patients represent a controversial issue. We evaluate the state of the art of staging system in gastric cancer and discuss standardisation in staging and treatment procedures. There is still a lack of uniformity in the use of laparoscopy with peritoneal cytology in clinical decision making and in the surgical treatment for gastric cancer. Survival of this patient subset remains poor. Multimodal therapies and new therapeutic strategies are required to improve the survival of these patients.

  17. High BIM mRNA levels are associated with longer survival in advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Nandie; Huang, Ying; Zou, Zhengyun; Gimenez-Capitan, Ana; Yu, Lixia; Hu, Wenjing; Zhu, Lijing; Sun, Xia; Sanchez, Jose Javier; Guan, Wenxian; Liu, Baorui; Rosell, Rafael; Wei, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy drugs, including 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), oxaliplatin and docetaxel, are commonly used in the treatment of gastric cancer (GC). Apoptosis-relevant genes may be associated with drug resistance. In the present study, the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels of B-cell lymphoma 2 interacting mediator of cell death (BIM), astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) and AXL receptor tyrosine kinase (AXL) were investigated in 131 advanced GC samples, and the expression levels of these genes were correlated with patients' overall survival (OS). All 131 patients received first-line FOLFOX combination chemotherapy with folinic acid and 5-FU, in which 56 patients were further treated with second-line docetaxel-based chemotherapy. A correlation between the mRNA expression levels of BIM and AEG-1 was observed (rs=0.30; P=0.002). There was no association between the mRNA expression levels of any of the individual genes analyzed and OS in patients only receiving first-line FOLFOX chemotherapy. In a subgroup of patients receiving docetaxel-based second-line chemotherapy, those with high or intermediate levels of BIM exhibited a median OS of 18.2 months [95% confidence interval (CI), 12.8–23.6], compared with 9.6 months (95% CI, 8.9–10.3) in patients with low BIM levels (P=0.008). However, there was no correlation between the mRNA expression levels of AEG-1 or AXL and OS. The risk of mortality was higher in patients with low BIM mRNA levels than in those with high or intermediate BIM mRNA levels (hazard ratio, 2.61; 95% CI, 1.21–5.62; P=0.010). Therefore, BIM may be considered as a biomarker to identify whether patients could benefit from docetaxel-based second-line chemotherapy in GC. PMID:28454330

  18. Yield of Staging Laparoscopy for Incurable Factors in Chinese Patients with Advanced Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Luo, Hongliang; Zhou, Chengliang; Zhan, Jianjun; Rao, Xionghui; Zhao, Gang; Zhu, Zhengming

    2017-06-26

    Although the role of staging laparoscopy (SL) in detecting radiologically occult M1 disease has been widely recognized, it is seldom used in China and its clinical value based on Chinese population has been rarely reported. The aim of this study is to identify the yield of SL for Chinese patients with advanced gastric cancer (AGC) and determine the proportions of patients in whom treatment plan is altered. The clinical data were retrospectively collected from 879 AGC patients who underwent SL without any definite signs of disseminated disease on imaging examination. The primary outcomes were the proportions of patients whose laparoscopy identified incurable factors (including M1 diseases and unresectable T4b diseases), and who had their treatment plan altered. SL revealed incurable factors in 130 (14.8%) patients, including macroscopic peritoneal metastasis (n = 92), positive peritoneal cytology (n = 10), liver metastasis (n = 12), para-aortic lymph node metastasis (n = 1), and unresectable T4b tumor (n = 18). After SL, treatment plans were altered in 123 (14.0%) patients, among which 82 (63.1%) patients were not offered any further procedure and referred for chemotherapy. Among 749 M0 patients who immediately proceeded to radical gastrectomy after SL, new incurable factors were found at subsequent operations in 21 (2.8%) patients. Multivariate analysis showed that tumor size ≥8 cm, Borrmann type III and IV, and tumor invasion of T4a and T4b in preoperative imaging examination were the predictive factors for peritoneal metastasis. SL detects additional incurable factors in Chinese AGC patients with potentially resectable disease and optimizes their treatments. A systematic and painstaking inspection of the whole abdominal cavity, including routine entry into the bursa omentalis, is necessary for improving the yield of SL.

  19. Doublet Versus Single Agent as Second-Line Treatment for Advanced Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Ma, Bing; Huang, Xiao-Tian; Li, Yan-Song; Wang, Yu; Liu, Zhou-Lu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to compare the efficacy and safety of doublet versus single agent as second-line treatment for advanced gastric cancer (AGC). A comprehensive literature search was performed to identify relevant RCTs. All clinical studies were independently identified by 2 authors for inclusion. Demographic data, treatment regimens, objective response rate (ORR), and progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were extracted and analyzed using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software (Version 2.0). Ten RCTs involving 1698 pretreated AGC patients were ultimately identified. The pooled results demonstrated that doublet combination therapy as second-line treatment for AGC significantly improved OS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.78–0.97, P = 0.011), PFS (HR 0.79, 95% CI: 0.72–0.87, P < 0.001), and ORR (relative risk [RR] 1.57, 95% CI: 1.27–1.95, P < 0.001). Sub-group analysis according to treatment regimens also showed that targeted agent plus chemotherapy significantly improve OS, PFS, and ORR. However, no significant survival benefits had been observed in doublet cytotoxic chemotherapy when compared with single cytotoxic agent. Additionally, more incidences of grade 3 or 4 myelosuppression toxicities, diarrhea, and fatigue were observed in doublet combination groups, while equivalent frequencies of grade 3 or 4 thrombocytopenia and nausea were found between the 2 groups. In comparison with single cytotoxic agent alone, the addition of targeted agent to mono-chemotherapy as salvage treatment for pretreated AGC patients provide substantial survival benefits, while no significant survival benefits were observed in doublet cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens. PMID:26937908

  20. High BIM mRNA levels are associated with longer survival in advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Nandie; Huang, Ying; Zou, Zhengyun; Gimenez-Capitan, Ana; Yu, Lixia; Hu, Wenjing; Zhu, Lijing; Sun, Xia; Sanchez, Jose Javier; Guan, Wenxian; Liu, Baorui; Rosell, Rafael; Wei, Jia

    2017-03-01

    Chemotherapy drugs, including 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), oxaliplatin and docetaxel, are commonly used in the treatment of gastric cancer (GC). Apoptosis-relevant genes may be associated with drug resistance. In the present study, the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels of B-cell lymphoma 2 interacting mediator of cell death (BIM), astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) and AXL receptor tyrosine kinase (AXL) were investigated in 131 advanced GC samples, and the expression levels of these genes were correlated with patients' overall survival (OS). All 131 patients received first-line FOLFOX combination chemotherapy with folinic acid and 5-FU, in which 56 patients were further treated with second-line docetaxel-based chemotherapy. A correlation between the mRNA expression levels of BIM and AEG-1 was observed (rs=0.30; P=0.002). There was no association between the mRNA expression levels of any of the individual genes analyzed and OS in patients only receiving first-line FOLFOX chemotherapy. In a subgroup of patients receiving docetaxel-based second-line chemotherapy, those with high or intermediate levels of BIM exhibited a median OS of 18.2 months [95% confidence interval (CI), 12.8-23.6], compared with 9.6 months (95% CI, 8.9-10.3) in patients with low BIM levels (P=0.008). However, there was no correlation between the mRNA expression levels of AEG-1 or AXL and OS. The risk of mortality was higher in patients with low BIM mRNA levels than in those with high or intermediate BIM mRNA levels (hazard ratio, 2.61; 95% CI, 1.21-5.62; P=0.010). Therefore, BIM may be considered as a biomarker to identify whether patients could benefit from docetaxel-based second-line chemotherapy in GC.

  1. Comparison of staging between the old (6th edition) and new (7th edition) TNM classifications in advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Shiro; Futawatari, Nobue; Sakuramoto, Shinichi; Katada, Natsuya; Yamashita, Keishi; Shibata, Tomotaka; Nemoto, Masayuki; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2011-06-01

    The aims of the present study were to compare staging between the old (6th edition) and new (7th edition) TNM classifications, and to evaluate the prognostic impact of extended lymph node dissection according to the new nodal staging in advanced gastric cancer. A total of 609 patients with advanced gastric cancer who had undergone curative gastric resection combined with extended lymph node dissection were enrolled in the present study. Survival curves were analyzed according to staging based on the TNM 6th and 7th editions and the Japanese Classification of Gastric Carcinoma (JCGC) 14th edition. The 5-year survival rates and the consecutive stage survival with no significant differences were: IB 88%; II 74%; IIIA 53%; IIIB 39%; and IV 18% (IIIA vs. IIIB, p=0.1307) by the TNM 6th edition; IB 94%; IIA 85%; IIB 71%; IIIA 68%; IIIB 48%; IIIC 23%; and IV 13%; (IIB vs. IIIA, p=0.7665; IIIC vs. IV, p=0.4156) by the TNM 7th and JCGC 14th editions; N0 85%; N1 70%; N2 46%; N3 18%; and M1 13%; (N3 vs. M1, p=0.8640) by the TNM 6th edition; and N0 85%; N1 80%; N2 61%; N3a 46%; N3b 18%; and M1 13%; (N0 vs. N1, p=0.2735; N2 vs. N3a, p=0.0663; N3b vs. M1, p=0.8640) by the TNM 7th and JCGC 14th editions. The new classification according to the TNM 7th and the JCGC 14th editions does not always seem to be superior to the TNM 6th edition for the prognostic stratification of stages in patients who undergo curative resection for advanced gastric cancer. An extended lymph node dissection may be effective for N0-N3a, but not for N3b and M1 stages classified according to the new TNM 7th and JCGC 14th editions.

  2. Docetaxel combined with irinotecan or 5-fluorouracil in patients with advanced oesophago-gastric cancer: a randomised phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Roy, A; Cunningham, D; Hawkins, R; Sörbye, H; Adenis, A; Barcelo, J-R; Lopez-Vivanco, G; Adler, G; Canon, J-L; Lofts, F; Castanon, C; Fonseca, E; Rixe, O; Aparicio, J; Cassinello, J; Nicolson, M; Mousseau, M; Schalhorn, A; D'Hondt, L; Kerger, J; Hossfeld, D K; Garcia Giron, C; Rodriguez, R; Schoffski, P; Misset, J-L

    2012-01-01

    Background: Docetaxel and irinotecan chemotherapy have shown good efficacy in the treatment of advanced oesophago-gastric cancer. This randomised phase II study evaluated the efficacy and toxicity profile of two non-platinum docetaxel-based doublet regimens in advanced oesophago-gastric cancer. Methods: Chemotherapy-naïve patients with advanced oesophago-gastric cancer were randomised to receive either 3-weekly DI (docetaxel 60 mg m−2 plus irinotecan 250 mg m−2 (Day 1)) or 3-weekly DF (docetaxel 85 mg m−2 (Day 1) followed by 5-fluorouracil 750 mg m−2 per day as a continuous infusion (Days 1–5)). Results: A total of 85 patients received DI (n=42) or DF (n=43). The primary endpoint was overall response rate (ORR). The ORR and time to progression (TTP) in the evaluable population (n=65) were 37.5% (DI) vs 33.3% (DF), and 4.2 months vs 4.4 months, respectively. In the intent-to-treat population, the observed ORR, TTP and median overall survival were similar between the two groups. Grade 3–4 neutropenia, febrile neutropenia and diarrhoea were more frequent in the DI arm as compared with the DF arm (83.3% vs 69.8%, 40.5% vs 18.6%, and 42.9% vs 16.3%, respectively). Conclusion: Both docetaxel-based doublet regimens show comparable efficacy; however, the DF regimen was associated with a better toxicity profile and is an alternative treatment option for patients in whom platinum-based regimens are unsuitable. PMID:22767144

  3. Breath Analysis Based on Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Sensors Distinguishes Early and Advanced Gastric Cancer Patients from Healthy Persons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunsheng; Zhang, Yixia; Pan, Fei; Liu, Jie; Wang, Kan; Zhang, Chunlei; Cheng, Shangli; Lu, Lungen; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Zheng; Zhi, Xiao; Zhang, Qian; Alfranca, Gabriel; de la Fuente, Jesús M; Chen, Di; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-09-27

    Fourteen volatile organic compound (VOC) biomarkers in the breath have been identified to distinguish early gastric cancer (EGC) and advanced gastric cancer (AGC) patients from healthy persons by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled with solid phase microextraction (SPME). Then, a breath analysis approach based on a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensor was developed to detect these biomarkers. Utilizing hydrazine vapor adsorbed in graphene oxide (GO) film, the clean SERS sensor is facilely prepared by in situ formation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) without any organic stabilizer. In the SERS sensor, RGO can selectively adsorb and enrich the identified biomarkers from breath as an SPME fiber, and AuNPs well dispersed on RGO endow the SERS sensor with an effective detection of adsorbed biomarkers. Fourteen Raman bands associated with the biomarkers are selected as the fingerprints of biomarker patterns to distinguish persons in different states. The approach has successfully analyzed and distinguished different simulated breath samples and 200 breath samples of clinical patients with a sensitivity of higher than 83% and a specificity of more than 92%. In conclusion, the VOC biomarkers and breath analysis approach in this study can not only diagnose gastric cancer but also distinguish EGC and AGC. This work has great potential for clinical translation in primary screening diagnosis and stage determination of stomach cancer in the near future.

  4. Effectiveness of 5-flurouracil-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally-advanced gastric/gastroesophageal cancer: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Lei; Wang, Hai-Jiang; Yin, Dong; Lei, Cheng; Zhu, Jin-Feng; Cai, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Guo-Qing

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effectiveness of 5-flurouracil-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) for gastroesophageal and gastric cancer by meta-analysis. METHODS: MEDLINE and manual searches were performed to identify all published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the efficacy of the flurouracil-based NAC for gastroesophageal and gastric cancer, and RCTs of NAC for advanced gastroesophageal and gastric cancer vs no therapy before surgery. Studies that included patients with metastases at enrollment were excluded. Primary endpoint was the odds ratio (OR) for improving overall survival rate of patients with gastroesophageal and gastric cancer. Secondary endpoints were the OR of efficiency for down-staging tumor and increasing R0 resection in patients with gastroesophageal and gastric cancer. Safety analyses were also performed. The OR was the principal measurement of effect, which was calculated as the treatment group (NAC plus surgery) vs control group (surgery alone) and was presented as a point estimate with 95% confidence intervals (CI). All calculations and statistical tests were performed using RevMan 5.1 software. RESULTS: Seven RCTs were included for the analysis. A total of 1249 patients with advanced gastroesophageal and gastric cancer enrolled in the seven trials were divided into treatment group (n = 620) and control group (n = 629). The quality scores of the RCTs were assessed according to the method of Jadad. The RCT quality scores ranged from 2 to 7 (5-point scale), with a mean of 3.75. The median follow-up time in these studies was over 3 years. The meta-analysis showed that NAC improved the overall survival rate (OR 1.40, 95%CI 1.11-1.76; P = 0.005), which was statistically significant. The 3-year progression-free survival rate was significantly higher in treatment group than in control group (37.7% vs 27.3%) (OR 1.62, 95%CI 1.21-2.15; P = 0.001). The tumor down-stage rate was higher in treatment group than in control group (55.76% vs 41

  5. Laparoscopic low anterior resection for hematogenous rectal metastasis from gastric adenocarcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sang Woo; Huh, Jung Wook; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Hyeong Rok

    2011-11-11

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies in the world and is the second most common cause of cancer-related death in Korea. Colorectal metastases from gastric adenocarcinoma are known to be very rare. We report an unusual case of rectal metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma. We report a case of a 43-year-old female patient with gastric cancer who first presented with epigastric pain. The endoscopic and radiologic findings were suggestive of Borrmann type III advanced gastric cancer with linitis plastica. Radical total gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection was performed. The pathology report was AJCC TNM Stage II gastric adenocarcinoma (T3N0M0). On follow up at 34 months after surgery, the patient complained of difficulty in defecation. On colonoscopy, a hard, indurated extraluminal mass was detected 7 cm proximal to the anal verge. The biopsy demonstrated chronic nonspecific colitis. Abdominal CT, rectal MRI and PET-CT revealed rectal metastasis from gastric cancer. Laparoscopic ultralow anterior resection with diverting ileostomy was performed. The pathology report was metastatic adenocarcinoma, and this diagnosis was identical to the gastric pathology reported in the previous pathology report. The patient was discharged after the 11th postoperative day with no adverse events. Rectal metastasis from gastric cancer is known to be very rare. However, metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma should be considered as a differential diagnosis for patients presenting with a colorectal mass and a past history of gastric cancer.

  6. Use of Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System tube in stabilization of proximal humeral endoprostheses

    PubMed Central

    Stavropoulos, Nikolaos A; Sawan, Hassan; Dandachli, Firas; Turcotte, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To review outcomes following usage of the Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS®) in shoulder tumors. METHODS: Medical records of nineteen patients (19 shoulders) that underwent tumor excisional procedure and reconstruction with the LARS synthetic fabric, were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: Patients’ median age was 58 years old, while the median length of resection was 110 mm (range 60-210 mm). Compared to immediate post-operative radiographs, the prosthesis mean end-point position migrated superiorly at a mean follow up period of 26 mo (P = 0.002). No statistical significant correlations between the prosthesis head size (P = 0.87); the implant stem body length (P = 0.949); and the length of resection (P = 0.125) with the position of the head, were found at last follow up. Two cases of radiological dislocation were noted but only one was clinically symptomatic. A minor superficial wound dehiscence, healed without surgery, occurred. There was no evidence of aseptic loosening either, and no prosthetic failure. CONCLUSION: LARS® use ensured stability of the shoulder following endoprosthetic reconstruction in most patients. PMID:27114934

  7. Advanced transformational analysis applied to e-beam proximity effect correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barouch, Eytan; Coifman, Ronald R.; Ma, Jimmy T.; Peckerar, Martin C.; Rokhlin, Vladimir

    1993-06-01

    In this paper we address the problem of dose correction in the data bases consistent with ultra- large-scale integration. It is shown that recent advances in transformation theory provide a natural platform on which to build these dose correctors. Specifically, transformation approaches making use of compactly supported, smooth basis functions are shown to be particularly suitable. This is a natural result of the evolution of mathematically based correctors currently in use. Previous work in Parikh, MacDonald and others employed global transform method to determine the values of 'corrected' dose. In most cases, the mathematical inversion is essentially ill posed, in other words, the exact pattern desired cannot be obtained using a finite Gaussian sum. In this paper a set of smooth basis elements of compact support are employed. The mathematically smooth form of the basis makes it easy to match doses at boundaries without Gibbs phenomenon. Thus the transform field can be partitioned for optimum speed. Consequently, while most transformation complexities are of order N6 (the inversion of an N2 X N2 matrix) where N2 is the number of grid points characterizing the database, we developed an algorithm of complexity N2 log N. A method of dose field bias is employed to stem the requests for negative dose. The heart of the numerical process is essentially based on an adapted fast non-uniform-grid Fourier Transform combined with proper filtering and geometric localization methods. Several examples are given.

  8. Effects of baclofen on the functional anatomy of the oesophago-gastric junction and proximal stomach in healthy volunteers and patients with GERD assessed by magnetic resonance imaging and high-resolution manometry: a randomised controlled double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Curcic, J; Schwizer, A; Kaufman, E; Forras-Kaufman, Z; Banerjee, S; Pal, A; Hebbard, G S; Boesiger, P; Fried, M; Steingoetter, A; Schwizer, W; Fox, M

    2014-11-01

    The mechanism of reflux protection may involve a 'flap valve' at the oesophago-gastric junction (OGJ). To assess the effects of baclofen, a gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor type-B (GABA-B) agonist known to suppress reflux events, on the 'functional anatomy' of the OGJ and proximal stomach after a large test meal. Twelve healthy volunteers (HVs) and 12 patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD); with erosive oesophagitis or pathological oesophageal acid exposure completed a randomised, double-blind, cross-over study. On 2 test days participants received 40-mg baclofen or placebo before ingestion of a large test meal. OGJ structure and function were assessed by high-resolution manometry (HRM) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using validated methods. Measurements of the oesophago-gastric angle were derived from three-dimensional models reconstructed from anatomic MRI images. Cine-MRI and HRM identified postprandial reflux events. Mixed model analysis and Wilcoxon rank signed tests assessed differences between participant groups and treatment conditions. In both HVs and GERD patients, baclofen reduced the frequency of postprandial reflux events. The oesophago-gastric insertion angle in GERD patients was reduced (-4.1 ± 1.8, P = 0.025), but was unchanged in healthy controls. In both study groups, baclofen augmented lower oesophageal sphincter (LES) pressure (HVs: +7.3 ± 1.8 mmHg, P < 0.0001, GERD: +4.50 ± 1.49 mmHg, P < 0.003) and increased LES length (HVs: +0.48 ± 0.11 cm, P < 0.0003, GERD: +0.35 ± 0.06 cm, P < 0.0001). Baclofen inhibits transient LES relaxations and augments LES pressure and length. Additionally, baclofen has effects on the 'functional anatomy' of the OGJ and proximal stomach in GERD patients, which may suppress reflux by means of a 'flap valve' mechanism. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Usefulness of diagnostic laparoscopy with 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-mediated photodynamic diagnosis for the detection of peritoneal micrometastasis in advanced gastric cancer after chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Kentaro; Fujiwara, Yoshiyuki; Yano, Masahiko; Motoori, Masaaki; Sugimura, Keijiro; Takahashi, Hidenori; Ohue, Masayuki; Sakon, Masato

    2016-12-01

    Successful cases have shown that conversion surgery after chemotherapy improves the prognosis of advanced gastric cancer. However, it is necessary to carefully select patients who have no unresectable factors prior to surgery. We recently reported that diagnostic laparoscopy with photodynamic diagnosis using oral 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA-PDD) is a promising tool for diagnosing early peritoneal metastasis in gastric cancer. We herein evaluated the usefulness of this technique for detecting peritoneal metastases of advanced gastric cancer after chemotherapy. Diagnostic laparoscopy using sequential white light (WL) and ALA-PDD observations was performed in 38 patients with advanced gastric cancer after chemotherapy. The sensitivity of ALA-PDD for detecting peritoneal disease was compared with that of WL. The relationship between the state of peritoneal metastasis assessed by ALA-PDD and a cytological examination of the peritoneal fluid was evaluated. Twelve of the 38 patients (32 %) were diagnosed with peritoneal metastases by conventional laparoscopy. However, laparoscopy with ALA-PDD detected peritoneal metastases in 4 (11 %) of the 26 remaining patients. Three of these 4 patients had negative cytological results from the evaluation of the peritoneal fluid. Diagnostic laparoscopy using ALA-PDD is a useful technique for detecting metastases and determining treatment strategies to select patients with advanced gastric cancer who have received chemotherapy.

  10. Successful Long-term Management with a Single Administration of Tri-weekly Nab-paclitaxel in a Patient with Advanced Gastric Cancer with Peritoneal Dissemination.

    PubMed

    Matano, Daisuke; Moriwaki, Toshikazu; Tange, Yoshitaka; Niisato, Yusuke; Yamaura, Masamichi; Nagase, Masaomi; Suganuma, Daisuke; Takagi Taketa, Kaoruko; Iwai, Kentaro; Enami, Chiaki; Yamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Hyodo, Ichinosuke

    2017-01-01

    Nanoparticle albumin-bound (nab)-paclitaxel has shown promising activity in advanced gastric cancer treatment. We herein report a case of advanced gastric cancer involving long-term management with a single administration of nab-paclitaxel. A 71-year-old man diagnosed with advanced gastric cancer with malignant ascites was treated with nab-paclitaxel as a second-line chemotherapy. He refused treatment continuation because of various severe toxicities in the first treatment cycle; he was therefore followed-up without any further treatments. Despite this, no disease progression was observed over 9 months. After progression, he received dose-dense paclitaxel, but he did not respond to this treatment and eventually died.

  11. Gastric cáncer: Overview

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Pelayo

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer ranks fourth in incidence and second in mortality among all cancers worldwide. Despite the decrease in incidence in some regions of the world, gastric cancer continues to present a major clinical challenge due to most cases being diagnosed in advanced stages with poor prognosis and limited treatment options. The development of gastric cancer is a complex and multifactorial process involving a number of etiological factors and multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations. Among the predisposing factors are: Helicobacter pylori infection, high salt intake, smoking, and in a small percentage of patients, a familial genetic component. More than 95% of stomach cancer cases are adenocarcinomas, which are classified into two major histologic types: intestinal and diffuse. Intestinal type adenocarcinoma is preceded by a sequence of gastric lesions known as Correa´s cascade and is the histologic type associated with the global decrease in gastric cancer rates. Diffuse type adenocarcinomas have a more aggressive behavior and worse prognosis than those of the intestinal type. According to the anatomical location, adenocarcinomas are classified as proximal (originating in the cardia) and distal (originating in the body and antrum). This classification seems to recognize two different clinical entities. Surgical resection of the tumor at an early stage is the only effective treatment method. Therefore, the identification and surveillance of patients at risk may play a significant role in survival rates. Anti-Helicobacter pylori therapy has been shown to be an effective measure in the prevention of gastric cancer. PMID:24892619

  12. Gastric cáncer: Overview.

    PubMed

    Piazuelo, M Blanca; Correa, Pelayo

    2013-07-01

    Gastric cancer ranks fourth in incidence and second in mortality among all cancers worldwide. Despite the decrease in incidence in some regions of the world, gastric cancer continues to present a major clinical challenge due to most cases being diagnosed in advanced stages with poor prognosis and limited treatment options. The development of gastric cancer is a complex and multifactorial process involving a number of etiological factors and multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations. Among the predisposing factors are: Helicobacter pylori infection, high salt intake, smoking, and in a small percentage of patients, a familial genetic component. More than 95% of stomach cancer cases are adenocarcinomas, which are classified into two major histologic types: intestinal and diffuse. Intestinal type adenocarcinoma is preceded by a sequence of gastric lesions known as Correa´s cascade and is the histologic type associated with the global decrease in gastric cancer rates. Diffuse type adenocarcinomas have a more aggressive behavior and worse prognosis than those of the intestinal type. According to the anatomical location, adenocarcinomas are classified as proximal (originating in the cardia) and distal (originating in the body and antrum). This classification seems to recognize two different clinical entities. Surgical resection of the tumor at an early stage is the only effective treatment method. Therefore, the identification and surveillance of patients at risk may play a significant role in survival rates. Anti-Helicobacter pylori therapy has been shown to be an effective measure in the prevention of gastric cancer.

  13. Advanced glycation end products interfere with gastric smooth muscle contractile marker expression via the AGE/RAGE/NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ting; Zheng, Yongping; Wang, Yun; Xiong, Wenjie; Lin, Lin

    2017-02-01

    Excessive production of advanced glycation end products (AGE) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Smooth muscle (SM) phenotype transition is involved in diabetes-associated gastric motility dysfunction. We investigated whether AGE interfere with gastric antral SM contractile marker expression. Sixteen Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into control and streptozotocin-induced diabetic groups. Sixteen weeks after streptozotocin administration, gastric antral SM strip contractility in the groups were measured. The gastric tissue expression of AGE was tested. Primary cultured gastric smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were used in complementary in vitro studies. In the presence and absence of AGE, SMCs were transfected with myocardin plasmid or treated with nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitor or anti-RAGE antibody. Diabetic rats showed weakness of SM strip contractility and decreased expression of SM contractile marker genes (myosin heavy chains [MHC], α-actin, calponin) as compared with the control group. Gastric antral SM layer Nε-(carboxymethyl) lysine (CML) level, the major AGE compound, were increased in the diabetic rats. AGE downregulated SM contractile markers and myocardin expression in a concentration-dependent manner. Myocardin overexpression prevented these results. AGE treatment activated NF-κB in SMCs. The NF-κB inhibitor BAY 11-7082 and anti-RAGE antibody blocked the effects of AGE on myocardin downregulation. AGE may induce the development of gastric dysmotility by downregulating SM contractile proteins and myocardin expression via the AGE/RAGE/NF-κB pathway.

  14. Upregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in advanced gastric cancer contributes to bone metastatic osteolysis by inducing long pentraxin 3

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Bongkun; Lee, Eun-Jin; Shin, Min-Kyung; Park, Young Soo; Ryu, Min-Hee; Kim, Sang-Min; Kim, Eun-Young; Lee, Hyung Keun; Chang, Eun-Ju

    2016-01-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) activates its receptor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB; also called NTRK2) that has been shown to promote the malignant progression of several cancers. In this study, we investigated the clinical and biological significance of the BDNF/TrkB axis in the progression of human gastric cancer. The increased co-expression of the BDNF/TrkB axis was significantly correlated with bone metastatic properties in advanced gastric cancers. BDNF acting via TrkB receptors increased the levels of long pentraxin 3 (PTX3) that was related to bone metastatic status of gastric cancer by enhancing gastric cancer–osteoblastic niche interactions. In bone metastatic gastric cancer, PTX3 knockdown using small interfering RNA significantly inhibited BDNF-induced interactions of cancer cells with osteoblasts. Moreover, BDNF-derived PTX3 induction supported subsequent osteoclastogenesis, and this effect was significantly reversed by PTX3 silencing. These findings suggest that a functional interaction between BDNF/TrkB and PTX3 enhances the osteolysis of bone metastatic gastric cancer, thereby providing potential prognostic factors for the development of bone metastasis of gastric cancer. PMID:27458153

  15. Lack of any prognostic relationship between adiponectin receptor (Adipo R1/R2) expression for early/advanced stage gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Ayyildiz, Talat; Dolar, Enver; Ugras, Nesrin; Dizdar, Oguzhan Sitki; Adim, Saduman Balaban; Yerci, Omer

    2014-01-01

    Adiponectin (ApN) is a complement C1q-related protein, mainly secreted from adipose tissue, that signals through ApN receptor 1 (Adipo-R1) and ApN receptor 2 (Adipo-R2). Low serum ApN concentrations are associated with obesity-related malignancies. However, there are very few studies on any prognostic role of ApN receptors in gastric cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between AdipoR1/R2 expression and early/advanced stage gastric cancer in terms of clinicopathologic characteristics and survival. Eighteen patients with early and 39 with advanced stage gastric cancer who underwent surgical gastric resection were included in this study. Adipo-R1 expression was low in 2 of the 18 patients with early stage gastric cancer (11.1%), while 4 had low Adipo-R2 expression (22.2%). In those with advanced stage gastric cancer, 7 of 39 had low Adipo-R1 expression (17.9%) and 16 had low Adipo-R2 expression (41%). Adipo-R2 expression was significantly higher (p=0.011) in moderately differentiated tumors when compared to well-differentiated tumors. While there was nearly a statistically significant relationship between TNM stage (T, tumor size; N, regional lymph node; M, whether distant metastases exist) and Adipo-R2 expression (p=0.054), there was no relationship between Adipo-R1/-R2 expression with tumor stage and survival. Adipo-R1/-R2 expression has no prognostic significance of in early/advanced stage gastric cancer.

  16. SOCS3 overexpression inhibits advanced glycation end product-induced EMT in proximal tubule epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Huimin; Li, Yingtao

    2017-06-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is among the most severe complications of diabetes mellitus, and may lead to end-stage renal disease. Sustained exposure to advanced glycation end products (AGEs) typically causes renal tubular epithelial cells (TECs) to suffer from an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, there remains no consensus regarding the mechanism underlying the cause of EMT in TECs as induced by AGEs. In the present study, we investigated the promotion of EMT in TECs by AGEs, and the activation of Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling. In addition, we constructed a recombinant adenovirus (Ad) that overexpressed suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3), and examined the regulatory role of SOCS3 in the activation of JAK/STAT signaling and the promotion of EMT in TECs. The results demonstrated that AGE-bovine serum albumin (BSA) treatment significantly promoted the expression of EMT-associated proteins, while reducing the expression of the epithelial cell marker, E-cadherin. Furthermore, the Ad-mediated SOCS3 overexpression markedly inhibited the AGE-BSA-induced JAK2/STAT3 activation; phosphorylated JAK2 and phosphorylated STAT3 expression levels were reduced by the Ad-SOCS3 infection, compared with the control Ad (Ad-con) infection, in HK-2 cells subject to AGE-BSA. Moreover, the overexpression of SOCS3 markedly inhibited the AGE-BSA-promoted EMT in HK-2 cells. AGE-BSA-promoted EMT-associated proteins, such as α-smooth muscle actin and collagen I, were reduced by the Ad-SOCS3 virus infection, in contrast to the Ad-con virus infection. Furthermore, reduced E-cadherin expression was reversed by the Ad-SOCS3 virus infection, in contrast to the Ad-con virus infection, in epithelial HK-2 cells. In conclusion, the present study confirmed the inhibitory role of SOCS3 in the AGE-induced EMT in renal TECs, implying the protective role of SOCS3 in DN.

  17. The new credo: induction chemotherapy in locally advanced gastric cancer: consequences for surgical strategies.

    PubMed

    Ott, Katja; Lordick, Florian; Herrmann, Ken; Krause, Bernd-Joachim; Schuhmacher, Christoph; Siewert, Jörg Rüdiger

    2008-01-01

    Perioperative chemotherapy in stage II and stage III gastric cancer is now accepted as a standard of care in the Western world. Two randomized phase III studies have shown improved survival for patients with induction chemotherapy followed by surgery compared with surgery alone. It is generally accepted that patients who respond to induction therapy have a significantly improved survival compared with that in nonresponding patients. Unfortunately no prospectively tested markers predicting response and/or prognosis are available for clinical practice. In adenocarcinomas of the esophagogastric junction (AEG), fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) prospectively was established as a surrogate predicting response and prognosis. The MUNICON (Metabolic response evalUatioN for Individualisation of neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in oesOphageal and oesophagogastric adeNocarcinoma) I study confirmed prospectively the usefulness of early metabolic response evaluation and showed the feasibility of a PET-guided treatment algorithm. These findings are an important step forward in the tailoring of multimodal treatment in accordance with tumor biology. In gastric cancer, we have analyzed FDG-PET in a prospective study. In gastric cancer the issue is more complicated, because about 30% of gastric cancers cannot be visualized with sufficient contrast for quantification. Insufficient FDG uptake is mostly associated with diffuse-type gastric cancer with signet ring cells and mucinous content. In FDG-avid patients, FDG-PET can be used for response evaluation, comparable to that in AEG. The prognosis of FDG-nonavid patients is similar to that in metabolic nonresponders. The addition of new tracers such as fluorothymidine may increase the sensitivity of PET in the future. Treatment concepts such as immediate resection after only 2 weeks of induction therapy with or without adjuvant treatment could be considered in metabolic nonresponders, or modified chemotherapy regimens

  18. Impact of chemokine receptor CXCR3 on tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte recruitment associated with favorable prognosis in advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Zhu, Zhengpeng; Luo, Jin; Fang, Jingyi; Zhou, Huanhuan; Hu, Min; Maskey, Ninu; Yang, Guifang

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine receptor CXCR3 has been proved to play an important role in tumorigenesis and tumor progression in many malignancies, but its precise efficacy on gastric cancer (GC) has not been evaluated yet. The present study was aimed to explore the correlation of chemokine receptor CXCR3 with tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and prognosis in advanced gastric cancer (GC). Expression of CXCR3 and CD4+, CD8+ TILs was conducted in 192 advanced GC specimens and 48 corresponding paracancerous tissues by immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis. CXCR3 expression in GC tissues was significantly higher than that in paracancerous tissues (P<0.001) and CD8+, CD4+ TILs infiltration increased with high CXCR3 expression (P=0.032 and P<0.001, respectively). Our study showed significantly lower CXCR3 expression in patients with greater tumor invasion depth and lymph node metastasis compared with patients with lesser tumor invasion depth and without lymph node metastasis (P=0.002 and P=0.001, respectively). Univariate analysis indicated that patients with high CXCR3 expression and high CD8+ TILs infiltration had longer overall survival (OS) (log-rank test, P<0.001 and P=0.002, respectively). Univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that CXCR3 expression was an independent prognostic factor for OS (P=0.002). The present study suggested that CXCR3 expression was upregulated in advanced GC and was associated with increased CD4+, CD8+ TILs infiltration and improved OS. Therefore, CXCR3 overexpression is implicated as a favorable prognostic biomarker in human advanced GC.

  19. Recent advances in photodynamic diagnosis of gastric cancer using 5-aminolevulinic acid

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Noriaki; Harada, Yoshinori; Minamikawa, Takeo; Tanaka, Hideo; Otsuji, Eigo; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis based on 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX has been clinically applied in many fields based upon its evidenced efficacy and adequate safety. In order to establish a personalized medicine approach for treating gastric cancer patients, rapid intraoperative detection of malignant lesions has become important. Feasibility of photodynamic diagnosis using 5-aminolevulinic acid for gastric cancer patients has been investigated, especially for the detection of peritoneal dissemination and lymph node metastasis. This method enables intraoperative real-time fluorescence detection of peritoneal dissemination, exhibiting higher sensitivity than white light observation without histopathological examination. The method also enables detection of metastatic foci within excised lymph nodes, exhibiting a diagnostic accuracy comparable to that of a current molecular diagnostics technique. Although several complicating issues still need to be resolved, such as the effect of tissue autofluorescence and the insufficient depth penetration of excitation light, this simple and rapid method has the potential to become a useful diagnostic tool for gastric cancer, as well as urinary bladder cancer and glioma. PMID:26811665

  20. Recent advances in photodynamic diagnosis of gastric cancer using 5-aminolevulinic acid.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Noriaki; Harada, Yoshinori; Minamikawa, Takeo; Tanaka, Hideo; Otsuji, Eigo; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2016-01-21

    Photodynamic diagnosis based on 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX has been clinically applied in many fields based upon its evidenced efficacy and adequate safety. In order to establish a personalized medicine approach for treating gastric cancer patients, rapid intraoperative detection of malignant lesions has become important. Feasibility of photodynamic diagnosis using 5-aminolevulinic acid for gastric cancer patients has been investigated, especially for the detection of peritoneal dissemination and lymph node metastasis. This method enables intraoperative real-time fluorescence detection of peritoneal dissemination, exhibiting higher sensitivity than white light observation without histopathological examination. The method also enables detection of metastatic foci within excised lymph nodes, exhibiting a diagnostic accuracy comparable to that of a current molecular diagnostics technique. Although several complicating issues still need to be resolved, such as the effect of tissue autofluorescence and the insufficient depth penetration of excitation light, this simple and rapid method has the potential to become a useful diagnostic tool for gastric cancer, as well as urinary bladder cancer and glioma.

  1. Robotic surgery of locally advanced gastric cancer: a single-surgeon experience of 41 cases.

    PubMed

    Vasilescu, C; Procopiuc, L

    2012-01-01

    The mainstay of curative gastric cancer treatment is open gastric resection with regional lymph node dissection. Minimally invasive surgery is yet to become an established technique with a well defined role. Robotic surgery has by-passed some of the limitations of conventional laparoscopy and has proven both safe and feasible. We present our initial experience with robotic surgery based on 41 gastric cancer patients. We especially wish to underline the advantages of the robotic system when performing the digestive tract anastomoses. We present the techniques of end-to-side eso-jejunoanastomoses (using a circular stapler or manual suture) and side-to-side eso-jejunoanastomoses. In our hands, the results with circular stapled anastomoses were good and we advocate against manual suturing when performing anastomoses in robotic surgery. Moreover, we recommend performing totally intracorporeal anastomoses which have a better post-operative outcome, especially in obese patients. We present three methods of realising the total intracorporeal eso-jejuno-anastomosis with a circular stapler: manual purse-string suture, using the OrVil and the double stapling technique. The eso-jejunoanastomosis is one of the most difficult steps in performing the total gastrectomy, but these techniques allow the surgeon to choose the best option for each case. We consider that surgeons who undertake total gastrectomies must have a special training in performing these anastomoses.

  2. Secondary sentinel lymph node tracing technique: a new method for tracing lymph nodes in radical gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Zong-lin; Jiang, Huai-wu; Song, Min; Xu, Liang; Xia, Dong; Liu, Qing

    2015-11-01

    To explore the feasibility and clinical value of secondary sentinel lymph node (SSLN) tracing technique in radical gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer (AGC). From January 2009 to June 2011, 247 patients who suffered from gastric angle cancer with metastasis in No. 3 group lymph nodes were divided randomly into groups A and B. Methylthioninium chloride was injected into the peripheral tissue of the metastatic No. 3 group lymph nodes of 138 patients in group A before tumor resections. SSLNs were traced and individual lymphadenectomies were carried out based on the biopsy results of the SSLNs. Standard D2 radical gastrectomies were carried out directly on 109 patients in group B. Postoperative follow-up and survival analysis were carried out for patients in both groups. SSLNs were found in 114 (82.6%) patients in group A. Ninety of those patients (78.9%) demonstrated existing metastasis in SSLNs. According to Kaplan-Meier's method, the postoperative 3-year cumulative survival rates were 63.5% and 47.5%, and the median survival time were 40 and 36 months for the patients of groups A and B, respectively (P<0.05). The SSLN tracing technique is feasible in radical gastrectomy for AGC. It gives surgeons important information about the terminal status of lymph node metastasis and provides some scientific basis for individual lymphadenectomy.

  3. Significance of volume-reduction surgery for far-advanced gastric cancer during treatment with novel anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Morinaga, Souichirou; Kasahara, Akira; Yoneyama, Katsuya; Osaragi, Tomohiko; Matsuura, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Tatsuya; Hasegawa, Shinichi

    2009-06-01

    We retrospectively assessed the survival benefit of novel anticancer agents (NACA) after volume-reduction surgery for far-advanced gastric cancer (FAGC). From 1995 to 2005, 41 patients with FAGC underwent chemotherapy after volume-reduction surgery. Those treated since 2000 who received NACA were referred to as group A, and those treated before 2000, who received anticancer agents other than NACA, were referred to as group B. In addition, 21 patients with unresectable gastric cancer treated since 2000 who received NACA were referred to as group C. We investigated the significance of volume-reduction surgery during treatment with NACA. The median survival time (MST) was significantly prolonged in group A (626 days) compared to group B (364 days; P = 0.0156). Multivariate analysis showed that having one noncurative factor (NCF), and the use of NACA, were factors that contributed to survival time. Comparison between the subgroup of group A that had one NCF and the subgroup that had two or more NCFs revealed MSTs of 700 days and 180 days, respectively, with a significantly longer MST among the patients with one NCF (P = 0.0021). In addition, no difference from the MST of 333 days in group C was seen among the group A patients with two or more NCFs. The postoperative survival time of patients with one NCF was prolonged by the advent of NACA, but no significant prolongation was observed in the patients with two or more NCFs.

  4. Combination of cisplatin/S-1 in the treatment of patients with advanced gastric or gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma: Results of noninferiority and safety analyses compared with cisplatin/5-fluorouracil in the First-Line Advanced Gastric Cancer Study.

    PubMed

    Ajani, J A; Buyse, M; Lichinitser, M; Gorbunova, V; Bodoky, G; Douillard, J Y; Cascinu, S; Heinemann, V; Zaucha, R; Carrato, A; Ferry, D; Moiseyenko, V

    2013-11-01

    The aim of developing oral fluorouracil (5-FU) is to provide a more convenient administration route with similar efficacy and the best achievable tolerance. S-1, a novel oral fluoropyrimidine, was specifically designed to overcome the limitations of intravenous fluoropyrimidine therapies. A multicentre, randomised phase 3 trial was undertaken to compare S-1/cisplatin (CS) with infusional 5-FU/cisplatin (CF) in 1053 patients with untreated, advanced gastric/gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma. This report discusses a post-hoc noninferiority overall survival (OS) and safety analyses. Results (1029 treated; CS = 521/CF = 508) revealed OS in CS (8.6 months) was statistically noninferior to CF (7.9 months) [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.92 (two-sided 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.80-1.05)] for any margin equal to or greater than 1.05. Statistically significant safety advantages for the CS arm were observed [G3/4 neutropenia (CS, 18.6%; CF, 40.0%), febrile neutropenia (CS, 1.7%; CF, 6.9%), G3/4 stomatitis (CS, 1.3%; CF, 13.6%), diarrhoea (all grades: CS, 29.2%; CF, 38.4%) and renal adverse events (all grades: CS, 18.8%; CF, 33.5%)]. Hand-foot syndrome, infrequently reported, was mainly grade 1/2 in both arms. Treatment-related deaths were significantly lower in the CS arm than the CF arm (2.5% and 4.9%, respectively; P<0.047). CS is noninferior to CF with a better safety profile and provides a new treatment option for patients with advanced gastric carcinoma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [A Case of Advanced Gastric Cancer with Peritoneal Dissemination Effectively Treated with S-1 and Docetaxel Combination Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Saito, Hiroyuki; Suematsu, Yuki; Hiratsuka, Miyuki; Suda, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Miyuki; Omori, Keita; Ishibashi, Yuji; Morita, Akihiko; Wakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Ito, Yutaka

    2015-11-01

    A 72-year-old man underwent surgery for advanced gastric cancer. Systemic chemotherapy was started, using a regimen of S-1/CDDP for 4 courses, followed by 8 courses of S-1. Three years and 8 months after the surgery, abdominal CT demonstrated ascites, and the serum CA19-9 level was abnormally high (1,165.1 U/mL). Adenocarcinoma cells were found in the ascites. Treatment with S-1/docetaxel (DOC) was started. After 10 courses, the ascites disappeared and the serum CA19-9 value returned to normal. Four years and 7 months after the operation, the patient has been in good health, with no signs of recurrence.

  6. Retrospective comparison of S-1 plus cisplatin versus S-1 monotherapy for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer patients with positive peritoneal cytology but without gross peritoneal metastasis.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Izuma; Chin, Keisho; Matsushima, Tomohiro; Takahari, Daisuke; Ogura, Mariko; Shinozaki, Eiji; Suenaga, Mitsukuni; Ozaka, Masato; Wakatsuki, Takeru; Ichimura, Takashi; Hiroki, Osumi; Yamaguchi, Kensei

    2017-07-26

    Peritoneal cytology positive for carcinoma cells (CY+) is an independent poor prognostic factor in gastric cancer, and patients with CY+ are diagnosed with stage IV disease. However, there is no standard treatment strategy for CY+ gastric cancer, whereas combination chemotherapy with fluoropyrimidine and platinum has been established as the standard treatment for unresectable advanced gastric cancer or after R2 resection. Herein, we assessed whether adding cisplatin to S-1 (SP) could improve the outcome of CY+ gastric cancer patients, as compared to S-1 monotherapy. This retrospective study was conducted at a single Japanese institute between June 2005 and March 2014. Patients diagnosed with CY+ advanced gastric cancer and treated with S-1-based therapy were enrolled. Patients with incurable factors other than CY+ were excluded. Forty-four patients were enrolled; 25 and 19 were administered S-1 and SP, respectively. The 2-year survival rates were 52.0% [95% confidence interval (CI), 31.2-69.2%] and 52.6% (28.7-71.9%) in the S-1 and SP groups, respectively. The median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 28.2 and 15.6 months in the S-1 group and 24.0 and 18.8 months in the SP group, respectively; they were not significantly different. The relative dose intensities were 0.79 (S-1) in the S-1 group and 0.69 (S-1)/0.70 (cisplatin) in the SP group. Adding cisplatin to long-term S-1 monotherapy did not significantly improve the outcome of CY+ advanced gastric cancer patients.

  7. Neoadjuvant Therapy of DOF Regimen Plus Bevacizumab Can Increase Surgical Resection Ratein Locally Advanced Gastric Cancer: A Randomized, Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junxun; Yao, Sheng; Li, Xiao-Song; Kang, Huan-Rong; Yao, Fang-Fang; Du, Nan

    2015-10-01

    Locally advanced gastric cancer (LAGC) is best treated with surgical resection. Bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy has shown promising results in treating advanced gastric cancer. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy using the docetaxel/oxaliplatin/5-FU (DOF) regimen and bevacizumab in LAGC patients.Eighty LAGC patients were randomized to receive DOF alone (n = 40) or DOF plus bevacizumab (n = 40) as neoadjuvant therapy before surgery. The lesions were evaluated at baseline and during treatment. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were counted using the FISH test. Patients were followed up for 3 years to analyze the disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS).The total response rate was significantly higher in the DOF plus bevacizumab group than the DOF group (65% vs 42.5%, P = 0.0436). The addition of bevacizumab significantly increased the surgical resection rate and the R0 resection rate (P < 0.05). The DOF plus bevacizumab group showed significantly greater reduction in CTC counts after neoadjuvant therapy in comparison with the DOF group (P = 0.0335). Although the DOF plus bevacizumab group had significantly improved DFS than the DOF group (15.2 months vs 12.3 months, P = 0.013), the 2 groups did not differ significantly in OS (17.6 ± 1.8 months vs 16.4 ± 1.9 months, P = 0.776. Cox proportional model analysis showed that number of metastatic lymph nodes, CTC reduction, R0 resection, and neoadjuvant therapy are independent prognostic factors for patients with LAGC.Neoadjuvant of DOF regimen plus bevacizumab can improve the R0 resection rate and DFS in LAGC. These beneficial effects might be associated with the reduction in CTC counts.

