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Sample records for advanced quantum devices

  1. Efficient Multi-Dimensional Simulation of Quantum Confinement Effects in Advanced MOS Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biegel, Bryan A.; Ancona, Mario G.; Rafferty, Conor S.; Yu, Zhiping

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the density-gradient (DG) transport model for efficient multi-dimensional simulation of quantum confinement effects in advanced MOS devices. The formulation of the DG model is described as a quantum correction ot the classical drift-diffusion model. Quantum confinement effects are shown to be significant in sub-100nm MOSFETs. In thin-oxide MOS capacitors, quantum effects may reduce gate capacitance by 25% or more. As a result, the inclusion of quantum effects may reduce gate capacitance by 25% or more. As a result, the inclusion of quantum effects in simulations dramatically improves the match between C-V simulations and measurements for oxide thickness down to 2 nm. Significant quantum corrections also occur in the I-V characteristics of short-channel (30 to 100 nm) n-MOSFETs, with current drive reduced by up to 70%. This effect is shown to result from reduced inversion charge due to quantum confinement of electrons in the channel. Also, subthreshold slope is degraded by 15 to 20 mV/decade with the inclusion of quantum effects via the density-gradient model, and short channel effects (in particular, drain-induced barrier lowering) are noticeably increased.

  2. Efficient Multi-Dimensional Simulation of Quantum Confinement Effects in Advanced MOS Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biegel, Bryan A.; Rafferty, Conor S.; Ancona, Mario G.; Yu, Zhi-Ping

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the density-gradient (DG) transport model for efficient multi-dimensional simulation of quantum confinement effects in advanced MOS devices. The formulation of the DG model is described as a quantum correction to the classical drift-diffusion model. Quantum confinement effects are shown to be significant in sub-100nm MOSFETs. In thin-oxide MOS capacitors, quantum effects may reduce gate capacitance by 25% or more. As a result, the inclusion or quantum effects in simulations dramatically improves the match between C-V simulations and measurements for oxide thickness down to 2 nm. Significant quantum corrections also occur in the I-V characteristics of short-channel (30 to 100 nm) n-MOSFETs, with current drive reduced by up to 70%. This effect is shown to result from reduced inversion charge due to quantum confinement of electrons in the channel. Also, subthreshold slope is degraded by 15 to 20 mV/decade with the inclusion of quantum effects via the density-gradient model, and short channel effects (in particular, drain-induced barrier lowering) are noticeably increased.

  3. Quantum memories: emerging applications and recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Heshami, Khabat; England, Duncan G.; Humphreys, Peter C.; Bustard, Philip J.; Acosta, Victor M.; Nunn, Joshua; Sussman, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum light–matter interfaces are at the heart of photonic quantum technologies. Quantum memories for photons, where non-classical states of photons are mapped onto stationary matter states and preserved for subsequent retrieval, are technical realizations enabled by exquisite control over interactions between light and matter. The ability of quantum memories to synchronize probabilistic events makes them a key component in quantum repeaters and quantum computation based on linear optics. This critical feature has motivated many groups to dedicate theoretical and experimental research to develop quantum memory devices. In recent years, exciting new applications, and more advanced developments of quantum memories, have proliferated. In this review, we outline some of the emerging applications of quantum memories in optical signal processing, quantum computation and non-linear optics. We review recent experimental and theoretical developments, and their impacts on more advanced photonic quantum technologies based on quantum memories.

  4. Quantum memories: emerging applications and recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heshami, Khabat; England, Duncan G.; Humphreys, Peter C.; Bustard, Philip J.; Acosta, Victor M.; Nunn, Joshua; Sussman, Benjamin J.

    2016-11-01

    Quantum light-matter interfaces are at the heart of photonic quantum technologies. Quantum memories for photons, where non-classical states of photons are mapped onto stationary matter states and preserved for subsequent retrieval, are technical realizations enabled by exquisite control over interactions between light and matter. The ability of quantum memories to synchronize probabilistic events makes them a key component in quantum repeaters and quantum computation based on linear optics. This critical feature has motivated many groups to dedicate theoretical and experimental research to develop quantum memory devices. In recent years, exciting new applications, and more advanced developments of quantum memories, have proliferated. In this review, we outline some of the emerging applications of quantum memories in optical signal processing, quantum computation and non-linear optics. We review recent experimental and theoretical developments, and their impacts on more advanced photonic quantum technologies based on quantum memories.

  5. Quantum memories: emerging applications and recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Heshami, Khabat; England, Duncan G.; Humphreys, Peter C.; Bustard, Philip J.; Acosta, Victor M.; Nunn, Joshua; Sussman, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum light–matter interfaces are at the heart of photonic quantum technologies. Quantum memories for photons, where non-classical states of photons are mapped onto stationary matter states and preserved for subsequent retrieval, are technical realizations enabled by exquisite control over interactions between light and matter. The ability of quantum memories to synchronize probabilistic events makes them a key component in quantum repeaters and quantum computation based on linear optics. This critical feature has motivated many groups to dedicate theoretical and experimental research to develop quantum memory devices. In recent years, exciting new applications, and more advanced developments of quantum memories, have proliferated. In this review, we outline some of the emerging applications of quantum memories in optical signal processing, quantum computation and non-linear optics. We review recent experimental and theoretical developments, and their impacts on more advanced photonic quantum technologies based on quantum memories. PMID:27695198

  6. Advanced III/V quantum-structure devices for high performance infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehm, Robert; Walther, Martin; Schmitz, Johannes; Rutz, Frank; Fleissner, Joachim; Scheibner, Ralf; Ziegler, Johann

    2009-09-01

    A mature production technology for Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector (QWIP) focal plane arrays (FPAs) and InAs/GaSb superlattice (SL) FPAs has been developed. Dual-band and dual-color QWIP- and SL-imagers are demonstrated for the 3-5 μm and 8-12 μm atmospheric windows in the infrared. The simultaneous, co-located detection of both spectral channels resolves the temporal and spatial registration problems common to existing bispectral IRimagers. The ability for a reliable remote detection of hot CO2 signatures makes tailored dual-color superlattice imagers ideally suited for missile warning systems for airborne platforms.

  7. Advanced quantum noise correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogl, Ulrich; Glasser, Ryan T.; Clark, Jeremy B.; Glorieux, Quentin; Li, Tian; Corzo, Neil V.; Lett, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    We use the quantum correlations of twin beams of light to investigate the fundamental addition of noise when one of the beams propagates through a fast-light medium based on phase-insensitive gain. The experiment is based on two successive four-wave mixing processes in rubidium vapor, which allow for the generation of bright two-mode-squeezed twin beams followed by a controlled advancement while maintaining the shared quantum correlations between the beams. The demonstrated effect allows the study of irreversible decoherence in a medium exhibiting anomalous dispersion, and for the first time shows the advancement of a bright nonclassical state of light. The advancement and corresponding degradation of the quantum correlations are found to be operating near the fundamental quantum limit imposed by using a phase-insensitive amplifier.

  8. Advanced Resistive Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raboin, Jasen; Niebuhr, Jason; Cruz, Santana; Lamoreaux, chris

    2007-01-01

    The advanced resistive exercise device (ARED), now at the prototype stage of development, is a versatile machine that can be used to perform different customized exercises for which, heretofore, it has been necessary to use different machines. Conceived as a means of helping astronauts and others to maintain muscle and bone strength and endurance in low-gravity environments, the ARED could also prove advantageous in terrestrial settings (e.g., health clubs and military training facilities) in which many users are exercising simultaneously and there is heavy demand for use of exercise machines.

  9. Recent advances on integrated quantum communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orieux, Adeline; Diamanti, Eleni

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, the use of integrated technologies for applications in the field of quantum information processing and communications has made great progress. The resulting devices feature valuable characteristics such as scalability, reproducibility, low cost and interconnectivity, and have the potential to revolutionize our computation and communication practices in the future, much in the way that electronic integrated circuits have drastically transformed our information processing capacities since the last century. Among the multiple applications of integrated quantum technologies, this review will focus on typical components of quantum communication systems and on overall integrated system operation characteristics. We are interested in particular in the use of photonic integration platforms for developing devices necessary in quantum communications, including sources, detectors and both passive and active optical elements. We also illustrate the challenges associated with performing quantum communications on chip, by using the case study of quantum key distribution—the most advanced application of quantum information science. We conclude with promising perspectives in this field.

  10. Advanced Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, Michael S.; Maki, Paul A.; Kolodzey, James

    2007-06-01

    I. Wide band gap devices. Wide-Bandgap Semiconductor devices for automotive applications / M. Sugimoto ... [et al.]. A GaN on SiC HFET device technology for wireless infrastructure applications / B. Green ... [et al.]. Drift velocity limitation in GaN HEMT channels / A. Matulionis. Simulations of field-plated and recessed gate gallium nitride-based heterojunction field-effect transistors / V. O. Turin, M. S. Shur and D. B. Veksler. Low temperature electroluminescence of green and deep green GaInN/GaN light emitting diodes / Y. Li ... [et al.]. Spatial spectral analysis in high brightness GaInN/GaN light emitting diodes / T. Detchprohm ... [et al.]. Self-induced surface texturing of Al2O3 by means of inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching in Cl2 chemistry / P. Batoni ... [et al.]. Field and termionic field transport in aluminium gallium arsenide heterojunction barriers / D. V. Morgan and A. Porch. Electrical characteristics and carrier lifetime measurements in high voltage 4H-SiC PiN diodes / P. A. Losee ... [et al.]. Geometry and short channel effects on enhancement-mode n-Channel GaN MOSFETs on p and n- GaN/sapphire substrates / W. Huang, T. Khan and T. P. Chow. 4H-SiC Vertical RESURF Schottky Rectifiers and MOSFETs / Y. Wang, P. A. Losee and T. P. Chow. Present status and future Directions of SiGe HBT technology / M. H. Khater ... [et al.]Optical properties of GaInN/GaN multi-quantum Wells structure and light emitting diode grown by metalorganic chemical vapor phase epitaxy / J. Senawiratne ... [et al.]. Electrical comparison of Ta/Ti/Al/Mo/Au and Ti/Al/Mo/Au Ohmic contacts on undoped GaN HEMTs structure with AlN interlayer / Y. Sun and L. F. Eastman. Above 2 A/mm drain current density of GaN HEMTs grown on sapphire / F. Medjdoub ... [et al.]. Focused thermal beam direct patterning on InGaN during molecular beam epitaxy / X. Chen, W. J. Schaff and L. F. Eastman -- II. Terahertz and millimeter wave devices. Temperature-dependent microwave performance of

  11. Microstrip Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices for Quantum Information Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Feo, Michael P.

    Quantum-limited amplification in the microwave frequency range is of both practical and fundamental importance. The weak signals corresponding to single microwave photons require substantial amplification to resolve. When probing quantum excitations of the electromagnetic field, the substantial noise produced by standard amplifiers dominates the signal, therefore, several averages must be accumulated to achieve even a modest signal-to-noise ratio. Even worse, the back-action on the system due to amplifier noise can hasten the decay of the quantum state. In recent years, low-noise microwave-frequency amplification has been advancing rapidly and one field that would benefit greatly from this is circuit quantum electrodynamics (cQED). The development of circuit quantum electrodynamics—which implements techniques of quantum optics at microwave frequencies—has led to revolutionary progress in the field of quantum information science. cQED employs quantum bits (qubits) and superconducting microwave resonators in place of the atoms and cavities used in quantum optics permitting preparation and control of low energy photon states in macroscopic superconducting circuits at millikelvin temperatures. We have developed a microstrip superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) amplifier (MSA) to provide the first stage of amplification for these systems. Employing sub-micron Josephson tunnel junctions for enhanced gain, these MSAs operate at microwave frequencies and are optimized to perform with near quantum-limited noise characteristics. Our MSA is utilized as the first stage of amplification to probe the dynamics of a SQUID oscillator. The SQUID oscillator is a flux-tunable microwave resonator formed by a capacitively shunted dc SQUID. Josephson plasma oscillations are induced by pulsed microwave excitations at the resonant frequency of the oscillator. Once pulsed, decaying plasma oscillations are observed in the time domain. By measuring with pulse amplitudes

  12. Relationship between quantum repeating devices and quantum seals

    SciTech Connect

    He Guangping

    2009-07-15

    It is revealed that quantum repeating devices and quantum seals have a very close relationship, thus the theory in one field can be applied to the other. Consequently, it is shown that the fidelity bounds and optimality of quantum repeating devices for decoding quantum information can be violated when they are used for decoding classical information from quantum states and the security bounds for protocols sealing quantum data exist.

  13. Advanced resistive exercise device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raboin, Jasen L. (Inventor); Niebuhr, Jason (Inventor); Cruz, Santana F. (Inventor); Lamoreaux, Christopher D. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to an exercise device, which includes a vacuum cylinder and a flywheel. The flywheel provides an inertial component to the load, which is particularly well suited for use in space as it simulates exercising under normal gravity conditions. Also, the present invention relates to an exercise device, which has a vacuum cylinder and a load adjusting armbase assembly.

  14. Building devices from colloidal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Kagan, Cherie R; Lifshitz, Efrat; Sargent, Edward H; Talapin, Dmitri V

    2016-08-26

    The continued growth of mobile and interactive computing requires devices manufactured with low-cost processes, compatible with large-area and flexible form factors, and with additional functionality. We review recent advances in the design of electronic and optoelectronic devices that use colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). The properties of materials assembled of QDs may be tailored not only by the atomic composition but also by the size, shape, and surface functionalization of the individual QDs and by the communication among these QDs. The chemical and physical properties of QD surfaces and the interfaces in QD devices are of particular importance, and these enable the solution-based fabrication of low-cost, large-area, flexible, and functional devices. We discuss challenges that must be addressed in the move to solution-processed functional optoelectronic nanomaterials. PMID:27563099

  15. Advanced underwater lift device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanagan, David T.; Hopkins, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    Flexible underwater lift devices ('lift bags') are used in underwater operations to provide buoyancy to submerged objects. Commercially available designs are heavy, bulky, and awkward to handle, and thus are limited in size and useful lifting capacity. An underwater lift device having less than 20 percent of the bulk and less than 10 percent of the weight of commercially available models was developed. The design features a dual membrane envelope, a nearly homogeneous envelope membrane stress distribution, and a minimum surface-to-volume ratio. A proof-of-concept model of 50 kg capacity was built and tested. Originally designed to provide buoyancy to mock-ups submerged in NASA's weightlessness simulators, the device may have application to water-landed spacecraft which must deploy flotation upon impact, and where launch weight and volume penalties are significant. The device may also be useful for the automated recovery of ocean floor probes or in marine salvage applications.

  16. Silicon superconducting quantum interference device

    SciTech Connect

    Duvauchelle, J. E.; Francheteau, A.; Marcenat, C.; Lefloch, F.; Chiodi, F.; Débarre, D.; Hasselbach, K.; Kirtley, J. R.

    2015-08-17

    We have studied a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) made from a single layer thin film of superconducting silicon. The superconducting layer is obtained by heavily doping a silicon wafer with boron atoms using the gas immersion laser doping technique. The SQUID is composed of two nano-bridges (Dayem bridges) in a loop and shows magnetic flux modulation at low temperature and low magnetic field. The overall behavior shows very good agreement with numerical simulations based on the Ginzburg-Landau equations.

  17. Photoelectric devices with quantum coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanhe, Su

    A phtotoelectric device consisting of a three-level system contacted with two fermionic baths and a photon bath is built. Making the Born-Markov approximation, the equation of motion for the density operator in a Lindblad-like form is derived. We obtain the coherence and the efficiency of the system under the steady-state condition. Results show that quantum coherence can enhance the photoelectric conversion efficiency. The efficiency at maximum power can be larger than the CA efficiency bound with the existence of coherence.

  18. Beyond Moore's law: towards competitive quantum devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troyer, Matthias

    2015-05-01

    A century after the invention of quantum theory and fifty years after Bell's inequality we see the first quantum devices emerge as products that aim to be competitive with the best classical computing devices. While a universal quantum computer of non-trivial size is still out of reach there exist a number commercial and experimental devices: quantum random number generators, quantum simulators and quantum annealers. In this colloquium I will present some of these devices and validation tests we performed on them. Quantum random number generators use the inherent randomness in quantum measurements to produce true random numbers, unlike classical pseudorandom number generators which are inherently deterministic. Optical lattice emulators use ultracold atomic gases in optical lattices to mimic typical models of condensed matter physics. In my talk I will focus especially on the devices built by Canadian company D-Wave systems, which are special purpose quantum simulators for solving hard classical optimization problems. I will review the controversy around the quantum nature of these devices and will compare them to state of the art classical algorithms. I will end with an outlook towards universal quantum computing and end with the question: which important problems that are intractable even for post-exa-scale classical computers could we expect to solve once we have a universal quantum computer?

  19. Advanced Modeling of Micromirror Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalicek, M. Adrian; Sene, Darren E.; Bright, Victor M.

    1995-01-01

    The flexure-beam micromirror device (FBMD) is a phase only piston style spatial light modulator demonstrating properties which can be used for phase adaptive corrective optics. This paper presents a complete study of a square FBMD, from advanced model development through final device testing and model verification. The model relates the electrical and mechanical properties of the device by equating the electrostatic force of a parallel-plate capacitor with the counter-acting spring force of the device's support flexures. The capacitor solution is derived via the Schwartz-Christoffel transformation such that the final solution accounts for non-ideal electric fields. The complete model describes the behavior of any piston-style device, given its design geometry and material properties. It includes operational parameters such as drive frequency and temperature, as well as fringing effects, mirror surface deformations, and cross-talk from neighboring devices. The steps taken to develop this model can be applied to other micromirrors, such as the cantilever and torsion-beam designs, to produce an advanced model for any given device. The micromirror devices studied in this paper were commercially fabricated in a surface micromachining process. A microscope-based laser interferometer is used to test the device in which a beam reflected from the device modulates a fixed reference beam. The mirror displacement is determined from the relative phase which generates a continuous set of data for each selected position on the mirror surface. Plots of this data describe the localized deflection as a function of drive voltage.

  20. Individual carbon nanotubes for quantum electronic and quantum photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Nan

    2011-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising materials since their unique one dimensional geometry leads to remarkable physical properties such as ballistic transport, long mean free path, large direct band gaps, high mechanical tensile strength and strong exciton binding energies, which make them attractive candidates for applications in high-performance nanoelectronics and nanophotonics. CNT-based field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs) are considered to be ideally suited for future nanoelectronics. Single CNT-FETs made by depositing metal electrodes on top of individual CNTs with E-beam lithography have achieved great performance but are limited for massive large area integrated circuit fabrication. Therefore, this thesis demonstrates characteristics of CNT-FETs made by registered in-plane growth utilizing tailored nanoscale catalyst patterns and chemical vapor deposition (CVD), resulting in CNT arrays directly bridging source and drain. The demonstrated access to individual CNTs with pronounced semiconducting behavior opens also the possibility to form more advanced nanoelectronic structures such as CNT quantum dots. CNT-based single electron transistors (CNT-SETS) are promising for quantum electronic devices operating with ultra-low power consumption and allow fundamental studies of electron transport. In addition to existing CNT-SETS based on individual CNTs, we have fabricated the first CNT-SETS based on in-plane grown CNTs using the CVD technique. The demonstrated utilization of registered in-plane growth opens possibilities to create novel SET device geometries which are more complex, i.e. laterally ordered and scalable, as required for advanced quantum electronic devices. Blinking and spectral diffusion are hallmarks of nanoscale light emitters and a challenge for creating stable fluorescent biomarkers or efficient nonclassical light sources. The studies of blinking of CNTs are still in the explorative stage. In this thesis, I show the first experimental

  1. Completely device-independent quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, Edgar A.; Ramanathan, Ravishankar; Kofler, Johannes; Pawłowski, Marcin

    2016-08-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) is a provably secure way for two distant parties to establish a common secret key, which then can be used in a classical cryptographic scheme. Using quantum entanglement, one can reduce the necessary assumptions that the parties have to make about their devices, giving rise to device-independent QKD (DIQKD). However, in all existing protocols to date the parties need to have an initial (at least partially) random seed as a resource. In this work, we show that this requirement can be dropped. Using recent advances in the fields of randomness amplification and randomness expansion, we demonstrate that it is sufficient for the message the parties want to communicate to be (partially) unknown to the adversaries—an assumption without which any type of cryptography would be pointless to begin with. One party can use her secret message to locally generate a secret sequence of bits, which can then be openly used by herself and the other party in a DIQKD protocol. Hence our work reduces the requirements needed to perform secure DIQKD and establish safe communication.

  2. Fully device-independent quantum key distribution.

    PubMed

    Vazirani, Umesh; Vidick, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Quantum cryptography promises levels of security that are impossible to replicate in a classical world. Can this security be guaranteed even when the quantum devices on which the protocol relies are untrusted? This central question dates back to the early 1990s when the challenge of achieving device-independent quantum key distribution was first formulated. We answer this challenge by rigorously proving the device-independent security of a slight variant of Ekert's original entanglement-based protocol against the most general (coherent) attacks. The resulting protocol is robust: While assuming only that the devices can be modeled by the laws of quantum mechanics and are spatially isolated from each other and from any adversary's laboratory, it achieves a linear key rate and tolerates a constant noise rate in the devices. In particular, the devices may have quantum memory and share arbitrary quantum correlations with the eavesdropper. The proof of security is based on a new quantitative understanding of the monogamous nature of quantum correlations in the context of a multiparty protocol.

  3. Fully device-independent quantum key distribution.

    PubMed

    Vazirani, Umesh; Vidick, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Quantum cryptography promises levels of security that are impossible to replicate in a classical world. Can this security be guaranteed even when the quantum devices on which the protocol relies are untrusted? This central question dates back to the early 1990s when the challenge of achieving device-independent quantum key distribution was first formulated. We answer this challenge by rigorously proving the device-independent security of a slight variant of Ekert's original entanglement-based protocol against the most general (coherent) attacks. The resulting protocol is robust: While assuming only that the devices can be modeled by the laws of quantum mechanics and are spatially isolated from each other and from any adversary's laboratory, it achieves a linear key rate and tolerates a constant noise rate in the devices. In particular, the devices may have quantum memory and share arbitrary quantum correlations with the eavesdropper. The proof of security is based on a new quantitative understanding of the monogamous nature of quantum correlations in the context of a multiparty protocol. PMID:25325625

  4. A quantum optical firewall based on simple quantum devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amellal, H.; Meslouhi, A.; Hassouni, Y.; El Baz, M.

    2015-07-01

    In order to enhance the transmission security in quantum communications via coherent states, we propose a quantum optical firewall device to protect a quantum cryptosystem against eavesdropping through optical attack strategies. Similar to the classical model of the firewall, the proposed device gives legitimate users the possibility of filtering, controlling (input/output states) and making a decision (access or deny) concerning the traveling states. To prove the security and efficiency of the suggested optical firewall, we analyze its performances against the family of intercept and resend attacks, especially against one of the most prominent attack schemes known as "Faked State Attack."

  5. The QCAD Framework for Quantum Device Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Xujiao; Nielsen, Erik; Muller, Richard P; Young, Ralph Watson; Salinger, Andrew G; Carroll, Malcolm S

    2012-06-01

    We present the Quantum Computer Aided Design (QCAD) simulator that targets modeling quantum devices, particularly Si double quantum dots (DQDs) developed for quantum computing. The simulator core includes Poisson, Schrodinger, and Configuration Interaction solvers which can be run individually or combined self-consistently. The simulator is built upon Sandia-developed Trilinos and Albany components, and is interfaced with the Dakota optimization tool. It is being developed for seamless integration, high flexibility and throughput, and is intended to be open source. The QCAD tool has been used to simulate a large number of fabricated silicon DQDs and has provided fast feedback for design comparison and optimization.

  6. Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution.

    PubMed

    Lo, Hoi-Kwong; Curty, Marcos; Qi, Bing

    2012-03-30

    How to remove detector side channel attacks has been a notoriously hard problem in quantum cryptography. Here, we propose a simple solution to this problem--measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (QKD). It not only removes all detector side channels, but also doubles the secure distance with conventional lasers. Our proposal can be implemented with standard optical components with low detection efficiency and highly lossy channels. In contrast to the previous solution of full device independent QKD, the realization of our idea does not require detectors of near unity detection efficiency in combination with a qubit amplifier (based on teleportation) or a quantum nondemolition measurement of the number of photons in a pulse. Furthermore, its key generation rate is many orders of magnitude higher than that based on full device independent QKD. The results show that long-distance quantum cryptography over say 200 km will remain secure even with seriously flawed detectors.

  7. Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution.

    PubMed

    Lo, Hoi-Kwong; Curty, Marcos; Qi, Bing

    2012-03-30

    How to remove detector side channel attacks has been a notoriously hard problem in quantum cryptography. Here, we propose a simple solution to this problem--measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (QKD). It not only removes all detector side channels, but also doubles the secure distance with conventional lasers. Our proposal can be implemented with standard optical components with low detection efficiency and highly lossy channels. In contrast to the previous solution of full device independent QKD, the realization of our idea does not require detectors of near unity detection efficiency in combination with a qubit amplifier (based on teleportation) or a quantum nondemolition measurement of the number of photons in a pulse. Furthermore, its key generation rate is many orders of magnitude higher than that based on full device independent QKD. The results show that long-distance quantum cryptography over say 200 km will remain secure even with seriously flawed detectors. PMID:22540686

  8. Superconducting quantum-interference devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, P. N.; Holdeman, L. B.

    1975-01-01

    Published document discusses devices which are based on weak-link Josephson elements that join superconductors. Links can take numerous forms, and circuitry utilizing links can perform many varied functions with unprecedented sensitivity. Theoretical review of Josephson's junctions include tunneling junctions, point contact devices, microbridges, and proximity-effect devices.

  9. Quantum key distribution based on quantum dimension and independent devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong-Wei; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Chen, Wei; Wang, Shuang; Guo, Guang-Can; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a quantum key distribution (QKD) protocol based on only a two-dimensional Hilbert space encoding a quantum system and independent devices between the equipment for state preparation and measurement. Our protocol is inspired by the fully device-independent quantum key distribution (FDI-QKD) protocol and the measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) protocol. Our protocol only requires the state to be prepared in the two-dimensional Hilbert space, which weakens the state preparation assumption in the original MDI-QKD protocol. More interestingly, our protocol can overcome the detection loophole problem in the FDI-QKD protocol, which greatly limits the application of FDI-QKD. Hence our protocol can be implemented with practical optical components.

  10. Semiconductor quantum wells: old technology or new device functionalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbas, R. M.; Lo, Y. C.; Hsieh, K. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Reed, F. E.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, T.

    2009-08-01

    The introduction of semiconductor quantum wells in the 1970s created a revolution in optoelectronic devices. A large fraction of today's lasers and light emitting diodes are based on quantum wells. It has been more than 30 years but novel ideas and new device functions have recently been demonstrated using quantum well heterostructures. This paper provides a brief overview of the subject and then focuses on the physics of quantum wells that the lead author believes holds the key to new device functionalities. The data and figures contained within are not new. They have been assembled from 30 years of work. They are presented to convey the story of why quantum wells continue to fuel the engine that drives the semiconductor optoelectronic business. My apologies in advance to my students and co-workers that contributed so much that could not be covered in such a short manuscript. The explanations provided are based on the simplest models possible rather than the very sophisticated mathematical models that have evolved over many years. The intended readers are those involved with semiconductor optoelectronic devices and are interested in new device possibilities.

  11. ZnCdMgSe as a Materials Platform for Advanced Photonic Devices: Broadband Quantum Cascade Detectors and Green Semiconductor Disk Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Jesus, Joel

    The ZnCdMgSe family of II-VI materials has unique and promising characteristics that may be useful in practical applications. For example they can be grown lattice matched to InP substrates with lattice matched bandgaps that span from 2.1 to 3.5 eV, they can be successfully doped n-type, have a large conduction band offset (CBO) with no intervalley scattering present when strained, they have lower average phonon energies, and the InP lattice constant lies in the middle of the ZnSe and CdSe binaries compounds giving room to experiment with tensile and compressive stress. However they have not been studied in detail for use in practical devices. Here we have identified two types of devices that are being currently developed that benefit from the ZnCdMgSe-based material properties. These are the intersubband (ISB) quantum cascade (QC) detectors and optically pumped semiconductor lasers that emit in the visible range. The paucity for semiconductor lasers operating in the green-orange portion of the visible spectrum can be easily overcome with the ZnCdMgSe materials system developed in our research. The non-strain limited, large CBO available allows to expand the operating wavelength of ISB devices providing shorter and longer wavelengths than the currently commercially available devices. This property can also be exploited to develop broadband room temperature operation ISB detectors. The work presented here focused first on using the ZnCdMgSe-based material properties and parameter to understand and predict the interband and intersubband transitions of its heterostructures. We did this by studying an active region of a QC device by contactless electroreflectance, photoluminescence, FTIR transmittance and correlating the measurements to the quantum well structure by transfer matrix modeling. Then we worked on optimizing the ZnCdMgSe material heterostructures quality by studying the effects of growth interruptions on their optical and optoelectronic properties of

  12. Quantum heat engines and refrigerators: continuous devices.

    PubMed

    Kosloff, Ronnie; Levy, Amikam

    2014-01-01

    Quantum thermodynamics supplies a consistent description of quantum heat engines and refrigerators up to a single few-level system coupled to the environment. Once the environment is split into three (a hot, cold, and work reservoir), a heat engine can operate. The device converts the positive gain into power, with the gain obtained from population inversion between the components of the device. Reversing the operation transforms the device into a quantum refrigerator. The quantum tricycle, a device connected by three external leads to three heat reservoirs, is used as a template for engines and refrigerators. The equation of motion for the heat currents and power can be derived from first principles. Only a global description of the coupling of the device to the reservoirs is consistent with the first and second laws of thermodynamics. Optimization of the devices leads to a balanced set of parameters in which the couplings to the three reservoirs are of the same order and the external driving field is in resonance. When analyzing refrigerators, one needs to devote special attention to a dynamical version of the third law of thermodynamics. Bounds on the rate of cooling when Tc→0 are obtained by optimizing the cooling current. All refrigerators as Tc→0 show universal behavior. The dynamical version of the third law imposes restrictions on the scaling as Tc→0 of the relaxation rate γc and heat capacity cV of the cold bath.

  13. Quantum heat engines and refrigerators: continuous devices.

    PubMed

    Kosloff, Ronnie; Levy, Amikam

    2014-01-01

    Quantum thermodynamics supplies a consistent description of quantum heat engines and refrigerators up to a single few-level system coupled to the environment. Once the environment is split into three (a hot, cold, and work reservoir), a heat engine can operate. The device converts the positive gain into power, with the gain obtained from population inversion between the components of the device. Reversing the operation transforms the device into a quantum refrigerator. The quantum tricycle, a device connected by three external leads to three heat reservoirs, is used as a template for engines and refrigerators. The equation of motion for the heat currents and power can be derived from first principles. Only a global description of the coupling of the device to the reservoirs is consistent with the first and second laws of thermodynamics. Optimization of the devices leads to a balanced set of parameters in which the couplings to the three reservoirs are of the same order and the external driving field is in resonance. When analyzing refrigerators, one needs to devote special attention to a dynamical version of the third law of thermodynamics. Bounds on the rate of cooling when Tc→0 are obtained by optimizing the cooling current. All refrigerators as Tc→0 show universal behavior. The dynamical version of the third law imposes restrictions on the scaling as Tc→0 of the relaxation rate γc and heat capacity cV of the cold bath. PMID:24689798

  14. Practical characterization of quantum devices without tomography.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Marcus P; Landon-Cardinal, Olivier; Poulin, David

    2011-11-18

    Quantum tomography is the main method used to assess the quality of quantum information processing devices. However, the amount of resources needed for quantum tomography is exponential in the device size. Part of the problem is that tomography generates much more information than is usually sought. Taking a more targeted approach, we develop schemes that enable (i) estimating the fidelity of an experiment to a theoretical ideal description, (ii) learning which description within a reduced subset best matches the experimental data. Both these approaches yield a significant reduction in resources compared to tomography. In particular, we demonstrate that fidelity can be estimated from a number of simple experiments that is independent of the system size, removing an important roadblock for the experimental study of larger quantum information processing units. PMID:22181862

  15. Photovoltaic and thermophotovoltaic devices with quantum barriers

    DOEpatents

    Wernsman, Bernard R.

    2007-04-10

    A photovoltaic or thermophotovoltaic device includes a diode formed by p-type material and n-type material joined at a p-n junction and including a depletion region adjacent to said p-n junction, and a quantum barrier disposed near or in the depletion region of the p-n junction so as to decrease device reverse saturation current density while maintaining device short circuit current density. In one embodiment, the quantum barrier is disposed on the n-type material side of the p-n junction and decreases the reverse saturation current density due to electrons while in another, the barrier is disposed on the p-type material side of the p-n junction and decreases the reverse saturation current density due to holes. In another embodiment, both types of quantum barriers are used.

  16. Advancing colloidal quantum dot photovoltaic technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yan; Arinze, Ebuka S.; Palmquist, Nathan; Thon, Susanna M.

    2016-06-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are attractive materials for solar cells due to their low cost, ease of fabrication and spectral tunability. Progress in CQD photovoltaic technology over the past decade has resulted in power conversion efficiencies approaching 10%. In this review, we give an overview of this progress, and discuss limiting mechanisms and paths for future improvement in CQD solar cell technology.We briefly summarize nanoparticle synthesis and film processing methods and evaluate the optoelectronic properties of CQD films, including the crucial role that surface ligands play in materials performance. We give an overview of device architecture engineering in CQD solar cells. The compromise between carrier extraction and photon absorption in CQD photovoltaics is analyzed along with different strategies for overcoming this trade-off. We then focus on recent advances in absorption enhancement through innovative device design and the use of nanophotonics. Several light-trapping schemes, which have resulted in large increases in cell photocurrent, are described in detail. In particular, integrating plasmonic elements into CQD devices has emerged as a promising approach to enhance photon absorption through both near-field coupling and far-field scattering effects. We also discuss strategies for overcoming the single junction efficiency limits in CQD solar cells, including tandem architectures, multiple exciton generation and hybrid materials schemes. Finally, we offer a perspective on future directions for the field and the most promising paths for achieving higher device efficiencies.

  17. Quantum computing with realistically noisy devices.

    PubMed

    Knill, E

    2005-03-01

    In theory, quantum computers offer a means of solving problems that would be intractable on conventional computers. Assuming that a quantum computer could be constructed, it would in practice be required to function with noisy devices called 'gates'. These gates cause decoherence of the fragile quantum states that are central to the computer's operation. The goal of so-called 'fault-tolerant quantum computing' is therefore to compute accurately even when the error probability per gate (EPG) is high. Here we report a simple architecture for fault-tolerant quantum computing, providing evidence that accurate quantum computing is possible for EPGs as high as three per cent. Such EPGs have been experimentally demonstrated, but to avoid excessive resource overheads required by the necessary architecture, lower EPGs are needed. Assuming the availability of quantum resources comparable to the digital resources available in today's computers, we show that non-trivial quantum computations at EPGs of as high as one per cent could be implemented.

  18. Practical characterization of quantum devices without tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landon-Cardinal, Olivier; Flammia, Steven; Silva, Marcus; Liu, Yi-Kai; Poulin, David

    2012-02-01

    Quantum tomography is the main method used to assess the quality of quantum information processing devices, but its complexity presents a major obstacle for the characterization of even moderately large systems. Part of the reason for this complexity is that tomography generates much more information than is usually sought. Taking a more targeted approach, we develop schemes that enable (i) estimating the ?delity of an experiment to a theoretical ideal description, (ii) learning which description within a reduced subset best matches the experimental data. Both these approaches yield a signi?cant reduction in resources compared to tomography. In particular, we show how to estimate the ?delity between a predicted pure state and an arbitrary experimental state using only a constant number of Pauli expectation values selected at random according to an importance-weighting rule. In addition, we propose methods for certifying quantum circuits and learning continuous-time quantum dynamics that are described by local Hamiltonians or Lindbladians.

  19. Quantum state transfer in double-quantum-well devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakumeit, Jurgen; Tutt, Marcel; Pavlidis, Dimitris

    1994-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of double-quantum-well (DQW) devices is presented in view of analyzing the quantum state transfer (QST) effect. Different structures, based on the AlGaAs/GaAs system, were simulated at 77 and 300 K and optimized in terms of electron transfer and device speed. The analysis revealed the dominant role of the impurity scattering for the QST. Different approaches were used for the optimization of QST devices and basic physical limitations were found in the electron transfer between the QWs. The maximum transfer of electrons from a high to a low mobility well was at best 20%. Negative differential resistance is hampered by the almost linear rather than threshold dependent relation of electron transfer on electric field. By optimizing the doping profile the operation frequency limit could be extended to 260 GHz.

  20. Measurement-device-independent quantum digital signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthoor, Ittoop Vergheese; Amiri, Ryan; Wallden, Petros; Curty, Marcos; Andersson, Erika

    2016-08-01

    Digital signatures play an important role in software distribution, modern communication, and financial transactions, where it is important to detect forgery and tampering. Signatures are a cryptographic technique for validating the authenticity and integrity of messages, software, or digital documents. The security of currently used classical schemes relies on computational assumptions. Quantum digital signatures (QDS), on the other hand, provide information-theoretic security based on the laws of quantum physics. Recent work on QDS Amiri et al., Phys. Rev. A 93, 032325 (2016);, 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.032325 Yin, Fu, and Zeng-Bing, Phys. Rev. A 93, 032316 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.032316 shows that such schemes do not require trusted quantum channels and are unconditionally secure against general coherent attacks. However, in practical QDS, just as in quantum key distribution (QKD), the detectors can be subjected to side-channel attacks, which can make the actual implementations insecure. Motivated by the idea of measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD), we present a measurement-device-independent QDS (MDI-QDS) scheme, which is secure against all detector side-channel attacks. Based on the rapid development of practical MDI-QKD, our MDI-QDS protocol could also be experimentally implemented, since it requires a similar experimental setup.

  1. Thermoelectric Devices Advance Thermal Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Thermoelectric (TE) devices heat, cool, and generate electricity when a temperature differential is provided between the two module faces. In cooperation with NASA, Chico, California-based United States Thermoelectric Consortium Inc. (USTC) built a gas emissions analyzer (GEA) for combustion research. The GEA precipitated hydrocarbon particles, preventing contamination that would hinder precise rocket fuel analysis. The USTC research and design team uses patent-pending dimple, pin-fin, microchannel and microjet structures to develop and design heat dissipation devices on the mini-scale level, which not only guarantee high performance of products, but also scale device size from 1 centimeter to 10 centimeters. USTC continues to integrate the benefits of TE devices in its current line of thermal management solutions and has found the accessibility of NASA technical research to be a valuable, sustainable resource that has continued to positively influence its product design and manufacturing

  2. Half adder capabilities of a coupled quantum dot device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeffer, P.; Hartmann, F.; Neri, I.; Schade, A.; Emmerling, M.; Kamp, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Höfling, S.; Worschech, L.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we demonstrate two realizations of a half adder based on a voltage-rectifying mechanism involving two Coulomb-coupled quantum dots. First, we examine the ranges of operation of the half adder’s individual elements, the AND and XOR gates, for a single rectifying device. It allows a switching between the two gates by a control voltage and thus enables a clocked half adder operation. The logic gates are shown to be reliably operative in a broad noise amplitude range with negligible error probabilities. Subsequently, we study the implementation of the half adder in a combined double-device consisting of two individually tunable rectifiers. We show that this double device allows a simultaneous operation of both relevant gates at once. The presented devices draw their power solely from electronic fluctuations and are therefore an advancement in the field of energy efficient and autonomous electronics.

  3. Half adder capabilities of a coupled quantum dot device.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, P; Hartmann, F; Neri, I; Schade, A; Emmerling, M; Kamp, M; Gammaitoni, L; Höfling, S; Worschech, L

    2016-05-27

    In this paper we demonstrate two realizations of a half adder based on a voltage-rectifying mechanism involving two Coulomb-coupled quantum dots. First, we examine the ranges of operation of the half adder's individual elements, the AND and XOR gates, for a single rectifying device. It allows a switching between the two gates by a control voltage and thus enables a clocked half adder operation. The logic gates are shown to be reliably operative in a broad noise amplitude range with negligible error probabilities. Subsequently, we study the implementation of the half adder in a combined double-device consisting of two individually tunable rectifiers. We show that this double device allows a simultaneous operation of both relevant gates at once. The presented devices draw their power solely from electronic fluctuations and are therefore an advancement in the field of energy efficient and autonomous electronics. PMID:27079182

  4. Terahertz detection using double quantum well devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodier, Majid; Christodoulou, Christos G.; Simmons, Jerry A.

    2001-12-01

    This paper discusses the principle of operation of an electrically tunable THz detector, working around 2.54 THz, integrated with a bowtie antenna. The detection is based on the idea of photon-assisted tunneling (PAT) in a double quantum well (DQW) device. The bowtie antenna is used to collect the THz radiation and feed it to the detector for processing. The Bowtie antenna geometry is integrated with the DQW device to achieve broadband characteristic, easy design, and compatibility with the detector fabrication process. The principle of operation of the detector is introduced first. Then, results of different bowtie antenna layouts are presented and discussed.

  5. Superlattice-based quantum devices: from theory to practical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razeghi, M.

    2014-07-01

    The concepts of resonant tunneling and superlattices were first developed by Esaki and Tsu. What started with the new physics of the Esaki tunnel diode has matured into nanoscale engineering of semiconductors superlattices to create whole synthetic band structures. While working at Thomson CSF in France, Manijeh Razeghi went on to develop the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and molecular beam epitaxy growth of superlattice material as reported in my seminal volumes of The MOCVD Challenge. After years of considerable effort to bring this technology to maturity, we now see the results of this formidable new science in almost every electronic and photonic device that we encounter. Among the most successful triumphs are the type-II superlattice photodetectors and quantum cascade lasers - these technologies have demonstrated the beauty of turning fundamental concepts into practical devices, thanks to advanced growth technologies. This enables us to design and realize compact devices capable of mimicking or even exceeding nature. Using superlattice to pioneer the development of quantum systems is driving the research work at the Center for Quantum Devices.

  6. Improved Thermoelectric Devices: Advanced Semiconductor Materials for Thermoelectric Devices

    SciTech Connect

    2009-12-11

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Phononic Devices is working to recapture waste heat and convert it into usable electric power. To do this, the company is using thermoelectric devices, which are made from advanced semiconductor materials that convert heat into electricity or actively remove heat for refrigeration and cooling purposes. Thermoelectric devices resemble computer chips, and they manage heat by manipulating the direction of electrons at the nanoscale. These devices aren’t new, but they are currently too inefficient and expensive for widespread use. Phononic Devices is using a high-performance, cost-effective thermoelectric design that will improve the device’s efficiency and enable electronics manufacturers to more easily integrate them into their products.

  7. Quantum transport in nanoscale semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Gregory Millington

    Because of technological advancement, transistor dimensions are approaching the length scale of the electron Fermi wavelength, on the order of only nanometers. In this regime, quantum mechanical phenomena will dominate electron transport. Using InAs single quantum wells, we have fabricated Y-shaped electron waveguides whose lengths are smaller than the elastic mean free path. Electron transport in these waveguides is ballistic, a quantum mechanical phenomenon. Coupled to the electron waveguide are two gates used to coherently steer the electron wave. We demonstrate for the first time that gating modifies the electron's wave function, by changing its geometrical resonance in the waveguide. Evidence of this alteration is the observation of anti-correlated, oscillatory transconductances. Our data provides direct evidence of wavefunction steering in a transistor structure and has applications in high-speed, low-power electronics. Quantum computing, if realized, will have a significant impact in computer security. The development of quantum computers has been hindered by challenges in producing the basic building block, the qubit. Qubit approaches using semiconductors promise upscalability and can take the form of a single electron transistor. We have designed, fabricated, and characterized single electron transistors in InAs, and separately in silicon, for the application of quantum computing. With the InAs single electron transistor, we have demonstrated one-electron quantum dots using a single-top-gate transistor configuration on a composite quantum well. Electrical transport data indicates a 15meV charging energy and a 20meV orbital energy spacing, which implies a quantum dot of 20nm in diameter. InAs is attractive due to its large electron Lande g-factor. With the silicon-based single electron transistor, we have demonstrated a structure that is similar to conventional silicon-based metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors. The substrate is undoped and

  8. Physics of Quantum Structures in Photovoltaic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Andersen, John D.

    2005-01-01

    There has been considerable activity recently regarding the possibilities of using various nanostructures and nanomaterials to improve photovoltaic conversion of solar energy. Recent theoretical results indicate that dramatic improvements in device efficiency may be attainable through the use of three-dimensional arrays of zero-dimensional conductors (i.e., quantum dots) in an ordinary p-i-n solar cell structure. Quantum dots and other nanostructured materials may also prove to have some benefits in terms of temperature coefficients and radiation degradation associated with space solar cells. Two-dimensional semiconductor superlattices have already demonstrated some advantages in this regard. It has also recently been demonstrated that semiconducting quantum dots can also be used to improve conversion efficiencies in polymeric thin film solar cells. Improvement in thin film cells utilizing conjugated polymers has also be achieved through the use of one-dimensional quantum structures such as carbon nanotubes. It is believed that carbon nanotubes may contribute to both the disassociation as well as the carrier transport in the conjugated polymers used in certain thin film photovoltaic cells. In this paper we will review the underlying physics governing some of the new photovoltaic nanostructures being pursued, as well as the the current methods being employed to produce III-V, II-VI, and even chalcopyrite-based nanomaterials and nanostructures for solar cells.

  9. Carbon Nanotube Superconducting Quantum Interference Device.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchiat, Vincent; Cleuziou, Jean-Pierre; Ondarcuhu, Thierry; Monthioux, Marc; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang

    2007-03-01

    We report on the study of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) with Josephson junctions made of portions of metallic single-walled carbon nanotube [1]. Quantum confinement in each nanotube junction induces a discrete quantum dot (QD) energy level structure, which can be controlled with a lateral electrostatic gate. In addition, a backgate electrode can vary the transparency of the QD barriers, thus permitting to change the hybridization of the QD states with the superconducting contacts [2]. The gates are also used to directly tune the quantum phase interference of the Cooper pairs circulating in the SQUID ring. Optimal modulation of a 6nA supercurrent current with magnetic flux is achieved when both QD junctions are in the ``on'' or ``off'' state. Futhermore, the SQUID design establishes that these CNT Josephson junctions can be used as gate-controlled π-junctions. This allow to verify that the sign of the current-phase relation across a proximity coupled Qdot can be reversed with a gate voltage. Noise studies shows that the noise figure of the nanotube SQUID together with the size of the junction should allow the detection of a single molecule magnet. [1] J-P. Cleuziou et al. Nature Nanotec., 1, 53, (2006). [2] J-P. Cleuziou et al. cond-mat/0610622.

  10. Quantum chromodynamics with advanced computing

    SciTech Connect

    Kronfeld, Andreas S.; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    We survey results in lattice quantum chromodynamics from groups in the USQCD Collaboration. The main focus is on physics, but many aspects of the discussion are aimed at an audience of computational physicists.

  11. Using Quantum Confinement to Uniquely Identify Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J.; Bagci, I. E.; Zawawi, M. A. M.; Sexton, J.; Hulbert, N.; Noori, Y. J.; Young, M. P.; Woodhead, C. S.; Missous, M.; Migliorato, M. A.; Roedig, U.; Young, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    Modern technology unintentionally provides resources that enable the trust of everyday interactions to be undermined. Some authentication schemes address this issue using devices that give a unique output in response to a challenge. These signatures are generated by hard-to-predict physical responses derived from structural characteristics, which lend themselves to two different architectures, known as unique objects (UNOs) and physically unclonable functions (PUFs). The classical design of UNOs and PUFs limits their size and, in some cases, their security. Here we show that quantum confinement lends itself to the provision of unique identities at the nanoscale, by using fluctuations in tunnelling measurements through quantum wells in resonant tunnelling diodes (RTDs). This provides an uncomplicated measurement of identity without conventional resource limitations whilst providing robust security. The confined energy levels are highly sensitive to the specific nanostructure within each RTD, resulting in a distinct tunnelling spectrum for every device, as they contain a unique and unpredictable structure that is presently impossible to clone. This new class of authentication device operates with minimal resources in simple electronic structures above room temperature.

  12. Using Quantum Confinement to Uniquely Identify Devices

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, J.; Bagci, I. E.; Zawawi, M. A. M.; Sexton, J.; Hulbert, N.; Noori, Y. J.; Young, M. P.; Woodhead, C. S.; Missous, M.; Migliorato, M. A.; Roedig, U.; Young, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    Modern technology unintentionally provides resources that enable the trust of everyday interactions to be undermined. Some authentication schemes address this issue using devices that give a unique output in response to a challenge. These signatures are generated by hard-to-predict physical responses derived from structural characteristics, which lend themselves to two different architectures, known as unique objects (UNOs) and physically unclonable functions (PUFs). The classical design of UNOs and PUFs limits their size and, in some cases, their security. Here we show that quantum confinement lends itself to the provision of unique identities at the nanoscale, by using fluctuations in tunnelling measurements through quantum wells in resonant tunnelling diodes (RTDs). This provides an uncomplicated measurement of identity without conventional resource limitations whilst providing robust security. The confined energy levels are highly sensitive to the specific nanostructure within each RTD, resulting in a distinct tunnelling spectrum for every device, as they contain a unique and unpredictable structure that is presently impossible to clone. This new class of authentication device operates with minimal resources in simple electronic structures above room temperature. PMID:26553435

  13. Measurement-device-independent quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Feihu; Curty, Marcos; Qi, Bing; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2014-12-18

    In theory, quantum key distribution (QKD) provides information-theoretic security based on the laws of physics. Owing to the imperfections of real-life implementations, however, there is a big gap between the theory and practice of QKD, which has been recently exploited by several quantum hacking activities. To fill this gap, a novel approach, called measurement-device-independent QKD (mdiQKD), has been proposed. In addition, it can remove all side-channels from the measurement unit, arguably the most vulnerable part in QKD systems, thus offering a clear avenue toward secure QKD realisations. In this study, we review the latest developments in the framework of mdiQKD, together with its assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses.

  14. Measurement-device-independent quantum cryptography

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Feihu; Curty, Marcos; Qi, Bing; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2014-12-18

    In theory, quantum key distribution (QKD) provides information-theoretic security based on the laws of physics. Owing to the imperfections of real-life implementations, however, there is a big gap between the theory and practice of QKD, which has been recently exploited by several quantum hacking activities. To fill this gap, a novel approach, called measurement-device-independent QKD (mdiQKD), has been proposed. In addition, it can remove all side-channels from the measurement unit, arguably the most vulnerable part in QKD systems, thus offering a clear avenue toward secure QKD realisations. In this study, we review the latest developments in the framework of mdiQKD,more » together with its assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses.« less

  15. Quantum-engineered interband cascade photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Rui Q.; Lotfi, Hossein; Li, Lu; Hinkey, Robert T.; Ye, Hao; Klem, John F.; Lei, L.; Mishima, T. D.; Keay, J. C.; Santos, M. B.; Johnson, M. B.

    2013-12-01

    Quantum-engineered multiple stage photovoltaic (PV) devices are explored based on InAs/GaSb/AlSb interband cascade (IC) structures. These ICPV devices employ multiple discrete absorbers that are connected in series by widebandgap unipolar barriers using type-II heterostructure interfaces for facilitating carrier transport between cascade stages similar to IC lasers. The discrete architecture is beneficial for improving the collection efficiency and for spectral splitting by utilizing absorbers with different bandgaps. As such, the photo-voltages from each individual cascade stage in an ICPV device add together, creating a high overall open-circuit voltage, similar to conventional multi-junction tandem solar cells. Furthermore, photo-generated carriers can be collected with nearly 100% efficiency in each stage. This is because the carriers travel over only a single cascade stage, designed to be shorter than a typical diffusion length. The approach is of significant importance for operation at high temperatures where the diffusion length is reduced. Here, we will present our recent progress in the study of ICPV devices, which includes the demonstration of ICPV devices at room temperature and above with narrow bandgaps (e.g. 0.23 eV) and high open-circuit voltages.

  16. Advances in nonlinear optical materials and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    The recent progress in the application of nonlinear techniques to extend the frequency of laser sources has come from the joint progress in laser sources and in nonlinear materials. A brief summary of the progress in diode pumped solid state lasers is followed by an overview of progress in nonlinear frequency extension by harmonic generation and parametric processes. Improved nonlinear materials including bulk crystals, quasiphasematched interactions, guided wave devices, and quantum well intersubband studies are discussed with the idea of identifying areas of future progress in nonlinear materials and devices.

  17. Detector-device-independent quantum key distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Charles Ci Wen; Korzh, Boris; Martin, Anthony; Bussières, Félix; Thew, Rob; Zbinden, Hugo

    2014-12-01

    Recently, a quantum key distribution (QKD) scheme based on entanglement swapping, called measurement-device-independent QKD (mdiQKD), was proposed to bypass all measurement side-channel attacks. While mdiQKD is conceptually elegant and offers a supreme level of security, the experimental complexity is challenging for practical systems. For instance, it requires interference between two widely separated independent single-photon sources, and the secret key rates are dependent on detecting two photons—one from each source. Here, we demonstrate a proof-of-principle experiment of a QKD scheme that removes the need for a two-photon system and instead uses the idea of a two-qubit single-photon to significantly simplify the implementation and improve the efficiency of mdiQKD in several aspects.

  18. Colloidal quantum dot light-emitting devices

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Vanessa; Bulović, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dot light-emitting devices (QD-LEDs) have generated considerable interest for applications such as thin film displays with improved color saturation and white lighting with a high color rendering index (CRI). We review the key advantages of using quantum dots (QDs) in display and lighting applications, including their color purity, solution processability, and stability. After highlighting the main developments in QD-LED technology in the past 15 years, we describe the three mechanisms for exciting QDs - optical excitation, Förster energy transfer, and direct charge injection - that have been leveraged to create QD-LEDs. We outline the challenges facing QD-LED development, such as QD charging and QD luminescence quenching in QD thin films. We describe how optical downconversion schemes have enabled researchers to overcome these challenges and develop commercial lighting products that incorporate QDs to achieve desirable color temperature and a high CRI while maintaining efficiencies comparable to inorganic white LEDs (>65 lumens per Watt). We conclude by discussing some current directions in QD research that focus on achieving higher efficiency and air-stable QD-LEDs using electrical excitation of the luminescent QDs. PMID:22110863

  19. Performance of device-independent quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhu; Zhao, Qi; Ma, Xiongfeng

    2016-07-01

    Quantum key distribution provides information-theoretically-secure communication. In practice, device imperfections may jeopardise the system security. Device-independent quantum key distribution solves this problem by providing secure keys even when the quantum devices are untrusted and uncharacterized. Following a recent security proof of the device-independent quantum key distribution, we improve the key rate by tightening the parameter choice in the security proof. In practice where the system is lossy, we further improve the key rate by taking into account the loss position information. From our numerical simulation, our method can outperform existing results. Meanwhile, we outline clear experimental requirements for implementing device-independent quantum key distribution. The maximal tolerable error rate is 1.6%, the minimal required transmittance is 97.3%, and the minimal required visibility is 96.8 % .

  20. Device-independent security of quantum cryptography against collective attacks.

    PubMed

    Acín, Antonio; Brunner, Nicolas; Gisin, Nicolas; Massar, Serge; Pironio, Stefano; Scarani, Valerio

    2007-06-01

    We present the optimal collective attack on a quantum key distribution protocol in the "device-independent" security scenario, where no assumptions are made about the way the quantum key distribution devices work or on what quantum system they operate. Our main result is a tight bound on the Holevo information between one of the authorized parties and the eavesdropper, as a function of the amount of violation of a Bell-type inequality.

  1. DSP control of superconducting quantum interference devices

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, R.R.; Kung, Pang-Jen; Lewis, P.S.; Flynn, E.R.

    1994-08-01

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDS) are used to defect very law level magnetic fields. Los Alamos National Laboratory is involved in developing digital signal processing (DSP) based instrumentation for these devices in conjunction with detecting magnetic flux from the human brain. This field of application is known as magnetoencephalography (MEG). The magnetic signals generated by the brain are on the order of a billion times smaller than the earth`s magnetic field, yet they can readily be detected with these highly ,sensitive magnetic detectors. Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed and implemented DSP control of the SQUID system. This has been accomplished by using an AT&T DSP32C DSP in conjunction with dual 18 bit a-to-d and d-to-a converters. The DSP performs the signal demodulation by synchronously sampling the recovered signal and applying the appropriate full wave rectification. The signal is then integrated and filtered and applied to the output. Also, the modulation signal is generated with the DSP system. All of the flux lock loop electronics are replaced except for the low noise analog preamplifier at the front of the recovery components. The system has been tested with both an electronic SQUID simulator and a low temperature thin film SQUID from Conductus. A number of experiments have been performed to allow evaluation of the system improvement made possible by use of DSP control.

  2. Advanced Electro-Optic Surety Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Watterson, C.E.

    1997-05-01

    The Advanced Electro-Optic Surety Devices project was initiated in march 1991 to support design laboratory guidance on electro-optic device packaging and evaluation. Sandia National Laboratory requested AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), to prepare for future packaging efforts in electro-optic integrated circuits. Los Alamos National Laboratory requested the evaluation of electro-optic waveguide devices for nuclear surety applications. New packaging techniques involving multiple fiber optic alignment and attachment, binary lens array development, silicon V-groove etching, and flip chip bonding were requested. Hermetic sealing of the electro-optic hybrid and submicron alignment of optical components present new challenges to be resolved. A 10-channel electro-optic modulator and laser amplifier were evaluated for potential surety applications.

  3. Advancements in the Field of Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Sambeet; Tripathy, Pratyasha; Sinha, Swami Prasad.

    2012-08-01

    Quantum dots are defined as very small semiconductor crystals of size varying from nanometer scale to a few micron i.e. so small that they are considered dimensionless and are capable of showing many chemical properties by virtue of which they tend to be lead at one minute and gold at the second minute.Quantum dots house the electrons just the way the electrons would have been present in an atom, by applying a voltage. And therefore they are very judiciously given the name of being called as the artificial atoms. This application of voltage may also lead to the modification of the chemical nature of the material anytime it is desired, resulting in lead at one minute to gold at the other minute. But this method is quite beyond our reach. A quantum dot is basically a semiconductor of very tiny size and this special phenomenon of quantum dot, causes the band of energies to change into discrete energy levels. Band gaps and the related energy depend on the relationship between the size of the crystal and the exciton radius. The height and energy between different energy levels varies inversely with the size of the quantum dot. The smaller the quantum dot, the higher is the energy possessed by it.There are many applications of the quantum dots e.g. they are very wisely applied to:Light emitting diodes: LEDs eg. White LEDs, Photovoltaic devices: solar cells, Memory elements, Biology : =biosensors, imaging, Lasers, Quantum computation, Flat-panel displays, Photodetectors, Life sciences and so on and so forth.The nanometer sized particles are able to display any chosen colour in the entire ultraviolet visible spectrum through a small change in their size or composition.

  4. Advances toward high spectral resolution quantum X-ray calorimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, S. H.; Kelley, R. L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Mccammon, D.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal detectors for X-ray spectroscopy combining high spectral resolution and quantum efficiency have been developed. These microcalorimeters measure the energy released in the absorption of a single photon by sensing the rise in temperature of a small absorbing structure. The ultimate energy resolution of such a device is limited by the thermodynamic power fluctuations in the thermal link between the calorimeter and isothermal bath and can in principle be made as low as 1 eV. The performance of a real device is degraded due to noise contributions such as excess 1/f noise in the thermistor and incomplete conversion of energy into phonons. The authors report some recent advances in thermometry, X-ray absorption and thermalization, fabrication techniques, and detector optimization in the presence of noise. These improvements have resulted in a device with a spectral resolution of 17 eV FWHM, measured at 6 keV.

  5. A triple quantum dot based nano-electromechanical memory device

    SciTech Connect

    Pozner, R.; Lifshitz, E.; Peskin, U.

    2015-09-14

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are free-standing nano-structures with chemically tunable electronic properties. This tunability offers intriguing possibilities for nano-electromechanical devices. In this work, we consider a nano-electromechanical nonvolatile memory (NVM) device incorporating a triple quantum dot (TQD) cluster. The device operation is based on a bias induced motion of a floating quantum dot (FQD) located between two bound quantum dots (BQDs). The mechanical motion is used for switching between two stable states, “ON” and “OFF” states, where ligand-mediated effective interdot forces between the BQDs and the FQD serve to hold the FQD in each stable position under zero bias. Considering realistic microscopic parameters, our quantum-classical theoretical treatment of the TQD reveals the characteristics of the NVM.

  6. Image stabilization for SWIR advanced optoelectronic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiopu, Paul; Manea, Adrian; Cristea, Ionica; Grosu, Neculai; Craciun, Anca-Ileana; Craciun, Alexandru; Granciu, Dana

    2015-02-01

    At long ranges and under low visibility conditions, Advanced Optoelectronic Device provides the signal-to-noise ratio and image quality in the Short-wave Infra-red - SWIR (wavelengths between 1,1 ÷2,5 μm), significantly better than in the near wave infrared - NWIR and visible spectral bands [1,2]. The quality of image is nearly independent of the polarization in the incoming light, but it is influenced by the relative movement between the optical system and the observer (the operators' handshake), and the movement towards the support system (land and air vehicles). All these make it difficult to detect objectives observation in real time. This paper presents some systems enhance which the ability of observation and sighting through the optical systems without the use of the stands, tripods or other means. We have to eliminate the effect of "tremors of the hands" and the vibration in order to allow the use of optical devices by operators on the moving vehicles on land, on aircraft, or on boats, and to provide additional comfort for the user to track the moving object through the optical system, without losing the control in the process of detection and tracking. The practical applications of stabilization image process, in SWIR, are the most advanced part of the optical observation systems available worldwide [3,4,5]. This application has a didactic nature, because it ensures understanding by the students about image stabilization and their participation in research.

  7. Nano-Bio Quantum Technology for Device-Specific Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.

    2009-01-01

    The areas discussed are still under development: I. Nano structured materials for TE applications a) SiGe and Be.Te; b) Nano particles and nanoshells. II. Quantum technology for optical devices: a) Quantum apertures; b) Smart optical materials; c) Micro spectrometer. III. Bio-template oriented materials: a) Bionanobattery; b) Bio-fuel cells; c) Energetic materials.

