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Sample records for advanced recurrent metastatic

  1. MLN0264 in Previously Treated Asian Participants With Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma or Metastatic or Recurrent Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma Expressing Guanylyl Cyclase C

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-08

    Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma; Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoma

  2. Nonsurgical Management of Cervical Cancer: Locally Advanced, Recurrent, and Metastatic Disease, Survivorship, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Helen J.; Wenzel, Lari; Mileshkin, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Overview Despite the declining incidence of cervical cancer as a result of the introduction of screening programs, globally it remains a leading cause of cancer-related death in women. Outcomes for patients who are diagnosed with anything but early-stage disease remain poor. Here we examine emerging strategies to improve the treatment of locally advanced disease. We discuss emerging biologic data, which are informing our investigation of new therapeutic interventions in persistent, recurrent, and metastatic cervical cancer. We recognize the importance of interventions to improve quality of life and to prevent long-term sequelae in women undergoing treatment. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, we recognize the need for global collaboration and advocacy to improve the outcome for all women at risk of and diagnosed with this disease. PMID:25993189

  3. VEGF Trap in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Locally Advanced, or Metastatic Cancer of the Urothelium

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-10

    Adenocarcinoma of the Bladder; Distal Urethral Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urethral Cancer Associated With Invasive Bladder Cancer

  4. Veliparib, Capecitabine, and Temozolomide in Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, and Recurrent Neuroendocrine Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-26

    Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Malignant Somatostatinoma; Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2A; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2B; Neuroendocrine Neoplasm; Non-Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Thymic Carcinoid Tumor; VIP-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Well Differentiated Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Zollinger Ellison Syndrome

  5. U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval: vismodegib for recurrent, locally advanced, or metastatic basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Axelson, Michael; Liu, Ke; Jiang, Xiaoping; He, Kun; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Hong; Kufrin, Dubravka; Palmby, Todd; Dong, Zedong; Russell, Anne Marie; Miksinski, Sarah; Keegan, Patricia; Pazdur, Richard

    2013-05-01

    The data and regulatory considerations leading to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) January 30, 2012 approval of Erivedge (vismodegib) capsules for the treatment of patients with recurrent, locally advanced, or metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC) are described. The FDA's approval decision was based primarily on the results observed in a single-arm, parallel cohort, international trial of vismodegib, administered orally at 150 mg daily until disease progression, in patients with pathologically confirmed, recurrent, locally advanced basal cell carcinoma (laBCC) or metastatic basal cell carcinoma (mBCC). An independent review committee confirmed an overall response rate (ORR) of 30.3% [95% confidence interval (CI): 15.6-48.2] in 33 patients with mBCC and an ORR of 42.9% (95% CI: 30.5-56.0) in 63 patients with laBCC; median response durations were 7.6 months and 7.6 months for patients with mBCC and laBCC, respectively. The most common adverse reactions were muscle spasms, alopecia, dysgeusia, weight loss, fatigue, nausea, diarrhea, decreased appetite, constipation, cough, arthralgias, vomiting, headache, ageusia, insomnia, and upper respiratory tract infection. Animal toxicology studies confirmed that vismodegib is a potent teratogenic agent. Approval was based on durable objective tumor responses supported by knowledge of the pathologic role of Hedgehog signaling in BCC and acceptable toxicity in a population without effective alternative therapies.

  6. Atezolizumab With or Without Eribulin Mesylate in Treating Patients With Recurrent Locally Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-04

    Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Urethral Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Renal Pelvis Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage III Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Pelvis Carcinoma; Stage III Ureter Cancer; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Renal Pelvis Carcinoma; Stage IV Ureter Cancer; Stage IV Urethral Cancer; Ureter Urothelial Carcinoma

  7. Targeted Therapy in Locally Advanced and Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (LA-R/M HNSCC)

    PubMed Central

    Echarri, María José; Lopez-Martin, Ana; Hitt, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Surgery and radiotherapy are the standard treatment options for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Chemoradiotherapy is an alternative for patients with locally advanced disease. In recurrent/metastatic disease and after progression to platin-based regimens, no standard treatments other than best supportive care are currently available. Most SCCHN tumours overexpress the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). This receptor is a tyrosine-kinase membrane receptor that has been implicated in angiogenesis, tumour progression and resistance to different cancer treatments. In this review, we analysed the different drugs and pathways under development to treat SCCHN, especially recurrent/metastatic disease. Until now, the EGFR signalling pathway has been considered the most important target with respect to new drugs; however, new drugs, such as immunotherapies, are currently under study. As new treatments for SCCHN are developed, the influence of therapies with respect to overall survival, progression free survival and quality of life in patients with this disease is changing. PMID:26927178

  8. Pemetrexed disodium in recurrent locally advanced or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Pivot, X; Raymond, E; Laguerre, B; Degardin, M; Cals, L; Armand, J P; Lefebvre, J L; Gedouin, D; Ripoche, V; Kayitalire, L; Niyikiza, C; Johnson, R; Latz, J; Schneider, M

    2001-01-01

    This phase II study determined response rate of patients with locally advanced or metastatic head and neck cancer treated with pemetrexed disodium, a new multitargeted antifolate that inhibits thymidylate synthase, dihydrofolate reductase and glycinamide ribonucleotide formyl transferase. 35 patients with local or metastatic relapse of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (31 male, 4 female; median age 53 years) were treated with pemetrexed 500 mg m2 administered as a 10-minute infusion on day 1 of a 21-day cycle. Patients received 1 to 8 cycles of therapy. 9 patients (26.5%) had an objective response, with a median response duration of 5.6 months (range 2.9–20 months). 15 (44.1%) had stable disease, and 8 (23.5%) had progressive disease. 2 patients were not assessable for response. Median overall survival was 6.4 months (range 0.7–28.1 months; 95% CI: 3.9–7.7 months). 24 patients (68.6%) experienced grade 3/4 neutropenia, with febrile neutropenia in 4 (11.4%). Grade 3/4 anaemia and thrombocytopenia occurred in 11 (34.3%) and 6 (17.1%) patients, respectively. The most frequent non-haematological toxicity was grade 3/4 mucositis (17.1%; 6 patients). In conclusion, pemetrexed is active in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Although substantial haematological toxicities were experienced by patients, subsequent studies have shown that these toxicities can be proactively managed by folic acid and vitamin B12 supplementation. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11531245

  9. Combination Chemotherapy and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Metastatic, or Recurrent Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  10. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Metastatic, Locally Advanced, or Recurrent Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    Adult Angiosarcoma; Adult Epithelioid Sarcoma; Adult Leiomyosarcoma; Adult Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma; Adult Neurofibrosarcoma; Adult Synovial Sarcoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Uterine Carcinosarcoma; Uterine Leiomyosarcoma

  11. AZD0530 in Treating Patients With Recurrent Locally Advanced or Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-02

    Adult Fibrosarcoma; Adult Leiomyosarcoma; Adult Liposarcoma; Adult Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans; Endometrial Stromal Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Uterine Carcinosarcoma; Uterine Leiomyosarcoma

  12. Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Locally Advanced Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-05

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IVA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IVB Endometrial Carcinoma

  13. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Metastatic, or Locally Recurrent Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-15

    Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer; Insular Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Papillary Thyroid Cancer

  14. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Recurrent, or Metastatic Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-15

    Recurrent Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Stage III Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Tongue Carcinoma

  15. Feasibility and Timing of Cytoreduction Surgery in Advanced (Metastatic or Recurrent) Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors During the Era of Imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shih-Chun; Liao, Chien-Hung; Wang, Shang-Yu; Tsai, Chun-Yi; Chiang, Kun-Chun; Cheng, Chi-Tung; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Chen, Yen-Yang; MA, Ming-Chun; Liu, Chien-Ting; Yeh, Chun-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The prognosis of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) was dramatically improved in the era of imatinib. Cytoreduction surgery was advocated as an additional treatment for advanced GISTs, especially when patients having poor response to imatinib or developing resistance to it. However, the efficacy and benefit of cytoreduction were still controversial. Likewise, the sequence between cytoreduction surgery and imatinib still need evaluation. In this study, we tried to assess the feasibility and efficiency of cytoreduction in advanced GISTs. Furthermore, we analyzed the impact of timing of the cytoreduction surgery on the prognosis of advanced GISTs. We conducted a prospective collecting retrospective review of patients with advanced GISTs (metastatic, unresectable, and recurrent GISTs) treated in Chang Gung memorial hospital (CGMH) since 2001 to 2013. We analyzed the impact of cytoreduction surgery to response to imatinib, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced GISTs. Moreover, by the timing of cytoreduction to imatinib, we divided the surgical patients who had surgery before imatinib use into early group and those who had surgery after imatinib into late. We compared the clinical response to imatinib, PFS and OS between early and late cytoreduction surgical groups. Totally, 182 patients were enrolled into this study. Seventy-six patients underwent cytoreduction surgery. The demographic characteristics and tumor presentation were similar between surgical and non-surgical groups. The surgical group showed better complete response rate (P < 0.001) and partial response rate (P = 0.008) than non-surgical group. The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year PFS were significantly superior in surgical group (P = 0.003). The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year OS were superior in surgical group, but without statistical significance (P = 0.088). Dividing by cytoreduction surgical timing, the demographic

  16. Cetuximab for the treatment of locally advanced and recurrent/metastatic oral cancer: An investigation of distant metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Naruse, Tomofumi; Yanamoto, Souichi; Matsushita, Yuki; Sakamoto, Yuki; Morishita, Kota; Ohba, Seigo; Shiraishi, Takeshi; Yamada, Shin-Ichi; Asahina, Izumi; Umeda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the efficacy and safety of cetuximab therapy for patients with locally advanced (LA) and recurrent/metastatic (R/M) oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), with a specific focus on distant metastases (DMs). Data from 21 patients with unresectable LA and R/M OSCC treated with cetuximab therapy in our department between December, 2012 and July, 2015 were reviewed. The endpoint was the time-to-progression and the assessments made were tumor response rate, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and safety. The overall response rate was 57.1%, with a complete response (CR) rate of 33.3%. The overall median PFS and OS were 5.5 and 8.0 months, respectively. For patients with DMs, the overall response rate was 60.0%, with a CR rate of 40.0%. The median PFS and OS were 3.8 and 5.8 months, respectively. In addition, improved 1-year OS was observed following approval of cetuximab, although the differences between the group of patients treated after that time and historical controls were not statistically significantly (P=0.246). Grade 3–4 adverse events included infusion reaction (4 cases), neutropenia, hypophosphatemia, upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, liver toxicity and mucositis (1 case each). There was one cetuximab-related death due to interstitial pneumonia. An acne-like rash was observed in all cases, but no grade 3 or 4 rash was reported. Hypomagnesemia was observed in 10 cases. Our results suggest that cetuximab may display significant therapeutic efficacy in patients with unresectable LA and R/M OSCC, including those with DMs. PMID:27446558

  17. A phase 2 study of nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel plus nedaplatin for patients with advanced, recurrent, or metastatic cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Yifan; Zeng, Jing; Huang, Manni; An, Jusheng; Bai, Ping; Wu, Lingying; Zhang, Rong

    2017-02-01

    Nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) and nedaplatin (NDP) are used for the treatment of patients with cervical cancer. However, to the authors' knowledge, the use of this combination regimen among patients with advanced, recurrent, or metastatic cervical cancer has rarely been reported. Patients with pathologically confirmed, stage IVB (FIGO staging 2009), recurrent or metastatic cervical cancer were eligible. Nab-paclitaxel at a dose of 175 mg/m(2) plus NDP at a dose of 80 mg/m(2) was administered intravenously every 3 weeks. The primary endpoint of the current study was the objective response rate (ORR). The secondary endpoints were progression-free survival, overall survival, and safety. A total of 27 patients were included (5 with late-stage and 22 with recurrent or metastatic disease). The mean age of the patients was 48.26 ± 9.21 years. Of these 27 patients, 25 had squamous cell carcinoma (92.6%). A total of 26 patients completed 92 cycles of chemotherapy, with an average of 3.4 cycles per patient. The ORR was 50.0% (13 of 26 patients). The overall survival was 16.6 months (95% confidence interval, 12.6-20.6 months) and the progression-free survival was 9.1 months (95% confidence interval, 2.4-15.8 months).The ORR of patients with an interval of >12 months from receipt of prior chemotherapy was significantly higher than that of those with a shorter interval (71.4% vs 25.0%; P = .034). The most common adverse effects reported were myelosuppression, gastrointestinal reactions, fatigue, and peripheral neuropathy. The incidence of grade 3 neutropenia was 33.3% (adverse effects were graded on a scale from 0 to 4 according to the National Cancer Institute's Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events [version 3.0]). The incidence of grade 3 thrombocytopenia and anemia was 7.4% and 18.5%, respectively. The incidence of grade 1 to 2 peripheral neuropathy was reported to be as high as 51.9%. No case of hypersensitivity was observed

  18. Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid in Treating Patients With Metastatic and/or Locally Advanced or Locally Recurrent Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-23

    Insular Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage II Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage II Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  19. TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Recurrent, or Metastatic Squamous Cell Cancer of Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-03

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage

  20. Sapanisertib or Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-10-12

    High Grade Sarcoma; Metastatic Leiomyosarcoma; Metastatic Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Metastatic Synovial Sarcoma; Metastatic Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma; Myxofibrosarcoma; Recurrent Leiomyosarcoma; Recurrent Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Recurrent Synovial Sarcoma; Recurrent Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma; Uterine Corpus Leiomyosarcoma

  1. Talazoparib and HSP90 Inhibitor AT13387 in Treating Patients With Metastatic Advanced Solid Tumor or Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, Primary Peritoneal, or Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-22

    Adult Solid Neoplasm; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Fallopian Tube Serous Neoplasm; HER2/Neu Negative; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Tumor; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  2. Indications for surgery in advanced/metastatic GIST.