  8. Phase II Study of Chemoradiotherapy With S-1 and Low-Dose Cisplatin for Inoperable Advanced Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Saikawa, Yoshiro Kubota, Tetsuro; Kumagai, Koshi; Nakamura, Rieko; Kumai, Koichiro; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Kubo, Atsushi; Kitajima, Masaki; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: The results of a pilot study using S-1/low-dose cisplatin/radiotherapy led us to hypothesize that the initial chemoradiotherapy regimen would induce a 70% efficacy rate with a 10% pathologic complete response rate. Patients and Methods: Only patients with unresectable or incurable advanced gastric cancer were eligible. The patients received induction S-1 and cisplatin therapy with radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy alone. Results: Of the 30 patients recruited and assessed, 29 were eligible for clinical evaluation of measurable lesions. The response rate was 65.5%, with 19 with a partial response, 8 with no change, and 2 with progressive disease of 29 patients. Of the 30 patients recruited, 10 (33.3%) underwent stomach resection and D2 LN dissections. The pathologic complete response rate was 13.3% (4 patients), and the R0 resection rate was 100% (10 patients). The survival analysis showed a median survival time of 25 months. Grade 3 toxicity occurred in 66.7% for leukocytopenia, 33.3% for thrombocytopenia, 23.3% for nausea and appetite loss, and 6.7% for anemia, diarrhea, and renal dysfunction. Although all the patients had been hospitalized with a poor performance status with a giant tumor, 97% (29 of 30) could be discharged after the first cycle, resulting in an improvement in quality of life. Conclusion: Chemoradiotherapy could be a powerful regimen for controlling tumor progression in advanced gastric cancer, improving patients' quality of life with tolerable toxicity. A complete histologic response rate of >10% would be expected, even for large tumors with metastatic lesions.

  9. Immunohistochemical evaluation of Ki-67, PCNA and MCM2 proteins proliferation index (PI) in advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Czyzewska, Jolanta; Guzińska-Ustymowicz, Katarzyna; Pryczynicz, Anna; Kemona, Andrzej; Bandurski, Roman

    2009-01-01

    The current study objective was to assess the proliferation indices (PI) of Ki-67, PCNA and MCM2 proteins in advanced gastric cancer and in metastatic lymph node in correlation with certain clinicopathological features and with postoperative survival of patients. The study was conducted in a group of 100 patients with advanced gastric cancers. Involvement of local lymph nodes was present in 36 cases. Immunohistochemical investigations were carried out using monoclonal antibodies against Ki-67 (DAKO), PCNA (DAKO) and polyclonal antibody to MCM2 (Santa Cruz Biotechnology). Visualization of the antigen/antibody complex was performed using LSAB technique (biotin-streptavidin-peroxidase) followed by application of chromogene DAB (DAKO). Statistical analysis revealed no correlations of Ki-67, PCNA and MCM2 PI in tumour tissue or metastatic lymph node with patients' age and gender, tumour location, histological grade, macroscopic type according to Bormann's classification and histological grading by Lauren's and Goseki's classifications. Moreover, no correlation was observed of Ki-67 and MCM2 PI in tumour tissue with histological grading. No correlation was also noted between the proliferation indices of all the three proteins in the affected lymph node and grade of histological differentiation. Such clinicopathological parameters as patients' age and gender, histological grading by Lauren's and Goseki's classifications and lymph node involvement did not correlate with survival time of patients. Furthermore, no statistically significant correlation was shown of postoperative survival time with Ki-67 and MCM2 PI in tumour tissue and metastatic lymph nodes and with PCNA PI in the affected lymph nodes. However, a statistically significant correlation was found of Ki-67, PCNA and MCM2 PI in tumour tissue and metastatic lymph nodes with depth of wall invasion and local lymph node involvement. A statistically significant correlation was also noted between PCNA PI in the main

  10. The Treatment of Peritoneal Carcinomatosis in Advanced Gastric Cancer: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Montori, Giulia; Ceresoli, Marco; Catena, Fausto; Colaianni, Nicola; Poletti, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the fourth most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in the world; 53–60% of patients show disease progression and die of peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC). PC of gastric origin has an extremely inauspicious prognosis with a median survival estimate at 1–3 months. Different studies presented contrasting data about survival rates; however, all agreed with the necessity of a complete cytoreduction to improve survival. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) has an adjuvant role in preventing peritoneal recurrences. A multidisciplinary approach should be empowered: the association of neoadjuvant intraperitoneal and systemic chemotherapy (NIPS), cytoreductive surgery (CRS), HIPEC, and early postoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (EPIC) could increase the rate of completeness of cytoreduction (CC) and consequently survival rates, especially in patients with Peritoneal Cancer Index (PCI) ≤6. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy may improve survival also in PC from GC and adjuvant chemotherapy could prevent recurrence. In the last decade an interesting new drug, called Catumaxomab, has been developed in Germany. Two studies showed that this drug seems to improve progression-free survival in patients with GC; however, final results for both studies have still to be published. PMID:24693422

  11. Endoluminal Revision (OverStitch (TM) , Apollo Endosurgery) of the Dilated Gastroenterostomy in Patients with Late Dumping Syndrome After Proximal Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass.

    PubMed

    Stier, Christine; Chiappetta, Sonja

    2016-08-01

    Dumping syndrome is a long-term postoperative complication of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass procedures. Morphologically, dumping syndrome usually correlates with a dilatation of the gastroenterostomy with accelerated pouch emptying. Conservative therapy includes diet changes, complementary pharmacotherapy and, if symptoms persist, surgical revision. Surgical options include endoscopic, endoluminal surgery to constrict the gastrojejunostomy using a novel endoscopic suturing device (OverStitch(TM), Apollo). In our study, we aimed to assess the viability, safety and efficacy of this procedure in patients with late dumping; 14 patients who had developed late dumping syndrome underwent surgery using an endoscopic suturing technique (OverStitch(TM), Apollo). Late dumping was confirmed by Sigstad score and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Prior to surgery, objective analysis of pouch emptying speed was assessed by gastric scintigraphy. Surgery was performed under general anaesthesia. None of the 14 patients suffered intra- or postoperative complications. No postsurgical increase in inflammation parameters was observed. The postinterventional pain scale (visual analogue scale) showed a mean score of 0.5 (range 0-10). In 13 of the 14 patients, no dumping was observed 1-month postsurgery. The postoperative Sigstad score (3.07 ± 2.06; range 1-9) showed an impressive reduction compared with the preoperative score (12.71 ± 4.18; range 7-24) (p < 0.001). Postoperative upper gastrointestinal gastrografin swallow revealed regular emptying in all the patients. The endoluminal endoscopic suturing technique-applied here for surgical revision of gastroenterostomy following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass-represents a promising, novel therapeutic option in late dumping syndrome involving minimal trauma and offering rapid reconvalescence.

  12. Short-term outcomes of laparoscopic D2 lymphadenectomy with complete mesogastrium excision for advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Xie, Daxing; Yu, Chaoran; Liu, Liang; Osaiweran, Hasan; Gao, Chun; Hu, Junbo; Gong, Jianping

    2016-11-01

    D2 lymphadenectomy has been widely accepted as a standard procedure of surgical treatment for local advanced gastric cancer [1, 2]. However, neither the dissection boundary nor the extent of the excision for perigastric soft tissues has been described [3-7]. Our previous researches demonstrate the existence of disseminated cancer cells in the mesogastrium [8, 9] and present an understandable mesogastrium model for gastrectomy [10]. Hence, the D2 lymphadenectomy plus complete mesogastrium excision (D2 + CME) is firstly proposed in this study, aiming to assess the safety, feasibility and corresponding short-term surgical outcomes. All of these patients underwent laparoscopy assisted D2 + CME radical gastrectomy with a curative R0 resection, and all the operations were performed by Prof. Jianping Gong, chief of GI surgery of Tongji Hospital, Huazhong University of Science and Technology. All participants provided informed written consent to participate in the study. This study was approved by the Tongji Hospital Ethics Committee. The standard surgical procedures in the video are described as follows. Dissect along the gastrocolic ligament and then toward the left colic flexture with special made gauze. Bluntly separate the adipose tissues to find fascia plane. Expose along the plane toward the splenic inferior polar area. Precede to the origins of left gastroepiploic vessels (LGEVs), clip and cut. All the mobilized adipose tissues in this area are defined as left gastroepiploic mesentery (LGEM) [10]. Next, turn to infra-pyloric area. Dissect the fascia plane between right gastroepiploic mesentery (RGEM) and transverse mesocolon. Turn to the pancreas head, remove the covering adipose tissues, identify the superior mesentery vein and expose the origins of right gastroepiploic vessels (RGEVs). Clip and cut. All the surrounding mobilized adipose tissues are defined as RGEM [10]. Move to the superior boarder of pancreas with the stomach reflected cephalad, incise the

  13. Clinicopathological significance of N-cadherin and VEGF in advanced gastric cancer brain metastasis and the effects of metformin in preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Jun, Kyong-Hwa; Lee, Jung Eun; Kim, Se Hoon; Jung, Ji-Han; Choi, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Young Il; Chin, Hyung-Min; Yang, Seung-Ho

    2015-10-01

    Gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Although brain metastasis is a rare complication of gastric cancer, no standard therapy for gastric cancer brain metastasis has been established. We attempted to identify biological markers that predict brain metastasis, and investigated how to modulate such markers. A case-control study of patients newly diagnosed with gastric cancer who had developed brain metastasis during follow-up, was conducted. These patients were compared with patients who had advanced gastric cancer but no evidence of brain metastasis. Immunohistochemistry was used to analyze the expression of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, MSS1, claudin-3, claudin-4, Glut1, clusterin, ITGB4, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and p53. The expression of VEGF tended to be higher in the case group (33.3 vs. 0%, p=0.055). Median survival was significantly correlated with vascular invasion (12 vs. 33 months, p=0.008) and N-cadherin expression (36 vs. 12 months, p=0.027). We also investigated the effects of metformin in tumor-bearing mouse models. VEGF expression was decreased and E-cadherin increased in the metformin‑treated group when compared with the control group. The expression of the mesenchymal marker MMP9 was decreased in the metformin-treated group. Brain metastasis of advanced gastric cancer was associated with the expression of VEGF. Metformin treatment may be useful for modulating the metastatic capacity by reducing VEGF expression and blocking epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

  14. Risk of advanced gastric precancerous lesions in Helicobacter pylori infected subjects is influenced by ABO blood group and cagA status.

    PubMed

    Rizzato, Cosmeri; Kato, Ikuko; Plummer, Martyn; Muñoz, Nubia; Stein, Angelika; Jan van Doorn, Leen; Franceschi, Silvia; Canzian, Federico

    2013-07-15

    A higher incidence of stomach cancer in ABO blood type A individuals than in those with blood type O has been known for a long time. We studied this association in relation to Helicobacter pylori (Hp) of different cagA status. For our study, we used baseline gastric histopathology data and DNAs from frozen gastric biopsies of 2,077 subjects enrolled in a chemoprevention trial for gastric precancerous lesions in Venezuela. We analyzed six single nucleotide polymorphisms in the ABO gene, and we assessed the presence of the Hp cagA gene. Odds ratios (ORs) for risk of advanced precancerous gastric lesions were calculated using individuals with normal gastric epithelium or non-atrophic gastritis as a reference. Among individuals carrying a cagA negative Hp infection or no Hp infection, those with blood type A had a lower risk of intestinal metaplasia (IM) and dysplasia than those with blood type O (OR=0.60; 95% CI 0.38-0.94). In carriers of cagA positive Hp strains, individuals with blood type A had a higher risk of IM or dysplasia than those with blood type O (OR=1.42, 95% CI 1.09-1.86) and a higher risk if compared to subjects carrying cagA negative strain and non-A blood group (OR=3.82, 95% CI=2.80-5.20). The interaction between Hp cagA status and blood type was statistically significant (p=0.0006). We showed that SNPs in the ABO gene, predictive of ABO blood groups, are associated with risk of advanced precancerous gastric lesions in individuals infected with Hp, but the assessment of the risk is strictly dependent on cagA status.

  15. Risk of advanced gastric precancerous lesions in Helicobacter pylori infected subjects is influenced by ABO blood group and cagA status

    PubMed Central

    Rizzato, Cosmeri; Kato, Ikuko; Plummer, Martyn; Muñoz, Nubia; Stein, Angelika; van Doorn, Leen Jan; Franceschi, Silvia; Canzian, Federico

    2013-01-01

    A higher incidence of stomach cancer in ABO blood type A individuals than in those with blood type O has been known for a long time. We studied this association in relation to Helicobacter pylori (Hp) of different cagA status. For this study we used baseline gastric histopathology data and DNAs from frozen gastric biopsies of 2077 subjects enrolled in a chemoprevention trial for gastric precancerous lesions in Venezuela. We analyzed 6 single nucleotide polymorphisms in the ABO gene and we assessed the presence of the Hp cagA gene. Odds ratios for risk of advanced precancerous gastric lesions were calculated using individuals with normal gastric epithelium or non-atrophic gastritis as a reference. Among individuals carrying a cagA negative Hp infection or no Hp infection, those with blood type A had a lower risk of intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia than those with blood type O (OR=0.60; 95% CI 0.38-0.94). In carriers of cagA positive Hp strains, individuals with blood type A had a higher risk of intestinal metaplasia or dysplasia than those with blood type O (OR=1.42, 95% CI 1.09-1.86) and a higher risk if compared with subjects carrying cagA− strain and non-A blood group (OR=3.82, 95%CI=2.80-5.20). The interaction between Hp cagA status and blood type was statistically significant (P=0.0006). We showed that SNPs in the ABO gene, predictive of ABO blood groups, are associated with risk of advanced precancerous gastric lesions in individuals infected with Hp, but the assessment of the risk is strictly dependent on cagA status. PMID:23319424

  16. Pathological Complete Response and Long-Term Survival in a Very Elderly Patient after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced, Unresectable Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Mitsuyoshi; Mori, Hirohito; Ebara, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    We address the pathological complete response and long-term survival of elderly patients after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced, unresectable gastric cancer. An 83-year-old man was hospitalized for upper abdominal pain. Gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a large tumor spanning from the gastric angle to the antrum, and extending to the duodenum. Histological analysis of the biopsy specimen revealed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Computed tomography images showed thickening of the gastric wall and invasion of the body and head of the pancreas, but did not show distant metastases. The patient was diagnosed with unresectable gastric cancer, and was treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy using S-1 (80 mg/m2) and paclitaxel (60 mg/m2). After the third course of chemotherapy, gastrointestinal endoscopy and abdominal computed tomography revealed a remarkable reduction in tumor size. This reduction allowed distal gastrectomy to be conducted. Histological examination of the specimen revealed no cancer cells in the primary lesion or lymph nodes. The patient was treated with adjuvant chemotherapy of oral tegafur-uracil (300 mg/day) for one year after surgery. He lived for five years after surgery without recurrence. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy using S-1 and paclitaxel is a potent strategy for improving survival in very elderly patients with unresectable gastric cancer. PMID:25298899

  17. [A Case of Double Cancer of Initially Unresectable Sigmoid Colon Cancer and Advanced Gastric Cancer Treated with Curative Resection after mFOLFOX6 Therapy].

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Toru; Aoki, Kazunori; Mitsuhashi, Yuto; Tomiura, Satoko; Suto, Akiko; Miura, Takuya; Ikenaga, Shojirokazunori; Shibasaki, Itaru; Endo, Masaaki

    2016-03-01

    A 61-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of a complaint of blood in stool. He was diagnosed with advanced colon and gastric cancers. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a sigmoid tumor with invasion to the bladder, a metastatic tumor in the lateral segmental branch of the left hepatic lobe, and ascites. He was diagnosed with initially unresectable double cancer. Ileostomy was performed immediately, and he was treated with modified (m) FOLFOX6 regimen (oxaliplatin in combination with infusional 5-fluorouracil/Leucovorin). After 6 courses of the mFOLFOX6 regimen, CT revealed that the primary lesion of the sigmoid colon and liver metastasis had reduced in size, and the ascites had disappeared. Gastroscopy revealed that the gastric cancer had disappeared. Biopsy results were negative. Accordingly, his gastric cancer was diagnosed as treatment effect Grade 3. After 8 courses of mFOLFOX6 therapy, sigmoidectomy, partial resection of the bladder, and partial resection of the liver were performed. Gastric cancer was not resected in accordance with his will. Although 40 months has passed after the radical resection, neither the sigmoid colon cancer nor the gastric cancer recurred.

  18. Regorafenib for the Treatment of Advanced Gastric Cancer (INTEGRATE): A Multinational Placebo-Controlled Phase II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sjoquist, Katrin M.; Martin, Andrew J.; Tsobanis, Eric; Yip, Sonia; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Bang, Yung-Jue; Alcindor, Thierry; O’Callaghan, Christopher J.; Burnell, Margot J.; Tebbutt, Niall C.; Rha, Sun Young; Lee, Jeeyun; Cho, Jae-Yong; Lipton, Lara R.; Wong, Mark; Strickland, Andrew; Kim, Jin Won; Zalcberg, John R.; Simes, John; Goldstein, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the activity of regorafenib, an oral multikinase inhibitor, in advanced gastric adenocarcinoma. Patients and Methods We conducted an international (Australia and New Zealand, South Korea, and Canada) randomized phase II trial in which patients were randomly assigned at a two-to-one ratio and stratified by lines of prior chemotherapy for advanced disease (one v two) and region. Eligible patients received best supportive care plus regorafenib 160 mg or matching placebo orally on days 1 to 21 of each 28-day cycle until disease progression or prohibitive adverse events occurred. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Final analysis included data to December 31, 2014. Results A total of 152 patients were randomly assigned from November 7, 2012, to February 25, 2014, yielding 147 evaluable patients (regorafenib, n = 97; placebo, n = 50). Baseline characteristics were balanced. Median PFS significantly differed between groups (regorafenib, 2.6 months; 95% CI, 1.8 to 3.1 and placebo, 0.9 months; 95% CI, 0.9 to 0.9; hazard ratio [HR], 0.40; 95% CI, 0.28 to 0.59; P < .001). The effect was greater in South Korea than in Australia, New Zealand, and Canada combined (HR, 0.12 v 0.61; interaction P < .001) but consistent across age, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, primary site, lines of chemotherapy, peritoneal metastasis presence, number of metastatic sites, and plasma vascular endothelial growth factor A. A survival trend in favor of regorafenib was seen (median, 5.8 months; 95% CI, 4.4 to 6.8 v 4.5 months; 95% CI, 3.4 to 5.2; HR, 0.74; P = .147). Twenty-nine patients assigned to placebo received open-label regorafenib after disease progression. Regorafenib toxicity was similar to that previously reported. Conclusion In this phase II trial, regorafenib was effective in prolonging PFS in refractory advanced gastric adenocarcinoma. Regional differences were found, but regorafenib was effective in both regional groups. A phase III trial is

  19. Regorafenib for the Treatment of Advanced Gastric Cancer (INTEGRATE): A Multinational Placebo-Controlled Phase II Trial.

    PubMed

    Pavlakis, Nick; Sjoquist, Katrin M; Martin, Andrew J; Tsobanis, Eric; Yip, Sonia; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Bang, Yung-Jue; Alcindor, Thierry; O'Callaghan, Christopher J; Burnell, Margot J; Tebbutt, Niall C; Rha, Sun Young; Lee, Jeeyun; Cho, Jae-Yong; Lipton, Lara R; Wong, Mark; Strickland, Andrew; Kim, Jin Won; Zalcberg, John R; Simes, John; Goldstein, David

    2016-08-10

    We evaluated the activity of regorafenib, an oral multikinase inhibitor, in advanced gastric adenocarcinoma. We conducted an international (Australia and New Zealand, South Korea, and Canada) randomized phase II trial in which patients were randomly assigned at a two-to-one ratio and stratified by lines of prior chemotherapy for advanced disease (one v two) and region. Eligible patients received best supportive care plus regorafenib 160 mg or matching placebo orally on days 1 to 21 of each 28-day cycle until disease progression or prohibitive adverse events occurred. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Final analysis included data to December 31, 2014. A total of 152 patients were randomly assigned from November 7, 2012, to February 25, 2014, yielding 147 evaluable patients (regorafenib, n = 97; placebo, n = 50). Baseline characteristics were balanced. Median PFS significantly differed between groups (regorafenib, 2.6 months; 95% CI, 1.8 to 3.1 and placebo, 0.9 months; 95% CI, 0.9 to 0.9; hazard ratio [HR], 0.40; 95% CI, 0.28 to 0.59; P < .001). The effect was greater in South Korea than in Australia, New Zealand, and Canada combined (HR, 0.12 v 0.61; interaction P < .001) but consistent across age, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, primary site, lines of chemotherapy, peritoneal metastasis presence, number of metastatic sites, and plasma vascular endothelial growth factor A. A survival trend in favor of regorafenib was seen (median, 5.8 months; 95% CI, 4.4 to 6.8 v 4.5 months; 95% CI, 3.4 to 5.2; HR, 0.74; P = .147). Twenty-nine patients assigned to placebo received open-label regorafenib after disease progression. Regorafenib toxicity was similar to that previously reported. In this phase II trial, regorafenib was effective in prolonging PFS in refractory advanced gastric adenocarcinoma. Regional differences were found, but regorafenib was effective in both regional groups. A phase III trial is planned. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical

  20. Comparison of site-specific gene expression levels in primary tumors and synchronous lymph node metastases in advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Naruke, Akira; Azuma, Mizutomo; Takeuchi, Atsuko; Ishido, Kenji; Katada, Chikatoshi; Sasaki, Tohru; Higuchi, Katsuhiko; Tanabe, Satoshi; Saegusa, Makoto; Koizumi, Wasaburo

    2015-04-01

    Many malignant tumors consist of heterogeneous subpopulations of cells. This heterogeneity is associated with genetic characteristics. However, it remains unclear whether gene expression levels differ among specific sites of tumors in gastric cancer. We studied differences in gene expression levels among specific sites of primary tumors and synchronous lymph node metastases, using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens resected surgically from 48 patients with previously untreated advanced gastric cancer. Specimens were obtained by laser-captured microdissection from five regions: (1) nonneoplastic mucosa, (2) surface layer (mucosa) of the primary tumor (surface sections), (3) middle layer (submucosa) of the primary tumor (middle sections), (4) the deepest layer of the primary tumor (muscularis propria or deeper) at the site of deepest invasion (deep sections), and (5) level 1 synchronous lymph node metastasis (lymph node metastases). Expression levels of the following target genes were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction: thymidylate synthase (TS), thymidine phosphorylase (TP), dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF1α). TP, DPD, EGFR, and HIF1α gene expression levels were significantly higher in deep sections than in surface sections. TP, EGFR, VEGF, and HIF1α gene expression levels were significantly higher in lymph node metastases than in surface sections. TP, DPD, EGFR, VEGF, and HIF1α gene expression levels were positively correlated with the specific samples harvested from the tumors. Our results show that the expression levels of some genes in tumor cells can change in specific sites of tumors and can become higher in association with tumor progression.

  1. Signet Ring Cells and Efficacy of First-line Chemotherapy in Advanced Gastric or Oesogastric Junction Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lemoine, Nathalie; Adenis, Antoine; Bouche, Olivier; Duhamel, Alain; Heurgue, Alexandra; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Amela, Eric; Salleron, Julia; Hebbar, Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of first-line palliative chemotherapy, regarding the presence of signet ring cells (SRC). Retrospective analysis of consecutive patients with locally advanced or metastatic gastric or oesogastric junction adenocarcinoma who received first-line chemotherapy. Response to chemotherapy, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were compared between SRC and non-SRC (NSRC) groups. Two hundred and three patients were treated, with 57 (28%) having SRC adenocarcinoma. Objective response rate was significantly lower in SRC patients (5.3% vs. 28.1%, p=0.0004). PFS was not significantly different between SRC and NSRC patients (median=3.8 vs. 4.9 months, p=0.07). OS was significantly shorter in SRC patients (median=5.6 vs. 9.4 months, p<0.008). In multivariate analysis SRC was not an independent prognostic factor for OS (hazard ratio (HR)=1.28, p=0.15). Patients with advanced SRC adenocarcinomas seemed to benefit less from chemotherapy, whereas the presence of SRC was not an independent survival prognostic factor. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  2. New Perspectives in the Treatment of Advanced Gastric Cancer: S-1 as a Novel Oral 5-FU Therapy in Combination with Cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Mahlberg, Rolf; Lorenzen, Sylvie; Thuss-Patience, Peter; Heinemann, Volker; Pfeiffer, Per; Möhler, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Oral fluoropyrimidines have been available for more than 10 years. Capecitabine is well established in treating solid tumors in Europe. S-1 (Teysuno®), an oral formulation containing the 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) prodrug tegafur and the two enzyme modulators gimeracil and oteracil, has not been available in non-Asia countries until recently. In Japan, S-1 in combination with cisplatin is the recommended first-line treatment in patients with gastric cancer. In Europe, the first trials with S-1 were disappointing due to high unacceptable incidences of adverse events. Pharmacokinetic studies showed differences in Asian and Caucasian patients; therefore, a new non-Asian study program was initiated, which led to the pivotal phase 3 trial First-Line Advanced Gastric Cancer Study (FLAGS). In FLAGS, 1,053 patients with advanced gastric cancer from 24 non-Asian countries were enrolled. S-1 plus cisplatin showed no overall survival (OS) benefit when compared to 5-FU plus cisplatin. The primary endpoint superior OS was not met but better tolerability was shown. A post hoc noninferiority OS and safety analysis showed that S-1 plus cisplatin has the same efficacy as 5-FU plus cisplatin but a more favorable safety profile. This led to the approval of S-1 in combination with cisplatin in gastric cancer in Europe in 2011. This article reviews the mode of action of S-1, pivotal study results from an EU point of view, and future perspectives.

  3. Combined use of gastric pull-up and pectoralis major flaps for massive defects after total laryngopharyngoesophagectomy in patients with advanced hypopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Caiyun; Chen, Shicai; Zhu, Minhui; Chen, Donghui; Chen, Hezhong; Zheng, Hongliang

    2015-11-01

    Reconstruction for patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the hypopharynx (SCCHP) after radical surgery is a challenge for head and neck surgeons, especially when one flap alone cannot entirely cover the defects. In this report, we describe the successful use of gastric pull-up combined with pectoralis major flaps for single-stage reconstruction after total laryngopharyngoesophagectomy in patients with SCCHP. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 23 patients with stage IV SCCHP who underwent this reconstructive procedure. Surgical details and perioperative morbidity were described, and functional and oncologic outcomes were evaluated. We used the gastric pull-up and pectoralis major flap procedure to reconstruct the defects for all 23 patients. In 13 patients the combined flaps were used to restore intestinal continuity, and in 10 patients the defects were repaired using gastric pull-up alone and covered by the pectoralis major flap. All the combined flaps worked well, and patients recovered normal swallowing function a mean 19.6 days after surgery. After an overall mean follow-up time of 25.3 months, six patients were still alive at the time of this analysis with no evidence of disease. Our results indicate that for patients with advanced SCCHP after total laryngopharyngoesophagectomy, using a pectoralis major flap combined with gastric pull-up enables one-stage reconstruction even when gastric pull-up alone cannot restore intestinal continuity. Furthermore, the functional and oncologic outcomes from this study suggest that this reconstructive procedure is safe and reliable, and more patients with advanced disease could be considered.

  4. Usefulness of Photodynamic Diagnosis and Therapy using Talaporfin Sodium for an Advanced-aged Patient with Inoperable Gastric Cancer (a secondary publication)

    PubMed Central

    Oinuma, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: In Japan the rise in the average life expectancy has caused an increase in the proportion of the population who are classed as geriatric. Accordingly, the number of elderly people being treated for cancer is increasing concomitantly. However, with the increase in age, the numbers of prior complications also increase. This is especially so in the advanced-aged patients, defined in Japan as those over the age of 85. Such complications may be too high risk for radical surgery and a less invasive treatment is warranted. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive treatment approved by the Japanese National Health Insurance for the treatment of early stage superficial type esophageal and gastric cancers, early stage uterine cervical cancers and dysplasia, and early and advanced lung cancer. We report herein on the efficacy of palliative PDT using talaporfin sodium (Laserphyrin®) for a case of inoperable gastric cancer. Material and methods: The patient was an 87-year-old-man, a diabetic with histories of diabetic nephropathy, cerebral infarction and myocardial infarction. This patient was first diagnosed as having gastric cancer in 2007 but surgery and chemotherapy were contraindicated due to his poor physical status and poor renal function, respectively, owing to the anticipated side effects. The patient was referred to our institution after hearing of PDT in 2009. He was treated with 1 course of porfimer sodium PDT and 3 courses of talaporfin sodium PDT with photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) during the period from September, 2009 to June, 2011. Results: The massive gastric cancer located in the cardia was successfully treated with 4 PDT sessions without any serious complications; therefore the patient was able to orally ingest food until his death due to natural causes other than the cancer, in October, 2011. Conclusion: Talaporfin sodium PDT is safe and effective treatment for advanced-aged patients suffering from inoperable gastric cancer. PMID

  5. [Successful treatment of advanced gastric cancer (Borrmann 1 type) with FTP chemotherapy after reduction surgery].

    PubMed

    Nomura, N; Yamada, A; Saitou, F; Tsuzawa, T; Yamashita, I; Sakakibara, T; Shimizu, T; Sakamoto, T; Karaki, Y; Tazawa, K

    1994-05-01

    A 54-year-old man was diagnosed with Borr 1 type gastric cancer, located just below ECJ with some paraaortic lymph node metastase, during treatment of diabetes mellitus at another hospital. He underwent spleno-total gastrectomy for reduction. The metastatic lymph nodes of the para-aorta were not resected, so the surgery was considered palliative. We administered FTP chemotherapy (CDDP 110 mg/day 1, 5-FU 1,200 mg/day 1-5, THP-ADM 30 mg/day 1) 5 times following surgery. The metastatic lymph nodes were remarkably decreased in size by the initial treatment. The decrement was 52.4% after the initial treatment (PR). After the 4th treatment, there were no lymph nodes detected (CR). After the 5th treatment, CR continued. The PR period was considered to be 5 months, and that of CR 4 months. The patient has no renal or heart dysfunction, and no suppression of bone marrow. His quality of life is satisfactory, and he continues to work as prior to surgery. FTP chemotherapy is considered a successful regimen for postoperative chemotherapy.

  6. Pre-adjuvant chemotherapy leukocyte count may predict the outcome for advanced gastric cancer after radical resection.

    PubMed

    Pei, Dong; Zhu, Fang; Chen, Xiaofeng; Qian, Jing; He, Shaohua; Qian, Yingying; Shen, Hua; Liu, Yiqian; Xu, Jiali; Shu, Yongqian

    2014-03-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) has a high morbidity worldwide each year especially in China and advanced GC is well known with poor prognosis, for which surgical resection combine adjuvant chemotherapy is the optimal choice for therapy. Leukocyte is an important index during the treatment for its influence on drugs' dosage and tolerance. Therefore, peripheral blood leukocyte and its subsets during adjuvant chemotherapy may have great clinical value for predicting prognostic. In this retrospective study, we showed the distribution of white blood cell and its subsets in the baseline period before adjuvant chemotherapy in 399 patients who underwent radical resection for advanced GC from January 1, 2008 to August 31, 2012. We investigated the relationship between leukocyte count and overall survival (OS) as well as disease-free survival (DFS). In these patients, females were more likely to have less white blood cells after operation (P=0.016). Patients with pre-chemotherapy leukocyte count less than 4×10(9)/L got worse DFS (P=0.028) and OS (P=0.016). In multivariate analysis, tumor size ≥ 6cm (P=0.033), TNM stage IV (P=0.024), vascular or nerval invasion (P=0.005) and leukocyte count less than 4.0×10(9)/L (P=0.019) was associated with poor DFS. TNM stage IV (P=0.008), vascular or nerval invasion (P=0.001) and lower leukocyte count (P=0.045) were independent risk factors for poor OS. Taken together, our findings suggest that pre-adjuvant chemotherapy peripheral blood leukocyte count correlates with clinical outcome of patients with advanced GC after radical resection.

  7. Trastuzumab: a novel standard option for patients with HER-2-positive advanced gastric or gastro-oesophageal junction cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, David

    2012-01-01

    The human epidermal receptor-2 (HER-2) is amplified in up to 25% of patients with gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas. Although the presence of this amplification does not appear to confer a poor prognosis, it provides a valuable novel therapeutic target for this group of patients. Trastuzumab is a fully humanized monoclonal antibody directed at HER-2 which binds the external domain of the receptor and exerts its action via a combination of antibody-dependent cytotoxicity, reduced shedding of the extracellular domain, inhibition of dimerization and possibly receptor downregulation. The ToGA trial was an international multicentre randomized phase III study which evaluated the addition of trastuzumab to a cisplatin plus fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy doublet in 594 patients with HER-2-positive advanced gastric or oesophagogastric junction adenocarcinoma. The combination of the antibody with chemotherapy significantly improved response rate, median progression-free survival and median overall survival without additional toxicity or adversely affecting quality of life. Accordingly, trastuzumab plus chemotherapy is now a standard first-line treatment option for patients with advanced HER-2-positive gastroesophageal cancer. Unfortunately, many patients with HER-2-positive cancer exhibit primary resistance to trastuzumab and the remainder will acquire resistance to the antibody; therefore, urgent investigation into novel agents which may circumvent resistance mechanisms is warranted. Small molecule inhibitors of HER-2, which commonly also target other members of the HER family of receptors, such as EGFR and HER-3, are currently undergoing evaluation in gastroesophageal cancer as first-line alternatives to trastuzumab and second-line salvage treatments for trastuzumab-resistant disease. Extrapolating the successful use of trastuzumab in the advanced disease setting, clinical trials are underway to assess the role of this antibody in the perioperative and adjuvant settings

  8. Efficacy of Sequential Ipilimumab Monotherapy versus Best Supportive Care for Unresectable Locally Advanced/Metastatic Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bang, Yung-Jue; Cho, Jae Yong; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Jin Won; Di Bartolomeo, Maria; Ajani, Jaffer A; Yamaguchi, Kensei; Balogh, Agnes; Sanchez, Teresa; Moehler, Markus

    2017-10-01

    Purpose: Ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody that blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein-4 interactions, enhances T-cell activation and promotes tumor immunity. This phase II study evaluated the safety and efficacy of ipilimumab monotherapy versus best supportive care (BSC) among patients with advanced/metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction cancer who achieved at least stable disease with first-line chemotherapy.Experimental Design: Eligible patients were randomized to ipilimumab 10 mg/kg every 3 weeks for four doses, then 10 mg/kg every 12 weeks for up to 3 years, or BSC, which could include continuation of fluoropyrimidine until progression or toxicity. The primary endpoint was immune-related progression-free survival (irPFS); secondary endpoints included PFS by modified World Health Organization criteria and overall survival (OS).Results: Of 143 patients screened, 57 were randomized to each arm. irPFS with ipilimumab versus BSC was not improved [2.92 months, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.61-5.16 vs. 4.90 months, 95% CI, 3.45-6.54, HR = 1.44; 80% CI, 1.09-1.91; P = 0.097], resulting in study cessation. At study closeout, which occurred 8 months after the interim analysis, the median OS durations were 12.7 months (95% CI, 10.5-18.9) and 12.1 months (95% CI, 9.3-not estimable), respectively. Grade 3/4 treatment-related adverse events occurred in 23% of ipilimumab-treated patients, in whom diarrhea (9%) and fatigue (5%) were most frequent, and in 9% of active BSC-treated patients.Conclusions: Although ipilimumab at 10 mg/kg was manageable, it did not improve irPFS versus BSC. However, comparable median OS of approximately 1 year and a favorable safety profile support the investigation of ipilimumab in combination with other therapies for advanced gastric cancer. Clin Cancer Res; 23(19); 5671-8. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Tumor Heterogeneity in Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2)-Positive Advanced Gastric Cancer Assessed by CT Texture Analysis: Association with Survival after Trastuzumab Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sung Hyun; Lee, Yoon Jin; Park, Jihoon; Kim, Jin Won; Lee, Hye Seung; Kim, Bohyoung

    2016-01-01

    Background Image texture analysis is a noninvasive technique for quantifying intratumoral heterogeneity, with derived texture features reported to be closely related to the treatment outcome of tumors. Gastric cancer is one of the most common tumors and the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Although trastuzumab is associated with a survival gain among patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive advanced gastric cancer, optimal patient selection is challenging. The purpose of this study was to determine whether CT texture features of HER2-positive gastric cancer were related to the survival rate after trastuzumab treatment. Methods and Findings Patients diagnosed with HER2-positive advanced gastric cancer from February 2007 to August 2014 were retrospectively selected. Using in-house built software, histogram features (kurtosis and skewness) and gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) features (angular second moment [ASM], contrast, entropy, variance, and correlation) were derived from the CT images of HER2-positive advanced gastric cancer in 26 patients. All the patients were followed up for more than 6 months, with no confirmed deaths. The patients were dichotomized into a good and poor survival group based on cutoff points of overall survival of 12 months. A receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was performed to test the ability of each texture parameter to identify the good survival group. Kaplan–Meier curves for patients above and below each threshold were constructed. Using a threshold of >265.8480 for contrast, >488.3150 for variance, and ≤0.1319×10−3. for correlation, all of the area under the ROC curves showed fair accuracy (>0.7). Kaplan–Meier analysis showed statistically significant survival difference between two groups according to optimal cutoff values of contrast, variance, correlation and ASM. However, as this study had a small number of patients, a further study with a larger

  10. A phase 2 study of fluorouracil/leucovorin in combination with paclitaxel and oxaliplatin as a salvage treatment in patients with refractory or relapsed advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Rongbo; Fan, Nanfeng; Wu, Guangfeng; Chen, Ying; Guo, Zengqing; Wang, Xiaojie; Jin, Feng; Chen, Ling; Liu, Jie

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of paclitaxel plus oxaliplatin plus fluorouracil/leucovorin (POF) as salvage chemotherapy in pretreated advanced gastric cancer. Fifty-two pretreated patients with the advanced gastric cancer were eligible for this study. The POF regimen consisted of a 3-hour infusion of paclitaxel (135 mg/m(2)) followed by oxaliplatin (85 mg/m(2)) and leucovorin (400 mg/m(2)), administered simultaneously over a 2-hour infusion period, followed by an infusion of fluorouracil (2400 mg/m(2)) over a 46-hour period, every 14 days. From an intention-to-treat analysis, overall response rate and stable disease rate were 28.8 and 38.5%, respectively. The median time to progression and overall survival were 4.1 and 7.9 months, respectively. Grade 3 or 4 neutropaenia, thrombocytopaenia, fatigue, and neuropathy were 38.5, 15.4, 17.3, and 15.4%, respectively. The POF regimen is active in pretreated advanced gastric cancer as salvage chemotherapy, with a favourable toxicity profile.

  11. [Laparoscopic distal gastrectomy for gastric cancer: initial experience].

    PubMed

    Berrospi, Francisco; Celis, Juan; Ruíz, Eloy; Payet, Eduardo; Chávez, Iván; Young, Frank

    2008-01-01

    To report the initial experience with the laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy (LADG) with D2 lymphadenectomy for gastric cancer. Between May 2006 and May 2007, 29 consecutive GC patients with gastric cancer underwent LADG with D2 lymphadenectomy. The operation consisted in a laparoscopic time to perform lymphadenectomy and mobilization of the distal stomach, followed by a minilaparotomy for exteriorization of the specimen and construction of a hand sewn anastomosis. Twenty-nine patients underwent LADG with D2 lymphadenectomy for gastric cancer. Mean age was 58.2 years. Mean operative time was 287.4 min. Mean number of lymph nodes resected was 42.6. Twelve patients were early gastric cancer, and seventeen were advanced gastric cancer. Mean proximal and distal resection margin were 5.8 cm and 3.5 cm, respectively. Resection margins were negative in all cases. Mean number of lymph nodes resected was 42.6. Thirty-day morbidity rate was 10.3 %. There were no postoperative deaths.CONCLUSION. The short-term results of our LADG with D2 lymphadenectomy for the treatment of gastric cancer shows that a radical surgery, in terms of resection margins and lymphadenectomy, can be done with low morbidity.

  12. Comparison of laparoscopy-assisted and open radical gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer: A retrospective study in a single minimally invasive surgery center.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yingxue; Yu, Peiwu; Qian, Feng; Zhao, Yongliang; Shi, Yan; Tang, Bo; Zeng, Dongzhu; Zhang, Chao

    2016-06-01

    Laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy (LAG) has gained international acceptance for the treatment of early gastric cancer (EGC). However, the use of laparoscopic surgery in the management of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) has not attained widespread acceptance. This retrospective large-scale patient study in a single center for minimally invasive surgery assessed the feasibility and safety of LAG for T2 and T3 stage AGC. A total of 628 patients underwent LAG and 579 patients underwent open gastrectomy (OG) from Jan 2004 to Dec 2011. All cases underwent radical lymph node (LN) dissection from D1 to D2+. This study compared short- and long-term results between the 2 groups after stratifying by pTNM stages, including the mean operation time, volume of blood loss, number of harvested LNs, average days of postoperative hospital stay, mean gastrointestinal function recovery time, intra- and post-operative complications, recurrence rate, recurrence site, and 5-year survival curve. Thirty-five patients (5.57%) converted to open procedures in the LAG group. There were no significant differences in retrieved LN number (30.4 ± 13.4 vs 28.1 ± 17.2, P = 0.43), proximal resection margin (PRM) (6.15 ± 1.63 vs 6.09 ± 1.91, P = 0.56), or distal resection margin (DRM) (5.46 ± 1.74 vs 5.40 ± 1.95, P = 0.57) between the LAG and OG groups, respectively. The mean volume of blood loss (154.5 ± 102.6 vs 311.2 ± 118.9 mL, P < 0.001), mean postoperative hospital stay (7.6 ± 2.5 vs 10.7 ± 3.6 days, P < 0.001), mean time for gastrointestinal function recovery (3.3 ± 1.4 vs 3.9 ± 1.5 days, P < 0.001), and postoperative complications rate (6.4% vs 10.5%, P = 0.01) were clearly lower in the LAG group compared to the OG group. However, the recurrence pattern and site were not different between the 2 groups, even they were stratified by the TNM stage. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 85.38%, 79.70%, 57

  13. The combination of docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil in advanced gastric cancer: a single-institution experience.

    PubMed

    Ben Aharon, Irit; Purim, Ofer; Kundel, Yulia; Brenner, Ronen; Gordon, Noa; Sulkes, Aaron; Brenner, Baruch

    2012-03-01

    The addition of docetaxel to cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil was shown to confer a survival benefit in patients with advanced gastric cancer (one; AGC), although with increased toxicity. We hereby report our experience with the use of docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (DCF). Data on all consecutive patients who received first-line treatment with DCF at our institute were analyzed retrospectively. Twenty-three patients were included. The median age was 63 years. Patients received an average of 10 cycles (range, 1-24). All experienced grade ≥3 toxicity, requiring hospitalization in 35%. There was one toxic death. The median progression-free and overall survival rates were 10.0 and 12.8 months, respectively; the 2-year and 3-year survival rates were 22 and 17%, respectively. The DCF regimen is indeed associated with substantial toxicity, although manageable. Nevertheless, the observed benefit was remarkable compared with any previous report on chemotherapy in AGC, and should therefore represent a valid treatment option in AGC and a platform for future combinations.

  14. Cost-effectiveness Analysis of Fluorouracil, Leucovorin, and Irinotecan versus Epirubicin, Cisplatin, and Capecitabine in Patients with Advanced Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Feng; Zheng, Hanrui; Wu, Yifan; Wheeler, John; Zeng, Xiaoxi; Fu, Ping; Li, Qiu

    2016-01-01

    No standard treatment has been accepted widely for the first-/second-line therapy for advanced gastric cancer (AGC). The current study aimed to determine a preferred strategy between FOLFIRI (fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan) and ECX (epirubicin, cisplatin,and capecitabine) for AGC from the cost-effectiveness perspective. According to a French intergroup study, two groups (ECX arm and FOLFIRI arm) and three health states (progression-free survival (PFS), progressive disease (PD) and death) were analyzed in the current Markov model. All the medical costs were calculated from a Chinese societal perspective. Although FOLFIRI was an acceptable first-line therapy in the treatment of AGC with a better time-to treatment failure (TTF) compared to ECX, ECX arm (ECX followed by FOLFIRI) gained 0.08 quality-adjusted life months (QALMs) more effectiveness benefit compared with FOLFIRI arm (FOLFIRI followed by ECX). Additionally, a lower cost was found in ECX arm ($23,813.13 versus $24,983.70). Hence, the strategy of FOLFIRI arm is dominated by ECX arm ($4,125.8 per QALM in FOLIRI arm; $3,879.724 per QALM in ECX arm). ECX followed by FOLFIRI was a preferred strategy with more effectiveness and lower cost compared with FOLFIRI followed by ECX for the treatment of AGC. PMID:27824060

  15. Theranostic, pH-Responsive, Doxorubicin-Loaded Nanoparticles Inducing Active Targeting and Apoptosis for Advanced Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Huanrong; Liu, Yuqing; Shi, Min; Shao, Xuebing; Zhong, Wen; Liao, Wangjun; Xing, Malcolm M Q

    2015-12-14

    This study developed a kind of magnetic-polymer nanocarrier with folate receptor-targeting and pH-sensitive multifunctionalities to carry doxorubicin (DOX) for treatment of advanced gastric cancer (AGC). Folate-conjugated, pH-sensitive, amphiphilic poly(β-aminoester) self-assembled with hydrophobic oleic acid-modified iron oxide nanoparticles, and the resulting hydrophobic interaction area is a reservoir for lipophilic DOX (F-P-DOX). Confocal microscopy illustrated that F-P-DOX treatment could keep higher DOX accumulation in cells than P-DOX (without folate conjugation), and therefore get a higher efficiency of DOX internalization at pH 6.5 than at pH 7.4. Electron microscope characterization and real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed cell apoptosis promoted by F-P-DOX. The better efficacy of F-P-DOX on GC than free DOX and P-DOX was determined by MTT assay and xenograft model. Moreover, the accumulation of F-P-DOX in the tumor site was detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). All those observations suggest F-P-DOX could be a promising theranostic candidate for AGC treatment.

  16. [A case of multiple distant lymph node metastases from advanced gastric cancer treated with adjuvant chemotherapy after total gastrectomy].

    PubMed

    Haruki, Shigeo; Usui, Shinsuke; Takiguchi, Noriaki; Arita, Kaida; Ito, Koji; Matsumoto, Akiyo; Hiranuma, Susumu; Suzuki, Keiko

    2013-11-01

    A 70-year-old woman with advanced gastric cancer (U, type 3, por, pT3, ly3, v2, pN3a [10/92, No. 1, 3], Stage IIIB) underwent total gastrectomy and D2 dissection followed by adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1. Eight months later, computed tomography (CT) showed multiple distant lymph node metastases, including metastases in the para-aortic and supraclavicular( Virchow's nodes) lymph nodes. Chemotherapy with cisplatin( CDDP) and irinotecan( CPT-11) was administered with concurrent radiation therapy for the para-aortic nodes. After 2 courses, the para-aortic lymph nodes showed complete response( CR), but Virchow's nodes showed partial response( PR). Dissection of Virchow's nodes was performed. Histopathological examination revealed a chemotherapeutic effect on the dissected node, and therefore, 2 more courses of chemotherapy were administered after the operation. Adverse events such as grade 3 neutropenia and grade 4 hyponatremia were observed. At present, the patient is well without recurrence, and chemotherapy is not being administered. Local therapy for distant metastasis followed by systemic chemotherapy may have been effective in this case.

  17. Gastric cancer: Basic aspects.

    PubMed

    Molina-Castro, Silvia; Pereira-Marques, Joana; Figueiredo, Ceu; Machado, Jose C; Varon, Christine

    2017-09-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most incident and deadliest malignancies in the world. Gastric cancer is a heterogeneous disease and the end point of a long and multistep process, which results from the stepwise accumulation of numerous (epi)genetic alterations, leading to dysregulation of oncogenic and tumor suppressor pathways. Gastric cancer stem cells have emerged as fundamental players in cancer development and as contributors to gastric cancer heterogeneity. For this special issue, we will report last year's update on the gastric cancer molecular classification, and in particular address the gastric cancer groups who could benefit from immune checkpoint therapy. We will also review the latest advances on gastric cancer stem cells, their properties as gastric cancer markers and therapeutic targets, and associated signaling pathways. The understanding of the molecular basis underlying gastric cancer heterogeneity and of the role played by gastric cancer stem cells in cancer development and heterogeneity is of major significance, not only for identifying novel targets for cancer prevention and treatment, but also for clinical management and patient stratification for targeted therapies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Germline mutation of the E-cadherin gene in three sibling cases with advanced gastric cancer: clinical consequences for the other family members.