  8. Quantum reading of unitary optical devices

    SciTech Connect

    Dall'Arno, Michele; Bisio, Alessandro; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro

    2014-12-04

    We address the problem of quantum reading of optical memories, namely the retrieving of classical information stored in the optical properties of a media with minimum energy. We present optimal strategies for ambiguous and unambiguous quantum reading of unitary optical memories, namely when one's task is to minimize the probability of errors in the retrieved information and when perfect retrieving of information is achieved probabilistically, respectively. A comparison of the optimal strategy with coherent probes and homodyne detection shows that the former saves orders of magnitude of energy when achieving the same performances. Experimental proposals for quantum reading which are feasible with present quantum optical technology are reported.

  9. Advances in superconducting quantum electronic microcircuit fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschman, R. K.; Notarys, H. A.; Mercereau, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    Standard microelectronic fabrication techniques have been utilized to produce batch quantities of superconducting quantum electronic devices and circuits. The overall goal is a fabrication technology yielding circuits that are rugged and stable and capable of being fabricated controllably and reproducibly in sizeable quantities. Our progress toward this goal is presented, with primary emphasis on the most recent work, which includes the use of electron-beam lithography and techniques of hybrid microelectronics. Several prototype microcircuits have been successfully fabricated. These microcircuits are formed in a thin-film parent material consisting of layers of superconducting and normal metals, and use proximity-effect structures as the active circuit elements.

  10. Multiscale quantum mechanics/electromagnetics simulation for electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Yam, ChiYung; Meng, Lingyi; Chen, GuanHua; Chen, Quan; Wong, Ngai

    2011-08-28

    The continuous downsizing of modern electronic devices implies the increasing importance of quantum phenomena. As the feature sizes of transistors inch towards 10 nanometer, simulations including quantum effects and atomistic details are inevitable. Here we report a novel hybrid quantum mechanics and electromagnetics (QM/EM) method to model individual electronic components at the nanoscale. QM and EM models are solved in different regions of the system in a self-consistent manner. As a demonstration, we study a carbon nanotube based electronic device embedded in a silicon block. Good agreement is obtained between simulation by QM/EM method and full QM treatment of the entire system.

  11. The quantum hydrodynamic model for semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C.L. )

    1994-04-01

    The classical hydrodynamic equations can be extended to include quantum effects by incorporating the first quantum corrections. The full three-dimensional quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model is derived for the first time by a moment expansion of the Wigner-Boltzmann equations. The QHD conservation laws have the same form as the classical hydrodynamic equations, but the energy density and stress tensor have additional quantum terms. These quantum terms allow particles to tunnel through potential barriers and to build up in potential wells. The three-dimensional QHD transport equations are mathematically classified as having two Schroedinger modes, two hyperbolic modes, and one parabolic mode. The one-dimensional steady-state QHD equations are discretized in conservation form using the second upwind method. Simulations of a resonant tunneling diode are presented that show charge buildup in the quantum well and negative differential resistance (NDR) in the current-voltage curve. These are the first simulations of the full QHD equations to show NDR in the resonant tunneling diode. The computed current-voltage curve agrees quantitatively with experimental measurements. NDR interpreted in terms of the time spent by electrons in the quantum well.

  12. Low contact resistance in epitaxial graphene devices for quantum metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Yager, Tom E-mail: ywpark@snu.ac.kr; Lartsev, Arseniy; Lara-Avila, Samuel; Kubatkin, Sergey; Cedergren, Karin; Yakimova, Rositsa; Panchal, Vishal; Kazakova, Olga; Tzalenchuk, Alexander; Kim, Kyung Ho; Park, Yung Woo E-mail: ywpark@snu.ac.kr

    2015-08-15

    We investigate Ti/Au contacts to monolayer epitaxial graphene on SiC (0001) for applications in quantum resistance metrology. Using three-terminal measurements in the quantum Hall regime we observed variations in contact resistances ranging from a minimal value of 0.6 Ω up to 11 kΩ. We identify a major source of high-resistance contacts to be due bilayer graphene interruptions to the quantum Hall current, whilst discarding the effects of interface cleanliness and contact geometry for our fabricated devices. Moreover, we experimentally demonstrate methods to improve the reproducibility of low resistance contacts (<10 Ω) suitable for high precision quantum resistance metrology.

  13. Long-distance measurement-device-independent multiparty quantum communication.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yao; Yin, Hua-Lei; Chen, Teng-Yun; Chen, Zeng-Bing

    2015-03-01

    The Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) entanglement, originally introduced to uncover the extreme violation of local realism against quantum mechanics, is an important resource for multiparty quantum communication tasks. But the low intensity and fragility of the GHZ entanglement source in current conditions have made the practical applications of these multiparty tasks an experimental challenge. Here we propose a feasible scheme for practically distributing the postselected GHZ entanglement over a distance of more than 100 km for experimentally accessible parameter regimes. Combining the decoy-state and measurement-device-independent protocols for quantum key distribution, we anticipate that our proposal suggests an important avenue for practical multiparty quantum communication.

  14. High Density Memory Based on Quantum Device Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanderWagt, Paul; Frazier, Gary; Tang, Hao

    1995-01-01

    We explore the feasibility of ultra-high density memory based on quantum devices. Starting from overall constraints on chip area, power consumption, access speed, and noise margin, we deduce boundaries on single cell parameters such as required operating voltage and standby current. Next, the possible role of quantum devices is examined. Since the most mature quantum device, the resonant tunneling diode (RTD) can easily be integrated vertically, it naturally leads to the issue of 3D integrated memory. We propose a novel method of addressing vertically integrated bistable two-terminal devices, such as resonant tunneling diodes (RTD) and Esaki diodes, that avoids individual physical contacts. The new concept has been demonstrated experimentally in memory cells of field effect transistors (FET's) and stacked RTD's.

  15. Multiplexed charge-locking device for large arrays of quantum devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puddy, R. K.; Smith, L. W.; Al-Taie, H.; Chong, C. H.; Farrer, I.; Griffiths, J. P.; Ritchie, D. A.; Kelly, M. J.; Pepper, M.; Smith, C. G.

    2015-10-01

    We present a method of forming and controlling large arrays of gate-defined quantum devices. The method uses an on-chip, multiplexed charge-locking system and helps to overcome the restraints imposed by the number of wires available in cryostat measurement systems. The device architecture that we describe here utilises a multiplexer-type scheme to lock charge onto gate electrodes. The design allows access to and control of gates whose total number exceeds that of the available electrical contacts and enables the formation, modulation and measurement of large arrays of quantum devices. We fabricate such devices on n-type GaAs/AlGaAs substrates and investigate the stability of the charge locked on to the gates. Proof-of-concept is shown by measurement of the Coulomb blockade peaks of a single quantum dot formed by a floating gate in the device. The floating gate is seen to drift by approximately one Coulomb oscillation per hour.

  16. Multiplexed charge-locking device for large arrays of quantum devices

    SciTech Connect

    Puddy, R. K. Smith, L. W; Chong, C. H.; Farrer, I.; Griffiths, J. P.; Ritchie, D. A.; Smith, C. G.; Al-Taie, H.; Kelly, M. J.; Pepper, M.

    2015-10-05

    We present a method of forming and controlling large arrays of gate-defined quantum devices. The method uses an on-chip, multiplexed charge-locking system and helps to overcome the restraints imposed by the number of wires available in cryostat measurement systems. The device architecture that we describe here utilises a multiplexer-type scheme to lock charge onto gate electrodes. The design allows access to and control of gates whose total number exceeds that of the available electrical contacts and enables the formation, modulation and measurement of large arrays of quantum devices. We fabricate such devices on n-type GaAs/AlGaAs substrates and investigate the stability of the charge locked on to the gates. Proof-of-concept is shown by measurement of the Coulomb blockade peaks of a single quantum dot formed by a floating gate in the device. The floating gate is seen to drift by approximately one Coulomb oscillation per hour.

  17. Measurement-device-independent entanglement-based quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiuqing; Wei, Kejin; Ma, Haiqiang; Sun, Shihai; Liu, Hongwei; Yin, Zhenqiang; Li, Zuohan; Lian, Shibin; Du, Yungang; Wu, Lingan

    2016-05-01

    We present a quantum key distribution protocol in a model in which the legitimate users gather statistics as in the measurement-device-independent entanglement witness to certify the sources and the measurement devices. We show that the task of measurement-device-independent quantum communication can be accomplished based on monogamy of entanglement, and it is fairly loss tolerate including source and detector flaws. We derive a tight bound for collective attacks on the Holevo information between the authorized parties and the eavesdropper. Then with this bound, the final secret key rate with the source flaws can be obtained. The results show that long-distance quantum cryptography over 144 km can be made secure using only standard threshold detectors.

  18. A quantum energy transport model for semiconductor device simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Sho, Shohiro; Odanaka, Shinji

    2013-02-15

    This paper describes numerical methods for a quantum energy transport (QET) model in semiconductors, which is derived by using a diffusion scaling in the quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model. We newly drive a four-moments QET model similar with a classical ET model. Space discretization is performed by a new set of unknown variables. Numerical stability and convergence are obtained by developing numerical schemes and an iterative solution method with a relaxation method. Numerical simulations of electron transport in a scaled MOSFET device are discussed. The QET model allows simulations of quantum confinement transport, and nonlocal and hot-carrier effects in scaled MOSFETs.

  19. Quantum computation: algorithms and implementation in quantum dot devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamble, John King

    In this thesis, we explore several aspects of both the software and hardware of quantum computation. First, we examine the computational power of multi-particle quantum random walks in terms of distinguishing mathematical graphs. We study both interacting and non-interacting multi-particle walks on strongly regular graphs, proving some limitations on distinguishing powers and presenting extensive numerical evidence indicative of interactions providing more distinguishing power. We then study the recently proposed adiabatic quantum algorithm for Google PageRank, and show that it exhibits power-law scaling for realistic WWW-like graphs. Turning to hardware, we next analyze the thermal physics of two nearby 2D electron gas (2DEG), and show that an analogue of the Coulomb drag effect exists for heat transfer. In some distance and temperature, this heat transfer is more significant than phonon dissipation channels. After that, we study the dephasing of two-electron states in a single silicon quantum dot. Specifically, we consider dephasing due to the electron-phonon coupling and charge noise, separately treating orbital and valley excitations. In an ideal system, dephasing due to charge noise is strongly suppressed due to a vanishing dipole moment. However, introduction of disorder or anharmonicity leads to large effective dipole moments, and hence possibly strong dephasing. Building on this work, we next consider more realistic systems, including structural disorder systems. We present experiment and theory, which demonstrate energy levels that vary with quantum dot translation, implying a structurally disordered system. Finally, we turn to the issues of valley mixing and valley-orbit hybridization, which occurs due to atomic-scale disorder at quantum well interfaces. We develop a new theoretical approach to study these effects, which we name the disorder-expansion technique. We demonstrate that this method successfully reproduces atomistic tight-binding techniques

  20. Memory Attacks on Device-Independent Quantum Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Jonathan; Colbeck, Roger; Kent, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Device-independent quantum cryptographic schemes aim to guarantee security to users based only on the output statistics of any components used, and without the need to verify their internal functionality. Since this would protect users against untrustworthy or incompetent manufacturers, sabotage, or device degradation, this idea has excited much interest, and many device-independent schemes have been proposed. Here we identify a critical weakness of device-independent protocols that rely on public communication between secure laboratories. Untrusted devices may record their inputs and outputs and reveal information about them via publicly discussed outputs during later runs. Reusing devices thus compromises the security of a protocol and risks leaking secret data. Possible defenses include securely destroying or isolating used devices. However, these are costly and often impractical. We propose other more practical partial defenses as well as a new protocol structure for device-independent quantum key distribution that aims to achieve composable security in the case of two parties using a small number of devices to repeatedly share keys with each other (and no other party).

  1. Memory attacks on device-independent quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Jonathan; Colbeck, Roger; Kent, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Device-independent quantum cryptographic schemes aim to guarantee security to users based only on the output statistics of any components used, and without the need to verify their internal functionality. Since this would protect users against untrustworthy or incompetent manufacturers, sabotage, or device degradation, this idea has excited much interest, and many device-independent schemes have been proposed. Here we identify a critical weakness of device-independent protocols that rely on public communication between secure laboratories. Untrusted devices may record their inputs and outputs and reveal information about them via publicly discussed outputs during later runs. Reusing devices thus compromises the security of a protocol and risks leaking secret data. Possible defenses include securely destroying or isolating used devices. However, these are costly and often impractical. We propose other more practical partial defenses as well as a new protocol structure for device-independent quantum key distribution that aims to achieve composable security in the case of two parties using a small number of devices to repeatedly share keys with each other (and no other party). PMID:23383767

  2. Memory attacks on device-independent quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Jonathan; Colbeck, Roger; Kent, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Device-independent quantum cryptographic schemes aim to guarantee security to users based only on the output statistics of any components used, and without the need to verify their internal functionality. Since this would protect users against untrustworthy or incompetent manufacturers, sabotage, or device degradation, this idea has excited much interest, and many device-independent schemes have been proposed. Here we identify a critical weakness of device-independent protocols that rely on public communication between secure laboratories. Untrusted devices may record their inputs and outputs and reveal information about them via publicly discussed outputs during later runs. Reusing devices thus compromises the security of a protocol and risks leaking secret data. Possible defenses include securely destroying or isolating used devices. However, these are costly and often impractical. We propose other more practical partial defenses as well as a new protocol structure for device-independent quantum key distribution that aims to achieve composable security in the case of two parties using a small number of devices to repeatedly share keys with each other (and no other party).

  3. Single-atom based coherent quantum interference device structure.

    PubMed

    Naydenov, Borislav; Rungger, Ivan; Mantega, Mauro; Sanvito, Stefano; Boland, John J

    2015-05-13

    We describe the fabrication, operation principles, and simulation of a coherent single-atom quantum interference device (QID) structure on Si(100) controlled by the properties of single atoms. The energy and spatial distribution of the wave functions associated with the device are visualized by scanning tunneling spectroscopy and the amplitude and phase of the evanescent wave functions that couple into the quantum well states are directly measured, including the action of an electrostatic gate. Density functional theory simulations were employed to simulate the electronic structure of the device structure, which is in excellent agreement with the measurements. Simulations of device transmission demonstrate that our coherent single-atom QID can have ON-OFF ratios in excess of 10(3) with potentially minimal power dissipation.

  4. Experimental measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Chen, Teng-Yun; Wang, Liu-Jun; Liang, Hao; Shentu, Guo-Liang; Wang, Jian; Cui, Ke; Yin, Hua-Lei; Liu, Nai-Le; Li, Li; Ma, Xiongfeng; Pelc, Jason S; Fejer, M M; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2013-09-27

    Quantum key distribution is proven to offer unconditional security in communication between two remote users with ideal source and detection. Unfortunately, ideal devices never exist in practice and device imperfections have become the targets of various attacks. By developing up-conversion single-photon detectors with high efficiency and low noise, we faithfully demonstrate the measurement-device-independent quantum-key-distribution protocol, which is immune to all hacking strategies on detection. Meanwhile, we employ the decoy-state method to defend attacks on a nonideal source. By assuming a trusted source scenario, our practical system, which generates more than a 25 kbit secure key over a 50 km fiber link, serves as a stepping stone in the quest for unconditionally secure communications with realistic devices. PMID:24116758

  5. Experimental Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Chen, Teng-Yun; Wang, Liu-Jun; Liang, Hao; Shentu, Guo-Liang; Wang, Jian; Cui, Ke; Yin, Hua-Lei; Liu, Nai-Le; Li, Li; Ma, Xiongfeng; Pelc, Jason S.; Fejer, M. M.; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2013-09-01

    Quantum key distribution is proven to offer unconditional security in communication between two remote users with ideal source and detection. Unfortunately, ideal devices never exist in practice and device imperfections have become the targets of various attacks. By developing up-conversion single-photon detectors with high efficiency and low noise, we faithfully demonstrate the measurement-device-independent quantum-key-distribution protocol, which is immune to all hacking strategies on detection. Meanwhile, we employ the decoy-state method to defend attacks on a nonideal source. By assuming a trusted source scenario, our practical system, which generates more than a 25 kbit secure key over a 50 km fiber link, serves as a stepping stone in the quest for unconditionally secure communications with realistic devices.

  6. Single-atom based coherent quantum interference device structure.

    PubMed

    Naydenov, Borislav; Rungger, Ivan; Mantega, Mauro; Sanvito, Stefano; Boland, John J

    2015-05-13

    We describe the fabrication, operation principles, and simulation of a coherent single-atom quantum interference device (QID) structure on Si(100) controlled by the properties of single atoms. The energy and spatial distribution of the wave functions associated with the device are visualized by scanning tunneling spectroscopy and the amplitude and phase of the evanescent wave functions that couple into the quantum well states are directly measured, including the action of an electrostatic gate. Density functional theory simulations were employed to simulate the electronic structure of the device structure, which is in excellent agreement with the measurements. Simulations of device transmission demonstrate that our coherent single-atom QID can have ON-OFF ratios in excess of 10(3) with potentially minimal power dissipation. PMID:25826690

  7. Optimal Device Independent Quantum Key Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Kamaruddin, S.; Shaari, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    We consider an optimal quantum key distribution setup based on minimal number of measurement bases with binary yields used by parties against an eavesdropper limited only by the no-signaling principle. We note that in general, the maximal key rate can be achieved by determining the optimal tradeoff between measurements that attain the maximal Bell violation and those that maximise the bit correlation between the parties. We show that higher correlation between shared raw keys at the expense of maximal Bell violation provide for better key rates for low channel disturbance. PMID:27485160

  8. Optimal Device Independent Quantum Key Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamaruddin, S.; Shaari, J. S.

    2016-08-01

    We consider an optimal quantum key distribution setup based on minimal number of measurement bases with binary yields used by parties against an eavesdropper limited only by the no-signaling principle. We note that in general, the maximal key rate can be achieved by determining the optimal tradeoff between measurements that attain the maximal Bell violation and those that maximise the bit correlation between the parties. We show that higher correlation between shared raw keys at the expense of maximal Bell violation provide for better key rates for low channel disturbance.

  9. Optimal Device Independent Quantum Key Distribution.

    PubMed

    Kamaruddin, S; Shaari, J S

    2016-01-01

    We consider an optimal quantum key distribution setup based on minimal number of measurement bases with binary yields used by parties against an eavesdropper limited only by the no-signaling principle. We note that in general, the maximal key rate can be achieved by determining the optimal tradeoff between measurements that attain the maximal Bell violation and those that maximise the bit correlation between the parties. We show that higher correlation between shared raw keys at the expense of maximal Bell violation provide for better key rates for low channel disturbance. PMID:27485160

  10. Local gate control in carbon nanotube quantum devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biercuk, Michael Jordan

    This thesis presents transport measurements of carbon nanotube electronic devices operated in the quantum regime. Nanotubes are contacted by source and drain electrodes, and multiple lithographically-patterned electrostatic gates are aligned to each device. Transport measurements of device conductance or current as a function of local gate voltages reveal that local gates couple primarily to the proximal section of the nanotube, hence providing spatially localized control over carrier density along the nanotube length. Further, using several different techniques we are able to produce local depletion regions along the length of a tube. This phenomenon is explored in detail for different contact metals to the nanotube. We utilize local gating techniques to study multiple quantum dots in carbon nanotubes produced both by naturally occurring defects, and by the controlled application of voltages to depletion gates. We study double quantum dots in detail, where transport measurements reveal honeycomb charge stability diagrams. We extract values of energy-level spacings, capacitances, and interaction energies for this system, and demonstrate independent control over all relevant tunneling rates. We report rf-reflectometry measurements of gate-defined carbon nanotube quantum dots with integrated charge sensors. Aluminum rf-SETs are electrostatically coupled to carbon nanotube devices and detect single electron charging phenomena in the Coulomb blockade regime. Simultaneous correlated measurements of single electron charging are made using reflected rf power from the nanotube itself and from the rf-SET on microsecond time scales. We map charge stability diagrams for the nanotube quantum dot via charge sensing, observing Coulomb charging diamonds beyond the first order. Conductance measurements of carbon nanotubes containing gated local depletion regions exhibit plateaus as a function of gate voltage, spaced by approximately 1e2/h, the quantum of conductance for a single

  11. Diversionary device history and revolutionary advancements.

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Paul W.; Grubelich, Mark Charles

    2005-04-01

    Diversionary devices also known as flash bangs or stun grenades were first employed about three decades ago. These devices produce a loud bang accompanied by a brilliant flash of light and are employed to temporarily distract or disorient an adversary by overwhelming their visual and auditory senses in order to gain a tactical advantage. Early devices that where employed had numerous shortcomings. Over time, many of these deficiencies were identified and corrected. This evolutionary process led to today's modern diversionary devices. These present-day conventional diversionary devices have undergone evolutionary changes but operate in the same manner as their predecessors. In order to produce the loud bang and brilliant flash of light, a flash powder mixture, usually a combination of potassium perchlorate and aluminum powder is ignited to produce an explosion. In essence these diversionary devices are small pyrotechnic bombs that produce a high point-source pressure in order to achieve the desired far-field effect. This high point-source pressure can make these devices a hazard to the operator, adversaries and hostages even though they are intended for 'less than lethal' roles. A revolutionary diversionary device has been developed that eliminates this high point-source pressure problem and eliminates the need for the hazardous pyrotechnic flash powder composition. This new diversionary device employs a fuel charge that is expelled and ignited in the atmosphere. This process is similar to a fuel air or thermobaric explosion, except that it is a deflagration, not a detonation, thereby reducing the overpressure hazard. This technology reduces the hazard associated with diversionary devices to all involved with their manufacture, transport and use. An overview of the history of diversionary device development and developments at Sandia National Laboratories will be presented.

  12. Memory-assisted measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panayi, Christiana; Razavi, Mohsen; Ma, Xiongfeng; Lütkenhaus, Norbert

    2014-04-01

    A protocol with the potential of beating the existing distance records for conventional quantum key distribution (QKD) systems is proposed. It borrows ideas from quantum repeaters by using memories in the middle of the link, and that of measurement-device-independent QKD, which only requires optical source equipment at the user's end. For certain memories with short access times, our scheme allows a higher repetition rate than that of quantum repeaters with single-mode memories, thereby requiring lower coherence times. By accounting for various sources of nonideality, such as memory decoherence, dark counts, misalignment errors, and background noise, as well as timing issues with memories, we develop a mathematical framework within which we can compare QKD systems with and without memories. In particular, we show that with the state-of-the-art technology for quantum memories, it is potentially possible to devise memory-assisted QKD systems that, at certain distances of practical interest, outperform current QKD implementations.

  13. Nonlinear periodic structures: From classical to quantum devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrafi, Peyman

    In this thesis, nonlinear periodic structures and their applications in both classical and quantum regime are investigated. New theoretical models are developed, and novel applications of nonlinear periodic structures are proposed and demonstrated. The theoretical studies, both design and simulation, are based on but not limited to InGaAsP material. A new method, namely the time-domain transfer-matrix (TDTM), is presented to simulate optical pulse propagation in layered media with resonant nonlinearity. As there were no satisfactory methods in the literature to model this problem, in order to validate and compare with the TDTM method, the standard FDTD method is generalized to include the rate equation in the analysis of semi-conductors. Also in this work, optical manipulation of absorption in periodic structures is studied for the first time. Thanks to the large accessible nonlinearity that results from the absorption saturation and frequency selectivity of periodic structures, a sensitive and compact optical limiter is designed. The novel design and modeling work developed in this thesis has provided new insights and tools to the utilization of resonant nonlinearities in compact all-optical devices. The experimental studies are based on quasi-phase matched AlGaAs superlattice waveguides. These devices have been previously designed and used for classical optical wavelength conversion such as second harmonic generation and difference frequency generation. In this work, these devices are exploited for spontaneous down conversion, which is a quantum effect, for the first time, through this process, entangled photon pairs are generated. Unprecedented performance, in terms of brightness and purity, of III-V semiconductor-based entangled photon sources has been demonstrated here. Moreover, the quantum properties of these entangled photons are characterized. The experimental studies presented in this thesis open up new application areas for III-V nonlinear optical

  14. Mini array of quantum Hall devices based on epitaxial graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, S.; Lebedeva, N.; Hämäläinen, J.; Iisakka, I.; Immonen, P.; Manninen, A. J.; Satrapinski, A.

    2016-05-01

    Series connection of four quantum Hall effect (QHE) devices based on epitaxial graphene films was studied for realization of a quantum resistance standard with an up-scaled value. The tested devices showed quantum Hall plateaux RH,2 at a filling factor v = 2 starting from a relatively low magnetic field (between 4 T and 5 T) when the temperature was 1.5 K. The precision measurements of quantized Hall resistance of four QHE devices connected by triple series connections and external bonding wires were done at B = 7 T and T = 1.5 K using a commercial precision resistance bridge with 50 μA current through the QHE device. The results showed that the deviation of the quantized Hall resistance of the series connection of four graphene-based QHE devices from the expected value of 4×RH,2 = 2 h/e2 was smaller than the relative standard uncertainty of the measurement (<1 × 10-7) limited by the used resistance bridge.

  15. Integrated quantum dot barcode smartphone optical device for wireless multiplexed diagnosis of infected patients.

    PubMed

    Ming, Kevin; Kim, Jisung; Biondi, Mia J; Syed, Abdullah; Chen, Kun; Lam, Albert; Ostrowski, Mario; Rebbapragada, Anu; Feld, Jordan J; Chan, Warren C W

    2015-03-24

    Inorganic nanoparticles are ideal precursors for engineering barcodes for rapidly detecting diseases. Despite advances in the chemical design of these barcodes, they have not advanced to clinical use because they lack sensitivity and are not cost-effective due to requirement of a large read-out system. Here we combined recent advances in quantum dot barcode technology with smartphones and isothermal amplification to engineer a simple and low-cost chip-based wireless multiplex diagnostic device. We characterized the analytical performance of this device and demonstrated that the device is capable of detecting down to 1000 viral genetic copies per milliliter, and this enabled the diagnosis of patients infected with HIV or hepatitis B. More importantly, the barcoding enabled us to detect multiple infectious pathogens simultaneously, in a single test, in less than 1 h. This multiplexing capability of the device enables the diagnosis of infections that are difficult to differentiate clinically due to common symptoms such as a fever or rash. The integration of quantum dot barcoding technology with a smartphone reader provides a capacity for global surveillance of infectious diseases and the potential to accelerate knowledge exchange transfer of emerging or exigent disease threats with healthcare and military organizations in real time. PMID:25661584

  16. ARED (Advanced-Resistive Exercise Device) Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes ARED which is a new hardware exercise device for use on the International Space Station. Astronaut physiological adaptations, muscle parameters, and cardiovascular parameters are also reviewed.

  17. Microfluidic Devices in Advanced Caenorhabditis elegans Research.

    PubMed

    Muthaiyan Shanmugam, Muniesh; Subhra Santra, Tuhin

    2016-01-01

    The study of model organisms is very important in view of their potential for application to human therapeutic uses. One such model organism is the nematode worm, Caenorhabditis elegans. As a nematode, C. elegans have ~65% similarity with human disease genes and, therefore, studies on C. elegans can be translated to human, as well as, C. elegans can be used in the study of different types of parasitic worms that infect other living organisms. In the past decade, many efforts have been undertaken to establish interdisciplinary research collaborations between biologists, physicists and engineers in order to develop microfluidic devices to study the biology of C. elegans. Microfluidic devices with the power to manipulate and detect bio-samples, regents or biomolecules in micro-scale environments can well fulfill the requirement to handle worms under proper laboratory conditions, thereby significantly increasing research productivity and knowledge. The recent development of different kinds of microfluidic devices with ultra-high throughput platforms has enabled researchers to carry out worm population studies. Microfluidic devices primarily comprises of chambers, channels and valves, wherein worms can be cultured, immobilized, imaged, etc. Microfluidic devices have been adapted to study various worm behaviors, including that deepen our understanding of neuromuscular connectivity and functions. This review will provide a clear account of the vital involvement of microfluidic devices in worm biology. PMID:27490525

  18. Realization of universal quantum cloning with superconducting quantum-interference device qubits in a cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian; Yu, Ya-Fei; Zhang, Zhi-Ming; Liu, Song-Hao

    2008-03-01

    We propose a scheme to realize a 1→2 universal quantum cloning machine with superconducting quantum interference device qubits, embedded in a high- Q cavity. The controlled-NOT operations are derived to present our scheme, and the two-photon Raman resonance processes are used to increase the operation rate. Compared with previous works, our scheme has advantages in the experimental realization and further utilization.

  19. Integrated devices for quantum information and quantum simulation with polarization encoded qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansoni, Linda; Sciarrino, Fabio; Mataloni, Paolo; Crespi, Andrea; Ramponi, Roberta; Osellame, Roberto

    2012-06-01

    The ability to manipulate quantum states of light by integrated devices may open new perspectives both for fundamental tests of quantum mechanics and for novel technological applications. The technology for handling polarization-encoded qubits, the most commonly adopted approach, was still missing in quantum optical circuits until the ultrafast laser writing (ULW) technique was adopted for the first time to realize integrated devices able to support and manipulate polarization encoded qubits.1 Thanks to this method, polarization dependent and independent devices can be realized. In particular the maintenance of polarization entanglement was demonstrated in a balanced polarization independent integrated beam splitter1 and an integrated CNOT gate for polarization qubits was realized and carachterized.2 We also exploited integrated optics for quantum simulation tasks: by adopting the ULW technique an integrated quantum walk circuit was realized3 and, for the first time, we investigate how the particle statistics, either bosonic or fermionic, influences a two-particle discrete quantum walk. Such experiment has been realized by adopting two-photon entangled states and an array of integrated symmetric directional couplers. The polarization entanglement was exploited to simulate the bunching-antibunching feature of non interacting bosons and fermions. To this scope a novel three-dimensional geometry for the waveguide circuit is introduced, which allows accurate polarization independent behaviour, maintaining a remarkable control on both phase and balancement of the directional couplers.

  20. Electronic simulation of a multiterminal quantum Hall effect device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosso, A.; Capra, P. P.

    1999-04-01

    A circuit with only resistors and unity gain amplifiers can be proven to be equivalent to the Ricketts and Kemeny electrical model of multiterminal quantum Hall effect (QHE) devices. By means of the new equivalent circuit, commercial software for electronic circuit analysis can be used to study a QHE measurement system. Moreover, it can be easily implemented, and we were able to build a circuit that simulates the electrical behavior of a QHE device. Particular care was taken in the design to reduce the effect of parasitic capacitances, which act as loads connected to the device terminals. Bootstrap buffers have been adopted to significantly reduce the capacitance of input stage. The small residual loading effect can be calculated and eliminated, allowing simulation of a QHE device with good accuracy.

  1. Matrix method analysis of quantum Hall effect device connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortolano, M.; Callegaro, L.

    2012-02-01

    The modelling of electrical connections of single, or several, multiterminal quantum Hall effect (QHE) devices is relevant for electrical metrology: it is known, in fact, that certain particular connections allow (i) the realization of multiples or fractions of the quantized resistance, or (ii) the rejection of stray impedances, so that the configuration maintains the status of quantum standard. Ricketts-Kemeny and Delahaye equivalent circuits are known to be accurate models of the QHE: however, the numerical or analytical solution of electrical networks including these equivalent circuits can be difficult. In this paper, we introduce a method of analysis based on the representation of a QHE device by means of the indefinite admittance matrix: external connections are then represented with another matrix, easily written by inspection. Some examples, including the solution of double- and triple-series connections, are shown.

  2. Method of making an improved superconducting quantum interference device

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Cheng-Teh; Falco, Charles M.; Kampwirth, Robert T.

    1977-01-01

    An improved superconducting quantum interference device is made by sputtering a thin film of an alloy of three parts niobium to one part tin in a pattern comprising a closed loop with a narrow region, depositing a thin film of a radiation shield such as copper over the niobium-tin, scribing a narrow line in the copper over the narrow region, exposing the structure at the scribed line to radiation and removing the deposited copper.

  3. A multiscale quantum mechanics/electromagnetics method for device simulations.

    PubMed

    Yam, ChiYung; Meng, Lingyi; Zhang, Yu; Chen, GuanHua

    2015-04-01

    Multiscale modeling has become a popular tool for research applying to different areas including materials science, microelectronics, biology, chemistry, etc. In this tutorial review, we describe a newly developed multiscale computational method, incorporating quantum mechanics into electronic device modeling with the electromagnetic environment included through classical electrodynamics. In the quantum mechanics/electromagnetics (QM/EM) method, the regions of the system where active electron scattering processes take place are treated quantum mechanically, while the surroundings are described by Maxwell's equations and a semiclassical drift-diffusion model. The QM model and the EM model are solved, respectively, in different regions of the system in a self-consistent manner. Potential distributions and current densities at the interface between QM and EM regions are employed as the boundary conditions for the quantum mechanical and electromagnetic simulations, respectively. The method is illustrated in the simulation of several realistic systems. In the case of junctionless field-effect transistors, transfer characteristics are obtained and a good agreement between experiments and simulations is achieved. Optical properties of a tandem photovoltaic cell are studied and the simulations demonstrate that multiple QM regions are coupled through the classical EM model. Finally, the study of a carbon nanotube-based molecular device shows the accuracy and efficiency of the QM/EM method.

  4. High-rate measurement-device-independent quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirandola, Stefano; Ottaviani, Carlo; Spedalieri, Gaetana; Weedbrook, Christian; Braunstein, Samuel L.; Lloyd, Seth; Gehring, Tobias; Jacobsen, Christian S.; Andersen, Ulrik L.

    2015-06-01

    Quantum cryptography achieves a formidable task—the remote distribution of secret keys by exploiting the fundamental laws of physics. Quantum cryptography is now headed towards solving the practical problem of constructing scalable and secure quantum networks. A significant step in this direction has been the introduction of measurement-device independence, where the secret key between two parties is established by the measurement of an untrusted relay. Unfortunately, although qubit-implemented protocols can reach long distances, their key rates are typically very low, unsuitable for the demands of a metropolitan network. Here we show, theoretically and experimentally, that a solution can come from the use of continuous-variable systems. We design a coherent-state network protocol able to achieve remarkably high key rates at metropolitan distances, in fact three orders of magnitude higher than those currently achieved. Our protocol could be employed to build high-rate quantum networks where devices securely connect to nearby access points or proxy servers.

  5. Strain-Engineering of Graphene Based Topological Quantum Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniz, Ginetom S.; Guassi, Marcos R.; Qu, Fanyao

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated the spin-charge transport in quantum devices based on graphene nanoribbons (GNR). Our calculation is based on the surface Green's function technique, considering the presence of an uniform uniaxial strain, spin-orbit interactions (SOIs), exchange field and a smooth staggered potential. We propose the use of uniaxial strain as an efficient mechanism to tune the conductance profiles of GNR with different edge terminations. Our results show that distinct behaviors can be achieved: for armchair GNR there is a complete suppression of the conductance close to the Fermi level with the formation of a band gap that depends on the direction and strength of the strain deformation, while for zigzag GNR there is only a small conductance suppression. We also discuss the effects of SOIs and the appearance of spin-resolved conductance oscillations, and the local density of states of these GNR devices in the quantum anomalous Hall regime. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the local density of states show that depending on the smoothness of the staggered potential, the edge states of AGNR can either emerge or be suppressed. These emerging states can be probed by scanning tunneling microscope. Our findings can be potentially used in novel GNR based topological quantum devices. Supported by FAP-DF, CNPq and CAPES.

  6. The theory research of multi-user quantum access network with Measurement Device Independent quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yi-Ming; Li, Yun-Xia; Shi, Lei; Meng, Wen; Cui, Shu-Min; Xu, Zhen-Yu

    2015-10-01

    Quantum access network can't guarantee the absolute security of multi-user detector and eavesdropper can get access to key information through time-shift attack and other ways. Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution is immune from all the detection attacks, and accomplishes the safe sharing of quantum key. In this paper, that Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution is used in the application of multi-user quantum access to the network is on the research. By adopting time-division multiplexing technology to achieve the sharing of multiuser detector, the system structure is simplified and the security of quantum key sharing is acquired.

  7. Stability of spintronic devices based on quantum ring networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Földi, Péter; Kálmán, Orsolya; Peeters, F. M.

    2009-09-01

    Transport properties in mesoscopic networks are investigated, where the strength of the (Rashba-type) spin-orbit coupling is tuned with external gate voltages. We analyze in detail to what extent the ideal behavior and functionality of some promising network-based devices are modified by random (spin-dependent) scattering events and by thermal fluctuations. It is found that although the functionality of these devices is obviously based on the quantum coherence of the transmitted electrons, there is a certain stability: moderate level of errors can be tolerated. For mesoscopic networks made of typical semiconductor materials, we found that when the energy distribution of the input carriers is narrow enough, the devices can operate close to their ideal limits even at relatively high temperature. As an example, we present results for two different networks: one that realizes a Stern-Gerlach device and another that simulates a spin quantum walker. Finally we propose a simple network that can act as a narrow band energy filter even in the presence of random scatterers.

  8. An Integrated Quantum Dot Barcode Smartphone Optical Device for Wireless Multiplexed Diagnosis of Infected Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Kevin

    Integrating mobile-cellular devices with multiplex molecular diagnostics can potentially provide the most powerful platform for tracking, managing and preventing the transmission of infectious diseases. With over 6.9 billion subscriptions globally, handheld mobile-cellular devices can be programmed to spatially map, temporally track, and transmit information on infections over wide geographical space and boundaries. Current cell phone diagnostic technologies have poor limit of detection, dynamic range, and cannot detect multiple pathogen targets simultaneously, limiting their utility to single infections with high load. Here we combined recent advances in quantum dot barcode technology for molecular detection with smartphones to engineer a simple and low-cost chip-based wireless multiplex diagnostic device. We validated our device using a variety of synthetic genomic targets for the respiratory virus and blood-borne pathogens, and demonstrated that it could detect clinical samples after simple amplification. More importantly, we confirmed that the device is capable of detecting patients infected with a single or multiple infectious pathogens (e.g., HIV and hepatitis B) in a single test. This device advances the capacity for global surveillance of infectious diseases and has the potential to accelerate knowledge exchange-transfer of emerging or exigent disease threats with healthcare and military organizations in real-time.

  9. Application of Advanced Atomic Force Microscopy Techniques to Study Quantum Dots and Bio-materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guz, Nataliia

    In recent years, there has been an increase in research towards micro- and nanoscale devices as they have proliferated into diverse areas of scientific exploration. Many of the general fields of study that have greatly affected the advancement of these devices includes the investigation of their properties. The sensitivity of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows detecting charges up to the single electron value in quantum dots in ambient conditions, the measurement of steric forces on the surface of the human cell brush, determination of cell mechanics, magnetic forces, and other important properties. Utilizing AFM methods, the fast screening of quantum dot efficiency and the differences between cancer, normal (healthy) and precancer (immortalized) human cells has been investigated. The current research using AFM techniques can help to identify biophysical differences of cancer cells to advance our understanding of the resistance of the cells against the existing medicine.

  10. Quantum Well and Quantum Dot Modeling for Advanced Infrared Detectors and Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David; Gunapala, S. D.; Bandara, S. V.; Hill, C. J.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the modeling of Quantum Well Infrared Detectors (QWIP) and Quantum Dot Infrared Detectors (QDIP) in the development of Focal Plane Arrays (FPA). The QWIP Detector being developed is a dual band detector. It is capable of running on two bands Long-Wave Infrared (LWIR) and Medium Wavelength Infrared (MWIR). The same large-format dual-band FPA technology can be applied to Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetector (QDIP) with no modification, once QDIP exceeds QWIP in single device performance. Details of the devices are reviewed.

  11. Microscopy imaging device with advanced imaging properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Kunal; Burns, Laurie; El Gamal, Abbas; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Cocker, Eric; Ho, Tatt Wei

    2015-11-24

    Systems, methods and devices are implemented for microscope imaging solutions. One embodiment of the present disclosure is directed toward an epifluorescence microscope. The microscope includes an image capture circuit including an array of optical sensor. An optical arrangement is configured to direct excitation light of less than about 1 mW to a target object in a field of view of that is at least 0.5 mm.sup.2 and to direct epi-fluorescence emission caused by the excitation light to the array of optical sensors. The optical arrangement and array of optical sensors are each sufficiently close to the target object to provide at least 2.5 .mu.m resolution for an image of the field of view.

  12. Microscopy imaging device with advanced imaging properties

    DOEpatents

    Ghosh, Kunal; Burns, Laurie; El Gamal, Abbas; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Cocker, Eric; Ho, Tatt Wei

    2016-10-25

    Systems, methods and devices are implemented for microscope imaging solutions. One embodiment of the present disclosure is directed toward an epifluorescence microscope. The microscope includes an image capture circuit including an array of optical sensor. An optical arrangement is configured to direct excitation light of less than about 1 mW to a target object in a field of view of that is at least 0.5 mm.sup.2 and to direct epi-fluorescence emission caused by the excitation light to the array of optical sensors. The optical arrangement and array of optical sensors are each sufficiently close to the target object to provide at least 2.5 .mu.m resolution for an image of the field of view.

  13. Virtual Learning Environment for Interactive Engagement with Advanced Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Mads Kock; Skyum, Birk; Heck, Robert; Müller, Romain; Bason, Mark; Lieberoth, Andreas; Sherson, Jacob F.

    2016-06-01

    A virtual learning environment can engage university students in the learning process in ways that the traditional lectures and lab formats cannot. We present our virtual learning environment StudentResearcher, which incorporates simulations, multiple-choice quizzes, video lectures, and gamification into a learning path for quantum mechanics at the advanced university level. StudentResearcher is built upon the experiences gathered from workshops with the citizen science game Quantum Moves at the high-school and university level, where the games were used extensively to illustrate the basic concepts of quantum mechanics. The first test of this new virtual learning environment was a 2014 course in advanced quantum mechanics at Aarhus University with 47 enrolled students. We found increased learning for the students who were more active on the platform independent of their previous performances.

  14. Robust and versatile black-box certification of quantum devices.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tzyh Haur; Vértesi, Tamás; Bancal, Jean-Daniel; Scarani, Valerio; Navascués, Miguel

    2014-07-25

    Self-testing refers to the fact that, in some quantum devices, both states and measurements can be assessed in a black-box scenario, on the sole basis of the observed statistics, i.e., without reference to any prior device calibration. Only a few examples of self-testing are known, and they just provide nontrivial assessment for devices performing unrealistically close to the ideal case. We overcome these difficulties by approaching self-testing with the semidefinite programing hierarchy for the characterization of quantum correlations. This allows us to improve dramatically the robustness of previous self-testing schemes; e.g., we show that a Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt violation larger than 2.57 certifies a singlet fidelity of more than 70%. In addition, the versatility of the tool brings about self-testing of hitherto impossible cases, such as the robust self-testing of nonmaximally entangled two-qutrit states in the Collins-Gisin-Linden-Massar-Popescu scenario.

  15. Robust and Versatile Black-Box Certification of Quantum Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tzyh Haur; Vértesi, Tamás; Bancal, Jean-Daniel; Scarani, Valerio; Navascués, Miguel

    2014-07-01

    Self-testing refers to the fact that, in some quantum devices, both states and measurements can be assessed in a black-box scenario, on the sole basis of the observed statistics, i.e., without reference to any prior device calibration. Only a few examples of self-testing are known, and they just provide nontrivial assessment for devices performing unrealistically close to the ideal case. We overcome these difficulties by approaching self-testing with the semidefinite programing hierarchy for the characterization of quantum correlations. This allows us to improve dramatically the robustness of previous self-testing schemes; e.g., we show that a Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt violation larger than 2.57 certifies a singlet fidelity of more than 70%. In addition, the versatility of the tool brings about self-testing of hitherto impossible cases, such as the robust self-testing of nonmaximally entangled two-qutrit states in the Collins-Gisin-Linden-Massar-Popescu scenario.

  16. Statistical benchmarking for orthogonal electrostatic quantum dot qubit devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamble, John; Frees, Adam; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S. N.

    2014-03-01

    Quantum dots in semiconductor systems have emerged as attractive candidates for the implementation of quantum information processors because of the promise of scalability, manipulability, and integration with existing classical electronics. A limitation in current devices is that the electrostatic gates used for qubit manipulation exhibit strong cross-capacitance, presenting a barrier for practical scale-up. Here, we introduce a statistical framework for making precise the notion of orthogonality. We apply our method to analyze recently implemented designs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that exhibit much increased orthogonal control than was previously possible. We then use our statistical modeling to future device designs, providing practical guidelines for devices to have robust control properties. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as representing the official policies, either expressly or implied, of the US Government. This work was supported in part by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories, by ARO (W911NF-12-0607), and by the United States Department of Defense.

  17. Future Opportunities for Advancing Glucose Test Device Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Young, Brian R; Young, Teresa L; Joyce, Margaret K; Kennedy, Spencer I; Atashbar, Massood Z

    2011-01-01

    Advancements in the field of printed electronics can be applied to the field of diabetes testing. A brief history and some new developments in printed electronics components applicable to personal test devices, including circuitry, batteries, transmission devices, displays, and sensors, are presented. Low-cost, thin, and lightweight materials containing printed circuits with energy storage or harvest capability and reactive/display centers, made using new printing/imaging technologies, are ideal for incorporation into personal-use medical devices such as glucose test meters. Semicontinuous rotogravure printing, which utilizes flexible substrates and polymeric, metallic, and/or nano “ink” composite materials to effect rapidly produced, lower-cost printed electronics, is showing promise. Continuing research advancing substrate, “ink,” and continuous processing development presents the opportunity for research collaboration with medical device designers. PMID:22027300

  18. Future opportunities for advancing glucose test device electronics.

    PubMed

    Young, Brian R; Young, Teresa L; Joyce, Margaret K; Kennedy, Spencer I; Atashbar, Massood Z

    2011-09-01

    Advancements in the field of printed electronics can be applied to the field of diabetes testing. A brief history and some new developments in printed electronics components applicable to personal test devices, including circuitry, batteries, transmission devices, displays, and sensors, are presented. Low-cost, thin, and lightweight materials containing printed circuits with energy storage or harvest capability and reactive/display centers, made using new printing/imaging technologies, are ideal for incorporation into personal-use medical devices such as glucose test meters. Semicontinuous rotogravure printing, which utilizes flexible substrates and polymeric, metallic, and/or nano "ink" composite materials to effect rapidly produced, lower-cost printed electronics, is showing promise. Continuing research advancing substrate, "ink," and continuous processing development presents the opportunity for research collaboration with medical device designers.

  19. Advanced devices and systems for radiation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, G.F.; Wehe, D.K.; He, Z.; Barrett, C.; Miyamoto, J.

    1996-06-01

    The authors` most recent work continues their long-standing efforts to develop semiconductor detectors based on the collection of only a single type of charge carrier. Their best results are an extension of the principle of coplanar electrodes first described by Paul Luke of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 18 months ago. This technique, described in past progress reports, has the effect of deriving an output signal from detectors that depends only on the motion of carriers close to one surface. Since nearly all of these carriers are of one type (electrons) that are attracted to that electrode, the net effect is to nearly eliminate the influence of hole motion on the properties of the output signal. The result is that the much better mobility of electrons in compound semiconductors materials such as CZT can now be exploited without the concurrent penalty of poor hole collection. They have also developed new techniques in conjunction with the coplanar electrode principle that extends the technique into a new dimension. By proper processing of signals from the opposite electrode (the cathode) from the coplanar surface, they are able to derive a signal that is a good indication of the depth of interaction at which the charge carriers were initially formed. They have been the first group to demonstrate this technique, and examples of separate pulse height spectra recorded at a variety of different depths of interaction are shown in several of the figures that follow. Obtaining depth information is one step in the direction of obtaining volumetric point-of-interaction information from the detector. If one could known the coordinates of each specific interaction, then corrections could be applied to account for the inhomogeneities that currently plague many room-temperature devices.

  20. Mathematical foundations of quantum mechanics: An advanced short course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, Valter

    2016-08-01

    This paper collects and extends the lectures I gave at the “XXIV International Fall Workshop on Geometry and Physics” held in Zaragoza (Spain) during September 2015. Within these lectures I review the formulation of Quantum Mechanics, and quantum theories in general, from a mathematically advanced viewpoint, essentially based on the orthomodular lattice of elementary propositions, discussing some fundamental ideas, mathematical tools and theorems also related to the representation of physical symmetries. The final step consists of an elementary introduction the so-called (C∗-) algebraic formulation of quantum theories.

  1. Self-assembling hybrid diamond-biological quantum devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, A.; Koplovitz, G.; Retzker, A.; Jelezko, F.; Yochelis, S.; Porath, D.; Nevo, Y.; Shoseyov, O.; Paltiel, Y.; Plenio, M. B.

    2014-09-01

    The realization of scalable arrangements of nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond remains a key challenge on the way towards efficient quantum information processing, quantum simulation and quantum sensing applications. Although technologies based on implanting NV-centers in bulk diamond crystals or hybrid device approaches have been developed, they are limited by the achievable spatial resolution and by the intricate technological complexities involved in achieving scalability. We propose and demonstrate a novel approach for creating an arrangement of NV-centers, based on the self-assembling capabilities of biological systems and their beneficial nanometer spatial resolution. Here, a self-assembled protein structure serves as a structural scaffold for surface functionalized nanodiamonds, in this way allowing for the controlled creation of NV-structures on the nanoscale and providing a new avenue towards bridging the bio-nano interface. One-, two- as well as three-dimensional structures are within the scope of biological structural assembling techniques. We realized experimentally the formation of regular structures by interconnecting nanodiamonds using biological protein scaffolds. Based on the achievable NV-center distances of 11 nm, we evaluate the expected dipolar coupling interaction with neighboring NV-centers as well as the expected decoherence time. Moreover, by exploiting these couplings, we provide a detailed theoretical analysis on the viability of multiqubit quantum operations, suggest the possibility of individual addressing based on the random distribution of the NV intrinsic symmetry axes and address the challenges posed by decoherence and imperfect couplings. We then demonstrate in the last part that our scheme allows for the high-fidelity creation of entanglement, cluster states and quantum simulation applications.

  2. Spectroscopic and Device Aspects of Nanocrystal Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Pietryga, Jeffrey M; Park, Young-Shin; Lim, Jaehoon; Fidler, Andrew F; Bae, Wan Ki; Brovelli, Sergio; Klimov, Victor I

    2016-09-28

    The field of nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs) is already more than 30 years old, and yet continuing interest in these structures is driven by both the fascinating physics emerging from strong quantum confinement of electronic excitations, as well as a large number of prospective applications that could benefit from the tunable properties and amenability toward solution-based processing of these materials. The focus of this review is on recent advances in nanocrystal research related to applications of QD materials in lasing, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and solar energy conversion. A specific underlying theme is innovative concepts for tuning the properties of QDs beyond what is possible via traditional size manipulation, particularly through heterostructuring. Examples of such advanced control of nanocrystal functionalities include the following: interface engineering for suppressing Auger recombination in the context of QD LEDs and lasers; Stokes-shift engineering for applications in large-area luminescent solar concentrators; and control of intraband relaxation for enhanced carrier multiplication in advanced QD photovoltaics. We examine the considerable recent progress on these multiple fronts of nanocrystal research, which has resulted in the first commercialized QD technologies. These successes explain the continuing appeal of this field to a broad community of scientists and engineers, which in turn ensures even more exciting results to come from future exploration of this fascinating class of materials. PMID:27677521

  3. Josephson phase diffusion in the superconducting quantum interference device ratchet

    SciTech Connect

    Spiechowicz, Jakub; Łuczka, Jerzy

    2015-05-15

    We study diffusion of the Josephson phase in the asymmetric superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) subjected to a time-periodic current and pierced by an external magnetic flux. We analyze a relation between phase diffusion and quality of transport characterized by the dc voltage across the SQUID and efficiency of the device. In doing so, we concentrate on the previously reported regime [J. Spiechowicz and J. Łuczka, New J. Phys. 17, 023054 (2015)] for which efficiency of the SQUID attains a global maximum. For long times, the mean-square displacement of the phase is a linear function of time, meaning that diffusion is normal. Its coefficient is small indicating rather regular phase evolution. However, it can be magnified several times by tailoring experimentally accessible parameters like amplitudes of the ac current or external magnetic flux. Finally, we prove that in the deterministic limit this regime is essentially non-chaotic and possesses an unexpected simplicity of attractors.

  4. Nano-superconducting quantum interference devices with suspended junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Hazra, D.; Hasselbach, K.; Kirtley, J. R.

    2014-04-14

    Nano-Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (nano-SQUIDs) are usually fabricated from a single layer of either Nb or Al. We describe here a simple method for fabricating suspended nano-bridges in Nb/Al thin-film bilayers. We use these suspended bridges, which act as Josephson weak links, to fabricate nano-SQUIDs which show critical current oscillations at temperatures up to 1.5 K and magnetic flux densities up to over 20 mT. These nano-SQUIDs exhibit flux modulation depths intermediate between all-Al and all-Nb devices, with some of the desirable characteristics of both. The suspended geometry is attractive for magnetic single nanoparticle measurements.

  5. Advances in Quantum Trajectory Approaches to Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askar, Attila

    2001-03-01

    The quantum fluid dynamics (QFD) formulation is based on the separation of the amplitude and phase of the complex wave function in Schrodinger's equation. The approach leads to conservation laws for an equivalent "gas continuum". The Lagrangian [1] representation corresponds to following the particles of the fluid continuum, i. e. calculating "quantum trajectories". The Eulerian [2] representation on the other hand, amounts to observing the dynamics of the gas continuum at the points of a fixed coordinate frame. The combination of several factors leads to a most encouraging computational efficiency. QFD enables the numerical analysis to deal with near monotonic amplitude and phase functions. The Lagrangian description concentrates the computation effort to regions of highest probability as an optimal adaptive grid. The Eulerian representation allows the study of multi-coordinate problems as a set of one-dimensional problems within an alternating direction methodology. An explicit time integrator limits the increase in computational effort with the number of discrete points to linear. Discretization of the space via local finite elements [1,2] and global radial functions [3] will be discussed. Applications include wave packets in four-dimensional quadratic potentials and two coordinate photo-dissociation problems for NOCl and NO2. [1] "Quantum fluid dynamics (QFD) in the Lagrangian representation with applications to photo-dissociation problems", F. Sales, A. Askar and H. A. Rabitz, J. Chem. Phys. 11, 2423 (1999) [2] "Multidimensional wave-packet dynamics within the fluid dynamical formulation of the Schrodinger equation", B. Dey, A. Askar and H. A. Rabitz, J. Chem. Phys. 109, 8770 (1998) [3] "Solution of the quantum fluid dynamics equations with radial basis function interpolation", Xu-Guang Hu, Tak-San Ho, H. A. Rabitz and A. Askar, Phys. Rev. E. 61, 5967 (2000)

  6. Computational and Mathematical Modeling of Coupled Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berggren, Susan Anne Elizabeth

    This research focuses on conducting an extensive computational investigation and mathematical analysis into the average voltage response of arrays of Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs). These arrays will serve as the basis for the development of a sensitive, low noise, significantly lower Size, Weight and Power (SWaP) antenna integrated with Low-Noise Amplifier (LNA) using the SQUID technology. The goal for this antenna is to be capable of meeting all requirements for Guided Missile Destroyers (DDG) 1000 class ships for Information Operations/Signals Intelligence (IO/SIGINT) applications in Very High Frequency/Ultra High Frequency (V/UHF) bands. The device will increase the listening capability of receivers by moving technology into a new regime of energy detection allowing wider band, smaller size, more sensitive, stealthier systems. The smaller size and greater sensitivity will allow for ships to be “de-cluttered” of their current large dishes and devices, replacing everything with fewer and smaller SQUID antenna devices. The fewer devices present on the deck of a ship, the more invisible the ship will be to enemy forces. We invent new arrays of SQUIDs, optimized for signal detection with very high dynamic range and excellent spur-free dynamic range, while maintaining extreme small size (and low radar cross section), wide bandwidth, and environmentally noise limited sensitivity, effectively shifting the bottle neck of receiver systems forever away from the antenna itself deeper into the receiver chain. To accomplish these goals we develop and validate mathematical models for different designs of SQUID arrays and use them to invent a new device and systems design. This design is capable of significantly exceeding, per size weight and power, state-of-the-art receiver system measures of performance, such as bandwidth, sensitivity, dynamic range, and spurious-free dynamic range.

  7. Advances in GaAs bistable optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, J. L.; Tarng, S. S.; Gibbs, H. M.; Tai, K.; Weinberger, D. A.; Gossard, A. C.; McCall, S. L.; Passner, A.; Venkatesan, T. N. C.; Weigmann, W.

    1984-01-01

    Bistable optical devices (BOD's) using GaAs as the nonlinear medium are viable candidators for the achievement of fast ( ns), room temperature, low-power (mw), externally controllable optical switches which are easily fabricated and operated. Advances were made in all of these areas and efforts are in progress to improve performances in ways that are simultaneously compatible.

  8. Function principle of a relaxation oscillator based on a bistable quantum Hall device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachtwei, G.; Kalugin, N. G.; Saǧol, B. E.; Stellmach, Ch.; Hein, G.

    2003-03-01

    We present a simple relaxation oscillator based on a quantum Hall device with Corbino geometry near the breakdown of the quantum Hall effect. In the hysteresis region of the breakdown, the quantum Hall device exhibits bistable behavior. If a resistance is connected in series and a capacitor in parallel to the quantum Hall device, the bistable switching leads to subsequent charging and discharging of the capacitor, detectable as relaxation oscillations. We explain the observed oscillations by solving Kirchhoff's equations and obtain a good quantitative description of the experiment. From this, we deduce some dynamical parameters of the Corbino device and discuss the performance limits of the oscillator.

  9. Advances in device and formulation technologies for pulmonary drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chan, John Gar Yan; Wong, Jennifer; Zhou, Qi Tony; Leung, Sharon Shui Yee; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2014-08-01

    Inhaled pharmaceuticals are formulated and delivered differently according to the therapeutic indication. However, specific device-formulation coupling is often fickle, and new medications or indications also demand new strategies. The discontinuation of chlorofluorocarbon propellants has seen replacement of older metered dose inhalers with dry powder inhaler formulations. High-dose dry powder inhalers are increasingly seen as an alternative dosage form for nebulised medications. In other cases, new medications have completely bypassed conventional inhalers and been formulated for use with unique inhalers such as the Staccato® device. Among these different devices, integration of software and electronic assistance has become a shared trend. This review covers recent device and formulation advances that are forming the current landscape of inhaled therapeutics. PMID:24728868

  10. Advanced Topic: Quasi-Hermitian Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtright, Thomas L.; Fairlie, David B.; Zachos, Cosmas K.

    2014-11-01

    So far, the discussion has limited itself to hermitian operators and systems. However, superficially non-hermitian Hamiltonian quantum systems are also of considerable current interest, especially in the context of PT symmetric models [Ben07, Mos05], although many of the main ideas appeared earlier [SGH92, XA96]. For such systems, the Hilbert space structure is at first sight very different from that for hermitian Hamiltonian systems, inasmuch as the dual wavefunctions are not just the complex conjugates of the wavefunctions, or, equivalently, the Hilbert space metric is not the usual one. While it is possible to keep most of the compact Dirac notation in analyzing such systems, here we work with explicit functions and avoid abstract notation, in the hope to fully expose all the structure, rather than to hide it...

  11. Recent Progress in Quantum Dot Based White Light-Emitting Devices.

    PubMed

    Su, Liang; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Yu; Rogach, Andrey L

    2016-08-01

    Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have been widely employed as components of white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) due to their excellent optical properties (highly saturated emission color, high luminescence quantum yield) as well as thermal and chemical stability. Much effort has been devoted to realize efficient QD-based WLEDs, including the synthesis of superior luminescent nanomaterials with excellent stabilities, and the design of advanced devices structures. In this paper, after introducing photometric parameters of the contemporary QD-based WLEDs, we highlight the recent progress in these devices grouped according to three main mechanisms for white light generation: optical excitation, direct charge carrier injection, and Förster resonance energy transfer. The methods to generate white light, the design of QD emitters and QD-based devices, as well as their fabrication techniques are considered, and the key scientific and technological challenges in the QD-based WLEDs are highlighted. Novel light-emitting materials for WLEDs such as carbon-based nanoparticles are also considered. PMID:27573394

  12. Quantum-ring spin interference device tuned by quantum point contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Diago-Cisneros, Leo; Mireles, Francisco

    2013-11-21

    We introduce a spin-interference device that comprises a quantum ring (QR) with three embedded quantum point contacts (QPCs) and study theoretically its spin transport properties in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction. Two of the QPCs conform the lead-to-ring junctions while a third one is placed symmetrically in the upper arm of the QR. Using an appropriate scattering model for the QPCs and the S-matrix scattering approach, we analyze the role of the QPCs on the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) and Aharonov-Casher (AC) conductance oscillations of the QR-device. Exact formulas are obtained for the spin-resolved conductances of the QR-device as a function of the confinement of the QPCs and the AB/AC phases. Conditions for the appearance of resonances and anti-resonances in the spin-conductance are derived and discussed. We predict very distinctive variations of the QR-conductance oscillations not seen in previous QR proposals. In particular, we find that the interference pattern in the QR can be manipulated to a large extend by varying electrically the lead-to-ring topological parameters. The latter can be used to modulate the AB and AC phases by applying gate voltage only. We have shown also that the conductance oscillations exhibits a crossover to well-defined resonances as the lateral QPC confinement strength is increased, mapping the eigenenergies of the QR. In addition, unique features of the conductance arise by varying the aperture of the upper-arm QPC and the Rashba spin-orbit coupling. Our results may be of relevance for promising spin-orbitronics devices based on quantum interference mechanisms.

  13. Are bioresorbable polylactate devices comparable to titanium devices for stabilizing Le Fort I advancement?

    PubMed

    Blakey, G H; Rossouw, E; Turvey, T A; Phillips, C; Proffit, W R; White, R P

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether skeletal and dental outcomes following Le Fort I surgery differed when stabilization was performed with polylactate bioresorbable devices or titanium devices. Fifty-seven patients with preoperative records and at least 1 year postoperative records were identified and grouped according to the stabilization method. All cephalometric X-rays were traced and digitized by a single operator. Analysis of covariance was used to compare the postsurgical change between the two stabilization methods. Twenty-seven patients received bioresorbable devices (group R), while 30 received titanium devices (group M). There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups with respect to gender, race/ethnicity, age, or dental and skeletal movements during surgery. Subtle postsurgical differences were noted, but were not statistically significant. Stabilization of Le Fort I advancement with polylactate bioresorbable and titanium devices produced similar clinical outcomes at 1 year following surgery.