    PubMed

    Ford, Samuel J; Gronchi, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are a relatively rare entity and often present as a locally advanced tumour or with metastatic disease. Complete surgical resection is the only means of cure in localised disease; however, imatinib therapy has greatly advanced the management of GIST and is established as both an adjunct to surgery in high-risk cases and as principle therapy in metastatic disease. Surgery in advanced GIST has undergone a renaissance in recent years with the potential for a combined treatment approach with either neoadjuvant imatinib in locally advanced primary disease or as an adjunct to imatinib in those with metastases or recurrent disease. Neoadjuvant imatinib can render a locally advanced primary GIST resectable, allow less invasive procedures or promote preservation of function, especially if the tumour is located in an anatomically difficult position. The role of surgery in metastatic or recurrent disease is more controversial and case selection is critical. The potential benefit is difficult to quantify, although surgery may have a limited favourable impact on progression-free survival and overall survival for those patients whose disease is responding to imatinib or those with limited focal progression. Patients with imatinib resistant disease should not be offered surgery unless as an emergency where palliative intervention may be justified.

  3. Exemestane With or Without Entinostat in Treating Patients With Recurrent Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer That is Locally Advanced or Metastatic

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-01

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  4. Bortezomib Followed by the Addition of Doxorubicin at Disease Progression in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Recurrent, or Metastatic Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma (Cancer) of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer

  5. GTI-2040 and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Metastatic, or Unresectable Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Prostate Cancer, or Other Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  6. Systemic Treatment in HPV-Induced Recurrent or Metastatic HNSCC.

    PubMed

    Rieke, Damian T; Keilholz, Ulrich

    Recurrent or metastatic head and neck cancer describes tumor deposits that arise locally, regionally, or at distant sites after treatment or distant metastases at the time of primary diagnosis. Prognosis for R/M squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (HNSCC) is poor and treatment options are limited in this situation. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is an important risk factor for HNSCC. About 40 % of all HNSCC have been attributed to HPV in Europe. HPV positivity at initial diagnosis is the single best prognostic factor for survival. However, data for the prognostic and predictive value of HPV in the R/M situation are still scarce. Due to the rising incidence of HPV-associated cancers, the number of R/M HPV+ carcinomas is also expected to rise. This chapter therefore aims to give an overview of the current knowledge concerning the role of HPV as a prognostic and predictive marker in recurrent or metastatic HNSCC.

  7. Gamma-secretase/Notch Signalling Pathway Inhibitor RO4929097 in Treating Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, or Recurrent Triple Negative Invasive Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-28

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  8. Recent Advances in Immunotherapy in Metastatic NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Pranshu; Osman, Diaa; Gan, Gregory N.; Simon, George R.; Boumber, Yanis

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of most common malignancies and the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Despite advances in targeted therapies, majority of NSCLC patients do not have targetable genomic alterations. Nevertheless, recent discovery that NSCLC is an immunogenic tumor type, and several breakthroughs in immunotherapies have led to rapid expansion of this new treatment modality in NSCLC with recent FDA approvals of programed death receptor-1 inhibitors, such as nivolumab and pembrolizumab. Here, we review promising immunotherapeutic approaches in metastatic NSCLC, including checkpoint inhibitors, agents with other mechanisms of action, and immunotherapy combinations with other drugs. With advent of immunotherapy, therapeutic options in metastatic NSCLC are rapidly expanding with the hope to further expand life expectancy in metastatic lung cancer. PMID:27896216

  9. Palliative treatment of patients with inoperable locally advanced, recurrent or metastatic head and neck squamous cell cancer, using a low-dose and personalized chemotherapeutic regimen

    PubMed Central

    Bishnoi, Rohit; Bennett, Jeffery; Reisman, David N.

    2017-01-01

    Inoperable or metastatic head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) is known to be associated with a poor patient prognosis. First line therapies include a Taxol, platinum-based antineoplastic and fluorouracil (FU) treatment regimen (TPF) or a platinum-based antineoplastic, FU and EGFR inhibitor treatment regimen (PFE). The toxicity of these regimens is one of the major limiting factors, particularly for palliative treatment. The present study is a retrospective study of 15 patients with HNSCC, where the treatment goal was palliative. Of the 15 patients, 8 received a TPF, while 7 received a PFE. A total of 129 treatment cycles were administered with a median of 9 cycles (range, 3–14). Chemotherapy began with low doses and was subsequently titrated up based on tolerance and response. Positive responses were noted with the lower doses compared with the conventional doses, and maximal doses were not required. The median dose of cisplatin, paclitaxel and 5-FU administered was 40 mg/m2, 80 mg/m2 and 360 mg/m2/day for 5 days, respectively. Cetuximab was used at a standard dose. At the initial follow-up (mean, 64 days; 3 cycles), a 100% disease control rate (DCR) and 80% overall response rate (ORR) was achieved. A positive response, 60% DCR and 60% ORR, was maintained until the late stages of the study (mean, 217 days; 9 cycles). Following termination of chemotherapy after >9 cycles, 4 patients remained disease free for ~1 year. A total of 3 patients exhibited a pathologic complete response despite radiologically exhibiting residual disease. The median progression-free survival time was 10.03 months and the overall survival time was 15.77 months. The only grade 3 hematologic toxicity noted was neutropenia in 3 (20%) patients. Grade 3 vomiting was noted in 1 (6.67%) patient and grade 3 stomatitis was noted in 1 (6.67%) patient. Due to low toxicity patients exhibited improved tolerance to this approach, particularly in terms of palliative care. Furthermore, these results

  10. Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Newly Diagnosed Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IV Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IV Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Neck With Occult Primary

  11. A phase I and pharmacokinetic study of TAS-108 in postmenopausal female patients with locally advanced, locally recurrent inoperable, or progressive metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Blakely, L Johnetta; Buzdar, Aman; Chang, Hsiu-Yin; Frye, Debra; Theriault, Richard; Valero, Vicente; Rivera, Edgardo; Booser, Daniel; Kuritani, Jun; Tsuda, Masuhiro

    2004-08-15

    TAS-108 is a novel steroidal anti-estrogen compound that has a strong binding affinity to the estrogen receptor and, in preclinical studies, has antitumor activity against tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cell lines. The objective of this study was to investigate the safety and the pharmacokinetics in patients with previously treated advanced breast cancer. TAS-108 was administered orally once daily starting at 40 mg/day, with dose escalations of 60, 80, 120, and 160 mg/day. A minimum of three patients were enrolled in each dose level, and, if no drug-related grade 3 or higher adverse events were seen in the first 14 days, the next cohort of patients was treated at the next level. Pharmacokinetic data were obtained on day 1, 2, 15, and 28 of the first course. A total of 16 patients were enrolled, and most had received six to seven prior therapies. Clinical toxicities included nausea, vomiting, hot flashes, headache, weakness and fatigue; all were grade 1-2. TAS-108 had no effect on endometrial thickness based on trans-vaginal ultrasound evaluation. The average duration of therapy was 17.4 weeks (range, 4-60 weeks). The mean terminal half-life ranged from 8.0 to 10.7 hour in the interval of 12 to 24 hours postdose. The mean C(max) ranged from 2.8 to 21.0 ng/mL and AUC(0-t) from 15.1 to 148.7 ng.h/mL, this showed a linear correlation with the dose. TAS-108 was well tolerated in the doses studied with no maximum tolerated dose. The drug has linear pharmacokinetics, and in this heavily treated patient population, there was evidence of biological antitumor activity. A multi-institutional phase II study is planned.

  12. Collecting and Studying Blood and Tissue Samples From Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Prostate or Bladder/Urothelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-06

    Healthy Control; Localized Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  13. Identifying patients at risk for recurrent or advanced BCC.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Omid; Goldenberg, Gary

    2013-11-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is a common skin cancer and its incidence is on the rise worldwide. Clinical presentation and histologic examination are used for diagnosis and to stratify BCCs as either low- or high-risk for recurrence or development of advanced disease. A number of surgical and nonsurgical options are available for BCC. BCC is most often managed with a surgical approach, but not all tumors and patients are suitable for surgery. Vismodegib is a recently approved first-in-class hedgehog pathway inhibitor that has expanded options for patients who have locally advanced or metastatic BCC.

  14. CPI-613 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Bile Duct Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-14

    Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

  15. The role of the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors as therapy for advanced, metastatic, and recurrent non-small-cell lung cancer: a Canadian national consensus statement

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, P.M.; Morzycki, W.; Melosky, B.; Butts, C.; Hirsh, V.; Krasnoshtein, F.; Murray, N.; Shepherd, F.A.; Soulieres, D.; Tsao, M.S.; Goss, G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To provide consensus recommendations on the use of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (egfr-tkis) in patients with advanced or meta-static non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc). Methods Using a systematic literature search, phase ii trials, randomized phase iii trials, and meta-analyses were identified for inclusion. Results A total of forty-six trials were included. Clear evidence is available that egfr-tkis should not be administered concurrently with platinum-based chemotherapy as first-line therapy in advanced or metastatic nsclc. Evidence is currently insufficient to recommend single-agent egfr-tkis as first-line therapy either in unselected populations or in populations selected on the basis of molecular or clinical characteristics. Following failure of platinum-based chemotherapy, the evidence suggests that second-line egfr-tkis or second-line chemotherapy result in similar survival. Quality of life and symptom improvement for patients treated with an egfr-tki appear better than they do for patients treated with second-line docetaxel. Sequence of therapy may not appear to be important, but if survival is the outcome of interest, the goal should be to optimize the number of patients receiving three lines of therapy. Based on available data, molecular markers and clinical characteristics do not appear to be predictive of a differential survival benefit from an egfr-tki and therefore those factors should not be used to select patients for egfr-tki therapy. Conclusions The egfr-tkis represent an additional therapy in the treatment of advanced or metastatic nsclc. The results of ongoing clinical trials may define the optimal role for these agents and the effectiveness of combinations of these agents with other targeted agents. PMID:19229369

  16. Cabozantinib-S-Malate in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-20

    Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mixed Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IV Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  17. Sapanisertib in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Bladder Cancer With TSC1 and/or TSC2 Mutations

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-04

    Metastatic Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Stage III Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; TSC1 Gene Mutation; TSC2 Gene Mutation

  18. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-13

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity

  19. TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Metastatic, Persistent, Recurrent, or Progressive Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-17

    Colorectal Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Melanoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer

  20. S0420, Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-27

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  1. Radiation Therapy and MK-3475 for Patients With Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer, Renal Cell Cancer, Melanoma, and Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Lung Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  2. Vismodegib: in locally advanced or metastatic basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2012-07-30

    Vismodegib is the first Hedgehog pathway inhibitor to be approved in the US, where it is indicated for the treatment of adults with metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC), or with locally advanced BCC that has recurred following surgery or who are not candidates for surgery, and who are not candidates for radiation. Vismodegib selectively and potently inhibits the Hedgehog signalling pathway by binding to Smoothened, thereby inhibiting the activation of Hedgehog target genes. Oral vismodegib was effective in the treatment of patients with locally advanced (n = 63) or metastatic (n = 33) BCC, according to the results of an ongoing, noncomparative, multinational, pivotal, phase II trial (ERIVANCE BCC). In this trial (using a clinical cutoff date of 26 November 2010), the independent review facility overall response rate was 42.9% in patients with locally advanced BCC and 30.3% in patients with metastatic BCC. In both patients with locally advanced BCC and those with metastatic BCC, the median duration of response was 7.6 months and median progression-free survival was 9.5 months. Oral vismodegib had an acceptable tolerability profile in patients with advanced BCC.

