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Sample records for advanced rectal cancer

  1. Locally advanced rectal cancer: management challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kokelaar, RF; Evans, MD; Davies, M; Harris, DA; Beynon, J

    2016-01-01

    Between 5% and 10% of patients with rectal cancer present with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), and 10% of rectal cancers recur after surgery, of which half are limited to locoregional disease only (locally recurrent rectal cancer). Exenterative surgery offers the best long-term outcomes for patients with LARC and locally recurrent rectal cancer so long as a complete (R0) resection is achieved. Accurate preoperative multimodal staging is crucial in assessing the potential operability of advanced rectal tumors, and resectability may be enhanced with neoadjuvant therapies. Unfortunately, surgical options are limited when the tumor involves the lateral pelvic sidewall or high sacrum due to the technical challenges of achieving histological clearance, and must be balanced against the high morbidity associated with resection of the bony pelvis and significant lymphovascular structures. This group of patients is usually treated palliatively and subsequently survival is poor, which has led surgeons to seek innovative new solutions, as well as revisit previously discarded radical approaches. A small number of centers are pioneering new techniques for resection of beyond-total mesorectal excision tumors, including en bloc resections of the sciatic notch and composite resections of the first two sacral vertebrae. Despite limited experience, these new techniques offer the potential for radical treatment of previously inoperable tumors. This narrative review sets out the challenges facing the management of LARCs and discusses evolving management options. PMID:27785074

  2. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40–60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice. PMID:26504848

  3. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40-60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice.

  4. Refining Preoperative Therapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In the PROSPECT trial, patients with locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either standard neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy or neoadjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy, with chemoradiation reserved for nonresponders.

  5. A Review of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Wang, Ji; Ma, Xiaowei; Tan, Li; Yan, Yanli; Xue, Chaofan; Hui, Beina; Liu, Rui; Ma, Hailin; Ren, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy has become the standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy not only can reduce tumor size and recurrence, but also increase the tumor resection rate and anus retention rate with very slight side effect. Comparing with preoperative chemotherapy, preoperative chemoradiotherapy can further reduce the local recurrence rate and downstage. Middle and low rectal cancers can benefit more from neoadjuvant chemradiotherapy than high rectal cancer. It needs to refine the selection of appropriate patients and irradiation modes for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Different therapeutic reactions to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy affect the type of surgical techniques, hence calling for the need of much attention. Furthermore, many problems such as accurate staging before surgery, selection of suitable neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy method, and sensitivity prediction to preoperative radiotherapy need to be well settled. PMID:27489505

  6. Locally advanced rectal cancer: the importance of a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Rossana; Maccaroni, Elena; Onofri, Azzurra; Morgese, Francesca; Torniai, Mariangela; Tiberi, Michela; Ferrini, Consuelo; Cascinu, Stefano

    2014-12-14

    Rectal cancer accounts for a relevant part of colorectal cancer cases, with a mortality of 4-10/100000 per year. The development of locoregional recurrences and the occurrence of distant metastases both influences the prognosis of these patients. In the last two decades, new multimodality strategies have improved the prognosis of locally advanced rectal cancer with a significant reduction of local relapse and an increase in terms of overall survival. Radical surgery still remains the principal curative treatment and the introduction of total mesorectal excision has significantly achieved a reduction in terms of local recurrence rates. The employment of neoadjuvant treatment, delivered before surgery, also achieved an improved local control and an increased sphincter preservation rate in low-lying tumors, with an acceptable acute and late toxicity. This review describes the multidisciplinary management of rectal cancer, focusing on the effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and of post-operative adjuvant chemotherapy both in the standard combined modality treatment programs and in the ongoing research to improve these regimens.

  7. Immunoscore in Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-28

    Cancer of the Rectum; Neoplasms, Rectal; Rectal Cancer; Rectal Tumors; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Melanoma; Breast Cancer; Renal Cell Cancer; Lung Cancer; Bladder Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Thyroid Cancer

  8. Locally advanced rectal cancer: time for precision therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Martin R; Zhang, Zhen; Schrag, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    The year 2015 marks the 30th anniversary of the publication of NSABP-R01, a landmark trial demonstrating the benefit of adding pelvic radiation to the treatment regimen for locally advanced rectal cancer with a resultant decrease in local recurrence from 25% to 16%. These results ushered in the era of multimodal therapy for rectal cancer, heralding modern treatment and changing the standard of care in the United States. We have seen many advances over the past 3 decades, including optimization of the administration and timing of radiation, widespread adoption of total mesorectal excision (TME), and the implementation of more effective systemic chemotherapy. The current standard is neoadjuvant chemoradiation with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and a radiosensitizer, TME, and adjuvant chemotherapy including 5-FU and oxaliplatin. The results of this regimen have been impressive, with a reported local recurrence rate of less than 10%. However, the rates of distant relapse remain 30% to 40%, indicating room for improvement. In addition, trimodality therapy is arduous and many patients are unable to complete the full course of treatment. In this article we discuss the current standard of care and alternative strategies that have evolved in an attempt to individualize therapy according to risk of recurrence.

  9. Recent advances in robotic surgery for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Soichiro; Otani, Kensuke; Yasuda, Koji; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Junichiro; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kazama, Shinsuke; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-08-01

    Robotic technology, which has recently been introduced to the field of surgery, is expected to be useful, particularly in treating rectal cancer where precise manipulation is necessary in the confined pelvic cavity. Robotic surgery overcomes the technical drawbacks inherent to laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer through the use of multi-articulated flexible tools, three-dimensional stable camera platforms, tremor filtering and motion scaling functions, and greater ergonomic and intuitive device manipulation. Assessments of the feasibility and safety of robotic surgery for rectal cancer have reported similar operation times, blood loss during surgery, rates of postoperative morbidity, and circumferential resection margin involvement when compared with laparoscopic surgery. Furthermore, rates of conversion to open surgery are reportedly lower with increased urinary and male sexual functions in the early postoperative period compared with laparoscopic surgery, demonstrating the technical advantages of robotic surgery for rectal cancer. However, long-term outcomes and the cost-effectiveness of robotic surgery for rectal cancer have not been fully evaluated yet; therefore, large-scale clinical studies are required to evaluate the efficacy of this new technology.

  10. Genetic Mutations in Blood and Tissue Samples in Predicting Response to Treatment in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-23

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  11. Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy in Elderly Patients with Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Musio, Daniela; Izzo, Luciano; Pugliese, Federico; Izzo, Paolo; Bolognese, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the treatment tolerance and clinical outcomes in patients aged 70 and older with locally advanced rectal carcinoma treated with multimodality approach. Methods and Materials. We retrospectively analysed 20 consecutive elderly patients, with histologically proven rectal adenocarcinoma, staged T3-4, and/or node-positive tumour, who received chemoradiotherapy and proceeded to surgical approach. Performance status score and adult comorbidity evaluation-27 score were calculated, and their influence on treatment tolerance and clinical outcomes was analysed. Results. All patients completed programmed chemoradiotherapy treatment. Gastrointestinal toxicity was the most common acute side effects: proctitis in 70% of patients and diarrhoea in 55%, classified as Grade 3 in 3 patients only. Radiation dermatitis was reported in 7 patients (35%) and it was graded G3 in one patient. There was no haematological toxicity. Eighteen patients out of 20 underwent surgery. Sphincter preservation was assured in 13 patients. Comorbidity index was related to higher severe acute toxicity (P = 0.015) but no influenced treatment outcomes. Conclusion. Treatment tolerance with combined modality is good in elderly patients. Due to age, no dose reduction for radiation therapy and chemotherapy should be considered. PMID:24392453

  12. Chromosomal copy number changes of locally advanced rectal cancers treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Grade, Marian; Gaedcke, Jochen; Wangsa, Danny; Varma, Sudhir; Beckmann, Jaje; Liersch, Torsten; Hess, Clemens; Becker, Heinz; Difilippantonio, Michael J.; Ried, Thomas; Ghadimi, B. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Standard treatment of rectal cancer patients comprises preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by radical surgery. However, clinicians are faced with the problem that response rates vary from one individual to another. Predictive biomarkers would therefore be helpful. Materials and Methods In order to identify genomic imbalances that might assist in stratifying tumors into responsive or non-responsive, we used metaphase comparative genomic hybridization to prospectively analyze pre-therapeutic biopsies from 42 patients with locally advanced rectal cancers. These patients were subsequently treated with 5-FU based preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Results Based on downsizing of the T-category, 21 rectal cancers were later classified as responsive, while 21 were non-responsive. Comparing these two groups, we could show that gains of chromosomal regions 7q32-q36 and 7q11-q31, and amplifications of 20q11-q13 were significantly associated with responsiveness to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (P<0.05). However, the probability to detect these copy number changes by chance is high (P=0.21). Conclusion Our primary results suggest that pre-therapeutic evaluation of chromosomal copy number changes may be of value for response prediction of rectal cancers to preoperative chemoradiotherapy. This will require validation in a larger cohort of patients. PMID:19602460

  13. Tegafur-uracil (UFT) plus folinic acid in advanced rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sanchiz, F; Milla, A

    1994-12-01

    We previously reported positive results to Tegafur-Uracil (UFT) chemotherapy in a group of patients with advanced rectal cancer. We have continued the study and now report the effectiveness of UFT plus folinic acid (FA) in 52 patients with advanced rectal cancer. The therapeutic schedule was UFT, 600 mg/m2/day x 14 days p.o. + FA, 90 mg/m2/day x 14 days p.o. Fifty-two out of a total of 56 patients were evaluated for response and toxicity. A higher incidence of positive responses in patients without previous chemotherapy was appreciated. Twenty-one of the 52 evaluated patients showed a partial response (PR). Responses were strongly correlated with previous chemotherapy (14/20; 70% PR of cases without previous chemotherapy vs 7/32; 22% of cases with previous chemotherapy). All responding patients came forward with a median time to progression of 8.2 months (19.6 months for patients without previous chemotherapy vs 7.7 months for patients with previous chemotherapy, P < 0.01). We concluded that the UFT plus FA could be a treatment of choice for patients with advanced rectal cancer.

  14. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-13

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  15. The Quality-of-Life Effects of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Joseph M.; Narang, Amol K.; Griffith, Kent A.; Zalupski, Mark M.; Reese, Jennifer B.; Gearhart, Susan L.; Azad, Nolifer S.; Chan, June; Olsen, Leah; Efron, Jonathan E.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Existing studies that examine the effect of neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer on patient quality of life (QOL) are limited. Our goals were to prospectively explore acute changes in patient-reported QOL endpoints during and after treatment and to establish a distribution of scores that could be used for comparison as new treatment modalities emerge. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were prospectively enrolled at 2 institutions. Validated cancer-specific European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC QLQ-CR30) and colorectal cancer-specific (EORTC QLQ-CR38 and EORTC QLQ-CR 29) QOL questionnaires were administered to patients 1 month before they began CRT, at week 4 of CRT, and 1 month after they had finished CRT. The questionnaires included multiple symptom scales, functional domains, and a composite global QOL score. Additionally, a toxicity scale was completed by providers 1 month before the beginning of CRT, weekly during treatment, and 1 month after the end of CRT. Results: Global QOL showed a statistically significant and borderline clinically significant decrease during CRT (-9.50, P=.0024) but returned to baseline 1 month after the end of treatment (-0.33, P=.9205). Symptoms during treatment were mostly gastrointestinal (nausea/vomiting +9.94, P<.0001; and diarrhea +16.67, P=.0022), urinary (dysuria +13.33, P<.0001; and frequency +11.82, P=.0006) or fatigue (+16.22, P<.0001). These symptoms returned to baseline after therapy. However, sexual enjoyment (P=.0236) and sexual function (P=.0047) remained persistently diminished after therapy. Conclusions: Rectal cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant CRT may experience a reduction in global QOL along with significant gastrointestinal and genitourinary symptoms during treatment. Moreover, provider-rated toxicity scales may not fully capture this decrease in patient-reported QOL. Although most symptoms are transient

  16. Progress in the treatment of locally advanced clinically resectable rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2011-12-01

    There have been significant developments in the adjuvant treatment of locally advanced clinically resectable (T3 and/or N+) rectal cancer. Postoperative systemic chemotherapy plus concurrent pelvic irradiation (chemoradiation) significantly improves local control and survival compared with surgery alone. The German Rectal Cancer Trial confirmed that when chemoradiation is delivered preoperatively there is a significant decrease in acute and late toxicity and a corresponding increase in local control and sphincter preservation. Despite these advances, controversies remain. Among these controversies are the role of short-course radiation, whether postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy is necessary for all patients, and if the type of surgery after chemoradiation can be modified based on tumor response. Are there more accurate imaging techniques and/or molecular markers to help identify patients with positive pelvic nodes with the goal of reducing the chance of overtreatment with preoperative therapy. Will more effective systemic agents both improve outcome and modify the need for pelvic irradiation? This review examines the advances in chemoradiation as well as addresses these and other opportunities for improvement.

  17. Application of Laparoscopic Extralevator Abdominoperineal Excision in Locally Advanced Low Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan-Lei; Dai, Yong; Jiang, Jin-Bo; Yuan, Hui-Yang; Hu, San-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background: When compared with conventional abdominoperineal resection (APR), extralevator abdominoperineal excision (ELAPE) has been demonstrated to reduce the risk of local recurrence for the treatment of locally advanced low rectal cancer. Combined with the laparoscopic technique, laparoscopic ELAPE (LELAPE) has the potential to reduce invasion and hasten postoperative recovery. In this study, we aim to investigate the advantages of LELAPE in comparison with conventional APR. Methods: From October 2010 to February 2013, 23 patients with low rectal cancer (T3–4N0–2M0) underwent LELAPE; while during the same period, 25 patients were treated with conventional APR. The patient characteristics, intraoperative data, postoperative complications, and follow-up results were retrospectively compared and analyzed. Results: The basic patient characteristics were similar; but the total operative time for the LELAPE was longer than that of the conventional APR group (P = 0.014). However, the operative time for the perineal portion was comparable between the two groups (P = 0.328). The LELAPE group had less intraoperative blood loss (P = 0.022), a lower bowel perforation rate (P = 0.023), and a positive circumferential margin (P = 0.028). Moreover, the patients, who received the LELAPE, had a lower postoperative Visual Analog Scale, quicker recovery of bowel function (P = 0.001), and a shorter hospital stay (P = 0.047). However, patients in the LELAPE group suffered more chronic perineal pain (P = 0.002), which may be related to the coccygectomy (P = 0.033). Although the metastasis rate and mortality rate were similar between the two groups, the local recurrence rate of the LELAPE group was statistically improved (P = 0.047). Conclusions: When compared with conventional APR, LELAPE has the potential to reduce the risk of local recurrence, and decreases operative invasion for the treatment of locally advanced low rectal cancer. PMID:25963355

  18. High-dose-rate intraluminal brachytherapy during preoperative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Tunio, Mutahir Ali; Rafi, Mansoor; Hashmi, Altaf; Mohsin, Rehan; Qayyum, Abdul; Hasan, Mujahid; Sattar, Amjad; Mubarak, Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To determine the feasibility and safety of high dose rate intraluminal brachytherapy (HDR-ILBT) boost during preoperative chemoradiation for rectal cancer. METHODS: Between 2008 and 2009, thirty-six patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (≥ T3 or N+), were treated initially with concurrent capecitabine (825 mg/m2 oral twice daily) and pelvic external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (45 Gy in 25 fractions), then were randomized to group A; HDR-ILBT group (n = 17) to receive 5.5-7 Gy × 2 to gross tumor volume (GTV) and group B; EBRT group (n = 19) to receive 5.4 Gy × 3 fractions to GTV with EBRT. All patients underwent total mesorectal excision. RESULTS: Grade 3 acute toxicities were registered in 12 patients (70.6%) in group A and in 8 (42.1%) in group B. Complete pathologic response of T stage (ypT0) in group A was registered in 10 patients (58.8%) and in group B, 3 patients (15.8%) had ypT0 (P < 0.0001). Sphincter preservation was reported in 6/9 patients (66.7%) in group A and in 5/10 patients (50%) in group B (P < 0.01). Overall radiological response was 68.15% and 66.04% in Group A and B, respectively. During a median follow up of 18 mo, late grade 1 and 2 sequelae were registered in 3 patients (17.6%) and 4 patients (21.1%) in the groups A and B, respectively. CONCLUSION: HDR-ILBT was found to be effective dose escalation technique in preoperative chemoradiation for rectal cancers, with higher response rates, downstaging and with manageable acute toxicities. PMID:20845511

  19. Rectal cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Mohammad Sadegh; Keramati, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer is the second most common cancer in large intestine. The prevalence and the number of young patients diagnosed with rectal cancer have made it as one of the major health problems in the world. With regard to the improved access to and use of modern screening tools, a number of new cases are diagnosed each year. Considering the location of the rectum and its adjacent organs, management and treatment of rectal tumor is different from tumors located in other parts of the gastrointestinal tract or even the colon. In this article, we will review the current updates on rectal cancer including epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, screening, and staging. Diagnostic methods and latest treatment modalities and approaches will also be discussed in detail. PMID:26034724

  20. Advances in management of adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer: Consequences for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Netter, Jeanne; Douard, Richard; Durdux, Catherine; Landi, Bruno; Berger, Anne; Taieb, Julien

    2016-11-01

    More than half the patients with rectal cancer present with locally advanced rectal disease at diagnosis with a high risk of recurrence. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy and standardized radical surgery with total mesorectal excision have been established as the 'gold standard' for treating these patients. Pathological staging using the ypTNM classification system to decide on adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT) is widely used in clinical practice, but the delivery of ACT is still controversial, as many discrepancies persist in the conclusions of different trials, due to heterogeneity of the inclusion criteria between studies, lack of statistical power, and variations in preoperative and adjuvant regimens. In 2014, a meta-analysis of four randomized phase-III trials (EORTC 22921, I-CNR-RT, PROCTOR-SCRIPT, CHRONICLE) failed to demonstrate any statistical efficacy of fluorouracil (5FU)-based ACT. Three recent randomized trials aimed to compare 5FU with 5FU plus oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. Two of them (ADORE, CAO/ARO/AIO-04) appeared to find a disease-free survival benefit for patients treated with the combination therapy. Thus, while awaiting new data, it can be said that, as of 2015, patients with yp stage I tumors or histological complete response derived no benefit from adjuvant therapy. On the other hand, the FOLFOX chemotherapy regimen should be proposed for yp stage III patients, and may be considered for yp stage II tumors in fit patients with high-risk factors. Nevertheless, well-designed and sufficiently powered clinical trials dedicated to adjuvant treatments for rectal cancer remain justified in future to achieve a high level of proof in keeping with evidence-based medical standards.

  1. Restaging locally advanced rectal cancer by different imaging modalities after preoperative chemoradiation: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To compare the accuracy of different imaging modalities, alone and in combination in predicting findings at surgery after preoperative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods Following chemoradiation, tumors were reclassified on the basis of findings on pelvic computed tomography (CT) (94 patients), endorectal ultrasonography (EUS) (138 patients) alone or by both CT and EUS (80 patients). The ability of the imaging modalities, to predict the pathologic T status, N status, and TNM stage at surgery was evaluated and compared. Results Mean age of the patients was 64.5 years (range 28–88 years); 55% were male. CT and EUS combined had a positive predictive value of 20% for pathologic pT1 stage, 29% for pT1, 29% for pT2, and 58% for pT3. Predictive values for the operative TNM stage were 50% for stage I, 45% for stage II, and 31% for stage III. These values did not exceed those for each modality alone. Conclusion The performance of preoperative CT and EUS in predicting the T and TNM stage of rectal cancer at surgery is poor. Neither modality alone nor the two combined is sufficiently accurate to serve as the basis for decisions regarding treatment modification. PMID:24286200

  2. Response to chemoradiotherapy and lymph node involvement in locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    García-Flórez, Luis J; Gómez-Álvarez, Guillermo; Frunza, Ana M; Barneo-Serra, Luis; Fresno-Forcelledo, Manuel F

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To establish the association between lymph node involvement and the response to neoadjuvant therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer. METHODS: Data of 130 patients with mid and low locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by radical surgery over a 5-year period were reviewed. Tumor staging was done by endorectal ultrasound and/or magnetic resonance imaging. Tumor response to neoadjuvant therapy was determined by T-downstaging and tumor regression grading (TRG). Pathologic complete response (pCR) is defined as the absence of tumor cells in the surgical specimen (ypT0N0). The varying degrees TRG were classified according to Mandard’s scoring system. The evaluation of the response is based on the comparison between previous clinico-radiological staging and the results of pathological evaluation. χ2 and Spearman’s correlation tests were used for the comparison of variables. RESULTS: Pathologic complete response (pCR, ypT0N0, TRG1) was observed in 19 cases (14.6%), and other 18 (13.8%) had only very few residual malignant cells in the rectal wall (TRG2). T-downstaging was found in 63 (48.5%). Mean lymph node retrieval was 9.4 (range 0-38). In 37 cases (28.5%) more than 12 nodes were identified in the surgical specimen. Preoperative lymph node involvement was seen in 77 patients (59.2%), 71 N1 and 6 N2. Postoperative lymph node involvement was observed in 41 patients (31.5%), 29 N1 and 12 N2, while the remaining 89 were N0 (68.5%). In relation to ypT stage, we found nodal involvement of 9.4% in ypT0-1, 22.2% in ypT2 and 43.7% in ypT3-4. Of the 37 patients considered “responders” to neoadjuvant therapy (TRG1 and 2), there were only 4 N+ (10.8%) and the remainder N0 (89.2%). In the “non responders” group (TRG 3, 4 and 5), 37 cases were N+ (39.8%) and 56 (60.2%) were N0 (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation in rectal cancer is associated with lymph node involvement. PMID:26425268

  3. Local advanced rectal cancer perforation in the midst of preoperative chemoradiotherapy: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Takase, Nobuhisa; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Sumi, Yasuo; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Masashi; Kanaji, Shingo; Matsuda, Yoshiko; Matsuda, Takeru; Oshikiri, Taro; Nakamura, Tetsu; Suzuki, Satoshi; Koma, Yu-Ichiro; Komatsu, Masato; Sasaki, Ryohei; Kakeji, Yoshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Standard chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for local advanced rectal cancer (LARC) rarely induce rectal perforation. Here we report a rare case of rectal perforation in a patient with LARC in the midst of preoperative CRT. A 56-year-old male was conveyed to our hospital exhibiting general malaise. Colonoscopy and imaging tests resulted in a clinical diagnosis of LARC with direct invasion to adjacent organs and regional lymphadenopathy. Preoperative 5-fluorouracil-based CRT was started. At 25 d after the start of CRT, the patient developed a typical fever. Computed tomography revealed rectal perforation, and he underwent emergency sigmoid colostomy. At 12 d after the surgery, the remaining CRT was completed according to the original plan. The histopathological findings after radical operation revealed a wide field of tumor necrosis and fibrosis without lymph node metastasis. We share this case as important evidence for the treatment of LARC perforation in the midst of preoperative CRT. PMID:28138443

  4. [A Case of Advanced Rectal Cancer Resected Successfully after Induction Chemotherapy with Modified FOLFOX6 plus Panitumumab].

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Yoshimi; Uchima, Yasutake; Kawamura, Minori; Takeda, Osami; Hanno, Hajime; Takayanagi, Shigenori; Hirooka, Tomoomi; Dozaiku, Toshio; Hirooka, Takashi; Aomatsu, Naoki; Hirakawa, Toshiki; Iwauchi, Takehiko; Nishii, Takafumi; Morimoto, Junya; Nakazawa, Kazunori; Takeuchi, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of advanced colon cancer that was effectively treated with mFOLFOX6 plus panitumumab combination chemotherapy. The patient was a 54-year-old man who had type 2 colon cancer of the rectum. An abdominal CT scan demonstrated rectal cancer with bulky lymph node metastasis and 1 hepatic node (rectal cancer SI [bladder retroperitoneum], N2M0H1P0, cStage IV). He was treated with mFOLFOX6 plus panitumumab as neoadjuvant chemotherapy. After 4 courses of chemotherapy, CT revealed that the primary lesion and regional metastatic lymph nodes had reduced in size (rectal cancer A, N1H1P0M0, cStage IV). Anterior rectal resection with D3 nodal dissection and left lateral segmentectomy of the liver was performed. The histological diagnosis was tubular adenocarcinoma (tub2-1), int, INF a, pMP, ly0, v0, pDM0, pPM0, R0. He was treated with 4 courses of mFOLFOX6 after surgery. The patient has been in good health without a recurrence for 2 years and 5 months after surgery. This case suggests that induction chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 plus panitumumab is a potentially effective regimen for advanced colon cancer.

  5. Definitive high-dose radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Kim, Eun Seok; Yeo, Seung-Gu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Standard management for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) involves preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and radical surgery. However, this level of treatment may be unnecessary for a subgroup of LARC patients. Previous reports have shown that approximately 20% of LARC patients experience a complete tumor response to preoperative CRT. Post-CRT nonoperative management of these patients may prevent morbidities associated with radical surgery. To our knowledge, this case report firstly presents the favorable long-term outcomes of a LARC patient who underwent definitive aim CRT. Methods: The patient was 73 years’ old, and staging workups revealed T3N2bM0 rectal adenocarcinoma. He agreed to receive CRT, but refused surgery. A radiotherapy (RT) dose of 64.8 Gy was prescribed, which was higher than conventional (50.4 Gy) preoperative aim RT. The regimen of concurrent chemotherapy was the same as that used in preoperative aim CRT: 2 cycles of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin. Results: Three months after CRT completion, a complete tumor response was identified clinically. Colonoscopic biopsy after 1 year showed no tumor cells. This patient is alive after 4 years with no evidence of recurrence or severe toxicity. Conclusion: The long-term outcomes of this case indicate the feasibility of definitive high-dose RT with concurrent chemotherapy for LARC. PMID:27749573

  6. Comparison of 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin and capecitabine in preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dae Yong; Jung, Kyung Hae . E-mail: khjung@ncc.re.kr; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Duck-Woo; Chang, Hee Jin; Jeong, Jun Yong; Kim, Young Hoon; Son, Seok-Hyun; Yun, Tak; Hong, Chang Won; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Park, Jae-Gahb

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To describe our experience with a bolus injection of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin (FL) vs. capecitabine in terms of radiologic and pathologic findings in preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods: The study enrolled 278 patients scheduled for preoperative CRT using two protocols with different chemotherapeutic regimens. Pelvic radiotherapy (50.4 Gy) was delivered concurrently with FL (n = 145) or capecitabine (n = 133). Surgery was performed 6 weeks after CRT completion. Tumor responses to CRT were measured using both radiologic and pathologic examination. Magnetic resonance volumetry was performed at the initial workup and just before surgery after completion of preoperative CRT. Post-CRT pathology tests were used to determine tumor stage and regression. Results: Radiologic examination showed that tumor volume decreased by 68.2% {+-} 20.5% in the FL group and 68.3% {+-} 22.3% in the capecitabine group (p = 0.970). Postoperative pathologic T stage determination showed that downstaging occurred in 44.3% of FL and 49.9% of capecitabine patients (p = 0.571). The tumor regression grades after CRT were Grade 1 (minimal response) in 22.6% and 21.0%, Grade 2 (moderate response) in 53.2% and 50.0%, Grade 3 (near-complete response) in 12.9% and 12.9%, and Grade 4 (complete response) in 11.3% and 16.1% of the FL and capecitabine groups, respectively (p = 0.758). Conclusion: In the present study, the radiologic and pathologic findings did not reveal significant differences in short-term tumor responses between preoperative FL and capecitabine CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer. Long-term results and a prospective randomized trial are needed.

  7. Predictive Factors of Tumor Response After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Moureau-Zabotto, Laurence; Farnault, Bertrand; de Chaisemartin, Cecile; Esterni, Benjamin; Lelong, Bernard; Viret, Frederic; Giovannini, Marc; Monges, Genevieve; Delpero, Jean-Robert; Bories, Erwan; Turrini, Olivier; Viens, Patrice; Salem, Naji

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by surgery is the standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer. The aim of this study was to correlate tumor response to survival and to identify predictive factors for tumor response after chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2008, 168 patients with histologically proven locally advanced adenocarcinoma treated by preoperative chemoradiation before total mesorectal excision were retrospectively studied. They received a radiation dose of 45 Gy with a concomitant 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy. Analysis of tumor response was based on lowering of the T stage between pretreatment endorectal ultrasound and pathologic specimens. Overall and progression-free survival rates were correlated with tumor response. Tumor response was analyzed with predictive factors. Results: The median follow-up was 34 months. Five-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates were, of 44.4% and 74.5% in the whole population, 83.4% and 83.4%, respectively, in patients with pathological complete response, 38.6% and 71.9%, respectively, in patients with tumor downstaging, and 29.1and 58.9% respectively, in patients with absence of response. A pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level of <5 ng/ml was significantly independently associated with pathologic complete tumor response (p = 0.019). Pretreatment small tumor size (p = 0.04), pretreatment CEA level of <5 ng/ml (p = 0.008), and chemotherapy with capecitabine (vs. 5-FU) (p = 0.04) were significantly associated with tumor downstaging. Conclusions: Downstaging and complete response after CRT improved progression-free survival and overall survival of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma. In multivariate analysis, a pretreatment CEA level of <5 ng/ml was associated with complete tumor response. Thus, small tumor size, a pretreatment CEA level of < 5ng/ml, and use of capecitabine were associated with tumor downstaging.

  8. Rectal imaging and cancer.

    PubMed

    Vining, D J

    1998-09-01

    Rectal imaging has evolved substantially during the past 25 years and now offers surgeons exquisite anatomic detail and physiologic information. Dynamic cystoproctography, helical computed tomography, endoscopic ultrasonography, endorectal magnetic resonance imaging, and immunoscintigraphy have become standards for the diagnosis of rectal disease, staging of neoplasia, and survey of therapeutic results. The indications, limitations, and relative costs of current imaging methods are reviewed, and advances in imaging technology that promise future benefits to colorectal surgeons are introduced.

  9. Discriminating cancer-related and cancer-unrelated chemoradiation-response genes for locally advanced rectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Guo, You; Cheng, Jun; Ao, Lu; Li, Xiangyu; Guan, Qingzhou; Zhang, Juan; Yan, Haidan; Cai, Hao; Gao, Qiao; Jiang, Weizhong; Guo, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    For patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) treated with preoperation chemoradiation (pCRT), identifying differentially expressed (DE) genes between non-responders and responders is a common approach for investigating mechanisms of chemoradiation resistance. However, some of such DE genes might be irrelevant to cancer itself but simply reflect the pharmacokinetic differences of the normal tissues. In this study, we adopted the RankComp algorithm to identify DE genes for each of LARC sample compared with its own normal state. Then, we identified genes with significantly different deregulation frequencies between the non-responders and responders, defined as cancer-related pCRT-response genes. Pathway enrichment and protein-protein interaction analyses showed that these genes specifically and intensively interacted with currently known effective genes of pCRT, involving in DNA replication, cell cycle and DNA repair. In contrast, after excluding the cancer-related pCRT-response genes, the other DE genes between non-responders and responders were enriched in many pathways of drug and protein metabolisms and transports, and interacted with both the known effective genes and pharmacokinetic genes. Hence, these two types of DE genes should be distinguished for investigating mechanisms of pCRT response in LARCs. PMID:27845363

  10. Phase II Trial of Neoadjuvant Bevacizumab, Capecitabine, and Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, Christopher H.; Eng, Cathy; Feig, Barry W.; Das, Prajnan; Skibber, John M.; Chang, George J.; Wolff, Robert A.; Krishnan, Sunil; Hamilton, Stanley; Janjan, Nora A.; Maru, Dipen M.; Ellis, Lee M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: We designed this Phase II trial to assess the efficacy and safety of the addition of bevacizumab to concurrent neoadjuvant capecitabine-based chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods: Between April 2004 and December 2007, 25 patients with clinically staged T3N1 (n = 20) or T3N0 (n = 5) rectal cancer received neoadjuvant therapy with radiotherapy (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions over 5.5 weeks), bevacizumab every 2 weeks (3 doses of 5 mg/kg), and capecitabine (900 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily only on days of radiation), followed by surgical resection a median of 7.3 weeks later. Results: Procedures included abdominoperineal resection (APR; 6 patients), proctectomy with coloanal anastamosis (8 patients), low anterior resection (10 patients), and local excision (1 patient). Eight (32%) of 25 patients had a pathologic complete response, and 6 (24%) of 25 had <10% viable tumor cells in the specimen. No patient had Grade 3 hand-foot syndrome, gastrointestinal toxicity, or significant hematologic toxicity. Three wound complications required surgical intervention (one coloanal anastamostic dehiscence requiring completion APR and two perineal wound dehiscences after initial APR). Five minor complications occurred that resolved without operative intervention. With a median follow-up of 22.7 months (range, 4.5-32.4 months), all patients were alive; one patient has had a recurrence in the pelvis (2-year actuarial rate, 6.2%) and 3 had distant recurrences. Conclusions: The addition of bevacizumab to neoadjuvant chemoradiation resulted in encouraging pathologic complete response without an increase in acute toxicity. The impact of bevacizumab on perineal wound and anastamotic healing due to concurrent bevacizumab requires further study.

  11. Chemoradiation of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Arrazubi, V; Suárez, J; Novas, P; Pérez-Hoyos, M T; Vera, R; Martínez Del Prado, P

    2013-02-01

    The treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer is a challenge. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy comprise the multimodal therapy that is administered in most cases. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is required. Because this cancer has a high rate of local recurrence, efforts have been made to improve clinical outcomes while minimizing toxicity and maintaining quality of life. Thus, total mesorectal excision technique was developed as the standard surgery, and chemotherapy and radiotherapy have been established as neoadjuvant treatment. Both approaches reduce locoregional relapse. Two neoadjuvant treatments have emerged as standards of care: short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiotherapy with fluoropyrimidines; however, long-course chemoradiotherapy might be more appropriate for low-lying neoplasias, bulky tumours or tumours with near-circumferential margins. If neoadjuvant treatment is not administered and locally advanced stage is demonstrated in surgical specimens, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy is recommended. The addition of chemotherapy to the treatment regimen confers a significant benefit. Adjuvant chemotherapy is widely accepted despite scarce evidence of its benefit. The optimal time for surgery after neoadjuvant therapy, the treatment of low-risk T3N0 neoplasms, the convenience of avoiding radiotherapy in some cases and tailoring treatment to pathological response have been recurrent subjects of debate that warrant more extensive research. Adding new drugs, changing the treatment sequence and selecting the treatment based on prognostic or predictive factors other than stage remain experimental.

  12. The Role of Robotic Surgery for Rectal Cancer: Overcoming Technical Challenges in Laparoscopic Surgery by Advanced Techniques.

    PubMed

    Park, Seungwan; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2015-07-01

    The conventional laparoscopic approach to rectal surgery has several limitations, and therefore many colorectal surgeons have great expectations for the robotic surgical system as an alternative modality in overcoming challenges of laparoscopic surgery and thus enhancing oncologic and functional outcomes. This review explores the possibility of robotic surgery as an alternative approach in laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer. The da Vinci® Surgical System was developed specifically to compensate for the technical limitations of laparoscopic instruments in rectal surgery. The robotic rectal surgery is associated with comparable or better oncologic and pathologic outcomes, as well as low morbidity and mortality. The robotic surgery is generally easier to learn than laparoscopic surgery, improving the probability of autonomic nerve preservation and genitourinary function recovery. Furthermore, in very complex procedures such as intersphincteric dissections and transabdominal transections of the levator muscle, the robotic approach is associated with increased performance and safety compared to laparoscopic surgery. The robotic surgery for rectal cancer is an advanced technique that may resolve the issues associated with laparoscopic surgery. However, high cost of robotic surgery must be addressed before it can become the new standard treatment.

  13. Association Between the Cytogenetic Profile of Tumor Cells and Response to Preoperative Radiochemotherapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    González-González, María; Garcia, Jacinto; Alcazar, José A.; Gutiérrez, María L.; Gónzalez, Luis M.; Bengoechea, Oscar; Abad, María M.; Santos-Briz, Angel; Blanco, Oscar; Martín, Manuela; Rodríguez, Ana; Fuentes, Manuel; Muñoz-Bellvis, Luis; Orfao, Alberto; Sayagues, Jose M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy to locally advanced rectal carcinoma patients has proven efficient in a high percentage of cases. Despite this, some patients show nonresponse or even disease progression. Recent studies suggest that different genetic alterations may be associated with sensitivity versus resistance of rectal cancer tumor cells to neoadjuvant therapy. We investigated the relationship between intratumoral pathways of clonal evolution as assessed by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (51 different probes) and response to neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy, evaluated by Dworak criteria in 45 rectal cancer tumors before (n = 45) and after (n = 31) treatment. Losses of chromosomes 1p (44%), 8p (53%), 17p (47%), and 18q (38%) and gains of 1q (49%) and 13q (75%) as well as amplification of 8q (38%) and 20q (47%) chromosomal regions were those specific alterations found at higher frequencies. Significant association (P < 0.05) was found between alteration of 1p, 1q, 11p, 12p, and 17p chromosomal regions and degree of response to neoadjuvant therapy. A clear association was observed between cytogenetic profile of the ancestral tumor cell clone and response to radiochemotherapy; cases presenting with del(17p) showed a poor response to neoadjuvant treatment (P = 0.03), whereas presence of del(1p) was more frequently observed in responder patients (P = 0.0002). Moreover, a significantly higher number of copies of chromosomes 8q (P = 0.004), 13q (P = 0.003), and 20q (P = 0.002) were found after therapy versus paired pretreatment rectal cancer samples. Our results point out the existence of an association between tumor cytogenetics and response to neoadjuvant therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer. Further studies in larger series of patients are necessary to confirm our results. PMID:25474426

  14. Pseudocirrhosis caused by regorafenib in an advanced rectal cancer patient with multiple liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Kumamoto, Kensuke; Endo, Shungo; Isohata, Noriyuki; Nirei, Azuma; Nemoto, Daiki; Utano, Kenichi; Saito, Takuro; Togashi, Kazutomo

    2017-01-01

    A 70-year-old man who was diagnosed with unresectable advanced rectal cancer with multiple liver metastases, received oxaliplatin-based treatment with bevacizumab as first-line chemotherapy and irinotecan-based treatment with bevacizumab as second-line chemotherapy for a total of 17 months. The patient was treated with regorafenib (160 mg/day for 3 weeks) as third-line chemotherapy. Following completion of one course of regorafenib treatment, the patient complained of abdominal distension. Computed tomography (CT) examination identified liver atrophy and massive ascites, while no such symptoms were observed prior to the regorafenib treatment. Blood testing revealed increases in the aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels. The patient was admitted to the Aizu Medical Center (Aizuwakamatsu, Japan). Approximately 2,000 ml of ascitic fluid were aspirated daily for 1 week by abdominal puncture. The patient was administered oral diuretics, including 20 mg/day of furosemide and 25 mg/day of spironolactone. Albumin was administered to correct the albumin deficit. The levels of AST, ALT and ALP were decreased from the peak value reported on admission and the patient was discharged from our hospital 16 days following treatment initiation. The CT examination after 1 month revealed that the volume of the liver had been restored and the ascites had disappeared. Furthermore, almost all the liver metastases were reduced in size. The carcinoembryonic antigen level, which was elevated prior to regorafenib treatment, also decreased to normal. PMID:28123730

  15. Clinical implications of preoperative chemoradiotherapy prior to laparoscopic surgery for locally advanced low rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Keisaku; Shimbo, Taiju; Tanaka, Keitaro; Yamamoto, Masashi; Narumi, Yoshifumi; Okuda, Junji; Uchiyama, Kazuhisa

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate whether preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has any adverse effects on laparoscopic surgery (LS) for locally advanced low rectal cancer (LARC). The study was performed at the Osaka Medical College Hospital, and included patients who were operated on between July 2006 and December 2013. The short-term outcomes in 156 patients who underwent surgery for LARC following CRT were evaluated, of whom 152 underwent LS. Among the patients who were followed for >40 months, 77 patients (the CRT group) were compared with 39 patients who underwent LS without CRT (the surgery-alone group) for long-term outcomes. The total number of patients who received sphincter-preserving surgery was 74%. No positive longitudinal resection margins were identified, and only 1.3% had identifiable positive circumferential resection margins. The complication rate was 14%, and no serious complications occurred. There were no significant differences between the CRT and the surgery-alone groups in terms of the 5-year relapse-free survival rate (70.1 vs. 61.5%; P=0.81) or the 5-year overall survival rate (88.3 vs. 69.2%; P=0.06). However, the 5-year local recurrence-free survival rate was significantly improved in the CRT group patients (96.1 vs. 79.5%; P=0.009). In conclusion, our results have demonstrated that LS with preoperative CRT appears to be feasible and safe, and may have beneficial effects on local recurrence. PMID:28123724

  16. Pseudocirrhosis caused by regorafenib in an advanced rectal cancer patient with multiple liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Kumamoto, Kensuke; Endo, Shungo; Isohata, Noriyuki; Nirei, Azuma; Nemoto, Daiki; Utano, Kenichi; Saito, Takuro; Togashi, Kazutomo

    2017-01-01

    A 70-year-old man who was diagnosed with unresectable advanced rectal cancer with multiple liver metastases, received oxaliplatin-based treatment with bevacizumab as first-line chemotherapy and irinotecan-based treatment with bevacizumab as second-line chemotherapy for a total of 17 months. The patient was treated with regorafenib (160 mg/day for 3 weeks) as third-line chemotherapy. Following completion of one course of regorafenib treatment, the patient complained of abdominal distension. Computed tomography (CT) examination identified liver atrophy and massive ascites, while no such symptoms were observed prior to the regorafenib treatment. Blood testing revealed increases in the aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels. The patient was admitted to the Aizu Medical Center (Aizuwakamatsu, Japan). Approximately 2,000 ml of ascitic fluid were aspirated daily for 1 week by abdominal puncture. The patient was administered oral diuretics, including 20 mg/day of furosemide and 25 mg/day of spironolactone. Albumin was administered to correct the albumin deficit. The levels of AST, ALT and ALP were decreased from the peak value reported on admission and the patient was discharged from our hospital 16 days following treatment initiation. The CT examination after 1 month revealed that the volume of the liver had been restored and the ascites had disappeared. Furthermore, almost all the liver metastases were reduced in size. The carcinoembryonic antigen level, which was elevated prior to regorafenib treatment, also decreased to normal.

  17. Future of therapy for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2013-06-01

    Since 2004, the standard of care for patients with cT3 and/or N+ rectal cancer has been preoperative chemoradiation followed by surgery and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. A number of advances have occurred and are defining the future of rectal cancer therapy. Among these are short course radiation, the impact of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy, selective radiation and selective surgery, and new chemoradiation regimens with novel agents. This review will examine these developments and assess their impact on the future therapy of rectal cancer.

  18. Epidermal growth factor receptor as a predictor of tumor downstaging in locally advanced rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jun-Sang . E-mail: k423j@cnu.ac.kr; Kim, Jin-Man; Li, Shengjin; Yoon, Wan-Hee; Song, Kyu-Sang; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Yeo, Seung-Gu; Nam, Ji Sook; Cho, Moon-June

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To examine retrospectively whether levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression can predict tumor downstaging after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 183 patients with rectal cancer (cT3-T4 or N+) were enrolled in this study. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy consisted of 50.4 Gy of pelvic radiation with concurrent 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin bolus intravenous chemotherapy in 94 patients or oral capecitabine and leucovorin in 89 patients. EGFR expression in pretreatment paraffin-embedded tumor biopsy specimens was assessed by immunohistochemistry. EGFR expression was determined from the intensity and extent of staining. Tumor downstaging was defined as a reduction of at least one T-stage level. Results: Tumor downstaging occurred in 97 patients (53%), and the tumors showed a pathologic complete response in 27 patients (15%). Positive EGFR expression was observed in 140 (76%) of 183 patients. EGFR expression levels were low in 113 patients (62%) and high in 70 patients (38%). On logistic regression analysis, the significant predictive factor for increased tumor downstaging was a low level of EGFR expression and preoperative chemotherapy using oral capecitabine (odds ratio, 0.437; p 0.012 vs. odds ratio, 3.235; p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: A high level of EGFR expression may be a significant predictive molecular marker for decreased tumor downstaging after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer.

  19. Phase I Study of Neoadjuvant Radiotherapy With 5-Fluorouracil for Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-02

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  20. Tumor Volume Reduction Rate After Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy as a Prognostic Factor in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Seung-Gu; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Byung Chang; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Min Ju

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic significance of tumor volume reduction rate (TVRR) after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: In total, 430 primary LARC (cT3-4) patients who were treated with preoperative CRT and curative radical surgery between May 2002 and March 2008 were analyzed retrospectively. Pre- and post-CRT tumor volumes were measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest MR volumetry. Tumor volume reduction rate was determined using the equation TVRR (%) = (pre-CRT tumor volume - post-CRT tumor volume) Multiplication-Sign 100/pre-CRT tumor volume. The median follow-up period was 64 months (range, 27-99 months) for survivors. Endpoints were disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results: The median TVRR was 70.2% (mean, 64.7% {+-} 22.6%; range, 0-100%). Downstaging (ypT0-2N0M0) occurred in 183 patients (42.6%). The 5-year DFS and OS rates were 77.7% and 86.3%, respectively. In the analysis that included pre-CRT and post-CRT tumor volumes and TVRR as continuous variables, only TVRR was an independent prognostic factor. Tumor volume reduction rate was categorized according to a cutoff value of 45% and included with clinicopathologic factors in the multivariate analysis; ypN status, circumferential resection margin, and TVRR were significant prognostic factors for both DFS and OS. Conclusions: Tumor volume reduction rate was a significant prognostic factor in LARC patients receiving preoperative CRT. Tumor volume reduction rate data may be useful for tailoring surgery and postoperative adjuvant therapy after preoperative CRT.

  1. Capecitabine Initially Concomitant to Radiotherapy Then Perioperatively Administered in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zampino, Maria Giulia Magni, Elena; Leonardi, Maria Cristina; Petazzi, Elena; Santoro, Luigi; Luca, Fabrizio; Chiappa, Antonio; Petralia, Giuseppe; Trovato, Cristina; Fazio, Nicola; Orecchia, Roberto; Nole, Franco; Braud, Filippo de

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of neoadjuvant capecitabine, concomitant to radiotherapy, followed by capecitabine monotherapy, in operable locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) by measuring pathologic response and conservative surgery rate, toxicity profile, and disease-free survival (DFS). Methods and Materials: From October 2002 to July 2006, a total of 51 patients affected by LARC (T3-T4 or any node positive tumor), received capecitabine (825 mg/m{sup 2}, orally, twice daily continuously) concomitant to radiotherapy on the pelvis (50.4 Gy/ 28 fractions), followed by two cycles of capecitabine (1,250 mg/m{sup 2}, orally, twice daily, 14 days on 7 days off) up until 2 weeks before surgery. Tailored adjuvant systemic treatment was discussed according to pathologic stage. Results: Of 51 patients, (median age 61 years, range 38-82 years; 19 women and 32 men; ECOG performance status 0/1/2: 46/4/1), 50 were evaluable for response: 18% complete pathologic remission; 12% T-downstaging, and 30% N-downstaging. One patient died before surgery from mesenteric stroke. Grade 3 acute toxicities were 2% diarrhea, 8% dermatitis, 2% liver function test elevation, and 2% hand-foot syndrome. Sphincter preservation rates for tumors {<=}6 cm from the anal verge were 62% and 80% for the whole population. Median follow up was 43.0 months (range 0.8-68.6 months). Five-years DFS was 85.4% (95% CI = 75.3-95.4%). Conclusions: Based on our study results, we conclude that this regimen is well tolerated and active and compares favorably with existing capecitabine-based approaches.

  2. Tumor deposits: markers of poor prognosis in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu-Ning; Xiao, Wei-Wei; Xi, Shao-Yan; OuYang, Pu-Yun; You, Kai-Yun; Zeng, Zhi-Fan; Ding, Pei-Rong; Zhang, Hui-Zhong; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Xu, Rui-Hua; Gao, Yuan-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background Tumor deposits (TDs) were reported to be poor prognoses in colorectal carcinoma, but the significance in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) (T3-4/N+) following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (neo-CRT) and surgery is unclear. Since adjuvant chemotherapy showed no benefit for LARC following neo-CRT, it is of great value to investigate whether TDs can identify the subgroup of patients who may benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods Between 2004 and 2012, 310 LARC patients following neo-CRT and surgery were retrospectively reviewed. Overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), distant metastasis free survival (DMFS) and local recurrence free survival (LRFS) were evaluated by Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank test and Cox models. Results TDs-positive patients showed adverse OS, DFS and DMFS (all P≤0.001), but not LRFS (P = 0.273). In multivariate analysis, TDs continued to be associated with poor OS (HR = 2.44, 95% CI 1.32-4.4, P = 0.004) and DFS (HR = 1.99, 95% CI 1.21-3.27, P = 0.007), but not DMFS (HR = 1.77, 95% CI 0.97-3.20, P = 0.061) or LRFS (HR = 1.85, 95% CI 0.58-5.85, P = 0.298). Among TDs-positive patients, adjuvant chemotherapy significantly improved OS (P = 0.045) and DMFS (P = 0.026), but not DFS (P = 0.127) or LRFS (P = 0.862). Conclusions TDs are predictive of poor survival in LARC after neo-CRT. Fortunately, TDs-positive patients appear to benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:26695441

  3. Panitumumab as a radiosensitizing agent in KRAS wild-type locally advanced rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mardjuadi, Feby Ingriani; Carrasco, Javier; Coche, Jean-Charles; Sempoux, Christine; Jouret-Mourin, Anne; Scalliet, Pierre; Goeminne, Jean-Charles; Daisne, Jean-François; Delaunoit, Thierry; Vuylsteke, Peter; Humblet, Yves; Meert, Nicolas; van den Eynde, Marc; Moxhon, Anne; Haustermans, Karin; Canon, Jean-Luc; Machiels, Jean-Pascal

    2015-09-01

    Our goal was to optimize the radiosensitizing potential of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibodies, when given concomitantly with preoperative radiotherapy in KRAS wild-type locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Based on pre-clinical studies conducted by our group, we designed a phase II trial in which panitumumab (6 mg/kg/q2 weeks) was combined with preoperative radiotherapy (45 Gy in 25 fractions) to treat cT3-4/N + KRAS wild-type LARC. The primary endpoint was complete pathologic response (pCR) (H0 = 5%, H1 = 17%, α = 0.05, β = 0.2). From 19 enrolled patients, 17 (89%) were evaluable for pathology assessment. Although no pCR was observed, seven patients (41%) had grade 3 Dworak pathological tumor regression. The regimen was safe and was associated with 95% of sphincter-preservation rate. No NRAS, BRAF, or PI3KCA mutation was found in this study, but one patient (5%) showed loss of PTEN expression. The quantification of plasma EGFR ligands during treatment showed significant upregulation of plasma TGF-α and EGF following panitumumab administration (p < 0.05). At surgery, patients with important pathological regression (grade 3 Dworak) had higher plasma TGF-α (p = 0.03) but lower plasma EGF (p = 0.003) compared to those with grade 0-2 Dworak. Our study suggests that concomitant panitumumab and preoperative radiotherapy in KRAS wild-type LARC is feasible and results in some tumor regression. However, pCR rate remained modest. Given that the primary endpoint of our study was not reached, we remain unable to recommend the use of panitumumab as a radiosensitizer in KRAS wild-type LARC outside a research setting.

  4. Spontaneous rupture of the renal pelvis presenting as an urinoma in locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Mohanty, Debajyoti; Rathi, Vinita; Jain, Bhupendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    A 29-year-old gentleman underwent a transverse colostomy for intestinal obstruction caused by advanced rectal carcinoma. On the 5th postoperative day, the patient developed a painful swelling on the right side of the abdomen. The contrast enhanced computed tomography of the abdomen revealed a right sided hydronephrosis, a large rent in the renal pelvis, and a large retroperitoneal fluid collection on the right side. Percutaneous nephrostomy and pigtail catheter drainage of the urinoma led to resolution of abdominal swelling. Development of a urinoma as a consequence of rectal carcinoma is highly unusual. Prompt imaging for confirmation of diagnosis, decompression of the renal pelvicalyceal system, and drainage of the urinoma limits morbidity. PMID:24749123

  5. Clinical factors of post-chemoradiotherapy as valuable indicators for pathological complete response in locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jianhong; Lin, Junzhong; Qiu, Miaozhen; Wu, Xiaojun; Lu, Zhenhai; Chen, Gong; Li, Liren; Ding, Peirong; Gao, Yuanhong; Zeng, Zhifan; Zhang, Huizhong; Wan, Desen; Pan, Zhizhong

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Pathological complete response has shown a better prognosis for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy. However, correlations between post-chemoradiotherapy clinical factors and pathologic complete response are not well confirmed. The aim of the current study was to identify post-chemoradiotherapy clinical factors that could serve as indicators of pathologic complete response in locally advanced rectal cancer. METHODS: This study retrospectively analyzed 544 consecutive patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated at Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center from December 2003 to June 2014. All patients received preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify post-chemoradiotherapy clinical factors that are significant indicators of pathologic complete response. RESULTS: In this study, 126 of 544 patients (23.2%) achieved pathological complete response. In multivariate analyses, increased pathological complete response rate was significantly associated with the following factors: post-chemoradiotherapy clinical T stage 0-2 (odds ratio=2.098, 95% confidence interval=1.023-4.304, p=0.043), post-chemoradiotherapy clinical N stage 0 (odds ratio=2.011, 95% confidence interval=1.264-3.201, p=0.003), interval from completion of preoperative chemoradiotherapy to surgery of >7 weeks (odds ratio=1.795, 95% confidence interval=1.151-2.801, p=0.010) and post-chemoradiotherapy carcinoembryonic antigen ≤2 ng/ml (odds ratio=1.579, 95% confidence interval=1.026-2.432, p=0.038). CONCLUSIONS: Post-chemoradiotherapy clinical T stage 0-2, post-chemoradiotherapy clinical N stage 0, interval from completion of chemoradiotherapy to surgery of >7 weeks and post-chemoradiotherapy carcinoembryonic antigen ≤2 ng/ml were independent clinical indicators for pathological complete response. These findings demonstrate that post-chemoradiotherapy clinical

  6. XRCC2 as a predictive biomarker for radioresistance in locally advanced rectal cancer patients undergoing preoperative radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Chang-Jiang; Song, Xin-Ming; Chen, Zhi-Hui; Ren, Xue-Qun; Xu, Kai-Wu; Jing, Hong; He, Yu-Long

    2015-01-01

    XRCC2 has been shown to increase the radioresistance of some cancers. Here, XRCC2 expression was investigated as a predictor of preoperative radiotherapy (PRT) treatment response in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). XRCC2 was found to be overexpressed in rectal cancer tissues resected from patients who underwent surgery without PRT. In addition, overall survival for LARC patients was improved in XRCC2-negative patients compared with XRCC2-positive patients after treatment with PRT (P < 0.001). XRCC2 expression was also associated with an increase in LARC radioresistance. Conversely, XRCC2-deficient cancer cells were more sensitive to irradiation in vitro, and a higher proportion of these cells underwent cell death induced by G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis. When XRCC2 was knocked down, the repair of DNA double-strand breaks caused by irradiation was impaired. Therefore, XRCC2 may increases LARC radioresistance by repairing DNA double-strand breaks and preventing cancer cell apoptosis. Moreover, the present data suggest that XRCC2 is a useful predictive biomarker of PRT treatment response in LARC patients. Thus, inhibition of XRCC2 expression or activity represents a potential therapeutic strategy for improving PRT response in LARC patients. PMID:26320178

  7. The evaluation of the oxidative stress for patients receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Serbanescu, GL; Gruia, MI; Bara, M; Anghel, RM

    2017-01-01

    Hypothesis: Nowadays, rectal cancer is an important healthcare challenge that affects many thousands of people each year worldwide, being diagnosed especially after the age of 50 years. Objective: This study attempted to evaluate the oxidative stress in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and results: 30 patients from the “Prof. Dr. Al. Trestioreanu” Institute of Oncology in Bucharest were treated with neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy during 2014 and 2016 and were included in the clinical study. Blood samples were obtained in dynamics during the treatment. From the blood samples, the serum was separated and used to identify the biochemical oxidative stress parameters. Results: Regarding the determination of lipid peroxides, albumin thiols, the cuprum oxidase activity of ceruloplasmin, the values registered in the dynamic of the treatment highlighted their increase to a maximum at the treatment’s endpoint due to an important oxidative stress. Regarding the serum values for total antioxidants, the results pointed out the activation of the natural protection systems, which in time were overwhelmed, due to the installed oxidative stress. Conclusion: Part of the cytotoxic effect of radiotherapy was due to the production of oxidative stress. The cell was constantly exposed to the cytotoxic action of the reactive oxygen species. The obtained results indicated the dual relation to which the tumoral cell exposed itself and the installed oxidative stress, respectively, the oxidative stress being a cause or a consequence of the malign transformation. Abbreviations: CT = computed tomography, MRI = magnetic resonance imaging, ESMO = European Society for Medical Oncology, ECOG = performance status scale PMID:28255388

  8. The evaluation of the oxidative stress for patients receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Serbanescu, G L; Gruia, M I; Bara, M; Anghel, R M

    2017-01-01

    Hypothesis: Nowadays, rectal cancer is an important healthcare challenge that affects many thousands of people each year worldwide, being diagnosed especially after the age of 50 years. Objective: This study attempted to evaluate the oxidative stress in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and results: 30 patients from the "Prof. Dr. Al. Trestioreanu" Institute of Oncology in Bucharest were treated with neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy during 2014 and 2016 and were included in the clinical study. Blood samples were obtained in dynamics during the treatment. From the blood samples, the serum was separated and used to identify the biochemical oxidative stress parameters. Results: Regarding the determination of lipid peroxides, albumin thiols, the cuprum oxidase activity of ceruloplasmin, the values registered in the dynamic of the treatment highlighted their increase to a maximum at the treatment's endpoint due to an important oxidative stress. Regarding the serum values for total antioxidants, the results pointed out the activation of the natural protection systems, which in time were overwhelmed, due to the installed oxidative stress. Conclusion: Part of the cytotoxic effect of radiotherapy was due to the production of oxidative stress. The cell was constantly exposed to the cytotoxic action of the reactive oxygen species. The obtained results indicated the dual relation to which the tumoral cell exposed itself and the installed oxidative stress, respectively, the oxidative stress being a cause or a consequence of the malign transformation. Abbreviations: CT = computed tomography, MRI = magnetic resonance imaging, ESMO = European Society for Medical Oncology, ECOG = performance status scale.

  9. Combined radiotherapy, 5-fluorouracil continuous infusion and weekly oxaliplatin in advanced rectal cancer: a phase I study.

    PubMed

    François, Eric; Ychou, Marc; Ducreux, Michel; Bertheault-Cvitkovic, Frédérique; Giovannini, Marc; Conroy, Thierry; Lemanski, Claire; Thomas, Olivier; Magnin, Valérie

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) of weekly oxaliplatin combined with 5-fluorouracil (5FU) continuous infusion administered concomitantly with fractionated radiotherapy in patients presenting advanced rectal cancer. Forty-three patients with rectal cancer (stage T3/T4 (n = 24), metastatic (n = 17) and 2 with local recurrence), were included. The radiotherapy dose delivered was 45 Gy over 5 weeks (1.8 Gy/fraction/day, 5 days per week). The initial weekly oxaliplatin dosage was 30 mg/m2 and the 5FU dosage 150 mg/m2/d. The oxaliplatin and 5FU doses were escalated. Eight dose levels were tested. At dose level 8 (oxaliplatin 80 mg/m2, 5FU 225 mg/m2/d), 2 patients out of 4 presented dose-limiting toxicity (severe diarrhoea with dehydration and fatal shock, rectovesical fistula). At dose level 7, 2 further patients presented with grade 3 diarrhoea. The main toxicity of the combination was diarrhoea. The hematological and neurological toxicities were not severe and were not dose-limiting. Out of the 30 patients undergoing surgery, 4 (13.3%) presented with pathological complete response and 4 (13.3%) only presented with microscopic residual disease. The results from this study enabled determination of the recommended weekly oxaliplatin dose (60 mg/m2) combined with 5FU continuous infusion (225 mg/m2) and fractionated radiotherapy (45 Gy) in the pre-operative treatment of advanced rectal cancer. The good safety profile of the regimen, associated with promising results in terms of histological response, suggest that the regimen could be developed in future phase II/III studies.

  10. Impact of chemotherapy on eosinophilia-associated advanced rectal cancer: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Maki; Kadono, Jun; Sugita, Hiroshi; Nakazono, Toshihiro; Motoi, Shunsuke; Kitazono, Iwao; Goto, Yuko; Fukukura, Yoshihiko; Yoshimitsu, Makoto; Misaka, Takaharu; Imoto, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports a case of eosinophilia-associated rectal cancer that was successfully stabilized using chemotherapy, and reviews the mechanisms of eosinophilia and the importance of chemotherapy. A 65-year-old man, who had previously been diagnosed with suspected rectal cancer, presented with the chief complaint of melena. Eosinophilia, abnormal blood coagulation, and elevated carcinoembryonic antigen and carbohydrate antigen 19–9 tumor marker levels were observed, and the patient was subsequently diagnosed with advanced rectal cancer accompanied by multiple lymph node metastases that extended from the para-aortic lymph nodes to the left axillary lymph nodes. The complication of deep vein thrombosis was also observed. Tumor hemorrhage was exacerbated, and thus, Hartmann's procedure was performed. Pathological findings included poorly- to moderately-differentiated adenocarcinoma; however, no eosinophil infiltration was observed within the tumor. Following surgery, the eosinophilia and lymph node metastasis were exacerbated, and an oxaliplatin plus capecitabine chemotherapy regimen was initiated. The patient's eosinophil count and tumor marker levels normalized, and the lymph nodes decreased in size; however, re-enlargement of the lymph nodes was observed 6 months after surgery. The patient was then administered a chemotherapeutic regimen of irinotecan/fluorouracil/folinic acid + bevacizumab, and stable disease was maintained until pleural and peritoneal dissemination were observed at 22 months post-surgery. Following a rapid deterioration in condition, the patient succumbed to the disease at 23 months post-surgery. The present case indicates that although eosinophilia-associated colon cancer exhibits a poor prognosis, early chemotherapeutic intervention may improve this. PMID:28105235

  11. Indication of pre-surgical radiochemotherapy enhances psychosocial morbidity among patients with resectable locally advanced rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Bencova, V; Krajcovicova, I; Svec, J

    2016-01-01

    Patients with cancer experience stress-determined psychosocial comorbidities and behavioural alterations. Patients expectation to be cured by the first line surgery and their emotional status can be negatively influenced by the decision to include neoadjuvant long-course radiotherapy prior to surgical intervention. From the patient's perspective such treatment algorithmindicates incurability of the disease. The aim of this study was to analyse the extent and dynamics of stress and related psychosocial disturbances among patients with resectable rectal cancer to whom the neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy before surgery has been indicated.Three standardised assessment tools evaluating psychosocial morbidity of rectal cancer patients have been implemented: The EORTC QLQ C30-3, the EORTC QLQ CR29 module and the HADS questionnaires previously tested for internal consistency were answered by patients before and after long-course radiotherapy and after surgery and the scores of clinical and psychosocial values were evaluated by means of the EORTC and HADS manuals. The most profound psychosocial distress was experienced by patients after the decision to apply neoadjuvant radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy before surgical intervention. The involvement of pre-surgical radiotherapy into the treatment algorithm increased emotional disturbances (anxiety, feelings of hopelessness) and negatively influenced patient's treatment adherence and positive expectations from the healing process. The negative psychosocial consequences appeared to be more enhanced in female patients. Despite provided information about advances of neoadjuvant radiotherapy onto success of surgical intervention, the emotional and cognitive disorders improved only slightly. The results clearly indicate that addressed communication and targeted psychosocial support has to find place before pre-surgical radiochemotherapy and as a standard part through the trajectory of the entire multimodal rectal cancer

  12. Implications for determining the optimal treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer in elderly patients aged 75 years and older.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jue-feng; Zhu, Ji; Li, Gui-chao; Sun, Wen-jie; Zhang, Zhen

    2015-10-06

    Patients were excluded if they were older than 75 years of age in most clinical trials. Thus, the optimal treatment strategies in elderly patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) are still controversial. We designed our study to specifically evaluate the cancer specific survival of four subgroups of patients according to four different treatment modalities: surgery only, radiation (RT) only, neoadjuvant RT and adjuvant RT by analyzing the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-registered database. The results showed that the 5-year cancer specific survival (CSS) was 52.1% in surgery only, 27.7% in RT only, 70.4% in neoadjuvant RT and 60.4% in adjuvant RT, which had significant difference in univariate log-rank test (P < 0.001) and multivariate Cox regression (P < 0.001). Thus, the neoadjuvant RT and surgery may be the optimal treatment pattern in elderly patients, especially for patients who are medically fit for the operation.

  13. Preoperative chemoradiation of locally advanced T3 rectal cancer combined with an endorectal boost

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobsen, Anders . E-mail: andjac@vgs.vejleamt.dk; Mortensen, John P.; Bisgaard, Claus; Lindebjerg, Jan; Hansen, Johnny W.; Rafaelsen, Soren R.

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect and feasibility of concurrent radiation and chemotherapy combined with endorectal brachytherapy in T3 rectal cancer with complete pathologic remission as end point. Methods and Materials: The study included 50 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma. All patients had T3 tumor with a circumferential margin 0-5 mm on a magnetic resonance imaging scan. The radiotherapy was delivered by a technique including two planning target volumes. Clinical target volume 1 (CTV1) received 60 Gy/30 fractions, and CTV2 received 48.6 Gy/27 fractions. The tumor dose was raised to 65 Gy with endorectal brachytherapy 5 Gy/1 fraction to the tumor bed. On treatment days, the patients received uracil and tegafur 300 mg/m2 concurrently with radiotherapy. Results: Forty-eight patients underwent operation. Histopathologic tumor regression was assessed by the Tumor Regression Grade (TRG) system. TRG1 was recorded in 27% of the patients, and a further 27% were classified as TRG2. TRG3 was found in 40%, and 6% had TRG4. The toxicity was low. Conclusion: The results indicate that high-dose radiation with concurrent chemotherapy and endorectal brachytherapy is feasible with a high rate of complete response, but further trials are needed to define its possible role as treatment option.

  14. Novel radiation techniques for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The concepts for management of rectal cancer have changed drastically over the past few years. Through national bowel cancer screening programmes in the Western countries and the increasing use of endoscopic procedures as diagnostic tool, there is increase in detection of rectal cancer in early stages. There is increase in ageing population worldwide but more so in Western countries. In addition, there is realisation of harm from extirpative surgical procedures which are directed towards managing advanced rectal cancer in the past. Increase in cost of health care burden has also led the investigators to seek alternative treatment options which are effective, safe and cost effective. There are several modern radiation techniques which fits this bill and we need to be aware of newer novel radiation techniques to fulfil this gap. PMID:24982769

  15. Nodal tumor response according to the count of peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations during preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jaesung; Oh, Young-Taek; Noh, O Kyu; Chun, Mison; Park, Jun-Eun; Cho, Sung-Ran

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the relationship between the circulating lymphocyte subpopulation counts during preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and tumor response in locally advanced rectal cancer. Materials and Methods From August 2015 to June 2016, 10 patients treated with preoperative CRT followed by surgery were enrolled. Patients received conventional fractionated radiotherapy (50.4 Gy) with fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. Surgical resection was performed at 4 to 8 weeks after the completion of preoperative CRT. The absolute blood lymphocyte subpopulation was obtained prior to and after 4 weeks of CRT. We analyzed the association between a tumor response and change in the lymphocyte subpopulation during CRT. Results Among 10 patients, 2 (20%) had evidence of pathologic complete response. In 8 patients with clinically node positive, 4 (50%) had nodal tumor response. All lymphocyte subpopulation counts at 4 weeks after CRT were significantly lower than those observed during pretreatment (p < 0.01). A high decrease in natural killer (NK) cell, count during CRT (baseline cell count − cell count at 4 weeks) was associated with node down staging (p = 0.034). Conclusion Our results suggest that the change of lymphocyte subset to preoperative CRT may be a predictive factor for tumor response in rectal cancer. PMID:27927012

  16. Clinical Trial of Oral Nelfinavir Before and During Radiation Therapy for Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Esme J.; Roberts, Corran; Franklin, Jamie M.; Enescu, Monica; West, Nicholas; MacGregor, Thomas P.; Chu, Kwun-Ye; Boyle, Lucy; Blesing, Claire; Wang, Lai-Mun; Mukherjee, Somnath; Anderson, Ewan M.; Brown, Gina; Dutton, Susan; Love, Sharon B.; Schnabel, Julia A.; Quirke, Phil; Muschel, Ruth; McKenna, William G.; Partridge, Michael; Sharma, Ricky A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Nelfinavir, a PI3-kinase pathway inhibitor, is a radiosensitizer which increases tumor blood flow in preclinical models. We conducted an early-phase study to demonstrate the safety of nelfinavir combined with hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) and to develop biomarkers of tumor perfusion and radiosensitization for this combinatorial approach. Patients and Methods Ten patients with T3-4 N0-2 M1 rectal cancer received 7 days of oral nelfinavir (1250 mg bd) and a further 7 days of nelfinavir during pelvic RT (25 Gy/5 fractions/7 days). Perfusion CT (p-CT) and DCE-MRI scans were performed pre-treatment, after 7 days of nelfinavir and prior to last fraction of RT. Biopsies taken pre-treatment and 7 days after the last fraction of RT were analysed for tumor cell density (TCD). Results There were 3 drug-related grade 3 adverse events: diarrhea, rash, lymphopenia. On DCE-MRI, there was a mean 42% increase in median Ktrans, and a corresponding median 30% increase in mean blood flow on p-CT during RT in combination with nelfinavir. Median TCD decreased from 24.3% at baseline to 9.2% in biopsies taken 7 days after RT (P=0.01). Overall, 5/9 evaluable patients exhibited good tumor regression on MRI assessed by Tumor Regression Grade (mrTRG). Conclusions This is the first study to evaluate nelfinavir in combination with RT without concurrent chemotherapy. It has shown that nelfinavir-RT is well tolerated and is associated with increased blood flow to rectal tumors. The efficacy of nelfinavir-RT versus RT alone merits clinical evaluation, including measurement of tumor blood flow. PMID:26861457

  17. Neoadjuvant Treatment in Rectal Cancer: Actual Status

    PubMed Central

    Garajová, Ingrid; Di Girolamo, Stefania; de Rosa, Francesco; Corbelli, Jody; Agostini, Valentina; Biasco, Guido; Brandi, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Neoadjuvant (preoperative) concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has become a standard treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. The clinical stages II (cT3-4, N0, M0) and III (cT1-4, N+, M0) according to International Union Against Cancer (IUCC) are concerned. It can reduce tumor volume and subsequently lead to an increase in complete resections (R0 resections), shows less toxicity, and improves local control rate. The aim of this review is to summarize actual approaches, main problems, and discrepancies in the treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. PMID:22295206

  18. The status of targeted agents in the setting of neoadjuvant radiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hadaki, Maher; Harrison, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy has a longstanding and well-defined role in the treatment of resectable rectal cancer to reduce the historically high risk of local recurrence. In more advanced borderline or unresectable cases, where the circumferential resection margin (CRM) is breached or threatened according to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), despite optimized local multimodality treatment and the gains achieved by modern high quality total mesorectal excision (TME), at least half the patients fail to achieve sufficient downstaging with current schedules. Many do not achieve an R0 resection. In less locally advanced cases, even if local control is achieved, this confers only a small impact on distant metastases and a significant proportion of patients (30-40%) still subsequently develop metastatic disease. In fact, distant metastases have now become the predominant cause of failure in rectal cancer. Therefore, increasing the intensity and efficacy of chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy by integrating additional cytotoxics and biologically targetted agents seems an appealing strategy to explore—with the aim of enhancing curative resection rates and improving distant control and survival. However, to date, we lack validated biomarkers for these biological agents apart from wild-type KRAS. For cetuximab, the appearance of an acneiform rash is associated with response, but low levels of magnesium appear more controversial. There are no molecular biomarkers for bevacizumab. Although some less invasive clinical markers have been proposed for bevacizumab, such as circulating endothelial cells (CECS), circulating levels of VEGF and the development of overt hypertension, these biomarkers have not been validated and are observed to emerge only after a trial of the agent. We also lack a simple method of ongoing monitoring of ‘on target’ effects of these biological agents, which could determine and pre-empt the development of resistance, prior to radiological and clinical assessessments

  19. The status of targeted agents in the setting of neoadjuvant radiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Hadaki, Maher; Harrison, Mark

    2013-09-01

    Radiotherapy has a longstanding and well-defined role in the treatment of resectable rectal cancer to reduce the historically high risk of local recurrence. In more advanced borderline or unresectable cases, where the circumferential resection margin (CRM) is breached or threatened according to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), despite optimized local multimodality treatment and the gains achieved by modern high quality total mesorectal excision (TME), at least half the patients fail to achieve sufficient downstaging with current schedules. Many do not achieve an R0 resection. In less locally advanced cases, even if local control is achieved, this confers only a small impact on distant metastases and a significant proportion of patients (30-40%) still subsequently develop metastatic disease. In fact, distant metastases have now become the predominant cause of failure in rectal cancer. Therefore, increasing the intensity and efficacy of chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy by integrating additional cytotoxics and biologically targetted agents seems an appealing strategy to explore-with the aim of enhancing curative resection rates and improving distant control and survival. However, to date, we lack validated biomarkers for these biological agents apart from wild-type KRAS. For cetuximab, the appearance of an acneiform rash is associated with response, but low levels of magnesium appear more controversial. There are no molecular biomarkers for bevacizumab. Although some less invasive clinical markers have been proposed for bevacizumab, such as circulating endothelial cells (CECS), circulating levels of VEGF and the development of overt hypertension, these biomarkers have not been validated and are observed to emerge only after a trial of the agent. We also lack a simple method of ongoing monitoring of 'on target' effects of these biological agents, which could determine and pre-empt the development of resistance, prior to radiological and clinical assessessments or

  20. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy first, followed by chemoradiation and then surgery, in the management of locally advanced rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Cercek, Andrea; Goodman, Karyn A; Hajj, Carla; Weisberger, Emily; Segal, Neil H; Reidy-Lagunes, Diane L; Stadler, Zsofia K; Wu, Abraham J; Weiser, Martin R; Paty, Philip B; Guillem, Jose G; Nash, Garrett M; Temple, Larissa K; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio; Saltz, Leonard B

    2014-04-01

    Standard therapy for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) is preoperative chemoradiotherapy and postoperative chemotherapy. At Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) the authors began offering FOLFOX (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin) as initial treatment for patients with high-risk LARC to target micrometastases while treating the primary tumor. The purpose of this study is to report the safety and efficacy of initial FOLFOX given before chemoradiotherapy on tumor downsizing and pathologic complete response (pathCR) in LARC. The records of patients with stage II/III rectal cancer treated at MSKCC between 2007 and 2012 were reviewed. Of approximately 300 patients with LARC treated at MSKCC, 61 received FOLFOX as initial therapy. Of these 61 patients, 57 received induction FOLFOX (median 7 cycles) followed by chemoradiation, and 4 experienced an excellent response, declined chemoradiation, and underwent total mesorectal excision (TME). Twelve of the 61 patients did not undergo TME: 9 had a complete clinical response (CCR), 1 declined despite persistent tumor, 1 declined because of comorbidities, and 1 developed metastatic disease. Among the 61 patients receiving initial FOLFOX, 22 (36%) had either a pathCR (n=13) or a CCR (n=9). Of the 49 patients who underwent TME, all had R0 resections and 23 (47%) had tumor response greater than 90%, including 13 (27%) who experienced a pathCR. Of the 28 patients who received all 8 cycles of FOLFOX, 8 experienced a pathCR (29%) and 3 a CCR (11%). No serious adverse events occurred that required a delay in treatment during FOLFOX or chemoradiation. FOLFOX and chemoradiation before planned TME results in tumor regression, a high rate of delivery of planned therapy, and a substantial rate of pathCRs, and offers a good platform for nonoperative management in select patients.