    PubMed

    Mayrbaeurl, Beate; Keller, Gisela; Schauer, Walter; Burgstaller, Sonja; Czompo, Manfred; Hoebling, Walter; Knoflach, Peter; Duba, Hans C; Hoefler, Heinz; Thaler, Josef

    2010-03-01

    Germline mutations in the E-cadherin (CDH1) gene have been found in families with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). These families are characterized by a highly penetrant susceptibility to diffuse gastric cancer with an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. We describe the clinical presentation of three sibling cases with advanced gastric cancer, the way of confirming the suspicion of underlying HDGC and the clinical management of the other healthy family members. Screening for CDH1 germline mutation was carried out by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and automated DNA sequencing. The clinical suspicion of HDGC has been confirmed by identifying a frameshift mutation in exon 9 (1302_1303insA, 1306_1307delTT) of the E-cadherin gene. Eight of nine tested family members were positive for the CDH1 germline mutation. Prophylactic laparoscopic gastrectomies were performed in five mutation carriers. After pathological examination, we could identify intramucosal malignant signet-ring cell carcinoma in all resected stomachs. This report underlines that prophylactic gastrectomy remains the only option to eliminate the high risk for gastric cancer in CDH1 mutation carriers.

  19. Phase I study of sunitinib plus capecitabine/cisplatin or capecitabine/oxaliplatin in advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, K-W; Park, S R; Oh, D-Y; Park, Y-I; Khosravan, R; Lin, X; Lee, S-Y; Roh, E-J; Valota, O; Lechuga, M J; Bang, Y-J

    2013-12-01

    We evaluated the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and safety of sunitinib plus capecitabine/cisplatin (XP) or capecitabine/oxaliplatin (XELOX) in Korean patients with advanced gastric cancer (GC). Sunitinib (37.5 or 25 mg/day) was administered on a 2-week-on/1-week-off schedule with chemotherapy. Assessments included dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), safety, pharmacokinetics, and antitumor activity. Twenty-eight patients received sunitinib/XP; 48 received sunitinib/XELOX. The MTDs were: sunitinib 25 mg/day, cisplatin 80 mg/m(2), and capecitabine 1,000 mg/m(2); sunitinib 37.5 mg/day, oxaliplatin 110 mg/m(2), and capecitabine 800 mg/m(2); and sunitinib 25 mg/day, oxaliplatin 110 mg/m(2), and capecitabine 1,000 mg/m(2). DLTs at the MTDs comprised grade (G) 4 febrile neutropenia plus G3 diarrhea (n = 1; sunitinib/XP), dose delays due to hematologic toxicity (n = 2; both sunitinib/XP), G3 bleeding (menorrhagia; n = 1; sunitinib/XELOX), and G3 increased alanine aminotransferase levels (n = 1; sunitinib/XELOX). There was a high frequency of G3/4 hematologic adverse events observed with both treatment regimens, particularly with sunitinib/XP. Frequent non-hematologic, G3/4 adverse events were nausea, stomatitis, and hypophosphatemia with sunitinib/XP and hypophosphatemia and pulmonary embolism with sunitinib/XELOX. No drug-drug interactions were apparent. At the MTDs, median progression-free survival was 6.4 months and 5.5-8.0 months for sunitinib/XP and sunitinib/XELOX, respectively; and the objective response rate was 46.7% and 43.5-45.5% for sunitinib/XP and sunitinib/XELOX, respectively. At the MTD, sunitinib/XELOX had an acceptable safety profile in patients with advanced GC.

  20. Modified coronally advanced flap with and without orthodontic button application in management of multiple proximate gingival recession defects: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Khobragade, Sumedh; Kolte, Abhay; Kolte, Rajashri; Shrirao, Tushar; Potey, Anushree

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gingival recession indicates oral display of the root surface due to apical movement of gingival margin. Coronally advanced flap (CAF) is often used periodontal plastic surgical technique to accomplish root coverage. The purpose of this clinical trial is to assess and compare the effectiveness of modified CAF with orthodontic button application (CAF+B) and without orthodontic button application (CAF) for the correction of multiple recession defects. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients exhibiting bilateral multiple proximate Millers Class I and/or Class II gingival recession defects were included in the study. Each set of proximate recession defects was designated randomly to test or control group. Control group was treated by CAF alone and test group by CAF+B. Baseline and postoperative clinical parameters at 2, 4, and 6 months time interval were recorded. Results: Mean root coverage percentage from baseline to 6 months in control group was 78.30% ± 20.75% and in test group was 92.23% ± 15.6%. Complete root coverage was 43.8% in control group and 77.47% in test group. Visual analog scale pain measurements did not reveal any difference among both the groups. Patient satisfaction with esthetics was very high in CAF+B group when compared with CAF group. Conclusion: Both treatment modalities, i.e., CAF and CAF+B are effectual in the treatment of proximate Miller's Class I and Class II gingival recession defects, but CAF+B showed significantly superior clinical results. PMID:27994426

  1. GASTRICHIP: D2 resection and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy in locally advanced gastric carcinoma: a randomized and multicenter phase III study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In Europe, gastric cancer remains diagnosed at advanced stage (serosal and/or lymph node involvement). Despite curative management combining perioperative systemic chemotherapy and gastrectomy with D1-D2 lymph node dissection, 5-year survival rates of T3 and/or N + patients remain under 30%. More than 50% of recurrences are peritoneal and/or locoregional. The use of adjuvant hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy that eliminates free cancer cells that can be released into peritoneal cavity during the gastrectomy and prevents peritoneal carcinomatosis recurrences, was extensively evaluated by several randomized trials conducted in Asia. Two meta-analysis reported that adjuvant hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy significantly reduces the peritoneal recurrences and significantly improves the overall survival. As it was previously done for the evaluation of the extension of lymph node dissection, it seems very important to validate on European or caucasian patients the results observed in trials performed in Asia. Methods/design GASTRICHIP is a prospective, open, randomized multicenter phase III clinical study with two arms that aims to evaluate the effects of hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy with oxaliplatin on patients with gastric cancer involving the serosa and/or lymph node involvement and/or with positive cytology at peritoneal washing, treated with perioperative systemic chemotherapy and D1-D2 curative gastrectomy. Peroperatively, at the end of curative surgery, patients will be randomized after preoperatively written consent has been given for participation. Primary endpoint will be overall survival from the date of surgery to the date of death or to the end of follow-up (5 years). Secondary endpoint will be 3- and 5-year recurrence-free survival, site of recurrence, morbidity, and quality of life. An ancillary study will compare the incidence of positive peritoneal cytology pre- and post-gastrectomy in two arms of the study

  2. On the Effect of Triplet or Doublet Chemotherapy in Advanced Gastric Cancer: Results From a National Cancer Registry.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Bayonas, Alberto; Jiménez-Fonseca, Paula; Lorenzo, Maria Luisa Sánchez; Ramchandani, Avinash; Martínez, Elena Asensio; Custodio, Ana; Garrido, Marcelo; Echavarría, Isabel; Cano, Juana María; Barreto, Jose Enrique Lorenzo; García, Teresa García; Manceñido, Felipe Álvarez; Lacalle, Alejandra; Cardona, Marta Ferrer; Mangas, Monserrat; Visa, Laura; Buxó, Elvira; Azkarate, Aitor; Díaz-Serrano, Asunción; Montes, Ana Fernández; Rivera, Fernando

    2016-11-01

    There is currently no consensus regarding first-line chemotherapy for patients with advanced gastric cancer (AGC) who are ineligible to receive trastuzumab. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerance of triplets versus doublets by analyzing a national gastric cancer registry. Patients with AGC treated with polychemotherapy without associating trastuzumab were included from 2008 through 2016. The effect of triplets versus doublets was compared using 3 methods: Cox proportional hazards regression, propensity score matching (PSM), and coarsened exact matching (CEM). A total of 970 patients were recruited (doublets: n=569; triplets: n=401). In the multivariate Cox model, the use of triplets was associated with better overall survival (OS), with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.84 (95% CI, 0.72-0.98; P=.035). After PSM, the sample contained 340 pairs. A significant increase in OS, 11.14 months (95% CI, 9.60-12.68) versus 9.60 months (95% CI, 8.44-10.75), was seen in favor of triplets (HR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.65-0.92; stratified log-rank test, P=.004). The effect appeared to be comparable for anthracycline-based (HR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.64-0.94) or docetaxel-based triplets (HR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.60-1.009). The trend was similar after applying the CEM algorithm, with an HR of 0.78 (95% CI, 0.63-0.97; P=.03). Triplet therapy was viable and relative dose intensities exceeded 85%, except for cisplatin in DCX (docetaxel, cisplatin, capecitabine). Triplets had more severe toxicity overall, especially hematologic, hepatic, and mucosal adverse events. With the limitations of a retrospective study that examines a heterogeneous set of chemotherapy regimens, we found that triplets are feasible in daily practice and are associated with a discreet benefit in efficacy at the expense of a moderate increase in toxicity. Copyright © 2016 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  3. Chemotherapy or targeted therapy as second-line treatment of advanced gastric cancer. A systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies.

    PubMed

    Iacovelli, Roberto; Pietrantonio, Filippo; Farcomeni, Alessio; Maggi, Claudia; Palazzo, Antonella; Ricchini, Francesca; de Braud, Filippo; Di Bartolomeo, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy is a cornerstone in treatments of gastric cancer, but despite its benefit, less than 60% of patients receive salvage therapy in clinical practice. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis based on trial data on the role of second-line treatment of advanced gastric cancer. MEDLINE/PubMed and Cochrane Library were searched for randomized phase III trials that compared active therapy to best supportive care in advanced gastric cancer. Data extraction was conducted according to the PRISMA statement. Summary HR for OS was calculated using a hierarchical Bayesian model and subgroup analysis was performed based on baseline Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status (ECOG) performance status (0 vs. 1 or more). A total of 1,407 patients were evaluable for efficacy, 908 were treated in the experimental arms, with chemotherapy (231 pts) or with targeted therapies (677 pts). The risk of death was decreased by 18% (HR = 0.82; 95% CI, 0.79-0.85; posterior probability HR≥1: <0.00001) with active therapies. Chemotherapy and ramucirumab were able to decrease this risk by 27% and 22%, respectively. No differences were found between chemotherapy and ramucirumab. In patients with ECOG = 0 a greater benefit was found for chemotherapy with a reduction of the risk of death by 43% and no benefits were found for ramucirumab or everolimus. In patients with ECOG = 1 or more a significant reduction of the risk of death by 32% was reported in patients treated with ramucirumab, even if no significant difference was reported between chemotherapy and ramucirumab. This analysis reports that active and available therapies are able to prolong survival in patients with advanced gastric cancer with a different outcome based on initial patient's performance status. New trials based on a better patient stratification are awaited.

  4. A novel mask proximity correction software combining accuracy and reduced writing time for the manufacturing of advanced photomasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavone, Patrick; Martin, Luc; Browning, Clyde; Farys, Vincent; Sundermann, Frank; Narukawa, Shogo; Takikawa, Tadahiko; Hayashi, Naoya

    2012-06-01

    The new generations of photomasks are seen to bring more and more challenges to the mask manufacturer. Maskshops face two conflicting requirements, namely improving pattern fidelity and reducing or at least maintaining acceptable writing time. These requirements are getting more and more challenging since pattern size continuously shrinks and data volumes continuously grows. Although the classical dose modulation Proximity Effect Correction is able to provide sufficient process control to the mainstream products, an increased number of published and wafer data show that the mask process is becoming a nonnegligible contributor to the 28nm technology yield. We will show in this paper that a novel approach of mask proximity effect correction is able to meet the dual challenge of the new generation of masks. Unlike the classical approach, the technique presented in this paper is based on a concurrent optimization of the dose and geometry of the fractured shots. Adding one more parameter allows providing the best possible compromise between accuracy and writing time since energy latitude can be taken into account as well. This solution is implemented in the Inscale software package from Aselta Nanographics. We have assessed the capability of this technology on several levels of a 28nm technology. On this set, the writing time has been reduced up to 25% without sacrificing the accuracy which at the same time has been improved significantly compared to the existing process. The experiments presented in the paper confirm that a versatile proximity effect correction strategy, combining dose and geometry modulation helps the users to tradeoff between resolution/accuracy and e-beam write time.

  5. Curative Resection Following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Advanced Gastric Cancer With Preservation of a Right Gastroepiploic Artery Coronary Artery Bypass Graft: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masaki; Ogata, Kyoichi; Kogure, Norimichi; Kimura, Akiharu; Toyomasu, Yoshitaka; Ohno, Tetsuro; Mochiki, Erito; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    Recently, the right gastroepiploic artery (RGEA) has been used in coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) as an alternative arterial graft. Because of the improvement of prognosis after CABG, malignant diseases are more common in older patients. However, there is a serious problem in patients with gastric cancer after CABG with RGEA graft. In these patients, an interruption of coronary blood supply through the RGEA may cause a life-threatening myocardial ischemia. Therefore, an appropriate strategy is very important to avoid risk while retaining the curability of the operation. We herein describe a 76-year-old Japanese man with advanced gastric cancer who underwent CABG using the RGEA. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed #6 lymph nodes (sub-pyloric lymph nodes) metastases surrounding the RGEA. We concluded that curative resection was impossible while preserving the RGEA and started combination chemotherapy using S-1 and cisplatin. After 2 courses of that, #6 lymph nodes were reduced extremely. Thereafter the patient underwent distal gastrectomy with regional lymph node dissection around the RGEA without excision of the RGEA. Histologically, there were no metastases in #6 lymph nodes. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy may be effective for preserving the RGEA graft in a patient with advanced gastric cancer after CABG.

  6. Wotherspoon criteria combined with B cell clonality analysis by advanced polymerase chain reaction technology discriminates covert gastric marginal zone lymphoma from chronic gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, M; Oeschger, S; Barth, T F E; Loddenkemper, C; Cogliatti, S B; Marx, A; Wacker, H‐H; Feller, A C; Bernd, H‐W; Hansmann, M‐L; Stein, H; Möller, P

    2006-01-01

    Background and aims Gastric mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma is a well defined B cell lymphoma yet often impossible to distinguish from severe chronic gastritis on morphological grounds alone. Therefore, it was suggested to use the clonality of the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain (H) genes, as detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), as a decisive criterion. However, there is controversy as to whether B cell clonality also exists in chronic gastritis, hence rendering this approach futile at present. Methods An expert panel re‐examined the histology and immunohistochemistry of a total of 97 cases of gastric biopsies, including clearcut marginal zone lymphoma, chronic gastritis, and ambiguous cases, applying the Wotherspoon criteria on the basis of haematoxylin‐eosin and CD20 immunostainings. In addition, a new and advanced PCR system for detection of clonal IgH gene rearrangements was independently applied in two institutions in each case. Results The overall IgH clonality assessments of both institutions were in total agreement. Overt lymphoma (Wotherspoon score 5) was clonal in 24/26 cases. Chronic gastritis (Wotherspoon scores 1 and 2) was not clonal in 52/53 cases; the clonal case being Wotherspoon score 2. Of 18 cases with ambiguous histology (Wotherspoon scores 3 and 4) four were clonal. Conclusions Using advanced PCR technology, clonal gastritis is extremely rare, if it exists at all. Thus B cell clonality in Wotherspoon 3 and 4 cases is regarded as suitable for definitively diagnosing gastric marginal zone lymphoma. PMID:16423889

  7. Second-line Treatments for Advanced Gastric Cancer: A Network Meta-Analysis of Overall Survival Using Parametric Modelling Methods.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Rebecca C

    2017-01-01

    Advanced gastric cancer (AGC) is one of the most common forms of cancer and remains difficult to cure. There is currently no recommended therapy for second-line AGC in the UK despite the availability of various interventions. This paper aims to compare different interventions for treatment of second-line AGC using more complex methods to estimate relative efficacy, fitting various parametric models and to compare results to those published adopting conventional methods of synthesis. Seven studies were identified in an existing literature review evaluating seven comparators, which formed a connected network of evidence. Citations were limited to randomised controlled trials in previously-treated AGC patients. Evidence quality was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool. Studies were assessed for the availability of Kaplan-Meier curves for overall survival. Individual patient data (IPD) were recreated using digitisation software along with a published algorithm in R. The data were analysed using multi-dimensional network meta-analysis (NMA) methods. A series of parametric models were fitted to the pseudo-IPD. Both fixed and random-effects models were fitted to explore long-term survival prospects based on extrapolation methods and estimated mean survival. Relative efficacy estimates were compared to those previously reported, which utilised conventional NMA methods. Results presented were consistent within findings from other publications and identified ramucirumab plus paclitaxel as the best treatment; however, all the treatments assessed were associated with poor survival prospects with mean survival estimates ranging from 5.0 to 12.7 months. Whilst the approach adopted in this paper does not adjust for differences in trial patient populations and is particularly data-intensive, use of such sophisticated methods of evidence synthesis may be more informative for subsequent cost-effectiveness modelling and may have greater impact when considering an

  8. Fluoropyrimidine-Based Chemotherapy as First-Line Treatment for Advanced Gastric Cancer: a Bayesian Network Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lucheng; Liu, Jihong; Ma, Shenglin

    2016-10-01

    Fluoropyrimidine-based regimens are the most common treatments in advanced gastric cancer. We used a Bayesian network meta-analysis to identify the optimal fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy by comparing their relative efficacy and safety. We systematically searched databases and extracted data from randomized controlled trials, which compared fluoropyrimidine-based regimens as first-line treatment in AGC. The main outcomes were overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), overall response rate (ORR), and grade 3 or 4 adverse events (AEs). A total of 12 RCTs of 4026 patients were included in our network meta-analysis. Pooled analysis showed S-1 and capecitabine had a significant OS benefit over 5-Fu, with hazard ratios of 0.90 (95%CI = 0.81-0.99) and 0.88 (95%CI = 0.80-0.96), respectively. The result also exhibited a trend that S-1 and capecitabine prolonged PFS in contrast to 5-Fu, with hazard ratios of 0.84 (95%CI = 0.66-1.02) and 0.84 (95%CI = 0.65-1.03), respectively. Additionally, all the three fluoropyrimidine-based regimens were similar in terms of ORR and grade 3 or 4 AEs. Compared with regimens based on 5-Fu, regimens based on S-1 or capecitabine demonstrated a significant OS improvement without compromise of AEs as first-line treatment in AGC in Asian population. S-1 and capecitabine can be interchangeable according their different emphasis on AEs.

  9. Aneuploidy of chromosome 8 in circulating tumor cells correlates with prognosis in patients with advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yilin; Zhang, Xiaotian; Gong, Jifang; Zhang, Qiyue; Gao, Jing; Cao, Yanshuo; Wang, Daisy Dandan; Lin, Peter Ping; Shen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Previous work indicated that aneuploidy of chromosome 8 in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) correlated with therapeutic efficacy for advanced gastric cancer (AGC) patients. In this follow-up study performed on the same population of AGC patients, we investigated whether and how aneuploidy of chromosome 8 in CTCs correlates with patients’ clinical prognosis. Methods The prospective study was performed on 31 patients with newly diagnosed AGC. Previously established integrated subtraction enrichment (SE) and immunostaining-fluorescence in situ hybridization (iFISH) platform was applied to identify, enumerate and characterize CTCs. Quantification of CTCs and analysis of their aneuploidy of chromosome 8 were performed on patients before and after therapy. Results CTCs were measured in 93.5% of AGC patients, and two CTC subtypes with diverse threshold values were identified, multiploid CTCs with the threshold of ≥2 per 7.5 mL and multiploid plus triploid CTCs with the threshold of ≥4, which were found to significantly correlate with poor progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). In particular, patients with ≥10% increased multiploid CTCs after an initial 6 weeks of therapy had poor PFS and OS, whereas improved PFS and OS were observed on those who had ≥10% decreased multiploid CTCs. After adjusting for clinically significant factors, ≥10% increased post-therapy multiploid CTCs was the only independent predictor of PFS and OS. Conclusions Aneuploidy of CTCs correlates with prognosis of AGC patients. Quantitative comparison monitoring multiploid CTCs before and after therapy may help predict improved or inferior prognosis and chemoresistance. PMID:28174486

  10. HER2 testing in advanced gastric and gastro-oesophageal cancer: analysis of an Australia-wide testing program.

    PubMed

    Kumarasinghe, M Priyanthi; Morey, Adrienne; Bilous, Michael; Farshid, Gelareh; Francis, Glenn; Lampe, Guy; McCue, Glenda; Von Neumann-Cosel, Vita; Fox, Stephen B

    2017-10-01

    This Australian human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) testing program aimed to analyse >800 cases tested in a coordinated setting to further evaluate the criteria to establish HER2 status in advanced gastric and gastro-oesophageal junction (GOJ) cancer. Heterogeneity, and minimum number of biopsy fragments for reliable HER2 assessment were also examined in a subset of samples. Five laboratories tested 891 samples referred to determine HER2 status for potential anti-HER2 treatment. Cancer site, specimen type (endoscopic biopsy/resection/metastases), immunohistochemistry (IHC) score, HER2 gene and CEP17 copy number (CN) and HER2:CEP17 ratios were recorded. Samples were derived from stomach (53.1%), GOJ (28.2%) or metastases (18.5%). IHC for HER2 and dual probe HER2:CEP17 in situ hybridisation (ISH) were performed in parallel. A stringent definition (SD) of HER2 positivity was used (IHC2+/3+ plus CN>6 and ratio>2) and compared with other published criteria. HER2 positive rate was 13.9% (114/820) by SD, and 12.9-16.0% using other definitions. There was higher concordance between IHC and HER2 CN by ISH than with ratio. The HER2 positive rate was significantly higher in GOJ samples than others (p = 0.03) and in endoscopic biopsies than resections (p = 0.047). In a subset of 98 positive cases, 39 (39.8%) showed heterogeneity, and in 282 endoscopic biopsies positivity rate plateaued at five tumour fragments, suggesting this is the minimum number of biopsies that should be examined. Copyright © 2017 Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of histological regression grade after two neoadjuvant approaches with or without radiotherapy in locally advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Martin-Romano, Patricia; Sola, Jose J; Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan A; Chopitea, Ana; Iragorri, Yohana; Martínez-Regueira, Fernando; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Arbea, Leire; Subtil, Jose C; Cano, David; Ceniceros, Lucia; Legaspi, Jairo; Hernandez, Jose Luis; Rodríguez, Javier

    2016-09-06

    The degree of histopathological response after neoadjuvant therapy in locally advanced gastric cancer (GC) is a key determinant of patients' long-term outcome. We aimed to assess the pattern of histopathological regression after two neoadjuvant approaches and its impact on survival times. Regression grade of the primary tumour (Becker criteria) and the degree of nodal response by a 4-point scale (grades A-D) were assessed. Grade A-true negative lymph nodes (LNs); grade B and C-infiltrated LNs with any or little evidence of nodal response; and grade D-complete pathological response in a previously infiltrated LN. A favourable pathological response was defined as Becker Ia-b and grade D. From 2004 to 2014, 80 patients with GC (cT3-4/N+ by CT-scan/EUS) were treated with either preoperative chemotherapy (ChT, n=34) or chemoradiation (CRT, n=46). Patients in the CRT group had a higher likelihood of achieving a Becker Ia-b response (58 vs 32%, P=0.001), a grade D nodal regression (30 vs 6%, P=0.009) and a favourable pathological response (23 vs 3%; P=0.019). Patients with a grade D nodal response had a longer 5-year PFS and OS compared with those with a grade B or C response. Patients with a baseline negative LN status had similar outcomes irrespective of the preoperative therapy received (5-year OS; ChT vs CRT, 58 vs 51%, P=0.92). Preoperative chemoradiation increases the likelihood of achieving favourable histopathological features that correlate with a 5-year OS>70% in GC patients.

  12. In vitro-activated tumor-specific T lymphocytes prolong the survival of patients with advanced gastric cancer: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kuai, Jun; Yang, Fang; Li, Guang-Jun; Fang, Xiang-Jie; Gao, Bao-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Background Conventional tumor managements have limited survival benefits and cause severely impaired immune function in patients with advanced gastric cancer (GC) whereas immunotherapies could restore antitumor immunity. This prospective cohort study was aimed at investigating the efficacy of in vitro-activated tumor-specific T lymphocytes combined with chemotherapy on the survival of patients with advanced GC. Patients and methods Two hundred and seventy-four postoperative patients were enrolled in this study to receive either activated T lymphocytes immunotherapy combining chemotherapy (71 patients) or only receive postoperative chemotherapy (203 patients). Overall survival was analyzed by the Kaplan–Meier with log-rank test and Cox’s regression methods. Results The immunotherapy prolonged 9.8-month median survival for advanced gastric cancer (29.70 vs 19.70 months, P=0.036). Furthermore, immunotherapy significantly benefited the survival of patients who underwent radical, palliative resection, and stage III malignancy. No serious adverse effect was observed in the immunotherapy group. Conclusion In vitro-activated tumor-specific T lymphocytes prolonged survival in patients with advanced GC. PMID:27382313

  13. Proximal Nephron

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Jia L.; Li, Xiao C.

    2013-01-01

    The kidney plays a fundamental role in maintaining body salt and fluid balance and blood pressure homeostasis through the actions of its proximal and distal tubular segments of nephrons. However, proximal tubules are well recognized to exert a more prominent role than distal counterparts. Proximal tubules are responsible for reabsorbing approximately 65% of filtered load and most, if not all, of filtered amino acids, glucose, solutes, and low molecular weight proteins. Proximal tubules also play a key role in regulating acid-base balance by reabsorbing approximately 80% of filtered bicarbonate. The purpose of this review article is to provide a comprehensive overview of new insights and perspectives into current understanding of proximal tubules of nephrons, with an emphasis on the ultrastructure, molecular biology, cellular and integrative physiology, and the underlying signaling transduction mechanisms. The review is divided into three closely related sections. The first section focuses on the classification of nephrons and recent perspectives on the potential role of nephron numbers in human health and diseases. The second section reviews recent research on the structural and biochemical basis of proximal tubular function. The final section provides a comprehensive overview of new insights and perspectives in the physiological regulation of proximal tubular transport by vasoactive hormones. In the latter section, attention is particularly paid to new insights and perspectives learnt from recent cloning of transporters, development of transgenic animals with knockout or knockin of a particular gene of interest, and mapping of signaling pathways using microarrays and/or physiological proteomic approaches. PMID:23897681

  14. Phase I dose-finding study of sorafenib with FOLFOX4 as first-line treatment in patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Yihebali; Yang, Jianliang; Yang, Sheng; Sun, Yongkun; Jia, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and efficacy of sorafenib in combination with FOLFOX4 (oxaliplatin/leucovorin (LV)/5-fluorouracil) as first-line treatment for advanced gastric cancer, we performed a phase I dose-finding study in nine evaluable patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. Methods According to modified Fibonacci method, the design of this study was to guide elevation of the sorafenib dosage to the next level (from 200 mg twice daily to 400 mg twice daily and then, if tolerated, 600 mg twice daily). If the patient achieved complete response (CR), partial response (PR) or stable disease (SD) after eight cycles of treatment, combination chemotherapy was scheduled to be discontinued and sorafenib monotherapy continued at the original dose until either disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Results In sorafenib 200 mg twice daily group, DLT was observed in 1 of 6 patients, and in 400 mg twice daily group, it was observed in 2 of 3 patients. Seven of 9 (77.8%) evaluable patients achieved PR, with a median overall survival (OS) of 11.8 [95% confidence interval (CI): 8.9-14.7] months. Common adverse effects include hand-foot syndrome, leukopenia, neutropenia, anorexia, and nausea. Conclusions Twice-daily dosing of sorafenib 200 mg in combination with FOLFOX4 was proven effective and safe for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer, and could be an appropriate dosage for subsequent phase II clinical studies. PMID:26157320

  15. Efficacy of preoperative chemotherapy regimens in patients with initially unresectable locally advanced gastric adenocarcinoma: capecitabine and oxaliplatin (XELOX) or with epirubicin (EOX)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Zhuang, Rong-yuan; Yu, Yi-yi; Yu, Shan; Hou, Jun; Ji, Yuan; Sun, Yi-hong; Shen, Kun-tang; Shen, Zhen-bin; Liu, Feng-lin; Zhao, Nai-qing; Liu, Tian-shu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We assessed the effectiveness of EOX (capecitabine, oxaliplatin and epirubicin) compared with XELOX (capecitabine and oxaliplatin) as preoperative chemotherapy for initially unresectable locally advanced gastric cancer. Methods This is a prospective observational study. Patients with unresectable locally advanced gastric cancer were performed EOX regimen or XELOX regimen at the discretion of the investigators. They were assessed for response every 2 cycles by CT (computed tomography) scan. A multidisciplinary team reassessed resectability after 4 cycles. The primary endpoint was the response rate. Secondary end points included the R0 resection rate, survival and adverse events. Results From November 2008 to May 2015, 242 patients were enrolled; 112 of them were assigned to EOX regimen and 130 to XELOX regimen. The response rates were 33.0% and 33.8% respectively in EOX group and XELOX group (P = 0.997). After 4 cycles of chemotherapy, 63 patients (56.3%) in EOX group and 81 patients (62.3%) in XELOX group received radical operation (P = 0.408). There was no significant difference in progress-free survival (PFS, 12.0m vs. 15.4m, P = 0.925) and overall survival (OS, 25.7m vs. 29.0m, P = 0.783) in two groups. In addition, more adverse effects occurred in EOX group, such as more leucopenia (22.3% vs. 10.0%, P = 0.014), neutropenia (23.2% vs. 11.5%, P = 0.025), fatigue (11.6% vs. 3.8%, P = 0.041) and vomiting (10.7% vs. 2.3%, P = 0.015). Conclusions For unresectable locally advanced gastric cancer patients, XELOX regimen showed similar effects in response rate, radical resection rate and survival benefits, but with less toxicity effects. PMID:27602586

  16. Phase II multi-institutional prospective randomised trial comparing S-1+paclitaxel with S-1+cisplatin in patients with unresectable and/or recurrent advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mochiki, E; Ogata, K; Ohno, T; Toyomasu, Y; Haga, N; Fukai, Y; Aihara, R; Ando, H; Uchida, N; Asao, T; Kuwano, H

    2012-01-01

    Background: A combination of S-1 and cisplatin has been shown to be effective with acceptable safety for the first-line treatment of far-advanced gastric cancer in Japan. This is the first randomised phase II trial to compare S-1+paclitaxel with S-1+cisplatin in this setting. Methods: Patients with unresectable and/or recurrent advanced gastric cancer were randomly assigned to receive one of the two regimens: S-1 (40 mg m−2 twice daily) on days 1–14 plus paclitaxel (60 mg m−2) on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 4-week cycle (S-1+paclitaxel) or S-1 (40 mg m−2 twice daily) on days 1–21 plus cisplatin (60 mg m−2) on day 8 of a 5-week cycle (S-1+cisplatin). The primary end point was the response rate (RR). Secondary end points included progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and safety. Results: A total of 83 patients were eligible for safety and efficacy analyses. In the S-1+paclitaxel and S-1+cisplatin groups, RRs (52.3% vs 48.7% P=0.74) and median PFS (9 vs 6 months; P=0.50) were similar. The median OS was similar in the S-1+paclitaxel and S-1+cisplatin groups (16 vs 17 months; P=0.84). The incidence of grade 3 or higher haematological toxicity was 19.0% with S-1+paclitaxel and 19.5% with S-1+cisplatin. The incidence of grade 3 or higher non-haematological toxicity was 14.2% with S-1+paclitaxel and 17.1% with S-1+cisplatin. Conclusion: S-1+paclitaxel was suggested to be a feasible and effective non-platinum-based regimen for chemotherapy in patients with advanced gastric cancer. Our results should be confirmed in multicenter, phase III-controlled clinical trials. PMID:22617130

  17. A multi-center phase II study of sequential paclitaxel and bryostatin-1 (NSC 339555) in patients with untreated, advanced gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ajani, Jaffer A; Jiang, Yixing; Faust, Josephine; Chang, Baochong B; Ho, Linus; Yao, James C; Rousey, Steven; Dakhil, Shaker; Cherny, Richard C; Craig, Catherine; Bleyer, Archie

    2006-07-01

    Protein Kinase C (PKC), involved in transmembrane signaling of cell surface receptors, promotes carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Bryostatin-1 competes with PKC for phorbol esters (tumor promoters), thus inhibiting tumor progression. Bryostatin-1 also increases cytotoxicity of paclitaxel in a sequential fashion. We studied sequential paclitaxel and bryostatin-1 in patients with untreated, advanced gastric adenocarcinoma. Patients with histologic proof of gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma with advanced, measurable cancers were eligible. Patients were required to have near normal organ function and ECOG performance status of 0 or 1. All patients gave an informed consent. Patients received paclitaxel 80 mg/m2 in 2 h intravenously on day 1 and bryostatin-1 40 mcg/m2 in 1 h intravenously on day 2 each week for 3 consecutive weeks out of 4. Primary objective was to assess the objective response rate. In a multi-center setting, 37 patients were enrolled and 35 were assessable for response. A confirmed partial response rate was 29%. The median time-to-progression was 4.25 months and the median survival time was 8 months. Grade 3 cumulative myalgias occurred in 55% of patients. Twelve patients discontinued therapy due to myalgias, including 6 patients who had not progressed after achieving a partial response. Other toxic effects were uncommon. Sequential paclitaxel plus bryostatin-1 resulted in a superior response rate than would be expected of paclitaxel alone in patients with untreated, advanced gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. Further development of this combination is warranted once an effective method to ameliorate or prevent myalgias can be established.

  18. Effect of glutamine-enriched nutritional support on intestinal mucosal barrier function, MMP-2, MMP-9 and immune function in patients with advanced gastric cancer during perioperative chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Li, Yanfen; Qi, Yuanling

    2017-09-01

    We studied the effects of glutamine-enriched nutritional support on intestinal mucosal barrier, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9 and immune function during perioperative chemotherapy in patients with advanced gastric cancer. The study was conducted on 94 patients with advanced gastric cancer admitted from April 2015 to March 2016. They were randomly divided into observation and control groups, n=47. Control group was given basic nutritional support whereas glutamine-enriched nutritional support was given to patients in observation group. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to measure lactulose and mannitol ratio in urine (L/M) and ELISA was used to measure D-lactate levels before chemotherapy and in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd cycle of chemotherapy. Immunoglobulin level was detected by immune turbidimetry assay, T lymphocyte subsets were determined by flow cytometry after 3 cycles of chemotherapy, MMP-2 and MMP-9 of patients were compared between the two groups. The serious adverse reactions incidence (grade and IV) of patients were observed. To evaluate the life quality of patients, QLQ-C30 was used after 6 months. The levels of L/M and D-lactate in both groups after the first cycle of chemotherapy were significantly higher than that before chemotherapy; they began to decline after the second or third cycle, but were still significantly higher than the levels before chemotherapy (p<0.05). On comparison, between the two groups after 1st, 2nd, 3rd cycle after chemotherapy, L/M and D-lactate levels of patients in the observation group were significantly lower than in the control group (p<0.05). Incidence of serious adverse reactions (grades III and IV) in observation group was significantly lower than control group (p<0.05). At follow-up of 6 months, living quality scores of patients in observation group were significantly higher than control group (p<0.05). Glutamine-enriched nutritional support can effectively protect the intestinal mucosal barrier

  19. High-mobility group box 1 inhibits gastric ulcer healing through Toll-like receptor 4 and receptor for advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Nadatani, Yuji; Watanabe, Toshio; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Ohkawa, Fumikazu; Takeda, Shogo; Higashimori, Akira; Sogawa, Mitsue; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Shiba, Masatsugu; Watanabe, Kenji; Tominaga, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Takeuchi, Koji; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) was initially discovered as a nuclear protein that interacts with DNA as a chromatin-associated non-histone protein to stabilize nucleosomes and to regulate the transcription of many genes in the nucleus. Once leaked or actively secreted into the extracellular environment, HMGB1 activates inflammatory pathways by stimulating multiple receptors, including Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, TLR4, and receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), leading to tissue injury. Although HMGB1's ability to induce inflammation has been well documented, no studies have examined the role of HMGB1 in wound healing in the gastrointestinal field. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of HMGB1 and its receptors in the healing of gastric ulcers. We also investigated which receptor among TLR2, TLR4, or RAGE mediates HMGB1's effects on ulcer healing. Gastric ulcers were induced by serosal application of acetic acid in mice, and gastric tissues were processed for further evaluation. The induction of ulcer increased the immunohistochemical staining of cytoplasmic HMGB1 and elevated serum HMGB1 levels. Ulcer size, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and the expression of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) mRNA peaked on day 4. Intraperitoneal administration of HMGB1 delayed ulcer healing and elevated MPO activity and TNFα expression. In contrast, administration of anti-HMGB1 antibody promoted ulcer healing and reduced MPO activity and TNFα expression. TLR4 and RAGE deficiency enhanced ulcer healing and reduced the level of TNFα, whereas ulcer healing in TLR2 knockout (KO) mice was similar to that in wild-type mice. In TLR4 KO and RAGE KO mice, exogenous HMGB1 did not affect ulcer healing and TNFα expression. Thus, we showed that HMGB1 is a complicating factor in the gastric ulcer healing process, which acts through TLR4 and RAGE to induce excessive inflammatory responses.

  20. High-Mobility Group Box 1 Inhibits Gastric Ulcer Healing through Toll-Like Receptor 4 and Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products

    PubMed Central

    Nadatani, Yuji; Watanabe, Toshio; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Ohkawa, Fumikazu; Takeda, Shogo; Higashimori, Akira; Sogawa, Mitsue; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Shiba, Masatsugu; Watanabe, Kenji; Tominaga, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Takeuchi, Koji; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) was initially discovered as a nuclear protein that interacts with DNA as a chromatin-associated non-histone protein to stabilize nucleosomes and to regulate the transcription of many genes in the nucleus. Once leaked or actively secreted into the extracellular environment, HMGB1 activates inflammatory pathways by stimulating multiple receptors, including Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, TLR4, and receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), leading to tissue injury. Although HMGB1’s ability to induce inflammation has been well documented, no studies have examined the role of HMGB1 in wound healing in the gastrointestinal field. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of HMGB1 and its receptors in the healing of gastric ulcers. We also investigated which receptor among TLR2, TLR4, or RAGE mediates HMGB1’s effects on ulcer healing. Gastric ulcers were induced by serosal application of acetic acid in mice, and gastric tissues were processed for further evaluation. The induction of ulcer increased the immunohistochemical staining of cytoplasmic HMGB1 and elevated serum HMGB1 levels. Ulcer size, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and the expression of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) mRNA peaked on day 4. Intraperitoneal administration of HMGB1 delayed ulcer healing and elevated MPO activity and TNFα expression. In contrast, administration of anti-HMGB1 antibody promoted ulcer healing and reduced MPO activity and TNFα expression. TLR4 and RAGE deficiency enhanced ulcer healing and reduced the level of TNFα, whereas ulcer healing in TLR2 knockout (KO) mice was similar to that in wild-type mice. In TLR4 KO and RAGE KO mice, exogenous HMGB1 did not affect ulcer healing and TNFα expression. Thus, we showed that HMGB1 is a complicating factor in the gastric ulcer healing process, which acts through TLR4 and RAGE to induce excessive inflammatory responses. PMID:24244627

  1. Gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ajani, Jaffer A; Lee, Jeeyun; Sano, Takeshi; Janjigian, Yelena Y; Fan, Daiming; Song, Shumei

    2017-06-01

    Gastric cancers, with gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC) as the most common histological type, impose a considerable global health burden. Although the screening strategies for early detection have been shown to be successful in Japan and South Korea, they are either not implemented or not feasible in most of the world, leading to late diagnosis in most patients. Helicobacter pylori infection contributes to the development of many endemic GACs, and pre-emptive eradication or early treatment of this bacterial infection might provide effective primary prevention. GACs are phenotypically and genotypically heterogeneous. Localized (clinical stage I) GAC is best treated either endoscopically or with limited surgical resection, but clinical stage II or stage III tumours require multidisciplinary adjunctive approaches in addition to surgery. Although GAC is highly treatable in its early stages, advanced (clinical stage IV) GAC has a median survival of just ∼9-10 months. However, detailed molecular and immune profiling of GAC is yielding promise; early studies with immune checkpoint inhibitors suggest that GAC is amenable to immune modulation. Molecular studies have yielded a vast quantity of new information for potential exploitation. Nevertheless, advances against GACs have lagged compared with other tumours of similar incidence, and more research is necessary to overcome the obstacles to prolong survival.

  2. Laparoscopy-assisted versus open gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection for advanced gastric cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Ling; Lin, Hai-Guan; Yang, Jian-Wu; Jiang, Fu-Quan; Zhang, Tao; Yang, He-Ming; Li, Cheng-Lin; Cui, Yan

    2014-01-01

    A raising number of surgeons have chosen laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy (LAG) as an alternative to open gastrectomy (OG) with D2 lymph node dissection for treatment of advanced gastric cancer (ADG). But no meta-analysis has been performed to evaluate the value of LAG versus OG with regard to safety and efficacy for treatment of ADG. A comprehensive literature research was performed in PubMed, Web of Science and Embase to identify studies that compared LAG and OG with D2 lymph node dissection for treatment of ADG. Data of interest were checked and subjected to meta-analysis with RevMan 5.1 software. 11 studies with 1904 patients (982 in LAG and 922 in OG) were enrolled. Pooled risk ratios (RR) and weighted mean difference (WMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were appropriately derived from random-effects models or fixed-effects models. Compared with OG, LAG was associated with less blood loss (WMD = -144.47; P < 0.05), shorter time of first flatus time (WMD = -0.91; P < 0.05) and postoperative hospital stay (WMD = -3.27; P < 0.05), and lower morbidity (RR = 0.70; P < 0.05), but longer operation time (WMD = 41.78; P < 0.05). No significant differences were noted in terms of harvested lymph nodes (WMD = 1.85; P = 0.09), pathological N stage (χ(2) 3.97; P = 0.26), tumor size (WMD = -0.05; P = 0.81), mortality (RR 0.82; P = 0.76), cancer recurrence rate (RR 0.77; P = 0.18) and 3-year overall survival rate (RR 1.09; P = 0.18). Compared with OG, LAG with D2 lymph node dissection for ADG had the advantages of minimal invasion, faster recovery, and fewer complications, and it could achieve the same degree of radicality, harvested lymph nodes, short-term and long-term prognosis as OG, though the operation time was slightly longer.

  3. A multicenter phase II study of TAS-102 monotherapy in patients with pre-treated advanced gastric cancer (EPOC1201).

    PubMed

    Bando, Hideaki; Doi, Toshihiko; Muro, Kei; Yasui, Hirofumi; Nishina, Tomohiro; Yamaguchi, Kensei; Takahashi, Shunji; Nomura, Shogo; Kuno, Hirofumi; Shitara, Kohei; Sato, Akihiro; Ohtsu, Atsushi

    2016-07-01

    American phase I studies have reported that the recommended dose of TAS-102 (trifluridine/tipiracil) was 25 mg/m(2) twice a day (b.i.d.), although this schedule did not provide clinically relevant improvements in a phase II study of advanced gastric cancer (AGC). However, a pivotal phase III study revealed that TAS-102 at 35 mg/m(2) b.i.d. provided a clinically relevant improvement in overall survival (OS) among patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Therefore, we re-evaluated the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetic parameters of TAS-102 at 35 mg/m(2) b.i.d among Japanese patients with AGC. All patients had undergone one or two previous chemotherapy regimens that contained fluoropyrimidine, platinum agents, and taxanes or irinotecan. The primary end-point target was a disease control rate (DCR) of ≥50% after 8 weeks of the 35 mg/m(2) b.i.d. schedule. Twenty-nine patients were assessable after completing the 35 mg/m(2) b.i.d. schedule. The investigator-determined DCR was 65.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 45.7-82.1%) and the independent central review's DCR was 51.9% (95% CI, 31.9-71.3%); both results exceeded the primary end-point target. The median progression-free survival and OS were 2.9 months (95% CI, 1.1-5.3 months) and 8.7 months (95% CI, 5.7-14.9 months), respectively. The grade III/IV adverse events included neutropenia (69.0%), leucopaenia (41.4%), anaemia (20.7%), and anorexia (10.3%). No AGC-specific toxicities were detected. The 35 mg/m(2) b.i.d. dose of TAS-102 provided positive efficacy and an acceptable toxicity profile in patients with AGC. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase III study is ongoing to validate these findings. UMIN000007421. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Mouse Models of Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sungsook; Yang, Mijeong

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Animal models have been used to elucidate the details of the molecular mechanisms of various cancers. However, most inbred strains of mice have resistance to gastric carcinogenesis. Helicobacter infection and carcinogen treatment have been used to establish mouse models that exhibit phenotypes similar to those of human gastric cancer. A large number of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have been developed using genetic engineering. A combination of carcinogens and gene manipulation has been applied to facilitate development of advanced gastric cancer; however, it is rare for mouse models of gastric cancer to show aggressive, metastatic phenotypes required for preclinical studies. Here, we review current mouse models of gastric carcinogenesis and provide our perspectives on future developments in this field. PMID:25061535

  5. An Initial AUV Investigation of the Morainal Bank and Ice-Proximal Submarine Processes of the Advancing Hubbard Glacier, Southeast Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, D. E.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Goff, J. A.; O'Halloran, W.

    2014-12-01

    The movement of an advancing tidewater glacier occurs in concert with the morainal bank that underlies its terminus. The mechanics of motion and sedimentological processes responsible for this advance of the morainal bank with the calving terminus are not well-defined and based largely on inferences from geophysical analyses of remnant morainal banks on fjord floors. There is a general absence of in situ or direct observation of the submarine margin because it is nearly impossible to access the immediate area of the ice face by boat safely. In order to obtain such data, in June 2014 we tested the ability of a Bluefin 9M AUV (autonomous underwater vehicle) to acquire high resolution swath bathymetry and sidescan backscatter across a ~2 km long section of the ice face of Hubbard Glacier (see also Goff et al., this meeting). Additionally onboard oceanographic measurements were taken that can be compared with surface cast CTD profiles obtained during AUV deployment, including locations with subglacial discharges. The AUV test provides details on the geometry of the morainal bank and nature of the fjord wall surfaces. The decimeter-scale imagery of the seabed reveals numerous erosional and depositional bedforms and gravitational features on the morainal bank's proximal slope. Closer to the ice face, the morainal bank surface appears much coarser, with textural patterns of unknown origin, and gravel lags including boulder fields. Comparing the water depth from the AUV survey with that of NOAA bathymetric data from 2004/2006 shows the morainal bank continued to advance in pace with ice advance into fjord waters over 200m deep, water depths shoaling up to 100m near the present ice margin. The glimpse of the morainal bank afforded by the AUV test clearly demonstrated the value of this technology to ice marginal submarine investigations.

  6. Does remnant gastric cancer really differ from primary gastric cancer? A systematic review of the literature by the Task Force of Japanese Gastric Cancer Association.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Hideaki; Fukagawa, Takeo; Haga, Yoshio; Oba, Koji

    2016-04-01

    Remnant gastric cancer, most frequently defined as cancer detected in the remnant stomach after distal gastrectomy for benign disease and those cases after surgery of gastric cancer at least 5 years after the primary surgery, is often reported as a tumor with poor prognosis. The Task Force of Japanese Gastric Cancer Association for Research Promotion evaluated the clinical impact of remnant gastric cancer by systematically reviewing publications focusing on molecular carcinogenesis, lymph node status, patient survival, and surgical complications. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed/MEDLINE with the keywords "remnant," "stomach," and "cancer," revealing 1154 relevant reports published up to the end of December 2014. The mean interval between the initial surgery and the diagnosis of remnant gastric cancer ranged from 10 to 30 years. The incidence of lymph node metastases at the splenic hilum for remnant gastric cancer is not significantly higher than that for primary proximal gastric cancer. Lymph node involvement in the jejunal mesentery is a phenomenon peculiar to remnant gastric cancer after Billroth II reconstruction. Prognosis and postoperative morbidity and mortality rates seem to be comparable to those for primary proximal gastric cancer. The crude 5-year mortality for remnant gastric cancer was 1.08 times higher than that for primary proximal gastric cancer, but this difference was not statistically significant. In conclusion, although no prospective cohort study has yet evaluated the clinical significance of remnant gastric cancer, our literature review suggests that remnant gastric cancer does not adversely affect patient prognosis and postoperative course.