  3. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Cancer of the Urothelium

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-28

    Localized Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

  4. A Novel Use for Olaparib for Treatment of Metastatic Castration-Recurrent Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Martin, Grace A; Chen, Adrienne H; Parikh, Kinjal

    2017-09-12

    Although mortality from prostate cancer has declined over the past 20 years as a result of early detection and treatment, the 5-year survival rate for men with prostate cancer who develop metastatic disease is only 29%. Current treatment options for metastatic castration-recurrent prostate cancer (mCRPC) are associated with toxicity and a limited durable response; therefore, additional lines of efficacious and minimally toxic therapy are needed. Olaparib, a poly(adenosine 5'-diphosphate) ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitor, received United States Food and Drug Administration breakthrough therapy designation in January 2016 for the treatment of patients with BRCA1/2 or ATM gene-mutated mCRPC based on results of a compelling phase II trial of olaparib in patients with advanced castration resistant prostate cancer (TOPARP-A). This study found that men with mCRPC and genetic mutations in DNA damage repair genes had an overall response rate of nearly 90% with olaparib treatment. In this review, we describe current therapies for mCRPC, the rationale for anti-PARP therapies, the pharmacology of olaparib for prostate cancer, clinical trials of olaparib for mCRPC, our clinical experience with olaparib for prostate cancer at a comprehensive cancer center, and future directions of olaparib for the treatment of mCRPC. Olaparib may constitute a promising treatment to prolong survival in patients with mCRPC, with an acceptable adverse effect profile. As the role of PARP inhibition in prostate cancer and other malignancies becomes further elucidated, olaparib may be shown to be beneficial for other patient populations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-17

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  6. Insulin-like growth factor II-producing metastatic colon cancer with recurrent hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Teramae, Satoshi; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Muguruma, Naoki; Okada, Yasuyuki; Goji, Takahiro; Kitamura, Shinji; Kimura, Tetsuo; Kimura, Masako; Bando, Yoshimi; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2015-02-01

    A 45-year-old man was referred to our hospital and found to have a tubular adenocarcinoma of the descending colon with multiple liver metastases. During hospitalization, the patient suffered recurrent hypoglycemic attacks that required intravenous 50% glucose infusion. He was diagnosed with non-islet cell tumor hypoglycemia (NICTH) because the colon cancer tissue obtained by biopsy was strongly stained for insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) by immunohistochemistry. He received chemotherapy with oxaliplatin, 5-FU and leucovorin (FOLFOX) plus bevacizumab (Bmab), and showed a partial response. As the metastatic lesions decreased in size, the hypoglycemic attacks gradually disappeared. Subsequently, he received outpatient chemotherapy and maintained a high quality of life for about 10 months. Western blot analysis of IGF-II in serum at the time of admission showed a high-molecular-weight form of IGF-II, which was considered to have caused hypoglycemia. This patient presents a very rare case of colorectal cancer associated with NICTH syndrome due to production of high-molecular-weight IGF-II by cancer cells. It is important to investigate IGF-II expression in cancer tissues for establishing the diagnosis of NICTH in cases with intractable hypoglycemia complicated by advanced cancer.

  7. Emerging and Mechanism-Based Therapies for Recurrent or Metastatic Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Natalie J.; Bhatia, Shailender; Parvathaneni, Upendra; Iyer, Jayasri G.; Nghiem, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Opinion statement Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare but aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer with a disease-specific mortality of approximately 40 %. The association of MCC with a recently discovered polyomavirus, combined with the increased incidence and mortality of MCC among immunocompromised patients, highlight the importance of the immune system in controlling this cancer. Initial management of MCC is summarized within the NCCN guidelines and in recently published reviews. The high rate of recurrent and metastatic disease progression in MCC, however, presents a major challenge in a cancer that lacks mechanism-based, disease-specific therapies. Traditional treatment approaches have focused on cytotoxic chemotherapy that, despite frequent initial efficacy, rarely provides durable responses and has high morbidity among the elderly. In addition, the immunosuppressive nature of chemotherapy is of concern when treating a virus-associated cancer for which survival is unusually tightly linked to immune function. With a median survival of 9.6 months after development of an initial metastasis (n=179, described herein), and no FDA-approved agents for this cancer, there is an urgent need for more effective treatments. We review diverse management options for patients with advanced MCC, with a focus on emerging and mechanism-based therapies, some of which specifically target persistently expressed viral antigens. These treatments include single-dose radiation and novel immunotherapies, some of which are in clinical trials. Due to their encouraging efficacy, low toxicity, and lack of immune suppression, these therapies may offer viable alternatives to traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy. PMID:23436166

  8. Genetic landscape of metastatic and recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hedberg, Matthew L.; Goh, Gerald; Chiosea, Simion I.; Bauman, Julie E.; Freilino, Maria L.; Zeng, Yan; Wang, Lin; Diergaarde, Brenda B.; Gooding, William E.; Lui, Vivian W.Y.; Herbst, Roy S.; Lifton, Richard P.; Grandis, Jennifer R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Recurrence and/or metastasis occurs in more than half of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), and these events pose the greatest threats to long-term survival. We set out to identify genetic alterations that underlie recurrent/metastatic HNSCC. METHODS. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed on genomic DNA extracted from fresh-frozen whole blood and patient-matched tumor pairs from 13 HNSCC patients with synchronous lymph node metastases and 10 patients with metachronous recurrent tumors. Mutational concordance within and between tumor pairs was used to analyze the spatiotemporal evolution of HNSCC in individual patients and to identify potential therapeutic targets for functional evaluation. RESULTS. Approximately 86% and 60% of single somatic nucleotide variants (SSNVs) identified in synchronous nodal metastases and metachronous recurrent tumors, respectively, were transmitted from the primary index tumor. Genes that were mutated in more than one metastatic or recurrent tumor, but not in the respective primary tumors, include C17orf104, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, type 3 (ITPR3), and discoidin domain receptor tyrosine kinase 2 (DDR2). Select DDR2 mutations have been shown to confer enhanced sensitivity to SRC-family kinase (SFK) inhibitors in other malignancies. Similarly, HNSCC cell lines harboring endogenous and engineered DDR2 mutations were more sensitive to the SFK inhibitor dasatinib than those with WT DDR2. CONCLUSION. In this WES study of patient-matched tumor pairs in HNSCC, we found synchronous lymph node metastases to be genetically more similar to their paired index primary tumors than metachronous recurrent tumors. This study outlines a compendium of somatic mutations in primary, metastatic, and/or recurrent HNSCC cancers, with potential implications for precision medicine approaches. FUNDING. National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society, Agency for Science, Technology and Research of Singapore

  9. Saracatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-02

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of

  10. Ixabepilone in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-26

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  11. Cisplatin and Fluorouracil Compared With Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Inoperable Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Anal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-22

    Anal Basaloid Carcinoma; Anal Canal Cloacogenic Carcinoma; Anal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Anal Canal Carcinoma; Recurrent Anal Canal Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Anal Canal Cancer; Stage IV Anal Canal Cancer

  12. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoran; Wu, Xiaohua; Cheng, Xi

    2016-07-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. The outcome of patients with metastatic cervical cancer is poor. We reviewed the relevant literature concerning the treatment and diagnosis of metastatic cervical cancer. There are two types of metastasis related to different treatments and survival rates: hematogenous metastasis and lymphatic metastasis. Patients with hematogenous metastasis have a higher risk of death than those with lymphatic metastasis. In terms of diagnosis, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and PET-computed tomography are effective tools for the evaluation of distant metastasis. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy and subsequent chemotherapy are well-tolerated and efficient for lymphatic metastasis. As for lung metastasis, chemotherapy and/or surgery are valuable treatments for resistant, recurrent metastatic cervical cancer and chemoradiotherapy may be the optimal choice for stage IVB cervical cancer. Chemotherapy and bone irradiation are promising for bone metastasis. A better survival is achieved with multimodal therapy. Craniotomy or stereotactic radiosurgery is an optimal choice combined with radiotherapy for solitary brain metastases. Chemotherapy and palliative brain radiation may be considered for multiple brain metastases and other organ metastases.

  13. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. The outcome of patients with metastatic cervical cancer is poor. We reviewed the relevant literature concerning the treatment and diagnosis of metastatic cervical cancer. There are two types of metastasis related to different treatments and survival rates: hematogenous metastasis and lymphatic metastasis. Patients with hematogenous metastasis have a higher risk of death than those with lymphatic metastasis. In terms of diagnosis, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and PET-computed tomography are effective tools for the evaluation of distant metastasis. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy and subsequent chemotherapy are well-tolerated and efficient for lymphatic metastasis. As for lung metastasis, chemotherapy and/or surgery are valuable treatments for resistant, recurrent metastatic cervical cancer and chemoradiotherapy may be the optimal choice for stage IVB cervical cancer. Chemotherapy and bone irradiation are promising for bone metastasis. A better survival is achieved with multimodal therapy. Craniotomy or stereotactic radiosurgery is an optimal choice combined with radiotherapy for solitary brain metastases. Chemotherapy and palliative brain radiation may be considered for multiple brain metastases and other organ metastases. PMID:27171673

  14. Vismodegib: the first drug approved for advanced and metastatic basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dubey, A K; Dubey, S; Handu, S S; Qazi, M A

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) usually involves surgical interventions and laser ablation, but in locally advanced BCC, which arise either from earlier untreated lesions or from recurrence of aggressive BCC, surgery and radiotherapy are not helpful. Vismodegib, the first oral-targeted therapy for locally advanced and metastatic BCC, unsuitable for surgery or radiotherapy, was recently approved by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The drug was under the priority review program of FDA and was approved on the basis of promising results of phase II trial. Vismodegib acts by targeting the hedgehog pathway, which is activated abnormally in most BCCs. Approval of vismodegib is a big step ahead in the treatment of advanced BCC, where there was no other effective drug therapy till now.

  15. Eribulin Mesylate in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Cancer of the Urothelium and Kidney Dysfunction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-12

    Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Urethral Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Renal Failure; Stage III Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma

  16. Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Previously Treated, Locally Advanced, or Metastatic Cancer of the Urothelium

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Distal Urethral Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urethral Cancer Associated With Invasive Bladder Cancer

  17. APN401 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, or Other Solid Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-02

    Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Metastatic Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Solid Neoplasm; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Unresectable Solid Neoplasm

  18. Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, Cetuximab, and Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-11

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  19. Evolving treatment paradigms for locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Dorff, Tanya B; Quek, Marcus L; Daneshmand, Siamak; Pinski, Jacek

    2006-11-01

    While men with early stage prostate cancer typically enjoy long-term survival after definitive management, for those who present with locally advanced or metastatic disease, survival is compromised. Multimodality therapy can prolong survival in these patients, with state-of-the-art options including intensity-modulated radiation or brachytherapy in conjunction with androgen ablation, adjuvant androgen ablation and/or chemotherapy with radical retropubic prostatectomy. In addition, novel biological therapies are being explored to target the unique molecular changes in prostate cancer cells and their interactions with the microenvironment. With these advances the outlook will undoubtedly improve, even for patients presenting with advanced disease. Careful application of these emerging therapies to a select group of prostate cancer patients most likely to obtain benefit from them is the challenge for urologists, medical oncologists and radiation oncologists for the future.

  20. Downregulation of osteoprotegerin expression in metastatic colorectal carcinoma predicts recurrent metastasis and poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Youn-Wha

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported the downregulation of osteoprotegerin expression in primary colorectal carcinoma and its significant association with aggressive oncogenic behavior, which suggest that this process contributes to colorectal carcinoma development and progression. In this study, we used immunohistochemical staining to evaluate osteoprotegerin expression in 81 colorectal liver metastasis tissue samples and investigated its possible association with the clinicopathological characteristics and outcomes of patients with colorectal liver metastasis. These tissues exhibited significantly reduced expression of osteoprotegerin compared to primary colorectal carcinomas and normal colorectal mucosa. This reduced expression was significantly associated with the extent of colorectal liver metastasis, including multiplicity of metastatic tumors, involvement of the bilateral hepatic lobes, and higher histological grade. In addition, reduced osteoprotegerin expression was an independent significant predictor of recurrent liver metastasis and prognostic factor for reduced patient survival. These findings suggest that osteoprotegerin expression may be a novel predictor of recurrent liver metastasis and a prognostic biomarker in patients with colorectal liver metastasis. Patients harboring colorectal liver metastasis with reduced osteoprotegerin expression should be carefully monitored after hepatic resection for colorectal liver metastasis to enable early detection of potentially resectable metastatic recurrences. PMID:27764814

  1. [An advanced metastatic breast cancer patient successfully treated with combination therapy including docetaxel, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide (TAC) as salvage therapy].

    PubMed

    Sato, Yasushi; Takayama, Tetsuji; Sagawa, Tamotsu; Sato, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Kumiko; Takahashi, Shou; Abe, Seiichiro; Iyama, Satoshi; Murase, Kazuyuki; Kato, Junji; Niitsu, Yoshiro

    2008-03-01

    We reported here a case of advanced breast cancer successfully treated with combination therapy including docetaxel, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide (TAC) as salvage therapy. A 56-year-old male was referred to our hospital for treatment of recurrent metastatic breast cancer. When he was admitted, his general condition was poor due to massive intraperitoneal metastasis. We administered TAC chemotherapy (docetaxel 75 mg/m(2), doxorubicin 50 mg/m(2), and cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m(2), every 3 weeks). During chemotherapy, he showed no major adverse effects except grade 3 neutropenia, which could be easily managed with G-CSF administration. Metastatic lesions almost disappeared after 4 cycles of TAC. TAC therapy was considered to be acceptable as salvage therapy for a metastatic male breast cancer patient.