  1. ACR Appropriateness Criteria on Resectable Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, W. Warren; Konski, Andre A.; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Poggi, Matthew M.; Regine, William F.; Cosman, Bard C.; Saltz, Leonard; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2008-04-01

    The American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria on Resectable Rectal Cancer was updated by the Expert Panel on Radiation Oncology-Rectal/Anal Cancer, based on a literature review completed in 2007.

  2. Preoperative Chemoradiation With Cetuximab, Irinotecan, and Capecitabine in Patients With Locally Advanced Resectable Rectal Cancer: A Multicenter Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Young; Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Jee Hyun; Im, Seok Ah; Lee, Keun Seok; Yun, Tak; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Choi, Hyo Seong; Lim, Seok-Byung; Chang, Hee Jin; Jung, Kyung Hae

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, irinotecan, and capecitabine in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, and mid- to lower rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiotherapy was delivered at a dose of 50.4 Gy/28 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of an initial dose of cetuximab of 400 mg/m{sup 2} 1 week before radiotherapy, and then cetuximab 250 mg/m{sup 2}/week, irinotecan 40 mg/m{sup 2}/week for 5 consecutive weeks and capecitabine 1,650 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 5 days a week (weekdays only) from the first day during radiotherapy. Total mesorectal excision was performed within 6 {+-} 2 weeks. The pathologic responses and survival outcomes were evaluated as study endpoints, and an additional KRAS mutation analysis was performed. Results: In total, 39 patients completed their planned preoperative chemoradiation and underwent R0 resection. The pathologic complete response rate was 23.1% (9/39), and 3 patients (7.7%) showed near total regression of tumor. The 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 80.0% and 94.7%, respectively. Grade 3/4 toxicities included leukopenia (4, 10.3%), neutropenia (2, 5.1%), anemia (1, 2.6%), diarrhea (2, 5.1%), fatigue (1, 2.6%), skin rash (1, 2.6%), and ileus (1, 2.6%). KRAS mutations were found in 5 (13.2%) of 38 patients who had available tissue for testing. Clinical outcomes were not significantly correlated with KRAS mutation status. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, irinotecan, and capecitabine was active and well tolerated. KRAS mutation status was not a predictive factor for pathologic response in this study.

  3. The Value of Restaging With Chest and Abdominal CT/MRI Scan After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-Chen; Zhang, Xu; Xie, E; An, Xin; Cai, Pei-Qiang; Zhu, Ying; Tang, Jing-Hua; Kong, Ling-Heng; Lin, Jun-Zhong; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Ding, Pei-Rong

    2015-11-01

    Little was known with regard to the value of preoperative systemic restaging for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). This study was designed to evaluate the role of chest and abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on preoperative restaging in LARC after neoadjuvant CRT and to assess the impact on treatment strategy.Between January 2007 and April 2013, 386 newly diagnosed consecutive patients with LARC who underwent neoadjuvant CRT and received restaging with chest and abdominal CT/MRI scan were included. Imaging results before and after CRT were analyzed.Twelve patients (3.1%) (6 liver lesions, 2 peritoneal lesions, 2 distant lymph node lesions, 1 lung lesions, 1 liver and lung lesions) were diagnosed as suspicious metastases on the restaging scan after radiotherapy. Seven patients (1.8%) were confirmed as metastases by pathology or long-term follow-up. The treatment strategy was changed in 5 of the 12 patients as a result of restaging CT/MRI findings. Another 10 patients (2.6%) who present with normal restaging imaging findings were diagnosed as metastases intra-operatively. The sensitivity, specificity accuracy, negative predictive value, and positive predictive values of restaging CT/MRI was 41.4%, 98.6%, 58.3%, and 97.3%, respectively.The low incidence of metastases and minimal consequences for the treatment plan question the clinical value of routine restaging of chest and abdomen after neoadjuvant CRT. Based on this study, a routine restaging CT/MRI of chest and abdomen in patients with rectal cancer after neoadjuvant CRT is not advocated, carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) -guided CT/MRI restaging might be an alternative.

  4. Prognostic Role of Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Treated with Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jinwen; Zhu, Yuan; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Lingnan; Ju, Haixing; Fan, Yongtian; Zhu, Yuping; Luo, Jialin; Liu, Peng; Zhou, Ning; Lu, Ke; Zhang, Na; Li, Dechuan; Liu, Luying

    2017-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence suggests that cancer-associated inflammation is associated with poorer outcomes. The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), considered as a systemic inflammation marker, is thought to predict prognoses in colorectal cancer. In this study, we explored the association between the NLR and prognoses following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Material/Methods From February 2002 to December 2012, a group of 202 patients diagnosed with LARC and receiving neoadjuvant CRT followed by radical surgery was included in our retrospective study. The associations between the pre-CRT NLR and clinicopathological characteristics, as well as the predictive value of pre-CRT NLR against survival outcomes, were analyzed. Results The average NLR was 2.7±1.5 (median 2.4, range 0.6–12.8). There were 63 (31.2%) patients with NLR ≥3.0, and 139 (68.8%) patients with NLR <3.0. Correlation analyses showed that no clinicopathological characteristics except age were associated with NLR. We did not find an association between NLR and survival outcomes. In multivariate Cox model analyses, the R1/R2 resection, lymph node ratio ≥0.1, and perineural/lymphovascular invasion were independently associated with worse disease-free survival and overall survival. Conclusions In our cohort, the NLR did not correlate with survival outcomes in LARC patients undergoing neoadjuvant CRT. The prognostic value of NLR should be validated in large-scale prospective studies. PMID:28100902

  5. Prevalence and clinical significance of acellular mucin in locally advanced rectal cancer patients showing pathologic complete response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seok-Byung; Hong, Seung-Mo; Yu, Chang Sik; Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Tae Won; Park, Jin-hong; Kim, Jong Hoon; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2013-01-01

    Occasionally, patients with locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma who receive preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) show acellular mucin in resection specimens that had shown pathologic complete response (pCR), but the clinical and prognostic significance of this finding has been controversial. This study analyzed data from 217 consecutive patients showing pCR to preoperative CRT followed by resection to evaluate the clinicopathologic features and prognostic significance of acellular mucin. Patients were categorized according to the presence of acellular mucin, as identified by pathologic analysis. The clinicopathologic findings and oncologic results were compared. Acellular mucins were identified in 35 (16.1%) of 217 pCR patients. Acellular mucins were found predominantly in male patients (20.8% vs. 9.8%, P=0.039) and in those with mucinous/signet ring cell differentiation (66.7% vs. 15.1%, P=0.008). The presence of acellular mucin was more frequent in patients with a shorter (<42 d) CRT-operation interval (22.6% vs. 10.3%, P=0.017). With a mean follow-up of 41 months (range, 2 to 119 mo), the 3-year overall survival (96.8% with mucin vs. 95.9% without mucin, P=0.314) and the 3-year disease-free survival (97.0% with mucin vs. 93.0% without mucin, P=0.131) did not differ between the groups. The presence of acellular mucin in rectal cancer patients showing pCR to preoperative CRT is associated with male sex and mucinous differentiation and does not have a significant impact on oncologic outcomes. Acellular mucins are also associated with the CRT-operation interval as a phenomenon of time-dependent response to CRT.

  6. Automatic segmentation software in locally advanced rectal cancer: READY (REsearch program in Auto Delineation sYstem)-RECTAL 02: prospective study.

    PubMed

    Gambacorta, Maria A; Boldrini, Luca; Valentini, Chiara; Dinapoli, Nicola; Mattiucci, Gian C; Chiloiro, Giuditta; Pasini, Danilo; Manfrida, Stefania; Caria, Nicola; Minsky, Bruce D; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2016-07-05

    To validate autocontouring software (AS) in a clinical practice including a two steps delineation quality assurance (QA) procedure.The existing delineation agreement among experts for rectal cancer and the overlap and time criteria that have to be verified to allow the use of AS were defined.Median Dice Similarity Coefficient (MDSC), Mean slicewise Hausdorff Distances (MSHD) and Total-Time saving (TT) were analyzed.Two expert Radiation Oncologists reviewed CT-scans of 44 patients and agreed the reference-CTV: the first 14 consecutive cases were used to populate the software Atlas and 30 were used as Test.Each expert performed a manual (group A) and an automatic delineation (group B) of 15 Test patients.The delineations were compared with the reference contours.The overlap between the manual and automatic delineations with MDSC and MSHD and the TT were analyzed.Three acceptance criteria were set: MDSC ≥ 0.75, MSHD ≤1mm and TT sparing ≥ 50%.At least 2 criteria had to be met, one of which had to be TT saving, to validate the system.The MDSC was 0.75, MSHD 2.00 mm and the TT saving 55.5% between group A and group B. MDSC among experts was 0.84.Autosegmentation systems in rectal cancer partially met acceptability criteria with the present version.

  7. Automatic segmentation software in locally advanced rectal cancer: READY (REsearch program in Auto Delineation sYstem)-RECTAL 02: prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Dinapoli, Nicola; Mattiucci, Gian C.; Chiloiro, Giuditta; Pasini, Danilo; Manfrida, Stefania; Caria, Nicola; Minsky, Bruce D.

    2016-01-01

    To validate autocontouring software (AS) in a clinical practice including a two steps delineation quality assurance (QA) procedure. The existing delineation agreement among experts for rectal cancer and the overlap and time criteria that have to be verified to allow the use of AS were defined. Median Dice Similarity Coefficient (MDSC), Mean slicewise Hausdorff Distances (MSHD) and Total-Time saving (TT) were analyzed. Two expert Radiation Oncologists reviewed CT-scans of 44 patients and agreed the reference-CTV: the first 14 consecutive cases were used to populate the software Atlas and 30 were used as Test. Each expert performed a manual (group A) and an automatic delineation (group B) of 15 Test patients. The delineations were compared with the reference contours. The overlap between the manual and automatic delineations with MDSC and MSHD and the TT were analyzed. Three acceptance criteria were set: MDSC ≥ 0.75, MSHD ≤1mm and TT sparing ≥ 50%. At least 2 criteria had to be met, one of which had to be TT saving, to validate the system. The MDSC was 0.75, MSHD 2.00 mm and the TT saving 55.5% between group A and group B. MDSC among experts was 0.84. Autosegmentation systems in rectal cancer partially met acceptability criteria with the present version. PMID:27302924

  8. Long-Term Results of a Randomized Trial in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: No Benefit From Adding a Brachytherapy Boost

    SciTech Connect

    Appelt, Ane L.; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Pløen, John; Rafaelsen, Søren R.; Lindebjerg, Jan; Havelund, Birgitte M.; Bentzen, Søren M.; Jakobsen, Anders

    2014-09-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): Mature data on tumor control and survival are presented from a randomized trial of the addition of a brachytherapy boost to long-course neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between March 2005 and November 2008, 248 patients with T3-4N0-2M0 rectal cancer were prospectively randomized to either long-course preoperative CRT (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions, per oral tegafur-uracil and L-leucovorin) alone or the same CRT schedule plus a brachytherapy boost (10 Gy in 2 fractions). The primary trial endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR) at the time of surgery; secondary endpoints included overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and freedom from locoregional failure. Results: Results for the primary endpoint have previously been reported. This analysis presents survival data for the 224 patients in the Danish part of the trial. In all, 221 patients (111 control arm, 110 brachytherapy boost arm) had data available for analysis, with a median follow-up time of 5.4 years. Despite a significant increase in tumor response at the time of surgery, no differences in 5-year OS (70.6% vs 63.6%, hazard ratio [HR] = 1.24, P=.34) and PFS (63.9% vs 52.0%, HR=1.22, P=.32) were observed. Freedom from locoregional failure at 5 years were 93.9% and 85.7% (HR=2.60, P=.06) in the standard and in the brachytherapy arms, respectively. There was no difference in the prevalence of stoma. Explorative analysis based on stratification for tumor regression grade and resection margin status indicated the presence of response migration. Conclusions: Despite increased pathologic tumor regression at the time of surgery, we observed no benefit on late outcome. Improved tumor regression does not necessarily lead to a relevant clinical benefit when the neoadjuvant treatment is followed by high-quality surgery.

  9. Neoadjuvant capecitabine, radiotherapy, and bevacizumab (CRAB) in locally advanced rectal cancer: results of an open-label phase II study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Preoperative capecitabine-based chemoradiation is a standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Here, we explored the safety and efficacy of the addition of bevacizumab to capecitabine and concurrent radiotherapy for LARC. Methods Patients with MRI-confirmed stage II/III rectal cancer received bevacizumab 5 mg/kg i.v. 2 weeks prior to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by bevacizumab 5 mg/kg on Days 1, 15 and 29, capecitabine 825 mg/m2 twice daily on Days 1-38, and concurrent radiotherapy 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/day, 5 days/week for 5 weeks + three 1.8 Gy/day), starting on Day 1. Total mesorectal excision was scheduled 6-8 weeks after completion of chemoradiotherapy. Tumour regression grades (TRG) were evaluated on surgical specimens according to Dworak. The primary endpoint was pathological complete response (pCR). Results 61 patients were enrolled (median age 60 years [range 31-80], 64% male). Twelve patients (19.7%) had T3N0 tumours, 1 patient T2N1, 19 patients (31.1%) T3N1, 2 patients (3.3%) T2N2, 22 patients (36.1%) T3N2 and 5 patients (8.2%) T4N2. Median tumour distance from the anal verge was 6 cm (range 0-11). Grade 3 adverse events included dermatitis (n = 6, 9.8%), proteinuria (n = 4, 6.5%) and leucocytopenia (n = 3, 4.9%). Radical resection was achieved in 57 patients (95%), and 42 patients (70%) underwent sphincter-preserving surgery. TRG 4 (pCR) was recorded in 8 patients (13.3%) and TRG 3 in 9 patients (15.0%). T-, N- and overall downstaging rates were 45.2%, 73.8%, and 73.8%, respectively. Conclusions This study demonstrates the feasibility of preoperative chemoradiotherapy with bevacizumab and capecitabine. The observed adverse events of neoadjuvant treatment are comparable with those previously reported, but the pCR rate was lower. PMID:21880132

  10. MicroRNA-31 Emerges as a Predictive Biomarker of Pathological Response and Outcome in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Caramés, Cristina; Cristobal, Ion; Moreno, Víctor; Marín, Juan P; González-Alonso, Paula; Torrejón, Blanca; Minguez, Pablo; Leon, Ana; Martín, José I; Hernández, Roberto; Pedregal, Manuel; Martín, María J; Cortés, Delia; García-Olmo, Damian; Fernández, María J; Rojo, Federico; García-Foncillas, Jesús

    2016-06-03

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by total mesorectal excision has emerged as the standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) patients. However, many cases do not respond to neoadjuvant CRT, suffering unnecessary toxicities and surgery delays. Thus, identification of predictive biomarkers for neoadjuvant CRT is a current clinical need. In the present study, microRNA-31 expression was measured in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) biopsies from 78 patients diagnosed with LARC who were treated with neoadjuvant CRT. Then, the obtained results were correlated with clinical and pathological characteristics and outcome. High microRNA-31 (miR-31) levels were found overexpressed in 34.2% of cases. Its overexpression significantly predicted poor pathological response (p = 0.018) and worse overall survival (OS) (p = 0.008). The odds ratio for no pathological response among patients with miR-31 overexpression was 0.18 (Confidence Interval = 0.06 to 0.57; p = 0.003). Multivariate analysis corroborated the clinical impact of miR-31 in determining pathological response to neoadjuvant CRT as well as OS. Altogether, miR-31 quantification emerges as a novel valuable clinical tool to predict both pathological response and outcome in LARC patients.

  11. Circulating serum microRNA-345 correlates with unfavorable pathological response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jing; Li, Ning; Wang, Xin; Ren, Hua; Wang, Weihu; Wang, Shulian; Song, Yongwen; Liu, Yueping; Li, Yexiong; Zhou, Xuantong; Luo, Aiping; Liu, Zhihua; Jin, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (pre-CRT) has been represented as the standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), but large variations of tumor radiation response to CRT have been reported in the clinic. To explore the function of microRNAs as potential therapeutic predictors of pre-CRT pathological response in LARC, we analyzed global miRNA expression in CRT-sensitive and CRT-resistant groups before treatment. MiR-345 was significantly elevated in the CRT-resistant group. Therefore, miR-345 was selected as a candidate for further analysis. We assessed the correlation between the miRNA signatures and the chemoradiotherapeutic response in 20 randomly selected LARC tissue samples (Validation set) and 87 serum samples (Training set) by qRT-PCR. Further, we validated the results in 42 randomly selected LARC serum samples (Validation set). High miR-345 expression was significantly correlated with unfavorable pre-CRT pathological response in tissue and serum. Moreover, low miR-345 levels predicted superior 3-year local recurrence free survival (LRFS). Taken together, circulating serum miR-345 correlates with unfavorable pre-CRT response and poor locoregional control in LARC. It might be a promising biomarker to facilitate patient stratification for personalized treatment. PMID:27572313

  12. MicroRNA-31 Emerges as a Predictive Biomarker of Pathological Response and Outcome in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Caramés, Cristina; Cristobal, Ion; Moreno, Víctor; Marín, Juan P.; González-Alonso, Paula; Torrejón, Blanca; Minguez, Pablo; Leon, Ana; Martín, José I.; Hernández, Roberto; Pedregal, Manuel; Martín, María J.; Cortés, Delia; García-Olmo, Damian; Fernández, María J.; Rojo, Federico; García-Foncillas, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by total mesorectal excision has emerged as the standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) patients. However, many cases do not respond to neoadjuvant CRT, suffering unnecessary toxicities and surgery delays. Thus, identification of predictive biomarkers for neoadjuvant CRT is a current clinical need. In the present study, microRNA-31 expression was measured in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) biopsies from 78 patients diagnosed with LARC who were treated with neoadjuvant CRT. Then, the obtained results were correlated with clinical and pathological characteristics and outcome. High microRNA-31 (miR-31) levels were found overexpressed in 34.2% of cases. Its overexpression significantly predicted poor pathological response (p = 0.018) and worse overall survival (OS) (p = 0.008). The odds ratio for no pathological response among patients with miR-31 overexpression was 0.18 (Confidence Interval = 0.06 to 0.57; p = 0.003). Multivariate analysis corroborated the clinical impact of miR-31 in determining pathological response to neoadjuvant CRT as well as OS. Altogether, miR-31 quantification emerges as a novel valuable clinical tool to predict both pathological response and outcome in LARC patients. PMID:27271609

  13. PET-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-25

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  14. Rectal cancer with synchronous liver metastases: Do we have a clear direction?

    PubMed

    Pathak, S; Nunes, Q M; Daniels, I R; Smart, N J; Poston, G J; Påhlman, L

    2015-12-01

    Rectal cancer is a common entity and often presents with synchronous liver metastases. There are discrepancies in management guidelines throughout the world regarding the treatment of advanced rectal cancer, which are further compounded when it presents with synchronous liver metastases. The following article examines the evidence regarding treatment options for patients with synchronous rectal liver metastases and suggests potential treatment algorithms.

  15. Phase II study of capecitabine and oxaliplatin given prior to and concurrently with preoperative pelvic radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koeberle, D; Burkhard, R; von Moos, R; Winterhalder, R; Hess, V; Heitzmann, F; Ruhstaller, T; Terraciano, L; Neuweiler, J; Bieri, G; Rust, C; Toepfer, M

    2008-01-01

    This multicentre phase II study evaluated the efficacy and safety of preoperative capecitabine plus oxaliplatin and radiotherapy (RT) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (T3/T4 rectal adenocarcinoma with or without nodal involvement). Treatment consisted of one cycle of XELOX (capecitabine 1000 mg m−2 bid on days 1–14 and oxaliplatin 130 mg m−2 on day 1), followed by RT (1.8 Gy fractions 5 days per week for 5 weeks) plus CAPOX (capecitabine 825 mg m−2 bid on days 22–35 and 43–56, and oxaliplatin 50 mg m−2 on days 22, 29, 43 and 50). Surgery was recommended 5 weeks after completion of chemoradiotherapy. The primary end point was pathological complete tumour response (pCR). Sixty patients were enrolled. In the intent-to-treat population, the pCR rate was 23% (95% CI: 13–36%). 58 patients underwent surgery; R0 resection was achieved in 57 (98%) patients, including all 5 patients with T4 tumours. Sphincter preservation was achieved in 49 (84%) patients. Tumour and/or nodal downstaging was observed in 39 (65%) patients. The most common grade 3/4 adverse events were diarrhoea (20%) and lymphocytopaenia (43%). Preoperative capecitabine, oxaliplatin and RT achieved encouraging rates of pCR, R0 resection, sphincter preservation and tumour downstaging in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. PMID:18349837

  16. Phase II study of capecitabine and oxaliplatin given prior to and concurrently with preoperative pelvic radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Koeberle, D; Burkhard, R; von Moos, R; Winterhalder, R; Hess, V; Heitzmann, F; Ruhstaller, T; Terraciano, L; Neuweiler, J; Bieri, G; Rust, C; Toepfer, M

    2008-04-08

    This multicentre phase II study evaluated the efficacy and safety of preoperative capecitabine plus oxaliplatin and radiotherapy (RT) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (T3/T4 rectal adenocarcinoma with or without nodal involvement). Treatment consisted of one cycle of XELOX (capecitabine 1000 mg m(-2) bid on days 1-14 and oxaliplatin 130 mg m(-2) on day 1), followed by RT (1.8 Gy fractions 5 days per week for 5 weeks) plus CAPOX (capecitabine 825 mg m(-2) bid on days 22-35 and 43-56, and oxaliplatin 50 mg m(-2) on days 22, 29, 43 and 50). Surgery was recommended 5 weeks after completion of chemoradiotherapy. The primary end point was pathological complete tumour response (pCR). Sixty patients were enrolled. In the intent-to-treat population, the pCR rate was 23% (95% CI: 13-36%). 58 patients underwent surgery; R0 resection was achieved in 57 (98%) patients, including all 5 patients with T4 tumours. Sphincter preservation was achieved in 49 (84%) patients. Tumour and/or nodal downstaging was observed in 39 (65%) patients. The most common grade 3/4 adverse events were diarrhoea (20%) and lymphocytopaenia (43%). Preoperative capecitabine, oxaliplatin and RT achieved encouraging rates of pCR, R0 resection, sphincter preservation and tumour downstaging in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer.

  17. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in colon cancer and rectal cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  18. [Surgical treatment of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Vergara-Fernández, O; Salinas-Aragón, L E; Camacho-Mauries, D; Medina-Franco, H

    2010-01-01

    Rectal affection accounts for 30% of colorectal cancer. The standard of treatment is surgical resection, which often is curative. For superior and middle-rectal involvement, low anterior resection (LAR) is the preferred procedure. For tumors involving the lower portion of the rectum, abdominoperineal resection (APR) or LAR are the options of treatment, depending on sphincter involvement. The main surgical objective is to achieve a R0 resection with an appropriated total mesorrectal excision, greater number of lymph nodes and negative distal and radial margins. These surgical parameters have been used as quality indicators and have prognostic implications in terms of overall and disease-free survival. Total mesorectal excision with preservation of hypogastric nerves has shown a reduction in rates of sexual and bladder dysfunction as well as lower local recurrence. At specialized centers such procedures are performed by minimal invasive surgery; however the number of meta-analysis is scarce.

  19. [A Case of Unresectable Advanced Rectal Cancer with a Pancreatic Tumor That Was Successfully Treated with FOLFIRINOX].

    PubMed

    Yabe, Nobushige; Murai, Shinji; Ozawa, Hiroki; Yokose, Takahiro; Oto, Ippei; Yoshikawa, Takahisa; Kitasato, Kenjiro; Shimizu, Hirotomo; Kojima, Kenji; Hasegawa, Hirotoshi; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2016-11-01

    A 72-year-old man was admitted to our hospital department in September 2014 because of a positive fecal occult blood test.Colonoscopy showed a type 2 tumor in half of the AV 15 cm rectosigmoid colon.Histology of the biopsy indicated a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, and the RAS gene test found wild type.On CT examination, there were multiple liver lung metastases and a 30mm diameter tumor with pancreatic duct extension to the pancreatic body.A PET-CT examination had a high SUVmax at the same site.Because of the location of the tumor EUS-FNA was not used.However, the possibility of pancreatic body cancer could not be denied after the CT examination.Treatment by radical resection was impossible because of the spread of the cancer so we selected chemotherapy.Undeniable pancreatic metastasis of rectal cancer, pancreatic cancer was used as a prognostic factor as double cancer of rectal cancer and pancreatic cancer, from that UGT1A1 test side effects appearance was a low-risk decision, was selected FOLFIRINOX in the treatment regimen.After 25 cycles, the pancreatic body tumor and liver metastases and also the primary tumor were reduced, the multiple lung metastases disappeared, and disease control was good.Side effects were diarrhea on the day of administration of irinotecan, but this was controllable by administering oral loperamide when starting the infusion.Grade 3 or more peripheral neuropathy has not developed, and this regimen is continuing.Pancreatic cancer is a solid cancer with a poor prognosis; if you do not reach the tissue diagnosis of metastatic pancreatic cancer, was a case in which no choice but to select a regimen to carcinoma of the prognostic.

  20. Dose-Effect Relationship in Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Randomized Trial Comparing Two Radiation Doses

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobsen, Anders; Ploen, John; Vuong, Te; Appelt, Ane; Lindebjerg, Jan; Rafaelsen, Soren R.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Locally advanced rectal cancer represents a major therapeutic challenge. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy is considered standard, but little is known about the dose-effect relationship. The present study represents a dose-escalation phase III trial comparing 2 doses of radiation. Methods and Materials: The inclusion criteria were resectable T3 and T4 tumors with a circumferential margin of {<=}5 mm on magnetic resonance imaging. The patients were randomized to receive 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions to the tumor and pelvic lymph nodes (arm A) or the same treatment supplemented with an endorectal boost given as high-dose-rate brachytherapy (10 Gy in 2 fractions; arm B). Concomitant chemotherapy, uftoral 300 mg/m{sup 2} and L-leucovorin 22.5 mg/d, was added to both arms on treatment days. The primary endpoint was complete pathologic remission. The secondary endpoints included tumor response and rate of complete resection (R0). Results: The study included 248 patients. No significant difference was found in toxicity or surgical complications between the 2 groups. Based on intention to treat, no significant difference was found in the complete pathologic remission rate between the 2 arms (18% and 18%). The rate of R0 resection was different in T3 tumors (90% and 99%; P=.03). The same applied to the rate of major response (tumor regression grade, 1+2), 29% and 44%, respectively (P=.04). Conclusions: This first randomized trial comparing 2 radiation doses indicated that the higher dose increased the rate of major response by 50% in T3 tumors. The endorectal boost is feasible, with no significant increase in toxicity or surgical complications.

  1. Phase II study of capecitabine (Xeloda (registered) ) and concomitant boost radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Sunil; Janjan, Nora A.; Skibber, John M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Wolff, Robert A.; Das, Prajnan; Delclos, Marc E.; Chang, George J.; Hoff, Paulo M.; Eng, Cathy; Brown, Thomas D.; Crane, Christopher H.; Feig, Barry W.; Morris, Jeffrey; Vadhan-Raj, Saroj; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Lin, Edward H. . E-mail: elin@u.washington.edu

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of capecitabine (Xeloda (registered) ), an oral fluoropyrimidine, as a radiosensitizer in the neoadjuvant treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: We conducted a phase II study of capecitabine (825 mg/m{sup 2} orally, twice daily continuous) with radiotherapy (52.5 Gy/30 fractions to the primary tumor and perirectal nodes) in 54 patients with LARC (node-negative {>=}T3 or any node-positive tumor) staged by endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). The primary endpoint was pathologic response rate; secondary endpoints included toxicity profiles and survival parameters. Results: Of the 54 patients (median age, 56.7 years; range, 21.3-78.7 years; male:female ratio, 1.7; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-1: 100%), 51 patients (94%) had T3N0 or T3N1 disease by EUS. Surgery was not performed in 3 patients; 2 of these patients had metastatic disease, and the third patient refused after a complete clinical response. Of the 51 patients evaluable for pathologic response, 9 patients (18%) achieved complete response, and 12 patients (24%) had microscopic residual disease (<10% viable cells). In addition, 26 patients of all 54 patients (51%) achieved T-downstaging, and 15 patients of 29 patients (52%) achieved N-downstaging. Grade 3/4 toxicities were radiation dermatitis (9%) and diarrhea (2%). Sphincter preservation rate for tumor {<=}5 cm from the anal verge was 67% (18/27). Conclusion: This regimen of radiotherapy plus capecitabine is well tolerated and is more convenient than protracted venous infusion of 5-FU. The pathologic response rate is comparable to our previous experience using protracted venous infusion 5-FU for LARC.

  2. Phase I Study of Preoperative Chemoradiation With S-1 and Oxaliplatin in Patients With Locally Advanced Resectable Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Sang; Lee, Jae-Lyun; Park, Jin Hong; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yoon, Sang Nam; Lim, Seok-Byung; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Mi-Jung; Jang, Se-Jin; Lee, Jung Shin; Kim, Jin Cheon; Kim, Tae Won

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To perform a Phase I study of preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) with S-1, a novel oral fluoropyrimidine, plus oxaliplatin in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer, to determine the maximum tolerated dose and the recommended dose. Methods and Materials: Radiotherapy was delivered to a total of 45 Gy in 25 fractions and followed by a coned-down boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of a fixed dose of oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}/week) on Days 1, 8, 22, and 29 and escalated doses of S-1 on Days 1-14 and 22-35. The initial dose of S-1 was 50 mg/m{sup 2}/day, gradually increasing to 60, 70, and 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day. Surgery was performed within 6 {+-} 2 weeks. Results: Twelve patients were enrolled and tolerated up to Dose Level 4 (3 patients at each dose level) without dose-limiting toxicity. An additional 3 patients were enrolled at Dose Level 4, with 1 experiencing a dose-limiting toxicity of Grade 3 diarrhea. Although maximum tolerated dose was not attained, Dose Level 4 (S-1 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day) was chosen as the recommended dose for further Phase II studies. No Grade 4 toxicity was observed, and Grade 3 toxicities of leukopenia and diarrhea occurred in the same patient (1 of 15, 6.7%). Pathologic complete responses were observed in 2 of 15 patients (13.3%). Conclusions: The recommended dose of S-1 was determined to be 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day when combined with oxaliplatin in preoperative CRT, and a Phase II trial is now ongoing.

  3. A Specific miRNA Signature Correlates With Complete Pathological Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Della Vittoria Scarpati, Giuseppina; Falcetta, Francesca; Carlomagno, Chiara; Ubezio, Paolo; Marchini, Sergio; De Stefano, Alfonso; Singh, Vijay Kumar; D'Incalci, Maurizio; De Placido, Sabino; Pepe, Stefano

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNA molecules that can be down- or upregulated in colorectal cancer and have been associated to prognosis and response to treatment. We studied miRNA expression in tumor biopsies of patients with rectal cancer to identify a specific 'signature' correlating with pathological complete response (pCR) after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 38 T3-4/N+ rectal cancer patients received capecitabine-oxaliplatin and radiotherapy followed by surgery. Pathologic response was scored according to the Mandard TRG scale. MiRNA expression was analyzed by microarray and confirmed by real-time Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR) on frozen biopsies obtained before treatment. The correlation between miRNA expression and TRG, coded as TRG1 (pCR) vs. TRG >1 (no pCR), was assessed by methods specifically designed for this study. Results: Microarray analysis selected 14 miRNAs as being differentially expressed in TRG1 patients, and 13 were confirmed by qRT-PCR: 11 miRNAs (miR-1183, miR-483-5p, miR-622, miR-125a-3p, miR-1224-5p, miR-188-5p, miR-1471, miR-671-5p, miR-1909 Asterisk-Operator , miR-630, miR-765) were significantly upregulated in TRG1 patients, 2 (miR-1274b, miR-720) were downexpressed. MiR-622 and miR-630 had a 100% sensitivity and specificity in selecting TRG1 cases. Conclusions: A set of 13 miRNAs is strongly associated with pCR and may represent a specific predictor of response to chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer patients.

  4. The use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to monitor treatment response and disease recurrence in locally advanced rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Carpinetti, Paola; Donnard, Elisa; Bettoni, Fabiana; Asprino, Paula; Koyama, Fernanda; Rozanski, Andrei; Sabbaga, Jorge; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Parmigiani, Raphael B.; Galante, Pedro A.F.; Perez, Rodrigo O.; Camargo, Anamaria A.

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) followed by surgery is the mainstay treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Variable degrees of tumor regression are observed after nCRT and alternative treatment strategies, including close surveillance without immediate surgery, have been investigated to spare patients with complete tumor regression from potentially adverse outcomes of radical surgery. However, clinical and radiological assessment of response does not allow accurate identification of patients with complete response. In addition, surveillance for recurrence is similarly important for these patients, as early detection of recurrence allows salvage resections and adjuvant interventions. We report the use of liquid biopsies and personalized biomarkers for monitoring treatment response to nCRT and detecting residual disease and recurrence in patients with rectal cancer. We sequenced the whole-genome of four rectal tumors to identify patient-specific chromosomal rearrangements that were used to monitor circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in liquid biopsies collected at diagnosis and during nCRT and follow-up. We compared ctDNA levels to clinical, radiological and pathological response to nCRT. Our results indicate that personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies may not be sensitive for the detection of microscopic residual disease. However, it can be efficiently used to monitor treatment response to nCRT and detect disease recurrence, preceding increases in CEA levels and radiological diagnosis. Similar good results were observed when assessing tumor response to systemic therapy and disease progression. Our study supports the use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to tailor the management of rectal cancer patients, however, replication in a larger cohort is necessary to introduce this strategy into clinical practice. PMID:26451609

  5. The use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to monitor treatment response and disease recurrence in locally advanced rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Carpinetti, Paola; Donnard, Elisa; Bettoni, Fabiana; Asprino, Paula; Koyama, Fernanda; Rozanski, Andrei; Sabbaga, Jorge; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Parmigiani, Raphael B; Galante, Pedro A F; Perez, Rodrigo O; Camargo, Anamaria A

    2015-11-10

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) followed by surgery is the mainstay treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Variable degrees of tumor regression are observed after nCRT and alternative treatment strategies, including close surveillance without immediate surgery, have been investigated to spare patients with complete tumor regression from potentially adverse outcomes of radical surgery. However, clinical and radiological assessment of response does not allow accurate identification of patients with complete response. In addition, surveillance for recurrence is similarly important for these patients, as early detection of recurrence allows salvage resections and adjuvant interventions. We report the use of liquid biopsies and personalized biomarkers for monitoring treatment response to nCRT and detecting residual disease and recurrence in patients with rectal cancer. We sequenced the whole-genome of four rectal tumors to identify patient-specific chromosomal rearrangements that were used to monitor circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in liquid biopsies collected at diagnosis and during nCRT and follow-up. We compared ctDNA levels to clinical, radiological and pathological response to nCRT. Our results indicate that personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies may not be sensitive for the detection of microscopic residual disease. However, it can be efficiently used to monitor treatment response to nCRT and detect disease recurrence, preceding increases in CEA levels and radiological diagnosis. Similar good results were observed when assessing tumor response to systemic therapy and disease progression. Our study supports the use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to tailor the management of rectal cancer patients, however, replication in a larger cohort is necessary to introduce this strategy into clinical practice.

  6. Less than 12 lymph nodes in the surgical specimen after neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy: an indicator of tumor regression in locally advanced rectal cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Gurawalia, Jaiprakash; Nayak, Sandeep P.; Kurpad, Vishnu; Pandey, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Background The number of lymph node retrieved in the surgical specimen is important for tumor staging and has paramount impact on prognosis in colorectal cancer and imitates the adequacy of lymph node surgical clearance. The paucity of lymph node yields in patients undergoing resection after preoperative chemo radiotherapy (CRT) in rectal cancer has seen. Lower total number of lymph nodes in the total mesoractal excision (TME) specimen after CRT, could a marker of better tumor response. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the prospectively managed data of patients underwent excision for rectal cancer, who treated by neoadjuvant radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer. From 2010 to 2014, 364 patients underwent rectal cancer surgery, of which ninety-one treated with neoadjuvant treatment. Standard surgical and pathological protocols were followed. Patients were categorized into two groups based on the number of total harvested lymph nodes with group 1, having 12 or more nodes harvested, and group 2 including patients who had <12 lymph nodes harvested. The total number of lymph nodes retrieved from the surgical specimen was correlated with grade of tumor regression with neoadjuvant treatment. Results Out of 91 patients, 38 patients (42%) had less than 12 lymph nodes examined in specimen. The difference in median number of lymph nodes was observed significantly as 9 (range, 2–11) versus 16 (range, 12–32), in group 2 and 1, respectively (P<0.01). Patients with fewer lymph node group were comparable with respect to age, BMI, pre-operative staging, neoadjuvant treatment. Pathological complete response in tumor pCR was seen with significantly higher rate (40% vs. 26%, P<0.05) in group 2. As per Mandard criteria, there was significant difference in tumor regression grade (TRG) between both the groups (P<0.05). Among patients with metastatic lymph nodes, median LNR was lower in <12 lymph nodes group at 0.167 (range, 0.09–0.45) versus

  7. Bevacizumab, Fluorouracil, Leucovorin Calcium, and Oxaliplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-24

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  8. Fournier gangrene: rare complication of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ossibi, Pierlesky Elion; Souiki, Tarik; Ibn Majdoub, Karim; Toughrai, Imane; Laalim, Said Ait; Mazaz, Khalid; Tenkorang, Somuah; Farih, My Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Fournier's Gangrene is a rare complication of rectal cancer. Its discovery is often delayed. It's incidence is about 0.3/100,000 populations in Western countries. We report a patient with peritoneal perforation of rectal cancer revealed by scrotal and perineal necrotizing fasciitis.

  9. Preoperative Chemoradiation With Irinotecan and Capecitabine in Patients With Locally Advanced Resectable Rectal Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Dae Yong; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Jeong, Jun Yong; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Chang, Hee Jin; Park, Jae-Gahb; Jung, Kyung Hae

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer has shown benefit over postoperative CRT; however, a standard CRT regimen has yet to be defined. We performed a prospective concurrent CRT Phase II study with irinotecan and capecitabine in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer to investigate the efficacy and safety of this regimen. Methods and Materials: Patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, and mid-to-lower rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8-Gy daily fractions for a total of 45 Gy in 25 fractions, followed by a coned-down boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of 40 mg/m{sup 2} of irinotecan per week for 5 consecutive weeks and 1,650 mg/m{sup 2} of capecitabine per day for 5 days per week (weekdays only) from the first day of radiotherapy. Total mesorectal excision was performed within 6 {+-} 2 weeks. The pathologic responses and survival outcomes were included for the study endpoints. Results: In total, 48 patients were enrolled; 33 (68.7%) were men and 15 (31.3%) were women, and the median age was 59 years (range, 32-72 years). The pathologic complete response rate was 25.0% (11 of 44; 95% confidence interval, 12.2-37.8) and 8 patients (18.2% [8 of 44]) showed near-total tumor regression. The 5-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 75.0% and 93.6%, respectively. Grade 3 toxicities included leukopenia (3 [6.3%]), neutropenia (1 [2.1%]), infection (1 [2.1%]), alanine aminotransferase elevation (1 [2.1%]), and diarrhea (1 [2.1%]). There was no Grade 4 toxicity or treatment-related death. Conclusions: Preoperative CRT with irinotecan and capecitabine with treatment-free weekends showed very mild toxicity profiles and promising results in terms of survival.

  10. Preoperative Short-Course Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy Followed by Delayed Surgery for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Phase 2 Multicenter Study (KROG 10-01)

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Seung-Gu; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Dae Yong; Baek, Ji Yeon; Kim, Sun Young; Park, Ji Won; Kim, Min Ju; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Tae Hyun; Lee, Jong Hoon; Jang, Hong Seok; Kim, Jun-Gi; Lee, Myung Ah; Nam, Taek-Keun

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: A prospective phase 2 multicenter trial was performed to investigate the efficacy and safety of preoperative short-course concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) followed by delayed surgery for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventy-three patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiation therapy of 25 Gy in 5 fractions was delivered over 5 consecutive days using helical tomotherapy. Concurrent chemotherapy was administered on the same 5 days with intravenous bolus injection of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m{sup 2}/day) and leucovorin (20 mg/m{sup 2}/day). After 4 to 8 weeks, total mesorectal excision was performed. The primary endpoint was the pathologic downstaging (ypStage 0-I) rate, and secondary endpoints included tumor regression grade, tumor volume reduction rate, and toxicity. Results: Seventy-one patients completed the planned preoperative CRT and surgery. Downstaging occurred in 20 (28.2%) patients, including 1 (1.4%) with a pathologic complete response. Favorable tumor regression (grade 4-3) was observed in 4 (5.6%) patients, and the mean tumor volume reduction rate was 62.5 ± 21.3%. Severe (grade ≥3) treatment toxicities were reported in 27 (38%) patients from CRT until 3 months after surgery. Conclusions: Preoperative short-course concurrent CRT followed by delayed surgery for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer demonstrated poor pathologic responses compared with conventional long-course CRT, and it yielded considerable toxicities despite the use of an advanced radiation therapy technique.

  11. Carcinoembryonic Antigen as a Predictor of Pathologic Response and a Prognostic Factor in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy and Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Ji Won; Lim, Seok-Byung Kim, Dae Yong; Jung, Kyung Hae; Hong, Yong Sang; Chang, Hee Jin; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a predictor of response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and prognostic factor for rectal cancer. Materials and Methods: The study retrospectively evaluated 352 locally advanced rectal cancer patients who underwent preoperative CRT followed by surgery. Serum CEA levels were determined before CRT administration (pre-CRT CEA) and before surgery (post-CRT CEA). Correlations between pre-CRT CEA levels and rates of good response (Tumor regression grade 3/4) were explored. Patients were categorized into three CEA groups according to their pre-/post-CRT CEA levels (ng/mL) (Group A: pre-CRT CEA {<=} 3; B: pre-CRT CEA >3, post-CRT CEA {<=}3; C: pre- and post-CRT CEA >3 ng/mL), and their oncologic outcomes were compared. Results: Of 352 patients, good responses were achieved in 94 patients (26.7%). The rates of good response decreased significantly as the pre-CRT CEA levels became more elevated (CEA [ng/mL]: {<=}3, 36.4%; 3-6, 23.6%; 6-9, 15.6%; >9, 7.8%; p < 0.001). The rates of good response were significantly higher in Group A than in Groups B and C (36.4% vs. 17.3% and 14.3%, respectively; p < 0.001). The 3-year disease-free survival rate was significantly better in Groups A and B than in Group C (82% and 79% vs. 57%, respectively; p = 0.005); the CEA grouping was identified as an independent prognostic factor (p = 0.025). Conclusions: In locally advanced rectal cancer patients, CEA levels could be of clinical value as a predictor of response to preoperative CRT and as an independent prognostic factor after preoperative CRT and curative surgery.

  12. Systematic review and meta-analysis of preoperative chemoradiotherapy with or without oxaliplatin in locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiabin; Feng, Xingyu; Hu, Weixian; Wang, Junjiang; Li, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy has become the current standard regimen for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). However, the additional benefit of oxaliplatin to preoperative chemotherapy was still controversial. On one hand, oxaliplatin may improve the tumor response rate of even prolong the survival time. On the other hand, it can bring a series of adverse effects. Opinions vary from studies to studies. We aim to perform a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and long-term survival of oxaliplatin in preoperative chemoradiotherapy for LARC. Method: To identify clinical trials fusing oxaliplatin in preoperative chemoradiotherapy for LARC published until December 2015, we searched PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and the Springer Link databases by combining various key words. We also search for relevant ASCO conferences. Data were extracted from every study to perform a meta-analysis using STATA 12.0 software. Result: Eleven articles or ASCO abstracts from 8 studies with a total of 5597 patients were included. Adding oxaliplatin to preoperative chemoradiotherapy can significantly improve the ypCR rate [risk ratio (RR) = 1.208, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.070–1.364, P = 0.002, I2 = 14.5%], and decrease the preoperative metastasis (RR = 0.494, 95% CI: 0.256–0.954, P = 0.036, I2 = 53.9%) and local recurrence rate (RR = 0.761, 95% CI: 0.616–0.941, P = 0.012, I2 = 26.1%). What's more, oxaliplatin can prolong the disease-free survival (DFS) [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.867, 95% CI: 0.741–0.992, P = 0.000, I2 = 16.3%]. However, oxaliplatin can increase the chemoradiotherapy-related toxicities (RR = 1.858, 95% CI 1.427–2.419, P = 0.000, I2 = 84.7%). There was no significant difference between the groups with and without oxaliplatin in operation rate, R0 resection rate, sphincter preservation rate, permanent stoma rate, postoperative complication, mortality, and overall

  13. KRAS Mutation Status and Clinical Outcome of Preoperative Chemoradiation With Cetuximab in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Pooled Analysis of 2 Phase II Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Young; Shim, Eun Kyung; Yeo, Hyun Yang; Baek, Ji Yeon; Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Jee Hyun; Im, Seock-Ah; Jung, Kyung Hae; Chang, Hee Jin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Cetuximab-containing chemotherapy is known to be effective for KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer; however, it is not clear whether cetuximab-based preoperative chemoradiation confers an additional benefit compared with chemoradiation without cetuximab in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: We analyzed EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutation status with direct sequencing and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression status with immunohistochemistry in tumor samples of 82 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who were enrolled in the IRIX trial (preoperative chemoradiation with irinotecan and capecitabine; n=44) or the ERBIRIX trial (preoperative chemoradiation with irinotecan and capecitabine plus cetuximab; n=38). Both trials were similarly designed except for the administration of cetuximab; radiation therapy was administered at a dose of 50.4 Gy/28 fractions and irinotecan and capecitabine were given at doses of 40 mg/m{sup 2} weekly and 1650 mg/m{sup 2}/day, respectively, for 5 days per week. In the ERBIRIX trial, cetuximab was additionally given with a loading dose of 400 mg/m{sup 2} on 1 week before radiation, and 250 mg/m{sup 2} weekly thereafter. Results: Baseline characteristics before chemoradiation were similar between the 2 trial cohorts. A KRAS mutation in codon 12, 13, and 61 was noted in 15 (34%) patients in the IRIX cohort and 5 (13%) in the ERBIRIX cohort (P=.028). Among 62 KRAS wild-type cancer patients, major pathologic response rate, disease-free survival and pathologic stage did not differ significantly between the 2 cohorts. No mutations were detected in BRAF exon 11 and 15, PIK3CA exon 9 and 20, or EGFR exon 18-24 in any of the 82 patients, and PTEN and EGFR expression were not predictive of clinical outcome. Conclusions: In patients with KRAS wild-type locally advanced rectal cancer, the addition of cetuximab to the chemoradiation with

  14. The accuracy of endorectal ultrasonography in rectal cancer staging

    PubMed Central

    COTE, ADRIAN; GRAUR, FLORIN; LEBOVICI, ANDREI; MOIS, EMIL; AL HAJJAR, NADIM; MARE, CODRUTA; BADEA, RADU; IANCU, CORNEL

    2015-01-01

    . The accuracy of ERUS is higher in diagnosing rectal cancer in stages T1, T2 and even in stage T3 with malignant tumor which is not occlusive. ERUS is less accurate for T staging of locally advanced and stenotic tumours. PMID:26609269

  15. Bupivacaine administered intrathecally versus rectally in the management of intractable rectal cancer pain in palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Zaporowska-Stachowiak, Iwona; Kowalski, Grzegorz; Łuczak, Jacek; Kosicka, Katarzyna; Kotlinska-Lemieszek, Aleksandra; Sopata, Maciej; Główka, Franciszek

    2014-01-01

    slower after rectal than after intrathecal administration (t½= 5.50 versus 2.02 hours, respectively). Limitations This study reports two cases only, and there could be inter-patient variation. Conclusion Bupivacaine in boluses administered intrathecally (0.25%, 2 mL) provided effective, safe analgesia in advanced cancer patients. Bupivacaine enema (100 mg·100 mL−1) was shown to be a valuable option for control of end-of-life tenesmoid cancer pain. PMID:25336967

  16. A comparative study of volumetric analysis, histopathologic downstaging, and tumor regression grade in evaluating tumor response in locally advanced rectal cancer following preoperative chemoradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Nam Kyu . E-mail: namkyuk@yumc.yonsei.ac.kr; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Choi, Yun Jung; Kim, Hogeun; Seong, Jinsil; Keum, Ki Chang; Rha, Sun Young; Chung, Hyun Cheol

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare tumor volume reduction rate, histopathologic downstaging, and tumor regression grade (TRG) among tumor responses in rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Patients and Methods: Between 2002 and 2004, 30 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer underwent preoperative CRT, followed by surgical resection. Magnetic resonance volumetry was performed before and after CRT. Histopathologic tumor staging and tumor regression were reviewed. We compared pre- and post-CRT tumor volume and percent of volume reduction, according to histopathologic downstaging and TRG. Results: The tumor volume reduction rates ranged from 14.6% to 100%. Mean pre- and post-CRT tumor volumes were significantly smaller in patients who showed T downstaging than in those who did not (p 0.040, 0.014). The mean tumor volume reduction was 66.4% vs. 55.2% (p 0.361). However, the mean pre- and post-CRT tumor volume and mean tumor volume reduction rate between patients who showed N downstaging and those who did not were not statistically different (p = 0.176, 0.767, and 0.899). With respect to TRG, the mean pre- and post-CRT tumor volumes were not statistically significant (p = 0.108, 0.708, and 0.120). Conclusion: Tumor volume reduction rate does not correlate with histopathologic downstaging and TRG. It might be hazardous to evaluate tumor response with respect to volume reduction and to select the surgical method on this basis.

  17. Focusing the management of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dbeis, Rachel; Smart, Neil J.

    2016-01-01

    Rectal cancer treatment has undergone major changes over the last 15 years with a focus on individualized care based around MRI assessment of the relationship of the tumour to the mesorectal fascia, improved surgical techniques and targeted use of pre-operative oncological therapies in patients with locally advanced disease. The recognition that some tumours responded completely to pre-operative chemoradiotherapy, and the selective use of a non-operative policy has led to a quest to further identify those patients and their tumour in whom this approach could be used, irrespective of MRI stage. With no clear patient factors identified, the tumour and its gene expression has become a target for research to identify individual single-nucleotide polymorphisms, which may indicate a response to specific treatment, or not. To date some agents have been identified and trialed, such as cetuximab, with individual tumours being assessed for response allowing directed treatment. The reviewed paper by Sebio and colleagues report a study that links polymorphisms in the DNA repair gene XRCC1 with response to neoadjuvant 5-Fluorouracil treatment in rectal cancer patients. However, genetic heterogeneity alone may not explain the variations of drug response and environmental factors may lead to epigenetic effects and therefore alter responses. Therefore whilst this study demonstrates the impact of different single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), it is only one step forward, but perhaps a step in the right direction. PMID:28149883

  18. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression correlated with tumor response in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer undergoing preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Unsal, Diclehan . E-mail: diclehan@yahoo.com; Uner, Aytug; Akyurek, Nalan; Erpolat, Petek; Dursun, Ayse; Pak, Yucel

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze whether the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors are associated with tumor response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Forty-four patients who had undergone preoperative chemoradiotherapy were evaluated retrospectively. Treatment consisted of pelvic radiotherapy and two cycles of 5-fluorouracil plus leucovorin. Surgery was performed 6-8 weeks later. MMP-2, MMP-9, and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-1 and -2 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry of the preradiation biopsy and surgical specimens. The intensity and extent of staining were evaluated separately, and a final score was calculated by multiplying the two scores. The primary endpoint was the correlation of expression with tumor response, with the secondary endpoint the effect of chemoradiotherapy on the expression. Results: Preoperative treatment resulted in downstaging in 20 patients (45%) and no clinical response in 24 (55%). The pathologic tumor response was complete in 11 patients (25%), partial in 23 (52%), and none in 10 (23%). Positive MMP-9 staining was observed in 20 tumors (45%) and was associated with the clinical nodal stage (p = 0.035) and the pathologic and clinical response (p < 0.0001). The staining status of the other markers was associated with neither stage nor response. The overall pathologic response rate was 25% in MMP-9-positive patients vs. 52% in MMP-9-negative patients (p = 0.001). None of the 11 patients with pathologic complete remission was MMP-9 positive. Conclusions: Matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression correlated with a poor tumor response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal carcinoma patients.

  19. Voiding Dysfunction after Total Mesorectal Excision in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Heon; Noh, Tae Il; Oh, Mi Mi; Park, Jae Young; Lee, Jeong Gu; Um, Jun Won; Min, Byung Wook

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the voiding dysfunction after rectal cancer surgery with total mesorectal excision (TME). Methods This was part of a prospective study done in the rectal cancer patients who underwent surgery with TME between November 2006 and June 2008. Consecutive uroflowmetry, post-voided residual volume, and a voiding questionnaire were performed at preoperatively and postoperatively. Results A total of 50 patients were recruited in this study, including 28 male and 22 female. In the comparison of the preoperative data with the postoperative 3-month data, a significant decrease in mean maximal flow rate, voided volume, and post-voided residual volume were found. In the comparison with the postoperative 6-month data, however only the maximal flow rate was decreased with statistical significance (P=0.02). In the comparison between surgical methods, abdominoperineal resection patients showed delayed recovery of maximal flow rate, voided volume, and post-voided residual volume. There was no significant difference in uroflowmetry parameters with advances in rectal cancer stage. Conclusions Voiding dysfunction is common after rectal cancer surgery but can be recovered in 6 months after surgery or earlier. Abdominoperineal resection was shown to be an unfavorable factor for postoperative voiding. Larger prospective study is needed to determine the long-term effect of rectal cancer surgery in relation to male and female baseline voiding condition. PMID:22087426

  20. Prognosis of locally advanced rectal cancer can be predicted more accurately using pre- and post-chemoradiotherapy neutrophil-lymphocyte ratios in patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sung, SooYoon; Park, Eun Young; Kay, Chul Seung

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) has been suggested as an inflammation-related factor, but also as an indicator of systemic anti-tumor immunity. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of the NLR and to propose a proper cut-off value in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who received preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) followed by curative total mesorectal excision (TME). Methods A total of 110 rectal cancer patients with clinical T3-4 or node-positive disease were retrospectively analyzed. The NLR value before preoperative CRT (pre-CRT NLR) and the NLR value between preoperative CRT and surgery (post-CRT NLR) were obtained. Using a maximally selected log-rank test, cut-off values were determined as 1.75 for the pre-CRT NLR and 5.14 for the post-CRT NLR. Results Patients were grouped as follows: group A, pre-CRT NLR ≤ 1.75 and post-CRT NLR ≤ 5.14 (n = 29); group B, pre-CRT NLR > 1.75 and post-CRT NLR ≤ 5.14, or pre-CRT NLR ≤ 1.75 and post-CRT NLR > 5.14 (n = 61); group C, pre-CRT NLR > 1.75 and post-CRT NLR > 5.14 (n = 20). The median follow-up time was 31.1 months. The 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates showed significant differences between the NLR groups (3-year DFS rate: 92.7% vs. 73.0% vs. 47.3%, for group A, B, and C, respectively, p = 0.018; 3-year OS rate: 96.0% vs. 85.5% vs. 59.8%, p = 0.034). Multivariate analysis revealed that the NLR was an independent prognostic factor for DFS (p = 0.028). Conclusion Both the pre-CRT NLR and the post-CRT NLR have a predictive value for the prognosis of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative CRT followed by curative TME and adjuvant chemotherapy. A persistently elevated post-CRT NLR may be an indicator of an increased risk of distant metastasis. PMID:28291841

  1. Surgical outcomes of post chemoradiotherapy unresectable locally advanced rectal cancers improve with interim chemotherapy, is FOLFIRINOX better than CAPOX?

    PubMed Central

    Engineer, Reena; Ramaswamy, Anant; Sahu, Arvind; Zanwar, Saurabh; Arya, Suprita; Chopra, Supriya; Bal, Munita; Patil, Prachi; Desouza, Ashwin; Saklani, Avanish

    2016-01-01

    Background Role of chemotherapy in patients who continue to have unresectable disease after pre-operative chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) remains largely unaddressed. Methods Patients with LA rectal cancer from January 2013 to June 2015 were evaluated. Post-CRT, patients, who were deemed unresectable, were considered for further interim chemotherapy (i-CT). Results Seventy six patients (15%) with median age of 38.5 years received i-CT after CRT. About 61.8% patients receiving i-CT managed to undergo a definitive surgery and the extent of surgery was reduced in 48.7% patients. With the median follow up of 19 months, the estimated 2-year event free survival (EFS) of 48% and OS was 56%. The estimated 2-year OS was 81% in mucinous tumors whereas it was 44.4% in signet ring pathology (P=0.045). The 2-year OS of 86% for whom surgery was done vs. 38% (2-year OS) in whom surgery was not done (P=0.011). Survival was better in conservative surgery group vs. total pelvic exenteration (TPE) vs. no surgery (2-year OS: 84% vs. 59.1% vs. 38%; P=0.033). In the CAPE-OX group, 71.4% (14/23) underwent surgery whereas 75.9% (29/47) in the 5-FU plus irinotecan plus oxaliplatin (FOLFIRINOX) group with EFS (P=0.570) and OS (P=0.120). In conservative surgery group, OS was better in FOLFIRINOX (2-year OS: 95.7%) vs. capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (CAPOX) (2-year OS: 70%) (P=0.012). Conclusions i-CT can lead to improved resection rates, improved survivals and downstaging with acceptable toxicity. FOLFIRINOX appears to better over CAPOX, specifically in whom conservative surgery is feasible. PMID:28078119

  2. Four-Week Neoadjuvant Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients: A Validation Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Arbea, Leire; Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan A.; Moreno, Marta; Rodriguez, Javier; Hernandez, Jose Luis; Sola, Jesus Javier; Ramos, Luis Isaac; Subtil, Jose Carlos; Nunez, Jorge; Chopitea, Ana; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Gaztanaga, Miren; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus; Aristu, Javier

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To validate tolerance and pathological complete response rate (pCR) of a 4-week preoperative course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPOX) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with T3 to T4 and/or N+ rectal cancer received preoperative IMRT (47.5 Gy in 19 fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (825 mg/m{sup 2} b.i.d., Monday to Friday) and oxaliplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, and 15). Surgery was scheduled 4 to 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Primary end points were toxicity and pathological response rate. Local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were also analyzed. Results: A total of 100 patients were evaluated. Grade 1 to 2 proctitis was observed in 73 patients (73%). Grade 3 diarrhea occurred in 9% of the patients. Grade 3 proctitis in 18% of the first 50 patients led to reduction of the dose per fraction to 47.5 Gy in 20 treatments. The rate of Grade 3 proctitis decreased to 4% thereafter (odds ratio, 0.27). A total of 99 patients underwent surgery. A pCR was observed in 13% of the patients, major response (96-100% of histological response) in 48%, and pN downstaging in 78%. An R0 resection was performed in 97% of the patients. After a median follow-up of 55 months, the LC, DFS, and OS rates were 100%, 84%, and 87%, respectively. Conclusions: Preoperative CAPOX-IMRT therapy (47.5 Gy in 20 fractions) is feasible and safe, and produces major pathological responses in approximately 50% of patients.

  3. The value of forceps biopsy and core needle biopsy in prediction of pathologic complete remission in locally advanced rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing-Hua; An, Xin; Lin, Xi; Gao, Yuan-Hong; Liu, Guo-Chen; Kong, Ling-Heng; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Ding, Pei-Rong

    2015-10-20

    Patients with pathological complete remission (pCR) after treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) have better long-term outcome and may receive conservative treatments in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). The study aimed to evaluate the value of forceps biopsy and core needle biopsy in prediction of pCR in LARC treated with nCRT. In total, 120 patients entered this study. Sixty-one consecutive patients received preoperative forceps biopsy during endoscopic examination. Ex vivo core needle biopsy was performed in resected specimens of another 43 consecutive patients. The accuracy for ex vivo core needle biopsy was significantly higher than forceps biopsy (76.7% vs. 36.1%; p < 0.001). The sensitivity for ex vivo core needle biopsy was significantly lower in good responder (TRG 3) than poor responder (TRG ≤ 2) (52.9% vs. 94.1%; p = 0.017). In vivo core needle biopsy was further performed in 16 patients with good response. Eleven patients had residual cancer cells in final resected specimens, among whom 4 (36.4%) patients were biopsy positive. In conclusion, routine forceps biopsy was of limited value in identifying pCR after nCRT. Although core needle biopsy might further identify a subset of patients with residual cancer cells, the accuracy was not substantially increased in good responders.

  4. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwangzoo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. Materials and Methods We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Results Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Conclusion Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary. PMID:27592514

  5. Transanal Approach to Rectal Polyps and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Vinay; Mishra, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    A transanal approach to rectal polyp and cancer excision is often an appropriate alternative to conventional rectal resection, and has a lower associated morbidity. There has been a steady evolution in the techniques of transanal surgery over the past 30 years. It started with traditional transanal excision and was revolutionized by introduction of transanal endoscopic microsurgery in early 1980s. Introduction of transanal minimally invasive surgery made it more accessible to surgeons around the world. Now robotic platforms are being tried in certain institutions. Concerns have been raised about recurrence rates of cancers with transanal approach and success of subsequent salvage operations. PMID:26929754

  6. The curative management of synchronous rectal and prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kavanagh, Dara O; Martin, Joseph; Small, Cormac; Joyce, Myles R; Faul, Clare M; Kelly, Paul J; O'Riordain, Michael; Gillham, Charles M; Armstrong, John G; Salib, Osama; McNamara, Deborah A; McVey, Gerard; O'Neill, Brian D P

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Neoadjuvant “long-course” chemoradiation is considered a standard of care in locally advanced rectal cancer. In addition to prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy with or without androgen suppression (AS) are well established in prostate cancer management. A retrospective review of ten cases was completed to explore the feasibility and safety of applying these standards in patients with dual pathology. To our knowledge, this is the largest case series of synchronous rectal and prostate cancers treated with curative intent. Methods: Eligible patients had synchronous histologically proven locally advanced rectal cancer (defined as cT3-4Nx; cTxN1-2) and non-metastatic prostate cancer (pelvic nodal disease permissible). Curative treatment was delivered to both sites simultaneously. Follow-up was as per institutional guidelines. Acute and late toxicities were reviewed, and a literature search performed. Results: Pelvic external beam radiotherapy (RT) 45–50.4 Gy was delivered concurrent with 5-fluorouracil (5FU). Prostate total dose ranged from 70.0 to 79.2 Gy. No acute toxicities occurred, excluding AS-induced erectile dysfunction. Nine patients proceeded to surgery, and one was managed expectantly. Three relapsed with metastatic colorectal cancer, two with metastatic prostate cancer. Five patients have no evidence of recurrence, and four remain alive with metastatic disease. With a median follow-up of 2.2 years (range 1.2–6.3 years), two significant late toxicities occurred; G3 proctitis in a patient receiving palliative bevacizumab and a G3 anastomotic stricture precluding stoma reversal. Conclusion: Patients proceeding to synchronous radical treatment of both primary sites should receive 45–50.4 Gy pelvic RT with infusional 5FU. Prostate dose escalation should be given with due consideration to the potential impact of prostate cancer on patient survival, as increasing dose may result in significant late morbidity

  7. Comparison of Adjuvant Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Rectal Cancer Who Are Receiving Radiation Therapy and Fluorouracil Before or After Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-26

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  8. Combination of three-gene immunohistochemical panel and magnetic resonance imaging-detected extramural vascular invasion to assess prognosis in non-advanced rectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Fu; Jiang, Zheng; Gao, Ying; Li, Chun-Xiang; Shen, Bao-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    AIM To identify a small, clinically applicable immunohistochemistry (IHC) panel that could be combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected extramural vascular invasion (EMVI) for assessment of prognosis concerning the non-advanced rectal cancer patients prior to operation. METHODS About 329 patients with pathologically confirmed rectal carcinoma (RC) were screened in this research, all of whom had been examined via an MRI and were treatment-naïve from July 2011 to July 2014. The candidate proteins that were reported to be altered by RC were examined in tissues by IHC. All chosen samples were adopted from the fundamental cores of histopathologically confirmed carcinomas during the initial surgeries. RESULTS Of the three proteins that were tested, c-MYC, PCNA and TIMP1 were detected with relatively significant expression in tumors, 35.9%, 23.7% and 58.7% respectively. The expression of the three proteins were closely connected with prognosis (P = 0.032, 0.003, 0.021). The patients could be classified into different outcome groups according to an IHC panel (P < 0.01) via these three proteins. Taking into consideration known survival covariates, especially EMVI, the IHC panel served as an independent prognostic factor. The EMVI combined with the IHC panel could categorize patients into different prognostic groups with distinction (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION These studies argue that this three-protein panel of c-MYC, PCNA, coupled with TIMP1 combined with MRI-detected EMVI could offer extra prognostic details for preoperative treatment of RC. PMID:27784970

  9. Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Reduces Local Recurrence Rates in Patients With Microscopically Involved Circumferential Resection Margins After Resection of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Alberda, Wijnand J.; Verhoef, Cornelis; Nuyttens, Joost J.; Meerten, Esther van; Rothbarth, Joost; Wilt, Johannes H.W. de; Burger, Jacobus W.A.

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is advocated by some for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) who have involved or narrow circumferential resection margins (CRM) after rectal surgery. This study evaluates the potentially beneficial effect of IORT on local control. Methods and Materials: All surgically treated patients with LARC treated in a tertiary referral center between 1996 and 2012 were analyzed retrospectively. The outcome in patients treated with IORT with a clear but narrow CRM (≤2 mm) or a microscopically involved CRM was compared with the outcome in patients who were not treated with IORT. Results: A total of 409 patients underwent resection of LARC, and 95 patients (23%) had a CRM ≤ 2 mm. Four patients were excluded from further analysis because of a macroscopically involved resection margin. In 43 patients with clear but narrow CRMs, there was no difference in the cumulative 5-year local recurrence-free survival of patients treated with (n=21) or without (n=22) IORT (70% vs 79%, P=.63). In 48 patients with a microscopically involved CRM, there was a significant difference in the cumulative 5-year local recurrence-free survival in favor of the patients treated with IORT (n=31) compared with patients treated without IORT (n=17) (84 vs 41%, P=.01). Multivariable analysis confirmed that IORT was independently associated with a decreased local recurrence rate (hazard ratio 0.24, 95% confidence interval 0.07-0.86). There was no significant difference in complication rate of patients treated with or without IORT (65% vs 52%, P=.18) Conclusion: The current study suggests that IORT reduces local recurrence rates in patients with LARC with a microscopically involved CRM.