  7. Exposure-Response Analyses of Ramucirumab from Two Randomized, Phase III Trials of Second-line Treatment for Advanced Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tabernero, Josep; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Muro, Kei; Van Cutsem, Eric; Oh, Sang Cheul; Bodoky, György; Shimada, Yasuhiro; Hironaka, Shuichi; Ajani, Jaffer A; Tomasek, Jiri; Safran, Howard; Chandrawansa, Kumari; Hsu, Yanzhi; Heathman, Michael; Khan, Azhar; Ni, Lan; Melemed, Allen S; Gao, Ling; Ferry, David; Fuchs, Charles S

    2017-10-01

    Ramucirumab is an IgG1 monoclonal antibody specific for the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2. Ramucirumab, 8 mg/kg every 2 weeks, administered as monotherapy (REGARD) or in combination with paclitaxel (RAINBOW), was safe and effective in patients with previously treated advanced gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. We evaluated exposure-efficacy and exposure-safety relationships of ramucirumab from two randomized, placebo-controlled phase III trials. Sparse pharmacokinetic samples were collected, and a population pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted to predict ramucirumab minimum trough concentration at steady state (Cmin,ss). Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the ramucirumab exposure (Cmin,ss)-efficacy relationship to overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate exposure-safety relationships. Analyses included 321 ramucirumab + paclitaxel and 335 placebo + paclitaxel patients from RAINBOW and 72 ramucirumab and 35 placebo patients from REGARD. Exposure-efficacy analysis showed ramucirumab Cmin,ss was a significant predictor of OS and PFS in both trials. Higher ramucirumab exposure was associated with longer OS and PFS. In RAINBOW, grade ≥3 hypertension, leukopenia, and neutropenia, but not febrile neutropenia, significantly correlated with Cmin,ss, with increased exposure leading to increased incidence. Exploratory exposure-response analyses suggest a positive relationship between efficacy and ramucirumab exposure with manageable toxicities at exposures generated from a dose of 8 mg/kg ramucirumab given every 2 weeks for patients with advanced gastric/GEJ cancer. These findings suggest an opportunity to further optimize benefit versus risk profiles of ramucirumab treatment in patients with gastric/GEJ cancer. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(10); 2215-22. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. A Phase I Trial of Oblimersen Sodium in Combination With Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil in Patients with Advanced Esophageal, Gastroesophageal Junction and Gastric Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Raab, Rachel; Sparano, Joseph A.; Ocean, Allyson J.; Christos, Paul; Ramirez, Mark; Vinciguerra, Vincent; Kaubisch, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine the maximum tolerated dose of oblimersen, an antisense oligonucleotide directed to the Bcl-2 mRNA, in combination with cisplatin and 5-flourouracil in patients with advanced gastric and esophageal carcinoma. Methods Patients were treated with escalating doses of oblimersen administered by continuous intravenous infusion (CIVI) days 1 to7, CIVI 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) days 4 to 7, and cisplatin on day 4 every three weeks. Results Fifteen patients received a total of 49 courses of oblimersen at doses of 3, 5, or 7 mg/kg/d given as a seven day CIVI in combination with 4 or 5 day CIVI of 5-FU (1000 or 750 mg/m2/d) plus intravenous cisplatin (100 or 75 mg/m2 over 2 hours). The recommended phase II dose of oblimersen was 5 mg/kg/day in combination with 5-FU (750 mg/m2/day for 4 days) and cisplatin (75 mg/m2). The most common grade 3 to 4 adverse events that occurred in at least 10% of patients at all dose levels included neutropenia (33%), hypokalemia (27%), infection (20%), and mucositis, fatigue, dizziness, thrombosis, and dehydration (in 13% for each category). Conclusion The combination of oblimersen with 5-FU and cisplatin chemotherapy is feasible in patients with advanced upper gastrointestinal cancer, with antitumor activity observed in gastric carcinoma. PMID:19738454

  9. A phase II study of 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin in combination with paclitaxel and oxaliplatin as first-line treatment for patients with advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Rong-Bo; Fan, Nan-Feng; Guo, Zeng-Qing; Wang, Xiao-Jie; Liu, Jie; Chen, Ling

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the POF regimen (biweekly 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin combined with paclitaxel and oxaliplatin) as first-line treatment for advanced gastric cancer (AGC). Twenty-seven previously untreated patients with advanced adenocarcinoma of the gastric or gastroesophageal junction were eligible for this study. The chemotherapy regimen consisted of a 3-hour infusion of paclitaxel (135 mg/m(2)) followed by oxaliplatin (85 mg/m(2)) and leucovorin (400 mg/m(2)), administered simultaneously over a 2-hour infusion period, followed by an infusion of 5-fluorouracil (2400 mg/m(2)) over a 46-hour period. Twenty-one patients had measurable lesions: four complete responses, eight partial responses and seven stable diseases. At a median follow-up of 610 days, median survival was 348 days. Frequent grade 3 to 4 toxicities were: neutropenia (29.6%), stomatitis (7.4%), nausea (7.4%), vomiting (7.4%), hepatic dysfunction (3.7%), and fatigue (18.5%). No treatment-related deaths occurred. The POF regimen appears to be efficacious and is well tolerated in patients with AGC.

  10. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials on the role of targeted therapy in the management of advanced gastric cancer: Evidence does not translate?

    PubMed Central

    Ciliberto, Domenico; Staropoli, Nicoletta; Caglioti, Francesca; Gualtieri, Simona; Fiorillo, Lucia; Chiellino, Silvia; De Angelis, Antonina Maria; Mendicino, Francesco; Botta, Cirino; Caraglia, Michele; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro

    2015-01-01

    Summary It is still uncertain if targeted therapy-based regimens in advanced gastric cancer actually produce survival benefit. To shed light on this important question, we performed a systematic review and meta-analyses on each relevant targeted-pathway. By searching literature databases and proceedings of major cancer meetings in the time-frame 2005–2014, 22 randomized clinical trials exploring targeted therapy for a total of 7022 advanced gastric cancer patients were selected and included in the final analysis. Benefit was demonstrated for antiangiogenic agents in terms of overall survival (HR 0.759; 95%CI 0.655–0.880; p < 0.001). Conversely no benefit was found for EGFR pathway (HR 1.077; 95%CI 0.847–1.370; p = 0.543). Meta-analysis of HER-2 pathway confirmed improvement in terms of survival outcome, already known for this class of drugs (HR 0.823; 95%CI 0.722–0.939; p = 0.004). Pooled analysis demonstrated a significant survival benefit (OS: HR 0.823; PFS: HR 0.762) with acceptable tolerability profile for targeted-based therapies as compared to conventional treatments. This finding conflicts with the outcome of most individual studies, probably due to poor trial design or patients selection. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate a significant survival benefit for targeted therapy in its whole, which can be ascribed to anti-angiogenic and anti-HER2 agents. PMID:26061272

  11. [Hereditary gastric and pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Langner, C

    2017-05-01

    Most cases of gastric and pancreatic cancer are sporadic, but familial clustering can be observed in approximately 10% of cases. Hereditary gastric cancer accounts for a very low percentage of cases (1-3%) and two syndromes have been characterized: hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) and gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach (GAPPS). Gastric and pancreatic cancer can develop in the setting of other hereditary cancer syndromes, such as hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC), Li-Fraumeni syndrome, Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), or various hamartomatous polyposis syndromes, including juvenile polyposis and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis carry an increased risk of cancer (40-55%).

  12. Beneficial effects of metformin and irbesartan on advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-RAGE-induced proximal tubular cell injury.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yuji; Matsui, Takanori; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2012-03-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) axis contributes to diabetic nephropathy. An oral hypoglycemic agent, metformin may have a potential effect on the inhibition of glycation reactions. Further, since a pathophysiological crosstalk between renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and AGEs-RAGE axis is involved in diabetic nephropathy, it is conceivable that metformin and irbesartan additively could protect against the AGEs-RAGE-induced tubular cell injury. In this study, we addressed the issues. Metformin dose-dependently inhibited the formation of AGEs modification of bovine serum albumin (BSA). Compared with AGEs-modified BSA prepared without metformin (AGEs-MF0), those prepared in the presence of 30 mM or 100 mM metformin (AGEs-MF30 or AGEs-MF100) significantly reduced RAGE mRNA level, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, apoptosis, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and transforming growth factor-β mRNA level in tubular cells. Irbesartan further inhibited the harmful effects of AGEs-MF0 or AGEs-MF30 on tubular cells. Our present study suggests that combination therapy with metformin and irbesartan may have therapeutic potential in diabetic nephropathy; it could play a protective role against tubular injury in diabetes not only by inhibiting AGEs formation, but also by attenuating the deleterious effects of AGEs via down-regulating RAGE expression and subsequently suppressing ROS generation.

  13. Putative model for heat shock protein 70 complexation with receptor of advanced glycation end products through fluorescence proximity assays and normal mode analyses.

    PubMed

    Grunwald, Marcelo Sartori; Ligabue-Braun, Rodrigo; Souza, Cristiane Santos; Heimfarth, Luana; Verli, Hugo; Gelain, Daniel Pens; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is recognized by receptors on the plasma membrane, such as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), TLR2, CD14, and CD40. This leads to activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, enhancement of the phagocytic activity of innate immune cells, and stimulation of antigen-specific responses. However, the specific characteristics of HSP70 binding are still unknown, and all HSP70 receptors have not yet been described. Putative models for HSP70 complexation to the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGEs), considering both ADP- and ATP-bound states of HSP70, were obtained through molecular docking and interaction energy calculations. This interaction was detected and visualized by a proximity fluorescence-based assay in A549 cells and further analyzed by normal mode analyses of the docking complexes. The interacting energy of the complexes showed that the most favored docking situation occurs between HSP70 ATP-bound and RAGE in its monomeric state. The fluorescence proximity assay presented a higher number of detected spots in the HSP70 ATP treatment, corroborating with the computational result. Normal-mode analyses showed no conformational deformability in the interacting interface of the complexes. Results were compared with previous findings in which oxidized HSP70 was shown to be responsible for the differential modulation of macrophage activation, which could result from a signaling pathway triggered by RAGE binding. Our data provide important insights into the characteristics of HSP70 binding and receptor interactions, as well as putative models with conserved residues on the interface area, which could be useful for future site-directed mutagenesis studies.

  14. Laparoscopy Assisted versus Open Distal Gastrectomy with D2 Lymph Node Dissection for Advanced Gastric Cancer: Design and Rationale of a Phase II Randomized Controlled Multicenter Trial (COACT 1001)

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Byung Ho; Reim, Daniel; Eom, Bang Wool; Yu, Wan Sik; Park, Young Kyu; Ryu, Keun Won; Lee, Young Joon; Yoon, Hong Man; Lee, Jun Ho; Jeong, Oh; Jeong, Sang Ho; Lee, Sang Eok; Lee, Sang Ho; Yoon, Ki Young; Seo, Kyung Won; Chung, Ho Young; Kwon, Oh Kyoung; Kim, Tae Bong; Lee, Woon Ki; Park, Seong Heum; Sul, Ji-Young; Yang, Dae Hyun; Lee, Jong Seok

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer has gained acceptance and popularity worldwide. However, laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer is still controversial. Therefore, we propose this prospective randomized controlled multi-center trial in order to evaluate the safety and feasibility of laparoscopy assisted D2-gastrectomy for advanced stage gastric cancer. Materials and Methods Patients undergoing distal gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer staged cT2/3/4 cN0/1/2/3a cM0 by endoscopy and computed tomography are eligible for enrollment after giving their informed consent. Patients will be randomized either to laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy or open distal gastrectomy. Sample size calculation revealed that 102 patients are to be included per treatment arm. The primary endpoint is the non-compliance rate of D2 dissection; relevant secondary endpoints are three-year disease free survival, surgical and postoperative complications, hospital stay and unanimity rate of D2 dissection evaluated by reviewing the intraoperative video documentation. Discussion Oncologic safety is the major concern regarding laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer. Therefore, the non-compliance rate of clearing the N2 area was chosen as the most important parameter for the technical feasibility of the laparoscopic procedure. Furthermore, surgical quality will be carefully reviewed, that is, three independent experts will review the video records and score with a check list. For a long-term result, disease free survival is considered a secondary endpoint for this trial. This study will offer promising evidence of the feasibility and safety of Laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer.Trial Registration: NCT01088204 (international), NCCCTS-09-448 (Korea). PMID:24156036

  15. [Rationality of N3 classification and its sub-classification in TNM classification system for advanced gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yanlong; Huang, Jinyu; Zhu, Zhi; Xu, Huimian

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the rationality of N3 classification and its sub-classification in the 7th UICC/AJCC TNM classification system. Clinicopathological data of 610 patients with stage N3 advanced gastric cancer who underwent standard D2 and D2+ radical surgery at the Department of Surgical Oncology, The First Hospital of China Medical University, from January 1980 to March 2010 were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were divided into N3a and N3b groups, and clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis were compared between N3a and N3b patients. Overall survival rate was determined using the Kaplan-Meier estimator. The log-rank test was used to identify differences between the survival curves of different groups. In multivariate analysis, Cox proportional hazard model was used to identify independent factors associated with prognosis. Among 610 patients, 426 were men and 184 were women, 394 were N3a and 216 were N3b, with a mean age of(57±11) years old (range 23 to 83). A total of 19 842 lymph nodes were examined, in which 9 575 nodes were positive, with the metastatic ratio of 48.3%. The 5-year overall survival rate was 20.0%. Univariate analysis of prognostic factors suggested that tumor location (P=0.000), tumor size (P=0.003), Borrmann type (P=0.000), pathologic type (P=0.043), lymphatic vessel invasion (P=0.000), growth pattern (P=0.019), invasion depth (P=0.000), resection extent (P=0.000) and N3 sub-classification (P=0.000) were significantly associated with the prognosis of N3 patients. Further analysis showed that tumor size (P=0.028), invasion depth (P=0.000) and gastric resection extent (P=0.002) were significantly associated with the prognosis of N3a patients, while Borrmann type (P=0.034), lymphatic vessel invasion (P=0.002), invasion depth (P=0.008) and resection extent (P=0.003) were significantly associated with the prognosis of N3b patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that lymphatic vessel invasion (P=0.009), resection extent (P=0

  16. Serum anti-Helicobacter pylori antibody and gastric carcinoma among young adults. Research Group on Prevention of Gastric Carcinoma among Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, S; Wada, O; Nakajima, T; Nishi, T; Kobayashi, O; Konishi, T; Inaba, Y

    1995-06-15

    Helicobacter pylori is recognized as one of the possible causes of gastric carcinoma. There have been few studies on the relationship between H. pylori and gastric carcinoma in patients younger than 40 years. Data and sera were collected from the cases (105 hospitalized patients younger than 40 years with gastric carcinoma from 9 hospitals in the Kanto-Shin-Etsu Area in Japan) and controls (102 hospitalized control subjects and 101 screening control subjects) whose sex and age (within 4 years) were matched. The serum anti-H. pylori immunoglobulin G antibody was measured, and the odds ratio (OR) for the association between seropositivity and gastric carcinoma was calculated. The OR (95% confidence interval) was 13.3 (5.3-35.6). For women, the OR was 32.8, whereas for men it was 6.8. The OR for patients with early gastric carcinoma was 20.8, and for patients with advanced disease, it was 10.8. The OR for intestinal-type carcinoma was 18.0, and for diffuse-type carcinoma, it was 12.8. The OR for proximal carcinoma was 11.3, and for distal carcinoma it was 14.8. The OR for these young subjects was considerably larger than that for the older subjects in previously published studies. Among those younger than 40 years of age, early stage carcinoma has a stronger association with H. pylori than advanced carcinoma, and intestinal- and diffuse-type carcinomas have an association with H. pylori.

  17. Gastric giardiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Doglioni, C.; De Boni, M.; Cielo, R.; Laurino, L.; Pelosio, P.; Braidotti, P.; Viale, G.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To assess the prevalence of gastric giardiasis in patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, and to define the clinicopathological correlates of gastric Giardia lamblia infection. METHODS: Consecutive gastric biopsy specimens (n = 15,023) from 11,085 patients, taken at Feltre City Hospital (north eastern Italy) from January 1986 to December 1991, were histologically and immunocytochemically examined for the occurrence of G lamblia trophozoites. Three gastric biopsy specimens from patients harbouring G lamblia infection, who repeated endoscopy before treatment, were also examined electron microscopically. RESULTS: Forty one patients (0.37% of the population study) harboured gastric giardiasis. All patients underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy because of dyspepsia, epigastric pain, or abdominal distension. Only two patients had diarrhoea at the time of investigation. Giardiasis was clinically unsuspected in all cases, although the nine patients who also had duodenal biopsies performed had concomitant intestinal giardiasis. Gastric giardiasis was invariably associated with chronic atrophic gastritis. Intestinal metaplasia of the gastric mucosa and Helicobacter pylori infection were found in 32 and 37 of the 41 patients with gastric giardiasis, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The invariable association of gastric giardiasis with chronic atrophic gastritis, most often showing intestinal metaplasia and H pylori infection, indicates that a decreased gastric acidity is a prerequisite for localisation of G lamblia to the gastric mucosa. Though its possible role as a gastric pathogen remains to be elucidated, these findings suggest that trophozoites should be carefully searched for when examining gastric biopsy specimens showing chronic atrophic gastritis. Images PMID:1452790

  18. [A case of unresectable advanced gastric cancer responding remarkably to combined chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and low-dose cisplatin].

    PubMed

    Yasumoto, K; Iwamoto, M; Hoshiko, M; Kawabata, S; Fujii, T; Morimatsu, M; Takeda, J; Kakegawa, T

    1995-11-01

    A 62-year-old male patient complaining epigastralgia was diagnosed as having Borrmann type 2 gastric concer (por). The primary lesion was unresectable, so the patient was treated by combined chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and low-dose cisplatin for 4 weeks, which resulted in the disappearance of primary tumor and a remarkable reduction of metastatic lymph nodes. The patient has a good quality of life without any sign of recurrence now.

  19. [A Case of Gastro-Gastric Intussusception Secondary to Primary Gastric Lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Jo, Hyeong Ho; Kang, Sun Mi; Kim, Si Hye; Ra, Moni; Park, Byeong Kyu; Kwon, Joong Goo; Kim, Eun Young; Jung, Jin Tae; Kim, Ho Gak; Ryoo, Hun Mo; Kang, Ung Rae

    2016-07-25

    In adults, most intussusceptions develop from a lesion, usually a benign or malignant neoplasm, and can occur at any site in the gastrointestinal tract. Intussusception in the proximal gastrointestinal tract is uncommon, and gastro-gastric intussusception is extremely rare. We present a case of gastro-gastric intussusception secondary to a primary gastric lymphoma. An 82-year-old female patient presented with acute onset chest pain and vomiting. Abdominal CT revealed a gastro-gastric intussusception. We performed upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, revealing a large gastric mass invaginated into the gastric lumen and distorting the distal stomach. Uncomplicated gastric reposition was achieved with endoscopy of the distal stomach. Histological evaluation of the gastric mass revealed a diffuse large B cell lymphoma that was treated with chemotherapy.

  20. FEP regimen (epidoxorubicin, etoposide and cisplatin) in advanced gastric cancer, with or without low-dose GM-CSF: an Italian Trial in Medical Oncology (ITMO) study.

    PubMed Central

    Bajetta, E.; Di Bartolomeo, M.; Carnaghi, C.; Buzzoni, R.; Mariani, L.; Gebbia, V.; Comella, G.; Pinotti, G.; Ianniello, G.; Schieppati, G.; Bochicchio, A. M.; Maiorino, L.

    1998-01-01

    The new regimens developed over the last few years have led to an improvement in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer, and our previous experience confirmed the fact that the combination of etoposide, doxorubicin and cisplatin (EAP regimen) is an active treatment that leads to interesting complete remission rates. The primary end point of the present multicentre, randomized, parallel-group phase II study was to determine the activity of the simplified 2-day EAP schedule in patients with locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer, and to verify whether the addition of low doses of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) made it possible to increase dose intensity. Of the 62 enrolled patients, 30 were randomized to receive epirubicin 35 mg m(-2), etoposide 120 mg m(-2) and cisplatin 45 mg m(-2) (FEP) on days 1 and 2 every 28 days and 32 to receive the same schedule plus subcutaneous GM-CSF (molgramostin) 150 microg day(-1) on days 5-14 every 21 days. The patients were stratified by age and the number of disease sites. The characteristics of the patients were well balanced between the two groups. The objective response rate of the patients as a whole was 34% (21 out of 62; 95% confidence interval 22-46), with only one complete remission. The median response duration was 4.5 months (range 1-24 months). The median time to treatment failure was 5 months (range 1-14 months), without any difference between the two groups. The median survival of the patients as a whole was 9 months. Full doses were administered in 92% and 94% of the cycles in the control and GM-CSF arms respectively. The average dose intensity calculated for all drugs was 0.96% in the control and 1.27% in the GM-CSF group. CTC-NCI grade 3-4 neutropenia was reported in 39% vs 45% of patients, thrombocytopenia in 11% vs 35% (P = 0.020) and anaemia in 7% vs 35% (P = 0.014). The FEP combination is as active (OR: 34%) in the treatment of patients with advanced gastric cancer as the EAP

  1. [A case of complete response for advanced gastric cancer with liver metastasis treated with combination chemotherapy of weekly paclitaxel and doxifluridine].

    PubMed

    Okabe, Toshio; Ohya, Toshihiro; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Tago, Ken-Ichi; Totsuka, Osamu; Numaga, Yuki; Higuchi, Toru; Iesato, Hiroshi; Yokomori, Tadahiro; Kawate, Susumu; Takeyoshi, Izumi

    2009-01-01

    A 68-year-old man underwent total gastrectomy for Type 3 gastric cancer with liver metastasis. The final finding was T3(SE), N1, H1, P0, CY0(class IV), Stage IV, Cur C. After surgery, he was treated with combination chemotherapy of weekly paclitaxel(PTX)/doxifluridine(5'-DFUR). Paclitaxel was administered at a dose of 80 mg/m(2) on day 1, 8 and 15, and doxifluridine was orally administered at a dose of 533 mg/m(2) day for five days followed by withdrawal for two days. This regimen was repeated every four weeks. After 2 courses, the tumor marker level normalized, and the size of the liver metastasis was remarkably decreased. After 5 courses, a CT scan revealed the liver metastasis had disappeared, and he has now survived without recurrence after the disappearance of the liver metastasis. No severe adverse reactions were observed, and the man can be treated as an outpatient. This therapy may thus be effective in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer following non-curative operation.

  2. Gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, H.O. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. Some of the titles are: Radiation therapy for gastric cancer; Experimental stomach cancer: Drug selection based on in vitro testing; Western surgical adjuvant trials in gastric cancers: Lessons from current trials to be applied in the future; and Chemotherapy of gastric cancer.

  3. Intraoperative thermal imaging in esophageal replacement: its use in the assessment of gastric tube viability.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Katsunori; Matsudaira, Hideki; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Mizuno, Ryouji; Hanyuu, Nobuyoshi; Iwabuchi, Shuuichi; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2006-01-01

    We examined the use of intraoperative thermal imaging to assess the gastric vascularization and gastric tube viability during esophagectomy. The surface temperatures of the intact stomach, devascularized stomach, and gastric tube were measured in 13 patients from the proximal end to the pylorus longitudinally along the greater curvature or along the entire gastric tube during esophagectomy. Thermal images clearly demonstrated a surface temperature decline in the proximal region of the gastric tube. The mean decline rate in the surface temperature in the proximal region of the gastric tube in comparison to the intact stomach was 17.7% (P < 0.001). One patient who developed gastric tube necrosis exhibited a prominent drop in the surface temperature in the proximal region of 20.6% in comparison to that in the distal region, compared to that of 12.5% in other patients. Intraoperative thermal imaging is a noninvasive and reliable technique for the assessment of the gastric tube viability.

  4. [Immunohistochemical assessment of HER2 expression in gastric cancer. A clinicopathologic study of 93 cases].

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Cabrero, Isabel; Gil-Hernández, Sara; Ruelas-Perea, Ana; Villaverde-Rodríguez, Diego; Montes-Ochoa, José Roberto; Medrano-Guzmán, Rafael

    2017-01-06

    Gastric cancer in Mexico is ranked third in both males and females. Most patients present clinically with advanced disease and treatment options are sparse. HER2 overexpression in gastric cancer is related to poor outcome. Immunohistochemical testing for HER2 is becoming the standard of care for guiding adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer with trastuzumab. To determine the frequency of HER2 overexpression in patients with gastric cancer in the Hospital de Oncología del Centro Médico Nacional, Siglo XXI and its association with other histopathological findings. Patients with gastric cancer who underwent surgery between March 12, 2006-August 31, 2011, were enrolled in this retrospective study. Diagnosis was confirmed by review of slides and immunohistochemistry with anti-HER2 antibody was performed. Scoring was done by Hoffman scoring system. Medical records were evaluated. Ninety-three patients were included in the study, with 43 (46.2%) male and 50 (53.7%) female patients. The median age was 64 years. HER2-positive tumours were identified in 6 patients (6.45%) and located most frequently in the proximal stomach. There was no difference in HER2 overexpression in relation to age, gender or histologic type. In our study, about 7% of patients with gastric cancer were HER2-positive on immunohistochemistry. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  5. Helicobacter pylori in gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Hyo Jun; Lee, Dong Soo

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer still is a major concern as the third most common cancer worldwide, despite declining rates of incidence in many Western countries. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the major cause of gastric carcinogenesis, and its infection insults gastric mucosa leading to the occurrence of atrophic gastritis which progress to intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, early gastric cancer, and advanced gastric cancer consequently. This review focuses on multiple factors including microbial virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors, which can heighten the chance of occurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma due to H. pylori infection. Bacterial virulence factors are key components in controlling the immune response associated with the induction of carcinogenesis, and cagA and vacA are the most well-known pathogenic factors. Host genetic polymorphisms contribute to regulating the inflammatory response to H. pylori and will become increasingly important with advancing techniques. Environmental factors such as high salt and smoking may also play a role in gastric carcinogenesis. It is important to understand the virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors interacting in the multistep process of gastric carcinogenesis. To conclude, prevention via H. pylori eradication and controlling environmental factors such as diet, smoking, and alcohol is an important strategy to avoid H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:26690981

  6. Molecular biology of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, A; Rodríguez Braun, E; Pérez Fidalgo, A; Chirivella González, I

    2007-04-01

    Despite its decreasing incidence overall, gastric cancer is still a challenging disease. Therapy is based mainly upon surgical resection when the tumour remains localised in the stomach. Conventional chemotherapy may play a role in treating micrometastatic disease and is effective as palliative therapy for recurrent or advanced disease. However, the knowledge of molecular pathways implicated in gastric cancer pathogenesis is still in its infancy and the contribution of molecular biology to the development of new targeted therapies in gastric cancer is far behind other more common cancers such as breast, colon or lung. This review will focus first on the difference of two well defined types of gastric cancer: intestinal and diffuse. A discussion of the cell of origin of gastric cancer with some intriguing data implicating bone marrow derived cells will follow, and a comprehensive review of different genetic alterations detected in gastric cancer, underlining those that may have clinical, therapeutic or prognostic implications.

  7. A randomized Phase III trial of weekly or 3-weekly doses of nab-paclitaxel versus weekly doses of Cremophor-based paclitaxel in patients with previously treated advanced gastric cancer (ABSOLUTE Trial).

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Wasaburo; Morita, Satoshi; Sakata, Yuh

    2015-03-01

    Paclitaxel is an agent widely used in second-line chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer. The aim of this trial is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of 3-weekly or weekly doses of nanoparticle albumin-bound-paclitaxel compared with weekly doses of Cremophor-based paclitaxel in patients with unresectable or recurrent gastric cancer refractory to first-line chemotherapy comprising fluoropyrimidines. A total of 730 patients will be enrolled from 72 institutions. The primary endpoint is the overall survival, and the secondary endpoints are progression-free survival, time to treatment failure, overall response rate, disease control rate, quality of life (by using the EQ-5D system) and safety.

  8. Roux-en-Y augmented gastric advancement: An alternative technique for concurrent esophageal and pyloric stenosis secondary to corrosive intake

    PubMed Central

    Waseem, Talat; Azim, Asad; Ashraf, Muhammad Hasham; Azim, Khawaja M

    2016-01-01

    Select group of patients with concurrent esophageal and gastric stricturing secondary to corrosive intake requires colonic or free jejunal transfer. These technically demanding reconstructions are associated with significant complications and have up to 18% ischemic conduit necrosis. Following corrosive intake, up to 30% of such patients have stricturing at the pyloro-duodenal canal area only and rest of the stomach is available for rather less complex and better perfused gastrointestinal reconstruction. Here we describe an alternative technique where we utilize stomach following distal gastric resection along with Roux-en-Y reconstruction instead of colonic or jejunal interposition. This neo-conduit is potentially superior in terms of perfusion, lower risk of gastro-esophageal anastomotic leakage and technical ease as opposed to colonic and jejunal counterparts. We have utilized the said technique in three patients with acceptable postoperative outcome. In addition this technique offers a feasible reconstruction plan in patients where colon is not available for reconstruction due to concomitant pathology. Utility of this technique may also merit consideration for gastroesophageal junction tumors. PMID:28070231

  9. Oesophageal adenocarcinoma and gastric cancer: should we mind the gap?

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Yoku; Sethi, Nilay; Sepulveda, Antonia R; Bass, Adam J; Wang, Timothy C

    2016-04-26

    Over recent decades we have witnessed a shift in the anatomical distribution of gastric cancer (GC), which increasingly originates from the proximal stomach near the junction with the oesophagus. In parallel, there has been a dramatic rise in the incidence of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC) in the lower oesophagus, which is associated with antecedent Barrett oesophagus (BO). In this context, there has been uncertainty regarding the characterization of adenocarcinomas spanning the area from the lower oesophagus to the distal stomach. Most relevant to this discussion is the distinction, if any, between OAC and intestinal-type GC of the proximal stomach. It is therefore timely to review our current understanding of OAC and intestinal-type GC, integrating advances from cell-of-origin studies and comprehensive genomic alteration analyses, ultimately enabling better insight into the relationship between these two cancers.

  10. Pravastatin inhibits advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-induced proximal tubular cell apoptosis and injury by reducing receptor for AGEs (RAGE) level.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yuji; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Matsui, Takanori; Ohta, Keisuke; Tanoue, Ryuichiro; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Ueda, Seiji; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro; Okuda, Seiya

    2012-08-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) axis play a role in diabetic nephropathy. Statins have been shown to ameliorate renal function and reduce proteinuria in patients with chronic kidney disease. However, the effects of statin on AGEs-induced tubular cell damage remain unknown. We examined here whether and how pravastatin could block the AGEs-RAGE-elicited tubular cell injury in vitro. Gene expression level was evaluated by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reactions. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was measured with dihydroethidium staining. Apoptosis was analyzed in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) expression was evaluated by immunostaining. Pravastatin dose-dependently inhibited the AGEs-induced up-regulation of RAGE mRNA level, ROS generation and apoptosis in human renal proximal tubular cells. Further, AGEs decreased mRNA level of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase-2, an enzyme that mainly degrades asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase and subsequently increased ADMA generation in tubular cells, both of which were also prevented by pravastatin. Geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) treatment blocked all of the effects of pravastatin on tubular cells. We found that rosuvastatin also significantly blocked the AGEs-induced increase in RAGE mRNA level and ROS generation, both of which were prevented by GGPP. Our present study suggests that pravastatin could inhibit the AGEs-induced apoptosis and ADMA generation in tubular cells by suppressing RAGE expression probably via inhibition of GGPP synthesis. Pravastatin may exert beneficial effects on tubular damage in diabetic nephropathy by blocking the AGEs-RAGE axis.

  11. Nifedipine inhibits advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) interaction-mediated proximal tubular cell injury via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Takanori; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Ueda, Seiji; Fukami, Kei; Okuda, Seiya

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} Nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced up-regulation of RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells, which was prevented by GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma}. {yields} GW9662 treatment alone increased RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells. {yields} Nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced reactive oxygen species generation, NF-{kappa}B activation and increases in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and transforming growth factor-{beta} gene expression in tubular cells, all of which were blocked by GW9662. -- Abstract: There is a growing body of evidence that advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) interaction evokes oxidative stress generation and subsequently elicits inflammatory and fibrogenic reactions, thereby contributing to the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. We have previously found that nifedipine, a calcium-channel blocker (CCB), inhibits the AGE-induced mesangial cell damage in vitro. However, effects of nifedipine on proximal tubular cell injury remain unknown. We examined here whether and how nifedipine blocked the AGE-induced tubular cell damage. Nifedipine, but not amlodipine, a control CCB, inhibited the AGE-induced up-regulation of RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells, which was prevented by the simultaneous treatment of GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}). GW9662 treatment alone was found to increase RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells. Further, nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced reactive oxygen species generation, NF-{kappa}B activation and increases in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and transforming growth factor-beta gene expression in tubular cells, all of which were blocked by GW9662. Our present study provides a unique beneficial aspect of nifedipine on diabetic nephropathy; it could work as an anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory agent against AGEs in tubular cells by suppressing RAGE expression

  12. Laparoscopic gastric banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjustable gastric banding; Bariatric surgery - laparoscopic gastric banding; Obesity - gastric banding; Weight loss - gastric banding ... gastric banding is not a "quick fix" for obesity. It will greatly change your lifestyle. You must ...

  13. Capecitabine and cisplatin with or without cetuximab for patients with previously untreated advanced gastric cancer (EXPAND): a randomised, open-label phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Lordick, Florian; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Chung, Hyun-Cheol; Salman, Pamela; Oh, Sang Cheul; Bodoky, György; Kurteva, Galina; Volovat, Constantin; Moiseyenko, Vladimir M; Gorbunova, Vera; Park, Joon Oh; Sawaki, Akira; Celik, Ilhan; Götte, Heiko; Melezínková, Helena; Moehler, Markus

    2013-05-01

    Patients with advanced gastric cancer have a poor prognosis and few efficacious treatment options. We aimed to assess the addition of cetuximab to capecitabine-cisplatin chemotherapy in patients with advanced gastric or gastro-oesophageal junction cancer. In our open-label, randomised phase 3 trial (EXPAND), we enrolled adults aged 18 years or older with histologically confirmed locally advanced unresectable (M0) or metastatic (M1) adenocarcinoma of the stomach or gastro-oesophageal junction. We enrolled patients at 164 sites (teaching hospitals and clinics) in 25 countries, and randomly assigned eligible participants (1:1) to receive first-line chemotherapy with or without cetuximab. Randomisation was done with a permuted block randomisation procedure (variable block size), stratified by disease stage (M0 vs M1), previous oesophagectomy or gastrectomy (yes vs no), and previous (neo)adjuvant (radio)chemotherapy (yes vs no). Treatment consisted of 3-week cycles of twice-daily capecitabine 1000 mg/m(2) (on days 1-14) and intravenous cisplatin 80 mg/m(2) (on day 1), with or without weekly cetuximab (400 mg/m(2) initial infusion on day 1 followed by 250 mg/m(2) per week thereafter). The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS), assessed by a masked independent review committee in the intention-to-treat population. We assessed safety in all patients who received at least one dose of study drug. This study is registered at EudraCT, number 2007-004219-75. Between June 30, 2008, and Dec 15, 2010, we enrolled 904 patients. Median PFS for 455 patients allocated capecitabine-cisplatin plus cetuximab was 4.4 months (95% CI 4.2-5.5) compared with 5.6 months (5.1-5.7) for 449 patients who were allocated to receive capecitabine-cisplatin alone (hazard ratio 1.09, 95% CI 0.92-1.29; p=0.32). 369 (83%) of 446 patients in the chemotherapy plus cetuximab group and 337 (77%) of 436 patients in the chemotherapy group had grade 3-4 adverse events, including grade 3

  14. To Excavate Biomarkers Predictive of the Response for Capecitabine plus RAD001 through Nanostring-Based Multigene Assay in Advanced Gastric Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hansang; Lee, Jeeyun; Sohn, Insuk; Park, Se Hoon; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Young Suk; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Kang, Won Ki; Kim, Seung Tae

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive characterization of individual patients' tumour is important to realize personalized medicine. Here, we investigate to identify subsets that benefit from capecitabine plus RAD001 in advanced gastric cancer (GC) patients by comprehensive high-throughput genomic analysis (nCounter assay). Archival tumour tissue blocks, if possible, were collected at phase II trial of capecitabine plus RAD001 in 47 refractory GC patients (at clinicaltrials.gov NCT#01099527). A total of 42 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumour samples were available for nanostring based-multigene Assay. An nCounter assay of 519 kinase panels has been used. We performed correlation analyses between expression levels of kinase genes and response for capecitabine plus RAD001. Among 42 patients with An nCounter assay of 519 kinase panels, 4 patients achieved confirmed partial response and 15 patients revealed stable disease, resulting in an overall response rate (ORR) of 9.5%. No difference in ORR was observed in terms of gender, performance status, primary tumour site, gastric resection, histologic subtype, Lauren classification, No. of metastatic site and No. of chemotherapy. In subgroups with response for capecitabine plus RAD001, there is significant overexpression of 6 genes among 519 kinase gene such as EPHA2 (P = 0.0025), PIM1 (P = 0.0031), KSR1 (P = 0.0033), and EIF2AK4 (P = 0.0046) that are related to the activation of mTOR signalling. This study is first report that investigated to identify biomarkers predictive of the response for RAD001 containing treatment in refractory GC patients, by comprehensive high-throughput genomic analysis (nCounter assay).

  15. Relationship Between the DPD and TS mRNA Expression and the Response to S-1-Based Chemotherapy and Prognosis in Patients with Advanced Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiao-Ming; Zhou, Chong; Lian, Lian; Li, Li-Qun; Li, Wei; Tao, Min

    2015-04-01

    The aim was to determine changes in dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) and thymidylate synthase (TS) mRNAs in the blood of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) patients to see whether these enzymes affected the patients' response to S-1-based chemotherapy and prognosis. For this purpose, pretreatment DPD/TS mRNA expressions were determined in 40 AGC patients using RT-PCR. The patients were then administered with S-1-based regimen (S-1 + cisplatin) and toxicities were recorded. The relationship between the DPD/TS mRNA expressions and the chemotherapy response, drug resistance, and prognosis was analyzed. The data show that DPD mRNA expression correlated significantly with Lauren type while TS mRNA expression correlated with distant metastasis. Patients with higher DPD and/or TS mRNA expression(s) showed poor response, while those with low DPD mRNA expression showed better response to the chemotherapy. Pooled analysis showed that the patients with low DPD/TS mRNA expressions had better therapeutic response. The incidence of bone marrow suppression, diarrhea, and oral mucositis was high in patients with low DPD mRNA expression. Median overall survival (OS) in 40 patients was 13.5 months. It was 17 months for low and 10 months for high DPD (P = 0.044) and TS mRNA expression (P = 0.047). Pooled analysis showed that the patients with both low DPD/TS mRNA expressions had longer OS (P = 0.001). In conclusion, the detection of DPD and/or TS mRNA expression can be used to predict the response to S-1-based chemotherapy, drug resistance, and prognosis in AGC patients as well as to help guide the individualized treatment of gastric cancer.

  16. To Excavate Biomarkers Predictive of the Response for Capecitabine plus RAD001 through Nanostring-Based Multigene Assay in Advanced Gastric Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hansang; Lee, Jeeyun; Sohn, Insuk; Park, Se Hoon; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Young Suk; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Kang, Won Ki; Kim, Seung Tae

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive characterization of individual patients' tumour is important to realize personalized medicine. Here, we investigate to identify subsets that benefit from capecitabine plus RAD001 in advanced gastric cancer (GC) patients by comprehensive high-throughput genomic analysis (nCounter assay). Archival tumour tissue blocks, if possible, were collected at phase II trial of capecitabine plus RAD001 in 47 refractory GC patients (at clinicaltrials.gov NCT#01099527). A total of 42 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumour samples were available for nanostring based-multigene Assay. An nCounter assay of 519 kinase panels has been used. We performed correlation analyses between expression levels of kinase genes and response for capecitabine plus RAD001. Among 42 patients with An nCounter assay of 519 kinase panels, 4 patients achieved confirmed partial response and 15 patients revealed stable disease, resulting in an overall response rate (ORR) of 9.5%. No difference in ORR was observed in terms of gender, performance status, primary tumour site, gastric resection, histologic subtype, Lauren classification, No. of metastatic site and No. of chemotherapy. In subgroups with response for capecitabine plus RAD001, there is significant overexpression of 6 genes among 519 kinase gene such as EPHA2 (P = 0.0025), PIM1 (P = 0.0031), KSR1 (P = 0.0033), and EIF2AK4 (P = 0.0046) that are related to the activation of mTOR signalling. This study is first report that investigated to identify biomarkers predictive of the response for RAD001 containing treatment in refractory GC patients, by comprehensive high-throughput genomic analysis (nCounter assay). PMID:27994652

  17. Phase I/II study of S-1 combined with paclitaxel in patients with unresectable and/or recurrent advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mochiki, E; Ohno, T; Kamiyama, Y; Aihara, R; Haga, N; Ojima, H; Nakamura, J; Ohsawa, H; Nakabayashi, T; Takeuchi, K; Asao, T; Kuwano, H

    2006-01-01

    Both paclitaxel and S-1 are effective against gastric cancer, but the optimal regimen for combined chemotherapy with these drugs remains unclear. This phase I/II study was designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), recommended dose (RD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), and objective response rate of paclitaxel in combination with S-1. S-1 was administered orally at a fixed dose of 80 mg m−2 day−1 from days 1 to 14 of a 28-day cycle. Paclitaxel was given intravenously on days 1, 8, and 15, starting with a dose of 40 mg m−2 day−1. The dose was increased in a stepwise manner to 70 mg m−2. Treatment was repeated every 4 weeks unless disease progression was confirmed. In the phase I portion, 17 patients were enrolled. The MTD of paclitaxel was estimated to be 70 mg m−2 because 40% of the patients given this dose level (two of five) had DLT. The RD was determined to be 60 mg m−2. In the phase II portion, 24 patients, including five with assessable disease who received the RD in the phase I portion, were evaluated. The median number of treatment courses was six (range: 1–17). The incidence of the worst-grade toxicity in patients given the RD was 28 and 8%, respectively. All toxic effects were manageable. The response rate was 54.1%, and the median survival time was 15.5 months. Our phase I/II trial showed that S-1 combined with paclitaxel is effective and well tolerated in patients with advanced gastric cancer. PMID:17133268

  18. A critical analysis of the cytoreductive surgery with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy combo in the clinical management of advanced gastric cancer: an effective multimodality approach with scope for improvement

    PubMed Central

    Beeharry, Maneesh K.; Liu, Wen-Tao; Yao, Xue-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) is manifested in up to 40% of gastric cancer (GC) patients, after which their 5-year survival drops to less than 5%. The currently most acceptable treatment option for advanced GC (AGC) is systemic chemo and radio therapies with however generally very unsatisfying results and this led to a resurgence of interest in regional therapies like cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC). Small trials have indicated an association with prolonged survival when applying this technique to AGC manifesting with PC. High procedure-related morbidity and mortality associated with the CRS-HIPEC approach have however brought by a polemic on the merits of the latter: with the advent of regulatory approval of more effective as well as novel, more personalized treatment options in AGC, along with advances in tailoring investigational agents specifically for peritoneal delivery, there clearly is a need to outline the appropriate role of CRS-HIPEC in this disease. In a clear objective to improve the therapeutic efficiency of HIPEC, there have been immense developments in the technical aspects of this technology including the use of nanotechnology in more precise drug delivery systems (DDS) or choice of more efficient drugs such as gene-target technology, laparoscopy and so on. Henceforth, in this review, we will be highlighting the past and current status of the CRS + HIPEC procedure, shedding light on the pros and cons in order to boost up the efficiency of this multimodality approach. PMID:28138643

  19. A critical analysis of the cytoreductive surgery with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy combo in the clinical management of advanced gastric cancer: an effective multimodality approach with scope for improvement.

    PubMed

    Beeharry, Maneesh K; Liu, Wen-Tao; Yao, Xue-Xin; Yan, Min; Zhu, Zheng-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) is manifested in up to 40% of gastric cancer (GC) patients, after which their 5-year survival drops to less than 5%. The currently most acceptable treatment option for advanced GC (AGC) is systemic chemo and radio therapies with however generally very unsatisfying results and this led to a resurgence of interest in regional therapies like cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC). Small trials have indicated an association with prolonged survival when applying this technique to AGC manifesting with PC. High procedure-related morbidity and mortality associated with the CRS-HIPEC approach have however brought by a polemic on the merits of the latter: with the advent of regulatory approval of more effective as well as novel, more personalized treatment options in AGC, along with advances in tailoring investigational agents specifically for peritoneal delivery, there clearly is a need to outline the appropriate role of CRS-HIPEC in this disease. In a clear objective to improve the therapeutic efficiency of HIPEC, there have been immense developments in the technical aspects of this technology including the use of nanotechnology in more precise drug delivery systems (DDS) or choice of more efficient drugs such as gene-target technology, laparoscopy and so on. Henceforth, in this review, we will be highlighting the past and current status of the CRS + HIPEC procedure, shedding light on the pros and cons in order to boost up the efficiency of this multimodality approach.

  20. Proximity fuze

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, T.R.

    1989-08-22

    A proximity fuze system is described. It includes an optical ranging apparatus, a detonation circuit controlled by the optical ranging apparatus, and an explosive charge detonated by the detonation circuit. The optical ranging apparatus includes a pulsed laser light source for generating target ranging light pulses and optical reference light pulses. A single lens directs ranging pulses to a target and collects reflected light from the target. An optical fiber bundle is used for delaying the optical reference pulses to correspond to a predetermined distance from the target. The optical ranging apparatus includes circuitry for providing a first signal depending upon the light pulses reflected from the target, a second signal depending upon the light pulses from the optical delay fiber bundle, and an output signal when the first and second signals coincide with each other. The output signal occurs when the distance from the target is equal to the predetermined distance from the target. Additional circuitry distinguishes pulses reflected from the target from background solar radiation.

  1. Proximity fuze

    DOEpatents

    Harrison, T.R.

    1987-07-10

    A proximity fuze system includes an optical ranging apparatus, a detonation circuit controlled by the optical ranging apparatus, and an explosive charge detonated by the detonation circuit. The optical ranging apparatus includes a pulsed laser light source for generating target ranging light pulses and optical reference light pulses. A single lens directs ranging pulses to a target and collects reflected light from the target. An optical fiber bundle is used for delaying the optical reference pulses to correspond to a predetermined distance from the target. The optical ranging apparatus includes circuitry for providing a first signal depending upon the light pulses reflected from the target, a second signal depending upon the light pulses from the optical delay fiber bundle, and an output signal when the first and second signals coincide with each other. The output signal occurs when the distance from the target is equal to the predetermined distance from the target. Additional circuitry distinguishes pulses reflected from the target from background solar radiation. 3 figs.

  2. Proximity fuze

    DOEpatents

    Harrison, Thomas R.

    1989-08-22

    A proximity fuze system includes an optical ranging apparatus, a detonation circuit controlled by the optical ranging apparatus, and an explosive charge detonated by the detonation cirtcuit. The optical ranging apparatus includes a pulsed laser light source for generating target ranging light pulses and optical reference light pulses. A single lens directs ranging pulses to a target and collects reflected light from the target. An optical fiber bundle is used for delaying the optical reference pulses to correspond to a predetermined distance from the target. The optical ranging apparatus includes circuitry for providing a first signal depending upon the light pulses reflected from the target, a second signal depending upon the light pulses from the optical delay fiber bundle, and an output signal when the first and second signals coincide with each other. The output signal occurs when the distance from the target is equal to the predetermined distance form the target. Additional circuitry distinguishes pulses reflected from the target from background solar radiation.

  3. Towards Fluorescence In Vivo Hybridization (FIVH) Detection of H. pylori in Gastric Mucosa Using Advanced LNA Probes

    PubMed Central

    Fontenete, Sílvia; Leite, Marina; Guimarães, Nuno; Madureira, Pedro; Ferreira, Rui Manuel; Figueiredo, Céu; Wengel, Jesper; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there have been several attempts to improve the diagnosis of infection caused by Helicobacter pylori. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a commonly used technique to detect H. pylori infection but it requires biopsies from the stomach. Thus, the development of an in vivo FISH-based method (FIVH) that directly detects and allows the visualization of the bacterium within the human body would significantly reduce the time of analysis, allowing the diagnosis to be performed during endoscopy. In a previous study we designed and synthesized a phosphorothioate locked nucleic acid (LNA)/ 2’ O-methyl RNA (2’OMe) probe using standard phosphoramidite chemistry and FISH hybridization was then successfully performed both on adhered and suspended bacteria at 37°C. In this work we simplified, shortened and adapted FISH to work at gastric pH values, meaning that the hybridization step now takes only 30 minutes and, in addition to the buffer, uses only urea and probe at non-toxic concentrations. Importantly, the sensitivity and specificity of the FISH method was maintained in the range of conditions tested, even at low stringency conditions (e.g., low pH). In conclusion, this methodology is a promising approach that might be used in vivo in the future in combination with a confocal laser endomicroscope for H. pylori visualization. PMID:25915865

  4. Immunotherapy in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Matsueda, Satoko; Graham, David Y

    2014-02-21

    Gastric cancer is the second most common of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In the majority of cases gastric cancer is advanced at diagnosis and although medical and surgical treatments have improved, survival rates remain poor. Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as a powerful and promising clinical approach for treatment of cancer and has shown major success in breast cancer, prostate cancer and melanoma. Here, we provide an overview of concepts of modern cancer immunotherapy including the theory, current approaches, remaining hurdles to be overcome, and the future prospect of cancer immunotherapy in the treatment of gastric cancer. Adaptive cell therapies, cancer vaccines, gene therapies, monoclonal antibody therapies have all been used with some initial successes in gastric cancer. However, to date the results in gastric cancer have been disappointing as current approaches often do not stimulate immunity efficiently allowing tumors continue to grow despite the presence of a measurable immune response. Here, we discuss the identification of targets for immunotherapy and the role of biomarkers in prospectively identifying appropriate subjects or immunotherapy. We also discuss the molecular mechanisms by which tumor cells escape host immunosurveillance and produce an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. We show how advances have provided tools for overcoming the mechanisms of immunosuppression including the use of monoclonal antibodies to block negative regulators normally expressed on the surface of T cells which limit activation and proliferation of cytotoxic T cells. Immunotherapy has greatly improved and is becoming an important factor in such fields as medical care and welfare for human being. Progress has been rapid ensuring that the future of immunotherapy for gastric cancer is bright.