  14. Nonlinear quantum transport in low-dimensional electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrios, Andres Javier

    recovered in the limit of small electric fields. In Part C, we apply the above results to the study of both linear and nonlinear longitudinal magneto-conductance in quasi one-dimensional quantum wires (1D QW). We have thus been able to quantitatively explain the experimental results, recently published by C. Brick, et al., on these novel frontier-type devices.

  15. Advanced photon source experience with vacuum chambers for insertion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hartog, P.D.; Grimmer, J.; Xu, S.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Wiemerslage, G.

    1997-08-01

    During the last five years, a new approach to the design and fabrication of extruded aluminum vacuum chambers for insertion devices was developed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). With this approach, three different versions of the vacuum chamber, with vertical apertures of 12 mm, 8 mm, and 5 mm, were manufactured and tested. Twenty chambers were installed into the APS vacuum system. All have operated with beam, and 16 have been coupled with insertion devices. Two different vacuum chambers with vertical apertures of 16 mm and 11 mm were developed for the BESSY-II storage ring and 3 of 16 mm chambers were manufactured.

  16. Advanced Sensor Fish Device for ImprovedTurbine Design

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Thomas J.

    2009-09-14

    Juvenile salmon (smolts) passing through hydroelectric turbines are subjected to environmental conditions that can potentially kill or injure them. Many turbines are reaching the end of their operational life expectancies and will be replaced with new turbines that incorporate advanced “fish friendly” designs devised to prevent injury and death to fish. To design a fish friendly turbine, it is first necessary to define the current conditions fish encounter. One such device used by biologists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was the sensor fish device to collect data that measures the forces fish experience during passage through hydroelectric projects.

  17. Single Cell Magnetic Measurements with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmstrom, Johanna C.; Arps, Jennifer; Dwyer, Bo; Kalisky, Beena; Kirtley, John R.; Moler, Kathryn A.; Qian, Lisa C.; Rosenberg, Aaron J.; Rutt, Brian; Tee, Sui Seng; Theis, Eric; Urbach, Elana; Wang, Yihua

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles play an important role in numerous biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging and targeted drug delivery. There is a need for tools to characterize individual magnetic nanoparticles and the magnetic properties of individual cells. We use a scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) to observe the magnetic fields from single mammalian cells loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. We show that the SQUID is a useful tool for imaging biological magnetism and is capable of resolving cell to cell variations in magnetic dipole moments. We hope to correlate these magnetic images with real space imaging techniques such as optical and scanning electron microscopy. The visualization of single cell magnetism can be used to optimize biological magnetic imaging techniques, such as MRI, by quantifying the strength of magnetic dipole moments of in vitro magnetic labeling. This work is supported by a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship and a Gabilan Stanford Graduate Fellowship.

  18. Radiofrequency amplifier based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device

    DOEpatents

    Hilbert, Claude; Martinis, John M.; Clarke, John

    1986-01-01

    A low noise radiofrequency amplifier (10), using a dc SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) as the input amplifying element. The dc SQUID (11) and an input coil (12) are maintained at superconductivity temperatures in a superconducting shield (13), with the input coil (12) inductively coupled to the superconducting ring (17) of the dc SQUID (11). A radiofrequency signal from outside the shield (13) is applied to the input coil (12), and an amplified radiofrequency signal is developed across the dc SQUID ring (17) and transmitted to exteriorly of the shield (13). A power gain of 19.5.+-.0.5 dB has been achieved with a noise temperature of 1.0.+-.0.4 K. at a frequency of 100 MHz.

  19. Radiofrequency amplifier based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device

    DOEpatents

    Hilbert, C.; Martinis, J.M.; Clarke, J.

    1984-04-27

    A low noise radiofrequency amplifer, using a dc SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) as the input amplifying element. The dc SQUID and an input coil are maintained at superconductivity temperatures in a superconducting shield, with the input coil inductively coupled to the superconducting ring of the dc SQUID. A radiofrequency signal from outside the shield is applied to the input coil, and an amplified radiofrequency signal is developed across the dc SQUID ring and transmitted to exteriorly of the shield. A power gain of 19.5 +- 0.5 dB has been achieved with a noise temperature of 1.0 +- 0.4 K at a frequency of 100 MHz.

  20. Storing quantum information for 30 seconds in a nanoelectronic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhonen, Juha T.; Dehollain, Juan P.; Laucht, Arne; Hudson, Fay E.; Kalra, Rachpon; Sekiguchi, Takeharu; Itoh, Kohei M.; Jamieson, David N.; McCallum, Jeffrey C.; Dzurak, Andrew S.; Morello, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    The spin of an electron or a nucleus in a semiconductor naturally implements the unit of quantum information—the qubit. In addition, because semiconductors are currently used in the electronics industry, developing qubits in semiconductors would be a promising route to realize scalable quantum information devices. The solid-state environment, however, may provide deleterious interactions between the qubit and the nuclear spins of surrounding atoms, or charge and spin fluctuations arising from defects in oxides and interfaces. For materials such as silicon, enrichment of the spin-zero 28Si isotope drastically reduces spin-bath decoherence. Experiments on bulk spin ensembles in 28Si crystals have indeed demonstrated extraordinary coherence times. However, it remained unclear whether these would persist at the single-spin level, in gated nanostructures near amorphous interfaces. Here, we present the coherent operation of individual 31P electron and nuclear spin qubits in a top-gated nanostructure, fabricated on an isotopically engineered 28Si substrate. The 31P nuclear spin sets the new benchmark coherence time (>30 s with Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence) of any single qubit in the solid state and reaches >99.99% control fidelity. The electron spin CPMG coherence time exceeds 0.5 s, and detailed noise spectroscopy indicates that—contrary to widespread belief—it is not limited by the proximity to an interface. Instead, decoherence is probably dominated by thermal and magnetic noise external to the device, and is thus amenable to further improvement.

  1. Nanoengineered quantum dot medium for space optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oktyabrsky, S.; Tokranov, V.; Yakimov, M.; Sergeev, A.; Mitin, V.

    2012-10-01

    Resistance to temperature and ionizing radiation of space optoelectronic devices can be improved through control of carrier kinetics in nanoscale systems. Recent results in the science and technology of self-assembled heteroepitaxial InAs quantum dot (QD) medium related to photonic applications are discussed. Focus is placed on management of carrier kinetics via nanoengineering of electronic spectrum and potential profiles in the QD ensemble using modeling and controlled fabrication of QDs with molecular beam epitaxy. Shape-engineered QD sheets embedded into GaAs quantum wells were found to withstand two orders of magnitude higher proton dose than QWs and to account for high luminescence efficiency and thermally stable laser diodes. Built-in charge in QDs is responsible for improvement of both near and mid-IR optical absorption, but also control photoelectron lifetime in the structures. The negatively charged QD medium was the first QD material that has recently shown credible improvement of solar cell efficiency. It has resulted from IR energy harvesting and suppressed fast electron capture processes. It is thus expected that QD InAs/GaAs photovoltaics will overcome the efficiency and lifespan of multi-junction solar cells. Potentials due to QD built-in charge are also responsible for improved photoelectron lifetime in QD infrared photodetectors. QD correlated clusters provide even higher collective potential barriers around clusters and constitute the novel approach to the optoelectronic materials combining manageable photoelectron lifetime, high mobility, and tunable localized and conducting states.

  2. Materials Advances for Next-Generation Ingestible Electronic Medical Devices.

    PubMed

    Bettinger, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    Electronic medical implants have collectively transformed the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases, but have many inherent limitations. Electronic implants require invasive surgeries, operate in challenging microenvironments, and are susceptible to bacterial infection and persistent inflammation. Novel materials and nonconventional device fabrication strategies may revolutionize the way electronic devices are integrated with the body. Ingestible electronic devices offer many advantages compared with implantable counterparts that may improve the diagnosis and treatment of pathologies ranging from gastrointestinal infections to diabetes. This review summarizes current technologies and highlights recent materials advances. Specific focus is dedicated to next-generation materials for packaging, circuit design, and on-board power supplies that are benign, nontoxic, and even biodegradable. Future challenges and opportunities are also highlighted.

  3. Insertion devices for the Advanced Light Source at LBL

    SciTech Connect

    Hassenzahl, W.; Chin, J.; Halbach, K.; Hoyer, E.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.; Savoy, R.

    1989-03-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory will be the first of the new generation of dedicated synchrotron light sources to be put into operation. Specially designed insertion devices will be required to realize the high brightness photon beams made possible by the low emittance of the electron beam. The complement of insertion devices on the ALS will include undulators with periods as short as 3.9 cm and one or more high field wigglers. The first device to be designed is a 5 m long, 5 cm period, hybrid undulator. The goal of very high brightness and high harmonic output imposes unusually tight tolerances on the magnetic field quality and thus on the mechanical structure. The design process, using a generic structure for all undulators, is described. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Realizing a partial general quantum cloning machine with superconducting quantum-interference devices in a cavity QED

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Baolong; Yang Zhen; Ye Liu

    2009-05-15

    We propose a scheme for implementing a partial general quantum cloning machine with superconducting quantum-interference devices coupled to a nonresonant cavity. By regulating the time parameters, our system can perform optimal symmetric (asymmetric) universal quantum cloning, optimal symmetric (asymmetric) phase-covariant cloning, and optimal symmetric economical phase-covariant cloning. In the scheme the cavity is only virtually excited, thus, the cavity decay is suppressed during the cloning operations.

  5. Quantum logical gates with four-level superconducting quantum interference devices coupled to a superconducting resonator

    SciTech Connect

    He Xiaoling; Luo Junyan; Yang Chuiping; Li Sheng; Han Siyuan

    2010-08-15

    We propose a way for realizing a two-qubit controlled phase gate with superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) coupled to a superconducting resonator. In this proposal, the two lowest levels of each SQUID serve as the logical states and two intermediate levels of each SQUID are used for the gate realization. We show that neither adjustment of SQUID level spacings during the gate operation nor uniformity in SQUID parameters is required by this proposal. In addition, this proposal does not require the adiabatic passage or a second-order detuning and thus the gate is much faster.

  6. Advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography for deterministic nanophotonic device processing.

    PubMed

    Kaganskiy, Arsenty; Gschrey, Manuel; Schlehahn, Alexander; Schmidt, Ronny; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Heindel, Tobias; Strittmatter, André; Rodt, Sven; Reitzenstein, Stephan

    2015-07-01

    We report on an advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography technique based on high-resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy at low temperatures. The technique has been developed for the deterministic fabrication and quantitative evaluation of nanophotonic structures. It is of particular interest for the realization and optimization of non-classical light sources which require the pre-selection of single quantum dots (QDs) with very specific emission features. The two-step electron-beam lithography process comprises (a) the detailed optical study and selection of target QDs by means of CL-spectroscopy and (b) the precise retrieval of the locations and integration of target QDs into lithographically defined nanostructures. Our technology platform allows for a detailed pre-process determination of important optical and quantum optical properties of the QDs, such as the emission energies of excitonic complexes, the excitonic fine-structure splitting, the carrier dynamics, and the quantum nature of emission. In addition, it enables a direct and precise comparison of the optical properties of a single QD before and after integration which is very beneficial for the quantitative evaluation of cavity-enhanced quantum devices. PMID:26233395

  7. Advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography for deterministic nanophotonic device processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganskiy, Arsenty; Gschrey, Manuel; Schlehahn, Alexander; Schmidt, Ronny; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Heindel, Tobias; Rodt, Sven Reitzenstein, Stephan; Strittmatter, André

    2015-07-15

    We report on an advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography technique based on high-resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy at low temperatures. The technique has been developed for the deterministic fabrication and quantitative evaluation of nanophotonic structures. It is of particular interest for the realization and optimization of non-classical light sources which require the pre-selection of single quantum dots (QDs) with very specific emission features. The two-step electron-beam lithography process comprises (a) the detailed optical study and selection of target QDs by means of CL-spectroscopy and (b) the precise retrieval of the locations and integration of target QDs into lithographically defined nanostructures. Our technology platform allows for a detailed pre-process determination of important optical and quantum optical properties of the QDs, such as the emission energies of excitonic complexes, the excitonic fine-structure splitting, the carrier dynamics, and the quantum nature of emission. In addition, it enables a direct and precise comparison of the optical properties of a single QD before and after integration which is very beneficial for the quantitative evaluation of cavity-enhanced quantum devices.

  8. Advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography for deterministic nanophotonic device processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaganskiy, Arsenty; Gschrey, Manuel; Schlehahn, Alexander; Schmidt, Ronny; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Heindel, Tobias; Strittmatter, André; Rodt, Sven; Reitzenstein, Stephan

    2015-07-01

    We report on an advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography technique based on high-resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy at low temperatures. The technique has been developed for the deterministic fabrication and quantitative evaluation of nanophotonic structures. It is of particular interest for the realization and optimization of non-classical light sources which require the pre-selection of single quantum dots (QDs) with very specific emission features. The two-step electron-beam lithography process comprises (a) the detailed optical study and selection of target QDs by means of CL-spectroscopy and (b) the precise retrieval of the locations and integration of target QDs into lithographically defined nanostructures. Our technology platform allows for a detailed pre-process determination of important optical and quantum optical properties of the QDs, such as the emission energies of excitonic complexes, the excitonic fine-structure splitting, the carrier dynamics, and the quantum nature of emission. In addition, it enables a direct and precise comparison of the optical properties of a single QD before and after integration which is very beneficial for the quantitative evaluation of cavity-enhanced quantum devices.

  9. Self-assembled InAs/InP quantum dots and quantum dashes: Material structures and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mohammed Zahed Mustafa; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.

    2014-11-01

    The advances in lasers, electronic and photonic integrated circuits (EPIC), optical interconnects as well as the modulation techniques allow the present day society to embrace the convenience of broadband, high speed internet and mobile network connectivity. However, the steep increase in energy demand and bandwidth requirement calls for further innovation in ultra-compact EPIC technologies. In the optical domain, advancement in the laser technologies beyond the current quantum well (Qwell) based laser technologies are already taking place and presenting very promising results. Homogeneously grown quantum dot (Qdot) lasers and optical amplifiers, can serve in the future energy saving information and communication technologies (ICT) as the work-horse for transmitting and amplifying information through optical fiber. The encouraging results in the zero-dimensional (0D) structures emitting at 980 nm, in the form of vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL), are already operational at low threshold current density and capable of 40 Gbps error-free transmission at 108 fJ/bit. Subsequent achievements for lasers and amplifiers operating in the O-, C-, L-, U-bands, and beyond will eventually lay the foundation for green ICT. On the hand, the inhomogeneously grown quasi 0D quantum dash (Qdash) lasers are brilliant solutions for potential broadband connectivity in server farms or access network. A single broadband Qdash laser operating in the stimulated emission mode can replace tens of discrete narrow-band lasers in dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) transmission thereby further saving energy, cost and footprint. We herein reviewed the1 progress of both Qdots and Qdash devices, based on the InAs/InGaAlAs/InP and InAs/InGaAsP/InP material systems, from the angles of growth and device performance. In particular, we discussed the progress in lasers, semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA), mode locked lasers, and superluminescent diodes, which are the building

  10. VME insertion device control at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M.; Ramanathan, M.; Grimmer, J.; Merritt, M.

    2002-03-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) currently has 29 insertion devices (IDs) installed and operating. The need to remotely diagnose and correct problems has become increasingly important. This has been accomplished through the development of a new control system with greatly enhanced input/output (I/O) capabilities specifically targeted to this control task. The system features a custom VME control card and three rack-mounted interface chassis for ID control, encoder interface, and motor drive shutdown. The card provides device interlocks, limit switch logic, motor axis selection, digital I/O, and status feedback. This VME insertion device control was designed to operate with an eight-axis intelligent motor controller and a stepper-motor drive that accepts step and direction inputs. The front panel of the card has two connectors for all of the control signals for the stepper-motor drives. There is a third connector for the ID limit switch inputs and the emergency stop circuit, and a fourth connector provides 23 bits of digital outputs and 16 bits of digital inputs. Light-emitting diodes indicate which motions are inhibited by the limit switch logic. An experimental physics industrial control system (EPICS) (http://www.APS.ANL-GOV/EPICS) device driver was developed to access all the registers on the VME control card. Using standard EPICS records, the insertion device status can be viewed remotely. This minimizes downtime for APS ID beamline users by allowing faster resolution of any problems preventing a user from operating the insertion device. This new insertion device control has been in use at the APS since July of 1999. The design features of the control system and rationale for them will be presented, along with our experience in building, testing, installing, and operating the control system.

  11. Security analysis on some experimental quantum key distribution systems with imperfect optical and electrical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Lin-Mei; Sun, Shi-Hai; Jiang, Mu-Sheng; Li, Chun-Yan

    2014-10-01

    In general, quantum key distribution (QKD) has been proved unconditionally secure for perfect devices due to quantum uncertainty principle, quantum noncloning theorem and quantum nondividing principle which means that a quantum cannot be divided further. However, the practical optical and electrical devices used in the system are imperfect, which can be exploited by the eavesdropper to partially or totally spy the secret key between the legitimate parties. In this article, we first briefly review the recent work on quantum hacking on some experimental QKD systems with respect to imperfect devices carried out internationally, then we will present our recent hacking works in details, including passive faraday mirror attack, partially random phase attack, wavelength-selected photon-number-splitting attack, frequency shift attack, and single-photon-detector attack. Those quantum attack reminds people to improve the security existed in practical QKD systems due to imperfect devices by simply adding countermeasure or adopting a totally different protocol such as measurement-device independent protocol to avoid quantum hacking on the imperfection of measurement devices [Lo, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2012, 108: 130503].

  12. Bell nonlocality: a resource for device-independent quantum information protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acin, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Bell nonlocality is not only one of the most fundamental properties of quantum physics, but has also recently acquired the status of an information resource for device-independent quantum information protocols. In the device-independent approach, protocols are designed so that their performance is independent of the internal working of the devices used in the implementation. We discuss all these ideas and argue that device-independent protocols are especially relevant or cryptographic applications, as they are insensitive to hacking attacks exploiting imperfections on the modelling of the devices.

  13. Advanced Measurement Devices for the Microgravity Electromagnetic Levitation Facility EML

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brillo, Jurgen; Fritze, Holger; Lohofer, Georg; Schulz, Michal; Stenzel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on two advanced measurement devices for the microgravity electromagnetic levitation facility (EML), which is currently under construction for the use onboard the "International Space Station (ISS)": the "Sample Coupling Electronics (SCE)" and the "Oxygen Sensing and Control Unit (OSC)". The SCE measures by a contactless, inductive method the electrical resistivity and the diameter of a spherical levitated metallic droplet by evaluating the voltage and electrical current applied to the levitation coil. The necessity of the OSC comes from the insight that properties like surface tension or, eventually, viscosity cannot seriously be determined by the oscillating drop method in the EML facility without knowing the conditions of the surrounding atmosphere. In the following both measurement devices are explained and laboratory test results are presented.

  14. TID Simulation of Advanced CMOS Devices for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajid, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    This paper focuses on Total Ionizing Dose (TID) effects caused by accumulation of charges at silicon dioxide, substrate/silicon dioxide interface, Shallow Trench Isolation (STI) for scaled CMOS bulk devices as well as at Buried Oxide (BOX) layer in devices based on Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology to be operated in space radiation environment. The radiation induced leakage current and corresponding density/concentration electrons in leakage current path was presented/depicted for 180nm, 130nm and 65nm NMOS, PMOS transistors based on CMOS bulk as well as SOI process technologies on-board LEO and GEO satellites. On the basis of simulation results, the TID robustness analysis for advanced deep sub-micron technologies was accomplished up to 500 Krad. The correlation between the impact of technology scaling and magnitude of leakage current with corresponding total dose was established utilizing Visual TCAD Genius program.

  15. Single donor electronics and quantum functionalities with advanced CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehl, Xavier; Niquet, Yann-Michel; Sanquer, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Recent progresses in quantum dots technology allow fundamental studies of single donors in various semiconductor nanostructures. For the prospect of applications figures of merits such as scalability, tunability, and operation at relatively large temperature are of prime importance. Beyond the case of actual dopant atoms in a host crystal, similar arguments hold for small enough quantum dots which behave as artificial atoms, for instance for single spin control and manipulation. In this context, this experimental review focuses on the silicon-on-insulator devices produced within microelectronics facilities with only very minor modifications to the current industrial CMOS process and tools. This is required for scalability and enabled by shallow trench or mesa isolation. It also paves the way for real integration with conventional circuits, as illustrated by a nanoscale device coupled to a CMOS circuit producing a radio-frequency drive on-chip. At the device level we emphasize the central role of electrostatics in etched silicon nanowire transistors, which allows to understand the characteristics in the full range from zero to room temperature.

  16. Engineering a Robust Photovoltaic Device with Quantum Dots and Bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Renugopalakrishnan, Venkatesan; Barbiellini, Bernardo; King, Chris; Molinari, Michael; Mochalov, Konstantin; Sukhanova, Alyona; Nabiev, Igor; Fojan, Peter; Tuller, Harry L; Chin, Michael; Somasundaran, Ponisseril; Padrós, Esteve; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2014-07-31

    We present a route toward a radical improvement in solar cell efficiency using resonant energy transfer and sensitization of semiconductor metal oxides with a light-harvesting quantum dot (QD)/bacteriorhodopsin (bR) layer designed by protein engineering. The specific aims of our approach are (1) controlled engineering of highly ordered bR/QD complexes; (2) replacement of the liquid electrolyte by a thin layer of gold; (3) highly oriented deposition of bR/QD complexes on a gold layer; and (4) use of the Forster resonance energy transfer coupling between bR and QDs to achieve an efficient absorbing layer for dye-sensitized solar cells. This proposed approach is based on the unique optical characteristics of QDs, on the photovoltaic properties of bR, and on state-of-the-art nanobioengineering technologies. It permits spatial and optical coupling together with control of hybrid material components on the bionanoscale. This method paves the way to the development of the solid-state photovoltaic device with the efficiency increased to practical levels. PMID:25383133

  17. Engineering a Robust Photovoltaic Device with Quantum Dots and Bacteriorhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present a route toward a radical improvement in solar cell efficiency using resonant energy transfer and sensitization of semiconductor metal oxides with a light-harvesting quantum dot (QD)/bacteriorhodopsin (bR) layer designed by protein engineering. The specific aims of our approach are (1) controlled engineering of highly ordered bR/QD complexes; (2) replacement of the liquid electrolyte by a thin layer of gold; (3) highly oriented deposition of bR/QD complexes on a gold layer; and (4) use of the Forster resonance energy transfer coupling between bR and QDs to achieve an efficient absorbing layer for dye-sensitized solar cells. This proposed approach is based on the unique optical characteristics of QDs, on the photovoltaic properties of bR, and on state-of-the-art nanobioengineering technologies. It permits spatial and optical coupling together with control of hybrid material components on the bionanoscale. This method paves the way to the development of the solid-state photovoltaic device with the efficiency increased to practical levels. PMID:25383133

  18. Nanoscale Copper and Copper Compounds for Advanced Device Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lih-Juann

    2016-04-01

    Copper has been in use for at least 10,000 years. Copper alloys, such as bronze and brass, have played important roles in advancing civilization in human history. Bronze artifacts date at least 6500 years. On the other hand, discovery of intriguing properties and new applications in contemporary technology for copper and its compounds, particularly on nanoscale, have continued. In this paper, examples for the applications of Cu and Cu alloys for advanced device applications will be given on Cu metallization in microelectronics devices, Cu nanobats as field emitters, Cu2S nanowire array as high-rate capability and high-capacity cathodes for lithium-ion batteries, Cu-Te nanostructures for field-effect transistor, Cu3Si nanowires as high-performance field emitters and efficient anti-reflective layers, single-crystal Cu(In,Ga)Se2 nanotip arrays for high-efficiency solar cell, multilevel Cu2S resistive memory, superlattice Cu2S-Ag2S heterojunction diodes, and facet-dependent Cu2O diode.

  19. Recent advances in conjugated polymers for light emitting devices.

    PubMed

    Alsalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Alam, Javed; Dass, Lawrence Arockiasamy; Raja, Mohan

    2011-01-01

    A recent advance in the field of light emitting polymers has been the discovery of electroluminescent conjugated polymers, that is, kind of fluorescent polymers that emit light when excited by the flow of an electric current. These new generation fluorescent materials may now challenge the domination by inorganic semiconductor materials of the commercial market in light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED) and polymer laser devices. This review provides information on unique properties of conjugated polymers and how they have been optimized to generate these properties. The review is organized in three sections focusing on the major advances in light emitting materials, recent literature survey and understanding the desirable properties as well as modern solid state lighting and displays. Recently, developed conjugated polymers are also functioning as roll-up displays for computers and mobile phones, flexible solar panels for power portable equipment as well as organic light emitting diodes in displays, in which television screens, luminous traffic, information signs, and light-emitting wallpaper in homes are also expected to broaden the use of conjugated polymers as light emitting polymers. The purpose of this review paper is to examine conjugated polymers in light emitting diodes (LEDs) in addition to organic solid state laser. Furthermore, since conjugated polymers have been approved as light-emitting organic materials similar to inorganic semiconductors, it is clear to motivate these organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) and organic lasers for modern lighting in terms of energy saving ability. In addition, future aspects of conjugated polymers in LEDs were also highlighted in this review.

  20. Recent Advances in Conjugated Polymers for Light Emitting Devices

    PubMed Central

    AlSalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Alam, Javed; Dass, Lawrence Arockiasamy; Raja, Mohan

    2011-01-01

    A recent advance in the field of light emitting polymers has been the discovery of electroluminescent conjugated polymers, that is, kind of fluorescent polymers that emit light when excited by the flow of an electric current. These new generation fluorescent materials may now challenge the domination by inorganic semiconductor materials of the commercial market in light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED) and polymer laser devices. This review provides information on unique properties of conjugated polymers and how they have been optimized to generate these properties. The review is organized in three sections focusing on the major advances in light emitting materials, recent literature survey and understanding the desirable properties as well as modern solid state lighting and displays. Recently, developed conjugated polymers are also functioning as roll-up displays for computers and mobile phones, flexible solar panels for power portable equipment as well as organic light emitting diodes in displays, in which television screens, luminous traffic, information signs, and light-emitting wallpaper in homes are also expected to broaden the use of conjugated polymers as light emitting polymers. The purpose of this review paper is to examine conjugated polymers in light emitting diodes (LEDs) in addition to organic solid state laser. Furthermore, since conjugated polymers have been approved as light-emitting organic materials similar to inorganic semiconductors, it is clear to motivate these organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) and organic lasers for modern lighting in terms of energy saving ability. In addition, future aspects of conjugated polymers in LEDs were also highlighted in this review. PMID:21673938

  1. Recent advances in conjugated polymers for light emitting devices.

    PubMed

    Alsalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Alam, Javed; Dass, Lawrence Arockiasamy; Raja, Mohan

    2011-01-01

    A recent advance in the field of light emitting polymers has been the discovery of electroluminescent conjugated polymers, that is, kind of fluorescent polymers that emit light when excited by the flow of an electric current. These new generation fluorescent materials may now challenge the domination by inorganic semiconductor materials of the commercial market in light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED) and polymer laser devices. This review provides information on unique properties of conjugated polymers and how they have been optimized to generate these properties. The review is organized in three sections focusing on the major advances in light emitting materials, recent literature survey and understanding the desirable properties as well as modern solid state lighting and displays. Recently, developed conjugated polymers are also functioning as roll-up displays for computers and mobile phones, flexible solar panels for power portable equipment as well as organic light emitting diodes in displays, in which television screens, luminous traffic, information signs, and light-emitting wallpaper in homes are also expected to broaden the use of conjugated polymers as light emitting polymers. The purpose of this review paper is to examine conjugated polymers in light emitting diodes (LEDs) in addition to organic solid state laser. Furthermore, since conjugated polymers have been approved as light-emitting organic materials similar to inorganic semiconductors, it is clear to motivate these organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) and organic lasers for modern lighting in terms of energy saving ability. In addition, future aspects of conjugated polymers in LEDs were also highlighted in this review. PMID:21673938

  2. Advanced Silicon Solar Cell Device Physics and Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deceglie, Michael Gardner

    A fundamental challenge in the development and deployment of solar photovoltaic technology is a reduction in cost enabling direct competition with fossil-fuel-based energy sources. A key driver in this cost reduction is optimized device efficiency, because increased energy output leverages all photovoltaic system costs, from raw materials and module manufacturing to installation and maintenance. To continue progress toward higher conversion efficiencies, solar cells are being fabricated with increasingly complex designs, including engineered nanostructures, heterojunctions, and novel contacting and passivation schemes. Such advanced designs require a comprehensive and unified understanding of the optical and electrical device physics at the microscopic scale. This thesis focuses on a microscopic understanding of solar cell optoelectronic performance and its impact on cell optimization. We consider this in three solar cell platforms: thin-film crystalline silicon, amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunctions, and thin-film cells with nanophotonic light trapping. The work described in this thesis represents a powerful design paradigm, based on a detailed physical understanding of the mechanisms governing solar cell performance. Furthermore, we demonstrate the importance of understanding not just the individual mechanisms, but also their interactions. Such an approach to device optimization is critical for the efficiency and competitiveness of future generations of solar cells.

  3. THz photoresponse of quantum Hall devices based on HgTe-Quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouider, F.; Hein, G.; Brüne, C.; Buhmann, H.; Vasilyev, Yu. B.; Nachtwei, G.

    2010-01-01

    This study concerns the experimental investigation of the Terahertz -(THz-) photoresponse in systems under quantum-Hall-(QH-) conditions. These investigations are interesting regarding a potential application of QH-systems as fast and spectrally sensitive THz-detectors. The measurements of the THz-photoresponse (PR) of devices with HgTe quantum wells (QWs) embedded in CdHgTe barriers are aimed at obtaining photosignals at smaller magnetic fields in comparison to detectors made of GaAs/AlGaAs wafers. This can be realized by changing the electron density (application of a gate electrode). The QWs have a thickness of dQW between 7 nm and 12 nm, so that the material HgTe of the QW possesses a semimetallic band structure. We found a cyclotron mass of about mc = 0.026 m0 for our samples from cyclotron resonance measurements (also approximately determined from our PR). As this cyclotron mass is by about a factor 3 smaller than the one of electrons in GaAs, the same Landau level splitting is reached at about 1/3 of the magnetic field as in GaAs.

  4. Josephson junction devices: Model quantum mechanical systems and medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Josephine

    In this dissertation, three experiments using Josephson junction devices are described. In Part I, the effect of dissipation on tunneling between charge states in a superconducting single-electron transistor (sSET) was studied. The sSET was fabricated on top of a semi-conductor heterostructure with a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) imbedded beneath the surface. The 2DEG acted as a dissipative ground plane. The sheet resistance of the 2DEG could be varied in situ by applying a large voltage to a gate on the back of the substrate. The zero-bias conductance of the sSET was observed to increase with increasing temperature and 2DEG resistance. Some qualitative but not quantitative agreement was found with theoretical calculations of the functional dependence of the conductance on temperature and 2DEG resistance. Part II describes a series of experiments performed on magnesium diboride point-contact junctions. The pressure between the MgB2 tip and base pieces could be adjusted to form junctions with different characteristics. With light pressure applied between the two pieces, quasiparticle tunneling in superconductor-insulator-superconductor junctions was measured. From these data, a superconducting gap of approximately 2 meV and a critical temperature of 29 K were estimated. Increasing the pressure between the MgB2 pieces formed junctions with superconductor-normal metal-superconductor characteristics. We used these junctions to form MgB2 superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDS). Noise levels as low as 35 fT/Hz1/2 and 4 muphi 0/Hz1/2 at 1 kHz were measured. In Part III, we used a SQUID-based instrument to acquire magnetocardiograms (MCG), the magnetic field signal measured from the human heart. We measured 51 healthy volunteers and 11 cardiac patients both at rest and after treadmill exercise. We found age and sex related differences in the MCG of the healthy volunteers that suggest that these factors should be considered when evaluating the MCG for

  5. Microtesla magnetic resonance imaging with a superconducting quantum interference device

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Robert; Lee, SeungKyun; ten Haken, Bennie; Trabesinger, Andreas H.; Pines, Alexander; Clarke, John

    2004-03-15

    We have constructed a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner based on a dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) configured as a second-derivative gradiometer. The magnetic field sensitivity of the detector is independent of frequency; it is therefore possible to obtain high-resolution images by prepolarizing the nuclear spins in a field of 300 mT and detecting the signal at 132 fYT, corresponding to a proton Larmor frequency of 5.6 kHz. The reduction in the measurement field by a factor of 10,000 compared with conventional scanners eliminates inhomogeneous broadening of the nuclear magnetic resonance lines, even in fields with relatively poor homogeneity. The narrow linewidths result in enhanced signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution for a fixed strength of the magnetic field gradients used to encode the image. We present two-dimensional images of phantoms and pepper slices, obtained in typical magnetic field gradients of 100 fYT/m, with a spatial resolution of about 1mm. We further demonstrate a slice-selected image of an intact pepper. By varying the time delay between removal of the polarizing field and initiation of the spin echo sequence we acquire T1-weighted contrast images of water phantoms, some of which are doped with a paramagnetic salt; here, T1 is the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time. The techniques presented here could readily be adapted to existing multichannel SQUID systems used for magnetic source imaging of brain signals. Further potential applications include low-cost systems for tumor screening and imaging peripheral regions of the body.

  6. Direct measurement on the geometric phase of a double quantum dot qubit via quantum point contact device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bao; Zhang, Feng-Yang; Song, Jie; Song, He-Shan

    2015-06-01

    We propose a direct measurement scheme to read out the geometric phase of a coupled double quantum dot system via a quantum point contact(QPC) device. An effective expression of the geometric phase has been derived, which relates the geometric phase of the double quantum dot qubit to the current through QPC device. All the parameters in our expression are measurable or tunable in experiment. Moreover, since the measurement process affects the state of the qubit slightly, the geometric phase can be protected. The feasibility of the scheme has been analyzed. Further, as an example, we simulate the geometrical phase of a qubit when the QPC device is replaced by a single electron transistor(SET).

  7. Towards noise engineering: Recent insights in low-frequency excess flux noise of superconducting quantum devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, Sebastian; Ferring, Anna; Enss, Christian

    2016-10-01

    The comprehensive analysis of low-frequency excess flux noise both in terms of magnetic flux noise S Φ , 1 / f and energy sensitivity ɛ1/f of 84 superconducting quantum devices studied at temperatures below 1 K reveals a universal behavior. When analyzing data in terms of ɛ1/f, we find that noise spectra of independent devices cross each other all at certain crossing frequencies fc. Besides this main result of our paper, we further show that superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) arrays systematically feature higher noise exponents than single SQUIDs and give evidence for a material and device type dependence of low-frequency excess flux noise. The latter results facilitate to engineer the shape of magnetic flux noise spectra and thus to experimentally modify key properties such as coherence or measurement times of superconducting quantum devices.

  8. A device adaptive inflow boundary condition for Wigner equations of quantum transport

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Haiyan; Lu, Tiao; Cai, Wei

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, an improved inflow boundary condition is proposed for Wigner equations in simulating a resonant tunneling diode (RTD), which takes into consideration the band structure of the device. The original Frensley inflow boundary condition prescribes the Wigner distribution function at the device boundary to be the semi-classical Fermi–Dirac distribution for free electrons in the device contacts without considering the effect of the quantum interaction inside the quantum device. The proposed device adaptive inflow boundary condition includes this effect by assigning the Wigner distribution to the value obtained from the Wigner transform of wave functions inside the device at zero external bias voltage, thus including the dominant effect on the electron distribution in the contacts due to the device internal band energy profile. Numerical results on computing the electron density inside the RTD under various incident waves and non-zero bias conditions show much improvement by the new boundary condition over the traditional Frensley inflow boundary condition.

  9. A device adaptive inflow boundary condition for Wigner equations of quantum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Haiyan; Lu, Tiao; Cai, Wei

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, an improved inflow boundary condition is proposed for Wigner equations in simulating a resonant tunneling diode (RTD), which takes into consideration the band structure of the device. The original Frensley inflow boundary condition prescribes the Wigner distribution function at the device boundary to be the semi-classical Fermi-Dirac distribution for free electrons in the device contacts without considering the effect of the quantum interaction inside the quantum device. The proposed device adaptive inflow boundary condition includes this effect by assigning the Wigner distribution to the value obtained from the Wigner transform of wave functions inside the device at zero external bias voltage, thus including the dominant effect on the electron distribution in the contacts due to the device internal band energy profile. Numerical results on computing the electron density inside the RTD under various incident waves and non-zero bias conditions show much improvement by the new boundary condition over the traditional Frensley inflow boundary condition.

  10. Advanced Numerical Methods and Software Approaches for Semiconductor Device Simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Carey, Graham F.; Pardhanani, A. L.; Bova, S. W.

    2000-01-01

    In this article we concisely present several modern strategies that are applicable to driftdominated carrier transport in higher-order deterministic models such as the driftdiffusion, hydrodynamic, and quantum hydrodynamic systems. The approaches include extensions of “upwind” and artificial dissipation schemes, generalization of the traditional Scharfetter – Gummel approach, Petrov – Galerkin and streamline-upwind Petrov Galerkin (SUPG), “entropy” variables, transformations, least-squares mixed methods and other stabilized Galerkin schemes such as Galerkin least squares and discontinuous Galerkin schemes. The treatment is representative rather than an exhaustive review and several schemes are mentioned only briefly with appropriate reference to the literature. Some of themore » methods have been applied to the semiconductor device problem while others are still in the early stages of development for this class of applications. We have included numerical examples from our recent research tests with some of the methods. A second aspect of the work deals with algorithms that employ unstructured grids in conjunction with adaptive refinement strategies. The full benefits of such approaches have not yet been developed in this application area and we emphasize the need for further work on analysis, data structures and software to support adaptivity. Finally, we briefly consider some aspects of software frameworks. These include dial-an-operator approaches such as that used in the industrial simulator PROPHET, and object-oriented software support such as those in the SANDIA National Laboratory framework SIERRA.« less

  11. Advanced numerical methods and software approaches for semiconductor device simulation

    SciTech Connect

    CAREY,GRAHAM F.; PARDHANANI,A.L.; BOVA,STEVEN W.

    2000-03-23

    In this article the authors concisely present several modern strategies that are applicable to drift-dominated carrier transport in higher-order deterministic models such as the drift-diffusion, hydrodynamic, and quantum hydrodynamic systems. The approaches include extensions of upwind and artificial dissipation schemes, generalization of the traditional Scharfetter-Gummel approach, Petrov-Galerkin and streamline-upwind Petrov Galerkin (SUPG), entropy variables, transformations, least-squares mixed methods and other stabilized Galerkin schemes such as Galerkin least squares and discontinuous Galerkin schemes. The treatment is representative rather than an exhaustive review and several schemes are mentioned only briefly with appropriate reference to the literature. Some of the methods have been applied to the semiconductor device problem while others are still in the early stages of development for this class of applications. They have included numerical examples from the recent research tests with some of the methods. A second aspect of the work deals with algorithms that employ unstructured grids in conjunction with adaptive refinement strategies. The full benefits of such approaches have not yet been developed in this application area and they emphasize the need for further work on analysis, data structures and software to support adaptivity. Finally, they briefly consider some aspects of software frameworks. These include dial-an-operator approaches such as that used in the industrial simulator PROPHET, and object-oriented software support such as those in the SANDIA National Laboratory framework SIERRA.

  12. Factors Associated With Electronic Cigarette Users’ Device Preferences and Transition From First Generation to Advanced Generation Devices

    PubMed Central

    Veldheer, Susan; Hrabovsky, Shari; Nichols, Travis T.; Wilson, Stephen J.; Foulds, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) are becoming increasingly popular but little is known about how e-cig users’ transition between the different device types and what device characteristics and preferences may influence the transition. Methods: Four thousand four hundred twenty-one experienced e-cig users completed an online survey about their e-cig use, devices, and preferences. Participants included in analysis were ever cigarette smokers who used an e-cig at least 30 days in their lifetime and who reported the type of their first and current e-cig device and the nicotine concentration of their liquid. Analyses focused on transitions between “first generation” devices (same size as a cigarette with no button) and “advanced generation” devices (larger than a cigarette with a manual button) and differences between current users of each device type. Results: Most e-cig users (n = 2603, 58.9%) began use with a first generation device, and of these users, 63.7% subsequently transitioned to current use of an advanced generation device. Among users who began use with an advanced generation device (n = 1818, 41.1%), only 5.7% transitioned to a first generation device. Seventy-seven percent of current advanced generation e-cig users switched to their current device in order to obtain a “more satisfying hit.” Battery capabilities and liquid flavor choices also influenced device choice. Conclusion: E-cig users commonly begin use with a device shaped like a cigarette and transition to a larger device with a more powerful battery, a button for manual activation and a wider choice of liquid flavors. PMID:25744966

  13. Towards manufacturing of advanced logic devices by double-patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koay, Chiew-seng; Halle, Scott; Holmes, Steven; Petrillo, Karen; Colburn, Matthew; van Dommelen, Youri; Jiang, Aiqin; Crouse, Michael; Dunn, Shannon; Hetzer, David; Kawakami, Shinichiro; Cantone, Jason; Huli, Lior; Rodgers, Martin; Martinick, Brian

    2011-04-01

    As reported previously, the IBM Alliance has established a DETO (Double-Expose-Track-Optimized) baseline, in collaboration with ASML, TEL, and CNSE, to evaluate commercially available DETO photoresist system for the manufacturing of advanced logic devices. Although EUV lithography is the baseline strategy for <2x nm logic nodes, alternative techniques are still being pursued. The DETO technique produces pitch-split patterns capable of supporting 16 nm and 11 nm node semiconductor devices. We present the long-term monitoring performances of CD uniformity (CDU), overlay, and defectivity of our DETO process. CDU and overlay performances for controlled experiments are also presented. Two alignment schemes in DETO are compared experimentally for their effects on inter-level & intralevel overlays, and space CDU. We also experimented with methods for improving CDU, in which the CD-OptimizerTMand DoseMapperTM were evaluated separately and in tandem. Overlay improvements using the Correction Per Exposure (CPE) and the intra-field High-Order Process Correction (i-HOPC) were compared against the usual linear correction method. The effects of the exposure field size are also compared between a small field and the full field. Included in all the above, we also compare the performances derived from stack-integrated wafers and bare-Si wafers.

  14. Evaluation of Advanced COTS Passive Devices for Extreme Temperature Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad; Dones, Keishla R.

    2009-01-01

    Electronic sensors and circuits are often exposed to extreme temperatures in many of NASA deep space and planetary surface exploration missions. Electronics capable of operation in harsh environments would be beneficial as they simplify overall system design, relax thermal management constraints, and meet operational requirements. For example, cryogenic operation of electronic parts will improve reliability, increase energy density, and extend the operational lifetimes of space-based electronic systems. Similarly, electronic parts that are able to withstand and operate efficiently in high temperature environments will negate the need for thermal control elements and their associated structures, thereby reducing system size and weight, enhancing its reliability, improving its efficiency, and reducing cost. Passive devices play a critical role in the design of almost all electronic circuitry. To address the needs of systems for extreme temperature operation, some of the advanced and most recently introduced commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) passive devices, which included resistors and capacitors, were examined for operation under a wide temperature regime. The types of resistors investigated included high temperature precision film, general purpose metal oxide, and wirewound.

  15. Programming and Tuning a Quantum Annealing Device to Solve Real World Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro; O'Gorman, Bryan; Fluegemann, Joseph; Smelyanskiy, Vadim

    2015-03-01

    Solving real-world applications with quantum algorithms requires overcoming several challenges, ranging from translating the computational problem at hand to the quantum-machine language to tuning parameters of the quantum algorithm that have a significant impact on the performance of the device. In this talk, we discuss these challenges, strategies developed to enhance performance, and also a more efficient implementation of several applications. Although we will focus on applications of interest to NASA's Quantum Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, the methods and concepts presented here apply to a broader family of hard discrete optimization problems, including those that occur in many machine-learning algorithms.

  16. Air-stable operation of transparent, colloidal quantum dot based LEDs with a unipolar device architecture.

    PubMed

    Wood, Vanessa; Panzer, Matthew J; Caruge, Jean-Michel; Halpert, Jonathan E; Bawendi, Moungi G; Bulović, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    We report a novel unipolar light-emitting device architecture that operates using direct-current, field-driven electroluminescence of colloidally synthesized quantum dots (QDs). This device architecture, which is based only on transparent ceramics and QDs, enables emission from different color QDs and, for the first time, constant QD electroluminescence during extended operation in air, unpackaged.

  17. Advanced materials and concepts for energy storage devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Shiang Jen

    Over the last decade, technological progress and advances in the miniaturization of electronic devices have increased demands for light-weight, high-efficiency, and carbon-free energy storage devices. These energy storage devices are expected to play important roles in automobiles, the military, power plants, and consumer electronics. Two main types of electrical energy storage systems studied in this research are Li ion batteries and supercapacitors. Several promising solid state electrolytes and supercapacitor electrode materials are investigated in this research. The first section of this dissertation is focused on the novel results on pulsed laser annealing of Li7La3Zr2O12 (LLZO). LLZO powders with a tetragonal structure were prepared by a sol-gel technique, then a pulsed laser annealing process was employed to convert the tetragonal powders to cubic LLZO without any loss of lithium. The second section of the dissertation reports on how Li5La 3Nb2O12 (LLNO) was successfully synthesized via a novel molten salt synthesis (MSS) method at the relatively low temperature of 900°C. The low sintering temperature prevented the loss of lithium that commonly occurs during synthesis using conventional solid state or wet chemical reactions. The second type of energy storage device studied is supercapacitors. Currently, research on supercapacitors is focused on increasing their energy densities and lowering their overall production costs by finding suitable electrode materials. The third section of this dissertation details how carbonized woods electrodes were used as supercapacitor electrode materials. A high energy density of 45.6 Wh/kg and a high power density of 2000 W/kg were obtained from the supercapacitor made from carbonized wood electrodes. The high performance of the supercapacitor was discovered to originate from the hierarchical porous structures of the carbonized wood. Finally, the fourth section of this dissertation is on the electrochemical effects of

  18. Advanced quantum cascade laser transmitter architectures and infrared photonics development

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Allen, Paul J.; Myers, Tanya L.

    2004-08-01

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) provide a viable infrared laser source for a new class of laser transmitters capable of meeting the performance requirements for a variety of national security and civilian applications. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors. This paper reports on the current development in infrared photonics that provides a pathway for QCL transmitter miniaturization. This research has produced infrared waveguide-based optical components in chalcogenide glass using both direct-laser writing and holographic exposure techniques. We discuss here the design and fabrication concepts and capabilities required to produce integrated waveguides, waveguide couplers, and other photonic devices.

  19. Graphene Quantum Dots: Molecularly Designed, Nitrogen-Functionalized Graphene Quantum Dots for Optoelectronic Devices (Adv. Mater. 23/2016).

    PubMed

    Tetsuka, Hiroyuki; Nagoya, Akihiro; Fukusumi, Takanori; Matsui, Takayuki

    2016-06-01

    H. Tetsuka and co-workers develop a versatile technique to tune the energy levels and energy gaps of nitrogen-functionalized graphene quantum dots (NGQDs) continuously through molecular structure design, as described on page 4632. The incorporation of layers of NGQDs into the structures markedly improves the performance of optoelectronic devices. PMID:27281048

  20. 76 FR 48169 - Advancing Regulatory Science for Highly Multiplexed Microbiology/Medical Countermeasure Devices...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... Microbiology/ Medical Countermeasure Devices; Public Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... following public meeting: ``Advancing Regulatory Science for Highly Multiplexed Microbiology/Medical... multiplexed microbiology/medical countermeasure (MCM) devices, their clinical application and public...

  1. Handheld deep ultraviolet emission device based on aluminum nitride quantum wells and graphene nanoneedle field emitters.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takahiro; Iwayama, Sho; Saito, Takao; Kawakami, Yasuyuki; Kubo, Fumio; Amano, Hiroshi

    2012-10-22

    We report the successful fabrication of a compact deep ultraviolet emission device via a marriage of AlGaN quantum wells and graphene nanoneedle field electron emitters. The device demonstrated a 20-mW deep ultraviolet output power and an approximately 4% power efficiency. The performance of this device may lead toward the realization of an environmentally friendly, convenient and practical deep ultraviolet light source.

  2. Nanosecond-timescale spin transfer using individual electrons in a quadruple-quantum-dot device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baart, T. A.; Jovanovic, N.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.; Vandersypen, L. M. K.

    2016-07-01

    The ability to coherently transport electron-spin states between different sites of gate-defined semiconductor quantum dots is an essential ingredient for a quantum-dot-based quantum computer. Previous shuttles using electrostatic gating were too slow to move an electron within the spin dephasing time across an array. Here, we report a nanosecond-timescale spin transfer of individual electrons across a quadruple-quantum-dot device. Utilizing enhanced relaxation rates at a so-called hot spot, we can upper bound the shuttle time to at most 150 ns. While actual shuttle times are likely shorter, 150 ns is already fast enough to preserve spin coherence in, e.g., silicon based quantum dots. This work therefore realizes an important prerequisite for coherent spin transfer in quantum dot arrays.

  3. Simulation of electron transport in quantum well devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. R.; Gullapalli, K. K.; Reddy, V. R.; Neikirk, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    Double barrier resonant tunneling diodes (DBRTD) have received much attention as possible terahertz devices. Despite impressive experimental results, the specifics of the device physics (i.e., how the electrons propagate through the structure) are only qualitatively understood. Therefore, better transport models are warranted if this technology is to mature. In this paper, the Lattice Wigner function is used to explain the important transport issues associated with DBRTD device behavior.

  4. Radiation doses to insertion devices at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Moog, E. R.; Den Hartog, P. K.; Semones, E. J.; Job, P. K.

    1997-07-01

    Dose measurements made on and around the insertion devices (IDs) at the Advanced Photon Source are reported. Attempts are made to compare these dose rates to dose rates that have been reported to cause radiation-induced demagnetization, but comparisons are complicated by such factors as the particular magnet material and the techniques used in its manufacture, the spectrum and type of radiation, and the demagnetizing field seen by the magnet. The spectrum of radiation at the IDs has been measured and found to include a large high-energy (7 GeV) component, at least during some runs. Lead shielding installed immediately upstream of the IDs has been found to decrease the dose to the upstream ends of the IDs. It has almost no effect on the dose to the downstream ends of the IDs, however, since much of the radiation travels through the ID vacuum chamber and cannot be readily shielded. Opening the gaps of the IDs during injection and at other times also helps decrease the radiation exposure.

  5. Radiation doses to insertion devices at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Moog, E.R.; Den Hartog, P.K.; Semones, E.J.; Job, P.K.

    1997-07-01

    Dose measurements made on and around the insertion devices (IDs) at the Advanced Photon Source are reported. Attempts are made to compare these dose rates to dose rates that have been reported to cause radiation-induced demagnetization, but comparisons are complicated by such factors as the particular magnet material and the techniques used in its manufacture, the spectrum and type of radiation, and the demagnetizing field seen by the magnet. The spectrum of radiation at the IDs has been measured and found to include a large high-energy (7 GeV) component, at least during some runs. Lead shielding installed immediately upstream of the IDs has been found to decrease the dose to the upstream ends of the IDs. It has almost no effect on the dose to the downstream ends of the IDs, however, since much of the radiation travels through the ID vacuum chamber and cannot be readily shielded. Opening the gaps of the IDs during injection and at other times also helps decrease the radiation exposure. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Design of advanced ultrasonic transducers for welding devices.

    PubMed

    Parrini, L

    2001-11-01

    A new high frequency ultrasonic transducer has been conceived, designed, prototyped, and tested. In the design phase, an advanced approach was used and established. The method is based on an initial design estimate obtained with finite element method (FEM) simulations. The simulated ultrasonic transducers and resonators are then built and characterized experimentally through laser interferometry and electrical resonance spectra. The comparison of simulation results with experimental data allows the parameters of FEM models to be adjusted and optimized. The achieved FEM simulations exhibit a remarkably high predictive potential and allow full control of the vibration behavior of the transducer. The new transducer is mounted on a wire bonder with a flange whose special geometry was calculated by means of FEM simulations. This flange allows the transducer to be attached on the wire bonder, not only in longitudinal nodes, but also in radial nodes of the ultrasonic field excited in the horn. This leads to a total decoupling of the transducer to the wire bonder, which has not been achieved so far. The new approach to mount ultrasonic transducers on a welding device is of major importance, not only for wire bonding, but also for all high power ultrasound applications and has been patented.

  7. Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device

    SciTech Connect

    Mekhiche, Mike; Dufera, Hiz; Montagna, Deb

    2012-10-29

    The project conducted under DOE contract DE‐EE0002649 is defined as the Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Converter. The overall project is split into a seven‐stage, gated development program. The work conducted under the DOE contract is OPT Stage Gate III work and a portion of Stage Gate IV work of the seven stage product development process. The project effort includes Full Concept Design & Prototype Assembly Testing building on our existing PowerBuoy technology to deliver a device with much increased power delivery. Scaling‐up from 150kW to 500kW power generating capacity required changes in the PowerBuoy design that addressed cost reduction and mass manufacturing by implementing a Design for Manufacturing (DFM) approach. The design changes also focused on reducing PowerBuoy Installation, Operation and Maintenance (IO&M) costs which are essential to reducing the overall cost of energy. In this design, changes to the core PowerBuoy technology were implemented to increase capability and reduce both CAPEX and OPEX costs. OPT conceptually envisaged moving from a floating structure to a seabed structure. The design change from a floating structure to seabed structure would provide the implementation of stroke‐ unlimited Power Take‐Off (PTO) which has a potential to provide significant power delivery improvement and transform the wave energy industry if proven feasible.

  8. N-dimensional measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with N + 1 un-characterized sources: zero quantum-bit-error-rate case.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Won-Young; Su, Hong-Yi; Bae, Joonwoo

    2016-07-25

    We study N-dimensional measurement-device-independent quantum-key-distribution protocol where one checking state is used. Only assuming that the checking state is a superposition of other N sources, we show that the protocol is secure in zero quantum-bit-error-rate case, suggesting possibility of the protocol. The method may be applied in other quantum information processing.

  9. N-dimensional measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with N + 1 un-characterized sources: zero quantum-bit-error-rate case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Won-Young; Su, Hong-Yi; Bae, Joonwoo

    2016-07-01

    We study N-dimensional measurement-device-independent quantum-key-distribution protocol where one checking state is used. Only assuming that the checking state is a superposition of other N sources, we show that the protocol is secure in zero quantum-bit-error-rate case, suggesting possibility of the protocol. The method may be applied in other quantum information processing.

  10. W-state Analyzer and Multi-party Measurement-device-independent Quantum Key Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Changhua; Xu, Feihu; Pei, Changxing

    2015-01-01

    W-state is an important resource for many quantum information processing tasks. In this paper, we for the first time propose a multi-party measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) protocol based on W-state. With linear optics, we design a W-state analyzer in order to distinguish the four-qubit W-state. This analyzer constructs the measurement device for four-party MDI-QKD. Moreover, we derived a complete security proof of the four-party MDI-QKD, and performed a numerical simulation to study its performance. The results show that four-party MDI-QKD is feasible over 150 km standard telecom fiber with off-the-shelf single photon detectors. This work takes an important step towards multi-party quantum communication and a quantum network. PMID:26644289

  11. Plug-and-play measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yujun; Kwon, Osung; Woo, Minki; Oh, Kyunghwan; Han, Sang-Wook; Kim, Yong-Su; Moon, Sung

    2016-03-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) guarantees unconditional communication security based on the laws of quantum physics. However, practical QKD suffers from a number of quantum hackings due to the device imperfections. From the security standpoint, measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) is in the limelight since it eliminates all the possible loopholes in detection. Due to active control units for mode matching between the photons from remote parties, however, the implementation of MDI-QKD is highly impractical. In this paper, we propose a method to resolve the mode matching problem while minimizing the use of active control units. By introducing the plug-and-play (P&P) concept into MDI-QKD, the indistinguishability in spectral and polarization modes between photons can naturally be guaranteed. We show the feasibility of P&P MDI-QKD with a proof-of-principle experiment.

  12. Quantum 1/f noise in high technology applications including ultrasmall structures and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handel, Peter H.

    1994-05-01

    The present report brings a final answer to the question on the nature of fundamental 1/f noise and its ubiquity. A sufficient criterion for a 1/f spectrum in arbitrary chaotic nonlinear systems is derived for the first time. This criterion guarantees a 1/f spectrum for nonlinear systems which also satisfy a condition of mathematical homogeneity. Briefly stated, nonlinearity + homogeneity = 1/f noise. The criterion results because the 1/f spectrum reproduces itself in a self-convolution. Among the five examples to which the criterion is applied is also quantum electrodynamics (QED), resulting in quantum 1/f noise as a fundamental form of quantum chaos. Nonlinearity of the system of a charged particle and its field, plus the basic homogeneity of physical equations causes the criterion to predict the quantum 1/f effect. The simple universal quantum 1/f formula is applied to infrared detectors and yields quantum 1/f noise in the dark current, but not in the photogenerated current. The fractal dimension of quantum 1/f noise is determined on the basis of its quantum chaos definition and is obtained theoretically as a function of bandwidth in a simple model by applying the Grassberger-Procaccia-Takens algorithm to the quantum 1/f theory. The quantum 1/f effect is successfully applied to quartz resonators and bipolar junction transistors. Finally, the quantum 1/f mobility fluctuations are calculated in silicon and the coherent quantum 1/f effect is derived for the first time from a new QED propagator with branch-point singularity. This opens the way to better bridging the gap between coherent and conventional quantum 1/f noise in small and ultrasmall devices.

  13. Carrier multiplication detected through transient photocurrent in device-grade films of lead selenide quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Jianbo; Fidler, Andrew F.; Klimov, Victor I.

    2015-09-08

    In carrier multiplication, the absorption of a single photon results in two or more electron–hole pairs. Quantum dots are promising materials for implementing carrier multiplication principles in real-life technologies. So far, however, most of research in this area has focused on optical studies of solution samples with yet to be proven relevance to practical devices. We report ultra-fast electro-optical studies of device-grade films of electronically coupled quantum dots that allow us to observe multiplication directly in the photocurrent. Our studies help rationalize previous results from both optical spectroscopy and steady-state photocurrent measurements and also provide new insights into effects of electric field and ligand treatments on multiexciton yields. Importantly, we demonstrate that using appropriate chemical treatments of the films, extra charges produced by carrier multiplication can be extracted from the quantum dots before they are lost to Auger recombination and hence can contribute to photocurrent of practical devices.

  14. Carrier multiplication detected through transient photocurrent in device-grade films of lead selenide quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jianbo; Fidler, Andrew F.; Klimov, Victor I.

    2015-01-01

    In carrier multiplication, the absorption of a single photon results in two or more electron–hole pairs. Quantum dots are promising materials for implementing carrier multiplication principles in real-life technologies. So far, however, most of research in this area has focused on optical studies of solution samples with yet to be proven relevance to practical devices. Here we report ultrafast electro-optical studies of device-grade films of electronically coupled quantum dots that allow us to observe multiplication directly in the photocurrent. Our studies help rationalize previous results from both optical spectroscopy and steady-state photocurrent measurements and also provide new insights into effects of electric field and ligand treatments on multiexciton yields. Importantly, we demonstrate that using appropriate chemical treatments of the films, extra charges produced by carrier multiplication can be extracted from the quantum dots before they are lost to Auger recombination and hence can contribute to photocurrent of practical devices. PMID:26345390

  15. A Transfer Hamiltonian Model for Devices Based on Quantum Dot Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Illera, S.; Prades, J. D.; Cirera, A.; Cornet, A.

    2015-01-01

    We present a model of electron transport through a random distribution of interacting quantum dots embedded in a dielectric matrix to simulate realistic devices. The method underlying the model depends only on fundamental parameters of the system and it is based on the Transfer Hamiltonian approach. A set of noncoherent rate equations can be written and the interaction between the quantum dots and between the quantum dots and the electrodes is introduced by transition rates and capacitive couplings. A realistic modelization of the capacitive couplings, the transmission coefficients, the electron/hole tunneling currents, and the density of states of each quantum dot have been taken into account. The effects of the local potential are computed within the self-consistent field regime. While the description of the theoretical framework is kept as general as possible, two specific prototypical devices, an arbitrary array of quantum dots embedded in a matrix insulator and a transistor device based on quantum dots, are used to illustrate the kind of unique insight that numerical simulations based on the theory are able to provide. PMID:25879055

  16. 78 FR 3319 - Amendments to Existing Validated End User Authorizations: Advanced Micro Devices China, Inc., Lam...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-16

    ... Micro 3D002, 3D003, AMD Technologies 75 FR 25763, 5/10/ Devices China, 3E001 (limited to (China) Co., 10... Suzhou, China 78 FR [INSERT FR 3C002 and 3C004 215021. PAGE NUMBER] 1/16/ and Advanced Micro 13... Authorizations: Advanced Micro Devices China, Inc., Lam Research Corporation, SK hynix Semiconductor (China)...

  17. Fabrication and characterization of an undoped GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dot device

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hai-Ou; Cao, Gang; Xiao, Ming You, Jie; Wei, Da; Tu, Tao; Guo, Guang-Can; Guo, Guo-Ping; Jiang, Hong-Wen

    2014-11-07

    We demonstrate the development of a double quantum dot with an integrated charge sensor fabricated in undoped GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures using a double top-gated design. Based on the evaluation of the integrated charge sensor, the double quantum dot can be tuned to a few-electron region. Additionally, the inter-dot coupling of the double quantum dot can be tuned to a large extent according to the voltage on the middle gate. The quantum dot is shown to be tunable from a single dot to a well-isolated double dot. To assess the stability of such design, the potential fluctuation induced by 1/f noise was measured. Based on the findings herein, the quantum dot design developed in the undoped GaAs/AlGaAs semiconductor shows potential for the future exploitation of nano-devices.