  10. Rectal dose to prostate cancer patients treated with proton therapy with or without rectal spacer.

    PubMed

    Chung, Heeteak; Polf, Jerimy; Badiyan, Shahed; Biagioli, Matthew; Fernandez, Daniel; Latifi, Kujtim; Wilder, Richard; Mehta, Minesh; Chuong, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a spacer inserted in the prerectal space could reduce modeled rectal dose and toxicity rates for patients with prostate cancer treated in silico with pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy. A total of 20 patients were included in this study who received photon therapy (12 with rectal spacer (DuraSeal™ gel) and 8 without). Two PBS treatment plans were retrospectively created for each patient using the following beam arrangements: (1) lateral-opposed (LAT) fields and (2) left and right anterior oblique (LAO/RAO) fields. Dose volume histograms (DVH) were generated for the prostate, rectum, bladder, and right and left femoral heads. The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for ≥grade 2 rectal toxicity was calculated using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model and compared between patients with and without the rectal spacer. A significantly lower mean rectal DVH was achieved in patients with rectal spacer compared to those without. For LAT plans, the mean rectal V70 with and without rectal spacer was 4.19 and 13.5%, respectively. For LAO/RAO plans, the mean rectal V70 with and without rectal spacer was 5.07 and 13.5%, respectively. No significant differences were found in any rectal dosimetric parameters between the LAT and the LAO/RAO plans generated with the rectal spacers. We found that ≥ 9 mm space resulted in a significant decrease in NTCP modeled for ≥grade 2 rectal toxicity. Rectal spacers can significantly decrease modeled rectal dose and predicted ≥grade 2 rectal toxicity in prostate cancer patients treated in silico with PBS. A minimum of 9 mm separation between the prostate and anterior rectal wall yields the largest benefit.

  11. Neoadjuvant Treatment With Single-Agent Cetuximab Followed by 5-FU, Cetuximab, and Pelvic Radiotherapy: A Phase II Study in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolini, Federica Chiara, Silvana; Bengala, Carmelo; Antognoni, Paolo; Dealis, Cristina; Zironi, Sandra; Malavasi, Norma; Scolaro, Tindaro; Depenni, Roberta; Jovic, Gordana; Sonaglio, Claudia; Rossi, Aldo; Luppi, Gabriele; Conte, Pier Franco

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery represents the standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Cetuximab has proved activity in advanced colorectal cancer, and its incorporation in preoperative treatment may increase tumor downstaging. Methods and Materials: After biopsy and staging, uT3/uT4 N0/+ LARC received single-agent cetuximab in three doses, followed by weekly cetuximab plus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), concomitantly with RT. Sample size was calculated according to Bryant and Day test, a two-stage design with at least 10 pathologic complete remissions observed in 60 patients (pts) able to complete the treatment plan. Results: Forty pts with LARC were entered: male/female = 34/6; median age: 61 (range, 28-77); 12 uT3N0 Ed(30%); 25 uT3N1 (62%); 3 uT4N1 (8%); all Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group = 0. Thirty-five pts completed neoadjuvant treatment; 5 (12%) withdrew therapy after one cetuximab administration: three for hypersensitivity reactions, one for rapid progression, and one for purulent arthritis. They continued 5-FU in continuous infusion in association with RT. Thirty-one pts (77%) presented with acnelike rash; dose reduction/interruption of treatment was necessary in six pts (15%): two for Grade 3 acnelike rash, two for Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity, and two for refusal. Thirty-eight pts were evaluable for pathological response (one patient refused surgery, and one was progressed during neoadjuvant treatment). Pathological staging was: pT0N0 three pts (8%), pT1N0 1 pt (3%); pT2N0 13 pts (34%), and pT3 19 pts (50%) (N0:9, N1:5; N2:5); pT4 2 pts (5%). Conclusions: Preoperative treatment with 5-FU, cetuximab, and pelvic RT is feasible with acceptable toxicities; however, the rate of pathologic responses is disappointingly low.

  12. Clinically relevant study end points in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Martos, Carlos; Guerrero, Angel; Minsky, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    In rectal cancer currently there are no clearly validated early end points which can serve as surrogates for long-term clinical outcome such as local control and survival. However, the use of a variety of response rates (i.e. pathological complete response, downsizing the primary tumor, tumor regression grade (TRG), radiological response) as endpoints in early (phase II) clinical trials is common since objective response to therapy is an early indication of activity. Disease-free survival (DFS) has been proposed as the most appropriate end point in adjuvant trials and is one of the most frequently used in newer rectal cancer trials. Due to the devastating nature of local recurrence in locally advanced rectal cancer, local control (which is itself a subset of the overall DFS endpoint) is still considered an important endpoint. Recently, circumferential resection margin (CRM) has been proposed as novel early end point because the CRM status can account for effects on DFS and overall survival after chemoradiation, radiation (RT), or surgery alone. Consensus is needed to define the most appropriate end points in both early and phase III trials in locally advanced cancer.

  13. Phase I Trial of Preoperative Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy with Incorporated Boost and Oral Capecitabine in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Gary M. . E-mail: G_Freedman@FCCC.edu; Meropol, Neal J.; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Hoffman, John; Callahan, Elaine; Price, Robert; Cheng, Jonathan; Cohen, Steve; Lewis, Nancy; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Rogatko, Andre; Konski, Andre

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the safety and efficacy of preoperative hypofractionated radiotherapy using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and an incorporated boost with concurrent capecitabine in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The eligibility criteria included adenocarcinoma of the rectum, T3-T4 and/or N1-N2 disease, performance status 0 or 1, and age {>=}18 years. Photon IMRT and an incorporated boost were used to treat the whole pelvis to 45 Gy and the gross tumor volume plus 2 cm to 55 Gy in 25 treatments within 5 weeks. The study was designed to escalate the dose to the gross tumor volume in 5-Gy increments in 3-patient cohorts. Capecitabine was given orally 825 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily for 7 days each week during RT. The primary endpoint was the maximal tolerated radiation dose, and the secondary endpoints were the pathologic response and quality of life. Results: Eight patients completed RT at the initial dose level of 55 Gy. The study was discontinued because of toxicity-six Grade 3 toxicities occurred in 3 (38%) of 8 patients. All patients went on to definitive surgical resection, and no patient had a pathologically complete response. Conclusion: This regimen, using hypofractionated RT with an incorporated boost, had unacceptable toxicity despite using standard doses of capecitabine and IMRT. Additional research is needed to determine whether IMRT is able to reduce the side effects during and after pelvic RT with conventional dose fractionation.

  14. A scoring system basing pathological parameters to predict regional lymph node metastasis after preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer: implication for local excision

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Jie; Chi, Pan; Lin, Hui-Ming; Lu, Xing-Rong; Huang, Ying; Xu, Zong-Bin; Huang, Sheng-Hui; Sun, Yan-Wu; Ye, Dao-Xiong; Yu, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Local excision is an alternative to radical surgery that is indicated in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) who have a good response to chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Regional lymph node status is a major uncertainty during local excision of LARC following CRT. We retrospectively reviewed clinicopathologic variables for 244 patients with LARC who were treated at our institute between December 2000 and December 2013 in order to identify independent predictors of regional lymph node metastasis. Multivariate analysis of the training sample demonstrated that histopathologic type, tumor size, and the presence of lymphovascular invasion were significant predictors of regional nodal metastasis. These variables were then incorporated into a scoring system in which the total scores were calculated based on the points assigned for each parameter. The area under the curve in the receiver operating characteristic analysis was 0.750, and the cutoff value for the total score to predict regional nodal metastasis was 7.5. The sensitivity of our system was 73.2% and the specificity was 69.4%. The sensitivity was 77.8% and the specificity was 51.2% when the scoring system was applied to the testing sample. Using this system, we could accurately predict regional nodal metastases in LARC patients following CRT, which may be useful for stratifying patients in clinical trials and selecting potential candidates for organ-sparing surgery following CRT for LARC PMID:27489356

  15. SU-E-T-126: Dosimetric Comparisons of VMAT, IMRT and 3DCRT for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer with Simultaneous Integrated Boost

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J; Wang, J; Zhang, Z; Hu, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare the dosimetric differences among volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), fixed-field intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for the preoperative locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods: Ten LARC patients treated in our department using the simultaneous escalate strategy were retrospectively analyzed in this study. All patients had T3 with N+/− and were treated with IMRT. Two additional VMAT and 3DCRT plans were created for each patient. Both IMRT and VMAT had similar optimization objectives. The prescription was 50Gy to the PTV and 55Gy to the GTV. The target coverage and organs at risk were compared for all the techniques.The paired, two-tailed Wilcoxcon signed-rank test was applied for statistical analysis. Results: IMRT and VMAT plans achieved comparable tumor response except for the conformality index (1.07 vs 1.19 and 1.08 vs 1.03 of IMRT vs VMAT for PTV-G and PTV-C respectively). Compared to VMAT, IMRT showed superior or similar dose sparing in the small bowel, bladder, femoral head. Both IMRT and VMAT had better organs at risk sparing and homogeneity index of PTV-G. Conclusion: All 3DCRT, IMRT and VMAT meet the prescript. The IMRT and VMAT provided comparable dosemitric parameters for target volume. IMRT shows better sparing for small bowel, bladder, femoral heads and normal tissue to 3DCRT and VMAT.

  16. Preoperative bi-fractionated accelerated radiation therapy for combined treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer in a consectutive series of unselected patients

    PubMed Central

    Biffi, Roberto; Marsiglia, Hugo; Fossa, Barbara Jereczek; Leonardi, Maria Cristina; Cante, Domenico; Lazzari, Roberta; Chiappa, Antonio; Cenciarelli, Sabine; Andreoni, Bruno; Zampino, Maria Giulia; Orecchia, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    preoperative setting to patients bearing locally advanced rectal cancer is reliable and safe, as its immediate and late toxicity (mainly infectious) is acceptably low and long-term survivals are achievable. These findings support the increasing use of preoperative RT for treatment of this malignancy in experienced centres. Ongoing multicentric trials are expected to address still unsolved issues, including the benefit of CT adjunct to preoperative RT. PMID:17883838

  17. KRAS and BRAF Mutations and PTEN Expression Do Not Predict Efficacy of Cetuximab-Based Chemoradiotherapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Erben, Philipp; Stroebel, Philipp; Horisberger, Karoline; Popa, Juliana; Bohn, Beatrice; Hanfstein, Benjamin; Kaehler, Georg; Kienle, Peter; Post, Stefan; Wenz, Frederik; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Mutations in KRAS and BRAF genes as well as the loss of expression of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) (deleted on chromosome 10) are associated with impaired activity of antibodies directed against epidermal growth factor receptor in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. The predictive and prognostic value of the KRAS and BRAF point mutations as well as PTEN expression in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) treated with cetuximab-based neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is unknown. Methods and Materials: We have conducted phase I and II trials of the combination of weekly administration of cetuximab and irinotecan and daily doses of capecitabine in conjunction with radiotherapy (45 Gy plus 5.4 Gy) in patients with LARC (stage uT3/4 or uN+). The status of KRAS and BRAF mutations was determined with direct sequencing, and PTEN expression status was determined with immunohistochemistry testing of diagnostic tumor biopsies. Tumor regression was evaluated by using standardized regression grading, and disease-free survival (DFS) was calculated according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: A total of 57 patients were available for analyses. A total of 31.6% of patients carried mutations in the KRAS genes. No BRAF mutations were found, while the loss of PTEN expression was observed in 9.6% of patients. Six patients achieved complete remission, and the 3-year DFS rate was 73%. No correlation was seen between tumor regression or DFS rate and a single marker or a combination of all markers. Conclusions: In the present series, no BRAF mutation was detected. The presence of KRAS mutations and loss of PTEN expression were not associated with impaired response to cetuximab-based chemoradiotherapy and 3-year DFS.

  18. Evidence and research in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Vincenzo; Beets-Tan, Regina; Borras, Josep M; Krivokapić, Zoran; Leer, Jan Willem; Påhlman, Lars; Rödel, Claus; Schmoll, Hans Joachim; Scott, Nigel; Velde, Cornelius Van de; Verfaillie, Christine

    2008-06-01

    The main evidences of epidemiology, diagnostic imaging, pathology, surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and follow-up are reviewed to optimize the routine treatment of rectal cancer according to a multidisciplinary approach. This paper reports on the knowledge shared between different specialists involved in the design and management of the multidisciplinary ESTRO Teaching Course on Rectal Cancer. The scenario of ongoing research is also addressed. In this time of changing treatments, it clearly appears that a common standard for large heterogeneous patient groups have to be substituted by more individualised therapies based on clinical-pathological features and very soon on molecular and genetic markers. Only trained multidisciplinary teams can face this new challenge and tailor the treatments according to the best scientific evidence for each patient.

  19. Transanal local excision of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Read, D R; Sokil, S; Ruiz-Salas, G

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with invasive rectal cancer treated by transanal excision between 1978-1989 are presented. Two patients had poorly differentiated tumours and were converted to abdominoperineal resection and one patient had extensive liver metastases documented preoperatively. The remaining twenty-two, mean age 64 years, fulfilled the criteria for local treatment. Eighty-two percent of tumours were T1 or T2 stage. There was no operative mortality. Six complications in five patients occurred, none requiring surgical intervention. Five patients died of unrelated causes without evidence of recurrence at 4, 4, 14, 26 and 58 months. The length of follow-up for the surviving group (17 patients) was 16 to 115 months (mean 63 months). Two patients developed local recurrence at 32 and 60 months. Transanal excision can be curative for selected rectal cancers.

  20. A Phase II study of preoperative radiotherapy and concomitant weekly irinotecan in combination with protracted venous infusion 5-fluorouracil, for resectable locally advanced rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, Matilde . E-mail: mnavarrogarcia@ico.scs.es; Dotor, Emma; Rivera, Fernando; Sanchez-Rovira, Pedro; Vega-Villegas, Maria Eugenia; Cervantes, Andres; Garcia, Jose Luis; Gallen, Manel; Aranda, Enrique

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerance of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with irinotecan (CPT-11) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in patients with resectable rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with resectable T3-T4 rectal cancer and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status <2 were included. CPT-11 (50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly) and 5-FU (225 mg/m{sup 2}/day continuous infusion, 5 days/week) were concurrently administered with radiation therapy (RT) (45 Gy, 1.8 Gy/day, 5 days/week), during 5 weeks. Results: A total of 74 patients were enrolled: mean age, 59 years (20-74 years; SD, 11.7). Planned treatment was delivered to most patients (median relative dose intensity for both drugs was 100%). Grade 3/4 lymphocytopenia occurred in 35 patients (47%), neutropenia in 5 (7%), and anemia in 2 (3%). Main Grade 3 nonhematologic toxicities were diarrhea (14%), asthenia (9%), rectal mucositis (8%), and abdominal pain (8%). Of the 73 resected specimens, 13.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.8-23.7) had a pathologic complete response and 49.3% (95% CI, 37.4-61.3) were downstaged. Additionally, 66.7% (95% CI, 51.1-80.0) of patients with ultrasound staged N1/N2 disease had no pathologic evidence of nodal involvement after CRT. Conclusions: This preoperative CRT schedule has been shown to be effective and feasible in a large population of patients with resectable rectal cancer.

  1. Rectal cancer: An evidence-based update for primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Gaertner, Wolfgang B; Kwaan, Mary R; Madoff, Robert D; Melton, Genevieve B

    2015-01-01

    Rectal adenocarcinoma is an important cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and key anatomic differences between the rectum and the colon have significant implications for management of rectal cancer. Many advances have been made in the diagnosis and management of rectal cancer. These include clinical staging with imaging studies such as endorectal ultrasound and pelvic magnetic resonance imaging, operative approaches such as transanal endoscopic microsurgery and laparoscopic and robotic assisted proctectomy, as well as refined neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapies. For stage II and III rectal cancers, combined chemoradiotherapy offers the lowest rates of local and distant relapse, and is delivered neoadjuvantly to improve tolerability and optimize surgical outcomes, particularly when sphincter-sparing surgery is an endpoint. The goal in rectal cancer treatment is to optimize disease-free and overall survival while minimizing the risk of local recurrence and toxicity from both radiation and systemic therapy. Optimal patient outcomes depend on multidisciplinary involvement for tailored therapy. The successful management of rectal cancer requires a multidisciplinary approach, with the involvement of enterostomal nurses, gastroenterologists, medical and radiation oncologists, radiologists, pathologists and surgeons. The identification of patients who are candidates for combined modality treatment is particularly useful to optimize outcomes. This article provides an overview of the diagnosis, staging and multimodal therapy of patients with rectal cancer for primary care providers. PMID:26167068

  2. Adjuvant therapy of resectable rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2002-08-01

    The two conventional treatments for clinically resectable rectal cancer are surgery followed by postoperative combined modality therapy and preoperative combined modality therapy followed by surgery and postoperative chemotherapy. Preoperative therapy (most commonly combined modality therapy) has gained acceptance as a standard adjuvant therapy. The potential advantages of the preoperative approach include decreased tumor seeding, less acute toxicity, increased radiosensitivity due to more oxygenated cells, and enhanced sphincter preservation. There are a number of new chemotherapeutic agents that have been developed for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Phase I/II trials examining the use of new chemotherapeutic agents in combination with pelvic radiation therapy are in progress.

  3. GLUT-1 expression and response to chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Sarah; Sheehan, Katherine M; McNamara, Deborah A; Deasy, Joseph; Bouchier-Hayes, David J; Kay, Elaine W

    2009-12-15

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is used in locally advanced rectal cancer to reduce local recurrence and improve operability, however a proportion of tumors do not undergo significant regression. Identification of predictive markers of response to chemoradiotherapy would improve patient selection and may allow response modification by targeting of specific pathways. The aim of this study was to determine whether expression of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) and p53 in pretreatment rectal cancer biopsies was predictive of tumor response to chemoradiotherapy. Immunohistochemical staining for GLUT-1 and p53 was performed on 69 pretreatment biopsies and compared to tumor response in the resected specimen as determined by the tumor regression grade (TRG) scoring system. GLUT-1 expression was significantly associated with reduced response to chemoradiotherapy and increasing GLUT expression correlated with poorer response (p=0.02). GLUT-1 negative tumors had a 70% probability of good response (TRG3/4) compared to a 31% probability of good response in GLUT-1 positive tumors. GLUT-1 may be a useful predictive marker of response to chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer.

  4. A Retrospective Analysis on Two-week Short-course Pre-operative Radiotherapy in Elderly Patients with Resectable Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chen; Zhou, Hao; Li, Xiaofan; Cai, Yong

    2016-01-01

    To validate that a two-week short-course pre-operative radiotherapy regimen is feasible, safe, and effective for the management of elderly patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), we retrospectively analyzed 99 radiotherapy-naive patients ≥70 years of age with LARC. Patients received pelvic radiation therapy (3D-CRT 30Gy/10f/2w) followed by TME surgery; some patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. The primary endpoint was OS, while the secondary endpoints were DFS, safety and response rate. The median follow-up time was 5.1 years. The 5-year OS and DFS rates were 58.3% and 51.2%, respectively. The completion rate of radiotherapy (RT) was 99.0% (98 of 99). Grade 3 acute adverse events, which resulted from RT, occurred in only 1 patient (1.0%). In addition, no grade 4 acute adverse events induced by RT were observed. All 99 patients (100%) were able to undergo R0 surgical resection, and 68.6% of the patients received sphincter-sparing surgery. The rate of occurrence of clinically relevant post-operative complications was 12.1%. Three patients (3.0%) achieved pathologic complete responses, and forty-three patients (43.4%) achieved pathologic partial responses. The rates of T-downsizing and N-downstaging were 30.3% and 55.7%, respectively. Therefore, we believe that a two-week short-course pre-operative radiotherapy is feasible in elderly patients with resectable LARC. PMID:27886277

  5. MRI for Assessing Response to Neoadjuvant Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Using DCE-MR and DW-MR Data Sets: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Petrillo, Mario; Fusco, Roberta; Catalano, Orlando; Sansone, Mario; Avallone, Antonio; Delrio, Paolo; Pecori, Biagio; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Petrillo, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate MRI for neoadjuvant therapy response assessment in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) using dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI (DCE-MRI) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), we have compared magnetic resonance volumetry based on DCE-MRI (V(DCE)) and on DWI (V(DWI)) scans with conventional T2-weighted volumetry (V(C)) in LARC patients after neoadjuvant therapy. Twenty-nine patients with LARC underwent MR examination before and after neoadjuvant therapy. A manual segmentation was performed on DCE-MR postcontrast images, on DWI (b-value 800 s/mm2), and on conventional T2-weighted images by two radiologists. DCE-MRI, DWI, and T2-weigthed volumetric changes before and after treatment were evaluated. Nonparametric sample tests, interobserver agreement, and receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) were performed. Diagnostic performance linked to DCE-MRI volumetric change was superior to T2-w and DW-MRI volumetric changes performance (specificity 86%, sensitivity 93%, and accuracy 93%). Area Under ROC (AUC) of V(DCE) was greater than AUCs of V(C) and V(DWI) resulting in an increase of 15.6% and 11.1%, respectively. Interobserver agreement between two radiologists was 0.977, 0.864, and 0.756 for V(C), V(DCE), and V(DWI), respectively. V(DCE) seems to be a promising tool for therapy response assessment in LARC. Further studies on large series of patients are needed to refine technique and evaluate its potential value. PMID:26413528

  6. Fluorouracil-based neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with or without oxaliplatin for treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer: An updated systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi-Wen; Zhao, Ling; Wu, Hong-Fen; Yue, Dan; Yang, Jin-Lei; Zhou, Zhi-Rui; Liu, Shi-Xin

    2016-01-01

    To measure the safety and efficacy of oxaliplatin (OX) application in neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), EMBASE, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science were used for a literature search. Cochrane's risk of bias tool of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was used for quality evaluation. The statistical analyses were performed using RevMan 5.3. In addition, 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and pooled risk ratios (RRs) were calculated. Seven RCTs were included in our meta-analysis. After adding OX to fluoropyrimidine (FU), a marginal significant improvement in disease-free survival was noted compared with FU alone (RR = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.78–1.00; P = 0.05). Neoadjuvant CRT with OX significantly decreased the distant metastasis rate (RR = 0.79, 95% CI: 0.67–0.94, P = 0.007). However, no improvement in the local recurrence rate (RR = 0.86, 95% CI: 0.68–1.08; P = 0.19) was noted. In addition, neoadjuvant CRT with OX also significantly increased the pathologic complete response (RR = 1.24, 95% CI: 1.02–1.51; P = 0.03). Grade 3–4 acute toxicity and grade 3–4 diarrhea was considerably higher for OX/FU compared with FU alone. In conclusion, the use of OX on the basis of FU/capecitabine in preoperative CRT is feasible. LARC patients are likely to benefit from CRT regimens with OX. PMID:27322422

  7. Upfront Systemic Chemotherapy and Short-Course Radiotherapy with Delayed Surgery for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer with Distant Metastases: Outcomes, Compliance, and Favorable Prognostic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hyung; Ahn, Joong Bae; Jung, Minkyu; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Hoguen; Shin, Sang Joon; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s) Optimal treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) with distant metastasis remains elusive. We aimed to evaluate upfront systemic chemotherapy and short-course radiotherapy (RT) followed by delayed surgery for such patients, and to identify favorable prognostic factors. Materials/Methods We retrospectively reviewed 50 LARC patients (cT4 or cT3, <2 mm from the mesorectal fascia) with synchronous metastatic disease. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). The secondary endpoints were overall survival, treatment-related toxicity, and compliance. We considered P values <0.05 significant. Results At 22 months median follow-up, the median PFS time was 16 months and the 2-year PFS rate was 34.8%. Thirty-five patients who received radical surgery for primary and metastatic tumors were designated the curable group. Six patients with clinical complete response (ypCR) of metastases who underwent radical surgery for only the primary tumor were classified as potentially curable. Nine patients who received no radical surgery (3 received palliative surgery) were deemed the palliative group. The ypCR rate among surgery patients was 13.6%. PFS rates for the curable or potentially curable groups were significantly longer than that of the palliative group (P<0.001). On multivariate analysis, solitary organ metastasis and R0 status were independent prognostic factors for PFS. Conclusions These findings demonstrated that a strong possibility that upfront chemotherapy and short-course RT with delayed surgery are an effective alternative treatment for LARC with potentially resectable distant metastasis, owing to achievement of pathologic down-staging, R0 resection, and favorable compliance and toxicity, despite the long treatment duration. PMID:27536871

  8. Rectal and colon cancer: Not just a different anatomic site.

    PubMed

    Tamas, K; Walenkamp, A M E; de Vries, E G E; van Vugt, M A T M; Beets-Tan, R G; van Etten, B; de Groot, D J A; Hospers, G A P

    2015-09-01

    Due to differences in anatomy, primary rectal and colon cancer require different staging procedures, different neo-adjuvant treatment and different surgical approaches. For example, neoadjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy is administered solely for rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant therapy and total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer might be responsible in part for the differing effect of adjuvant systemic treatment on overall survival, which is more evident in colon cancer than in rectal cancer. Apart from anatomic divergences, rectal and colon cancer also differ in their embryological origin and metastatic patterns. Moreover, they harbor a different composition of drug targets, such as v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF), which is preferentially mutated in proximal colon cancers, and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is prevalently amplified or overexpressed in distal colorectal cancers. Despite their differences in metastatic pattern, composition of drug targets and earlier local treatment, metastatic rectal and colon cancer are, however, commonly regarded as one entity and are treated alike. In this review, we focused on rectal cancer and its biological and clinical differences and similarities relative to colon cancer. These aspects are crucial because they influence the current staging and treatment of these cancers, and might influence the design of future trials with targeted drugs.

  9. Combined modality therapy for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D; Röedel, Claus; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    The standard adjuvant treatment for cT3 and/or N+ rectal cancer is preoperative chemoradiation. However, there are many controversies regarding this approach. These include the role of short course radiation, whether postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy necessary for all patients and whether the type of surgery after chemoradiation should be based on the response rate. More accurate imaging techniques and/or molecular markers may help identify patients with positive pelvic nodes to reduce the chance of overtreatment with preoperative therapy. Will more effective systemic agents both improve the results of radiation as well as modify the need for pelvic radiation? These questions and others remain active areas of clinical investigation.

  10. Abdominosacral resection for locally recurring rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Belli, Filiberto; Gronchi, Alessandro; Corbellini, Carlo; Milione, Massimo; Leo, Ermanno

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate feasibility and outcome of abdominal-sacral resection for treatment of locally recurrent rectal adenocarcinoma. METHODS A population of patients who underwent an abdominal-sacral resection for posterior recurrent adenocarcinoma of the rectum at the National Cancer Institute of Milano, between 2005 and 2013, is considered. Retrospectively collected data includes patient characteristics, treatment and pathology details regarding the primary and the recurrent rectal tumor surgical resection. A clinical and instrumental follow-up was performed. Surgical and oncological outcome were investigated. Furthermore an analytical review of literature was conducted in order to compare our case series with other reported experiences. RESULTS At the time of abdomino-sacral resection, the mean age of patients was 55 (range, 38-64). The median operating time was 380 min (range, 270-480). Sacral resection was performed at S2/S3 level in 3 patients, S3/S4 in 3 patients and S4/S5 in 4 patients. The median operating time was 380 ± 58 min. Mean intraoperative blood loss was 1750 mL (range, 200-680). The median hospital stay was 22 d. Overall morbidity was 80%, mainly type II complication according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Microscopically negative margins (R0) is obtained in all patients. Overall 5-year survival after first surgical procedure is 60%, with a median survival from the first surgery of 88 ± 56 mo. The most common site of re-recurrence was intrapelvic. CONCLUSION Sacral resection represents a feasible approach to posterior rectal cancer recurrence without evidence of distant spreading. An accurate staging is essential for planning the best therapy. PMID:28070232

  11. Rectal prolapse as initial clinical manifestation of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, C-W; Hsiao, C-W; Wu, C-C; Jao, S-W

    2008-04-01

    Rectal prolapse as the initial clinical manifestation of colorectal cancer is uncommon. We describe the case of a 75-year-old woman who was diagnosed as having adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon after presenting with complete rectal prolapse. The tumor caused rectosigmoid intussusception and then it prolapsed out through the anus. She underwent rectosigmoidectomy and rectopexy. The postoperative course was uneventful. The relationship between colorectal cancer and rectal prolapse has not been clearly established. This case report describes an unusual presentation of colorectal cancer. It suggests that rectal prolapse can present as the initial symptom of colorectal cancer and may also be a presenting feature of the occult intra-abdominal pathology. The importance of adequate investigation such as colonoscopy should be emphasized in patients who develop a new onset of rectal prolapse.

  12. Long-Term Follow-Up of Preoperative Pelvic Radiation Therapy and Concomitant Boost Irradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients: A Multi-Institutional Phase II Study (KROG 04-01)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Dae Yong; Nam, Taek-Keun; Yoon, Sei-Chul; Lee, Doo Seok; Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Chang, Hee Jin; Yoon, Mee Sun; Jeong, Jae-Uk; Jang, Hong Seok

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To perform a prospective phase II study to investigate the efficacy and safety of preoperative pelvic radiation therapy and concomitant small-field boost irradiation with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin for 5 weeks in locally advanced rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Sixty-nine patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, mid-to-lower rectal cancer were prospectively enrolled. They had received preoperative chemoradiation therapy and total mesorectal excision. Pelvic radiation therapy of 43.2 Gy in 24 fractions plus concomitant boost radiation therapy of 7.2 Gy in 12 fractions was delivered to the pelvis and tumor bed for 5 weeks. Two cycles of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin were administered for 3 days in the first and fifth week of radiation therapy. The pathologic response, survival outcome, and treatment toxicity were evaluated for the study endpoints. Results: Of 69 patients, 8 (11.6%) had a pathologically complete response. Downstaging rates were 40.5% for T classification and 68.1% for N classification. At the median follow-up of 69 months, 36 patients have been followed up for more than 5 years. The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival rates were 66.0% and 75.3%, respectively. Higher pathologic T (P = .045) and N (P = .032) classification were significant adverse prognostic factors for DFS, and high-grade histology was an adverse prognostic factor for both DFS (P = .025) and overall survival (P = .031) on the multivariate analysis. Fifteen patients (21.7%) experienced grade 3 or 4 acute toxicity, and 7 patients (10.1%) had long-term toxicity. Conclusion: Preoperative pelvic radiation therapy with concomitant boost irradiation with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin for 5 weeks showed acceptable acute and long-term toxicities. However, the benefit of concomitant small-field boost irradiation for 5 weeks in rectal cancer patients was not demonstrated beyond conventional irradiation for 6 weeks in terms of tumor response and

  13. Neoadjuvant Sandwich Treatment With Oxaliplatin and Capecitabine Administered Prior to, Concurrently With, and Following Radiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Prospective Phase 2 Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yuan-Hong; Lin, Jun-Zhong; An, Xin; Luo, Jie-Lin; Cai, Mu-Yan; Cai, Pei-Qiang; Kong, Ling-Heng; Liu, Guo-Chen; Tang, Jing-Hua; Chen, Gong; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Ding, Pei-Rong

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: Systemic failure remains the major challenge in management of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). To optimize the timing of neoadjuvant treatment and enhance systemic control, we initiated a phase 2 trial to evaluate a new strategy of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment, integrating induction chemotherapy, concurrent chemoradiation therapy, and consolidation chemotherapy. Here, we present preliminary results of this trial, reporting the tumor response, toxicities, and surgical complications. Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients with LARC were enrolled, among which were two patients who were ineligible because of distant metastases before treatment. Patients were treated first with one cycle of induction chemotherapy consisting of oxaliplatin, 130 mg/m² on day 1, with capecitabine, 1000 mg/m² twice daily for 14 days every 3 weeks (the XELOX regimen), followed by chemoradiation therapy, 50 Gy over 5 weeks, with the modified XELOX regimen (oxaliplatin 100 mg/m²), and then with another cycle of consolidation chemotherapy with the XELOX regimen. Surgery was performed 6 to 8 weeks after completion of radiation therapy. Tumor responses, toxicities, and surgical complications were recorded. Results: All but one patent completed the planned schedule of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment. Neither life-threatening blood count decrease nor febrile neutropenia were observed. Forty-five patents underwent optimal surgery with total mesorectal excision (TME). Four patients refused surgery because of clinically complete response. There was no perioperative mortality in this cohort. Five patients (11.1%) developed postoperative complications. Among the 45 patients who underwent TME, pathologic complete response (pCR), pCR or major regression, and at least moderate regression were achieved in 19 (42.2%), 37 (82.2%), and 44 patients (97.8%), respectively. Conclusions: Preliminary results suggest that the strategy of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment using XELOX regimen

  14. Combined value of apparent diffusion coefficient-standardized uptake value max in evaluation of post-treated locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ippolito, Davide; Fior, Davide; Trattenero, Chiara; Ponti, Elena De; Drago, Silvia; Guerra, Luca; Franzesi, Cammillo Talei; Sironi, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the clinical diagnostic value of functional imaging, combining quantitative parameters of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and standardized uptake value (SUV)max, before and after chemo-radiation therapy, in prediction of tumor response of patients with rectal cancer, related to tumor regression grade at histology. METHODS: A total of 31 patients with biopsy proven diagnosis of rectal carcinoma were enrolled in our study. All patients underwent a whole body 18FDG positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scan and a pelvic magnetic resonance (MR) examination including diffusion weighted (DW) imaging for staging (PET1, RM1) and after completion (6.6 wk) of neoadjuvant treatment (PET2, RM2). Subsequently all patients underwent total mesorectal excision and the histological results were compared with imaging findings. The MR scanning, performed on 1.5 T magnet (Philips, Achieva), included T2-weighted multiplanar imaging and in addition DW images with b-value of 0 and 1000 mm²/s. On PET/CT the SUVmax of the rectal lesion were calculated in PET1 and PET2. The percentage decrease of SUVmax (ΔSUV) and ADC (ΔADC) values from baseline to presurgical scan were assessed and correlated with pathologic response classified as tumor regression grade (Mandard’s criteria; TRG1 = complete regression, TRG5 = no regression). RESULTS: After completion of therapy, all the patients were submitted to surgery. According to the Mandard’s criteria, 22 tumors showed complete (TRG1) or subtotal regression (TRG2) and were classified as responders; 9 tumors were classified as non responders (TRG3, 4 and 5). Considering all patients the mean values of SUVmax in PET 1 was higher than the mean value of SUVmax in PET 2 (P < 0.001), whereas the mean ADC values was lower in RM1 than RM2 (P < 0.001), with a ΔSUV and ΔADC respectively of 60.2% and 66.8%. The best predictors for TRG response were SUV2 (threshold of 4.4) and ADC2 (1.29 × 10-3 mm2/s) with high

  15. Technical feasibility of laparoscopic extended surgery beyond total mesorectal excision for primary or recurrent rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Akiyoshi, Takashi

    2016-01-14

    Relatively little is known about the oncologic safety of laparoscopic surgery for advanced rectal cancer. Recently, large randomized clinical trials showed that laparoscopic surgery was not inferior to open surgery, as evidenced by survival and local control rates. However, patients with T4 tumors were excluded from these trials. Technological advances in the instrumentation and techniques used by laparoscopic surgery have increased the use of laparoscopic surgery for advanced rectal cancer. High-definition, illuminated, and magnified images obtained by laparoscopy may enable more precise laparoscopic surgery than open techniques, even during extended surgery for T4 or locally recurrent rectal cancer. To date, the quality of evidence regarding the usefulness of laparoscopy for extended surgery beyond total mesorectal excision has been low because most studies have been uncontrolled series, with small sample sizes, and long-term data are lacking. Nevertheless, laparoscopic extended surgery for rectal cancer, when performed by specialized laparoscopic colorectal surgeons, has been reported safe in selected patients, with significant advantages, including a clear visual field and less blood loss. This review summarizes current knowledge on laparoscopic extended surgery beyond total mesorectal excision for primary or locally recurrent rectal cancer.

  16. Preliminary report of a new treatment strategy for advanced pelvic malignancy: surgical resection and radiation therapy using afterloading catheters plus an inflatable displacement prosthesis in the treatment of advanced primary and recurrent rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Edington, H.D.; Hancock, S.; Coe, F.L.; Sugarbaker, P.H.

    1986-09-01

    An unsolved problem in colon and rectal surgery involves the treatment of locally invasive primary and recurrent rectal cancer. An approach is described that uses intracavitary iridium-192 sources in combination with a pelvic displacement prosthesis to augment external beam radiation doses to sites of residual disease identified at surgery. This approach should permit administration of tumoricidal doses of radiation to positive surgical margins minimizing radiation toxicity to the small bowel. The radiation source and all prosthetic materials are removed at the bedside within 2 weeks of surgery, ensuring accurate radiation dosimetry, minimizing infectious complications, and sparing the patient the need for full high-dose pelvic irradiation.

  17. Current debate in the oncologic management of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Millard, Trish; Kunk, Paul R; Ramsdale, Erika; Rahma, Osama E

    2016-01-01

    Despite the considerable amount of research in the field, the management of locally advanced rectal cancer remains a subject to debate. To date, effective treatment centers on surgical resection with the standard approach of total mesorectal resection. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy have been incorporated in order to decrease local and systemic recurrence. While it is accepted that a multimodality treatment regimen is indicated, there remains significant debate for how best to accomplish this in regards to order, dosing, and choice of agents. Preoperative radiation is the standard of care, yet remains debated with the option for chemoradiation, short course radiation, and even ongoing studies looking at the possibility of leaving radiation out altogether. Chemotherapy was traditionally incorporated in the adjuvant setting, but recent reports suggest the possibility of improved efficacy and tolerance when given upfront. In this review, the major studies in the management of locally advanced rectal cancer will be discussed. In addition, future directions will be considered such as the role of immunotherapy and ongoing trials looking at timing of chemotherapy, inclusion of radiation, and non-operative management. PMID:27795811

  18. Current debate in the oncologic management of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Millard, Trish; Kunk, Paul R; Ramsdale, Erika; Rahma, Osama E

    2016-10-15

    Despite the considerable amount of research in the field, the management of locally advanced rectal cancer remains a subject to debate. To date, effective treatment centers on surgical resection with the standard approach of total mesorectal resection. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy have been incorporated in order to decrease local and systemic recurrence. While it is accepted that a multimodality treatment regimen is indicated, there remains significant debate for how best to accomplish this in regards to order, dosing, and choice of agents. Preoperative radiation is the standard of care, yet remains debated with the option for chemoradiation, short course radiation, and even ongoing studies looking at the possibility of leaving radiation out altogether. Chemotherapy was traditionally incorporated in the adjuvant setting, but recent reports suggest the possibility of improved efficacy and tolerance when given upfront. In this review, the major studies in the management of locally advanced rectal cancer will be discussed. In addition, future directions will be considered such as the role of immunotherapy and ongoing trials looking at timing of chemotherapy, inclusion of radiation, and non-operative management.

  19. Addition of Bevacizumab to XELOX Induction Therapy Plus Concomitant Capecitabine-Based Chemoradiotherapy in Magnetic Resonance Imaging–Defined Poor-Prognosis Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: The AVACROSS Study

    PubMed Central

    Salud, Antonieta; Vicente, Pilar; Arriví, Antonio; Roca, José María; Losa, Ferran; Ponce, José; Safont, María José; Guasch, Inmaculada; Moreno, Isabel; Ruiz, Ana; Pericay, Carles

    2011-01-01

    Background. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy followed by total mesorectal excision is standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. This approach, however, focuses on local disease control and delays systemic treatment. Induction chemotherapy has the advantage of earlier administration of systemic therapy and may improve distant control. The objective of the current study was to assess the efficacy and toxicity of adding bevacizumab to induction chemotherapy followed by preoperative bevacizumab-based chemoradiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Patients and Methods. Eligible patients had high-risk rectal adenocarcinoma defined by magnetic resonance imaging criteria. Treatment consisted of four 21-day cycles of bevacizumab (7.5 mg/kg) and XELOX (capecitabine plus oxaliplatin), followed by concomitant radiotherapy (50.4 Gy) plus bevacizumab (5 mg/kg every 2 weeks) and capecitabine (825 mg/m2 twice daily on days 1–15). Surgery was scheduled for 6–8 weeks after chemoradiotherapy. The primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR). Results. Between July 2007 and July 2008, 47 patients were recruited. Among 45 patients who underwent surgery, pCR was achieved in 16 patients (36%; 95% confidence interval: 22.29%–51.27%), and an additional 17 patients (38%) had Dworak tumor regression grade 3. R0 resection was performed in 44 patients (98%). Most grade 3/4 adverse events occurred during the induction phase and included diarrhea (11%), asthenia (4%), neutropenia (6%), and thrombocytopenia (4%). Eleven patients (24%) required surgical reintervention. Conclusions. Addition of bevacizumab to induction chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy is feasible, with impressive activity and manageable toxicity. However, caution is recommended regarding surgical complications. PMID:21467148

  20. Chemoembolization Using Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Liver Metastases From Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-10

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  1. [A Case of Advanced Rectal Cancer in Which Combined Prostate Removal and ISR Using the da Vinci Surgical System with Preoperative Chemotherapy Allowed Curative Resection].

    PubMed

    Kawakita, Hideaki; Katsumata, Kenji; Kasahara, Kenta; Kuwabara, Hiroshi; Shigoka, Masatoshi; Matsudo, Takaaki; Enomoto, Masanobu; Ishizaki, Tetsuo; Hisada, Masayuki; Kasuya, Kazuhiko; Tsuchida, Akihiko

    2016-11-01

    A 53-year-old male presented with a chief complaint of dyschezia.Lower gastrointestinal endoscopy confirmed the presence of a type II tumor in the lower part of the rectum, and a biopsy detected a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma.As invasion of the prostate and levator muscle of the anus was suspected on diagnostic imaging, surgery was performed after preoperative chemotherapy.With no clear postoperative complications, the patient was discharged 26 days after surgery. After 24 months, the number of urination ranged from 1 to 6, with a Wexner score of 6 and a mild desire to urinate in the absence of incontinence.At present, the patient is alive without recurrence.When combined with chemotherapy, robotassisted surgery allows the curative resection of extensive rectal cancer involving the suspected invasion of other organs.In this respect, it is likely to be a useful method to conserve anal and bladder function.

  2. Preoperative Capecitabine and Pelvic Radiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer-Is it Equivalent to 5-FU Infusion Plus Leucovorin and Radiotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Alexander K.; Wong, Alfred O.; Jenken, Daryl A.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: The aim of this retrospective case-matching study was to compare the treatment outcomes and acute toxicity of preoperative radiotherapy (RT) with capecitabine vs. preoperative RT with intermittent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) infusion, leucovorin, and mitomycin C in rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: We matched 34 patients who were treated with preoperative concurrent capecitabine and 50 Gy of RT by their clinical T stage (T3 or T4) and the tumor location (<=7 cm or >7 cm from the anal verge) with another 68 patients who were treated with preoperative intermittent 5-FU infusion, leucovorin, mitomycin C, and 50 Gy of RT for a comparison of the pathologic tumor response, local control, distant failure, and survival rates. Results: The pathologic complete response rate was 21% with capecitabine and 18% with 5-FU and leucovorin (p = 0.72). The rate of T downstaging after chemoradiation was 59% for both groups. The rate of sphincter-sparing resection was 38% after capecitabine plus RT and 43% after 5-FU plus RT (p = 0.67). At 3 years, there was no significant difference in the local control rate (93% for capecitabine and 92% for 5-FU and leucovorin), relapse-free rate (74% for capecitabine and 73% for 5-FU and leucovorin), or disease-specific survival rate (86% for capecitabine and 77% for 5-FU and leucovorin). The acute toxicity profile was comparable, with little Grade 3 and 4 toxicity. Conclusions: When administered with concurrent preoperative RT, both capecitabine and intermittent 5-FU infusion with leucovorin modulation provided comparable pathologic tumor response, local control, relapse-free survival, and disease-specific survival rates in rectal cancer.

  3. Low thrombospondin 2 expression is predictive of low tumor regression after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-Yi; Lin, Ching-Yih; Chang, I-Wei; Sheu, Ming-Jen; Li, Chien-Feng; Lee, Sung-Wei; Lin, Li-Ching; Lee, Ying-En; He, Hong-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) followed by surgery is the mainstay of treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Several heparin-binding associated proteins have been reported to play a critical role in cancer progression. However, the clinical relevancies of such proteins and their associations with CCRT response in rectal cancer have not yet to be fully elucidated. Methods: The analysis of a public transcriptome of rectal cancer indicated that thrombospondin 2 (THBS2) is a predictive factor for CCRT response. Immunohistochemical analyses were conducted to evaluate the expression of THBS2 in pretreatment biopsy specimens from rectal cancer patients without distant metastasis. Furthermore, the relationships between THBS2 expression and various clinicopathological factors or survival were analyzed. Results: Low expression of THBS2 was significantly associated with advanced pretreatment tumor (P<0.001) and nodal status (P=0.004), post-treatment tumor (P<0.001) and nodal status (P<0.001), increased vascular invasion (P=0.003), increased perineural invasion (P=0.023) and inferior tumor regression grade (P=0.015). In univariate analysis, low THBS2 expression predicted worse outcomes for disease-free survival, local recurrence-free survival and metastasis-free survival (all P<0.001). In multivariate analysis, low expression of THBS2 still served as a negative prognostic factor for disease-free survival (Hazard ratio=3.057, P=0.002) and metastasis-free survival (Hazard ratio=3.362, P=0.012). Conclusion: Low THBS2 expression was correlated with advanced disease status and low tumor regression after preoperative CCRT and that it acted as an independent negative prognostic factor in rectal cancer. THBS2 may represent a predictive biomarker for CCRT response in rectal cancer. PMID:26807188

  4. Fournier gangrene: first manifestation of occult rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Tovar, J; Córdoba, L; Devesa, J M

    2011-01-01

    Fournier gangrene is a necrotizing fasciitis of the genital and perineal region. Diverse factors predispose to Fournier gangrene, such as diabetes mellitus, ethylism, liver dysfunction, haematological disorders, obesity or recent regional instrumentation. Rectal tumours can also predispose to Fournier gangrene; most of the reported cases are perforated or unresectable colorectal tumours, but some cases of anorectal cancer diagnosed after recovery from Fournier gangrene have also been reported. In these cases, the presence of a rectal tumour at the time of, or prior to, diagnosis of Fournier gangrene could not be ruled out. We present three cases of rectal cancer whose first manifestation was as Fournier gangrene.

  5. Combined-modality therapy for rectal cancer using irinotecan.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2002-05-01

    Preoperative or postoperative pelvic radiation plus concurrent fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is standard adjuvant treatment for patients with T3 and/or N1/2 rectal cancer. Newer chemotherapeutic regimens have been developed for the treatment of patients with metastatic disease. Irinotecan (CPT-11, Camptosar)-based regimens have improved survival in patients with metastatic disease and are being actively investigated in combination with pelvic radiation therapy for patients with rectal cancer.

  6. Phase I-II Trial of Concurrent Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin With Preoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aristu, Jose Javier Arbea, Leire; Rodriguez, Javier; Hernandez-Lizoain, Jose Luis; Sola, Jesus Javier; Moreno, Marta M.D.; Azcona, Juan Diego; Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan Antonio; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus Miguel; Martinez-Monge, Rafael

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To identify the maximal tolerated dose level of preoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy combined with capecitabine and oxaliplatin and to evaluate the efficacy. Patients and Methods: Patients with rectal T3-T4 and/or N0-N+ rectal cancer received capecitabine 825 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily Monday through Friday and oxaliplatin 60 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously on Days 1, 8, and 15, concurrently with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. The radiation dose was increased in 5.0-Gy steps in cohorts of 3 patients starting from 37.5 Gy in 15 fractions (dose level [DL] 1). DL2 and DL3 were designed to reach 42.5 Gy in 17 fractions and 47.5 Gy in 19 fractions, respectively. Results: No dose-limiting toxicity was observed at DL1 or DL2. Of the 3 patients treated at DL3, 1 presented with Grade 3 diarrhea, which was considered a dose-limiting toxicity, and 3 additional patients were added. Of the 6 patients treated at DL3, no new dose-limiting toxicities were observed, and DL3 was identified as the recommended dose in this study. Eight additional patients were treated at 47.5 Gy. Grade 2 proctitis was the most frequent adverse event (40%); Grade 3 diarrhea occurred in 2 patients (10%). All patients underwent surgery, and 17 patients (85%) underwent R0 resection. Four patients (20%) presented with a histologic response of Grade 4, 11 (55%) with Grade 3+, 2 (15%) with Grade 3, and 2 patients (10%) with Grade 2. Conclusion: The maximal tolerated dose in this study was 47.5 Gy. The high rates of pathologic response of Grade 3+ and 4 must be confirmed through the accrual of new patients in the Phase II study.

  7. Patterns of metastasis in colon and rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Riihimäki, Matias; Hemminki, Akseli; Sundquist, Jan; Hemminki, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Investigating epidemiology of metastatic colon and rectal cancer is challenging, because cancer registries seldom record metastatic sites. We used a population based approach to assess metastatic spread in colon and rectal cancers. 49,096 patients with colorectal cancer were identified from the nationwide Swedish Cancer Registry. Metastatic sites were identified from the National Patient Register and Cause of Death Register. Rectal cancer more frequently metastasized into thoracic organs (OR = 2.4) and the nervous system (1.5) and less frequently within the peritoneum (0.3). Mucinous and signet ring adenocarcinomas more frequently metastasized within the peritoneum compared with generic adenocarcinoma (3.8 [colon]/3.2 [rectum]), and less frequently into the liver (0.5/0.6). Lung metastases occurred frequently together with nervous system metastases, whereas peritoneal metastases were often listed with ovarian and pleural metastases. Thoracic metastases are almost as common as liver metastases in rectal cancer patients with a low stage at diagnosis. In colorectal cancer patients with solitary metastases the survival differed between 5 and 19 months depending on T or N stage. Metastatic patterns differ notably between colon and rectal cancers. This knowledge should help clinicians to identify patients in need for extra surveillance and gives insight to further studies on the mechanisms of metastasis. PMID:27416752

  8. [Peri-operative treatments for rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Gérard, Jean-Pierre; Doyen, Jerome; Bénézery, Karen; Borens, Bruno; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel; François, Éric

    2015-06-01

    Depending on its location or stage, rectal cancer may differ significantly. Before any treatment decision a careful work up is mandatory relying mainly on endoscopy and imaging (MRI). Surgery according to the TME principle is the cornerstone of treatment. Most of the time surgery is associated with external beam radiotherapy often combined with concurrent chemotherapy (capecitabine) according to the neoadjuvant regimen CAP 50 (5 weeks long). It is sometimes possible to escalate safely the dose of irradiation using contact X-ray brachytherapy 50 Kv or Iridium 192 interstitial brachytherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy may be given in case of pejorative pathological findings but its benefit is not yet proven in contrast with colon cancer. Local recurrences are becoming unusual as is permanent APE surgery with permanent stoma. To reduce the risk of distant metastasis clinical trials are testing first line chemotherapy in T3-4 lesions. For early stage (T2-"small" T3) clinical trials try to achieve organ preservation. Intensification of CAP 50 either with more chemotherapy or radiation dose escalation using contact X-ray aim at achieving a clinical complete response followed by local excision or close surveillance.

  9. Delaying surgery after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy improves prognosis of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mihmanlı, Mehmet; Kabul Gürbulak, Esin; Akgün, İsmail Ethem; Celayir, Mustafa Fevzi; Yazıcı, Pınar; Tunçel, Deniz; Bek, Tuba Tülin; Öz, Ayhan; Ömeroğlu, Sinan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the prognostic effect of a delayed interval between neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and surgery in locally advanced rectal cancer. METHODS We evaluated 87 patients with locally advanced mid- or distal rectal cancer undergoing total mesorectal excision following an interval period after neoadjuvant CRT at Şişli Hamidiye Etfal Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul between January 2009 and January 2014. Patients were divided into two groups according to the interval before surgery: < 8 wk (group I) and ≥ 8 wk (group II). Data related to patients, cancer characteristics and pathological examination were collected and analyzed. RESULTS When the distribution of timing between group I (n = 45) and group II (n = 42) was viewed, comparison of interval periods (median ± SD) of groups showed a significant difference of as 5 ± 1.28 wk in group I and 10.1 ± 2.2 wk in group II (P < 0.001). The median follow-up period for all patients was 34.5 (9.9-81) mo. group II had significantly higher rates of pathological complete response (pCR) than group I had (19% vs 8.9%, P = 0.002). Rate of tumor regression grade (TRG) poor response was 44.4% in group I and 9.5% in group II (P < 0.002). A poor pathological response was associated with worse disease-free survival (P = 0.009). The interval time did not show any association with local recurrence (P = 0.79). CONCLUSION Delaying the neoadjuvant CRT-surgery interval may provide nodal down-staging, improve pCR rate, and decrease the rate of TRG poor response. PMID:27672428

  10. Prognosis and value of preoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced rectal signet-ring cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Chun-Run; Wang, Rui; Wang, Mo-Jin; Ping, Jie; Zhuang, Wen

    2017-01-01

    As well known, signet-ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) is a rare histological subtype of colorectal adenocarcinoma, which has been associated with poor prognosis and resistant to non-surgery therapy compared with common adenocarcinoma. In this study, we assessed the effect of preoperative radiotherapy (PRT) for locally advanced rectal SRCC in a large patient group from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program (SEER, 1988–2011) database. SRCC was found in 0.9% (n = 622) rectal cancer (RC) patients in our study. In the PRT setting, SRCC had significantly worse cancer-specific survival than mucinous adenocarcinoma and nonmucinous adenocarcinoma patients (log-rank, P < 0.001). In terms of SRCC, stage III RC patients benefited from PRT (log-rank, P < 0.001) while stage II did not (P = 0.095). The multivariate Cox proportional hazard model showed that PRT was an independent benefit factor in stage III rectal SRCC patients (HR, 0.611; 95% CI, 0.407–0.919; P = 0.018). In conclusion, SRCC was an independent predictor of poor prognosis in stage III RC patients, but not in stage II. In the PRT setting of locally advanced RC, SRCC patients had significantly worse prognosis. PRT was an independent prognostic factor associated with improved survival in stage III rectal SRCC. PMID:28345614

  11. Extralevator abdominoperineal excision versus conventional surgery for low rectal cancer: a single surgeon experience

    PubMed Central

    Neşşar, Gürel; Demirbağ, Ali Eba; Celep, Bahadır; Elbir, Orhan Hayri; Kayaalp, Cüneyt

    2016-01-01

    Objective Extralevator abdominoperineal excision (ELAPE) reduces the risk of positive circumferential resection margin (CRM) and of intraoperative perforation (IOP), both of which are associated with high local recurrence rates and poor survival outcomes for rectal cancer. The aim of this study was to compare the results of ELAPE with conventional abdominoperineal excision (APE) for low rectal cancer. Material and Methods A total of 25 consecutive patients underwent ELAPE for low rectal cancer between November 2008 and September 2011. Fifty-six patients treated by conventional APE prior to 2008 were selected from our rectal cancer database for comparison as a historical cohort. Results The mean follow-up was 44.7 months in the ELAPE group, and 70.6 months in the APE group. Patients undergoing ELAPE had a lower CRM positivity and IOP rate than APE (12% vs. 20%, p=0,531; 4% vs. 8,9%, p=0,826; respectively). The ELAPE group was associated with higher perineal wound complications than the APE group (16.0% vs. 1.8%, p=0.030). Local recurrence rates for patients in both groups did not differ significantly (4.0% vs. 3.6%, p=1.0). Conclusion The results of this study suggest that ELAPE technique was associated with less CRM involvement and reduced rates of IOP but markedly higher rates of postoperative perineal complications occurred as compared to conventional surgery. ELAPE must be reserved for advanced low rectal cancers. PMID:28149119

  12. Unique considerations in the patient with rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2011-08-01

    In the past two decades, substantial progress has been made in the adjuvant management of colorectal cancer. Chemotherapy has improved overall survival in patients with node-positive (N+) disease. In contrast with colon cancer, which has a low incidence of local recurrence, patients with rectal cancer have a higher incidence requiring the addition of pelvic radiation therapy (chemoradiation). Patients with rectal cancer have a number of unique management considerations: for example, the role of short-course radiation, whether postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy is necessary for all patients, and if the type of surgery following chemoradiation should be based on the response rate. More accurate imaging techniques and/or molecular markers may help identify patients with positive pelvic nodes to reduce the chance of overtreatment with preoperative therapy. Will more effective systemic agents both improve the results of radiation as well as modify the need for pelvic radiation? This review will address these and other controversies specific to patients with rectal cancer.

  13. [Quality standards in rectal cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Pera, M; Pascual, M

    2005-01-01

    The results of surgery for rectal cancer have classically been measured through indicators such as morbidity, mortality, and length of hospital stay. In the last few years other parameters have been included that evaluate healthcare quality such as the functional results of the surgical technique employed and quality of life. Total resection of the mesorectum, performed by experienced surgeons, is the surgical technique of choice. Currently, the sphincter can be preserved in 70% of patients. Anastomotic dehiscence after anterior resection of the rectum is the most serious complication and the most important risk factor is the height of the anastomosis. The overall dehiscence rate should be less than 15% and operative mortality should be between 2% and 3%. The colonic reservoir improves functional outcome and consequently it is the procedure of choice to reconstruct transit after low anterior resection. Local recurrence should be less than 10% and 5-year survival should be between 70% and 80%. In general, quality of life is better after anterior resection of the rectum than after abdominoperineal amputation, despite the functional deterioration presented by some patients.

  14. Phase II Study of Preoperative Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin-based Intensified Chemoradiotherapy With or Without Induction Chemotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer and Synchronous Liver-limited Resectable Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyungwoo; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Kyu-pyo; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Jin Cheon; Kim, Jong Hoon; Lee, Myung Ah; Jang, Hong Seok; Oh, Seong Taek; Kim, Sun Young; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Dae Yong; Hong, Yong Sang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Controversy surrounds the management of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer with synchronous resectable liver metastases (LMs). This study was designed to improve both systemic and local control in these patients. Methods: Patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (cT3-4N0 or cTanyN1-2) and synchronous resectable liver-limited metastases (cM1a) were randomly assigned to receive either preoperative treatments of induction CapeOx, followed by chemoradiotherapy with CapeOx (CapeOx-RT) (arm A) or CapeOx-RT alone (arm B). Induction CapeOx consisted of oxaliplatin 130 mg/m2 on day 1 and capecitabine 1000 mg/m2 twice daily on days 1 to 14, every 3 weeks for 2 cycles; CapeOx-RT consisted of radiotherapy with 45 Gy/25 daily fractions±5.4 Gy/3 fractions, oxaliplatin 50 mg/m2 weekly for 5 weeks, and capecitabine 825 mg/m2 twice daily on days 1 to 38. Total mesorectal excision and simultaneous liver metastasectomy were planned within 6 weeks after completion of preoperative treatments. The primary endpoint was R0 resection rate of both the primary tumor and LMs. Results: Thirty-eight patients were randomly assigned to the present study, 18 to arm A and 20 to arm B. The overall R0 resection rate for both the primary tumor and LMs was 77.8% in arm A and 70.0% in arm B (P=0.72). The median progression-free survival was 14.2 versus 15.1 months (P=0.422) and the 3-year overall survival rate was 75.0% versus 88.8% (P=0.29), respectively. Conclusions: Both treatment strategies showed considerable R0 resection rates; however, further study will be warranted to apply these intensified strategies in clinical practice. PMID:27322695

  15. Toward Restored Bowel Health in Rectal Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Steineck, Gunnar; Schmidt, Heike; Alevronta, Eleftheria; Sjöberg, Fei; Bull, Cecilia Magdalena; Vordermark, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    As technology gets better and better, and as clinical research provides more and more knowledge, we can extend our ambition to cure patients from cancer with restored physical health among the survivors. This increased ambition requires attention to grade 1 toxicity that decreases quality of life. It forces us to document the details of grade 1 toxicity and improve our understanding of the mechanisms. Long-term toxicity scores, or adverse events as documented during clinical trials, may be regarded as symptoms or signs of underlying survivorship diseases. However, we lack a survivorship nosology for rectal cancer survivors. Primarily focusing on radiation-induced side effects, we highlight some important observations concerning late toxicity among rectal cancer survivors. With that and other data, we searched for a preliminary survivorship-disease nosology for rectal cancer survivors. We disentangled the following survivorship diseases among rectal cancer survivors: low anterior resection syndrome, radiation-induced anal sphincter dysfunction, gut wall inflammation and fibrosis, blood discharge, excessive gas discharge, excessive mucus discharge, constipation, bacterial overgrowth, and aberrant anatomical structures. The suggested survivorship nosology may form the basis for new instruments capturing long-term symptoms (patient-reported outcomes) and professional-reported signs. For some of the diseases, we can search for animal models. As an end result, the suggested survivorship nosology may accelerate our understanding on how to prevent, ameliorate, or eliminate manifestations of treatment-induced diseases among rectal cancer survivors.

  16. EURECCA consensus conference highlights about colon & rectal cancer multidisciplinary management: the radiology experts review.

    PubMed

    Tudyka, V; Blomqvist, L; Beets-Tan, R G H; Boelens, P G; Valentini, V; van de Velde, C J; Dieguez, A; Brown, G

    2014-04-01

    Some interesting shifts have taken place in the diagnostic approach for detection of colorectal lesions over the past decade. This article accompanies the recent EURECCA consensus group reccomendations for optimal management of colon and rectal cancers. In summary, imaging has a crucial role to play in the diagnosis, staging assessment and follow up of patients with colon and rectal cancer. Recent advances include the use of CT colonography instead of Barium Enema in the diagnosis of colonoic cancer and as an alternative to colonoscopy. Modern mutlidetector CT scanning techniques have also shown improvements in prognostic stratification of patients with colonic cancer and clinical trials are underway testing the selective use of neoadjuvant therapy for imaging identified high risk colon cancers. In rectal cancer, high resolution MRI with a voxel size less or equal to 3 × 1 × 1 mm3 on T2-weighted images has a proven ability to accurately stage patients with rectal cancer. Moreover, preoperative identification of prognostic features allows stratification of patients into different prognostic groups based on assessment of depth of extramural spread, relationship of the tumour edge to the mesorectal fascia (MRF) and extramural venous invasion (EMVI). These poor prognostic features predict an increased risk of local recurrence and/or metastatic disease and should form the basis for preoperative local staging and multidisciplinary preoperative discussion of patient treatment options.

  17. The Effect of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy on Whole-Body Physical Fitness and Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Oxidative Phosphorylation In Vivo in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients – An Observational Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    West, Malcolm A.; Loughney, Lisa; Lythgoe, Daniel; Barben, Christopher P.; Adams, Valerie L.; Bimson, William E.; Grocott, Michael P. W.; Jack, Sandy; Kemp, Graham J.

    2014-01-01

    Background In the United Kingdom, patients with locally advanced rectal cancer routinely receive neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. However, the effects of this on physical fitness are unclear. This pilot study is aimed to investigate the effect of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy on objectively measured in vivo muscle mitochondrial function and whole-body physical fitness. Methods We prospectively studied 12 patients with rectal cancer who completed standardized neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy, recruited from a large tertiary cancer centre, between October 2012 and July 2013. All patients underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test and a phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy quadriceps muscle exercise-recovery study before and after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Data were analysed and reported blind to patient identity and clinical course. Primary variables of interest were the two physical fitness measures; oxygen uptake at estimated anaerobic threshold and oxygen uptake at Peak exercise (ml.kg−1.min−1), and the post-exercise phosphocreatine recovery rate constant (min−1), a measure of muscle mitochondrial capacity in vivo. Results Median age was 67 years (IQR 64–75). Differences (95%CI) in all three primary variables were significantly negative post-NACRT: Oxygen uptake at estimated anaerobic threshold −2.4 ml.kg−1.min−1 (−3.8, −0.9), p = 0.004; Oxygen uptake at Peak −4.0 ml.kg−1.min−1 (−6.8, −1.1), p = 0.011; and post-exercise phosphocreatine recovery rate constant −0.34 min−1 (−0.51, −0.17), p<0.001. Conclusion The significant decrease in both whole-body physical fitness and in vivo muscle mitochondrial function raises the possibility that muscle mitochondrial mechanisms, no doubt multifactorial, may be important in deterioration of physical fitness following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. This may have implications for targeted interventions to improve physical fitness pre-surgery. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials

  18. Low Rectal Cancer Study (MERCURY II)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-11

    Adenocarcinoma; Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous; Carcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous; Colorectal Neoplasms; Intestinal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intestinal Diseases; Rectal Diseases

  19. Sexual Function in Males After Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bruheim, Kjersti; Guren, Marianne G.; Dahl, Alv A.; Skovlund, Eva; Balteskard, Lise; Carlsen, Erik; Fossa, Sophie D.; Tveit, Kjell Magne

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Knowledge of sexual problems after pre- or postoperative radiotherapy (RT) with 50 Gy for rectal cancer is limited. In this study, we aimed to compare self-rated sexual functioning in irradiated (RT+) and nonirradiated (RT-) male patients at least 2 years after surgery for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients diagnosed with rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified from the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Male patients without recurrence at the time of the study. The International Index of Erectile Function, a self-rated instrument, was used to assess sexual functioning, and serum levels of serum testosterone were measured. Results: Questionnaires were returned from 241 patients a median of 4.5 years after surgery. The median age was 67 years at survey. RT+ patients (n = 108) had significantly poorer scores for erectile function, orgasmic function, intercourse satisfaction, and overall satisfaction with sex life compared with RT- patients (n = 133). In multiple age-adjusted analysis, the odds ratio for moderate-severe erectile dysfunction in RT+ patients was 7.3 compared with RT- patients (p <0.001). Furthermore, erectile dysfunction of this degree was associated with low serum testosterone (p = 0.01). Conclusion: RT for rectal cancer is associated with significant long-term effects on sexual function in males.

  20. Preoperative Radiotherapy of Advanced Rectal Cancer With Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin With or Without Cetuximab: A Pooled Analysis of Three Prospective Phase I-II Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Christian; Arnold, Dirk; Dellas, Kathrin; Liersch, Torsten; Hipp, Matthias; Fietkau, Rainer; Sauer, Rolf; Hinke, Axel; Roedel, Claus

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: A pooled analysis of three prospective trials of preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) for rectal cancer by using oxaliplatin and capecitabine with or without cetuximab was performed to evaluate the impact of additional cetuximab on pathologic complete response (pCR) rates and tumor regression (TRG) grades. Methods and Materials: Of 202 patients, 172 patients met the inclusion criteria (primary tumor stage II/III, M0). All patients received concurrent RCT, and 46 patients received additional cetuximab therapy. A correlation of pretreatment clinicopathologic factors and cetuximab treatment with early pCR rates (TRG > 50%) was performed with univariate and multivariate analyses. Toxicity data were recorded for all patients. Results: Of 172 patients, 24 (14%) patients achieved a pCR, and 84 of 172 (71%) patients showed a TRG of >50% in the surgical specimen assessment after preoperative treatment. Age, gender, and T/N stages, as well as localization of the tumor, were not associated with pCR or good TRG. The pCR rate was 16% after preoperative RCT alone and 9% with concurrent cetuximab therapy (p = 0.32). A significantly reduced TRG of >50% was found after RCT with cetuximab compared to RCT alone (p = 0.0035). This was validated by a multivariate analysis with all available clinical factors (p = 0.0037). Acute toxicity and surgical complications were not increased with additional cetuximab. Conclusions: Triple therapy with RCT and cetuximab seems to be feasible, with no unexpected toxicity. Early response assessment (TRG), however, suggests subadditive interaction. A longer follow-up (and finally randomized trials) is needed to draw any firm conclusions with respect to local and distant failure rates.

  1. Results of radical surgery for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Heald, R J; Karanjia, N D

    1992-01-01

    This paper examines the hypothesis that a reduction in the distal mural margin during anterior resection for sphincter conservation in rectal cancer excision is safe, provided total mesorectal excision is undertaken with wash-out of the clamped rectum. One hundred ninety-two patients underwent anterior resection and 21 (less than 10%) patients underwent abdomino-perineal excision (APE) by one surgeon (RJH). Anterior resections were classified as "curative" (79%) and "non-curative" (21%); in the "curative" sub-group less than 4% of patients developed local recurrence. The series was retrospectively analyzed for the effect of mural margins on local recurrence with 152 patients undergoing "curative" anterior resections and 40 patients undergoing "non-curative" resections. In the 152 specimens from curative resections, 110 had a resection margin greater than 1 cm and 42 had a resection margin less than 1 cm. Four patients developed local recurrence in the greater than 1 cm margin group (95% confidence interval: 0.8%-7.8%) and no patients developed local recurrence in the less than or equal to 1 cm margin group (95% confidence interval: 0%-5.9%). In each patient with local recurrence a cause for failure was apparent. There was no statistically significant difference in local recurrence rate between the less than or equal to 1 cm margin group and the greater than 1 cm margin group. A reduction in resection margin therefore did not compromise survival after anterior resection. The significance of lateral resection margins is discussed. The role of deep radiotherapy and cytotoxics are considered.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Neo-adjuvant radiotherapy in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Glimelius, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    In rectal cancer treatment, attention has focused on the local primary tumour and the regional tumour cell deposits to diminish the risk of a loco-regional recurrence. Several large randomized trials have also shown that combinations of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy have markedly reduced the risk of a loco-regional recurrence, but this has not yet had any major influence on overall survival. The best results have been achieved when the radiotherapy has been given preoperatively. Preoperative radiotherapy improves loco-regional control even when surgery has been optimized to improve lateral clearance, i.e., when a total mesorectal excision has been performed. The relative reduction is then 50%-70%. The value of radiotherapy has not been tested in combination with more extensive surgery including lateral lymph node clearance, as practised in some Asian countries. Many details about how the radiotherapy is performed are still open for discussion, and practice varies between countries. A highly fractionated radiation schedule (5 Gy × 5), proven efficacious in many trials, has gained much popularity in some countries, whereas a conventionally fractionated regimen (1.8-2.0 Gy × 25-28), often combined with chemotherapy, is used in other countries. The additional therapy adds morbidity to the morbidity that surgery causes, and should therefore be administered only when the risk of loco-regional recurrence is sufficiently high. The best integration of the weakest modality, to date the drugs (conventional cytotoxics and biologicals) is not known. A new generation of trials exploring the best sequence of treatments is required. Furthermore, there is a great need to develop predictors of response, so that treatment can be further individualized and not solely based upon clinical factors and anatomic imaging. PMID:24379566

  3. Predictive and Prognostic Molecular Biomarkers for Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dayde, Delphine; Tanaka, Ichidai; Jain, Rekha; Tai, Mei Chee; Taguchi, Ayumu

    2017-01-01

    The standard of care in locally advanced rectal cancer is neoadjuvant chemoradiation (nCRT) followed by radical surgery. Response to nCRT varies among patients and pathological complete response is associated with better outcome. However, there is a lack of effective methods to select rectal cancer patients who would or would not have a benefit from nCRT. The utility of clinicopathological and radiological features are limited due to lack of adequate sensitivity and specificity. Molecular biomarkers have the potential to predict response to nCRT at an early time point, but none have currently reached the clinic. Integration of diverse types of biomarkers including clinicopathological and imaging features, identification of mechanistic link to tumor biology, and rigorous validation using samples which represent disease heterogeneity, will allow to develop a sensitive and cost-effective molecular biomarker panel for precision medicine in rectal cancer. Here, we aim to review the recent advance in tissue- and blood-based molecular biomarker research and illustrate their potential in predicting nCRT response in rectal cancer. PMID:28272347

  4. Predictive and Prognostic Molecular Biomarkers for Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dayde, Delphine; Tanaka, Ichidai; Jain, Rekha; Tai, Mei Chee; Taguchi, Ayumu

    2017-03-07

    The standard of care in locally advanced rectal cancer is neoadjuvant chemoradiation (nCRT) followed by radical surgery. Response to nCRT varies among patients and pathological complete response is associated with better outcome. However, there is a lack of effective methods to select rectal cancer patients who would or would not have a benefit from nCRT. The utility of clinicopathological and radiological features are limited due to lack of adequate sensitivity and specificity. Molecular biomarkers have the potential to predict response to nCRT at an early time point, but none have currently reached the clinic. Integration of diverse types of biomarkers including clinicopathological and imaging features, identification of mechanistic link to tumor biology, and rigorous validation using samples which represent disease heterogeneity, will allow to develop a sensitive and cost-effective molecular biomarker panel for precision medicine in rectal cancer. Here, we aim to review the recent advance in tissue- and blood-based molecular biomarker research and illustrate their potential in predicting nCRT response in rectal cancer.