  5. The potential predictive role of nuclear NHERF1 expression in advanced gastric cancer patients treated with epirubicin/oxaliplatin/capecitabine first line chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mangia, Anita; Caldarola, Lucia; Dell'Endice, Stefania; Scarpi, Emanuela; Saragoni, Luca; Monti, Manlio; Santini, Daniele; Brunetti, Oronzo; Simone, Giovanni; Silvestris, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Cellular resistance in advanced gastric cancer (GC) might be related to function of multidrug resistance (MDR) proteins. The adaptor protein NHERF1 (Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor) is an important player in cancer progression for a number of solid malignancies, even if its role to develop drug resistance remains uncertain. Herein, we aimed to analyze the potential association between NHERF1 expression and P-gp, sorcin and HIF-1α MDR-related proteins in advanced GC patients treated with epirubicin/oxaliplatin/capecitabine (EOX) chemotherapy regimen, and its relation to response. Total number of 28 untreated patients were included into the study. Expression and subcellular localization of all proteins were assessed by immunohistochemistry on formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tumor samples. We did not found significant association between NHERF1 expression and the MDR-related proteins. A trend was observed between positive cytoplasmic NHERF1 (cNHERF1) expression and negative nuclear HIF-1α (nHIF-1α) expression (68.8% versus 31.3% respectively, P = 0.054). However, cytoplasmic P-gp (cP-gp) expression was positively correlated with both cHIF-1α and sorcin expression (P = 0.011; P = 0.002, respectively). Interestingly, nuclear NHERF1 (nNHERF1) staining was statistically associated with clinical response. In detail, 66.7% of patients with high nNHERF1 expression had a disease control rate, while 84.6% of subjects with negative nuclear expression of the protein showed progressive disease (P = 0.009). Multivariate analysis confirmed a significant correlation between nNHERF1 and clinical response (OR 0.06, P = 0.019). These results suggest that nuclear NHERF1 could be related to resistance to the EOX regimen in advanced GC patients, identifying this marker as a possible independent predictive factor. PMID:26126066

  6. Epidemiologic Study of Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Expression in Advanced/Metastatic Gastric Cancer: an Assessment of Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Status in Tumor Tissue Samples of Gastric and Gastro-Esophageal Junction Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Kyung Won; Jeon, Taeyong; Kim, Sewon; Kim, Sung Soo; Kim, Kwanghee; Suh, Byoung-Jo; Hwang, Sunhwi; Choi, SeongHee; Ryu, Seungwan; Min, Jae Seok; Lee, Young-Joon; Jee, Ye Seob; Chae, Hyeondong

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The Trastuzumab for gastric cancer (GC) trial identified human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) as a predictor of successful treatment with trastuzumab (HER2 receptor targeting agent) among patients with advanced/metastatic GC. To date, the prevalence of HER2 overexpression in the Korean population is unknown. The present study aimed to assess the incidence of HER2 positivity among GC and gastroesophageal (GE) junction cancer samples and the relationship between HER2 overexpression and clinicopathological characteristics in Korean patients. Materials and Methods Tumor samples collected from 1,695 patients with histologically proven GC or GE junction enrolled at 14 different hospitals in Korea were examined. After gathering clinicopathological data of all patients, HER2 status was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) at each hospital, and IHC 2+ cases were subjected to silver-enhanced in situ hybridization at 3 central laboratories. Results A total of 182 specimens tested positive for HER2, whereas 1,505 tested negative. Therefore, the overall HER2-positive rate in this study was 10.8% (95% confidence interval=9.3%–12.3%). The HER2-positive rate was higher among intestinal-type cases (17.6%) than among other types, and was higher among patients older than 70 years and 50 years of age, compared to other age groups. Conclusions Our evaluation of the HER2 positivity rate (10.8%) among Korean patients with GC and GE junction indicated the necessity of epidemiological data when conducting studies related to HER2 expression in GC and GE junction. PMID:28337363

  7. Primary gastric lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Al-Akwaa, Ahmad M; Siddiqui, Neelam; Al-Mofleh, Ibrahim A

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this review is to describe the various aspects of primary gastric lymphoma and the treatment options currently available. METHODS: After a systematic search of Pubmed, Medscape and MDconsult, we reviewed and retrieved literature regarding gastric lymphoma. RESULTS: Primary gastric lymphoma is rare however, the incidence of this malignancy is increasing. Chronic gastritis secondary to Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection has been considered a major predisposing factor for MALT lymphoma. Immune histochemical marker studies and molecular biology utilizing polymerase chain reaction have facilitated appropriate diagnosis and abolished the need for diagnostic surgical resection. Advances in imaging techniques including Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Endoscopic Ultrasonography (EUS) have helped evaluation of tumor extension and invasion. The clinical course and prognosis of this disease is dependent on histopathological sub-type and stage at the time of diagnosis. Controversy remains regarding the best treatment for early stages of this disease. Chemotherapy, surgery and combination have been studied and shared almost comparable results with survival rate of 70%-90%. However, chemotherapy possesses the advantage of preserving gastric anatomy. Radiotherapy alone has been tried and showed good results. Stage IIIE, IVE disease treatment is solely by chemotherapy and surgical resection has been a remote consideration. CONCLUSION: We conclude that methods of diagnosis and staging of the primary gastric lymphoma have dramatically improved. The modalities of treatment are many and probably chemotherapy is superior because of high success rate, preservation of stomach and tolerable complications. PMID:14695759

  8. Gastric Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Ianiro, Gianluca; Molina-Infante, Javier; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    After the discovery of Helicobacter pylori in 1983, the stomach was no longer considered a sterile environment. In 2015, evolving data shows that H. pylori is not the only inhabitant of the gastric mucosa. Using culture-independent methods of analysis, a non-H. pylori microbial community has been recently observed in the human stomach, the so-called human gastric microbiota, along with H. pylori itself. Increasing evidence supports the hypothesis that although H. pylori may be the most relevant, it is not the only local bacterial culprit leading to gastric diseases. Further studies are warranted to offer a better picture of the role and functions of gastric microbiota and to identify the best therapeutic modulators of gut microbiota for the management of gastric diseases. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Efficacy and safety of SOX chemotherapy with or without surgery in AFP-producing advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhu; Hou, Xu; Chen, Juan; Sun, Huidong; Mi, Yuetang; Sui, Yongling; Li, Yuhong; Xie, Jiaping; Qiao, Yingli; Lei, Xiaofeng; Che, Xiaoshuang; Liu, Jun

    2017-07-01

    The present study investigated the clinical efficacy of S-1 plus oxaliplatin (SOX) regimen, with or without surgery in α-fetoprotein-producing gastric cancer (APGC) with liver metastasis. A total of 24 patients with APGC treated at the Liaocheng People's Hospital between January 2011 and December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical efficacy and patient safety were compared between the two groups. The median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in the SOX group were 6.5 [95% confidence interval (CI), 4.6-8.4] and 13.5 (95% CI, 8.1-18.9) months, respectively. The corresponding indicators in the SOX and surgery group were 7.0 (95% CI, 5.7-8.3) and 14 (95% CI, 11.0-17.1) months, respectively. There was no significant difference in PFS and OS between the two groups (P=0.703 and 0.710, respectively). The adverse effects of leucopenia, neutropenia, anemia and diarrhea occurred in ~10% of patients in the SOX group and in 14.3% (2/14), 7.14% (1/14), 14.3% (2/14) and 7.14% (1/14), respectively, in the surgery group. No significant difference was identified between groups in terms of overall incidence of adverse effects (P=0.17). However, severe adverse events, including gastroplegia, pancreatic fistula, pulmonary infection and refractory ascites, occurred only in the SOX plus surgery group [incidence rate for severe adverse events, 7.14% (1/14); P<0.001 between groups]. In conclusion, SOX chemotherapy is safe and effective in patients with APGC and liver metastasis. However, the addition of surgery to SOX chemotherapy may not improve the disease control rate and may increase the adverse effects.

  10. Sentinel node biopsy using blue dye and technetium99 in advanced gastric cancer: anatomical drainage and clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Santos, F.A.V.; Drummond-Lage, A.P.; Rodrigues, M.A.; Cabral, M.A.; Pedrosa, M.S.; Braga, H.; Wainstein, A.J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Lymph node metastases are an independent prognosis factor in gastric carcinoma (GC) patients. Radical lymphadenectomy can improve survival but it can also increase surgical morbidity. As a principle, sentinel node (SN) navigation surgery can avoid unnecessary lymphadenectomy without compromising prognosis. In this pilot study, 24 patients with untreated GC were initially screened for SN navigation surgery, of which 12 were eligible. Five patients had T2 tumors, 5 had T3 tumors and 2 had T1 tumors. In 33% of cases, tumor diameter was greater than 5.0 cm. Three hundred and eighty-seven lymph nodes were excised with a median of 32.3 per patient. The SN navigation surgery was feasible in all patients, with a median of 4.5 SNs per patient. The detection success rate was 100%. All the SNs were located in N1 and N2 nodal level. In 70.9% of cases, the SNs were located at lymphatic chains 6 and 7. The SN sensitivity for nodal staging was 91.6%, with 8.3% of false negative. In 4 patients who were initially staged as N0, the SNs were submitted to multisection analyses and immunohistochemistry, confirming the N0 stage, without micrometastases. In one case initially staged as negative for nodal metastases based on SN analyses, metastases in lymph nodes other than SN were found, resulting in a 20% skip metastases incidence. This surgery is a reproducible procedure with 100% detection rate of SN. Tumor size, GC location and obesity were factors that imposed some limitations regarding SN identification. Results from nodal multisection histology and immunohistochemistry analysis did not change initial nodal staging. PMID:27409337

  11. Efficacy and safety of cord blood-derived dendritic cells plus cytokine-induced killer cells combined with chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with advanced gastric cancer: a randomized Phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Ying; Wang, Wei-hua; Xie, Jia-ping; Zhang, Ying-xin; Yang, Ya-pei; Zhou, Chang-hui

    2016-01-01

    Background Cellular immunotherapy has been widely used in the treatment of solid tumors. However, the clinical application of cord blood-derived dendritic cells and cytokine-induced killer cells (CB-DC-CIK) for the treatment of gastric cancer has not been frequently reported. In this study, the efficacy and safety of CB-DC-CIK for the treatment of gastric cancer were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. Methods The phenotypes, cytokines, and cytotoxicity of CB-DC-CIK were detected in vitro. Patients with advanced gastric cancer were divided into the following two groups: the experimental group (CB-DC-CIK combined with chemotherapy) and the control group (chemotherapy alone). The curative effects and immune function were compared between the two groups. Results First, the results showed that combination therapy significantly increased the overall disease-free survival rate (P=0.0448) compared with chemotherapy alone. The overall survival rate (P=0.0646), overall response rate (P=0.410), and disease control rate (P=0.396) were improved in the experimental group, but these changes did not reach statistical significance. Second, the percentage of T-cell subsets (CD4+, CD3−CD56+, and CD3+CD56+) and the levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2, which reflect immune function, were significantly increased (P<0.05) after immunotherapy. Finally, no serious side effects appeared in patients with gastric cancer after the application of cellular immunotherapy based on CB-DC-CIK. Conclusion CB-DC-CIK combined with chemotherapy is effective and safe for the treatment of patients with advanced gastric cancer. PMID:27524915

  12. Advanced statistical methods to study the effects of gastric tube and non-invasive ventilation on functional decline and survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Atassi, Nazem; Cudkowicz, Merit E; Schoenfeld, David A

    2011-07-01

    A few studies suggest that non-invasive ventilation (1) and gastric tube (G-tube) may have a positive impact on survival but the effect on functional decline is unclear. Confounding by indication may have produced biased estimates of the benefit seen in some of these retrospective studies. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of G-tube and NIV on survival and functional decline using advanced statistical models that adjust for confounding by indications. A database of 331 subjects enrolled in previous clinical trials in ALS was available for analysis. Marginal structural models (MSM) were used to compare the mortality hazards and ALSFRS-R slopes between treatment and non-treatment groups, after adjusting for confounding by indication. Results showed that the placement of a G-tube was associated with an additional 1.42 units/month decline in the ALSFRS-R slope (p < 0.0001) and increased mortality hazard of 0.28 (p = 0.02). The use of NIV had no significant effect on ALSFRS-R decline or mortality. In conclusion, marginal structural models can be used to adjust for confounding by indication in retrospective ALS studies. G-tube placement could be followed by a faster rate of functional decline and increased mortality. Our results may suffer from some of the limitations of retrospective analyses.

  13. Laparoscopic Spleen-Preserving Splenic Hilar Lymph Node Dissection for Advanced Upper Gastric Cancer in Patients with High Body Mass Index.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chang-Ming; Wang, Yi; Wang, Jia-Bin; Zheng, Chao-Hui; Li, Ping; Xie, Jian-Wei; Lin, Jian-Xian; Lu, Jun

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and safety of laparoscopic spleen-preserving splenic hilar lymph node dissection for advanced upper gastric cancer in patients with high body mass index. Outcomes were retrospectively analyzed in 140 patients with AUGC who underwent laparoscopic spleen-preserving splenic hilar LN dissection between January 2010 and December 2012, including those with high (≥ 23 kg/m) and normal (< 23 kg/m2) BMI. Except for BMI, the clinicopathologic characteristics of patients with high and normal BMI were similar. The number of retrieved No. 10 LNs per patient was significantly lower in the high than in the normal BMI group. There were no significant between group differences in operation time, blood loss, postoperative hospital stay and complications. Subgroup analysis showed that the numbers of No. 10 LNs retrieved per patient were lower in males with high than normal BMI and in patients after the initial learning curve of 40 patients with high than normal BMI. Laparoscopic spleen-preserving splenic hilar LN dissection is feasible and safe in patients with high BMI, although even experienced laparoscopic surgeons should take special care in these patients, especially in men.

  14. Early gastric cancer. A 25-year surgical experience.

    PubMed Central

    Moreaux, J; Bougaran, J

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Special emphasis has been placed on pathologic features, survival after surgical treatment, and prognostic factors. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Incidence is much lower in Western countries than in Japan. All degrees of tumor differentiation met in invasive cancer may be found. Prognosis is remarkably good, compared with advanced gastric cancer. METHODS: After reexamination of the pathologic specimens of 115 patients, 101 patients were included in this study; 58 were male. Mean age was 60.7 years. Preoperative biopsies were positive in 88%. The lesion was located in the antrum in 78 patients. Subtotal gastrectomy was performed in 85 patients and total gastrectomy in 13 patients with a RI lymph node resection. RESULTS: Cancer was extended to submucosa in 68.3%, poorly differentiated in 48.5%, and multifocal in 12.9% of patients. Lymph node involvement was present in 18.8%. Secondary deaths (n = 25) were in relation with the cancer in 6 patients only. The 5-, 10-, 15-, and 20-year actuarial crude survival rates were 88, 65, 58, and 51%, respectively. The survival rate was significantly higher for mucosal lesions than for submucosal lesions (p < 0.01). Survival showed no significant correlation with lymph node involvement, tumor size, and differentiation. CONCLUSIONS: Subtotal gastrectomy is recommended, except for proximal lesions, with survey of the gastric stump. Prognosis is significantly better for cancers limited to mucosa. Early gastric cancer is not a specific entity. Transitions between early and advanced carcinomas, especially observed in the poorly differentiated carcinomas with signet ring cells, suggest that this type of cancer should be a precursor of the invasive gastric carcinomas. PMID:8385441

  15. Comparative study of the pathological characteristics of gastric stump carcinoma and carcinoma of the upper third of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Rabin, Igor; Kapiev, Andronik; Chikman, Bar; Halpern, Zvi; Poluksht, Natan; Wassermann, Ilan; Sandbank, Judith; Halevy, Ariel

    2011-09-01

    Gastric stump cancer is often described as a tumor with a poor prognosis and low resectability rates. To compare the pathological characteristics of gastric stump cancer patients with those of patients with proximal gastric cancer. This retrospective study was based on the demographic and pathological data of patients diagnosed with gastric cancer and treated at Assaf Harofeh Medical Center during an 11 year period. The patients were divided into two groups: those undergoing proximal gastrectomy for proximal gastric cancer and those undergoing total gastrectomy for gastric stump cancer. Patients with gastric stump cancer were predominantly male, older (P = 0.202, not significant), and had a lower T stage with less signet-ring type histology, fewer harvested and fewer involved lymph nodes (P = 0.03, statistically significant) and less vascular/lymphatic involvement than patients with proximal gastric cancer. The lower incidence of involved lymph nodes and lymphovascular invasion in gastric stump cancer as compared to proximal gastric cancer in this study may imply that the prognosis of gastric stump cancer may be better than that of proximal gastric cancer. However, to verify this assumption a study comparing patient survival is required.

  16. A Phase Ib/II Study Evaluating the Combination of Weekly Docetaxel and Cisplatin Together with Capecitabine and Bevacizumab in Patients with Advanced Esophago-Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sarfaty, Michal; Purim, Ofer; Kundel, Yulia; Amit, Limor; Abramovich, Amir; Sadeh Gonik, Udi; Idelevich, Efraim; Gordon, Noa; Medalia, Gal; Sulkes, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Current treatment options for advanced esophagogastric cancer (AEGC) are still unsatisfactory. The aim of this prospective phase Ib/II study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a novel regimen, AVDCX, consisting of weekly docetaxel and cisplatin together with capecitabine and bevacizumab, in AEGC. Methods Patients with AEGC received treatment with different dose levels of AVDCX (cisplatin and docetaxel 25–35 mg/m2, days 1,8, capecitabine 1,600 mg/m2 days 1–14, bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg, day 1, Q:21 days). The study's primary objectives were to establish the recommended phase II doses of docetaxel and cisplatin in AVDCX (phase Ib part) and to determine the tumor response rate (phase II part). Results The study was closed early, after the accrual of 22 patients, due to accumulating toxicity-related deaths. The median age was 59 years and 77% of patients had gastric or gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas. Grade ≥3 adverse events were documented in 18 patients (82%), usually neutropenia (36%), fatigue (54%) or diarrhea (23%). There were three fatal toxicities (14%): mesenteric thromboembolism, gastric perforation and pancytopenic sepsis. The recommended phase II doses of cisplatin and docetaxel were determined to be 25 mg/m2 and 30 mg/m2, respectively. Twenty-one patients were evaluable for response: 12 (54%) had partial response (PR), 4 (18%) had stable disease (SD) and none had complete response (CR). Hence, the objective response rate (CR+PR) was 54% and the disease control rate (CR+PR+SD) was 72%. For the 17 patients treated at the MTD, the objective response rate was 41% and the disease control rate was 88%. The median overall survival (OS) for these patients was 13.9 months (range, 1.5–52.2 months) and the median progression-free survival was 7.6 months (range, 1.3–26.6 months). The 2-year OS rate reached 23.7%. Conclusions AVDCX was associated with a high rate of regimen related fatal adverse events and is not appropriate for further

  17. Gastric suction

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric lavage; Stomach pumping; Nasogastric tube suction; Bowel obstruction - suction ... A tube is inserted through your nose or mouth, down the food pipe (esophagus), and into the stomach. Your ...

  18. Gastric sarcoidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Akinyemi, Emmanuel; Rohewal, Upinder; Tangorra, Matthew; Abdullah, Muhammad

    2006-01-01

    A 58-year-old Jamaican male presented with acute-onset, right-sided facial droop and slurred speech. He had an episode of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleed on the second day of admission and endoscopy with biopsy of antral ulcer revealed gastric sarcoidosis. This case demonstrates the rare entity of gastric sarcoidosis presenting acutely with an upper GI bleed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:16775918

  19. Gastric infarction following gastric bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Do, Patrick H; Kang, Young S; Cahill, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Gastric infarction is an extremely rare occurrence owing to the stomach's extensive vascular supply. We report an unusual case of gastric infarction following gastric bypass surgery. We describe the imaging findings and discuss possible causes of this condition.

  20. Proximal Tibial Bone Graft

    MedlinePlus

    ... All Site Content AOFAS / FootCareMD / Treatments Proximal Tibial Bone Graft Page Content What is a bone graft? Bone grafts may be needed for various ... the proximal tibia. What is a proximal tibial bone graft? Proximal tibial bone graft (PTBG) is a ...

  1. Phase II study of the effectiveness and safety of trastuzumab and paclitaxel for taxane- and trastuzumab-naïve patients with HER2-positive, previously treated, advanced, or recurrent gastric cancer (JFMC45-1102).

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Tsunehiro; Takaishi, Hiromasa; Miki, Akira; Noshiro, Hirokazu; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Nishida, Yasunori; Iwasa, Satoru; Miwa, Hiroto; Masuishi, Toshiki; Boku, Narikazu; Yamada, Yasuhide; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Morita, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Junichi; Saji, Shigetoyo; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2017-01-01

    Paclitaxel is a standard second-line gastric cancer treatment in Japan. Trastuzumab could be active as second-line chemotherapy for taxane/trastuzumab-naïve patients with epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2)-positive advanced gastric cancer. Patients aged ≥20 years with HER2-positive, previously treated (except for trastuzumab and taxane), unresectable or recurrent gastric adenocarcinoma underwent combined trastuzumab (first and subsequent doses of 8 and 6 mg kg(-1) , respectively, every 3 weeks) and paclitaxel (days 1, 8, 15, every 4 weeks) treatment. Study endpoints were best overall response, progression-free survival, overall survival, and safety. From September 2011 to March 2012, 47 Japanese patients were enrolled. Forty patients discontinued treatment after a median of 128.5 (range 4-486) days. Complete and partial responses were obtained in one and 16 patients (response rate of 37% [95% CI 23-52]), respectively. Median progression-free survival and overall survival were 5.1 (95% CI 3.8-6.5) and 17.1 (95% CI 13.5-18.6) months, respectively. Grade 3/4 adverse events were neutropenia (32.6%), leukopenia (17.4%), anemia (15.2%) and hypoalbuminemia (8.7%). There was no clinically significant cardiotoxicity or cumulative toxicity. Three (disturbed consciousness, pulmonary fibrosis, and rapid disease progression) grade 5 events occurred. In conclusion, trastuzumab combined with paclitaxel was well tolerated and was a promising regimen for patients with HER2-positive, previously treated, advanced or recurrent gastric cancer. © 2016 The Authors International Journal of Cancer published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of UICC.

  2. Phase II study of the effectiveness and safety of trastuzumab and paclitaxel for taxane‐ and trastuzumab‐naïve patients with HER2‐positive, previously treated, advanced, or recurrent gastric cancer (JFMC45‐1102)

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Tsunehiro; Takaishi, Hiromasa; Miki, Akira; Noshiro, Hirokazu; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Nishida, Yasunori; Iwasa, Satoru; Miwa, Hiroto; Masuishi, Toshiki; Boku, Narikazu; Yamada, Yasuhide; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Morita, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Junichi; Saji, Shigetoyo

    2016-01-01

    Paclitaxel is a standard second‐line gastric cancer treatment in Japan. Trastuzumab could be active as second‐line chemotherapy for taxane/trastuzumab‐naïve patients with epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2)‐positive advanced gastric cancer. Patients aged ≥20 years with HER2‐positive, previously treated (except for trastuzumab and taxane), unresectable or recurrent gastric adenocarcinoma underwent combined trastuzumab (first and subsequent doses of 8 and 6 mg kg−1, respectively, every 3 weeks) and paclitaxel (days 1, 8, 15, every 4 weeks) treatment. Study endpoints were best overall response, progression‐free survival, overall survival, and safety. From September 2011 to March 2012, 47 Japanese patients were enrolled. Forty patients discontinued treatment after a median of 128.5 (range 4–486) days. Complete and partial responses were obtained in one and 16 patients (response rate of 37% [95% CI 23–52]), respectively. Median progression‐free survival and overall survival were 5.1 (95% CI 3.8–6.5) and 17.1 (95% CI 13.5–18.6) months, respectively. Grade 3/4 adverse events were neutropenia (32.6%), leukopenia (17.4%), anemia (15.2%) and hypoalbuminemia (8.7%). There was no clinically significant cardiotoxicity or cumulative toxicity. Three (disturbed consciousness, pulmonary fibrosis, and rapid disease progression) grade 5 events occurred. In conclusion, trastuzumab combined with paclitaxel was well tolerated and was a promising regimen for patients with HER2‐positive, previously treated, advanced or recurrent gastric cancer. PMID:27521503

  3. Comments to young surgeons concerning laparoscopic spleen-preserving D2 lymph node dissection for advanced gastric cancer on the upper body

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Young; An, Ji Yeong; Hyung, Woo Jin

    2014-01-01

    Qualified radical gastrectomy with lymph node dissection is very important to the prognosis of patients with gastric cancer. Now D2 lymph node dissection is standard procedure for gastric cancer surgery, and spleen hilar lymph node dissection is mandatory for gastric cancer in upper body. Because the anatomy of vessels in this area is very complicated, D2 lymph node dissection is technical challenging not only for open gastrectomy but also for laparoscopic one. Adapting a new technique is important to all surgeons, but we surgeons should always consider a patient’s safety as the most important factor during surgery and that efforts should be based on scientific rationale with oncologic principles. I hope that the recent report by Huang et al. about laparoscopic spleen preserving hilar lymph node dissection would be helpful to young surgeons who will perform laparoscpic total gastrectomy for gastric cancer. PMID:25035646

  4. Phase II Trial of Preoperative Irinotecan-Cisplatin Followed by Concurrent Irinotecan-Cisplatin and Radiotherapy for Resectable Locally Advanced Gastric and Esophagogastric Junction Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, Fernando; Galan, Maica; Tabernero, Josep; Cervantes, Andres; Vega-Villegas, M. Eugenia; Gallego, Javier; Laquente, Berta; Rodriguez, Edith; Carrato, Alfredo; Escudero, Pilar; Massuti, Bartomeu; Alonso-Orduna, Vicente; Cardenal, Adelaida; Saenz, Alberto; Giralt, Jordi; Yuste, Ana Lucia

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To determine in a Phase II trial whether preoperative irinotecan-cisplatin (IC) followed by concurrent IC therapy and radiotherapy (IC/RT) improved outcome in patients with resectable, locally advanced gastric adenocarcinoma (GC) or esophagogastric junction cancer (EGJC). Patients and Methods: Patients with resectable Stage II-IV, M0 GC or EGJC made up the study population. The primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR). Two courses of IC (irinotecan, 65mg/m{sup 2}; cisplatin, 30mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 and 8 every 21 days) were given. Patients without progression then received IC/RT, consisting of daily radiotherapy (45Gy) with concurrent IC (irinotecan, 65mg/m{sup 2}; cisplatin, 30mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, 15, and 22). Surgical resection was performed, if feasible, 5-8 weeks after the end of radiotherapy. Results: Twenty-three patients were included in the study: 10 with EGJC and 13 with GC. Two patients (9%) achieved pCR. The incidences of Grade 3-4 toxicities were as follows: IC: neutropenia 35% (febrile 13%), anemia 22%, diarrhea 22%, emesis 8%; IC/RT: neutropenia 52% (febrile 5%), asthenia 19%, anemia 9%, emesis 9%, diarrhea 5%, cardiotoxicity 5%. No patients died during IC or IC/RT. R0 resection was achieved in 15 patients (65%). Median survival was 14.5 months, and the actuarial 2-year survival rate was 35%. Conclusions: Preoperative IC followed by IC/RT resulted in moderate response and resection rates with mild toxicity in patients with GC and EGJC.

  5. Low angiomotin-p130 with concomitant high Yes-associated protein 1 expression is associated with adverse prognosis of advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Hong, Soon Auck; Son, Myoung Won; Cho, Junhun; Jang, Si-Hyong; Lee, Hyun Ju; Lee, Ji-Hye; Cho, Hyun Deuk; Oh, Mee-Hye; Lee, Moon Soo

    2017-09-08

    Angiomotin (AMOT) promotes angiogenesis and plays a role in neovascularization during tumorigenesis. Recently, the AMOT isoform, AMOT-p130, was shown to exert a regulatory effect on Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1), a major downstream effector of the Hippo pathway. The specific roles of AMOT-p130 and YAP1 in advanced gastric cancer (AGC) are yet to be established. In this study, a total of 166 patients with AGC were enrolled, and AMOT-p130 and YAP1 levels were analyzed by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays. Low AMOT-p130 together with high YAP1 expression (n = 30, 18.1%) was associated with high T stage (p = 0.042), high TNM stage (p = 0.025), and venous invasion (p = 0.048). A Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with log-rank test revealed a significant correlation with decreased AMOT-p130 coupled with high nuclear YAP1 expression with shorter overall survival (p = 0.0045) and disease-free survival (p = 0.0028). Furthermore, multivariate analyses showed that the low AMOT-p130/high YAP1 expression profile was an independent prognostic factor for disease-free survival (p = 0.008, HR = 1.874, CI, 1.177-2.986) and overall survival (p = 0.012, HR = 1.903, CI, 1.152-3.143). Our findings collectively demonstrate that low AMOT-p130 combined with high YAP1 expression is correlated with an unfavorable AGC prognosis. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Multicentre phase II pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic study of OSI-7904L in previously untreated patients with advanced gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Falk, S; Anthoney, A; Eatock, M; Van Cutsem, E; Chick, J; Glen, H; Valle, J W; Drolet, D W; Albert, D; Ferry, D; Ajani, J

    2006-08-21

    A two-stage Simon design was used to evaluate the response rate of OSI-7904L, a liposome encapsulated thymidylate synthase inhibitor, in advanced gastric and/or gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma (A-G/GEJA), administered intravenously at 12 mg m(-2) over 30 min every 21 days. Fifty patients were treated. Median age was 64 years (range 35-82), 62% were male and 89% had ECOG PS of 0/1. A total of 252 cycles were administered; median of 4 per patient (range 1-21). Twelve patients required dose reductions, mainly for skin toxicity. Investigator assessed response rate was 17.4% (95% CI 7.8-31.4) with one complete and seven partial responses in 46 evaluable patients. Twenty-one patients (42%) had stable disease. Median time to progression and survival were 12.4 and 36.9 weeks, respectively. NCI CTCAE Grade 3/4 neutropenia (14%) and thrombocytopenia (4%) were uncommon. The main G3/4 nonhaematological toxicities were skin-related 22%, stomatitis 14%, fatigue/lethargy 10%, and diarrhea 8%. Pharmacokinetic data showed high interpatient variability. Patients with higher AUC were more likely to experience G3/4 toxicity during cycle 1 while baseline homocysteine did not predict toxicity. Response did not correlate with AUC. Elevations in 2'-dU were observed indicating target inhibition. Analysis of TS genotype, TS protein and expression did not reveal any correlation with outcome. OSI-7904L has activity in A-G/GEJA similar to other active agents and an acceptable safety profile.

  7. Predictive Role of the Number of 18F-FDG-Positive Lymph Nodes Detected by PET/CT for Pre-Treatment Evaluation of Locally Advanced Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Wei, Yuzhe; Xue, Yingwei; Lu, Peiou; Yu, Lijuan; Shen, Baozhong

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive value of the numbers of metabolically positive lymph nodes (MPLN) detected by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in patients with locally advanced gastric cancer (LAGC). Methods We retrospectively analyzed the records of 50 patients with LAGC (stage T2-T4) who had undergone pre-operative PET/CT examination and laparotomy (total gastrectomy, n = 11; subtotal gastrectomy, n = 13; distal gastrectomy, n = 22; and bypass with gastrojejunstomy, n = 4). The numbers of MPLN were determined by combining visual observations with semi-quantitative measurements of the maximized standardized uptake value (SUVmax). Performance was investigated in terms of predicting post-surgical overall survival (OS). Results The median post-surgical OS was 32.57 months (range 3.0-94 months). The numbers of MPLN were moderately correlated with the numbers of histological positive LN (r = 0.694, p = 0.001). In univariate analyses, the numbers of MPLN (≤ 2 vs. ≥3), PET/CT LN (positivity vs. negativity), SUVmax of LN (< 2.8 vs. ≥ 2.8), TNM stage (I, II vs. III, IV), and surgery type (R0 vs. non-R0) were significantly associated with OS. In multivariate analysis, surgery type (R0 vs. non-R0) and numbers of MPLN (≤ 2 vs. ≥ 3) were both independent factors for poor OS. Conclusions This explored study indicates that the number of MPLN could provide additional information for LAGC prognosis. Patients with MPLNs ≥ 3 may be at the risk of the more bad outcomes, and the further clinical trials are needed. PMID:27936109

  8. Randomized phase II trial of nimotuzumab plus irinotecan versus irinotecan alone as second-line therapy for patients with advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Taroh; Lee, Kyung Hee; Rha, Sun Young; Sasaki, Yasutsuna; Park, Se Hoon; Komatsu, Yoshito; Yasui, Hirofumi; Kim, Tae-You; Yamaguchi, Kensei; Fuse, Nozomu; Yamada, Yasuhide; Ura, Takashi; Kim, Si-Young; Munakata, Masaki; Saitoh, Soh; Nishio, Kazuto; Morita, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Eriko; Zhang, Qingwei; Kim, Jung-mi; Kim, Yeul Hong; Sakata, Yuh

    2015-10-01

    This multicenter, randomized phase II trial was conducted to compare the efficacy and safety of nimotuzumab plus irinotecan (N-IRI) versus irinotecan alone (IRI) in patients with advanced gastric cancer (AGC) showing disease progression after previous 5-fluorouracil-based therapy. Irinotecan-naive patients (n = 82) received N-IRI (nimotuzumab 400 mg weekly plus irinotecan 150 mg/m(2) biweekly) or IRI (irinotecan 150 mg/m(2) biweekly) until disease progression. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS), and the secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS), response rate (RR), safety, tolerability, and the correlation between efficacy and tumor epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression. Of 83 patients, 40 and 43 patients were randomly assigned to the N-IRI and IRI groups, respectively. In the N-IRI/IRI treatment group, median PFS was 73.0/85.0 days (P = 0.5668), and median OS and RR at 18 months were 250.5/232.0 days (P = 0.9778) and 18.4/10.3 %, respectively. Median PFS and OS in the EGFR 2+/3+ subgroups were 118.5/59.0 and 358.5/229.5 days, respectively. The RR was 33.3/0.0 % in the N-IRI/IRI treatment group. The incidence of grade 3 or higher adverse events was 77.5/64.3 %. No adverse events of grade 3 or higher skin rash or grade 3 or higher infusion-related reaction were reported. There was no superiority of N-IRI over IRI alone in terms of PFS in 5-fluorouracil-refractory AGC patients. However, N-IRI showed potential improvement in the EGFR 2+/3+ subgroup based on improved RR, PFS, and OS.

  9. A randomised phase II study of combination chemotherapy with epirubicin, cisplatin and capecitabine (ECX) or cisplatin and capecitabine (CX) in advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jina; Lee, Jeeyun; Park, Se Hoon; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Young Suk; Lim, Ho Yeong; Kang, Won Ki

    2010-03-01

    Both cisplatin/capecitabine (CX) and epirubicin plus CX (ECX) have clearly demonstrated efficacy against advanced gastric cancer (AGC). Chemotherapy-naïve patients with histologically confirmed, measurable AGC were randomised to receive CX (cisplatin 75mg/m(2) iv on day 1 and capecitabine 1000mg/m(2) bid po on days 1-14) or ECX (epirubicin 50mg/m(2) plus CX) every 3weeks. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Of the 91 registered patients, 45 patients were treated with CX and 44 with ECX. A total of 241 CX (median, 6; range, 1-12) and 201 ECX (median, 5; range, 1-11) cycles were delivered. Treatment duration was similar for both arms (4.4 for CX versus 4.2months for ECX). There was no relevant difference in the occurrence of overall grade 3 or 4 toxicities between the CX and ECX arms (80% versus 78%, respectively; P=0.516). However, none in the CX and 12% in the ECX arm discontinued treatment because of toxicity. There were no significant differences in therapeutic efficacy between CX and ECX with respect to the response rate (38% versus 37%, respectively) and PFS (6.4 versus 6.5months). Both CX and ECX appear to be active as first-line chemotherapy for AGC, and the safety profiles are acceptable. Given the comparable efficacy results, CX could be a reasonable standard chemotherapy for untreated AGC patients. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Phase I/II study of a combination of capecitabine, cisplatin, and intraperitoneal docetaxel (XP ID) in advanced gastric cancer patients with peritoneal metastasis.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyungwoo; Ryu, Min-Hee; Kim, Kyu-Pyo; Ryoo, Baek-Yeol; Park, Sook Ryun; Kim, Bum Soo; Lee, In-Seob; Kim, Hee-Sung; Yoo, Moon-Won; Yook, Jeong Hwan; Oh, Seong Tae; Kim, Byung Sik; Kang, Yoon-Koo

    2017-03-16

    This study was conducted to determine the recommended dose (RD) of intraperitoneal docetaxel (ID) in combination with systemic capecitabine and cisplatin (XP) and to evaluate its efficacy and safety at the RD in advanced gastric cancer (AGC) patients with peritoneal metastasis. AGC patients with peritoneal metastasis received XP ID, which consists of 937.5 mg/m(2) of capecitabine twice daily on days 1-14, 60 mg/m(2) of intravenous cisplatin on day 1, and intraperitoneal docetaxel at 3 different dose levels (60, 80, or 100 mg/m(2)) on day 1, every 3 weeks. In the phase I study, the standard 3 + 3 method was used to determine the RD of XP ID. In the phase II study, patients received RD of XP ID. In the phase I study, ID 100 mg/m(2) was chosen as the RD, with one dose-limiting toxicity (ileus) out of six patients. The 39 AGC patients enrolled in the phase II study received the RD of XP ID. The median progression-free survival was 11.0 months (95% CI 6.9-15.1), and median overall survival was 15.1 months (95% CI 9.1-21.1). The most frequent grade 3/4 adverse events were neutropenia (38.6%) and abdominal pain (30.8%). The incidence of abdominal pain cumulatively increased in the later treatment cycles. Our study indicated that XP ID was effective, with manageable toxicities, in AGC patients with peritoneal metastasis. As the cumulative incidence of abdominal pain was probably related to bowel irritation by ID, it might be necessary to modify the dose.

  11. Use of positron emission tomography scan response to guide treatment change for locally advanced gastric cancer: the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center experience

    PubMed Central

    Won, Elizabeth; Shah, Manish A.; Schöder, Heiko; Strong, Vivian E.; Coit, Daniel G.; Brennan, Murray F.; Kelsen, David P.; Janjigian, Yelena Y.; Tang, Laura H.; Capanu, Marinela; Rizk, Nabil P.; Allen, Peter J.; Bains, Manjit S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Early metabolic response on 18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) during neoadjuvant chemotherapy is PET non-responders have poor outcomes whether continuing chemotherapy or proceeding directly to surgery. Use of PET may identify early treatment failure, sparing patients from inactive therapy and allowing for crossover to alternative therapies. We examined the effectiveness of PET directed switching to salvage chemotherapy in the PET non-responders. Methods Patients with locally advanced resectable FDG-avid gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma received bevacizumab 15 mg/kg, epirubicin 50 mg/m2, cisplatin 60 mg/m2 day 1, and capecitabine 625 mg/m2 bid (ECX) every 21 days. PET scan was obtained at baseline and after cycle 1. PET responders, (i.e., ≥35% reduction in FDG uptake at the primary tumor) continued ECX + bev. Non-responders switched to docetaxel 30 mg/m2, irinotecan 50 mg/mg2 day 1 and 8 plus bevacizumab every 21 days for 2 cycles. Patients then underwent surgery. The primary objective was to improve the 2-year disease free survival (DFS) from 30% (historical control) to 53% in the non-responders. Results Twenty evaluable patients enrolled before the study closed for poor accrual. Eleven were PET responders and the 9 non-responders switched to the salvage regimen. With a median follow-up of 38.2 months, the 2-year DFS was 55% [95% confidence interval (CI), 30–85%] in responders compared with 56% in the non-responder group (95% CI, 20–80%, P=0.93). Conclusions The results suggest that changing chemotherapy regimens in PET non-responding patients may improve outcomes. Results from this pilot trial are hypothesis generating and suggest that PET directed neoadjuvant therapy merits evaluation in a larger trial. PMID:27563439

  12. Survival after failure of first-line chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer patients: differences between Japan and the rest of the world.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Atsuo; Iizumi, Sakura; Boku, Narikazu

    2017-04-07

    In this review, we focus on post-progression survival after first-line chemotherapy of advanced gastric cancer, and particularly the differences between Japan and the rest of the world. We reviewed 15 recent phase III trials of which 4 were solely recruited from Japanese and 11 from rest of the world. The patient characteristics age, performance status, previous gastrectomy and the number of metastatic sites were similar in Japan and rest of the world. However, the diffuse histological type was more common in Japan. While overall survival was longer in Japan (10.5-14.1 vs. 7.9-12.2 months), progression-free survival tended to be shorter in Japan (3.6-6.0 vs. 3.1-7.4 months). Post-progression survival calculated as the difference between median overall survival and progression-free survival was clearly longer in Japan (6.9-8.6 vs. 2.4-6.2 months). The proportion of patients receiving second-line chemotherapy (%2nd-CX) was quite different in Japan and rest of the world (69-85% vs. 11-59%). Correlations between %2nd-CX and post-progression survival were strong (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient; ρ = 0.86, P < 0.001). Correlations between %2nd-CX and ratio of post-progression survival to total overall survival were also strong (ρ = 0.84, P < 0.001). Because a survival benefit of second-CX was documented in several phase III trials, it can be concluded that higher %2nd-CX partly contributed to extended post-progression survival. However, considering that second-CX increased survival only by ~1.5 months at median, other factors such as third-line chemotherapy may have some influences to prolonged post-progression survival.

  13. Dose-escalation study for the targeting of CD44v(+) cancer stem cells by sulfasalazine in patients with advanced gastric cancer (EPOC1205).

    PubMed

    Shitara, Kohei; Doi, Toshihiko; Nagano, Osamu; Imamura, Chiyo K; Ozeki, Takeshi; Ishii, Yuya; Tsuchihashi, Kenji; Takahashi, Shunji; Nakajima, Takako E; Hironaka, Shuichi; Fukutani, Miki; Hasegawa, Hiromi; Nomura, Shogo; Sato, Akihiro; Einaga, Yasuaki; Kuwata, Takeshi; Saya, Hideyuki; Ohtsu, Atsushi

    2017-03-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have enhanced mechanisms of protection from oxidative stress. A variant form of CD44 (CD44v), a major CSC marker, was shown to interact with xCT, a subunit of cystine-glutamate transporter, which maintains high levels of intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH) which defend the cell against oxidative stress. Sulfasalazine (SSZ) is an inhibitor of xCT and was shown to suppress the survival of CD44v-positive stem-like cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. To find the dose of SSZ which can safely reduce the population of CD44v-positive cells in tumors, a dose-escalation study in patients with advanced gastric cancer was conducted. SSZ was given four times daily by oral administration with 2 weeks as one cycle. Tumor biopsies were obtained before and after 14 days of administration of SSZ to evaluate expression of CD44v and the intratumoral level of GSH. Eleven patients were enrolled and received a dosage from 8 to 12 g/day. Safety was confirmed up to a dosage of 12 g/day, which was considered the maximum tolerated dose. Among the eight patients with CD44v-positive cells in their pretreatment biopsy samples, the CD44v-positive cancer cell population appeared to be reduced in the posttreatment biopsy tissues of four patients. Intratumoral GSH levels were also decreased in two patients, suggesting biological effectiveness of SSZ at 8 g/day or greater. This is the first study of SSZ as an xCT inhibitor for targeting CSCs. Reduction of the levels of CD44v-positive cells and GSH was observed in some patients, consistent with the mode of action of SSZ in CSCs.

  14. Prospective phase II trial of pazopanib plus CapeOX (capecitabine and oxaliplatin) in previously untreated patients with advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Tae; Lee, Jeeyun; Lee, Su Jin; Park, Se Hoon; Jung, Sin-Ho; Park, Young Suk; Lim, Ho Yeong; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Joon Oh

    2016-01-01

    We designed a single-arm, open label phase II study to determine the efficacy and toxicity of the combination of pazopanib with CapeOx (capecitabine and oxaliplatin) in metastatic /recurrent advanced gastric cancer (AGC) patients. Previously untreated AGC patients received capecitabine (850 mg/m2 bid, day 1–14) plus oxaliplatin (130 mg/m2, day 1) in combination with pazopanib (800 mg, day 1–21) every three weeks. Treatment was continued until progression of the disease or intolerable toxicity was observed. In all, 66 patients were treated with pazopanib plus CapeOx. The median age of the patients was 51.5 years (range, 23.0–77), and the median ECOG performance status was 1 (0–1). Among all 66 patients, one complete response and 37 partial responses were observed (overall response rate, 62.4%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 45.7–73.5% accounting for the 2-stage design of this trial). Stable disease was observed in 23 patients (34.8%), revealing a 92.4% disease control rate. The median progression free survival and overall survival were 6.5 months (95% CI, 5.6–7.4) and 10.5 months (95% CI, 8.1–12.9), respectively. Thirty-four patients (51.5%) experienced a treatment-related toxicity of grade 3 or more. The most common toxicities of grade 3 or more were neutropenia (15.1%), anemia (10.6%), thrombocytopenia (10.6%), anorexia (7.6%), nausea (3.0%), and vomiting (3.0%). There were no treatment-related deaths. The combination of pazopanib and CapeOx showed moderate activity and an acceptable toxicity profile as a first-line treatment in metastatic / recurrent AGC patients (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01130805). PMID:27003363

  15. Relationship between glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1), X-ray repair cross complementing group 1 (XRCC1) and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (5,10-MTHFR) gene polymorphisms and response to chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Ji, Mei; Xu, Bin; Jiang, Jing-Ting; Wu, Jun; Li, Xiao-Dong; Zhao, Wei-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Zhou, Wen-Jie; Wu, Chang-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Our study aimed to investigate the relationship between glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1), 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (5,10-MTHFR) and X-ray repair cross complementing group 1 (XRCC1) gene polymorphisms and the response to chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer. 59 cases of advanced gastric cancer were enrolled. All patients were treated with the DCF regimen comprising docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil. All patients' genotypes regarding GSTP1, XRCC1, and 5,10-MTHFR were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction/ligase detection reaction (PCR-LDR). There were 15 (25.42%) cases of G/G genotype, 21 (35.59%) of G/A genotype, and 23 (38.98%) of A/A genotype for GSTP1, 16 (27.12%) cases of A/A genotype, 18 (30.51%) of G/A genotype, and 25 (42.37%) of G/G genotype for XRCC1, and 21 (35.59%) cases of C/C genotype, 22 (37.29%) of C/T genotype, and 16 (27.12%) of T/T genotype for 5,10-MTHFR. After 2 cycles of chemotherapy, there were 4 cases of complete remission, 14 of partial remission, 19 of stable disease, and 22 of advanced disease, with a total effective rate of 30.51%. Better survival was shown for GSTP1 G/G genotype, XRCC1 A/A genotype, and 5,10-MTHFR T/T genotype (p < 0.05). The gene polymorphisms of GSTP1 G/G, XRCC1 A/A, and 5,10-MTHFR T/T have clinical value for predicting the response to the DCF regimen for advanced gastric cancer. © 2013 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  16. Percutaneous gastric drainage as a treatment for small bowel obstruction after gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Hamoui, Nahid; Crookes, Peter F; Kaufman, Howard S

    2007-10-01

    The authors report the case of a patient who developed small bowel obstruction after laparoscopic gastric bypass. Imaging revealed an obstruction at the enteroenterostomy resulting in dilation of the bypassed stomach and proximal small bowel. The bypassed stomach was percutaneously drained using CT guidance, leading to resolution of the small bowel obstruction. Biliopancreatic limb obstructions can be successfully treated non-operatively after gastric bypass.