  2. Molecular characterization of permanent cell lines from primary, metastatic and recurrent malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) with underlying neurofibromatosis-1.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuqiang; Elahi, Abul; Denley, Ryan C; Rao, Pulivarthi H; Brennan, Murray F; Jhanwar, Suresh C

    2009-04-01

    lines was observed, as reported by others. The role of biallelic inactivation of p53 gene in MPNST with underlying NF1 mutations, however, needs further study. Overexpression of Rb1-protein observed in metastatic and recurrent cell lines is indicative of its role in the progression of the disease. One of the most important observations of this study is that Nm23-H1 expression is closely associated with advanced or metastatic disease. In summary, MPNST cell lines derived from a patient with metastatic and recurrent disease with NF1 disorder were characterized and a gene associated with metastatic potential which is amenable to therapeutic and chemo-preventative approaches was identified. These cell lines with extensive characterization of genetic abnormalities are likely to provide important reagents for biochemical, molecular and pharmacological studies related to MPNST.

  3. [Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosing recurrent and metastatic ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Bulanova, I M; Bulanova, T V; Burenchev, D V

    2006-01-01

    The paper deals with the capacities of ultrasonography (USG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing recurrent and metastatic ovarian cancer along with routine clinical and laboratory studies (physical examination, measurement of the tumor-associated serum antigen CA-125) in 95 patients with ovarian cancer after primary special treatment. MRI is preferable to USG in evaluating the extent of a tumorous process and the invasion of a tumor into the adjacent tissues, which is of great value in defining a further treatment policy.

  4. Vorinostat in Combination With Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Solid Tumors and HIV Infection

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-11

    HIV Infection; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  5. Enhanced Metastatic Recurrence Via Lymphatic Trafficking of a High-Metastatic Variant of Human Triple-Negative Breast Cancer After Surgical Resection in Orthotopic Nude Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Yano, Shuya; Takehara, Kiyoto; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Bouvet, Michael; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Hoffman, Robert M

    2017-03-01

    We previously developed and characterized a highly invasive and metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) variant by serial orthotopic implantation of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells in nude mice. Eventually, a highly invasive and metastatic variant of human TNBC was isolated after lymph node metastases was harvested and orthotopically re-implanted into the mammary gland of nude mice for two cycles. The variant thereby isolated is highly invasive in the mammary gland and metastasized to lymph nodes in 10 of 12 mice compared to 2 of 12 of the parental cell line. In the present report, we observed that high-metastatic MDA-MB-231H-RFP cells produced significantly larger subcutaneous tumors compared with parental MDA-MB-231 cells in nude mice. Extensive lymphatic trafficking by high-metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells was also observed. High-metastatic MDA-MB-231 developed larger recurrent tumors 2 weeks after tumor resection compared with tumors that were not resected in orthotopic models. Surgical resection of the MDA-MB-231 high-metastatic variant primary tumor in orthotopic models also resulted in rapid and enhanced lymphatic trafficking of residual cancer cells and extensive lymph node and lung metastasis that did not occur in the non-surgical mice. These results suggest that surgical resection of high metastatic TNBC can greatly increase the malignancy of residual cancer. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 559-569, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Alisertib in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-01

    Myxofibrosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Leiomyosarcoma; Recurrent Liposarcoma; Recurrent Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Recurrent Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma; Stage III Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  7. Paclitaxel Plus Oxaliplatin for Recurrent or Metastatic Cervical Cancer: A New York Cancer Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Dennis Yi-Shin; Blank, Stephanie V.; Christo, Paul J.; Kim, Mimi; Caputo, Thomas A.; Pothuri, Bhavana; Hershman, Dawn; Goldman, Noah; Ivy, Percy S.; Runowicz, Carolyn D.; Muggia, Franco; Goldberg, Gary L.; Einstein, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Survival in women with recurrent or metastatic cervical cancer remains poor. More effective and less toxic regimens are needed. Cisplatin is an effective radiosensitizer, but its single agent activity in recurrent cervical cancer, especially after prior cisplatin exposure, is disappointing, with a response rate of only 13%. Oxaliplatin has preclinical activity in cisplatin-resistant tumors and may have synergic activity when combined with paclitaxel. Our objective is determine the efficacy and toxicity of paclitaxel and oxaliplatin in patients with recurrent or metastatic cervical cancer. Methods Patients with histologic confirmation of primary metastatic or recurrent cervical cancer not amenable to surgical management were eligible. Treatment consisted of paclitaxel 175 mg/m2 IV and oxaliplatin 130 mg/m2 IV every 21 days. The primary endpoints were toxicity, recorded every cycle, and response, determined by RECIST criteria were assessed every 9 weeks, with subsequent confirmation as required. Sample size determinations were made using a Simon's two-stage design with a projected overall response proportion of 13% with cisplatin alone. Survival rates were calculated with Kaplan-Meier methods. Results Of the 35 patients enrolled, 32 were evaluable. The median age was 56(27-78); 30 had had prior radiation (23 concomitant with cisplatin). Patients completed a mean of 4.2 cycles (1-11). There were 2 complete and 5 partial responses for a total response rate of 7/32 (22%; 95% CI: 9.3%-40.0%). Eight patients had stable disease for an overall clinical benefit rate of 15/32 (47%; 95% CI: 29.1% - 65.3%). The mean time to best response was 13.5 weeks (95% C.I.: 10.6, 16.4). The mean progression-free survival was 21 weeks (95% C.I.: 14.7, 27.2) and mean overall survival was 52.1weeks (95% C.I.: 39.4, 64.8). A total of 135 cycles were administered. There were 28 (20.1%) grade 3/4 hematologic toxicities and 46 (34.1%) grade 3/4 non-hematologic toxicities, which were

  8. Chemotherapy and irradiation for locally advanced and metastatic pulmonary carcinoid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Curtis R.; Wirth, Lori J.; Nishino, Mizuki; Chen, Aileen B.; Sholl, Lynette M.; Kulke, Matthew H.; McNamee, Ciaran J.; Jänne, Pasi A.; Johnson, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The optimal management of locally advanced and metastatic pulmonary carcinoid tumors remains to be determined. Materials and methods A retrospective review was conducted on patients with typical and atypical pulmonary carcinoid tumors treated at our institutions between 1990 and 2012. Results 300 patients were identified with pulmonary carcinoid, (80 patients with atypical carcinoid), of whom 29 presented with metastatic disease (16 atypical). Of evaluable patients, 26 (41%) with stages I–III atypical carcinoid tumors recurred at a median time of 3.7 years (range, 0.4–32), compared to 3 (1%) patients with typical carcinoid (range, 8–12.3). 39 patients were treated with chemotherapy, including 30 patients with metastatic disease (27 atypical), and 7 patients were treated with adjuvant platinum–etoposide chemoradiation (6 atypical, 1 typical, 6 stage IIIA, 1 stage IIB). At a median follow-up of 2 years there were 2 recurrences in the 7 patients receiving adjuvant treatment. Median survival after diagnosis of metastatic disease for patients with atypical pulmonary carcinoid was 3.3 years with a 5-year survival of 24%. Treatment regimens showing efficacy in pulmonary carcinoid include 15 patients treated with octreotide-based therapies (10% response rate (RR), 70% disease control rate (DCR), 15 month median progression-free survival (PFS)), 13 patients treated with etoposide + platinum (23% RR, 69% DCR, 7 month median PFS), and 14 patients treated with temozolomide-based therapies (14% RR, 57% DCR, 10 month median PFS). 8 of 10 patients with octreotide-avid disease treated with an octreotide-based regimen experienced disease control (1 partial response, 7 stable disease) for a median of 18 months (range 6–72 months). Conclusions These results support our previous finding that a subset of pulmonary carcinoid tumors are responsive to chemotherapy. PMID:25218177

  9. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Metastatic and Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma and Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lindsay C.; Lester, Rachael A.; Grams, Michael P.; Haddock, Michael G.; Olivier, Kenneth R.; Arndt, Carola A. S.; Rose, Peter S.; Laack, Nadia N.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Radiotherapy has been utilized for metastatic and recurrent osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma (ES), in order to provide palliation and possibly prolong overall or progression-free survival. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is convenient for patients and offers the possibility of increased efficacy. We report our early institutional experience using SBRT for recurrent and metastatic osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma. Methods. We reviewed all cases of osteosarcoma or ES treated with SBRT between 2008 and 2012. Results. We identified 14 patients with a total of 27 lesions from osteosarcoma (n = 19) or ES (n = 8). The median total curative/definitive SBRT dose delivered was 40 Gy in 5 fractions (range, 30–60 Gy in 3–10 fractions). The median total palliative SBRT dose delivered was 40 Gy in 5 fractions (range, 16–50 Gy in 1–10 fractions). Two grade 2 and 1 grade 3 late toxicities occurred, consisting of myonecrosis, avascular necrosis with pathologic fracture, and sacral plexopathy. Toxicity was seen in the settings of concurrent chemotherapy and reirradiation. Conclusions. This descriptive report suggests that SBRT may be a feasible local treatment option for patients with osteosarcoma and ES. However, significant toxicity can result, and thus systematic study is warranted to clarify efficacy and characterize long-term toxicity. PMID:25548538

  10. The safety and efficacy of bevacizumab in the treatment of patients with recurrent or metastatic cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Minion, Lindsey E; Tewari, Krishnansu S

    2017-03-01

    Bevacizumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). (Avastin; Genetech, Inc, San Francisco, CA) Angiogenesis is blocked by the binding of bevacizumab to VEGF, inhibiting the binding of this ligand to the VEGF receptor. On 14 August 2014 the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved use of bevacizumab in persistent, recurrent, or metastatic cervical cancer. Areas covered: Herein we review pharmacodynamics and kinetics, clinical data and treatment-related toxicities of bevacizumab in the treatment of metastatic, recurrent or persistent cervical cancer. Additionally, future areas of development are reviewed. Expert commentary: Anti-angiogenesis therapy with bevacizumab is central to metastatic, persistent, and recurrent cervical cancer treatment. Additional anti-angiogenesis drugs are in development. Future studies will need to establish if the addition of multiple anti-angiogenesis agents or anti-angiogenesis in combination with immunotherapy is more effective than bevacizumab with chemotherapy.

  11. Phase II study of capecitabine as palliative treatment for patients with recurrent and metastatic squamous head and neck cancer after previous platinum-based treatment

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Trufero, J; Isla, D; Adansa, J C; Irigoyen, A; Hitt, R; Gil-Arnaiz, I; Lambea, J; Lecumberri, M J; Cruz, J J

    2010-01-01

    Background: Platinum-based therapy (PBT) is the standard therapy for recurrent and/or metastatic head and neck cancer (HNC), but the incidence of recurrence remains high. This study evaluates the efficacy and tolerability of capecitabine as palliative monotherapy for recurrent HNC previously treated with PBT. Methods: Patients aged 18–75 years, with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0–2, squamous HNC with locoregional and/or metastatic recurrence previously treated with PBT and adequate organ functions, were included. Capecitabine (1.250 mg m−2 BID) was administered on days 1–14 every 21 days for at least two cycles. Results: A total of 40 male patients with a median age of 58 years were analysed. All patients received a median number of four cycles of capecitabine (range: 1–9) and the median relative dose intensity was 91%. Seven patients were not evaluable for response. Overall response rate was 24.2%. Median time to progression and overall survival were 4.8 and 7.3 months, respectively. Haematological adverse events (AEs) grade 3/4 were reported in six patients. Most common grade 3/4 non-haematological AEs were asthenia (12.5%), palmar-plantar eritrodisestesia (10%), mucositis (10%), dysphagia (10%) and diarrhoea (7.5%). Conclusions: Capecitabine seems to be an active, feasible and well-tolerated mode of palliative treatment for advanced HNC patients who have previously received PBT schedules. PMID:20485287