  5. Reproducibility with repeat CT in radiomics study for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Panpan; Wang, Jiazhou; Zhong, Haoyu; Zhou, Zhen; Shen, Lijun; Hu, Weigang; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the reproducibility of radiomics features by repeating computed tomographic (CT) scans in rectal cancer. To choose stable radiomics features for rectal cancer. Results Volume normalized features are much more reproducible than unnormalized features. The average value of all slices is the most reproducible feature type in rectal cancer. Different filters have little effect for the reproducibility of radiomics features. For the average type features, 496 out of 775 features showed high reproducibility (ICC ≥ 0.8), 225 out of 775 features showed medium reproducibility (0.8 > ICC ≥ 0.5) and 54 out of 775 features showed low reproducibility (ICC < 0.5). Methods 40 rectal cancer patients with stage II were enrolled in this study, each of whom underwent two CT scans within average 8.7 days. 775 radiomics features were defined in this study. For each features, five different values (value from the largest slice, maximum value, minimum value, average value of all slices and value from superposed intermediate matrix) were extracted. Meanwhile a LOG filter with different parameters was applied to these images to find stable filter value. Concordance correlation coefficients (CCC) and inter-class correlation coefficients (ICC) of two CT scans were calculated to assess the reproducibility, based on original features and volume normalized features. Conclusions Features are recommended to be normalized to volume in radiomics analysis. The average type radiomics features are the most stable features in rectal cancer. Further analysis of these features of rectal cancer can be warranted for treatment monitoring and prognosis prediction. PMID:27669756

  6. Evidence of improving survival of patients with rectal cancer in France: a population based study

    PubMed Central

    Finn-Faivre, C; Maurel, J; Benhamiche, A; Herbert, C; Mitry, E; Launoy, G; Faivre, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Over the past 20 years there have been many changes in the management of rectal cancer. Their impact on the overall population is not well known. 
AIMS—To determine trends in management and prognosis of rectal cancer in two French regions. 
SUBJECTS—1978 patients with a rectal carcinoma diagnosed between 1978 and 1993. 
METHODS—Time trends in treatment, stage at diagnosis, operative mortality, and survival were studied on a four year basis. A non-conditional logistic regression was performed to obtain an odds ratio for each period adjusted for the other variables. To estimate the independent effect of the period a multivariate relative survival analysis was performed. 
RESULTS—Over the 16 year period resection rates increased from 66.0% to 80.1%; the increase was particularly noticeable for sphincter saving procedures (+30.6% per four years, p=0.03). The percentage of patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy increased from 24.0% to 40.0% (p=0.02). The proportion of patients with Dukes' type A cancer increased from 17.7% to 30.6% with a corresponding decrease in those with more advanced disease. Operative mortality decreased by 31.1% per four years (p=0.03). All these improvements have resulted in a dramatic increase in relative survival (from 35.4% for the 1978-1981 period to 57.0% for the 1985-1989 period). 
CONCLUSIONS—Substantial advances in the management of rectal cancer have been achieved, but there is evidence that further improvements can be made in order to increase survival. 

 Keywords: rectal cancer; treatment; stage at diagnosis; survival; time trends; cancer registries PMID:10026324

  7. High Rate of Positive Circumferential Resection Margins Following Rectal Cancer Surgery: A Call to Action

    PubMed Central

    Rickles, Aaron S.; Dietz, David W.; Chang, George J.; Wexner, Steven D.; Berho, Mariana E.; Remzi, Feza H.; Greene, Frederick L.; Fleshman, James W.; Abbas, Maher A.; Peters, Walter; Noyes, Katia; Monson, John R.T.; Fleming, Fergal J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To identify predictors of positive circumferential resection margin following rectal cancer resection in the United States. Background Positive circumferential resection margin is associated with a high rate of local recurrence and poor morbidity and mortality for rectal cancer patients. Prior study has shown poor compliance with national rectal cancer guidelines, but whether this finding is reflected in patient outcomes has yet to be shown. Methods Patients who underwent resection for stage I-III rectal cancer were identified from the 2010-2011 National Cancer Database. The primary outcome was a positive circumferential resection margin. The relationship between patient, hospital, tumor, and treatment-related characteristics was analyzed using bivariate and multivariate analysis. Findings A positive circumferential resection margin was noted in 2,859 (17.2%) of the 16,619 patients included. Facility location, clinical T and N stage, histologic type, tumor size, tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion, type of operation, and operative approach were significant predictors of positive circumferential resection margin on multivariable analysis. Total proctectomy had nearly a 30% increased risk of positive margin compared to partial proctectomy (OR 1.293, 95%CI 1.185-1.411) and a laparoscopic approach had nearly 22% less risk of a positive circumferential resection margin compared to an open approach (OR 0.882, 95%CI 0.790-0.985). Interpretation Despite advances in surgical technique and multimodality therapy, rates of positive circumferential resection margin remain high in the United States. Several tumor and treatment characteristics were identified as independent risk factors, and advances in rectal cancer care are necessary to approach the outcomes seen in other countries. PMID:26473651

  8. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by transanal local excision for T3 distal rectal cancer: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YEO, SEUNG-GU

    2016-01-01

    Local excision (LE) for rectal cancer is currently indicated for selected T1 stage tumors. However, preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer not only improves local disease control, but also leads to a decrease in the stage and size of the primary mural tumor, along with a decrease in the risk of regional lymphadenopathy. The present study reports the outcome of a patient with T3N0M0 rectal cancer who was treated with LE following preoperative CRT. The distal pole of the tumor was located 2 cm from the anal verge. Preoperative pelvic radiotherapy of 50.4 Gy was administered in 28 fractions. Chemotherapy using 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin was administered during the first and last weeks of radiotherapy. The tumor response to CRT, was found to be marked at 7 weeks after CRT completion, and a complete response was presumed clinically. Transanal full-thickness LE was performed, and pathological examination revealed the absence of residual cancer cells. After 30 months of close follow-up, the patient was alive with no evidence of disease, and treatment-associated severe toxicities were not observed. Although a longer follow-up period is required, this case report suggests that LE may also be a feasible alternative treatment for T3 rectal cancer, which exhibits a marked response to preoperative CRT, particularly in elderly and comorbid patients contraindicated for radical surgery, or patients who are reluctant to undergo sphincter-ablation surgery. PMID:27073466

  9. Total mesorectal excision and management of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Pinsk, Ilia; Phang, P Terry

    2007-10-01

    Treatment of rectal cancer over the last two decades has evolved with changes in techniques of surgery and radiation based on national and international trials. Preoperative adjuvant radiation is now preferred over postoperative adjuvant radiation, and total mesorectal excision with preservation of pelvic nerves is the gold standard for surgical treatment of rectal cancer. Preservation of the anal sphincter without compromising oncological outcome is an additional benefit for patients with carcinoma in the distal rectum. Further progress in imaging and a multidisciplinary team approach will facilitate individualization of treatment strategy with more focus on quality of life.

  10. Metachronous penile metastasis from rectal cancer after total pelvic exenteration.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuta; Shida, Dai; Nasu, Keiichi; Matsunaga, Hiroki; Warabi, Masahiro; Inoue, Satoru

    2012-10-14

    Despite its abundant vascularization and extensive circulatory communication with neighboring organs, metastases to the penis are a rare event. A 57-year-old male, who had undergone total pelvic exenteration for rectal cancer sixteen months earlier, demonstrated an abnormal uptake within his penis by positron emission tomography/computed tomography. A single elastic nodule of the middle penis shaft was noted deep within Bucks fascia. No other obvious recurrent site was noted except the penile lesion. Total penectomy was performed as a curative resection based on a diagnosis of isolated penile metastasis from rectal cancer. A histopathological examination revealed an increase of well differentiated adenocarcinoma in the corpus spongiosum consistent with his primary rectal tumor. The immunohistochemistry of the tumor cells demonstrated positive staining for cytokeratin 20 and negative staining for cytokeratin 7, which strongly supported a diagnosis of penile metastasis from the rectum. The patient is alive more than two years without any recurrence.

  11. Sphincter-saving surgeries for rectal cancer: A single center study from Kashmir

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Shabeer Ahmed; Chowdri, Nisar A.; Parray, Fazl Q.; Mir, Parvez Ahmed; Bashir, Yasir; Nafae, Muntakhab

    2013-01-01

    Summary and Background Data: The goals in the treatment of rectal cancer are cure, local control, and preservation of sphincter, bladder and sexual function. Surgical resection using sharp mesorectal dissection is important for achieving these goals. Objectives: The current treatment of choice for carcinoma rectum is sphincter saving procedures, which have practically replaced the previously done abdominoperineal resection. We performed a study in our institute to evaluate the surgical outcome and complications of rectal cancer. Materials and Methods: This prospectivestudy included 117 patients, treated for primary rectal cancer by low anterior resection (LAR) from May 2007 to December 2010. All patients underwent standard total mesorectal excision (TME) followed by restoration of continuity. Results: The peri-operative mortality rate was 2.5% (3/117). Post-operative complications occurred in 32% of the patients. After a median follow up of 42 months, local recurrences developed in 6 (5%) patients and distant metastasis in 5 (4.2%). The survival rate was 93%. Conclusion: The concept of total mesorectal excision (TME), advances in stapling technology and neoadjuvant therapy have made it possible to preserve the anal sphincter in most of the patients. Rectal cancer needs to be managed especially in a specialized unit for better results. PMID:24455643

  12. Sequential PET/CT with [18F]-FDG Predicts Pathological Tumor Response to Preoperative Short Course Radiotherapy with Delayed Surgery in Patients with Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Using Logistic Regression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pecori, Biagio; Lastoria, Secondo; Caracò, Corradina; Celentani, Marco; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Avallone, Antonio; Rega, Daniela; De Palma, Giampaolo; Mormile, Maria; Budillon, Alfredo; Muto, Paolo; Bianco, Francesco; Aloj, Luigi; Petrillo, Antonella; Delrio, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that FDG PET/CT may predict pathological response in patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Aim of the current study is evaluate if pathological response can be similarly predicted in LARC patients after short course radiation therapy alone. Methods: Thirty-three patients with cT2-3, N0-2, M0 rectal adenocarcinoma treated with hypo fractionated short course neoadjuvant RT (5x5 Gy) with delayed surgery (SCRTDS) were prospectively studied. All patients underwent 3 PET/CT studies at baseline, 10 days from RT end (early), and 53 days from RT end (delayed). Maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax), mean standardized uptake value (SUVmean) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) of the primary tumor were measured and recorded at each PET/CT study. We use logistic regression analysis to aggregate different measures of metabolic response to predict the pathological response in the course of SCRTDS. Results: We provide straightforward formulas to classify response and estimate the probability of being a major responder (TRG1-2) or a complete responder (TRG1) for each individual. The formulas are based on the level of TLG at the early PET and on the overall proportional reduction of TLG between baseline and delayed PET studies. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that in the course of SCRTDS it is possible to estimate the probabilities of pathological tumor responses on the basis of PET/CT with FDG. Our formulas make it possible to assess the risks associated to LARC borne by a patient in the course of SCRTDS. These risk assessments can be balanced against other health risks associated with further treatments and can therefore be used to make informed therapy adjustments during SCRTDS. PMID:28060889

  13. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to preoperative chemoradiation or radiation in rectal cancer: should we be more cautious?

    PubMed Central

    Glynne-Jones, R; Grainger, J; Harrison, M; Ostler, P; Makris, A

    2006-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) is a term originally used to describe the administration of chemotherapy preoperatively before surgery. The original rationale for administering NACT or so-called induction chemotherapy to shrink or downstage a locally advanced tumour, and thereby facilitate more effective local treatment with surgery or radiotherapy, has been extended with the introduction of more effective combinations of chemotherapy to include reducing the risks of metastatic disease. It seems logical that survival could be lengthened, or organ preservation rates increased in resectable tumours by NACT. In rectal cancer NACT is being increasingly used in locally advanced and nonmetastatic unresectable tumours. Randomised studies in advanced colorectal cancer show high response rates to combination cytotoxic therapy. This evidence of efficacy coupled with the introduction of novel molecular targeted therapies (such as Bevacizumab and Cetuximab), and long waiting times for radiotherapy have rekindled an interest in delivering NACT in locally advanced rectal cancer. In contrast, this enthusiasm is currently waning in other sites such as head and neck and nasopharynx cancer where traditionally NACT has been used. So, is NACT in rectal cancer a real advance or just history repeating itself? In this review, we aimed to explore the advantages and disadvantages of the separate approaches of neoadjuvant, concurrent and consolidation chemotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer, drawing on theoretical principles, preclinical studies and clinical experience both in rectal cancer and other disease sites. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy may improve outcome in terms of disease-free or overall survival in selected groups in some disease sites, but this strategy has not been shown to be associated with better outcomes than postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. In particular, there is insufficient data in rectal cancer. The evidence for benefit is strongest when NACT is administered

  14. [Advanced rectal cancer in an older patient, in whom metastatic liver lesions were effectively controlled with oral UFT+LV and venous CPT-11 administration--case report].

    PubMed

    Shibaki, Taiichiro; Morimoto, Norio

    2006-06-01

    An 81-year-old man was admitted to our department due to acute ileus. He was diagnosed with sigmoid colon cancer with multiple metastatic lesions in the right lobe of the liver. Two weeks after insertion of an ileus tube, he underwent sigmoidectomy and permanent colostomy. The final diagnosis was stage IV sigmoid colon cancer with metastasis to the omentum. One month after the operation, adjuvant chemotherapy with oral administration of tegafur/uracil compound (UFT) and Leucovorin (LV), and drip venous infusion of irinotecan hydrochloride (CPT-11) was initiated (UFT 300 mg/day for 14 days, LV 75 mg/day for 14 days, CPT-11 90 mg/m(2) on the 1 st day, with 1 course consisting of 21 days). The levels of tumor markers, CA19-9 and CEA, and the size of metastases on CT were reduced remarkably after one and 4 courses of this therapy, respectively. Although the administration was temporarily discontinued due to low-grade nausea, we continued the treatment. Adjuvant chemotherapy with an oral administering agent is favorable for older patients with advanced colorectal cancer to reduce side effects and preserve the quality of life.

  15. Multidisciplinary management of resectable rectal cancer. New developments and controversies.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D; Guillem, Jose G

    2008-11-15

    Until 2004, initial surgery and, in cases of pT3 and/or node-positive disease, postoperative chemoradiotherapy (radiation plus concurrent chemotherapy) was the conventional approach for patients with clinical T3 and/or node-positive rectal cancer. The German CAO/ARO/AIO 94 trial confirmed that, compared with preoperative chemoradiotherapy, postoperative chemoradiotherapy is associated with significantly higher local failure and toxicity rates as well as a decrease in the incidence of sphincter preservation. These data resulted in a change from postoperative to preoperative chemoradiotherapy. This shift to preoperative therapy has prompted a series of new questions regarding the multidisciplinary management of rectal cancer, including: What is the ideal neoadjuvant approach (short-course vs. combined-modality therapy)? Is postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy necessary for all patients following preoperative chemoradiotherapy? Do patients with node-negative rectal cancer require pelvic radiation? What is the ideal combined-modality regimen? Does an increase in response rate translate into improved local control and survival? And lastly, what is the benefit of novel radiation sensitization and delivery techniques? This review will address these and other questions surrounding the multidisciplinary management of rectal cancer.

  16. Effect of misclassified underlying cause of death on survival estimates of colon and rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yin, Daixin; Morris, Cyllene R; Bates, Janet H; German, Robert R

    2011-07-20

    Inaccurate coding of patients' Underlying Cause of Death (UCOD) has constrained cause-specific survival estimates for colon and rectal cancers. Using California data from the Accuracy of Cancer Mortality study, we compared the cancer site data from the California Cancer Registry (CCR) with UCODs reported on death certificates and reclassified the UCODs based on cancer registry data when they disagreed. We then calculated 1-, 3-, 5-, and 10-year cause-specific survival for colon and rectal cancers separately, before and after the reclassification. Records from 26 312 colon and 10 687 rectal cancer patients were examined. UCOD records disagreed with CCR records for 700 (6%) of 11 404 colon cancer deaths and with 1958 (39%) of 5011 rectal cancer deaths, and 82% of the misclassified rectal cancer deaths were coded as colon cancer deaths in the UCOD. Reclassification decreased cause-specific survival for both colon and rectal cancers, but the impact was more pronounced for rectal cancer (eg, 5-year cause-specific survival of colon cancer decreased by 2.8% and of rectal cancer decreased by 20.0% relative to previous estimates; absolute rates changed from 65.4% to 63.6%, and 81.2% to 64.9%, respectively, after reclassification). Interchangeable use of the terms colon cancer and colorectal cancer is likely to be one of the reasons for UCOD misclassification. Educational measures could improve the accuracy of UCOD for colon and rectal cancer deaths.

  17. How to identify rectal sub-regions likely involved in rectal bleeding in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dréan, G.; Acosta, O.; Ospina, J. D.; Voisin, C.; Rigaud, B.; Simon, A.; Haigron, P.; de Crevoisier, R.

    2013-11-01

    Nowadays, the de nition of patient-speci c constraints in prostate cancer radiotherapy planning are solely based on dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. Nevertheless those DVH models lack of spatial accuracy since they do not use the complete 3D information of the dose distribution. The goal of the study was to propose an automatic work ow to de ne patient-speci c rectal sub-regions (RSR) involved in rectal bleeding (RB) in case of prostate cancer radiotherapy. A multi-atlas database spanning the large rectal shape variability was built from a population of 116 individuals. Non-rigid registration followed by voxel-wise statistical analysis on those templates allowed nding RSR likely correlated with RB (from a learning cohort of 63 patients). To de ne patient-speci c RSR, weighted atlas-based segmentation with a vote was then applied to 30 test patients. Results show the potentiality of the method to be used for patient-speci c planning of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT).

  18. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-13

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  19. Robotic Surgery for Colon and Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Jung; Baik, Seung Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Robotic surgery, used generally for colorectal cancer, has the advantages of a three-dimensional surgical view, steadiness, and seven degrees of robotic arms. However, there are disadvantages, such as a decreased sense of touch, extra time needed to dock the robotic cart, and high cost. Robotic surgery is performed using various techniques, with or without laparoscopic surgery. Because the results of this approach are reported to be similar to or less favorable than those of laparoscopic surgery, the learning curve for robotic colorectal surgery remains controversial. However, according to short- and long-term oncologic outcomes, robotic colorectal surgery is feasible and safe compared with conventional surgery. Advanced technologies in robotic surgery have resulted in favorable intraoperative and perioperative clinical outcomes as well as functional outcomes. As the technical advances in robotic surgery improve surgical performance as well as outcomes, it increasingly is being regarded as a treatment option for colorectal surgery. However, a multicenter, randomized clinical trial is needed to validate this approach.

  20. Nanocytology of rectal colonocytes to assess risk of colon cancer based on field cancerization

    PubMed Central

    Damania, Dhwanil; Roy, Hemant K.; Subramanian, Hariharan; Weinberg, David S.; Rex, Douglas K.; Goldberg, Michael J.; Muldoon, Joseph; Cherkezyan, Lusik; Zhu, Yuanjia; Bianchi, Laura K.; Shah, Dhiren; Pradhan, Prabhakar; Borkar, Monica; Lynch, Henry; Backman, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    Developing a minimally invasive and cost effective pre-screening strategy for colon cancer is critical, because of the impossibility of performing colonoscopy on the entire at-risk population. The concept of field carcinogenesis, in which normal-appearing tissue away from a tumor has molecular and, consequently, nano-architectural abnormalities, offers one attractive approach to identify high-risk patients. In this study, we investigated whether the novel imaging technique partial-wave spectroscopic (PWS) microscopy could risk-stratify patients harboring precancerous lesions of the colon, using an optically measured biomarker (Ld) obtained from microscopically normal but nanoscopically altered cells. Rectal epithelial cells were examined from 146 patients, including 72 control patients, 14 patients with diminutive adenomas, 20 patients with non-advanced-non-diminutive adenomas, 15 patients with advanced adenomas/high-grade dysplasia, 12 patients with genetic mutation leading to Lynch syndrome, and 13 cancer patients. We found that the Ld obtained from rectal colonocytes was well-correlated with colon tumorigenicity in our patient cohort and in an independent validation set of 39 additional patients. Therefore, our findings suggest that PWS-measured Ld is an accurate marker of field carcinogenesis. This approach provides a potential pre-screening strategy for risk stratification before colonoscopy. PMID:22491589

  1. Irinotecan-Eluting Beads in Treating Patients With Refractory Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer That Has Spread to the Liver

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  2. Do Older Americans Undergo Stoma Reversal Following Low Anterior Resection for Rectal Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Dodgion, Christopher M.; Neville, Bridget A.; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Hu, Yue-Yung; Schrag, Deborah; Breen, Elizabeth; Greenberg, Caprice C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective For low-lying rectal cancers, proximal diversion can reduce anastomotic leak after sphincter preserving surgery; however, evidence suggests that such temporary diversions are often not reversed. We aimed to evaluate non-reversal and delayed stoma reversal in elderly patients undergoing low anterior resection (LAR). Design SEER-Medicare linked analysis from 1991-2007. Settings and Participants 1,179 primary stage I-III rectal cancer patients over age 66 who underwent LAR with synchronous diverting stoma. Main Outcome Measures 1) Stoma creation and reversal rates. 2) Time to reversal. 3) Characteristics associated with reversal and shorter time to reversal. Results Within 18 months of LAR, 51% (603/1179) of patients underwent stoma reversal. Stoma reversal was associated with age < 80 years (p<0.0001), male gender (p=0.018), less comorbidities (p=0.017), higher income [quartile 4 vs. 1, (p=0.002)], early tumor stage [1 vs. 3; (p<0.001)], neoadjuvant radiation (p<0.0001), rectal tumor location [vs. rectosigmoid, (p=0.001)], more recent diagnosis (p=0.021), and shorter length of stay on LAR admission (p=0.021). Median time to reversal was 126 days (IQR: 79-249). Longer time to reversal was associated with older age (p=0.031), presence of comorbidities (p=0.014), more advanced tumor stage (p=0.007), positive lymph nodes (p=0.009), receipt of adjuvant radiation therapy (p=0.008), more recent diagnosis (p=0.004) and longer LOS on LAR admission (p <0.0001). Conclusions Half of elderly rectal cancer patients who undergo LAR with temporary stoma have not undergone stoma reversal by 18 months. Identifiable risk factors predict both non-reversal and longer time to reversal. These results help inform pre-operative discussions and promote realistic expectations for elderly rectal cancer patients. PMID:23298948

  3. Experts reviews of the multidisciplinary consensus conference colon and rectal cancer 2012: science, opinions and experiences from the experts of surgery.

    PubMed

    van de Velde, C J H; Boelens, P G; Tanis, P J; Espin, E; Mroczkowski, P; Naredi, P; Pahlman, L; Ortiz, H; Rutten, H J; Breugom, A J; Smith, J J; Wibe, A; Wiggers, T; Valentini, V

    2014-04-01

    The first multidisciplinary consensus conference on colon and rectal cancer was held in December 2012, achieving a majority of consensus for diagnostic and treatment decisions using the Delphi Method. This article will give a critical appraisal of the topics discussed during the meeting and in the consensus document by well-known leaders in surgery that were involved in this multidisciplinary consensus process. Scientific evidence, experience and opinions are collected to support multidisciplinary teams (MDT) with arguments for medical decision-making in diagnosis, staging and treatment strategies for patients with colon or rectal cancer. Surgery is the cornerstone of curative treatment for colon and rectal cancer. Standardizing treatment is an effective instrument to improve outcome of multidisciplinary cancer care for patients with colon and rectal cancer. In this article, a review of the following focuses; Perioperative care, age and colorectal surgery, obstructive colorectal cancer, stenting, surgical anatomical considerations, total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery and training, surgical considerations for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) and local recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC), surgery in stage IV colorectal cancer, definitions of quality of surgery, transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM), laparoscopic colon and rectal surgery, preoperative radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy, and how about functional outcome after surgery?

  4. Metachronous adenoma on ileorectal anastomosis suture line and submucosal deep invasive cancer suspected of rapid growth in rectal remnant following long-term interval after curative surgery for advanced colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Uraoka, Toshio; Horii, Joichiro; Goto, Osamu; Shimoda, Masayuki; Yahagi, Naohisa

    2013-05-01

    There is general agreement as to the value of postoperative surveillance and the effectiveness of colonoscopy in the early detection of metachronous colorectal lesions. In the present case, a 56-year-old woman with no family history of colon cancer underwent surveillance colonoscopy in which a metachronous flat adenoma was detected following an interval of 23 years after a colectomy and 20 years subsequent to treatment for uterine cancer. A second metachronous flat lesion histopathologically determined to be a submucosal (sm) deep invasive cancer with lymphovascular involvement was detected 12 months later. This second metachronous lesion was suspected of having developed rapidly in the rectal remnant accounting for its sm deep invasion. The findings of this case suggest colonoscopy surveillance guidelines proposed for individuals at high risk should be evaluated based on cancer history and an analysis of possible mismatch repair gene mutations. In addition, the first metachronous lesion was located directly on the suture line of the anastomosis. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) was indicated despite severe fibrosis into the sm layer. This case also demonstrates the successful use of improved ESD instruments, sm injection agents and technique refinements in the treatment of a technically difficult lesion with a high risk of complications.

  5. Prognostic Value of MicroRNAs in Preoperative Treated Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Azizian, Azadeh; Epping, Ingo; Kramer, Frank; Jo, Peter; Bernhardt, Markus; Kitz, Julia; Salinas, Gabriela; Wolff, Hendrik A.; Grade, Marian; Beißbarth, Tim; Ghadimi, B. Michael; Gaedcke, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with locally advanced rectal cancer are treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by surgical resection. Despite similar clinical parameters (uT2-3, uN+) and standard therapy, patients’ prognoses differ widely. A possible prediction of prognosis through microRNAs as biomarkers out of treatment-naïve biopsies would allow individualized therapy options. Methods: Microarray analysis of 45 microdissected preoperative biopsies from patients with rectal cancer was performed to identify potential microRNAs to predict overall survival, disease-free survival, cancer-specific survival, distant-metastasis-free survival, tumor regression grade, or nodal stage. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed on an independent set of 147 rectal cancer patients to validate relevant miRNAs. Results: In the microarray screen, 14 microRNAs were significantly correlated to overall survival. Five microRNAs were included from previous work. Finally, 19 miRNAs were evaluated by qPCR. miR-515-5p, miR-573, miR-579 and miR-802 demonstrated significant correlation with overall survival and cancer-specific survival (p < 0.05). miR-573 was also significantly correlated with the tumor regression grade after preoperative chemoradiotherapy. miR-133b showed a significant correlation with distant-metastasis-free survival. miR-146b expression levels showed a significant correlation with nodal stage. Conclusion: Specific microRNAs can be used as biomarkers to predict prognosis of patients with rectal cancer and possibly stratify patients’ therapy if validated in a prospective study. PMID:27092493

  6. Short- and Long-Term Quality of Life and Bowel Function in Patients With MRI-Defined, High-Risk, Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Treated With an Intensified Neoadjuvant Strategy in the Randomized Phase 2 EXPERT-C Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Sclafani, Francesco; Peckitt, Clare; Cunningham, David; Tait, Diana; Giralt, Jordi; Glimelius, Bengt; Keränen, Susana Roselló; Bateman, Andrew; Hickish, Tamas; Tabernero, Josep; Thomas, Janet; Brown, Gina; Oates, Jacqueline; Chau, Ian

    2015-10-01

    Objective: Intensified preoperative treatments have been increasingly investigated in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), but limited data are available for the impact of these regimens on quality of life (QoL) and bowel function (BF). We assessed these outcome measures in EXPERT-C, a randomized phase 2 trial of neoadjuvant capecitabine combined with oxaliplatin (CAPOX), followed by chemoradiation therapy (CRT), total mesorectal excision, and adjuvant CAPOX with or without cetuximab in magnetic resonance imaging-defined, high-risk LARC. Methods and Materials: QoL was assessed using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 and QLQ-CR29 questionnaires. Bowel incontinence was assessed using the modified Fecal Incontinence Severity Index questionnaire. Results: Compared to baseline, QoL scores during preoperative treatment were better for symptoms associated with the primary tumor in the rectum (blood and mucus in stool, constipation, diarrhea, stool frequency, buttock pain) but worse for global health status, role functioning, and symptoms related to the specific safety profile of each treatment modality. During follow-up, improved emotional functioning and lessened anxiety and insomnia were observed, but deterioration of body image, increased urinary incontinence, less sexual interest (men), and increased impotence and dyspareunia were observed. Cetuximab was associated with a deterioration of global health status during neoadjuvant chemotherapy but did not have any long-term detrimental effect. An improvement in bowel continence was observed after preoperative treatment and 3 years after sphincter-sparing surgery. Conclusions: Intensifying neoadjuvant treatment by administering induction systemic chemotherapy before chemoradiation therapy improves tumor-related symptoms and does not appear to have a significantly detrimental effect on QoL and BF, in both the short and the long term.

  7. Could preoperative short-course radiotherapy be the treatment of choice for localized advanced rectal carcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Ciria, Juan Pablo; Eguiguren, Mikel; Cafiero, Sergio; Uranga, Intza; Diaz de Cerio, Ivan; Querejeta, Arrate; Urraca, Jose Maria; Minguez, Julian; Guimon, Elena; Puertolas, Jose Ramón

    2014-01-01

    Short-course preoperative radiotherapy (RT) is widely used in northern Europe for locally advanced resectable rectal cancer, but its role in the era of advanced imaging techniques is uncertain. Here, we reviewed articles and abstracts on SCRT published from 1974 through 2013 with the goal of identifying patients who might be best suited for short-course RT. We included relevant articles comparing surgery with or without preoperative radiation published before and after the advent of total mesorectal excision. We also analyzed two randomized trials directly comparing short-course RT with conventionally fractionated chemoradiation (the Polish Colorectal Study Group and the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group) that compared short-course RT with conventional chemoradiotherapy. We conclude from our review that short-course RT can be generally applied for operable rectal cancer and produces high rates of pelvic control with acceptable toxicity; it reduces local recurrence rates but does not increase overall survival. SCRT seems to be best used for tumors considered “low risk,” i.e., those that are >5 cm from the anal margin, without circumferential margin involvement, and involvement of fewer than 4 lymph nodes. Whether sequential chemotherapy can further improve outcomes remains to be seen, as does the best time for surgery (immediately or 6–8 weeks after RT). We further recommend that selection of patients for short-course RT should be based on findings from magnetic resonance imaging or transrectal ultrasonography. PMID:25535578

  8. Critical appraisal of laparoscopic vs open rectal cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Winson Jianhong; Chew, Min Hoe; Dharmawan, Angela Renayanti; Singh, Manraj; Acharyya, Sanchalika; Loi, Carol Tien Tau; Tang, Choong Leong

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the long-term clinical and oncological outcomes of laparoscopic rectal resection (LRR) and the impact of conversion in patients with rectal cancer. METHODS: An analysis was performed on a prospective database of 633 consecutive patients with rectal cancer who underwent surgical resection. Patients were compared in three groups: Open surgery (OP), laparoscopic surgery, and converted laparoscopic surgery. Short-term outcomes, long-term outcomes, and survival analysis were compared. RESULTS: Among 633 patients studied, 200 patients had successful laparoscopic resections with a conversion rate of 11.1% (25 out of 225). Factors predictive of survival on univariate analysis include the laparoscopic approach (P = 0.016), together with factors such as age, ASA status, stage of disease, tumor grade, presence of perineural invasion and vascular emboli, circumferential resection margin < 2 mm, and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. The survival benefit of laparoscopic surgery was no longer significant on multivariate analysis (P = 0.148). Neither 5-year overall survival (70.5% vs 61.8%, P = 0.217) nor 5-year cancer free survival (64.3% vs 66.6%, P = 0.854) were significantly different between the laparoscopic group and the converted group. CONCLUSION: LRR has equivalent long-term oncologic outcomes when compared to OP. Laparoscopic conversion does not confer a worse prognosis. PMID:27358678

  9. [Causes of local recurrence after curative surgery for rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Hôhn, József; Varga, László; Baradnay, Gellért; Simonka, Zsolt; Géczi, Tibor; Nagy, Ferenc; Molnár, Tamás; Maráz, Anikó; Kahán, Zsuzsa; Balogh, Adám

    2003-01-01

    The rate of local recurrence (LR) has been 20-40% after resective surgery for rectal cancer by the traditional - Miles or Dixon - operative technics. The authors performed curative resection in 358 patients with rectal cancer in a 10 year period (01.01.1990 - 31.12.2000) in the Surgical Department of Szeged University. Since 01.01.1996 the authors changed this type of surgery for the Heald technics (total mesorectal excision - TME - with sharp dissection, using the UltraCision device) for the surgical treatment of middle or lower third rectal cancer. To compare the results of the two procedures, the authors analysed their material in two periods: Period I: 01.01.1991 - 31.12.1992: 62 patients operated on with the traditional operative technics; LR 15% within 2 years after surgery. Period II: 01.01.1997 - 31.12.1998: 78 patients operated on with the Heald technics (TME with sharp dissection); LR 6.4% within 2 years after surgery. Based on their results, the authors found that the modern operative technics by Heald, used in the second period of the study, was a relevant factor decreasing LR from 15% to 6.4%, while the gender, age of the patients, ratio of the abdominoperineal extirpation versus anterior resection (APRE/AR) and the free margin of more than 3 cm proved to be irrelevant.

  10. Nanocytology of rectal colonocytes to assess risk of colon cancer based on field cancerization.

    PubMed

    Damania, Dhwanil; Roy, Hemant K; Subramanian, Hariharan; Weinberg, David S; Rex, Douglas K; Goldberg, Michael J; Muldoon, Joseph; Cherkezyan, Lusik; Zhu, Yuanjia; Bianchi, Laura K; Shah, Dhiren; Pradhan, Prabhakar; Borkar, Monica; Lynch, Henry; Backman, Vadim

    2012-06-01

    Developing a minimally invasive and cost-effective prescreening strategy for colon cancer is critical because of the impossibility of conducting colonoscopy on the entire at-risk population. The concept of field carcinogenesis, in which normal-appearing tissue away from a tumor has molecular and, consequently, nano-architectural abnormalities, offers one attractive approach to identify high-risk patients. In this study, we investigated whether the novel imaging technique partial wave spectroscopic (PWS) microscopy could risk-stratify patients harboring precancerous lesions of the colon, using an optically measured biomarker (L(d)) obtained from microscopically normal but nanoscopically altered cells. Rectal epithelial cells were examined from 146 patients, including 72 control patients, 14 patients with diminutive adenomas, 20 patients with nondiminutive/nonadvanced adenomas, 15 patients with advanced adenomas/high-grade dysplasia, 12 patients with genetic mutation leading to Lynch syndrome, and 13 patients with cancer. We found that the L(d) obtained from rectal colonocytes was well correlated with colon tumorigenicity in our patient cohort and in an independent validation set of 39 additional patients. Therefore, our findings suggest that PWS-measured L(d) is an accurate marker of field carcinogenesis. This approach provides a potential prescreening strategy for risk stratification before colonoscopy.

  11. Comparison of laparoscopic vs. open surgery for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zihai; Wang, Zheng; Huang, Shijie; Zhong, Shizhen; Lin, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the safety of laparoscopic radical resection for rectal cancer. A total of 64 cases of rectal cancer patients undergoing radical surgery between January, 1998 and March, 2010 were collected. The patients were divided into the laparoscopic rectal surgery group (LS group, n=31) and the open surgery group (OS group, n=33). Operation time, postoperative recovery, complications and tumor-free survival rate were compared between the two groups. The inclusion criteria were as follows: Standard Karnofsky score >70 prior to surgery, definitive pathological diagnosis and complete clinical data. The exclusion criteria were concomitant tumors affecting survival. With the Dixon operation, the LS group had a longer operation time compared with the OS group (271.2±56.2 vs. 216.0±62.7 min, respectively; P=0.036), and an earlier time of oral intake (3.0±0.9 vs. 4.7±1.0 days, respectively; P=0.000). There were no significant differences between the LS and OS groups in terms of intraoperative blood loss, number of lymph nodes retrieved, duration of postoperative hyperthermia and hospitalization time (P>0.05). With the Miles operation, there were no obvious differences between the LS and OS groups regarding operation time, intraoperative blood loss, number of lymph nodes retrieved, time of oral intake, duration of postoperative hyperthermia and hospitalization time (P>0.05). Furthermore, there were no significant differences between the LS and OS groups with the Dixon or Miles operation in terms of 3-year tumor-free survival rate (P>0.05). Thus, laparoscopic surgery appears to be a safe and feasible option for the treatment of rectal cancer. PMID:28357087

  12. Clinical application of multimodality imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan Yang; Zhe, Hong

    2013-12-11

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of rectal cancer. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy are mainstay techniques of radiotherapy for rectal cancer. However, the success of these techniques is heavily reliant on accurate target delineation and treatment planning. Computed tomography simulation is a cornerstone of rectal cancer radiotherapy, but there are limitations, such as poor soft-tissue contrast between pelvic structures and partial volume effects. Magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography (PET) can overcome these limitations and provide additional information for rectal cancer treatment planning. PET can also reduce the interobserver variation in the definition of rectal tumor volume. However, there is a long way to go before these image modalities are routinely used in the clinical setting. This review summarizes the most promising studies on clinical applications of multimodality imaging in target delineation and treatment planning for rectal cancer radiotherapy.

  13. ¹H NMR-based metabolic profiling of human rectal cancer tissue

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rectal cancer is one of the most prevalent tumor types. Understanding the metabolic profile of rectal cancer is important for developing therapeutic approaches and molecular diagnosis. Methods Here, we report a metabonomics profiling of tissue samples on a large cohort of human rectal cancer subjects (n = 127) and normal controls (n = 43) using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) based metabonomics assay, which is a highly sensitive and non-destructive method for the biomarker identification in biological systems. Principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and orthogonal projection to latent structure with discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) were applied to analyze the 1H-NMR profiling data to identify the distinguishing metabolites of rectal cancer. Results Excellent separation was obtained and distinguishing metabolites were observed among the different stages of rectal cancer tissues (stage I = 35; stage II = 37; stage III = 37 and stage IV = 18) and normal controls. A total of 38 differential metabolites were identified, 16 of which were closely correlated with the stage of rectal cancer. The up-regulation of 10 metabolites, including lactate, threonine, acetate, glutathione, uracil, succinate, serine, formate, lysine and tyrosine, were detected in the cancer tissues. On the other hand, 6 metabolites, including myo-inositol, taurine, phosphocreatine, creatine, betaine and dimethylglycine were decreased in cancer tissues. These modified metabolites revealed disturbance of energy, amino acids, ketone body and choline metabolism, which may be correlated with the progression of human rectal cancer. Conclusion Our findings firstly identify the distinguishing metabolites in different stages of rectal cancer tissues, indicating possibility of the attribution of metabolites disturbance to the progression of rectal cancer. The altered metabolites may be as potential biomarkers, which would

  14. Neoadjuvant Long-Course Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer: Does Time to Surgery Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Panagiotopoulou, Ioanna G.; Parashar, Deepak; Qasem, Eyas; Mezher-Sikafi, Rasha; Parmar, Jitesh; Wells, Alan D.; Bajwa, Farrukh M.; Menon, Madhav; Jephcott, Catherine R.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to evaluate whether delaying surgery following long-course chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer correlates with pathologic complete response. Pre-operative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is standard practice in the UK for the management of locally advanced rectal cancer. Optimal timing of surgery following CRT is still not clearly defined. All patients with a diagnosis of rectal cancer who had undergone long-course CRT prior to surgery between January 2008 and December 2011 were included. Statistical analysis was performed using Stata 11. Fifty-nine patients received long-course CRT prior to surgery in the selected period. Twenty-seven percent (16/59) of patients showed a complete histopathologic response and 59.3% (35/59) of patients had tumor down-staging from radiologically-assessed node positive to histologically-proven node negative disease. There was no statistically significant delay to surgery after completion of CRT in the 16 patients with complete response (CR) compared with the rest of the group [IR: incomplete response; CR group median: 74.5 days (IQR: 70–87.5) and IR group median: 72 days (IQR: 57–83), P = 0.470]. Although no statistically significant predictors of either complete response or tumor nodal status down-staging were identified in logistic regression analyses, a trend toward complete response was seen with longer delay to surgery following completion of long-course CRT. PMID:26414816

  15. Neoadjuvant Long-Course Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer: Does Time to Surgery Matter?

    PubMed

    Panagiotopoulou, Ioanna G; Parashar, Deepak; Qasem, Eyas; Mezher-Sikafi, Rasha; Parmar, Jitesh; Wells, Alan D; Bajwa, Farrukh M; Menon, Madhav; Jephcott, Catherine R

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this paper was to evaluate whether delaying surgery following long-course chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer correlates with pathologic complete response. Pre-operative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is standard practice in the UK for the management of locally advanced rectal cancer. Optimal timing of surgery following CRT is still not clearly defined. All patients with a diagnosis of rectal cancer who had undergone long-course CRT prior to surgery between January 2008 and December 2011 were included. Statistical analysis was performed using Stata 11. Fifty-nine patients received long-course CRT prior to surgery in the selected period. Twenty-seven percent (16/59) of patients showed a complete histopathologic response and 59.3% (35/59) of patients had tumor down-staging from radiologically-assessed node positive to histologically-proven node negative disease. There was no statistically significant delay to surgery after completion of CRT in the 16 patients with complete response (CR) compared with the rest of the group [IR: incomplete response; CR group median: 74.5 days (IQR: 70-87.5) and IR group median: 72 days (IQR: 57-83), P = 0.470]. Although no statistically significant predictors of either complete response or tumor nodal status down-staging were identified in logistic regression analyses, a trend toward complete response was seen with longer delay to surgery following completion of long-course CRT.

  16. Clinical predictive circulating peptides in rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Crotti, Sara; Enzo, Maria Vittoria; Bedin, Chiara; Pucciarelli, Salvatore; Maretto, Isacco; Del Bianco, Paola; Traldi, Pietro; Tasciotti, Ennio; Ferrari, Mauro; Rizzolio, Flavio; Toffoli, Giuseppe; Giordano, Antonio; Nitti, Donato; Agostini, Marco

    2015-08-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is worldwide accepted as a standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Current standard of treatment includes administration of ionizing radiation for 45-50.4 Gy in 25-28 fractions associated with 5-fluorouracil administration during radiation therapy. Unfortunately, 40% of patients have a poor or absent response and novel predictive biomarkers are demanding. For the first time, we apply a novel peptidomic methodology and analysis in rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Circulating peptides (Molecular Weight <3 kDa) have been harvested from patients' plasma (n = 33) using nanoporous silica chip and analyzed by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time of Flight mass spectrometer. Peptides fingerprint has been compared between responders and non-responders. Random Forest classification selected three peptides at m/z 1082.552, 1098.537, and 1104.538 that were able to correctly discriminate between responders (n = 16) and non-responders (n = 17) before therapy (T0) providing an overall accuracy of 86% and an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.92. In conclusion, the nanoporous silica chip coupled to mass spectrometry method was found to be a realistic method for plasma-based peptide analysis and we provide the first list of predictive circulating biomarker peptides in rectal cancer patients underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy.

  17. Critical role of bevacizumab scheduling in combination with pre-surgical chemo-radiotherapy in MRI-defined high-risk locally advanced rectal cancer: results of the branch trial

    PubMed Central

    Avallone, Antonio; Pecori, Biagio; Bianco, Franco; Aloj, Luigi; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Romano, Carmela; Granata, Vincenza; Marone, Pietro; Leone, Alessandra; Botti, Gerardo; Petrillo, Antonella; Caracò, Corradina; Iaffaioli, Vincenzo R.; Muto, Paolo; Romano, Giovanni; Comella, Pasquale; Budillon, Alfredo; Delrio, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Background We have previously shown that an intensified preoperative regimen including oxaliplatin plus raltitrexed and 5-fluorouracil/folinic acid (OXATOM/FUFA) during preoperative pelvic radiotherapy produced promising results in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Preclinical evidence suggests that the scheduling of bevacizumab may be crucial to optimize its combination with chemo-radiotherapy. Patients and methods This non-randomized, non-comparative, phase II study was conducted in MRI-defined high-risk LARC. Patients received three biweekly cycles of OXATOM/FUFA during RT. Bevacizumab was given 2 weeks before the start of chemo-radiotherapy, and on the same day of chemotherapy for 3 cycles (concomitant-schedule A) or 4 days prior to the first and second cycle of chemotherapy (sequential-schedule B). Primary end point was pathological complete tumor regression (TRG1) rate. Results The accrual for the concomitant-schedule was early terminated because the number of TRG1 (2 out of 16 patients) was statistically inconsistent with the hypothesis of activity (30%) to be tested. Conversely, the endpoint was reached with the sequential-schedule and the final TRG1 rate among 46 enrolled patients was 50% (95% CI 35%–65%). Neutropenia was the most common grade ≥3 toxicity with both schedules, but it was less pronounced with the sequential than concomitant-schedule (30% vs. 44%). Postoperative complications occurred in 8/15 (53%) and 13/46 (28%) patients in schedule A and B, respectively. At 5 year follow-up the probability of PFS and OS was 80% (95%CI, 66%–89%) and 85% (95%CI, 69%–93%), respectively, for the sequential-schedule. Conclusions These results highlights the relevance of bevacizumab scheduling to optimize its combination with preoperative chemo-radiotherapy in the management of LARC. PMID:26320185

  18. Infusional 5-Fluorouracil and ZD1839 (Gefitinib-Iressa) in Combination With Preoperative Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Phase I and II Trial (1839IL/0092)

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, Vincenzo; De Paoli, Antonino; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta Mantini, Giovanna; Ratto, Carlo; Vecchio, Fabio Maria; Barbaro, Brunella; Innocente, Roberto; Rossi, Carlo; Boz, Giovanni; Barba, Maria Cristina; Frattegiani, Alessandro; Lupattelli, Marco; Doglietto, Giovan Battista

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To report the final data of a Phase I and II study (1839IL/0092) on the combination of an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor drug (gefitinib), infusional 5-fluorouracil, and preoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients received 45 Gy in the posterior pelvis plus a boost of 5.4 Gy on the tumor and corresponding mesorectum. Infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and gefitinib (250 and 500 mg/day) were delivered during all radiotherapy course. An IORT boost of 10 Gy was allowed. The main endpoints of the study were to establish dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and to evaluate the rate of pathologic response according to the tumor regression grade (TRG) Mandard score. Results: A total of 41 patients were enrolled. The DLT was not reached in the 6 patients enrolled in the dose-escalation part of the study. Of the 33 patients in the Phase II, TRG 1 was recorded in 10 patients (30.3%) and TRG 2 in 7 patients (21.2 %); overall 17 of 33 patients (51.5%) had a favorable endpoint. Overall, Grade 3+ toxicity was recorded in 16 patients (41%); these included Grade 3+ gastrointestinal toxicity in 8 patients (20.5%), Grade 3+ skin toxicity in 6 (15.3%), and Grade 3+ genitourinary toxicity in 4 (10.2%). A dose reduction of gefitinib was necessary in 24 patients (61.5%). Conclusions: Gefitinib can be associated with 5-FU-based preoperative chemoradiation at the dose of 500 mg without any life-threatening toxicity and with a high pCR (30.3%). The relevant rate of Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity suggests that 250 mg would be more tolerable dose in a neaoadjuvant approach with radiotherapy and infusional 5-FU.

  19. Watch and wait approach to rectal cancer: A review.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Marcos E; Fang, Sandy H

    2015-11-27

    In 2014, there were an estimated 136800 new cases of colorectal cancer, making it the most common gastrointestinal malignancy. It is the second leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States and over one-third of newly diagnosed patients have stage III (node-positive) disease. For stage II and III colorectal cancer patients, the mainstay of curative therapy is neoadjuvant therapy, followed by radical surgical resection of the rectum. However, the consequences of a proctectomy, either by low anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection, can lead to very extensive comorbidities, such as the need for a permanent colostomy, fecal incontinence, sexual and urinary dysfunction, and even mortality. Recently, trends of complete regression of the rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy have been confirmed by clinical and radiographic evaluation-this is known as complete clinical response (cCR). The "watch and wait" approach was first proposed by Dr. Angelita Habr-Gama in Brazil in 2009. Those patients with cCR are followed with close surveillance physical examinations, endoscopy, and imaging. Here, we review management of rectal cancer, the development of the "watch and wait" approach and its outcomes.

  20. Protocol for a multicentre randomised feasibility trial evaluating early Surgery Alone In LOw Rectal cancer (SAILOR)

    PubMed Central

    Thorne, Kymberley; Hutchings, Hayley; Islam, Saiful; Holland, Gail; Hatcher, Olivia; Gwynne, Sarah; Jenkins, Ian; Coyne, Peter; Duff, Michael; Feldman, Melanie; Winter, Des C; Gollins, Simon; Quirke, Phil; West, Nick; Brown, Gina; Fitzsimmons, Deborah; Brown, Alan; Beynon, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There are 11 500 rectal cancers diagnosed annually in the UK. Although surgery remains the primary treatment, there is evidence that preoperative radiotherapy (RT) improves local recurrence rates. High-quality surgery in rectal cancer is equally important in minimising local recurrence. Advances in MRI-guided prediction of resection margin status and improvements in abdominoperineal excision of the rectum (APER) technique supports a reassessment of the contribution of preoperative RT. A more selective approach to RT may be appropriate given the associated toxicity. Methods and analysis This trial will explore the feasibility of a definitive trial evaluating the omission of RT in resectable low rectal cancer requiring APER. It will test the feasibility of randomising patients to (1) standard care (neoadjuvant long course RT±chemotherapy and APER, or (2) APER surgery alone for cT2/T3ab N0/1 low rectal cancer with clear predicted resection margins on MRI. RT schedule will be 45 Gy over 5 weeks as current standard, with restaging and surgery after 8–12 weeks. Recruitment will be for 24 months with a minimum 12-month follow-up. Objectives Objectives include testing the ability to recruit, consent and retain patients, to quantify the number of patients eligible for a definitive trial and to test feasibility of outcomes measures. These include locoregional recurrence rates, distance to circumferential resection margin, toxicity and surgical complications including perineal wound healing, quality of life and economic analysis. The quality of MRI staging, RT delivery and surgical specimen quality will be closely monitored. Ethics and dissemination The trial is approved by the Regional Ethics Committee and Health Research Authority (HRA) or equivalent. Written informed consent will be obtained. Serious adverse events will be reported to Swansea Trials Unit (STU), the ethics committee and trial sites. Trial results will be submitted for peer review

  1. VNN1 overexpression is associated with poor response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy and adverse prognosis in patients with rectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Chi-Yung; Zhang, Yimin; Song, Junlong; Lin, Shih-Chun; Sun, Shengrong; Chang, I-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Colorectal cancer is prevalent worldwide and it is also the fourth most common cause of cancer mortality. For rectal cancer, neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) followed by radical proctectomy is gold standard treatment for patients with stage II/III rectal cancer. By data mining a public dataset of rectal cancer transcriptome (GSE35452) from Gene Expression Omnibus, National Center of Biotechnology Information (GEO, NCBI), we identified that VNN1 was the most significantly upregulated gene among those related to nitrogen compound metabolic process (GO:0006807). Therefore, we analyzed the clinicopathological correlation and prognostic impact of VNN1 protein (pantetheinase), which encoded by VNN1 gene. Methods: VNN1 immunostaining was performed in 172 rectal adenocarcinomas treated with preoperative CCRT followed by surgery, which were bisected into high- and low-expression subgroups. Furthermore, statistical analyses were performed to correlate the relationship between VNN1 immunoreactivity and clinicopathological features, as well as three survival indices: disease-specific survival (DSS), local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) and metastasis-free survival (MeFS). Results: High VNN1 immunoexpression was significantly associated with advanced pre-treatment and post-treatment disease and poor response to CCRT (all P ≤ .026). In addition, VNN1 overexpression was linked to adverse DSS, LRFS and MeFS in univariate analysis and served as an independent prognosticator indicating worse DSS and LRFS in multivariate analysis (all P ≤ .019). Conclusion: VNN1 may play a crucial role in rectal cancer progression and responsiveness to CCRT, and serve as a novel prognostic biomarker. Additional studies to clarify the molecular pathway are essential for developing potential VNN1-targeted therapies for rectal cancer. PMID:27830030

  2. The use of capecitabine in the combined-modality therapy for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Liauw, Stanley L; Minsky, Bruce D

    2008-03-01

    Locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma is treated by combined-modality therapy, which consists of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. A series of randomized trials established a preferred treatment sequence of preoperative radiation therapy and 5-fluorouracil(5-FU)-based chemotherapy, total mesorectal excision, and adjuvant 5-FU-based chemotherapy for patients with stage II/III disease. Capecitabine is an oral prodrug of 5-FU that has potential advantages compared with intravenous 5-FU, including ease of administration and potentially increased therapeutic effect. Capecitabine is converted by a 3-step enzymatic process; the last step involves the enzyme thymidine phosphorylase, which is overexpressed in tumor tissues and is stimulated by concurrent radiation therapy. Over the past 5 years, several phase I/II trials of capecitabine-based therapy were reported. This review discusses the evolution of combined-modality therapy for rectal cancer with specific attention given to the use of capecitabine in conjunction with radiation therapy.

  3. 17-Week Delay Surgery after Chemoradiation in Rectal Cancer with Complete Pathological Response

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Marisa D.; Gomes, Manuel T.; Moreno, Filipa; Rocha, Anabela; Lopes, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) followed by curative surgery still remains the standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). The main purpose of this multimodal treatment is to achieve a complete pathological tumor response (ypCR), with better survival. The surgery delay after CRT completion seems to increase tumor response and ypCR rate. Usually, time intervals range from 8 to 12 weeks, but the maximum tumor regression may not be seen in rectal adenocarcinomas until several months after CRT. About this issue, we report a case of a 52-year-old man with LARC treated with neoadjuvant CRT who developed, one month after RT completion, an acute myocardial infarction. The need to increase the interval between CRT and surgery for 17 weeks allowed a curative surgery without morbidity and an unexpected complete tumor response in the resected specimen (given the parameters presented in pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed 11 weeks after radiotherapy completion). PMID:26579325

  4. Clinical impact of HLA class I expression in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Speetjens, Frank M.; de Bruin, Elza C.; Morreau, Hans; Zeestraten, Eliane C. M.; Putter, Hein; van Krieken, J. Han; van Buren, Maaike M.; van Velzen, Monique; Dekker-Ensink, N. Geeske; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To determine the clinical impact of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I expression in irradiated and non-irradiated rectal carcinomas. Experimental design Tumor samples in tissue micro array format were collected from 1,135 patients. HLA class I expression was assessed after immunohistochemical staining with two antibodies (HCA2 and HC10). Results Tumors were split into two groups: (1) tumors with >50% of tumor cells expressing HLA class I (high) and (2) tumors with ≤50% of tumor cells expressing HLA class I (low). No difference in distribution or prognosis of HLA class I expression was found between irradiated and non-irradiated patients. Patients with low expression of HLA class I (15% of all patients) showed an independent significantly worse prognosis with regard to overall survival and disease-free survival. HLA class I expression had no effect on cancer-specific survival or recurrence-free survival. Conclusions Down-regulation of HLA class I in rectal cancer is associated with poor prognosis. In contrast to our results, previous reports on HLA class I expression in colorectal cancer described a large population of patients with HLA class I negative tumors, having a good prognosis. This difference might be explained by the fact that a large proportion of HLA negative colon tumors are microsatellite instable (MSI). MSI tumors are associated with a better prognosis than microsatellite stable (MSS). As rectal tumors are mainly MSS, our results suggest that it is both, oncogenic pathway and HLA class I expression, that dictates patient’s prognosis in colorectal cancer. Therefore, to prevent confounding in future prognostic analysis on the impact of HLA expression in colorectal tumors, separate analysis of MSI and MSS tumors should be performed. PMID:17874100

  5. Molecular Markers Predict Distant Metastases After Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jun Won; Kim, Yong Bae; Choi, Jun Jeong; Koom, Woong Sub; Kim, Hoguen; Kim, Nam-Kyu; Ahn, Joong Bae; Lee, Ikjae; Cho, Jae Ho; Keum, Ki Chang

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The outcomes of adjuvant chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer are nonuniform among patients with matching prognostic factors. We explored the role of molecular markers for predicting the outcome of adjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The study included 68 patients with stages II to III rectal adenocarcinoma who were treated with total mesorectal excision and adjuvant chemoradiation. Chemotherapy based on 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin was intravenously administered each month for 6-12 cycles. Radiation therapy consisted of 54 Gy delivered in 30 fractions. Immunostaining of surgical specimens for COX-2, EGFR, VEGF, thymidine synthase (TS), and Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) was performed. Results: The median follow-up was 65 months. Eight locoregional (11.8%) and 13 distant (19.1%) recurrences occurred. Five-year locoregional failure-free survival (LRFFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) rates for all patients were 83.9%, 78.7%, 66.7%, and 73.8%, respectively. LRFFS was not correlated with TNM stage, surgical margin, or any of the molecular markers. VEGF overexpression was significantly correlated with decreased DMFS (P=.045), while RKIP-positive results were correlated with increased DMFS (P=.025). In multivariate analyses, positive findings for COX-2 (COX-2+) and VEGF (VEGF+) and negative findings for RKIP (RKIP-) were independent prognostic factors for DMFS, DFS, and OS (P=.035, .014, and .007 for DMFS; .021, .010, and <.0001 for DFS; and .004, .012, and .001 for OS). The combination of both COX-2+ and VEGF+ (COX-2+/VEGF+) showed a strong correlation with decreased DFS (P=.007), and the combinations of RKIP+/COX-2- and RKIP+/VEGF- showed strong correlations with improved DFS compared with the rest of the patients (P=.001 and <.0001, respectively). Conclusions: Molecular markers can be valuable in predicting treatment outcome of adjuvant

  6. Prognostic significance of survivin in rectal cancer patients treated with surgery and postoperative concurrent chemo-radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Il Yu, Jeong; Lee, Hyebin; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho; Choi, Yoon-La; Do, In-Gu; Kim, Hee Cheol; Lee, Woo Yong; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Cho, Yong Beom; Huh, Jung Wook; Park, Yoon Ah; Park, Young Suk; Park, Joon Oh; Kim, Seung Tae; Park, Won

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims This study is designed to investigate the expression of survivin and p53 in human rectal cancer tissues and analyze associations between expression and clinical outcomes in terms of disease recurrence and survival duration. Results During follow-up (median 119.0, range 6.6 to 161.3 months), tumor recurrence was detected in 50 patients (43.1%), and local recurrence developed as a first failure site in 13 patients (11.2%). Positive immunostaining of nuclear and cytoplasmic survivin was observed in about one quarter of patients, and about half of all patients had positive staining for p53. Both survivin and p53 were significant prognostic factors of disease-free survival in the univariate analyses, but only survivin remained a significant prognostic factor in the multivariate analysis. Methods We performed a retrospective study with 116 locally advanced rectal cancer patients who underwent total mesorectal excision (TME) followed by postoperative concurrent chemo-radiation therapy (CCRT). Immunohistochemical staining was conducted using antibodies for survivin or p53, and their expression was analyzed using an individual score that combined the percentage of positive cells and staining intensity. Conclusions Overexpression of nuclear and cytoplasmic survivin in locally advanced rectal cancer patients was associated with a higher recurrence rate in rectal cancer patients treated with TME followed by postoperative CCRT. PMID:27391438

  7. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Thigh Secondary to Radiation Colitis in a Rectal Cancer Patient

    PubMed Central

    Park, So Hyun; Choi, Jung Ran; Song, Ji Young; Kang, Kyu Keun; Yoo, Woong Sun; Han, Sung Wan

    2012-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis usually occurs after dermal injury or through hematogenous spread. To date, few cases have been reported as necrotizing fasciitis of the thigh secondary to rectal perforation in rectal cancer patients. A 66-year-old male complained of pelvic and thigh pain and subsequently developed necrotizing fasciitis in his right thigh. Four years earlier, he had undergone a low anterior resection and radiotherapy due to of rectal cancer. An ulcerative lesion had been observed around the anastomosis site during the colonoscopy that had been performed two months earlier. Pelvic computed tomography and sigmoidoscopy showed rectal perforation and presacral abscess extending to buttock and the right posterior thigh fascia. Thus, the necrotizing fasciitis was believed to have occurred because of ulcer perforation, one of the complications of chronic radiation colitis, at the anastomosis site. When a rectal-cancer patient complains of pelvic and thigh pain, the possibility of a rectal perforation should be considered. PMID:23346513

  8. Robotic-Laparoscopic Rectal Cancer Excision Versus Traditional Laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Michael S.; Abbass, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Robotic surgery has been advocated for the radical excision of rectal cancer. Most data supporting its use have been reported from European and Asian centers, with a paucity of data from the United States documenting clear advantages of the robotic technique. This study compares the short-term outcome of robotic versus laparoscopic surgery. Methods: Consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic (group 1) or robotic (group 2) rectal cancer excision at a single institution over a 2-year period were retrospectively reviewed. The main outcome measures were operative time, blood loss, conversion rates, number of lymph nodes, margin positivity, length of hospital stay, complications, and readmission rates. Results: Forty-two patients were analyzed. The median operative time was shorter in group 1 than that in group 2 (240 minutes vs 260 minutes, P = .04). No difference was noted in blood loss, transfusion rates, intraoperative complications, or conversion rates. There was no difference in circumferential or distal margin positivity. The median length of stay was shorter in group 1 (5 days vs 6 days, P = .05). The 90-day complication rate was similar in both groups (33% vs 43%, P = .75), but there was a trend toward more anastomotic leaks in group 1 (14% vs 0%, P = .23). Similarly, a non–statistically significant trend toward a higher readmission rate was noted in group 1 (24% vs 5%, P = .18). Conclusion: Robotic rectal cancer excision yielded a longer operative time and hospital length of stay, although immediate oncologic results were comparable. The need for randomized data is critical to determine whether the added resource utilization in robotic surgery is justifiable. PMID:25392653

  9. Patient factors may predict anastomotic complications after rectal cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Dana M.; Mora Pinzon, Maria C.; Francescatti, Amanda B.; Saclarides, Theodore J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Anastomotic complications following rectal cancer surgery occur with varying frequency. Preoperative radiation, BMI, and low anastomoses have been implicated as predictors in previous studies, but their definitive role is still under review. The objective of our study was to identify patient and operative factors that may be predictive of anastomotic complications. Methods A retrospective review was performed on patients who had sphincter-preservation surgery performed for rectal cancer at a tertiary medical center between 2005 and 2011. Results 123 patients were included in this study, mean age was 59 (26–86), 58% were male. There were 33 complications in 32 patients (27%). Stenosis was the most frequent complication (24 of 33). 11 patients required mechanical dilatation, and 4 had operative revision of the anastomosis. Leak or pelvic abscess were present in 9 patients (7.3%); 4 were explored, 2 were drained and 3 were managed conservatively. 4 patients had permanent colostomy created due to anastomotic complications. Laparoscopy approach, BMI, age, smoking and tumor distance from anal verge were not significantly associated with anastomotic complications. After a multivariate analysis chemoradiation was significantly associated with overall anastomotic complications (Wall = 0.35, p = 0.05), and hemoglobin levels were associated with anastomotic leak (Wald = 4.09, p = 0.04). Conclusion Our study identifies preoperative anemia as possible risk factor for anastomotic leak and neoadjuvant chemoradiation may lead to increased risk of complications overall. Further prospective studies will help to elucidate these findings as well as identify amenable factors that may decrease risk of anastomotic complications after rectal cancer surgery. PMID:25685338

  10. [Secondary retroperitoneal fibrosis in a 39-year-old man after rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Jarosch, A; Tiller, M; Rohrbach, H; Leimbach, T; Schepp, W

    2016-05-01

    A 39-year-old man had been treated for rectal cancer 6 years ago by lower anterior resection of the rectum and perioperative radiochemotherapy. Since then follow-up had been unremarkable but now the patient presented with unspecific lower abdominal pain. The cause of the pain was identified as paraneoplastic retroperitoneal fibrosis secondary to metachronous pulmonary metastases of the rectal cancer.

  11. Oxaliplatin-based combined-modality therapy for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2003-08-01

    There are two conventional treatments for clinically resectable rectal cancer. The first is surgery, and, if the tumor is T3 and/or N1-2, this is followed by postoperative combined-modality therapy. The second, for patients with ultrasound T3 or clinical T4 disease, is preoperative combined-modality therapy followed by surgery and postoperative chemotherapy. In this review, the results of these approaches as well as novel combined-modality approaches using oxaliplatin-based regimens will be presented.

  12. Radiation plus chemotherapy as adjuvant therapy for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2002-04-01

    The most common neo-adjuvant therapy for rectal cancer is chemotherapy and concurrent radiation therapy. In general, it is delivered pre-operatively for patients with clinical evidence of T(3-4) disease or post-operatively in patients who have undergone surgery and have T(3) and/or N(1-2) disease. This chapter reviews the rationale and results for neo-adjuvant therapy, the selection process for pre-operative versus post-operative treatment, and new approaches and controversies.

  13. Rectal metastasis from Breast cancer: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Cho Ee; Wright, Lucie; Pieri, Andrew; Belhasan, Anas; Fasih, Tarannum

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer metastases occurs in around 50% of all presentation. It is the second most common type of cancer to metastasise to the GI tract but this only occurs in less than 1% of cases. Presentation of case We report a case that underwent treatment for invasive lobular cancer (ILC) of the breast and 5 years later was found to have rectal and peritoneal metastasis. She is currently receiving palliative management including chemotherapy in the form of weekly Paclitaxel (Taxol®) and stenting to relieve obstruction. Conclusion There should be high clinical suspicion of bowel metastasis in patients presenting with positive faecal occult blood with or without bowel symptoms even if the incidence is less <1% of metastases, particularly in cases where the initial breast tumour was large, with positive axillary nodes. PMID:26188979

  14. Local excision for early rectal cancer: transanal endoscopic microsurgery and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Althumairi, Azah A.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of treatment for early stage rectal cancer is to optimize oncologic control while minimizing the long-term impact of treatment on quality of life. The standard of care treatment for most stage I and II rectal cancers is radical surgery alone, specifically total mesorectal excision (TME). For early rectal cancers, this procedure is usually curative but can have a substantial impact on quality of life, including the possibility of permanent colostomy and the potential for short and long-term bowel, bladder, and sexual dysfunction. Given the morbidity associated with radical surgery, alternative approaches to management of early rectal cancer have been explored, including local excision (LE) via transanal excision (TAE) or transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) and transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS). Compared to the gold standard of radical surgery, local procedures for strictly selected early rectal cancers should lead to identical oncological results and even better outcomes regarding morbidity, mortality, and quality of life. PMID:26029457

  15. Neoadjuvant treatment for rectal cancer-A value-based proposition.

    PubMed

    Massarweh, Nader N; Artinyan, Avo; Chang, George J

    2016-09-01

    Over the last decade, the use of neoadjuvant chemo-radiation has been an integral part of the care of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. However, emerging data are beginning to challenge the current treatment paradigm of neoadjuvant chemo-radiation followed by radical resection and subsequent adjuvant chemotherapy. Going forward, the challenge will be to identify patients for whom radiation can be safely omitted and those for whom it can potentially provide added oncologic value. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;114:304-310. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Formulation and delivery of anti-HIV rectal microbicides: advances and challenges.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Rute; Sarmento, Bruno; das Neves, José

    2014-11-28

    Men and women engaged in unprotected receptive anal intercourse (RAI) are at higher risk of acquiring HIV from infected partners. The implementation of preventive strategies is urgent and rectal microbicides may be a useful tool in reducing the sexual transmission of HIV. However, pre-clinical and first clinical trials have been able to identify limitations of candidate products, mostly related with safety issues, which can in turn enhance viral infection. Indeed, the development of suitable formulations for the rectal delivery of promising antiretroviral drugs is not an easy task, and has been mostly based on products specifically intended for vaginal delivery, but these have been shown to provide sub-optimal outcomes when administered rectally. Research and development in the rectal microbicide field are now charting their own path and important information is now available. In particular, specific formulation requirements of rectal microbicide products that need to be met have just recently been acknowledged despite additional work being still required. Desirable rectal microbicide product features regarding characteristics such as pH, osmolality, excipients, dosage forms, volume to be administered and the need for applicator use have been studied and defined in recent years, and specific guidance is now possible. This review provides a synopsis of the field of rectal microbicides, namely past and ongoing clinical studies, and details on formulation and drug delivery issues regarding the specific development of rectal microbicide products. Also, future work, as required for the advancement of the field, is discussed.