  17. Current issues in gastric cancer epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Patru, C L; Surlin, V; Georgescu, I; Patru, Emilia

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer, one of the most common malignant tumors of digestive tract continues to be a major health problem by frequency, aggressiveness and low rate of cure in symptomatic stage. Although its incidence is decreasing (especially in the West), globally the gastric cancer is ranked fourth in incidence among cancers at various sites. Despite these developments, the gastric cancer mortality, overall declining globally, is high. especially in the West where even if diagnosed fewer cases of gastric cancer, TNM stages are advanced and have a poor prognosis. In contrast, in Japan, where the incidence is still high, the percentage of cases diagnosed at the stage of "early gastric cancer" has greatly increased, thus improving prognosis. Gastric neoplasia affects more men, age range 50-70 years, disadvantaged social classes and black race. In Romania the gastric cancer incidence is increasing over recent years, presenting variations across the country being more common in men compared with women, reaching a peak of incidence around age 60. Gastric cancer mortality in the world places Romania among the countries with average mortality. Gastric cancer prognosis remains extremely reserved, in close correlation with tumor stage at diagnosis, surgical treatment being the only possibility to provide improved survival, especially in the early stages. Improvement of survival rate in recent years is due to increased gastric resectability result of an earlier diagnosis, a more complex treatment and a closer monitoring of the population at risk.

  18. Cubesat Proximity Operations Demonstration (CPOD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villa, Marco; Martinez, Andres; Petro, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The CubeSat Proximity Operations Demonstration (CPOD) project will demonstrate rendezvous, proximity operations and docking (RPOD) using two 3-unit (3U) CubeSats. Each CubeSat is a satellite with the dimensions 4 inches x 4 inches x 13 inches (10 centimeters x 10 centimeters x 33 centimeters) and weighing approximately 11 pounds (5 kilograms). This flight demonstration will validate and characterize many new miniature low-power proximity operations technologies applicable to future missions. This mission will advance the state of the art in nanosatellite attitude determination,navigation and control systems, in addition to demonstrating relative navigation capabilities.The two CPOD satellites are scheduled to be launched together to low-Earth orbit no earlier than Dec. 1, 2015.

  19. Should peri-gastrectomy gastric acidity be our focus among gastric cancer patients?

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lei; Xu, A-Man; Li, Tuan-Jie; Han, Wen-Xiu; Xu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the necessity and correctness of acid suppression pre- and post-gastrectomy among gastric carcinoma (GC) patients. METHODS: From June 2011 to April 2013, 99 patients who were diagnosed with GC or adenocarcinoma of the gastroesophageal junction (type II or III) and needed surgical management were enrolled. They all underwent gastrectomy by the same operators [35 undergoing total gastrectomy (TG) plus Roux-en-Y reconstruction, 34 distal gastrectomy (DG) plus Billroth I reconstruction, and 30 proximal gastrectomy (PG) plus gastroesophagostomy]. We collected and analyzed their gastrointestinal juice and tissues from the pre-operational day to the 5th day post-operation, and 6 mo post-surgery. Gastric pH was detected with a precise acidity meter. Gastric juice contents including potassium, sodium and bicarbonate ions, urea nitrogen, direct and indirect bilirubin, and bile acid were detected using Automatic Biochemical Analyzer. Data regarding tumor size, histological type, tumor penetration and tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage were obtained from the pathological records. Reflux symptoms pre- and 6 mo post-gastrectomy were evaluated by reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ) and gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaire (GERD-Q). SPSS 16.0 was applied to analyze the data. RESULTS: Before surgery, gastric pH was higher than the threshold of hypoacidity (4.25 ± 1.45 vs 3.5, P = 0.000), and significantly affected by age, tumor size and differentiation grade, and potassium and bicarbonate ions; advanced malignancies were accompanied with higher pH compared with early ones (4.49 ± 1.31 vs 3.66 ± 1.61, P = 0.008). After operation, gastric pH in all groups was of weak-acidity and significantly higher than that pre-gastrectomy; on days 3-5, comparisons of gastric pH were similar between the 3 groups. Six months later, gastric pH was comparable to that on days 3-5; older patients were accompanied with higher total bilirubin level, indicating more serious

  20. [Gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Belén Fraile, M; Serra Bartual, M; Segarra Sánchez, J; Richart Rufino, M J

    1991-11-01

    Gastric cancer represents a disorder which incidence has come down last years. Its etiology is unknown, but diet is the principal determinant risk of suffering it. Clinic history is not much useful, because in the early stage symptoms can fail and in the late stage are inespecific. Election diagnosis is endoscopy. Surgery is the only curative treatment. By these features, it would be useful to left under vigilance to: a) patients 40 years older with dispepsia; b) patients following gastric operations; c) patients with disorders presenting aclorhidria. The authors report a clinic case that can be of frequent presentation in primary assistance.

  1. [Gastric cleansing].

    PubMed

    Zimmermann Serret, Alina; Alcaraz Bravo, Judit; Carballo Alvarez, Montse; Fernández Vargas, Carmen

    2006-10-01

    Numerous cases in emergency wards are due to the ingestion of potentially toxic substances. One of the most utilized procedures under these circumstances is gastric cleansing. This procedure is a technique habitually practiced by nursing personnel but is not without its risks. Therefore, the motive of this article is to make known the indications, contraindications, related complications of gastric cleansing and its integral patient care process in order to offer quality care methods which enable their being performed in an effective and efficient manner, under the maximum security conditions with the minimum inconveniences for the patient while at the same time describing the system most commonly used by our service.

  2. [Gastric volvulus].

    PubMed

    Solórzano, J; Acosta, D; Morales, H; Vásquez, F; Mora, G; Chávez, M; Andrade, D; Joutteaux, R; Sánchez, I; García, D; Valenzuela, E

    2006-10-01

    Gastric volvulus is a rare condition in pediatric population in which there is an abnormal rotation of one part of the stomach around itself. It's a surgical emergency. We report a six year old female admitted in the emergency due to upper abdominal distention, nausea without vomiting, physical exam revealed upper abdominal distention and abdominal tenderness, no bowel sounds. Laparotomy was performed and a gastric volvulus with occlusive vascular involvement was found. In the post operative period she required a second laparotomy due to adhesions in small bowel.

  3. [Gastric lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Ruskoné-Fourmestraux, A

    1997-04-15

    The stomach is the most common site involved in primary gastrointestinal lymphoma. Gastric lymphoma originates from the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue so called MALT. It comprises a group of distinctive clinicopathological entities which are important to take in account for clinical behavior. In recent years, new diagnostic tools and modern modes of treatment have improved their overall prognosis. One of the most exciting recent discoveries is the hypothesis that an infection by a bacterium. Helicobacter pylori has a decisive role in gastric lymphoma.

  4. Irinotecan (CPT-11) and mitomycin-C (MMC) as second-line therapy in advanced gastric cancer: a phase II study of the Gruppo Oncologico dell' Italia Meridionale (prot. 2106).

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Francesco; Molica, Stefano; Maiello, Evaristo; Battaglia, C; Gebbia, Vittorio; Di Bisceglie, Maurizio; Vinciarelli, Gianluca; Gebbia, Nicola; Colucci, Giuseppe

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity and toxicity of a combination regimen of CPT-11 and mitomycin-c as second-line chemotherapy for pretreated patients with advanced, metastatic, or both, gastric adenocarcinoma. Patients with pretreated metastatic disease or early relapsed after adjuvant chemotherapy were enrolled. Entry criteria included histologic/cytologic diagnosis of gastric adenocarcinoma, age 18 to 75 years, performance status > or =70 (Karnofsky scale), bi-dimensionally measurable disease. Patients received CPT-11 and mitomycin-c at the dosage of 150 mg/m2 on days 1 and 15, and 8 mg/m2 on day 1, respectively, every 4 weeks. The disease evaluation was done every 3 cycles. Among the 38 patients we observed, 1 (3%) complete response and 11 (29%) partial responses for an overall response rate of 32% according to an intent-to-treat analysis. The median duration of response was 6.5 months. The median time to progression was 4 months with a median overall survival 8 months. All patients were evaluable for toxicity and the only grade 3-4 observed toxicities were leukopenia (8%), neutropenia (21%), and anemia (5%). The combination of CPT-11 and mitomycin-c is an active and well tolerated second-line treatment in pretreated gastric cancer patients. Further studies are needed to test its role in first-line treatment.

  5. A randomized Phase II trial of systemic chemotherapy with and without trastuzumab followed by surgery in HER2-positive advanced gastric or esophagogastric junction adenocarcinoma with extensive lymph node metastasis: Japan Clinical Oncology Group study JCOG1301 (Trigger Study).

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Kozo; Tokunaga, Masanori; Mizusawa, Junki; Machida, Nozomu; Katayama, Hiroshi; Shitara, Kohei; Tomita, Toshihiko; Nakamura, Kenichi; Boku, Narikazu; Sano, Takeshi; Terashima, Masanori; Sasako, Mitsuru

    2015-11-01

    Pre-operative chemotherapy with S-1 plus cisplatin is considered to be acceptable as one of the standard treatment options for gastric cancer patients with extensive lymph node metastases in Japan. Addition of trastuzumab to chemotherapy is shown to be effective for HER2-positive advanced gastric cancer patients, and we have commenced a randomized Phase II trial in March 2015 to evaluate S-1 plus cisplatin plus trastuzumab compared with S-1 plus cisplatin alone in the neoadjuvant setting for HER2-positive gastric cancer patients with ELM, which are followed by adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1 for 1 year. A total of 130 patients will be accrued from 41 Japanese institutions over 3 years. The primary endpoint is overall survival. The secondary endpoints are progression-free survival, response rate of pre-operative chemotherapy, proportion of patients with R0 resection, proportion of patients who complete the pre-operative chemotherapy and surgery, proportion of patients who complete the protocol treatment including post-operative chemotherapy, pathological response rate and adverse events. This trial has been registered in the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN 000016920. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Mixed gastric carcinoma with intestinal and cribriform patterns: a distinctive pathologic appearance associated with poor prognosis in advanced stages and a potential mimicker of metastatic breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lino-Silva, Leonardo Saúl; Salcedo Hernández, Rosa Angélica; Molina-Frías, Ernesto

    2013-02-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is characterized by marked heterogeneity at cytological and architectural level and frequently shows overlap between microscopic patterns. This article describes a peculiar pattern of gastric adenocarcinoma, previously unreported, that combines intestinal type adenocarcinoma with areas of cribriform pattern that resembles both architectural and cytological in situ ductal carcinoma of the breast and to the best of the authors' knowledge, there are no earlier reports of this pattern in the stomach, which has been named "gastric carcinoma with cribriform component (CGA). The authors analyzed 12 cases of intestinal type adenocarcinoma with areas at least 20% of cribriform pattern (range from 20% to 90%) that was present in 9% of intestinal type gastric adenocarcinomas in their institution. There is slight predilection for male sex, and the median age of presentation is 55.8 years. The phenotype by immunohistochemistry is the same as with conventional (non-CGA) carcinomas. CGA shows more frequent lymphovascular invasion (P = .039), perineural invasion (P = .027) and resembles both in situ and invasive cribriform carcinoma of the breast. In clinical stage III the overall 3-year survival of CGA was worse than those with non-CGA component (38.6% vs 25%; 3-year survival, P = .010) and proves to be an independent adverse factor for overall survival in a multivariate analysis. Compared with conventional gastric carcinomas, CGA is deep infiltrating, has more nodal metastases, more lymphovascular and perineural invasion, and has decreased overall survival. Thus, proper recognition and report is important, even in small biopsies or small foci.

  7. Gene methylation in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yiping; Dang, Siwen; Hou, Peng

    2013-09-23

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies and remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Over 70% of new cases and deaths occur in developing countries. In the early years of the molecular biology revolution, cancer research mainly focuses on genetic alterations, including gastric cancer. Epigenetic mechanisms are essential for normal development and maintenance of tissue-specific gene expression patterns in mammals. Disruption of epigenetic processes can lead to altered gene function and malignant cellular transformation. Recent advancements in the rapidly evolving field of cancer epigenetics have shown extensive reprogramming of every component of the epigenetic machinery in cancer, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, nucleosome positioning, noncoding RNAs, and microRNAs. Aberrant DNA methylation in the promoter regions of gene, which leads to inactivation of tumor suppressor and other cancer-related genes in cancer cells, is the most well-defined epigenetic hallmark in gastric cancer. The advantages of gene methylation as a target for detection and diagnosis of cancer in biopsy specimens and non-invasive body fluids such as serum and gastric washes have led to many studies of application in gastric cancer. This review focuses on the most common and important phenomenon of epigenetics, DNA methylation, in gastric cancer and illustrates the impact epigenetics has had on this field. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Gastric protein hydrolysis of raw and roasted almonds in the growing pig.

    PubMed

    Bornhorst, Gail M; Drechsler, Krista C; Montoya, Carlos A; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Moughan, Paul J; Singh, R Paul

    2016-11-15

    Gastric protein hydrolysis may influence gastric emptying rate and subsequent protein digestibility in the small intestine. This study examined the gastric hydrolysis of dietary protein from raw and roasted almonds in the growing pig as a model for the adult human. The gastric hydrolysis of almond proteins was quantified by performing tricine-sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subsequent image analysis. There was an interaction between digestion time, stomach region, and almond type for gastric protein hydrolysis (p<0.05). Gastric emptying rate of protein was a significant (p<0.05) covariate in the gastric protein hydrolysis. In general, greater gastric protein hydrolysis was observed in raw almonds (compared to roasted almonds), hypothesized to be related to structural changes in almond proteins during roasting. Greater gastric protein hydrolysis was observed in the distal stomach (compared to the proximal stomach), likely related to the lower pH in the distal stomach.

  9. Computed tomographic recognition of gastric varices

    SciTech Connect

    Balthazar, E.J.; Megibow, A.; Naidich, D.; LeFleur, R.S.

    1984-06-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) findings in 13 consecutive patients with proven gastric varices were analyzed and correlated with the radiographic, angiographic, and gastroscopic evaluations. In 11 patients, CT clearly identified large (five) or smaller (six) varices located mainly along the posteromedial wall of the gastric fundus and proximal body of the stomach. Well defined rounded or tubular densities that enhanced during intravenous administration of contrast material and could not be distinguished from the gastric wall were identified. Dense, enhancing, round or tubular, intraluminal filling defects were seen in the cases where the stomach was distended with water. In seven patients, the CT examination correctly diagnosed the pathogenesis of gastric varices by identifying hepatic cirrhosis, calcific pancreatis, and carcinoma of the pancreas.

  10. S-1-Based Chemotherapy versus Capecitabine-Based Chemotherapy as First-Line Treatment for Advanced Gastric Carcinoma: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-qiang; Zhang, Dong-sheng; Luo, Hui-yan; Qiu, Miao-zhen; Wang, Feng-hua; Ren, Chao; Zeng, Zhao-lei; Xu, Rui-hua

    2013-01-01

    Background Although both oral fluoropyrimidines were reported effective and safe, doubts exist about whether S-1 or capecitabine is more advantageous in advanced gastric carcinoma (AGC). Herein, we performed a meta-analysis to comprehensively compare the efficacy and safety of S-1-based chemotherapy versus capecitabine-based chemotherapy as first-line treatment for AGC. Methods PubMed/Medline, EmBase, Cochrane library, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched for articles comparing S-1-based chemotherapy to capecitabine-based chemotherapy for AGC. Primary outcomes were overall response rate (ORR), time to progression (TTP), overall survival (OS), progression-free probability, and survival probability. Secondary outcomes were toxicities. Fixed-effects model were used and all the results were confirmed by random-effects model. Results Five randomized controlled trials and five cohort studies with 821 patients were included. We found equivalent ORR (38.3% vs. 39.1%, odds ratio [OR] 0.92, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.69-1.24, P = 0.59), TTP (harzad ratio [HR] 0.98, 95% CI 0.82-1.16, P = 0.79), OS (HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.87-1.13, P = 0.91), progression-free probability (3-month OR 1.02, 95% CI 0.62-1.68, P = 0.94; 6-month OR 1.34, 95% CI 0.88-2.04, P = 0.18) and survival probability (0.5-year OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.61-1.31, P =0.57; 1-year OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.70- 1.33, P = 0.84; 2-year OR 1.15, 95% CI 0.61-2.17, P = 0.66). Equivalent grade 3 to 4 hematological and non-hematological toxicities were found except hand-foot syndrome was less prominent in S-1-based chemotherapy (0.3% vs. 5.9%, OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.06-0.56, P = 0.003). There’re no significant heterogeneity and publication bias. Cumulative analysis found stable time-dependent trend. Consistent results stratified by study design, age, regimen, cycle, country were observed. Conclusion S-1-based chemotherapy was associated with non-inferior antitumor efficacy and better safety profile, compared

  11. Phase I study of 3-weekly combination chemotherapy using epirubicin, oxaliplatin, and S-1 (EOS) in patients with previously untreated advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Sym, Sun Jin; Hong, Junsik; Jung, Minkyu; Park, Jinny; Cho, Eun Kyung; Lee, Woon Ki; Chung, Min; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Lee, Jae Hoon; Shin, Dong Bok

    2012-08-01

    This study was performed to determine the recommended dose (RD) and dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) associated with epirubicin, oxaliplatin, and S-1 (EOS) combination therapy in patients with previously untreated advanced gastric cancer (AGC). Previously untreated patients with histologically proven metastatic AGC, with an ECOG performance status of 0-2, were enrolled in this study. A fixed dose of epirubicin (50 mg/m(2)) and oxaliplatin (130 mg/m(2)) was intravenously administered on day 1 of treatment, followed by oral S-1 administration twice daily on days 1-14. The S-1 dose was escalated according to the following schedule: level I, 35 mg/m(2); level II, 40 mg/m(2); level III, 45 mg/m(2); Level IV, 50 mg/m(2). Each cycle was repeated every 21 days. DLTs were evaluated during the first two cycles of treatment. Nineteen patients with a median age of 53 years (range, 40-71 years) were enrolled in this study. One case of DLT (grade 4 neutropenia lasting more than 5 days) developed from among the six dose level II patients, while 2 DLTs (grade 3 diarrhea and nausea) were observed among the 4 dose level III patients. Based on these results, dose level II was determined as the RD. Of the 13 patients with measurable lesions, eight achieved partial response, three showed stable disease, and the objective response rate was 61.5 % (95 % confidence interval (CI), 13.3-66.6 %). The median progression-free survival and overall survival of all patients was 6.8 months (95 % CI, 1.4-9.5 months) and 13.3 months (95 % CI, 1.9-24.6 months), respectively. The RD of the EOS regimen in patients with previously untreated AGC was 50 mg/m(2) of epirubicin and 130 mg/m(2) of oxaliplatin on day 1, with administration of 40 mg/m(2) of S-1 twice a day on days 1-14 for each 21-day cycle. The EOS regimen described produced promising results.

  12. Symptomatic subserosal gastric lipoma successfully treated with enucleation.

    PubMed

    Krasniqi, Avdyl-Selmon; Hoxha, Faton-Tatil; Bicaj, Besnik-Xhafer; Hashani, Shemsedin-Isuf; Hasimja, Shpresa-Mehmet; Kelmendi, Sadik-Mal; Gashi-Luci, Lumturije-Hasan

    2008-10-14

    Gastric lipomas are rare tumors, accounting for 2%-3% of all benign gastric tumors. They are of submucosal or extremely rare subserosal origin. Although most gastric lipomas are usually detected incidentally, they can cause abdominal pain, dyspeptic disorders, obstruction, invagination, and hemorrhages. Subserosal gastric lipomas are rarely symptomatic. There is no report on treatment of subserosal gastric lipomas in the English literature. We present a case of a 50-year-old male with symptomatic subserosal gastric lipoma which was successfully managed with removal, enucleation of lipoma, explorative gastrotomy and edge resection for histology check of gastric wall. The incidence of gastric lipoma, advanced diagnostic possibilities and their role in treatment modalities are discussed.

  13. Gastric bypass surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Bariatric surgery - gastric bypass - discharge; Roux-en-Y gastric bypass - discharge; Gastric bypass - Roux-en-Y - discharge; Obesity ... Gloy VL, Briel M, Bhatt DL, et al. Bariatric surgery versus non-surgical treatment for obesity: a systematic ...

  14. Anastomotic complications after Ivor Lewis esophagectomy in patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation are related to radiation dose to the gastric fundus.

    PubMed

    Vande Walle, Caroline; Ceelen, Wim P; Boterberg, Tom; Vande Putte, Dirk; Van Nieuwenhove, Yves; Varin, Oswald; Pattyn, Piet

    2012-03-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) is increasingly used in locally advanced esophageal cancer. Some studies have suggested that CRT results in increased surgical morbidity. We assessed the influence of CRT on anastomotic complications in a cohort of patients who underwent CRT followed by Ivor Lewis esophagectomy. Clinical and pathologic data were collected from all patients treated with neoadjuvant CRT (36 Gy combined with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin) followed by Ivor Lewis esophagectomy. On the radiotherapy (RT) planning computed tomography scans, normal tissue volumes were drawn encompassing the proximal esophageal region and the gastric fundus. Within these volumes, dose-volume histograms were analyzed to generate the total dose to 50% of the volume (D(50)). We studied the ability of the D(50) to predict anastomotic complications (leakage, ischemia, or stenosis). Dose limits were derived using receiver operating characteristics analysis. Fifty-four patients were available for analysis. RT resulted in either T or N downstaging in 51% of patients; complete pathologic response was achieved in 11%. In-hospital mortality was 5.4%, and major morbidity occurred in 36% of patients. Anastomotic complications (AC) developed in 7 patients (13%). No significant influence of the D(50) on the proximal esophagus was noted on the anastomotic complication rate. The median D(50) on the gastric fundus, however, was 33 Gy in patients with AC and 18 Gy in patients without AC (p = 0.024). Using receiver operating characteristics analysis, the D(50) limit on the gastric fundus was defined as 29 Gy. In patients undergoing neoadjuvant CRT followed by Ivor Lewis esophagectomy, the incidence of AC is related to the RT dose on the gastric fundus but not to the dose received by the proximal esophagus. When planning preoperative RT, efforts should be made to limit the median dose on the gastric fundus to 29 Gy with a V(30) below 40%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Anastomotic Complications After Ivor Lewis Esophagectomy in Patients Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Are Related to Radiation Dose to the Gastric Fundus

    SciTech Connect

    Vande Walle, Caroline; Ceelen, Wim P.; Boterberg, Tom; Vande Putte, Dirk; Van Nieuwenhove, Yves; Varin, Oswald; Pattyn, Piet

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) is increasingly used in locally advanced esophageal cancer. Some studies have suggested that CRT results in increased surgical morbidity. We assessed the influence of CRT on anastomotic complications in a cohort of patients who underwent CRT followed by Ivor Lewis esophagectomy. Patients and Methods: Clinical and pathologic data were collected from all patients treated with neoadjuvant CRT (36 Gy combined with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin) followed by Ivor Lewis esophagectomy. On the radiotherapy (RT) planning computed tomography scans, normal tissue volumes were drawn encompassing the proximal esophageal region and the gastric fundus. Within these volumes, dose-volume histograms were analyzed to generate the total dose to 50% of the volume (D{sub 50}). We studied the ability of the D{sub 50} to predict anastomotic complications (leakage, ischemia, or stenosis). Dose limits were derived using receiver operating characteristics analysis. Results: Fifty-four patients were available for analysis. RT resulted in either T or N downstaging in 51% of patients; complete pathologic response was achieved in 11%. In-hospital mortality was 5.4%, and major morbidity occurred in 36% of patients. Anastomotic complications (AC) developed in 7 patients (13%). No significant influence of the D{sub 50} on the proximal esophagus was noted on the anastomotic complication rate. The median D{sub 50} on the gastric fundus, however, was 33 Gy in patients with AC and 18 Gy in patients without AC (p = 0.024). Using receiver operating characteristics analysis, the D{sub 50} limit on the gastric fundus was defined as 29 Gy. Conclusions: In patients undergoing neoadjuvant CRT followed by Ivor Lewis esophagectomy, the incidence of AC is related to the RT dose on the gastric fundus but not to the dose received by the proximal esophagus. When planning preoperative RT, efforts should be made to limit the median dose on the gastric fundus to 29 Gy with a V

  16. Gastric cancer after mini-gastric bypass surgery: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chun-Chi; Lee, Wei-Jei; Ser, Kong-Han; Chen, Jung-Chien; Tsou, Jun-Juin; Chen, Shu-Chun; Kuan, Wai-Sang

    2013-11-01

    Gastric cancer in the stomach after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or mini-gastric bypass is rare, but a few cases have been reported since 1991, when the first case emerged. According to the literature, the interval between bypass surgery and the diagnosis of cancer ranged from 1 to 22 years. Given the difficulty of monitoring a bypassed stomach, the potential for gastric cancer must be considered, especially in countries with high incidence of this cancer. The literature reported the first case in the Asia-Pacific region - a woman developed advanced gastric cancer in her stomach 9 years after laparoscopic mini-gastric bypass for morbid obesity. © 2013 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Longitudinal Analysis of Severe Anxiety Symptoms in the Last Year of Life Among Patients With Advanced Cancer: Relationships With Proximity to Death, Burden, and Social Support.

    PubMed

    Tang, Siew Tzuh; Chen, Jen-Shi; Chou, Wen-Chi; Chang, Wen-Cheng; Wu, Chiao-En; Hsieh, Chia-Hsun; Chiang, Ming-Chu; Kuo, Mei-Ling

    2016-06-01

    Temporal changes in the prevalence of anxiety disorders/symptoms for patients with cancer at the end of life (EOL) remain unclear. This study was undertaken to describe changes in the prevalence of severe anxiety symptoms and to identify its correlates in the last year of life for patients with cancer. A convenience sample of 325 patients with cancer was followed until death. Severe anxiety symptoms were identified as anxiety subscale scores of 11 or greater on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Longitudinal changes in and correlates of severe anxiety symptoms were examined from demographics, disease-related characteristics, disease burden, perceived burden to others, and social support using multivariate logistic regression modeling with generalized estimating equations. The prevalence of severe anxiety symptoms increased as death approached (18.6%, 21.9%, 26.7%, and 33.4% at 181-365, 91-180, 31-90, and 1-30 days before death, respectively). However, after controlling for covariates, this temporal increase was not significant. The prevalence of severe anxiety symptoms was not associated with fixed demographics and disease-related characteristics, except for diagnosis and metastatic status, but was significantly higher in patients with cancer with high physical symptom distress, severe depressive symptoms, high perceived burden to others, and strong perceived social support. Severe anxiety symptoms were not associated with time proximity to death per se but were related to factors modifiable by high-quality EOL care. Clinicians may decrease the likelihood of severe anxiety symptoms at EOL by adequately managing physical and depressive symptoms and lightening perceived burden to others for patients strongly connected with their social network to improve their psychological well-being. Copyright © 2016 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  18. Gastric electrical stimulation optimized to inhibit gastric motility reduces food intake in dogs.

    PubMed

    Song, Geng-Qing; Zhu, Hongbing; Lei, Yong; Yuan, Charlene; Starkebaum, Warren; Yin, Jieyun; Chen, Jiande D Z

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that that a method of gastric electrical stimulation (GES) optimized to inhibit gastric motility was effective in reducing food intake in dogs. Female dogs with a gastric cannula and gastric serosal electrodes were studied in three experiments: (1) to determine the best parameters and locations of GES in inhibiting gastric tone, slow waves, and contractions in dogs;( 2) to investigate the reproducibility of the inhibitory effects of GES; and (3) to study the effect of the GES method on food intake in dogs. (1) For GES to exert significant effects on gastric motility, a pulse width of ≥2 ms was required, and with other appropriate inhibitory parameters, GES was able to increase gastric volume by 190.4 %, reduce antral contractions by 39.7 %, and decrease the percentage of normal slow waves by 47.6 %. In addition, the inhibitory effect of GES was more potent with the stimulation electrodes placed along the lesser or greater curvature than placed in the middle, and more potent with the electrodes placed in the distal stomach than in the proximal stomach; (2) the inhibitory effects of GES on gastric motility were reproducible; (3) the GES method optimized to inhibit gastric motility produced a 20 % reduction in food intakes in non-obese dogs. GES with appropriate parameters inhibits gastric motility, and the effects are reproducible. The GES method optimized to inhibit gastric motility reduces food intake in healthy dogs and may have a therapeutic potential for treating obesity.

  19. Review of docetaxel in the treatment of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tetzlaff, Eric D; Cheng, Jonathan D; Ajani, Jaffer A

    2008-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a global health problem accounting for 800,000 cancer related deaths annually. Often diagnosed at an advanced stage, the treatment of gastric cancer with chemotherapy is directed towards palliating cancer related symptoms with only modest improvements in survival. In addition, no regimen has emerged as a globally accepted standard. New therapeutic options are desperately needed for the treatment of gastric cancer. Docetaxel given in combination has recently emerged as a new option for patients with advanced gastric cancer. This review focuses on the treatment of advanced gastric cancer utilizing docetaxel-based therapy and the novel additions of biotherapy to the existing cytotoxic platforms. In addition, the current investigations of docetaxel for the treatment of potentially curable gastric cancer will be discussed. PMID:19209281

  20. A Summary of the Rendezvous, Proximity Operations, Docking, and Undocking (RPODU) Lessons Learned from the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) Orbital Express (OE) Demonstration System Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennehy, Cornelius J.; Carpenter, James R.

    2011-01-01

    The Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) Technical Discipline Team (TDT) sponsored Dr. J. Russell Carpenter, a Navigation and Rendezvous Subject Matter Expert (SME) from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), to provide support to the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) Orbital Express (OE) rendezvous and docking flight test that was conducted in 2007. When that DARPA OE mission was completed, Mr. Neil Dennehy, NASA Technical Fellow for GN&C, requested Dr. Carpenter document his findings (lessons learned) and recommendations for future rendezvous missions resulting from his OE support experience. This report captures lessons specifically from anomalies that occurred during one of OE's unmated operations.

  1. Resection of the Gastric Tube Reconstructed through the Retrosternal Route without Sternotomy

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Kotaro; Tanaka, Hironori; Hato, Motoki; Taniwaki, Satoshi; Mori, Yoichiro; Ochi, Nobuo; Nagasaki, Takaya; Ueno, Shuhei; Eguchi, Yuki

    2017-01-01

    With advances of combined modality therapy, prognoses in esophageal cancer have been improving. After resection of esophageal cancer, the development of gastric tube cancer is a risk. While such cancer in an early stage can be cured endoscopically, total gastric tube resection is indicated in advanced stages. A 68-year-old man underwent subtotal esophagectomy reconstructed with a gastric tube through the retrosternal route. Gastric cancer was found one and a half years postoperatively. The gastric tube was resected without sternotomy. This is the first report of a patient undergoing resection of the gastric tube reconstructed through the retrosternal route without sternotomy. PMID:28299227

  2. Gastric acid secretion: changes during a century.

    PubMed

    Di Mario, Francesco; Goni, Elisabetta

    2014-12-01

    The advances in knowledge of gastric physiology within the past century have been the most exciting and important in this area of interest for many decades. The aim of this presentation consists of a comprehensive review of the extensive recent literature on this topic in order to highlight milestones in the field of gastric physiology, in particular in gastric acid secretion, gastric pathophysiology, acid-related diseases and use of acid regulatory drugs. Moreover, in the 21st century there have been many epidemiologic changes as well as a decrease of Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric cancer together with an increase of gastroesophageal reflux disease and the related increase of pomp proton inhibitor wide use.

  3. Motor function of the proximal stomach and visceral perception in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Penagini, R; Hebbard, G; Horowitz, M; Dent, J; Bermingham, H; Jones, K; Holloway, R

    1998-01-01

    Background—The abnormally high postprandial rate of transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations seen in patients with reflux disease may be related to altered proximal gastric motor function. Heightened visceral sensitivity may also contribute to reporting of symptoms in these patients. 
Aims—To assess motor function of the proximal stomach and visceral perception in reflux disease with a barostat. 
Methods—Fasting and postprandial proximal gastric motility, sensation, and symptoms were measured in nine patients with reflux disease and nine healthy subjects. Gastric emptying of solids and liquids was assessed in six of the patients on a different day (and compared to historical controls). 
Results—Minimal distending pressure and gastric compliance were similar in the two groups, whereas the patients experienced fullness at lower pressures (p<0.05) and discomfort at lower balloon volumes (p<0.005) during isobaric and isovolumetric distensions respectively. Maximal gastric relaxation induced by the meal was similar in the two groups. Late after the meal, however, proximal gastric tone was lower (p<0.01) and the score for fullness higher (p<0.01) in the reflux patients, in whom the retention of both solids and liquids in the proximal stomach was greater (p<0.05). 
Conclusions—Reflux disease is associated with delayed recovery of proximal gastric tone after a meal and increased visceral sensitivity. The former may contribute to the increased prevalence of reflux during transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations and the delay in emptying from the proximal stomach, whereas both may contribute to symptom reporting. 

 Keywords: barostat; tone; compliance; mechanics PMID:9536951

  4. Therapeutics for Equine Gastric Ulcer Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zavoshti, Fereydon Rezazadeh; Andrews, Frank M

    2017-04-01

    Equine gastric ulcer syndrome (EGUS) is an umbrella term used to describe ulcers in the nonglandular squamous and glandular mucosa, terminal esophagus, and proximal duodenum. Gastric ulcers in the squamous and glandular regions occur more often than esophageal or duodenal ulcers and likely have a different pathogenesis. At present, omeprazole is accepted globally as the best pharmacologic therapy for both regions of the stomach; however, the addition of coating agents and synthetic prostaglandins could add to its effectiveness in treatment of EGUS. Dietary and environmental management are necessary for prevention of recurrence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Treatment of resectable gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dikken, Johan L.; van de Velde, Cornelis J.H.; Coit, Daniel G.; Shah, Manish A.; Verheij, Marcel

    2012-01-01

    Stomach cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, despite its declining overall incidence. Although there are differences in incidence, etiology and pathological factors, most studies do not separately analyze cardia and noncardia gastric cancer. Surgery is the only potentially curative treatment for advanced, resectable gastric cancer, but locoregional relapse rate is high with a consequently poor prognosis. To improve survival, several preoperative and postoperative treatment strategies have been investigated. Whereas perioperative chemotherapy and postoperative chemoradiation (CRT) are considered standard therapy in the Western world, in Asia postoperative monochemotherapy with S-1 is often used. Several other therapeutic options, although generally not accepted as standard treatment, are postoperative combination chemotherapy, hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy and preoperative radiotherapy and CRT. Postoperative combination chemotherapy does show a statistically significant but clinically equivocal survival advantage in several meta-analyses. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy is mainly performed in Asia and is associated with a higher postoperative complication rate. Based on the currently available data, the use of postoperative radiotherapy alone and the use of intraoperative radiotherapy should not be advised in the treatment of resectable gastric cancer. Western randomized trials on gastric cancer are often hampered by slow or incomplete accrual. Reduction of toxicity for preoperative and especially postoperative treatment is essential for the ongoing improvement of gastric cancer care. PMID:22282708

  6. Worldwide practice in gastric cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Brenkman, Hylke JF; Haverkamp, Leonie; Ruurda, Jelle P; van Hillegersberg, Richard

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the current status of gastric cancer surgery worldwide. METHODS: An international cross-sectional survey on gastric cancer surgery was performed amongst international upper gastro-intestinal surgeons. All surgical members of the International Gastric Cancer Association were invited by e-mail to participate. An English web-based survey had to be filled in with regard to their surgical preferences. Questions asked included hospital volume, the use of neoadjuvant treatment, preferred surgical approach, extent of the lymphadenectomy and preferred anastomotic technique. The invitations were sent in September 2013 and the survey was closed in January 2014. RESULTS: The corresponding specific response rate was 227/615 (37%). The majority of respondents: originated from Asia (54%), performed > 21 gastrectomies per year (79%) and used neoadjuvant chemotherapy (73%). An open surgical procedure was performed by the majority of surgeons for distal gastrectomy for advanced cancer (91%) and total gastrectomy for both early and advanced cancer (52% and 94%). A minimally invasive procedure was preferred for distal gastrectomy for early cancer (65%). In Asia surgeons preferred a minimally invasive procedure for total gastrectomy for early cancer also (63%). A D1+ lymphadenectomy was preferred in early gastric cancer (52% for distal, 54% for total gastrectomy) and a D2 lymphadenectomy was preferred in advanced gastric cancer (93% for distal, 92% for total gastrectomy) CONCLUSION: Surgical preferences for gastric cancer surgery vary between surgeons worldwide. Although the majority of surgeons use neoadjuvant chemotherapy, minimally invasive techniques are still not widely adapted. PMID:27099448

  7. Proximal stomach function in obesity with normal or abnormal oesophageal acid exposure.

    PubMed

    Iovino, P; Angrisani, L; Galloro, G; Consalvo, D; Tremolaterra, F; Pascariello, A; Ciacci, C

    2006-06-01

    There is an increased prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux and symptoms in obese patients. Information about the proximal stomach in obese patients with reflux is lacking. Gastric volume and compliance are similar between obese and lean subjects. To study the proximal stomach function and perception in obese patients with normal or abnormal oesophageal acid exposure, thirty-one obese patients, with normal or abnormal oesophageal acid exposure, underwent medical evaluation of oesophageal and gastrointestinal symptoms by a questionnaire and measurement of proximal stomach function and perception by an electronic barostat and a standardized questionnaire. Nineteen obese patients had abnormal oesophageal acid exposure. The percentage of total time with pH <4 is significantly related to the presence of hiatal hernia, the oesophageal intensity-frequency symptom score and gender, i.e. higher percentage in men. The perception cumulative score was significantly different between patients with normal and abnormal oesophageal acid exposure after adjusting for covariates (gender, body mass index, age, minimal distending pressure, gastric tone and gastric compliance). Gastric tone and compliance were significantly related to the perception cumulative score. In conclusion, patients with abnormal oesophageal acid exposure have increased gastric perception. A significant relation among gastric tone, gastric compliance and upper gastrointestinal sensations was shown.

  8. Current status of randomized controlled trials for laparoscopic gastric surgery for gastric cancer in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoxin; Hu, Yanfeng; Liu, Hao

    2015-08-01

    China alone accounts for nearly 42% of all new gastric cancer cases worldwide, and gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in China nowadays. Without mass screening programs, unfortunately over 80% of all Chinese patients have been diagnosed as advanced diseases. As in other Asian countries, especially Japan and Korea, laparoscopic gastrectomy for the treatment of gastric cancer has gained increasingly popularity in China during the past decade. Whether laparoscopic surgery can be safely and effectively performed in the treatment of gastric cancer remains controversial, particularly with regard to curative intent in advanced diseases. Given the high incidence of these cancers, and their advanced stage at diagnosis, China has a significant interest in determining the safety and effectiveness of laparoscopic gastrectomy. A well-designed randomized controlled trial (RCT) is considered the only feasible way to provide conclusive evidence. To date, China has not played a significant role in terms of conducting RCT concerning laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer. However, an effort has been made by the Chinese researchers, with the great help from our colleagues in neighboring countries such as Korea and Japan, through the establishment of the Chinese Laparoscopic Gastrointestinal Surgery Study Group. In this review, we present the current status of RCT for laparoscopic gastric surgery for gastric cancer in China, including published and ongoing registered RCT.

  9. Complications after radical gastrectomy following FOLFOX7 neoadjuvant chemotherapy for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study assessed the postoperative morbidity and mortality occurring in the first 30 days after radical gastrectomy by comparing gastric cancer patients who did or did not receive the FOLFOX7 regimen of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods We completed a retrospective analysis of 377 patients after their radical gastrectomies were performed in our department between 2005 and 2009. Two groups of patients were studied: the SURG group received surgical treatment immediately after diagnosis; the NACT underwent surgery after 2-6 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Results There were 267 patients in the SURG group and 110 patients in the NACT group. The NACT group had more proximal tumours (P = 0.000), more total/proximal gastrectomies (P = 0.000) and longer operative time (P = 0.005) than the SURG group. Morbidity was 10.0% in the NACT patients and 17.2% in the SURG patients (P = 0.075). There were two cases of postoperative death, both in the SURG group (P = 1.000). No changes in complications or mortality rate were observed between the SURG and NACT groups. Conclusion The FOLFOX7 neoadjuvant chemotherapy is not associated with increased postoperative morbidity, indicating that the FOLFOX7 neoadjuvant chemotherapy is a safe choice for the treatment of local advanced gastric cancer. PMID:21942969

  10. Selective gene expression by rat gastric corpus epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Goebel, M.; Stengel, A.; Sachs, G.

    2011-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is divided into several segments that have distinct functional properties, largely absorptive. The gastric corpus is the only segment thought of as largely secretory. Microarray hybridization of the gastric corpus mucosal epithelial cells was used to compare gene expression with other segments of the columnar GI tract followed by statistical data subtraction to identify genes selectively expressed by the rat gastric corpus mucosa. This provides a means of identifying less obvious specific functions of the corpus in addition to its secretion-related genes. For example, important properties found by this GI tract comparative transcriptome reflect the energy demand of acid secretion, a role in lipid metabolism, the large variety of resident neuroendocrine cells, responses to damaging agents and transcription factors defining differentiation of its epithelium. In terms of overlap of gastric corpus genes with the rest of the GI tract, the distal small bowel appears to express many of the gastric corpus genes in contrast to proximal small and large bowel. This differential map of gene expression by the gastric corpus epithelium will allow a more detailed description of major properties of the gastric corpus and may lead to the discovery of gastric corpus cell differentiation genes and those mis-regulated in gastric carcinomas. PMID:21177383

  11. Randomized trials and quality assurance in gastric cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Dikken, Johan L; Cats, Annemieke; Verheij, Marcel; van de Velde, Cornelis J H

    2013-03-01

    A D2 lymphadenectomy can be considered standard of surgical care for advanced resectable gastric cancer. Currently, several multimodality strategies are used, including postoperative monochemotherapy in Asia, postoperative chemoradiotherapy in the United States, and perioperative chemotherapy in Europe. As the majority of gastric cancer patients are treated outside the framework of clinical trials, quality assurance programs, including referral to high-volume centers and clinical auditing are needed to improve gastric cancer care on a nationwide level. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Paclitaxel plus valproic acid versus paclitaxel alone as second- or third-line therapy for advanced gastric cancer: a randomized Phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    Fushida, Sachio; Kinoshita, Jun; Kaji, Masahide; Oyama, Katsunobu; Hirono, Yasuo; Tsukada, Tomoya; Fujimura, Takashi; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Background Weekly paclitaxel (wPTX) is the preferred second-line chemotherapy for gastric cancer in Japan. Histone deacetylase inhibitors have been shown to decrease proliferation through cell-cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. One histone deacetylase inhibitor, valproic acid (VPA), also inhibits tumor growth by inducing apoptosis and enhances the efficacy of paclitaxel (PTX), shown in a murine gastric cancer model. This Phase II trial was designed to evaluate the benefits of adding VPA to wPTX in patients with gastric cancer refractory to first-line treatment with fluoropyrimidine. Patients and methods The patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive PTX 80 mg/m2 intravenously on days 1, 8, and 15, every 4 weeks, or a dose of PTX plus VPA taken everyday at 7.5 mg/kg twice daily. Random assignment was carried out at the data center with a minimization method adjusted by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (0–1 vs 2), prior chemotherapy (first-line vs second-line), and measurable lesions (presence vs absence). The primary end point was the overall survival (OS) rate, and the secondary end points were the progression-free survival rate and safety analysis. Results Sixty-six patients were randomly assigned to receive wPTX (n=33) or wPTX plus VPA (n=33). The median OS was 9.8 months in the wPTX group and 8.7 months in the wPTX plus VPA group (hazard ratio 1.19; 95% CI 0.702–2.026; P=0.51). The median progression-free survival was 4.5 months in the wPTX group and 3.0 months in the wPTX plus VPA group (hazard ratio 1.29; 95% CI 0.753–2.211; P=0.35). Grade 3–4 adverse events were neutropenia (3.1%), pneumonia (1.6%), liver injury (1.6%), brain infarction (1.6%), and rupture of aorta (1.6%). Conclusion No statistically significant difference was observed between wPTX and wPTX plus VPA for OS. PMID:27524882

  13. Paclitaxel plus valproic acid versus paclitaxel alone as second- or third-line therapy for advanced gastric cancer: a randomized Phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Fushida, Sachio; Kinoshita, Jun; Kaji, Masahide; Oyama, Katsunobu; Hirono, Yasuo; Tsukada, Tomoya; Fujimura, Takashi; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Weekly paclitaxel (wPTX) is the preferred second-line chemotherapy for gastric cancer in Japan. Histone deacetylase inhibitors have been shown to decrease proliferation through cell-cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. One histone deacetylase inhibitor, valproic acid (VPA), also inhibits tumor growth by inducing apoptosis and enhances the efficacy of paclitaxel (PTX), shown in a murine gastric cancer model. This Phase II trial was designed to evaluate the benefits of adding VPA to wPTX in patients with gastric cancer refractory to first-line treatment with fluoropyrimidine. The patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive PTX 80 mg/m(2) intravenously on days 1, 8, and 15, every 4 weeks, or a dose of PTX plus VPA taken everyday at 7.5 mg/kg twice daily. Random assignment was carried out at the data center with a minimization method adjusted by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (0-1 vs 2), prior chemotherapy (first-line vs second-line), and measurable lesions (presence vs absence). The primary end point was the overall survival (OS) rate, and the secondary end points were the progression-free survival rate and safety analysis. Sixty-six patients were randomly assigned to receive wPTX (n=33) or wPTX plus VPA (n=33). The median OS was 9.8 months in the wPTX group and 8.7 months in the wPTX plus VPA group (hazard ratio 1.19; 95% CI 0.702-2.026; P=0.51). The median progression-free survival was 4.5 months in the wPTX group and 3.0 months in the wPTX plus VPA group (hazard ratio 1.29; 95% CI 0.753-2.211; P=0.35). Grade 3-4 adverse events were neutropenia (3.1%), pneumonia (1.6%), liver injury (1.6%), brain infarction (1.6%), and rupture of aorta (1.6%). No statistically significant difference was observed between wPTX and wPTX plus VPA for OS.

  14. Incidence of hand-foot syndrome with capecitabine in combination with chemotherapy as first-line treatment in patients with advanced and/or metastatic gastric cancer suitable for treatment with a fluoropyrimidine-based regimen.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Martin, Carlos; Sánchez, Antonio; Irigoyen, Antonio; Llorente, Beatriz; Pérez, Begoña; Serrano, Raquel; Safont, M José; Falcó, Esther; Lacasta, Adelaida; Reboredo, Margarita; Aparicio, Jorge; Dueñas, Rosario; Muñoz, Marta Llanos; Regueiro, Pilar; Sanchez-Viñes, Elena; López, Rafael López

    2012-09-01

    Hand-foot syndrome (HFS) is a limiting toxicity of capecitabine, which is not life-threatening but could compromise capecitabine efficacy. This phase II, multicenter, non-controlled study assessed the safety, particularly grade three HFS incidence, and efficacy of four capecitabine-based chemotherapy regimens [cisplatin/capecitabine (CX), epirubicin/cisplatin/capecitabine (ECX), epirubicin/oxaliplatin/capecitabine (EOX) and docetaxel/cisplatin/capecitabine (DCX)] as first-line treatment for advanced and/or metastatic gastric cancer. One hundred and eight patients were assigned to one of the four treatment groups, according to investigator's criteria, and grouped together for both safety and efficacy primary analyses. HFS was reported in 31 patients (19.6%) and its first presentation occurred at a median of 72 days (range 19-209 days). Grade 3 HFS developed in 6.3, 5.2, 3.7 and 2.4%, of patients receiving ECX, DCX, EOX or CX chemotherapy regimen, respectively. Capecitabine dose reduction/discontinuation due to HFS was required in 5.7% of patients (9/158). The most common (> 10%) grade 3-4 treatment-related AEs were neutropenia (15.2%), asthenia (12.0%) and diarrhoea (11.4%). A moderate incidence of HFS was reported in patients treated with capecitabine, which generally presented late and required dose reduction in < 1/3 of patients. The results suggest that capecitabine may be useful in combination with standard fluorouracil-based regimens in patients with advanced and/or metastatic gastric cancer with favourable safety profile.