  18. Enhancement of Quantum Efficiency of Organic Light Emitting Devices by Doping Magnetic Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Chengjun; Wu, Yue; Xu, Zhihua; Hu, Bin; Bai, Jianmin; Wang, Jian-Ping; Shen, Jian

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles of CoFe are used as dopants to enhance the quantum efficiency of electroluminance in a single layer organic light emitting device (OLED). The enhancement of quantum efficiency increases with both increasing density of CoFe nanoparticles and external magnetic field. For a given OLED with 0.1 wt % doping, the enhancement of the quantum efficiency reaches {approx}27% and {approx}32% without and with a magnetic field, respectively. The origin of these improvements could be attributed to the simultaneous increases of the portion of excitons among total charge carriers and the fraction of singlets among the total excitons

  19. Optical field-strength generalized polarization of non-stationary quantum states in waveguiding photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barral, David; Liñares, Jesús; Nistal, María C.

    2013-07-01

    A quantum analysis of the generalized polarization properties of multimode non-stationary states based on their optical field-strength probability distributions is presented. The quantum generalized polarization is understood as a significant confinement of the probability distribution along certain regions of a multidimensional optical field-strength space. The analysis is addressed to quantum states generated in multimode linear and nonlinear waveguiding (integrated) photonic devices, such as multimode waveguiding directional couplers and waveguiding parametric amplifiers, whose modes fulfill a spatial modal orthogonality. In particular, the generalized polarization degree of coherent, squeezed and Schrödinger's cat states is analyzed.

  20. Electrode-stress-induced nanoscale disorder in Si quantum electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Ahn, Y.; Tilka, J. A.; Sampson, K. C.; Savage, D. E.; Prance, J. R.; Simmons, C. B.; Lagally, M. G.; Coppersmith, S. N.; Eriksson, M. A.; Holt, M. V.; Evans, P. G.

    2016-06-01

    Disorder in the potential-energy landscape presents a major obstacle to the more rapid development of semiconductor quantum device technologies. We report a large-magnitude source of disorder, beyond commonly considered unintentional background doping or fixed charge in oxide layers: nanoscale strain fields induced by residual stresses in nanopatterned metal gates. Quantitative analysis of synchrotron coherent hard x-ray nanobeam diffraction patterns reveals gate-induced curvature and strains up to 0.03% in a buried Si quantum well within a Si/SiGe heterostructure. Electrode stress presents both challenges to the design of devices and opportunities associated with the lateral manipulation of electronic energy levels.

  1. Hybrid Quantum Device with Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond Coupled to Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng-Bo; Xiang, Ze-Liang; Rabl, Peter; Nori, Franco

    2016-07-01

    We show that nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond interfaced with a suspended carbon nanotube carrying a dc current can facilitate a spin-nanomechanical hybrid device. We demonstrate that strong magnetomechanical interactions between a single NV spin and the vibrational mode of the suspended nanotube can be engineered and dynamically tuned by external control over the system parameters. This spin-nanomechanical setup with strong, intrinsic, and tunable magnetomechanical couplings allows for the construction of hybrid quantum devices with NV centers and carbon-based nanostructures, as well as phonon-mediated quantum information processing with spin qubits.

  2. A non-doped phosphorescent organic light-emitting device with above 31% external quantum efficiency.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Oswald, Iain W H; Yang, Xiaolong; Zhou, Guijiang; Jia, Huiping; Qiao, Qiquan; Chen, Yonghua; Hoshikawa-Halbert, Jason; Gnade, Bruce E

    2014-12-23

    The demonstrated square-planar Pt(II)-complex has reduced triplet-triplet quenching and therefore a near unity quantum yield in the neat thin film. A non-doped phosphorescent organic light-emitting diode (PhOLED) based on this emitter achieves (31.1 ± 0.1)% external quantum efficiency without any out-coupling, which shows that a non-doped PhOLED can be comparable in efficiency to the best doped devices with very complicated device structures. PMID:25219957

  3. Hybrid Quantum Device with Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond Coupled to Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng-Bo; Xiang, Ze-Liang; Rabl, Peter; Nori, Franco

    2016-07-01

    We show that nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond interfaced with a suspended carbon nanotube carrying a dc current can facilitate a spin-nanomechanical hybrid device. We demonstrate that strong magnetomechanical interactions between a single NV spin and the vibrational mode of the suspended nanotube can be engineered and dynamically tuned by external control over the system parameters. This spin-nanomechanical setup with strong, intrinsic, and tunable magnetomechanical couplings allows for the construction of hybrid quantum devices with NV centers and carbon-based nanostructures, as well as phonon-mediated quantum information processing with spin qubits. PMID:27419577

  4. Long-distance quantum key distribution with imperfect devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lo Piparo, Nicoló; Razavi, Mohsen

    2014-12-04

    Quantum key distribution over probabilistic quantum repeaters is addressed. We compare, under practical assumptions, two such schemes in terms of their secure key generation rate per memory, R{sub QKD}. The two schemes under investigation are the one proposed by Duan et al. in [Nat. 414, 413 (2001)] and that of Sangouard et al. proposed in [Phys. Rev. A 76, 050301 (2007)]. We consider various sources of imperfections in the latter protocol, such as a nonzero double-photon probability for the source, dark count per pulse, channel loss and inefficiencies in photodetectors and memories, to find the rate for different nesting levels. We determine the maximum value of the double-photon probability beyond which it is not possible to share a secret key anymore. We find the crossover distance for up to three nesting levels. We finally compare the two protocols.

  5. Long-distance quantum key distribution with imperfect devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Piparo, Nicoló; Razavi, Mohsen

    2014-12-01

    Quantum key distribution over probabilistic quantum repeaters is addressed. We compare, under practical assumptions, two such schemes in terms of their secure key generation rate per memory, RQKD. The two schemes under investigation are the one proposed by Duan et al. in [Nat. 414, 413 (2001)] and that of Sangouard et al. proposed in [Phys. Rev. A 76, 050301 (2007)]. We consider various sources of imperfections in the latter protocol, such as a nonzero double-photon probability for the source, dark count per pulse, channel loss and inefficiencies in photodetectors and memories, to find the rate for different nesting levels. We determine the maximum value of the double-photon probability beyond which it is not possible to share a secret key anymore. We find the crossover distance for up to three nesting levels. We finally compare the two protocols.

  6. Natural Framework for Device-Independent Quantification of Quantum Steerability, Measurement Incompatibility, and Self-Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shin-Liang; Budroni, Costantino; Liang, Yeong-Cherng; Chen, Yueh-Nan

    2016-06-01

    We introduce the concept of assemblage moment matrices, i.e., a collection of matrices of expectation values, each associated with a conditional quantum state obtained in a steering experiment. We demonstrate how it can be used for quantum states and measurements characterization in a device-independent manner, i.e., without invoking any assumption about the measurement or the preparation device. Specifically, we show how the method can be used to lower bound the steerability of an underlying quantum state directly from the observed correlation between measurement outcomes. Combining such device-independent quantifications with earlier results established by Piani and Watrous [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 060404 (2015)], our approach immediately provides a device-independent lower bound on the generalized robustness of entanglement, as well as the usefulness of the underlying quantum state for a type of subchannel discrimination problem. In addition, by proving a quantitative relationship between steering robustness and the recently introduced incompatibility robustness, our approach also allows for a device-independent quantification of the incompatibility between various measurements performed in a Bell-type experiment. Explicit examples where such bounds provide a kind of self-testing of the performed measurements are provided.

  7. Point-of-care (POC) devices by means of advanced MEMS.

    PubMed

    Karsten, Stanislav L; Tarhan, Mehmet C; Kudo, Lili C; Collard, Dominique; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have become an invaluable technology to advance the development of point-of-care (POC) devices for diagnostics and sample analyses. MEMS can transform sophisticated methods into compact and cost-effective microdevices that offer numerous advantages at many levels. Such devices include microchannels, microsensors, etc., that have been applied to various miniaturized POC products. Here we discuss some of the recent advances made in the use of MEMS devices for POC applications.

  8. Point-of-care (POC) devices by means of advanced MEMS.

    PubMed

    Karsten, Stanislav L; Tarhan, Mehmet C; Kudo, Lili C; Collard, Dominique; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have become an invaluable technology to advance the development of point-of-care (POC) devices for diagnostics and sample analyses. MEMS can transform sophisticated methods into compact and cost-effective microdevices that offer numerous advantages at many levels. Such devices include microchannels, microsensors, etc., that have been applied to various miniaturized POC products. Here we discuss some of the recent advances made in the use of MEMS devices for POC applications. PMID:26459443

  9. Quantum dot-block copolymer hybrids with improved properties and their application to quantum dot light-emitting devices.

    PubMed

    Zorn, Matthias; Bae, Wan Ki; Kwak, Jeonghun; Lee, Hyemin; Lee, Changhee; Zentel, Rudolf; Char, Kookheon

    2009-05-26

    To combine the optical properties of CdSe@ZnS quantum dots (QDs) with the electrical properties of semiconducting polymers, we prepared QD/polymer hybrids by grafting a block copolymer (BCP) containing thiol-anchoring moieties (poly(para-methyl triphenylamine-b-cysteamine acrylamide)) onto the surfaces of QDs through the ligand exchange procedure. The prepared QD/polymer hybrids possess improved processability such as enhanced solubility in various organic solvents as well as the film formation properties along with the improved colloidal stability derived from the grafted polymer shells. We also demonstrated light-emitting diodes based on QD/polymer hybrids, exhibiting the improved device performance (i.e., 3-fold increase in the external quantum efficiency) compared with the devices prepared by pristine (unmodified) QDs.

  10. Semi-device-independent security of one-way quantum key distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlowski, Marcin; Brunner, Nicolas

    2011-07-15

    By testing nonlocality, the security of entanglement-based quantum key distribution (QKD) can be enhanced to being ''device-independent.'' Here we ask whether such a strong form of security could also be established for one-way (prepare and measure) QKD. While fully device-independent security is impossible, we show that security can be guaranteed against individual attacks in a semi-device-independent scenario. In the latter, the devices used by the trusted parties are noncharacterized, but the dimensionality of the quantum systems used in the protocol is assumed to be bounded. Our security proof relies on the analogies between one-way QKD, dimension witnesses, and random-access codes.

  11. Multi-valley effective mass theory for device-level modeling of open quantum dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, N. Tobias; Baczewski, Andrew D.; Frees, Adam; Gamble, John King; Montano, Ines; Moussa, Jonathan E.; Muller, Richard P.; Nielsen, Erik

    2015-03-01

    Simple models for semiconductor-based quantum information processors can provide useful qualitative descriptions of device behavior. However, as experimental implementations have matured, more specific guidance from theory has become necessary, particularly in the form of quantitatively reliable yet computationally efficient modeling. Besides modeling static device properties, improved characterization of noisy gate operations requires a more sophisticated description of device dynamics. Making use of recent developments in multi-valley effective mass theory, we discuss device-level simulations of the open system quantum dynamics of a qubit interacting with phonons and other noise sources. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Scaling in the quantum Hall regime of graphene Corbino devices

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Eva C.; Burghard, Marko; Giesbers, A. J. M.; Kern, Klaus

    2014-05-19

    The scaling behavior of graphene devices in Corbino geometry was investigated through temperature dependent conductivity measurements under magnetic field. Evaluation of the Landau level width as a function of temperature yielded a relatively low temperature exponent of κ = 0.16 ± 0.05. Furthermore, an unusually large value close to 7.6 ± 0.9 was found for the universal scaling constant γ, while the determined inelastic scattering exponent of p = 2 is consistent with established scattering mechanisms in graphene. The deviation of the scaling parameters from values characteristic of conventional two-dimensional electron gases is attributed to an inhomogeneous charge carrier distribution in the Corbino devices. Direct evidence for the presence of the latter could be gained by spatially resolved photocurrent microscopy away from the charge neutrality point of the devices.

  13. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy using quantum dots: advances, challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Heuff, Romey F; Swift, Jody L; Cramb, David T

    2007-04-28

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots) have been increasingly employed in measuring the dynamic behavior of biomacromolecules using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. This poses a challenge, because quantum dots display their own dynamic behavior in the form of intermittent photoluminescence, also known as blinking. In this review, the manifestation of blinking in correlation spectroscopy will be explored, preceded by an examination of quantum dot blinking in general.

  14. Large scale two-dimensional arrays of magnesium diboride superconducting quantum interference devices

    SciTech Connect

    Cybart, Shane A. Dynes, R. C.; Wong, T. J.; Cho, E. Y.; Beeman, J. W.; Yung, C. S.; Moeckly, B. H.

    2014-05-05

    Magnetic field sensors based on two-dimensional arrays of superconducting quantum interference devices were constructed from magnesium diboride thin films. Each array contained over 30 000 Josephson junctions fabricated by ion damage of 30 nm weak links through an implant mask defined by nano-lithography. Current-biased devices exhibited very large voltage modulation as a function of magnetic field, with amplitudes as high as 8 mV.

  15. Design and Implementation of Quantum Dot Enhanced Next Generation Photovoltaic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polly, Stephen Jade

    Photovoltaics are an essential enabling technology providing power both where it would be impractical to deliver otherwise and where sustainably produced--and recently, economically competitive--energy is demanded. Significant effort has gone into increasing the efficiency of these devices since their initial development in the 1950s. The most dramatic enhancements have been from the judicious choice of material used for photon collection, with current state of the art (SOA) conversion efficiencies reaching 46%. Further improvements may be engineered through exploration of next-generation methodologies, such as the incorporation of quantum dots (QDs), to maximally exploit the solar spectrum and develop solar cells producing both large current densities and large voltages compared to current SOA. In this work, the electrical, optical, and mechanical properties of GaAs solar cells incorporating nanostructured InAs QDs, strain balanced with GaP, were studied. QDs allow for an increase in the current generation capabilities of the bulk GaAs semiconductor through absorption of sub-bandgap photons via bound states in the low-bandgap, low-dimensional material. QDs alter the recombination dynamics of charge carriers in the photovoltaic device, which typically led to an undesirable reduction in voltage of more than 200 mV. The addition of dopant, necessary to explore the effects of an intermediate band solar cell, showed a voltage recovery of 121 mV, with no positive or negative effects on sub-bandgap collection. Advanced characterization and data analysis techniques were developed, combining photoreflectance and temperature-dependent photoluminescence, to investigate the activation energy of bound states in the QD, which were shown to undesirably decrease by 34 meV to 40 meV with the addition of doping. Simulation of alternative structures that may help to increase this activation energy were performed using alternative strain balancing designs, and a general strain

  16. Superconducting quantum interference devices based set-up for probing current noise and correlations in three-terminal devices

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeffer, A. H.; Kaviraj, B.; Coupiac, O.; Lefloch, F.

    2012-11-15

    We have implemented a new experimental set-up for precise measurements of current fluctuations in three-terminal devices. The system operates at very low temperatures (30 mK) and is equipped with three superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) as low noise current amplifiers. A SQUID input coil is connected to each terminal of a sample allowing the acquisition of time-dependent current everywhere in the circuit. From these traces, we can measure the current mean value, the noise, and cross-correlations between different branches of a device. In this paper, we present calibration results of noise and cross-correlations obtained using low impedance macroscopic resistors. From these results, we can extract the noise level of the set-up and show that there are no intrinsic correlations due to the measurement scheme. We also studied noise and correlations as a function of a dc current and estimated the electronic temperature of various macroscopic resistors.

  17. Atomic-scale investigations of current and future devices: from nitride-based transistors to quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Luke

    Our era is defined by its technology, and our future is dependent on its continued evolution. Over the past few decades, we have witnessed the expansion of advanced technology into all walks of life and all industries, driven by the exponential increase in the speed and power of semiconductor-based devices. However, as the length scale of devices reaches the atomic scale, a deep understanding of atomistic theory and its application is increasingly crucial. In order to illustrate the power of an atomistic approach to understanding devices, we will present results and conclusions from three interlinked projects: n-type doping of III-nitride semiconductors, defects for quantum computing, and macroscopic simulations of devices. First, we will study effective n-type doping of III-nitride semiconductors and their alloys, and analyze the barriers to effective n-type doping of III-nitrides and their alloys. In particular, we will study the formation of DX centers, and predict alloy composition onsets for various III-nitride alloys. In addition, we will perform a comprehensive study of alternative dopants, and provide potential alternative dopants to improve n-type conductivity in AlN and wide-band-gap nitride alloys. Next, we will discuss how atomic-scale defects can act as a curse for the development of quantum computers by contributing to decoherence at an atomic scale, specifically investigating the effect of two-level state defects (TLS) systems in alumina as a source of decoherence in superconducting qubits based on Josephson junctions; and also as a blessing, by allowing the identification of wholly new qubits in different materials, specifically showing calculations on defects in SiC for quantum computing applications. Finally, we will provide examples of recent calculations we have performed for devices using macrosopic device simulations, largely in conjunction with first-principles calculations. Specifically, we will discuss the power of using a multi

  18. Quantum-corrected drift-diffusion models for transport in semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    De Falco, Carlo; Gatti, Emilio; Lacaita, Andrea L.; Sacco, Riccardo . E-mail: riccardo.sacco@mate.polimi.it

    2005-04-10

    In this paper, we propose a unified framework for Quantum-corrected drift-diffusion (QCDD) models in nanoscale semiconductor device simulation. QCDD models are presented as a suitable generalization of the classical drift-diffusion (DD) system, each particular model being identified by the constitutive relation for the quantum-correction to the electric potential. We examine two special, and relevant, examples of QCDD models; the first one is the modified DD model named Schroedinger-Poisson-drift-diffusion, and the second one is the quantum-drift-diffusion (QDD) model. For the decoupled solution of the two models, we introduce a functional iteration technique that extends the classical Gummel algorithm widely used in the iterative solution of the DD system. We discuss the finite element discretization of the various differential subsystems, with special emphasis on their stability properties, and illustrate the performance of the proposed algorithms and models on the numerical simulation of nanoscale devices in two spatial dimensions.

  19. Heralded-qubit amplifiers for practical device-independent quantum key distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Curty, Marcos; Moroder, Tobias

    2011-07-15

    Device-independent quantum key distribution does not need a precise quantum mechanical model of employed devices to guarantee security. Despite its beauty, it is still a very challenging experimental task. We compare a recent proposal by Gisin et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 070501 (2010)] to close the detection loophole problem with that of a simpler quantum relay based on entanglement swapping with linear optics. Our full-mode analysis for both schemes confirms that, in contrast to recent beliefs, the second scheme can indeed provide a positive key rate which is even considerably higher than that of the first alternative. The resulting key rates and required detection efficiencies of approximately 95% for both schemes, however, strongly depend on the underlying security proof.

  20. Simple proof of the quantum benchmark fidelity for continuous-variable quantum devices

    SciTech Connect

    Namiki, Ryo

    2011-04-15

    An experimental success criterion for continuous-variable quantum teleportation and memory is to surpass the limit of the average fidelity achieved by classical measure-and-prepare schemes with respect to a Gaussian-distributed set of coherent states. We present an alternative proof of the classical limit based on the familiar notions of state-channel duality and partial transposition. The present method enables us to produce a quantum-domain criterion associated with a given set of measured fidelities.

  1. Zinc Cadmium Selenide Cladded Quantum Dot Based Electroluminescent and Nonvolatile Memory Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Amody, Fuad H.

    This dissertation presents electroluminescent (EL) and nonvolatile memory devices fabricated using pseudomorphic ZnCdSe-based cladded quantum dots (QDs). These dots were grown using our own in-school built novel reactor. The EL device was fabricated on a substrate of ITO (indium tin oxide) coated glass with the quantum dots sandwiched between anode and cathode contacts with a small barrier layer on top of the QDs. The importance of these cladded dots is to increase the quantum yield of device. This device is unique as they utilize quantum dots that are pseudomorphic (nearly lattice-matched core and the shell of the dot). In the case of floating quantum dot gate nonvolatile memory, cladded ZnCdSe quantum dots are deposited on single crystalline gate insulator (ZnMgS/ZnMgSe), which is grown using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The control gate dielectric layer of the nonvolatile memory is Si3N4 or SiO2 and is grown using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The cladded dots are grown using an improved methodology of photo-assisted microwave plasma metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (PMP-MOCVD) enhanced reactor. The cladding composition of the core and shell of the dots was engineered by the help of ultraviolet light which changed the incorporation of zinc (and hence composition of ZnCdSe). This makes ZnxCd1--xSe-ZnyCd1--y Se QDs to have a low composition of zinc in the core than the cladding (x

  2. Template method for nano-order positioning and dense packing of quantum dots for optoelectronic device application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, Kohki; Hirota, Akinobu; Shimizu, Yuta; Nakashima, Seisuke

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we present recent progress of our researches on positioning of quantum dot in the field of optoelectronics. The first research is aimed at quantum information device application. As a technology for production of quantum devices, we developed the method for positioning of a single colloidal quantum dot. Oxide lines on a Si substrate drawn by a scanning probe microscope were used as a negative etching mask with controlling their cross section in order to create a nanohole for trapping of a single quantum dot. The other research is aimed at solar cell application. It has been predicted that quantum-dot superlattice solar cell will achieve photoelectric conversion efficiency of more than 70%. After the sedimentation of the colloidal quantum dots into the pyramidal holes processed by anisotropic wet etching on a Si substrate, we observed characteristic photoluminescence from the quantum-dot sheet.

  3. Broadband calibrated scattering parameters characterization of a superconducting quantum interference device amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Ranzani, Leonardo; Spietz, Lafe; Aumentado, Jose

    2013-07-08

    In this work, we characterize the 2-port scattering parameters of a superconducting quantum interference device amplifier at {approx}20 mK over several gigahertz of bandwidth. The measurement reference plane is positioned on a 6.25 {Omega} microstrip line situated directly at the input and output of the device by means of a thru-reflect-line cryogenic calibration procedure. From the scattering parameters, we derive the device available power gain, isolation, and input impedance over the 2-8 GHz range. This measurement methodology provides a path towards designing wide-band matching circuits for low impedance superconducting amplifiers operating at dilution refrigerator temperatures.

  4. Detection and measurement of electroreflectance on quantum cascade laser device using Fourier transform infrared microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Enobio, Eli Christopher I.; Ohtani, Keita; Ohno, Yuzo; Ohno, Hideo

    2013-12-02

    We demonstrate the use of a Fourier Transform Infrared microscope system to detect and measure electroreflectance (ER) from mid-infrared quantum cascade laser (QCL) device. To characterize intersubband transition (ISBT) energies in a functioning QCL device, a microscope is used to focus the probe on the QCL cleaved mirror. The measured ER spectra exhibit resonance features associated to ISBTs under applied electric field in agreement with the numerical calculations and comparable to observed photocurrent, and emission peaks. The method demonstrates the potential as a characterization tool for QCL devices.

  5. Nanostructured Quantum Dots or Dashes in Photovoltaic Devices and Methods Thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raffaele, Ryne P. (Inventor); Wilt, David M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A photovoltaic device includes one or more structures, an array of at least one of quantum dots and quantum dashes, at least one groove, and at least one conductor. Each of the structures comprises an intrinsic layer on one of an n type layer and a p type layer and the other one of the n type layer and the p type layer on the intrinsic layer. The array of at least one of quantum dots and quantum dashes is located in the intrinsic layer in at least one of the structures. The groove extends into at least one of the structures and the conductor is located along at least a portion of the groove.

  6. Gain dynamics of quantum dot devices for dual-state operation

    SciTech Connect

    Kaptan, Y. Herzog, B.; Kolarczik, M.; Owschimikow, N.; Woggon, U.; Schmeckebier, H.; Arsenijević, D.; Bimberg, D.; Mikhelashvili, V.; Eisenstein, G.

    2014-06-30

    Ground state gain dynamics of In(Ga)As-quantum dot excited state lasers are investigated via single-color ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy below and above lasing threshold. Two-color pump-probe experiments are used to localize lasing and non-lasing quantum dots within the inhomogeneously broadened ground state. Single-color results yield similar gain recovery rates of the ground state for lasing and non-lasing quantum dots decreasing from 6 ps to 2 ps with increasing injection current. We find that ground state gain dynamics are influenced solely by the injection current and unaffected by laser operation of the excited state. This independence is promising for dual-state operation schemes in quantum dot based optoelectronic devices.

  7. Thermodynamic limits to the efficiency of solar energy conversion by quantum devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buoncristiani, A. M.; Byvik, C. E.; Smith, B. T.

    1981-01-01

    The second law of thermodynamics imposes a strict limitation to the energy converted from direct solar radiation to useful work by a quantum device. This limitation requires that the amount of energy converted to useful work (energy in any form other than heat) can be no greater than the change in free energy of the radiation fields. Futhermore, in any real energy conversion device, not all of this available free energy in the radiation field can be converted to work because of basic limitations inherent in the device itself. A thermodynamic analysis of solar energy conversion by a completely general prototypical quantum device is presented. This device is completely described by two parameters, its operating temperature T sub R and the energy threshold of its absorption spectrum. An expression for the maximum thermodynamic efficiency of a quantum solar converter was derived in terms of these two parameters and the incident radiation spectrum. Efficiency curves for assumed solar spectral irradiance corresponding to air mass zero and air mass 1.5 are presented.

  8. Investigation of thioglycerol stabilized ZnS quantum dots in electroluminescent device performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ethiraj, Anita Sagadevan; Rhen, Dani; Lee, D. H.; Kang, Dae Joon; Kulkarni, S. K.

    2016-05-01

    The present work is focused on the investigation of thioglycerol (TG) stabilized Zinc Sulfide Quantum dots (ZnS QDs) in the hybrid electroluminescence (EL) device. Optical absorption spectroscopy clearly indicates the formation of narrow size distributed ZnS in the quantum confinement regime. X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Photoluminescence (PL), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) data supports the same. The hybrid EL device with structure of ITO (indium tin oxide)//PEDOT:PSS ((poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrene sulfonate)//HTL (α NPD- N,N'-diphenyl-N,N'-bis(1-naphthyl)-(1,1'-phenyl)-4,4'-diamine// PVK:ZnS QDs//ETL(PBD- 2-tert-butylphenyl- 5-biphenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole)//LiF:Al (Device 1) was fabricated. Reference device without the ZnS QDs were also prepared (Device 2). The results show that the ZnS QDs based device exhibited bright electroluminescence emission of 24 cd/m2 at a driving voltage of 16 Volts under the forward bias conditions as compared to the reference device without the ZnS QDs, which showed 6 cd/m2 at ˜22 Volts.

  9. Advanced integrated safeguards using front-end-triggering devices

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, J.A.; Whitty, W.J.

    1995-12-01

    This report addresses potential uses of front-end-triggering devices for enhanced safeguards. Such systems incorporate video surveillance as well as radiation and other sensors. Also covered in the report are integration issues and analysis techniques.

  10. Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Philip R.

    2011-09-27

    This presentation from the Water Peer Review highlights one of the program's marine and hyrokinetics device design projects to scale up the current Ocean Power Technology PowerBuoy from 150kW to 500kW.

  11. Chip-scale Photonic Devices for Light-matter Interactions and Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jie

    Chip-scale photonic devices such as microdisks, photonic crystal cavities and slow-light photonic crystal waveguides possess strong light localization and long photon lifetime, which will significantly enhance the light-matter interactions and can be used to implement new functionalities for both classical and quantum information processing, optical computation and optical communication in integrated nanophotonic circuits. This thesis will focus on three topics about light matter interactions and quantum information processing with chip-scale photonic devices, including 1) Design and characterization of asymmetric resonate cavity with radiation directionality and air-slot photonic crystal cavity with ultrasmall effective mode volume, 2) Exciton-photon interactions between quantum dots and photonic crystal devices and non-classical photon source from a single quantum dot, and 3) Quantum controlled phase gate and phase switching based on quantum dots and photonic crystal waveguide. The first topic is engineered control of radiation directionality and effective mode volume for optical mode in chip-scale silicon micro-/nano-cavities. High quality factor (Q), subwavelength mode volume ( V) and controllable radiation directionality are the major properties for optical cavities designs. In Chapter 2, asymmetric resonant cavities with rational caustics are proposed and interior whispering gallery modes in monolithic silicon mesoscopic microcavities are experimentally demonstrated. These microcavities possess unique robustness of cavity quality factor against roughness Rayleigh scattering. In Chapter 3, air-slot mode-gap photonic crystal cavities with quality factor of 104 and effective mode volume ˜ 0.02 cubic wavelengths are experimentally demonstrated. The origin of the high Q air-slot cavity mode is the mode-gap effect from the slotted photonic crystal waveguide mode with negative dispersion. The second topic is exciton-photon coupling between quantum dots and

  12. Ångström-level, real-time control of the formation of quantum devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, S.-B.; Deppert, K.; Junno, T.; Magnusson, M. H.; Montelius, L.; Samuelson, L.

    1998-08-01

    We report a novel approach for the realization of quantum devices which require device structures of sub-10 nm dimensions and position control better than 1 nm. In this approach we combine three methods from nano-technology: (i) an aerosol technique for the fabrication of metallic and semiconducting nano-crystals or nano-particles with diameters in the range 5-50 nm, (ii) extreme electron beam lithography to define contact gap geometries with dimensions of 10-50 nm and (iii) a manipulation technique based on atomic-force microscopy, combined with in situ electrical measurements of the device characteristics, by which pre-fabricated nano-structures can be positioned with high accuracy. We present details of room-temperature measurements on quantized conductance devices, formed in the neck structures between neighbouring gold particles. These necks or wires have a cross-section of only one or a few gold atoms, leading to quantized conductance of 0268-1242/13/8A/035/img1, with values of n between 1 and 10 having been observed. Such lateral quantum resistor devices are found to be remarkably stable, frequently maintaining the conductance levels on the time scale of hours. We also discuss the prospect for novel devices in which a single nano-particle or a single molecule is controllably positioned with high accuracy, with tunnel gaps surrounding the island.

  13. Proximity effect bilayer nano superconducting quantum interference devices for millikelvin magnetometry

    SciTech Connect

    Blois, A. Rozhko, S.; Romans, E. J.; Hao, L.; Gallop, J. C.

    2013-12-21

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) incorporating thin film nanobridges as weak links have sensitivities approaching that required for single spin detection at 4.2 K. However, due to thermal hysteresis they are difficult to operate at much lower temperatures which hinder their application to many quantum measurements. To overcome this, we have developed nanoscale SQUIDs made from titanium-gold proximity bilayers. We show that their electrical properties are consistent with a theoretical model developed for heat flow in bilayers and demonstrate that they enable magnetic measurements to be made on a sample at system temperatures down to 60 mK.

  14. Simulating of the measurement-device independent quantum key distribution with phase randomized general sources

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qin; Wang, Xiang-Bin

    2014-01-01

    We present a model on the simulation of the measurement-device independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) with phase randomized general sources. It can be used to predict experimental observations of a MDI-QKD with linear channel loss, simulating corresponding values for the gains, the error rates in different basis, and also the final key rates. Our model can be applicable to the MDI-QKDs with arbitrary probabilistic mixture of different photon states or using any coding schemes. Therefore, it is useful in characterizing and evaluating the performance of the MDI-QKD protocol, making it a valuable tool in studying the quantum key distributions. PMID:24728000

  15. MovAid- a novel device for advanced rehabilitation monitoring.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Prashant; Verma, Piyush; Gupta, Rakesh; Verma, Bhawna

    2015-08-01

    The present article introduces a new device "MovAid" which helps to measure and monitor rehabilitation. It has two main components- "MovAid device" and the "MovAid Smart Phone Application". The device connects wirelessly to the MovAid smart phone application via Bluetooth. It has electronic sensors to measure three important parameters of the patient- Angle of Joint Bent, Lift from the ground and Orientation of the limb. A mono-axis flex sensor to measure the degree of joint bent and a 3-axis accelerometer and gyroscope to measure the orientation of the limb and lift from the ground have been used. MovAid system bridges the gap between caretakers and patients, empowering both in ways never thought of before, by providing detailed and accurate data on every move. PMID:26737332

  16. N-dimensional measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with N + 1 un-characterized sources: zero quantum-bit-error-rate case

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Won-Young; Su, Hong-Yi; Bae, Joonwoo

    2016-01-01

    We study N-dimensional measurement-device-independent quantum-key-distribution protocol where one checking state is used. Only assuming that the checking state is a superposition of other N sources, we show that the protocol is secure in zero quantum-bit-error-rate case, suggesting possibility of the protocol. The method may be applied in other quantum information processing. PMID:27452275

  17. N-dimensional measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with N + 1 un-characterized sources: zero quantum-bit-error-rate case.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Won-Young; Su, Hong-Yi; Bae, Joonwoo

    2016-01-01

    We study N-dimensional measurement-device-independent quantum-key-distribution protocol where one checking state is used. Only assuming that the checking state is a superposition of other N sources, we show that the protocol is secure in zero quantum-bit-error-rate case, suggesting possibility of the protocol. The method may be applied in other quantum information processing. PMID:27452275

  18. Multiple functional UV devices based on III-Nitride quantum wells for biological warfare agent detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qin; Savage, Susan; Persson, Sirpa; Noharet, Bertrand; Junique, Stéphane; Andersson, Jan Y.; Liuolia, Vytautas; Marcinkevicius, Saulius

    2009-02-01

    We have demonstrated surface normal detecting/filtering/emitting multiple functional ultraviolet (UV) optoelectronic devices based on InGaN/GaN, InGaN/AlGaN and AlxGa1-xN/AlyGa1-yN multiple quantum well (MQW) structures with operation wavelengths ranging from 270 nm to 450 nm. Utilizing MQW structure as device active layer offers a flexibility to tune its long cut-off wavelength in a wide UV range from solar-blind to visible by adjusting the well width, well composition and barrier height. Similarly, its short cut-off wavelength can be adjusted by using a GaN or AlGaN block layer on a sapphire substrate when the device is illuminated from its backside, which further provides an optical filtering effect. When a current injects into the device under forward bias the device acts as an UV light emitter, whereas the device performs as a typical photodetector under reverse biases. With applying an alternating external bias the device might be used as electroabsorption modulator due to quantum confined Stark effect. In present work fabricated devices have been characterized by transmission/absorption spectra, photoresponsivity, electroluminescence, and photoluminescence measurements under various forward and reverse biases. The piezoelectric effect, alloy broadening and Stokes shift between the emission and absorption spectra in different InGaN- and AlGaN-based QW structures have been investigated and compared. Possibilities of monolithic or hybrid integration using such multiple functional devices for biological warfare agents sensing application have also be discussed.

  19. Valley splitting in a silicon quantum device platform.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Jill A; Warschkow, Oliver; Carter, Damien J; Marks, Nigel A; Mazzola, Federico; Simmons, Michelle Y; Wells, Justin W

    2014-03-12

    By suppressing an undesirable surface Umklapp process, it is possible to resolve the two most occupied states (1Γ and 2Γ) in a buried two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in silicon. The 2DEG exists because of an atomically sharp profile of phosphorus dopants which have been formed beneath the Si(001) surface (a δ-layer). The energy separation, or valley splitting, of the two most occupied bands has critical implications for the properties of δ-layer derived devices, yet until now, has not been directly measurable. Density functional theory (DFT) allows the 2DEG band structure to be calculated, but without experimental verification the size of the valley splitting has been unclear. Using a combination of direct spectroscopic measurements and DFT we show that the measured band structure is in good qualitative agreement with calculations and reveal a valley splitting of 132 ± 5 meV. We also report the effective mass and occupation of the 2DEG states and compare the dispersions and Fermi surface with DFT. PMID:24571617

  20. Valley splitting in a silicon quantum device platform.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Jill A; Warschkow, Oliver; Carter, Damien J; Marks, Nigel A; Mazzola, Federico; Simmons, Michelle Y; Wells, Justin W

    2014-03-12

    By suppressing an undesirable surface Umklapp process, it is possible to resolve the two most occupied states (1Γ and 2Γ) in a buried two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in silicon. The 2DEG exists because of an atomically sharp profile of phosphorus dopants which have been formed beneath the Si(001) surface (a δ-layer). The energy separation, or valley splitting, of the two most occupied bands has critical implications for the properties of δ-layer derived devices, yet until now, has not been directly measurable. Density functional theory (DFT) allows the 2DEG band structure to be calculated, but without experimental verification the size of the valley splitting has been unclear. Using a combination of direct spectroscopic measurements and DFT we show that the measured band structure is in good qualitative agreement with calculations and reveal a valley splitting of 132 ± 5 meV. We also report the effective mass and occupation of the 2DEG states and compare the dispersions and Fermi surface with DFT.

  1. A Comprehensive Microfluidics Device Construction and Characterization Module for the Advanced Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piunno, Paul A. E.; Zetina, Adrian; Chu, Norman; Tavares, Anthony J.; Noor, M. Omair; Petryayeva, Eleonora; Uddayasankar, Uvaraj; Veglio, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    An advanced analytical chemistry undergraduate laboratory module on microfluidics that spans 4 weeks (4 h per week) is presented. The laboratory module focuses on comprehensive experiential learning of microfluidic device fabrication and the core characteristics of microfluidic devices as they pertain to fluid flow and the manipulation of samples.…

  2. Novel device-based interventional strategies for advanced heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Vanderheyden, Marc; Bartunek, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    While heart failure is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity, our tools to provide ultimate treatment solutions are still limited. Recent developments in new devices are designed to fill this therapeutic gap. The scope of this review is to focus on two particular targets, namely (1) left ventricular geometric restoration and (2) atrial depressurization. (1) Reduction of the wall stress by shrinking the ventricular cavity has been traditionally attempted surgically. Recently, the Parachute device (CardioKinetix Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA) has been introduced to restore ventricular geometry and cardiac mechanics. The intervention aims to partition distal dysfunctional segments that are non-contributory to the ventricular mechanics and forward cardiac output. (2) Diastolic heart failure is characterized by abnormal relaxation and chamber stiffness. The main therapeutic goal achieved should be the reduction of afterload and diastolic pressure load. Recently, new catheter-based approaches were proposed to reduce left atrial pressure and ventricular decompression: the InterAtrial Shunt Device (IASD™) (Corvia Medical Inc., Tewksbury, MA, USA) and the V-Wave Shunt (V-Wave Ltd, Or Akiva, Israel). Both are designed to create a controlled atrial septal defect in symptomatic patients with heart failure. While the assist devices are aimed at end-stage heart failure, emerging device-based percutaneous or minimal invasive techniques comprise a wide spectrum of innovative concepts that target ventricular remodeling, cardiac contractility or neuro-humoral modulation. The clinical adoption is in the early stages of the initial feasibility and safety studies, and clinical evidence needs to be gathered in appropriately designed clinical trials. PMID:26966444

  3. Novel device-based interventional strategies for advanced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Toth, Gabor G; Vanderheyden, Marc; Bartunek, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    While heart failure is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity, our tools to provide ultimate treatment solutions are still limited. Recent developments in new devices are designed to fill this therapeutic gap. The scope of this review is to focus on two particular targets, namely (1) left ventricular geometric restoration and (2) atrial depressurization. (1) Reduction of the wall stress by shrinking the ventricular cavity has been traditionally attempted surgically. Recently, the Parachute device (CardioKinetix Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA) has been introduced to restore ventricular geometry and cardiac mechanics. The intervention aims to partition distal dysfunctional segments that are non-contributory to the ventricular mechanics and forward cardiac output. (2) Diastolic heart failure is characterized by abnormal relaxation and chamber stiffness. The main therapeutic goal achieved should be the reduction of afterload and diastolic pressure load. Recently, new catheter-based approaches were proposed to reduce left atrial pressure and ventricular decompression: the InterAtrial Shunt Device (IASD™) (Corvia Medical Inc., Tewksbury, MA, USA) and the V-Wave Shunt (V-Wave Ltd, Or Akiva, Israel). Both are designed to create a controlled atrial septal defect in symptomatic patients with heart failure. While the assist devices are aimed at end-stage heart failure, emerging device-based percutaneous or minimal invasive techniques comprise a wide spectrum of innovative concepts that target ventricular remodeling, cardiac contractility or neuro-humoral modulation. The clinical adoption is in the early stages of the initial feasibility and safety studies, and clinical evidence needs to be gathered in appropriately designed clinical trials. PMID:26966444

  4. Quantum filter of spin polarized states: Metal–dielectric–ferromagnetic/semiconductor device

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, Vladimir I.; Khmelinskii, Igor

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • Development of a new spintronics device. • Development of quantum spin polarized filters. • Development of theory of quantum spin polarized filter. - Abstract: Recently we proposed a model for the Quantum Spin-Polarized State Filter (QSPSF). The magnetic moments are transported selectively in this model, detached from the electric charge carriers. Thus, transfer of a spin-polarized state between two conductors was predicted in a system of two levels coupled by exchange interaction. The strength of the exchange interaction between the two conductive layers depends on the thickness of the dielectric layer separating them. External magnetic fields modulate spin-polarized state transfer, due to Zeeman level shift. Therefore, a linearly growing magnetic field generates a series of current peaks in a nearby coil. Thus, our spin-state filter should contain as least three nanolayers: (1) conductive or ferromagnetic; (2) dielectric; and (3) conductive or semiconductive. The spectrum of spin-polarized states generated by the filter device consists of a series of resonance peaks. In a simple case the number of lines equals S, the total spin angular momentum of discrete states in one of the coupled nanolayers. Presently we report spin-polarized state transport in metal–dielectric–ferromagnetic (MDF) and metal–dielectric–semiconductor (MDS) three-layer sandwich devices. The exchange-resonance spectra in such devices are quite specific, differing also from spectra observed earlier in other three-layer devices. The theoretical model is used to interpret the available experimental results. A detailed ab initio analysis of the magnetic-field dependence of the output magnetic moment averaged over the surface of the device was carried out. The model predicts the resonance structure of the signal, although at its present accuracy it cannot predict the positions of the spectral peaks.

  5. BORON NITRIDE CAPACITORS FOR ADVANCED POWER ELECTRONIC DEVICES

    SciTech Connect

    N. Badi; D. Starikov; C. Boney; A. Bensaoula; D. Johnstone

    2010-11-01

    This project fabricates long-life boron nitride/boron oxynitride thin film -based capacitors for advanced SiC power electronics with a broad operating temperature range using a physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique. The use of vapor deposition provides for precise control and quality material formation.

  6. Long-distance measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with coherent-state superpositions.

    PubMed

    Yin, H-L; Cao, W-F; Fu, Y; Tang, Y-L; Liu, Y; Chen, T-Y; Chen, Z-B

    2014-09-15

    Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) with decoy-state method is believed to be securely applied to defeat various hacking attacks in practical quantum key distribution systems. Recently, the coherent-state superpositions (CSS) have emerged as an alternative to single-photon qubits for quantum information processing and metrology. Here, in this Letter, CSS are exploited as the source in MDI-QKD. We present an analytical method that gives two tight formulas to estimate the lower bound of yield and the upper bound of bit error rate. We exploit the standard statistical analysis and Chernoff bound to perform the parameter estimation. Chernoff bound can provide good bounds in the long-distance MDI-QKD. Our results show that with CSS, both the security transmission distance and secure key rate are significantly improved compared with those of the weak coherent states in the finite-data case. PMID:26466295

  7. Note: Increasing dynamic range of digital-to-analog converter using a superconducting quantum interference device.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Masakazu

    2014-10-01

    Responses of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) are periodically dependent on magnetic flux coupling to its superconducting ring and the period is a flux quantum (Φo = h/2e, where h and e, respectively, express Planck's constant and elementary charge). Using this periodicity, we had proposed a digital to analog converter using a SQUID (SQUID DAC) of first generation with linear current output, interval of which corresponded to Φo. Modification for increasing dynamic range by interpolating within each interval is reported. Linearity of the interpolation was also based on the quantum periodicity. A SQUID DAC with dynamic range of about 1.4 × 10(7) was created as a demonstration.

  8. Note: Increasing dynamic range of digital-to-analog converter using a superconducting quantum interference device

    SciTech Connect

    Nakanishi, Masakazu

    2014-10-15

    Responses of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) are periodically dependent on magnetic flux coupling to its superconducting ring and the period is a flux quantum (Φ{sub o} = h/2e, where h and e, respectively, express Planck's constant and elementary charge). Using this periodicity, we had proposed a digital to analog converter using a SQUID (SQUID DAC) of first generation with linear current output, interval of which corresponded to Φ{sub o}. Modification for increasing dynamic range by interpolating within each interval is reported. Linearity of the interpolation was also based on the quantum periodicity. A SQUID DAC with dynamic range of about 1.4 × 10{sup 7} was created as a demonstration.

  9. Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution over Untrustful Metropolitan Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yan-Lin; Yin, Hua-Lei; Zhao, Qi; Liu, Hui; Sun, Xiang-Xiang; Huang, Ming-Qi; Zhang, Wei-Jun; Chen, Si-Jing; Zhang, Lu; You, Li-Xing; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Yang; Lu, Chao-Yang; Jiang, Xiao; Ma, Xiongfeng; Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Teng-Yun; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Quantum cryptography holds the promise to establish an information-theoretically secure global network. All field tests of metropolitan-scale quantum networks to date are based on trusted relays. The security critically relies on the accountability of the trusted relays, which will break down if the relay is dishonest or compromised. Here, we construct a measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDIQKD) network in a star topology over a 200-square-kilometer metropolitan area, which is secure against untrustful relays and against all detection attacks. In the field test, our system continuously runs through one week with a secure key rate 10 times larger than previous results. Our results demonstrate that the MDIQKD network, combining the best of both worlds—security and practicality, constitutes an appealing solution to secure metropolitan communications.

  10. Measurement device-independent quantum key distribution with heralded pair coherent state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Shang-Hong, Zhao; Lei, Shi

    2016-10-01

    The original measurement device-independent quantum key distribution is reviewed, and a modified protocol using heralded pair coherent state (HPCS) is proposed to overcome the quantum bit error rate associated with the dark count rate of the detectors in long-distance quantum key distribution. Our simulation indicates that the secure transmission distance can be improved evidently with HPCS owing to the lower probability of vacuum events when compared with weak coherent source scenario, while the secure key rate can be increased with HPCS due to the higher probability of single-photon events when compared with heralded single-photon source scenario. Furthermore, we apply the finite key analysis to the decoy state MDI-QKD with HPCS and obtain a practical key rate.

  11. Measurement device-independent quantum key distribution with heralded pair coherent state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Shang-Hong, Zhao; Lei, Shi

    2016-07-01

    The original measurement device-independent quantum key distribution is reviewed, and a modified protocol using heralded pair coherent state (HPCS) is proposed to overcome the quantum bit error rate associated with the dark count rate of the detectors in long-distance quantum key distribution. Our simulation indicates that the secure transmission distance can be improved evidently with HPCS owing to the lower probability of vacuum events when compared with weak coherent source scenario, while the secure key rate can be increased with HPCS due to the higher probability of single-photon events when compared with heralded single-photon source scenario. Furthermore, we apply the finite key analysis to the decoy state MDI-QKD with HPCS and obtain a practical key rate.

  12. Advanced investigation of two-phase charge-coupled devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosonocky, W. F.; Carnes, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The performance of experimental two phase, charge-coupled shift registers constructed using polysilicon gates overlapped by aluminum gates was studied. Shift registers with 64, 128, and 500 stages were built and operated. Devices were operated at the maximum clock frequency of 20 MHz. Loss per transfer of less than .0001 was demonstrated for fat zero operation. The effect upon transfer efficiency of various structural and materials parameters was investigated including substrate orientation, resistivity, and conductivity type; channel width and channel length; and method of channel confinement. Operation of the devices with and without fat zero was studied as well as operation in the complete charge transfer mode and the bias charge, or bucket brigade mode.

  13. Experimental asymmetric plug-and-play measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Guang-Zhao; Sun, Shi-Hai; Xu, Feihu; Chen, Huan; Li, Chun-Yan; Liang, Lin-Mei

    2016-09-01

    Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) is immune to all security loopholes on detection. Previous experiments on MDI-QKD required spatially separated signal lasers and complicated stabilization systems. In this paper, we perform a proof-of-principle experimental demonstration of plug-and-play MDI-QKD over an asymmetric channel setting with a single signal laser in which the whole system is automatically stabilized in spectrum, polarization, arrival time, and phase reference. Both the signal laser and the single-photon detectors are in the possession of a common server. A passive timing-calibration technique is applied to ensure the precise and stable overlap of signal pulses. The results pave the way for the realization of a quantum network in which the users only need the encoding devices.

  14. Efficient heralding of photonic qubits with applications to device-independent quantum key distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Pitkanen, David; Ma Xiongfeng; Luetkenhaus, Norbert; Wickert, Ricardo; Loock, Peter van

    2011-08-15

    We present an efficient way of heralding photonic qubit signals using linear optics devices. First, we show that one can obtain asymptotically perfect heralding and unit success probability with growing resources. Second, we show that even using finite resources, we can improve qualitatively and quantitatively over earlier heralding results. In the latter scenario, we can obtain perfect heralded photonic qubits while maintaining a finite success probability. We demonstrate the advantage of our heralding scheme by predicting key rates for device-independent quantum key distribution, taking imperfections of sources and detectors into account.

  15. Secondary treatment of films of colloidal quantum dots for optoelectronics and devices produced thereby

    DOEpatents

    Semonin, Octavi Escala; Luther, Joseph M; Beard, Matthew C; Chen, Hsiang-Yu

    2014-04-01

    A method of forming an optoelectronic device. The method includes providing a deposition surface and contacting the deposition surface with a ligand exchange chemical and contacting the deposition surface with a quantum dot (QD) colloid. This initial process is repeated over one or more cycles to form an initial QD film on the deposition surface. The method further includes subsequently contacting the QD film with a secondary treatment chemical and optionally contacting the surface with additional QDs to form an enhanced QD layer exhibiting multiple exciton generation (MEG) upon absorption of high energy photons by the QD active layer. Devices having an enhanced QD active layer as described above are also disclosed.

  16. A band-modulation device in advanced FDSOI technology: Sharp switching characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Dirani, Hassan; Solaro, Yohann; Fonteneau, Pascal; Legrand, Charles-Alex; Marin-Cudraz, David; Golanski, Dominique; Ferrari, Philippe; Cristoloveanu, Sorin

    2016-11-01

    A band-modulation device is demonstrated experimentally in advanced FDSOI (Fully Depleted SOI). The Z2-FET (Zero Impact Ionization and Zero Subthreshold Slope FET) is a very recent sharp switching device which achieves remarkable performance in terms of leakage current and triggering control. The device is fabricated with Ultra-Thin Body and Buried Oxide (UTBB) Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology, features an extremely sharp on-switch, low leakage and an adjustable triggering voltage (VON). The Z2-FET operation relies on the modulation of electrons and holes injection barriers. In this paper, we show, for the first time, experimental data obtained with the most advanced FDSOI node.

  17. Tradeoff between energy and error in the discrimination of quantum-optical devices

    SciTech Connect

    Bisio, Alessandro; Dall'Arno, Michele; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro

    2011-07-15

    We address the problem of energy-error tradeoff in the discrimination between two linear passive quantum optical devices with a single use. We provide an analytical derivation of the optimal strategy for beamsplitters and an iterative algorithm converging to the optimum in the general case. We then compare the optimal strategy with a simpler strategy using coherent input states and homodyne detection. It turns out that the former requires much less energy in order to achieve the same performances.

  18. Retrieval of original signals for superconducting quantum interference device operating in flux locked mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dang-Ting; Tian, Ye; Zhao, Shi-Ping; Ren, Yu-Feng; Chen, Geng-Hua

    2015-04-01

    We discuss a simple relation between the input and output signals of a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer operating in flux locked mode in a cosine curve approximation. According to this relation, an original fast input signal can be easily retrieved from its distorted output response. This technique can be used in some areas such as sensitive and fast detection of magnetic or metallic grains in medicine and food security checking.

  19. Resonant enhancement of the photocurrent in multiple-quantum-well photovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Raisky, O.Y.; Wang, W.B.; Alfano, R.R.; Reynolds, C.L. Jr.; Stampone, D.V.; Focht, M.W.

    1999-01-01

    Sequential resonant tunneling is proposed to enhance the photocurrent and reduce recombination losses in photovoltaic devices based on multiple-quantum-well (MQW) heterostructures. An InGaAsP/InP MQW {ital p{endash}i{endash}n} diode with built-in sequential resonant tunneling has been fabricated, and demonstrates an increase in the photocurrent and reduction in photoluminescence intensity. These effects are attributed to the resonance tunneling effect. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Microstrip superconducting quantum interference device radio-frequency amplifier: Scattering parameters and input coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Kinion, D; Clarke, J

    2008-01-24

    The scattering parameters of an amplifier based on a dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) are directly measured at 4.2 K. The results can be described using an equivalent circuit model of the fundamental resonance of the microstrip resonator which forms the input of the amplifier. The circuit model is used to determine the series capacitance required for critical coupling of the microstrip to the input circuit.

  1. Measurements of undoped accumulation-mode SiGe quantum dot devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eng, Kevin; Borselli, Mathew; Holabird, Kevin; Milosavljevic, Ivan; Schmitz, Adele; Deelman, Peter; Huang, Biqin; Sokolich, Marko; Warren, Leslie; Hazard, Thomas; Kiselev, Andrey; Ross, Richard; Gyure, Mark; Hunter, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    We report transport measurements of undoped single-well accumulation-mode SiGe quantum dot devices with an integrated dot charge sensor. The device is designed so that individual forward-biased circular gates have dominant control of dot charge occupancy, and separate intervening gates have dominant control of tunnel rates and exchange coupling. We have demonstrated controlled loading of the first electron in single and double quantum dots. We used magneto-spectroscopy to measure singlet-triplet splittings in our quantum dots: values are typically ˜0.1 meV. Tunnel rates of single electrons to the baths can be controlled from less than 1 Hz to greater than 10 MHz. We are able to control the (0,2) to (1,1) coupling in a double quantum dot from under-coupled (tc < kT˜ 5μeV) to over-coupled (tc ˜ 0.1 meV) with a bias control of one exchange gate. Sponsored by the United States Department of Defense. Approved for Public Release, Distribution Unlimited. The views expressed are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government.

  2. Combining semiconductor quantum dots and bioscaffolds into nanoscale energy transfer devices.

    PubMed

    Spillmann, Christopher M; Stewart, Michael H; Susumu, Kimihiro; Medintz, Igor L

    2015-11-01

    Significant advances have been made in the development of nanoscale devices capable of exciton transport via Förster resonance energy transfer. Several requirements must be met for effective operation, including a reliable energy-harvesting source along with highly organized, precisely placed energy relay elements. For the latter, biological scaffolds such as DNA provide a customizable, symmetric, and stable structure that can be site-specifically modified with organic fluorophores. Here, advancements in nanoscale energy transfer devices incorporating semiconductor nanocrystals and bioscaffolds are reviewed with discussion of biofunctionalization, linker chemistries, design considerations, and concluding with applications in light harvesting, multiplexed biosensing, and optical logic. PMID:26560627

  3. Carrier multiplication detected through transient photocurrent in device-grade films of lead selenide quantum dots

    DOE PAGES

    Gao, Jianbo; Fidler, Andrew F.; Klimov, Victor I.

    2015-09-08

    In carrier multiplication, the absorption of a single photon results in two or more electron–hole pairs. Quantum dots are promising materials for implementing carrier multiplication principles in real-life technologies. So far, however, most of research in this area has focused on optical studies of solution samples with yet to be proven relevance to practical devices. We report ultra-fast electro-optical studies of device-grade films of electronically coupled quantum dots that allow us to observe multiplication directly in the photocurrent. Our studies help rationalize previous results from both optical spectroscopy and steady-state photocurrent measurements and also provide new insights into effects ofmore » electric field and ligand treatments on multiexciton yields. Importantly, we demonstrate that using appropriate chemical treatments of the films, extra charges produced by carrier multiplication can be extracted from the quantum dots before they are lost to Auger recombination and hence can contribute to photocurrent of practical devices.« less

  4. Silicon and germanium crystallization techniques for advanced device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaocheng

    Three-dimensional architectures are believed to be one of the possible approaches to reduce interconnect delay in integrated circuits. Metal-induced crystallization (MIC) can produce reasonably high-quality Si crystals with low-temperature processing, enabling the monolithic integration of multilevel devices and circuits. A two-step MIC process was developed to make single-crystal Si pillars on insulator by forming a single-grain NiSi2 template in the first step and crystallizing the amorphous Si by NiSi2-mediated solid-phase epitaxy (SPE) in the second step. A transmission electron microscopy study clearly showed the quality improvement over the traditional MIC process. Another crystallization technique developed is rapid melt growth (RMG) for the fabrication of Ge crystals and Ge-on-insulator (GeOI) substrates. Ge is an important semiconductor with high carrier mobility and excellent optoelectronic properties. GeOI substrates are particularly desired to achieve high device performances and to solve the process problems traditionally associated with bulk Ge wafers. High-quality Ge crystals and GeOI structures were grown on Si substrates using the novel rapid melt growth technique that integrates the key elements in Czochralski growth---seeding, melting, epitaxy and defect necking. Growth velocity and nucleation rate were calculated to determine the RMG process window. Self-aligned microcrucibles were created to hold the Ge liquid during the RMG annealing. Material characterization showed a very low defect density in the RMG GeOI structures. The Ge films are relaxed, with their orientations controlled by the Si substrates. P-channel MOSFETs and p-i-n photodetectors were fabricated with the GeOI substrates. The device properties are comparable to those obtained with bulk Ge wafers, indicating that the RMG GeOI substrates are well suited for device fabrication. A new theory, growth-induced barrier lowering (GIBL), is proposed to understand the defect generation in

  5. Component mode synthesis approach for quantum mechanical electrostatic and transport analysis of nanoscale structures and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhe

    As the dimensions of commonly used semiconductor devices have shrunk into nanometer regime, it is recognized that the influence of quantum effects on their electrostatic and transport properties cannot be ignored. In the past few decades, various computational models and approaches have been developed to analyze these properties in nanostructures and devices. Among these computational models, the Schrodinger-Poisson model has been widely adopted for quantum mechanical electrostatic and transport analysis of nanostructures and devices such as quantum wires, metal--oxide--semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) and nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). The numerical results allow for evaluations of the electrical properties such as charge concentration and potential profile in these structures. The emergence of MOSFETs with multiple gates, such as Trigates, FinFETs and Pi-gates, offers a superior electrostatic control of devices by the gates, which can be therefore used to reduce the short channel effects within those devices. Full 2-D electrostatic and transport analysis enables a better understanding of the scalability of devices, geometric effects on the potential and charge distribution, and transport characteristics of the transistors. The Schrodinger-Poisson model is attractive due to its simplicity and straightforward implementation by using standard numerical methods. However, as it is required to solve a generalized eigenvalue problem generated from the discretization of the Schrodinger equation, the computational cost of the analysis increases quickly when the system's degrees of freedom (DOFs) increase. For this reason, techniques that enable an efficient solution of discretized Schrodinger equation in multidimensional domains are desirable. In this work, we seek to accelerate the numerical solution of the Schrodinger equation by using a component mode synthesis (CMS) approach. In the CMS approach, a nanostructure is divided into a set of

  6. River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials (River DREAM)

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, Daniel P.

    2013-07-03

    The purpose of this project is to develop a generator called a Galloping Hydroelectric Energy Extraction Device (GHEED). It uses a galloping prism to convert water flow into linear motion. This motion is converted into electricity via a dielectric elastomer generator (DEG). The galloping mechanism and the DEG are combined to create a system to effectively generate electricity. This project has three research objectives: 1. Oscillator development and design a. Characterize galloping behavior, evaluate control surface shape change on oscillator performance and demonstrate shape change with water flow change. 2. Dielectric Energy Generator (DEG) characterization and modeling a. Characterize and model the performance of the DEG based on oscillator design 3. Galloping Hydroelectric Energy Extraction Device (GHEED) system modeling and integration a. Create numerical models for construction of a system performance model and define operating capabilities for this approach Accomplishing these three objectives will result in the creation of a model that can be used to fully define the operating parameters and performance capabilities of a generator based on the GHEED design. This information will be used in the next phase of product development, the creation of an integrated laboratory scale generator to confirm model predictions.

  7. Advanced Thermophotovoltaic Devices for Space Nuclear Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wernsman, Bernard; Mahorter, Robert G.; Siergiej, Richard; Link, Samuel D.; Wehrer, Rebecca J.; Belanger, Sean J.; Fourspring, Patrick; Murray, Susan; Newman, Fred; Taylor, Dan; Rahmlow, Tom

    2005-02-06

    Advanced thermophotovoltaic (TPV) modules capable of producing > 0.3 W/cm2 at an efficiency > 22% while operating at a converter radiator and module temperature of 1228 K and 325 K, respectively, have been made. These advanced TPV modules are projected to produce > 0.9 W/cm2 at an efficiency > 24% while operating at a converter radiator and module temperature of 1373 K and 325 K, respectively. Radioisotope and nuclear (fission) powered space systems utilizing these advanced TPV modules have been evaluated. For a 100 We radioisotope TPV system, systems utilizing as low as 2 general purpose heat source (GPHS) units are feasible, where the specific power for the 2 and 3 GPHS unit systems operating in a 200 K environment is as large as {approx} 16 We/kg and {approx} 14 We/kg, respectively. For a 100 kWe nuclear powered (as was entertained for the thermoelectric SP-100 program) TPV system, the minimum system radiator area and mass is {approx} 640 m2 and {approx} 1150 kg, respectively, for a converter radiator, system radiator and environment temperature of 1373 K, 435 K and 200 K, respectively. Also, for a converter radiator temperature of 1373 K, the converter volume and mass remains less than 0.36 m3 and 640 kg, respectively. Thus, the minimum system radiator + converter (reactor and shield not included) specific mass is {approx} 16 kg/kWe for a converter radiator, system radiator and environment temperature of 1373 K, 425 K and 200 K, respectively. Under this operating condition, the reactor thermal rating is {approx} 1110 kWt. Due to the large radiator area, the added complexity and mission risk needs to be weighed against reducing the reactor thermal rating to determine the feasibility of using TPV for space nuclear (fission) power systems.