  17. Defining the distal margin of rectal cancer for surgical planning

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Takashi; Tanaka, Jun-Ichi

    2017-01-01

    Accurate measurement of the distal rectal tumor margin is essential in selecting the appropriate surgical procedure. However, there is no standard measurement method. The National Cancer Institute consensus group recommends use of the anal verge (AV) as a landmark, and the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology recommends use of the anorectal ring (ARR). In addition, whether measurements should be made on double contrast barium enema (BE) radiographs or magnetic resonance (MR) images remains controversial. We measured the distal tumor margin on both BE and MR images obtained preoperatively from 52 patients who underwent sphincter-saving resection for rectal cancer. The distances from the distal end of the tumor to the AV and the ARR were measured on both types of images, and the variability was investigated by Bland-Altman analysis. The mean distance from the tumor to the AV was 8.9 cm on the BE radiographs and 7.7 cm on the MR images (P=0.013). The mean distances to the ARR were 6.8 and 5.6 cm, respectively (P=0.070). Significant proportional bias was shown as the measured distances increased, the difference between the BE- and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based measurements increased. Use of one or the other landmark did not affect selection of the appropriate surgical procedure. We conclude that an approximate 1-cm underestimation should be taken into account when MRI-based measurement of the distal rectal tumor margin is used to choose between sphincter-saving resection and abdominoperineal resection. PMID:28280625

  18. Presacral venous bleeding during mobilization in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Casal Núñez, Jose Enrique; Vigorita, Vincenzo; Ruano Poblador, Alejandro; Gay Fernández, Ana María; Toscano Novella, Maria Ángeles; Cáceres Alvarado, Nieves; Pérez Dominguez, Lucinda

    2017-01-01

    AIM To analyze the anatomy of sacral venous plexus flow, the causes of injuries and the methods for controlling presacral hemorrhage during surgery for rectal cancer. METHODS A review of the databases MEDLINE® and Embase™ was conducted, and relevant scientific articles published between January 1960 and June 2016 were examined. The anatomy of the sacrum and its venous plexus, as well as the factors that influence bleeding, the causes of this complication, and its surgical management were defined. RESULTS This is a review of 58 published articles on presacral venous plexus injury during the mobilization of the rectum and on techniques used to treat presacral venous bleeding. Due to the lack of cases published in the literature, there is no consensus on which is the best technique to use if there is presacral bleeding during mobilization in surgery for rectal cancer. This review may provide a tool to help surgeons make decisions regarding how to resolve this serious complication. CONCLUSION A series of alternative treatments are described; however, a conventional systematic review in which optimal treatment is identified could not be performed because few cases were analyzed in most publications. PMID:28321171

  19. Pilot Study of a Clinical Pathway Implementation in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Uña, Esther; López-Lara, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Background: Rectal cancer is a highly prevalent disease which needs a multidisciplinary approach to be treated. The absence of specific protocols implies a significant and unjustifiable variability among the different professionals involved in this disease. The purpose is to develop a clinical pathway based on the analysis process and aims to reduce this variability and to reduce unnecessary costs. Methods: We created a multidisciplinary team with contributors from every clinical area involved in the diagnosis and treatment in this disease. We held periodic meetings to agree on a protocol based on the best available clinical practice guidelines. Once we had agreed on the protocol, we implemented its use as a standard in our institution. Every patient older than 18 years who was diagnosed with rectal cancer was considered a candidate to be treated via the pathway. Results: We evaluated 48 patients during the course of this study. Every parameter measured was improved after the implementation of the pathway, except the proportion of patients with 12 nodes or more analysed. The perception that our patients had about this project was very good. Conclusions: Clinical pathways are needed to improve the quality of health care. This kind of project helps reduce hospital costs and optimizes the use of limited resources. On the other hand, unexplained variability is also reduced, with consequent benefits for the patients. PMID:21151842

  20. An integrative approach for the identification of prognostic and predictive biomarkers in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Agostini, Marco; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Kim, ll-Jin; D'Angelo, Edoardo; Pizzini, Silvia; Zangrando, Andrea; Zanon, Carlo; Pastrello, Chiara; Maretto, Isacco; Digito, Maura; Bedin, Chiara; Jurisica, Igor; Rizzolio, Flavio; Giordano, Antonio; Bortoluzzi, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the world, a small fraction of which is represented by locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). If not medically contraindicated, preoperative chemoradiotherapy, represent the standard of care for LARC patients. Unfortunately, patients shows a wide range of response rates in which approximately 20% has a complete pathological response, whereas in 20 to 40% the response is poor or absent. Results The following specific gene signature, able to discriminate responders' patients from non-responders, were founded: AKR1C3, CXCL11, CXCL10, IDO1, CXCL9, MMP12 and HLA-DRA. These genes are mainly involved in immune system pathways and interact with drugs traditionally used in the adjuvant treatment of rectal cancer. Discussion The present study suggests that new ideas for therapy could be found not only limited to studying genes differentially expressed between the two groups of patients but deepening the mechanisms, associated to response, in which they are involved. Methods Gene expression studies performed by: Agostini et al., Rimkus et al. and Kim et al. have been merged through a meta-analysis of the raw data. Gene expression data-sets have been processed using A-MADMAN. Common differentially expressed gene (DEG) were identified through SAM analysis. To further characterize the identified DEG we deeply investigated its biological role using an integrative computational biology approach. PMID:26359356

  1. Management of Rectal Cancer: Short- vs. Long-Course Preoperative Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mohiuddin, Mohammed Marks, John; Marks, Gerald

    2008-11-01

    There is considerable debate on the optimum approach to neoadjuvant therapy in rectal cancer. This review of major published studies of short-course preoperative radiation and the more conventional approach of long-course neoadjuvant chemoradiation was undertaken in an effort to understand the potential advantages and disadvantages of each of these approaches. Studies were evaluated with regard to patient selection, clinical outcomes, and toxicities. Short-course preoperative radiation has shown a clear advantage over surgery alone in reducing local recurrence rates and improving survival of patients with rectal cancer. However, studies using short-course preoperative treatment have included a significant number of early (30%; Stage I/II) and more proximal cancers yet appear to have higher positive margin rates, higher abdominoperineal resection rates, and lower aggregate survival than patients treated with long-course neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Although long-course preoperative chemoradiation is associated with higher rates of reversible acute toxicity, there appears to be more significant and a higher rate of late gastrointestinal toxicity observed in short-course preoperative radiation studies. Patient convenience and lower cost of treatment, however, can be a significant advantage in using a short-course treatment schedule. Selective utilization of either of these approaches should be based on extent of disease and goals of treatment. Patients with distal cancers or more advanced disease (T3/T4) appear to have better outcomes with neoadjuvant chemoradiation, especially where downstaging of disease is critical for more complete surgical resection and sphincter preservation.

  2. Proteogenomic characterization of human colon and rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bing; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xiaojing; Zhu, Jing; Liu, Qi; Shi, Zhiao; Chambers, Matthew C.; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Shaddox, Kent F.; Kim, Sangtae; Davies, Sherri; Wang, Sean; Wang, Pei; Kinsinger, Christopher; Rivers, Robert; Rodriguez, Henry; Townsend, Reid; Ellis, Matthew; Carr, Steven A.; Tabb, David L.; Coffey, Robert J.; Slebos, Robbert; Liebler, Daniel

    2014-09-18

    We analyzed proteomes of colon and rectal tumors previously characterized by the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and performed integrated proteogenomic analyses. Protein sequence variants encoded by somatic genomic variations displayed reduced expression compared to protein variants encoded by germline variations. mRNA transcript abundance did not reliably predict protein expression differences between tumors. Proteomics identified five protein expression subtypes, two of which were associated with the TCGA "MSI/CIMP" transcriptional subtype, but had distinct mutation and methylation patterns and associated with different clinical outcomes. Although CNAs showed strong cis- and trans-effects on mRNA expression, relatively few of these extend to the protein level. Thus, proteomics data enabled prioritization of candidate driver genes. Our analyses identified HNF4A, a novel candidate driver gene in tumors with chromosome 20q amplifications. Integrated proteogenomic analysis provides functional context to interpret genomic abnormalities and affords novel insights into cancer biology.

  3. Rectal cancer and Fournier’s gangrene - current knowledge and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Bruketa, Tomislav; Majerovic, Matea; Augustin, Goran

    2015-01-01

    Fournier’s gangrene (FG) is a rapid progressive bacterial infection that involves the subcutaneous fascia and part of the deep fascia but spares the muscle in the scrotal, perianal and perineal region. The incidence has increased dramatically, while the reported incidence of rectal cancer-induced FG is unknown but is extremely low. Pathophysiology and clinical presentation of rectal cancer-induced FG per se does not differ from the other causes. Only rectal cancer-specific symptoms before presentation can lead to the diagnosis. The diagnosis of rectal cancer-induced FG should be excluded in every patient with blood on digital rectal examination, when urogenital and dermatological causes are excluded and when fever or sepsis of unknown origin is present with perianal symptomatology. Therapeutic options are more complex than for other forms of FG. First, the causative rectal tumor should be removed. The survival of patients with rectal cancer resection is reported as 100%, while with colostomy it is 80%. The preferred method of rectal resection has not been defined. Second, oncological treatment should be administered but the timing should be adjusted to the resolution of the FG and sometimes for the healing of plastic reconstructive procedures that are commonly needed for the reconstruction of large perineal, scrotal and lower abdominal wall defects. PMID:26290629

  4. Multivariate Analysis of Risk Factors Associated With the Nonreversal Ileostomy Following Sphincter-Preserving Surgery for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Ah; Lee, Gil Jae; Park, Sung Won; Lee, Won-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A loop ileostomy is used to protect an anastomosis after anal sphincter-preserving surgery, especially in patients with low rectal cancer, but little information is available concerning risk factors associated with a nonreversal ileostomy. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors of ileostomy nonreversibility after a sphincter-saving resection for rectal cancer. Methods Six hundred seventy-nine (679) patients with rectal cancer who underwent sphincter-preserving surgery between January 2004 and December 2011 were evaluated retrospectively. Of the 679, 135 (19.9%) underwent a defunctioning loop ileostomy of temporary intent, and these patients were divided into two groups, that is, a reversal group (RG, 112 patients) and a nonreversal group (NRG, 23 patients) according to the reversibility of the ileostomy. Results In 23 of the 135 rectal cancer patients (17.0%) that underwent a diverting ileostomy, stoma reversal was not possible for the following reasons; stage IV rectal cancer (11, 47.8%), poor tone of the anal sphincter (4, 17.4%), local recurrence (2, 8.7%), anastomotic leakage (1, 4.3%), radiation proctitis (1, 4.3%), and patient refusal (4, 17.4%). The independent risk factors of the nonreversal group were anastomotic leakage or fistula, stage IV cancer, local recurrence, and comorbidity. Conclusion Postoperative complications such as anastomotic leakage or fistula, advanced primary disease (stage IV), local recurrence and comorbidity were identified as risk factors of a nonreversal ileostomy. These factors should be considered when drafting prudential guidelines for ileostomy closure. PMID:26161377

  5. Update and Debate Issues in Surgical Treatment of Middle and Low Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Sung; AL-Asari, Sami F.

    2012-01-01

    Based on a review of the literature, this paper provides an update on surgical treatment of middle and low rectal cancer and discusses issues of debate surrounding that treatment. The main goal of the surgical treatment of rectal cancer is radical resection of the tumor and surrounding lymphatic tissue. Local excision of early rectal cancer can be another treatment option, in which the patient can avoid possible complications related to radical surgery. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) has been recommended for patients with cT3-4N0 or any T N+ rectal cancer because CRT shows better local control and less toxicity than adjuvant CRT. However, recent clinical trials showed promising results for local excision after neoadjuvant CRT in selected patients with low rectal cancer. In addition, the "wait and see" concept is another modality that has been reported for the management of tumors that show complete clinical remission after neoadjuvant CRT. Although radical surgery for middle and low rectal cancer is the cornerstone therapy, an ultralow anterior resection with or without intersphincteric resection (ISR) has become an alternative standard surgical method for selected patients. Many studies have reported on the oncological safety of the ISR, but few of them have addressed the issue the functional outcome. Furthermore, an abdominoperineal resection (APR) has problems with high rates of tumor perforations and positive circumferential resection margins, and those factors have contributed to its having a high rate of local recurrence and a poor survival rate for rectal cancer compared with sphincter-saving procedures. Recently, great efforts have been made to reduce these problems, and the total levator excision or the extended APR concept has emerged. Surgical management for low rectal cancer should aim to radically excise the tumor and to preserve as much of the sphincter function as possible by using multidisciplinary approaches. However, further prospective

  6. NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0822: A Phase 2 Study of Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy Using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Combination With Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Theodore S.; Moughan, Jennifer; Garofalo, Michael C.; Bendell, Johanna; Berger, Adam C.; Oldenburg, Nicklas B.E.; Anne, Pramila Rani; Perera, Francisco; Jabbour, Salma K.; Nowlan, Adam; DeNittis, Albert; Crane, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the rate of gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity of neoadjuvant chemoradiation with capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in cT3-4 rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with localized, nonmetastatic T3 or T4 rectal cancer <12 cm from the anal verge were enrolled in a prospective, multi-institutional, single-arm study of preoperative chemoradiation. Patients received 45 Gy with IMRT in 25 fractions, followed by a 3-dimensional conformal boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions with concurrent capecitabine/oxaliplatin (CAPOX). Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. Patients were recommended to receive FOLFOX chemotherapy after surgery. The primary endpoint of the study was acute grade 2 to 5 GI toxicity. Seventy-one patients provided 80% probability to detect at least a 12% reduction in the specified GI toxicity with the treatment of CAPOX and IMRT, at a significance level of .10 (1-sided). Results: Seventy-nine patients were accrued, of whom 68 were evaluable. Sixty-one patients (89.7%) had cT3 disease, and 37 (54.4%) had cN (+) disease. Postoperative chemotherapy was given to 42 of 68 patients. Fifty-eight patients had target contours drawn per protocol, 5 patients with acceptable variation, and 5 patients with unacceptable variations. Thirty-five patients (51.5%) experienced grade ≥2 GI toxicity, 12 patients (17.6%) experienced grade 3 or 4 diarrhea, and pCR was achieved in 10 patients (14.7%). With a median follow-up time of 3.98 years, the 4-year rate of locoregional failure was 7.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0%-13.7%). The 4-year rates of OS and DFS were 82.9% (95% CI: 70.1%-90.6%) and 60.6% (95% CI: 47.5%-71.4%), respectively. Conclusion: The use of IMRT in neoadjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer did not reduce the rate of GI toxicity.

  7. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0247: A Randomized Phase II Study of Neoadjuvant Capecitabine and Irinotecan or Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin With Concurrent Radiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Stuart J.; Winter, Kathryn; Meropol, Neal J.; Anne, Pramila Rani; Kachnic, Lisa; Rashid, Asif; Watson, James C.; Mitchell, Edith; Pollock, Jondavid; Lee, Robert Jeffrey; Haddock, Michael; Erickson, Beth A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the rate of pathologic complete response (pCR) and the toxicity of two neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (chemoRT) regimens for Stage T3-T4 rectal cancer in a randomized Phase II study. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage T3 or T4 rectal cancer of <12 cm from the anal verge were randomized to preoperative RT (50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (1,200 mg/m{sup 2}/d Mondays through Friday) and irinotecan (50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly in four doses) (Arm 1) or concurrent capecitabine (1,650 mg/m{sup 2}/d Monday through Friday) and oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly in five doses) (Arm 2). Surgery was performed 4-8 weeks after chemoRT, and adjuvant chemotherapy 4-6 weeks after surgery. The primary endpoint was the pCR rate, requiring 48 evaluable patients per arm. Results: A total of 146 patients were enrolled. The protocol chemotherapy was modified because of excessive gastrointestinal toxicity after treatment of 35 patients; 96 were assessed for the primary endpoint-the final regimen described above. The patient characteristics were similar for both arms. After chemoRT, the rate of tumor downstaging was 52% and 60% and the rate of nodal downstaging (excluding N0 patients) was 46% and 40%, for Arms 1 and 2, respectively. The pCR rate for Arm 1 was 10% and for Arm 2 was 21%. For Arm 1 and 2, the preoperative chemoRT rate of Grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity was 9% and 4% and the rate of Grade 3-4 nonhematologic toxicity was 26% and 27%, respectively. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoRT with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin for distal rectal cancer has significant clinical activity (10 of 48 pCRs) and acceptable toxicity. This regimen is currently being evaluated in a Phase III randomized trial (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project R04).

  8. SU5416 and Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  9. Combination Chemotherapy and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Metastatic, or Recurrent Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  10. Have the changes in treatment of rectal cancer made a significant difference to our patients?

    PubMed

    Benson, Al B; Guillem, José G; Minsky, Bruce D

    2011-12-01

    The treatment for patients with locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer has evolved over the years. Various combinations and sequences of chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and total mesorectal excision (TME)-based surgery are the mainstay of current therapy. Preoperative combined chemoradiation, followed by surgery, is now the preferred treatment strategy, with the majority of patients receiving either infusion fluorouracil (5-FU) or capecitabine (Xeloda) with radiation. Clinical trials with oxaliplatin (Eloxatin)-based neoadjuvant chemoradiation have not shown improvement in the pathologic complete response rate (pCR) compared with 5-FU; however, final data addressing local recurrence rates and disease-free survival are pending.The use of adjuvant chemotherapy following preoperative chemoradiation and surgery has not been optimally defined. Some studies have shown that patients who obtained significant pathologic downstaging after chemoradiation and surgery have improved survival with the use of adjuvant chemotherapy. Since FOLFOX (folinic acid, 5-FU, and oxaliplatin) is the preferred adjuvant chemotherapy regimen for stage III colon cancer based on randomized clinical trial results, FOLFOX is also recommended for rectal cancer patients as an adjuvant therapy approach.

  11. A Complete Response Case in a Patient with Multiple Lung Metastases of Rectal Cancer Treated with Bevacizumab plus XELIRI Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hashida, Hiroki; Satake, Hironaga; Kaihara, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    It has been reported that many patients with lung metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC) underwent chemotherapy with fluorouracil, folinic acid, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, or capecitabine. There is a small number of reports about the capecitabine and irinotecan (XELIRI) plus bevacizumab (BV) therapy for patients with metastatic CRC in Japan. We report a case of successful BV+XELIRI therapy for rectal cancer with multiple lung metastases as first-line chemotherapy. A 53-year-old female presented with advanced rectal cancer and metastatic lung tumors. Following surgery, the patient was treated with XELIRI+BV. After 6 courses, a computed tomography scan showed complete response of the lung metastases. No recurrence has occurred for 3 years after chemotherapy was stopped. PMID:28203168

  12. Chemoradiation for rectal cancer: rationale, approaches, and controversies.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2010-10-01

    The standard adjuvant treatment of cT3 and/or N+ rectal cancer is preoperative chemoradiation. However, there are many controversies regarding this approach. These controversies include the role of short course radiation, whether postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy is necessary for all patients, and if the type of surgery following chemoradiation should be based on the response rate. More accurate imaging techniques and/or molecular markers may help identify patients with positive pelvic nodes to reduce the chance of overtreatment with preoperative therapy. Will more effective systemic agents both improve the results of radiation, as well as modify the need for pelvic radiation? These questions and others remain active areas of clinical investigation.

  13. Irinotecan Compared With Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  14. [Experience with radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of unresectable pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Mátrai, Zoltán; Fehér, István; Péley, Gábor; Rényi Vámos, Ferenc; Farkas, Emil; Sulyok, Zoltán; Kovács, Tibor; Köves, István

    2005-02-01

    More than half of colorectal cancers are located in the rectum, and the number of such cancers is increasing. In Hungary colorectal cancers are diagnosed predominantly in advanced stages. In the last five years 736 patients with colorectal cancer were operated on at our Department, with the following stage distribution: Dukes A 10%, BI 10%, B2 31%, C 36% and D 13%. The local recurrence rate is decreasing since the introduction of total mesorectal excision and preoperative radiation. Effective treatment options are however poor for unresectable pelvic recurrences. Chemo- and radiotherapy have severe limitations in this advanced stage cancer. In recent years there are a few publications on the minimal-invasive radiofrequency tumour ablation (RFTA) technique, which is an effective treatment for primary and metastatic liver carcinomas and is a new palliative for the local treatment of pelvic recurrence. The aim of this study was to assess the response to treatment using ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation in two patients with unresectable pelvic recurrent rectal cancer.

  15. A novel approach to inoperable or recurrent rectal cancer by chemoembolization. A new arrow in our quiver?

    PubMed Central

    Bini, Roberto; Comelli, Simone; Leli, Renzo; Vaudano, Giacomo Paolo; Savio, Daniele; Viora, Tiziana; Addeo, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Assess the feasibility, safety and efficacy of TACE with irinotecan loaded micro particles (debiri) for the treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer patients. Results We assessed the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS). The tool is designed to assess nine common symptoms in cancer patients: pain, tiredness, nausea, depression, anxiety, drowsiness, appetite, wellbeing and shortness of breath. The ESAS score was 7 in 10/12 (83%) patients before treatment and 6 in 2/12 (16.5%) patients. After treatment in 6/12 (50%) patients the score dropped to 3; 3/12 (33%) reported 4, 1/12 (8%) reported 2. All patients experienced local control disease with a degree of citoreduction; in 4 cases (33%) we observed outstanding responses with a dramatic reduction in the tumors size which led us to surgical radical resections. Materials and methods We run a prospective mono-institutional study where we recruited, 12 non- consecutive patients with histology confirmation of rectal cancer, inoperable and not treatable due to severe comorbidities, or pelvic recurrence/progression after curative treatment, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and/or surgery. Their performance status (PS) ECOG was 2-3. Twelve patients (10 male and 2 female) with a median age 71 (range 56-89) were recruited in the study. Conclusions The study has met the primary endpoint and showed encouraging activity. Debiri could be a possible option for locally advanced/inoperable or recurred rectal cancer patients. Further trials are warranted to validate this methodic in early stages. PMID:27303924

  16. Matched case-control analysis comparing oncologic outcomes between preoperative and postoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byoung Chul; Park, In Ja; Kim, Chan Wook; Lim, Seok-Byung; Yu, Chang Sik

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate patterns of recurrence and oncologic outcomes after recurrence between preoperative and postoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods Records of patients with stage II or III locally advanced rectal cancer seen between January 2000 and December 2010 were analyzed. The outcomes for patients undergoing preoperative CRT followed by radical resection (n = 466) were compared with outcomes of patients matched for sex, age, and stage who had surgery and then postoperative CRT (n = 466). Recurrence rates and sites, treatment of recurrence, and oncologic outcomes after recurrence were investigated. The rate of sphincter preservation and permanent stoma formation were also evaluated. Results Recurrence occurred in 124 and 140 patients in the pre- and postoperative CRT groups, respectively. The local and systemic recurrence rates were 3.6% and 20.8%, respectively, in the preoperative CRT group and 3.0% and 25.3%, respectively, in the postoperative CRT group (P = 0.245). Time to recurrence was longer in the postoperative CRT group (19 months vs. 24.2 months, P = 0.029). The overall rates of sphincter preservation (sphincter preservation operation and postoperative permanent stoma formation) did not significantly different between the two groups (P = 0.381). The 5-year overall survival rate after recurrence did not differ between the two groups (25.6% vs. 18.6%, P = 0.051). Conclusion Preoperative and postoperative CRT are both safe and suitable treatment methods for rectal cancer, so the choice can be tailored to the patient's situation. PMID:28382292

  17. Does gadolinium-based contrast material improve diagnostic accuracy of local invasion in rectal cancer MRI? A multireader study.

    PubMed

    Gollub, Marc J; Lakhman, Yulia; McGinty, Katrina; Weiser, Martin R; Sohn, Michael; Zheng, Junting; Shia, Jinru

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to compare reader accuracy and agreement on rectal MRI with and without gadolinium administration in the detection of T4 rectal cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS. In this study, two radiologists and one fellow independently interpreted all posttreatment MRI studies for patients with locally advanced or recurrent rectal cancer using unenhanced images alone or combined with contrast-enhanced images, with a minimum interval of 4 weeks. Readers evaluated involvement of surrounding structures on a 5-point scale and were blinded to pathology and disease stage. Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value, and AUC were calculated and kappa statistics were used to describe interreader agreement. RESULTS. Seventy-two patients (38 men and 34 women) with a mean age of 61 years (range, 32-86 years) were evaluated. Fifteen patients had 32 organs invaded. Global AUCs without and with gadolinium administration were 0.79 and 0.77, 0.91 and 0.86, and 0.83 and 0.78 for readers 1, 2, and 3, respectively. AUCs before and after gadolinium administration were similar. Kappa values before and after gadolinium administration for pairs of readers ranged from 0.5 to 0.7. CONCLUSION. On the basis of pathology as a reference standard, the use of gadolinium during rectal MRI did not significantly improve radiologists' agreement or ability to detect T4 disease.

  18. Clinical value of MRI-detected extramural venous invasion in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Pratik; Rao, Sheng Xiang; Zeng, Meng Su

    2017-01-01

    Extramural venous invasion (EMVI) is associated with a poor prognosis and a poor overall survival rate in rectal cancer. It can independently predict local and distant tumor recurrences. Preoperative EMVI detection in rectal cancer is useful for determining the treatment strategy. EMVI status is beneficial for the post-treatment evaluation and analysis of rectal cancer. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic modality with no radiation effects. High-resolution MRI can detect EMVI with high accuracy. In addition, MRI results are equal to or even better than pathological results in the detection of medium to large EMVI in rectal cancer. MRI-detected EMVI (mrEMVI) can be used as a potential biomarker that facilitates treatment methods. This review highlights the importance of MRI before and after rectal cancer treatment. In addition, we analyze the prognostic correlation between mrEMVI and circulating tumor cells (CTC) in rectal cancer. This article may help shed light on the significance of mrEMVI.

  19. A case of metastatic carcinoma of anal fistula caused by implantation from rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Rina; Ichikawa, Ryosuke; Ito, Singo; Mizukoshi, Kosuke; Ishiyama, Shun; Sgimoto, Kiichi; Kojima, Yutaka; Goto, Michitoshi; Tomiki, Yuichi; Yao, Takashi; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    This case involved an 80-year-old man who was seen for melena. Further testing revealed a tubular adenocarcinoma 50 mm in size in the rectum. In addition, an anal fistula was noted behind the anus along with induration. A biopsy of tissue from the external (secondary) opening of the fistula also revealed adenocarcinoma. Nodules suspected of being metastases were noted in both lung fields. The patient was diagnosed with rectal cancer, a cancer arising from an anal fistula, and a metastatic pulmonary tumor, and neoadjuvant chemotherapy was begun. A laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection was performed 34 days after 6 cycles of mFOLFOX-6 therapy. Based on pathology, the rectal cancer was diagnosed as moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, and this adenocarcinoma had lymph node metastasis (yp T3N2aM1b). There was no communication between the rectal lesion and the anal fistula, and a moderately differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma resembling the rectal lesion was noted in the anal fistula. Immunohistochemical staining indicated that both the rectal lesion and anal fistula were cytokeratin 7 (CK7) (-) and cytokeratin 20 (CK20) (+), and the patient's condition was diagnosed as implantation of rectal cancer in an anal fistula.In instances where an anal fistula develops in colon cancer, cancer implantation in that fistula must also be taken into account, and further testing should be performed prior to surgery.

  20. Mismatch Repair Gene Expression as a Predictor of Tumor Responses in Patients With Rectal Cancer Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Jung Wook; Kim, Hee Cheol; Kim, Seok Hyung; Park, Yoon Ah; Cho, Yong Beom; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Lee, Woo Yong; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Young Suk; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study evaluated the predictive and prognostic value of expression of mismatch repair (MMR) protein, including MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 in rectal cancer patients with preoperative chemoradiotherapy. MMR protein expression was measured by immunohistochemistry in both pretreatment biopsies (pre-) and pathologic specimens (post-) from 209 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy and radical surgery. The patients were followed for a median period of 44 months. A pathologic complete response (pCR) was observed in 30 patients (14.4%). The expression levels of MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 were not significantly different between the pCR and non-pCR groups. A multivariate analysis revealed that tumor differentiation, postoperative chemotherapy, and pre-MSH6 expression were independent predictors of overall survival; ypN category and perineural invasion were independent predictors of disease-free survival. The pre-MSH6 expression was significantly associated with tumor budding and expression of all MMR proteins. On multivariate analysis, ypN category and post-MSH6 expression were independent predictors for local recurrence. In our study, we observed the independent prognostic value of MSH6 expression in pretreatment tissue on overall survival and MSH6 expression after chemoradiation on local recurrence. Constitutive MSH6 expression before and after preoperative therapy may be a useful tool for prediction of oncologic outcome in locally advanced rectal cancer. PMID:26817916

  1. Differences in carcinoembryonic antigen levels between colon and rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yunlong; Xuan, Weibo; Chen, Chunlin; Chen, Zhe; Yang, Ziyi; Zuo, Yunfei; Ren, Shuangyi

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the levels of the serum tumor biomarker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in patients with carcinoma of the colon and rectum in different clinical stages. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed types of cancer worldwide and previous studies have reported rapidly updated therapeutic regimes. While the majority of studies focus on CRC as a single entity, certain studies distinguish colon cancer (CC) from rectal cancer (RC), as there is a hypothesis stating that CC and RC are two naturally different entities. CEA is reported to be an important tumor-associated antigen overexpressed in CRC, which is routinely detected as a significant indicator of CRC. Our study aimed to identify potential differences in the expression of CEA between CC and RC, which may, to some degree, reflect the natural differences between the two. We investigated 240 CRC cases between July, 2010 and December, 2012 from The First and Second Affiliated Hospitals of Dalian Medical University, including 117 CC and 123 RC patients with tumors classified by Duke's staging as A-D. The serum CEA level was measured preoperatively by radioimmunoassays as a routinely used auxiliary indicator. The expression of CEA differed between CC and RC, with the former exhibiting variation among the four stages, whereas no variation was observed in RC. In addition, there were differences between CC and RC regarding the CEA level in stage C and D. Furthermore, the CEA level in stage C of CC was significantly lower compared to that in any other stage. In conclusion, the intrinsic distribution of the CEA level between CC and RC suggests that CC and RC may be two naturally different entities; the significantly low CEA level in stage C of CC indicates that stage C may be crucial in the evolution of CC.

  2. Is Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy Beneficial for Sphincter Preservation in Low-Lying Rectal Cancer Patients?

    PubMed

    Park, In Ja; Yu, Chang Sik; Lim, Seok-Byung; Lee, Jong Lyul; Kim, Chan Wook; Yoon, Yong Sik; Park, Seong Ho; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2016-05-01

    The present study explored the benefit of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) for sphincter preservation in locally advanced low-lying rectal cancer patients who underwent stapled anastomosis, especially in those with deep and narrow pelvises determined by magnetic resonance imaging.Patients with locally advanced low-lying rectal cancer (≤5 cm from the anal verge) who underwent stapled anastomosis were included. Patients were categorized into two groups (PCRT+ vs. PCRT-) according to PCRT application. Patients in the PCRT+ group were matched to those in the PCRT- group according to potential confounding factors (age, gender, clinical stage, and body mass index) for sphincter preservation. Sphincter preservation, permanent stoma, and anastomosis-related complications were compared between the groups. Pelvic magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure 12 dimensions representing pelvic cavity depth and width with which deep and narrow pelvis was defined. The impact of PCRT on sphincter preservation and permanent stoma in pelvic dimensions defined as deep and narrow pelvis was evaluated, and factors associated with sphincter preservation and permanent stoma were analyzed.One hundred sixty-six patients were one-to-one matched between the PCRT+ and PCRT- groups. Overall, sphincter-saving surgery was performed in 66.3% and the rates were not different between the 2 groups. Anastomotic complications and permanent stoma occurred nonsignificantly more frequently in the PCRT+ group. PCRT was not associated with higher rate of sphincter preservation in all pelvic dimensions defined as deep and narrow pelvis, while PCRT was related to higher rate of permanent stoma in shorter transverse diameter and interspinous distance. On logistic regression analysis, PCRT was not shown to influence both sphincter preservation and permanent stoma, while longer transverse diameter and interspinous distance were associated with lower rate of permanent stoma.PCRT had no beneficial

  3. Is Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy Beneficial for Sphincter Preservation in Low-Lying Rectal Cancer Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Park, In Ja; Yu, Chang Sik; Lim, Seok-Byung; Lee, Jong Lyul; Kim, Chan Wook; Yoon, Yong Sik; Park, Seong Ho; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The present study explored the benefit of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) for sphincter preservation in locally advanced low-lying rectal cancer patients who underwent stapled anastomosis, especially in those with deep and narrow pelvises determined by magnetic resonance imaging. Patients with locally advanced low-lying rectal cancer (≤5 cm from the anal verge) who underwent stapled anastomosis were included. Patients were categorized into two groups (PCRT+ vs. PCRT–) according to PCRT application. Patients in the PCRT+ group were matched to those in the PCRT– group according to potential confounding factors (age, gender, clinical stage, and body mass index) for sphincter preservation. Sphincter preservation, permanent stoma, and anastomosis-related complications were compared between the groups. Pelvic magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure 12 dimensions representing pelvic cavity depth and width with which deep and narrow pelvis was defined. The impact of PCRT on sphincter preservation and permanent stoma in pelvic dimensions defined as deep and narrow pelvis was evaluated, and factors associated with sphincter preservation and permanent stoma were analyzed. One hundred sixty-six patients were one-to-one matched between the PCRT+ and PCRT− groups. Overall, sphincter-saving surgery was performed in 66.3% and the rates were not different between the 2 groups. Anastomotic complications and permanent stoma occurred nonsignificantly more frequently in the PCRT+ group. PCRT was not associated with higher rate of sphincter preservation in all pelvic dimensions defined as deep and narrow pelvis, while PCRT was related to higher rate of permanent stoma in shorter transverse diameter and interspinous distance. On logistic regression analysis, PCRT was not shown to influence both sphincter preservation and permanent stoma, while longer transverse diameter and interspinous distance were associated with lower rate of permanent stoma. PCRT had

  4. [Clinical and histopathological results after the neo-adjuvant treatment of advanced rectal tumors].

    PubMed

    Varga, László; Baradnay, Gellért; Hohn, József; Simonka, Zsolt; Hideghéthy, Katalin; Maráz, Anikó; Nikolényi, Alíz; Veréb, Blanka; Tiszlavicz, László; Németh, István; Mán, Eszter; Lázár, György

    2010-06-01

    The role of the surgical intervention is decisive in treating colorectal tumors. The neo-adjuvant radio-chemotherapy has improved the efficacy of the treatment of advanced rectum tumors. In order to decrease the size and stage of advanced rectal carcinoma and to increase the rate of resecability, we introduced neoadjuvant radio-chemotherapy. We carried out neo-adjuvant and surgical treatment in case of 67 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma (T 2-4 N 1-2 M 0 ) between June 1, 2005 and July 31, 2008. The average age of the patients was 61.2 years, the division according to sex was 44 males/23 females. Regarding the local stage of the rectal process or the proximity to the sphincter, we applied radio-chemotherapy (radiotherapy 25 times altogether 45 Gy and on the first and last week for 5-5 days they received 350 mg/m 2 /day 5-FU and 20 mg/m 2 /day leucovorin chemotherapy, recently complemented with 3 x 1.8 Gy advanced boost radiation aiming at the macroscopic tumor site with security zone). Patients underwent surgery 8 weeks on average after restaging examinations. Thirty-eight patients underwent anterior rectal resection with double stapler procedure; there were 18 abdominoperineal rectal extirpations, 7 Hartmann operations and 4 per annum excisions. Compared to the preoperative staging, the histological evaluation of the resected specimens showed total remission (pT 0 N 0 ) in 11% and partial remission in 43%. The morbidity necessitating reoperation was 5.9%, without mortality and suture insufficiency. The long-term neo-adjuvant oncological treatment led to down-staging of rectal tumors in most cases and increased the resecability and rate of resection operations.

  5. Variation in the CYP19A1 gene and risk of colon and rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Martha L; Lundgreen, Abbie; Herrick, Jennifer S; Kadlubar, Susan; Caan, Bette J; Potter, John D; Wolff, Roger K

    2011-07-01

    CYP19A1, or aromatase, influences estrogen-metabolizing enzymes and may influence cancer risk. We examine variation in the CYP19A1 gene and risk of colorectal cancer using data from population-based case-control studies (colon n = 1,574 cases, 1,970 controls; rectal n = 791 cases, 999 controls). Four SNPs were statistically significantly associated with colon cancer and four were associated with rectal cancer. After adjustment for multiple comparisons, the AA genotype of rs12591359 was associated with an increased risk of colon cancer (OR 1.44 95% CI 1.16-1.80) and the AA genotype of rs2470144 was associated with a reduced risk of rectal cancer (OR 0.65 95% CI 0.50-0.84). Variants of CYP19A1 were associated with CIMP+ and CIMP+/KRAS2-mutated tumors. CT/TT genotypes of rs1961177 were significantly associated with an increased likelihood of a MSI+ colon tumor (OR 1.77 95% CI 1.26-2.37). We observed statistically significant interactions between genetic variation in NFκB1 and CYP19A1 for both colon and rectal cancer. Our data suggest the importance of CYP19A1 in the development of colon and rectal cancer and that estrogen may influence risk through an inflammation-related mechanism.

  6. Microarray profiling of mononuclear peripheral blood cells identifies novel candidate genes related to chemoradiation response in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Palma, Pablo; Cuadros, Marta; Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Olmedo, Carmen; Cano, Carlos; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Blanco, Armando; Bueno, Pablo; Ferrón, J Antonio; Medina, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Preoperative chemoradiation significantly improves oncological outcome in locally advanced rectal cancer. However there is no effective method of predicting tumor response to chemoradiation in these patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells have emerged recently as pathology markers of cancer and other diseases, making possible their use as therapy predictors. Furthermore, the importance of the immune response in radiosensivity of solid organs led us to hypothesized that microarray gene expression profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells could identify patients with response to chemoradiation in rectal cancer. Thirty five 35 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were recruited initially to perform the study. Peripheral blood samples were obtained before neaodjuvant treatment. RNA was extracted and purified to obtain cDNA and cRNA for hybridization of microarrays included in Human WG CodeLink bioarrays. Quantitative real time PCR was used to validate microarray experiment data. Results were correlated with pathological response, according to Mandard´s criteria and final UICC Stage (patients with tumor regression grade 1-2 and downstaging being defined as responders and patients with grade 3-5 and no downstaging as non-responders). Twenty seven out of 35 patients were finally included in the study. We performed a multiple t-test using Significance Analysis of Microarrays, to find those genes differing significantly in expression, between responders (n = 11) and non-responders (n = 16) to CRT. The differently expressed genes were: BC 035656.1, CIR, PRDM2, CAPG, FALZ, HLA-DPB2, NUPL2, and ZFP36. The measurement of FALZ (p = 0.029) gene expression level determined by qRT-PCR, showed statistically significant differences between the two groups. Gene expression profiling reveals novel genes in peripheral blood samples of mononuclear cells that could predict responders and non-responders to chemoradiation in patients with locally advanced

  7. Intratumoral Heterogeneity of MicroRNA Expression in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Rikke Fredslund; Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Appelt, Ane Lindegaard; Jakobsen, Anders; Hansen, Torben Frøstrup

    2016-01-01

    Introduction An increasing number of studies have investigated microRNAs (miRNAs) as potential markers of diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. So far, agreement between studies has been minimal, which may in part be explained by intratumoral heterogeneity of miRNA expression. The aim of the present study was to assess the heterogeneity of a panel of selected miRNAs in rectal cancer, using two different technical approaches. Materials and Methods The expression of the investigated miRNAs was analysed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH) in tumour specimens from 27 patients with T3-4 rectal cancer. From each tumour, tissue from three different luminal localisations was examined. Inter- and intra-patient variability was assessed by calculating intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Correlations between RT-qPCR and ISH were evaluated using Spearman’s correlation. Results ICCsingle (one sample from each patient) was higher than 50% for miRNA-21 and miRNA-31. For miRNA-125b, miRNA-145, and miRNA-630, ICCsingle was lower than 50%. The ICCmean (mean of three samples from each patient) was higher than 50% for miRNA-21(RT-qPCR and ISH), miRNA-125b (RT-qPCR and ISH), miRNA-145 (ISH), miRNA-630 (RT-qPCR), and miRNA-31 (RT-qPCR). For miRNA-145 (RT-qPCR) and miRNA-630 (ISH), ICCmean was lower than 50%. Spearman correlation coefficients, comparing results obtained by RT-qPCR and ISH, respectively, ranged from 0.084 to 0.325 for the mean value from each patient, and from -0.085 to 0.515 in the section including the deepest part of the tumour. Conclusion Intratumoral heterogeneity may influence the measurement of miRNA expression and consequently the number of samples needed for representative estimates. Our findings with two different methods suggest that one sample is sufficient for adequate assessment of miRNA-21 and miRNA-31, whereas more samples would improve the assessment of miRNA-125b, miRNA-145, and miRNA-630

  8. Immunohistochemical Markers as Predictors of Histopathologic Response and Prognosis in Rectal Cancer Treated with Preoperative Adjuvant Therapy: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We explain the state of the art of the immunohistochemical markers of response in rectal cancers treated with neoadjuvant medical therapies and its implication with prognosis. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is widely used to improve the outcome of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer, and the evaluation of the effects of medical therapy is to date based on histomorphological examination by applying four grading systems of response to therapy (tumor regression grade (TRG)). The need to identify immunohistochemical markers that could ensure a better assessment of response and possibly provide additional prognostic information has emerged. We identified p53, p27kip1, Ki67, matrix metalloprotease-9, survivin, Ki67 proliferative index, CD133, COX2, CD44v6, thymidylate synthase, thymidine phosphorylase, and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase as the most common markers studied in literature to date, and we explained their prognostic potential and their implications in the evaluation of the response to preoperative therapies in rectal cancers. PMID:28326100

  9. Preoperative Therapy for Lower Rectal Cancer and Modifications in Distance From Anal Sphincter

    SciTech Connect

    Gavioli, Margherita Losi, Lorena; Luppi, Gabriele; Iacchetta, Francesco; Zironi, Sandra; Bertolini, Federica; Falchi, Anna Maria; Bertoni, Filippo; Natalini, Gianni

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the frequency and magnitude of changes in lower rectal cancer resulting from preoperative therapy and its impact on sphincter-saving surgery. Preoperative therapy can increase the rate of preserving surgery by shrinking the tumor and enhancing its distance from the anal sphincter. However, reliable data concerning these modifications are not yet available in published reports. Methods and Materials: A total of 98 cases of locally advanced cancer of the lower rectum (90 Stage uT3-T4N0-N+ and 8 uT2N+M0) that had undergone preoperative therapy were studied by endorectal ultrasonography. The maximal size of the tumor and its distance from the anal sphincter were measured in millimeters before and after preoperative therapy. Surgery was performed 6-8 weeks after therapy, and the histopathologic margins were compared with the endorectal ultrasound data. Results: Of the 90 cases, 82.5% showed tumor downsizing, varying from one-third to two-thirds or more of the original tumor mass. The distance between the tumor and the anal sphincter increased in 60.2% of cases. The median increase was 0.73 cm (range, 0.2-2.5). Downsizing was not always associated with an increase in distance. Preserving surgery was performed in 60.6% of cases. It was possible in nearly 30% of patients in whom the cancer had reached the anal sphincter before the preoperative therapy. The distal margin was tumor free in these cases. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that in very low rectal cancer, preoperative therapy causes tumor downsizing in >80% of cases and in more than one-half enhances the distance between the tumor and anal sphincter. These modifications affect the primary surgical options, facilitating or making sphincter-saving surgery possible.

  10. Use of Molecular Imaging to Predict Clinical Outcome in Patients With Rectal Cancer After Preoperative Chemotherapy and Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Konski, Andre Li Tianyu; Sigurdson, Elin; Cohen, Steven J.; Small, William; Spies, Stewart; Yu, Jian Q.; Wahl, Andrew; Stryker, Steven; Meropol, Neal J.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To correlate changes in 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (18-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) (18-FDG-PET) uptake with response and disease-free survival with combined modality neoadjuvant therapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Charts were reviewed for consecutive patients with ultrasound-staged T3x to T4Nx or TxN1 rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent preoperative chemoradiation therapy at Fox Chase Cancer Center (FCCC) or Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University with 18-FDG-PET scanning before and after combined-modality neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy . The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) was measured from the tumor before and 3 to 4 weeks after completion of chemoradiation therapy preoperatively. Logistic regression was used to analyze the association of pretreatment SUV, posttreatment SUV, and % SUV decrease on pathologic complete response (pCR), and a Cox model was fitted to analyze disease-free survival. Results: A total of 53 patients (FCCC, n = 41, RLCCC, n = 12) underwent pre- and postchemoradiation PET scanning between September 2000 and June 2006. The pCR rate was 31%. Univariate analysis revealed that % SUV decrease showed a marginally trend in predicting pCR (p = 0.08). In the multivariable analysis, posttreatment SUV was shown a predictor of pCR (p = 0.07), but the test results did not reach statistical significance. None of the investigated variables were predictive of disease-free survival. Conclusions: A trend was observed for % SUV decrease and posttreatment SUV predicting pCR in patients with rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiation therapy. Further prospective study with a larger sample size is warranted to better characterize the role of 18-FDG-PET for response prediction in patients with rectal cancer.

  11. Optimal follow-up to curative colon and rectal cancer surgery: how and for how long?

    PubMed

    Asgeirsson, Theodor; Zhang, Sen; Senagore, Anthony J

    2010-10-01

    In 2009, the projected incidence for colon and rectal cancers in the United States was 106,100 and 40,870, respectively, and approximately 75% of these patients were treated with curative intent. Surveillance or follow-up after colon and rectal cancer resection serves multiple purposes; however, the primary argument supporting the validity of surveillance is the detection of metachronous and recurrent cancers amenable to curative treatment. The surveillance may provide some comfort for cancer survivors who can be informed that they have no evidence of disease.

  12. Nitrates in drinking water and risk of death from rectal cancer in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Hsin-Wei; Wu, Trong-Neng; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2007-10-01

    The relationship between nitrate levels in drinking water and rectal cancer development has been inconclusive. A matched case-control and nitrate ecology study was used to investigate the association between mortality attributed to rectal cancer and drinking-water nitrate exposure in Taiwan. All deaths due to rectal cancer of Taiwan residents from 1999 through 2003 were obtained from the Bureau of Vital Statistics of the Taiwan Provincial Department of Health. Controls were deaths from other causes and were pair matched to the cancer cases by gender, year of birth, and year of death. Each matched control was selected randomly from the set of possible controls for each case. Data on nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) levels in drinking water throughout Taiwan were collected from Taiwan Water Supply Corporation (TWSC). The municipality of residence for cancer cases and controls was assumed to be the source of the subject's nitrate exposure via drinking water. The adjusted odds ratios for rectal cancer death for those with high nitrate levels in their drinking water, as compared to the lowest tertile, were 1.22 (0.98-1.52) and 1.36 (1.08-1.70), respectively. The findings of this study warrant further investigation of the role of nitrates in drinking water in the etiology of rectal cancer in Taiwan.

  13. Age and cellular context influence rectal prolapse formation in mice with caecal wall colorectal cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Tommelein, Joke; Gremonprez, Félix; Verset, Laurine; De Vlieghere, Elly; Wagemans, Glenn; Gespach, Christian; Boterberg, Tom; Demetter, Pieter; Ceelen, Wim; Bracke, Marc; De Wever, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    In patients with rectal prolapse is the prevalence of colorectal cancer increased, suggesting that a colorectal tumor may induce rectal prolapse. Establishment of tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice after orthotopic inoculations of human colorectal cancer cells into the caecal wall is a widely used approach for the study of human colorectal cancer progression and preclinical evaluation of therapeutics. Remarkably, 70% of young mice carrying a COLO320DM caecal tumor showed symptoms of intussusception of the large bowel associated with intestinal lumen obstruction and rectal prolapse. The quantity of the COLO320DM bioluminescent signal of the first three weeks post-inoculation predicts prolapse in young mice. Rectal prolapse was not observed in adult mice carrying a COLO320DM caecal tumor or young mice carrying a HT29 caecal tumor. In contrast to HT29 tumors, which showed local invasion and metastasis, COLO320DM tumors demonstrated a non-invasive tumor with pushing borders without presence of metastasis. In conclusion, rectal prolapse can be linked to a non-invasive, space-occupying COLO320DM tumor in the gastrointestinal tract of young immunodeficient mice. These data reveal a model that can clarify the association of patients showing rectal prolapse with colorectal cancer. PMID:27689329

  14. The role of the robotic technique in minimally invasive surgery in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Paolo Pietro; Luca, Fabrizio; Petz, Wanda; Valvo, Manuela; Cenciarelli, Sabine; Zuccaro, Massimiliano; Biffi, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic rectal surgery is feasible, oncologically safe, and offers better short-term outcomes than traditional open procedures in terms of pain control, recovery of bowel function, length of hospital stay, and time until return to working activity. Nevertheless, laparoscopic techniques are not widely used in rectal surgery, mainly because they require a prolonged and demanding learning curve that is available only in high-volume and rectal cancer surgery centres experienced in minimally invasive surgery. Robotic surgery is a new technology that enables the surgeon to perform minimally invasive operations with better vision and more intuitive and precise control of the operating instruments, promising to overcome some of the technical difficulties associated with standard laparoscopy. The aim of this review is to summarise the current data on clinical and oncological outcomes of minimally invasive surgery in rectal cancer, focusing on robotic surgery, and providing original data from the authors’ centre. PMID:24101946

  15. On a prolonged interval between rectal cancer (chemo)radiotherapy and surgery

    PubMed Central

    Glimelius, Bengt

    2017-01-01

    Preoperative radiotherapy (RT) or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is often required before rectal cancer surgery to obtain low local recurrence rates or, in locally advanced tumours, to radically remove the tumour. RT/CRT in tumours responding completely can allow an organ-preserving strategy. The time from the end of the RT/CRT to surgery or to the decision not to operate has been prolonged during recent years. After a brief review of the literature, the relevance of the time interval to surgery is discussed depending upon the indication for RT/CRT. In intermediate rectal cancers, where the aim is to decrease local recurrence rates without any need for down-sizing/-staging, short-course RT with immediate surgery is appropriate. In elderly patients at risk for surgical complications, surgery could be delayed 5–8 weeks. If CRT is used, surgery should be performed when the acute radiation reaction has subsided or after 5–6 weeks. In locally advanced tumours, where CRT is indicated, the optimal delay is 6–8 weeks. In patients not tolerating CRT, short-course RT with a 6–8-week delay is an alternative. If organ preservation is a goal, a first evaluation should preferably be carried out after about 6 weeks, with planned surgery for week 8 if the response is inadequate. In case the response is good, a new evaluation should be carried out after about 12 weeks, with a decision to start a ‘watch-and-wait’ programme or operate. Chemotherapy in the waiting period is an interesting option, and has been the subject of recent trials with promising results. PMID:28256956

  16. On a prolonged interval between rectal cancer (chemo)radiotherapy and surgery.

    PubMed

    Glimelius, Bengt

    2017-03-01

    Preoperative radiotherapy (RT) or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is often required before rectal cancer surgery to obtain low local recurrence rates or, in locally advanced tumours, to radically remove the tumour. RT/CRT in tumours responding completely can allow an organ-preserving strategy. The time from the end of the RT/CRT to surgery or to the decision not to operate has been prolonged during recent years. After a brief review of the literature, the relevance of the time interval to surgery is discussed depending upon the indication for RT/CRT. In intermediate rectal cancers, where the aim is to decrease local recurrence rates without any need for down-sizing/-staging, short-course RT with immediate surgery is appropriate. In elderly patients at risk for surgical complications, surgery could be delayed 5-8 weeks. If CRT is used, surgery should be performed when the acute radiation reaction has subsided or after 5-6 weeks. In locally advanced tumours, where CRT is indicated, the optimal delay is 6-8 weeks. In patients not tolerating CRT, short-course RT with a 6-8-week delay is an alternative. If organ preservation is a goal, a first evaluation should preferably be carried out after about 6 weeks, with planned surgery for week 8 if the response is inadequate. In case the response is good, a new evaluation should be carried out after about 12 weeks, with a decision to start a 'watch-and-wait' programme or operate. Chemotherapy in the waiting period is an interesting option, and has been the subject of recent trials with promising results.

  17. Distal intramural spread of rectal cancer after preoperative radiotherapy: The results of a multicenter randomized clinical study

    SciTech Connect

    Chmielik, Ewa; Bujko, Krzysztof . E-mail: bujko@coi.waw.pl; Nasierowska-Guttmejer, Anna; Nowacki, Marek P.; Kepka, Lucyna; Sopylo, Rafal; Wojnar, Andrzej; Majewski, Przemyslaw; Sygut, Jacek; Karmolinski, Andrzej; Huzarski, Tomasz; Wandzel, Piotr

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the extent of distal intramural spread (DIS) after preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 316 patients with T{sub 3-4} primary resectable rectal cancer were randomized to receive either preoperative 5x5 Gy radiation with immediate surgery or chemoradiation (50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy per fraction plus boluses of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin) with delayed surgery. The slides of the 106 patients who received short-course radiation and of the 86 who received chemoradiation were available for central microscopic evaluation of DIS. Results: The length of DIS did not differ significantly (p = 0.64) between the short-course group and the chemoradiation group and was 0 in 47% vs. 49%; 1 to 5 mm in 41% vs. 42%; 6 to 10 mm in 8% vs. 9%, and greater than 10 mm in 4% vs. 0, respectively. Among the 11 clinically complete responders, DIS was found 1 to 5 mm from the microscopically detected ulceration of the mucosa in 5 patients. The discontinuous DIS was more frequent in the chemoradiation group as compared with the short-course group (i.e., 57% vs. 16% of cases, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Approximately 1 out of 10 advanced rectal cancers after preoperative radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy was characterized by DIS of over 5 mm. No significant difference was seen in the length of DIS between the 2 groups.

  18. The radiation-induced changes in rectal mucosa: Hyperfractionated vs. hypofractionated preoperative radiation for rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Starzewski, Jacek J.; Pajak, Jacek T.; Pawelczyk, Iwona; Lange, Dariusz; Golka, Dariusz . E-mail: dargolka@wp.pl; Brzeziska, Monika; Lorenc, Zbigniew

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of acute radiation-induced rectal changes in patients who underwent preoperative radiotherapy according to two different irradiation protocols. Patients and Methods: Sixty-eight patients with rectal adenocarcinoma underwent preoperative radiotherapy; 44 and 24 patients underwent hyperfractionated and hypofractionated protocol, respectively. Fifteen patients treated with surgery alone served as a control group. Five basic histopathologic features (meganucleosis, inflammatory infiltrations, eosinophils, mucus secretion, and erosions) and two additional features (mitotic figures and architectural glandular abnormalities) of radiation-induced changes were qualified and quantified. Results: Acute radiation-induced reactions were found in 66 patients. The most common were eosinophilic and plasma-cell inflammatory infiltrations (65 patients), erosions, and decreased mucus secretion (54 patients). Meganucleosis and mitotic figures were more common in patients who underwent hyperfractionated radiotherapy. The least common were the glandular architectural distortions, especially in patients treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy. Statistically significant differences in morphologic parameters studied between groups treated with different irradiation protocols were found. Conclusion: The system of assessment is a valuable tool in the evaluation of radiation-induced changes in the rectal mucosa. A greater intensity of regenerative changes was found in patients treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy.

  19. Integrated analysis of genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression profiles identifies potential novel biomarkers of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinning; Zhou, Yuhui; Dang, Shuwei; Chen, Hongsheng; Wu, Qiong; Liu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation was regarded as the promising biomarker for rectal cancer diagnosis. However, the optimal methylation biomarkers with ideal diagnostic performance for rectal cancer are still limited. To identify new molecular markers for rectal cancer, we mapped DNA methylation and transcriptomic profiles in the six rectal cancer and paired normal samples. Further analysis revealed the hypermethylated probes in cancer prone to be located in gene promoter. Meanwhile, transcriptome analysis presented 773 low-expressed and 1,161 over-expressed genes in rectal cancer. Correction analysis identified a panel of 36 genes with an inverse correlation between methylation and gene expression levels, including 10 known colorectal cancer related genes. From the other 26 novel marker genes, GFRA1 and GSTM2 were selected for further analysis on the basis of their biological functions. Further experiment analysis confirmed their methylation and expression status in a larger number (44) of rectal cancer samples, and ROC curves showed higher AUC than SEPT9, which has been used as a biomarker in rectal cancer. Our data suggests that aberrant DNA methylation of contiguous CpG sites in methylation array may be potential diagnostic markers of rectal cancer. PMID:27566576

  20. Discrimination of rectal cancer through human serum using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Yang, Tianyue; Li, Siqi; Zhang, Su; Jin, Lili

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was used to detect the changes in blood serum components that accompany rectal cancer. The differences in serum SERS data between rectal cancer patients and healthy controls were examined. Postoperative rectal cancer patients also participated in the comparison to monitor the effects of cancer treatments. The results show that there are significant variations at certain wavenumbers which indicates alteration of corresponding biological substances. Principal component analysis (PCA) and parameters of intensity ratios were used on the original SERS spectra for the extraction of featured variables. These featured variables then underwent linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and classification and regression tree (CART) for the discrimination analysis. Accuracies of 93.5 and 92.4 % were obtained for PCA-LDA and parameter-CART, respectively.

  1. Rectal Cancer With Disseminated Carcinomatosis of the Bone Marrow: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Yuichiro; Takeishi, Kazuki; Guntani, Atsushi; Tsujita, Eiji; Yoshinaga, Keiji; Matsuyama, Ayumi; Hamatake, Motoharu; Maeda, Takashi; Tsutsui, Shinichi; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Fujihara, Megumu; Ishida, Teruyoshi

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case of disseminated carcinomatosis of the bone marrow from rectal cancer with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). A 65-year-old man was admitted with melena and low back pain at rest. X-ray examination showed rectal cancer with multiple bone metastases. Laboratory examination showed severe anemia and DIC. Histologic examination showed disseminated carcinomatosis of the bone marrow. The DIC was considered to be caused by disseminated carcinomatosis of the bone marrow from rectal cancer, and we immediately started treatment with anti-DIC therapy and anticancer chemotherapy with the modified FOLFOX6 regimen (mFOLFOX6). After some response to therapy, the patient's general condition deteriorated, and he died 128 days after admission. This is the first English report showing disseminated carcinomatosis of the bone marrow from colorectal cancer treated with mFOLFOX6. PMID:25216414

  2. A functional biological network centered on XRCC3: a new possible marker of chemoradiotherapy resistance in rectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Agostini, Marco; Zangrando, Andrea; Pastrello, Chiara; D'Angelo, Edoardo; Romano, Gabriele; Giovannoni, Roberto; Giordan, Marco; Maretto, Isacco; Bedin, Chiara; Zanon, Carlo; Digito, Maura; Esposito, Giovanni; Mescoli, Claudia; Lavitrano, Marialuisa; Rizzolio, Flavio; Jurisica, Igor; Giordano, Antonio; Pucciarelli, Salvatore; Nitti, Donato

    2015-01-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is widely used to improve local control of disease, sphincter preservation and to improve survival in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Patients enrolled in the present study underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy, followed by surgical excision. Response to chemoradiotherapy was evaluated according to Mandard's Tumor Regression Grade (TRG). TRG 3, 4 and 5 were considered as partial or no response while TRG 1 and 2 as complete response. From pretherapeutic biopsies of 84 locally advanced rectal carcinomas available for the analysis, only 42 of them showed 70% cancer cellularity at least. By determining gene expression profiles, responders and non-responders showed significantly different expression levels for 19 genes (P < 0.001). We fitted a logistic model selected with a stepwise procedure optimizing the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) and then validated by means of leave one out cross validation (LOOCV, accuracy = 95%). Four genes were retained in the achieved model: ZNF160, XRCC3, HFM1 and ASXL2. Real time PCR confirmed that XRCC3 is overexpressed in responders group and HFM1 and ASXL2 showed a positive trend. In vitro test on colon cancer resistant/susceptible to chemoradioterapy cells, finally prove that XRCC3 deregulation is extensively involved in the chemoresistance mechanisms. Protein-protein interactions (PPI) analysis involving the predictive classifier revealed a network of 45 interacting nodes (proteins) with TRAF6 gene playing a keystone role in the network. The present study confirmed the possibility that gene expression profiling combined with integrative computational biology is useful to predict complete responses to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with advanced rectal cancer. PMID:26023803

  3. A functional biological network centered on XRCC3: a new possible marker of chemoradiotherapy resistance in rectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Marco; Zangrando, Andrea; Pastrello, Chiara; D'Angelo, Edoardo; Romano, Gabriele; Giovannoni, Roberto; Giordan, Marco; Maretto, Isacco; Bedin, Chiara; Zanon, Carlo; Digito, Maura; Esposito, Giovanni; Mescoli, Claudia; Lavitrano, Marialuisa; Rizzolio, Flavio; Jurisica, Igor; Giordano, Antonio; Pucciarelli, Salvatore; Nitti, Donato

    2015-01-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is widely used to improve local control of disease, sphincter preservation and to improve survival in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Patients enrolled in the present study underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy, followed by surgical excision. Response to chemoradiotherapy was evaluated according to Mandard's Tumor Regression Grade (TRG). TRG 3, 4 and 5 were considered as partial or no response while TRG 1 and 2 as complete response. From pretherapeutic biopsies of 84 locally advanced rectal carcinomas available for the analysis, only 42 of them showed 70% cancer cellularity at least. By determining gene expression profiles, responders and non-responders showed significantly different expression levels for 19 genes (P < 0.001). We fitted a logistic model selected with a stepwise procedure optimizing the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) and then validated by means of leave one out cross validation (LOOCV, accuracy = 95%). Four genes were retained in the achieved model: ZNF160, XRCC3, HFM1 and ASXL2. Real time PCR confirmed that XRCC3 is overexpressed in responders group and HFM1 and ASXL2 showed a positive trend. In vitro test on colon cancer resistant/susceptible to chemoradioterapy cells, finally prove that XRCC3 deregulation is extensively involved in the chemoresistance mechanisms. Protein-protein interactions (PPI) analysis involving the predictive classifier revealed a network of 45 interacting nodes (proteins) with TRAF6 gene playing a keystone role in the network. The present study confirmed the possibility that gene expression profiling combined with integrative computational biology is useful to predict complete responses to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with advanced rectal cancer.

  4. Rectal cancer: future directions and priorities for treatment, research and policy in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Christopher; Ehrenberg, Nieves; Frizelle, Frank; Sarfati, Diana; Balasingam, Adrian; Pearse, Maria; Parry, Susan; Print, Cristin; Findlay, Michael; Bissett, Ian

    2014-06-06

    New Zealand has one of the highest incidences of rectal cancer in the world, and its optimal management requires a multidisciplinary approach. A National Rectal Cancer Summit was convened in August 2013 to discuss management of rectal cancer in the New Zealand context, to highlight controversies and discuss domestic priorities for the future. This paper summarises the priorities for treatment, research and policy for rectal cancer services in New Zealand identified as part of the Summit in August. The following priorities were identified: - Access to high-quality information for service planning, review of outcomes, identification of inequities and gaps in provision, and quality improvement; - Engagement with the entire sector, including private providers; - Focus on equity; - Emerging technologies; - Harmonisation of best practice; - Importance of multidisciplinary team meetings. In conclusion, improvements in outcomes for patients with rectal cancer in New Zealand will require significant engagement between policy makers, providers, researchers, and patients in order to ensure equitable access to high quality treatment, and strategic incorporation of emerging technologies into clinical practice. A robust clinical information framework is required in order to facilitate monitoring of quality improvements and to ensure that equitable care is delivered.

  5. The development of metachronous prostate cancer and chronic myeloid leukemia in a patient with metastatic rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Oztop, I; Yaren, A; Demirpence, M; Alacacioglu, I; Tuna, B; Piskin, O; Yilmaz, U

    2008-01-01

    We report herein an unusual case of metachronous triple cancers (rectum, prostate and Philadelphia(+) [Ph(+)] chronic myeloid leukemia [CML]). A metastatic rectal cancer was diagnosed in a 76-year-old male patient, who was treated with transanal tumor resection and chemotherapy. Thirty months from the initial rectal cancer diagnosis, prostate cancer was diagnosed and the patient was administered maximal androgen blockade and received palliative radiotherapy to the lumbar spine because of painful bone metastases. Thirty months after the diagnosis of rectal cancer and 12 months after the diagnosis of prostate cancer the patient developed Ph(+) CML and imatinib treatment was started. After one-year period in remission, CML evolved into accelerated phase and the patient died of intracranial hemorrhage.

  6. A rare presentation of breast cancer: near obstructing rectal mass and gastric outlet obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Rachel; Mathews, Winn; Scarcliff, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer metastasizes to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are exceedingly rare. The low incidence and vague presentation of GI metastasizes often cause delay in diagnosis and treatment. Here, we present a case of metastatic breast cancer causing gastric outlet obstruction and rectal obstruction. PMID:27672104

  7. Study shows colon and rectal tumors constitute a single type of cancer

    Cancer.gov

    The pattern of genomic alterations in colon and rectal tissues is the same regardless of anatomic location or origin within the colon or the rectum, leading researchers to conclude that these two cancer types can be grouped as one, according to The Cancer

  8. The clinicopathologic relevance and prognostic value of tumor deposits and the applicability of N1c category in rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    He, Ming-ming; Luo, Hui-yan; Wang, Feng-hua; Zhang, Dong-sheng; Li, Yu-hong; Xu, Rui-hua

    2016-01-01

    The clinicopathologic relevance and prognostic value of tumor deposits in colorectal cancer has been widely demonstrated. However, there are still debates in the prognostic value of tumor deposits and the applicability of N1c category in rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy. In this study, rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy followed by resection of primary tumors registered in Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database from 2010-2012 were analyzed. There were 4,813 cases eligible for this study, and tumor deposits were found in 514 (10.7%) cases. The presence of tumor deposits was significantly associated with some aggressive characteristics, including poorer tumor differentiation, more advanced ypT category, ypN category and ypTNM stage, distant metastasis, elevated carcinoembryonic antigen, higher positive rates of circumferential resection margin and perineural invasion (all P < = 0.001). Tumor deposit was also an independent negative prognostic factor for cancer-specific survival in rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy (adjusted HR and 95% CI: 2.25 (1.51 – 3.35)). N1c category had significant worse survival compared with N0 category (adjusted HR and 95% CI: 2.41 (1.24 – 4.69)). In conclusion, tumor deposit was a significant and independent prognostic factor, and the N1c category by the 7th edition of AJCC/TNM staging system was applicable in rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy. PMID:27655707

  9. Ropidoxuridine in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Bile Duct Carcinoma; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Esophageal Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Liver Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Small Intestinal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Small Intestinal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Small Intestinal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Liver Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Small Intestinal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IVA Liver Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IVB Liver Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  10. ACR Appropriateness Criteria®—Recurrent Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suh, W. Warren; Herman, Joseph M.; Blackstock, A. William; Hong, Theodore S.; Poggi, Matthew M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel; Small, William; Thomas, Charles R.; Zook, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions. These Criteria are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The development and review of these guidelines includes an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. Local recurrence of rectal cancer can result in devastating symptoms for patients, including intractable pain and discharge. Prior treatment can limit subsequent treatment options. Preoperative 5-FU based chemoradiotherapy is the treatment of choice for patients with a local recurrence who did not receive adjuvant therapy after initial resection or who might have received chemotherapy alone. Chemoradiotherapy followed by evaluation for surgery is the preferred treatment for patients who have undergone previous radiotherapy after surgery. The inclusion of surgery has resulted in the best outcomes in a majority of studies. Palliative chemoradiotherapy is appropriate for patients who have received previous radiotherapy whose recurrent disease is considered inoperable. Radiotherapy can be delivered on a standard or hyperfractionated treatment schedule. Newer systemic treatments have improved response rates and given physicians more options for treating patients in this difficult situation. The use of induction chemotherapy prior to radiotherapy is an evolving treatment option. Specialized treatment modalities should be used at institutions with experience in these techniques and preferably in patients enrolled in clinical trials. PMID:22574231

  11. Neoadjuvant Bevacizumab, Oxaliplatin, 5-Fluorouracil, and Radiation for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dipetrillo, Tom; Pricolo, Victor; Lagares-Garcia, Jorge; Vrees, Matt; Klipfel, Adam; Cataldo, Tom; Sikov, William; McNulty, Brendan; Shipley, Joshua; Anderson, Elliot; Khurshid, Humera; Oconnor, Brigid; Oldenburg, Nicklas B.E.; Radie-Keane, Kathy; Husain, Syed; Safran, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and pathologic complete response rate of induction bevacizumab + modified infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) 6 regimen followed by concurrent bevacizumab, oxaliplatin, continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and radiation for patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients received 1 month of induction bevacizumab and mFOLFOX6. Patients then received 50.4 Gy of radiation and concurrent bevacizumab (5 mg/kg on Days 1, 15, and 29), oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}/week for 6 weeks), and continuous infusion 5-FU (200 mg/m{sup 2}/day). Because of gastrointestinal toxicity, the oxaliplatin dose was reduced to 40 mg/m{sup 2}/week. Resection was performed 4-8 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Results: The trial was terminated early because of toxicity after 26 eligible patients were treated. Only 1 patient had significant toxicity (arrhythmia) during induction treatment and was removed from the study. During chemoradiation, Grade 3/4 toxicity was experienced by 19 of 25 patients (76%). The most common Grade 3/4 toxicities were diarrhea, neutropenia, and pain. Five of 25 patients (20%) had a complete pathologic response. Nine of 25 patients (36%) developed postoperative complications including infection (n = 4), delayed healing (n = 3), leak/abscess (n = 2), sterile fluid collection (n = 2), ischemic colonic reservoir (n = 1), and fistula (n = 1). Conclusions: Concurrent oxaliplatin, bevacizumab, continuous infusion 5-FU, and radiation causes significant gastrointestinal toxicity. The pathologic complete response rate of this regimen was similar to other fluorouracil chemoradiation regimens. The high incidence of postoperative wound complications is concerning and consistent with other reports utilizing bevacizumab with chemoradiation before major surgical resections.

  12. Rectal bleeding after radiation therapy for endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Devarati; Nout, Remi; Catalano, Paul J.; Creutzberg, Carien; Cimbak, Nicole; Lee, Larissa; Viswanathan, Akila

    2015-01-01

    Background & Purpose The goals of this study were to determine the rate and risk factors of rectal bleeding (RB) after external beam radiotherapy and vaginal brachytherapy (EBRT+VB), and to compare this data to previously unreported RB rates from PORTEC-2 patients receiving EBRT or VB alone. Materials & Methods Retrospective chart review identified 212 endometrial cancer patients receiving adjuvant EBRT+VB between 2006–2013. Patient-reported RB data were also obtained from PORTEC-2 patients randomized to EBRT (n=166) or VB (n=182). The two populations were compared using an RB Scale of symptom severity. Results After a median 35 months, 17.9% of EBRT+VB patients (n=38) experienced any RB with 1.9% (n=4) having bleeding requiring intervention. Age ≤70 years was the only predictor of RB (OR 2.8; 95% CI 1.1–8.7; p=0.027). Rates of patient-reported RB after EBRT were similar with 15.0% (n=25) having any RB and 0.6% (n=1) having “very much” bleeding. On regression analysis, any EBRT (either EBRT alone or EBRT+VB) increased the risk of RB compared to those who received VB alone (OR 3.0; p=0.0028; 95% CI 1.4–6.7). The rates of more severe RB were low and did not significantly differ between treatments. Conclusions Significant RB is rare after radiation. The addition of VB to EBRT does not significantly alter bleeding rates. PMID:26003340

  13. Ozone Therapy in the Management of Persistent Radiation-Induced Rectal Bleeding in Prostate Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Clavo, Bernardino; Santana-Rodriguez, Norberto; Llontop, Pedro; Gutierrez, Dominga; Ceballos, Daniel; Méndez, Charlin; Rovira, Gloria; Suarez, Gerardo; Rey-Baltar, Dolores; Garcia-Cabrera, Laura; Martínez-Sánchez, Gregorio; Fiuza, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Persistent radiation-induced proctitis and rectal bleeding are debilitating complications with limited therapeutic options. We present our experience with ozone therapy in the management of such refractory rectal bleeding. Methods. Patients (n = 12) previously irradiated for prostate cancer with persistent or severe rectal bleeding without response to conventional treatment were enrolled to receive ozone therapy via rectal insufflations and/or topical application of ozonized-oil. Ten (83%) patients had Grade 3 or Grade 4 toxicity. Median follow-up after ozone therapy was 104 months (range: 52-119). Results. Following ozone therapy, the median grade of toxicity improved from 3 to 1 (p < 0.001) and the number of endoscopy treatments from 37 to 4 (p = 0.032). Hemoglobin levels changed from 11.1 (7-14) g/dL to 13 (10-15) g/dL, before and after ozone therapy, respectively (p = 0.008). Ozone therapy was well tolerated and no adverse effects were noted, except soft and temporary flatulence for some hours after each session. Conclusions. Ozone therapy was effective in radiation-induced rectal bleeding in prostate cancer patients without serious adverse events. It proved useful in the management of rectal bleeding and merits further evaluation.