  15. The European Medicines Agency Review of Tegafur/Gimeracil/Oteracil (Teysuno™) for the Treatment of Advanced Gastric Cancer When Given in Combination with Cisplatin: Summary of the Scientific Assessment of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP)

    PubMed Central

    van Zwieten-Boot, Barbara; Calvo Rojas, Gonzalo; ter Hofstede, Hadewych; Garcia-Carbonero, Rocio; Camarero, Jorge; Abadie, Eric; Pignatti, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    The product Teysuno™ (S-1) contains tegafur, a prodrug of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and two modulators of 5-FU metabolism, gimeracil and oteracil. The main clinical study in this application was a randomized controlled study comparing S-1 plus cisplatin with 5-FU plus cisplatin. In this study, median overall survival times of 8.6 months and 7.9 months for S-1 plus cisplatin and 5-FU plus cisplatin, respectively, were observed (hazard ratio, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.80–1.05). The Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use of the European Medicines Agency concluded that S-1 in combination with cisplatin (75 mg/m2) was noninferior to 5-FU plus cisplatin (100 mg/m2) in patients with advanced gastric cancer and adopted a positive opinion recommending the marketing authorization for this product for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer when given in combination with cisplatin. The recommended dose of S-1 is 25 mg/m2 (expressed as tegafur content) twice a day, for 21 consecutive days followed by 7 days rest (one treatment cycle), in combination with 75 mg/m2 cisplatin i.v. administered on day 1. This treatment cycle is repeated every 4 weeks. The most common side effects reported in the pivotal study were anemia, neutropenia, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight decrease, anorexia, and fatigue. The objective of this paper is to summarize the scientific review of the application leading to approval in the EU. The full scientific assessment report and the summary of product characteristics are available on the European Medicines Agency website (http://www.ema.europa.eu). PMID:21963999

  16. Ulcerative colitis with gastric and duodenal involvement.

    PubMed

    García Gavilán, María Del Carmen; López Vega, María Carmen; Sánchez, Isabel María

    2017-07-01

    Ulcerative colitis is one of the forms of presentation of the inflammatory bowel disease. UC yypically affects the large bowel but in the last few years more cases with proximal involvement have been described (diffuse gastritis, focally enhanced gastritis and duodenitis). We present the case of gastric and duodenitis involvement in the context of a moderate-severe ulcerative pancolitis which showed a good evolution and resolution of symptoms with corticoid treatment.

  17. Proximal humerus fractures.

    PubMed

    Price, Matthew C; Horn, Pamela L; Latshaw, James C

    2013-01-01

    Proximal humerus fractures are among the most common fractures associated with osteoporosis. With an aging population, incidence of these fractures will only increase. The proximal humerus not only forms the lateral portion of the shoulder articulation but also has significant associations with musculoskeletal and neurovascular structures. As a result, fractures of the proximal humerus can significantly impact not only the function of the shoulder joint, but the health and function of the entire upper extremity as well. Understanding of these fractures, the management options, and associated nursing care, can help reduce morbidity rate and improve functional outcomes.

  18. Ramucirumab plus paclitaxel versus placebo plus paclitaxel in patients with previously treated advanced gastric or gastro-oesophageal junction adenocarcinoma (RAINBOW): a double-blind, randomised phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Wilke, Hansjochen; Muro, Kei; Van Cutsem, Eric; Oh, Sang-Cheul; Bodoky, György; Shimada, Yasuhiro; Hironaka, Shuichi; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Lipatov, Oleg; Kim, Tae-You; Cunningham, David; Rougier, Philippe; Komatsu, Yoshito; Ajani, Jaffer; Emig, Michael; Carlesi, Roberto; Ferry, David; Chandrawansa, Kumari; Schwartz, Jonathan D; Ohtsu, Atsushi

    2014-10-01

    VEGFR-2 has a role in gastric cancer pathogenesis and progression. We assessed whether ramucirumab, a monoclonal antibody VEGFR-2 antagonist, in combination with paclitaxel would increase overall survival in patients previously treated for advanced gastric cancer compared with placebo plus paclitaxel. This randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, phase 3 trial was done at 170 centres in 27 countries in North and South America, Europe, Asia, and Australia. Patients aged 18 years or older with advanced gastric or gastro-oesophageal junction adenocarcinoma and disease progression on or within 4 months after first-line chemotherapy (platinum plus fluoropyrimidine with or without an anthracycline) were randomly assigned with a centralised interactive voice or web-response system in a 1:1 ratio to receive ramucirumab 8 mg/kg or placebo intravenously on days 1 and 15, plus paclitaxel 80 mg/m(2) intravenously on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28-day cycle. A permuted block randomisation, stratified by geographic region, time to progression on first-line therapy, and disease measurability, was used. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Efficacy analysis was by intention to treat, and safety analysis included all patients who received at least one treatment with study drug. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01170663, and has been completed; patients who are still receiving treatment are in the extension phase. Between Dec 23, 2010, and Sept 23, 2012, 665 patients were randomly assigned to treatment-330 to ramucirumab plus paclitaxel and 335 to placebo plus paclitaxel. Overall survival was significantly longer in the ramucirumab plus paclitaxel group than in the placebo plus paclitaxel group (median 9·6 months [95% CI 8·5-10·8] vs 7·4 months [95% CI 6·3-8·4], hazard ratio 0·807 [95% CI 0·678-0·962]; p=0·017). Grade 3 or higher adverse events that occurred in more than 5% of patients in the ramucirumab plus paclitaxel group versus placebo

  19. Trastuzumab emtansine versus taxane use for previously treated HER2-positive locally advanced or metastatic gastric or gastro-oesophageal junction adenocarcinoma (GATSBY): an international randomised, open-label, adaptive, phase 2/3 study.

    PubMed

    Thuss-Patience, Peter C; Shah, Manish A; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Van Cutsem, Eric; Ajani, Jaffer A; Castro, Hugo; Mansoor, Wasat; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Bodoky, Gyorgy; Shitara, Kohei; Phillips, Gail D Lewis; van der Horst, Tina; Harle-Yge, Marie-Laurence; Althaus, Betsy L; Kang, Yoon-Koo

    2017-05-01

    Although trastuzumab plus chemotherapy is the standard of care for first-line treatment of HER2-positive advanced gastric cancer, there is no established therapy in the second-line setting. In GATSBY, we examined the efficacy and tolerability of trastuzumab emtansine in patients previously treated for HER2-positive advanced gastric cancer (unresectable, locally advanced, or metastatic gastric cancer, including adenocarcinoma of the gastro-oesophageal junction). This is the final analysis from GATSBY, a randomised, open-label, adaptive, phase 2/3 study, done at 107 centres (28 countries worldwide). Eligible patients had HER2-positive advanced gastric cancer and progressed during or after first-line therapy. In stage one of the trial, patients were randomly assigned to treatment groups (2:2:1) to receive intravenous trastuzumab emtansine (3·6 mg/kg every 3 weeks or 2·4 mg/kg weekly) or physician's choice of a taxane (intravenous docetaxel 75 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks or intravenous paclitaxel 80 mg/m(2) weekly). In stage two, patients were randomly assigned to treatment groups (2:1) to receive the independent data monitoring committee (IDMC)-selected dose of trastuzumab emtansine (2·4 mg/kg weekly) or a taxane (same regimen as above). We used permuted block randomisation, stratified by world region, previous HER2-targeted therapy, and previous gastrectomy. The primary endpoint (overall survival) was assessed in the intention-to-treat population. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01641939. Between Sept 3, 2012, and Oct 14, 2013, 70 patients were assigned to receive trastuzumab emtansine 3·6 mg/kg every 3 weeks, 75 to receive trastuzumab emtansine 2·4 mg/kg weekly, and 37 to receive a taxane in the stage 1 part of the trial. At the pre-planned interim analysis (Oct 14, 2013), the IDMC selected trastuzumab emtansine 2·4 mg/kg weekly as the dose to proceed to stage 2. By Feb 9, 2015, a further 153 patients had been randomly assigned to receive

  20. Chronic Gastric Ischemia Leading to Gastric Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Lundsmith, Emma; Zheng, Matthew; McCue, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old man with diabetes, peripheral vascular disease, and hypertension presented with 3 months of diffuse abdominal pain that worsened with meals, weight loss, and dysphagia. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy and computed tomography revealed findings consistent with chronic gastric ischemia secondary to atherosclerosis. Gastric ischemia eventually led to perforation. We discuss causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and management of gastric ischemia, an underdiagnosed and potentially fatal condition that requires urgent diagnosis and treatment. PMID:28119945

  1. Oncogenic Transformation of Human-Derived Gastric Organoids.

    PubMed

    Bertaux-Skeirik, Nina; Centeno, Jomaris; Gao, Jian; Gabre, Joel; Zavros, Yana

    2016-08-19

    The culture of organoids has represented a significant advancement in the gastrointestinal research field. Previous research studies have described the oncogenic transformation of human intestinal and mouse gastric organoids. Here we detail the protocol for the oncogenic transformation and orthotopic transplantation of human-derived gastric organoids.

  2. A randomized phase II trial to elucidate the efficacy of capecitabine plus cisplatin (XP) and S-1 plus cisplatin (SP) as a first-line treatment for advanced gastric cancer: XP ascertainment vs. SP randomized PII trial (XParTS II).

    PubMed

    Tsuburaya, Akira; Morita, Satoshi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Michiya; Shitara, Kohei; Yamaguchi, Kensei; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Yoshino, Shigefumi; Sakamoto, Jun-ichi

    2012-07-23

    On the basis of international clinical trials, capecitabine plus cisplatin (XP) as a first-line treatment of advanced gastric cancer is considered a global standard regimen. However, the usefulness of XP as compared with S-1 plus cisplatin (SP), which is considered standard therapy in Japan, has not yet been assessed. This is a multicenter randomized phase II trial to elucidate the efficacy of XP as compared with SP for first-line treatment of advanced gastric cancer. Patients with unresectable metastatic or recurrent gastric cancer, 20-74 years of age and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2)-negative status, will be assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive either S-1 40 mg/m2 bid for 21 days plus cisplatin 60 mg/m2 (day 8) every 5-week cycle or capecitabine 1000 mg/m2 bid for 14 days plus cisplatin 80 mg/m2 (day 1) every 3-week cycle. Patients will be also asked to the analysis of tumor tissues for translational investigations. The Primary endpoint is progression-free survival and secondary endpoints are overall survival, time to treatment failure, tumor response rate and safety. These comparisons will also be evaluated in terms of biomarkers. Planned sample size is 100 (50 in each arm), which is appropriate for this trial. Fluoropyrimidine plus cisplatin combination is the standard regimen of the first line treatment for advanced gastric cancer. Both S-1 and capecitabine are the prodrug of 5-FU but differ from their process of metabolism. Result of this trial and translational research will provide the important clues to prepare the individualized therapy for advanced gastric cancer in the near future. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01406249.

  3. Practical Points in Gastric Pathology.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sangjeong; Park, Do Youn

    2016-05-01

    -The diagnosis of gastric epithelial lesions is difficult in clinical practice, even with the recent developments and advances in endoscopic modalities, owing to the diverse morphologic features of the lesions, lack of standardized diagnostic criteria, and the high intraobserver and interobserver variabilities in the nonneoplastic (regenerative)-neoplastic spectrum. -To provide an overview of the current concepts and unresolved issues surrounding the diagnosis of diseases in the nonneoplastic-neoplastic spectrum, and to discuss some noteworthy properties and histologic features of gastric epithelial lesions. -A comprehensive assessment of the medical literature on gastric epithelial lesions was performed; we also interjected our own experiences into the discussion. Sources included original studies, review articles, and textbooks related to the field. -Our literature review revealed that clear cell changes and micropapillary carcinoma components in gastric carcinomas are associated with poor clinical outcomes and should hence be included in pathologic reports. Moreover, we suggest a stepwise biopsy-endoscopic resection modality for the diagnosis of borderline neoplasia-nonneoplasia cases.

  4. Translating gastric cancer genomics into targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Ang, Yvonne L E; Yong, Wei Peng; Tan, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Gastric cancer is a common disease with limited treatment options and a poor prognosis. Many gastric cancers harbour potentially actionable targets, including over-expression and mutations in tyrosine kinase pathways. Agents have been developed against these targets with varying success- in particular, the use of trastuzumab in HER2-overexpressing gastric cancers has resulted in overall survival benefits. Gastric cancers also have high levels of somatic mutations, making them candidates for immunotherapy; early work in this field has been promising. Recent advances in whole genome and multi-platform sequencing have driven the development of molecular classification systems, which may in turn guide the selection of patients for targeted treatment. Moving forward, challenges will include the development of appropriate biomarkers to predict responses to targeted therapy, and the application of new molecular classifications into trial development and clinical practice.

  5. Gastric stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Ovali, Gülgün Yilmaz; Tarhan, Serdar; Serter, Selim; Pabuşçu, Yüksel

    2005-06-01

    Gastric stromal tumors are rare neoplasms of the stomach. In this report we present a gastric stromal tumor with an exophytic growth pattern, and describe magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopic ultrasonography findings.

  6. Concurrent Liposomal Cisplatin (Lipoplatin), 5-Fluorouracil and Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Locally Advanced Gastric Cancer: A Phase I/II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Koukourakis, Michael I.

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: Liposomal drugs have a better tolerance profile and are highly accumulated in the tumor environment, properties that promise an optimal radiosensitization. We investigated the feasibility of the combination of 5-fluorouracil/lecovorin-based radio-chemotherapy with the administration of high weekly dose of a liposomal platinum formulation (Lipoplatin{sup TM}). Methods and Materials: Lipoplatin was given at a dose of 120mg/m{sup 2}/week, 5-fluorouracil at 400mg/m{sup 2}/week (Day 1), whereas radiotherapy was given through 3.5-Gy fractions on Days 2, 3, and 4. Two groups of 6 patients received four and five consecutive cycles, respectively. Results: Minimal nephrotoxicity (18.2% Grade 1) and neutropenia (9% Grade 3) was noted. Fatigue Grade 2 appeared in 25% of cases. Abdominal discomfort was reported by 18% of patients. No liver, kidney, gastric, or intestinal severe acute or late sequellae were documented, although the median follow-up of 9 months is certainly too low to allow safe conclusions. A net improvement in the performance status (from a median of 1 to 0) was recorded 2 months after the end of therapy. The response rates assessed with computed tomography, endoscopy, and biopsies confirmed 33% (2 of 6) tumor disappearance in patients treated with four cycles, which reached 80% (4 of 5) in patients receiving five cycles. Conclusions: Lipoplatin radio-chemotherapy is feasible, with minor hematological and nonhematological toxicity. The high complete response rates obtained support the testing of Lipoplatin in the adjuvant postoperative or preoperative radio-chemotherapy setting for the treatment of gastric cancer.

  7. Capacitive proximity sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A proximity sensor based on a closed field circuit. The circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plates that creates an oscillating displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of objects to the plate array. Preferably the plates are in the form of a group of three pair of symmetric plates having a common center, arranged in a hexagonal pattern with opposing plates linked as a pair. The sensor produces logic level pulses suitable for interfacing with a computer or process controller. The proximity sensor can be incorporated into a load cell, a differential pressure gauge, or a device for measuring the consistency of a characteristic of a material where a variation in the consistency causes the dielectric constant of the material to change.

  8. Capacitive proximity sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    A proximity sensor based on a closed field circuit is disclosed. The circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plates that creates an oscillating displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of objects to the plate array. Preferably the plates are in the form of a group of three pair of symmetric plates having a common center, arranged in a hexagonal pattern with opposing plates linked as a pair. The sensor produces logic level pulses suitable for interfacing with a computer or process controller. The proximity sensor can be incorporated into a load cell, a differential pressure gauge, or a device for measuring the consistency of a characteristic of a material where a variation in the consistency causes the dielectric constant of the material to change. 14 figs.

  9. Effect of carbonated water on gastric emptying and intragastric meal distribution.

    PubMed

    Pouderoux, P; Friedman, N; Shirazi, P; Ringelstein, J G; Keshavarzian, A

    1997-01-01

    Carbonated water has long been advocated to relieve dyspeptic symptoms, suggesting that it may alter gastric motility via gastric distension. This study aimed to determine the effect of carbonated water on gastric emptying of a radiolabeled mixed meal in eight healthy volunteers. Meal emptying and its distribution within the stomach were assessed with carbonated and still water in a crossover study. Emptying of both solid and liquid, including the duration of the lag phase, was identical for both drinks. However, the proximal stomach contained a greater proportion of solids (74 +/- 7% vs 56 +/- 8%, P < 0.05) and liquids (43 +/- 5% vs 27 +/- 4%, P < 0.05) with carbonated water as opposed to still water. Retention of the meal within the proximal stomach ended with the lag phase and was likely related to proximal distension. In conclusion, carbonated water did not alter overall gastric emptying but profoundly modified intragastric distribution of the meal.

  10. Proximal Hamstring Repair Strength

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Margaret Ann; Singh, Hardeep; Obopilwe, Elifho; Charette, Ryan; Miller, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Background: Proximal hamstring repair for complete ruptures has become a common treatment. There is no consensus in the literature about postoperative rehabilitation protocols following proximal hamstring repair. Some protocols describe bracing to prevent hip flexion or knee extension while others describe no immobilization. There are currently no biomechanical studies evaluating proximal hamstring repairs; nor are there any studies evaluating the effect of different hip flexion angles on these repairs. Hypothesis: As hip flexion increases from 0° to 90°, there will be a greater gap with cyclical loading. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Proximal hamstring insertions were detached from the ischial tuberosity in 24 cadavers and were repaired with 3 single-loaded suture anchors in the hamstring footprint with a Krakow suture technique. Cyclic loading from 10 to 125 N at 1 Hz was then performed for 0°, 45°, and 90° of hip flexion for 1500 cycles. Gap formation, stiffness, yield load, ultimate load, and energy to ultimate load were compared between groups using paired t tests. Results: Cyclic loading demonstrated the least amount of gap formation (P < .05) at 0° of hip flexion (2.39 mm) and most at 90° of hip flexion (4.19 mm). There was no significant difference in ultimate load between hip flexion angles (326, 309, and 338 N at 0°, 45°, and 90°, respectively). The most common mode of failure occurred with knot/suture failure (n = 17). Conclusion: Increasing hip flexion from 0° to 90° increases the displacement across proximal hamstring repairs. Postoperative bracing that limits hip flexion should be considered. Clinical Relevance: Repetitive motion involving hip flexion after a proximal hamstring repair may cause compromise of the repair. PMID:26665049

  11. [Gastric and intestinal bezoars].

    PubMed

    Larbi, Noureddine; Kaâbi, Samarra; Ben Salah, Khiareddine

    2003-12-01

    The authors report a retrospective study of 10 cases of gastric and small bowel bezoars. There was one gastric trichobezoar diagnosed by an abdominal mass and 9 small bowel obstruction due to phytobezoars. All patients underwent surgery: the gastric trichobezoar was removed through a gastrotomy; small bowel bezoars were treated either by enterotomy (n = 3), fragmentation (n = 5) or bowel resection (n = 1). Non operative treatment is efficient in gastric phytobezoars. Surgery is advisable for trichobezoars and small bowel bezoars. Prevention is main and patients who have gastric surgery must be alarmed from consumption of cactus in our country Tunisia.

  12. Pathogenetic mechanisms in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jing; Qu, Yi-Ping; Hou, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a major public health issue as the fourth most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Recent advances have improved our understanding of its molecular pathogenesis, as best exemplified by elucidating the fundamental role of several major signaling pathways and related molecular derangements. Central to these mechanisms are the genetic and epigenetic alterations in these signaling pathways, such as gene mutations, copy number variants, aberrant gene methylation and histone modification, nucleosome positioning, and microRNAs. Some of these genetic/epigenetic alterations represent effective diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for GC. This information has now opened unprecedented opportunities for better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis and the development of novel therapeutic strategies for this cancer. The pathogenetic mechanisms of GC are the focus of this review. PMID:25320518

  13. Co-ordinated overexpression of SIRT1 and STAT3 is associated with poor survival outcome in gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Huang, Shuling; Deng, Chao; Cao, Yu; Yang, Jun; Chen, Guangxia; Zhang, Bin; Duan, Chaoqin; Shi, Jiong; Kong, Bo; Friess, Helmut; Zhao, Nanyi; Huang, Chen; Huang, Xiaoli; Wang, Lei; Zou, Xiaoping

    2017-03-21

    In many gastric cancer patients, the disease is diagnosed in an advanced stage and therefore the mortality levels are high. Because there is a need to identify novel early diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers, we tested whether SIRT1 and STAT3 are good candidates. Towards this, we used patient tissues representing different stages of gastric cancer including gastric pre-cancerous lesions, early gastric cancer, and advanced gastric cancer, and probed SIRT1, STAT3 and phosphorylated STAT3 (pSTAT3) levels using immunohistochemistry. Our results revealed upregulated expression of SIRT1 in all stages of gastric cancer compared with noncancerous gastric mucosa, suggesting that high SIRT1 levels are likely involved in establishing gastric neoplasticity. However, STAT3 and pSTAT3 levels remained low until the gastric mucosa reached the tumor stage. Moreover, co-ordinated high expression of SIRT1 and STAT3 predicted poor overall survival for advanced gastric cancer patients. In addition, through analysis of gastric cancer patients from the TCGA dataset, we identified SIRT2 as an independent prognostic factor in gastric cancer patients. We postulate that SIRT1 and STAT3 are potential early diagnostic and prognostic markers of gastric cancer. Our study also shows that SIRT1 acts a gatekeeper during gastric tumorigenesis.

  14. Antropyloroduodenal activity during gastric emptying of liquid meals in humans.

    PubMed

    Dooley, C P; Valenzuela, J E

    1988-07-01

    The present study examines the possible roles of the pylorus and the proximal duodenum in the gastric emptying of two liquid meals in six healthy volunteers. Gastric emptying of a saline meal (150 mM) and an acid meal (120 mM hydrochloric acid) were measured by the double-sampling dye dilution technique while antroduodenal motility was monitored with a continuously perfused catheter system. Pyloric region pressures were measured with a Dent sleeve. The acid meal (t1/2 = 13.5 +/- 1.8 min) emptied significantly (P less than 0.01) slower than the saline meal (t1/2 = 3.5 +/- 0.7 min). This slowing in the emptying of the acid meal was associated with significant (P less than 0.05) increments in tonic pyloric activity and phasic contractions of the proximal duodenum. Thus the gastric emptying of liquid meals is a complex process involving all components of the gastroduodenal region.

  15. Expression of the Matrix Metalloproteases 2, 14, 24, and 25 and Tissue Inhibitor 3 as Potential Molecular Markers in Advanced Human Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    de la Peña, Sol; Sampieri, Clara Luz; Ochoa-Lara, Mariana; León-Córdoba, Kenneth; Remes-Troche, José María

    2014-01-01

    Background. During progression of gastric cancer (GC), degradation of the extracellular matrix is mediated by the matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs): changes in the expression of these have been related to unfavorable prognosis in GC. Objective. To analyze the expression of certain MMPs and TIMPs in chronic superficial gastritis (SG) and GC. Methods. The expression of MMPs and TIMPs was determined using qRT-PCR; the expression was classified, using threshold cycle (CT) values, as very high (CT ≤ 25), high (CT = 26–30), moderate (CT = 31–35), low (CT = 36–39), or not detected (CT = 40). Strength of association was estimated between the proteins, which were detected by Western blot, and the risk of developing GC. Results. We found a high expression of MMP1, MMP2, MMP14, TIMP1, and TIMP3; moderate one of MMP9 and MMP25, and low one of MMP13 and MMP24 in both tissues. In absolute mRNA levels, significant differences were found in expression of MMP2, MMP24, and MMP25, which are overexpressed in GC compared with SG. The presence of the proteins MMP-14 and TIMP-3 was associated with the risk of developing GC. Conclusions. We consider that MMP2, MMP24, and MMP25 and the proteins MMP-14 and TIMP-3 could be candidates for prognostic molecular markers in GC. PMID:24669030

  16. Expression of the matrix metalloproteases 2, 14, 24, and 25 and tissue inhibitor 3 as potential molecular markers in advanced human gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    de la Peña, Sol; Sampieri, Clara Luz; Ochoa-Lara, Mariana; León-Córdoba, Kenneth; Remes-Troche, José María

    2014-01-01

    During progression of gastric cancer (GC), degradation of the extracellular matrix is mediated by the matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs): changes in the expression of these have been related to unfavorable prognosis in GC. To analyze the expression of certain MMPs and TIMPs in chronic superficial gastritis (SG) and GC. The expression of MMPs and TIMPs was determined using qRT-PCR; the expression was classified, using threshold cycle (C(T)) values, as very high (C(T) ≤ 25), high (C(T) = 26-30), moderate (C(T) = 31-35), low (C(T) = 36-39), or not detected (C(T) = 40). Strength of association was estimated between the proteins, which were detected by Western blot, and the risk of developing GC. We found a high expression of MMP1, MMP2, MMP14, TIMP1, and TIMP3; moderate one of MMP9 and MMP25, and low one of MMP13 and MMP24 in both tissues. In absolute mRNA levels, significant differences were found in expression of MMP2, MMP24, and MMP25, which are overexpressed in GC compared with SG. The presence of the proteins MMP-14 and TIMP-3 was associated with the risk of developing GC. We consider that MMP2, MMP24, and MMP25 and the proteins MMP-14 and TIMP-3 could be candidates for prognostic molecular markers in GC.

  17. Proximate Analysis of Coal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, Craig J.; Rais, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    This lab experiment illustrates the use of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to perform proximate analysis on a series of coal samples of different rank. Peat and coke are also examined. A total of four exercises are described. These are dry exercises as students interpret previously recorded scans. The weight percent moisture, volatile matter,…

  18. Traumatic proximal tibiofibular dislocation.

    PubMed

    Burgos, J; Alvarez-Montero, R; Gonzalez-Herranz, P; Rapariz, J M

    1997-01-01

    Proximal tibiofibular dislocation is an exceptional lesion. Rarer still is its presentation in childhood. We describe the clinical case of a 6-year-old boy, the victim of a road accident. He had a tibiofibular dislocation associated with a metaphyseal fracture of the tibia.

  19. Steerable Capacitive Proximity Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenstrom, Del T.; Mcconnell, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    Steerable capacitive proximity sensor of "capaciflector" type based partly on sensing units described in GSC-13377 and GSC-13475. Position of maximum sensitivity adjusted without moving sensor. Voltage of each driven shield adjusted separately to concentrate sensing electric field more toward one side or other.

  20. Proximate Analysis of Coal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, Craig J.; Rais, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    This lab experiment illustrates the use of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to perform proximate analysis on a series of coal samples of different rank. Peat and coke are also examined. A total of four exercises are described. These are dry exercises as students interpret previously recorded scans. The weight percent moisture, volatile matter,…

  1. Subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pascoe, M. K.; Low, P. A.; Windebank, A. J.; Litchy, W. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical, electrophysiologic, autonomic, and neuropathologic characteristics and the natural history of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy and its response to immunotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: For the 12-year period from 1983 to 1995, we conducted a retrospective review of medical records of Mayo Clinic patients with diabetes who had subacute onset and progression of proximal weakness. The responses of treated versus untreated patients were compared statistically. RESULTS: During the designated study period, 44 patients with subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy were encountered. Most patients were middle-aged or elderly, and no sex preponderance was noted. The proximal muscle weakness often was associated with reduced or absent lower extremity reflexes. Associated weight loss was a common finding. Frequently, patients had some evidence of demyelination on nerve conduction studies, but it invariably was accompanied by concomitant axonal degeneration. The cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration was usually increased. Diffuse and substantial autonomic failure was generally present. In most cases, a sural nerve biopsy specimen suggested demyelination, although evidence of an inflammatory infiltrate was less common. Of 12 patients who received treatment (with prednisone, intravenous immune globulin, or plasma exchange), 9 had improvement of their conditions, but 17 of 29 untreated patients (59%) with follow-up also eventually had improvement, albeit at a much slower rate. Improvement was usually incomplete. CONCLUSION: We suggest that the entity of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy is an extensive and severe variant of bilateral lumbosacral radiculoplexopathy, with some features suggestive of an immune-mediated cause. It differs from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in that most cases have a more restricted distribution and seem to be monophasic and self-limiting. The efficacy of immunotherapy is unproved

  2. Subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pascoe, M. K.; Low, P. A.; Windebank, A. J.; Litchy, W. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical, electrophysiologic, autonomic, and neuropathologic characteristics and the natural history of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy and its response to immunotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: For the 12-year period from 1983 to 1995, we conducted a retrospective review of medical records of Mayo Clinic patients with diabetes who had subacute onset and progression of proximal weakness. The responses of treated versus untreated patients were compared statistically. RESULTS: During the designated study period, 44 patients with subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy were encountered. Most patients were middle-aged or elderly, and no sex preponderance was noted. The proximal muscle weakness often was associated with reduced or absent lower extremity reflexes. Associated weight loss was a common finding. Frequently, patients had some evidence of demyelination on nerve conduction studies, but it invariably was accompanied by concomitant axonal degeneration. The cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration was usually increased. Diffuse and substantial autonomic failure was generally present. In most cases, a sural nerve biopsy specimen suggested demyelination, although evidence of an inflammatory infiltrate was less common. Of 12 patients who received treatment (with prednisone, intravenous immune globulin, or plasma exchange), 9 had improvement of their conditions, but 17 of 29 untreated patients (59%) with follow-up also eventually had improvement, albeit at a much slower rate. Improvement was usually incomplete. CONCLUSION: We suggest that the entity of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy is an extensive and severe variant of bilateral lumbosacral radiculoplexopathy, with some features suggestive of an immune-mediated cause. It differs from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in that most cases have a more restricted distribution and seem to be monophasic and self-limiting. The efficacy of immunotherapy is unproved

  3. Gastric cancer stem cells in gastric carcinogenesis, progression, prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kang; Dan, Zeng; Nie, Yu-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, the study of the mechanism of tumorigenesis has brought much progress to cancer treatment. However, cancer stem cell (CSC) theory has changed previous views of tumors, and has provided a new method for treatment of cancer. The discovery of CSCs and their characteristics have contributed to understanding the molecular mechanism of tumor genesis and development, resulting in a new effective strategy for cancer treatment. Gastric CSCs (GCSCs) are the basis for the onset of gastric cancer. They may be derived from gastric stem cells in gastric tissues, or bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. As with other stem cells, GCSCs highly express drug-resistance genes such as aldehyde dehydrogenase and multidrug resistance, which are resistant to chemotherapy and thus form the basis of drug resistance. Many specific molecular markers such as CD44 and CD133 have been used for identification and isolation of GCSCs, diagnosis and grading of gastric cancer, and research on GCSC-targeted therapy for gastric cancer. Therefore, discussion of the recent development and advancements in GCSCs will be helpful for providing novel insight into gastric cancer treatment. PMID:24833872

  4. [Eleven Patients with Gastric Cancer Who Received Chemotherapy after Stent Placement for Gastric Outlet Obstruction].

    PubMed

    Endo, Shunji; Nakagawa, Tomo; Konishi, Ken; Ikenaga, Masakazu; Ohta, Katsuya; Nakashima, Shinsuke; Matsumoto, Kenichi; Nishikawa, Kazuhiro; Ohmori, Takeshi; Yamada, Terumasa

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic placement of self-expandable metallic stents is reportedly effective for gastric outlet obstructions due to advanced gastric cancer, and is less invasive than gastrojejunostomy. For patients who have good performance status, we administer chemotherapy after stent placement, although the safety and feasibility of this chemotherapy have not yet been discussed in full. Between 2011 and 2015, 15 patients at our institution underwent endoscopic gastroduodenal stent placement for gastric outlet obstruction due to gastric cancer. Eleven of these patients were administered chemotherapy after stent placement. In our case series, we did not observe any specific adverse event caused by stent placement plus chemotherapy. Adverse events after chemotherapy included anemia of CTCAE Grade 3 in 7 patients. Stent-in-stent placement was needed in 2 patients. Neither stent migration nor perforation was observed. Therefore, chemotherapy after stent placement for gastric outlet obstruction due to gastric cancer was considered safe and feasible. Stent placement is useful not only as palliative care for patients with terminal-stage disease, but also as one of the multimodal therapeutic strategies for gastric cancer.

  5. [Anesthetic management for gastrectomy in two gastric cancer patients after coronary artery bypass grafting using right gastroepiploic artery].

    PubMed

    Kameyama, Naomitsu; Mishima, Yasunori; Itoh, Takahiko; Kano, Tatsuhiko

    2010-07-01

    We report two cases for anesthetic management of gastrectomy for gastric cancer which took place after receiving coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) using the right gastroepiploic artery (RGEA). The first patient was a 75-year-old man after CABG using the RGEA 14 years before. He was diagnosed with gastric cancer and was scheduled for total gastrectomy. Preoperative coronary angiography (CAG) showed complete occlusion of the right coronary artery (RCA), whereas RGEA was patent. Because percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was hard to perform on the occluded RCA, proximal gastrectomy was carried out without lymph node dissection. The surgeons judged the surgery enough for radical treatment. Surgery was accomplished without any problems. The second patient was a 76-year-old man after CABG using the RGEA 15 years before. He was diagnosed with advanced gastric cancer and was scheduled for distal gastrectomy. Preoperative CAG showed the RCA partially occluded and the RGEA remaining patent. He received the scheduled surgery after confirmation of the success of PCI, performed preoperatively for reperfusion of the occluded segments. Although the RGEA was incised during the surgery, gastrectomy was accomplished without any problems in the cardiac function.

  6. The tumor-stromal ratio as a strong prognosticator for advanced gastric cancer patients: proposal of a new TSNM staging system.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chunwei; Liu, Jiuyang; Yang, Guifang; Li, Yan

    2017-08-16

    Insufficient attention is paid to the underlying tumor microenvironment (TME) evolution, that resulting in tumor heterogeneity and driving differences in cancer aggressiveness and treatment outcomes. The morphological evaluation of the proportion of the stroma at the most invasive part of primary tumor (tumor-stromal ratio, TSR) in cancer is gaining momentum as evidence strengthens for the clinical relevance. Tissue samples from the most invasive part of the primary gastric cancer (GC) of 494 patients were analyzed for their TSR, and a new TSNM (tumor-stromal node metastasis) staging system based on patho-biological behaviors was established and assessed. TSR is a new and strong independent prognostic factor for GC patients. The likelihood of tumor invasion is increased significantly for patients in the stromal-high subgroup compared to those in the stromal-low subgroup (P = 0.011). The discrimination ability of TSR was not less than the TNM staging system and was better in patients with stages I and II GC. We integrated the TSR parameter into the TNM staging system and proposed a new TSNM staging system creatively. There were three new subgroups (IC, IIC, IIID). There were four major groups and 10 subgroups in the TSNM system. The difference in overall survival (OS) was statistically significant among all TSNM system (P < 0.005 for all). Deep analyses revealed well predictive performance of the TSNM (P < 0.001). This study confirms the TSR as a TME prognostic factor for GC. TSR is a candidate TME parameter that could easily be implemented in routine pathology diagnostics, and the TSNM staging system has been established to optimize risk stratification for GC. The value of the TSNM staging system should be validated in further prospective study.

  7. HER2 Status in Advanced or Metastatic Gastric, Esophageal, or Gastroesophageal Adenocarcinoma for Entry to the TRIO-013/LOGiC Trial of Lapatinib.

    PubMed

    Press, Michael F; Ellis, Catherine E; Gagnon, Robert C; Grob, Tobias J; Buyse, Marc; Villalobos, Ivonne; Liang, Zhiyong; Wu, Shafei; Bang, Yung-Jue; Qin, Shu-Kui; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Xu, Jianming; Park, Joon Oh; Jeziorski, Krzysztof; Afenjar, Karen; Ma, Yanling; Estrada, Monica C; Robinson, Douglas M; Scherer, Stefan J; Sauter, Guido; Hecht, J Randolph; Slamon, Dennis J

    2017-01-01

    HER2/ERBB2 status is used to select patients for HER2-targeted therapy. HER2/ERBB2 amplification/overexpression of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) adenocarcinomas was determined locally or in two central laboratories to select patients for the TRIO-013/LOGiC trial of chemotherapy with or without lapatinib. Patients selected locally had central laboratory confirmation of HER2 amplification for inclusion in the primary efficacy population. HER2 was assessed with PathVysion or IQ PharmDx FISH and HercepTest immunohistochemistry assays. Associations with outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Overall, HER2 status was determined in UGI cancers from 4,674 patients in a central laboratory for eligibility (1,995 cases) and for confirmation of local HER2 results (333 cases). Of 1,995 adenocarcinomas screened centrally, 322 (16.1%) had HER2-amplified disease with 29 (1.5%) showing HER2 genomic heterogeneity. Men and older patients had higher rates of amplification. Of 545 patients accrued to the trial (gastric, 87.3%; GEJ, 8.3% and esophageal cancer, 4.4%), 487 patients (89%) were centrally confirmed as having HER2-amplified disease. Concordance between central and local HER2 testing was 83%. Concordance between PathVysion and IQ PharmDx FISH assays was 99% and FISH in the two central laboratories was 95%. Lapatinib-treated Asian participants and those less than 60 years had significant improvement in progression-free survival (PFS), particularly among those whose cancers had 5.01-10.0 and >10.0-fold amplification of HER2 In conclusion, HER2 is commonly amplified in UGI adenocarcinomas with amplification highly correlated to overexpression, and HER2 amplification levels correlated with PFS. While HER2 genomic heterogeneity occurs, its prevalence is low. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(1); 228-38. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Efficacy and safety of capecitabine plus cisplatin in Japanese patients with advanced or metastatic gastric cancer: subset analyses of the AVAGAST study and the ToGA study.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kensei; Sawaki, Akira; Doi, Toshihiko; Satoh, Taroh; Yamada, Yasuhide; Omuro, Yasushi; Nishina, Tomohiro; Boku, Narikazu; Chin, Keisho; Hamamoto, Yasuo; Takiuchi, Hiroya; Komatsu, Yoshito; Saji, Shigehira; Koizumi, Wasaburo; Miyata, Yoshinori; Sato, Atsushi; Baba, Eishi; Tamura, Takao; Abe, Takashi; Ohtsu, Atsushi

    2013-04-01

    Capecitabine plus cisplatin (XP) is recognized as one of the global standard first-line chemotherapy regimens for patients with metastatic gastric cancer (mGC). Recent multinational phase III trials in mGC have been conducted with XP as the control arm, although no data on XP in Japanese patients with mGC have been published to date. The AVAGAST (XP ± bevacizumab in mGC) and ToGA (XP ± trastuzumab in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 [HER2]-positive mGC) studies were the first two global studies including Japanese mGC patients. The aim of this analysis was to investigate the efficacy and safety of XP in Japanese mGC patients, using AVAGAST and ToGA subgroup data. Efficacy and safety analyses were carried out in Japanese patients with mGC receiving XP alone, based on results from the AVAGAST and ToGA studies. There were differences in the target populations between the two studies; for example, the ToGA study limited patients to those with HER2-positive tumors; therefore, efficacy was evaluated separately. Ninety-four Japanese patients in the AVAGAST study and 50 in the ToGA study received XP alone. Median overall and progression-free survivals were 14.2 and 5.7 months, respectively, in the AVAGAST study, and 17.7 and 5.6 months, respectively, in the ToGA study. Overall response rates were 49.2 % in the AVAGAST and 58.5 % in the ToGA study. Adverse events were generally mild; the most common grade 3/4 events were neutropenia, anemia, anorexia, and nausea. XP is effective and well tolerated in Japanese patients with mGC, and could be one of the standard regimens for the first-line treatment in this cohort.

  9. Omeprazole promotes proximal duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion in humans.

    PubMed

    Mertz-Nielsen, A; Hillingsø, J; Bukhave, K; Rask-Madsen, J

    1996-01-01

    The proton pump inhibitor, omeprazole, surprisingly resulted in higher rates of proximal duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion than previously reported using an H2 receptor antagonist for gastric acid inhibition. Gastroduodenal perfusions were performed in healthy volunteers to evaluate whether this incidental finding is explained by more potent gastric acid inhibition by omeprazole or might be caused by the different mode of drug action. Basal and stimulated gastric and duodenal bicarbonate secretion rates were measured in the same subjects in control experiments (n = 17) and after pretreatment with high dose omeprazole (n = 17) and ranitidine (n = 9), respectively, by use of a technique permitting simultaneous measurements. Concentrations of bicarbonate were measured in the respective effluents by the method of back titration. Both omeprazole and ranitidine completely inhibited gastric acid secretion (pH 6.9 v 6.8; p > 0.05). Omeprazole caused higher rates of basal (mean (SEM)) (597 (48) v 351 (39) mumol/h; p < 0.02) and vagally stimulated (834 (72) v 474 (66) mumol/h; p < 0.02), but not acid stimulated (3351 (678) v 2550 (456) mumol/h; p > 0.05) duodenal bicarbonate secretion compared with control experiments. Also the combination of omeprazole and ranitidine increased (p = 0.05) duodenal bicarbonate secretion, while ranitidine alone caused no change in either basal or stimulated secretion. In the stomach basal as well as vagally stimulated bicarbonate secretion was independent of the means of acid inhibition. These results show that the proton pump inhibitor, omeprazole, promotes proximal duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion apparently independent of its gastric acid inhibitory effect. The mechanism of action remains speculative.

  10. Omeprazole promotes proximal duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Mertz-Nielsen, A; Hillingsø, J; Bukhave, K; Rask-Madsen, J

    1996-01-01

    The proton pump inhibitor, omeprazole, surprisingly resulted in higher rates of proximal duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion than previously reported using an H2 receptor antagonist for gastric acid inhibition. Gastroduodenal perfusions were performed in healthy volunteers to evaluate whether this incidental finding is explained by more potent gastric acid inhibition by omeprazole or might be caused by the different mode of drug action. Basal and stimulated gastric and duodenal bicarbonate secretion rates were measured in the same subjects in control experiments (n = 17) and after pretreatment with high dose omeprazole (n = 17) and ranitidine (n = 9), respectively, by use of a technique permitting simultaneous measurements. Concentrations of bicarbonate were measured in the respective effluents by the method of back titration. Both omeprazole and ranitidine completely inhibited gastric acid secretion (pH 6.9 v 6.8; p > 0.05). Omeprazole caused higher rates of basal (mean (SEM)) (597 (48) v 351 (39) mumol/h; p < 0.02) and vagally stimulated (834 (72) v 474 (66) mumol/h; p < 0.02), but not acid stimulated (3351 (678) v 2550 (456) mumol/h; p > 0.05) duodenal bicarbonate secretion compared with control experiments. Also the combination of omeprazole and ranitidine increased (p = 0.05) duodenal bicarbonate secretion, while ranitidine alone caused no change in either basal or stimulated secretion. In the stomach basal as well as vagally stimulated bicarbonate secretion was independent of the means of acid inhibition. These results show that the proton pump inhibitor, omeprazole, promotes proximal duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion apparently independent of its gastric acid inhibitory effect. The mechanism of action remains speculative. PMID:8566861

  11. Molecular Classification of Gastric Cancer: A new paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Manish A.; Khanin, Raya; Tang, Laura; Janjigian, Yelena Y.; Klimstra, David S.; Gerdes, Hans; Kelsen, David P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Gastric cancer may be subdivided into three distinct subtypes –proximal, diffuse, and distal gastric cancer– based on histopathologic and anatomic criteria. Each subtype is associated with unique epidemiology. Our aim is to test the hypothesis that these distinct gastric cancer subtypes may also be distinguished by gene expression analysis. Experimental Design Patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma being screened for a phase II preoperative clinical trial (NCI 5917) underwent endoscopic biopsy for fresh tumor procurement. 4–6 targeted biopsies of the primary tumor were obtained. Macrodissection was performed to ensure >80% carcinoma in the sample. HG-U133A GeneChip (Affymetrix) was used for cDNA expression analysis, and all arrays were processed and analyzed using the Bioconductor R-package. Results Between November 2003 and January 2006, 57 patients were screened to identify 36 patients with localized gastric cancer who had adequate RNA for expression analysis. Using supervised analysis, we built a classifier to distinguish the three gastric cancer subtypes, successfully classifying each into tightly grouped clusters. Leave-one-out cross validation error was 0.14, suggesting that >85% of samples were classified correctly. Gene set analysis with the False Discovery Rate set at 0.25 identified several pathways that were differentially regulated when comparing each gastric cancer subtype to adjacent normal stomach. Conclusions Subtypes of gastric cancer that have epidemiologic and histologic distinction are also distinguished by gene expression data. These preliminary data suggest a new classification of gastric cancer with implications for improving our understanding of disease biology and identification of unique molecular drivers for each gastric cancer subtype. PMID:21430069

  12. Guilty as charged: bugs and drugs in gastric ulcer.

    PubMed

    Sontag, S J

    1997-08-01

    Gastric ulcer disease remains a cause of hemorrhage, perforation, outlet obstruction, and death. Recent advances in the understanding of peptic ulcer disease indicate that infection with Helicobacter pylori and ingestion of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the cause of almost all gastric and duodenal ulcers. Our therapy, therefore, is in a state of transition: the old acid-suppressive temporary therapy that allows frequent ulcer recurrences and complications is being replaced by curative therapies. The old therapy, by reducing gastric acid secretion or enhancing gastric mucosal defenses, inhibited the cofactors needed for ulcer development. Acid suppression relieved symptoms and healed ulcers, while defense enhancers, such as prostaglandin analogs healed and prevented acute NSAID-induced gastric ulcers. These benefits were maintained, however, only as long as acid-reducing agents or mucosal defense enhancers were continued. On the other hand, curative therapies (such as eradicating H. pylori infection and/or stopping the use of NSAIDs) eliminate the causes of ulcer. Curative combination regimens consisting of antibiotics, ranitidine bismuth citrate, bismuth, and proton pump inhibitors have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. These new regimens can cure benign gastric ulcer. Unfortunately, we cannot always determine which gastric ulcers are benign, and concern about gastric cancer remains. All gastric ulcers therefore still require biopsy and histological examination. With new treatment regimens, the time may be rapidly approaching when ulcer disease will be "history."

  13. ABCC2-24C > T polymorphism is associated with the response to platinum/5-Fu-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and better clinical outcomes in advanced gastric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Fei; Li, Shuangxi; Li, Zhongwu; Xiao, Aitang; Xing, Zhaodong; Xue, Kan; Li, Zhemin; Hu, Ying; Jia, Yongning; Miao, Rulin; Zhang, Lianhai; Bu, Zhaode; Wu, Aiwen; Ji, Jiafu

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have evaluated the efficacy of neoadjuvant treatment using oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidines in advanced gastric cancer (GC). However, preoperative biomarkers predictive of clinical outcome remain lacking. We examined polymorphisms in the MTHFR, DPYD, UMPS, ABCB1, ABCC2, GSTP1, ERCC1, and XRCC1 genes to evaluate their usefulness as pharmacogenetic markers in a cohort of 103 GC patients treated with preoperative chemotherapy. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood cells, and the genotypes were analyzed using a SNaPShotTM assay, polymerase chain reaction amplification, and sequencing. The ABCC2-24C > T (rs717620) genotype was associated with pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Patients with the TT and TC genotypes responded to neoadjuvant chemotherapy 3.80 times more often than those with the CC genotype (95% CI: 1.27–11.32). Patients with the CC genotype also had poorer outcomes than those with other genotypes. Thus, ABCC2-24C > T polymorphism may help to predict the response to preoperative chemotherapy in GC patients. PMID:27487151

  14. HER2 therapies and gastric cancer: A step forward

    PubMed Central

    de Mello, Ramon Andrade; Marques, Andrea Marin; Araújo, António

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer usually is diagnosed in advanced stages and thus current medical practice affords limited therapeutic options. However, recent studies established the role of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in clinical management. Trastuzumab, an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, acquired a main role in advanced gastric cancer harboring HER2 overexpression and/or amplification improving survival to 17.1 mo according to trastuzumab for gastric cancer phase III trial results. Also, new promising drugs, such as c-Met inhibitors, are in development and assessment for this setting. Certainly, novel drugs will emerge in the next feel years for help oncologists improve clinical management of advanced gastric cancer providing higher survival and quality of life. In this mini-review we will discuss some issues in this regard and provide an actual overview of this setting. PMID:24115812

  15. Proximity Networks and Epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guclu, Hasan; Toroczkai, Zoltán

    2007-03-01

    We presented the basis of a framework to account for the dynamics of contacts in epidemic processes, through the notion of dynamic proximity graphs. By varying the integration time-parameter T, which is the period of infectivity one can give a simple account for some of the differences in the observed contact networks for different diseases, such as smallpox, or AIDS. Our simplistic model also seems to shed some light on the shape of the degree distribution of the measured people-people contact network from the EPISIM data. We certainly do not claim that the simplistic graph integration model above is a good model for dynamic contact graphs. It only contains the essential ingredients for such processes to produce a qualitative agreement with some observations. We expect that further refinements and extensions to this picture, in particular deriving the link-probabilities in the dynamic proximity graph from more realistic contact dynamics should improve the agreement between models and data.