  8. Advanced Thermophotovoltaic Devices for Space Nuclear Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernsman, Bernard; Mahorter, Robert G.; Siergiej, Richard; Link, Samuel D.; Wehrer, Rebecca J.; Belanger, Sean J.; Fourspring, Patrick; Murray, Susan; Newman, Fred; Taylor, Dan; Rahmlow, Tom

    2005-02-01

    Advanced thermophotovoltaic (TPV) modules capable of producing > 0.3 W/cm2 at an efficiency > 22% while operating at a converter radiator and module temperature of 1228 K and 325 K, respectively, have been made. These advanced TPV modules are projected to produce > 0.9 W/cm2 at an efficiency > 24% while operating at a converter radiator and module temperature of 1373 K and 325 K, respectively. Radioisotope and nuclear (fission) powered space systems utilizing these advanced TPV modules have been evaluated. For a 100 We radioisotope TPV system, systems utilizing as low as 2 general purpose heat source (GPHS) units are feasible, where the specific power for the 2 and 3 GPHS unit systems operating in a 200 K environment is as large as ˜ 16 We/kg and ˜ 14 We/kg, respectively. For a 100 kWe nuclear powered (as was entertained for the thermoelectric SP-100 program) TPV system, the minimum system radiator area and mass is ˜ 640 m2 and ˜ 1150 kg, respectively, for a converter radiator, system radiator and environment temperature of 1373 K, 435 K and 200 K, respectively. Also, for a converter radiator temperature of 1373 K, the converter volume and mass remains less than 0.36 m3 and 640 kg, respectively. Thus, the minimum system radiator + converter (reactor and shield not included) specific mass is ˜ 16 kg/kWe for a converter radiator, system radiator and environment temperature of 1373 K, 425 K and 200 K, respectively. Under this operating condition, the reactor thermal rating is ˜ 1110 kWt. Due to the large radiator area, the added complexity and mission risk needs to be weighed against reducing the reactor thermal rating to determine the feasibility of using TPV for space nuclear (fission) power systems.

  9. Advanced Epi Tools for Gallium Nitride Light Emitting Diode Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Patibandla, Nag; Agrawal, Vivek

    2012-12-01

    Over the course of this program, Applied Materials, Inc., with generous support from the United States Department of Energy, developed a world-class three chamber III-Nitride epi cluster tool for low-cost, high volume GaN growth for the solid state lighting industry. One of the major achievements of the program was to design, build, and demonstrate the world’s largest wafer capacity HVPE chamber suitable for repeatable high volume III-Nitride template and device manufacturing. Applied Materials’ experience in developing deposition chambers for the silicon chip industry over many decades resulted in many orders of magnitude reductions in the price of transistors. That experience and understanding was used in developing this GaN epi deposition tool. The multi-chamber approach, which continues to be unique in the ability of the each chamber to deposit a section of the full device structure, unlike other cluster tools, allows for extreme flexibility in the manufacturing process. This robust architecture is suitable for not just the LED industry, but GaN power devices as well, both horizontal and vertical designs. The new HVPE technology developed allows GaN to be grown at a rate unheard of with MOCVD, up to 20x the typical MOCVD rates of 3{micro}m per hour, with bulk crystal quality better than the highest-quality commercial GaN films grown by MOCVD at a much cheaper overall cost. This is a unique development as the HVPE process has been known for decades, but never successfully commercially developed for high volume manufacturing. This research shows the potential of the first commercial-grade HVPE chamber, an elusive goal for III-V researchers and those wanting to capitalize on the promise of HVPE. Additionally, in the course of this program, Applied Materials built two MOCVD chambers, in addition to the HVPE chamber, and a robot that moves wafers between them. The MOCVD chambers demonstrated industry-leading wavelength yield for GaN based LED wafers and industry

  10. Advanced materials development for multi-junction monolithic photovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, L.R.; Reno, J.L.

    1996-07-01

    We report results in three areas of research relevant to the fabrication of monolithic multi-junction photovoltaic devices. (1) The use of compliant intervening layers grown between highly mismatched materials, GaAs and GaP (same lattice constant as Si), is shown to increase the structural quality of the GaAs overgrowth. (2) The use of digital alloys applied to the MBE growth of GaAs{sub x}Sb{sub l-x} (a candidate material for a two junction solar cell) provides increased control of the alloy composition without degrading the optical properties. (3) A nitrogen plasma discharge is shown to be an excellent p-type doping source for CdTe and ZnTe, both of which are candidate materials for a two junction solar cell.

  11. Advances in quantum cascade lasers for security and crime-fighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normand, Erwan L.; Stokes, Robert J.; Hay, Kenneth; Foulger, Brian; Lewis, Colin

    2010-10-01

    Advances in the application of Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCL) to trace gas detection will be presented. The solution is real time (~1 μsec per scan), is insensitive to turbulence and vibration, and performs multiple measurements in one sweep. The QCL provides a large dynamic range, which is a linear response from ppt to % level. The concentration can be derived with excellent immunity from cross interference. Point sensing sensors developed by Cascade for home made and commercial explosives operate by monitoring key constituents in real time and matching this to a spatial event (i.e. sniffer device placed close to an object or person walking through portal (overt or covert). Programmable signature detection capability allows for detection of multiple chemical compounds along the most likely array of explosive chemical formulation. The advantages of configuration as "point sensing" or "stand off" will be discussed. In addition to explosives this method is highly applicable to the detection of mobile drugs labs through volatile chemical release.

  12. Advanced Level Physics Students' Conceptions of Quantum Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mashhadi, Azam

    This study addresses questions about particle physics that focus on the nature of electrons. Speculations as to whether they are more like particles or waves or like neither illustrate the difficulties with which students are confronted when trying to incorporate the concepts of quantum physics into their overall conceptual framework. Such…

  13. The enhanced measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with two-intensity decoy states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian-Rong; Zhu, Feng; Zhou, Xing-Yu; Wang, Qin

    2016-09-01

    We put forward a new scheme for implementing the measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (QKD) with weak coherent source, while using only two different intensities. In the new scheme, we insert a beam splitter and a local detector at both Alice's and Bob's side, and then all the triggering and non-triggering signals could be employed to process parameter estimations, resulting in very precise estimations for the two-single-photon contributions. Besides, we compare its behavior with two other often used methods, i.e., the conventional standard three-intensity decoy-state measurement-device-independent QKD and the passive measurement-device-independent QKD. Through numerical simulations, we demonstrate that our new approach can exhibit outstanding characteristics not only in the secure transmission distance, but also in the final key generation rate.

  14. 9 CFR 381.131 - Preparation of labeling or other devices bearing official inspection marks without advance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... devices bearing official inspection marks without advance approval prohibited; exceptions. 381.131 Section... Preparation of labeling or other devices bearing official inspection marks without advance approval prohibited... otherwise make any marking device containing any official mark or simulation thereof, or any label...

  15. 9 CFR 381.131 - Preparation of labeling or other devices bearing official inspection marks without advance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... devices bearing official inspection marks without advance approval prohibited; exceptions. 381.131 Section... Preparation of labeling or other devices bearing official inspection marks without advance approval prohibited... otherwise make any marking device containing any official mark or simulation thereof, or any label...

  16. Quantum Dot/Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cell Hybrid Device and Mechanism of Its Operation.

    PubMed

    Frohleiks, Julia; Wepfer, Svenja; Kelestemur, Yusuf; Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Bacher, Gerd; Nannen, Ekaterina

    2016-09-21

    A new type of light-emitting hybrid device based on colloidal quantum dots (QDs) and an ionic transition metal complex (iTMC) light-emitting electrochemical cell (LEC) is introduced. The developed hybrid devices show light emission from both active layers, which are combined in a stacked geometry. Time-resolved photoluminescence experiments indicate that the emission is controlled by direct charge injection into both the iTMC and the QD layer. The turn-on time (time to reach 1 cd/m(2)) at constant voltage operation is significantly reduced from 8 min in the case of the reference LEC down to subsecond in the case of the hybrid device. Furthermore, luminance and efficiency of the hybrid device are enhanced compared to reference LEC directly after device turn-on by a factor of 400 and 650, respectively. We attribute these improvements to an increased electron injection efficiency into the iTMC directly after device turn-on.

  17. Quantum Dot/Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cell Hybrid Device and Mechanism of Its Operation.

    PubMed

    Frohleiks, Julia; Wepfer, Svenja; Kelestemur, Yusuf; Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Bacher, Gerd; Nannen, Ekaterina

    2016-09-21

    A new type of light-emitting hybrid device based on colloidal quantum dots (QDs) and an ionic transition metal complex (iTMC) light-emitting electrochemical cell (LEC) is introduced. The developed hybrid devices show light emission from both active layers, which are combined in a stacked geometry. Time-resolved photoluminescence experiments indicate that the emission is controlled by direct charge injection into both the iTMC and the QD layer. The turn-on time (time to reach 1 cd/m(2)) at constant voltage operation is significantly reduced from 8 min in the case of the reference LEC down to subsecond in the case of the hybrid device. Furthermore, luminance and efficiency of the hybrid device are enhanced compared to reference LEC directly after device turn-on by a factor of 400 and 650, respectively. We attribute these improvements to an increased electron injection efficiency into the iTMC directly after device turn-on. PMID:27557045

  18. Advanced materials and device technology for photonic electric field sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toney, James E.; Stenger, Vincent E.; Kingsley, Stuart A.; Pollick, Andrea; Sriram, Sri; Taylor, Edward

    2012-10-01

    Photonic methods for electric field sensing have been demonstrated across the electromagnetic spectrum from near-DC to millimeter waves, and at field strengths from microvolts-per-meter to megavolts-per-meter. The advantages of the photonic approach include a high degree of electrical isolation, wide bandwidth, minimum perturbation of the incident field, and the ability to operate in harsh environments. Aerospace applications of this technology span a wide range of frequencies and field strengths. They include, at the high-frequency/high-field end, measurement of high-power electromagnetic pulses, and at the low-frequency/low-field end, in-flight monitoring of electrophysiological signals. The demands of these applications continue to spur the development of novel materials and device structures to achieve increased sensitivity, wider bandwidth, and greater high-field measurement capability. This paper will discuss several new directions in photonic electric field sensing technology for defense applications. The first is the use of crystal ion slicing to prepare high-quality, single-crystal electro-optic thin films on low-dielectricconstant, RF-friendly substrates. The second is the use of two-dimensional photonic crystal structures to enhance the electro-optic response through slow-light propagation effects. The third is the use of ferroelectric relaxor materials with extremely high electro-optic coefficients.

  19. Polarization control for enhanced defect detection on advanced memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byoung-Ho; Ihm, Dong-Chul; Yeo, Jeong-Ho; Gluk, Yael; Meshulach, Doron

    2006-03-01

    Dense repetitive wafer structures, such as memory cells, with a pitch below the wavelength of the illumination light may take on effective birefringent properties, especially in layers of high refractive index materials such as silicon or conductors. Such induced "form birefringence" effects may result in dependency of the optical response on the illumination polarization and direction. In such structures, control over the polarization of the light becomes important to enhance signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of pattern defects. We present defect detection results and analysis using DUV laser illumination for different polarization configurations and collection perspectives on Flash RAM devices. Improvement in detection SNR of bridge defect type is observed with linear illumination polarization perpendicular to the pattern lines. Generally, for small design rules (smaller than wavelength) polarization effects become more evident. Also, for smaller defect sizes, detection strongly depends on control of the illumination polarization. Linear polarization perpendicular to the pattern showed penetration into the structure even though the pitch is smaller than the illumination wavelength.

  20. Predicting the valley physics of silicon quantum dots directly from a device layout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamble, John King; Harvey-Collard, Patrick; Jacobson, N. Tobias; Bacewski, Andrew D.; Nielsen, Erik; Montaño, Inès; Rudolph, Martin; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Muller, Richard P.

    Qubits made from electrostatically-defined quantum dots in Si-based systems are excellent candidates for quantum information processing applications. However, the multi-valley structure of silicon's band structure provides additional challenges for the few-electron physics critical to qubit manipulation. Here, we present a theory for valley physics that is predictive, in that we take as input the real physical device geometry and experimental voltage operation schedule, and with minimal approximation compute the resulting valley physics. We present both effective mass theory and atomistic tight-binding calculations for two distinct metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) quantum dot systems, directly comparing them to experimental measurements of the valley splitting. We conclude by assessing these detailed simulations' utility for engineering desired valley physics in future devices. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from the Sandia National Laboratories Truman Fellowship Program, which is funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program.

  1. [A device for mandibular advancement in respiratory disorders of sleep. Clinical study].

    PubMed

    Bacon, W; Tschill, P; Sforza, E; Krieger, J

    2000-12-01

    This study describes the technical steps for the making of a mandibular advancement device for sleep disordered patients (apnea index < 10). In a second part of the study, a group of 21 patients with sleep disordered breathing treated successfully with a mandibular advancement device is compared to a homologous control group. The experimental group showed cephalometric characteristics approaching those seen in patients with sleep apnea syndrome. The mandibular advancement device moved the mandibule forward (SNB angle increases by 1.7 degrees) and downward (mandibular plane angle increases by 3 degrees, which can be related to the 7.4 mm anterior vertical height increase). The hyoid bone adopted a more distant position from the cervical vertebrae. Important individual variations were seen among the patients for the optimal repositioning of the mandible.

  2. Large-area nanofabrication and applications in advanced nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Wei

    The research work presented in this dissertation includes novel large area nanofabrication techniques and their applications in advanced nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices. The fabrications and applications include: 1) high performance transparent electrodes, 2) a novel plasmonic nanocavity and its applications in organic solar cells and light emitting diodes, and 3) a bipolar plasmonic nonlinear optical device to enhance and tune second harmonic generation. Based upon these topics, the thesis is divided into the following parts. First, a novel transparent electrode (TE), metallic deep subwavelength mesh electrode is developed and fabricated, showing better transmittance and conductance than previous TEs. Its performance dependence on nanostructure geometries and materials are investigated. The deep-subwavelength mesh electrode also has excellent antiglare properties. Such electrodes are fabricated on 4" wafer by nanoimprint, scalable to meter sizes. Second, a novel plasmonic nanocavity from the MESH is developed, named "plasmonic cavity with subwavelength hole-array (PlaCSH)", consisting of a thin MESH as a transparent front electrode, a thin metal back electrode, and in-between layer of active material. This structure is used to create high performance solar cells and LEDs. PlaCSH solar cell gives a solution to three central challenges in organic solar cells (light coupling into solar cell, light trapping in a sub-absorption-length-thick layer, and replacement of the indium-tin-oxide). Experimentally, the PlaCSH polymer SCs achieve high light coupling-efficiency/absorptance/power conversion efficiency, along with broad-band, Omni angle/polarization acceptance. In OLEDs, PlaCSH shows numerous benefits with both the small- molecule and polymer active materials. Enhanced light extraction, internal quantum efficiency, ambient light absorption, contrast, viewing angle, brightness, and decreased glare are all observed. The above experiments -- along with

  3. Advanced Simulation Technology to Design Etching Process on CMOS Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuboi, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    Prediction and control of plasma-induced damage is needed to mass-produce high performance CMOS devices. In particular, side-wall (SW) etching with low damage is a key process for the next generation of MOSFETs and FinFETs. To predict and control the damage, we have developed a SiN etching simulation technique for CHxFy/Ar/O2 plasma processes using a three-dimensional (3D) voxel model. This model includes new concepts for the gas transportation in the pattern, detailed surface reactions on the SiN reactive layer divided into several thin slabs and C-F polymer layer dependent on the H/N ratio, and use of ``smart voxels''. We successfully predicted the etching properties such as the etch rate, polymer layer thickness, and selectivity for Si, SiO2, and SiN films along with process variations and demonstrated the 3D damage distribution time-dependently during SW etching on MOSFETs and FinFETs. We confirmed that a large amount of Si damage was caused in the source/drain region with the passage of time in spite of the existing SiO2 layer of 15 nm in the over etch step and the Si fin having been directly damaged by a large amount of high energy H during the removal step of the parasitic fin spacer leading to Si fin damage to a depth of 14 to 18 nm. By analyzing the results of these simulations and our previous simulations, we found that it is important to carefully control the dose of high energy H, incident energy of H, polymer layer thickness, and over-etch time considering the effects of the pattern structure, chamber-wall condition, and wafer open area ratio. In collaboration with Masanaga Fukasawa and Tetsuya Tatsumi, Sony Corporation. We thank Mr. T. Shigetoshi and Mr. T. Kinoshita of Sony Corporation for their assistance with the experiments.

  4. Verification, Validation and Credibility Assessment of a Computational Model of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, C. R.; Humphreys, B. T.; Mulugeta, L.

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) is the resistive exercise device used by astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) to mitigate bone loss and muscle atrophy due to extended exposure to microgravity (micro g). The Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) has developed a multi-body dynamics model of biomechanics models for use in spaceflight exercise physiology research and operations. In an effort to advance model maturity and credibility of the ARED model, the DAP performed verification, validation and credibility (VV and C) assessment of the analyses of the model in accordance to NASA-STD-7009 'Standards for Models and Simulations'.

  5. Phase-Reference-Free Experiment of Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Song, Xiao-Tian; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Wang, Shuang; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Chun-Mei; Guo, Guang-Can; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2015-10-16

    Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI QKD) is a substantial step toward practical information-theoretic security for key sharing between remote legitimate users (Alice and Bob). As with other standard device-dependent quantum key distribution protocols, such as BB84, MDI QKD assumes that the reference frames have been shared between Alice and Bob. In practice, a nontrivial alignment procedure is often necessary, which requires system resources and may significantly reduce the secure key generation rate. Here, we propose a phase-coding reference-frame-independent MDI QKD scheme that requires no phase alignment between the interferometers of two distant legitimate parties. As a demonstration, a proof-of-principle experiment using Faraday-Michelson interferometers is presented. The experimental system worked at 1 MHz, and an average secure key rate of 8.309 bps was obtained at a fiber length of 20 km between Alice and Bob. The system can maintain a positive key generation rate without phase compensation under normal conditions. The results exhibit the feasibility of our system for use in mature MDI QKD devices and its value for network scenarios. PMID:26550855

  6. Phase-Reference-Free Experiment of Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Song, Xiao-Tian; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Wang, Shuang; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Chun-Mei; Guo, Guang-Can; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2015-10-16

    Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI QKD) is a substantial step toward practical information-theoretic security for key sharing between remote legitimate users (Alice and Bob). As with other standard device-dependent quantum key distribution protocols, such as BB84, MDI QKD assumes that the reference frames have been shared between Alice and Bob. In practice, a nontrivial alignment procedure is often necessary, which requires system resources and may significantly reduce the secure key generation rate. Here, we propose a phase-coding reference-frame-independent MDI QKD scheme that requires no phase alignment between the interferometers of two distant legitimate parties. As a demonstration, a proof-of-principle experiment using Faraday-Michelson interferometers is presented. The experimental system worked at 1 MHz, and an average secure key rate of 8.309 bps was obtained at a fiber length of 20 km between Alice and Bob. The system can maintain a positive key generation rate without phase compensation under normal conditions. The results exhibit the feasibility of our system for use in mature MDI QKD devices and its value for network scenarios.

  7. Perfectly Matched Layers versus discrete transparent boundary conditions in quantum device simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Mennemann, Jan-Frederik Jüngel, Ansgar

    2014-10-15

    Discrete transparent boundary conditions (DTBC) and the Perfectly Matched Layers (PML) method for the realization of open boundary conditions in quantum device simulations are compared, based on the stationary and time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The comparison includes scattering state, wave packet, and transient scattering state simulations in one and two space dimensions. The Schrödinger equation is discretized by a second-order Crank–Nicolson method in case of DTBC. For the discretization with PML, symmetric second-, fourth-, and sixth-order spatial approximations as well as Crank–Nicolson and classical Runge–Kutta time-integration methods are employed. In two space dimensions, a ring-shaped quantum waveguide device is simulated in the stationary and transient regime. As an application, a simulation of the Aharonov–Bohm effect in this device is performed, showing the excitation of bound states localized in the ring region. The numerical experiments show that the results obtained from PML are comparable to those obtained using DTBC, while keeping the high numerical efficiency and flexibility as well as the ease of implementation of the former method. -- Highlights: •In-depth comparison between discrete transparent boundary conditions (DTBC) and PML. •First 2-D transient scattering state simulations using DTBC. •First 2-D transient scattering state simulations of the Aharonov–Bohm effect.

  8. High-efficiency red electroluminescent device based on multishelled InP quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Jo, Jung-Ho; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Lee, Ki-Heon; Han, Chang-Yeol; Jang, Eun-Pyo; Do, Young Rag; Yang, Heesun

    2016-09-01

    We report on the synthesis of highly fluorescent red-emitting InP quantum dots (QDs) and their application to the fabrication of a high-efficiency QD-light-emitting diode (QLED). The core/shell heterostructure of the QDs is elaborately tailored toward a multishelled structure with a composition-gradient ZnSeS intermediate shell and an outer ZnS shell. Using the resulting InP/ZnSeS/ZnS QDs as an emitting layer, all-solution-processible red InP QLEDs are fabricated with a hybrid multilayered device structure having an organic hole transport layer (HTL) and an inorganic ZnO nanoparticle electron transport layer. Two HTLs of poly(9-vinlycarbazole) or poly[(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-co-(4,4'-(N-(4-sec-butylphenyl))diphenyl-amine), whose hole mobilities are different by at least three orders of magnitude, are individually applied for QLED fabrication and such HTL-dependent device performances are compared. Our best red device displays exceptional figures of merit such as a maximum luminance of 2849  cd/m2, a current efficiency of 4.2  cd/A, and an external quantum efficiency of 2.5%. PMID:27607953

  9. Measurement-device-independent entanglement witnesses for all entangled quantum states.

    PubMed

    Branciard, Cyril; Rosset, Denis; Liang, Yeong-Cherng; Gisin, Nicolas

    2013-02-01

    The problem of demonstrating entanglement is central to quantum information processing applications. Resorting to standard entanglement witnesses requires one to perfectly trust the implementation of the measurements to be performed on the entangled state, which may be an unjustified assumption. Inspired by the recent work of F. Buscemi [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 200401 (2012)], we introduce the concept of measurement-device-independent entanglement witnesses (MDI-EWs), which allow one to demonstrate entanglement of all entangled quantum states with untrusted measurement apparatuses. We show how to systematically obtain such MDI-EWs from standard entanglement witnesses. Our construction leads to MDI-EWs that are loss tolerant and can be implemented with current technology.

  10. Coupling slot-waveguide cavities for large-scale quantum optical devices.

    PubMed

    Su, Chun-Hsu; Hiscocks, Mark P; Gibson, Brant C; Greentree, Andrew D; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L; Ladouceur, François

    2011-03-28

    By offering effective modal volumes significantly less than a cubic wavelength, slot-waveguide cavities offer a new in-road into strong atom-photon coupling in the visible regime. Here we explore two-dimensional arrays of coupled slot cavities which underpin designs for novel quantum emulators and polaritonic quantum phase transition devices. Specifically, we investigate the lateral coupling characteristics of diamond-air and GaP-air slot waveguides using numerically-assisted coupled-mode theory, and the longitudinal coupling properties via distributed Bragg reflectors using mode-propagation simulations. We find that slot-waveguide cavities in the Fabry-Perot arrangement can be coupled and effectively treated with a tight-binding description, and are a suitable platform for realizing Jaynes-Cummings-Hubbard physics.

  11. Large thermoelectric power and figure of merit in a ferromagnetic-quantum dot-superconducting device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sun-Yong; López, Rosa; Sánchez, David

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the thermoelectric properties of a quantum dot coupled to ferromagnetic and superconducting electrodes. The combination of spin polarized tunneling at the ferromagnetic-quantum dot interface and the application of an external magnetic field that Zeeman splits the dot energy level leads to large values of the thermopower (Seebeck coefficient). Importantly, the thermopower can be tuned with an external gate voltage connected to the dot. We compute the figure of merit that measures the efficiency of thermoelectric conversion and find that it attains high values. We discuss the different contributions from Andreev reflection processes and quasiparticle tunneling into and out of the superconducting contact. Furthermore, we obtain dramatic variations of both the magnetothermopower and the spin Seebeck effect, which suggest that in our device spin currents can be controlled with temperature gradients only.

  12. Advanced upper limb prosthetic devices: implications for upper limb prosthetic rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Resnik, Linda; Meucci, Marissa R; Lieberman-Klinger, Shana; Fantini, Christopher; Kelty, Debra L; Disla, Roxanne; Sasson, Nicole

    2012-04-01

    The number of catastrophic injuries caused by improvised explosive devices in the Afghanistan and Iraq Wars has increased public, legislative, and research attention to upper limb amputation. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has partnered with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and DEKA Integrated Solutions to optimize the function of an advanced prosthetic arm system that will enable greater independence and function. In this special communication, we examine current practices in prosthetic rehabilitation including trends in adoption and use of prosthetic devices, financial considerations, and the role of rehabilitation team members in light of our experiences with a prototype advanced upper limb prosthesis during a VA study to optimize the device. We discuss key challenges in the adoption of advanced prosthetic technology and make recommendations for service provision and use of advanced upper limb prosthetics. Rates of prosthetic rejection are high among upper limb amputees. However, these rates may be reduced with sufficient training by a highly specialized, multidisciplinary team of clinicians, and a focus on patient education and empowerment throughout the rehabilitation process. There are significant challenges emerging that are unique to implementing the use of advanced upper limb prosthetic technology, and a lack of evidence to establish clinical guidelines regarding prosthetic prescription and treatment. Finally, we make recommendations for future research to aid in the identification of best practices and development of policy decisions regarding insurance coverage of prosthetic rehabilitation. PMID:22464092

  13. Advanced upper limb prosthetic devices: implications for upper limb prosthetic rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Resnik, Linda; Meucci, Marissa R; Lieberman-Klinger, Shana; Fantini, Christopher; Kelty, Debra L; Disla, Roxanne; Sasson, Nicole

    2012-04-01

    The number of catastrophic injuries caused by improvised explosive devices in the Afghanistan and Iraq Wars has increased public, legislative, and research attention to upper limb amputation. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has partnered with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and DEKA Integrated Solutions to optimize the function of an advanced prosthetic arm system that will enable greater independence and function. In this special communication, we examine current practices in prosthetic rehabilitation including trends in adoption and use of prosthetic devices, financial considerations, and the role of rehabilitation team members in light of our experiences with a prototype advanced upper limb prosthesis during a VA study to optimize the device. We discuss key challenges in the adoption of advanced prosthetic technology and make recommendations for service provision and use of advanced upper limb prosthetics. Rates of prosthetic rejection are high among upper limb amputees. However, these rates may be reduced with sufficient training by a highly specialized, multidisciplinary team of clinicians, and a focus on patient education and empowerment throughout the rehabilitation process. There are significant challenges emerging that are unique to implementing the use of advanced upper limb prosthetic technology, and a lack of evidence to establish clinical guidelines regarding prosthetic prescription and treatment. Finally, we make recommendations for future research to aid in the identification of best practices and development of policy decisions regarding insurance coverage of prosthetic rehabilitation.

  14. Quantum Hall resistance standard in graphene devices under relaxed experimental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro-Palau, R.; Lafont, F.; Brun-Picard, J.; Kazazis, D.; Michon, A.; Cheynis, F.; Couturaud, O.; Consejo, C.; Jouault, B.; Poirier, W.; Schopfer, F.

    2015-11-01

    The quantum Hall effect provides a universal standard for electrical resistance that is theoretically based on only the Planck constant h and the electron charge e. Currently, this standard is implemented in GaAs/AlGaAs, but graphene's electronic properties have given hope for a more practical device. Here, we demonstrate that the experimental conditions necessary for the operation of devices made of high-quality graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition on silicon carbide can be extended and significantly relaxed compared with those for state-of-the-art GaAs/AlGaAs devices. In particular, the Hall resistance can be accurately quantized to within 1 × 10-9 over a 10 T wide range of magnetic flux density, down to 3.5 T, at a temperature of up to 10 K or with a current of up to 0.5 mA. This experimental simplification highlights the great potential of graphene in the development of user-friendly and versatile quantum standards that are compatible with broader industrial uses beyond those in national metrology institutes. Furthermore, the measured agreement of the quantized Hall resistance in graphene and GaAs/AlGaAs, with an ultimate uncertainty of 8.2 × 10-11, supports the universality of the quantum Hall effect. This also provides evidence of the relation of the quantized Hall resistance with h and e, which is crucial for the new Système International d'unités to be based on fixing such fundamental constants of nature.

  15. Evaluation of advanced cooling therapy's esophageal cooling device for core temperature control.

    PubMed

    Naiman, Melissa; Shanley, Patrick; Garrett, Frank; Kulstad, Erik

    2016-05-01

    Managing core temperature is critical to patient outcomes in a wide range of clinical scenarios. Previous devices designed to perform temperature management required a trade-off between invasiveness and temperature modulation efficiency. The Esophageal Cooling Device, made by Advanced Cooling Therapy (Chicago, IL), was developed to optimize warming and cooling efficiency through an easy and low risk procedure that leverages heat transfer through convection and conduction. Clinical data from cardiac arrest, fever, and critical burn patients indicate that the Esophageal Cooling Device performs very well both in terms of temperature modulation (cooling rates of approximately 1.3°C/hour, warming of up to 0.5°C/hour) and maintaining temperature stability (variation around goal temperature ± 0.3°C). Physicians have reported that device performance is comparable to the performance of intravascular temperature management techniques and superior to the performance of surface devices, while avoiding the downsides associated with both. PMID:27043177

  16. Evaluation of the magnetic properties of cosmetic contact lenses with a superconducting quantum interference device.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kagayaki; Shirakawa, Naoki; Yoshida, Yoshiyuki; Tawara, Kazuya; Kobayashi, Akihiro; Nakai, Toshiharu

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the magnetization of 21 cosmetic contact lens samples that included various coloring materials with a superconducting quantum interference device with regard to magnetic resonance (MR) safety. We found 7 samples were ferromagnetic; two had both ferromagnetic and diamagnetic properties; and the rest were diamagnetic. The saturated magnetization of the most ferromagnetic sample was 15.0 µJ/T, which yielded a magnetically induced displacement force of 90.0 µN when the spatial gradient of the static magnetic field was 6.0 T/m. The force was less than one-third of the gravitational force.

  17. An enhanced proposal on decoy-state measurement device-independent quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qin; Zhang, Chun-Hui; Luo, Shunlong; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-09-01

    By employing pulses involving three-intensity, we propose a scheme for the measurement device-independent quantum key distribution with heralded single-photon sources. We make a comparative study of this scheme with the standard three-intensity decoy-state scheme using weak coherent sources or heralded single-photon sources. The advantage of this scheme is illustrated through numerical simulations: It can approach very closely the asymptotic case of using an infinite number of decoy-states and exhibits excellent behavior in both the secure transmission distance and the final key generation rate.

  18. A terraced scanning superconducting quantum interference device susceptometer with submicron pickup loops

    SciTech Connect

    Koshnick, Nicholas C.; Bert, Julie A.; Hicks, Clifford W.; Huber, Martin E.; Moler, Kathryn A.; Large, Jeff; Edwards, Hal

    2008-12-15

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) can have excellent spin sensitivity depending on their magnetic flux noise, pickup loop diameter, and distance from the sample. We report a family of scanning SQUID susceptometers with terraced tips that position the pickup loops 300 nm from the sample. The 600 nm-2 {mu}m pickup loops, defined by focused ion beam, are integrated into a 12-layer optical lithography process allowing flux-locked feedback, in situ background subtraction and optimized flux noise. These features enable a sensitivity of {approx}70 electron spins per root hertz at 4 K.

  19. Iii-V Compound Multiple Quantum Well Based Modulator and Switching Devices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Songcheol

    A general formalism to study the absorption and photocurrent in multiple quantum well is provided with detailed consideration of quantum confined Stark shift, exciton binding energy, line broadening, tunneling, polarization, and strain effects. Results on variation of exciton size, binding energies and transition energies as a function electric field and well size have been presented. Inhomogeneous line broadening of exciton lines due to interface roughness, alloy disorder and well to well size fluctuation is calculated. The potential of material tailoring by introducing strain for specific optical response is discussed. Theoretical and experimental results on excitonic and band-to-band absorption spectra in strained multi-quantum well structures are shown. I also report on polarization dependent optical absorption for excitonic and interband transitions in lattice matched and strained multiquantum well structures in presence of transverse electric field. Photocurrent in a p-i(MQW)-n diode with monochromatic light is examined with respect to different temperatures and intensities. The negative resistance of I-V characteristic of the p-i-n diode is based on the quantum confined Stark effect of the heavy hole excitonic transition in a multiquantum well. This exciton based photocurrent characteristic allows efficient switching. A general purpose low power optical logic device using the controller-modulator concept bas been proposed and realized. The controller is a heterojunction phototransistor with multiquantum wells in the base-collector depletion region. This allows an amplified photocurrent controlled voltage feedback with low light intensity levels. Detailed analysis of the sensitivity of this device in various modes of operation is studied. Studies are also presented on the cascadability of the device as well as its integrating -thresholding properties. A multiquantum well heterojunction bipolar transistor (MHBT), which has N^+ -p^+-i(MQW)-N structure has been

  20. Shapiro steps observed in a dc superconducting quantum interference device with multiple junctions in each arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Chen, P.; Ong, C. K.

    2002-02-01

    A high-Tc dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) with three Josephson junctions (JJs) in series in each of its arms has been fabricated. Its Shapiro steps were studied using microwave (rf) radiation of 10 GHz and weak magnetic fields. The appearance of giant Shapiro steps and of some of half-integer steps was observed. Separation between the adjacent Shapiro steps could be tuned by rf magnetic fields and small external dc magnetic fields. This phenomenon was analyzed by phase locking the JJs in the SQUID.

  1. Measurement of the dynamic input impedance of a dc superconducting quantum interference device at audio frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Falferi, P.; Mezzena, R.; Vitale, S.; Cerdonio, M.

    1997-08-01

    The coupling effects of a commercial dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) to an electrical LC resonator which operates at audio frequencies ({approx}1kHz) with quality factors Q{approx}10{sup 6} are presented. The variations of the resonance frequency of the resonator as functions of the flux applied to the SQUID are due to the SQUID dynamic inductance in good agreement with the predictions of a model. The variations of the quality factor point to a feedback mechanism between the output of the SQUID and the input circuit. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Quantum transport measurement of few-layer WTe2 field effect devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianhao; Liu, Xin; Tian, Shibing; Zhang, Chenglong; Jia, Shuang

    2015-03-01

    We have performed systematic quantum transport measurement on field effect devices fabricated from few-layer WTe2 single crystals. We found that the magnetoresistance of few-layer WTe2 could be very different from that of bulk samples, which may arise from the imbalance of electron and hole carriers in the samples. We shall discuss our findings in more details in light of recent progress in our experiment. This work is supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11374021 and 11327406); by China Ministry of Science and Technology under Contract # 2014CB920900 and 2013CB921900; and by the Young 1000-Talent Program of China.

  3. Multi-scale quantum point contact model for filamentary conduction in resistive random access memories devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Xiaojuan Cartoixà, Xavier; Miranda, Enrique; Suñé, Jordi; Perniola, Luca; Rurali, Riccardo; Long, Shibing; Liu, Ming

    2014-06-28

    We depart from first-principle simulations of electron transport along paths of oxygen vacancies in HfO{sub 2} to reformulate the Quantum Point Contact (QPC) model in terms of a bundle of such vacancy paths. By doing this, the number of model parameters is reduced and a much clearer link between the microscopic structure of the conductive filament (CF) and its electrical properties can be provided. The new multi-scale QPC model is applied to two different HfO{sub 2}-based devices operated in the unipolar and bipolar resistive switching (RS) modes. Extraction of the QPC model parameters from a statistically significant number of CFs allows revealing significant structural differences in the CF of these two types of devices and RS modes.

  4. Superconducting quantum interference device microsusceptometer balanced over a wide bandwidth for nuclear magnetic resonance applications

    SciTech Connect

    Vinante, A. Falferi, P.; Mezzena, R.

    2014-10-15

    Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) microsusceptometers have been widely used to study magnetic properties of materials at microscale. As intrinsically balanced devices, they could also be exploited for direct SQUID-detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from micron sized samples, or for SQUID readout of mechanically detected NMR from submicron sized samples. Here, we demonstrate a double balancing technique that enables achievement of very low residual imbalance of a SQUID microsusceptometer over a wide bandwidth. In particular, we can generate ac magnetic fields within the SQUID loop as large as 1 mT, for frequencies ranging from dc up to a few MHz. As an application, we demonstrate direct detection of NMR from {sup 1}H spins in a glycerol droplet placed directly on top of the 20 μm SQUID loops.

  5. Vertical nano superconducting quantum interference device based on Josepshon tunnel nanojunctions for small spin cluster detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granata, Carmine; Vettoliere, Antonio; Fretto, Matteo; Leo, Natascia De; Vincenzo, Lacquaniti

    2015-06-01

    The ultra high sensitivity exhibited by Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUIDs) could be the key to explore new field of nanoscience such as the investigation of small cluster of elementary magnetic moments. In this paper, an ultra high sensitive niobium nanoSQUID based on submicron Josephson tunnel junction is presented. It has been fabricated in a vertical configuration by using a three-dimensional focused ion beam sculpting technique. In such a configuration, the nanosensor loop (area of 0.25 μm2) is perpendicular to the substrate plane allowing to drastically reduce the spurious effects of the external magnetic field employed to excite the nano-objects under investigation. Main device characteristics have been measured at T=4.2 K by using a low noise readout electronics. Due to high voltage responsivity, the nanosensor has exhibited a spectral density of the magnetic flux noise as low as 1.6 μΦ0/Hz1/2.

  6. Series-Parallel Superconducting Quantum Interference Device Arrays Using High-TC Ion Damage Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Travis; Mukhanov, Oleg

    2015-03-01

    We have fabricated several designs of three junction series-parallel DC Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (BiSQUID) arrays in YBa2Cu3O7-x using 104 ion damage Josephson Junctions on a single 1 cm2 chip. A high aspect ratio ion implantation mask (30:1 ratio) with 30 nm slits was fabricated using electron beam lithography and low pressure reactive ion etching. Samples were irradiated with 60 keV helium ions to achieve a highly uniform damaged region throughout the thickness of the YBCO thin film as confirmed with Monte Carlo ion implantation simulations. Low frequency measurements of four different BiSQUID series-parallel SQUID array devices will be presented to investigate the effect of the BiSQUID design parameters on the linearity of the SQUID array in response to magnetic fields. BiSQUID arrays could provide a promising architecture for improved linearity transimpedance amplifiers with high linearity.

  7. Superconducting quantum interference device microsusceptometer balanced over a wide bandwidth for nuclear magnetic resonance applications.

    PubMed

    Vinante, A; Mezzena, R; Falferi, P

    2014-10-01

    Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) microsusceptometers have been widely used to study magnetic properties of materials at microscale. As intrinsically balanced devices, they could also be exploited for direct SQUID-detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from micron sized samples, or for SQUID readout of mechanically detected NMR from submicron sized samples. Here, we demonstrate a double balancing technique that enables achievement of very low residual imbalance of a SQUID microsusceptometer over a wide bandwidth. In particular, we can generate ac magnetic fields within the SQUID loop as large as 1 mT, for frequencies ranging from dc up to a few MHz. As an application, we demonstrate direct detection of NMR from (1)H spins in a glycerol droplet placed directly on top of the 20 μm SQUID loops.

  8. Optical nonlinearity for few-photon pulses on a quantum dot-pillar cavity device.

    PubMed

    Loo, V; Arnold, C; Gazzano, O; Lemaître, A; Sagnes, I; Krebs, O; Voisin, P; Senellart, P; Lanco, L

    2012-10-19

    Giant optical nonlinearity is observed under both continuous wave and pulsed excitation in a deterministically coupled quantum dot-micropillar system, in a pronounced strong-coupling regime. Using absolute reflectivity measurements we determine the critical intracavity photon number as well as the input and output coupling efficiencies of the device. Thanks to a near-unity input-coupling efficiency, we demonstrate a record nonlinearity threshold of only 8 incident photons per pulse. The output-coupling efficiency is found to strongly influence this nonlinearity threshold. We show how the fundamental limit of single-photon nonlinearity can be attained in realistic devices, which would provide an effective interaction between two coincident single-photons.

  9. Novel characteristics of VUV insertion device beamlines at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, T.; Heimann, P.

    1991-10-01

    The design of VUV beamlines for the Advanced Light Source is discussed. Features of the design serve to illustrate the careful attention required in order to preserve the performance of the low emittance ``third generation`` storage ring, operating with insertion devices. 11 refs.

  10. Novel characteristics of VUV insertion device beamlines at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, T.; Heimann, P.

    1991-10-01

    The design of VUV beamlines for the Advanced Light Source is discussed. Features of the design serve to illustrate the careful attention required in order to preserve the performance of the low emittance third generation'' storage ring, operating with insertion devices. 11 refs.

  11. Multi-modal, ultrasensitive detection of trace explosives using MEMS devices with quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandieh, Omid; Kim, Seonghwan

    2016-05-01

    Multi-modal chemical sensors based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have been developed with an electrical readout. Opto-calorimetric infrared (IR) spectroscopy, capable of obtaining molecular signatures of extremely small quantities of adsorbed explosive molecules, has been realized with a microthermometer/microheater device using a widely tunable quantum cascade laser. A microthermometer/microheater device responds to the heat generated by nonradiative decay process when the adsorbed explosive molecules are resonantly excited with IR light. Monitoring the variation in microthermometer signal as a function of illuminating IR wavelength corresponds to the conventional IR absorption spectrum of the adsorbed molecules. Moreover, the mass of the adsorbed molecules is determined by measuring the resonance frequency shift of the cantilever shape microthermometer for the quantitative opto-calorimetric IR spectroscopy. In addition, micro-differential thermal analysis, which can be used to differentiate exothermic or endothermic reaction of heated molecules, has been performed with the same device to provide additional orthogonal signal for trace explosive detection and sensor surface regeneration. In summary, we have designed, fabricated and tested microcantilever shape devices integrated with a microthermometer/microheater which can provide electrical responses used to acquire both opto-calorimetric IR spectra and microcalorimetric thermal responses. We have demonstrated the successful detection, differentiation, and quantification of trace amounts of explosive molecules and their mixtures (cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN)) using three orthogonal sensing signals which improve chemical selectivity.

  12. Recent Advances in Organic Photovoltaics: Device Structure and Optical Engineering Optimization on the Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guoping; Ren, Xingang; Zhang, Su; Wu, Hongbin; Choy, Wallace C H; He, Zhicai; Cao, Yong

    2016-03-23

    Organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices, which can directly convert absorbed sunlight to electricity, are stacked thin films of tens to hundreds of nanometers. They have emerged as a promising candidate for affordable, clean, and renewable energy. In the past few years, a rapid increase has been seen in the power conversion efficiency of OPV devices toward 10% and above, through comprehensive optimizations via novel photoactive donor and acceptor materials, control of thin-film morphology on the nanoscale, device structure developments, and interfacial and optical engineering. The intrinsic problems of short exciton diffusion length and low carrier mobility in organic semiconductors creates a challenge for OPV designs for achieving optically thick and electrically thin device structures to achieve sufficient light absorption and efficient electron/hole extraction. Recent advances in the field of OPV devices are reviewed, with a focus on the progress in device architecture and optical engineering approaches that lead to improved electrical and optical characteristics in OPV devices. Successful strategies are highlighted for light wave distribution, modulation, and absorption promotion inside the active layer of OPV devices by incorporating periodic nanopatterns/nanostructures or incorporating metallic nanomaterials and nanostructures. PMID:26856789

  13. Recent Advances in Organic Photovoltaics: Device Structure and Optical Engineering Optimization on the Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guoping; Ren, Xingang; Zhang, Su; Wu, Hongbin; Choy, Wallace C H; He, Zhicai; Cao, Yong

    2016-03-23

    Organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices, which can directly convert absorbed sunlight to electricity, are stacked thin films of tens to hundreds of nanometers. They have emerged as a promising candidate for affordable, clean, and renewable energy. In the past few years, a rapid increase has been seen in the power conversion efficiency of OPV devices toward 10% and above, through comprehensive optimizations via novel photoactive donor and acceptor materials, control of thin-film morphology on the nanoscale, device structure developments, and interfacial and optical engineering. The intrinsic problems of short exciton diffusion length and low carrier mobility in organic semiconductors creates a challenge for OPV designs for achieving optically thick and electrically thin device structures to achieve sufficient light absorption and efficient electron/hole extraction. Recent advances in the field of OPV devices are reviewed, with a focus on the progress in device architecture and optical engineering approaches that lead to improved electrical and optical characteristics in OPV devices. Successful strategies are highlighted for light wave distribution, modulation, and absorption promotion inside the active layer of OPV devices by incorporating periodic nanopatterns/nanostructures or incorporating metallic nanomaterials and nanostructures.

  14. Quantum interference measurement of spin interactions in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure

    DOE PAGES

    Deo, Vincent; Zhang, Yao; Soghomonian, Victoria; Heremans, Jean J.

    2015-03-30

    Quantum interference is used to measure the spin interactions between an InAs surface electron system and the iron center in the biomolecule hemin in nanometer proximity in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure. The interference quantifies the influence of hemin on the spin decoherence properties of the surface electrons. The decoherence times of the electrons serve to characterize the biomolecule, in an electronic complement to the use of spin decoherence times in magnetic resonance. Hemin, prototypical for the heme group in hemoglobin, is used to demonstrate the method, as a representative biomolecule where the spin state of a metal ion affects biologicalmore » functions. The electronic determination of spin decoherence properties relies on the quantum correction of antilocalization, a result of quantum interference in the electron system. Spin-flip scattering is found to increase with temperature due to hemin, signifying a spin exchange between the iron center and the electrons, thus implying interactions between a biomolecule and a solid-state system in the hemin/InAs hybrid structure. The results also indicate the feasibility of artificial bioinspired materials using tunable carrier systems to mediate interactions between biological entities.« less

  15. Interaction effects in superconductor/quantum spin Hall devices: Universal transport signatures and fractional Coulomb blockade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasen, David; Lee, Shu-Ping; Karzig, Torsten; Alicea, Jason

    2016-10-01

    Interfacing s -wave superconductors and quantum spin Hall edges produces time-reversal-invariant topological superconductivity of a type that can not arise in strictly one-dimensional systems. With the aim of establishing sharp fingerprints of this phase, we use renormalization-group methods to extract universal transport characteristics of superconductor/quantum spin Hall heterostructures where the native edge states serve as leads. We determine scaling forms for the conductance through a grounded superconductor and show that the results depend sensitively on the interaction strength in the leads, the size of the superconducting region, and the presence or absence of time-reversal-breaking perturbations. We also study transport across a floating superconducting island isolated by magnetic barriers. Here, we predict e -periodic Coulomb-blockade peaks, as recently observed in nanowire devices [S. M. Albrecht et al., Nature (London) 531, 206 (2016), 10.1038/nature17162], with the added feature that the island can support fractional charge tunable via the relative orientation of the barrier magnetizations. As an interesting corollary, when the magnetic barriers arise from strong interactions at the edge that spontaneously break time-reversal symmetry, the Coulomb-blockade periodicity changes from e to e /2 . These findings suggest several future experiments that probe unique characteristics of topological superconductivity at the quantum spin Hall edge.

  16. Quantum interference measurement of spin interactions in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure

    SciTech Connect

    Deo, Vincent; Zhang, Yao; Soghomonian, Victoria; Heremans, Jean J.

    2015-03-30

    Quantum interference is used to measure the spin interactions between an InAs surface electron system and the iron center in the biomolecule hemin in nanometer proximity in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure. The interference quantifies the influence of hemin on the spin decoherence properties of the surface electrons. The decoherence times of the electrons serve to characterize the biomolecule, in an electronic complement to the use of spin decoherence times in magnetic resonance. Hemin, prototypical for the heme group in hemoglobin, is used to demonstrate the method, as a representative biomolecule where the spin state of a metal ion affects biological functions. The electronic determination of spin decoherence properties relies on the quantum correction of antilocalization, a result of quantum interference in the electron system. Spin-flip scattering is found to increase with temperature due to hemin, signifying a spin exchange between the iron center and the electrons, thus implying interactions between a biomolecule and a solid-state system in the hemin/InAs hybrid structure. The results also indicate the feasibility of artificial bioinspired materials using tunable carrier systems to mediate interactions between biological entities.

  17. Light-Emitting Devices Based on Top-down Fabricated GaAs Quantum Nanodisks

    PubMed Central

    Higo, Akio; Kiba, Takayuki; Tamura, Yosuke; Thomas, Cedric; Takayama, Junichi; Wang, Yunpeng; Sodabanlu, Hassanet; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Nakano, Yoshiaki; Yamashita, Ichiro; Murayama, Akihiro; Samukawa, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Quantum dots photonic devices based on the III–V compound semiconductor technology offer low power consumption, temperature stability, and high-speed modulation. We fabricated GaAs nanodisks (NDs) of sub-20-nm diameters by a top-down process using a biotemplate and neutral beam etching (NBE). The GaAs NDs were embedded in an AlGaAs barrier regrown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). The temperature dependence of photoluminescence emission energies and the transient behavior were strongly affected by the quantum confinement effects of the embedded NDs. Therefore, the quantum levels of the NDs may be tuned by controlling their dimensions. We combined NBE and MOVPE in a high-throughput process compatible with industrial production systems to produce GaAs NDs with tunable optical characteristics. ND light emitting diode exhibited a narrow spectral width of 38 nm of high-intensity emission as a result of small deviation of ND sizes and superior crystallographic quality of the etched GaAs/AlGaAs layer. PMID:25792119

  18. Novel Colloidal MoS2 Quantum Dot Heterojunctions on Silicon Platforms for Multifunctional Optoelectronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Subhrajit; Maiti, Rishi; Katiyar, Ajit K; Das, Soumen; Ray, Samit K

    2016-01-01

    Silicon compatible wafer scale MoS2 heterojunctions are reported for the first time using colloidal quantum dots. Size dependent direct band gap emission of MoS2 dots are presented at room temperature. The temporal stability and decay dynamics of excited charge carriers in MoS2 quantum dots have been studied using time correlated single photon counting spectroscopy technique. Fabricated n-MoS2/p-Si 0D/3D heterojunctions exhibiting excellent rectification behavior have been studied for light emission in the forward bias and photodetection in the reverse bias. The electroluminescences with white light emission spectra in the range of 450-800 nm are found to be stable in the temperature range of 10-350 K. Size dependent spectral responsivity and detectivity of the heterojunction devices have been studied. The peak responsivity and detectivity of the fabricated heterojunction detector are estimated to be ~0.85 A/W and ~8 × 10(11) Jones, respectively at an applied bias of -2 V for MoS2 QDs of 2 nm mean diameter. The above values are found to be superior to the reported results on large area photodetector devices fabricated using two dimensional materials. PMID:27357596

  19. Novel Colloidal MoS2 Quantum Dot Heterojunctions on Silicon Platforms for Multifunctional Optoelectronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Subhrajit; Maiti, Rishi; Katiyar, Ajit K; Das, Soumen; Ray, Samit K

    2016-06-30

    Silicon compatible wafer scale MoS2 heterojunctions are reported for the first time using colloidal quantum dots. Size dependent direct band gap emission of MoS2 dots are presented at room temperature. The temporal stability and decay dynamics of excited charge carriers in MoS2 quantum dots have been studied using time correlated single photon counting spectroscopy technique. Fabricated n-MoS2/p-Si 0D/3D heterojunctions exhibiting excellent rectification behavior have been studied for light emission in the forward bias and photodetection in the reverse bias. The electroluminescences with white light emission spectra in the range of 450-800 nm are found to be stable in the temperature range of 10-350 K. Size dependent spectral responsivity and detectivity of the heterojunction devices have been studied. The peak responsivity and detectivity of the fabricated heterojunction detector are estimated to be ~0.85 A/W and ~8 × 10(11) Jones, respectively at an applied bias of -2 V for MoS2 QDs of 2 nm mean diameter. The above values are found to be superior to the reported results on large area photodetector devices fabricated using two dimensional materials.

  20. Phase encoding schemes for measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with basis-dependent flaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong; Fung, Chi-Hang Fred; Qi, Bing

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we study the unconditional security of the so-called measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDIQKD) with the basis-dependent flaw in the context of phase encoding schemes. We propose two schemes for the phase encoding: The first one employs a phase locking technique with the use of non-phase-randomized coherent pulses, and the second one uses conversion of standard Bennett-Brassard 1984 (BB84) phase encoding pulses into polarization modes. We prove the unconditional security of these schemes and we also simulate the key generation rate based on simple device models that accommodate imperfections. Our simulation results show the feasibility of these schemes with current technologies and highlight the importance of the state preparation with good fidelity between the density matrices in the two bases. Since the basis-dependent flaw is a problem not only for MDIQKD but also for standard quantum key distribution (QKD), our work highlights the importance of an accurate signal source in practical QKD systems.

  1. Mid-infrared surface transmitting and detecting quantum cascade device for gas-sensing

    PubMed Central

    Harrer, Andreas; Szedlak, Rolf; Schwarz, Benedikt; Moser, Harald; Zederbauer, Tobias; MacFarland, Donald; Detz, Hermann; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Schrenk, Werner; Lendl, Bernhard; Strasser, Gottfried

    2016-01-01

    We present a bi-functional surface emitting and surface detecting mid-infrared device applicable for gas-sensing. A distributed feedback ring quantum cascade laser is monolithically integrated with a detector structured from a bi-functional material for same frequency lasing and detection. The emitted single mode radiation is collimated, back reflected by a flat mirror and detected by the detector element of the sensor. The surface operation mode combined with the low divergence emission of the ring quantum cascade laser enables for long analyte interaction regions spatially separated from the sample surface. The device enables for sensing of gaseous analytes which requires a relatively long interaction region. Our design is suitable for 2D array integration with multiple emission and detection frequencies. Proof of principle measurements with isobutane (2-methylpropane) and propane as gaseous analytes were conducted. Detectable concentration values of 0–70% for propane and 0–90% for isobutane were reached at a laser operation wavelength of 6.5 μm utilizing a 10 cm gas cell in double pass configuration. PMID:26887891

  2. Mid-infrared surface transmitting and detecting quantum cascade device for gas-sensing.

    PubMed

    Harrer, Andreas; Szedlak, Rolf; Schwarz, Benedikt; Moser, Harald; Zederbauer, Tobias; MacFarland, Donald; Detz, Hermann; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Schrenk, Werner; Lendl, Bernhard; Strasser, Gottfried

    2016-01-01

    We present a bi-functional surface emitting and surface detecting mid-infrared device applicable for gas-sensing. A distributed feedback ring quantum cascade laser is monolithically integrated with a detector structured from a bi-functional material for same frequency lasing and detection. The emitted single mode radiation is collimated, back reflected by a flat mirror and detected by the detector element of the sensor. The surface operation mode combined with the low divergence emission of the ring quantum cascade laser enables for long analyte interaction regions spatially separated from the sample surface. The device enables for sensing of gaseous analytes which requires a relatively long interaction region. Our design is suitable for 2D array integration with multiple emission and detection frequencies. Proof of principle measurements with isobutane (2-methylpropane) and propane as gaseous analytes were conducted. Detectable concentration values of 0-70% for propane and 0-90% for isobutane were reached at a laser operation wavelength of 6.5 μm utilizing a 10 cm gas cell in double pass configuration. PMID:26887891

  3. Mid-infrared surface transmitting and detecting quantum cascade device for gas-sensing.

    PubMed

    Harrer, Andreas; Szedlak, Rolf; Schwarz, Benedikt; Moser, Harald; Zederbauer, Tobias; MacFarland, Donald; Detz, Hermann; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Schrenk, Werner; Lendl, Bernhard; Strasser, Gottfried

    2016-02-18

    We present a bi-functional surface emitting and surface detecting mid-infrared device applicable for gas-sensing. A distributed feedback ring quantum cascade laser is monolithically integrated with a detector structured from a bi-functional material for same frequency lasing and detection. The emitted single mode radiation is collimated, back reflected by a flat mirror and detected by the detector element of the sensor. The surface operation mode combined with the low divergence emission of the ring quantum cascade laser enables for long analyte interaction regions spatially separated from the sample surface. The device enables for sensing of gaseous analytes which requires a relatively long interaction region. Our design is suitable for 2D array integration with multiple emission and detection frequencies. Proof of principle measurements with isobutane (2-methylpropane) and propane as gaseous analytes were conducted. Detectable concentration values of 0-70% for propane and 0-90% for isobutane were reached at a laser operation wavelength of 6.5 μm utilizing a 10 cm gas cell in double pass configuration.

  4. Quantum Hall resistance standard in graphene devices under relaxed experimental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schopfer, F.; Ribeiro-Palau, R.; Lafont, F.; Brun-Picard, J.; Kazazis, D.; Michon, A.; Cheynis, F.; Couturaud, O.; Consejo, C.; Jouault, B.; Poirier, W.

    Large-area and high-quality graphene devices synthesized by CVD on SiC are used to develop reliable electrical resistance standards, based on the quantum Hall effect (QHE), with state-of-the-art accuracy of 1x10-9 and under an extended range of experimental conditions of magnetic field (down to 3.5 T), temperature (up to 10 K) or current (up to 0.5 mA). These conditions are much relaxed as compared to what is required by GaAs/AlGaAs standards and will enable to broaden the use of the primary quantum electrical standards to the benefit of Science and Industry for electrical measurements. Furthermore, by comparison of these graphene devices with GaAs/AlGaAs standards, we demonstrate the universality of the QHE within an ultimate uncertainty of 8.2x10-11. This suggests the exact relation of the quantized Hall resistance with the Planck constant and the electron charge, which is crucial for the new SI to be based on fixing such fundamental constants. These results show that graphene realizes its promises and demonstrates its superiority over other materials for a demanding application. Nature Nanotech. 10, 965-971, 2015, Nature Commun. 6, 6806, 2015

  5. Experimental measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with imperfect sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhiyuan; Wei, Kejin; Bedroya, Olinka; Qian, Li; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2016-04-01

    Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD), which is immune to all detector side-channel attacks, is the most promising solution to the security issues in practical quantum key distribution systems. Although several experimental demonstrations of MDI-QKD have been reported, they all make one crucial but not yet verified assumption, that is, there are no flaws in state preparation. Such an assumption is unrealistic and security loopholes remain in the source. Here we present a MDI-QKD experiment with the modulation error taken into consideration. By applying the loss-tolerant security proof by Tamaki et al. [Phys. Rev. A 90, 052314 (2014)], 10.1103/PhysRevA.90.052314, we distribute secure keys over fiber links up to 40 km with imperfect sources, which would not have been possible under previous security proofs. By simultaneously closing loopholes at the detectors and a critical loophole—modulation error in the source, our work shows the feasibility of secure QKD with practical imperfect devices.

  6. Novel Colloidal MoS2 Quantum Dot Heterojunctions on Silicon Platforms for Multifunctional Optoelectronic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Subhrajit; Maiti, Rishi; Katiyar, Ajit K.; Das, Soumen; Ray, Samit K.

    2016-01-01

    Silicon compatible wafer scale MoS2 heterojunctions are reported for the first time using colloidal quantum dots. Size dependent direct band gap emission of MoS2 dots are presented at room temperature. The temporal stability and decay dynamics of excited charge carriers in MoS2 quantum dots have been studied using time correlated single photon counting spectroscopy technique. Fabricated n-MoS2/p-Si 0D/3D heterojunctions exhibiting excellent rectification behavior have been studied for light emission in the forward bias and photodetection in the reverse bias. The electroluminescences with white light emission spectra in the range of 450–800 nm are found to be stable in the temperature range of 10–350 K. Size dependent spectral responsivity and detectivity of the heterojunction devices have been studied. The peak responsivity and detectivity of the fabricated heterojunction detector are estimated to be ~0.85 A/W and ~8 × 1011 Jones, respectively at an applied bias of −2 V for MoS2 QDs of 2 nm mean diameter. The above values are found to be superior to the reported results on large area photodetector devices fabricated using two dimensional materials. PMID:27357596

  7. Mid-infrared surface transmitting and detecting quantum cascade device for gas-sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrer, Andreas; Szedlak, Rolf; Schwarz, Benedikt; Moser, Harald; Zederbauer, Tobias; Macfarland, Donald; Detz, Hermann; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Schrenk, Werner; Lendl, Bernhard; Strasser, Gottfried

    2016-02-01

    We present a bi-functional surface emitting and surface detecting mid-infrared device applicable for gas-sensing. A distributed feedback ring quantum cascade laser is monolithically integrated with a detector structured from a bi-functional material for same frequency lasing and detection. The emitted single mode radiation is collimated, back reflected by a flat mirror and detected by the detector element of the sensor. The surface operation mode combined with the low divergence emission of the ring quantum cascade laser enables for long analyte interaction regions spatially separated from the sample surface. The device enables for sensing of gaseous analytes which requires a relatively long interaction region. Our design is suitable for 2D array integration with multiple emission and detection frequencies. Proof of principle measurements with isobutane (2-methylpropane) and propane as gaseous analytes were conducted. Detectable concentration values of 0-70% for propane and 0-90% for isobutane were reached at a laser operation wavelength of 6.5 μm utilizing a 10 cm gas cell in double pass configuration.

  8. Hybrid quantum nanophotonic devices for coupling to rare-earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazono, Evan; Hartz, Alex; Zhong, Tian; Faraon, Andrei

    2015-03-01

    With an assortment of narrow line-width transitions spanning the visible and IR spectrum and long spin coherence times, rare-earth doped crystals are the leading material system for solid-state quantum memories. Integrating these materials in an on-chip optical platform would create opportunities for highly integrated light-matter interfaces for quantum communication and quantum computing. Nano-photonic resonators with high quality factors and small mode volumes are required for efficient on-chip coupling to the small dipole moment of rare-earth ion transitions. However, direct fabrication of optical cavities in these crystals with current nanofabrication techniques is difficult and unparallelized, as either exotic etch chemistries or physical milling processes are required. We fabricated hybrid devices by mechanically transferring a nanoscale membrane of gallium arsenide (GaAs) onto a neodymium-doped yttrium silicon oxide (Y2SiO5) crystal and then using electron beam lithography and standard III-V dry etching to pattern nanobeam photonic crystal cavities and ring resonator cavities, a technique that is easily adapted to other frequency ranges for arbitrary dopants in any rare earth host system. Single crystalline GaAs was chosen for its low loss and high refractive index at the transition wavelength. We demonstrated the potential to evanescently couple between the cavity field and the 883 nm 4I9/2- 4F3/2 transition of nearby neodymium impurities in the host crystal by examining transmission spectra through a waveguide coupled to the resonator with a custom-built confocal microscope. The prospects and requirements for using this system for scalable quantum networks are discussed.