  14. Ozone Therapy in the Management of Persistent Radiation-Induced Rectal Bleeding in Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Clavo, Bernardino; Santana-Rodriguez, Norberto; Llontop, Pedro; Gutierrez, Dominga; Ceballos, Daniel; Méndez, Charlin; Rovira, Gloria; Suarez, Gerardo; Rey-Baltar, Dolores; Garcia-Cabrera, Laura; Martínez-Sánchez, Gregorio; Fiuza, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Persistent radiation-induced proctitis and rectal bleeding are debilitating complications with limited therapeutic options. We present our experience with ozone therapy in the management of such refractory rectal bleeding. Methods. Patients (n = 12) previously irradiated for prostate cancer with persistent or severe rectal bleeding without response to conventional treatment were enrolled to receive ozone therapy via rectal insufflations and/or topical application of ozonized-oil. Ten (83%) patients had Grade 3 or Grade 4 toxicity. Median follow-up after ozone therapy was 104 months (range: 52–119). Results. Following ozone therapy, the median grade of toxicity improved from 3 to 1 (p < 0.001) and the number of endoscopy treatments from 37 to 4 (p = 0.032). Hemoglobin levels changed from 11.1 (7–14) g/dL to 13 (10–15) g/dL, before and after ozone therapy, respectively (p = 0.008). Ozone therapy was well tolerated and no adverse effects were noted, except soft and temporary flatulence for some hours after each session. Conclusions. Ozone therapy was effective in radiation-induced rectal bleeding in prostate cancer patients without serious adverse events. It proved useful in the management of rectal bleeding and merits further evaluation. PMID:26357522

  15. Prediction of Response to Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy in Rectal Cancer by Multiplex Kinase Activity Profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Folkvord, Sigurd; Flatmark, Kjersti; Dueland, Svein

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: Tumor response of rectal cancer to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) varies considerably. In experimental tumor models and clinical radiotherapy, activity of particular subsets of kinase signaling pathways seems to predict radiation response. This study aimed to determine whether tumor kinase activity profiles might predict tumor response to preoperative CRT in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: Sixty-seven LARC patients were treated with a CRT regimen consisting of radiotherapy, fluorouracil, and, where possible, oxaliplatin. Pretreatment tumor biopsy specimens were analyzed using microarrays with kinase substrates, and the resulting substrate phosphorylation patterns were correlated with tumor response to preoperative treatment as assessed by histomorphologic tumor regression grade (TRG). A predictive model for TRG scores from phosphosubstrate signatures was obtained by partial-least-squares discriminant analysis. Prediction performance was evaluated by leave-one-out cross-validation and use of an independent test set. Results: In the patient population, 73% and 15% were scored as good responders (TRG 1-2) or intermediate responders (TRG 3), whereas 12% were assessed as poor responders (TRG 4-5). In a subset of 7 poor responders and 12 good responders, treatment outcome was correctly predicted for 95%. Application of the prediction model on the remaining patient samples resulted in correct prediction for 85%. Phosphosubstrate signatures generated by poor-responding tumors indicated high kinase activity, which was inhibited by the kinase inhibitor sunitinib, and several discriminating phosphosubstrates represented proteins derived from signaling pathways implicated in radioresistance. Conclusions: Multiplex kinase activity profiling may identify functional biomarkers predictive of tumor response to preoperative CRT in LARC.

  16. Associations between red meat and risks for colon and rectal cancer depend on the type of red meat consumed.

    PubMed

    Egeberg, Rikke; Olsen, Anja; Christensen, Jane; Halkjær, Jytte; Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne

    2013-04-01

    Cancer prevention guidelines recommend limiting intake of red meat and avoiding processed meat; however, few studies have been conducted on the effects of specific red meat subtypes on colon cancer or rectal cancer risk. The study aim was to evaluate associations between intake of red meat and its subtypes, processed meat, fish, and poultry and risk for colon cancer or rectal cancer in the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort study. We also evaluated whether fish or poultry should replace red meat intake to prevent colon cancer or rectal cancer. During follow-up (13.4 y), 644 cases of colon cancer and 345 cases of rectal cancer occurred among 53,988 participants. Cox proportional hazards models were used to compute incidence rate ratio (IRRs) and 95% CIs. No associations were found between intake of red meat, processed meat, fish, or poultry and risk for colon cancer or rectal cancer. The risk associated with specific red meat subtypes depended on the animal of origin and cancer subsite; thus, the risk for colon cancer was significantly elevated for higher intake of lamb [IRR(per 5g/d) = 1.07 (95% CI: 1.02-1.13)], whereas the risk for rectal cancer was elevated for higher intake of pork [IRR(per 25g/d) = 1.18 (95% CI: 1.02-1.36)]. Substitution of fish for red meat was associated with a significantly lower risk for colon cancer [IRR(per 25g/d) = 0.89 (95% CI: 0.80-0.99)] but not rectal cancer. Substitution of poultry for red meat did not reduce either risk. This study suggests that the risks for colon cancer and potentially for rectal cancer differ according to the specific red meat subtype consumed.

  17. Tumor Volume Reduction Rate Measured by Magnetic Resonance Volumetry Correlated With Pathologic Tumor Response of Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Seung-Gu; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Jung, Kyung Hae; Hong, Yong Sang; Chang, Hee Jin; Park, Ji Won; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the tumor volume reduction rate (TVRR) measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry correlates with the pathologic tumor response after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study included 405 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (cT3-T4) who had undergone preoperative CRT and radical proctectomy. The tumor volume was measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry before and after CRT but before surgery. We analyzed the correlation between the TVRR and the pathologic tumor response in terms of downstaging and tumor regression grade (TRG). Downstaging was defined as ypStage 0-I (ypT0-T2N0M0), and the TRG proposed by Dworak et al. was used. Results: The mean TVRR was 65.0% {+-} 22.3%. Downstaging and complete regression occurred in 167 (41.2%) and 58 (14.3%) patients, respectively. The TVRRs according to ypT classification (ypT0-T2 vs. ypT3-T4), ypN classification (ypN0 vs. ypN1-N2), downstaging (ypStage 0-I vs. ypStage II-III), good regression (TRG 3-4 vs. TRG 1-2), and complete regression (TRG 4 vs. TRG 1-3) were all significantly different (p <.05). When the TVRR was categorized into three groups (<60%, 60-80%, and >80%), the rates of ypT0-T2, ypN0, downstaging, and good regression were all significantly greater for patients with a TVRR of {>=}60%, as was the complete regression rate for patients with a TVRR >80% (p <.05). Conclusion: The TVRR measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry correlated significantly with the pathologic tumor response in terms of downstaging and TRG after preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer.

  18. Bladder and rectal complications following radiotherapy for cervix cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stryker, J.A.; Bartholomew, M.; Velkley, D.E.; Cunningham, D.E.; Mortel, R.; Craycraft, G.; Shafer, J.

    1988-01-01

    One-hundred and thirty-two patients with cervix carcinoma who were treated with whole pelvis irradiation and two intracavitary applications had bladder and rectal dosimetry during brachytherapy with contrast agents placed into the bladder and rectum prior to orthogonal simulator radiographs. Doses were computer calculated at points A and B, F (bladder), R1 (rectum), and R2 (rectosigmoid). Late occurring bladder and rectal complications were graded on a severity scale of 1 to 3, and 14% had grade 2 or 3 injuries (9% developed fistulas). Statistical evaluation of the data showed that severe bladder and rectal injuries occur more commonly in stage IIIA and IIIB disease and in those receiving high external beam doses (5000 rad +). Analysis of variance tests revealed a significant correlation of brachytherapy dose to points R1 and R2 with severe rectal injuries but there was not a correlation of dose to F with bladder injuries. Nor was there correlation of injuries with dose to point A or the milligram-hour dose. We conclude that our technique for rectal dosimetry is adequate but that an improved technique of bladder dosimetry is needed. Also, when combining whole pelvis irradiation with two intracavitary applications (4000 rad to point A), the whole pelvis dose should probably not exceed 4000-4500 rad.

  19. Preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer: a comparative study of quality control adherence at two cancer hospitals in Spain and Poland

    PubMed Central

    Fundowicz, Magdalena; Macia, Miguel; Marin, Susanna; Bogusz-Czerniewicz, Marta; Konstanty, Ewelina; Modolel, Ignaci; Malicki, Julian; Guedea, Ferran

    2014-01-01

    Background We performed a clinical audit of preoperative rectal cancer treatment at two European radiotherapy centres (Poland and Spain). The aim was to independently verify adherence to a selection of indicators of treatment quality and to identify any notable inter-institutional differences. Methods A total of 162 patients, in Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO) 68 and in Greater Poland Cancer Centre (GPCC) 94, diagnosed with locally advanced rectal cancer and treated with preoperative radiotherapy or radio-chemotherapy were included in retrospective study. A total of 7 quality control measures were evaluated: waiting time, multidisciplinary treatment approach, portal verification, in vivo dosimetry, informed consent, guidelines for diagnostics and therapy, and patient monitoring during treatment. Results Several differences were observed. Waiting time from pathomorphological diagnosis to initial consultation was 31 (ICO) vs. 8 (GPCC) days. Waiting time from the first visit to the beginning of the treatment was twice as long at the ICO. At the ICO, 82% of patient experienced treatment interruptions. The protocol for portal verification was the same at both institutions. In vivo dosimetry is not used for this treatment localization at the ICO. The ICO utilizes locally-developed guidelines for diagnostics and therapy, while the GPCC is currently developing its own guidelines. Conclusions An independent external clinical audit is an excellent approach to identifying and resolving deficiencies in quality control procedures. We identified several procedures amenable to improvement. Both institutions have since implemented changes to improve quality standards. We believe that all radiotherapy centres should perform a comprehensive clinical audit to identify and rectify deficiencies. PMID:24991212

  20. Cross-Linked Hyaluronan Gel Reduces the Acute Rectal Toxicity of Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, Richard B.; Barme, Greg A.; Gilbert, Ronald F.; Holevas, Richard E.; Kobashi, Luis I.; Reed, Richard R.; Solomon, Ronald S.; Walter, Nancy L.; Chittenden, Lucy; Mesa, Albert V.; Agustin, Jeffrey; Lizarde, Jessica; Macedo, Jorge; Ravera, John; Tokita, Kenneth M.

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To prospectively analyze whether cross-linked hyaluronan gel reduces the mean rectal dose and acute rectal toxicity of radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 2008 and March 2009, we transperitoneally injected 9mL of cross-linked hyaluronan gel (Hylaform; Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, MA) into the anterior perirectal fat of 10 early-stage prostate cancer patients to increase the separation between the prostate and rectum by 8 to 18mm at the start of radiotherapy. Patients then underwent high-dose rate brachytherapy to 2,200cGy followed by intensity-modulated radiation therapy to 5,040cGy. We assessed acute rectal toxicity using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 grading scheme. Results: Median follow-up was 3 months. The anteroposterior dimensions of Hylaform at the start and end of radiotherapy were 13 {+-} 3mm (mean {+-} SD) and 10 {+-} 4mm, respectively. At the start of intensity-modulated radiation therapy, daily mean rectal doses were 73 {+-} 13cGy with Hylaform vs. 106 {+-} 20cGy without Hylaform (p = 0.005). There was a 0% incidence of National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 Grade 1, 2, or 3 acute diarrhea in 10 patients who received Hylaform vs. a 29.7% incidence (n = 71) in 239 historical controls who did not receive Hylaform (p = 0.04). Conclusions: By increasing the separation between the prostate and rectum, Hylaform decreased the mean rectal dose. This led to a significant reduction in the acute rectal toxicity of radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

  1. Critical analysis of the literature investigating urogenital function preservation following robotic rectal cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Panteleimonitis, Sofoklis; Ahmed, Jamil; Harper, Mick; Parvaiz, Amjad

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyses the current literature regarding the urogenital functional outcomes of patients receiving robotic rectal cancer surgery. METHODS A comprehensive literature search of electronic databases was performed in October 2015. The following search terms were applied: “rectal cancer” or “colorectal cancer” and robot* or “da Vinci” and sexual or urolog* or urinary or erect* or ejaculat* or impot* or incontinence. All original studies examining the urological and/or sexual outcomes of male and/or female patients receiving robotic rectal cancer surgery were included. Reference lists of all retrieved articles were manually searched for further relevant articles. Abstracts were independently searched by two authors. RESULTS Fifteen original studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. A total of 1338 patients were included; 818 received robotic, 498 laparoscopic and 22 open rectal cancer surgery. Only 726 (54%) patients had their urogenital function assessed via means of validated functional questionnaires. From the included studies, three found that robotic rectal cancer surgery leads to quicker recovery of male urological function and five of male sexual function as compared to laparoscopic surgery. It is unclear whether robotic surgery offers favourable urogenital outcomes in the long run for males. In female patients only two studies assessed urological and three sexual function independently to that of males. In these studies there was no difference identified between patients receiving robotic and laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery. However, in females the presented evidence was very limited making it impossible to draw any substantial conclusions. CONCLUSION There seems to be a trend towards earlier recovery of male urogenital function following robotic surgery. To evaluate this further, larger well designed studies are required. PMID:27933136

  2. Pathological Assessment of Rectal Cancer after Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy: Distribution of Residual Cancer Cells and Accuracy of Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lin; Yu, Xin; Deng, Wenjing; Feng, Huixia; Chang, Hui; Xiao, Weiwei; Zhang, Huizhong; Xi, Shaoyan; Liu, Mengzhong; Zhu, Yujia; Gao, Yuanhong

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the distribution of residual cancer cells (RCCs) within different layers of the bowel wall in surgical specimens and the value of biopsies of primary rectal lesion after preoperative volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with concurrent chemotherapy in patients with rectal cancer. Between April 2011 and April 2013, 178 patients with rectal cancer who received preoperative VMAT, concurrent chemotherapy, and surgery were evaluated; 79 of the patients received a biopsy of the primary lesion after chemoradiotherapy and prior to surgery. The distribution of RCCs in the surgical specimens and the sensitivity and specificity of the biopsy of primary rectal lesions for pathological response were evaluated. Fifty-two patients had a complete pathological response in the bowel wall. Of the 120 patients with ypT2-4, the rate of detection of RCCs in the mucosa, submucosa, and muscularis propria was 20%, 36.7%, 69.2%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of biopsies of primary rectal lesions was 12.9% and 94.1%, respectively. After chemoradiotherapy, the RCCs were primarily located in the deeper layers of the bowel wall, and the biopsy results for primary rectal lesions were unreliable due to poor sensitivity. PMID:27721486

  3. Early Proctoscopy is a Surrogate Endpoint of Late Rectal Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ippolito, Edy; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Digesu, Cinzia; Deodato, Francesco; Macchia, Gabriella; Pirozzi, Giuseppe Antonio; Cilla, Savino; Cuscuna, Daniele; Di Lallo, Alessandra; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Mantini, Giovanna; Pacelli, Fabio; Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Numa; Ingrosso, Marcello; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To predict the grade and incidence of late clinical rectal toxicity through short-term (1 year) mucosal alterations. Methods and Materials: Patients with prostate adenocarcinoma treated with curative or adjuvant radiotherapy underwent proctoscopy a year after the course of radiotherapy. Mucosal changes were classified by the Vienna Rectoscopy Score (VRS). Late toxicity data were analyzed according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Comparison between prognosis groups was performed by log-rank analysis. Results: After a median follow-up time of 45 months (range, 18-99), the 3-year incidence of grade {>=}2 rectal late toxicity according to the criteria of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group was 24%, with all patients (24/24; 100%) experiencing rectal bleeding. The occurrence of grade {>=}2 clinical rectal late toxicity was higher in patients with grade {>=}2 (32% vs. 15 %, p = 0.02) or grade {>=}3 VRS telangiectasia (47% vs. 17%, p {<=} 0.01) and an overall VRS score of {>=}2 (31% vs. 16 %, p = 0.04) or {>=}3 (48% vs. 17%, p = 0.01) at the 1-year proctoscopy. Conclusions: Early proctoscopy (1 year) predicts late rectal bleeding and therefore can be used as a surrogate endpoint for late rectal toxicity in studies aimed at reducing this frequent complication.

  4. A long and distant journey: a case of rectal cancer with metastasis to the orbit.

    PubMed

    Pearlman, Michelle; Kwong, Wilson T

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 33-year-old man with acute onset of eye pain and diplopia as the presenting symptoms of rectal cancer with orbital metastasis. Colorectal cancer with orbital metastasis is exceedingly rare with only 7 cases worldwide despite the prevalence of colorectal cancer. The rarity of this presentation may be related to the long path through multiple vascular beds that tumor emboli from the rectum must travel in order to reach the orbit.

  5. Examining the Quality of Rectal Cancer Operative Reports in Teaching Institutions: Is There an Opportunity for Resident Education?

    PubMed

    Parrish, Aaron B; Sanaiha, Yas; Petrie, Beverley A; Russell, Marcia M; Chen, Formosa

    2016-10-01

    The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons rectal cancer checklist describes a set of best practices for rectal cancer surgery. The objective of this study was to assess the quality of operative reports for rectal cancer surgery based on the intraoperative American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons checklist items. Patients undergoing rectal cancer surgery at two public teaching hospitals from 2009 to 2015 were included. A total of 12 intraoperative checklist items were assessed. One hundred and fifty-eight operative reports were reviewed. Overall adherence to checklist items was 55 per cent, and was significantly higher in attending versus resident dictated reports (67% vs 51%, P < 0.01). Senior residents had significantly higher adherence to checklist items than junior residents (55% vs 44%, P < 0.01). However, overall adherence to rectal cancer checklist items was low. This represents an opportunity to improve the quality of operative documentation in rectal cancer surgery, which could also impact the technical quality of the operation itself.

  6. Efficacy Endpoints of Radiation Therapy Group Protocol 0247: A Randomized, Phase 2 Study of Neoadjuvant Radiation Therapy Plus Concurrent Capecitabine and Irinotecan or Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Stuart J.; Moughan, Jennifer; Meropol, Neal J.; Anne, Pramila Rani; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Rashid, Asif; Watson, James C.; Mitchell, Edith P.; Pollock, Jondavid; Lee, R. Jeffrey; Haddock, Michael; Erickson, Beth A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To report secondary efficacy endpoints of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0247, primary endpoint analysis of which demonstrated that preoperative radiation therapy (RT) with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin achieved a pathologic complete remission prespecified threshold (21%) to merit further study, whereas RT with capecitabine plus irinotecan did not (10%). Methods and Materials: A randomized, phase 2 trial evaluated preoperative RT (50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions) with 2 concurrent chemotherapy regimens: (1) capecitabine (1200 mg/m{sup 2}/d Monday-Friday) plus irinotecan (50 mg/m{sup 2}/wk × 4); and (2) capecitabine (1650 mg/m{sup 2}/d Monday-Friday) plus oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}/wk × 5) for clinical T3 or T4 rectal cancer. Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after chemoradiation, then 4 to 6 weeks later, adjuvant chemotherapy (oxaliplatin 85 mg/m{sup 2}; leucovorin 400 mg/m{sup 2}; 5-fluorouracil 400 mg/m{sup 2}; 5-fluorouracil 2400 mg/m{sup 2}) every 2 weeks × 9. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated univariately by the Kaplan-Meier method. Local–regional failure (LRF), distant failure (DF), and second primary failure (SP) were estimated by the cumulative incidence method. No statistical comparisons were made between arms because each was evaluated individually. Results: A total of 104 patients (median age, 57 years) were treated; characteristics were similar for both arms. Median follow-up for RT with capecitabine/irinotecan arm was 3.77 years and for RT with capecitabine/oxaliplatin arm was 3.97 years. Four-year DFS, OS, LRF, DF, and SP estimates for capecitabine/irinotecan arm were 68%, 85%, 16%, 24%, and 2%, respectively. The 4-year DFS, OS, LRF, DF, and SP failure estimates for capecitabine/oxaliplatin arm were 62%, 75%, 18%, 30%, and 6%, respectively. Conclusions: Efficacy results for both arms are similar to other reported studies but suggest that pathologic complete remission is an

  7. New technique of transanal proctectomy with completely robotic total mesorrectal excision for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Gómez Ruiz, Marcos; Palazuelos, Carlos Manuel; Martín Parra, José Ignacio; Alonso Martín, Joaquín; Cagigas Fernández, Carmen; del Castillo Diego, Julio; Gómez Fleitas, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Anterior resection with total mesorectal excision is the standard method of rectal cancer resection. However, this procedure remains technically difficult in mid and low rectal cancer. A robotic transanal proctectomy with total mesorectal excision and laparoscopic assistance is reported in a 57 year old male with BMI 32 kg/m2 and rectal adenocarcinoma T2N1M0 at 5 cm from the dentate line. Operating time was 420 min. Postoperative hospital stay was 6 days and no complications were observed. Pathological report showed a 33 cm specimen with ypT2N0 adenocarcinoma at 2 cm from the distal margin, complete TME and non affected circumferential resection margin. Robotic technology might reduce some technical difficulties associated with TEM/TEO or SILS platforms in transanal total mesorectal excision. Further clinical trials will be necessary to assess this technique.

  8. Significance of Cox-2 expression in rectal cancers with or without preoperative radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pachkoria, Ketevan; Zhang Hong; Adell, Gunnar; Jarlsfelt, Ingvar; Sun Xiaofeng . E-mail: xiao-feng.sun@ibk.liu.se

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy has reduced local recurrence of rectal cancers, but the result is not satisfactory. Further biologic factors are needed to identify patients for more effective radiotherapy. Our aims were to investigate the relationship of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) expression to radiotherapy, and clinicopathologic/biologic variables in rectal cancers with or without radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Cox-2 expression was immunohistochemically examined in distal normal mucosa (n = 28), in adjacent normal mucosa (n = 107), in primary cancer (n = 138), lymph node metastasis (n = 30), and biopsy (n = 85). The patients participated in a rectal cancer trial of preoperative radiotherapy. Results: Cox-2 expression was increased in primary tumor compared with normal mucosa (p < 0.0001), but there was no significant change between primary tumor and metastasis. Cox-2 positivity was or tended to be related to more p53 and Ki-67 expression, and less apoptosis (p {<=} 0.05). In Cox-2-negative cases of either biopsy (p = 0.01) or surgical samples (p = 0.02), radiotherapy was related to less frequency of local recurrence, but this was not the case in Cox-2-positive cases. Conclusion: Cox-2 expression seemed to be an early event involved in rectal cancer development. Radiotherapy might reduce a rate of local recurrence in the patients with Cox-2 weakly stained tumors, but not in those with Cox-2 strongly stained tumors.

  9. Remission of Unresectable Lung Metastases from Rectal Cancer After Herbal Medicine Treatment: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyungsuk; Lee, Sanghun

    2016-01-01

    Lung metastasis is frequent in rectal cancer patients and has a poor prognosis, with an expected three-year survival rate of about 10%. Though western medicine has made great strides in the curative resection of liver metastases, resection of lung metastases has lagged far behind. Many preclinical studies have suggested that herbal treatments block metastasis, but few clinical studies have addressed this topic. We present the case of a 57-year-old Asian male with lung metastases from rectal cancer. He first underwent resection of the primary lesion (stage IIA, T3N0M0) and six cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy. Unfortunately, lung metastases were confirmed about one year later. Palliative chemotherapy was begun, but his disease continued to progress after three cycles and chemotherapy was halted. The patient was exclusively treated with herbal medicine-standardized allergen-removed Rhus verniciflua stokes extract combined with Dokhwaljihwang-tang (Sasang constitutional medicine in Korea). After seven weeks of herbal medicine treatment, the lung metastases were markedly improved. Regression of lung metastases has continued; also, the patient's rectal cancer has not returned. He has been receiving herbal medicine for over two years and very few side effects have been observed. We suggest that the herbal regimen used in our patient is a promising candidate for the treatment of lung metastases secondary to rectal cancer, and we hope that this case stimulates further investigation into the efficacy of herbal treatments for metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

  10. Effect of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy on Locally Advanced Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma: A Propensity Score-Matched Study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan-wu; Lin, Hui-ming; Lu, Xing-rong; Huang, Ying; Xu, Zong-bin; Huang, Sheng-hui; Wang, Xiao-jie

    2017-01-01

    Aims. To compare the surgical and oncological outcomes of rectal mucinous adenocarcinomas treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy versus surgery alone. Methods. A total of 167 locally advanced rectal mucinous adenocarcinoma patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and surgery alone between 2008 and 2014 were matched using propensity score; the surgical and oncological outcomes were compared. Results. Ninety-six patients were matched. Postoperative morbidity was similar between groups. Sphincter preservation rate was higher in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (79.2% versus 60.4%, P = 0.045), especially for tumors ≥ 3 cm but ≤5 cm from the anal verge (75.0% versus 44.0%, P = 0.036). With a median follow-up of 54.8 months, the 5-year overall survival rate (neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy versus surgery alone: 79.6% versus 67.1%; P = 0.599) and disease-free survival rate (75.6% versus 64.2%; P = 0.888) were similar. The 5-year local recurrence rate was lower in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (7.7% versus 26.0%, P = 0.036), while no difference was observed in distant metastasis. A poor response to chemoradiation was associated with higher local recurrence (P = 0.037). Conclusions. Compared with surgery alone, neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy was found to increase the sphincter preservation rate and reduce local recurrence, thus being beneficial for locally advanced rectal mucinous adenocarcinoma patients.

  11. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of radiation therapy-induced microcirculation changes in rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lussanet, Quido G. de . E-mail: qdlu@rdia.azm.nl; Backes, Walter H.; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Padhani, Anwar R.; Baeten, Coen I.; Baardwijk, Angela van; Lambin, Philippe; Beets, Geerard L.; Engelshoven, Jos van; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: Dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) allows noninvasive evaluation of tumor microvasculature characteristics. This study evaluated radiation therapy related microvascular changes in locally advanced rectal cancer by DCE-MRI and histology. Methods and Materials: Dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI was performed in 17 patients with primary rectal cancer. Seven patients underwent 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy radiation therapy (RT) (long RT) before DCE-MRI and 10 did not. Of these 10, 3 patients underwent five fractions of 5 Gy RT (short RT) in the week before surgery. The RT treated and nontreated groups were compared in terms of endothelial transfer coefficient (K{sup PS}, measured by DCE-MRI), microvessel density (MVD) (scored by immunoreactivity to CD31 and CD34), and tumor cell and endothelial cell proliferation (scored by immunoreactivity to Ki67). Results: Tumor K{sup PS} was 77% (p = 0.03) lower in the RT-treated group. Histogram analyses showed that RT reduced both magnitude and intratumor heterogeneity of K{sup PS} (p = 0.01). MVD was significantly lower (37%, p 0.03) in tumors treated with long RT than in nonirradiated tumors, but this was not the case with short RT. Endothelial cell proliferation was reduced with short RT (81%, p = 0.02) just before surgery, but not with long RT (p > 0.8). Tumor cell proliferation was reduced with both long (57%, p < 0.001) and short RT (52%, p = 0.002). Conclusion: Dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI-derived K{sup PS} values showed significant radiation therapy related reductions in microvessel blood flow in locally advanced rectal cancer. These findings may be useful in evaluating effects of radiation combination therapies (e.g., chemoradiation or RT combined with antiangiogenesis therapy), to account for effects of RT alone.

  12. Stage II/III rectal cancer with intermediate response to preoperative radiochemotherapy: Do we have indications for individual risk stratification?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Response to preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer is very heterogeneous. Pathologic complete response (pCR) is accompanied by a favorable outcome. However, most patients show incomplete response. The aim of this investigation was to find indications for risk stratification in the group of intermediate responders to RCT. Methods From a prospective database of 496 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma, 107 patients with stage II/III cancers and intermediate response to preoperative 5-FU based RCT (ypT2/3 and TRG 2/3), treated within the German Rectal Cancer Trials were studied. Surgical treatment comprised curative (R0) total mesorectal excision (TME) in all cases. In 95 patients available for statistical analyses, residual transmural infiltration of the mesorectal compartment, nodal involvement and histolologic tumor grading were investigated for their prognostic impact on disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results Residual tumor transgression into the mesorectal compartment (ypT3) did not influence DFS and OS rates (p = 0.619, p = 0.602, respectively). Nodal involvement after preoperative RCT (ypN1/2) turned out to be a valid prognostic factor with decreased DFS and OS (p = 0.0463, p = 0.0236, respectively). Persistent tumor infiltration of the mesorectum (ypT3) and histologic tumor grading of residual tumor cell clusters were strongly correlated with lymph node metastases after neoadjuvant treatment (p < 0.001). Conclusions Advanced transmural tumor invasion after RCT does not affect prognosis when curative (R0) resection is achievable. Residual nodal status is the most important predictor of individual outcome in intermediate responders to preoperative RCT. Furthermore, ypT stage and tumor grading turn out to be additional auxiliary factors. Future clinical trials for risk-adapted adjuvant therapy should be based on a synopsis of clinicopathologic parameters. PMID:20388220

  13. Clinical significance of radiation-induced CD133 expression in residual rectal cancer cells after chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Aya; Tanaka, Koji; Saigusa, Susumu; Toiyama, Yuji; Morimoto, Yuhki; Fujikawa, Hiroyuki; Iwata, Takashi; Matsushita, Kohei; Yokoe, Takeshi; Yasuda, Hiromi; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Miki, Chikao; Kusunoki, Masato

    2012-03-01

    CD133 and CD44 have been considered as markers for colorectal cancer stem cells (CSCs). The association of CD133 and CD44 expression with radiation has not been fully examined in rectal cancer. Both CD133 (PROM) and CD44 mRNA levels were measured in post-chemoradiotherapy (CRT) specimens of 52 rectal cancer patients using real-time RT-PCR and compared to clinicopathological variables and clinical outcome. Their protein levels were examined in the radiation-treated HT29 human colon cancer cell line. Post-CRT CD133 in residual cancer cells was significantly higher than matched pre-CRT CD133 in biopsy specimens (n=30). By contrast, CD44 was significantly lower in post-CRT specimens (P<0.01). CD133 was associated with distant recurrence after CRT followed by surgery (P<0.05). Patients with elevated CD133 in residual cancer cells showed poor disease-free survival (P<0.05). No significant association between post-CRT CD44 and clinical outcome was found. The in vitro study showed that CD133 protein was increased in a radiation dose-dependent manner, despite of the decreased number of clonogenic radiation-surviving cells. CD44 protein was decreased after irradiation. CD133, but not CD44, was increased in radiation-resistant surviving colon cancer cells. Post-CRT CD133 in residual cancer cells may predict metachronous distant recurrence and poor survival of rectal cancer patients after CRT.

  14. Prediction of response to chemoradiation in rectal cancer by a gene polymorphism in the epidermal growth factor receptor promoter region

    SciTech Connect

    Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm . E-mail: kalgsp@vgs.vejleamt.dk; Nielsen, Jens Nederby; Lindebjerg, Jan; Brandslund, Ivan; Jakobsen, Anders

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been associated with radioresistance in solid tumors. Recently a polymorphism in the Sp1 recognition site of the EGFR promoter region was identified. The present study investigated the predictive value of this polymorphism for the outcome of chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study included 77 patients with locally advanced T3 rectal tumors. Treatment consisted of preoperative radiation therapy at a total tumor dose of 65 Gy and concomitant chemotherapy with Uftoral. Blood samples from 63 patients were evaluated for Sp1 -216 G/T polymorphism by polymerase chain reaction analysis. Forty-eight primary tumor biopsies were available for EGFR immunostaining. Patients underwent surgery 8 weeks after treatment. Pathologic response evaluation was performed according to the tumor regression grade (TRG) system. Results: Forty-nine percent had major response (TRG1-2) and 51% moderate response (TRG 3-4) to chemoradiation. The rates of major response were 34% (10/29) in GG homozygote patients compared with 65% (22/34) in patients with T containing variants (p = 0.023). Fifty-eight percent of biopsies were positive for EGFR expression (28/48). The major response rates with regard to EGFR immunostaining were not significantly different. EGFR-positive tumors were found in 83% of the GG homozygote patients compared with 38% of patients with TT or GT variants (p = 0.008). Conclusions: There was a significant correlation between EGFR Sp1 -216 G/T polymorphism and treatment response to chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer. Further investigations of a second set of patient and other treatment schedules are warranted.

  15. Quantitative analysis of rectal cancer by spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. Q.; Wu, X. J.; Tang, T.; Zhu, S. W.; Yao, Q.; Gao, Bruce Z.; Yuan, X. C.

    2012-08-01

    To quantify OCT images of rectal tissue for clinic diagnosis, the scattering coefficient of the tissue is extracted by curve fitting the OCT signals to a confocal single model. A total of 1000 measurements (half and half of normal and malignant tissues) were obtained from 16 recta. The normal rectal tissue has a larger scattering coefficient ranging from 1.09 to 5.41 mm-1 with a mean value of 2.29 mm-1 (std:±0.32), while the malignant group shows lower scattering property and the values ranging from 0.25 to 2.69 mm-1 with a mean value of 1.41 mm-1 (std:±0.18). The peri-cancer of recta has also been investigated to distinguish the difference between normal and malignant rectal tissue. The results demonstrate that the quantitative analysis of the rectal tissue can be used as a promising diagnostic criterion of early rectal cancer, which has great value for clinical medical applications.

  16. Vaccine Therapy With or Without Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Male Breast Cancer; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Intraductal Carcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Invasive Ductal Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  17. Essential Items for Structured Reporting of Rectal Cancer MRI: 2016 Consensus Recommendation from the Korean Society of Abdominal Radiology.

    PubMed

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution rectal MRI plays a crucial role in evaluating rectal cancer by providing multiple prognostic findings and imaging features that guide proper patient management. Quality reporting is critical for accurate effective communication of the information among multiple disciplines, for which a systematic structured approach is beneficial. Existing guides on reporting of rectal MRI are divergent on some issues, largely reflecting the differences in overall management of rectal cancer patients between the United States and Europe. The Korean Society of Abdominal Radiology (KSAR) study group for rectal cancer has developed an expert consensus recommendation regarding essential items for structured reporting of rectal cancer MRI using a modified Delphi method. This recommendation aims at presenting an up-to-date, evidence-based, practical, structured reporting template that can be readily adopted in daily clinical practice. In addition, a thorough explanation of the clinical and scientific rationale underlying the reporting items and their formats is provided. This KSAR recommendation may serve as a useful tool to help achieve more standardized optimal care for rectal cancer patients using rectal MRI.

  18. Essential Items for Structured Reporting of Rectal Cancer MRI: 2016 Consensus Recommendation from the Korean Society of Abdominal Radiology

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution rectal MRI plays a crucial role in evaluating rectal cancer by providing multiple prognostic findings and imaging features that guide proper patient management. Quality reporting is critical for accurate effective communication of the information among multiple disciplines, for which a systematic structured approach is beneficial. Existing guides on reporting of rectal MRI are divergent on some issues, largely reflecting the differences in overall management of rectal cancer patients between the United States and Europe. The Korean Society of Abdominal Radiology (KSAR) study group for rectal cancer has developed an expert consensus recommendation regarding essential items for structured reporting of rectal cancer MRI using a modified Delphi method. This recommendation aims at presenting an up-to-date, evidence-based, practical, structured reporting template that can be readily adopted in daily clinical practice. In addition, a thorough explanation of the clinical and scientific rationale underlying the reporting items and their formats is provided. This KSAR recommendation may serve as a useful tool to help achieve more standardized optimal care for rectal cancer patients using rectal MRI. PMID:28096724

  19. Eastern Canadian Colorectal Cancer Consensus Conference 2013: emerging therapies in the treatment of pancreatic, rectal, and colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Di Valentin, T; Asmis, T; Asselah, J; Aubin, F; Aucoin, N; Berry, S; Biagi, J; Booth, C M; Burkes, R; Coburn, N; Colwell, B; Cripps, C; Dawson, L A; Dorreen, M; Frechette, D; Goel, R; Gray, S; Hammad, N; Jonker, D; Kavan, P; Maroun, J; Nanji, S; Roberge, D; Samson, B; Seal, M; Shabana, W; Simunovic, M; Snow, S; Tehfe, M; Thirlwell, M; Tsvetkova, E; Vickers, M; Vuong, T; Goodwin, R

    2016-02-01

    The annual Eastern Canadian Colorectal Cancer Consensus Conference held in Montreal, Quebec, 17-19 October 2013, marked the 10-year anniversary of this meeting that is attended by leaders in medical, radiation, and surgical oncology. The goal of the attendees is to improve the care of patients affected by gastrointestinal malignancies. Topics discussed during the conference included pancreatic cancer, rectal cancer, and metastatic colorectal cancer.

  20. Eastern Canadian Colorectal Cancer Consensus Conference 2013: emerging therapies in the treatment of pancreatic, rectal, and colorectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Di Valentin, T.; Asmis, T.; Asselah, J.; Aubin, F.; Aucoin, N.; Berry, S.; Biagi, J.; Booth, C.M.; Burkes, R.; Coburn, N.; Colwell, B.; Cripps, C.; Dawson, L.A.; Dorreen, M.; Frechette, D.; Goel, R.; Gray, S.; Hammad, N.; Jonker, D.; Kavan, P.; Maroun, J.; Nanji, S.; Roberge, D.; Samson, B.; Seal, M.; Shabana, W.; Simunovic, M.; Snow, S.; Tehfe, M.; Thirlwell, M.; Tsvetkova, E.; Vickers, M.; Vuong, T.; Goodwin, R.

    2016-01-01

    The annual Eastern Canadian Colorectal Cancer Consensus Conference held in Montreal, Quebec, 17–19 October 2013, marked the 10-year anniversary of this meeting that is attended by leaders in medical, radiation, and surgical oncology. The goal of the attendees is to improve the care of patients affected by gastrointestinal malignancies. Topics discussed during the conference included pancreatic cancer, rectal cancer, and metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:26966404

  1. [A Case of Rectal Stenosis For Gastric Cancer Recurrence Effectively Treated with a Colonic Stent].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yutaka; Ebihara, Ken; Kato, Fumitaka; Makari, Yoichi; Mikami, Johta; Kawase, Tomono; Hamakawa, Takuya; Tsukamoto, Yuki; Fujimori, Masaki; Gobaru, Aya; Mitsudo, Daichi; Yabuta, Takamasa; Nakata, Ken; Tsujie, Masaki; Kitamura, Shinji; Ohzato, Hiroki

    2015-11-01

    A man in his 70s underwent distal gastrectomy and D1 dissection with Roux-en-Y reconstruction in March 2009 for advanced gastric cancer with peritoneal metastasis. He was diagnosed with signet-ring cell carcinoma, Stage Ⅳ(T4a, N3a, H0, P1, CY1, M1) and R2. Seventeen cycles of S-1 plus CDDP were administered from April 2009 to December 2010 and 19 cycles of S-1 monotherapy were administered from January 2011 to March 2014. He developed peritoneal recurrence with serum tumor marker elevation in May 2014. Stenosis of the common bile duct, hydronephrosis, and rectal stenosis in Ra-Rs was observed in June 2014. A bile duct stent and a double J catheter was inserted. A colonic stent (NitiTM, 22 mm×6 cm) was also inserted. He could eat after the surgery and was discharged from the hospital. We suggest that a colonic stent is an effective treatment for colon stenosis due to peritoneal metastasis from gastric cancer.

  2. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Dose constraints for the anterior rectal wall to minimize rectal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Jennifer L.; Buskirk, Steven J.; Heckman, Michael G.; Diehl, Nancy N.; Bernard, Johnny R.; Tzou, Katherine S.; Casale, Henry E.; Bellefontaine, Louis P.; Serago, Christopher; Kim, Siyong; Vallow, Laura A.; Daugherty, Larry C.; Ko, Stephen J.

    2014-04-01

    Rectal adverse events (AEs) are a major concern with definitive radiotherapy (RT) treatment for prostate cancer. The anterior rectal wall is at the greatest risk of injury as it lies closest to the target volume and receives the highest dose of RT. This study evaluated the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall receiving a high dose to identify potential ideal dose constraints that can minimize rectal AEs. A total of 111 consecutive patients with Stage T1c to T3a N0 M0 prostate cancer who underwent image-guided intensity-modulated RT at our institution were included. AEs were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. The volume of anterior rectal wall receiving 5 to 80 Gy in 2.5-Gy increments was determined. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to identify cut points in these volumes that led to an increased risk of early and late rectal AEs. Early AEs occurred in most patients (88%); however, relatively few of them (13%) were grade ≥2. At 5 years, the cumulative incidence of late rectal AEs was 37%, with only 5% being grade ≥2. For almost all RT doses, we identified a threshold of irradiated absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which there was at least a trend toward a significantly higher rate of AEs. Most strikingly, patients with more than 1.29, 0.73, or 0.45 cm{sup 3} of anterior rectal wall exposed to radiation doses of 67.5, 70, or 72.5 Gy, respectively, had a significantly increased risk of late AEs (relative risks [RR]: 2.18 to 2.72; p ≤ 0.041) and of grade ≥ 2 early AEs (RR: 6.36 to 6.48; p = 0.004). Our study provides evidence that definitive image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) for prostate cancer is well tolerated and also identifies dose thresholds for the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which patients are at greater risk of early and late complications.

  3. A watch-and-wait approach to the management of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Das, Prajnan; Minsky, Bruce D

    2013-10-01

    There has been increasing interest in whether a watch-and-wait strategy can be pursued instead of routine surgery in selected rectal cancer patients who have a clinical complete response (cCR) after chemoradiation. The watch-and-wait approach could potentially reduce treatment-related toxicity in selected rectal cancer patients. A large study from Brazil and a prospective trial from the Netherlands appear to support this approach, although multiple other studies have raised concerns about the high rate of local recurrence with this strategy. This article reviews current evidence in support of a watch-and-wait approach to rectal cancer management, and discusses the challenges and limitations of this approach. Among these are the facts that current methods of assessing tumor response have limited accuracy, and that a cCR does not necessarily imply pathologic complete response. Careful patient selection and systematic methods of response assessment and follow-up will be critical to the success of nonoperative approaches. Based on the available evidence, ideally a watch-and-wait approach for patients with rectal cancer should be pursued within the context of a prospective clinical trial.

  4. Adjuvant radiotherapy for the treatment of stage IV rectal cancer after curative resection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Sang Jin; Park, Sung-Chan; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Ji Won; Ryoo, Seung-Bum; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Park, Kyu Joo; Oh, Heung Kwon; Kim, Duck-Woo; Kang, Sung-Bum; Joo, Jung Nam; Oh, Jae Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The role of pelvic radiotherapy (RT) in stage IV rectal cancer with total mesorectal excision (TME) has not been defined. We evaluated the impact of RT on oncologic outcomes among patients with stage IV rectal cancer who underwent TME and performed a meta-analysis of published studies. The records of stage IV rectal cancer patients who underwent TME between August 2001 and December 2011 were reviewed. Patients who received pelvic RT (RT group) and those who did not (non-RT group) were matched using a propensity score. Oncologic outcomes were compared between the groups. A systematic literature search and meta-analysis was conducted. One hundred seventy-six patients were matched with propensity score matching, resulting in 39 patients in each group. The local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) of the RT group was significantly higher than that of the non-RT group (2-year LRFS: 100% vs 83.6%, respectively, P = 0.038). The overall survival, disease-free survival, and systemic recurrence were not significantly different between the groups. In the meta-analysis, the RT group had a reduced risk for loco-regional recurrence than the non-RT group (RR: 0.48, 95% confidence interval: 0.29–0.79). Pelvic RT might have benefits for loco-regional control in patients with stage IV rectal cancer who undergo TME. PMID:27893653

  5. Rectal cancer mortality and total hardness levels in Taiwan's drinking water.

    PubMed

    Yang, C Y; Tsai, S S; Lai, T C; Hung, C F; Chiu, H F

    1999-05-01

    The possible association between the risk of rectal cancer and hardness levels in drinking water from municipal supplies was investigated in a matched case-control study in Taiwan. All eligible rectal cancer deaths (986 cases) of Taiwan residents from 1990 through 1994 were compared with deaths from other causes (986 controls), and the hardness levels of the drinking water used by these residents were determined. Data on water hardness throughout Taiwan were collected from Taiwan Water Supply Corporation (TWSC). The control group consisted of people who died from other causes and the controls were pair matched to the cases by sex, year of birth, and year of death. The results show a significant negative relationship between drinking water hardness and rectal cancer mortality. Odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals were 1.24 (1.01-1. 55) and 1.38 (1.10-1.73), respectively, for exposure to moderately hard water and soft water compared with the use of hard water. Trend analyses showed an increasing odds ratio for rectal cancer with decreasing levels of hardness in drinking water. This is an important finding for the Taiwan water industry and human health.

  6. [Evaluation of Intra-abdominal fat distribution using X-ray CT data for detection of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Ogura, Toshihiro; Takatsu, Kazuaki; Negishi, Ryoichi; Koizumi, Kouichi; Satou, Masanori; Yanai, Kazuya; Sasaki, Isamu; Fukuda, Kazuya; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Kouno, Atsushi; Shimomura, Younosuke

    2005-06-20

    To develop a novel method of detecting rectal cancer, we assessed relationships between intra-abdominal fat distribution and rectal cancer in Japanese patients. Subjects comprised 38 patients with rectal cancer apparent on CT-colonography and 110 other cases. The intra-abdominal fat area was determined by calculating pixel distribution with attenuation values from -140 HU to -40 HU. The area of intra-abdominal fat was measured on axial images using an interslice gap of 10 mm. Profile curves of intra-abdominal fat were in the plane direction from diaphragm to anus. Of note is the fact that Ogura's peak, a secondary small peak around the rectal cancer, was apparent on the profile of intra-abdominal fat, with 73.7% of rectal cancers displaying Ogura's peak. In comparison, only 19.1% of other cases displayed Ogura's peak on this profile. The relationship between fat and rectal cancer is difficult to explain. However, making good use of these results showing intra-abdominal fat distribution, a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for detecting rectal cancer according to the presence of Ogura's peak has potential as a method of mass screening. As only 148 cases were investigated in the present study, the accumulation of additional data is needed. More detailed studies with larger patient populations are warranted.

  7. Challenge or opportunity: outcomes of laparoscopic resection for rectal cancer in patients with high operative risk.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ai-Guo; Zhao, Xue-wei; Mao, Zhi-hai; Han, Ding-pei; Zhao, Jing-kun; Wang, Puxiongzhi; Zhang, Zhuo; Zong, Ya-ping; Thasler, Wolfgang; Feng, Hao

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated the impact of laparoscopic rectal cancer resection for patients with high operative risk, which was defined as American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) grades III and IV. This study was conducted at a single center on patients undergoing rectal resection from 2006 to 2010. After screening by ASA grade III or IV, 248 patients who met the inclusion criteria were identified, involving 104 open and 144 laparoscopic rectal resections. The distribution of the Charlson Comorbidity Index was similar between the two groups. Compared with open rectal resection, laparoscopic resection had a significantly lower total complication rate (P<.0001), lower pain rate (P=.0002), and lower blood loss (P<.0001). It is notable that the two groups of patients had no significant difference in cardiac and pulmonary complication rates. Thus, these data showed that the laparoscopic group for rectal cancer could provide short-term outcomes similar to those of their open resection counterparts with high operative risk. The 5-year actuarial survival rates were 0.8361 and 0.8119 in the laparoscopic and open groups for stage I/II (difference not significant), as was the 5-year overall survival rate in stage III/IV (P=.0548). In patients with preoperative cardiovascular or pulmonary disease, the 5-year survival curves were significantly different (P=.0165 and P=.0210), respectively. The cost per patient did not differ between the two procedures. The results of this analysis demonstrate the potential advantages of laparoscopic rectal cancer resection for high-risk patients, although a randomized controlled trial should be conducted to confirm the findings of the present study.

  8. Robotic surgery for rectal cancer: current immediate clinical and oncological outcomes.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Sergio Eduardo Alonso; Seid, Victor Edmond; Klajner, Sidney

    2014-10-21

    Laparoscopic rectal surgery continues to be a challenging operation associated to a steep learning curve. Robotic surgical systems have dramatically changed minimally invasive surgery. Three-dimensional, magnified and stable view, articulated instruments, and reduction of physiologic tremors leading to superior dexterity and ergonomics. Therefore, robotic platforms could potentially address limitations of laparoscopic rectal surgery. It was aimed at reviewing current literature on short-term clinical and oncological (pathological) outcomes after robotic rectal cancer surgery in comparison with laparoscopic surgery. A systematic review was performed for the period 2002 to 2014. A total of 1776 patients with rectal cancer underwent minimally invasive robotic treatment in 32 studies. After robotic and laparoscopic approach to oncologic rectal surgery, respectively, mean operating time varied from 192-385 min, and from 158-297 min; mean estimated blood loss was between 33 and 283 mL, and between 127 and 300 mL; mean length of stay varied from 4-10 d; and from 6-15 d. Conversion after robotic rectal surgery varied from 0% to 9.4%, and from 0 to 22% after laparoscopy. There was no difference between robotic (0%-41.3%) and laparoscopic (5.5%-29.3%) surgery regarding morbidity and anastomotic complications (respectively, 0%-13.5%, and 0%-11.1%). Regarding immediate oncologic outcomes, respectively among robotic and laparoscopic cases, positive circumferential margins varied from 0% to 7.5%, and from 0% to 8.8%; the mean number of retrieved lymph nodes was between 10 and 20, and between 11 and 21; and the mean distal resection margin was from 0.8 to 4.7 cm, and from 1.9 to 4.5 cm. Robotic rectal cancer surgery is being undertaken by experienced surgeons. However, the quality of the assembled evidence does not support definite conclusions about most studies variables. Robotic rectal cancer surgery is associated to increased costs and operating time. It also seems to be

  9. Prognostic Impact of Immunonutritional Status Changes During Preoperative Chemoradiation in Patients With Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Joon; Kim, Woo Ram; Han, Jeonghee; Han, Yoon Dae; Cho, Min Soo; Hur, Hyuk; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies have demonstrated the prognostic impact of the prognostic nutritional index (PNI), a proposed indicator of immunonutritional statuses of surgical patients, on patients with various gastrointestinal cancers. Although the prognostic impact of the PNI on patients with colorectal cancer has been well established, its value has not been studied in patients treated with preoperative chemoradiation (pCRT). This study aimed to evaluate the prognostic impact of PNI on patients receiving pCRT for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods Patients with LARC who underwent curative pCRT followed by surgical resection were enrolled. The PNI was measured in all patients before and after pCRT, and the difference in values was calculated as the PNI difference (dPNI). Patients were classified according to dPNI (<5, 5–10, and >10). Clinicopathologic parameters and long-term oncologic outcomes were assessed according to dPNI classification. Results No significant intergroup differences were observed in clinicopathologic parameters such as age, histologic grade, tumor location, tumor-node-metastasis stage, and postoperative complications. Approximately 53% of the patients had a mild dPNI (<5); only 15% had a high dPNI (>10). Univariate and multivariate analyses identified the dPNI as an independent prognostic factor for disease-free status (P < 0.01; hazard ratio [HR], 2.792; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.577–4.942) and for cancer-specific survival (P = 0.012; HR, 2.469; 95%CI, 1.225–4.978). Conclusion The dPNI is predictive of long-term outcomes in pCRT-treated patients with LARC. Further prospective studies should investigate whether immune-nutritional status correction during pCRT would improve oncologic outcomes. PMID:28119863

  10. [Downstaging after neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer modifies the planned original surgery].

    PubMed

    Scutari, F; Tramutola, G; Morlino, A; Rossi, M T; Manzione, L; Rosati, G; Sopranzi, A

    2008-01-01

    Cancer of the rectum has been for more years burdened with a heavy rate of local relapse about 30%. The introduction of total meso-rectum excision has reduced the rate of up to 5-8%. Later more studies proved how the preoperative radiotherapy was able to reduce the rate of local relapse. The Authors introduce studies about downstaging after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer and discuss about their own series from 2005 to 2007.

  11. Advances in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Levin, Mark

    2003-06-01

    From May 29 to June 5, 2003, the American Society of Clinical Oncology held its 39th Annual Meeting in Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A. The meeting was devoted to the presentation of advances in clinical sciences, diagnosis, prevention and management of malignant disorders, and brings together investigators, clinicians, policy makers and other professionals interested in the science and impact of cancer worldwide. This report will be presented in two parts, the first focusing of colon cancer, and the second on breast cancer will be published in the next issue of Drug News & Perspectives.

  12. Impact of anastomotic leakage on long-term oncologic outcome and its related factors in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Gyoung Tae; Ann, Yeo Shen; Cheong, Chinock; Han, Jeonghee; Cho, Min Soo; Hur, Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Anastomotic leakage (AL) is a well-known cause of morbidity after low anterior resection (LAR) for rectal cancer, but its impact on oncologic outcome is not well understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of AL on long-term oncologic outcome and to identify factors associated with AL that may affect prognosis after LAR for rectal cancer. A retrospective analysis of patients who underwent curative resection for rectal cancer without diverting stoma was performed. To investigate AL related factors that may be associated with oncologic outcome, Clavien-Dindo grades, prognostic nutritional indices (PNI) and inflammatory indices were included. One hundred and one patients out of a total of 1258 patients developed postoperative AL, giving an AL rate of 8.0%. Patients with AL showed poorer disease-free survival (DFS), than patients without AL (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.6; 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 1.1–2.5; P = 0.01). In patients who developed AL, age over 60 (HR = 2.2; 95% CI: 1.1–4.7; P = 0.033), advanced pathologic stage (HR = 2.4; 95% CI: 1.4–4.0; P = 0.001), suppressed neutrophil-proportion (≤80%) (HR = 2.6; 95% CI: 1.2–5.8; P = 0.019) and PNI <36 (HR = 3.5; 95% CI: 1.2–9.6; P = 0.018) were associated with poorer DFS. AL was associated with poorer DFS. In patients with AL, a suppressed neutrophil-proportion and decreased PNI below 36 were associated with tumor recurrence. PMID:27472726

  13. Pretreatment Evaluation of Microcirculation by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predicts Survival in Primary Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    DeVries, Alexander Friedrich; Piringer, Gudrun; Kremser, Christian; Judmaier, Werner; Saely, Christoph Hubert; Lukas, Peter; Öfner, Dietmar

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of the perfusion index (PI), a microcirculatory parameter estimated from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), which integrates information on both flow and permeability, to predict overall survival and disease-free survival in patients with primary rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 83 patients with stage cT3 rectal cancer requiring neoadjuvant chemoradiation were investigated with DCE-MRI before start of therapy. Contrast-enhanced dynamic T{sub 1} mapping was obtained, and a simple data analysis strategy based on the calculation of the maximum slope of the tissue concentration–time curve divided by the maximum of the arterial input function was used as a measure of tumor microcirculation (PI), which integrates information on both flow and permeability. Results: In 39 patients (47.0%), T downstaging (ypT0-2) was observed. During a mean (±SD) follow-up period of 71 ± 29 months, 58 patients (69.9%) survived, and disease-free survival was achieved in 45 patients (54.2%). The mean PI (PImean) averaged over the group of nonresponders was significantly higher than for responders. Additionally, higher PImean in age- and gender-adjusted analyses was strongly predictive of therapy nonresponse. Most importantly, PImean strongly and significantly predicted disease-free survival (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.85 [ 95% confidence interval, 1.35-2.54; P<.001)]; HR adjusted for age and sex, 1.81 [1.30-2.51]; P<.001) as well as overall survival (unadjusted HR 1.42 [1.02-1.99], P=.040; HR adjusted for age and sex, 1.43 [1.03-1.98]; P=.034). Conclusions: This analysis identifies PImean as a novel biomarker that is predictive for therapy response, disease-free survival, and overall survival in patients with primary locally advanced rectal cancer.

  14. Age distribution, polyps and rectal cancer in the Egyptian population-based cancer registry

    PubMed Central

    Veruttipong, Darlene; Soliman, Amr S; Gilbert, Samuel F; Blachley, Taylor S; Hablas, Ahmed; Ramadan, Mohamed; Rozek, Laura S; Seifeldin, Ibrahim A

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To describe the clinical and epidemiologic profiles of the disease and to compare the findings with those generated from the previous hospital-based studies. METHODS: The Gharbiah cancer registry is the only population-based cancer registry in Egypt since 1998. We analyzed the data of all colorectal cancer patients included in the registry for the period of 1999-2007. All medical records of the 1364 patients diagnosed in Gharbiah during the study period were retrieved and the following information abstracted: age, residence, diagnosis date, grade, stage, topology, clinical characteristics, and histology variables. Egyptian census data for 1996 and 2006 were used to provide the general population’s statistics on age, sex, residence and other related demographic factors. In addition to age- and sex-specific incidence rate analyses, we analyze the data to explore the incidence distribution by rural-urban differences among the 8 districts of the province. We also compared the incidence rates of Gharbiah to the rates of the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data of the United States. RESULTS: Over the 9 year-period, 1364 colorectal cancer cases were included. The disease incidence under age 40 years was relatively high (1.3/105) while the incidence in the age groups 40 and over was very low (12.0/105, 19.4/105 and 21.2/105 in the age groups 40-59 years, 60-69 years and > 70 years, respectively). The vast majority of tumors (97.2%) had no polyps and 37.2% of the patients presented with primary lesions in the rectum. Colorectal cancer was more common in patients from urban (55%) than rural (45%) areas. Regional differences in colon and rectal cancer incidence in the 8 districts of the study province may reflect different etiologic patterns in this population. The registry data of Egypt shows a slightly higher incidence of colorectal cancer than the United States in subjects under age 40 years. The results also shows significantly lower incidence of

  15. Random Forests to Predict Rectal Toxicity Following Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ospina, Juan D.; Zhu, Jian; Chira, Ciprian; Bossi, Alberto; Delobel, Jean B.; Beckendorf, Véronique; Dubray, Bernard; Lagrange, Jean-Léon; Correa, Juan C.; and others

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To propose a random forest normal tissue complication probability (RF-NTCP) model to predict late rectal toxicity following prostate cancer radiation therapy, and to compare its performance to that of classic NTCP models. Methods and Materials: Clinical data and dose-volume histograms (DVH) were collected from 261 patients who received 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer with at least 5 years of follow-up. The series was split 1000 times into training and validation cohorts. A RF was trained to predict the risk of 5-year overall rectal toxicity and bleeding. Parameters of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model were identified and a logistic regression model was fit. The performance of all the models was assessed by computing the area under the receiving operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results: The 5-year grade ≥2 overall rectal toxicity and grade ≥1 and grade ≥2 rectal bleeding rates were 16%, 25%, and 10%, respectively. Predictive capabilities were obtained using the RF-NTCP model for all 3 toxicity endpoints, including both the training and validation cohorts. The age and use of anticoagulants were found to be predictors of rectal bleeding. The AUC for RF-NTCP ranged from 0.66 to 0.76, depending on the toxicity endpoint. The AUC values for the LKB-NTCP were statistically significantly inferior, ranging from 0.62 to 0.69. Conclusions: The RF-NTCP model may be a useful new tool in predicting late rectal toxicity, including variables other than DVH, and thus appears as a strong competitor to classic NTCP models.

  16. Laparoscopic vs open abdominoperineal resection in the multimodality management of low rectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Wei; Huang, Li-Yong; Song, Cheng-Li; Zhuo, Chang-Hua; Shi, De-Bing; Cai, Guo-Xiang; Xu, Ye; Cai, San-Jun; Li, Xin-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection compared with the open procedure in multimodality management of rectal cancer. METHODS: A total of 106 rectal cancer patients who underwent open abdominoperineal resection (OAPR) were matched with 106 patients who underwent laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection (LAPR) in a 1 to 1 fashion, between 2009 and 2013 at Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center. Propensity score matching was carried out based on age, gender, pathological staging of the disease and administration of neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Data regarding preoperative staging, surgical technique, pathological results, postoperative recovery and complications were reviewed and compared between the LAPR and OAPR groups. Perineal closure around the stoma and pelvic floor reconstruction were performed only in OAPR, not in LAPR. Therefore, abdominoperineal resection procedure-specific surgical complications including parastomal hernia and perineal wound complications were compared between the open and laparoscopic procedure. Regular surveillance of the two cohorts was carried out to gather prognostic data. Disease-free survival was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier estimate and log-rank test. Subgroup analysis was performed in patients with locally advanced disease treated with preoperative chemoradiation followed by surgical resection. RESULTS: No significant difference was found between the LAPR group and the OAPR group in terms of clinicopathological features. The operation time (180.8 ± 47.8 min vs 172.1 ± 49.2 min, P = 0.190), operative blood loss (93.9 ± 60.0 mL vs 88.4 ± 55.2 mL, P = 0.494), total number of retrieved lymph nodes (12.9 ± 6.9 vs 12.9 ± 5.4, P = 0.974), surgical complications (12.3% vs 15.1%, P = 0.549) and pathological characteristics were comparable between the LAPR and OAPR group, respectively. Compared with OAPR patients, LAPR patients showed significantly shorter postoperative analgesia (2.4 ± 0

  17. Localization of thymidine phosphorylase in advanced gastric and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Michiya; Okamoto, Ken; Akimori, Toyokazu; Tochika, Naoshige; Yoshimoto, Tadashi; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Sugimoto, Takeki; Araki, Keijiro

    2004-01-01

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) is known to be more concentrated in human cancer tissues than in adjacent normal tissue based on findings using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunohistochemistry. However, the ultrastructural localization of TP in cancer tissues has not previously been demonstrated. We investigated the localization of TP in gastric cancer and colorectal cancer tissue by ELISA, immunohistochemistry, and immunoelectron microscopy. Between April 1997 and May 2000, we obtained surgically resected specimens from 42, 46, and 36 cases of advanced gastric, colon, and rectal cancer, respectively. ELISA demonstrated that the TP level was higher in cancer tissues than in adjacent normal tissue. Immunohistochemically, cancer cells were positive for the enzyme in some cases. However, in a number of cases immunopositive inflammatory cells were also present in cancerous tissues. At the electron microscope level, TP was diffusely distributed in the cytoplasm of cancer cells and in the mitochondria of the neutrophil in gastric cancer tissue. In rectal cancer tissues, cytoplasmic granules in macrophages in cancer tissues were immunoreactive for the TP. These findings suggest that TP is produced by macrophages and exists in neutrophils and cancer cells.

  18. Expression of PRL proteins at invasive margin of rectal cancers in relation to preoperative radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wallin, Asa R.; Svanvik, Joar; Adell, Gunnar; Sun Xiaofeng . E-mail: xiasu@ibk.liu.se

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: PRL-3 (phosphatase of regenerating liver) is involved in metastasis of colorectal cancer; however, its therapeutic implication in cancer patients has not been studied. We investigated the relationships of PRL expression to radiotherapy (RT) in rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression was immunohistochemically examined in distant (n = 36) and adjacent (n = 82) normal mucosa, primary tumor (n = 125), biopsy specimens (n = 96), and lymph node metastasis (n = 30) from rectal cancer patients participating in a clinical trial of preoperative RT. Results: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression was increased from the distant to adjacent mucosa and to the primary tumor (p < 0.05). PRL was highly expressed at the invasive margin in 28% of the primary tumors and 26% of the metastases. In the RT group, strong PRL expression at the invasive margin was related to distant recurrence (p 0.006) and poor survival (p = 0.01), but not in the non-RT group. The survival significance remained even after adjusting for Dukes' stage and differentiation (p = 0.02). Additional multivariate analyses showed that the correlation with prognostic significance of PRL differed between the RT and non-RT groups (p = 0.01). Conclusion: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression (rather than PRL-3 alone) at the invasive margin predicted resistance to RT and unfavorable survival in rectal cancer patients with preoperative RT.

  19. Role of Genetic Polymorphisms in NFKB-Mediated Inflammatory Pathways in Response to Primary Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhugashvili, Maia; Luengo-Gil, Ginés; García, Teresa; González-Conejero, Rocío; Conesa-Zamora, Pablo; Escolar, Pedro Pablo; Calvo, Felipe; Vicente, Vicente; Ayala de la Peña, Francisco

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether polymorphisms of genes related to inflammation are associated with pathologic response (primary endpoint) in patients with rectal cancer treated with primary chemoradiation therapy (PCRT). Methods and Materials: Genomic DNA of 159 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with PCRT was genotyped for polymorphisms rs28362491 (NFKB1), rs1213266/rs5789 (PTGS1), rs5275 (PTGS2), and rs16944/rs1143627 (IL1B) using TaqMan single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping assays. The association between each genotype and pathologic response (poor response vs complete or partial response) was analyzed using logistic regression models. Results: The NFKB1 DEL/DEL genotype was associated with pathologic response (odds ratio [OR], 6.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.78-52.65; P=.03) after PCRT. No statistically significant associations between other polymorphisms and response to PCRT were observed. Patients with the NFKB1 DEL/DEL genotype showed a trend for longer disease-free survival (log-rank test, P=.096) and overall survival (P=.049), which was not significant in a multivariate analysis that included pathologic response. Analysis for 6 polymorphisms showed that patients carrying the haplotype rs28362491-DEL/rs1143627-A/rs1213266-G/rs5789-C/rs5275-A/rs16944-G (13.7% of cases) had a higher response rate to PCRT (OR, 8.86; 95% CI, 1.21-64.98; P=.034) than the reference group (rs28362491-INS/rs1143627-A/rs1213266-G/rs5789-C/rs5275-A/rs16944-G). Clinically significant (grade ≥2) acute organ toxicity was also more frequent in patients with that same haplotype (OR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.11-15.36; P=.037). Conclusions: Our results suggest that genetic variation in NFKB-related inflammatory pathways might influence sensitivity to primary chemoradiation for rectal cancer. If confirmed, an inflammation-related radiogenetic profile might be used to select patients with rectal cancer for preoperative combined-modality treatment.

  20. Role of endoscopic ultrasonography in the loco-regional staging of patients with rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marone, Pietro; de Bellis, Mario; D’Angelo, Valentina; Delrio, Paolo; Passananti, Valentina; Di Girolamo, Elena; Rossi, Giovanni Battista; Rega, Daniela; Tracey, Maura Claire; Tempesta, Alfonso Mario

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis of rectal cancer (RC) is strictly related to both T and N stage of the disease at the time of diagnosis. RC staging is crucial for choosing the best multimodal therapy: patients with high risk locally advanced RC (LARC) undergo surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy (NAT); those with low risk LARC are operated on after a preoperative short-course radiation therapy; finally, surgery alone is recommended only for early RC. Several imaging methods are used for staging patients with RC: computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). EUS is highly accurate for the loco-regional staging of RC, since it is capable to evaluate precisely the mural infiltration of the tumor (T), especially in early RC. On the other hand, EUS is less accurate in restaging RC after NAT and before surgery. Finally, EUS is indicated for follow-up of patients operated on for RC, where there is a need for the surveillance of the anastomosis. The aim of this review is to highlight the impact of EUS on the management of patients with RC, evaluating its role in both preoperative staging and follow-up of patients after surgery. PMID:26140096

  1. Complete Response after Chemoradiotherapy in Rectal Cancer (Watch-and-Wait): Have we Cracked the Code?

    PubMed

    Glynne-Jones, R; Hughes, R

    2016-02-01

    Patients with locally advanced rectal cancer receive preoperative chemoradiation as the standard of care, producing a pathological complete response in 10-20% and a complete clinical response (CCR) in 20-30%. Small observational studies suggest a selective non-operative management with rigorous surveillance is an option and is increasingly being advocated in many parts of the world for patients who achieve a CCR or near CCR. The assumption is that oncological outcomes for good responders, who are observed, compare favourably with patients subjected to radical surgery. Late regrowth of the primary is rare, almost invariably endoluminal and, hence, can be salvaged. However, concerns remain among some surgeons and oncologists regarding the reproducibility of published results in routine practice. We have previously reviewed this topic. The aim of this brief overview was to re-assess the feasibility and safety of a non-operative approach based on the currently available literature. We make recommendations as to the quality of care required to undertake this management. Significant heterogeneity remains in the initial inclusion criteria, staging and restaging methods, study design, timing of assessment, duration and rigour of follow-up of the trials reviewed - all of which obscure the validity of the results.

  2. Predictive Response Value of Pre- and Postchemoradiotherapy Variables in Rectal Cancer: An Analysis of Histological Data.

    PubMed

    Santos, Marisa D; Silva, Cristina; Rocha, Anabela; Nogueira, Carlos; Matos, Eduarda; Lopes, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) followed by curative surgery in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) improves pelvic disease control. Survival improvement is achieved only if pathological response occurs. Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG) proved to be a valid system to measure nCRT response. Potential predictive factors for Mandard response are analyzed. Materials and Methods. 167 patients with LARC were treated with nCRT and curative surgery. Tumor biopsies and surgical specimens were reviewed and analyzed regarding mitotic count, necrosis, desmoplastic reaction, and inflammatory infiltration grade. Surgical specimens were classified according to Mandard TRG. The patients were divided as "good responders" (Mandard TRG1-2) and "bad responders" (Mandard TRG3-5). According to results from our previous data, good responders have better prognosis than bad responders. We examined predictive factors for Mandard response and performed statistical analysis. Results. In univariate analysis, distance from anal verge and ten other postoperative variables related with nCRT tumor response had predictive value for Mandard response. In multivariable analysis only mitotic count, necrosis, and differentiation grade in surgical specimen had predictive value. Conclusions. There is a lack of clinical and pathological preoperative variables able to predict Mandard response. Only postoperative pathological parameters related with nCRT response have predictive value.

  3. Influence of enteral glutamine on inflammatory and hormonal response in patients with rectal cancer during preoperative radiochemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rotovnik Kozjek, N; Kompan, L; Žagar, T; Mrevlje, Ž

    2017-03-08

    We conducted a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study evaluating the influence of 5 weeks' duration of 30 g enteral glutamine supplementation on inflammatory and hormonal responses in 73 patients with rectal cancer undergoing preoperative radiochemotherapy. Plasma levels of inflammatory and hormonal parameters were controlled at the beginning and at the end of supplementation. Enteral glutamine resulted in modulation of inflammatory and hormonal responses as shown by a decreased plasma interleukin 6 and cortisol levels in glutamine compared with placebo group: 5.5±3.8 versus 11.1±19.9 ng/l (P=0.02) for IL-6 and 386±168.4 to 312.7±111.7 nmol/l (P=0.03) for cortisol. We conclude that enteral glutamine exhibits some anti-inflammatory activity and, consequently, leads to a lower hormonal stress response during radiochemotherapy in patients with rectal cancer.European Journal of Clinical Nutrition advance online publication, 8 March 2017; doi:10.1038/ejcn.2017.11.

  4. Does Extending the Waiting Time of Low-Rectal Cancer Surgery after Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Increase the Perioperative Complications?