  12. Robotic image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy, for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node or metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Beltramo, Giancarlo; Fariselli, Laura; Fodor, Cristiana; Santoro, Luigi; Vavassori, Andrea; Zerini, Dario; Gherardi, Federica; Ascione, Carmen; Bossi-Zanetti, Isa; Mauro, Roberta; Bregantin, Achille; Bianchi, Livia Corinna; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Orecchia, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the outcome of robotic CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA)-based stereotactic radiotherapy (CBK-SRT) for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer. Between May 2007 and December 2009, 34 consecutive patients/38 lesions were treated (15 patients reirradiated for local recurrence [P], 4 patients reirradiated for anastomosis recurrence [A], 16 patients treated for single lymph node recurrence [LN], and 3 patients treated for single metastasis [M]). In all but 4 patients, [(11)C]choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography was performed. CBK-SRT consisted of reirradiation and first radiotherapy in 27 and 11 lesions, respectively. The median CBK-SRT dose was 30 Gy in 4.5 fractions (P, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; A, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; LN, 33 Gy in 3 fractions; and M, 36 Gy in 3 fractions). In 18 patients (21 lesions) androgen deprivation was added to CBK-SRT (median duration, 16.6 months). The median follow-up was 16.9 months. Acute toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event). Late toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event and 1 Grade 2 event). Biochemical response was observed in 32 of 38 evaluable lesions. Prostate-specific antigen stabilization was seen for 4 lesions, and in 2 cases prostate-specific antigen progression was reported. The 30-month progression-free survival rate was 42.6%. Disease progression was observed for 14 lesions (5, 2, 5, and 2 in Groups P, A, LN, and M respectively). In only 3 cases, in-field progression was seen. At the time of analysis (May 2010), 19 patients are alive with no evidence of disease and 15 are alive with disease. CyberKnife-based stereotactic radiotherapy is a feasible approach for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer, offering excellent in-field tumor control and a low toxicity profile. Further investigation

  13. Robotic Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy, for Isolated Recurrent Primary, Lymph Node or Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Beltramo, Giancarlo; Fariselli, Laura; Fodor, Cristiana; Santoro, Luigi; Vavassori, Andrea; Zerini, Dario; Gherardi, Federica; Ascione, Carmen; Bossi-Zanetti, Isa; Mauro, Roberta; Bregantin, Achille; Bianchi, Livia Corinna; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Orecchia, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of robotic CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA)-based stereotactic radiotherapy (CBK-SRT) for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2007 and December 2009, 34 consecutive patients/38 lesions were treated (15 patients reirradiated for local recurrence [P], 4 patients reirradiated for anastomosis recurrence [A], 16 patients treated for single lymph node recurrence [LN], and 3 patients treated for single metastasis [M]). In all but 4 patients, [{sup 11}C]choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography was performed. CBK-SRT consisted of reirradiation and first radiotherapy in 27 and 11 lesions, respectively. The median CBK-SRT dose was 30 Gy in 4.5 fractions (P, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; A, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; LN, 33 Gy in 3 fractions; and M, 36 Gy in 3 fractions). In 18 patients (21 lesions) androgen deprivation was added to CBK-SRT (median duration, 16.6 months). Results: The median follow-up was 16.9 months. Acute toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event). Late toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event and 1 Grade 2 event). Biochemical response was observed in 32 of 38 evaluable lesions. Prostate-specific antigen stabilization was seen for 4 lesions, and in 2 cases prostate-specific antigen progression was reported. The 30-month progression-free survival rate was 42.6%. Disease progression was observed for 14 lesions (5, 2, 5, and 2 in Groups P, A, LN, and M respectively). In only 3 cases, in-field progression was seen. At the time of analysis (May 2010), 19 patients are alive with no evidence of disease and 15 are alive with disease. Conclusions: CyberKnife-based stereotactic radiotherapy is a feasible approach for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer, offering excellent in-field tumor

  14. Current treatment options for recurrent/metastatic head and neck cancer: a post-ASCO 2011 update and review of last year's literature.

    PubMed

    Kurzweg, T; Möckelmann, N; Laban, S; Knecht, R

    2012-10-01

    The majority of patients with a squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck present with locally advanced tumors. The first-line treatment of locally advanced tumor stages consists of a combined modality management. Despite these aggressive protocols, many patients develop locoregional recurrences or metastasis and place particularly high demands on the interdisciplinary treatment team. Treatment with a curative intent must be differentiated from a palliative one. In addition to prior treatment, resectability, age and performance status, patient wishes must be taken into consideration in treatment planning, especially considering that most therapies offer little to no overall survival benefit. Salvage surgery, chemo- and target therapies, and reirradiation are head and neck surgeon's and radiooncologist's weapons in the fight against these strong opponents. This review focuses on publications and meeting news from last year and reviews the current status of the clinical application of each treatment modality in recurrent or metastatic head and neck cancer.

  15. Sorafenib Tosylate, Cisplatin, and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-01

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  16. Metastatic lymph node status in the central compartment of papillary thyroid carcinoma: A prognostic factor of locoregional recurrence.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Min; Wang, Soo-Geun; Lee, Jin-Choon; Shin, Dong Hoon; Kim, In-Ju; Son, Seok-Man; Mun, Mijin; Lee, Byung-Joo

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to present our focus on the lymph node status in the central compartment and evaluate the relevant factors and disease recurrence. Between January 2004 and December 2009, 1040 patients were diagnosed with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and underwent surgery. The number of metastatic lymph nodes was a significant predictor for recurrence conferring a hazard ratio of 1.36 (confidence interval = 1.103-1.680; p = .004). The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was calculated to determine the cutoff number of lymph nodes that predicted recurrence with the highest sensitivity and specificity (area under the ROC curve, 0.794; SE, 0.077; p = .001). The sensitivity/specificity of >3 metastatic lymph nodes for predicting recurrence was 63.6%/77.0%, respectively. The number of metastatic lymph nodes in the central compartment was a statistical significant predictive factor associated with disease recurrence. Further study is required to confirm the relationship between the number of lymph nodes and disease recurrence. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E1172-E1176, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Number of metastatic lymph nodes as determinant of outcome after salvage radical prostatectomy for radiation-recurrent prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Gugliemetti, G; Sukhu, R; Conca Baenas, M A; Meeks, J; Sjoberg, D D; Eastham, J A; Scardino, P T; Touijer, K

    2016-09-01

    Presence of lymph node metástasis (LNM) at salvage radical prostatectomy (sRP) is associated with poor outcome. Predictors of outcome in this context remain undetermined. ThE objective was to assess the role of number of positive lymph node on outcome of patients with LNM after sRP and for radio-recurrent prostate cancer. We analyzed data from a consecutive cohort of 215 men treated with sRP at a single institution. We used univariate Cox proportional hazard regression models for biochemical recurrence (BCR) and metastatic outcomes, with prostate-specific antigen, Gleason score, extraprostatic extension, seminal vesicle invasion, time between radiation therapy and sRP, and number of positive nodes as predictors. Of the 47 patients with LNM, 37 developed BCR, 11 developed distant metastasis and 4 died with a median follow-up of 2.3 years for survivors. The risk of metastases increased with higher pre-operative PSA levels (HR 1.19 per 1ng/ml; 95% CI: 1.06-1.34; P=.003). The remaining predictors did not reach conventional levels of significance. However, removal of 3 or more positive lymph nodes demonstrated a positive association, as expected, with metastatic disease (HR 3.44; 95% CI: 0.91-13.05; P=.069) compared to one or 2 positive nodes. Similarly, the presence of extraprostatic extension, seminal vesicle invasion and Gleason grade greater than 7 also demonstrated a positive association with higher risk of metástasis, with hazard ratios of 3.97 (95% CI: 0.50, 31.4; P=.2), 3.72 (95% CI: 0.80-17.26; P=.1), and 1.45 (95% CI: 0.44-4.76; P=.5), respectively. In patients with LNM after sRP for radio-recurrent prostate cancer, the risk of distant metástasis is likely to be influenced by the number of positive nodes (3 or more), high preoperative PSA, Gleason grade and advanced pathologic stage. These results are consistent with the findings of number of nodes (1 to 2 vs. 3 or more nodes positive) as a prognostic indicator after primary radical prostatectomy and

  18. Activation of MET pathway predicts poor outcome to cetuximab in patients with recurrent or metastatic head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Madoz-Gúrpide, Juan; Zazo, Sandra; Chamizo, Cristina; Casado, Victoria; Caramés, Cristina; Gavín, Eduardo; Cristóbal, Ion; García-Foncillas, Jesús; Rojo, Federico

    2015-08-29

    Activation of the MET oncogene promotes tumor growth, invasion and metastasis in several tumor types. Additionally, MET is activated as a compensatory pathway in the presence of EGFR blockade, thus resulting in a mechanism of resistance to EGFR inhibitors. We have investigated the impact of HGF and MET expression, MET activation (phosphorylation), MET gene status, and MET-activating mutations on cetuximab sensitivity in recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) patients. A single-institution retrospective analysis was performed in 57 patients. MET overexpression was detected in 58% patients, MET amplification in 39% and MET activation (p-MET) in 30%. Amplification was associated with MET overexpression. Log-rank testing showed significantly worse outcomes in recurrent/metastatic, MET overexpressing patients for progression-free survival and overall survival. Activation of MET was correlated with worse PFS and OS. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, p-MET was an independent prognostic factor for PFS. HGF overexpression was observed in 58% patients and was associated with MET phosphorylation, suggesting a paracrine activation of the receptor. HGF/MET pathway activation correlated with worse outcome in recurrent/metastatic HNSCC patients. When treated with a cetuximab-based regimen, these patients correlated with worse outcome. This supports a dual blocking strategy of HGF/MET and EGFR pathways for the treatment of patients with recurrent/metastatic HNSCC.

  19. Cisplatin With or Without WEE1 Inhibitor MK-1775 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-22

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma

  20. Advances in the treatment of metastatic melanoma: new immunomodulatory agents.

    PubMed

    Sznol, Mario

    2012-04-01

    Antibodies targeting ligand-receptor interactions that control activation and function of immune cell subsets such as dendritic cells (DCs) and in particular T cells have shown substantial promise for the treatment of unresectable or metastatic melanoma. The furthest in development, the antagonist anti-CTLA-4 antibodies, which block a key negative regulator of T-cell activation, have been shown to produce durable clinical responses in a small subset of patients. One of these antibodies, ipilimumab, also prolonged overall survival in two randomized phase III studies, leading to regulatory approval for marketing by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Consistent with its mechanism of action, the major adverse events from anti-CTLA4 stem from immune-mediated inflammatory reactions. Paradigms for the administration of anti-CTLA-4 and newer immunomodulatory agents have evolved to effectively manage the adverse events and also to consider unique patterns and kinetics of tumor response. Early clinical studies of another antagonist antibody, which blocks the co-inhibitory receptor PD-1 on activated T cells, also are showing promising activity in metastatic melanoma. The clinical efficacy of cancer vaccines, which in broad terms also includes intratumorally administered agents designed to increase tumor immunogenicity, is being investigated in ongoing phase III trials, and various new agents are in earlier development, including newer cytokines and T-cell or DC co-stimulatory antibodies, some of which have already demonstrated clinical activity in advanced disease. Current data suggest that focusing development on agents countering immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment or blocking regulatory checkpoints to T-cell activation may have the greatest clinical yield. Combinations of immunomodulatory agents also may improve clinical activity, although possibly at a cost of greater toxicity. A major challenge for the field will be to develop predictive biomarkers

  1. Vincristine, cisplatin, teniposide, and cyclophosphamide combination in the treatment of recurrent or metastatic adrenocortical cancer.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tanweera S; Sundin, Anders; Juhlin, Claes; Wilander, Erik; Oberg, Kjell; Eriksson, Barbro

    2004-01-01

    The efficacy and tolerability of a combination of vincristine, cisplatin, teniposide, and cyclophosphamide (OPEC) in 11 patients (median age, 45 yr) with recurrent and/or metastatic adrenocortical cancer (ACC) (seven functional and four nonfunctional) were evaluated. All patients received this regimen after the failure of streptozocin and o,p'-DDD (SO) combination therapy. The regimen comprised cyclophosphamide, 600 mg/m2, and vincristine, 1.5 mg/m2, maximum dose 2.0 mg (d 1); cisplatin, 100 mg/m2 (d 2) and teniposide, 150 mg/m2 (d 4). Cycles were repeated every 4 wk. One to eight cycles (median, six cycles) of OPEC were administered to each patient. The median duration of treatment was 6 mo. The overall 2-yr survival rate was 82% and the median survival since diagnosis was 44 mo while it was 21 mo since start of OPEC therapy. Responses were obtained in nine patients: partial response in two patients, and stable disease in seven patients. The median duration of response was 6.75 mo. A total of 60 cycles of chemotherapy were given to all patients; grade 1-2 toxicity occurred in 57 cycles, while grade 3 toxicity was observed only in two cycles, according to NCI's Common Toxicity Criteria. We conclude that the OPEC regimen may be considered in recurrent or metastatic ACC as a second-line medical treatment. However, the combination is accompanied by considerable side effects and dose modifications are necessary in order to be able to recommend the treatment. This regimen needs further evaluation compared with SO therapy preferably in a randomized multicenter trial.