  9. Gate-defined quantum dot devices in undoped Si/SiGe heterostructures for spin qubit applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, Christian; Martins, Frederico; Marcus, Charles M.; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand

    Spin qubits based on few electron quantum dots in semiconductor heterostructures are among the most promising systems for realizing quantum computation. Due to its low concentration of nuclear-spin-carrying isotopes, silicon is of special interest as a host material. We characterize gate-defined double and triple quantum dot devices fabricated from undoped Si/Si0.7Ge0.3 heterostructures. Our device architecture is based on integrating all accumulation and depletion mode gates in a single gate layer. This allows us to omit the commonly used global accumulation gate in order to achieve a more local control of the potential landscape in the device. We present our recent progress towards implementing spin qubits in these structures. Support through the EC FP7- ICT project SiSPIN no. 323841, and the Danish National Research Foundation is acknowledged.

  10. Device-independent quantum key distribution with generalized two-mode Schrödinger cat states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadbent, Curtis J.; Marshall, Kevin; Weedbrook, Christian; Howell, John C.

    2015-11-01

    We show how weak nonlinearities can be used in a device-independent quantum key distribution (QKD) protocol using generalized two-mode Schrödinger cat states. The QKD protocol is therefore shown to be secure against collective attacks and for some coherent attacks. We derive analytical formulas for the optimal values of the Bell parameter, the quantum bit error rate, and the device-independent secret key rate in the noiseless lossy bosonic channel. Additionally, we give the filters and measurements which achieve these optimal values. We find that, over any distance in this channel, the quantum bit error rate is identically zero, in principle, and the states in the protocol are always able to violate a Bell inequality. The protocol is found to be superior in some regimes to a device-independent QKD protocol based on polarization entangled states in a depolarizing channel. Finally, we propose an implementation for the optimal filters and measurements.

  11. Single Phosphorus Ion Implantation into Prefabricated Nanometre Cells of Silicon Devices for Quantum Bit Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Changyi; Jamieson, David N.; Pakes, Chris; Prawer, Steven; Dzurak, Andrew; Stanley, Fay; Spizziri, Paul; Macks, Linda; Gauja, Eric; Clark, Robert G.

    2003-06-01

    In the near future, devices that employ single atoms to store or manipulate information will be constructed. For example, a solid-state quantum computer has been proposed that encodes information in the nuclear spin of shallow arrays of single 31P atoms (quantum bits or qubits) in a matrix of pure silicon. Construction of these devices presents formidable challenges. One strategy is to use single ion implantation, with the energy range of 10 to 20 keV, to load the qubits into prefabricated cells of the device with a period of a few tens of nanometres. We have developed a method of single ion implantation that employs detector electrodes adjacent to the prefabricated qubit cells that can detect on-line single keV ion strikes appropriate for the fabrication of shallow arrays. Our method of the sub-20 keV single ion detection utilizes a pure silicon substrate with a very high resistivity, a thin (5 nm) SiO2 surface layer, biased electrodes applied to the surface and sensitive electronics that can detect the charge transient from single keV ion strikes. We show that our detectors have a near 100% efficiency for keV ions, extremely thin dead layer thickness (˜5 nm) and a wide sensitive region extending laterally from the electrodes (greater than 15 μm) where the nanometre cells can be constructed. We compare the method with the other methods, such as those of measuring the secondary electrons or phonons induced by single ion impacts.

  12. Quantum dots in biomedical applications: advances and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinteza, Ludmila Otilia

    2010-09-01

    In the past two decades, nanotechnology has made great progress in generating novel materials with superior properties. Quantum dots (QDs) are an example of such materials. With unique optical properties, they have proven to be useful in a wide range of applications in life sciences, especially as a better alternative to overcome the shortcomings of conventional fluorophores. Current progress in the synthesis of biocompatible QDs allows for the possibility of producing a large variety of semiconductor nanocrystals in terms of size, surface functionality, bioconjugation, and targeting facilities. Strategies to enhance the water-dispersibility and biocompatibility of these nanoparticles have been developed, involving various encapsulation techniques and surface functionalization. The major obstacle in the clinical use of QDs remains their toxicity, and the systematic investigation on harmful effects of QDs both to humans and to the environment has become critical. Many examples of the experimental use of QDs prove their far-reaching potential for the study of intracellular processes at the molecular level, high resolution cellular imaging, and in vivo observation of cell trafficking. Biosensing methods based on QD bioconjugates proved to be successful in rapid detection of pathogens, and significant improvements are expected in early cancer diagnostic, non-conventional therapy of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. 75 FR 25763 - Addition to the List of Validated End-Users: Advanced Micro Devices China, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-10

    ...: Advanced Micro Devices China, Inc. AGENCY: Bureau of Industry and Security, Commerce. ACTION: Final rule... FR 33646) by creating a new authorization for ``validated end-users'' located in eligible... three eligible facilities are as follows: Validated End-User Advanced Micro Devices China, Inc....

  14. AN ADVANCED CALIBRATION PROCEDURE FOR COMPLEX IMPEDANCE SPECTRUM MEASUREMENTS OF ADVANCED ENERGY STORAGE DEVICES

    SciTech Connect

    William H. Morrison; Jon P. Christophersen; Patrick Bald; John L. Morrison

    2012-06-01

    With the increasing demand for electric and hybrid electric vehicles and the explosion in popularity of mobile and portable electronic devices such as laptops, cell phones, e-readers, tablet computers and the like, reliance on portable energy storage devices such as batteries has likewise increased. The concern for the availability of critical systems in turn drives the availability of battery systems and thus the need for accurate battery health monitoring has become paramount. Over the past decade the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Montana Tech of the University of Montana (Tech), and Qualtech Systems, Inc. (QSI) have been developing the Smart Battery Status Monitor (SBSM), an integrated battery management system designed to monitor battery health, performance and degradation and use this knowledge for effective battery management and increased battery life. Key to the success of the SBSM is an in-situ impedance measurement system called the Impedance Measurement Box (IMB). One of the challenges encountered has been development of an accurate, simple, robust calibration process. This paper discusses the successful realization of this process.

  15. Recent advances in medical device triage technologies for chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear events.

    PubMed

    Lansdowne, Krystal; Scully, Christopher G; Galeotti, Loriano; Schwartz, Suzanne; Marcozzi, David; Strauss, David G

    2015-06-01

    In 2010, the US Food and Drug Administration (Silver Spring, Maryland USA) created the Medical Countermeasures Initiative with the mission of development and promoting medical countermeasures that would be needed to protect the nation from identified, high-priority chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) threats and emerging infectious diseases. The aim of this review was to promote regulatory science research of medical devices and to analyze how the devices can be employed in different CBRN scenarios. Triage in CBRN scenarios presents unique challenges for first responders because the effects of CBRN agents and the clinical presentations of casualties at each triage stage can vary. The uniqueness of a CBRN event can render standard patient monitoring medical device and conventional triage algorithms ineffective. Despite the challenges, there have been recent advances in CBRN triage technology that include: novel technologies; mobile medical applications ("medical apps") for CBRN disasters; electronic triage tags, such as eTriage; diagnostic field devices, such as the Joint Biological Agent Identification System; and decision support systems, such as the Chemical Hazards Emergency Medical Management Intelligent Syndromes Tool (CHEMM-IST). Further research and medical device validation can help to advance prehospital triage technology for CBRN events.

  16. Recent advances in medical device triage technologies for chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear events.

    PubMed

    Lansdowne, Krystal; Scully, Christopher G; Galeotti, Loriano; Schwartz, Suzanne; Marcozzi, David; Strauss, David G

    2015-06-01

    In 2010, the US Food and Drug Administration (Silver Spring, Maryland USA) created the Medical Countermeasures Initiative with the mission of development and promoting medical countermeasures that would be needed to protect the nation from identified, high-priority chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) threats and emerging infectious diseases. The aim of this review was to promote regulatory science research of medical devices and to analyze how the devices can be employed in different CBRN scenarios. Triage in CBRN scenarios presents unique challenges for first responders because the effects of CBRN agents and the clinical presentations of casualties at each triage stage can vary. The uniqueness of a CBRN event can render standard patient monitoring medical device and conventional triage algorithms ineffective. Despite the challenges, there have been recent advances in CBRN triage technology that include: novel technologies; mobile medical applications ("medical apps") for CBRN disasters; electronic triage tags, such as eTriage; diagnostic field devices, such as the Joint Biological Agent Identification System; and decision support systems, such as the Chemical Hazards Emergency Medical Management Intelligent Syndromes Tool (CHEMM-IST). Further research and medical device validation can help to advance prehospital triage technology for CBRN events. PMID:25868677

  17. Thermodynamic limits to the conversion of blackbody radiation by quantum systems. [with application to solar energy conversion devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buoncristiani, A. M.; Smith, B. T.; Byvik, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    Using general thermodynamic arguments, we analyze the conversion of the energy contained in the radiation from a blackbody to useful work by a quantum system. We show that the energy available for conversion is bounded above by the change in free energy in the incident and reradiated fields and that this free energy change depends upon the temperature of the receiving device. Universal efficiency curves giving the ultimate thermodynamic conversion efficiency of the quantum system are presented in terms of the blackbody temperature and the temperature and threshold energy of the quantum system. Application of these results is made to a variety of systems including biological photosynthetic, photovoltaic, and photoelectrochemical systems.

  18. Thermodynamic formalism of minimum heat source temperature for driving advanced adsorption cooling device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Bidyut Baran; Chakraborty, Anutosh; Koyama, Shigeru; Srinivasan, Kandadai; Ng, Kim Choon; Kashiwagi, Takao; Dutta, Pradip

    2007-09-01

    This letter presents a thermodynamic formulation to calculate the minimum driving heat source temperature of an advanced solid sorption cooling device, and it is validated with experimental data. This formalism has been developed from the rigor of the Boltzmann distribution function and the condensation approximation of adsorptive molecules. An interesting and useful finding has been established from this formalism that it is possible to construct a solid sorption refrigeration device that operates in a cycle transferring heat from a low temperature source to a heat sink with a driving heat source at a temperature close to but above ambient.

  19. Development of advanced electron holographic techniques and application to industrial materials and devices.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazuo; Hirayama, Tsukasa; Tanji, Takayoshi

    2013-06-01

    The development of a transmission electron microscope equipped with a field emission gun paved the way for electron holography to be put to practical use in various fields. In this paper, we review three advanced electron holography techniques: on-line real-time electron holography, three-dimensional (3D) tomographic holography and phase-shifting electron holography, which are becoming important techniques for materials science and device engineering. We also describe some applications of electron holography to the analysis of industrial materials and devices: GaAs compound semiconductors, solid oxide fuel cells and all-solid-state lithium ion batteries.

  20. Porous graphene materials for advanced electrochemical energy storage and conversion devices.

    PubMed

    Han, Sheng; Wu, Dongqing; Li, Shuang; Zhang, Fan; Feng, Xinliang

    2014-02-12

    Combining the advantages from both porous materials and graphene, porous graphene materials have attracted vast interests due to their large surface areas, unique porous structures, diversified compositions and excellent electronic conductivity. These unordinary features enable porous graphene materials to serve as key components in high-performance electrochemical energy storage and conversion devices such as lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, and fuel cells. This progress report summarizes the typical fabrication methods for porous graphene materials with micro-, meso-, and macro-porous structures. The structure-property relationships of these materials and their application in advanced electrochemical devices are also discussed.

  1. Parasitic effects in superconducting quantum interference device-based radiation comb generators

    SciTech Connect

    Bosisio, R.; Giazotto, F.; Solinas, P.

    2015-12-07

    We study several parasitic effects on the implementation of a Josephson radiation comb generator based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) driven by an external magnetic field. This system can be used as a radiation generator similarly to what is done in optics and metrology, and allows one to generate up to several hundreds of harmonics of the driving frequency. First we take into account how the assumption of a finite loop geometrical inductance and junction capacitance in each SQUID may alter the operation of the devices. Then, we estimate the effect of imperfections in the fabrication of an array of SQUIDs, which is an unavoidable source of errors in practical situations. We show that the role of the junction capacitance is, in general, negligible, whereas the geometrical inductance has a beneficial effect on the performance of the device. The errors on the areas and junction resistance asymmetries may deteriorate the performance, but their effect can be limited to a large extent by a suitable choice of fabrication parameters.

  2. Tunable strong nonlinearity of a micromechanical beam embedded in a dc-superconducting quantum interference device

    SciTech Connect

    Ella, Lior Yuvaraj, D.; Suchoi, Oren; Shtempluk, Oleg; Buks, Eyal

    2015-01-07

    We present a study of the controllable nonlinear dynamics of a micromechanical beam coupled to a dc-SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device). The coupling between these systems places the modes of the beam in a highly nonlinear potential, whose shape can be altered by varying the bias current and applied flux of the SQUID. We detect the position of the beam by placing it in an optical cavity, which sets free the SQUID to be used solely for actuation. This enables us to probe the previously unexplored full parameter space of this device. We measure the frequency response of the beam and find that it displays a Duffing oscillator behavior which is periodic in the applied magnetic flux. To account for this, we develop a model based on the standard theory for SQUID dynamics. In addition, with the aim of understanding if the device can reach nonlinearity at the single phonon level, we use this model to show that the responsivity of the current circulating in the SQUID to the position of the beam can become divergent, with its magnitude limited only by noise. This suggests a direction for the generation of macroscopically distinguishable superposition states of the beam.

  3. Advanced InSb monolithic Charge Coupled Infrared Imaging Devices (CCIRID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, T. L.; Thom, R. D.; Parrish, W. D.

    1981-01-01

    The continued development of monolithic InSb charge coupled infrared imaging devices (CCIRIDs) is discussed. The processing sequence and structural design of 20-element linear arrays are discussed. Also, results obtained from radiometric testing of the 20-element arrays using a clamped sample-and-hold output circuit are reported. The design and layout of a next-generation CCIRID chip are discussed. The major devices on this chip are a 20 by 16 time-delay-and-integration (TDI) area array and a 100-element linear imaging array. The development of a process for incorporating an ion implanted S(+) planar channel stop into the CCIRID structure and the development of a thin film transparent photogate are also addressed. The transparent photogates will increase quantum efficiency to greater than 70% across the 2.5 to 5.4 micrometer spectral region in future front-side illuminated CCIRIDs.

  4. Quantum efficiency as a device-physics interpretation tool for thin-film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagle, Timothy J.

    2007-12-01

    Thin-film solar cells made from CdTe and CIGS p-type absorbers are promising candidates for generating pollution-free electricity. The challenge faced by the thin-film photovoltaics (PV) community is to improve the electrical properties of devices, without straying from low-cost, industry-friendly techniques. This dissertation will focus on the use of quantum-efficiency (QE) measurements to deduce the device physics of thin-film devices, in the hope of improving electrical properties and efficiencies of PV materials. Photons which are absorbed, but not converted into electrical energy can modify the energy bands in the solar cell. Under illumination, photoconductivity in the CdS window layer can result in bands different from those in the dark. QE data presented here was taken under a variety of light-bias conditions. These results suggest that 0.10 sun of white-light bias incident on the CdS layer is usually sufficient to achieve accurate QE results. QE results are described by models based on carrier collection by drift and diffusion, and photon absorption. These models are sensitive to parameters such as carrier mobility and lifetime. Comparing calculated QE curves with experiments, it was determined that electron lifetimes in CdTe are less than 0.1 ns. Lifetime determinations also suggest that copper serves as a recombination center in CdTe. The spatial uniformity of QE results has been investigated with the LBIC apparatus, and several experiments are described which investigate cell uniformity. Electrical variations that occur in solar cells often occur in a nonuniform fashion, and can be detected with the LBIC apparatus. Studies discussed here include investigation of patterned deposition of Cu in back-contacts, the use of high-resistivity TCO layers to mitigate nonuniformity, optical effects, and local shunts. CdTe devices with transparent back contacts were also studied with LBIC, including those that received a strong bromine/dichrol/hydrazine (BDH) etch

  5. Recent Advances in Flexible and Stretchable Bio-Electronic Devices Integrated with Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Choi, Suji; Lee, Hyunjae; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2016-06-01

    Flexible and stretchable electronics and optoelectronics configured in soft, water resistant formats uniquely address seminal challenges in biomedicine. Over the past decade, there has been enormous progress in the materials, designs, and manufacturing processes for flexible/stretchable system subcomponents, including transistors, amplifiers, bio-sensors, actuators, light emitting diodes, photodetector arrays, photovoltaics, energy storage elements, and bare die integrated circuits. Nanomaterials prepared using top-down processing approaches and synthesis-based bottom-up methods have helped resolve the intrinsic mechanical mismatch between rigid/planar devices and soft/curvilinear biological structures, thereby enabling a broad range of non-invasive, minimally invasive, and implantable systems to address challenges in biomedicine. Integration of therapeutic functional nanomaterials with soft bioelectronics demonstrates therapeutics in combination with unconventional diagnostics capabilities. Recent advances in soft materials, devices, and integrated systems are reviewes, with representative examples that highlight the utility of soft bioelectronics for advanced medical diagnostics and therapies.

  6. Recent Advances in Flexible and Stretchable Bio-Electronic Devices Integrated with Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Choi, Suji; Lee, Hyunjae; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2016-06-01

    Flexible and stretchable electronics and optoelectronics configured in soft, water resistant formats uniquely address seminal challenges in biomedicine. Over the past decade, there has been enormous progress in the materials, designs, and manufacturing processes for flexible/stretchable system subcomponents, including transistors, amplifiers, bio-sensors, actuators, light emitting diodes, photodetector arrays, photovoltaics, energy storage elements, and bare die integrated circuits. Nanomaterials prepared using top-down processing approaches and synthesis-based bottom-up methods have helped resolve the intrinsic mechanical mismatch between rigid/planar devices and soft/curvilinear biological structures, thereby enabling a broad range of non-invasive, minimally invasive, and implantable systems to address challenges in biomedicine. Integration of therapeutic functional nanomaterials with soft bioelectronics demonstrates therapeutics in combination with unconventional diagnostics capabilities. Recent advances in soft materials, devices, and integrated systems are reviewes, with representative examples that highlight the utility of soft bioelectronics for advanced medical diagnostics and therapies. PMID:26779680

  7. Beyond Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors: Beating the Quantum Limit with Squeezed States of Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsotti, Lisa

    2013-04-01

    After two decades of technology development, the first direct observation of gravitational waves appears to be imminent. Ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors world-wide are about to come back on-line after a major upgrade aimed to significantly improve their sensitivity. As these advanced detectors become a reality, the gravitational wave community is looking at new ways of further expanding their astrophysical reach. The quantum nature of light imposes a fundamental limit to the sensitivity that gravitational wave detectors can achieve, due to statistical fluctuations in the arrival time of photons at the interferometer output (shot noise) and the recoil of the mirrors due to radiation pressure noise. In this talk I will show how mature technology can be used to push interferometric precision measurement beyond the standard quantum limit by means of squeezed states of light, and current ideas on how to integrate this technology into the Advanced detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (LIGO).

  8. Effect of Mandibular Advancement Device Therapy on the Signs and Symptoms of Temporomandibular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Raunio, Antti; Sipilä, Kirsi; Raustia, Aune

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives Mandibular advancement device therapy is effectively used in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea, but also several side effects in the masticatory system have been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the subjective symptoms and clinical signs of temporomandibular disorders connected to mandibular advancement device therapy. Material and Methods The material consisted of 15 patients (9 men and 6 women, mean age 51.1 years, range 21 to 70 years) diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Subjective symptoms and clinical temporomandibular disorders (TMD) signs were recorded at the beginning of the treatment (baseline) and at 1-month, 3-month, 6-month and 24-month follow-ups. The degree of TMD was assessed using the anamnestic (Ai) and the clinical dysfunction index (Di) of Helkimo. For assessing the effect of TMD the patients were divided in discontinuing and continuing groups. Results According to Ai and Di, the severity of TMD remained unchanged during the follow-up in most of the patients. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) crepitation was found more frequently in discontinuing patients at all follow-ups. The difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05) at the six-month follow-up. Masticatory muscle pain during palpation was a frequent clinical sign at the baseline and during the follow-up period but the difference between discontinuing and continuing patients was not significant. Conclusions It seems that signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders do not necessarily increase during long-term mandibular advancement device therapy. However, it seems that patients with clinically assessed temporomandibular joint crepitation may discontinue their mandibular advancement device therapy due to temporomandibular disorders. PMID:24422023

  9. Optical transmission modules for multi-channel superconducting quantum interference device readouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Mok; Kwon, Hyukchan; Yu, Kwon-kyu; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kim, Kiwoong

    2013-12-01

    We developed an optical transmission module consisting of 16-channel analog-to-digital converter (ADC), digital-noise filter, and one-line serial transmitter, which transferred Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) readout data to a computer by a single optical cable. A 16-channel ADC sent out SQUID readouts data with 32-bit serial data of 8-bit channel and 24-bit voltage data at a sample rate of 1.5 kSample/s. A digital-noise filter suppressed digital noises generated by digital clocks to obtain SQUID modulation as large as possible. One-line serial transmitter reformed 32-bit serial data to the modulated data that contained data and clock, and sent them through a single optical cable. When the optical transmission modules were applied to 152-channel SQUID magnetoencephalography system, this system maintained a field noise level of 3 fT/√Hz @ 100 Hz.

  10. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-09-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  11. Andreev transport in a correlated ferromagnet-quantum-dot-superconductor device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weymann, I.; Wójcik, K. P.

    2015-12-01

    The spin-resolved Andreev reflection processes in a hybrid ferromagnet-quantum-dot-superconductor device are theoretically studied. In particular, the transport coefficients, such as the Andreev transmission as well as the linear-response Andreev conductance, are calculated by means of the numerical renormalization group method. It is shown that, generally, transport properties are conditioned by the interplay of correlations leading to the Kondo effect, superconducting proximity effect, and ferromagnetic-contact-induced exchange field. The exchange field is shown to greatly affect the low-energy behavior of the Andreev transmission by splitting the Kondo resonance. Moreover, it leads to a nonmonotonic dependence of the Andreev conductance on the dot level position. At low temperatures, the conductance has a peak at the particle-hole symmetry point, which however becomes quickly suppressed with increasing the temperature. The mechanisms responsible for those effects are thoroughly discussed.

  12. Experimental validation of superconducting quantum interference device sensors for electromagnetic scattering in geologic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, R.H. Jr.; Flynn, E.; Ruminer, P.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project has supported the collaborative development with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the University of New Mexico (UNM) of two critical components for a hand-held low-field magnetic sensor based on superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensor technology. The two components are a digital signal processing (DSP) algorithm for background noise rejection and a small hand-held dewar cooled by a cryocooler. A hand-held sensor has been designed and fabricated for detection of extremely weak magnetic fields in unshielded environments. The sensor is capable of measuring weak magnetic fields in unshielded environments and has multiple applications. We have chosen to pursue battlefield medicine as the highest probability near-term application because of stated needs of several agencies.

  13. Optical transmission modules for multi-channel superconducting quantum interference device readouts

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin-Mok Kwon, Hyukchan; Yu, Kwon-kyu; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kim, Kiwoong

    2013-12-15

    We developed an optical transmission module consisting of 16-channel analog-to-digital converter (ADC), digital-noise filter, and one-line serial transmitter, which transferred Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) readout data to a computer by a single optical cable. A 16-channel ADC sent out SQUID readouts data with 32-bit serial data of 8-bit channel and 24-bit voltage data at a sample rate of 1.5 kSample/s. A digital-noise filter suppressed digital noises generated by digital clocks to obtain SQUID modulation as large as possible. One-line serial transmitter reformed 32-bit serial data to the modulated data that contained data and clock, and sent them through a single optical cable. When the optical transmission modules were applied to 152-channel SQUID magnetoencephalography system, this system maintained a field noise level of 3 fT/√Hz @ 100 Hz.

  14. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system.

    PubMed

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems. PMID:25273745

  15. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system.

    PubMed

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  16. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  17. External driving synchronization in a superconducting quantum interference device based oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jie; Zhao, Peng; Yu, Haifeng; Yu, Yang

    2016-11-01

    We propose an external driving, self-sustained oscillator based on superconducting resonators. The dynamics of the self-sustained oscillator can be described by a Duffing–van der Pol like equation. Under external driving, the self-sustained oscillator presents synchronization phenomena. We analytically and numerically investigate the synchronization regions, and the results show that the synchronization bandwidth can be quickly adjusted in situ by the external weak magnetic field in sub-nano seconds. Moreover, the system can re-stabilize in about 10 ns with a certain sudden change of driving frequency or the critical current of the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). These advantages allow the potential applications of self-sustained oscillators in timing reference, microwave communication and electromagnetic sensing.

  18. Long distance measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with entangled photon sources

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Feihu; Qi, Bing; Liao, Zhongfa; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2013-08-05

    We present a feasible method that can make quantum key distribution (QKD), both ultra-long-distance and immune, to all attacks in the detection system. This method is called measurement-device-independent QKD (MDI-QKD) with entangled photon sources in the middle. By proposing a model and simulating a QKD experiment, we find that MDI-QKD with one entangled photon source can tolerate 77 dB loss (367 km standard fiber) in the asymptotic limit and 60 dB loss (286 km standard fiber) in the finite-key case with state-of-the-art detectors. Our general model can also be applied to other non-QKD experiments involving entanglement and Bell state measurements.

  19. Wavelength tuning of InAs quantum dot laser by micromirror device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, J. Y.; Gong, Q.; Kang, C. Z.; Xu, H. X.; Cao, C. F.; Li, Y. Y.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, H. L.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the InAs quantum dot (QD) external cavity laser (ECL) using a digital mirror device (DMD) as the key component for wavelength tuning. The InAs QD laser diode was grown by gas source molecular-beam epitaxy, which had a broad gain profile. Single mode operation was achieved with the side mode suppression ratio of 21 dB when the optical feedback was provided by a mirror pattern consisting of 9 micromirrors. Moreover, two-color lasing was demonstrated with two laser lines having frequency difference in the THz range. The incorporation of DMD in the ECL enables great flexibility and many unique features, such as high tuning speed independent of the tuning step, two-color or multi-color lasing, and adjustable intensity for individual laser lines.

  20. Magnetometry of injury currents from human nerve and muscle specimens using superconducting quantum interferences devices.

    PubMed

    Mackert, B M; Mackert, J; Wübbeler, G; Armbrust, F; Wolff, K D; Burghoff, M; Trahms, L; Curio, G

    1999-03-12

    Acute lesions of polarized membranes lead to slowly decaying ('near-DC') injury currents driven by the transmembrane resting potential gradient. Here we report the first recordings of injury-related near-DC magnetic fields from human nerve and muscle specimens in vitro using Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) operated in a conventional magnetically shielded room in a clinical environment. The specimen position was modulated sinusoidally beneath the sensor array by a non-magnetically fabricated scissors lift to improve the signal-to-noise ratio for near-DC fields. Depending on the specimen geometry the field patterns showed dipolar or quadrupolar aspects. The slow decay of human nerve and muscle injury currents was monitored for several hours from a distance of a few centimeters. Thus DC-magnetometry provides a sensitivity which might allow the remote detection of injury currents also in vivo.

  1. Fabrication of a white electroluminescent device based on bilayered yellow and blue quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Hoon; Lee, Ki-Heon; Kang, Hee-Don; Park, Byoungnam; Hwang, Jun Yeon; Jang, Ho Seong; Do, Young Rag; Yang, Heesun

    2015-03-12

    Until now most work on colloidal quantum dot-light-emitting diodes (QLEDs) has been focused on the improvement of the electroluminescent (EL) performance of monochromatic devices, and multi-colored white QLEDs comprising more than one type of QD emitter have been rarely investigated. To demonstrate a white EL as a result of color mixing between blue and yellow, herein a unique combination of two dissimilar QDs of blue- CdZnS/ZnS plus a yellow-emitting Cu-In-S (CIS)/ZnS is used for the formation of the emitting layer (EML) of a multilayered QLED. First, the QLED consisting of a single EML randomly mixed with two QDs is fabricated, however, its EL is dominated by blue emission with the contribution of yellow emission substantially weaker. Thus, another EML configuration is devised in the form of a QD bilayer with two stacking sequences of CdZnS/ZnS//CIS/ZnS QD and vice versa. The QLED with the former stacking sequence shows an overwhelming contribution of blue EL, similar to the mixed QD EML-based device. Upon applying the oppositely stacked QD bilayer of CIS/ZnS//CdZnS/ZnS, however, a bicolored white EL can be successfully achieved by means of the effective extension of the radiative excitonic recombination zone throughout both QD EML regions. Such QD EML configuration-dependent EL results, which are discussed primarily using the proposed device energy level diagram, strongly suggest that the positional design of individual QD emitters is a critical factor for the realization of multicolored, white emissive devices. PMID:25721494

  2. Quantum tricks with femtosecond light pulses teach magnetic devices to think ultrafast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perakis, I. E.; Lingos, P. C.; Wang, J.

    2014-03-01

    The technological demand to push the gigahertz switching speed limit of today's magnetic memory/logic devices into the terahertz (1THz=1ps-1) regime underlies the entire field of spin-electronics and integrated multi- functional devices. This challenge is met by all-optical magnetic switching based on coherent spin manipulation By analogy to femto-chemistry and photosynthetic dynamics where photo-products of chemical/biochemical re- actions can be influenced by creating suitable superpositions of molecular states, femtosecond (fs) laser-excited coherence between spin/orbital/charge states can switch magnetic orders, by "suddenly" breaking the delicate balance between competing phases of correlated materials, e.g., the colossal magneto-resistive (CMR) manganites suitable for applications. Here we discuss femtosecond (fs) all-optical switching from antiferro- to ferromagnetic ordering via establishment of a magnetization increase within ˜100 fs, while the laser field still interacts with the system. Such non-equilibrium ferromagnetic correlations arise from quantum spin-flip fluctuations corre- lated with coherent superpositions of electronic states. The development of ferromagnetic correlations during the fs laser pulse reveals an initial quantum coherent regime of magnetism, clearly distinguished from the pi- cosecond lattice-heating regime characterized by phase separation. We summarize a microscopic theory based on density matrix equations of motion for composite fermion Hubbard operators, instead of bare electrons, that take into account the strong spin and charge local correlations. Our work merges two fields, femto-magnetism in metals/band insulators and non-equilibrium phase transitions of strongly correlated electrons, where local interactions exceeding the kinetic energy produce a complex balance of competing orders.

  3. Design, Fabrication, and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Devices for Advanced Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radauscher, Erich Justin

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently emerged as promising candidates for electron field emission (FE) cathodes in integrated FE devices. These nanostructured carbon materials possess exceptional properties and their synthesis can be thoroughly controlled. Their integration into advanced electronic devices, including not only FE cathodes, but sensors, energy storage devices, and circuit components, has seen rapid growth in recent years. The results of the studies presented here demonstrate that the CNT field emitter is an excellent candidate for next generation vacuum microelectronics and related electron emission devices in several advanced applications. The work presented in this study addresses determining factors that currently confine the performance and application of CNT-FE devices. Characterization studies and improvements to the FE properties of CNTs, along with Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) design and fabrication, were utilized in achieving these goals. Important performance limiting parameters, including emitter lifetime and failure from poor substrate adhesion, are examined. The compatibility and integration of CNT emitters with the governing MEMS substrate (i.e., polycrystalline silicon), and its impact on these performance limiting parameters, are reported. CNT growth mechanisms and kinetics were investigated and compared to silicon (100) to improve the design of CNT emitter integrated MEMS based electronic devices, specifically in vacuum microelectronic device (VMD) applications. Improved growth allowed for design and development of novel cold-cathode FE devices utilizing CNT field emitters. A chemical ionization (CI) source based on a CNT-FE electron source was developed and evaluated in a commercial desktop mass spectrometer for explosives trace detection. This work demonstrated the first reported use of a CNT-based ion source capable of collecting CI mass spectra. The CNT-FE source demonstrated low power requirements, pulsing

  4. Development of a Cryostat to Characterize Nano-scale Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Mathew; Matheny, Matthew; Knudsen, Jasmine

    2016-03-01

    We have designed and constructed a low-noise vacuum cryostat to be used for the characterization of nano-scale superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). Such devices are very sensitive to magnetic fields and can measure changes in flux on the order of a single electron magnetic moment. As a part of the design process, we calculated the separation required between the cryogenic preamplifier and superconducting magnet, including a high-permeability magnetic shield, using a finite-element model of the apparatus. The cryostat comprises a vacuum cross at room temperature for filtered DC and shielded RF electrical connections, a thin-wall stainless steel support tube, a taper-sealed cryogenic vacuum can, and internal mechanical support and wiring for the nanoSQUID. The Dewar is modified with a room-temperature flange with a sliding seal for the cryostat. The flange supports the superconducting 3 Tesla magnet and thermometry wiring. Upon completion of the cryostat fabrication and Dewar modifications, operation of the nanoSQUIDs as transported from our collaborator's laboratory in Israel will be confirmed, as the lead forming the SQUID is sensitive to oxidation and the SQUIDs must be shipped in a vacuum container. After operation of the nanoSQUIDs is confirmed, the primary work of characterizing their high-speed properties will begin. This will include looking at the measurement of relaxation oscillations at high bandwidth in comparison to the theoretical predictions of the current model.

  5. Nitride based quantum well light-emitting devices having improved current injection efficiency

    DOEpatents

    Tansu, Nelson; Zhao, Hongping; Liu, Guangyu; Arif, Ronald

    2014-12-09

    A III-nitride based device provides improved current injection efficiency by reducing thermionic carrier escape at high current density. The device includes a quantum well active layer and a pair of multi-layer barrier layers arranged symmetrically about the active layer. Each multi-layer barrier layer includes an inner layer abutting the active layer; and an outer layer abutting the inner layer. The inner barrier layer has a bandgap greater than that of the outer barrier layer. Both the inner and the outer barrier layer have bandgaps greater than that of the active layer. InGaN may be employed in the active layer, AlInN, AlInGaN or AlGaN may be employed in the inner barrier layer, and GaN may be employed in the outer barrier layer. Preferably, the inner layer is thin relative to the other layers. In one embodiment the inner barrier and active layers are 15 .ANG. and 24 .ANG. thick, respectively.

  6. Turnbuckle diamond anvil cell for high-pressure measurements in a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Giriat, Gaétan; Wang, Weiwei; Attfield, J Paul; Huxley, Andrew D; Kamenev, Konstantin V

    2010-07-01

    We have developed a miniature diamond anvil cell for magnetization measurements in a widely used magnetic property measurement system commercial magnetometer built around a superconducting quantum interference device. The design of the pressure cell is based on the turnbuckle principle in which force can be created and maintained by rotating the body of the device while restricting the counterthreaded end-nuts to translational movement. The load on the opposed diamond anvils and the sample between them is generated using a hydraulic press. The load is then locked by rotating the body of the cell with respect to the end-nuts. The dimensions of the pressure cell have been optimized by use of finite element analysis. The cell is approximately a cylinder 7 mm long and 7 mm in diameter and weighs only 1.5 g. Due to its small size the cell thermalizes rapidly. It is capable of achieving pressures in excess of 10 GPa while allowing measurements to be performed with the maximum sensitivity of the magnetometer. The performance of the pressure cell is illustrated by a high pressure magnetic study of Mn(3)[Cr(CN)(6)](2) x xH(2)O Prussian blue analog up to 10.3 GPa.

  7. Turnbuckle diamond anvil cell for high-pressure measurements in a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giriat, Gaétan; Wang, Weiwei; Attfield, J. Paul; Huxley, Andrew D.; Kamenev, Konstantin V.

    2010-07-01

    We have developed a miniature diamond anvil cell for magnetization measurements in a widely used magnetic property measurement system commercial magnetometer built around a superconducting quantum interference device. The design of the pressure cell is based on the turnbuckle principle in which force can be created and maintained by rotating the body of the device while restricting the counterthreaded end-nuts to translational movement. The load on the opposed diamond anvils and the sample between them is generated using a hydraulic press. The load is then locked by rotating the body of the cell with respect to the end-nuts. The dimensions of the pressure cell have been optimized by use of finite element analysis. The cell is approximately a cylinder 7 mm long and 7 mm in diameter and weighs only 1.5 g. Due to its small size the cell thermalizes rapidly. It is capable of achieving pressures in excess of 10 GPa while allowing measurements to be performed with the maximum sensitivity of the magnetometer. The performance of the pressure cell is illustrated by a high pressure magnetic study of Mn3[Cr(CN)6]2ṡxH2O Prussian blue analog up to 10.3 GPa.

  8. Detector-device-independent quantum key distribution: Security analysis and fast implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boaron, Alberto; Korzh, Boris; Houlmann, Raphael; Boso, Gianluca; Lim, Charles Ci Wen; Martin, Anthony; Zbinden, Hugo

    2016-08-01

    One of the most pressing issues in quantum key distribution (QKD) is the problem of detector side-channel attacks. To overcome this problem, researchers proposed an elegant "time-reversal" QKD protocol called measurement-device-independent QKD (MDI-QKD), which is based on time-reversed entanglement swapping. However, MDI-QKD is more challenging to implement than standard point-to-point QKD. Recently, an intermediary QKD protocol called detector-device-independent QKD (DDI-QKD) has been proposed to overcome the drawbacks of MDI-QKD, with the hope that it would eventually lead to a more efficient detector side-channel-free QKD system. Here, we analyze the security of DDI-QKD and elucidate its security assumptions. We find that DDI-QKD is not equivalent to MDI-QKD, but its security can be demonstrated with reasonable assumptions. On the more practical side, we consider the feasibility of DDI-QKD and present a fast experimental demonstration (clocked at 625 MHz), capable of secret key exchange up to more than 90 km.

  9. Reliability of Strength Testing using the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device and Free Weights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, Kirk L.; Loehr, James A.; Laughlin, Mitzi A.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Hagan, R. Donald

    2008-01-01

    The Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) was developed for use on the International Space Station as a countermeasure against muscle atrophy and decreased strength. This investigation examined the reliability of one-repetition maximum (1RM) strength testing using ARED and traditional free weight (FW) exercise. Methods: Six males (180.8 +/- 4.3 cm, 83.6 +/- 6.4 kg, 36 +/- 8 y, mean +/- SD) who had not engaged in resistive exercise for at least six months volunteered to participate in this project. Subjects completed four 1RM testing sessions each for FW and ARED (eight total sessions) using a balanced, randomized, crossover design. All testing using one device was completed before progressing to the other. During each session, 1RM was measured for the squat, heel raise, and deadlift exercises. Generalizability (G) and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated for each exercise on each device and were used to predict the number of sessions needed to obtain a reliable 1RM measurement (G . 0.90). Interclass reliability coefficients and Pearson's correlation coefficients (R) also were calculated for the highest 1RM value (1RM9sub peak)) obtained for each exercise on each device to quantify 1RM relationships between devices.

  10. Semi-device-independent randomness expansion with partially free random sources using 3 →1 quantum random access code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yu-Qian; Gao, Fei; Li, Dan-Dan; Li, Xin-Hui; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2016-09-01

    We have proved that new randomness can be certified by partially free sources using 2 →1 quantum random access code (QRAC) in the framework of semi-device-independent (SDI) protocols [Y.-Q. Zhou, H.-W. Li, Y.-K. Wang, D.-D. Li, F. Gao, and Q.-Y. Wen, Phys. Rev. A 92, 022331 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.92.022331]. To improve the effectiveness of the randomness generation, here we propose the SDI randomness expansion using 3 →1 QRAC and obtain the corresponding classical and quantum bounds of the two-dimensional quantum witness. Moreover, we get the condition which should be satisfied by the partially free sources to successfully certify new randomness, and the analytic relationship between the certified randomness and the two-dimensional quantum witness violation.

  11. Optimized QKD BB84 protocol using quantum dense coding and CNOT gates: feasibility based on probabilistic optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueddana, Amor; Attia, Moez; Chatta, Rihab

    2014-05-01

    In this work, we simulate a fiber-based Quantum Key Distribution Protocol (QKDP) BB84 working at the telecoms wavelength 1550 nm with taking into consideration an optimized attack strategy. We consider in our work a quantum channel composed by probabilistic Single Photon Source (SPS), single mode optical Fiber and quantum detector with high efficiency. We show the advantages of using the Quantum Dots (QD) embedded in micro-cavity compared to the Heralded Single Photon Sources (HSPS). Second, we show that Eve is always getting some information depending on the mean photon number per pulse of the used SPS and therefore, we propose an optimized version of the QKDP BB84 based on Quantum Dense Coding (QDC) that could be implemented by quantum CNOT gates. We evaluate the success probability of implementing the optimized QKDP BB84 when using nowadays probabilistic quantum optical devices for circuit realization. We use for our modeling an abstract probabilistic model of a CNOT gate based on linear optical components and having a success probability of sqrt (4/27), we take into consideration the best SPSs realizations, namely the QD and the HSPS, generating a single photon per pulse with a success probability of 0.73 and 0.37, respectively. We show that the protocol is totally secure against attacks but could be correctly implemented only with a success probability of few percent.

  12. Intermediate-band photosensitive device with quantum dots having tunneling barrier embedded in organic matrix

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.

    2008-08-19

    A plurality of quantum dots each have a shell. The quantum dots are embedded in an organic matrix. At least the quantum dots and the organic matrix are photoconductive semiconductors. The shell of each quantum dot is arranged as a tunneling barrier to require a charge carrier (an electron or a hole) at a base of the tunneling barrier in the organic matrix to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach the respective quantum dot. A first quantum state in each quantum dot is between a lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and a highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the organic matrix. Wave functions of the first quantum state of the plurality of quantum dots may overlap to form an intermediate band.

  13. Integrated p-n junction InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well devices with diverse functionalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Wei; Gao, Xumin; Yuan, Wei; Yang, Yongchao; Yuan, Jialei; Zhu, Hongbo; Wang, Yongjin

    2016-05-01

    We propose, fabricate, and demonstrate integrated p-n junction InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well devices with diverse functionalities on a GaN-on-silicon platform. Suspended devices with a common n-contact are realized using a wafer-level process. For the integrated devices, part of the light emitted by a light-emitting diode (LED) is guided in-plane through a suspended waveguide and is sensed by another photodiode. The induced photocurrent is tuned by the LED. The integrated devices can act as two independent LEDs to deliver different signals simultaneously for free-space visible light communication. Furthermore, the suspended devices can be used as two separate photodiodes to detect incident light with a distinct on/off switching performance.

  14. New electroabsorptive device with negative resistance based on a low-responsivity GaAs/AlAs multiple quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryvkin, B. S.; Goodwill, D. J.; Walker, A. C.; Stanley, C. R.; Pottier, F.; Holland, M. C.

    1994-02-01

    The configuration of a novel electroabsorption instrument having a much bigger photocurrent ratio in the negative resistance section than before. The device consisted of n-i-p GaAs/AlAs MQW modulator and p-i-n GaAs/GaAlAs non-quantum well photodetector all vertically incorporated. The modulator and the photodetector are electrically linked parallel to each other in a reverse biased state. Compared with self-electro-optic effect devices (SEEDs), the high-state responsivity of the device is lower but the total photocurrent alteration is comparable. The device affords improved operation of S-SEED devices at greater intensities as well the fabrication of a microwave oscillator with high efficiency.

  15. Simulation and Experimental Study on Anti-reflection Characteristics of Nano-patterned Si Structures for Si Quantum Dot-Based Light-Emitting Devices.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wenyi; Lu, Peng; Li, Wei; Xu, Jun; Xu, Ling; Chen, Kunji

    2016-12-01

    Surface-textured structure is currently an interesting topic since it can efficiently reduce the optical losses in advanced optoelectronic devices via light management. In this work, we built a model in finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) solutions by setting the simulation parameters based on the morphology of the Si nanostructures and compared with the experimental results in order to study the anti-reflection behaviors of the present nano-patterned structures. It is found that the reflectance is gradually reduced by increasing the depth of Si nanostructures which is in well agreement with the experimental observations. The reflectance can be lower than 10 % in the light range from 400 to 850 nm for Si nano-patterned structures with a depth of 150 nm despite the quite low aspect ratio, which can be understood as the formation of gradually changed index layer and the scattering effect of Si nano-patterned structures. By depositing the Si quantum dots/SiO2 multilayers on nano-patterned Si substrate, the reflectance can be further suppressed and the luminescence intensity centered at 820 nm from Si quantum dots is enhanced by 6.6-fold compared with that of flat one, which can be attributed to the improved light extraction efficiency. However, the further etch time causes the reduction of luminescence intensity from Si quantum dots which may ascribe to the serious surface recombination of carriers. PMID:27356564

  16. Simulation and Experimental Study on Anti-reflection Characteristics of Nano-patterned Si Structures for Si Quantum Dot-Based Light-Emitting Devices.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wenyi; Lu, Peng; Li, Wei; Xu, Jun; Xu, Ling; Chen, Kunji

    2016-12-01

    Surface-textured structure is currently an interesting topic since it can efficiently reduce the optical losses in advanced optoelectronic devices via light management. In this work, we built a model in finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) solutions by setting the simulation parameters based on the morphology of the Si nanostructures and compared with the experimental results in order to study the anti-reflection behaviors of the present nano-patterned structures. It is found that the reflectance is gradually reduced by increasing the depth of Si nanostructures which is in well agreement with the experimental observations. The reflectance can be lower than 10 % in the light range from 400 to 850 nm for Si nano-patterned structures with a depth of 150 nm despite the quite low aspect ratio, which can be understood as the formation of gradually changed index layer and the scattering effect of Si nano-patterned structures. By depositing the Si quantum dots/SiO2 multilayers on nano-patterned Si substrate, the reflectance can be further suppressed and the luminescence intensity centered at 820 nm from Si quantum dots is enhanced by 6.6-fold compared with that of flat one, which can be attributed to the improved light extraction efficiency. However, the further etch time causes the reduction of luminescence intensity from Si quantum dots which may ascribe to the serious surface recombination of carriers.

  17. Simulation and Experimental Study on Anti-reflection Characteristics of Nano-patterned Si Structures for Si Quantum Dot-Based Light-Emitting Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Wenyi; Lu, Peng; Li, Wei; Xu, Jun; Xu, Ling; Chen, Kunji

    2016-06-01

    Surface-textured structure is currently an interesting topic since it can efficiently reduce the optical losses in advanced optoelectronic devices via light management. In this work, we built a model in finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) solutions by setting the simulation parameters based on the morphology of the Si nanostructures and compared with the experimental results in order to study the anti-reflection behaviors of the present nano-patterned structures. It is found that the reflectance is gradually reduced by increasing the depth of Si nanostructures which is in well agreement with the experimental observations. The reflectance can be lower than 10 % in the light range from 400 to 850 nm for Si nano-patterned structures with a depth of 150 nm despite the quite low aspect ratio, which can be understood as the formation of gradually changed index layer and the scattering effect of Si nano-patterned structures. By depositing the Si quantum dots/SiO2 multilayers on nano-patterned Si substrate, the reflectance can be further suppressed and the luminescence intensity centered at 820 nm from Si quantum dots is enhanced by 6.6-fold compared with that of flat one, which can be attributed to the improved light extraction efficiency. However, the further etch time causes the reduction of luminescence intensity from Si quantum dots which may ascribe to the serious surface recombination of carriers.

  18. In vitro retention of a new thermoplastic titratable mandibular advancement device

    PubMed Central

    Braem, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Oral appliance (OA) therapy with a mandibular advancement device (OAm) is a non-invasive, alternative approach to maintaining upper airway patency. The main requirement for an OAm to be effective is the adequate retention on the teeth while the patient is asleep. We evaluated the retentive forces of a new low-cost, customizable, titratable, thermoplastic OAm (BluePro ®; BlueSom, France). Dental impressions and casts were made for one patient with complete upper and lower dental arches including the third molars and class II bite proportions. A setup based on Frasaco ANA-4 models was also used. Two protrusive positions of the mandible were investigated: 3 mm and 8 mm, representing respectively 25% and 65% of the maximal protrusion. The forces required to remove the BluePro ® device from the carriers were recorded continuously over 730 cycles (=365 days, twice a day) to simulate 1 year of clinical use. At 8 mm protrusion the BluePro ® device showed retentive forces of ~27N. There was a slight but non-significant decrease in retentive forces in the tests on the epoxified carriers which was not found on the ANA-4 carriers. There were no significant differences between the carriers as a function of protrusion. The BluePro ® device tested in the present study possesses sufficient retention forces to resist initial jaw opening forces and full mouth opening forces estimated to be ~20N. It could therefore broaden the indications for use of thermoplastic OAms. It could provide a temporary OAm while a custom-made OAm is being manufactured or repaired. Patients could be provided with a low-cost try-out device capable of reliable titration, providing an indication of effectiveness and of patient acceptance of an OAm, although the effect of device shape and size on therapeutic outcome is not yet known. Finally it could provide an affordable OAm solution in resource-restricted healthcare settings. PMID:25901281

  19. Green route synthesis of high quality CdSe quantum dots for applications in light emitting devices

    SciTech Connect

    Bera, Susnata; Singh, Shashi B.; Ray, S.K.

    2012-05-15

    Investigation was made on light emitting diodes fabricated using CdSe quantum dots. CdSe quantum dots were synthesized chemically using olive oil as the capping agent, instead of toxic phosphine. Room temperature photoluminescence investigation showed sharp 1st excitonic emission peak at 568 nm. Bi-layer organic/inorganic (P3HT/CdSe) hybrid light emitting devices were fabricated by solution process. The electroluminescence study showed low turn on voltage ({approx}2.2 V) .The EL peak intensity was found to increase by increasing the operating current. - Graphical abstract: Light emitting diode was fabricated using CdSe quantum dots using olive oil as the capping agent, instead of toxic phosphine. Bi-layer organic/inorganic (P3HT/CdSe) hybrid light emitting device shows strong electroluminescence in the range 630-661 nm. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CdSe Quantum dots were synthesized using olive oil as the capping agent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Light emitting device was fabricated using CdSe QDs/P3HT polymer heterojunction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The I-V characteristics study showed low turn on voltage at {approx}2.2 V. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The EL peak intensity increases with increasing the operating current.

  20. Descriptions of a linear device developed for research on advanced plasma imaging and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, J.; Lee, K. D.; Seo, D. C.; Nam, Y. U.; Ko, W. H.; Lee, J. H.; Choi, M. C.

    2009-10-15

    The research on advanced plasma imaging and dynamics (RAPID) device is a newly developed linear electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma device. It has a variety of axial magnetic field profiles provided by eight water-cooled magnetic coils and two dc power supplies. The positions of the magnetic coils are freely adjustable along the axial direction and the power supplies can be operated with many combinations of electrical wiring to the coils. A 6 kW 2.45 GHz magnetron is used to produce steady-state ECR plasmas with central magnetic fields of 875 and/or 437.5 G (second harmonic). The cylindrical stainless steel vacuum chamber is 300 mm in diameter and 750 mm in length and has eight radial and ten axial ports including 6-in. and 8-in. viewing windows for heating and diagnostics. Experimental observation of ECR plasma heating has been recently carried out during the initial plasma operation. The main diagnostic systems including a 94 GHz heterodyne interferometer, a high-resolution 25 channel one-dimensional array spectrometer, a single channel survey spectrometer, and an electric probe have been also prepared. The RAPID device is a flexible simulator for the understanding of tokamak edge plasma physics and new diagnostic system development. In this work, we describe the RAPID device and initial operation results.

  1. Advanced simulation technology for etching process design for CMOS device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuboi, Nobuyuki; Fukasawa, Masanaga; Tatsumi, Tetsuya

    2016-07-01

    Plasma etching is a critical process for the realization of high performance in the next generation of CMOS devices. To predict and control fluctuations in the etching properties accurately during mass production, it is essential that etching process simulation technology considers fluctuations in the plasma chamber wall conditions, the effects of by-products on the critical dimensions, the Si recess dependence on the wafer open area ratio and local pattern structure, and the time-dependent plasma-induced damage distribution associated with the three-dimensional feature scale profile at the 100 nm level. This consideration can overcome the issues with conventional simulations performed under the assumed ideal conditions, which are not accurate enough for practical process design. In this article, these advanced process simulation technologies are reviewed, and, from the results of suitable process simulations, a new etching system that automatically controls the etching properties is proposed to enable stable CMOS device fabrication with high yields.

  2. Cryogenic helium gas circulation system for advanced characterization of superconducting cables and other devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamidi, Sastry; Kim, Chul Han; Kim, Jae-Ho; Crook, Danny; Dale, Steinar

    2012-04-01

    A versatile cryogenic test bed, based on circulating cryogenic helium gas, has been designed, fabricated, and installed at the Florida State University Center for Advanced Power Systems (FSU-CAPS). The test bed is being used to understand the benefits of integrating the cryogenic systems of multiple superconducting power devices. The helium circulation system operates with four sets of cryocooler and heat exchanger combinations. The maximum operating pressure of the system is 2.1 MPa. The efficacy of helium circulation systems in cooling superconducting power devices is evaluated using a 30-m-long simulated superconducting cable in a flexible cryostat. Experiments were conducted at various mass flow rates and a variety of heat load profiles. A 1-D thermal model was developed to understand the effect of the gas flow parameters on the thermal gradients along the cable. Experimental results are in close agreement with the results from the thermal model.

  3. Optical system design for the charge exchange spectroscopy of the Korea superconducting tokamak advanced research device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Seungtae; Ko, Won-Ha

    2011-04-01

    The collective optical design is described for the charge exchange spectroscopy (CES) of the Korea superconducting tokamak advanced research (KSTAR) device. The CES diagnostic measures the ion temperature of carbon and other impurities, in conjunction with the neutral heating beam in KSTAR. The visible light from the plasma is concentrated via collection optics and imaged onto quartz fibers. The collection optics in the system is the key component for the CES system. The final design is derived through four steps and its performance is examined in a simulation step. In this paper, the design details of the collective optical system for the KSTAR CES are discussed.

  4. Management of severe obstructive sleep apnea using mandibular advancement devices with auto continuous positive airway pressures

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Rashmi; Dubey, Abhishek; Kant, Surya; Singh, Balendra Pratap

    2015-01-01

    The use of continuous positive airway pressures (CPAP) is considered standard treatment of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Treatment of the disease poses a great challenge not only for its diagnostic purpose but also for its treatment part. In about 29-83% of the patients, treatment is difficult because of non-compliance resulting due to high pressures, air leaks and other related issues. In such situations, alternative methods of treatment need to be looked for so as to ascertain better management. Mandibular advancement devices along with CPAP may show better treatment outcome in specific situations. PMID:25814802

  5. Development of the Vibration Isolation System for the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niebuhr, Jason H.; Hagen, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the Vibration Isolation System for the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device from conceptual design to lessons learned. Maintaining a micro-g environment on the International Space Station requires that experiment racks and major vibration sources be isolated. The challenge in characterizing exercise loads and testing the system in the presence of gravity led to a decision to qualify the system by analysis. Available data suggests that the system is successful in attenuating loads, yet there has been a major component failure and several procedural issues during its 3 years of operational use.

  6. Computational Models of Exercise on the Advanced Resistance Exercise Device (ARED)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newby, Nate; Caldwell, Erin; Scott-Pandorf, Melissa; Peters,Brian; Fincke, Renita; DeWitt, John; Poutz-Snyder, Lori

    2011-01-01

    Muscle and bone loss remain a concern for crew returning from space flight. The advanced resistance exercise device (ARED) is used for on-orbit resistance exercise to help mitigate these losses. However, characterization of how the ARED loads the body in microgravity has yet to be determined. Computational models allow us to analyze ARED exercise in both 1G and 0G environments. To this end, biomechanical models of the squat, single-leg squat, and deadlift exercise on the ARED have been developed to further investigate bone and muscle forces resulting from the exercises.

  7. Certifying the dimension of classical and quantum systems in a prepare-and-measure scenario with independent devices.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Joseph; Quintino, Marco Túlio; Brunner, Nicolas

    2014-04-11

    We consider the problem of testing the dimension of uncharacterized classical and quantum systems in a prepare-and-measure setup. Here we assume the preparation and measurement devices to be independent, thereby making the problem nonconvex. We present a simple method for generating nonlinear dimension witnesses for systems of arbitrary dimension. The simplest of our witnesses is highly robust to technical imperfections, and can certify the use of qubits in the presence of arbitrary noise and arbitrarily low detection efficiency. Finally, we show that this witness can be used to certify the presence of randomness, suggesting applications in quantum information processing. PMID:24765929

  8. A scanning probe-based pick-and-place procedure for assembly of integrated quantum optical hybrid devices.

    PubMed

    Schell, Andreas W; Kewes, Günter; Schröder, Tim; Wolters, Janik; Aichele, Thomas; Benson, Oliver

    2011-07-01

    Integrated quantum optical hybrid devices consist of fundamental constituents such as single emitters and tailored photonic nanostructures. A reliable fabrication method requires the controlled deposition of active nanoparticles on arbitrary nanostructures with highest precision. Here, we describe an easily adaptable technique that employs picking and placing of nanoparticles with an atomic force microscope combined with a confocal setup. In this way, both the topography and the optical response can be monitored simultaneously before and after the assembly. The technique can be applied to arbitrary particles. Here, we focus on nanodiamonds containing single nitrogen vacancy centers, which are particularly interesting for quantum optical experiments on the single photon and single emitter level.

  9. [Objective surgery -- advanced robotic devices and simulators used for surgical skill assessment].

    PubMed

    Suhánszki, Norbert; Haidegger, Tamás

    2014-12-01

    Robotic assistance became a leading trend in minimally invasive surgery, which is based on the global success of laparoscopic surgery. Manual laparoscopy requires advanced skills and capabilities, which is acquired through tedious learning procedure, while da Vinci type surgical systems offer intuitive control and advanced ergonomics. Nevertheless, in either case, the key issue is to be able to assess objectively the surgeons' skills and capabilities. Robotic devices offer radically new way to collect data during surgical procedures, opening the space for new ways of skill parameterization. This may be revolutionary in MIS training, given the new and objective surgical curriculum and examination methods. The article reviews currently developed skill assessment techniques for robotic surgery and simulators, thoroughly inspecting their validation procedure and utility. In the coming years, these methods will become the mainstream of Western surgical education.

  10. Quantum optics, cavity QED, and quantum optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meystre, Pierre

    2013-05-01

    Quantum optomechanics provides a universal tool to achieve the quantum control of mechanical motion. It does that in devices spanning a vast range of parameters, with mechanical frequencies from a few Hertz to GHz, and with masses from 10-20 g to several kilos. Its underlying ideas can be traced back to the study of gravitational wave antennas, quantum optics, cavity QED and laser cooling which, when combined with the recent availability of advanced micromechanical and nanomechanical devices, opens a path to the realization of macroscopic mechanical systems that operate deep in the quantum regime. At the fundamental level this development paves the way to experiments that will lead to a more profound understanding of quantum mechanics; and from the point of view of applications, quantum optomechanical techniques will provide motion and force sensing near the fundamental limit imposed by quantum mechanics (quantum metrology) and significantly expand the toolbox of quantum information science. After a brief summary of key historical developments, the talk will give a broad overview of the current state of the art of quantum optomechanics, and comment on future prospects both in applied and in fundamental science. Work supported by NSF, ARO and the DARPA QuASAR and ORCHID programs.

  11. Implementation of continuous-variable quantum key distribution with composable and one-sided-device-independent security against coherent attacks.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Tobias; Händchen, Vitus; Duhme, Jörg; Furrer, Fabian; Franz, Torsten; Pacher, Christoph; Werner, Reinhard F; Schnabel, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Secret communication over public channels is one of the central pillars of a modern information society. Using quantum key distribution this is achieved without relying on the hardness of mathematical problems, which might be compromised by improved algorithms or by future quantum computers. State-of-the-art quantum key distribution requires composable security against coherent attacks for a finite number of distributed quantum states as well as robustness against implementation side channels. Here we present an implementation of continuous-variable quantum key distribution satisfying these requirements. Our implementation is based on the distribution of continuous-variable Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entangled light. It is one-sided device independent, which means the security of the generated key is independent of any memoryfree attacks on the remote detector. Since continuous-variable encoding is compatible with conventional optical communication technology, our work is a step towards practical implementations of quantum key distribution with state-of-the-art security based solely on telecom components. PMID:26514280

  12. Implementation of continuous-variable quantum key distribution with composable and one-sided-device-independent security against coherent attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, Tobias; Händchen, Vitus; Duhme, Jörg; Furrer, Fabian; Franz, Torsten; Pacher, Christoph; Werner, Reinhard F.; Schnabel, Roman

    2015-10-01

    Secret communication over public channels is one of the central pillars of a modern information society. Using quantum key distribution this is achieved without relying on the hardness of mathematical problems, which might be compromised by improved algorithms or by future quantum computers. State-of-the-art quantum key distribution requires composable security against coherent attacks for a finite number of distributed quantum states as well as robustness against implementation side channels. Here we present an implementation of continuous-variable quantum key distribution satisfying these requirements. Our implementation is based on the distribution of continuous-variable Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entangled light. It is one-sided device independent, which means the security of the generated key is independent of any memoryfree attacks on the remote detector. Since continuous-variable encoding is compatible with conventional optical communication technology, our work is a step towards practical implementations of quantum key distribution with state-of-the-art security based solely on telecom components.

  13. Implementation of continuous-variable quantum key distribution with composable and one-sided-device-independent security against coherent attacks

    PubMed Central

    Gehring, Tobias; Händchen, Vitus; Duhme, Jörg; Furrer, Fabian; Franz, Torsten; Pacher, Christoph; Werner, Reinhard F.; Schnabel, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Secret communication over public channels is one of the central pillars of a modern information society. Using quantum key distribution this is achieved without relying on the hardness of mathematical problems, which might be compromised by improved algorithms or by future quantum computers. State-of-the-art quantum key distribution requires composable security against coherent attacks for a finite number of distributed quantum states as well as robustness against implementation side channels. Here we present an implementation of continuous-variable quantum key distribution satisfying these requirements. Our implementation is based on the distribution of continuous-variable Einstein–Podolsky–Rosen entangled light. It is one-sided device independent, which means the security of the generated key is independent of any memoryfree attacks on the remote detector. Since continuous-variable encoding is compatible with conventional optical communication technology, our work is a step towards practical implementations of quantum key distribution with state-of-the-art security based solely on telecom components. PMID:26514280

  14. Implementation of continuous-variable quantum key distribution with composable and one-sided-device-independent security against coherent attacks.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Tobias; Händchen, Vitus; Duhme, Jörg; Furrer, Fabian; Franz, Torsten; Pacher, Christoph; Werner, Reinhard F; Schnabel, Roman

    2015-10-30

    Secret communication over public channels is one of the central pillars of a modern information society. Using quantum key distribution this is achieved without relying on the hardness of mathematical problems, which might be compromised by improved algorithms or by future quantum computers. State-of-the-art quantum key distribution requires composable security against coherent attacks for a finite number of distributed quantum states as well as robustness against implementation side channels. Here we present an implementation of continuous-variable quantum key distribution satisfying these requirements. Our implementation is based on the distribution of continuous-variable Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entangled light. It is one-sided device independent, which means the security of the generated key is independent of any memoryfree attacks on the remote detector. Since continuous-variable encoding is compatible with conventional optical communication technology, our work is a step towards practical implementations of quantum key distribution with state-of-the-art security based solely on telecom components.