    PubMed Central

    Timudom, Kittinut; Phothong, Natthawut; Akaraviputh, Thawatchai; Chinswangwatanakul, Vitoon; Pongpaibul, Ananya; Petsuksiri, Janjira; Ithimakin, Suthinee

    2016-01-01

    Background. Traditionally, rectal cancer surgery is recommended 6 to 8 weeks after completing neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Extending the waiting time may increase the tumor response rate. However, the perioperative complication rate may increase. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between extending the waiting time of surgery after neoadjuvant chemoradiation and perioperative outcomes. Methods. Sixty patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by radical resection at Siriraj hospital between June 2012 and January 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Demographic data and perioperative outcomes were compared between the two groups. Results. The two groups were comparable in term of demographic parameters. The mean time interval from neoadjuvant chemoradiation to surgery was 6.4 weeks in Group A and 11.7 weeks in Group B. The perioperative outcomes were not significantly different between Groups A and B. Pathologic examination showed a significantly higher rate of circumferential margin positivity in Group A than in Group B (30% versus 9.3%, resp.; P = 0.04). Conclusions. Extending the waiting to >8 weeks from neoadjuvant chemoradiation to surgery did not increase perioperative complications, whereas the rate of circumferential margin positivity decreased. PMID:27738430

  5. Quality of life in rectal cancer surgery: What do the patient ask?

    PubMed Central

    De Palma, Giovanni D; Luglio, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer surgery has dramatically changed with the introduction of the total mesorectal excision (TME), which has demonstrated to significantly reduce the risk of local recurrence. The combination of TME with radiochemotherapy has led to a reduction of local failure to less than 5%. On the other hand, surgery for rectal cancer is also impaired by the potential for a significant loss in quality of life. This is a new challenge surgeons should think about nowadays: If patients live more, they also want to live better. The fight against cancer cannot only be based on survival, recurrence rate and other oncological endpoints. Patients are also asking for a decent quality of life. Rectal cancer is probably a paradigmatic example: Its treatment is often associated with the loss or severe impairment of faecal function, alteration of body anatomy, urogenital problems and, sometimes, intractable pain. The evolution of laparoscopic colorectal surgery in the last decades is an important example, which emphasizes the importance that themes like scar, recovery, pain and quality of life might play for patients. The attention to quality of life from both patients and surgeons led to several surgical innovations in the treatment of rectal cancer: Sphincter saving procedures, reservoir techniques (pouch and coloplasty) to mitigate postoperative faecal disorders, nerve-sparing techniques to reduce the risk for sexual dysfunction. Even more conservative procedures have been proposed alternatively to the abdominal-perineal resection, like the local excisions or transanal endoscopic microsurgery, till the possibility of a wait and see approach in selected cases after radiation therapy. PMID:26730279

  6. Influence of image slice thickness on rectal dose-response relationships following radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, C.; Thor, M.; Liu, M.; Moissenko, V.; Petersen, S. E.; Høyer, M.; Apte, A.; Deasy, J. O.

    2014-07-01

    When pooling retrospective data from different cohorts, slice thicknesses of acquired computed tomography (CT) images used for treatment planning may vary between cohorts. It is, however, not known if varying slice thickness influences derived dose-response relationships. We investigated this for rectal bleeding using dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the rectum and rectal wall for dose distributions superimposed on images with varying CT slice thicknesses. We used dose and endpoint data from two prostate cancer cohorts treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to either 74 Gy (N = 159) or 78 Gy (N = 159) at 2 Gy per fraction. The rectum was defined as the whole organ with content, and the morbidity cut-off was Grade ≥2 late rectal bleeding. Rectal walls were defined as 3 mm inner margins added to the rectum. DVHs for simulated slice thicknesses from 3 to 13 mm were compared to DVHs for the originally acquired slice thicknesses at 3 and 5 mm. Volumes, mean, and maximum doses were assessed from the DVHs, and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) values were calculated. For each organ and each of the simulated slice thicknesses, we performed predictive modeling of late rectal bleeding using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model. For the most coarse slice thickness, rectal volumes increased (≤18%), whereas maximum and mean doses decreased (≤0.8 and ≤4.2 Gy, respectively). For all a values, the gEUD for the simulated DVHs were ≤1.9 Gy different than the gEUD for the original DVHs. The best-fitting LKB model parameter values with 95% CIs were consistent between all DVHs. In conclusion, we found that the investigated slice thickness variations had minimal impact on rectal dose-response estimations. From the perspective of predictive modeling, our results suggest that variations within 10 mm in slice thickness between cohorts are unlikely to be a limiting factor when pooling multi-institutional rectal dose data that include slice thickness

  7. Engagement of Patients With Advanced Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-15

    End of Life; Advanced Cancer; Lung Neoplasm; Gastric Cancer; Colon Cancer; Glioblastoma Multiforme; Head and Neck Neoplasms; Rectum Cancer; Melanoma; Kidney Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Testicular Neoplasms; Liver Cancer; Cancer of Unknown Origin

  8. Results of intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy containing multimodality treatment for locally unresectable T4 rectal cancer: a pooled analysis of the Mayo Clinic Rochester and Catharina Hospital Eindhoven

    PubMed Central

    Holman, Fabian A.; Haddock, Michael G.; Gunderson, Leonard L.; Kusters, Miranda; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A. P.; van den Berg, Hetty A.; Nelson, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to analyse the pooled results of intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy (IOERT) containing multimodality treatment of locally advanced T4 rectal cancer, initially unresectable for cure, from the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, USA (MCR) and Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven, The Netherlands (CHE), both major referral centers for locally advanced rectal cancer. A rectal tumor is called locally unresectable for cure if after full clinical work-up infiltration into the surrounding structures or organs has been demonstrated, which would result in positive surgical margins if resection was the initial component of treatment. This was the reason to refer these patients to the IOERT program of one of the centers. Methods In the period from 1981 to 2010, 417 patients with locally unresectable T4 rectal carcinomas at initial presentation were treated with multimodality treatment including IOERT at either one of the two centres. The preferred treatment approach was preoperative (chemo) radiation and intended radical surgery combined with IOERT. Risk factors for local recurrence (LR), cancer specific survival, disease free survival and distant metastases (DM) were assessed. Results A total of 306 patients (73%) underwent a R0 resection. LRs and metastases occurred more frequently after an R1-2 resection (P<0.001 and P<0.001 respectively). Preoperative chemoradiation (preop CRT) was associated with a higher probability of having a R0 resection. Waiting time after preoperative treatment was inversely related with the chance of developing a LR, especially after R+ resection. In 16% of all cases a LR developed. Five-year disease free survival and overall survival (OS) were 55% and 56% respectively. Conclusions An acceptable survival can be achieved in treatment of patients with initially unresectable T4 rectal cancer with combined modality therapy that includes preop CRT and IOERT. Completeness of the resection is the most important predictive and

  9. Reduced Acute Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelian, Jason M.; Callister, Matthew D.; Ashman, Jonathan B.; Young-Fadok, Tonia M.; Borad, Mitesh J.; Gunderson, Leonard L.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can reduce dose to small bowel, bladder, and bone marrow compared with three-field conventional radiotherapy (CRT) technique in the treatment of rectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to review our experience using IMRT to treat rectal cancer and report patient clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of patients with rectal cancer who were treated at Mayo Clinic Arizona with pelvic radiotherapy (RT). Data regarding patient and tumor characteristics, treatment, acute toxicity according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v 3.0, tumor response, and perioperative morbidity were collected. Results: From 2004 to August 2009, 92 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-one (66%) patients were treated with CRT, and 31 (34%) patients were treated with IMRT. All but 2 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. There was no significant difference in median dose (50.4 Gy, CRT; 50 Gy, IMRT), preoperative vs. postoperative treatment, type of concurrent chemotherapy, or history of previous pelvic RT between the CRT and IMRT patient groups. Patients who received IMRT had significantly less gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Sixty-two percent of patients undergoing CRT experienced {>=}Grade 2 acute GI side effects, compared with 32% among IMRT patients (p = 0.006). The reduction in overall GI toxicity was attributable to fewer symptoms from the lower GI tract. Among CRT patients, {>=}Grade 2 diarrhea and enteritis was experienced among 48% and 30% of patients, respectively, compared with 23% (p = 0.02) and 10% (p = 0.015) among IMRT patients. There was no significant difference in hematologic or genitourinary acute toxicity between groups. In addition, pathologic complete response rates and postoperative morbidity between treatment groups did not differ significantly. Conclusions: In the management of rectal cancer, IMRT is associated with a

  10. The Impact of Ileostomy-Related Complications on the Multidisciplinary Treatment of Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Phatak, Uma R.; Kao, Lillian S.; You, Y. Nancy; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Skibber, John M.; Feig, Barry W.; Nguyen, Sa; Chang, George J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Radical resection is the primary treatment for rectal cancer. When anastomosis is possible, a temporary ileostomy is used to decrease morbidity from a poorly healed anastomosis. However, ileostomies are associated with complications, dehydration, and need for a second operation. Our purpose was to evaluate the impact of ileostomy related complications on the treatment of rectal cancer. Methods A retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent sphincter preserving surgery between January 2005 and December 2010 at a tertiary cancer center. The primary outcome was the overall rate of ileostomy related complications. Secondary outcomes included complications related to ileostomy status, ileostomy closure, anastomotic complications at primary resection, rate of stoma closure, and completion of adjuvant chemotherapy. Statistical analyses were performed with STATA 12. Results A total of 294 patients were analyzed, 32% (n=95) were women. Two hundred seventy-one (92%) received neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The median tumor distance from the anal verge was 7 centimeters (interquartile range 5-10). Two hundred eighty-one (96%) underwent stoma closure at a median 7 months (interquartile range 5.4 – 8.3). The most common complication related to readmission was dehydration (n=32, 11%). Readmission within 60 days of primary resection was associated with delay in initiating adjuvant chemotherapy (OR 3.01, 95% CI 1.42-6.38, p=0.004). Conclusion Diverting ileostomies created during surgical treatment of rectal cancers are associated with morbidity; however this is balanced against the risk of anastomosis-related morbidity at rectal resection. Given the potential benefit of fecal diversion, patient-oriented interventions to improve ostomy management, particularly during adjuvant chemotherapy, can be expected to yield marked benefits. PMID:24085329

  11. Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer Is Associated With Reduced Serum Testosterone and Increased FSH and LH

    SciTech Connect

    Bruheim, Kjersti Svartberg, Johan; Carlsen, Erik; Dueland, Svein; Haug, Egil; Skovlund, Eva; Tveit, Kjell Magne; Guren, Marianne G.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: It is known that scattered radiation to the testes during pelvic radiotherapy can affect fertility, but there is little knowledge on its effects on male sex hormones. The aim of this study was to determine whether radiotherapy for rectal cancer affects testosterone production. Methods and Materials: All male patients who had received adjuvant radiotherapy for rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified from the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Patients treated with surgery alone were randomly selected from the same registry as control subjects. Serum levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were analyzed, and free testosterone was calculated (N = 290). Information about the radiotherapy treatment was collected from the patient hospital charts. Results: Serum FSH was 3 times higher in the radiotherapy group than in the control group (median, 18.8 vs. 6.3 IU/L, p <0.001), and serum LH was 1.7 times higher (median, 7.5 vs. 4.5 IU/l, p <0.001). In the radiotherapy group, 27% of patients had testosterone levels below the reference range (8-35 nmol/L), compared with 10% of the nonirradiated patients (p <0.001). Irradiated patients had lower serum testosterone (mean, 11.1 vs. 13.4 nmol/L, p <0.001) and lower calculated free testosterone (mean, 214 vs. 235 pmol/L, p <0.05) than control subjects. Total testosterone, calculated free testosterone, and gonadotropins were related to the distance from the bony pelvic structures to the caudal field edge. Conclusions: Increased serum levels of gonadotropins and subnormal serum levels of testosterone indicate that curative radiotherapy for rectal cancer can result in permanent testicular dysfunction.

  12. Salvage high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Pellizzon, Antônio Cássio Assis

    2016-01-01

    For tumors of the lower third of the rectum, the only safe surgical procedure is abdominal-perineal resection. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy is a promising treatment for local recurrence of previously irradiated lower rectal cancer, due to the extremely high concentrated dose delivered to the tumor and the sparing of normal tissue, when compared with a course of external beam radiation therapy. PMID:27403021

  13. Renaissance of contact x-ray therapy for treating rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Gérard, Jean-Pierre; Myint, Arthur Sun; Croce, Olivier; Lindegaard, Jacob; Jensen, Anie; Myerson, Robert; Hannoun-Lévi, Jean-Michel; Marcie, Serge

    2011-07-01

    Contact x-ray therapy (CXRT) with 50 kV has proven to be an efficient radiation therapy technique to achieve local control and rectal preservation for early rectal adenocarcinoma. Despite these results, CXRT has not been used due to the shortage of the no longer manufactured Philips RT 50™ unit. Recently, a new CXRT machine (Papillon 50™) became available on the market. This machine delivers a beam of 50 kV with a dose rate close to 15 Gy/min and has a percentage depth dose of 50% at 6-7 mm. The applicator size varies from 2-3 cm in diameter. Due to the original design of the main tube, treatment delivery is quick and more comfortable for the patients. An online viewing system incorporated in the tube allows a good visualization of the tumor with improved accuracy of radiation delivery. An international collaborative trial (Contact Endoscopic Microsurgery [CONTEM]) was set up to accrue approximately 300 cases of rectal adenocarcinoma staged T1, T2 or early T3 tumors in the UK, France, Denmark and Sweden. This trial should confirm the role of CXRT in curative treatment with organ preservation for early rectal cancers.

  14. Neoadjuvant Treatment Does Not Influence Perioperative Outcome in Rectal Cancer Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Alexis; Weitz, Juergen Slodczyk, Matthias; Koch, Moritz; Jaeger, Dirk; Muenter, Marc; Buechler, Markus W.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To identify the risk factors for perioperative morbidity in patients undergoing resection of primary rectal cancer, with a specific focus on the effect of neoadjuvant therapy. Methods and Materials: This exploratory analysis of prospectively collected data included all patients who underwent anterior resection/low anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection for primary rectal cancer between October 2001 and October 2006. The study endpoints were perioperative surgical and medical morbidity. Univariate and multivariate analyses of potential risk factors were performed. Results: A total of 485 patients were included in this study; 425 patients (88%) underwent a sphincter-saving anterior resection/low anterior resection, 47 (10%) abdominoperineal resection, and 13 (2%) multivisceral resection. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy was performed in 100 patients (21%), and 168 (35%) underwent neoadjuvant short-term radiotherapy (5 x 5 Gy). Patient age and operative time were independently associated with perioperative morbidity, and operative time, body mass index >27 kg/m{sup 2} (overweight), and resection type were associated with surgical morbidity. Age and a history of smoking were confirmed as independent prognostic risk factors for medical complications. Neoadjuvant therapy was not associated with a worse outcome. Conclusion: The results of this prospective study have identified several risk factors associated with an adverse perioperative outcome after rectal cancer surgery. In addition, neoadjuvant therapy was not associated with increased perioperative complications.

  15. Systematic review of prognostic importance of extramural venous invasion in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chand, Manish; Siddiqui, Muhammed RS; Swift, Ian; Brown, Gina

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To systematically review the survival outcomes relating to extramural venous invasion in rectal cancer. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted using PRISMA guidelines. An electronic search was carried out using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane library databases, Google scholar and PubMed until October 2014. Search terms were used in combination to yield articles on extramural venous invasion in rectal cancer. Outcome measures included prevalence and 5-year survival rates. These were graphically displayed using Forest plots. Statistical analysis of the data was carried out. RESULTS: Fourteen studies reported the prevalence of extramural venous invasion (EMVI) positive patients. Prevalence ranged from 9%-61%. The pooled prevalence of EMVI positivity was 26% [Random effects: Event rate 0.26 (0.18, 0.36)]. Most studies showed that EMVI related to worse oncological outcomes. The pooled overall survival was 39.5% [Random effects: Event rate 0.395 (0.29, 0.51)]. CONCLUSION: Historically, there has been huge variation in the prevalence of EMVI through inconsistent reporting. However the presence of EMVI clearly leads to worse survival outcomes. As detection rates become more consistent, EMVI may be considered as part of risk-stratification in rectal cancer. Standardised histopathological definitions and the use of magnetic resonance imaging to identify EMVI will improve detection rates in the future. PMID:26819536

  16. [Different strategies between Japan and other countries for the diagnosis and treatment of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2008-11-01

    In the treatment of rectal cancer, various attempts have been made to reduce the local recurrence rate. In Japan, lateral node dissection (LND) has been widely performed as a standard procedure for lower rectal cancers. Studies since the 1980s have shown that LND reduces the local recurrence rate and improves the survival rate. However, significant sexual or urinary dysfunction has been reported due to impairment of autonomic nerves by LND. To overcome these problems, autonomic nerve-preserving LND has been introduced. At present, autonomic nerve-preserving LND is the standard procedure for the treatment of lower rectal cancers in Japan. On the other hand, radiotherapy combined with total mesorectal excision is the standard procedure in other countries. Survival data also differ between Japan and elsewhere. In Japanese series, the postoperative survival rate is higher than those in other countries. This may be due to differences in the method of lymph node examination, surgical technique, etc. However, this is a very important issue in determining the postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. In Japan, these differences need to be taken into account in determining the postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy regimen.

  17. The intentional oblique transection double stapling technique in anterior resection for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Masafumi; Ikeshima, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Kenichiro; Morita, Keisuke; Uchihara, Tomoyuki; Itouyama, Rumi; Yoshimatsu, Shinichi; Shimada, Shinya; Baba, Hideo

    2017-04-01

    The double stapling technique (DST) is an intestinal reconstruction technique that has been widely adopted in anterior resection (AR) for rectal cancer. However, anastomotic leakage (AL) after the operation remains a major concern for colorectal surgeons. The sharp-angled corner of the remnant rectum that is often created by the ordinary DST can be a risk factor for AL. We have developed a new method of performing intentional oblique transection DST (IOT-DST). Using this technique, the anal side of the rectum is intentionally obliquely transected with linear staplers, and the area of the sharp-angled edge is totally punched out with a circular stapler. Between September 2015 and March 2016, we used the IOT-DST technique in the treatment of 15 consecutive rectal cancer patients and experienced no anastomosis-related complications, including leakage and stenosis. IOT-DST is easy to use and less stressful to perform than other techniques. IOT-DST has the potential to become the standard technique for AR in rectal cancer surgery.

  18. Lack of CD44 variant 6 expression in rectal cancer invasive front associates with early recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Avoranta, Suvi Tuulia; Korkeila, Eija Annika; Syrjänen, Kari Juhani; Pyrhönen, Seppo Olavi; Sundström, Jari Toivo Tapio

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prognostic value of CD44 variant 6 (CD44v6), a membranous adhesion molecule, in rectal cancer. METHODS: Altogether, 210 rectal cancer samples from 214 patients treated with short-course radiotherapy (RT, n = 90), long-course (chemo) RT (n = 53) or surgery alone (n = 71) were studied with immunohistochemistry for CD44v6. The extent and intensity of membranous and cytoplasmic CD44v6 staining, and the intratumoral membranous staining pattern, were analyzed. RESULTS: Membranous CD44v6 expression was seen in 84% and cytoplasmic expression in 81% of the cases. In 59% of the tumors with membranous CD44v6 expression, the staining pattern in the invasive front was determined as “front-positive” and in 41% as “front-negative”. The latter pattern was associated with narrower circumferential margin (P = 0.01), infiltrative growth pattern (P < 0.001), and shorter disease-free survival in univariate survival analysis (P = 0.022) when compared to the “front-positive” tumors. CONCLUSION: The lack of membranous CD44v6 in the rectal cancer invasive front could be used as a method to identify patients at increased risk for recurrent disease. PMID:22969228

  19. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by local excision in clinical T2N0 rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young Seob; Yoon, Yong sik; Lim, Seok-Byung; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Tae Won; Chang, Heung Moon; Park, Jin-hong; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Sang-Wook; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jin Cheon; Kim, Jong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) followed by local excision (LE) is feasible approach in clinical T2N0 rectal cancer patients. Materials and Methods Patients who received PCRT and LE because of clinical T2 rectal cancer within 7 cm from anal verge between January 2006 and June 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. LE was performed in case of a good clinical response after PCRT. Patients’ characteristics, treatment record, tumor recurrence, and treatment-related complications were reviewed at a median follow-up of 49 months. Results All patients received transanal excision or transanal minimally invasive surgery. Of 34 patients, 19 patients (55.9%) presented pathologic complete response (pCR). The 3-year local recurrence-free survival and disease free-survival were 100.0% and 97.1%, respectively. There was no recurrence among the patients with pCR. Except for 1 case of grade 4 enterovesical fistula, all other late complications were mild and self-limiting. Conclusion PCRT followed by an LE might be feasible as an alternative to total mesorectal excision in good responders with clinical T2N0 distal rectal cancer. PMID:27730804

  20. Panitumumab and Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancer After Prior Therapy With Bevacizumab

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-07

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  1. JAK/STAT/SOCS-signaling pathway and colon and rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Martha L.; Lundgreen, Abbie; Kadlubar, Susan A.; Bondurant, Kristina L.; Wolff, Roger K.

    2012-01-01

    The Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling pathway is involved in immune function and cell growth. We evaluated the association between genetic variation in JAK1 (10 SNPs), JAK2 (9 SNPs), TYK2 (5 SNPs), SOCS1 (2 SNPs), SOCS2 (2 SNPs), STAT1 (16 SNPs), STAT2 (2 SNPs), STAT3 (6 SNPs), STAT4 (21 SNPs), STAT5A (2 SNPs), STAT5B (3 SNPs), STAT6 (4 SNPs) with risk of colorectal cancer. We used data from population-based case-control studies (colon cancer n=1555 cases, 1956 controls; rectal cancer n=754 cases, 959 controls). JAK2, SOCS2, STAT1, STAT3, STAT5A, STAT5B, and STAT6 were associated with colon cancer; STAT3, STAT4, STAT6, and TYK2 were associated with rectal cancer. Given the biological role of the JAK/STAT-signaling pathway and cytokines, we evaluated interaction with IFNG, TNF, and IL6; numerous statistically significant associations after adjustment for multiple comparisons were observed. The following statistically significant interactions were observed: TYK2 with aspirin/NSAID use; STAT1, STAT4, and TYK2 with estrogen status; and JAK2, STAT2, STAT4, STAT5A, STAT5B, and STAT6 with smoking status and colon cancer risk; JAK2, STAT6, and TYK2 with aspirin/NSAID use; JAK1 with estrogen status; STAT2 with cigarette smoking and rectal cancer. JAK2, SOCS1, STAT3, STAT5, and TYK2 were associated with colon cancer survival (HRR of 3.3 95% CI 2.01, 5.42 for high mutational load). JAK2, SOCS1, STAT1, STAT4, and TYK2 were associated with rectal cancer survival (HRR 2.80 95 %CI 1.63, 4.80). These data support the importance of the JAK/STAT-signaling pathway in colorectal cancer and suggest targets for intervention. PMID:22121102

  2. Diagnostic value of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in rectal cancer and its correlation with tumor differentiation

    PubMed Central

    SHEN, FU; LU, JIANPING; CHEN, LUGUANG; WANG, ZHEN; CHEN, YUKUN

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a novel imaging modality that can be used to reflect the microcirculation, although its value in diagnosing rectal cancer is unknown. The present study aimed to explore the clinical application of DCE-MRI in the preoperative diagnosis of rectal cancer, and its correlation with tumor differentiation. To achieve this, 40 pathologically confirmed patients with rectal cancer and 15 controls were scanned using DCE-MRI. The Tofts model was applied to obtain the perfusion parameters, including the plasma to extravascular volume transfer (Ktrans), the extravascular to plasma volume transfer (Kep), the extravascular fluid volume (Ve) and the initial area under the enhancement curve (iAUC). Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were plotted to determine the diagnostic value. The results demonstrated that the time-signal intensity curve of the rectal cancer lesion exhibited an outflow pattern. The Ktrans, Kep, Ve, and iAUC values were higher in the cancer patients compared with controls (P<0.05). The intraclass correlation coefficients of Ktrans, Kep, Ve and iAUC, as measured by two independent radiologists, were 0.991, 0.988, 0.972 and 0.984, respectively (all P<0.001), indicating a good consistency. The areas under the ROC curves for Ktrans and iAUC were both >0.9, resulting in a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 93.3% for Ktrans, and of 92.5%, and 93.3% or 100%, for iAUC, respectively. In the 40 rectal cancer cases, there was a moderate correlation between Ktrans and iAUC, and pathological differentiation (0.3rectal cancer and differentiation, and therefore may provide novel insights into the preoperative diagnosis of rectal cancer. PMID:27073650

  3. Risk factors of late rectal bleeding after carbon ion therapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi . E-mail: h_tsuji@nirs.go.jp; Kamada, Tadashi; Hirasawa, Naoki; Yanagi, Takeshi; Mizoe, Jun-Etsu; Akakura, Koichiro; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Shimazaki, Jun; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors for late gastrointestinal (GI) morbidity after hypofractionated carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 2000 and November 2003, a Phase II clinical trial of C-ion RT with a total dose of 66 GyE in 20 fractions was performed on 175 patients with prostate cancer, and the correlations of clinical and dosimetric parameters with the incidence of late GI toxicity in 172 patients who survived for more than 18 months were investigated. Results: Although no Grade 3-4 late morbidities of the rectum were observed, Grade 1 and 2 morbidities developed in 23 (13%) and 4 (2%) patients, respectively. Dose-volume histogram analysis revealed that the percentage of rectal volume receiving 50% of the prescribed dose (V50) was significantly higher in patients with rectal toxicity than without toxicity (13.2 {+-} 5.6% with toxicity; 11.4 {+-} 4.0% without toxicity, p = 0.046). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the use of anticoagulation therapy (p = 0.010) and rectal V50 (p = 0.012) were significant risk factors for the occurrence of Grade 1-2 late GI toxicity. Conclusions: Although C-ion RT with hypofractionation yielded favorable results regarding late GI complication, dosimetric parameter was a very important factor in the occurrence of rectal bleeding after C-ion RT as well as photon beam RT. Our results provide useful information for physicians applying charged particle RT in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  4. Timing Is Everything: What Is the Optimal Duration After Chemoradiation for Surgery for Rectal Cancer?

    PubMed

    Goodman, Karyn A

    2016-09-06

    The Oncology Grand Rounds series is designed to place original reports published in the Journal into clinical context. A case presentation is followed by a description of diagnostic and management challenges, a review of the relevant literature, and a summary of the authors' suggested management approaches. The goal of this series is to help readers better understand how to apply the results of key studies, including those published in Journal of Clinical Oncology, to patients seen in their own clinical practice.A 47-year-old woman was referred for management of a newly diagnosed rectal cancer. She presented with a 2-month history of rectal bleeding and change in bowel habits. She underwent a colonoscopy that demonstrated a 5-cm fungating, friable, and partially obstructing mass in the distal rectum, approximately 5 cm from the anal verge. The tumor was palpable on digital rectal examination on the anterior wall of rectum. The biopsy demonstrated a moderately differentiated invasive adenocarcinoma, microsatellite stable. A staging work-up, including a computed tomography scan of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis, demonstrated rectal wall thickening in the midrectum and small lymph nodes in the left perirectal fat. There was a nonspecific 3-mm right lower lobe pulmonary nodule. Rectal magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a 3-cm mass arising from mid-distal rectum with minimal extension beyond muscularis propria into the mesorectal fat, but without invasion of mesorectal fascia (Fig 1). There were at least three small mesorectal lymph nodes present; the largest rounded node measured up to 5 mm, and no additional pelvic lymphadenopathy was identified. Her carcinoembryonic antigen was 1.1, and all other laboratory studies were within normal limits. She was seen in the Colorectal Multidisciplinary Conference for a discussion of her treatment options.

  5. Predictive biomarkers for response to therapy in advanced colorectal/rectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Payal

    2012-01-01

    Over the past couple of decades, with discovery of novel targeted therapies, and expansion of our understanding of the molecular biology of rectal cancer, there has been an emergence of a wide variety of therapeutic options designed to facilitate a personalized approach for the treatment of this malignancy. A plethora of new prognostic and predictive single genes and proteins are being discovered that may reflect susceptibility and/or resistance to therapy. Pathologic complete response rates occur in 10-16% of patients and have been shown to correlate with both disease-free and overall survival. However, the response to neoadjuvant therapy remains variable and unpredictable. In this review, some of these novel markers are discussed for their potential use as pharmacogenetic predictors for specific therapy, drug toxicity, and disease outcome.

  6. Participation in Activities Associated With Quality of Life for Long-Term Survivors of Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McMullen, Carmit; Liu, Liyan; Bulkley, Joanna E; Hornbrook, Mark C; Wendel, Christopher; Grant, Marcia; Altschuler, Andrea; Temple, Larissa KF; Krouse, Robert S; Herrinton, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Context: Cancer patients’ participation in social, recreational, and civic activities is strongly associated with quality of life (QOL), but these activities are not well integrated into cancer survivorship research or interventions. Objective: Test the hypothesis that for long-term (≥ 5 years) survivors of rectal cancer, clinical factors (type of surgery and bowel function) are associated with long-term participation in activities and that participation in activities is associated with long-term QOL. Design: Observational study with longitudinal and cross-sectional components. Main Outcome Measures: Participation in activities and QOL. Tumor registry records were used to identify patients and obtain clinical data; surveys assessed participation and QOL. Using general linear models, we analyzed participation in activities in relation to type of surgery and bowel function after adjustment for potential confounders. We analyzed overall QOL relative to participation in activities after adjustment. Results: A total of 567 rectal cancer survivors completed a mailed questionnaire. Overall response rate was 61%. The type of operation (p < 0.0001), receipt of radiation therapy (p = 0.002), and bowel function (p < 0.0001) were associated with participation in activities. Participation in activities was the strongest predictor of QOL (p < 0.0001), explaining 20% of the variance (R2) in QOL, with all other variables together accounting for another 18% of the variance. Conclusion: The importance of participation in activities on rectal cancer survivors’ QOL is underappreciated. We recommend revising QOL instruments used in cancer care and research to include questions about participation in activities. Interventions should address maintenance of preferred activities and adoption of new, fulfilling activities. PMID:28241904

  7. Prone-position thoracoscopic resection of posterior mediastinal lymph node metastasis from rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Yasuhiro; Noma, Kazuhiro; Koujima, Takeshi; Maeda, Naoaki; Tanabe, Shunsuke; Ohara, Toshiaki; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi

    2015-02-12

    Mediastinal lymph node metastasis from colorectal cancer is rare, and barely any reports have described resection of this pathology. We report herein a successful thoracoscopic resection of mediastinal lymph node metastasis in a prone position. A 65-year-old man presented with posterior mediastinal lymph node metastasis after resection of the primary rectal cancer and metachronous hepatic metastasis. Metastatic lymph nodes were resected completely using thoracoscopic surgery in the prone position, which provided advantages of minimal invasiveness, good surgical field, and reduced ergonomic burden on the surgeon. Thoracoscopic resection in the prone position was thought to have the potential to become the standard procedure of posterior mediastinal tumors.

  8. Genetic variation in C-reactive protein (CRP) in relation to colon and rectal cancer risk and survival

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Martha L.; Curtin, Karen; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Duggan, David J.; Samowitz, Wade S.; Peters, Ulrike; Caan, Bette J.; Potter, John D.; Ulrich, Cornelia M.

    2011-01-01

    Background C-reactive protein (CRP), a biomarker of inflammation has been shown to be influenced by genetic variation in the CRP gene. Methods In this study, we test the hypothesis that genetic variation in CRP influences both the risk of developing colon and rectal cancer and survival. Two population-based studies of colon cancer (n=1574 cases, 1970 controls) and rectal (n=791 cases, 999 controls) were conducted. We evaluated four CRP tagSNPs: rs1205 (G>A, 3’ UTR); rs1417938 (T>A, intron); rs1800947 (G>C, L184L); and rs3093075 (C>A, 3’ flanking). Results The CRP rs1205 AA genotype was associated with an increased risk of colon cancer (OR 1.3, 95%CI 1.1-1.7), whereas the rs3093075 A allele was associated with a reduced risk of rectal cancer (OR 0.7, 95%CI 0.5-0.9). The strongest association for the rs1205 polymorphism and colon cancer was observed among those with KRAS2 mutations (OR 1.5, 95%CI 1.1-2.0). The CRP rs1205 AA genotype also was associated with an increased risk of CIMP+ rectal tumors (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.2-5.3); conversely, the rs1417938 A allele was associated with a reduced risk of CIMP+ rectal tumors (OR 0.5, 95%CI 0.3-0.9). We observed interactions between CRP rs1800947 and BMI and family history of CRC in modifying risk of both colon and rectal cancer. Conclusions These data suggest that genetic variation in the CRP gene influences risk of both colon and rectal cancer development. PMID:20949557

  9. Phase I-II Study of Fluorouracil in Combination With Phenylbutyrate in Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-31

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  10. Low rectal cancer: Sphincter preserving techniques-selection of patients, techniques and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, Nikoletta; Michail, Othon; Moris, Dimitrios; Griniatsos, John

    2015-07-15

    Low rectal cancer is traditionally treated by abdominoperineal resection. In recent years, several new techniques for the treatment of very low rectal cancer patients aiming to preserve the gastrointestinal continuity and to improve both the oncological as well as the functional outcomes, have been emerged. Literature suggest that when the intersphincteric resection is applied in T1-3 tumors located within 30-35 mm from the anal verge, is technically feasible, safe, with equal oncological outcomes compared to conventional surgery and acceptable quality of life. The Anterior Perineal PlanE for Ultra-low Anterior Resection technique, is not disrupting the sphincters, but carries a high complication rate, while the reports on the oncological and functional outcomes are limited. Transanal Endoscopic MicroSurgery (TEM) and TransAnal Minimally Invasive Surgery (TAMIS) should represent the treatment of choice for T1 rectal tumors, with specific criteria according to the NCCN guidelines and favorable pathologic features. Alternatively to the standard conventional surgery, neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy followed by TEM or TAMIS seems promising for tumors of a local stage T1sm2-3 or T2. Transanal Total Mesorectal Excision should be performed only when a board approved protocol is available by colorectal surgeons with extensive experience in minimally invasive and transanal endoscopic surgery.

  11. Expression of the p73 protein in rectal cancers with or without preoperative radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifer, Daniella; Gao Jingfang; Adell, Gunnar; Sun Xiaofeng . E-mail: xiasu@ibk.liu.se

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate p73 expression in normal mucosa, primary tumor, and metastasis in relation to radiotherapy (RT) response and clinicopathologic/biologic variables in rectal cancers. Methods and Materials: p73 was immunohistochemically examined on biopsies (unirradiated, n = 102), distant (from the large bowel, n = 82), and adjacent (adjacent to primary tumor, n = 89) normal mucosa samples, primary tumors (n = 131), and lymph node metastasis (n = 32) from rectal cancer patients participating in a clinical trial of preoperative RT. Seventy-four patients received surgery alone and 57 received additional RT. Results: Cytoplasmic p73 was increased in the primary tumor compared with the distant or adjacent mucosa (p {<=} 0.0001). Nuclear (p = 0.02) and cytoplasmic (p = 0.003) p73 was higher in irradiated distant mucosa samples than in unirradiated ones, and nuclear p73 tended to be increased in irradiated primary tumors compared with unirradiated ones (p = 0.06). p73 was positively related to cyclooxygenase-2 expression in irradiated tumors (p = 0.03). p73-negative tumors tended to have a lower local recurrence after RT compared with unirradiated cases (p 0.06). Conclusions: Normal epithelial cells seem more sensitive to RT than tumor cells regarding p73 expression. Patients with p73-negative rectal tumors may have a lower risk of local recurrence after RT.

  12. Low rectal cancer: Sphincter preserving techniques-selection of patients, techniques and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriou, Nikoletta; Michail, Othon; Moris, Dimitrios; Griniatsos, John

    2015-01-01

    Low rectal cancer is traditionally treated by abdominoperineal resection. In recent years, several new techniques for the treatment of very low rectal cancer patients aiming to preserve the gastrointestinal continuity and to improve both the oncological as well as the functional outcomes, have been emerged. Literature suggest that when the intersphincteric resection is applied in T1-3 tumors located within 30-35 mm from the anal verge, is technically feasible, safe, with equal oncological outcomes compared to conventional surgery and acceptable quality of life. The Anterior Perineal PlanE for Ultra-low Anterior Resection technique, is not disrupting the sphincters, but carries a high complication rate, while the reports on the oncological and functional outcomes are limited. Transanal Endoscopic MicroSurgery (TEM) and TransAnal Minimally Invasive Surgery (TAMIS) should represent the treatment of choice for T1 rectal tumors, with specific criteria according to the NCCN guidelines and favorable pathologic features. Alternatively to the standard conventional surgery, neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy followed by TEM or TAMIS seems promising for tumors of a local stage T1sm2-3 or T2. Transanal Total Mesorectal Excision should be performed only when a board approved protocol is available by colorectal surgeons with extensive experience in minimally invasive and transanal endoscopic surgery. PMID:26191350

  13. Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Colorectal Cancer or Adenoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-22

    Adenomatous Polyp; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  14. The degree of extramural spread of T3 rectal cancer: an appeal to the American Joint Committee on Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zinicola, R; Pedrazzi, G; Haboubi, N; Nicholls, R J

    2017-01-01

    The T3 category of the TNM classification includes over 60% of all rectal tumours and encompasses the greatest variance in cancer-specific end-points than any other T category. The most recent edition of the cancer staging handbook of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) dated 2010 does not divide T3 tumours into subgroups which reflect cancer-specific outcome more sensitively. The original aim of the present study was to review the literature to assess the influence of the degree of extramural extent of T3 rectal cancer on local recurrence and survival. An article written by the authors was accepted for publication but was withdrawn immediately after they became aware of the publication of the 4th edition of the TNM Supplement by the Union for International Cancer Control dated 2012, which was not accessible by the search system used. This article dealt with the subdivision of the T3 category although this was not included in the most up-to-date AJCC guidelines and was stated to be 'entirely optional'. Medline, PubMed and Cochrane Library searches were performed to identify all studies that investigated the degree of extramural spread and its relationship to survival and local recurrence. Twenty-two studies were identified of which 12 assessed the degree of histopathological extramural spread measured in millimetres. In 18 of the 22 studies the degree of extramural spread was a statistically significant prognostic factor for survival and local recurrence. Analysis of the studies indicated that the subdivision of category T3 rectal cancer into two subgroups of extramural spread ≤ 5 mm or more than 5 mm resulted in markedly different survival and local recurrence rates. The data were insufficient to allow validation of any greater subdivision. Measurement of the extent of extramural spread by MRI before any treatment agreed with the histopathological measurement in the surgical specimen to within 1 mm. The extent of extramural spread in T3 rectal

  15. Robotic and laparoscopic pelvic lymph node dissection for rectal cancer: short-term outcomes of 21 consecutive series

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sung Uk; Saklani, Avanish P.; Hur, Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Lee, Kang Young

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to describe our initial experience and assess the feasibility and safety of robotic and laparoscopic lateral pelvic node dissection (LPND) in advanced rectal cancer. Methods Between November 2007 and November 2012, extended minimally invasive surgery for LPND was performed in 21 selected patients with advanced rectal cancer, including 11 patients who underwent robotic LPND and 10 who underwent laparoscopic LPND. Extended lymphadenectomy was performed when LPN metastasis was suspected on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging even after chemoradiation. Results All 21 procedures were technically successful without the need for conversion to open surgery. The median operation time was 396 minutes (range, 170-581 minutes) and estimated blood loss was 200 mL (range, 50-700 mL). The median length of stay was 10 days (range, 5-24 days) and time to removal of the urinary catheter was 3 days (range, 1-21 days). The median total number of lymph nodes harvested was 24 (range, 8-43), and total number of lateral pelvic lymph nodes was 7 (range, 2-23). Six patients (28.6%) developed postoperative complications; three with an anastomotic leakages, two with ileus and one patient with chyle leakage. Two patients (9.5%) developed urinary incontinence. There was no mortality within 30 days. During a median follow-up of 14 months, two patients developed lung metastasis and there was no local recurrence. Conclusion Robotic and laparoscopic LPND is technically feasible and safe. Minimally invasive techniques for LPND in selected patients can be an acceptable alternative to an open LPND. PMID:24761412

  16. Treatment of rectal cancer by transanal endoscopic microsurgery: Experience with 425 patients

    PubMed Central

    Guerrieri, Mario; Gesuita, Rosaria; Ghiselli, Roberto; Lezoche, Giovanni; Budassi, Andrea; Baldarelli, Maddalena

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To describe our experience in treating rectal cancer by transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM), report morbidity and mortality and oncological outcome. METHODS: A total of 425 patients with rectal cancer (120 T1, 185 T2, 120 T3 lesions) were staged by digital rectal examination, rectoscopy, transanal endosonography, magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography. Patients with T1-N0 lesions and favourable histological features underwent TEM immediately. Patients with preoperative stage T2-T3-N0 underwent preoperative high-dose radiotherapy; from 1997 those aged less than 70 years and in good general health also underwent preoperative chemotherapy. Patients with T2-T3-N0 lesions were restaged 30 d after radiotherapy and were then operated on 40-50 d after neoadjuvant therapy. The instrumentation designed by Buess was used for all procedures. RESULTS: There were neither perioperative mortality nor intraoperative complications. Conversion to other surgical procedures was never required. Major complications (urethral lesions, perianal or retroperitoneal phlegmon and rectovaginal fistula) occurred in six (1.4%) patients and minor complications (partial suture line dehiscence, stool incontinence and rectal haemorrhage) in 42 (9.9%). Postoperative pain was minimal. Definitive histological examination of the 425 malignant lesions showed 80 (18.8%) pT0, 153 (36%) pT1, 151 (35.5%) pT2, and 41 (9.6%) pT3 lesions. Eighteen (4.2%) patients (ten pT2 and eight pT3) had a local recurrence and 16 (3.8%) had distant metastasis. Cancer-specific survival rates at the end of follow-up were 100% for pT1 patients (253 mo), 93% for pT2 patients (255 mo) and 89% for pT3 patients (239 mo). CONCLUSION: TEM is a safe and effective procedure to treat rectal cancer in selected patients without evidence of nodal involvement. T2-T3 lesions require preoperative neoadjuvant therapy. PMID:25071352

  17. Amount, type, and timing of recreational physical activity in relation to colon and rectal cancer in older adults: the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort.

    PubMed

    Chao, Ann; Connell, Cari J; Jacobs, Eric J; McCullough, Marjorie L; Patel, Alpa V; Calle, Eugenia E; Cokkinides, Vilma E; Thun, Michael J

    2004-12-01

    Physical activity has consistently been associated with lower risk of colon cancer, but information is limited on the amount, type, and timing of activities. The relationship between physical activity and rectal cancer is unclear. We examined characteristics of recreational physical activity in relation to colon and rectal cancer in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort of 70,403 men and 80,771 women (median age, 63 years); 940 colon and 390 rectal cancers were identified from enrollment in 1992 to 1993 through August 1999. The multivariate-adjusted rate ratios (95% confidence intervals) associated with any recreational physical activity compared with none were 0.87 (0.71-1.06) for colon cancer and 0.70 (0.53-0.93) for rectal cancer. Colon cancer risk decreased significantly with increasing total hours (P for trend without reference group = 0.007) and metabolic equivalent hours (P for trend = 0.006) per week of activities. No clear decrease in rectal cancer risk was seen with increasing hours per week of physical activity. Rate ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 0.72 (0.52-0.98) for <2 hours, 0.68 (0.47-0.97) for 2 to 3 hours, 0.59 (0.41-0.83) for 4 to 6 hours, and 0.83 (0.59-1.16) for >/=7 hours per week of physical activity compared with none. Past exercise, as reported in 1982, was not associated with risk of either colon or rectal cancer. We conclude that increasing amounts of time spent at recreational physical activity are associated with substantially lower risk of colon cancer and that recreational physical activity is associated with lower risk of rectal cancer in older men and women.

  18. ‘I–We’ boundary fluctuations in couple adjustment to rectal cancer and life with a permanent colostomy

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Molly; Fergus, Karen; Miller, Debbie

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates couples’ adjustment to rectal cancer and a colostomy using the ‘Classification System of Couple Adjustment to Cancer’, a framework delineating fluctuations in couples’ sense of ‘I’ and ‘We’ in response to cancer. Nine couples affected by rectal cancer and adjusting to life with a colostomy were interviewed. A theoretical thematic analysis of the transcripts was conducted; nearly all ‘I–We’ shifts of the Classification System of Couple Adjustment to Cancer were observed – often in unique ways in response to rectal cancer–specific challenges – and one new shift was described. The results provide a novel and experientially grounded means of conceptualizing complex dyadic coping processes. PMID:28070388

  19. Pancreatic Metastasis from Rectal Cancer that was Diagnosed by Endoscopic Ultrasonography-guided Fine Needle Aspiration (EUS-FNA)

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Itsuki; Katanuma, Akio; Yane, Kei; Kin, Toshifumi; Nagai, Kazumasa; Yamazaki, Hajime; Koga, Hideaki; Kitagawa, Koh; Yokoyama, Kensuke; Ikarashi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Kuniyuki; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Omori, Yuko; Shinohara, Toshiya

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic metastasis from colorectal cancer is rare, and there have been only a few reports of its preoperative diagnosis by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) with immunohistochemical staining. We herein describe the case of a 77-year-old woman in whom a solitary mass in the pancreatic tail was detected 11 years after rectal cancer resection. The patient also had a history of pulmonary tumor resection. We performed EUS-FNA and a histopathological examination showed adenocarcinoma with CD20+, CD7-, and CDX2+ (similar to her rectal cancer). EUS-FNA enabled a histopathological examination, including immunohistochemical staining, which helped to confirm the diagnosis of pancreatic and pulmonary metastasis from rectal cancer. PMID:28154274

  20. Use of Valtrac™-Secured Intracolonic Bypass in Laparoscopic Rectal Cancer Resection

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Feng; Chen, Dong; Wang, Danyang; Lin, Jianjiang; Zheng, Shusen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The occurrence of anastomotic leakage (AL) remains a major concern in the early postoperative stage. Because of the relatively high morbidity and mortality of AL in patients with laparoscopic low rectal cancer who receive an anterior resection, a fecal diverting method is usually introduced. The Valtrac™-secured intracolonic bypass (VIB) was used in open rectal resection, and played a role of protecting the anastomotic site. This study was designed to assess the efficacy and safety of the VIB in protecting laparoscopic low rectal anastomosis and to compare the efficacy and complications of VIB with those of loop ileostomy (LI). Medical records of the 43 patients with rectal cancer who underwent elective laparoscopic low anterior resection and received VIB procedure or LI between May 2011 and May 2013 were retrospectively analyzed, including the patients’ demographics, clinical features, and operative data. Twenty-four patients received a VIB and 19 patients a LI procedure. Most of the demographics and clinical features of the groups, including Dukes stages, were similar. However, the median distance of the tumor edge from the anus verge in the VIB group was significantly longer (7.5 cm; inter-quartile range [IQR] 7.0–9.5 cm) than that of the L1 group (6.0 cm; IQR 6.0–7.0 cm). None of the patients developed clinical AL. The comparisons between the LI and the VIB groups were adjusted for the significant differences in the tumor level of the groups. After adjustment, the LI group experienced longer overall postoperative hospital stay (14.0 days, IQR: 12.0, 16.0 days; P < 0.001) and incurred higher costs ($6300 (IQR: $5900, $6600)) than the VIB group (7.0 days, $4800; P < 0.05). Stoma-related complications in the ileostomy group included dermatitis (n = 2), stoma bleeding (n = 1), and wound infection after closure (n = 2). No BAR-related complications occurred. The mean time to Valtrac™ ring loosening was 14.1 ± 3

  1. Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation for Distal Rectal Cancer: 5-Year Updated Results of a Randomized Phase 2 Study of Neoadjuvant Combined Modality Chemoradiation for Distal Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Paulus, Rebecca; Mitchell, Edith; Hanna, Nader; Yuen, Albert; Nichols, Romaine; Yalavarthi, Salochna; Hayostek, Cherie; Willett, Christopher

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of 2 different approaches to neoadjuvant chemoradiation for distal rectal cancers. Methods and Materials: One hundred six patients with T3/T4 distal rectal cancers were randomized in a phase 2 study. Patients received either continuous venous infusion (CVI) of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), 225 mg/m{sup 2} per day, 7 days per week plus pelvic hyperfractionated radiation (HRT), 45.6 Gy at 1.2 Gy twice daily plus a boost of 9.6 to 14.4 Gy for T3 or T4 cancers (Arm 1), or CVI of 5-FU, 225 mg/m{sup 2} per day, Monday to Friday, plus irinotecan, 50 mg/m{sup 2} once weekly × 4, plus pelvic radiation therapy (RT), 45 Gy at 1.8 Gy per day and a boost of 5.4 Gy for T3 and 9 Gy for T4 cancers (Arm 2). Surgery was performed 4 to 10 weeks later. Results: All eligible patients (n=103) are included in this analysis; 2 ineligible patients were excluded, and 1 patient withdrew consent. Ninety-eight of 103 patients (95%) underwent resection. Four patients did not undergo surgery for either disease progression or patient refusal, and 1 patient died during induction chemotherapy. The median time of follow-up was 6.4 years in Arm 1 and 7.0 years in Arm 2. The pathological complete response (pCR) rates were 30% in Arm 1 and 26% in Arm 2. Locoregional recurrence rates were 16% in Arm 1 and 17% in Arm 2. Five-year survival rates were 61% and 75% and Disease-specific survival rates were 78% and 85% for Arm1 and Arm 2, respectively. Five second primaries occurred in patients on Arm 1, and 1 second primary occurred in Arm 2. Conclusions: High rates of disease-specific survival were seen in each arm. Overall survival appears affected by the development of unrelated second cancers. The high pCR rates with 5-FU and higher dose radiation in T4 cancers provide opportunity for increased R0 resections and improved survival.

  2. High Frequency of CD8 Positive Lymphocyte Infiltration Correlates with Lack of Lymph Node Involvement in Early Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Däster, Silvio; Eppenberger-Castori, Serenella; Hirt, Christian; Zlobec, Inti; Delko, Tarik; Nebiker, Christian A.; Soysal, Savas D.; Amicarella, Francesca; Iezzi, Giandomenica; Sconocchia, Giuseppe; Heberer, Michael; Lugli, Alessandro; Spagnoli, Giulio C.; Kettelhack, Christoph; Terracciano, Luigi; Oertli, Daniel; von Holzen, Urs; Tornillo, Luigi; Droeser, Raoul A.

    2014-01-01

    Aims. A trend towards local excision of early rectal cancers has prompted us to investigate if immunoprofiling might help in predicting lymph node involvement in this subgroup. Methods. A tissue microarray of 126 biopsies of early rectal cancer (T1 and T2) was stained for several immunomarkers of the innate and the adaptive immune response. Patients' survival and nodal status were analyzed and correlated with infiltration of the different immune cells. Results. Of all tested markers, only CD8 (P = 0.005) and TIA-1 (P = 0.05) were significantly more frequently detectable in early rectal cancer biopsies of node negative as compared to node positive patients. Although these two immunomarkers did not display prognostic effect “per se,” CD8+ and, marginally, TIA-1 T cell infiltration could predict nodal involvement in univariate logistic regression analysis (OR 0.994; 95% CI 0.992–0.996; P = 0.009 and OR 0.988; 95% CI 0.984–0.994; P = 0.05, resp.). An algorithm significantly predicting the nodal status in early rectal cancer based on CD8 together with vascular invasion and tumor border configuration could be calculated (P < 0.00001). Conclusion. Our data indicate that in early rectal cancers absence of CD8+ T-cell infiltration helps in predicting patients' nodal involvement. PMID:25609852

  3. Rectal Dose-Volume Differences Using Proton Radiotherapy and a Rectal Balloon or Water Alone for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos Mahajan, Chaitali; Fryer, Amber; Indelicato, Daniel; Henderson, Randal H.; McKenzie, Craig C.; Horne, David C.; Chellini, Angela; Lawlor, Paula C.; Li Zuofeng; Oliver, Kenneth; Keole, Sameer

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To describe dose-volume values with the use of water alone vs. a rectal balloon (RB) for the treatment of prostate cancer with proton therapy. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 30 proton plans for 15 patients who underwent CT and MRI scans with an RB or water alone. Simulation was performed with a modified MRI endorectal coil and an RB with 100 mL of water or water alone. Doses of 78-82 gray equivalents were prescribed to the planning target volume. The two groups were compared for three structures: rectum, rectal wall (RW), and rectal wall 7 cm (RW7) at the level of the planning target volume. Results: Rectum and RW volumes radiated to low, intermediate, and high doses were small: rectum V10, 33.7%; V50, 17.3%; and V70, 10.2%; RW V10, 32.4%; V50, 20.4%; and V70, 14.6%. The RB effectively increased the rectal volume for all cases (139.8 {+-} 44.9 mL vs. 217.7 {+-} 32.2 mL (p < 0.001). The RB also decreased the volume of the rectum radiated to doses V10-V65 (p {<=} 0.05); RW for V10-V50; and RW7 for V10-V35. An absolute rectum V50 improvement >5% was seen for the RB in 5 of 15 cases, for a benefit of 9.2% {+-} 2.3% compared with 2.4% {+-} 1.3% for the remaining 10 cases (p < 0.001). Similar benefit was seen for the rectal wall. No benefit was seen for doses {>=}70 gray equivalents for the rectum, RW, or RW7. No benefit of {<=}1% was seen with an RB in 46% for the rectum V70 and in 40% for the rectal wall V70. Conclusions: Rectum and rectal wall doses with proton radiation were low whether using water or an RB. Selected patients will have a small but significant advantage with an RB; however, water alone was well tolerated and will be an alternative for most patients.

  4. Late Side Effects and Quality of Life After Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bruheim, Kjersti; Guren, Marianne G.; Skovlund, Eva; Hjermstad, Marianne J.; Dahl, Olav; Frykholm, Gunilla; Carlsen, Erik; Tveit, Kjell Magne

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: There is little knowledge on long-term morbidity after radiotherapy (50 Gy) and total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer. Therefore, late effects on bowel, anorectal, and urinary function, and health-related quality of life (QoL), were studied in a national cohort (n = 535). Methods and Materials: All Norwegian patients who received pre- or postoperative (chemo-)radiotherapy for rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified. Patients treated with surgery alone served as controls. Patients were without recurrence or metastases. Bowel and urinary function was scored with the LENT SOMA scale and the St. Marks Score for fecal incontinence and QoL with the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30). Results: Median time since surgery was 4.8 years. Radiation-treated (RT+) patients (n = 199) had increased bowel frequency compared with non-radiation-treated (RT-) patients (n = 336); 19% vs. 6% had more than eight daily bowel movements (p < 0.001). In patients without stoma, a higher proportion of RT+ (n = 69) compared with RT- patients (n = 240), were incontinent for liquid stools (49% vs. 15%, p < 0.001), needed a sanitary pad (52% vs. 13%, p < 0.001), and lacked the ability to defer defecation (44% vs. 16%, p < 0.001). Daily urinary incontinence occurred more frequently after radiotherapy (9% vs. 2%, p = 0.001). Radiation-treated patients had worse social function than RT- patients, and patients with fecal or urinary incontinence had impaired scores for global quality of life and social function (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Radiotherapy for rectal cancer is associated with considerable long-term effects on anorectal function, especially in terms of bowel frequency and fecal incontinence. RT+ patients have worse social function, and fecal incontinence has a negative impact on QoL.

  5. MRE11 and ATM Expression Levels Predict Rectal Cancer Survival and Their Association with Radiotherapy Response

    PubMed Central

    Revoltar, Maxine; Lim, Stephanie H.; Tut, Thein-Ga; Abubakar, Askar; Henderson, Chris J.; Chua, Wei; Ng, Weng; Lee, Mark; De Souza, Paul; Morgan, Matthew; Lee, C. Soon; Shin, Joo-Shik

    2016-01-01

    Background Aberrant expression of DNA repair proteins is associated with poor survival in cancer patients. We investigated the combined expression of MRE11 and ATM as a predictive marker of response to radiotherapy in rectal cancer. Methods MRE11 and ATM expression were examined in tumor samples from 262 rectal cancer patients who underwent surgery for rectal cancer, including a sub-cohort of 54 patients who were treated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy. The relationship between expression of the two-protein panel and tumor regression grade (TRG) was assessed by Mann–Whitney U test and receiver operating characteristics area under curve (ROC-AUC) analysis. The association between expression of the two-protein panel and clinicopathologic variables and survival was examined by Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox regression analysis. Results A high score for two-protein combined expression in the tumor center (TC) was significantly associated with worse disease-free survival (DFS) (P = 0.035) and overall survival (OS) (P = 0.003) in the whole cohort, and with DFS (P = 0.028) and OS (P = 0.024) in the neoadjuvant subgroup (n = 54). In multivariate analysis, the two-protein combination panel (HR = 2.178, 95% CI 1.115–4.256, P = 0.023) and perineural invasion (HR = 2.183, 95% CI 1.222–3.899, P = 0.008) were significantly associated with DFS. Using ROC-AUC analysis of good versus poor histological tumor response among patients treated preoperatively with radiotherapy, the average ROC-AUC was 0.745 for the combined panel, 0.618 for ATM alone, and 0.711 for MRE11 alone. Conclusions The MRE11/ATM two-protein panel developed in this study may have clinical value as a predictive marker of tumor response to neoadjuvant radiotherapy, and a prognostic marker for disease-free and overall survival. PMID:27930716

  6. Aspirin as a neoadjuvant agent during preoperative chemoradiation for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Restivo, Angelo; Cocco, Ivana Maria Francesca; Casula, Giuseppe; Scintu, Francesco; Cabras, Francesco; Scartozzi, Mario; Zorcolo, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently, many studies have suggested a possible adjuvant role of aspirin in colorectal cancer, reporting a positive prognostic effect with its use in patients with established disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the anticancer effect of aspirin use during preoperative chemoradiation for rectal cancer. Methods: Two hundred and forty-one patients with stage II–III rectal cancer and candidates for chemoradiation (CRT) were selected and assigned to two groups: group 1, patients taking aspirin at the time of diagnosis, and group 2, all others. Treatment and oncological outcomes were explored. Results: Aspirin use was associated with a higher rate of tumour downstaging (67.6% vs 43.6%, P=0.01), good pathological response (46% vs 19% P<0.001), and a slightly, although not significant, higher rate of complete pathological response (22% vs 13% P=0.196). Aspirin use was also associated with a better 5-year progression-free survival (86.6% vs 67.1% hazard rate (HR)=0.20; 95% CI=0.07–0.60) and overall survival (90.6% vs 73.2% HR=0.21; 95% CI=0.05–0.89). Although chance of local relapse was similar (HR=0.6; 95% CI=0.06–4.5), aspirin use was associated with a lower risk of developing metastasis (HR=0.30; 95% CI=0.10–0.86). Conclusions: Aspirin might have anticancer activity against rectal cancer during preoperative CRT. This finding could be clinically relevant and should be further investigated with randomised trials. PMID:26372700

  7. SPARCL1 Expression Increases With Preoperative Radiation Therapy and Predicts Better Survival in Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kotti, Angeliki Holmqvist, Annica; Albertsson, Maria; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: The secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine-like 1 (SPARCL1) is expressed in various normal tissues and many types of cancers. The function of SPARCL1 and its relationship to a patient's prognosis have been studied, whereas its relationship to radiation therapy (RT) is not known. Our aim was to investigate the expression of SPARCL1 in rectal cancer patients who participated in a clinical trial of preoperative RT. Methods and Materials: The study included 136 rectal cancer patients who were randomized to undergo preoperative RT and surgery (n=63) or surgery alone (n=73). The expression levels of SPARCL1 in normal mucosa (n=29), primary tumor (n=136), and lymph node metastasis (n=35) were determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: Tumors with RT had stronger SPARCL1 expression than tumors without RT (P=.003). In the RT group, strong SPARCL1 expression was related to better survival than weak expression in patients with stage III tumors, independent of sex, age, differentiation, and margin status (P=.022; RR = 18.128; 95% confidence interval, 1.512-217.413). No such relationship was found in the non-RT group (P=.224). Further analysis of interactions among SPARCL1 expression, RT, and survival showed statistical significance (P=.024). In patients with metastases who received RT, strong SPARCL1 expression was related to better survival compared to weak expression (P=.041) but not in the non-RT group (P=.569). Conclusions: SPARCL1 expression increases with RT and is related to better prognosis in rectal cancer patients with RT but not in patients without RT. This result may help us to select the patients best suited for preoperative RT.

  8. [A Case of Rectal Cancer Successfully Treated with Surgery and Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Metachronous Lung Metastases].

    PubMed

    Oshima, Yu; Hosoda, Yohei; Tachi, Hidekazu; Sugimoto, Takashi; Okabe, Asami; Nishiyama, Kazuhiro; Ogura, Nobuko; Komoto, Izumi; Kiyochi, Hidenori; Tsunekawa, Shoji; Tanaka, Toru; Taki, Yoshiro; Imamura, Masayuki

    2016-11-01

    A 64-year-old woman underwent polypectomy for a rectal polyp(Isp). Pathological findings were invasion of the submucosa( 3,500 mm diameter), and she underwent anterior resection for rectal cancer(RS, pT1b, pN0, cM0, Stage I )without adjuvant chemotherapy. Lung masses were found in her right(8mm)and left lung(7mm). The tumors enlarged during the 4 month follow-up period. We decided to perform left partial pneumonectomy. The tumor was diagnosed as a lung metastasis from colon cancer by pathology. Because the right tumor was located towards the center, performing right pneumonectomy would have been quite invasive and we feared occult metastases. We decided to apply SRT(50 Gy)to the right tumor. The tumor shrunk and became a scar after treatment. There were no complications such as radiation pneumonitis. The patient was in good health without any recurrence for 12 months after SRT. Surgical resection is an optimal method to control lung metastasis from colon cancer if the lesion is operable. However, in the case of a tumor centrally located, surgical resection may cause deterioration of lung function. There are also cases with contraindications for surgery due to co-morbidities. In addition, there is no consensus on observation periods to exclude occult metastases. SRT can be an effective treatment for lung metastases from colon cancer when there are bilateral lung metastases and no metastases outside the lungs.

  9. Strategies to evaluate the impact of rectal volume on prostate motion during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Ana Paula Diniz Fortuna; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Giordani, Adelmo José; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo; Segreto, Roberto Araujo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the rectal volume influence on prostate motion during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer. Materials and Methods Fifty-one patients with prostate cancer underwent a series of three computed tomography scans including an initial planning scan and two subsequent scans during 3D-CRT. The organs of interest were outlined. The prostate contour was compared with the initial CT images considering the anterior, posterior, superior, inferior and lateral edges of the organ. Variations in the anterior limits and volume of the rectum were assessed and correlated with prostate motion in the anteroposterior direction. Results The maximum range of prostate motion was observed in the superoinferior direction, followed by the anteroposterior direction. A significant correlation was observed between prostate motion and rectal volume variation (p = 0.037). A baseline rectal volume superior to 70 cm3 had a significant influence on the prostate motion in the anteroposterior direction (p = 0.045). Conclusion The present study showed a significant interfraction motion of the prostate during 3D-CRT with greatest variations in the superoinferior and anteroposterior directions, and that a large rectal volume influences the prostate motion with a cutoff value of 70 cm3. Therefore, the treatment of patients with a rectal volume > 70 cm3 should be re-planned with appropriate rectal preparation. PMID:26929456

  10. Recent Advances in Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Arthur-Quan; Gehrig, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy in the United States, with yearly rates continuing to increase. Most women present with early stage disease; however, advanced disease carries a grave prognosis. As a result, novel therapies are currently under investigation for the treatment of endometrial cancer. These advances include a better understanding of the genetic basis surrounding the development of endometrial cancer, novel surgical therapies, and new molecular targets for the treatment of this disease. This review explores the literature regarding these advancements in endometrial cancer. PMID:28184290

  11. Efficacy of Immunohistochemical Staining in Differentiating a Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Poorly Differentiated Rectal Cancer: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Rami, Sairafi; Han, Yoon Dae; Jang, Mi; Cho, Min Soo; Hur, Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Lee, Kang Young

    2016-01-01

    A rectal carcinoma, including primary an adenosquamous and a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), is a very rare disease, accounting for 0.025% to 0.20% of all large-bowel malignant tumors. Because SCCs have a higher mortality than adenosquamous carcinomas, determining whether the primary rectal cancer exhibits an adenomatous component or a squamous component is important. While differentiating between these 2 components, especially in poorly differentiated rectal cancer, is difficult, specific immunohistochemical stains enable accurate diagnoses. Here, we report the use of immunohistochemical stains to distinguish between the adenomatous and the squamous components in 2 patients with low rectal cancer, a 58-year-old man and a 73-year-old woman, who were initially diagnosed using the histopathologic results for a poorly differentiated carcinoma. These data suggest that using these immunohistochemical stains will help to accurately diagnose the type of rectal cancer, especially for poorly differentiated carcinomas, and will provide important information to determine the proper treatment for the patient. PMID:27626026

  12. Evaluation of Tumor Response after Short-Course Radiotherapy and Delayed Surgery for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rega, Daniela; Pecori, Biagio; Scala, Dario; Avallone, Antonio; Pace, Ugo; Petrillo, Antonella; Aloj, Luigi; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Delrio, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Neoadjuvant therapy is able to reduce local recurrence in rectal cancer. Immediate surgery after short course radiotherapy allows only for minimal downstaging. We investigated the effect of delayed surgery after short-course radiotherapy at different time intervals before surgery, in patients affected by rectal cancer. Methods From January 2003 to December 2013 sixty-seven patients with the following characteristics have been selected: clinical (c) stage T3N0 ≤ 12 cm from the anal verge and with circumferential resection margin > 5 mm (by magnetic resonance imaging); cT2, any N, < 5 cm from anal verge; and patients facing tumors with enlarged nodes and/or CRM+ve who resulted unfit for chemo-radiation, were also included. Patients underwent preoperative short-course radiotherapy with different interval to surgery were divided in three groups: A (within 6 weeks), B (between 6 and 8 weeks) and C (after more than 8 weeks). Hystopatolgical response to radiotherapy was measured by Mandard’s modified tumor regression grade (TRG). Results All patients completed the scheduled treatment. Sixty-six patients underwent surgery. Fifty-three of which (80.3%) received a sphincter saving procedure. Downstaging occurred in 41 cases (62.1%). The analysis of subgroups showed an increasing prevalence of TRG 1–2 prolonging the interval to surgery (group A—16.7%, group B—36.8% and 54.3% in group C; p value 0.023). Conclusions Preoperative short-course radiotherapy is able to downstage rectal cancer if surgery is delayed. A higher rate of TRG 1–2 can be obtained if interval to surgery is prolonged to more than 8 weeks. PMID:27548058

  13. Feasibility of transanal endoscopic total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer: results of a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jae Hwan; Park, Sung Chan; Kim, Min Jung; Park, Byung Kwan; Hyun, Jong Hee; Chang, Hee Jin; Han, Kyung Su

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of transanal total mesorectal excision (TME) in patients with rectal cancer. Methods This study enrolled 12 patients with clinically node negative rectal cancer located 4–12 cm from the anal verge who underwent transanal endoscopic TME with the assistance of single port laparoscopic surgery between September 2013 and August 2014. The primary endpoint was TME quality; secondary endpoints included number of harvested lymph nodes and postoperative complications within 30 days (NCT01938027). Results The 12 patients included 7 males and 5 females, of median age 59 years and median body mass index 24.2 kg/m2. Tumors were located on average 6.7 cm from the anal verge. Four patients (33.3%) received preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Median operating time was 195 minutes and median blood loss was 50 mL. There were no intraoperative complications and no conversions to open surgery. TME was complete or nearly complete in 11 patients (91.7%). Median distal resection and circumferential resection margins were 18.5 mm and 10 mm, respectively. Median number of harvested lymph nodes was 15. Median length of hospital stay was 9 days. There were no postoperative deaths. Six patients experienced minor postoperative complications, including urinary dysfunction in 2, transient ileus in 3, and wound abscess in 1. Conclusion This pilot study showed that high-quality TME was possible in most patients without serious complications. Transanal TME for patients with rectal cancer may be feasible and safe, but further investigations are necessary to evaluate its long-term functional and oncologic outcomes and to clarify its indications. PMID:27757396

  14. Adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer: defining subgroups who may benefit after neoadjuvant chemoradiation and resection

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Monique; Nelemans, Patty J; Valentini, Vincenzo; Crane, Christopher H; Capirci, Carlo; Rödel, Claus; Nash, Garrett M; Kuo, Li-Jen; Glynne-Jones, Rob; García-Aguilar, Julio; Suárez, Javier; Calvo, Felipe A; Pucciarelli, Salvatore; Biondo, Sebastiano; Theodoropoulos, George; Lambregts, Doenja MJ; Beets-Tan, Regina GH; Beets, Geerard L

    2016-01-01

    Recent literature suggests that the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy (aCT) for rectal cancer patients might depend on the response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT). Aim was to evaluate whether the effect of aCT in rectal cancer is modified by response to CRT and to identify which patients benefit from aCT after CRT, by means of a pooled analysis of individual patient data from 13 datasets. Patients were categorised into 3 groups: pCR (ypT0N0), ypT1-2 tumour and ypT3-4 tumour. Hazard ratios for the effect of aCT were derived from multivariable Cox regression analyses. Primary outcome measure was recurrence-free survival (RFS). 1723(52%) of 3313 included patients received aCT. 898 patients had a pCR, 966 had a ypT1-2 tumour and 1302 had a ypT3-4 tumour. For 122 patients response category was missing and 25 patients had ypT0N+. Median follow-up for all patients was 51 (0-219) months. Hazard ratios for RFS with 95%CI for patients treated with aCT were 1.25(0.68-2.29), 0.58(0.37-0.89) and 0.83(0.66-1.10) for patients with pCR, ypT1-2 and ypT3-4 tumours, respectively. The effect of aCT in rectal cancer patients treated with CRT differs between subgroups. Patients with a pCR after CRT may not benefit from aCT, whereas patients with residual tumour had superior outcomes when aCT was administered. The test for interaction did not reach statistical significance, but the results support further investigation of a more individualized approach to administer aCT after CRT and surgery based on pathologic staging. PMID:25418551

  15. Fortune of temporary ileostomies in patients treated with laparoscopic low anterior resection for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Haksal, Mustafa; Okkabaz, Nuri; Atici, Ali Emre; Civil, Osman; Ozdenkaya, Yasar; Erdemir, Ayhan; Aksakal, Nihat

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The current study aims to analyze the risk factors for the failure of ileostomy reversal after laparoscopic low anterior resection for rectal cancer. Methods All patients who underwent a laparoscopic low anterior resection for rectal cancer with a diverting ileostomy between 2007 and 2014 were abstracted. The patients who underwent and did not undergo a diverting ileostomy procedure were compared regarding patient, tumor, treatment related parameters, and survival. Results Among 160 (103 males [64.4%], mean [± standard deviation] age was 58.1 ± 11.9 years) patients, stoma reversal was achieved in 136 cases (85%). Anastomotic stricture (n = 13, 52.4%) was the most common reason for stoma reversal. These were the risk factors for the failure of stoma reversal: Male sex (P = 0.035), having complications (P = 0.01), particularly an anastomotic leak (P < 0.001), or surgical site infection (P = 0.019) especially evisceration (P = 0.011), requirement for reoperation (P = 0.003) and longer hospital stay (P = 0.004). Multivariate analysis revealed that male sex (odds ratio [OR], 7.82; P = 0.022) and additional organ resection (OR, 6.71; P = 0.027) were the risk factors. Five-year survival rates were similar (P = 0.143). Conclusion Fifteen percent of patients cannot receive a stoma reversal after laparoscopic low anterior resection for rectal cancer. Anastomotic stricture is the most common reason for the failure of stoma takedown. Having complications, particularly an anastomotic leak and the necessity of reoperation, limits the stoma closure rate. Male sex and additional organ resection are the risk factors for the failure in multivariate analyses. These patients require a longer hospitalization period, but have similar survival rates as those who receive stoma closure procedure. PMID:28090504

  16. Alterations in Hormone Levels After Adjuvant Chemoradiation in Male Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Frederick H.; Perera, Francisco Fisher, Barbara; Stitt, Larry

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and testosterone levels after postoperative chemoradiation in men with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-three men with rectal cancer had baseline and postchemoradiation FSH, LH, and testosterone measured. Adjuvant chemoradiation consisted of two 5-day cycles of bolus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) every 4 weeks at a dose of 500 mg/m{sup 2}/d followed by concurrent chemoradiation followed by two additional 5-day cycles of 5-FU at a dose of 450 mg/m{sup 2}/d. Continuous-infusion 5-FU at 225 mg/m{sup 2}/d was given during radiation. Pelvic radiation consisted of a three- or four-field technique with a median dose of 54.0 Gy in 30 fractions. Results: Median follow-up was 6.1 years. Mean baseline FSH levels increased from 5.3 to a peak of 23.9 IU/L (p < 0.001) 13-24 months after chemoradiation. Mean baseline LH levels increased from 4.3 to a peak of 8.5 IU/L (p < 0.001) within 6 months after chemoradiation. Mean testosterone levels decreased from 15.4 nmol/L at baseline to 8.0 nmol/L more than 4 years after chemoradiation. Mean testosterone to mean LH ratio decreased from 4.4 at baseline to 1.1 after 48 months posttreatment, suggesting a continued decrease in Leydig cell function with time. Testicular dose was measured in 5 patients. Median dose was 4 Gy (range, 1.5-8.9 Gy). Conclusions: Chemoradiation in men with rectal cancer causes persistent increases in FSH and LH levels and decreases in testosterone levels.