  2. Chemotherapy With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-14

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Tongue Carcinoma; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Neck With Occult Primary

  3. Management of muscle invasive, locally advanced and metastatic urothelial carcinoma of the bladder: a literature review with emphasis on the role of surgery

    PubMed Central

    Abufaraj, Mohammad; Gust, Kilian; Moschini, Marco; Foerster, Beat; Soria, Francesco; Mathieu, Romain

    2016-01-01

    Locally advanced (T3b, T4 and N1−N3) and metastatic urothelial bladder cancer (BCa) is a lethal disease with poor survival outcomes. Combination chemotherapy remains the treatment of choice in patients with metastatic disease and an important part of treatment in addition to radical cystectomy (RC) in patients with locally advanced tumour. Approximately half of patients who underwent RC for muscle invasive BCa relapse after surgery with either local recurrence or distant metastasis. This review focuses on the management of muscle invasive, locally advanced and metastatic BCa with emphasis on the role of surgery; to summarize the current knowledge in order to enhance clinical decision-making and counselling process. PMID:27785430

  4. Immunophenotypic features of metastatic lymph node tumors to predict recurrence in N2 lung squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Matsuwaki, Rie; Ishii, Genichiro; Zenke, Yoshitaka; Neri, Shinya; Aokage, Keiju; Hishida, Tomoyuki; Yoshida, Junji; Fujii, Satoshi; Kondo, Haruhiko; Goya, Tomoyuki; Nagai, Kanji; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Patients with mediastinal lymph node metastasis (N2) in squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) of the lung have poor prognosis after surgical resection of the primary tumor. The aim of this study was to clarify predictive factors of the recurrence of pathological lung SqCC with N2 focusing on the biological characteristics of both cancer cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in primary and metastatic lymph node tumors. We selected 64 patients with pathological primary lung N2 SqCC who underwent surgical complete resection and investigated the expressions of four epithelial–mesenchymal transition-related markers (caveolin, clusterin, E-cadherin, ZEB2), three cancer stem cell-related markers (ALDH-1, CD44 variant6, podoplanin) of cancer cells, and four markers of CAFs (caveolin, CD90, clusterin, podoplanin) in both primary and matched metastatic lymph node tumors in the N2 area. In the primary tumors, the expressions of all the examined molecules were not related to recurrence. However, in the metastatic lymph node tumors, high clusterin and ZEB2 expressions in the cancer cells and high podoplanin expression in the CAFs were significantly correlated with recurrence (P = 0.03, 0.04, and 0.007, respectively). In a multivariate analysis, only podoplanin expression in the CAFs in metastatic lymph node tumors was identified as a significantly independent predictive factor of recurrence (P = 0.03). Our study indicated that the immunophenotypes of both cancer cells and CAFs in metastatic lymph node tumors, but not primary tumors, provide useful information for predicting the recurrence of pathological N2 lung SqCC. PMID:24814677

  5. Metabolic syndrome contributes to an increased recurrence risk of non-metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    You, Jie; Liu, Wen-Yue; Zhu, Gui-Qi; Wang, Ou-Chen; Ma, Rui-Min; Huang, Gui-Qian; Shi, Ke-Qing; Guo, Gui-Long; Braddock, Martin; Zheng, Ming-Hua

    2015-08-14

    Epidemiological data suggests a close link between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and non-metastatic colorectal cancer (NMCRC). However, the relationship between MetS and the outcome of NMCRC is less well understood. We aim to evaluate the impact of MetS on the prognosis in NMCRC patients. We performed a large cohort study of 1069 NMCRC patients. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate the cumulative survival rate. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to analyze the prognosis associated with MetS adjusting for clinicopathologic variables. MetS was identified in 20.7% of NMCRC patients. Patients with MetS were more likely to be older, higher levels of blood glucose, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein, and uric acid than patients without MS (P < 0.05 for all). During a mean period of 59.6 months follow-up, patients with MetS had a statistically significantly lower rate of disease-free survival (DFS) than the patients without MetS (P = 0.014), especially local recurrence (P = 0.040). However, there was no difference in overall survival (P = 0.116). Multivariate analysis showed that the presence of MetS was an independent risk factor for DFS (HR = 0.733, 95%CI 0.545-0.987, P = 0.041), but not for OS (P = 0.118). MetS is associated with an increased recurrence risk of NMCRC.

  6. PI3K Inhibitor BKM120 and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-09

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  7. Vismodegib: a guide to its use in locally advanced or metastatic basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lyseng-Williamson, Katherine A; Keating, Gillian M

    2013-02-01

    Vismodegib is the first Hedgehog pathway inhibitor to be approved in the USA, where it is indicated for the treatment of adults with metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC), or with locally advanced BCC that has recurred following surgery or who are not candidates for surgery, and who are not candidates for radiation. In an ongoing, noncomparative, phase II trial, oral vismodegib was effective in and had an acceptable tolerability profile in the treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic BCC.

  8. Cetuximab and Everolimus in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Colon Cancer or Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-07-06

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Colon

  9. Successful resection of metachronous para-aortic, Virchow lymph node and liver metastatic recurrence of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Nobuyoshi; Fukunaga, Toru; Kimura, Masayuki; Sugamoto, Yuji; Tasaki, Kentaro; Hoshino, Isamu; Ota, Takumi; Maruyama, Tetsuro; Tamachi, Tomohide; Hosokawa, Takashi; Asai, Yo; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2015-11-28

    A 66-year-old female presented with the main complaint of defecation trouble and abdominal distention. With diagnosis of rectal cancer, cSS, cN0, cH0, cP0, cM0 cStage II, Hartmann's operation with D3 lymph node dissection was performed and a para-aortic lymph node and a disseminated node near the primary tumor were resected. Histological examination showed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, pSS, pN3, pH0, pP1, pM1 (para-aortic lymph node, dissemination) fStage IV. After the operation, the patient received chemotherapy with FOLFIRI regimen. After 12 cycles of FOLFIRI regimen, computed tomography (CT) detected an 11 mm of liver metastasis in the postero-inferior segment of right hepatic lobe. With diagnosis of liver metastatic recurrence, we performed partial hepatectomy. Histological examination revealed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma as a metastatic rectal cancer with cut end microscopically positive. After the second operation, the patient received chemotherapy with TS1 alone for 2 years. Ten months after the break, CT detected a 20 mm of para-aortic lymph node metastasis and a 10 mm of lymph node metastasis at the hepato-duodenal ligament. With diagnosis of lymph node metastatic recurrences, we performed lymph node dissection. Histological examination revealed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma as metastatic rectal cancer in para-aortic and hepato-duodenal ligament areas. After the third operation, we started chemotherapy with modified FOLFOX6 regimen. After 2 cycles of modified FOLFOX6 regimen, due to the onset of neutropenia and liver dysfunction, we switched to capecitabine alone and continued it for 6 mo and then stopped. Eleven months after the break, CT detected two swelling 12 mm of lymph nodes at the left supraclavicular region. With diagnosis of Virchow lymph node metastatic recurrence, we started chemotherapy with capecitabine plus bevacizumab regimen. Due to the onset of neutropenia and hand foot syndrome (Grade 3), we managed to

  10. Successful resection of metachronous para-aortic, Virchow lymph node and liver metastatic recurrence of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, Nobuyoshi; Fukunaga, Toru; Kimura, Masayuki; Sugamoto, Yuji; Tasaki, Kentaro; Hoshino, Isamu; Ota, Takumi; Maruyama, Tetsuro; Tamachi, Tomohide; Hosokawa, Takashi; Asai, Yo; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2015-01-01

    A 66-year-old female presented with the main complaint of defecation trouble and abdominal distention. With diagnosis of rectal cancer, cSS, cN0, cH0, cP0, cM0 cStage II, Hartmann’s operation with D3 lymph node dissection was performed and a para-aortic lymph node and a disseminated node near the primary tumor were resected. Histological examination showed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, pSS, pN3, pH0, pP1, pM1 (para-aortic lymph node, dissemination) fStage IV. After the operation, the patient received chemotherapy with FOLFIRI regimen. After 12 cycles of FOLFIRI regimen, computed tomography (CT) detected an 11 mm of liver metastasis in the postero-inferior segment of right hepatic lobe. With diagnosis of liver metastatic recurrence, we performed partial hepatectomy. Histological examination revealed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma as a metastatic rectal cancer with cut end microscopically positive. After the second operation, the patient received chemotherapy with TS1 alone for 2 years. Ten months after the break, CT detected a 20 mm of para-aortic lymph node metastasis and a 10 mm of lymph node metastasis at the hepato-duodenal ligament. With diagnosis of lymph node metastatic recurrences, we performed lymph node dissection. Histological examination revealed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma as metastatic rectal cancer in para-aortic and hepato-duodenal ligament areas. After the third operation, we started chemotherapy with modified FOLFOX6 regimen. After 2 cycles of modified FOLFOX6 regimen, due to the onset of neutropenia and liver dysfunction, we switched to capecitabine alone and continued it for 6 mo and then stopped. Eleven months after the break, CT detected two swelling 12 mm of lymph nodes at the left supraclavicular region. With diagnosis of Virchow lymph node metastatic recurrence, we started chemotherapy with capecitabine plus bevacizumab regimen. Due to the onset of neutropenia and hand foot syndrome (Grade 3), we managed

  11. Maximal testosterone suppression in the management of recurrent and metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Klotz, Laurence; Breau, Rodney H.; Collins, Loretta L.; Gleave, Martin E.; Pickles, Tom; Pouliot, Frederic; Saad, Fred

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Testosterone suppression, or androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT), is an established treatment for recurrent and metastatic prostate cancer (PCa). Based on the accuracy and sensitivity of early assays (c. 1960–1970), the castrate testosterone level was set at ≤1.7 nmol/l. Improved sensitivity of testosterone assays shows that both surgical and medical castration can achieve levels <0.7 nmol/l. However, the clinical implications and importance of maximum testosterone suppression remains a subject of controversy. This evidence-based review assesses prospective and retrospective clinical data, linking maximum suppression of testosterone with improved outcomes from ADT. Methods: PubMed and conference proceedings were searched for studies assessing the impact of low testosterone on clinical outcomes from ADT. The key search terms included combinations of prostate cancer and testosterone, predictive/prognostic, and androgen deprivation. Results were limited to studies investigating the relationship between testosterone levels and clinical outcomes. Results: Both prospective and retrospective data support a relationship between testosterone levels below the historical standard of 1.7 nmol/l and improved outcomes. Eight studies showed significant improvements in survival-related outcomes, with the majority of data supporting a testosterone level cutoff of ≤0.7 nmol/l. Conclusions: Tracking both testosterone and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels has significant clinical benefits, and the serum testosterone threshold of ≤0.7 nmol/l is a practical goal. The relative levels of testosterone and PSA may indicate continued hormone responsiveness or progression toward castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and should, therefore, inform treatment strategy. Standardization of assay methods and clinical coordination to facilitate widespread access to state-of the art laboratory equipment is necessary to ensure accurate decision-making. PMID:28443139

  12. Mitomycin C pharmacokinetics in patients with recurrent or metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Erlichman, C; Rauth, A M; Battistella, R; Fine, S

    1987-03-01

    The pharmacokinetics of mitomycin C as a single agent have been determined in 25 treatment courses given to 18 patients with recurrent or metastatic colorectal carcinoma using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay to analyze plasma and urine samples. The plasma pharmacokinetics conformed to a two-compartment linear model in 21 of 25 courses monitored with a mean t1/2 lambda 1 of 9.8 +/- 1.2 (SEM) min and mean t1/2 lambda z of 64.1 +/- 8.9 (SEM) min. The large variation observed in t1/2 lambda z was not related to dose or treatment, but an interaction of these two factors approached significance (p = 0.057). Renal excretion in the 12 courses in which it was determined averaged only 2.3% of the total administered dose during the first 4 h monitored and no mitomycin C metabolites were detected in plasma or urine by the HPLC technique used. The most common toxicity, thrombocytopenia, did not correlate with t1/2 lambda z or the area under the curve. This may be due to a failure to monitor active metabolites of mitomycin C; other factors besides plasma drug concentrations that mediate toxicity towards marrow elements; or the small number of courses associated with thrombocytopenia (less than 100,000/mm3). Our study indicates that an interaction of drug dose and treatment course may be associated with increasing t1/2 lambda z; the renal clearance contributes a small component of mitomycin C elimination; metabolites of mitomycin C cannot be detected by the present HPLC technique; and routine monitoring of mitomycin C using present methods cannot be recommended for clinical use to predict toxicity.