  16. Gastric microbiota and carcinogenesis: the role of non-Helicobacter pylori bacteria - A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Dias-Jácome, Emanuel; Libânio, Diogo; Borges-Canha, Marta; Galaghar, Ana; Pimentel-Nunes, Pedro

    2016-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor for gastric cancer. However, recent advances in DNA sequencing technology have revealed a complex microbial community in the stomach that could also contribute to the development of gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to present recent scientific evidence regarding the role of non-Helicobacter pylori bacteria in gastric carcinogenesis. A systematic review of original articles published in PubMed in the last ten years related to gastric microbiota and gastric cancer in humans was performed. Thirteen original articles were included. The constitution of gastric microbiota appears to be significantly affected by gastric cancer and premalignant lesions. In fact, differences in gastric microbiota have been documented, depending on Helicobacter pylori status and gastric conditions, such as non-atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and cancer. Gastric carcinogenesis can be associated with an increase in many bacteria (such as Lactobacillus coleohominis, Klebsiella pneumoniae or Acinetobacter baumannii) as well as decrease in others (such as Porphyromonas spp, Neisseria spp, Prevotella pallens or Streptococcus sinensis). However, there is no conclusive data that confirms if these changes in microbiota are a cause or consequence of the process of carcinogenesis. Even though there is limited evidence in humans, microbiota differences between normal individuals, pre-malignant lesions and gastric cancer could suggest a progressive shift in the constitution of gastric microbiota in carcinogenesis, possibly resulting from a complex cross-talk between gastric microbiota and Helicobacter pylori. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the specific role (if any) of different microorganisms.

  17. [Volumes of lymphadenectomy in gastric cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Cherniavskiĭ, A A; Lavrov, N A

    2015-01-01

    It is summarized an experience of 1528 resections for gastric cancer supplemented by D1-, D2-, D2,5- and D3-lymphadenectomy in 751, 241, 359 and 177 patients resrectively. Unconventional type D2.5 means D2-lymphodis section with additional lymphadenectomy along hepatoduodenal ligament and superior retropancreatic nodes as well as omental bursa removal with lymphodis section of esophageal opening crura. Analysis of immediate and remote results is presented. It is concluded that D3-lymphadenectomy is minimally preferred over D2.5-type in gastric cancer staging. D3-lymphodis section has the largest number of especially purulent and pancreatogenic postoperative complications. D2.5-lymphadenectomy significantly increases 5-year survival in comparison with D2-lymphodis section (from 51.2 ± 4.9 to 64.0 ± 4.1%; p<0.001) and may be chosen for any radical surgery for gastric cancer including early forms. Localized proximal tumors which are in distinctive for metastasis into hepatoduodenal ligament lymph nodes are exception. D3-lymphodis section did not impact on survival in comparison with D2,5-lymphadenectomy. Only patients with antral cancer after distal subtotal gastric resection had 5-year survival increasing on 8 % (from 60.6 ± 7.5 to 68.5 ± 6.3%).

  18. Prognostic value of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio in advanced oesophago-gastric cancer: exploratory analysis of the REAL-2 trial.

    PubMed

    Grenader, T; Waddell, T; Peckitt, C; Oates, J; Starling, N; Cunningham, D; Bridgewater, J

    2016-04-01

    The REAL-2 trial demonstrated that capecitabine and oxaliplatin were effective alternatives to fluorouracil and cisplatin, respectively, when used in triplet chemotherapy regimens for previously untreated oesophago-gastric cancer. The aim of the current analysis was to evaluate the prognostic value of the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) in the REAL-2 cohort. A post hoc exploratory analysis was carried out on REAL-2 patients with the available absolute neutrophil count and absolute lymphocyte count. A high NLR was defined using a cut-off value of >3.0. The NLR was then correlated with clinical outcomes including overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS) and objective response rate. Survival curves were generated using the Kaplan-Meier method and comparison between groups was carried out using Cox regression. Data were available in 908 of the 1002 REAL-2 participants. Of these, 516 (56.8%) were deemed to have a high NLR. In univariate analysis, high NLR was associated with a hazard ratio (HR) for OS of 1.73 (1.50-2.00), P < 0.001, compared with low NLR, equating to median OS values of 9.1 [95% confidence interval (CI) 8.0-9.6] and 12.7 months (95% CI 10.8-14.4), respectively. The NLR remained highly significant for OS (P < 0.001) in a multivariate model including performance status, age, disease extent, presence of liver metastases and presence of peritoneal metastases. For PFS, high NLR was associated with an HR of 1.63 (1.41-1.87), P < 0.001, compared with low NLR in univariate analysis. No significant interaction was found between NLR status and treatment arm, 13% of all patients with low NLR achieving survival beyond 24 months compared with only 6% of patients with high NLR (P < 0.001). Our results confirm that high NLR status had a significant negative prognostic effect in the REAL-2 trial population. Based on the multivariate analysis, this effect was independent of other known prognostic factors. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford

  19. Gastric syphilis - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Tais Ferreira; Novis, Camila Freitas Lobo; Bottino, Caroline Bertolini; D'Acri, Antonio Macedo; Lima, Ricardo Barbosa; Martins, Carlos José

    2016-01-01

    Gastric syphilis is an uncommon extracutaneous manifestation of syphilis, occurring in less than 1% of patients, presenting nonspecific clinical manifestations. In general, it occurs on secondary stage. The critical point is the recognition of the syphilitic gastric involvement, without which there may be incorrect diagnosis of malignancy of the digestive tract. In this report, a case of secondary syphilis with gastric involvement that had complete remission with benzathine penicillin will be described. PMID:27828649

  20. Triple gastric peptic ulcer perforation.

    PubMed

    Radojkovic, Milan; Mihajlovic, Suncica; Stojanovic, Miroslav; Stanojevic, Goran; Damnjanovic, Zoran

    2016-03-01

    Patients with advanced or metastatic cancer have compromised nutritional, metabolic, and immune conditions. Nevertheless, little is known about gastroduodenal perforation in cancer patients. Described in the present report is the case of a 41-year old woman with stage IV recurrent laryngeal cancer, who used homeopathic anticancer therapy and who had triple peptic ulcer perforation (PUP) that required surgical repair. Triple gastric PUP is a rare complication. Self-administration of homeopathic anticancer medication should be strongly discouraged when evidence-based data regarding efficacy and toxicity is lacking.

  1. Endoscopic treatment for early gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Min, Yang Won; Min, Byung-Hoon; Lee, Jun Haeng; Kim, Jae J.

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains one of the most common causes of cancer death. However the proportion of early gastric cancer (EGC) at diagnosis is increasing. Endoscopic treatment for EGC is actively performed worldwide in cases meeting specific criteria. Endoscopic mucosal resection can treat EGC with comparable results to surgery for selected cases. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) increases the en bloc and complete resection rates and reduces the local recurrence rate. ESD has been performed with expanded indication and is expected to be more widely used in the treatment of EGC through the technological advances in the near future. This review will describe the techniques, indications and outcomes of endoscopic treatment for EGC. PMID:24782609

  2. High Levels of Aromatic Amino Acids in Gastric Juice during the Early Stages of Gastric Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Kai; Lin, Sanren; Zhou, Liya; Li, Yuan; Chen, Mo; Wang, Yingchun; Li, Yuwen

    2012-01-01

    Background Early-stage gastric cancer is mostly asymptomatic and can easily be missed easily by conventional gastroscopy. Currently, there are no useful biomarkers for the early detection of gastric cancer, and their identification of biomarkers is urgently needed. Methods Gastric juice was obtained from 185 subjects that were divided into three groups: non-neoplastic gastric disease (NGD), advanced gastric cancer and early gastric cancer (EGC). The levels of aromatic amino acids in the gastric juice were quantitated using high-performance liquid chromatography. Results The median values (25th to 75th percentile) of tyrosine, phenylalanine and tryptophan in the gastric juice were 3.8 (1.7–7.5) µg/ml, 5.3 (2.3–9.9) µg/ml and 1.0 (0.4–2.8) µg/ml in NGD; 19.4 (5.8–72.4) µg/ml, 24.6 (11.5–73.7) µg/ml and 8.3 (2.1–28.0) µg/ml in EGC. Higher levels of tyrosine, phenylalanine and tryptophan in the gastric juice were observed in individuals of EGC groups compared those of the NGD group (NGD vs. EGC, P<0.0001). For the detection of EGC, the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) of each biomarker were as follows: tyrosine, 0.790 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.703–0.877]; phenylalanine, 0.831 (95% CI, 0.750–0.911); and tryptophan, 0.819 (95% CI, 0.739–0.900). The sensitivity and specificity of phenylalanine were 75.5% and 81.4%, respectively, for detection of EGC. A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that high levels of aromatic amino acids in the gastric juice were associated with gastric cancer (adjusted β coefficients ranged from 1.801 to 4.414, P<0.001). Conclusion Increased levels of tyrosine, phenylalanine and tryptophan in the gastric juice samples were detected in the early phase of gastric carcinogenesis. Thus, tyrosine, phenylalanine and tryptophan in gastric juice could be used as biomarkers for the early detection of gastric cancer. A gastric juice analysis is an efficient, economical and convenient

  3. Gastrin and Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Waldum, Helge L.; Sagatun, Liv; Mjønes, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer although occurring in reduced frequency is still an important disease, partly because of the bad prognosis when occurring in western countries. This decline in occurrence may mainly be due to the reduced prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection, which is the most important cause of gastric cancer. There exist many different pathological classifications of gastric carcinomas, but the most useful seems to be the one by Lauren into intestinal and diffuse types since these types seldom transform into the other and also have different epidemiology. During the nearly 30 years that have passed since the groundbreaking description of Hp as the cause of gastritis and gastric cancer, a continuous search for the mechanism by which Hp infection causes gastric cancer has been done. Interestingly, it is mainly atrophic gastritis of the oxyntic mucosa that predisposes to gastric cancer possibly by inducing hypoacidity and hypergastrinemia. There are many arguments in favor of an important role of gastrin and its target cell, the enterochromaffin-like cell, in gastric carcinogenesis. The role of gastrin in gastric carcinogenesis implies caution in the long-term treatment with inhibitors of gastric acid secretion inducing secondary hypergastrinemia, in a common disease like gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:28144230

  4. Applications of nanotechnology in gastric cancer: detection and prevention by nutrition.

    PubMed

    Elingarami, Sauli; Liu, Ming; Fan, Jing; He, Nongyue

    2014-01-01

    New and emerging technologies, such as nanotechnology, have the potential to advance nutrition science by assisting in the discovery, development, and delivery of several intervention strategies to improve health and reduce the risk and complications of several diseases, including gastric cancer. This article reviews gastric cancer in relation to nutrition, discussing gastric carcinogenesis in-depth in relation to prevention of the disease by nutrition, as well as current detection approaches using nanotechnology. The current status of molecular nutritional biomarkers for gastric cancer is also discussed, as well as future strategies for the tailored management of gastric cancer.

  5. Improving the outcomes in gastric cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Tegels, Juul J W; De Maat, Michiel F G; Hulsewé, Karel W E; Hoofwijk, Anton G M; Stoot, Jan H M B

    2014-10-14

    Gastric cancer remains a significant health problem worldwide and surgery is currently the only potentially curative treatment option. Gastric cancer surgery is generally considered to be high risk surgery and five-year survival rates are poor, therefore a continuous strive to improve outcomes for these patients is warranted. Fortunately, in the last decades several potential advances have been introduced that intervene at various stages of the treatment process. This review provides an overview of methods implemented in pre-, intra- and postoperative stage of gastric cancer surgery to improve outcome. Better preoperative risk assessment using comorbidity index (e.g., Charlson comorbidity index), assessment of nutritional status (e.g., short nutritional assessment questionnaire, nutritional risk screening - 2002) and frailty assessment (Groningen frailty indicator, Edmonton frail scale, Hopkins frailty) was introduced. Also preoperative optimization of patients using prehabilitation has future potential. Implementation of fast-track or enhanced recovery after surgery programs is showing promising results, although future studies have to determine what the exact optimal strategy is. Introduction of laparoscopic surgery has shown improvement of results as well as optimization of lymph node dissection. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy has not shown to be beneficial in peritoneal metastatic disease thus far. Advances in postoperative care include optimal timing of oral diet, which has been shown to reduce hospital stay. In general, hospital volume, i.e., centralization, and clinical audits might further improve the outcome in gastric cancer surgery. In conclusion, progress has been made in improving the surgical treatment of gastric cancer. However, gastric cancer treatment is high risk surgery and many areas for future research remain.

  6. Improving the outcomes in gastric cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tegels, Juul JW; De Maat, Michiel FG; Hulsewé, Karel WE; Hoofwijk, Anton GM; Stoot, Jan HMB

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains a significant health problem worldwide and surgery is currently the only potentially curative treatment option. Gastric cancer surgery is generally considered to be high risk surgery and five-year survival rates are poor, therefore a continuous strive to improve outcomes for these patients is warranted. Fortunately, in the last decades several potential advances have been introduced that intervene at various stages of the treatment process. This review provides an overview of methods implemented in pre-, intra- and postoperative stage of gastric cancer surgery to improve outcome. Better preoperative risk assessment using comorbidity index (e.g., Charlson comorbidity index), assessment of nutritional status (e.g., short nutritional assessment questionnaire, nutritional risk screening - 2002) and frailty assessment (Groningen frailty indicator, Edmonton frail scale, Hopkins frailty) was introduced. Also preoperative optimization of patients using prehabilitation has future potential. Implementation of fast-track or enhanced recovery after surgery programs is showing promising results, although future studies have to determine what the exact optimal strategy is. Introduction of laparoscopic surgery has shown improvement of results as well as optimization of lymph node dissection. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy has not shown to be beneficial in peritoneal metastatic disease thus far. Advances in postoperative care include optimal timing of oral diet, which has been shown to reduce hospital stay. In general, hospital volume, i.e., centralization, and clinical audits might further improve the outcome in gastric cancer surgery. In conclusion, progress has been made in improving the surgical treatment of gastric cancer. However, gastric cancer treatment is high risk surgery and many areas for future research remain. PMID:25320507

  7. Clinicopathologic features and prognosis analysis of mucinous gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chunming; Li, Deming; Sun, Zhe; Zhang, Ting; Xu, Yan; Wang, Zhenning; Xu, Huimian

    2012-06-01

    Mucious gastric carcinoma (MGC) is a subtype of gastric carcinoma and its clinicopathologic features and prognosis still remain unclear. To investigate the clinical significance and surgical outcomes of mucinous gastric carcinoma, 2,769 patients with gastric carcinoma were analyzed in a case control study. We reviewed the records of 196 patients with mucinous gastric carcinoma and 2,573 with nonmucinous gastric carcinoma (NGC). Clinicopathologic features and survival rate of patients were analyzed. In all registered patients, patients with MGC had a larger size, more T3 and T4 invasion to the gastric wall, more positive lymph node metastasis, more III and IV stage and more positive peritoneal dissemination, but less curative gastrectomy. In curative gastrectomy patients, MGC had larger size, deeper invasion to gastric wall, more positive lymph node metastasis and more advanced TNM stage. The overall survival rate in curative gastrectomy patients with MGC was significantly lower than that for patients with NGC (P < 0.021). Age (P = 0.001), location of tumor (P < 0.001), Borrmann type (P = 0.037), depth of invasion (P < 0.001), lymph node metastasis (P < 0.001) and lymphovascular invasion (P = 0.001) were independent prognostic factors of gastric carcinoma, but MGC itself was not. The prognosis of MGC did not have significant difference compared with NGC. Frequently, MGC was of advanced stage at the time of diagnosis. Age, location of tumor, Borrmann type, depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis and lymphovascular invasion are independent prognostic factors of gastric carcinoma, but mucinous histological type itself is not. Further study on the origin and progression of MGC is needed in future.

  8. The role of leptin in gastric cancer: Clinicopathologic features and molecular mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kang Nyeong; Choi, Ho Soon; Yang, Sun Young; Park, Hyun Ki; Lee, Young Yiul; Lee, Oh Young; Yoon, Byung Chul; Hahm, Joon Soo; Paik, Seung Sam

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Leptin and Ob-R are expressed in gastric adenoma and early and advanced cancer. • Leptin is more likely associated with differentiated gastric cancer or cardia cancer. • Leptin proliferates gastric cancer cells via activating the STAT3 and ERK1/2 pathways. - Abstract: Obesity is associated with certain types of cancer, including gastric cancer. However, it is still unclear whether obesity-related cytokine, leptin, is implicated in gastric cancer. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the role of leptin in gastric cancer. The expression of leptin and its receptor, Ob-R, was assessed by immunohistochemical staining and was compared in patients with gastric adenoma (n = 38), early gastric cancer (EGC) (n = 38), and advanced gastric cancer (AGC) (n = 38), as a function of their clinicopathological characteristics. Gastric cancer cell lines were studied to investigate the effects of leptin on the signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) and extracellular receptor kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathways using MTT assays, immunoblotting, and inhibition studies. Leptin was expressed in gastric adenomas (42.1%), EGCs (47.4%), and AGCs (43.4%). Ob-R expression tended to increase from gastric adenoma (2%), through EGC (8%), to AGC (18%). Leptin induced the proliferation of gastric cancer cells by activating STAT3 and ERK1/2 and up-regulating the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Blocking Ob-R with pharmacological inhibitors and by RNAi decreased both the leptin-induced activation of STAT3 and ERK1/2 and the leptin-induced expression of VEGF. Leptin plays a role in gastric cancer by stimulating the proliferation of gastric cancer cells via activating the STAT3 and ERK1/2 pathways.

  9. Pediatric primary gastric lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Harris, G J; Laszewski, M J

    1992-04-01

    Primary gastric lymphoma in the pediatric population is rare. We have described a case of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (Burkitt's type) manifested as a gastric mass. Despite its rarity in children, this tumor should be treated aggressively, since long-term survival has been reported.

  10. [Ways to personalized medicine for gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Röcken, C

    2013-09-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common tumor and the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in the world. Approximately 70 % of the patients already have lymph node metastases at the time of the diagnosis leading to a median overall survival time of 16.7 months. Complete resection of the primary tumor with D2 lymphadenectomy offers the only chance of cure in the early stages of the disease. Survival of more locally advanced gastric cancer was improved by the introduction of perioperative, adjuvant and palliative chemotherapy of gastric cancer; however, the identification of novel predictive and diagnostic targets is urgently needed. Our own studies on gastric cancer biology identified several putative tumor biologically relevant G-protein-coupled receptors (e.g. AT1R, AT2R, CXCR4, FZD7, LGR4, LGR5, LGR6). Some of these receptors are also putative stem cell markers and may serve as future targets of an individualized therapy of gastric cancer.

  11. Echosonography with proximity sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaisiam, W.; Laithong, T.; Meekhun, S.; Chaiwathyothin, N.; Thanlarp, P.; Danworaphong, S.

    2013-03-01

    We propose the use of a commercial ultrasonic proximity sensor kit for profiling an altitude-varying surface by employing echosonography. The proximity sensor kit, two identical transducers together with its dedicated operating circuit, is used as a profiler for the construction of an image. Ultrasonic pulses are emitted from one of the transducers and received by the other. The time duration between the pulses allows us to determine the traveling distance of each pulse. In the experiment, the circuit is used with the addition of two copper wires for directing the outgoing and incoming signals to an oscilloscope. The time of flight of ultrasonic pulses can thus be determined. Square grids of 5 × 5 cm2 are made from fishing lines, forming pixels in the image. The grids are designed to hold the detection unit in place, about 30 cm above a flat surface. The surface to be imaged is constructed to be height varying and placed on the flat surface underneath the grids. Our result shows that an image of the profiled surface can be created by varying the location of the detection unit along the grid. We also investigate the deviation in relation to the time of flight of the ultrasonic pulse. Such an experiment should be valuable for conveying the concept of ultrasonic imaging to physical and medical science undergraduate students. Due to its simplicity, the setup could be made in any undergraduate laboratory relatively inexpensively and it requires no complex parts. The results illustrate the concept of echosonography.

  12. Proximity networks and epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toroczkai, Zoltán; Guclu, Hasan

    2007-05-01

    Disease spread in most biological populations requires the proximity of agents. In populations where the individuals have spatial mobility, the contact graph is generated by the “collision dynamics” of the agents, and thus the evolution of epidemics couples directly to the spatial dynamics of the population. We first briefly review the properties and the methodology of an agent-based simulation (EPISIMS) to model disease spread in realistic urban dynamic contact networks. Using the data generated by this simulation, we introduce the notion of dynamic proximity networks which takes into account the relevant time-scales for disease spread: contact duration, infectivity period, and rate of contact creation. This approach promises to be a good candidate for a unified treatment of epidemic types that are driven by agent collision dynamics. In particular, using a simple model, we show that it can account for the observed qualitative differences between the degree distributions of contact graphs of diseases with short infectivity period (such as air-transmitted diseases) or long infectivity periods (such as HIV).

  13. Obesity and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Yongning; Qiao, Liang

    2012-06-01

    Obesity is an important public health problem worldwide. It increases the risk of many chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Meanwhile, obesity is a major risk factor for several types of cancer including gastric cancer. Possible mechanisms linking obesity with gastric cancer may include obesity associated gastro-oesophageal reflux, insulin resistance, altered levels of adiponectin, leptin, ghrelin, and an abnormally increased blood level of insulin-like growth factor (IGF). Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a well-recognized risk factor for peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. Recent studies have revealed an increased prevalence of H. pylori infection in obese patients, providing another clue for the increased incidence of gastric cancer in obese population. If this connection can be confirmed in animal models and a large cohort of patients, then eradicating H. pylori together with life style modification in obese individuals may help prevent the development of gastric cancer in the increasingly obese population.

  14. Treatment of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Orditura, Michele; Galizia, Gennaro; Sforza, Vincenzo; Gambardella, Valentina; Fabozzi, Alessio; Laterza, Maria Maddalena; Andreozzi, Francesca; Ventriglia, Jole; Savastano, Beatrice; Mabilia, Andrea; Lieto, Eva; Ciardiello, Fortunato; De Vita, Ferdinando

    2014-01-01

    The authors focused on the current surgical treatment of resectable gastric cancer, and significance of peri- and post-operative chemo or chemoradiation. Gastric cancer is the 4th most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Surgery remains the only curative therapy, while perioperative and adjuvant chemotherapy, as well as chemoradiation, can improve outcome of resectable gastric cancer with extended lymph node dissection. More than half of radically resected gastric cancer patients relapse locally or with distant metastases, or receive the diagnosis of gastric cancer when tumor is disseminated; therefore, median survival rarely exceeds 12 mo, and 5-years survival is less than 10%. Cisplatin and fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy, with addition of trastuzumab in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive patients, is the widely used treatment in stage IV patients fit for chemotherapy. Recent evidence supports the use of second-line chemotherapy after progression in patients with good performance status PMID:24587643

  15. [Fixation of a non-adjustable gastric band using an anterior gastric wall cuff (randomized study)].

    PubMed

    Kasalický, M; Fried, M; Pesková, M; Bortlík, M; Votrubová, J

    2000-05-01

    We have been concerned with bariatric surgery at the First Surgical Clinic of th General Faculty Hospital, First Medical Faculty, Charles University Prague since 1983. In 1983-1986 vertical gastroplasties were made, between 1986 and 1993 non-adjustable gastric bands were provided by the laparotomic approach. Since 1993 when we were the first to implement a gastric band operation (GB) by the laparoscopic route, this method is used as the standard method. In 1993-1998 we made at the First Surgical Clinic 517 laparoscopic GB operation on account of morbid obesity in patients with a body mass index of 34-49 kg/m2. The group comprised 449 women and 59 men. The most frequent late complication in our group of morbidly obese patients who had a laparoscopically administered GB was in 5.1% enlargement of the proximal pouch above the GB by dilatation of its wall or slippage of the anterior wall proximally under the GB with a subsequent disorder of gastric evacuation and vomiting. We tried to reduce the incidence of this complication by fixing the GB by a cuff made from the anterior gastric wall. To test the effectiveness of the suggested fixation of the non-adjustable GB by a cuff we implemented in 1998-1999 a prospective randomized study in a group of 80 morbidly obese patients divided into experimental group n1-GB + C with the cuff and a control group n2-GB - C without a cuff. We investigated the incidence of the mentioned complication and the changed volume of the pouch above the GB after one year. Endoscopic assessment of the size of the pouch above the GB after surgery and after one year revealed that in group n1-GB + C the mean increase of the pouch volume was 14.6 ml, i.e. 124% of the original size, while in group n2-GB - C the mean increase of the volume was 33.6 ml, i.e. 154.1% of the original size (p < 0.001). Based on the assembled results and aware of the fact that small groups were involved, we should like to express the assumption that the suggested modification

  16. Molecular Epidemiology of Gastric Cancer: Current Status and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhibin; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Wei, Qingyi

    2007-01-01

    Gene-environment interaction appears to contribute to the etiology of gastric cancer, as suggested by the varying geographic patterns of gastric cancer incidence. Even in areas with a high rate Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, only a small proportion of infected individuals develop gastric cancer. It is likely that genetic factors, particularly relatively common genetic variants, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), may modulate the effects of environmental risk factors by regulating multiple biologic pathways involved in gastric carcinogenesis. Thus, common genetic variants can pose a substantial influence on the population attributable risk, even though the absolute risk associated with each of these variants may be low. Remarkable progress has been made in the field of molecular epidemiology, but it appears that an initial view on the magnitude of the effects of inherited variants was overestimated. Nevertheless, evidence suggests that genetic variants may contribute to the etiology of gastric cancer, particularly those SNPs in genes that are involved in inflammatory response, metabolism of chemical carcinogens, DNA repair, and tumor suppression. Although previous molecular epidemiologic studies of potentially functional polymorphisms in candidate genes and gastric cancer susceptibility lack consistency, they have advanced our knowledge of the role of genetic susceptibility in the etiology of gastric cancer. Future, welldesigned large population-based studies will validate current findings and provide the rationale for identifying at-risk subpopulations for primary prevention of gastric cancer. PMID:19262698

  17. Correlation between Fas and FasL proteins expression in normal gastric mucosa and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Gryko, Mariusz; Guzińska-Ustymowicz, Katarzyna; Pryczynicz, Anna; Cepowicz, Dariusz; Kukliński, Adam; Czyżewska, Jolanta; Kemona, Andrzej; Kędra, Bogusław

    2011-01-01

    The study's objective was to assess the expressions of Fas and FasL proteins in gastric cancer in correlation with chosen clinicohistological parameters. Fas and FasL expression was analyzed in 68 patients with gastric cancer, using the immunohistochemical method. The expression of Fas was found to be lower in gastric cancer cells than in healthy mucosa, both in the lining epithelium and in glandular tubes (28% vs. 48% and 44%; p < 0.001). The expression of FasL was also markedly lower in cancer cells than in glandular tubes, yet higher than in the lining epithelium (51% vs. 73% and 14%; p < 0.01). Positive expressions of FasL and Fas were lower in less advanced gastric cancer cells (T1, T2), than in more advanced tumors (T3, T4), but only in the case of FasL was this difference statistically significant (p < 0.05). Our findings seem to confirm the theory of the impact of apoptotic disorders at the level of Fas receptor and FasL protein in the process of gastric cancer formation and growth, which is manifested in the varied expressions of these proteins in gastric cancer and in the normal lining and glandular epithelium of the stomach. However, the lack of significant differences in the expressions of Fas and FasL in correlation to other clinicohistological parameters indicates the existence of mechanisms that have a greater impact on the process of differentiation of gastric cancers. This in our opinion eliminates these proteins as prognostic factors.

  18. Gastric Necrosis due to Acute Massive Gastric Dilatation

    PubMed Central

    Pergel, Ahmet; Yucel, Ahmet Fikret; Sahin, Dursun Ali; Ozer, Ender

    2013-01-01

    Gastric necrosis due to acute massive gastric dilatation is relatively rare. Vascular reasons, herniation, volvulus, acute gastric dilatation, anorexia, and bulimia nervosa play a role in the etiology of the disease. Early diagnosis and treatment are highly important as the associated morbidity and mortality rates are high. In this case report, we present a case of gastric necrosis due to acute gastric dilatation accompanied with the relevant literature. PMID:23983714

  19. Gastric cancer: The times they are a-changin’

    PubMed Central

    Satolli, Maria Antonietta; Buffoni, Lucio; Spadi, Rosella; Roato, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Even though during these last decades gastric cancer incidence decreased in Western countries, it remains endemic and with a high incidence in Eastern countries. The survival in advanced and metastatic stage of gastric cancer is still very poor. Recently the Cancer Genoma Atlas Research Network identified four subtypes with different molecular profiles to classify gastric cancer in order to offer the optimal targeted therapies for pre-selected patients. Indeed, the key point is still the selection of patients for the right treatment, on basis of molecular tumor characterization. Since chemotherapy reached a plateau of efficacy for gastric cancer, the combination between cytotoxic therapy and biological agents gets a better prognosis and decreases chemotherapeutic toxicity. Currently, Trastuzumab in combination with platinum and fluorouracil is the only approved targeted therapy in the first line for c-erbB2 positive patients, whereas Ramucirumab is the only approved targeted agent for patients with metastatic gastric cancer. New perspectives for an effective treatment derived from the immunotherapeutic strategies. Here, we report an overview on gastric cancer treatments, with particular attention to recent advances in targeted therapies and in immunotherapeutic approach. PMID:26600930

  20. Gastric cancer: The times they are a-changin'.

    PubMed

    Satolli, Maria Antonietta; Buffoni, Lucio; Spadi, Rosella; Roato, Ilaria

    2015-11-15

    Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Even though during these last decades gastric cancer incidence decreased in Western countries, it remains endemic and with a high incidence in Eastern countries. The survival in advanced and metastatic stage of gastric cancer is still very poor. Recently the Cancer Genoma Atlas Research Network identified four subtypes with different molecular profiles to classify gastric cancer in order to offer the optimal targeted therapies for pre-selected patients. Indeed, the key point is still the selection of patients for the right treatment, on basis of molecular tumor characterization. Since chemotherapy reached a plateau of efficacy for gastric cancer, the combination between cytotoxic therapy and biological agents gets a better prognosis and decreases chemotherapeutic toxicity. Currently, Trastuzumab in combination with platinum and fluorouracil is the only approved targeted therapy in the first line for c-erbB2 positive patients, whereas Ramucirumab is the only approved targeted agent for patients with metastatic gastric cancer. New perspectives for an effective treatment derived from the immunotherapeutic strategies. Here, we report an overview on gastric cancer treatments, with particular attention to recent advances in targeted therapies and in immunotherapeutic approach.

  1. Gastric Cancer with Peritoneal Tuberculosis: Challenges in Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Alshahrani, Amer Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report a 39-year-old female patient presenting with gastric cancer and tuberculous peritonitis. The differential diagnosis between advanced gastric cancer with peritoneal carcinomatosis and early gastric cancer with peritoneal tuberculosis (TB), and the treatment of these two diseases, were challenging in this case. Physicians should have a high index of suspicion for peritoneal TB if the patient has a history of this disease, especially in areas with a high incidence of TB, such as South Korea. An early diagnosis is critical for patient management and prognosis. A surgical approach including tissue biopsy or laparoscopic exploration is recommended to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:27433397

  2. Comprehensive characterization of the genomic alterations in human gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Juan; Yin, Yanbin; Ma, Qin; Wang, Guoqing; Olman, Victor; Zhang, Yu; Chou, Wen-Chi; Hong, Celine S.; Zhang, Chi; Cao, Sha; Mao, Xizeng; Li, Ying; Qin, Steve; Zhao, Shaying; Jiang, Jing; Hastings, Phil; Li, Fan; Xu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most prevalent and aggressive cancers worldwide, and its molecular mechanism remains largely elusive. Here we report the genomic landscape in primary gastric adenocarcinoma of human, based on the complete genome sequences of five pairs of cancer and matching normal samples. In total, 103,464 somatic point mutations, including 407 nonsynonymous ones, were identified and the most recurrent mutations were harbored by Mucins (MUC3A and MUC12) and transcription factors (ZNF717, ZNF595 and TP53). 679 genomic rearrangements were detected, which affect 355 protein-coding genes; and 76 genes show copy number changes. Through mapping the boundaries of the rearranged regions to the folded three-dimensional structure of human chromosomes, we determined that 79.6% of the chromosomal rearrangements happen among DNA fragments in close spatial proximity, especially when two endpoints stay in a similar replication phase. We demonstrated evidences that microhomology-mediated break-induced replication was utilized as a mechanism in inducing ~40.9% of the identified genomic changes in gastric tumor. Our data analyses revealed potential integrations of Helicobacter pylori DNA into the gastric cancer genomes. Overall a large set of novel genomic variations were detected in these gastric cancer genomes, which may be essential to the study of the genetic basis and molecular mechanism of the gastric tumorigenesis. PMID:25422082

  3. Ultimate and proximate explanations of strong reciprocity.

    PubMed

    Vromen, Jack

    2017-08-23

    Strong reciprocity (SR) has recently been subject to heated debate. In this debate, the "West camp" (West et al. in Evol Hum Behav 32(4):231-262, 2011), which is critical of the case for SR, and the "Laland camp" (Laland et al. in Science, 334(6062):1512-1516, 2011, Biol Philos 28(5):719-745, 2013), which is sympathetic to the case of SR, seem to take diametrically opposed positions. The West camp criticizes advocates of SR for conflating proximate and ultimate causation. SR is said to be a proximate mechanism that is put forward by its advocates as an ultimate explanation of human cooperation. The West camp thus accuses advocates of SR for not heeding Mayr's original distinction between ultimate and proximate causation. The Laland camp praises advocates of SR for revising Mayr's distinction. Advocates of SR are said to replace Mayr's uni-directional view on the relation between ultimate and proximate causes by the bi-directional one of reciprocal causation. The paper argues that both the West camp and the Laland camp misrepresent what advocates of SR are up to. The West camp is right that SR is a proximate cause of human cooperation. But rather than putting forward SR as an ultimate explanation, as the West camp argues, advocates of SR believe that SR itself is in need of ultimate explanation. Advocates of SR tend to take gene-culture co-evolutionary theory as the correct meta-theoretical framework for advancing ultimate explanations of SR. Appearances notwithstanding, gene-culture coevolutionary theory does not imply Laland et al.'s notion of reciprocal causation. "Reciprocal causation" suggests that proximate and ultimate causes interact simultaneously, while advocates of SR assume that they interact sequentially. I end by arguing that the best way to understand the debate is by disambiguating Mayr's ultimate-proximate distinction. I propose to reserve "ultimate" and "proximate" for different sorts of explanations, and to use other terms for distinguishing

  4. Gastric electromechanical dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Krygowska-Wajs, A; Lorens, K; Thor, P; Szczudlik, A; Konturek, S

    2000-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate gastric myoelectrical and mechanical activities in idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) patients. Twenty patients with IPD (14 male and 6 female, mean age 42 +/- 9 years) were studied. Patients were divided into two groups: group A--early stage of disease (no. = 6) and group B--advanced IPD (no. = 14). Electrogastrography (EGG) was performed in fasting and postprandial conditions (Synectics system). The cross-sectional area of the gastric antrum was measured by sonography (Hitachi EUB-240). The antral area in fasting conditions was 2.1 +/- 0.4 and 4.2 +/- 1.2 cm2 and gastric emptying was 75 +/- 5 and 125 +/- 12 min in groups A and B respectively. EGG showed dysrhythmias (range 1-6 cycles per minute) in about 75% of both groups of IPD patients without increase in signal amplitude after a meal. Our results suggest that gastric motility is particularly impaired in patients with advanced IPD. It may be caused by the primary degenerative process in the autonomic nervous system of the gut.

  5. Laparoscopy in the management of gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, E C; Karpeh, M S; Conlon, K C; Brennan, M F

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors determined the accuracy of laparoscopy in detecting metastatic disease in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The majority of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma in the United States present with advanced disease. They are at high risk for intraabdominal metastatic spread. METHODS: One hundred eleven patients with gastric adenocarcinoma underwent laparoscopy at Memorial-Sloan Kettering Cancer Center from December 1991 to December 1995. All were judged to be free of intra-abdominal metastatic disease on preoperative computed tomographic scan imaging. RESULTS: Laparoscopic exploration was successful in 110 of 111 patients and accurately staged 94% of the patients with respect to metastatic disease with a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 100%. The prevalence rate of metastatic disease was 37%. Twenty-four patients underwent laparoscopy only and were discharged in an average 1.4 days versus 6.5 days in patients undergoing exploratory laparotomy without resection (p < 0.05). No patients undergoing laparoscopy only have returned for palliative surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopy should be performed in nonobstructed, nonbleeding patients with advanced gastric cancer in the United States. More than one third of these patients have unsuspected metastatic disease at time of operation. Laparoscopy is highly accurate in detecting occult metastases and identifies a unique population of stage IV patients who may benefit from newer induction chemotherapeutic approaches while avoiding unnecessary laparotomy. Images Figure 4. PMID:9060581

  6. Microbial flora of the stomach after gastric bypass for morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Robson K; Faintuch, Joel; Paula, Ana M R; Risttori, Christiane A; Silva, Sabrina N; Gomes, Elaine S; Mattar, Rejane; Kuga, Rogerio; Ribeiro, Adriana S; Sakai, Paulo; Barbeiro, Hermes V; Barbeiro, Denise F; Soriano, Francisco G; Cecconello, Ivan

    2007-06-01

    The normal stomach is virtually sterile but the effect of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP) on bacterial flora in the used (very small proximal pouch) and unused (large bypassed) gastric chambers is not known. In a prospective study, this variable was documented. Bariatric subjects (n=37) were submitted to endoscopic examination of both gastric reservoirs via FUJINON enteroscope model EN-450P5, 7.3 +/- 1.4 years after RYGBP. Age was 42.4 +/- 9.9 years (70.2% females), preoperative BMI was 53.5 +/- 10.6, and current BMI was 32.6 +/- 7.8 kg/m2. Methods included quantitative culture of gastric secretion along with gastric pH and lactulose/hydrogen breath test. None of the subjects displayed diarrhea, malabsorption or other complaints suggestive of GI bacterial overgrowth. Elevated counts of bacteria and fungi were identified in both chambers, with predominance of aerobes and anaerobes, but not molds and yeasts, in the proximal stomach. Gram-positive cocci, bacilli and coccobacilli represented the majority of the isolates. Gastric pH was neutral (pH 7.0 +/- 0.2) in the proximal pouch, whereas the distal chamber mostly but not always conserved the expected acidity (pH 3.3 +/- 2.2, P<0.001). The breath test for bacterial overgrowth was positive in 40.5% of the population. 1) Frequent colonization of both gastric chambers was detected; 2) Aerobes, anaerobes and fungi were represented in both situations; 3) Gastric pH as well as bacterial count was higher in the functioning proximal stomach; 4) Breath test was positive in 40.5% of the subjects; 5) Clinical manifestation such as diarrhea, malabsorption or pneumonia were not demonstrated; 6) Further histologic and microbiologic studies of both the stomach and the small bowel are recommended.

  7. Hemiarthroplasty for proximal humeral fracture: restoration of the Gothic arch.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Sumant G; Bennion, Phillip W; Reineck, John R; Burkhead, Wayne Z

    2008-10-01

    Proximal humerus fractures are the most common fractures of the shoulder girdle, and initial management of these injuries often determines final outcome. When arthroplasty is used to manage proximal humeral fractures, surgery remains technically demanding, and outcomes have been unpredictable. Recent advances in both technique and prosthetic implants have led to more successful and reproducible results. Key technical points include restoration of the Gothic arch, anatomic tuberosity reconstruction, and minimal soft tissue dissection.

  8. [Empirical study in the relation of gastric mucosal lesion with gastric emptying and gastric acid secretion].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-feng; Xue, Ying-wei

    2008-09-01

    To study the precise cause and the specific procedure about gastric mucosal lesion in rats with water immersion-restraint stress(WRS). One hundred and forty-four Wistar rats were divided into 9 groups randomly: A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H and I group. There were 16 rats in each group. A, B and C groups underwent gastric emptying determination. Emptying rate of gastric fluid was determined with radiate nuclide (99m)Tc. D, E and F groups underwent gastric acid secretion determination after cleaning gastric contents and pylorus ligation. G, H and I groups underwent gastric acid secretion determination after pylorus ligation without cleaning gastric contents. Gastric mucosal lesion ulcer index(UI) was evaluated. The relationship between of gastric mucosal lesion and gastric emptying rate and gastric acid secretion were examined. Gastric emptying rate decreased obviously when the WRS time was prolonged. There were significant differences among B (WRS 2 h), C group (WRS 4 h) and A group (controlled group) (P<0.01). There was also significant difference between B and C group (P<0.01).The rats' gastric acid secretion was inhibited significantly. The differences among E (WRS 2 h), F (WRS 4 h) and D groups (controlled group) were significant (P<0.01). There was no significant difference between F and E groups (P>0.05). The gastric mucosal lesions were aggravated with time of stress. Gastric contents cleaning could effectively prevent gastric mucosal lesions originated by stress .The operation had no influence on this test. There were significant gastric mucosal lesion UI in B and C groups compared with A group (P<0.01). The difference between B and C group was significant (P<0.01).There were no gastric mucosal lesions in A, D, E, F and G groups. However, There was significant difference between I and F group (P<0.01). No significant difference were found among A, D, E, F and G groups (P>0.05). There were significant difference between H and B group and also between I and C group

  9. Some Properties of Fuzzy Soft Proximity Spaces

    PubMed Central

    Demir, İzzettin; Özbakır, Oya Bedre

    2015-01-01

    We study the fuzzy soft proximity spaces in Katsaras's sense. First, we show how a fuzzy soft topology is derived from a fuzzy soft proximity. Also, we define the notion of fuzzy soft δ-neighborhood in the fuzzy soft proximity space which offers an alternative approach to the study of fuzzy soft proximity spaces. Later, we obtain the initial fuzzy soft proximity determined by a family of fuzzy soft proximities. Finally, we investigate relationship between fuzzy soft proximities and proximities. PMID:25793224

  10. Some properties of fuzzy soft proximity spaces.

    PubMed

    Demir, İzzettin; Özbakır, Oya Bedre

    2015-01-01

    We study the fuzzy soft proximity spaces in Katsaras's sense. First, we show how a fuzzy soft topology is derived from a fuzzy soft proximity. Also, we define the notion of fuzzy soft δ-neighborhood in the fuzzy soft proximity space which offers an alternative approach to the study of fuzzy soft proximity spaces. Later, we obtain the initial fuzzy soft proximity determined by a family of fuzzy soft proximities. Finally, we investigate relationship between fuzzy soft proximities and proximities.

  11. Genetics of Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Strand, Matthew S; Lockhart, Albert Craig; Fields, Ryan C

    2017-04-01

    Gastric cancer represents a major cause of cancer mortality worldwide despite a declining incidence. New molecular classification schemes developed from genomic and molecular analyses of gastric cancer have provided a framework for understanding this heterogenous disease, and early findings suggest these classifications will be relevant for designing and implementing new targeted therapies. The success of targeted therapy and immunotherapy in breast cancer and melanoma, respectively, has not been duplicated in gastric cancer, but trastuzumab and ramucirumab have demonstrated efficacy in select populations. New markers that predict therapeutic response are needed to improve patient selection for both targeted and immunotherapies.

  12. A newly designed big cup nitinol stent for gastric outlet obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ding; Liao, Sheng-Hui; Geng, Jian-Ping

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To find out whether a newly designed big cup nitinol stent is suitable for treatment of patients with gastric outlet obstruction resulting from gastric cancer. METHODS: The new stent is composed of a proximal big cup segment (20 mm in length and 48-55 mm in diameter), a middle part (60 mm in length and 20 mm in diameter) covered by a polyethylene membrane and a distal sphericity (20 mm in length and 28 mm in diameter). Half of the proximal big cup segment is also covered by a polyethlene membrane, which is adjacent to the middle part of the stent. The stent is preloaded in a 6.0-mm-diameter introducer system. Thirteen patients with gastric outlet obstruction resulting from gastric cancer received the new stents under endoscopic and fluoroscopic guidance. RESULTS: Technical success was achieved in 12 of 13 (92.3%) patients. Among the 12 patients in whom endoscopic stent was placed successfully, the clinical success rate was 91.7% during a follow-up of average 6.5 mo. During the first month follow-up, the migration rate was 0%, recurrent obstruction 0% and gastric bleeding 8.3%. During the follow-up between 2-12 mo, no migration, recurrent obstruction and gastric bleeding occurred. CONCLUSION: The proximal big cup segment seems to be effective and promising for technical efficacy, clinical outcome, and preventing migration and tumor ingrowth and increasing the emptying rate of sinus ventriculi. PMID:20806440

  13. Short segment Barrett's esophagus and distal gastric intestinal metaplasia.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Judite; Chaves-E-Silva, Sílvia; Meurer, Luíse; Sekine, Setsuo; de Souza, Andréa Ribeiro; Meine, Gilmara Coelho

    2006-01-01

    Short segment Barrett's esophagus is defined by the presence of <3 cm of columnar-appearing mucosa in the distal esophagus with intestinal metaplasia on histophatological examination. Barrett's esophagus is a risk factor to develop adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. While Barrett's esophagus develops as a result of chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease, intestinal metaplasia in the gastric cardia is a consequence of chronic Helicobacter pylori infection and is associated with distal gastric intestinal metaplasia. It can be difficult to determine whether short-segment columnar epithelium with intestinal metaplasia are lining the esophagus (a condition called short segment Barrett's esophagus) or the proximal stomach (a condition called intestinal metaplasia of the gastric cardia). To study the association of short segment Barrett's esophagus (length <3 cm) with gastric intestinal metaplasia (antrum or body) and infection by H. pylori. Eight-nine patients with short segment columnar-appearing mucosa in the esophagus, length <3 cm, were studied. Symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease were recorded. Biopsies were obtained immediately below the squamous-columnar lining, from gastric antrum and gastric corpus for investigation of intestinal metaplasia and H. pylori. Forty-two from 89 (47.2%) patients were diagnosed with esophageal intestinal metaplasia by histopathology. The mean-age was significantly higher in the group with esophageal intestinal metaplasia. The two groups were similar in terms of gender (male: female), gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms and H. pylori infection. Gastric intestinal metaplasia (antrum or body) was diagnosed in 21 from 42 (50.0%) patients in the group with esophageal intestinal metaplasia and 7 from 47 (14.9%) patients in the group with esophageal columnar appearing mucosa but without intestinal metaplasia. Intestinal metaplasia is a frequent finding in patients with <3 cm of columnar-appearing mucosa in the distal esophagus. In

  14. Gastric cancer progression associated with local humoral immune responses.

    PubMed

    Yolanda, López-Vidal; Sergio, Ponce-de-León; Hugo, Esquivel-Solís; Isabel, Amieva-Fernández Rosa; Rafael, Barreto-Zúñiga; Aldo, Torre-Delgadillo; Gonzalo, Castillo-Rojas

    2015-11-21

    Although the association between H. pylori and gastric cancer has been well described, the alterations studies are scarce in the humoral immune response in specific anatomical areas of stomach and during the stages of gastric cancer. The aim in this study was to determine the influence of humoral immune responses against H. pylori infection on gastric carcinoma. We selected 16 gastric cancer cases and approximately one matched control per case at the National Institute of Medical Sciences and Nutrition Salvador Zubirán (INCMNSZ); all the cases met the inclusion criteria for the study. We obtained three biopsies from each patient and from each of the predetermined regions of the stomach: antrum, angular portion, corpus, and fundus. From the patients with gastric cancer, additional biopsy specimens were obtained from tumor mid-lesion and tumor margin, and additional specimens were collected at least 2 and 5 cm from the tumor margin. We compared IgA levels against H. pylori in each area of stomach between cases and controls as well as between early and advanced stages of gastric cancer. IgA values were strikingly elevated in cancer cases compared with control subjects; a value that was even higher in the distant periphery of tumor but was remarkably decreased toward the carcinoma lesion. The advanced stages of gastric cancer demonstrated the relapse of the humoral immune response in the mid-lesion region of the tumor compared with the tumor margins and adjacent non-tumor tissue. Gastric cancer is characterized by progressive accumulation of a concentrated, specific IgA response against H. pylori, beginning with an abnormal increase in the entire stomach but particularly in the adjacent non-tumor tissue. Thus, it is possible that this strong immune response also participates in some degree in the damage and in the development of gastric cancer to some extent.

  15. PEN-866 in Patients With Advanced Solid Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-31

    Carcinoma; Sarcoma; Rhabdomyosarcoma; Neoplasms; Small Cell Lung Cancer; Triple Negative Breast Cancer; Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Colorectal Carcinoma; Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Advanced Cancer; Solid Tumor; Solid Carcinoma

  16. Proximal Biceps Tenodesis

    PubMed Central

    Kovack, Thomas J.; Idoine, John D.; Jacob, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To (1) better define the anatomy of the proximal shoulder in relation to the long head of the biceps tendon, (2) compare the length-tension relationship of the biceps tendon in the native shoulder with that after arthroscopic and open tenodesis techniques using interference screws, and (3) provide surgical recommendations for both procedures based on study findings. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Twenty fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders were dissected for analysis. Initial anatomic measurements involving the proximal long head of the biceps tendon (BT) were made, which included: the labral origin to the superior bicipital groove (LO-SBG), the total tendon length (TTL), the musculotendinous junction (MTJ) to the inferior pectoralis major tendon border, the MTJ to the superior pectoralis major tendon border, and the biceps tendon diameter (