  17. Acute small bowel toxicity and preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer: Investigating dose-volume relationships and role for inverse planning

    SciTech Connect

    Tho, Lye Mun . E-mail: l.tho@beatson.gla.ac.uk; Glegg, Martin; Paterson, Jennifer; Yap, Christina; MacLeod, Alice; McCabe, Marie; McDonald, Alexander C.

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: The relationship between volume of irradiated small bowel (VSB) and acute toxicity in rectal cancer radiotherapy is poorly quantified, particularly in patients receiving concurrent preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Using treatment planning data, we studied a series of such patients. Methods and Materials: Details of 41 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were reviewed. All received 45 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks, 3-4 fields three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with daily 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid during Weeks 1 and 5. Toxicity was assessed prospectively in a weekly clinic. Using computed tomography planning software, the VSB was determined at 5 Gy dose intervals (V{sub 5}, V{sub 1}, etc.). Eight patients with maximal VSB had dosimetry and radiobiological modeling outcomes compared between inverse and conformal three-dimensional planning. Results: VSB correlated strongly with diarrheal severity at every dose level (p < 0.03), with strongest correlation at lowest doses. Median VSB differed significantly between patients experiencing Grade 0-1 and Grade 2-4 diarrhea (p {<=} 0.05). No correlation was found with anorexia, nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, age, body mass index, sex, tumor position, or number of fields. Analysis of 8 patients showed that inverse planning reduced median dose to small bowel by 5.1 Gy (p = 0.008) and calculated late normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) by 67% (p = 0.016). We constructed a model using mathematical analysis to predict for acute diarrhea occurring at V{sub 5} and V{sub 15}. Conclusions: A strong dose-volume relationship exists between VSB and acute diarrhea at all dose levels during preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Our constructed model may be useful in predicting toxicity, and this has been derived without the confounding influence of surgical excision on bowel function. Inverse planning can reduce calculated dose to small bowel and late NTCP, and its clinical role warrants further

  18. Phase I trial of cetuximab in combination with capecitabine, weekly irinotecan, and radiotherapy as neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter . E-mail: ralf.hofheinz@med3.ma.uni-heidelberg.de; Horisberger, Karoline; Woernle, Christoph; Wenz, Frederik; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Kaehler, Georg; Dinter, Dietmar; Grobholz, Rainer; Heeger, Steffen; Post, Stefan; Hochhaus, Andreas; Willeke, Frank

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: To establish the feasibility and efficacy of chemotherapy with capecitabine, weekly irinotecan, cetuximab, and pelvic radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and materials: Twenty patients with rectal cancer (clinical Stage uT3-T4 or N+) received a standard dosing regimen of cetuximab (400 mg/m{sup 2} on Day 1 and 250 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 8, 15, 22, and 29) and escalating doses of irinotecan and capecitabine according to phase I methods: dose level I, irinotecan 40 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29 and capecitabine 800 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1-38; dose level II, irinotecan 40 mg/m{sup 2} and capecitabine 1000 mg/m{sup 2}; and dose level III, irinotecan 50 mg/m{sup 2} and capecitabine 1000 mg/m{sup 2}. Radiotherapy was given to a dose of 50.4 Gy (45 Gy plus 5.4 Gy). Resection was scheduled 4-5 weeks after termination of chemoradiotherapy. Results: On dose level I, no dose-limiting toxicities occurred; however, Grade 3 diarrhea affected 1 of 6 patients on dose level II. Of 5 patients treated at dose level III, 2 exhibited dose-limiting toxicity (diarrhea in 2 and nausea/vomiting in 1). Therefore, dose level II was determined as the recommended dose for future studies. A total of 10 patients were treated on dose level II and received a mean relative dose intensity of 100% of cetuximab, 94% of irinotecan, and 95% of capecitabine. All patients underwent surgery. Five patients had a pathologically complete remission and six had microfoci of residual tumor only. Conclusion: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy with cetuximab, capecitabine, and weekly irinotecan is feasible and well tolerated. The preliminary efficacy is very promising. Larger phase II trials are ongoing.

  19. Short-course radiation versus long-course chemoradiation for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D; Rödel, Claus; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2012-10-01

    The 2 broad approaches to preoperative therapy for rectal cancer are chemoradiation and short-course radiation. The outcomes of these 2 approaches reported in nonrandomized trials are not comparable because patients selected for treatment with short-course radiotherapy included those with cT1-3 disease, whereas patients selected for chemoradiation included those with T3 and/or N+ disease. However, more recent trials of short-course radiation have included patients with cT3 and/or N+ disease who also underwent sequential or postoperative chemotherapy, allowing a more relevant comparison with chemoradiation. This article compares the 2 preoperative approaches and addresses their emerging roles.

  20. Tolerability of Combined Modality Therapy for Rectal Cancer in Elderly Patients Aged 75 Years and Older

    SciTech Connect

    Margalit, Danielle N.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Ryan, David P.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Clark, Jeffrey; Willett, Christopher G.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the rate of treatment deviations during combined modality therapy for rectal cancer in elderly patients aged 75 years and older. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of consecutively treated patients with rectal cancer aged 75 years and older treated with combined modality therapy at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital from 2002 to 2007. The primary endpoint was the rate of treatment deviation, defined as a treatment break, dose reduction, early discontinuation of therapy, or hospitalization during combined modality therapy. Patient comorbidity was rated using the validated Adult Comorbidity Evaluation 27 Test (ACE-27) comorbidity index. Fisher's exact test and the Mantel-Haenszel trend test were used to identify predictors of treatment tolerability. Results: Thirty-six eligible patients had a median age of 79.0 years (range, 75-87 years); 53% (19/36) had no or mild comorbidity and 47% (17/36) had moderate or severe comorbidity. In all, 58% of patients (21/36) were treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and 33% (12/36) with postoperative CRT. Although 92% patients (33/36) completed the planned radiotherapy (RT) dose, 25% (9/36) required an RT-treatment break, 11% (4/36) were hospitalized, and 33% (12/36) had a dose reduction, break, or discontinuation of concurrent chemotherapy. In all, 39% of patients (14/36) completed {>=}4 months of adjuvant chemotherapy, and 17% (6/36) completed therapy without a treatment deviation. More patients with no to mild comorbidity completed treatment than did patients with moderate to severe comorbidity (21% vs. 12%, p = 0.66). The rate of deviation did not differ between patients who had preoperative or postoperative CRT (19% vs. 17%, p = 1.0). Conclusions: The majority of elderly patients with rectal cancer in this series required early termination of treatment, treatment interruptions, or dose reductions. These data suggest that further intensification of

  1. [A case with liver resection of metastasis from rectal cancer after FOLFOX4+bevacizumab treatment].

    PubMed

    Kojima, Taiki; Matsui, Takanori; Uemura, Takanori; Fujimitsu, Yasunobu; Kure, Narihiro; Kojima, Hiroshi

    2008-10-01

    We report a 59-year-old woman with rectal cancer who underwent low anterior resection in March 2007. After curative operation at Stage IIIb(pT3N2M0), multiple liver metastasis was diagnosed in May 2007. Chemotherapy with FOLFOX4+bevacizumab was performed from June to August in 2007, and liver resection(left lobectomy and partial resection)was performed in September 2007. Bevacizumab was newly available from June 2007 in Japan, and liver resection after bevacizumab administration was safely performed.

  2. Comprehensive molecular characterization of human colon and rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    2012-07-18

    To characterize somatic alterations in colorectal carcinoma, we conducted a genome-scale analysis of 276 samples, analysing exome sequence, DNA copy number, promoter methylation and messenger RNA and microRNA expression. A subset of these samples (97) underwent low-depth-of-coverage whole-genome sequencing. In total, 16% of colorectal carcinomas were found to be hypermutated: three-quarters of these had the expected high microsatellite instability, usually with hypermethylation and MLH1 silencing, and one-quarter had somatic mismatch-repair gene and polymerase ε (POLE) mutations. Excluding the hypermutated cancers, colon and rectum cancers were found to have considerably similar patterns of genomic alteration. Twenty-four genes were significantly mutated, and in addition to the expected APC, TP53, SMAD4, PIK3CA and KRAS mutations, we found frequent mutations in ARID1A, SOX9 and FAM123B. Recurrent copy-number alterations include potentially drug-targetable amplifications of ERBB2 and newly discovered amplification of IGF2. Recurrent chromosomal translocations include the fusion of NAV2 and WNT pathway member TCF7L1. Integrative analyses suggest new markers for aggressive colorectal carcinoma and an important role for MYC-directed transcriptional activation and repression.

  3. Comprehensive Molecular Characterization of Human Colon and Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary To characterize somatic alterations in colorectal carcinoma (CRC), we conducted genome-scale analysis of 276 samples, analyzing exome sequence, DNA copy number, promoter methylation, mRNA and microRNA expression. A subset (97) underwent low-depth-of-coverage whole-genome sequencing. 16% of CRC have hypermutation, three quarters of which have the expected high microsatellite instability (MSI), usually with hypermethylation and MLH1 silencing, but one quarter has somatic mismatch repair gene mutations. Excluding hypermutated cancers, colon and rectum cancers have remarkably similar patterns of genomic alteration. Twenty-four genes are significantly mutated. In addition to the expected APC, TP53, SMAD4, PIK3CA and KRAS mutations, we found frequent mutations in ARID1A, SOX9, and FAM123B/WTX. Recurrent copy number alterations include potentially drug-targetable amplifications of ERBB2 and newly discovered amplification of IGF2. Recurrent chromosomal translocations include fusion of NAV2 and WNT pathway member TCF7L1. Integrative analyses suggest new markers for aggressive CRC and important role for MYC-directed transcriptional activation and repression. PMID:22810696

  4. A review on robotic surgery in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mohd Azman, Zairul Azwan; Kim, Seon-Hahn

    2016-01-01

    Robotic surgery has the upper hand when compared to the laparoscopic approach in terms of superior visualisation, flexibility in movement, steadiness and accessibility to confined anatomical spaces. Nevertheless, limitations still exist with regards to cost, reduced tactile sensation, time-consuming setup and a significant learning curve to achieve. Although studies have shown better or at least comparable outcomes between the robotic and laparoscopic approach, the limitations mentioned result in poor penetrance among centres and surgeons. Advancements in robotic surgery technology and attaining the acquired skillset will translate into better clinical outcomes for patients.

  5. A review on robotic surgery in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Azman, Zairul Azwan

    2016-01-01

    Robotic surgery has the upper hand when compared to the laparoscopic approach in terms of superior visualisation, flexibility in movement, steadiness and accessibility to confined anatomical spaces. Nevertheless, limitations still exist with regards to cost, reduced tactile sensation, time-consuming setup and a significant learning curve to achieve. Although studies have shown better or at least comparable outcomes between the robotic and laparoscopic approach, the limitations mentioned result in poor penetrance among centres and surgeons. Advancements in robotic surgery technology and attaining the acquired skillset will translate into better clinical outcomes for patients. PMID:28138573

  6. Nitrates in drinking water and the risk of death from rectal cancer: does hardness in drinking water matter?

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Ching; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Wu, Deng-Chuang; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to (1) examine the relationship between nitrate levels in public water supplies and increased risk of death from rectal cancer and (2) determine whether calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) levels in drinking water might modify the effects of nitrate on development of rectal cancer. A matched case-control study was used to investigate the relationship between the risk of death from rectal cancer and exposure to nitrate in drinking water in Taiwan. All rectal cancer deaths of Taiwan residents from 2003 through 2007 were obtained from the Bureau of Vital Statistics of the Taiwan Provincial Department of Health. Controls were deaths from other causes and were pair-matched to the cases by gender, year of birth, and year of death. Information on the levels of nitrate-nitrogen (NO(3)-N), Ca, and Mg in drinking water was collected from Taiwan Water Supply Corporation (TWSC). The municipality of residence for cancer cases and controls was presumed to be the source of the subject's NO(3)-N, Ca, and Mg exposure via drinking water. Relative to individuals whose NO(3)-N exposure level was <0.38 ppm, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) (95% CI) for rectal cancer occurrence was 1.15 (1.01-1.32) for individuals who resided in municipalities served by drinking water with a NO(3)-N exposure > or =0.38 ppm. There was no apparent evidence of an interaction between drinking water NO(3)-N levels with low Mg intake via drinking water. However, evidence of a significant interaction was noted between drinking-water NO(3)-N concentrations and Ca intake via drinking water. Our findings showed that the correlation between NO(3)-N exposure and risk of rectal cancer development was influenced by Ca in drinking water. This is the first study to report effect modification by Ca intake from drinking water on the association between NO(3)-N exposure and risk of rectal cancer occurrence. Increased knowledge of the mechanistic interaction between Ca and NO(3)-N in reducing

  7. Combined-modality therapy of rectal cancer with oxaliplatin-based regimens.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2004-06-01

    There are 2 conventional treatments for clinically resectable rectal cancer. First is surgery and, if the tumor is stage T3 and/or N1/2, this is followed by postoperative combined modality therapy. The second is preoperative combined modality therapy followed by surgery and postoperative combined modality therapy if the tumor is stage uT3/4 and/or node-positive. There are a number of new chemotherapeutic agents that have been developed for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Phase I/II trials examining the use of these new chemotherapeutic agents in combination with pelvic radiation therapy, most commonly in the preoperative setting are in progress and suggest higher complete response rates. There is considerable interest in integrating oxaliplatin into preoperative combined modality therapy regimens for rectal cancer. Based on results from phase I/II trials, the recommended regimen for patients who receive oxaliplatin-based combined modality therapy is continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine with pelvic radiation.

  8. Combined-modality therapy of rectal cancer with irinotecan-based regimens.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2004-12-01

    There are two conventional treatments for clinically resectable rectal cancer. The first is surgery followed by postoperative combined-modality therapy if the tumor is T3 and/or N1/2. The second, if the tumor is ultrasound T3 or clinical T4, is preoperative combined-modality therapy followed by surgery and postoperative chemotherapy. There are a number of new chemotherapeutic agents that have been developed for the treatment of colorectal cancer. Phase I/II trials are examining the use of new chemotherapeutic agents in combination with pelvic radiation therapy, most commonly in the preoperative setting. There is considerable interest in integrating irinotecan (Camptosar) into preoperative combined-modality therapy regimens for rectal cancer. Based on these trials, the recommended regimen for patients who receive irinotecan-based combined-modality therapy is continuous infusion fluorouracil (5-FU), irinotecan, and pelvic radiation. New trials examining preoperative combined-modality therapy regimens substituting capecitabine (Xeloda) for continuous infusion 5-FU are in progress.

  9. A system biology approach for understanding the miRNA regulatory network in colon rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Meeta; Nagulapalli, Kshithija; Ledford, Lakenvia; Pandit, Yogesh; Palakal, Mathew

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a systems biology approach to the understanding of the miRNA-regulatory network in colon rectal cancer. An initial set of significant genes in Colon Rectal Cancer (CRC) were obtained by mining relevant literature. An initial set of cancer-related miRNAs were obtained from three databases: miRBase, miRWalk, Targetscan and GEO microarray experiment. First principle methods were then used to generate the global miRNA-gene network. Significant miRNAs and associated transcription factors in the global miRNA-gene network were identified using topological and sub-graph analyses. Eleven novel miRNAs were identified and three of the novel miRNAs, hsa-miR-630, hsa-miR-100 and hsa-miR-99a, were further analysed to elucidate their role in CRC. The proposed methodology effectively made use of literature data and was able to show novel, significant miRNA-transcription associations in CRC.

  10. Late Patient-Reported Toxicity After Preoperative Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy in Nonresectable Rectal Cancer: Results From a Randomized Phase III Study

    SciTech Connect

    Braendengen, Morten; Tveit, Kjell Magne; Bruheim, Kjersti; Cvancarova, Milada; Berglund, Ake; Glimelius, Bengt

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is superior to radiotherapy (RT) in locally advanced rectal cancer, but the survival gain is limited. Late toxicity is, therefore, important. The aim was to compare late bowel, urinary, and sexual functions after CRT or RT. Methods and Materials: Patients (N = 207) with nonresectable rectal cancer were randomized to preoperative CRT or RT (2 Gy Multiplication-Sign 25 {+-} 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin). Extended surgery was often required. Self-reported late toxicity was scored according to the LENT SOMA criteria in a structured telephone interview and with questionnaires European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30), International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), and sexual function -vaginal changes questionnaire (SVQ). Results: Of the 105 patients alive in Norway and Sweden after 4 to 12 years of follow-up, 78 (74%) responded. More patients in the CRT group had received a stoma (73% vs. 52%, p = 0.09). Most patients without a stoma (7 of 12 in CRT group and 9 of 16 in RT group) had incontinence for liquid stools or gas. No stoma and good anal function were seen in 5 patients (11%) in the CRT group and in 11 (30%) in the RT group (p = 0.046). Of 44 patients in the CRT group, 12 (28%) had had bowel obstruction compared with 5 of 33 (15%) in the RT group (p = 0.27). One-quarter of the patients reported urinary incontinence. The majority of men had severe erectile dysfunction. Few women reported sexual activity during the previous month. However, the majority did not have concerns about their sex life. Conclusions: Fecal incontinence and erectile dysfunction are frequent after combined treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. There was a clear tendency for the problems to be more common after CRT than after RT.

  11. Assessment of quality of life in patients with rectal cancer treated by preoperative radiotherapy: A longitudinal prospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Allal, Abdelkarim S. . E-mail: abdelkarim.allal@hcuge.ch; Gervaz, Pascal; Gertsch, Philippe; Bernier, Jacques; Roth, Arnaud D.; Morel, Philippe; Bieri, Sabine

    2005-03-15

    Purpose: To assess prospectively the quality of life (QOL) of patients treated by preoperative radiotherapy (RT) and surgery for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and materials: We studied 53 patients treated with bi-fractionated RT (50 Gy in 40 fractions within 4 weeks) followed at a median interval of 45 days by abdominoperineal resection in 11 patients and low anterior resection in 42 patients. Their QOL was assessed using two self-rating questionnaires developed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC): one was cancer specific (EORTC QLQ-C30) and one was site specific (EORTC QLQ-C38). The questionnaires were completed before RT and 12-16 months after RT, at which time 17 patients had undergone colostomy. We hypothesized that at least some scores of the various scales would vary between the two analyses. Results: Compared with the pre-RT scores, at 1 year, patients reported statistically significant improvement in their emotional state (median 75 vs. 100, p <0.0001), perspective of the future (67 vs. 100, p = 0.0004), and their global QOL (75 vs. 83, p = 0.0008), as well as a decrease in GI symptoms (13 vs. 0, p = 0.002). However, the sexual dysfunction score increased significantly, particularly in men (17 vs. 83, p = 0.0045), and a trend toward a lower body image score was observed (100 vs. 89, p = 0.068). At 1 year, patients with colostomies reported similar or significantly improved symptom scores for fatigue, pain, GI problems, and sleep disturbance, but no such improvements were observed in patients without stomas. Conclusion: One year after combined treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer, patients exhibited statistically significant improvement in some important QOL outcomes, including global QOL, despite a decrease in sexual function and body image. Any additional improvement in QOL outcome may require refinements in the RT and surgical techniques to reduce late sequelae, particularly sexual dysfunction. Our

  12. Comparison of Digital Rectal Examination and Serum Prostate Specific Antigen in the Early Detection of Prostate Cancer: Results of a Multicenter Clinical Trial of 6,630 Men.

    PubMed

    Catalona, William J; Richie, Jerome P; Ahmann, Frederick R; Hudson, M'Liss A; Scardino, Peter T; Flanigan, Robert C; DeKernion, Jean B; Ratliff, Timothy L; Kavoussi, Louis R; Dalkin, Bruce L; Waters, W Bedford; MacFarlane, Michael T; Southwick, Paula C

    2017-02-01

    To compare the efficacy of digital rectal examination and serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) in the early detection of prostate cancer, we conducted a prospective clinical trial at 6 university centers of 6,630 male volunteers 50 years old or older who underwent PSA determination (Hybritech Tandom-E or Tandem-R assays) and digital rectal examination. Quadrant biopsies were performed if the PSA level was greater than 4 μg./l. or digital rectal examination was suspicious, even if transrectal ultrasonography revealed no areas suspicious for cancer. The results showed that 15% of the men had a PSA level of greater than 4 μg./l., 15% had a suspicious digital rectal examination and 26% had suspicious findings on either or both tests. Of 1,167 biopsies performed cancer was detected in 264. PSA detected significantly more tumors (82%, 216 of 264 cancers) than digital rectal examination (55%, 146 of 264, p = 0.001). The cancer detection rate was 3.2% for digital rectal examination, 4.6% for PSA and 5.8% for the 2 methods combined. Positive predictive value was 32% for PSA and 21% for digital rectal examination. Of 160 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy and pathological staging 114 (71%) had organ confined cancer: PSA detected 85 (75%) and digital rectal examination detected 64 (56%, p = 0.003). Use of the 2 methods in combination increased detection of organ confined disease by 78% (50 of 64 cases) over digital rectal examination alone. If the performance of a biopsy would have required suspicious transrectal ultrasonography findings, nearly 40% of the tumors would have been missed. We conclude that the use of PSA in conjunction with digital rectal examination enhances early prostate cancer detection. Prostatic biopsy should be considered if either the PSA level is greater than 4 μg./l. or digital rectal examination is suspicious for cancer, even in the absence of abnormal transrectal ultrasonography findings.

  13. Synergistic effects of AKAP95, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1, and Cx43 in the development of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Fengjie; Yuan, Yangyang; Zhi, Xuehong; Huang, Qian; Chen, Yuexin; Zhuang, Wenxin; Zhang, Dengcheng; Teng, Bogang; Kong, Xiangyu; Zhang, Yongxing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the expression of A-kinase anchor protein 95 (AKAP95), Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1, and Connexin43 (Cx43) in rectal cancer tissues and assess the associations between each of the proteins and pathological parameters, as well as their inter-relationships. Methods: AKAP95, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1, and Cx43 protein expression rates were evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 50 rectal cancer specimens and 16 pericarcinoma tissues. Results: The positive rates of AKAP95, Cyclin E1, and Cyclin D1 proteins were 54.00 vs. 18.75%, 62.00 vs. 6.25%, and 72.00 vs. 31.25% in rectal cancer specimens and pericarcinoma tissues, respectively, representing statistically significant differences (P < 0.05). The positive rate of Cx43 protein expression in rectal cancer tissues was 44.00% and 62.50% in pericarcinoma tissues, and the difference between them was not significant (P > 0.05). No significant associations were found between protein expression of AKAP95, Cyclin E1, Cyclin D1, and Cx43, and the degree of differentiation, histological type, and lymph node metastasis of rectal cancer (P > 0.05). However, significant correlations were obtained between the expression rates of AKAP95 and Cyclin E1, Cyclin E1 and Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1 and Cx43 protein, and Cyclin D1 and Cx43, respectively (P < 0.05). Conclusion: AKAP95, Cyclin E1, and Cyclin D1 protein expression rates were significantly higher in rectal cancer tissues compared with pericarcinoma samples, suggesting an association between these proteins and the development and progression of rectal cancer. In addition, the significant correlations between the proteins (AKAP95 and Cyclin E1, Cyclin E1 and Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1 and Cx43 protein, and Cyclin D1 and Cx43) indicate the possible synergistic effects of these factors in the development and progression of rectal cancer. PMID:25973052

  14. Trihalomethanes in drinking water and the risk of death from rectal cancer: does hardness in drinking water matter?

    PubMed

    Kuo, Hsin-Wei; Chen, Pei-Shih; Ho, Shu-Chen; Wang, Li-Yu; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to examine the relationship between total trihalomethanes (TTHM) levels in public water supplies and risk of rectal cancer development and (2) to determine whether calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) levels in drinking water might modify the effects of TTHM on risk of developing rectal cancer. A matched cancer case-control study was used to investigate the relationship between the risk of death attributed to rectal cancer and exposure to TTHM in drinking water in 53 municipalities in Taiwan. All rectal cancer deaths in the 53 municipalities from 1998 through 2007 were obtained from the Bureau of Vital Statistics of the Taiwan Provincial Department of Health. Controls were deaths from other causes and were pair-matched to cancer cases by gender, year of birth, and year of death. Each matched control was selected randomly from the set of possible controls for each cancer case. Data on TTHM levels in drinking water were collected from the Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration. Information on the levels of Ca and Mg in drinking water was obtained from the Taiwan Water Supply Corporation. The municipality of residence for cancer cases and controls was presumed to be the source of the subject's TTHM, Ca, and Mg exposure via drinking water. Relative to individuals whose TTHM exposure level was <4.9 ppb, the adjusted OR (95% CI) for rectal cancer occurrence was 1.04 (0.88-1.22) for individuals who resided in municipalities served by drinking water with a TTHM exposure >or=4.9 ppb. There was no evidence of an interaction of drinking-water TTHM levels with low Ca intake via drinking water. However, evidence of an interaction was noted between drinking-water TTHM concentrations and Mg intake via drinking water. Our findings showed that the correlation between TTHM exposure and risk of rectal cancer is influenced by Mg in drinking water. Increased knowledge of the interaction between Mg and TTHM in reducing rectal cancer risk will aid

  15. Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer in Patients With Prior Pelvic Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Prajnan; Delclos, Marc E.; Skibber, John M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Feig, Barry W.; Chang, George J.; Eng, Cathy; Bedi, Manpreet; Krishnan, Sunil; Crane, Christopher H.

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively determine rates of toxicity, freedom from local progression, and survival in rectal cancer patients treated with reirradiation. Methods and Materials: Between February 2001 and February 2005, 50 patients with a history of pelvic radiotherapy were treated with hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy for primary (n = 2 patients) or recurrent (n = 48 patients) rectal adenocarcinoma. Patients were treated with 150-cGy fractions twice daily, with a total dose of 39 Gy (n = 47 patients) if the retreatment interval was >=1 year or 30 Gy (n = 3) if the retreatment interval was <1 year. Concurrent chemotherapy was administered to 48 (96%) patients. Eighteen (36%) patients underwent surgical resection following radiotherapy. Results: Two patients had grade 3 acute toxicity and 13 patients had grade 3 to 4 late toxicity. The 3-year rate of grade 3 to 4 late toxicity was 35%. The 3-year rate of freedom from local progression was 33%. The 3-year freedom from local progression rate was 47% in patients undergoing surgery and 21% in those not undergoing surgery (p = 0.057). The 3-year overall survival rate was 39%. The 3-year overall survival rate was 66% in patients undergoing surgery and 27% in those not undergoing surgery (p = 0.003). The 3-year overall survival rate was 53% in patients with a retreatment interval of >2 years and 21% in those with a retreatment interval of <=2 years (p = 0.001). Conclusions: Hyperfractionated, accelerated reirradiation was well tolerated, with low rates of acute toxicity and moderate rates of late toxicity. Reirradiation may help improve pelvic control in rectal cancer patients with a history of pelvic radiotherapy.

  16. Sacral Insufficiency Fractures After Preoperative Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Clinical Course

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Michael P.; Kopetz, Scott; Bhosale, Priya R.; Eng, Cathy; Skibber, John M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Feig, Barry W.; Chang, George J.; Delclos, Marc E.; Krishnan, Sunil; Crane, Christopher H.; Das, Prajnan

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: Sacral insufficiency (SI) fractures can occur as a late side effect of pelvic radiation therapy. Our goal was to determine the incidence, risk factors, and clinical course of SI fractures in patients treated with preoperative chemoradiation for rectal cancer. Materials and Methods: Between 1989 and 2004, 562 patients with non-metastatic rectal adenocarcinoma were treated with preoperative chemoradiation followed by mesorectal excision. The median radiotherapy dose was 45 Gy. The hospital records and radiology reports of these patients were reviewed to identify those with pelvic fractures. Radiology images of patients with pelvic fractures were then reviewed to identify those with SI fractures. Results: Among the 562 patients, 15 had SI fractures. The 3-year actuarial rate of SI fractures was 3.1%. The median time to SI fractures was 17 months (range, 2-34 months). The risk of SI fractures was significantly higher in women compared to men (5.8% vs. 1.6%, p = 0.014), and in whites compared with non-whites (4% vs. 0%, p = 0.037). On multivariate analysis, gender independently predicted for the risk of SI fractures (hazard ratio, 3.25; p = 0.031). Documentation about the presence or absence of pain was available for 13 patients; of these 7 (54%) had symptoms requiring pain medications. The median duration of pain was 22 months. No patient required hospitalization or invasive intervention for pain control. Conclusions: SI fractures were uncommon in patients treated with preoperative chemoradiation for rectal cancer. The risk of SI fractures was significantly higher in women. Most cases of SI fractures can be managed conservatively with pain medications.

  17. Effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy on angiogenesis and leukocyte infiltration in rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Baeten, Coen . E-mail: C.Baeten@surgery.azm.nl; Castermans, Karolien; Lammering, Guido; Hillen, Femke; Wouters, Bradly G.; Hillen, Harry; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Baeten, Cornelius G.M.I.

    2006-11-15

    Background: We and others have shown that angiogenesis and leukocyte infiltration are important prognostic factors in rectal cancer. However, little is known about its possible changes in response to radiotherapy (RTX), which is frequently given to rectal tumors as a neoadjuvant treatment to improve the prognosis. We therefore investigated the biologic effects of RTX on these parameters using fresh-frozen biopsy samples of tumor and normal mucosa tissue before and after RTX. Methods: Biopsy samples were taken from a total of 34 patients before and after either a short course or long course of RTX combined with chemotherapy. The following parameters were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, or quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction: Microvessel density, leukocyte infiltration, proliferating epithelial and tumor cells, proliferating endothelial cells, adhesion molecule expression on endothelial cells, and the angiogenic mRNA profile. Results: The tumor biopsy samples taken after RTX treatment demonstrated a significant decrease in microvessel density and the number of proliferating tumor cells and proliferating endothelial cells (p < 0.001). In contrast, the leukocyte infiltration, the levels of basic fibroblast growth factor in carcinoma tissue, and the adhesion molecule expression on endothelial cells in normal as well as carcinoma tissue increased significantly (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Our data show that together with an overall decrease in tumor cell and endothelial cell proliferation, RTX results in an increase in the expression of adhesion molecules that stimulate leukocyte infiltration. This suggests the possibility that, in addition to its direct cytotoxic effect, radiation may also stimulate an immunologic tumor response that could contribute to the documented improvement in local tumor control and distal failure rate of rectal cancers.

  18. Age and Comorbid Illness Are Associated With Late Rectal Toxicity Following Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hamstra, Daniel A.; Stenmark, Matt H.; Ritter, Tim; Litzenberg, Dale; Jackson, William; Johnson, Skyler; Albrecht-Unger, Liesel; Donaghy, Alex; Phelps, Laura; Blas, Kevin; Halverson, Schuyler; Marsh, Robin; Olson, Karin; Feng, Felix Y.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the impacts of patient age and comorbid illness on rectal toxicity following external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer and to assess the Qualitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC) normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model in this context. Methods and Materials: Rectal toxicity was analyzed in 718 men previously treated for prostate cancer with EBRT (≥75 Gy). Comorbid illness was scored using the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCMI), and the NTCP was evaluated with the QUANTEC model. The influence of clinical and treatment-related parameters on rectal toxicity was assessed by Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models. Results: The cumulative incidence of rectal toxicity grade ≥2 was 9.5% and 11.6% at 3 and 5 years and 3.3% and 3.9% at 3 and 5 years for grade ≥3 toxicity, respectively. Each year of age predicted an increasing relative risk of grade ≥2 (P<.03; hazard ratio [HR], 1.04 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01-1.06]) and ≥3 rectal toxicity (P<.0001; HR, 1.14 [95% CI,1.07-1.22]). Increasing CCMI predicted rectal toxicity where a history of either myocardial infarction (MI) (P<.0001; HR, 5.1 [95% CI, 1.9-13.7]) or congestive heart failure (CHF) (P<.0006; HR, 5.4 [95% CI, 0.6-47.5]) predicted grade ≥3 rectal toxicity, with lesser correlation with grade ≥2 toxicity (P<.02 for MI, and P<.09 for CHF). An age comorbidity model to predict rectal toxicity was developed and confirmed in a validation cohort. The use of anticoagulants increased toxicity independent of age and comorbidity. NTCP was prognostic for grade ≥3 (P=.015) but not grade ≥2 (P=.49) toxicity. On multivariate analysis, age, MI, CHF, and an NTCP >20% all correlated with late rectal toxicity. Conclusions: Patient age and a history of MI or CHF significantly impact rectal toxicity following EBRT for the treatment of prostate cancer, even after controlling for NTCP.

  19. Risk Factors Associated With Sphincter-Preserving Resection in Patients With Low Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Zhi-Jie; Hu, Liang-Hao; Xing, Jun-Jie; Zhang, Wei; Fu, Chuan-Gang; Yu, En-Da; Zhong, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Abdominoperineal resection (APR) and sphincter-preserving resection (SPR) are the two primary surgical options for rectal cancer. Retrospectively we collected rectal cancer patients for SPR and APR observation between 2005 and 2007. The patient-related, tumor-related, and surgery-related variables of the SPR and APR groups were analyzed by using logistic regression techniques. The mean distance from the anal verge (DAV) of cancer is significantly higher in SPR than that in APR (P < 0.001). In cancers with DAV <40 mm (SPR, 40 versus APR, 110), multivariate analysis shows that surgeon procedure volume (odds ratio [OR] = 0.244; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.077–0.772; P = 0.016) and neoadjuvant radiotherapy (OR = 0.031; 95% CI: 0.002–0.396; P = 0.008) are factors influencing SPR. In cancers with DAV ranging from 40 mm to 59 mm (SPR 190 versus APR 50), analysis shows that patient age (OR = 2.139; 95% CI: 1.124–4.069; P = 0.021), diabetes (OR = 2.657; 95% CI: 0.872–8.095; P = 0.086), and colorectal surgeon (OR = 0.122, 95% CI: 0.020–0.758; P = 0.024), are influencing factors for SPR. The local recurrence and disease-free survival reveal no significant difference. A significant difference exists in DAV, surgeon specialization, procedure volume, age, diabetes, and neoadjuvant radiotherapy between SPR and APR. PMID:25058761

  20. Long-term disease-free survival after surgical resection for multiple bone metastases from rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seok Jin; Kim, Jong Hun; Lee, Min Ro; Lee, Chang Ho; Kuh, Ja Hong; Kim, Jung Ryul

    2011-08-10

    Bone metastasis of primary colorectal cancer is uncommon. When it occurs, it is usually a late manifestation of disease and is indicative of poor prognosis. We describe a patient with multiple metachronous bone metastases from lower rectal cancer who was successfully treated with multimodal treatment including surgical resections and has shown 32 mo disease-free survival. Surgical resection of metastatic bone lesion(s) from colorectal cancer may be a good treatment option in selected patients.

  1. New perspectives in treatment decision for integrated management of rectal cancer: multimodal research for multimodal treatments

    PubMed Central

    VALENTINI, V.; CELLINI, F.

    2014-01-01

    Rectal cancer management improved results in the last thirty-five applying new integrated treatment options. Preoperative radiochemotherapy or radiotherapy alone joined to the modern surgery gaining significant improvement of outcomes. Nevertheless, a definitive conclusion about superiority of one on the other in term of survival and toxicity is still lacking, and further improvement is in general required and seems obtainable. The need for a wide sharing of the accumulated knowledge is represented by the consensus conferences that over the years summarizes the state of the art for the management of rectal cancer. One of the most promising opportunities comes from the attempt of characterization of the tumor heterogeneity. An always-increasing number of new parameters come from different sources including genomic, imaging, pathological features and many others. The need of new informatics technologies able to handle and continuously incorporate new inputs derived from the evidences is also imperative. The combined use of large shared databases and “learning models” could allow generating and rapidly testing new hypotheses, providing further survival improvement in the next years. PMID:24979100

  2. [Role of neoadjuvant radiotherapy for rectal cancer : Is MRI-based selection a future model?].

    PubMed

    Kulu, Y; Hackert, T; Debus, J; Weber, M-A; Büchler, M W; Ulrich, A

    2016-07-01

    Following the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME) in the curative treatment of rectal cancer, the role of neoadjuvant therapy has evolved. By improving the surgical technique the local recurrence rate could be reduced by TME surgery alone to below 8 %. Even if local control was further improved by additional preoperative irradiation this did not lead to a general survival benefit. Guidelines advocate that all patients in UICC stage II and III should be pretreated; however, the stage-based indications for neoadjuvant therapy have limitations. This is mainly attributable to the facts that patients with T3 tumors comprise a very heterogeneous prognostic group and preoperative lymph node diagnostics lack accuracy. In contrast, in recent years the circumferential resection margin (CRM) has become an important prognostic parameter. Patients with tumors that are very close to or infiltrate the pelvic fascia (positive CRM) have a higher rate of local recurrence and poorer survival. With high-resolution pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination in patients with rectal cancer, the preoperative CRM can be determined with a high sensitivity and specificity. Improved T staging and better prediction of the resection margins by pelvic MRI potentially facilitate the selection of patients for study-based treatment strategies omitting neoadjuvant radiotherapy.

  3. Brachytherapy and Local Excision for Sphincter Preservation in T1 and T2 Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Grimard, Laval Stern, Hartley; Spaans, Johanna N. M.Sc.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To report long-term results of brachytherapy after local excision (LE) in the treatment of T1 and T2 rectal cancer at risk of recurrence due to residual subclinical disease. Methods and Materials: Between 1989 and 2007, 32 patients undergoing LE and brachytherapy were followed prospectively for a mean of 6.2 years. Estimates of local recurrence (LR), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) were generated. Treatment-related toxicity and the effect of known prognostic factors were determined. Results: There were 8 LR (3 T1, 5 T2), of which 5 were salvaged surgically. Median time to the 8 LR was 14 months, and the 5-year rate of local control was 76%. Although there have been 9 deaths to date, only 5 were from disease. Five-year DSS and OS rates were 85% and 78%, respectively. There were 4 cases of Grade 2-3 radionecrosis and 1 case of mild stool incontinence. The sphincter was preserved in 27 of 32 patients. Conclusion: Local excision and adjuvant brachytherapy for T1 and T2 rectal cancer is an appealing treatment alternative to immediate radical resection, particularly in the frail and elderly who are unable to undergo major surgery, as well as for patients wanting to avoid a permanent colostomy.

  4. COX-2 verexpression in pretreatment biopsies predicts response of rectal cancers to neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Fraser M.; Reynolds, John V. . E-mail: reynoldsjv@stjames.ie; Kay, Elaine W.; Crotty, Paul; Murphy, James O.; Hollywood, Donal; Gaffney, Eoin F.; Stephens, Richard B.; Kennedy, M. John

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the utility of COX-2 expression as a response predictor for patients with rectal cancer who are undergoing neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy (RCT). Methods and Materials: Pretreatment biopsies (PTB) from 49 patients who underwent RCT were included. COX-2 and proliferation in PTB were assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and apoptosis was detected by TUNEL stain. Response to treatment was assessed by a 5-point tumor-regression grade (TRG) based on the ratio of residual tumor to fibrosis. Results: Good response (TRG 1 + 2), moderate response (TRG 3), and poor response (TRG 4 + 5) were seen in 21 patients (42%), 11 patients (22%), and 17 patients (34%), respectively. Patients with COX-2 overexpression in PTB were more likely to demonstrate moderate or poor response (TRG 3 + 4) to treatment than were those with normal COX-2 expression (p = 0.026, chi-square test). Similarly, poor response was more likely if patients had low levels of spontaneous apoptosis in PTBs (p = 0.0007, chi-square test). Conclusions: COX-2 overexpression and reduced apoptosis in PTB can predict poor response of rectal cancer to RCT. As COX-2 inhibitors are commercially available, their administration to patients who overexpress COX-2 warrants assessment in clinical trials in an attempt to increase overall response rates.

  5. Probiotics for Rectal Volume Variation During Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ki, Yongkan; Kim, Wontaek; Nam, Jiho; Kim, Donghyun; Lee, Juhye; Park, Dahl; Jeon, Hosang; Ha, Honggu; Kim, Taenam; Kim, Dongwon

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of the probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus on the percentage volume change of the rectum (PVC{sub R}), a crucial factor of prostate movement. Methods and Materials: Prostate cancer patients managed with tomotherapy as a radical treatment were enrolled in the study to take a probiotic capsule containing 1.0 × 10{sup 8} colony-forming units of L acidophilus or a placebo capsule twice daily. Radiation therapy was performed at a dose of 78 Gy in 39 fractions. The PVC{sub R}, defined as the difference in rectal volume between the planning computed tomographic (CT) and daily megavoltage CT images, was analyzed. Results: Forty patients were randomized into 2 groups. The L acidophilus group showed significantly lower median rectal volume and median PVC{sub R} values than the placebo group. L acidophilus showed a significant reduction effect on the PVC{sub R} (P<.001). However, the radiation therapy fraction number did not significantly influence the PVC{sub R}. Conclusions: L acidophilus was useful in reducing the PVC{sub R}, which is the most important determining factor of prostate position, during radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

  6. [A case of liver metastasis of rectal cancer demonstrating complete response to 5-FU + Leucovorin + UFT].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hideyuki; Ohsawa, Tomonori; Takeuchi, Ikuya; Nakada, Hiroshi; Inokuma, Shigehisa; Hoshino, Takanobu; Daijo, Hashimoto

    2002-04-01

    Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) is a rate-limiting enzyme that metabolizes 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). We report a patient with metachronous liver metastasis from rectal cancer with low expression of DPD, who demonstrated complete response to chemotherapy comprising 5-FU, Leucovorin, and UFT. A 53-year-old man underwent macroscopically curative proctectomy with coloanal anastomosis for lower rectal cancer (Curability B). The DPD level in the primary tumor determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was extremely low (10.3 U/mg.protein). Three months postoperatively, 5-FU (333 mg/m2) + Leucovorin (200 mg/m2) therapy (once a week for 3 weeks with a one-week rest interval, repeatedly) was started as an adjuvant therapy. However, computed tomography demonstrated a solitary liver metastasis 3 cm in size 1 month later. Chemotherapy was continued with dose escalation of 5-FU (500 mg/m2) and with oral administration of UFT-E (400 mg/body, daily). Five months later, computed tomography did not detect the liver metastasis, and this finding was maintained for two months (complete response). This case provides evidence that a low expression of DPD in the primary lesion is related to a favorable response of liver metastasis to 5-FU-based systemic chemotherapy.

  7. STED super-resolution microscopy of clinical paraffin-embedded human rectal cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Ilgen, Peter; Stoldt, Stefan; Conradi, Lena-Christin; Wurm, Christian Andreas; Rüschoff, Josef; Ghadimi, B Michael; Liersch, Torsten; Jakobs, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Formalin fixed and paraffin-embedded human tissue resected during cancer surgery is indispensable for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes and represents a vast and largely unexploited resource for research. Optical microscopy of such specimen is curtailed by the diffraction-limited resolution of conventional optical microscopy. To overcome this limitation, we used STED super-resolution microscopy enabling optical resolution well below the diffraction barrier. We visualized nanoscale protein distributions in sections of well-annotated paraffin-embedded human rectal cancer tissue stored in a clinical repository. Using antisera against several mitochondrial proteins, STED microscopy revealed distinct sub-mitochondrial protein distributions, suggesting a high level of structural preservation. Analysis of human tissues stored for up to 17 years demonstrated that these samples were still amenable for super-resolution microscopy. STED microscopy of sections of HER2 positive rectal adenocarcinoma revealed details in the surface and intracellular HER2 distribution that were blurred in the corresponding conventional images, demonstrating the potential of super-resolution microscopy to explore the thus far largely untapped nanoscale regime in tissues stored in biorepositories.

  8. Risk factors causing structural sequelae after anastomotic leakage in mid to low rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Woong Bae; Kwak, Jung Myun; Kim, Jin; Um, Jun Won; Kim, Seon Hahn

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the risk factors causing structural sequelae after anastomotic leakage in patients with mid to low rectal cancer. METHODS: Prospectively collected data of consecutive subjects who had anastomotic leakage after surgical resection for rectal cancer from March 2006 to May 2013 at Korea University Anam Hospital were retrospectively analyzed. Two subgroup analyses were performed. The patients were initially divided into the sequelae (stricture, fistula, or sinus) and no sequelae groups and then divided into the permanent stoma (PS) and no PS groups. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the risk factors of structural sequelae after anastomotic leakage. RESULTS: Structural sequelae after anastomotic leakage were identified in 29 patients (39.7%). Multivariate analysis revealed that diversion ileostomy at the first operation increases the risk of structural sequelae [odds ratio (OR) = 6.741; P = 0.017]. Fourteen patients (17.7%) had permanent stoma during the follow-up period (median, 37 mo). Multivariate analysis showed that the tumor level from the dentate line was associated with the risk of permanent stoma (OR = 0.751; P = 0.045). CONCLUSION: Diversion ileostomy at the first operation increased the risk of structural sequelae of the anastomosis, while lower tumor location was associated with the risk of permanent stoma in the management of anastomotic leakage. PMID:26019455

  9. Combined laparoscopic and transanal total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer: Initial experience and early results

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Morten Holt; Ovesen, Henrik; Eriksen, Jens Ravn

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Incomplete specimens resulting in residual mesorectum in the patient and an increased risk of local recurrence remains a problem. We have introduced transanal-total mesorectal excision (Ta-TME) in our department to potentially overcome this problem due to more direct access to the lower pelvis in patients undergoing TME for rectal cancer and this article presents our initial experience with the new procedure. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with a T1-T3 mid or low rectal cancer eligible for TME or intersphincteric abdominoperineal excision were selected for a combined transanal and transabdominal laparoscopic resection. The primary aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of the method with a special focus on the quality of the specimen. RESULTS: During a 9-month period, 11 patients were operated with this technique. All procedures resulted in complete or nearly complete specimen. We did, however, find the procedure technically demanding and experienced several complications with three anastomotic leaks (all with preserved intestinal continuity) and a urethral lesion. CONCLUSION: Ta-TME is feasible and might be the answer to obtaining good quality specimens and overcome some of the technical difficulties that can be encountered in the obese narrow male pelvis. The procedure however is technically demanding. PMID:28281474

  10. Decision-making in rectal and colorectal cancer: systematic review and qualitative analysis of surgeons' preferences.

    PubMed

    Broc, Guillaume; Gana, Kamel; Denost, Quentin; Quintard, Bruno

    2017-04-01

    Surgeons are experiencing difficulties implementing recommendations not only owing to incomplete, confusing or conflicting information but also to the increasing involvement of patients in decisions relating to their health. This study sought to establish which common factors including heuristic factors guide surgeons' decision-making in colon and rectal cancers. We conducted a systematic literature review of surgeons' decision-making factors related to colon and rectal cancer treatment. Eleven of 349 identified publications were eligible for data analyses. Using the IRaMuTeQ (Interface of R for the Multidimensional Analyses of Texts and Questionnaire), we carried out a qualitative analysis of the significant factors collected in the studies reviewed. Several validation procedures were applied to control the robustness of the findings. Five categories of factors (i.e. patient, surgeon, treatment, tumor and organizational cues) were found to influence surgeons' decision-making. Specifically, all decision criteria including biomedical (e.g. tumor information) and heuristic (e.g. surgeons' dispositional factors) criteria converged towards the factor 'age of patient' in the similarity analysis. In the light of the results, we propose an explanatory model showing the impact of heuristic criteria on medical issues (i.e. diagnosis, prognosis, treatment features, etc.) and thus on decision-making. Finally, the psychosocial complexity involved in decision-making is discussed and a medico-psycho-social grid for use in multidisciplinary meetings is proposed.

  11. Laparoscopic-assisted one-stage resection of rectal cancer with synchronous liver metastasis utilizing a pfannenstiel incision.

    PubMed

    Aljiffry, Murad; Alrajraji, Mawaddah; Al-Sabah, Salman; Hassanain, Mazen

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic approaches have been increasingly used in selected patients with either colorectal or liver cancer. However, simultaneous resection of colorectal carcinoma with synchronous liver metastases is still a subject of debate. The present case describes combined laparoscopic rectal and liver resections for a patient with primary rectal cancer and a synchronous liver metastasis utilizing a Pfannenstiel incision for specimen extraction. The operative time was 370 min and estimated blood loss was 400 mL. Postoperatively, the patient required parenteral analgesia for 48 h, resumed normal diet on day 3 and was discharged on day 7 after the operation. A laparoscopic approach utilizing a Pfannenstiel extraction incision may present an advantageous and attractive option for simultaneous laparoscopic rectal and liver resection in selected patients with the aim of improving short-term outcomes.

  12. A Phase I, Pharmacological, and Biological Study of OSI-774 in Combination With FOLFOX 4 (5-FU, Leucovorin, and Oxaliplatin) and Bevacizumab (Avastin) in Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  13. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Monitoring Rectal Cancer Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Barbaro, Brunella; Vitale, Renata; Valentini, Vincenzo; Illuminati, Sonia; Vecchio, Fabio M.; Rizzo, Gianluca; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Coco, Claudio; Crucitti, Antonio; Persiani, Roberto; Sofo, Luigi; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To prospectively monitor the response in patients with locally advanced nonmucinous rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic finding was the reference standard. Methods and Materials: The institutional review board approved the present study. A total of 62 patients (43 men and 19 women; mean age, 64 years; range, 28-83) provided informed consent. T{sub 2}- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans (b value, 0 and 1,000 mm{sup 2}/s) were acquired before, during (mean 12 days), and 6-8 weeks after CRT. We compared the median apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between responders and nonresponders and examined the associations with the Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG). The postoperative nodal status (ypN) was evaluated. The Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon two-sample test was used to evaluate the relationships among the pretherapy ADCs, extramural vascular invasion, early percentage of increases in ADCs, and preoperative ADCs. Results: Low pretreatment ADCs (<1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s) were correlated with TRG 4 scores (p = .0011) and associated to extramural vascular invasion with ypN+ (85.7% positive predictive value for ypN+). During treatment, the mean percentage of increase in tumor ADC was significantly greater in the responders than in the nonresponders (p < .0001) and a >23% ADC increase had a 96.3% negative predictive value for TRG 4. In 9 of 16 complete responders, CRT-related tumor downsizing prevented ADC evaluations. The preoperative ADCs were significantly different (p = .0012) between the patients with and without downstaging (preoperative ADC {>=}1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s showed a positive and negative predictive value of 78.9% and 61.8%, respectively, for response assessment). The TRG 1 and TRG 2-4 groups were not significantly different. Conclusion: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a promising

  14. Paf15 expression correlates with rectal cancer prognosis, cell proliferation and radiation response

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Rong; Zhu, Kun; Dang, Chengxue; Lan, Ke; Wang, Haonan; Yuan, Dawei; Chen, Wei; Meltzer, Stephen J.; Li, Kang

    2016-01-01

    Paf15, which participates in DNA repair, is overexpressed in numerous solid tumors. Blocking of Paf15 inhibits the growth of many types of cancer cells; while simultaneously enhancing cellular sensitivity to UV radiation. However, its expression and function in rectal cancer (RC) remain unknown. The current study was undertaken to assess the association of Paf15 expression with RC prognosis, as well as to explore the participation of Paf15 in the response of RC cells to irradiation. Increased Paf15 expression was observed in RC tissues and associated with pTNM stage and poor survival. In vitro, Paf15 induced increased RC cell proliferation while accelerating cell cycle progression, inhibiting cell death, and protecting against gamma radiation-induced DNA damage in RC cells. In conclusion, increased Paf15 expression is associated with increased RC proliferation, decreased patient survival, and a worse radiotherapeutic response. PMID:27246972

  15. Association of pretreatment serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels with chemoradiation-induced downstaging and downsizing of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Seung-Gu

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to identify pretreatment clinical parameters associated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT)-induced downstaging and downsizing of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC T3-4 or N+). Data from 51 LARC patients, who received preoperative CRT and radical surgery between 2010 and 2013, were retrospectively analyzed. Rectal adenocarcinoma was histologically confirmed in all patients, who ranged in age between 41 and 81 years (median, 64 years). CRT consisted of 50.4 Gy pelvic radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy using 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin. After a median interval of 7 weeks post-CRT, the patients underwent total mesorectal excision. Downstaging was defined as the transition from cStage II-III to ypStage 0-I. The longest tumor diameter was measured pre- and post-CRT using computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, and based on the surgical specimen, respectively. Downstaging was observed in 16 (31.4%) patients, including 5 (9.8%) with a pathological complete response. The median downsizing rate was 60%. The serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels were 0.8-153.9 ng/ml (median, 4.4 ng/ml). The maximum standardized uptake value was 4.7-33.9 (median, 10.8). On univariate analysis, cT stage, tumor size and CEA level were associated with downstaging. On multivariate analysis, only CEA level (≤5 ng/ml) was a significant predictor of downstaging (odds ratio = 16.0; 95% confidence interval: 1.8-146.7; P=0.014). CEA level was the only factor significantly associated with downsizing (>60%) in the univariate analysis. These results demonstrated that pretreatment serum CEA levels are significantly associated with downstaging as well as downsizing of LARC following preoperative CRT. Therefore, this parameter may be useful in personalizing the management of LARC patients.

  16. Bevacizumab, Oxaliplatin, and Capecitabine With Radiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer: Phase I Trial Results

    SciTech Connect

    Czito, Brian G. . E-mail: czito001@mc.duke.edu; Bendell, Johanna C.; Willett, Christopher G.; Morse, Michael A.; Blobe, Gerard C.; Tyler, Douglas S.; Thomas, John; Ludwig, Kirk A.; Mantyh, Christopher R.; Ashton, Jill; Yu Daohai; Hurwitz, Herbert I.

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: The overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is associated with poor outcomes in colorectal cancer patients. Bevacizumab, a VEGF inhibitor, enhances the effects of chemotherapy and radiation therapy on tumor cytotoxicity in preclinical models, including colorectal cancer. A Phase I trial was undertaken to evaluate the combination of bevacizumab, capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiation therapy in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with pathologically confirmed adenocarcinoma of the rectum were eligible. Pretreatment staging included computerized tomography, endoscopic ultrasound, and surgical evaluation. Patients received 50.4 Gy of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to the tumor in 28 fractions. Capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab were administered concurrently with radiation therapy. After EBRT completion, patients were restaged and evaluated for surgery. Primary endpoints included the determination of dose-limiting toxicity and a recommended Phase II dose, non dose-limiting toxicity, and preliminary radiographic and pathologic response rates. Results: Eleven patients were enrolled. All were evaluable for toxicity and efficacy. Dose level 2 was associated with unacceptable toxicity (primarily diarrhea). Dose level 1 had an acceptable toxicity profile. The recommended Phase II dose in our study was bevacizumab 15 mg/kg Day 1 + 10 mg/kg Days 8 and 22, oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly, and capecitabine 625 mg/m{sup 2} bid during radiation days. Six patients had clinical responses. Two patients had a pathologic complete response, and 3 had microscopic disease only. One patient experienced a postoperative abscess, one a syncopal episode during adjuvant chemotherapy, and one a subclinical myocardial infarction during adjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusions: The combination of bevacizumab, capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiation therapy in rectal cancer was tolerable, with encouraging response rates. Further

  17. Prognostic Factors Affecting Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer and Clinical Significance of Hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk Kuhn, Hildegard; Schultze, Juergen; Homann, Nils; Brandenburg, Bernd; Schulte, Rainer; Krull, Andreas; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate potential prognostic factors, including hemoglobin levels before and during radiotherapy, for associations with survival and local control in patients with unirradiated locally recurrent rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: Ten potential prognostic factors were investigated in 94 patients receiving radiotherapy for recurrent rectal cancer: age ({<=}68 vs. {>=}69 years), gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (0-1 vs. 2-3), American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage ({<=}II vs. III vs. IV), grading (G1-2 vs. G3), surgery, administration of chemotherapy, radiation dose (equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions: {<=}50 vs. >50 Gy), and hemoglobin levels before (<12 vs. {>=}12 g/dL) and during (majority of levels: <12 vs. {>=}12 g/dL) radiotherapy. Multivariate analyses were performed, including hemoglobin levels, either before or during radiotherapy (not both) because these are confounding variables. Results: Improved survival was associated with better performance status (p < 0.001), lower AJCC stage (p = 0.023), surgery (p = 0.011), chemotherapy (p = 0.003), and hemoglobin levels {>=}12 g/dL both before (p = 0.031) and during (p < 0.001) radiotherapy. On multivariate analyses, performance status, AJCC stage, and hemoglobin levels during radiotherapy maintained significance. Improved local control was associated with better performance status (p = 0.040), lower AJCC stage (p = 0.010), lower grading (p = 0.012), surgery (p < 0.001), chemotherapy (p < 0.001), and hemoglobin levels {>=}12 g/dL before (p < 0.001) and during (p < 0.001) radiotherapy. On multivariate analyses, chemotherapy, grading, and hemoglobin levels before and during radiotherapy remained significant. Subgroup analyses of the patients having surgery demonstrated the extent of resection to be significantly associated with local control (p = 0.011) but not with survival (p = 0.45). Conclusion: Predictors for outcome in patients who received radiotherapy for

  18. Tumour-infiltrating regulatory T cell density before neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer does not predict treatment response.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Melanie J; Hemmings, Chris; Anyaegbu, Chidozie C; Austin, Stephanie J; Lee-Pullen, Tracey F; Miller, Timothy J; Bulsara, Max K; Zeps, Nikolajs; Nowak, Anna K; Lake, Richard A; Platell, Cameron F

    2017-02-03

    Neoadjuvant (preoperative) chemoradiotherapy (CRT) decreases the risk of rectal cancer recurrence and reduces tumour volume prior to surgery. However, response to CRT varies considerably between individuals and factors associated with response are poorly understood. Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) inhibit anti-tumour immunity and may limit any response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We have previously reported that a low density of Tregs in the tumour stroma following neoadjuvant CRT for rectal cancer is associated with improved tumour regression. Here we have examined the association between Treg density in pre-treatment diagnostic biopsy specimens and treatment response, in this same patient cohort. We aimed to determine whether pre-treatment tumour-infiltrating Treg density predicts subsequent response to neoadjuvant CRT. Foxp3+, CD8+ and CD3+ cell densities in biopsy samples from 106 patients were assessed by standard immunohistochemistry (IHC) and evaluated for their association with tumour regression grade and survival. We found no association between the density of any T cell subset pre-treatment and clinical outcome, indicating that tumour-infiltrating Treg density does not predict response to neoadjuvant CRT in rectal cancer. Taken together with the findings of the previous study, these data suggest that in the context of neoadjuvant CRT for rectal cancer, the impact of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy on anti-tumour immunity may be more important than the state of the pre-existing local immune response.

  19. Cancer Screening Among Patients With Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sima, Camelia S.; Panageas, Katherine S.; Schrag, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Context Cancer screening has been integrated into routine primary care but does not benefit patients with limited life expectancy. Objective To evaluate the extent to which patients with advanced cancer continue to be screened for new cancers. Design, Setting, and Participants Utilization of cancer screening procedures (mammography, Papanicolaou test, prostate-specific antigen [PSA], and lower gastrointestinal [GI] endoscopy) was assessed in 87 736 fee-for-service Medicare enrollees aged 65 years or older diagnosed with advanced lung, colorectal, pancreatic, gastroesophageal, or breast cancer between 1998 and 2005, and reported to one of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) tumor registries. Participants were followed up until death or December 31, 2007, whichever came first. A group of 87 307 Medicare enrollees without cancer were individually matched by age, sex, race, and SEER registry to patients with cancer and observed over the same period to evaluate screening rates in context. Demographic and clinical characteristics associated with screening were also investigated. Main Outcome Measure For each cancer screening test, utilization rates were defined as the percentage of patients who were screened following the diagnosis of an incurable cancer. Results Among women following advanced cancer diagnosis compared with controls, at least 1 screening mammogram was received by 8.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.6%-9.1%) vs 22.0% (95% CI, 21.7%-22.5%); Papanicolaou test screening was received by 5.8% (95% CI, 5.6%-6.1%) vs 12.5% (95% CI, 12.2%-12.8%). Among men following advanced cancer diagnosis compared with controls, PSA test was received by 15.0% (95% CI, 14.7%-15.3%) vs 27.2% (95% CI, 26.8%-27.6%). For all patients following advanced diagnosis compared with controls, lower GI endoscopy was received by 1.7% (95% CI, 1.6%-1.8%) vs 4.7% (95% CI, 4.6%-4.9%). Screening was more frequent among patients with a recent history of screening (16.2% [95

  20. Biopsy Specimens Obtained 7 Days After Starting Chemoradiotherapy (CRT) Provide Reliable Predictors of Response to CRT for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Sadahiro, Sotaro; Tanaka, Akira; Okada, Kazutake; Kamata, Hiroko; Kamijo, Akemi; Murayama, Chieko; Akiba, Takeshi; Kawada, Shuichi

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) significantly decreases local recurrence in locally advanced rectal cancer. Various biomarkers in biopsy specimens obtained before CRT have been proposed as predictors of response. However, reliable biomarkers remain to be established. Methods and Materials: The study group comprised 101 consecutive patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who received preoperative CRT with oral uracil/tegafur (UFT) or S-1. We evaluated histologic findings on hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) staining and immunohistochemical expressions of Ki67, p53, p21, and apoptosis in biopsy specimens obtained before CRT and 7 days after starting CRT. These findings were contrasted with the histologic response and the degree of tumor shrinkage. Results: In biopsy specimens obtained before CRT, histologic marked regression according to the Japanese Classification of Colorectal Carcinoma (JCCC) criteria and the degree of tumor shrinkage on barium enema examination (BE) were significantly greater in patients with p21-positive tumors than in those with p21-negative tumors (P=.04 and P<.01, respectively). In biopsy specimens obtained 7 days after starting CRT, pathologic complete response, histologic marked regression according to both the tumor regression criteria and JCCC criteria, and T downstaging were significantly greater in patients with apoptosis-positive and p21-positive tumors than in those with apoptosis-negative (P<.01, P=.02, P=.01, and P<.01, respectively) or p21-negative tumors (P=.03, P<.01, P<.01, and P=.02, respectively). The degree of tumor shrinkage on both BE as well as MRI was significantly greater in patients with apoptosis-positive and with p21-positive tumors than in those with apoptosis-negative or p21-negative tumors, respectively. Histologic changes in H and E-stained biopsy specimens 7 days after starting CRT significantly correlated with pathologic complete response and marked regression on both JCCC and tumor

  1. Voxel-based population analysis for correlating local dose and rectal toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Oscar; Drean, Gael; Ospina, Juan David; Simon, Antoine; Haigron, Pascal; Lafond, Caroline; De Crevoisier, Renaud

    2013-01-01

    The majority of current models utilized for predicting toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy are based on dose-volume histograms. One of their main drawbacks is the lack of spatial accuracy, since they consider the organs as a whole volume and thus ignore the heterogeneous intra-organ radio-sensitivity. In this paper, we propose a dose-image-based framework to reveal the relationships between local dose and toxicity. In this approach, the three-dimensional (3D) planned dose distributions across a population are non-rigidly registered into a common coordinate system and compared at a voxel level, therefore enabling the identification of 3D anatomical patterns, which may be responsible for toxicity, at least to some extent. Additionally, different metrics were employed in order to assess the quality of the dose mapping. The value of this approach was demonstrated by prospectively analyzing rectal bleeding (≥Grade 1 at 2 years) according to the CTCAE v3.0 classification in a series of 105 patients receiving 80Gy to the prostate by IMRT. Within the patients presenting bleeding, a significant dose excess (6Gy on average, p<0.01) was found in a region of the anterior rectal wall. This region, close to the prostate (1cm), represented less than 10% of the rectum. This promising voxel-wise approach allowed subregions to be defined within the organ that may be involved in toxicity and, as such, must be considered during the inverse IMRT planning step. PMID:23528429

  2. Anastomotic leak rate after low anterior resection for rectal cancer after chemoradiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Benjamin R; Harris, Lisa J; Maxwell, Pinckney J; Isenberg, Gerald A; Goldstein, Scott D

    2010-08-01

    Anastomotic leak may be the most concerning complication after colorectal anastomosis. To compare open with laparoscopic rectal resection, we must have accurate leak rates in patients who have received neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy to serve as a benchmark for comparison. All patients who had preoperative chemoradiation therapy with rectal resection and low pelvic anastomosis for cancer in a single colorectal practice over a 7-year period were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had proximal diversion and a contrast enema study before stoma reversal. Eighty-seven consecutive patients were included in the study. Average age was 58 years. Fifty-nine per cent of patients were male. Sixty-six per cent were smokers. Pathologic T stage was 5 per cent T0, 16 per cent T1, 28 per cent T2, 47 per cent T3, and 5 per cent T4. Seventy-five per cent of patients were pathologically lymph node-negative. Average time to stoma reversal was 122 days. Total anastomotic leak rate was 10.3 per cent (8% clinical leaks). Five (56%) patients with leak successfully underwent reversal of their diverting stoma (average time to reversal, 290 days). Patients who had the complication of anastomotic leakage had less likelihood of stoma reversal and a significantly prolonged time to stoma reversal.

  3. The functional outcomes of coloanal and low colorectal anastomoses with reservoirs after low rectal cancer resections.

    PubMed

    Rubin, François; Douard, Richard; Wind, Philippe

    2014-12-01

    Nearly half of patients undergoing low anterior rectal cancer resection have a functional sequelae after straight coloanal or low colorectal anastomoses (SA), including low anterior rectal resection syndrome, which combines stool fragmentation, urge incontinence, and incontinence. SA are responsible for anastomotic leakage rates of 0 to 29.2 per cent. Adding a colonic reservoir improves the functional results while reducing anastomotic complications. These colonic reservoir techniques include the colonic J pouch (CJP), transverse coloplasty (TC), and side-to-end anastomosis (STEA) procedures. The aim of this literature review was to compare the functional outcomes of these three techniques from a high level of evidence. CJP with a 4- to 6-cm reservoir is a good surgical option because it reduces functional impairments during the first year, and probably up to 5 years, but is not always feasible. TC appears to perform as well as CJP, is achievable in over 95 per cent of patients, but still with some doubts about a higher anastomotic leakage rate and worse functional outcomes. STEA appears equivalent to CJP in terms of morbidity and even better functional outcomes. STEA, with a terminal side segment size of 3 cm, is feasible in the majority of nonobese patients, combines good functional results, has low anastomotic leakage rates, and is easy to complete.

  4. Phase II Study of Preoperative Helical Tomotherapy With a Simultaneous Integrated Boost for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, Benedikt; Tournel, Koen; Everaert, Hendrik; Hoorens, Anne; Sermeus, Alexandra; Christian, Nicolas; Storme, Guy; Verellen, Dirk; De Ridder, Mark

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: The addition of concomitant chemotherapy to preoperative radiotherapy is considered the standard of care for patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer. The combined treatment modality increases the complete response rate and local control (LC), but has no impact on survival or the incidence of distant metastases. In addition, it is associated with considerable toxicity. As an alternative strategy, we explored prospectively, preoperative helical tomotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Methods and Materials: A total of 108 patients were treated with intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy using the Tomotherapy Hi-Art II system. A dose of 46 Gy, in daily fractions of 2 Gy, was delivered to the mesorectum and draining lymph nodes, without concomitant chemotherapy. Patients with an anticipated circumferential resection margin (CRM) of less than 2 mm, based on magnetic resonance imaging, received a SIB to the tumor up to a total dose of 55.2 Gy. Acute and late side effects were scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: A total of 102 patients presented with cT3-4 tumors; 57 patients entered the boost group and 51 the no-boost group. One patient in the no-boost group developed a radio-hypersensitivity reaction, resulting in a complete tumor remission, a Grade 3 acute and Grade 5 late enteritis. No other Grade {>=}3 acute toxicities occurred. With a median follow-up of 32 months, Grade {>=}3 late gastrointestinal and urinary toxicity were observed in 6% and 4% of the patients, respectively. The actuarial 2-year LC, progression-free survival and overall survival were 98%, 79%, and 93%. Conclusions: Preoperative helical tomotherapy displays a favorable acute toxicity profile in patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer. A SIB can be safely administered in patients with a narrow CRM and resulted in a promising LC.

  5. Transanal Total Mesorectal Excision With Single-Incision Laparoscopy for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Dominic Chi-chung; Choi, Hok Kwok; Wei, Rockson; Yip, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: There has been great enthusiasm for the technique of transanal total mesorectal excision. Coupled with this procedure, we performed single-incision laparoscopic surgery for left colon mobilization. This is a description of our initial experience with the combined approach. Methods: Patients with distal or mid rectal cancer were included. The operation was performed by 2 teams: one team performed the single-incision mobilization of the left colon via the right lower quadrant ileostomy site, and the other team performed the total mesorectal excision with a transanal platform. Results: During the study period, 10 patients (5 men) with cancer of the rectum underwent the surgery. The mean age was 62.2 ± 11.1 years, and the mean body mass index was 23.4 ± 3.2 kg/m2. The tumor's mean distance from the anal verge was 5.1 ± 2.5 cm. The median operating time was 247.5 minutes (range, 188–462 minutes). The mean estimated blood loss was 124 ± 126 mL (range, 10–188 mL). Conversion to multiport laparoscopy was needed in one case (10%). Postoperative pain, as reflected by the pain score, was minimal. The mean number of lymph nodes harvested was 15.6 ± 3.8. All specimens had clear distal and circumferential radial margins. The overall complication rate was 10%. Conclusion: Our experience showed transanal total mesorectal excision with single-incision laparoscopy to be a feasible option for rectal cancer. Patients reported minimal postoperative pain. Further studies on the long-term outcome are warranted. PMID:27186068

  6. Synchronous rectal and gastric cancer in a fighter pilot: aeromedical concerns.

    PubMed

    Gu, Guo-Li; Wei, Xue-Ming; Xu, Xian-Rong; Li, De-Chang; Wang, Shi-Lin; Gu, Jin

    2013-06-01

    Synchronous cancer of the stomach and rectum is very r