  13. Pharmacodynamic study of Disulfiram in Men with Non-metastatic Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Michael T.; Lin, Jianqing; Blackford, Amanda; Bardia, Aditya; King, Serina; Armstrong, Andrew J.; Rudek, Michelle A.; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; Carducci, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Preclinical drug screens identified disulfiram as a potent in vitro inhibitor of prostate cancer cell growth. Although many mechanisms for its anticancer activity have been proposed, tumor suppressor gene re-expression through promoter demethylation emerged as one of the more plausible. Methods We conducted an open-label, dose escalation trial of disulfiram in men with non-metastatic recurrent prostate cancer after local therapy. Dose escalation occurred if a demethylating “response” [i.e. ≥10% decrease in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) global 5meC content] was observed in <3 patients in cohort 1. Cohort 1 and 2 received disulfiram 250 mg and 500 mg daily respectively. The primary endpoint was the proportion of subjects with a demethylation response. Secondary endpoints included rate of PSA progression at 6 months, changes in PSA doubling time and safety/tolerability. Results Changes in global 5meC content were observed in 2 of 9 patients (22.2%) in cohort 1 and 3 of 10 (30.0%) in cohort 2. Only 5 subjects were on trial for ≥6 months, all were in cohort 1 and all had PSA progression by 6 months. No changes in PSA kinetics were observed in either cohort. Disulfiram was poorly tolerated with 6 patients experiencing grade 3 AEs (3 per cohort). Three of the responders displayed pre-treatment instability in their 5meC content. Conclusions A minority of patients had transient global PBMC demethylation changes. Instability in 5meC may limit the reproducibility of these findings, limiting our ability to confirm our hypothesis. Given the toxicities and no clinical benefits, further development of disulfiram should not be pursued in this population. PMID:23958896

  14. Treatment of recurrent metastatic uterine leiomyosarcoma of the spine: a multimodality approach using resection, radiosurgery, and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Strong, Michael J; Rosenlof, Trevor; Padmanabha, Siddhartha; Weiner, Roy S; Morgan, Lee Roy; Ware, Marcus I

    2015-07-17

    The authors describe the case of a patient who initially presented with uterine leiomyosarcoma (LMS) that later metastasized to the spine. The patient was treated at another institution for her primary uterine LMS, undergoing resection followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. After several years of disease remission, the patient presented in January 2011 to the authors' institution with recurrent uterine LMS metastatic to the spine, which has been treated with multiple therapeutic modalities in a combination of surgery, radiosurgery, and chemotherapy. As a result of this approach, the patient has been progression free for 35 months since her presentation (April 2011 to March 2014). We herein describe our experience treating this patient with recurrent uterine LMS of the spine and suggest that patients with recurrent uterine LMSs should be considered for treatment using a multimodality approach with emphasis on enrollment into clinical trials.

  15. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Primary, Recurrent, and Metastatic Tumors in the Head-and-Neck Region

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Farzan; Patel, Mehul; Khan, Mumtaz; McLean, Scott; Dragovic, Jadranka; Jin, J.-Y.; Movsas, Benjamin; Ryu, Samuel

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), also known as radiosurgery, in patients with head-and-neck cancers. Methods and Materials: Patients with pathologically proven malignant lesions in the head-and-neck region were treated using single-dose SBRT (S-SBRT) or fractionated SBRT (F-SBRT). Radiation doses were either single-fraction 13-18 Gy for S-SBRT or 36-48 Gy in five to eight fractions for F-SBRT. Response evaluation was based on clinical examinations and computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging scans. Pre- and post-SBRT tumor dimensions were measured in three axes, and tumor volumes were calculated. Response evaluation also was performed using World Health Organization criteria. Results: Fifty-five lesions were treated in 44 patients (25 men, 19 women). There were three groups of patients: those with primary (n = 10), recurrent (n = 21), and metastatic tumors (n = 13). The predominant histologic type was squamous cell carcinoma (n = 33). The majority of lesions were treated using F-SBRT (n = 37). Based on radiographic and clinical assessment, a 77% (complete + partial response) response rate was noted. Percentage of reduction in tumor volume was 52% {+-} 38% based on follow-up scans in 24 patients. Tumor control rates at 1 year were 83.3% and 60.6% in the primary and recurrent groups, respectively. Median overall survival was 28.7, 6.7, and 5.6 months for the primary, recurrent, and metastatic groups, respectively. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 1-2 mucositis was noted in all patients treated for oropharyngeal or laryngeal lesions. Conclusions: The SBRT in single or fractionated doses offers a viable treatment option for selected patients with primary, recurrent, and metastatic head-and-neck cancers with functional preservation.

  16. A Long-Term Survivor of Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Free of Recurrence 12 Years After Treatment of Oligometastatic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Zenta; Chang, Bryan W; Hochster, Howard S; Johung, Kimberly L

    2017-01-01

    Aggressive local therapy for patients with oligometastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has traditionally not been pursued due to high rates of distant progression. We describe a 62-year-old male initially presenting with resectable PDAC who underwent the Whipple procedure but developed multiple liver metastases within two months of starting adjuvant gemcitabine. Oxaliplatin was added to the regimen and complete resolution of the liver lesions resulted. He remained disease-free for five years until re-staging revealed a small lung nodule. This was resected and confirmed to be metastatic PDAC. After additional adjuvant gemcitabine, the patient remained free of recurrence for 12 years after diagnosis of metastatic disease and ultimately passed away from complications of ascending cholangitis associated with stricture at the biliary-enteric anastomosis site. He had no evidence of disease recurrence at the time of death. Next-generation sequencing of the tumor was unrevealing, showing only an activating mutation of KRAS and a deleterious mutation of tumor protein p53 (TP53). Our case suggests that while the prognosis for metastatic PDAC is poor, the population is nonetheless heterogeneous. Prognostic biomarkers are needed for the identification of patients for whom aggressive local treatment of oligometastatic PDAC may be warranted. PMID:28293485

  17. Comparison of Tumor Recurrence After Resection of Highly- and Poorly-Metastatic Triple-negative Breast Cancer in Orthotopic Nude-Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Yano, Shuya; Takehara, Kiyoto; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Urata, Yasuo; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Bouvet, Michael; Hoffman, Robert M

    2017-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), defined by the absence of receptors for estrogen, progesterone and human epithelial receptor 2, is a recalcitrant disease in need of effective therapy. We previously isolated highly-metastatic variants of the human TNBC cell line MDA-MB-231 using serial orthotopic implantation in nude mice. In the present report, we compared local and metastatic recurrence in lymph nodes in orthotopic nude-mouse models after bright-light surgery (BLS) of tumors from highly-metastatic variants or poorly-metastatic parental MDA-MB-231-RFP cells. Orthotopic tumors from parental MDA-MB-231 or highly-metastatic MDA-MB-231 were resected under bright light similar to an operating room. After resection of primary tumors, local recurrence from highly-metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells grew more rapidly than did parental MDA-MB-231 cells. Lymph-node metastasis from highly-metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells occurred after primary tumor resection much more extensively than after parental MDA-MB-231 tumors were resected. The results of the present report suggest that conventional surgery under bright light was unable to control highly-metastatic compared with poorly-metastatic MDA-MB-231 TNBC. Copyright© 2017 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  18. Hsp90 Inhibitor AT13387, Dabrafenib, and Trametinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent Melanoma or Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-13

    BRAF V600E Mutation Present; BRAF V600K Mutation Present; Metastatic Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Melanoma; Stage III Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Unresectable Solid Neoplasm

  19. Evidence-Based Treatment Options in Recurrent and/or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Argiris, Athanassios; Harrington, Kevin J.; Tahara, Makoto; Schulten, Jeltje; Chomette, Pauline; Ferreira Castro, Ana; Licitra, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    The major development of the past decade in the first-line treatment of recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (R/M SCCHN) was the introduction of cetuximab in combination with platinum plus 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy (CT), followed by maintenance cetuximab (the “EXTREME” regimen). This regimen is supported by a phase 3 randomized trial and subsequent observational studies, and it confers well-documented survival benefits, with median survival ranging between approximately 10 and 14 months, overall response rates between 36 and 44%, and disease control rates of over 80%. Furthermore, as indicated by patient-reported outcome measures, the addition of cetuximab to platinum-based CT leads to a significant reduction in pain and problems with social eating and speech. Conversely, until very recently, there has been a lack of evidence-based second-line treatment options, and the therapies that have been available have shown low response rates and poor survival outcomes. Presently, a promising new treatment option in R/M SCCHN has emerged: immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs), which have demonstrated favorable results in second-line clinical trials. Nivolumab and pembrolizumab are the first two ICIs that were approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. We note that the trials that showed benefit with ICIs included not only patients who previously received ≥1 platinum-based regimens for R/M SCCHN but also patients who experienced recurrence within 6 months after combined modality therapy with a platinum agent for locally advanced disease. In this review, we outline the available clinical and observational evidence for the EXTREME regimen and the initial results from clinical trials for ICIs in patients with R/M SCCHN. We propose that these treatment options can be integrated into a new continuum of care paradigm, with first-line EXTREME regimen followed by second-line ICIs. A number of ongoing clinical trials are comparing

  20. Trabectedin for the treatment of advanced metastatic soft tissue sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Simpson, E L; Rafia, R; Stevenson, M D; Papaioannou, D

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a summary of the evidence review group (ERG) report into the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of trabectedin for the treatment of advanced metastatic soft tissue sarcoma, in accordance with the licensed indication, based on the evidence submission from the manufacturer to NICE as part of the single technology appraisal (STA) process. The outcomes stated in the manufacturer's definition of the decision problem were overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), response rates, adverse effects of treatment, health-related quality of life, and cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. The clinical evidence was derived from one randomised controlled trial (RCT), in which the licensed dose of trabectedin was compared with a different dose of trabectedin, and three phase II studies. In the RCT, the median OS was 13.9 months for the licensed dose of trabectedin, which was not significantly different from that for the comparator dose of trabectedin, which was 11.8 months. From the phase II uncontrolled trials, median OS was reported as 9.2 or 12.8 months. The RCT reported significantly superior PFS for the licensed dose of trabectedin (median 3.3 months) over the comparator trabectedin dose (median 2.3 months). One phase II uncontrolled trial reported median PFS as 1.9 months in the licensed dose of trabectedin. The RCT reported PFS rates at 6 months were 35.5% for the licensed dose of trabectedin, and 27.5% for the comparator dose of trabectedin. From the phase II uncontrolled trials, PFS rates at 6 months were 24.4% or 29%. For the RCT, deaths attributed to trabectedin occurred in 3.1% of the licensed dose, and 2.3% of the comparator group. The most common severe adverse events were neutropenia, although with a low rate of febrile neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase elevation, although these were reported to be non-cumulative and reversible. Following dialogue

  1. Lapatinib in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Biliary Tract or Liver Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-18

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  2. Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Abdominopelvic Tumors: A Single Institute Experience.

    PubMed

    Sezen, D; Gurkaynak, M; Gultekin, M; Cengiz, M; Yildiz, F; Zorlu, F; Akyol, F; Yazici, G; Hurmuz, P; Ozyigit, G

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of robotic CyberKnife (Accuray Incorporated, Sunnyvale, California)-based stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with recurrent or metastatic abdominopelvic tumors. A total of 69 patients treated between May 2008 and January 2011 were evaluated retrospectively. Indication for SBRT was persistent disease in 3 (4%) patients, local recurrence in 29 (42%) patients, regional recurrence in 13 (19%) patients, and oligometastatic disease in 24 (35%) patients. Forty-two (61%) patients were previously irradiated to the same region and 27 (39%) patients were treated for the first time. The median age was 59 years (range, 24-86 years). There were 31 (45%) male and 38 (55%) female patients. The median total dose was 30 Gy (range, 15-60 Gy) delivered with a median 3 fractions (range, 2-5 fractions). The tumor response to treatment was assessed by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or positron emission tomography. At the 12-month (range, 2-44 months) median follow-up, local control was 65% and median overall survival (OS) was 20 months. A larger gross tumor volume (≥ 67 cm(3)) was significantly correlated with worse 1-year OS (81% vs 48%, P = .03). The patients with local recurrence occurring <11 months had a significantly shorter 1-year local control rate than patients with ≥ 11 months (31% vs 91%, P < .001). Grade 3-4 acute and late toxicities were seen in 7% and 15% of patients, respectively. The patients with previous radiotherapy history had significantly higher rate of acute toxicity (19% vs 0%, P = .019). Late toxicity was significantly higher in pelvic tumors than in abdominal tumors (3% vs 28%, P = .004). The SBRT seems to be feasible and resulted in good treatment outcomes in patients with recurrent or metastatic abdominopelvic tumors. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Cisplatin With or Without Veliparib or Veliparib Alone in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-24

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; PALB2 Gene Mutation; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  4. Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With HIV Associated Relapsed or Refractory Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma or Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-04

    Advanced Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Anal Carcinoma; HIV Infection; Kaposi Sarcoma; Lung Carcinoma; Metastatic Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; Unresectable Solid Neoplasm