  15. Combination of a Sample Pretreatment Microfluidic Device with a Photoluminescent Graphene Oxide Quantum Dot Sensor for Trace Lead Detection.

    PubMed

    Park, Minsu; Ha, Hyun Dong; Kim, Yong Tae; Jung, Jae Hwan; Kim, Shin-Hyun; Kim, Do Hyun; Seo, Tae Seok

    2015-11-01

    A novel trace lead ion (Pb(2+)) detection platform by combining a microfluidic sample pretreatment device with a DNA aptamer linked photoluminescent graphene oxide quantum dot (GOQD) sensor was proposed. The multilayered microdevice included a microchamber which was packed with cation exchange resins for preconcentrating metal ions. The sample loading and recovery were automatically actuated by a peristaltic polydimethylsiloxane micropump with a flow rate of 84 μL/min. Effects of the micropump actuation time, metal ion concentration, pH, and the volumes of the sample and eluent on the metal ion capture and preconcentration efficiency were investigated on a chip. The Pb(2+) samples whose concentrations ranged from 0.48 nM to 1.2 μM were successfully recovered with a preconcentration factor value between 4 and 5. Then, the preconcentrated metal ions were quantitatively analyzed with a DNA aptamer modified GOQD. The DNA aptamer on the GOQD specifically captured the target Pb(2+) which can induce electron transfer from GOQD to Pb(2+) upon UV irradiation, thereby resulting in the fluorescence quenching of the GOQD. The disturbing effect of foreign anions on the Pb(2+) detection and the spiked Pb(2+) real samples were also analyzed. The proposed GOQD metal ion sensor exhibited highly sensitive Pb(2+) detection with a detection limit of 0.64 nM and a dynamic range from 1 to 1000 nM. The on-chip preconcentration of the trace metal ions from a large-volume sample followed by the metal ion detection by the fluorescent GOQD sensor can provide an advanced platform for on-site water pollution screening. PMID:26456631

  16. The Physics of Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falci, Giuseppe; Paladino, Elisabette

    2015-10-01

    Quantum Computation has emerged in the past decades as a consequence of down-scaling of electronic devices to the mesoscopic regime and of advances in the ability of controlling and measuring microscopic quantum systems. QC has many interdisciplinary aspects, ranging from physics and chemistry to mathematics and computer science. In these lecture notes we focus on physical hardware, present day challenges and future directions for design of quantum architectures.

  17. Fabrication of a white electroluminescent device based on bilayered yellow and blue quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-Hoon; Lee, Ki-Heon; Kang, Hee-Don; Park, Byoungnam; Hwang, Jun Yeon; Jang, Ho Seong; Do, Young Rag; Yang, Heesun

    2015-03-01

    Until now most work on colloidal quantum dot-light-emitting diodes (QLEDs) has been focused on the improvement of the electroluminescent (EL) performance of monochromatic devices, and multi-colored white QLEDs comprising more than one type of QD emitter have been rarely investigated. To demonstrate a white EL as a result of color mixing between blue and yellow, herein a unique combination of two dissimilar QDs of blue- CdZnS/ZnS plus a yellow-emitting Cu-In-S (CIS)/ZnS is used for the formation of the emitting layer (EML) of a multilayered QLED. First, the QLED consisting of a single EML randomly mixed with two QDs is fabricated, however, its EL is dominated by blue emission with the contribution of yellow emission substantially weaker. Thus, another EML configuration is devised in the form of a QD bilayer with two stacking sequences of CdZnS/ZnS//CIS/ZnS QD and vice versa. The QLED with the former stacking sequence shows an overwhelming contribution of blue EL, similar to the mixed QD EML-based device. Upon applying the oppositely stacked QD bilayer of CIS/ZnS//CdZnS/ZnS, however, a bicolored white EL can be successfully achieved by means of the effective extension of the radiative excitonic recombination zone throughout both QD EML regions. Such QD EML configuration-dependent EL results, which are discussed primarily using the proposed device energy level diagram, strongly suggest that the positional design of individual QD emitters is a critical factor for the realization of multicolored, white emissive devices.Until now most work on colloidal quantum dot-light-emitting diodes (QLEDs) has been focused on the improvement of the electroluminescent (EL) performance of monochromatic devices, and multi-colored white QLEDs comprising more than one type of QD emitter have been rarely investigated. To demonstrate a white EL as a result of color mixing between blue and yellow, herein a unique combination of two dissimilar QDs of blue- CdZnS/ZnS plus a yellow-emitting Cu

  18. Stress-induced Effects Caused by 3D IC TSV Packaging in Advanced Semiconductor Device Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Sukharev, V.; Kteyan, A.; Choy, J.-H.; Hovsepyan, H.; Markosian, A.; Zschech, E.; Huebner, R.

    2011-11-10

    Potential challenges with managing mechanical stress and the consequent effects on device performance for advanced 3D through-silicon-via (TSV) based technologies are outlined. The paper addresses the growing need in a simulation-based design verification flow capable to analyze a design of 3D IC stacks and to determine across-die out-of-spec variations in device electrical characteristics caused by the layout and through-silicon-via (TSV)/package-induced mechanical stress. The limited characterization/measurement capabilities for 3D IC stacks and a strict ''good die'' requirement make this type of analysis critical for the achievement of an acceptable level of functional and parametric yield and reliability. The paper focuses on the development of a design-for-manufacturability (DFM) type of methodology for managing mechanical stresses during a sequence of designs of 3D TSV-based dies, stacks and packages. A set of physics-based compact models for a multi-scale simulation to assess the mechanical stress across the device layers in silicon chips stacked and packaged with the 3D TSV technology is proposed. A calibration technique based on fitting to measured stress components and electrical characteristics of the test-chip devices is presented. A strategy for generation of a simulation feeding data and respective materials characterization approach are proposed, with the goal to generate a database for multi-scale material parameters of wafer-level and package-level structures. For model validation, high-resolution strain measurements in Si channels of the test-chip devices are needed. At the nanoscale, the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is the only technique available for sub-10 nm strain measurements so far.

  19. Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution for Scarani-Acin-Ribordy-Gisin 04 protocol.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Akihiro; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Ikuta, Rikizo; Yamamoto, Takashi; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    The measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI QKD) was proposed to make BB84 completely free from any side-channel in detectors. Like in prepare & measure QKD, the use of other protocols in MDI setting would be advantageous in some practical situations. In this paper, we consider SARG04 protocol in MDI setting. The prepare & measure SARG04 is proven to be able to generate a key up to two-photon emission events. In MDI setting we show that the key generation is possible from the event with single or two-photon emission by a party and single-photon emission by the other party, but the two-photon emission event by both parties cannot contribute to the key generation. On the contrary to prepare & measure SARG04 protocol where the experimental setup is exactly the same as BB84, the measurement setup for SARG04 in MDI setting cannot be the same as that for BB84 since the measurement setup for BB84 in MDI setting induces too many bit errors. To overcome this problem, we propose two alternative experimental setups, and we simulate the resulting key rate. Our study highlights the requirements that MDI QKD poses on us regarding with the implementation of a variety of QKD protocols. PMID:24913431

  20. Superconducting quantum interference device detection of magnetically tagged micro-organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Helene L.; Lee, SeungKyun; Myers, Whittier R.; Chemla, Yann R.; Poon, Yan; Cho, H. M.; McDermott, Robert; Stevens, Raymond C.; Alper, Mark; Clarke, John

    2002-02-01

    A fast and versatile technique has been developed for detecting small quantities of specific microorganisms or molecules with high specificity. The target analytes are bound to a substrate and placed in the measurement cell of a microscope based on a high-transition temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). A solution containing nanometer-size magnetite particles, coated with antibodies specific to the target, is added. The particles, which bind to the target via the antibody- antigen interaction, are superparamagnetic with a Neel relaxation time of ~1s. A pulsed magnetic field aligns the dipole moments, and the SQUID measures the magnetic relaxation signal when the field is turned off. Unbound magnetic particles relax rapidly (~15microsecond(s) ) by Brownian rotation and are not detected. On the other hand, particles bound to targets cannot rotate and instead relax slowly by the Neel mechanism. As a result, only bound particles contribute to the signal, allowing for quantification of the number of targets present without the need for a wash step. The current system can detect as few as 2000 magnetic particles. This technique could be used to detect a wide range of bacteria, viruses, and molecules, with potential applications in the food industry, clinical settings, or research laboratories.

  1. Davisson-Germer Prize Talk: Atomically Uniform Thin Films as Quantum Wells and Device Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Tai C.

    2015-03-01

    Atomically uniform films can be made for various overlayer-substrate combinations (such as Ag, Pb, Sb, ...on Si, Ge, Fe, ...), many of which are not even lattice matched. These films show remarkable property variations as the film thickness is built up in atomic-layer increments. The thermal stability of the film, its work function, electron-phonon coupling, superconducting transition temperature, etc. exhibit damped and modulated oscillations as the film thickness increases toward the bulk limit. The underlying physics can be understood generally in terms of the energetics of a coarsened electronic structure of thin films and more specifically in terms of a ''one-dimensional shell effect'' - the quantized electronic levels in the film are progressively filled at increasing film thicknesses just like the elemental atomic shells in going through the periodic table. The phase and the amplitude of the oscillations can be tailored by surface/interface engineering that leads to changes in the surface potential and the interface Schottky barrier or band mismatch. These quantum size and confinement effects are important and observable at film thicknesses well in the realm of practical device dimensions and at room temperature, suggesting opportunities for applications. When the films are made of topologically nontrivial materials, the electron spin and its transport become relevant parameters. This talk will discuss issues related to uniform film growth, general trends in connection with reduced dimensions, surprising findings including phonon-mediated pseudogaps, and technology potential.

  2. Coherent superposition of current flows in an atomtronic quantum interference device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghamalyan, Davit; Cominotti, Marco; Rizzi, Matteo; Rossini, Davide; Hekking, Frank; Minguzzi, Anna; Kwek, Leong-Chuan; Amico, Luigi

    2015-04-01

    We consider a correlated Bose gas tightly confined into a ring shaped lattice, in the presence of an artificial gauge potential inducing a persistent current through it. A weak link painted on the ring acts as a source of coherent back-scattering for the propagating gas, interfering with the forward scattered current. This system defines an atomic counterpart of the rf-SQUID: the atomtronics quantum interference device. The goal of the present study is to corroborate the emergence of an effective two-level system in such a setup and to assess its quality, in terms of its inner resolution and its separation from the rest of the many-body spectrum, across the different physical regimes. In order to achieve this aim, we examine the dependence of the qubit energy gap on the bosonic density, the interaction strength, and the barrier depth, and we show how the superposition between current states appears in the momentum distribution (time-of-flight) images. A mesoscopic ring lattice with intermediate-to-strong interactions and weak barrier depth is found to be a favorable candidate for setting up, manipulating and probing a qubit in the next generation of atomic experiments.

  3. Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution for Scarani-Acin-Ribordy-Gisin 04 protocol

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Akihiro; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Ikuta, Rikizo; Yamamoto, Takashi; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    The measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI QKD) was proposed to make BB84 completely free from any side-channel in detectors. Like in prepare & measure QKD, the use of other protocols in MDI setting would be advantageous in some practical situations. In this paper, we consider SARG04 protocol in MDI setting. The prepare & measure SARG04 is proven to be able to generate a key up to two-photon emission events. In MDI setting we show that the key generation is possible from the event with single or two-photon emission by a party and single-photon emission by the other party, but the two-photon emission event by both parties cannot contribute to the key generation. On the contrary to prepare & measure SARG04 protocol where the experimental setup is exactly the same as BB84, the measurement setup for SARG04 in MDI setting cannot be the same as that for BB84 since the measurement setup for BB84 in MDI setting induces too many bit errors. To overcome this problem, we propose two alternative experimental setups, and we simulate the resulting key rate. Our study highlights the requirements that MDI QKD poses on us regarding with the implementation of a variety of QKD protocols. PMID:24913431

  4. Detection of bacteria in suspension using a superconducting Quantum interference device

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, H.L.; Myers, W.R.; Vreeland, V.J.; Alper, J.D.; Bertozzi, C.R.; Clarke, J.

    2003-06-09

    We demonstrate a technique for detecting magnetically-labeled Listeria monocytogenes and for measuring the binding rate between antibody-linked magnetic particles and bacteria. This assay, which is both sensitive and straightforward to perform, can quantify specific bacteria in a sample without the need to immobilize the bacteria or wash away unbound magnetic particles. In the measurement, we add 50 nm diameter superparamagnetic particles, coated with antibodies, to a liquid sample containing L. monocytogenes. We apply a pulsed magnetic field to align the magnetic dipole moments and use a high transition temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID), an extremely sensitive detector of magnetic flux, to measure the magnetic relaxation signal when the field is turned off. Unbound particles randomize direction by Brownian rotation too quickly to be detected. In contrast, particles bound to L. monocytogenes are effectively immobilized and relax in about 1 s by rotation of the internal dipole moment. This Neel relaxation process is detected by the SQUID. The measurements indicate a detection limit of (5.6 {+-} 1.1) x 10{sup 6} L. monocytogenes for a 20 {micro}L sample volume. If the sample volume were reduced to 1 nL, we estimate that the detection limit could be improved to 230 {+-} 40 L. monocytogenes cells. Time-resolved measurements yield the binding rate between the particles and bacteria.

  5. Self-heterodyne detection of the in situ phase of an atomic superconducting quantum interference device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, R.; Kumar, A.; Eckel, S.; Jendrzejewski, F.; Campbell, G. K.; Edwards, Mark; Tiesinga, E.

    2015-09-01

    We present theoretical and experimental analysis of an interferometric measurement of the in situ phase drop across and current flow through a rotating barrier in a toroidal Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). This experiment is the atomic analog of the rf-superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The phase drop is extracted from a spiral-shaped density profile created by the spatial interference of the expanding toroidal BEC and a reference BEC after release from all trapping potentials. We characterize the interferometer when it contains a single particle, which is initially in a coherent superposition of a torus and reference state, as well as when it contains a many-body state in the mean-field approximation. The single-particle picture is sufficient to explain the origin of the spirals, to relate the phase-drop across the barrier to the geometry of a spiral, and to bound the expansion times for which the in situ phase can be accurately determined. Mean-field estimates and numerical simulations show that the interatomic interactions shorten the expansion time scales compared to the single-particle case. Finally, we compare the mean-field simulations with our experimental data and confirm that the interferometer indeed accurately measures the in situ phase drop.

  6. Interface traps and quantum size effects on the retention time in nanoscale memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Ling-Feng

    2013-08-01

    Based on the analysis of Poisson equation, an analytical surface potential model including interface charge density for nanocrystalline (NC) germanium (Ge) memory devices with p-type silicon substrate has been proposed. Thus, the effects of Pb defects at Si(110)/SiO2, Si(111)/SiO2, and Si(100)/SiO2 interfaces on the retention time have been calculated after quantum size effects have been considered. The results show that the interface trap density has a large effect on the electric field across the tunneling oxide layer and leakage current. This letter demonstrates that the retention time firstly increases with the decrease in diameter of NC Ge and then rapidly decreases with the diameter when it is a few nanometers. This implies that the interface defects, its energy distribution, and the NC size should be seriously considered in the aim to improve the retention time from different technological processes. The experimental data reported in the literature support the theoretical expectation.

  7. Individual Mammalian Cell Magnetic Measurements with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmstrom, Johanna C.; Brewer, Kimberly; Tee, Sui Seng; Theis, Eric; Rutt, Brian; Moler, Kathryn A.

    2015-03-01

    Magnetism can be introduced into otherwise nonmagnetic cells by the uptake of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles. SPIO nanoparticles are used in numerous biomedical applications including cellular therapies and targeted drug delivery. Currently there are few tools capable of characterizing individual magnetic nanoparticles and the magnetic properties of individual mammalian cells loaded with SPIO. Our scanning superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) are good candidates for these measurements due to their high sensitivity to magnetic dipole moments (approx. 200 μb/ √Hz) In this study, we use a scanning SQUID to image the magnetic flux from SPIO loaded H1299 lung cancer cells. We find that the magnetic moment spatially varies inside the cell with each cell having a unique distribution of moments. We also correlate these magnetic images with optical and scanning electron microscope images. These results show that the SQUID is a useful tool for imaging biological magnetism. The visualization of single cell magnetism and the quantification of magnetic dipole moments in magnetically labeled cells can be used to optimize conventional biological magnetic imaging techniques, such as MRI.

  8. Precision quantum efficiency measurements on 1.7 micron near infrared devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubnell, M.; Brown, M. G.; Karabina, A.; Lorenzon, W.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Tarlé, G.; Weaverdyck, C.

    2008-07-01

    High detector quantum efficiency (QE) can greatly improve speed and performance of wide field instruments that strive for fast precision photometry. SNAP, a proposed satellite mission dedicated to exploring the nature of the dark energy will employ a very large focal plane instrumented with about equal number of CCD and NIR sensors totaling more than 600 million pixels covering roughly 0.7 square degrees on the sky. To precisely characterize the NIR detector QE, the SNAP project has put in place a test set-up capable of measuring absolute QE at the 5% level with the goal of ultimately reaching a precision better than 2%. Illumination of the NIR detectors is provided by either a quartz tungsten halogen lamp combined with a set of narrow band filters or a manually tunable monochromator. The two light sources feed an integrating sphere at a distance of roughly 60 cm from the detector to be tested and a calibrated InGaAs photodiode, mounted adjacent to the NIR detector provides absolute photon flux measurements. This paper describes instrumentation, performance and measurement procedures and summarizes results of detailed characterization of the QE on several SNAP devices as a function of wavelength.

  9. Nanohertz frequency determination for the gravity probe B high frequency superconducting quantum interference device signal.

    PubMed

    Salomon, M; Conklin, J W; Kozaczuk, J; Berberian, J E; Keiser, G M; Silbergleit, A S; Worden, P; Santiago, D I

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we present a method to measure the frequency and the frequency change rate of a digital signal. This method consists of three consecutive algorithms: frequency interpolation, phase differencing, and a third algorithm specifically designed and tested by the authors. The succession of these three algorithms allowed a 5 parts in 10(10) resolution in frequency determination. The algorithm developed by the authors can be applied to a sampled scalar signal such that a model linking the harmonics of its main frequency to the underlying physical phenomenon is available. This method was developed in the framework of the gravity probe B (GP-B) mission. It was applied to the high frequency (HF) component of GP-B's superconducting quantum interference device signal, whose main frequency f(z) is close to the spin frequency of the gyroscopes used in the experiment. A 30 nHz resolution in signal frequency and a 0.1 pHz/s resolution in its decay rate were achieved out of a succession of 1.86 s-long stretches of signal sampled at 2200 Hz. This paper describes the underlying theory of the frequency measurement method as well as its application to GP-B's HF science signal.

  10. Graphene Quantum Dots Interfaced with Single Bacterial Spore for Bio-Electromechanical Devices: A Graphene Cytobot

    PubMed Central

    Sreeprasad, T. S.; Nguyen, Phong; Alshogeathri, Ahmed; Hibbeler, Luke; Martinez, Fabian; McNeil, Nolan; Berry, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    The nanoarchitecture and micromachinery of a cell can be leveraged to fabricate sophisticated cell-driven devices. This requires a coherent strategy to derive cell's mechanistic abilities, microconstruct, and chemical-texture towards such microtechnologies. For example, a microorganism's hydrophobic membrane encapsulating hygroscopic constituents allows it to sustainably withhold a high aquatic pressure. Further, it provides a rich surface chemistry available for nano-interfacing and a strong mechanical response to humidity. Here we demonstrate a route to incorporate a complex cellular structure into microelectromechanics by interfacing compatible graphene quantum dots (GQDs) with a highly responsive single spore microstructure. A sensitive and reproducible electron-tunneling width modulation of 1.63 nm within a network of GQDs chemically-secured on a spore was achieved via sporal hydraulics with a driving force of 299.75 Torrs (21.7% water at GQD junctions). The electron-transport activation energy and the Coulomb blockade threshold for the GQD network were 35 meV and 31 meV, respectively; while the inter-GQD capacitance increased by 1.12 folds at maximum hydraulic force. This is the first example of nano/bio interfacing with spores and will lead to the evolution of next-generation bio-derived microarchitectures, probes for cellular/biochemical processes, biomicrorobotic-mechanisms, and membranes for micromechanical actuation. PMID:25774962

  11. Subnanosecond control of excitons in coupled quantum well nanostructures: Photonic storage and Exciton Conveyer devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winbow, Alexander Graham

    Indirect excitons in GaAs coupled quantum well nanostructures are a versatile system for fundamental study of cold neutral bosonic gases and demonstration of novel optoelectronic devices based on excitons --- a bound electron--hole pair --- rather than electrons. Indirect exciton lifetimes range from nanoseconds to microseconds and cool rapidly after photoexcitation to the lattice temperature. Lithographically-patterned electrodes enable design of potential energy landscapes, and both energy and lifetime can be controlled in situ, rapidly, on timescales much shorter than the exciton lifetime. Such intrinsically optoelectronic devices can operate at speeds relevant to optical networks, and later be fabricated in other semiconductors for higher-temperature operation. Two different kinds of devices are demonstrated: Photon storage --- an optical memory --- with 250 ps rise time of the readout optical signal and storage time reaching microseconds was implemented with indirect excitons in CQW. The storage and release of photons was controlled by the gate voltage pulse, and the transient processes in the CQW studied by measuring the kinetics of the exciton emission spectra. This control of excitons on timescales much shorter than the exciton lifetime demonstrates the feasibility of studying excitons in in situ controlled electrostatic traps. The Exciton Conveyer is a laterally moving electrostatic lattice potential for actively transporting excitons. Generated by laterally modulated electrodes, the potential velocity and depth are controlled in situ by frequency and voltage. We observed exciton transport characterized by average exciton cloud spatial extension over several tens of microns, and observed dynamical localization--delocalization transitions for the excitons in the conveyer: In the localization regime of deeper potentials and moderate exciton density, excitons are moved by the conveyer; in the delocalized regime of shallower lattice potential or high exciton

  12. Realization of reliable solid-state quantum memory for photonic polarization qubit.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zong-Quan; Lin, Wei-Bin; Yang, Ming; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2012-05-11

    Faithfully storing an unknown quantum light state is essential to advanced quantum communication and distributed quantum computation applications. The required quantum memory must have high fidelity to improve the performance of a quantum network. Here we report the reversible transfer of photonic polarization states into collective atomic excitation in a compact solid-state device. The quantum memory is based on an atomic frequency comb (AFC) in rare-earth ion-doped crystals. We obtain up to 0.999 process fidelity for the storage and retrieval process of single-photon-level coherent pulse. This reliable quantum memory is a crucial step toward quantum networks based on solid-state devices.

  13. Evaluation of ExPress glaucoma filtration device in Indian patients with advanced glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Angmo, Dewang; Sharma, Reetika; Temkar, Shreyas; Dada, Tanuj

    2015-05-01

    ExPress glaucoma filtration device (GFD) has recently become available in India as a surgical option for glaucoma patients. We retrospectively evaluated the outcome of ExPress GFD in 12 eyes with advanced glaucoma with intraocular pressures (IOPs) not controlled on maximal tolerable medical therapy. The mean preoperative IOP of 29.58 ± 7.13 mmHg decreased to 17.0 ± 2.67 and 17.40 ± 0.89 mmHg at 6 and 12 months after surgery. Absolute success (IOP ≤ 18 mmHg, with no additional glaucoma medications) was achieved in eight cases (66.7%) and qualified success (IOP ≤ 18 mmHg, with additional glaucoma medications) in two cases (16.7%) at 1-year after surgery. Early intervention was needed in 4 patients; two underwent anterior chamber reformation while the other two required needling. Two patients required resurgery. There was no significant change in the best corrected visual acuity postoperatively (P = 0.37). ExPress GFD does not seem to offer a benefit over standard trabeculectomy in patients with advanced glaucomatous disease in terms of IOP control or complication rate. However, due to the small sample size with a heterogeneous mixture of primary and secondary glaucoma's, we await further studies with a larger sample size and long-term follow-up, to see how the device performs.

  14. Advances in Resistive Pulse Sensors: Devices bridging the void between molecular and microscopic detection

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Darby; Anderson, Will; Vogel, Robert; Trau, Matt

    2011-01-01

    Since the first reported use of a biological ion channel to detect differences in single stranded genomic base pairs in 1996, a renaissance in nanoscale resistive pulse sensors has ensued. This resurgence of a technique originally outlined and commercialized over fifty years ago has largely been driven by advances in nanoscaled fabrication, and ultimately, the prospect of a rapid and inexpensive means for genomic sequencing as well as other macromolecular characterization. In this pursuit, the potential application of these devices to characterize additional properties such as the size, shape, charge, and concentration of nanoscaled materials (10 – 900 nm) has been largely overlooked. Advances in nanotechnology and biotechnology are driving the need for simple yet sensitive individual object readout devices such as resistive pulse sensors. This review will examine the recent progress in pore-based sensing in the nanoscale range. A detailed analysis of three new types of pore sensors – in-series, parallel, and size-tunable pores – has been included. These pores offer improved measurement sensitivity over a wider particle size range. The fundamental physical chemistry of these techniques, which is still evolving, will be reviewed. PMID:22034585

  15. Evaluation of ExPress glaucoma filtration device in Indian patients with advanced glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Angmo, Dewang; Sharma, Reetika; Temkar, Shreyas; Dada, Tanuj

    2015-01-01

    ExPress glaucoma filtration device (GFD) has recently become available in India as a surgical option for glaucoma patients. We retrospectively evaluated the outcome of ExPress GFD in 12 eyes with advanced glaucoma with intraocular pressures (IOPs) not controlled on maximal tolerable medical therapy. The mean preoperative IOP of 29.58 ± 7.13 mmHg decreased to 17.0 ± 2.67 and 17.40 ± 0.89 mmHg at 6 and 12 months after surgery. Absolute success (IOP ≤ 18 mmHg, with no additional glaucoma medications) was achieved in eight cases (66.7%) and qualified success (IOP ≤ 18 mmHg, with additional glaucoma medications) in two cases (16.7%) at 1-year after surgery. Early intervention was needed in 4 patients; two underwent anterior chamber reformation while the other two required needling. Two patients required resurgery. There was no significant change in the best corrected visual acuity postoperatively (P = 0.37). ExPress GFD does not seem to offer a benefit over standard trabeculectomy in patients with advanced glaucomatous disease in terms of IOP control or complication rate. However, due to the small sample size with a heterogeneous mixture of primary and secondary glaucoma's, we await further studies with a larger sample size and long-term follow-up, to see how the device performs. PMID:26139813

  16. On-chip integration of suspended InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well devices with versatile functionalities.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wei; Yang, Yongchao; Gao, Xumin; Yuan, Jialei; Yuan, Wei; Zhu, Hongbo; Wang, Yongjin

    2016-03-21

    We propose, fabricate and demonstrate on-chip photonic integration of suspended InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) devices on the GaN-on-silicon platform. Both silicon removal and back wafer etching are conducted to obtain membrane-type devices, and suspended waveguides are used for the connection between p-n junction InGaN/GaN MQWs devices. As an in-plane data transmission system, the middle p-n junction InGaN/GaN MQWs device is used as a light emitting diode (LED) to deliver signals by modulating the intensity of the emitted light, and the other two devices act as photodetectors (PDs) to sense the light guided by the suspended waveguide and convert the photons into electrons, achieving 1 × 2 in-plane information transmission via visible light. Correspondingly, the three devices can function as independent PDs to realize multiple receivers for free space visible light communication. Further, the on-chip photonic platform can be used as an active electro-optical sensing system when the middle device acts as a PD and the other two devices serve as LEDs. The experimental results show that the auxiliary LED sources can enhance the amplitude of the induced photocurrent. PMID:27136794

  17. On-chip integration of suspended InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well devices with versatile functionalities.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wei; Yang, Yongchao; Gao, Xumin; Yuan, Jialei; Yuan, Wei; Zhu, Hongbo; Wang, Yongjin

    2016-03-21

    We propose, fabricate and demonstrate on-chip photonic integration of suspended InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) devices on the GaN-on-silicon platform. Both silicon removal and back wafer etching are conducted to obtain membrane-type devices, and suspended waveguides are used for the connection between p-n junction InGaN/GaN MQWs devices. As an in-plane data transmission system, the middle p-n junction InGaN/GaN MQWs device is used as a light emitting diode (LED) to deliver signals by modulating the intensity of the emitted light, and the other two devices act as photodetectors (PDs) to sense the light guided by the suspended waveguide and convert the photons into electrons, achieving 1 × 2 in-plane information transmission via visible light. Correspondingly, the three devices can function as independent PDs to realize multiple receivers for free space visible light communication. Further, the on-chip photonic platform can be used as an active electro-optical sensing system when the middle device acts as a PD and the other two devices serve as LEDs. The experimental results show that the auxiliary LED sources can enhance the amplitude of the induced photocurrent.

  18. Advances in methods and algorithms in a modern quantum chemistry program package.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yihan; Molnar, Laszlo Fusti; Jung, Yousung; Kussmann, Jörg; Ochsenfeld, Christian; Brown, Shawn T; Gilbert, Andrew T B; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V; Levchenko, Sergey V; O'Neill, Darragh P; DiStasio, Robert A; Lochan, Rohini C; Wang, Tao; Beran, Gregory J O; Besley, Nicholas A; Herbert, John M; Lin, Ching Yeh; Van Voorhis, Troy; Chien, Siu Hung; Sodt, Alex; Steele, Ryan P; Rassolov, Vitaly A; Maslen, Paul E; Korambath, Prakashan P; Adamson, Ross D; Austin, Brian; Baker, Jon; Byrd, Edward F C; Dachsel, Holger; Doerksen, Robert J; Dreuw, Andreas; Dunietz, Barry D; Dutoi, Anthony D; Furlani, Thomas R; Gwaltney, Steven R; Heyden, Andreas; Hirata, So; Hsu, Chao-Ping; Kedziora, Gary; Khalliulin, Rustam Z; Klunzinger, Phil; Lee, Aaron M; Lee, Michael S; Liang, Wanzhen; Lotan, Itay; Nair, Nikhil; Peters, Baron; Proynov, Emil I; Pieniazek, Piotr A; Rhee, Young Min; Ritchie, Jim; Rosta, Edina; Sherrill, C David; Simmonett, Andrew C; Subotnik, Joseph E; Woodcock, H Lee; Zhang, Weimin; Bell, Alexis T; Chakraborty, Arup K; Chipman, Daniel M; Keil, Frerich J; Warshel, Arieh; Hehre, Warren J; Schaefer, Henry F; Kong, Jing; Krylov, Anna I; Gill, Peter M W; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2006-07-21

    Advances in theory and algorithms for electronic structure calculations must be incorporated into program packages to enable them to become routinely used by the broader chemical community. This work reviews advances made over the past five years or so that constitute the major improvements contained in a new release of the Q-Chem quantum chemistry package, together with illustrative timings and applications. Specific developments discussed include fast methods for density functional theory calculations, linear scaling evaluation of energies, NMR chemical shifts and electric properties, fast auxiliary basis function methods for correlated energies and gradients, equation-of-motion coupled cluster methods for ground and excited states, geminal wavefunctions, embedding methods and techniques for exploring potential energy surfaces. PMID:16902710

  19. Numerical simulations of nanodiamond nitrogen-vacancy centers coupled with tapered optical fibers as hybrid quantum nanophotonic devices.

    PubMed

    Almokhtar, Mohamed; Fujiwara, Masazumi; Takashima, Hideaki; Takeuchi, Shigeki

    2014-08-25

    Tapered optical fibers are promising one-dimensional nanophotonic waveguides that can provide efficient coupling between their fundamental mode and quantum nanoemitters placed inside them. Here, we present numerical studies on the coupling of single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers (single point dipoles) in nanodiamonds with tapered fibers. Our results lead to two important conclusions: (1) A maximum coupling efficiency of 53.4% can be realized for the two fiber ends when the NV bare dipole is located at the center of the tapered fiber. (2) NV centers even in 100-nm-sized nanodiamonds where bulk-like optical properties were reported show a coupling efficiency of 22% at the taper surface, with the coupling efficiency monotonically decreasing as the nanodiamond size increases. These results will be helpful in guiding the development of hybrid quantum devices for applications in quantum information science. PMID:25321215

  20. Device physics vis-à-vis fundamental physics in Cold War America: the case of quantum optics.

    PubMed

    Bromberg, Joan Lisa

    2006-06-01

    Historians have convincingly shown the close ties U.S. physicists had with the military during the Cold War and have raised the question of whether this alliance affected the content of physics. Some have asserted that it distorted physics, shifting attention from fundamental problems to devices. Yet the papers of physicists in quantum electronics and quantum optics, fields that have been exemplary for those who hold the distortion thesis, show that the same scientists who worked on military devices simultaneously pursued fundamental and foundational topics. This essay examines one such physicist, Marlan O. Scully, with attention to both his extensive foundational studies and the way in which his applied and basic researches played off each other.

  1. Cu−In−Ga−S quantum dot composition-dependent device performance of electrically driven light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jong-Hoon; Lee, Ki-Heon; Jo, Dae-Yeon; Yang, Heesun; Lee, Yangjin; Hwang, Jun Yeon

    2014-09-29

    Colloidal synthesis of ternary and quaternary quantum dots (QDs) of In/Ga ratio-varied Cu−In{sub 1−x}−Ga{sub x}−S (CIGS) with nominal x = 0, 0.5, 0.7, and 1 and their application for the fabrication of quantum dot-light-emitting diodes (QLEDs) are reported. Four QLEDs having CIGS QDs with different compositions are all solution-processed in the framework of multilayered structure, where QD emitting layer is sandwiched by hybrid charge transport layers of poly(9-vinlycarbazole) and ZnO nanoparticles. The device performance such as luminance and efficiency is found to be strongly dependent on the composition of CIGS QDs, and well interpreted by the device energy level diagram proposed through the determination of QD valence band minima by photoelectron emission spectroscopic measurement.

  2. Material growth and device fabrication of terahertz quantum-cascade laser based on bound-to-continuum structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Rong; Wan, Wen-Jian; Zhang, Zhen-Zhen; Tan, Zhi-Yong; Cao, Jun-Cheng

    2014-10-01

    The terahertz quantum-cascade laser (THz QCL) based on bound-to-continuum structure is demonstrated. The X-ray diffraction measurement of the material shows a high crystalline quality of the active region. A THz QCL device was fabricated with semi-insulating surface-plasmon waveguide. The test device is lasing at about 3 THz and operating up to 60 K. It shows a single frequency property under different drive currents and temperatures. At 9 K, the maximum output power is greater than 2 mW with a threshold current density of 159 A/cm2.

  3. Giant relaxation oscillations in a very strongly hysteretic superconductive quantum interference device ring-tank circuit system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, T. D.; Prance, R. J.; Whiteman, R.; Prance, H.; Everitt, M. J.; Bulsara, A. R.; Ralph, J. F.

    2001-09-01

    In this article, we show that the radio frequency (rf) dynamical characteristics of a very strongly hysteretic superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) ring, coupled to a rf tank circuit resonator, display relaxation oscillations. We demonstrate that the overall form of these characteristics, together with the relaxation oscillations, can be modeled accurately by solving the quasiclassical nonlinear equations of motion for the system. We suggest that in these very strongly hysteretic regimes, SQUID ring-resonator systems may find application in logic and memory devices.

  4. Recent advances in computational methodology for simulation of mechanical circulatory assist devices

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, Alison L.; Bazilevs, Yuri; Long, Christopher C.; Behr, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Ventricular assist devices (VADs) provide mechanical circulatory support to offload the work of one or both ventricles during heart failure. They are used in the clinical setting as destination therapy, as bridge to transplant, or more recently as bridge to recovery to allow for myocardial remodeling. Recent developments in computational simulation allow for detailed assessment of VAD hemodynamics for device design and optimization for both children and adults. Here, we provide a focused review of the recent literature on finite element methods and optimization for VAD simulations. As VAD designs typically fall into two categories, pulsatile and continuous flow devices, we separately address computational challenges of both types of designs, and the interaction with the circulatory system with three representative case studies. In particular, we focus on recent advancements in finite element methodology that has increased the fidelity of VAD simulations. We outline key challenges, which extend to the incorporation of biological response such as thrombosis and hemolysis, as well as shape optimization methods and challenges in computational methodology. PMID:24449607

  5. Mechanism Development, Testing, and Lessons Learned for the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamoreaux, Christopher D.; Landeck, Mark E.

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) has been developed at NASA Johnson Space Center, for the International Space Station (ISS) program. ARED is a multi-exercise, high-load resistive exercise device, designed for long duration, human space missions. ARED will enable astronauts to effectively maintain their muscle strength and bone mass in the micro-gravity environment more effectively than any other existing devices. ARED's resistance is provided via two, 20.3 cm (8 in) diameter vacuum cylinders, which provide a nearly constant resistance source. ARED also has a means to simulate the inertia that is felt during a 1-G exercise routine via the flywheel subassembly, which is directly tied to the motion of the ARED cylinders. ARED is scheduled to fly on flight ULF 2 to the ISS and will be located in Node 1. Presently, ARED is in the middle of its qualification and acceptance test program. An extensive testing program and engineering evaluation has increased the reliability of ARED by bringing potential design issues to light before flight production. Some of those design issues, resolutions, and design details will be discussed in this paper.

  6. Advanced Multi-Junction Photovoltaic Device Optimization For High Temperature Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherif, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Almost all solar cells available today for space or terrestrial applications are optimized for low temperature or "room temperature" operations, where cell performances demonstrate favourable efficiency figures. The fact is in many space applications, as well as when using solar concentrators, operating cell temperature are typically highly elevated, where cells outputs are severely depreciated. In this paper, a novel approach for the optimization of multi-junction photovoltaic devices at such high expected operating temperature is presented. The device optimization is carried out on the novel cell physical model previously developed at the Naval Postgraduate School using the SILVACO software tools [1]. Taking into account the high cost of research and experimentation involved with the development of advanced cells, this successful modelling technique was introduced and detailed results were previously presented by the author [2]. The flexibility of the proposed methodology is demonstrated and example results are shown throughout the whole process. The research demonstrated the capability of developing a realistic model of any type of solar cell, as well as thermo-photovoltaic devices. Details of an example model of an InGaP/GaAs/Ge multi-junction cell was prepared and fully simulated. The major stages of the process are explained and the simulation results are compared to published experimental data. An example of cell parameters optimization for high operating temperature is also presented. Individual junction layer optimization was accomplished through the use of a genetic search algorithm implemented in Matlab.

  7. Influence of the asymmetry of the potential on the dynamics of a two-level superconducting quantum interference device qubit

    SciTech Connect

    Aravantinos-Zafiris, Nikolaos; Paspalakis, Emmanuel

    2005-07-15

    We analyze the interaction of a two-level superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) qubit with a classical microwave pulse. The rf-SQUID is characterized by an asymmetric double well potential that gives rise to diagonal matrix elements. The diagonal matrix elements are accounted for in the interaction of the microwave pulse with the SQUID. We present analytical results that correctly describe the system's dynamics.

  8. Note: simultaneous measurements of magnetization and electrical transport signal by a reconstructed superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Wang, H L; Yu, X Z; Wang, S L; Chen, L; Zhao, J H

    2013-08-01

    We have developed a sample rod which makes the conventional superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer capable of performing magnetization and electrical transport measurements simultaneously. The sample holder attached to the end of a 140 cm long sample rod is a nonmagnetic drinking straw or a 1.5 mm wide silicon strip with small magnetic background signal. Ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As films are used to test the new sample rod, and the results are in good agreement with previous report.

  9. Realizing the measure-device-independent quantum-key-distribution with passive heralded-single photon sources

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qin; Zhou, Xing-Yu; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we put forward a new approach towards realizing measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with passive heralded single-photon sources. In this approach, both Alice and Bob prepare the parametric down-conversion source, where the heralding photons are labeled according to different types of clicks from the local detectors, and the heralded ones can correspondingly be marked with different tags at the receiver’s side. Then one can obtain four sets of data through using only one-intensity of pump light by observing different kinds of clicks of local detectors. By employing the newest formulae to do parameter estimation, we could achieve very precise prediction for the two-single-photon pulse contribution. Furthermore, by carrying out corresponding numerical simulations, we compare the new method with other practical schemes of measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution. We demonstrate that our new proposed passive scheme can exhibit remarkable improvement over the conventional three-intensity decoy-state measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with either heralded single-photon sources or weak coherent sources. Besides, it does not need intensity modulation and can thus diminish source-error defects existing in several other active decoy-state methods. Therefore, if taking intensity modulating errors into account, our new method will show even more brilliant performance. PMID:27759085

  10. Si quantum dots and different aspects of applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torchynska, Tetyana V.

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents briefly the history of the study of Si quantum dot (QDs) structures and the advances of different applications of Si quantum dots (QDs) in quantum electronics, such as: Si QD light emitting diodes, Si QD solar cells and memory structures, Si QD based one electron devices and double QD structures for spintronics [1].

  11. Development of a High Fidelity Dynamic Module of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) Using Adams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, B. T.; Thompson, W. K.; Lewandowski, B. E.; Cadwell, E. E.; Newby, N. J.; Fincke, R. S.; Sheehan, C.; Mulugeta, L.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) implements well-vetted computational models to predict and assess spaceflight health and performance risks, and enhance countermeasure development. DAP provides expertise and computation tools to its research customers for model development, integration, or analysis. DAP is currently supporting the NASA Exercise Physiology and Countermeasures (ExPC) project by integrating their biomechanical models of specific exercise movements with dynamic models of the devices on which the exercises were performed. This presentation focuses on the development of a high fidelity dynamic module of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) on board the ISS. The ARED module, illustrated in the figure below, was developed using the Adams (MSC Santa Ana, California) simulation package. The Adams package provides the capabilities to perform multi rigid body, flexible body, and mixed dynamic analyses of complex mechanisms. These capabilities were applied to accurately simulate: Inertial and mass properties of the device such as the vibration isolation system (VIS) effects and other ARED components, Non-linear joint friction effects, The gas law dynamics of the vacuum cylinders and VIS components using custom written differential state equations, The ARED flywheel dynamics, including torque limiting clutch. Design data from the JSC ARED Engineering team was utilized in developing the model. This included solid modeling geometry files, component/system specifications, engineering reports and available data sets. The Adams ARED module is importable into LifeMOD (Life Modeler, Inc., San Clemente, CA) for biomechanical analyses of different resistive exercises such as squat and dead-lift. Using motion capture data from ground test subjects, the ExPC developed biomechanical exercise models in LifeMOD. The Adams ARED device module was then integrated with the exercise subject model into one integrated dynamic model. This presentation will describe the

  12. Effect of phase transition on quantum transport in group-IV two-dimensional U-shape device

    SciTech Connect

    Sadi, Mohammad Abdullah; Gupta, Gaurav Liang, Gengchiau

    2014-10-21

    The effect of phase-transition from the quantum-spin-hall to the band-insulator phase on the transport through a three-terminal U-shape spin-separator has been computationally investigated via non-equilibrium green function formalism. Two-dimensional group-IV elements have been comprehensively appraised as the device material. The device separates the unpolarized current injected at the source-terminal into nearly 100% spin-polarized currents of the opposite polarities at the two drain terminals. The phase-transition activated by the electric-field orthogonal to the device is shown to extensively influence the current magnitude and its spin-polarization, and the effect is stronger for materials with smaller intrinsic spin-orbit coupling. Moreover, the device length and the area under field are shown to critically affect the device characteristics on phase change. It is shown that the same device can be operated as a spin-filter by inducing phase-transition selectively in the channel. The results are important for designing spin-devices from Group-IV monolayers.

  13. Effect of phase transition on quantum transport in group-IV two-dimensional U-shape device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadi, Mohammad Abdullah; Gupta, Gaurav; Liang, Gengchiau

    2014-10-01

    The effect of phase-transition from the quantum-spin-hall to the band-insulator phase on the transport through a three-terminal U-shape spin-separator has been computationally investigated via non-equilibrium green function formalism. Two-dimensional group-IV elements have been comprehensively appraised as the device material. The device separates the unpolarized current injected at the source-terminal into nearly 100% spin-polarized currents of the opposite polarities at the two drain terminals. The phase-transition activated by the electric-field orthogonal to the device is shown to extensively influence the current magnitude and its spin-polarization, and the effect is stronger for materials with smaller intrinsic spin-orbit coupling. Moreover, the device length and the area under field are shown to critically affect the device characteristics on phase change. It is shown that the same device can be operated as a spin-filter by inducing phase-transition selectively in the channel. The results are important for designing spin-devices from Group-IV monolayers.

  14. 76 FR 71982 - Advancing Regulatory Science for Highly Multiplexed Microbiology/Medical Countermeasure Devices...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... highly multiplexed microbiology/medical countermeasure (MCM) devices, their clinical application and... Application of Highly Multiplexed Microbiology Devices: Their clinical application and public health/clinical... clinical performance of highly multiplexed microbiology devices; approaches to device validation...

  15. Roadmap on quantum optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumke, Rainer; Lu, Zehuang; Close, John; Robins, Nick; Weis, Antoine; Mukherjee, Manas; Birkl, Gerhard; Hufnagel, Christoph; Amico, Luigi; Boshier, Malcolm G.; Dieckmann, Kai; Li, Wenhui; Killian, Thomas C.

    2016-09-01

    This roadmap bundles fast developing topics in experimental optical quantum sciences, addressing current challenges as well as potential advances in future research. We have focused on three main areas: quantum assisted high precision measurements, quantum information/simulation, and quantum gases. Quantum assisted high precision measurements are discussed in the first three sections, which review optical clocks, atom interferometry, and optical magnetometry. These fields are already successfully utilized in various applied areas. We will discuss approaches to extend this impact even further. In the quantum information/simulation section, we start with the traditionally successful employed systems based on neutral atoms and ions. In addition the marvelous demonstrations of systems suitable for quantum information is not progressing, unsolved challenges remain and will be discussed. We will also review, as an alternative approach, the utilization of hybrid quantum systems based on superconducting quantum devices and ultracold atoms. Novel developments in atomtronics promise unique access in exploring solid-state systems with ultracold gases and are investigated in depth. The sections discussing the continuously fast-developing quantum gases include a review on dipolar heteronuclear diatomic gases, Rydberg gases, and ultracold plasma. Overall, we have accomplished a roadmap of selected areas undergoing rapid progress in quantum optics, highlighting current advances and future challenges. These exciting developments and vast advances will shape the field of quantum optics in the future.

  16. Low-temperature-grown InGaAs quantum wells for optical device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juodawlkis, Paul William

    1999-11-01

    The large optical absorption and carrier-induced nonlinearities of semiconductor materials are useful for optical signal processing applications. For absorptive devices operating at ultrafast data rates (>100 Gb/s) or high optical intensities, it is necessary to reduce the intrinsic photo-excited carrier removal time. One method of achieving this reduction is to increase the nonradiative recombination rate through the controlled introduction of defects. In this thesis, we explore the use of low-temperature molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) to introduce nonradiative recombination centers into InGaAs-based quantum-wells (QWs). The objectives of the thesis are: (i)to improve the understanding of the optoelectronic properties of low-temperature-grown (LTG) InGaAs/InAlAs QWs, and (ii)to assess the feasibility of using these materials for optical device applications in the 1.5-μm wavelength region. Time-resolved differential transmission measurements reveal that the nonlinear absorption recovery time in InGaAs/InAlAs QWs can be reduced from >100 ps to 0.6 ps through the combination of low-temperature growth (~250°C) and beryllium (Be) doping. The bandedge absorption slope and the nonlinear absorption cross- section are only diminished by factors of 2 to 3 relative to QWs grown at standard temperature (~500°C). The Be doping dependence of the recovery time and the residual electron density in the LTG-QWs can be mainly attributed to impurity-related compensation. Be doping also maintains the ultrafast recovery following thermal anneal. The recovery response results from fast electron- trapping followed by slow (>100 ps) trapped- electron/free-hole recombination. Detailed simulations of the nonlinear absorption saturation and recovery processes agree quantitatively with measured data and substantiate the importance of the photo-excitation wavelength on the observed recovery response. The absorption saturation model includes the competition between band-filling and band

  17. Relativistic Quantum Metrology: Exploiting relativity to improve quantum measurement technologies

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Mehdi; Bruschi, David Edward; Sabín, Carlos; Adesso, Gerardo; Fuentes, Ivette

    2014-01-01

    We present a framework for relativistic quantum metrology that is useful for both Earth-based and space-based technologies. Quantum metrology has been so far successfully applied to design precision instruments such as clocks and sensors which outperform classical devices by exploiting quantum properties. There are advanced plans to implement these and other quantum technologies in space, for instance Space-QUEST and Space Optical Clock projects intend to implement quantum communications and quantum clocks at regimes where relativity starts to kick in. However, typical setups do not take into account the effects of relativity on quantum properties. To include and exploit these effects, we introduce techniques for the application of metrology to quantum field theory. Quantum field theory properly incorporates quantum theory and relativity, in particular, at regimes where space-based experiments take place. This framework allows for high precision estimation of parameters that appear in quantum field theory including proper times and accelerations. Indeed, the techniques can be applied to develop a novel generation of relativistic quantum technologies for gravimeters, clocks and sensors. As an example, we present a high precision device which in principle improves the state-of-the-art in quantum accelerometers by exploiting relativistic effects. PMID:24851858

  18. Relativistic quantum metrology: exploiting relativity to improve quantum measurement technologies.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Mehdi; Bruschi, David Edward; Sabín, Carlos; Adesso, Gerardo; Fuentes, Ivette

    2014-05-22

    We present a framework for relativistic quantum metrology that is useful for both Earth-based and space-based technologies. Quantum metrology has been so far successfully applied to design precision instruments such as clocks and sensors which outperform classical devices by exploiting quantum properties. There are advanced plans to implement these and other quantum technologies in space, for instance Space-QUEST and Space Optical Clock projects intend to implement quantum communications and quantum clocks at regimes where relativity starts to kick in. However, typical setups do not take into account the effects of relativity on quantum properties. To include and exploit these effects, we introduce techniques for the application of metrology to quantum field theory. Quantum field theory properly incorporates quantum theory and relativity, in particular, at regimes where space-based experiments take place. This framework allows for high precision estimation of parameters that appear in quantum field theory including proper times and accelerations. Indeed, the techniques can be applied to develop a novel generation of relativistic quantum technologies for gravimeters, clocks and sensors. As an example, we present a high precision device which in principle improves the state-of-the-art in quantum accelerometers by exploiting relativistic effects.

  19. Relativistic quantum metrology: exploiting relativity to improve quantum measurement technologies.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Mehdi; Bruschi, David Edward; Sabín, Carlos; Adesso, Gerardo; Fuentes, Ivette

    2014-01-01

    We present a framework for relativistic quantum metrology that is useful for both Earth-based and space-based technologies. Quantum metrology has been so far successfully applied to design precision instruments such as clocks and sensors which outperform classical devices by exploiting quantum properties. There are advanced plans to implement these and other quantum technologies in space, for instance Space-QUEST and Space Optical Clock projects intend to implement quantum communications and quantum clocks at regimes where relativity starts to kick in. However, typical setups do not take into account the effects of relativity on quantum properties. To include and exploit these effects, we introduce techniques for the application of metrology to quantum field theory. Quantum field theory properly incorporates quantum theory and relativity, in particular, at regimes where space-based experiments take place. This framework allows for high precision estimation of parameters that appear in quantum field theory including proper times and accelerations. Indeed, the techniques can be applied to develop a novel generation of relativistic quantum technologies for gravimeters, clocks and sensors. As an example, we present a high precision device which in principle improves the state-of-the-art in quantum accelerometers by exploiting relativistic effects. PMID:24851858

  20. Nano Superconducting Quantum Interference device: A powerful tool for nanoscale investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granata, Carmine; Vettoliere, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    The magnetic sensing at nanoscale level is a promising and interesting research topic of nanoscience. Indeed, magnetic imaging is a powerful tool for probing biological, chemical and physical systems. The study of small spin cluster, like magnetic molecules and nanoparticles, single electron, cold atom clouds, is one of the most stimulating challenges of applied and basic research of the next years. In particular, the magnetic nanoparticle investigation plays a fundamental role for the modern material science and its relative technological applications like ferrofluids, magnetic refrigeration and biomedical applications, including drug delivery, hyper-thermia cancer treatment and magnetic resonance imaging contrast-agent. Actually, one of the most ambitious goals of the high sensitivity magnetometry is the detection of elementary magnetic moment or spin. In this framework, several efforts have been devoted to the development of a high sensitivity magnetic nanosensor pushing sensing capability to the individual spin level. Among the different magnetic sensors, Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) exhibit an ultra high sensitivity and are widely employed in numerous applications. Basically, a SQUID consists of a superconducting ring (sensitive area) interrupted by two Josephson junctions. In the recent years, it has been proved that the magnetic response of nano-objects can be effectively measured by using a SQUID with a very small sensitive area (nanoSQUID). In fact, the sensor noise, expressed in terms of the elementary magnetic moment (spin or Bohr magneton), is linearly dependent on the SQUID loop side length. For this reason, SQUIDs have been progressively miniaturized in order to improve the sensitivity up to few spin per unit of bandwidth. With respect to other techniques, nanoSQUIDs offer the advantage of direct measurement of magnetization changes in small spin systems. In this review, we focus on nanoSQUIDs and its applications. In

  1. New chicane magnet design for insertion device straights at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, Steve; Schlueter, Ross; Anderson, David; Gath, William; Jung, Jin-Young; Robin, David; Steier, Christoph; Stevens, Troy

    2001-12-10

    A chicane magnet incorporating counter-rotating permanent magnet pairs together with trim coils has been designed for use in the Advanced Light Source (ALS) straights in conjunction with two insertion devices. In particular, this design is being developed for use in the existing beam line (BL) 4 elliptically polarizing undulator (EPU) straight and in the BL11 EPU straight, currently under design and construction. The purpose of the chicane is to provide a fixed angular separation between two successive EPU photon fans, and to correct steering perturbations resulting from EPU polarization state changes. Polarization changes occur on the time scale of one second; associated steering corrections must be accomplished in less than a second. Hysteresis associated with conventional iron core electromagnets prevents fast steering correction to the required precision. This consideration motivated the iron-free design presented here.

  2. Influence of etching processes on electronic transport in mesoscopic InAs/GaSb quantum well devices

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Atindra Nath; Müller, Susanne; Ihn, Thomas; Ensslin, Klaus; Tschirky, Thomas; Charpentier, Christophe; Wegscheider, Werner

    2015-07-15

    We report the electronic characterization of mesoscopic Hall bar devices fabricated from coupled InAs/GaSb quantum wells sandwiched between AlSb barriers, an emerging candidate for two-dimensional topological insulators. The electronic width of the etched structures was determined from the low field magneto-resistance peak, a characteristic signature of partially diffusive boundary scattering in the ballistic limit. In case of dry-etching the electronic width was found to decrease with electron density. In contrast, for wet etched devices it stayed constant with density. Moreover, the boundary scattering was found to be more specular for wet-etched devices, which may be relevant for studying topological edge states.

  3. Improvement of Efficiency and Brightness of Red Organic Light-Emitting Devices Using Double-Quantum-Well Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Rui; Cheng, Gang; Zhao, Yi; Xie, Wen-Fa; Hou, Jing-Ying; Ding, Tao; Liu, Shi-Yong

    2004-03-01

    We present red double-quantum-well organic light-emitting devices (DQW-OLEDs), in which N,N-bis-(1-naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-1,1'-biphenyo-4,4'-diamine (NPB) is used as potential barriers and hole transport layer, 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-t-butyl-6-(1,1,7,7-thtramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl)-4H-pyran (DCJTB) doped tris (8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminium (Alq3) as potential wells and emitter, undoped Alq3 as electron transport layer, respectively. The turn-on voltage is about 4 V. The maximum brightness and electroluminescent (EL) efficiency of the DQW device can reach 5916 cd m-2 at 16 V and 2.85 cd A-1 at 7 V, respectively. In addition, the EL efficiency of the DQW device is relatively independent of the drive voltage in the range from 5 V to 16 V.

  4. Connecting the (quantum) dots: Towards hybrid photovoltaic devices based on chalcogenide gels

    PubMed Central

    De Freitas, Jilian N.; Korala, Lasantha; Reynolds, Luke X.; Haque, Saif A.

    2014-01-01

    CdSe(ZnS) core(shell) aerogels were prepared from the assembly of quantum dots into mesoporous colloidal networks. The sol-gel method produces inorganic particle interfaces with low resistance to electrical transport while maintaining quantum-confinement. The photoelectrochemical properties of aerogels and their composites with poly(3-hexylthiophene) are reported for the first time. PMID:23034484

  5. Silicon high speed modulator for advanced modulation: device structures and exemplary modulator performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milivojevic, Biljana; Wiese, Stefan; Whiteaway, James; Raabe, Christian; Shastri, Anujit; Webster, Mark; Metz, Peter; Sunder, Sanjay; Chattin, Bill; Anderson, Sean P.; Dama, Bipin; Shastri, Kal

    2014-03-01

    Fiber optics is well established today due to the high capacity and speed, unrivaled flexibility and quality of service. However, state of the art optical elements and components are hardly scalable in terms of cost and size required to achieve competitive port density and cost per bit. Next-generation high-speed coherent optical communication systems targeting a data rate of 100-Gb/s and beyond goes along with innovations in component and subsystem areas. Consequently, by leveraging the advanced silicon micro and nano-fabrication technologies, significant progress in developing CMOS platform-based silicon photonic devices has been made all over the world. These achievements include the demonstration of high-speed IQ modulators, which are important building blocks in coherent optical communication systems. In this paper, we demonstrate silicon photonic QPSK modulator based on a metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitor structure, address different modulator configuration structures and report our progress and research associated with highspeed advanced optical modulation in silicon photonics

  6. Intermediate-band photosensitive device with quantum dots embedded in energy fence barrier

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Wei, Guodan

    2010-07-06

    A plurality of layers of a first semiconductor material and a plurality of dots-in-a-fence barriers disposed in a stack between a first electrode and a second electrode. Each dots-in-a-fence barrier consists essentially of a plurality of quantum dots of a second semiconductor material embedded between and in direct contact with two layers of a third semiconductor material. Wave functions of the quantum dots overlap as at least one intermediate band. The layers of the third semiconductor material are arranged as tunneling barriers to require a first electron and/or a first hole in a layer of the first material to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach the second material within a respective quantum dot, and to require a second electron and/or a second hole in a layer of the first semiconductor material to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach another layer of the first semiconductor material.

  7. Developing and validating advanced divertor solutions on DIII-D for next-step fusion devices

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, H. Y.; Hill, D. N.; Leonard, A. W.; Allen, S. L.; Stangeby, P. C.; Thomas, D.; Unterberg, E. A.; Abrams, T.; Boedo, J.; Briesemeister, A. R.; et al

    2016-09-14

    A major challenge facing the design and operation of next-step high-power steady-state fusion devices is to develop a viable divertor solution with order-of-magnitude increases in power handling capability relative to present experience, while having acceptable divertor target plate erosion and being compatible with maintaining good core plasma confinement. A new initiative has been launched on DIII-D to develop the scientific basis for design, installation, and operation of an advanced divertor to evaluate boundary plasma solutions applicable to next step fusion experiments beyond ITER. Developing the scientific basis for fusion reactor divertor solutions must necessarily follow three lines of research, whichmore » we plan to pursue in DIII-D: (1) Advance scientific understanding and predictive capability through development and comparison between state-of-the art computational models and enhanced measurements using targeted parametric scans; (2) Develop and validate key divertor design concepts and codes through innovative variations in physical structure and magnetic geometry; (3) Assess candidate materials, determining the implications for core plasma operation and control, and develop mitigation techniques for any deleterious effects, incorporating development of plasma-material interaction models. These efforts will lead to design, installation, and evaluation of an advanced divertor for DIII-D to enable highly dissipative divertor operation at core density (n e/n GW), neutral fueling and impurity influx most compatible with high performance plasma scenarios and reactor relevant plasma facing components (PFCs). In conclusion, this paper highlights the current progress and near-term strategies of boundary/PMI research on DIII-D.« less

  8. Developing and validating advanced divertor solutions on DIII-D for next-step fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, H. Y.; Hill, D. N.; Leonard, A. W.; Allen, S. L.; Stangeby, P. C.; Thomas, D.; Unterberg, E. A.; Abrams, T.; Boedo, J.; Briesemeister, A. R.; Buchenauer, D.; Bykov, I.; Canik, J. M.; Chrobak, C.; Covele, B.; Ding, R.; Doerner, R.; Donovan, D.; Du, H.; Elder, D.; Eldon, D.; Lasa, A.; Groth, M.; Guterl, J.; Jarvinen, A.; Hinson, E.; Kolemen, E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Lore, J.; Makowski, M. A.; McLean, A.; Meyer, B.; Moser, A. L.; Nygren, R.; Owen, L.; Petrie, T. W.; Porter, G. D.; Rognlien, T. D.; Rudakov, D.; Sang, C. F.; Samuell, C.; Si, H.; Schmitz, O.; Sontag, A.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Wampler, W.; Wang, H.; Watkins, J. G.

    2016-12-01

    A major challenge facing the design and operation of next-step high-power steady-state fusion devices is to develop a viable divertor solution with order-of-magnitude increases in power handling capability relative to present experience, while having acceptable divertor target plate erosion and being compatible with maintaining good core plasma confinement. A new initiative has been launched on DIII-D to develop the scientific basis for design, installation, and operation of an advanced divertor to evaluate boundary plasma solutions applicable to next step fusion experiments beyond ITER. Developing the scientific basis for fusion reactor divertor solutions must necessarily follow three lines of research, which we plan to pursue in DIII-D: (1) Advance scientific understanding and predictive capability through development and comparison between state-of-the art computational models and enhanced measurements using targeted parametric scans; (2) Develop and validate key divertor design concepts and codes through innovative variations in physical structure and magnetic geometry; (3) Assess candidate materials, determining the implications for core plasma operation and control, and develop mitigation techniques for any deleterious effects, incorporating development of plasma-material interaction models. These efforts will lead to design, installation, and evaluation of an advanced divertor for DIII-D to enable highly dissipative divertor operation at core density (n e/n GW), neutral fueling and impurity influx most compatible with high performance plasma scenarios and reactor relevant plasma facing components (PFCs). This paper highlights the current progress and near-term strategies of boundary/PMI research on DIII-D.

  9. Chemical Compass Model for Avian Magnetoreception as a Quantum Coherent Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jianming; Plenio, Martin B.

    2013-12-01

    It is known that more than 50 species use the Earth’s magnetic field for orientation and navigation. Intensive studies, particularly behavior experiments with birds, provide support for a chemical compass based on magnetically sensitive free radical reactions as a source of this sense. However, the fundamental question of how quantum coherence plays an essential role in such a chemical compass model of avian magnetoreception yet remains controversial. Here, we show that the essence of the chemical compass model can be understood in analogy to a quantum interferometer exploiting global quantum coherence rather than any subsystem coherence. Within the framework of quantum metrology, we quantify global quantum coherence and correlate it with the function of chemical magnetoreception. Our results allow us to understand and predict how various factors can affect the performance of a chemical compass from the unique perspective of quantum coherence assisted metrology. This represents a crucial step to affirm a direct connection between quantum coherence and the function of a chemical compass.

  10. Chemical compass model for avian magnetoreception as a quantum coherent device.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jianming; Plenio, Martin B

    2013-12-01

    It is known that more than 50 species use the Earth's magnetic field for orientation and navigation. Intensive studies, particularly behavior experiments with birds, provide support for a chemical compass based on magnetically sensitive free radical reactions as a source of this sense. However, the fundamental question of how quantum coherence plays an essential role in such a chemical compass model of avian magnetoreception yet remains controversial. Here, we show that the essence of the chemical compass model can be understood in analogy to a quantum interferometer exploiting global quantum coherence rather than any subsystem coherence. Within the framework of quantum metrology, we quantify global quantum coherence and correlate it with the function of chemical magnetoreception. Our results allow us to understand and predict how various factors can affect the performance of a chemical compass from the unique perspective of quantum coherence assisted metrology. This represents a crucial step to affirm a direct connection between quantum coherence and the function of a chemical compass. PMID:24476240

  11. Potential applications of microtesla magnetic resonance imaging detected using a superconducting quantum interference device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Whittier Ryan

    This dissertation describes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of protons performed in a precession field of 132 muT. In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a pulsed 40-300 mT magnetic field prepolarizes the sample spins and an untuned second-order superconducting gradiometer coupled to a low transition temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detects the subsequent 5.6-kHz spin precession. Imaging sequences including multiple echoes and partial Fourier reconstruction are developed. Calculating the SNR of prepolarized SQUID-detected MRI shows that three-dimensional Fourier imaging yields higher SNR than slice-selection imaging. An experimentally demonstrated field-cycling pulse sequence and post-processing algorithm mitigate image artifacts caused by concomitant gradients in low-field MRI. The magnetic field noise of SQUID untuned detection is compared to the noise of SQUID tuned detection, conventional Faraday detection, and the Nyquist noise generated by conducting biological samples. A second-generation microtesla MRI system employing a low-noise SQUID is constructed to increase SNR. A 2.4-m cubic, eddy-current shield with 6-mm thick aluminum walls encloses the experiment to attenuate external noise. The measured noise is 0.75 fT Hz 1/2 referred to the bottom gradiometer loop. Solenoids wound from 30-strand braided wire to decrease Nyquist noise and cooled by either liquid nitrogen or water polarize the spins. Copper wire coils wound on wooden supports produce the imaging magnetic fields and field gradients. Water phantom images with 0.8 x 0.8 x 10 mm3 resolution have a SNR of 6. Three-dimensional 1.6 x 1.9 x 14 mm3 images of bell peppers and 3 x 3 x 26 mm3 in vivo images of the human arm are presented. Since contrast based on the transverse spin relaxation rate (T1 ) is enhanced at low magnetic fields, microtesla MRI could potentially be used for tumor imaging. The measured T1 of ex vivo normal and cancerous prostate tissue

  12. Potential Applications of Microtesla Magnetic Resonance ImagingDetected Using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Whittier Ryan

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of protons performed in a precession field of 132 μT. In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a pulsed 40-300 mT magnetic field prepolarizes the sample spins and an untuned second-order superconducting gradiometer coupled to a low transition temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detects the subsequent 5.6-kHz spin precession. Imaging sequences including multiple echoes and partial Fourier reconstruction are developed. Calculating the SNR of prepolarized SQUID-detected MRI shows that three-dimensional Fourier imaging yields higher SNR than slice-selection imaging. An experimentally demonstrated field-cycling pulse sequence and post-processing algorithm mitigate image artifacts caused by concomitant gradients in low-field MRI. The magnetic field noise of SQUID untuned detection is compared to the noise of SQUID tuned detection, conventional Faraday detection, and the Nyquist noise generated by conducting biological samples. A second-generation microtesla MRI system employing a low-noise SQUID is constructed to increase SNR. A 2.4-m cubic, eddy-current shield with 6-mm thick aluminum walls encloses the experiment to attenuate external noise. The measured noise is 0.75 fT Hz-1/2 referred to the bottom gradiometer loop. Solenoids wound from 30-strand braided wire to decrease Nyquist noise and cooled by either liquid nitrogen or water polarize the spins. Copper wire coils wound on wooden supports produce the imaging magnetic fields and field gradients. Water phantom images with 0.8 x 0.8 x 10 mm3 resolution have a SNR of 6. Three-dimensional 1.6 x 1.9 x 14 mm3 images of bell peppers and 3 x 3 x 26 mm3 in vivo images of the human arm are presented. Since contrast based on the transverse spin relaxation rate (T1) is enhanced at low magnetic fields, microtesla MRI could potentially be used for tumor imaging. The

  13. Development of a SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) detection system of magnetic nanoparticles for cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Song

    In this dissertation, I present the development of a SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) imaging system using targeted magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) as contrast agents. The contrast agents are functionalized for targeting by the conjugation of the magnetic NPs to folic acid (FA) molecules on dendrimer scaffolds. Cellular internalization is accomplished through the high-affinity folic acid receptors (FARs), which are overexpressed in various human carcinomas. SQUID can be applied to detect signals from the magnetic cores of the contrast agents and hence diagnose the tumor. Based on the magnetic properties of the magnetic NPs, two detection methods were developed: remanence and magnetorelaxometry (MRX). The remanence measurement-based method detects magnetic NPs that are sufficiently large and possess long relaxation time. Samples were vertically oscillated and horizontally translated each in one-dimension. The system was calibrated with gamma-Fe2O3 NPs (mean diameter 25 nm) and the detection limit was found to be 10 ng at a distance of 1.7 cm and the spatial resolution was ˜1 cm. A theoretical model of this system was proposed and applied to image reconstruction of scanned phantoms with two NP injection spots. The developed SQUID system can determine not only the amount and horizontal position of the NPs, but also their depth in the phantoms. The MRX technique utilizes the NPs superparamagnetic property and records their time course magnetic decay. The system was investigated by using a number of iron oxide NP products with different mean diameters. The results showed that the MRX signal intensity is sensitively dependent on the size of the NPs. The best detection limit of 300 ng of total iron content was found on using a d = 12 nm Fe3O4 NP sample and this result was supported by computer simulations. To produce magnetic NPs for the MRX study, a synthetic approach of size-controllable Fe3O4 NPs was developed. Accordingly, the magnetic property can be

  14. MgB{sub 2} tunnel junctions and 19 K low-noise dc superconducting quantum interference devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Kinion, D.; Chen, J.; Clarke, J.; Hinks, D. G.; Crabtree, G. W.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of California at Berkeley

    2001-01-01

    Point contact junctions made from two pieces of MgB{sub 2} can be adjusted to exhibit either superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) or superconductor-normal metal-superconductor (SNS) current-voltage characteristics. The SIS characteristics are in good agreement with the standard tunneling model for s-wave superconductors, and yield an energy gap of (2.02{+-}0.08) meV. The SNS characteristics are in good agreement with the predictions of the resistively-shunted junction model. DC superconducting quantum interference devices made from two SNS junctions yield magnetic flux and field noise as low as 4 {mu}{Phi}{sub 0} Hz{sup -1/2} and 35 fT Hz{sup -1/2} at 19 K; {Phi}{sub 0} is the flux quantum.

  15. Top-emitting quantum dots light-emitting devices employing microcontact printing with electricfield-independent emission

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shihao; Liu, Wenbo; Ji, Wenyu; Yu, Jing; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Letian; Xie, Wenfa

    2016-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in quantum dot light-emitting devices (QD-LEDs) show their promise in the development of next-generation displays. However, the QD-LED with conventional ITO-based bottom emission structure is difficult to realize the high aperture ratio, electricfield-independent emission and flexible full-color displays. Hence, we demonstrate top-emitting QD-LEDs with dry microcontact printing quantum dot films. The top-emitting structure is proved to be able to accelerate the excitons radiative transition rate, then contributing to stable electroluminescent efficiency with a very low roll-off, and preventing spectra from shifting and broadening with the electric field increases. The results suggest potential routes towards creating high aperture ratio, wide color gamut, color-stable and flexible QD-LED displays. PMID:26932521

  16. Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auletta, Gennaro; Fortunato, Mauro; Parisi, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Introduction; Part I. Basic Features of Quantum Mechanics: 1. From classical mechanics to quantum mechanics; 2. Quantum observable and states; 3. Quantum dynamics; 4. Examples of quantum dynamics; 5. Density matrix; Part II. More Advanced Topics: 6. Angular momentum and spin; 7. Identical particles; 8. Symmetries and conservation laws; 9. The measurement problem; Part III. Matter and Light: 10. Perturbations and approximation methods; 11. Hydrogen and helium atoms; 12. Hydrogen molecular ion; 13. Quantum optics; Part IV. Quantum Information: State and Correlations: 14. Quantum theory of open systems; 15. State measurement in quantum mechanics; 16. Entanglement: non-separability; 17. Entanglement: quantum information; References; Index.

  17. Biophotonic logic devices based on quantum dots and temporally-staggered Förster energy transfer relays.

    PubMed

    Claussen, Jonathan C; Algar, W Russ; Hildebrandt, Niko; Susumu, Kimihiro; Ancona, Mario G; Medintz, Igor L

    2013-12-21

    Integrating photonic inputs/outputs into unimolecular logic devices can provide significantly increased functional complexity and the ability to expand the repertoire of available operations. Here, we build upon a system previously utilized for biosensing to assemble and prototype several increasingly sophisticated biophotonic logic devices that function based upon multistep Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) relays. The core system combines a central semiconductor quantum dot (QD) nanoplatform with a long-lifetime Tb complex FRET donor and a near-IR organic fluorophore acceptor; the latter acts as two unique inputs for the QD-based device. The Tb complex allows for a form of temporal memory by providing unique access to a time-delayed modality as an alternate output which significantly increases the inherent computing options. Altering the device by controlling the configuration parameters with biologically based self-assembly provides input control while monitoring changes in emission output of all participants, in both a spectral and temporal-dependent manner, gives rise to two input, single output Boolean Logic operations including OR, AND, INHIBIT, XOR, NOR, NAND, along with the possibility of gate transitions. Incorporation of an enzymatic cleavage step provides for a set-reset function that can be implemented repeatedly with the same building blocks and is demonstrated with single input, single output YES and NOT gates. Potential applications for these devices are discussed in the context of their constituent parts and the richness of available signal.

  18. A computational approach to quantum noise in time-dependent nanoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaury, Benoit; Waintal, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    We derive simple expressions that relate the noise and correlation properties of a general time-dependent quantum conductor to the wave functions of the system. The formalism provides a practical route for numerical calculations of quantum noise in an externally driven system. We illustrate the approach with numerical calculations of the noise properties associated to a voltage pulse applied on a one-dimensional conductor. The methodology is however fully general and can be used for a large class of mesoscopic conductors.

  19. Reprint of : A computational approach to quantum noise in time-dependent nanoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaury, Benoit; Waintal, Xavier

    2016-08-01

    We derive simple expressions that relate the noise and correlation properties of a general time-dependent quantum conductor to the wave functions of the system. The formalism provides a practical route for numerical calculations of quantum noise in an externally driven system. We illustrate the approach with numerical calculations of the noise properties associated to a voltage pulse applied on a one-dimensional conductor. The methodology is however fully general and can be used for a large class of mesoscopic conductors.

  20. Characterization of a linear device developed for research on advanced plasma imaging and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, J.; Lee, K. D.; Seo, D. C.; Nam, Y. U.; Choi, M. C.

    2010-10-15

    Within the scope of long term research on imaging diagnostics for steady-state plasmas and understanding of edge plasma physics through diagnostics with conventional spectroscopic methods, we have constructed a linear electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma device named Research on Advanced Plasma Imaging and Dynamics (RAPID). It has a variety of axial magnetic field profiles provided by eight water-cooled magnetic coils and two dc power supplies. The positions of the magnetic coils are freely adjustable along the axial direction and the power supplies can be operated with many combinations of electrical wiring to the coils. Here, a 6 kW 2.45 GHz magnetron is used to produce steady-state hydrogen, helium, and argon plasmas with central magnetic fields of 875 and/or 437.5 G (second harmonic). In order to achieve the highest possible plasma performance within the limited input parameters, wall conditioning experiments were carried out. Chamber bake-out was achieved with heating coils that were wound covering the vessel, and long-pulse electron cyclotron heating discharge cleaning was also followed after 4 days of bake-out. A uniform bake-out temperature (150 deg. C) was achieved by wrapping the vessel in high temperature thermal insulation textile and by controlling the heating coil current using a digital control system. The partial pressure changes were observed using a residual gas analyzer, and a total system pressure of 5x10{sup -8} Torr was finally reached. Diagnostic systems including a millimeter-wave interferometer, a high resolution survey spectrometer, a Langmuir probe, and an ultrasoft x-ray detector were used to provide the evidence that the plasma performance was improved as we desired. In this work, we present characterization of the RAPID device for various system conditions and configurations.

  1. Characterization of a linear device developed for research on advanced plasma imaging and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chung, J; Lee, K D; Seo, D C; Nam, Y U; Choi, M C

    2010-10-01

    Within the scope of long term research on imaging diagnostics for steady-state plasmas and understanding of edge plasma physics through diagnostics with conventional spectroscopic methods, we have constructed a linear electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma device named Research on Advanced Plasma Imaging and Dynamics (RAPID). It has a variety of axial magnetic field profiles provided by eight water-cooled magnetic coils and two dc power supplies. The positions of the magnetic coils are freely adjustable along the axial direction and the power supplies can be operated with many combinations of electrical wiring to the coils. Here, a 6 kW 2.45 GHz magnetron is used to produce steady-state hydrogen, helium, and argon plasmas with central magnetic fields of 875 and/or 437.5 G (second harmonic). In order to achieve the highest possible plasma performance within the limited input parameters, wall conditioning experiments were carried out. Chamber bake-out was achieved with heating coils that were wound covering the vessel, and long-pulse electron cyclotron heating discharge cleaning was also followed after 4 days of bake-out. A uniform bake-out temperature (150 °C) was achieved by wrapping the vessel in high temperature thermal insulation textile and by controlling the heating coil current using a digital control system. The partial pressure changes were observed using a residual gas analyzer, and a total system pressure of 5×10(-8) Torr was finally reached. Diagnostic systems including a millimeter-wave interferometer, a high resolution survey spectrometer, a Langmuir probe, and an ultrasoft x-ray detector were used to provide the evidence that the plasma performance was improved as we desired. In this work, we present characterization of the RAPID device for various system conditions and configurations.

  2. A Randomized Controlled Trial of the embrace Advanced Scar Therapy Device to Reduce Incisional Scar Formation

    PubMed Central

    Longaker, Michael T.; Rohrich, Rod J.; Greenberg, Lauren; Furnas, Heather; Wald, Robert; Bansal, Vivek; Seify, Hisham; Tran, Anthony; Weston, Jane; Korman, Joshua M.; Chan, Rodney; Kaufman, David; Dev, Vipul R.; Mele, Joseph A.; Januszyk, Michael; Cowley, Christy; McLaughlin, Peggy; Beasley, Bill; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.; Longaker, Michael T.; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Scarring represents a significant biomedical burden in clinical medicine. Mechanomodulation has been linked to scarring through inflammation, but until now a systematic approach to attenuate mechanical force and reduce scarring has not been possible. Methods The authors conducted a 12-month, prospective, open-label, randomized, multicenter clinical trial to evaluate abdominoplasty scar appearance following postoperative treatment with the embrace Advanced Scar Therapy device to reduce mechanical forces on healing surgical incisions. Incisions from 65 healthy adult subjects were randomized to receive embrace treatment on one half of an abdominoplasty incision and control treatment (surgeon's optimal care methods) on the other half. The primary endpoint for this study was the difference between assessments of scar appearance for the treated and control sides using the visual analogue scale scar score. Results Final 12-month study photographs were obtained from 36 subjects who completed at least 5 weeks of dressing application. The mean visual analogue scale score for embrace-treated scars (2.90) was significantly improved compared with control-treated scars (3.29) at 12 months (difference, 0.39; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.14 to 0.66; p = 0.027). Both subjects and investigators found that embrace-treated scars demonstrated significant improvements in overall appearance at 12 months using the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale evaluation (p = 0.02 and p < 0.001, respectively). No serious adverse events were reported. Conclusions These results demonstrate that the embrace device significantly reduces scarring following abdominoplasty surgery. To the authors’ knowledge, this represents the first level I evidence for postoperative scar reduction. PMID:24804638

  3. High-Tc superconducting quantum interference device recordings of spontaneous brain activity: Towards high-Tc magnetoencephalography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öisjöen, F.; Schneiderman, J. F.; Figueras, G. A.; Chukharkin, M. L.; Kalabukhov, A.; Hedström, A.; Elam, M.; Winkler, D.

    2012-03-01

    We have performed single- and two-channel high transition temperature (high-Tc) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings of spontaneous brain activity in two healthy human subjects. We demonstrate modulation of two well-known brain rhythms: the occipital alpha rhythm and the mu rhythm found in the motor cortex. We further show that despite higher noise-levels compared to their low-Tc counterparts, high-Tc SQUIDs can be used to detect and record physiologically relevant brain rhythms with comparable signal-to-noise ratios. These results indicate the utility of high-Tc technology in MEG recordings of a broader range of brain activity.

  4. Ground-state modulation-enhancement by two-state lasing in quantum-dot laser devices

    SciTech Connect

    Röhm, André; Lingnau, Benjamin; Lüdge, Kathy

    2015-05-11

    We predict a significant increase of the 3 dB-cutoff-frequency on the ground-state lasing wavelength for two-state-lasing quantum-dot lasers using a microscopically motivated multi-level rate-equation model. After the onset of the second lasing line, the excited state acts as a high-pass filter, improving the ground-state response to faster modulation frequencies. We present both numerically simulated small-signal and large-signal modulation results and compare the performance of single and two-state lasing devices. Furthermore, we give dynamical arguments for the advantages of two-state lasing on data-transmission capabilities.

  5. Mandibular advancement devices: indications and predictors of treatment outcome. A review.

    PubMed

    Cuccia, A M; Caradonna, C

    2007-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a chronic sleep and respiratory disorder, which causes a partial or total obstruction of the air passage at the upper airway level. Mandibular advancement devices (MADs) have been used in the treatment of snoring, but may be a valid alternative to the continuous nasal positive airway pressure (CPAP) for certain OSAS cases. Therapy by means of MADs arises the interest of the scientific community and now there are many sleep-centres where dentists work as experts in sleep disorders. MADs are instruments of value because they are simple to use, reversible, portable and they generally have a low complication rate. They mechanically increase the oropharyngeal space by advancing the mandible and/or the tongue and reduce pharyngeal collapsibility. More than 60 different MADs are in use, with considerable variations in design. Several studies show that their systematic use produces an evident improvement in the global quality of life as well as in the symptoms of patients with OSAS, especially sleepiness. Even though significant progress has been made in proving the efficacy of MADs for OSAS, the ability to predict the treatment outcome and hence pre-select suitable candidates for this treatment still remains in its early stage. The first aim of this review is to supply to the clinician informations on the cephalometric and polysomnographic parameters that can be used to predict the efficacy of the outcome of MAD therapy in OSAS. Moreover, we examine the cases for which the use of a MAD is indicated. PMID:17938623

  6. Teaching Advanced Operation of an iPod-Based Speech-Generating Device to Two Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achmadi, Donna; Kagohara, Debora M.; van der Meer, Larah; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Sutherland, Dean; Lang, Russell; Marschik, Peter B.; Green, Vanessa A.; Sigafoos, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated a program for teaching two adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) to perform more advanced operations on an iPod-based speech-generating device (SGD). The effects of the teaching program were evaluated in a multiprobe multiple baseline across participants design that included two intervention phases. The first intervention…

  7. Return on Investment and Technology-Based Training--An Introduction and a Case Study at Advanced Micro Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masumian, Bijan

    1999-01-01

    Summarizes findings from studies comparing classroom and technology-based approaches to training and the respective Return on Investment (ROI) data. Highlights several advantages of technology-based training. Offers information and initial ROI numbers on the use of technology-based training at Advanced Micro Devices, a global manufacturer of…

  8. An innovative epitaxial growth method for minimizing dislocations in thin-film quantum-dot optoelectronic and photovoltaic device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, Jateen S.

    A new buffer layer method for epitaxial growth of lattice-mismatched semiconductor quantum-dots based p-i-n structures is presented. To our knowledge this is the first instance of a dislocation-reduction approach that has shown reduced dark current behavior in a quantum-dot device compared to its counterpart homojunction p-n device consisted of the barrier material. The present work compared a lattice misfit strain build-up behavior between an In0.15Ga0.85As (p) / InAs ( i) / In0.15Ga0.85As (n) (QD) device to an In0.15Ga0.85As (p) / In 0.15Ga0.85As (n) (HOM) device, as both were grown on an un-doped gallium arsenide (GaAs) (100) substrate. The intrinsic region of QD device incorporated 5 layers of 2.1 ML indium arsenide quantum dots that were fabricated using self-assembly via Stranski-Krastanov strain release mechanism. Atomic force microscopy measurements exhibited 35 +/- 3 nm sized pyramidal islands with a narrow distribution and a density of 2.5 x 1010 per cm2. A low temperature (6K) photoluminescence characterization of the QD sample revealed an activity at 1400 nm wavelength that was attributed to optical pumping of carriers, which experienced a 3-dimensional quantum confinement due to a potential well formed by In0.15Ga0.85As matrix, and their subsequent radiative recombination. Both of the QD and HOM samples were characterized using x-ray diffractometer (XRD) and a high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) method. The XRD data recorded a signature of the biaxially strained pseudomorphic section of In0.15Ga0.85As buffer layer that absorbed a lattice misfit due to epitaxial growth on GaAs substrate. This signature consisted of a set of twin peaks at higher and lower 2theta degrees resembling elastically strained and plastically relaxed sections, respectively, of the buffer layer residing in the vicinity of buffer-GaAs interface. A comparison of those peaks between QD and HOM samples exhibited an increase in the volume of the plastically relaxed

  9. Treatment outcomes of mandibular advancement devices in positional and non-positional OSA patients

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jin Woo; Enciso, Reyes; Levendowski, Daniel J.; Morgan, Todd D.; Westbrook, Philip R.; Clark, Glenn T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to investigate treatment outcome of mandibular advancement devices (MADs) for positional and non-positional obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Study design Forty-two positional (supine apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] ≥ 2x’s lateral AHI) and 30 non-positional (supine AHI < 2x’s lateral AHI) OSA patients performed two-nights of sleep study before and after insertion of MADs. Results The decreases in apnea severity based on a reduction in the overall and supine AHI values after MADs therapy were significantly greater for the positional OSA than non-positional OSA group. A multiple linear regression analysis showed that decrease in overall AHI was significantly associated with being in the positional group (standardized coefficient=0.505). Age, body mass index, gender, and time in supine position during sleep did not show significant associations with decrease in overall AHI after MAD therapy. Conclusion Our data suggest that MADs are more effective in positional OSA than non-positional OSA patients. PMID:20299246

  10. A Cs2LiYCl6:Ce-based advanced radiation monitoring device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budden, B. S.; Stonehill, L. C.; Dallmann, N.; Baginski, M. J.; Best, D. J.; Smith, M. B.; Graham, S. A.; Dathy, C.; Frank, J. M.; McClish, M.

    2015-06-01

    Cs2LiYCl6:Ce3+ (CLYC) scintillator has gained recent interest because of its ability to perform simultaneous gamma spectroscopy and thermal neutron detection. Discrimination between the two incident particle types owes to the fundamentally unique emission waveforms, a consequence of the interaction and subsequent scintillation mechanisms within the crystal. Due to this dual-mode detector capability, CLYC was selected for the development of an Advanced Radiation Monitoring Device (ARMD), a compact handheld instrument for radioisotope identification and localization. ARMD consists of four 1 in.-right cylindrical CLYC crystals, custom readout electronics including a suitable multi-window application specific integrated circuit (ASIC), battery pack, proprietary software, and Android-based tablet for high-level analysis and display. We herein describe the motivation of the work and engineering design of the unit, and we explain the software embedded in the core module and for radioisotope analysis. We report an operational range of tens of keV to 8.5 MeV with approximately 5.3% gamma energy resolution at 662 keV, thermal neutron detection efficiency of 10%, battery lifetime of up to 10 h, manageable rates of 20 kHz; further, we describe in greater detail time to identify specific gamma source setups.

  11. Advanced Aerodynamic Devices to Improve the Performance, Economics, Handling, and Safety of Heavy Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Englar

    2001-05-14

    Research is being conducted at the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) to develop advanced aerodynamic devices to improve the performance, economics, stability, handling and safety of operation of Heavy Vehicles by using previously-developed and flight-tested pneumatic (blown) aircraft technology. Recent wind-tunnel investigations of a generic Heavy Vehicle model with blowing slots on both the leading and trailing edges of the trailer have been conducted under contract to the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies. These experimental results show overall aerodynamic drag reductions on the Pneumatic Heavy Vehicle of 50% using only 1 psig blowing pressure in the plenums, and over 80% drag reductions if additional blowing air were available. Additionally, an increase in drag force for braking was confirmed by blowing different slots. Lift coefficient was increased for rolling resistance reduction by blowing only the top slot, while downforce was produced for traction increase by blowing only the bottom. Also, side force and yawing moment were generated on either side of the vehicle, and directional stability was restored by blowing the appropriate side slot. These experimental results and the predicted full-scale payoffs are presented in this paper, as is a discussion of additional applications to conventional commercial autos, buses, motor homes, and Sport Utility Vehicles.

  12. Core-shell heterojunction of silicon nanowire arrays and carbon quantum dots for photovoltaic devices and self-driven photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chao; Nie, Biao; Zeng, Longhui; Liang, Feng-Xia; Wang, Ming-Zheng; Luo, Linbao; Feng, Mei; Yu, Yongqiang; Wu, Chun-Yan; Wu, Yucheng; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2014-04-22

    Silicon nanostructure-based solar cells have lately intrigued intensive interest because of their promising potential in next-generation solar energy conversion devices. Herein, we report a silicon nanowire (SiNW) array/carbon quantum dot (CQD) core-shell heterojunction photovoltaic device by directly coating Ag-assisted chemical-etched SiNW arrays with CQDs. The heterojunction with a barrier height of 0.75 eV exhibited excellent rectifying behavior with a rectification ratio of 10(3) at ±0.8 V in the dark and power conversion efficiency (PCE) as high as 9.10% under AM 1.5G irradiation. It is believed that such a high PCE comes from the improved optical absorption as well as the optimized carrier transfer and collection capability. Furthermore, the heterojunction could function as a high-performance self-driven visible light photodetector operating in a wide switching wavelength with good stability, high sensitivity, and fast response speed. It is expected that the present SiNW array/CQD core-shell heterojunction device could find potential applications in future high-performance optoelectronic devices.

  13. Co thickness dependence of structural and magnetic properties in spin quantum cross devices utilizing stray magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiju, H. Kasa, H.; Mori, S.; Misawa, T.; Abe, T.; Nishii, J.; Komine, T.

    2015-05-07

    We investigate the Co thickness dependence of the structural and magnetic properties of Co thin-film electrodes sandwiched between borate glasses in spin quantum cross (SQC) devices that utilize stray magnetic fields. We also calculate the Co thickness dependence of the stray field between the two edges of Co thin-film electrodes in SQC devices using micromagnetic simulation. The surface roughness of Co thin films with a thickness of less than 20 nm on borate glasses is shown to be as small as 0.18 nm, at the same scanning scale as the Co film thickness, and the squareness of the hysteresis loop is shown to be as large as 0.96–1.0. As a result of the establishment of polishing techniques for Co thin-film electrodes sandwiched between borate glasses, we successfully demonstrate the formation of smooth Co edges and the generation of stray magnetic fields from Co edges. Theoretical calculation reveals that a strong stray field beyond 6 kOe is generated when the Co thickness is greater than 10 nm at a junction gap distance of 5 nm. From these experimental and calculation results, it can be concluded that SQC devices with a Co thickness of 10–20 nm can be expected to function as spin-filter devices.

  14. Demonstration of optically controlled data routing with the use of multiple-quantum-well bistable and electro-optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppa, P.; Chavel, P.; Oudar, J. L.; Kuszelewicz, R.; Schnell, J. P.; Pocholle, J. P.

    1997-08-01

    We present experimental results on a 1-to-64-channel free-space photonic switching demonstration system based on GaAs GaAlAs multiple-quantum-well active device arrays. Two control schemes are demonstrated: data transparent optical self-routing usable in a packet-switching environment and direct optical control with potential signal amplification for circuit switching. The self-routing operation relies on the optical recognition of the binary destination address coded in each packet header. Address decoding is implemented with elementary optical bistable devices and modulator pixels as all-optical latches and electro-optical and gates, respectively. All 60 defect-free channels of the system could be operated one by one, but the simultaneous operation of only three channels could be achieved mainly because of the spatial nonhomogeneities of the devices. Direct-control operation is based on directly setting the bistable device reflectivity with a variable-control beam power. This working mode turned out to be much more tolerant of spatial noises: 37 channels of the system could be operated simultaneously. Further development of the system to a crossbar of N inputs and M outputs and system miniaturization are also considered.

  15. An improved scheme on decoy-state method for measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Li, Mo; Guo, Guang-Can; Wang, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Quantum key distribution involving decoy-states is a significant application of quantum information. By using three-intensity decoy-states of single-photon-added coherent sources, we propose a practically realizable scheme on quantum key distribution which approaches very closely the ideal asymptotic case of an infinite number of decoy-states. We make a comparative study between this scheme and two other existing ones, i.e., two-intensity decoy-states with single-photon-added coherent sources, and three-intensity decoy-states with weak coherent sources. Through numerical analysis, we demonstrate the advantages of our scheme in secure transmission distance and the final key generation rate. PMID:26463580

  16. Circuit models and SPICE macro-models for quantum Hall effect devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortolano, Massimo; Callegaro, Luca

    2015-08-01

    Precise electrical measurement technology based on the quantum Hall effect is one of the pillars of modern quantum electrical metrology. Electrical networks including one or more QHE elements can be used as quantum resistance and impedance standards. The analysis of these networks allows metrologists to evaluate the effect of the inevitable parasitic parameters on their performance as standards. This paper presents a concise review of the various circuit models for QHE elements proposed in the literature, and the development of a new model. This last model is particularly suited to be employed with the analogue electronic circuit simulator SPICE. The SPICE macro-model and examples of SPICE simulations, validated by comparison with the corresponding analytical solution and/or experimental data, are provided.

  17. Recent advances toward a general purpose linear-scaling quantum force field.

    PubMed

    Giese, Timothy J; Huang, Ming; Chen, Haoyuan; York, Darrin M

    2014-09-16

    Conspectus There is need in the molecular simulation community to develop new quantum mechanical (QM) methods that can be routinely applied to the simulation of large molecular systems in complex, heterogeneous condensed phase environments. Although conventional methods, such as the hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) method, are adequate for many problems, there remain other applications that demand a fully quantum mechanical approach. QM methods are generally required in applications that involve changes in electronic structure, such as when chemical bond formation or cleavage occurs, when molecules respond to one another through polarization or charge transfer, or when matter interacts with electromagnetic fields. A full QM treatment, rather than QM/MM, is necessary when these features present themselves over a wide spatial range that, in some cases, may span the entire system. Specific examples include the study of catalytic events that involve delocalized changes in chemical bonds, charge transfer, or extensive polarization of the macromolecular environment; drug discovery applications, where the wide range of nonstandard residues and protonation states are challenging to model with purely empirical MM force fields; and the interpretation of spectroscopic observables. Unfortunately, the enormous computational cost of conventional QM methods limit their practical application to small systems. Linear-scaling electronic structure methods (LSQMs) make possible the calculation of large systems but are still too computationally intensive to be applied with the degree of configurational sampling often required to make meaningful comparison with experiment. In this work, we present advances in the development of a quantum mechanical force field (QMFF) suitable for application to biological macromolecules and condensed phase simulations. QMFFs leverage the benefits provided by the LSQM and QM/MM approaches to produce a fully QM method that is able to

  18. Quantum dots light emitting devices on MEMS: microcontact printing, near-field imaging, and early cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Ashwini; Hoshino, Kazunori; Zhang, John X. J.

    2011-08-01

    Controlled patterning of light emitting devices on semiconductors and micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) enables a vast variety of applications such as structured illumination, large-area flexible displays, integrated optoelectronic systems and micro-total analysis systems for real-time biomedical screening. We have demonstrated a series of techniques of creating quantum dot-based (QD) patterned inorganic light emitting devices at room temperature on silicon (Si) substrate. The innovative technology was translated to create localized QD-based light sources for two applications: (1) Three-dimensional scanning probe tip structures for near field imaging. Combined topographic and optical images were acquired using this new class of "self-illuminating" probe in commercial NSOM. The emission wavelength can be tuned through quantum-size effect of QDs. (2) Multispectral excitation sources integrated with microfluidic channels for tumor cell analyses. We were able to detect the variation of sub-cellular features, such as the nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio, to quantify the absorption at different wavelength upon the near-field illumination of individual tumor cells towards the determination of cancer developmental stage.

  19. Tracing the characteristics of a flux qubit with a hysteretic dc-superconducting quantum interference device comparator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, M. G.; Chiarello, F.; Leoni, R.; Simeone, D.; Torrioli, G.; Cosmelli, C.; Buttiglione, R.; Poletto, S.; Carelli, P.

    2003-12-01

    A hysteretic dc-superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is used to trace the flux characteristic of a tunable rf-SQUID, the basic element for the realization of superconducting flux qubits. This allows important simplifications of circuitry and electronics in developing devices for quantum computing, by eliminating the necessity of more complex magnetometers. A hysteretic dc-SQUID is usually operated as a comparator, distinguishing only which one of two adjacent flux states is occupied by the rf-SQUID. The necessary sensitivity, moreover, is usually reached only at temperatures in the mK range. However, by exploiting the statistical properties of the current-voltage curve in the region where the switching from the zero-voltage state occurs, it is possible to obtain an accurate tracing of the input flux, even at a relatively high temperature (a few Kelvin). In our case, the input signal is given by the internal flux of a tunable rf-SQUID, the building block of a flux qubit.

  20. Parity independence of the zero-bias conductance peak in a nanowire based topological superconductor-quantum dot hybrid device

    PubMed Central

    Deng, M. T.; Yu, C. L.; Huang, G. Y.; Larsson, M.; Caroff, P.; Xu, H. Q.

    2014-01-01

    We explore the signatures of Majorana fermions in a nanowire based topological superconductor-quantum dot-topological superconductor hybrid device by charge transport measurements. At zero magnetic field, well-defined Coulomb diamonds and the Kondo effect are observed. Under the application of a finite, sufficiently strong magnetic field, a zero-bias conductance peak structure is observed. It is found that the zero-bias conductance peak is present in many consecutive Coulomb diamonds, irrespective of the even-odd parity of the quasi-particle occupation number in the quantum dot. In addition, we find that the zero-bias conductance peak is in most cases accompanied by two differential conductance peaks, forming a triple-peak structure, and the separation between the two side peaks in bias voltage shows oscillations closely correlated to the background Coulomb conductance oscillations of the device. The observed zero-bias conductance peak and the associated triple-peak structure are in line with Majorana fermion physics in such a hybrid topological system. PMID:25434375

  1. InAs quantum well Hall devices for room-temperature detection of single magnetic biomolecular labels.

    SciTech Connect

    Mihajlovic, G.; Xiong, P.; von Molnar, S.; Field, M.; Sullivan, G. J.; Materials Science Division; Florida State Univ.; Teledyne Scientific Co. LLC

    2007-08-01

    Hall sensors with cross width of {approx}1 {micro}m were fabricated from InAs/AlSb quantum well semiconductor heterostructures containing two-dimensional electron gas. The room-temperature device characteristics were examined by Hall effect and electronic noise measurements along with analytical calculations. In the low-frequency range, from 20 Hz to 1.6 kHz, the noise-equivalent magnetic field resolution was found to be limited by 1/f and generation-recombination noise from 22 to 3.5 {micro}T/{radical}Hz. The corresponding noise-equivalent magnetic moment resolution reached 10{sub {mu}{sub B}}{sup 6}/{radical}Hz at {approx}700 Hz and was even lower at higher frequencies. Using a phase-sensitive measurement technique, detection of a single 1.2 {micro}m diameter bead, suitable for biological applications, was achieved with a signal to noise ratio of {approx}33.3 dB, as well as detection of six 250 nm beads with a signal to noise of {approx}2.3 dB per bead. The work demonstrates the efficacy of InAs quantum well Hall devices for application in high sensitivity detection of single magnetic biomolecular labels.

  2. Parity independence of the zero-bias conductance peak in a nanowire based topological superconductor-quantum dot hybrid device.

    PubMed

    Deng, M T; Yu, C L; Huang, G Y; Larsson, M; Caroff, P; Xu, H Q

    2014-01-01

    We explore the signatures of Majorana fermions in a nanowire based topological superconductor-quantum dot-topological superconductor hybrid device by charge transport measurements. At zero magnetic field, well-defined Coulomb diamonds and the Kondo effect are observed. Under the application of a finite, sufficiently strong magnetic field, a zero-bias conductance peak structure is observed. It is found that the zero-bias conductance peak is present in many consecutive Coulomb diamonds, irrespective of the even-odd parity of the quasi-particle occupation number in the quantum dot. In addition, we find that the zero-bias conductance peak is in most cases accompanied by two differential conductance peaks, forming a triple-peak structure, and the separation between the two side peaks in bias voltage shows oscillations closely correlated to the background Coulomb conductance oscillations of the device. The observed zero-bias conductance peak and the associated triple-peak structure are in line with Majorana fermion physics in such a hybrid topological system.

  3. Resonant tunneling device with two-dimensional quantum well emitter and base layers

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Jerry A.; Sherwin, Marc E.; Drummond, Timothy J.; Weckwerth, Mark V.

    1998-01-01

    A double electron layer tunneling device is presented. Electrons tunnel from a two dimensional emitter layer to a two dimensional tunneling layer and continue traveling to a collector at a lower voltage. The emitter layer is interrupted by an isolation etch, a depletion gate, or an ion implant to prevent electrons from traveling from the source along the emitter to the drain. The collector is similarly interrupted by a backgate, an isolation etch, or an ion implant. When the device is used as a transistor, a control gate is added to control the allowed energy states of the emitter layer. The tunnel gate may be recessed to change the operating range of the device and allow for integrated complementary devices. Methods of forming the device are also set forth, utilizing epoxy-bond and stop etch (EBASE), pre-growth implantation of the backgate or post-growth implantation.

  4. Resonant tunneling device with two-dimensional quantum well emitter and base layers

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, J.A.; Sherwin, M.E.; Drummond, T.J.; Weckwerth, M.V.

    1998-10-20

    A double electron layer tunneling device is presented. Electrons tunnel from a two dimensional emitter layer to a two dimensional tunneling layer and continue traveling to a collector at a lower voltage. The emitter layer is interrupted by an isolation etch, a depletion gate, or an ion implant to prevent electrons from traveling from the source along the emitter to the drain. The collector is similarly interrupted by a backgate, an isolation etch, or an ion implant. When the device is used as a transistor, a control gate is added to control the allowed energy states of the emitter layer. The tunnel gate may be recessed to change the operating range of the device and allow for integrated complementary devices. Methods of forming the device are also set forth, utilizing epoxy-bond and stop etch (EBASE), pre-growth implantation of the backgate or post-growth implantation. 43 figs.

  5. Quantum information processing with atoms and photons.

    PubMed

    Monroe, C

    2002-03-14

    Quantum information processors exploit the quantum features of superposition and entanglement for applications not possible in classical devices, offering the potential for significant improvements in the communication and processing of information. Experimental realization of large-scale quantum information processors remains a long-term vision, as the required nearly pure quantum behaviour is observed only in exotic hardware such as individual laser-cooled atoms and isolated photons. But recent theoretical and experimental advances suggest that cold atoms and individual photons may lead the way towards bigger and better quantum information processors, effectively building mesoscopic versions of 'Schrödinger's cat' from the bottom up.

  6. Novel Rigid External Distraction Device Improves Stability and Controls the Vector During Midfacial Advancement.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Cory M; Rottgers, Stephen Alex; Langenfeld, Christopher C; Mulliken, John B; Padwa, Bonnie L

    2016-06-01

    The major limitation of the rigid external devices currently used for midfacial distraction after subcranial Le Fort III osteotomies is the ductile wire that connects the midface to the device, which makes it difficult to control the vector and force during distraction. The authors describe a novel external appliance that addresses this and other problems of contemporary devices, and application of a custom cranial template that facilitates precise placement of the device to achieve the planned vector of distraction.

  7. Cognitive Mapping of Advanced Level Physics Students' Conceptions of Quantum Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mashhadi, Azam; Woolnough, Brian

    This paper presents findings from a study that investigated students' understanding of quantum phenomena and focused on how students incorporate the ideas of quantum physics into their overall cognitive framework. The heuristic metaphor of the map is used to construct graphic representations of students' understanding of quantum physics. The…

  8. Automated hotspot analysis with aerial image CD metrology for advanced logic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttgereit, Ute; Trautzsch, Thomas; Kim, Min-ho; Seo, Jung-Uk; Yoon, Young-Keun; Han, Hak-Seung; Chung, Dong Hoon; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Meyers, Gary

    2014-09-01

    Continuously shrinking designs by further extension of 193nm technology lead to a much higher probability of hotspots especially for the manufacturing of advanced logic devices. The CD of these potential hotspots needs to be precisely controlled and measured on the mask. On top of that, the feature complexity increases due to high OPC load in the logic mask design which is an additional challenge for CD metrology. Therefore the hotspot measurements have been performed on WLCD from ZEISS, which provides the benefit of reduced complexity by measuring the CD in the aerial image and qualifying the printing relevant CD. This is especially of advantage for complex 2D feature measurements. Additionally, the data preparation for CD measurement becomes more critical due to the larger amount of CD measurements and the increasing feature diversity. For the data preparation this means to identify these hotspots and mark them automatically with the correct marker required to make the feature specific CD measurement successful. Currently available methods can address generic pattern but cannot deal with the pattern diversity of the hotspots. The paper will explore a method how to overcome those limitations and to enhance the time-to-result in the marking process dramatically. For the marking process the Synopsys WLCD Output Module was utilized, which is an interface between the CATS mask data prep software and the WLCD metrology tool. It translates the CATS marking directly into an executable WLCD measurement job including CD analysis. The paper will describe the utilized method and flow for the hotspot measurement. Additionally, the achieved results on hotspot measurements utilizing this method will be presented.

  9. Spatially-resolved molecular Quantum Dots at the Surface of a Gated Graphene Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Wickenburg, Sebastian; Lu, Jiong; Omrani, Arash A.; Coh, Sinisa; Jung, Han Sae; Wong, Dillon; Lischner, Johannes; Khajeh, Ramin; Riss, Alexander; Bradley, Aaron J.; Piatti, Erik; Zettl, Alex; Louie, Steven G.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Crommie, Michael F.

    2015-03-01

    The ability to modify the electronic properties of monolayer graphene via charge-donating or charge-accepting molecules creates new opportunities for fabricating nano-scale hybrid devices. Understanding the charge transfer process at the single molecule level is essential for tuning the electronic and magnetic characteristics of such hybrid devices. We have used scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to locally probe how different molecular assemblies (including single molecules, molecular chains, and 2D molecular islands) exchange charge with a graphene substrate as the device backgate voltage is varied. Different molecular configurations exhibit substantially different charging behavior - some are permanently charged while others can be controllably ionized using the device backgate. Electrostatic interactions lead to charge heterogeneity at the molecular level. Single-chemical-bond-resolved atomic force microscopy allows us to correlate chemical structure and adsorption geometry of the molecules with their electronic properties.

  10. Prospects of application of superconducting electrodynamic structures in electronic devices for their advancement to the terahertz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuraev, A. A.; Kurkin, S. A.; Koronovskii, A. A.; Rak, A. O.; Sinitsyn, A. K.; Hramov, A. E.

    2015-04-01

    It is shown that the application of superconducting electrodynamic structures in microwave electronic devices not only improves their characteristics, but also creates premises for implementation of devices like the autophase traveling-wave tube (TWT) and peniotron operating in the millimeter range with their further advancement to the terahertz range, which is impossible for conventional electrodynamic structures with Ohmic losses. Superconducting corrugated waveguides make it possible to suspend limitations imposed on the output power of pulsed relativistic Cherenkov oscillators, which are associated with thermal degradation of the working surface of conventional waveguides with Ohmic losses.

  11. Lab-on-a-Membrane Foldable Devices for Duplex Drop-Volume Electrochemical Biosensing Using Quantum Dot Tags.

    PubMed

    Kokkinos, Christos; Angelopoulou, Michailia; Economou, Anastasios; Prodromidis, Mamas; Florou, Ageliki; Haasnoot, Willem; Petrou, Panagiota; Kakabakos, Sotirios

    2016-07-01

    This work describes a new type of integrated lab-on-a-membrane foldable device suitable for on-site duplex electrochemical biosensing using drop-size sample volumes. The devices are fabricated entirely by screen-printing on a nylon membrane and feature two assay zones which are located symmetrically on either side of a three-electrode voltammetric cell with a bismuth citrate-loaded graphite working electrode. After the completion of two spatially separated drop-volume competitive immunoassays on the assay zones using biotinylated antibodies labeled with streptavidin-conjugated Pb- and Cd-based quantum dots (QDs), respectively, the QD labels are dissolved releasing Pb(II) and Cd(II) in the assay zones. Then, the two assay zones are folded over, and they are brought in contact with the voltammetric cell for simultaneous anodic stripping voltammetric (ASV) determination of Pb(II) and Cd(II) at the bismuth nanostructured layer formed on the working electrode by reduction of the bismuth citrate during the preconcentration step. The fabrication of the devices is discussed in detail, and their operational characteristics are exhaustively studied. In order to demonstrate their applicability to the analysis in complex matrices, duplex ASV-QDs-based determination of bovine casein and bovine immunoglobulin G is carried out in milk samples yielding limits of detection of 0.04 μg mL(-1) and 0.02 μg mL(-1), respectively. The potential of the devices to detect milk adulteration is further demonstrated. These new membrane devices enable duplex biosensing with distinct advantages over existing approaches in terms of cost, fabrication, and operational simplicity and rapidity, portability, sample size, disposability, sensitivity, and suitability for field analysis. PMID:27257985

  12. ISS Squat and Deadlift Kinematics on the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newby, N.; Caldwell, E.; Sibonga, J.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.

    2014-01-01

    Visual assessment of exercise form on the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) on orbit is difficult due to the motion of the entire device on its Vibration Isolation System (VIS). The VIS allows for two degrees of device translational motion, and one degree of rotational motion. In order to minimize the forces that the VIS must damp in these planes of motion, the floor of the ARED moves as well during exercise to reduce changes in the center of mass of the system. To help trainers and other exercise personnel better assess squat and deadlift form a tool was developed that removes the VIS motion and creates a stick figure video of the exerciser. Another goal of the study was to determine whether any useful kinematic information could be obtained from just a single camera. Finally, the use of these data may aid in the interpretation of QCT hip structure data in response to ARED exercises performed in-flight. After obtaining informed consent, four International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers participated in this investigation. Exercise was videotaped using a single camera positioned to view the side of the crewmember during exercise on the ARED. One crewmember wore reflective tape on the toe, heel, ankle, knee, hip, and shoulder joints. This technique was not available for the other three crewmembers, so joint locations were assessed and digitized frame-by-frame by lab personnel. A custom Matlab program was used to assign two-dimensional coordinates to the joint locations throughout exercise. A second custom Matlab program was used to scale the data, calculate joint angles, estimate the foot center of pressure (COP), approximate normal and shear loads, and to create the VIS motion-corrected stick figure videos. Kinematics for the squat and deadlift vary considerably for the four crewmembers in this investigation. Some have very shallow knee and hip angles, and others have quite large ranges of motion at these joints. Joint angle analysis showed that crewmembers

  13. Advances in molecular quantum chemistry contained in the Q-Chem 4 program package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yihan; Gan, Zhengting; Epifanovsky, Evgeny; Gilbert, Andrew T. B.; Wormit, Michael; Kussmann, Joerg; Lange, Adrian W.; Behn, Andrew; Deng, Jia; Feng, Xintian; Ghosh, Debashree; Goldey, Matthew; Horn, Paul R.; Jacobson, Leif D.; Kaliman, Ilya; Khaliullin, Rustam Z.; Kuś, Tomasz; Landau, Arie; Liu, Jie; Proynov, Emil I.; Rhee, Young Min; Richard, Ryan M.; Rohrdanz, Mary A.; Steele, Ryan P.; Sundstrom, Eric J.; Woodcock, H. Lee, III; Zimmerman, Paul M.; Zuev, Dmitry; Albrecht, Ben; Alguire, Ethan; Austin, Brian; Beran, Gregory J. O.; Bernard, Yves A.; Berquist, Eric; Brandhorst, Kai; Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Brown, Shawn T.; Casanova, David; Chang, Chun-Min; Chen, Yunqing; Chien, Siu Hung; Closser, Kristina D.; Crittenden, Deborah L.; Diedenhofen, Michael; DiStasio, Robert A., Jr.; Do, Hainam; Dutoi, Anthony D.; Edgar, Richard G.; Fatehi, Shervin; Fusti-Molnar, Laszlo; Ghysels, An; Golubeva-Zadorozhnaya, Anna; Gomes, Joseph; Hanson-Heine, Magnus W. D.; Harbach, Philipp H. P.; Hauser, Andreas W.; Hohenstein, Edward G.; Holden, Zachary C.; Jagau, Thomas-C.; Ji, Hyunjun; Kaduk, Benjamin; Khistyaev, Kirill; Kim, Jaehoon; Kim, Jihan; King, Rollin A.; Klunzinger, Phil; Kosenkov, Dmytro; Kowalczyk, Tim; Krauter, Caroline M.; Lao, Ka Un; Laurent, Adèle D.; Lawler, Keith V.; Levchenko, Sergey V.; Lin, Ching Yeh; Liu, Fenglai; Livshits, Ester; Lochan, Rohini C.; Luenser, Arne; Manohar, Prashant; Manzer, Samuel F.; Mao, Shan-Ping; Mardirossian, Narbe; Marenich, Aleksandr V.; Maurer, Simon A.; Mayhall, Nicholas J.; Neuscamman, Eric; Oana, C. Melania; Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; O'Neill, Darragh P.; Parkhill, John A.; Perrine, Trilisa M.; Peverati, Roberto; Prociuk, Alexander; Rehn, Dirk R.; Rosta, Edina; Russ, Nicholas J.; Sharada, Shaama M.; Sharma, Sandeep; Small, David W.; Sodt, Alexander; Stein, Tamar; Stück, David; Su, Yu-Chuan; Thom, Alex J. W.; Tsuchimochi, Takashi; Vanovschi, Vitalii; Vogt, Leslie; Vydrov, Oleg; Wang, Tao; Watson, Mark A.; Wenzel, Jan; White, Alec; Williams, Christopher F.; Yang, Jun; Yeganeh, Sina; Yost, Shane R.; You, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Igor Ying; Zhang, Xing; Zhao, Yan; Brooks, Bernard R.; Chan, Garnet K. L.; Chipman, Daniel M.; Cramer, Christopher J.; Goddard, William A., III; Gordon, Mark S.; Hehre, Warren J.; Klamt, Andreas; Schaefer, Henry F., III; Schmidt, Michael W.; Sherrill, C. David; Truhlar, Donald G.; Warshel, Arieh; Xu, Xin; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Baer, Roi; Bell, Alexis T.; Besley, Nicholas A.; Chai, Jeng-Da; Dreuw, Andreas; Dunietz, Barry D.; Furlani, Thomas R.; Gwaltney, Steven R.; Hsu, Chao-Ping; Jung, Yousung; Kong, Jing; Lambrecht, Daniel S.; Liang, WanZhen; Ochsenfeld, Christian; Rassolov, Vitaly A.; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V.; Subotnik, Joseph E.; Van Voorhis, Troy; Herbert, John M.; Krylov, Anna I.; Gill, Peter M. W.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A summary of the technical advances that are incorporated in the fourth major release of the Q-Chem quantum chemistry program is provided, covering approximately the last seven years. These include developments in density functional theory methods and algorithms, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) property evaluation, coupled cluster and perturbation theories, methods for electronically excited and open-shell species, tools for treating extended environments, algorithms for walking on potential surfaces, analysis tools, energy and electron transfer modelling, parallel computing capabilities, and graphical user interfaces. In addition, a selection of example case studies that illustrate these capabilities is given. These include extensive benchmarks of the comparative accuracy of modern density functionals for bonded and non-bonded interactions, tests of attenuated second order Møller-Plesset (MP2) methods for intermolecular interactions, a variety of parallel performance benchmarks, and tests of the accuracy of implicit solvation models. Some specific chemical examples include calculations on the strongly correlated Cr2 dimer, exploring zeolite-catalysed ethane dehydrogenation, energy decomposition analysis of a charged ter-molecular complex arising from glycerol photoionisation, and natural transition orbitals for a Frenkel exciton state in a nine-unit model of a self-assembling nanotube.

  14. Core-Shell Zn x Cd1- x Se/Zn y Cd1- y Se Quantum Dots for Nonvolatile Memory and Electroluminescent Device Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Amoody, Fuad; Suarez, Ernesto; Rodriguez, Angel; Heller, E.; Huang, Wenli; Jain, F.

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a floating quantum dot (QD) gate nonvolatile memory device using high-energy-gap Zn y Cd1- y Se-cladded Zn x Cd1- x Se quantum dots ( y > x) with tunneling layers comprising nearly lattice-matched semiconductors (e.g., ZnS/ZnMgS) on Si channels. Also presented is the fabrication of an electroluminescent (EL) device with embedded cladded ZnCdSe quantum dots. These ZnCdSe quantum dots were embedded between indium tin oxide (ITO) on glass and a top Schottky metal electrode deposited on a thin CsF barrier. These QDs, which were nucleated in a photo-assisted microwave plasma (PMP) metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) reactor, were grown between the source and drain regions on a p-type silicon substrate of the nonvolatile memory device. The composition of QD cladding, which relates to the value of y in Zn y Cd1- y Se, was engineered by the intensity of ultraviolet light, which controlled the incorporation of zinc in ZnCdSe. The QD quality is comparable to those deposited by other methods. Characteristics and modeling of the II-VI quantum dots as well as two diverse types of devices are presented in this paper.

  15. Dynamics of an Optically Generated Electric Field in a Quantum Dot Molecule Device Using Time-Resolved Photoluminescence Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thota, Venkata R.; Wickramasinghe, Thushan E.; Wijesundara, Kushal; Stinaff, Eric A.; Bracker, Allan S.; Gammon, D.

    2016-04-01

    Interdot transitions in the emission spectra of a quantum dot molecule may be used as a sensitive nanoscale probe to measure electric fields. Here, we demonstrate this potential by monitoring the temporal behavior of photovoltaic band flattening in a Schottky diode structure using a two-color excitation scheme. First, a continuous wave laser is tuned to an excitation energy below the wetting layer (WL) emission energy to create the interdot transition that is used to monitor the electric field in the device. A second modulated laser, at higher energy, is then used to create the optically generated electric field (OGEF) which leads to the photovoltaic band flattening. It is found that the rise time of this OGEF is ˜2.85 μs and the decay, or fall time, is on the order of ˜110 μs, most likely determined by device-dependent carrier transport, trapping, and tunneling rates. We also find that, at higher applied fields, the OGEF tends to decay faster and the measured values are consistent with the photovoltaic band-flattening effects reported previously in nanostructure devices.

  16. A ventricular assist device as a bridge to recovery, decision making, or transplantation in patients with advanced cardiac failure.

    PubMed

    Neragi-Miandoab, Siyamek

    2012-10-01

    Despite many advances in the management of patients with heart failure, acute cardiogenic shock and progressive congestive heart failure remain serious problems with dismal prognoses. Both temporary and permanent mechanical support has been gaining wide clinical application in this patient population. Although mechanical circulatory support technology is rapidly evolving, this approach is associated with multiple issues such as the optimal duration of temporary support, ideal timing to bridge these patients to a long-term device, and selection of the right device for the right patient. The currently available devices are categorized into two major groups: temporary and long-term devices (including destination therapy). Heart failure is a dynamic condition, and the therapeutic approach may need to be modified depending on the patient's condition. Furthermore, the patient's preexisting morbidity, age, socioeconomic status, and family support are confounding factors that need to be considered when making such decisions. Clinical trials including prospective studies, as well as meticulous analysis of existing data, may help develop universal guidelines to select the right device. This manuscript will review the most widely used ventricular assist devices. PMID:22814623

  17. OLED devices for signage applications: a review of recent advances and remaining challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprengard, Ruediger; Bonrad, Klaus; Daeubler, Thomas K.; Frank, T.; Hagemann, V.; Koehler, I.; Pommerehne, J.; Ottermann, Clemens R.; Voges, Frank; Vingerling, B.

    2004-11-01

    Reported efficiency records of >70 lm/W and the community's performance roadmaps indicate the potential of OLEDs (Organic Light Emitting Diodes) for use in general lighting applications. Within a shorter timeframe, OLED technology may be exploited for signage applications. Key differences of OLED signage devices to display and lighting devices are discussed. Recent results are presented on large area device design, polymer deposition technology, device and material performance, and encapsulation technology. Finally we discuss performance and cost targets for potential applications indicating the main challenges for future developments.

  18. Recent Advances in Photonic Devices for Optical Computing and the Role of Nonlinear Optics-Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin; Frazier, Donald O.; Witherow, William K.; Banks, Curtis E.; Paley, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    The twentieth century has been the era of semiconductor materials and electronic technology while this millennium is expected to be the age of photonic materials and all-optical technology. Optical technology has led to countless optical devices that have become indispensable in our daily lives in storage area networks, parallel processing, optical switches, all-optical data networks, holographic storage devices, and biometric devices at airports. This chapters intends to bring some awareness to the state-of-the-art of optical technologies, which have potential for optical computing and demonstrate the role of nonlinear optics in many of these components. Our intent, in this Chapter, is to present an overview of the current status of optical computing, and a brief evaluation of the recent advances and performance of the following key components necessary to build an optical computing system: all-optical logic gates, adders, optical processors, optical storage, holographic storage, optical interconnects, spatial light modulators and optical materials.

  19. Up-conversion detectors at 1550 nm for quantum communication: review and recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournier, M.; Alibart, O.; Doutre, F.; Tascu, S.; de Micheli, M. P.; Ostrowsky, D. B.; Thyagarajan, K.; Tanzilli, S.

    Up-conversion, or hybrid, detectors have been investigated in quantum communication experiments to replace Indium-Gallium-Arsenide avalanche photodiodes (InGaAs-APD) for the detection of infrared and telecom single photons. Those detectors are based on the supposedly noise-free process of frequency up-conversion, also called sum-frequency generation (SFG), using a second order (χ^2) non-linear crystal. Powered by an intense pump laser, this process permits transposing with a certain probability the single photons at telecom wavelengths to the visible range where silicon APDs (Si-APD) operate with a much better performance than InGaAs detectors. To date, the literature reports up-conversion detectors having efficiency and noise figures comparable to that of the best commercially available IngaAs-APDs. However, in all of these previous realizations, a pump-induced noise is always observed which was initially expected to be as low as the dark count level of the Si-APDs. Although this additional noise represents a problem for the detection, up-conversion detectors have advantageously replaced InGaAs-APDs in various long-distance quantum cryptography schemes since they offer a continuous regime operation mode instead of a gated mode necessary for InGaAs-APDs, and the possibility of much higher counting rates. Despite attempted explanations, no detailed nor conclusive study of this noise has been reported. The aim of this paper is to offer a definitive explanation for this noise. We first give a review of the state of the art by describing already demonstrated up-conversion detectors. We discuss these realizations especially regarding the choices made for the material, in bulk or guided configurations, the single photon wavelengths, and the pump scheme. Then we describe an original device made of waveguides integrated on periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN)or on single-domain lithium niobate aimed at investigating the origin of the additional pump-induced noise

  20. Integrated photonic quantum walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfe, Markus; Heilmann, René; Lebugle, Maxime; Guzman-Silva, Diego; Perez-Leija, Armando; Szameit, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Over the last 20 years quantum walks (QWs) have gained increasing interest in the field of quantum information science and processing. In contrast to classical walkers, quantum objects exhibit intrinsic properties like non-locality and non-classical many-particle correlations, which renders QWs a versatile tool for quantum simulation and computation as well as for a deeper understanding of genuine quantum mechanics. Since they are highly controllable and hardly interact with their environment, photons seem to be ideally suited quantum walkers. In order to study and exploit photonic QWs, lattice structures that allow low loss coherent evolution of quantum states are demanded. Such requirements are perfectly met by integrated optical waveguide devices that additionally allow a substantial miniaturization of experimental settings. Moreover, by utilizing the femtosecond direct laser writing technique three-dimensional waveguide structures are capable of analyzing QWs also on higher dimensional geometries. In this context, advances and findings of photonic QWs are discussed in this review. Various concepts and experimental results are presented covering, such as different quantum transport regimes, the Boson sampling problem, and the discrete fractional quantum Fourier transform.