  5. Hormonal therapy in advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kokka, Fani; Brockbank, Elly; Oram, David; Gallagher, Chris; Bryant, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Endometrial cancer is a cancer of the lining of the womb and worldwide is the seventh most common cancer in women. Treatment with hormones is thought to be beneficial in patients with endometrial cancer. Objectives To assess the indications, effectiveness and safety of hormone therapy for advanced or recurrent epithelial endometrial cancer. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, MEDLINE, EMBASE up to May 2009 and and CENTRAL (Issue 2, 2009). We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies, and contacted experts in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that studied hormonal therapy in adult women diagnosed with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Comparisons were restricted to single-trial analyses so we did not synthesise data in meta-analyses. Main results We found six trials (542 participants) that met our inclusion criteria. These trials assessed the effectiveness of hormonal therapy in women with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer as a single agent, as part of combination therapy and as low versus high dose. All comparisons were restricted to single-trial analyses, where we found no evidence that hormonal therapy as a single agent or as a combination treatment prolonged overall or five-year disease-free survival of women with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer. However, low-dose hormonal therapy may have had a benefit in terms of overall and progression-free survival (PFS) compared to high-dose hormonal therapy (HR 1.31, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.66 and HR 1.35, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.71 for overall and PFS, respectively). Authors’ conclusions We found insufficient evidence that hormonal treatment in any form, dose or as part of combination therapy improves the survival of patients with advanced or

  6. Vismodegib and Gamma-Secretase/Notch Signalling Pathway Inhibitor RO4929097 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    Adult Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Adult Angiosarcoma; Adult Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Adult Epithelioid Hemangioendothelioma; Adult Epithelioid Sarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Myxoid Chondrosarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma; Adult Fibrosarcoma; Adult Leiomyosarcoma; Adult Liposarcoma; Adult Malignant Mesenchymoma; Adult Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Adult Synovial Sarcoma; Adult Unclassified Pleomorphic Sarcoma; Chondrosarcoma; Clear Cell Sarcoma of the Kidney; Conjunctival Kaposi Sarcoma; Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Osteosarcoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult Unclassified Pleomorphic Sarcoma of Bone; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Kaposi Sarcoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Sarcoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Unclassified Pleomorphic Sarcoma of Bone

  7. Cixutumumab and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Unresectable, Locally Advanced, or Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-16

    Adult Angiosarcoma; Adult Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Adult Epithelioid Sarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Myxoid Chondrosarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma; Adult Fibrosarcoma; Adult Leiomyosarcoma; Adult Liposarcoma; Adult Malignant Mesenchymoma; Adult Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Adult Synovial Sarcoma; Adult Undifferentiated High Grade Pleomorphic Sarcoma of Bone; Childhood Angiosarcoma; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Childhood Epithelioid Sarcoma; Childhood Fibrosarcoma; Childhood Leiomyosarcoma; Childhood Liposarcoma; Childhood Malignant Mesenchymoma; Childhood Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Childhood Pleomorphic Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma With Mixed Embryonal and Alveolar Features; Childhood Synovial Sarcoma; Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans; Malignant Adult Hemangiopericytoma; Malignant Childhood Hemangiopericytoma; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Untreated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma

  8. Preliminary Testing of a Patient-Reported Outcome Measure for Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Leanne K; Deng, Jie; Ridner, Sheila H; Gilbert, Jill; Dietrich, Mary S; Murphy, Barbara A

    2016-05-01

    We describe development and preliminary testing of Vanderbilt Head and Neck Symptom Survey-Recurrent/Metastatic (VHNSS-RM) to assess residual symptoms, tumor-related symptoms, and side effects from therapy. Items were identified through patient and provider interviews. Card sort selected high-yield and high-impact items. The VHNSS-RM was administered to 50 patients with recurrent/metastatic head and neck cancer (RMHNC). The VHNSS-RM includes 12 unique symptoms (diet change, tongue movement affecting speech/swallowing, face/neck swelling, neck/jaw cramping, bad breath, drooling, wound drainage/pain/odor, nasal congestion/drainage, eyes watering, face/tongue/ear/scalp numbness, headaches, and confusion) and 7 unique psychosocial issues (burden to family/friends, lost independence, fear, embarrassment, mood swings, stress, and boredom). The VHNSS-RM contains 35 physical and 12 psychosocial issues. The VHNSS-RM is feasible and not overly burdensome. Nineteen unique items may improve palliation to patients with RMHNC. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. A Study of Epacadostat in Combination With a PD-1 Inhibitor and Chemotherapy in Subjects With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors (ECHO-207)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-20

    Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors; Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer (CRC); Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC); Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC; Squamous or Nonsquamous); Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumor That Progressed on Previous Therapy With a Programmed Cell Death Protein 1 (PD-1) Inhibitor; Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumor That Progressed on Previous Therapy With a Programmed Cell Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1) Inhibitor

  10. Temsirolimus With or Without Cetuximab in Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer Who Did Not Respond to Previous Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-23

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma

  11. Atezolizumab and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Persistent, or Metastatic Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-28

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IV Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  12. Sunitinib Malate in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Carcinosarcoma; Uterine Corpus Carcinosarcoma

  13. Capecitabine and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-03

    Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  14. Critical appraisal of pazopanib as treatment for patients with advanced metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2011-01-01

    The management of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has undergone significant changes during the past 10 years, with the treatment of metastatic RCC undergoing the most radical changes. These developments reflect an enhanced understanding of this tumor's underlying biology, which was then translated into the development of a new treatment paradigm. Current therapeutic approaches for the management of patients with metastatic RCC utilize knowledge of histology, molecular abnormalities, clinical prognostic factors, the natural history of this malignancy, and the treatment efficacy and toxicity of available agents. The treatment options available for patients with metastatic RCC have changed dramatically over the past 6 years. Interferon-α and interleukin-2 were the previous mainstays of therapy, but since December 2005, six new agents have been approved in the US for the treatment of advanced RCC. Three are multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) including sunitinib, sorafenib, and pazopanib, two target the mammalian target of rapamycin (temsirolimus and everolimus), and one is a humanized monoclonal antibody (bevacizumab in combination with interferon-α). The current review focuses on the newest TKI available to treat patients with metastatic RCC, pazopanib. The development of this agent both preclinically and clinically is reviewed. The efficacy and safety data from the pivotal clinical trials are discussed, and the potential role of pazopanib in the treatment of patients with metastatic RCC in comparison to other treatment alternatives is critically appraised. This agent has a favorable overall risk benefit, and the available data demonstrate efficacy in patients with metastatic RCC who are either treatment-naïve or cytokine refractory. It therefore represents another alternative for treatment of metastatic RCC patients.

  15. Critical appraisal of pazopanib as treatment for patients with advanced metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2011-01-01

    The management of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has undergone significant changes during the past 10 years, with the treatment of metastatic RCC undergoing the most radical changes. These developments reflect an enhanced understanding of this tumor’s underlying biology, which was then translated into the development of a new treatment paradigm. Current therapeutic approaches for the management of patients with metastatic RCC utilize knowledge of histology, molecular abnormalities, clinical prognostic factors, the natural history of this malignancy, and the treatment efficacy and toxicity of available agents. The treatment options available for patients with metastatic RCC have changed dramatically over the past 6 years. Interferon-α and interleukin-2 were the previous mainstays of therapy, but since December 2005, six new agents have been approved in the US for the treatment of advanced RCC. Three are multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) including sunitinib, sorafenib, and pazopanib, two target the mammalian target of rapamycin (temsirolimus and everolimus), and one is a humanized monoclonal antibody (bevacizumab in combination with interferon-α). The current review focuses on the newest TKI available to treat patients with metastatic RCC, pazopanib. The development of this agent both preclinically and clinically is reviewed. The efficacy and safety data from the pivotal clinical trials are discussed, and the potential role of pazopanib in the treatment of patients with metastatic RCC in comparison to other treatment alternatives is critically appraised. This agent has a favorable overall risk benefit, and the available data demonstrate efficacy in patients with metastatic RCC who are either treatment-naïve or cytokine refractory. It therefore represents another alternative for treatment of metastatic RCC patients. PMID:21931501

  16. Metronomic cyclophosphamide therapy in hormone-naive patients with non-metastatic biochemical recurrent prostate cancer: a phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, Fabien; Mouillet, Guillaume; Adotevi, Olivier; Maurina, Tristan; Nguyen, Thierry; Montcuquet, Philippe; Curtit, E; Kleinclauss, F; Pivot, Xavier; Borg, Christophe; Thiery-Vuillemin, Antoine

    2016-08-01

    After curative local therapy, biochemical recurrence is a mode of relapse among patient with prostate cancer (PC). Deferring androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) or offering non-hormonal therapies may be an appropriate option for these non-symptomatic patients with no proven metastases. Metronomic cyclophosphamide (MC) has shown activity in metastatic PC setting and was chosen to be assessed in biochemical relapse. This prospective single-arm open-label phase II study was conducted to evaluate MC regimen in patients with biochemical recurrent PC. MC was planned to be administered orally at a daily dose of 50 mg for 6 months. Primary endpoint was PSA response. Thirty-eight patients were included and treated. Median follow-up was 45.5 months (range 17-100). Among them, 14 patients (37 %) achieved PSA stabilisation and 22 patients (58 %) experienced PSA progression. Response rate was 5 % with one complete response (2.6 %), and 1 partial response with PSA decrease >50 % (2.6 %). The median time until androgen deprivation therapy initiation was around 15 months. The treatment was well tolerated. Neither grade 3-4 toxicity nor serious adverse events were observed. This first prospective clinical trial with MC therapy in patients with non-metastatic biochemical recurrence of PC displayed modest efficacy when measured with PSA response rate, without significant toxicity. It might offer a new safe and non-expensive option to delay initiation of ADT. These results would need to be confirmed with larger prospective randomised trials.

  17. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Progressive, Recurrent, or Metastatic Adenoid Cyst Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-14

    Recurrent Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma

  18. Advanced new strategies for metastatic cancer treatment by therapeutic stem cells and oncolytic virotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Geon-Tae; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-01-01

    The field of therapeutic stem cell and oncolytic virotherapy for cancer treatment has rapidly expanded over the past decade. Oncolytic viruses constitute a promising new class of anticancer agent because of their ability to selectively infect and destroy tumor cells. Engineering of viruses to express anticancer genes and specific cancer targeting molecules has led to the use of these systems as a novel platform of metastatic cancer therapy. In addition, stem cells have a cancer specific migratory capacity, which is available for metastatic cancer targeting. Prodrug activating enzyme or anticancer cytokine expressing stem cells successfully inhibited the proliferation of cancer cells. Preclinical models have clearly demonstrated anticancer activity of these two platforms against a number of different cancer types and metastatic cancer. Several systems using therapeutic stem cells or oncolytic virus have entered clinical trials, and promising results have led to late stage clinical development. Consequently, metastatic cancer therapies using stem cells and oncolytic viruses are extremely promising. The following review will focus on the metastatic cancer targeting mechanism of therapeutic stem cells and oncolytic viruses, and potential challenges ahead for advancing the field. PMID:27494901

  19. Advanced new strategies for metastatic cancer treatment by therapeutic stem cells and oncolytic virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Geon-Tae; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-09-06

    The field of therapeutic stem cell and oncolytic virotherapy for cancer treatment has rapidly expanded over the past decade. Oncolytic viruses constitute a promising new class of anticancer agent because of their ability to selectively infect and destroy tumor cells. Engineering of viruses to express anticancer genes and specific cancer targeting molecules has led to the use of these systems as a novel platform of metastatic cancer therapy. In addition, stem cells have a cancer specific migratory capacity, which is available for metastatic cancer targeting. Prodrug activating enzyme or anticancer cytokine expressing stem cells successfully inhibited the proliferation of cancer cells. Preclinical models have clearly demonstrated anticancer activity of these two platforms against a number of different cancer types and metastatic cancer. Several systems using therapeutic stem cells or oncolytic virus have entered clinical trials, and promising results have led to late stage clinical development. Consequently, metastatic cancer therapies using stem cells and oncolytic viruses are extremely promising. The following review will focus on the metastatic cancer targeting mechanism of therapeutic stem cells and oncolytic viruses, and potential challenges ahead for advancing the field.

  20. Evaluation of nutritional status in advanced metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Sarhill, N; Mahmoud, F; Walsh, D; Nelson, K A; Komurcu, S; Davis, M; LeGrand, S; Abdullah, O; Rybicki, L

    2003-10-01

    Consecutive cancer referrals to a palliative medicine program were evaluated to assess nutritional status using a standard protocol. The study included 352 patients (180 men, 172 women; median age 61 years, range 22-94 years). The most common diagnosis was lung cancer. All had metastatic disease, 139 with gastrointestinal involvement. The most common gastrointestinal symptoms were weight loss ( n=307), anorexia ( n=285), and early satiety ( n=243). Of those with any weight loss, 71% had lost >or0% of their pre-illness weight. The most common factor identified which might have contributed to weight loss was hypophagia ( n=275/307). Men had lost weight more often and to a greater extent than women. Triceps skinfold (TSF) was measured in 337: 51% had values that suggested severe fat deficiency. Upper mid-arm muscle area (AMA) was measured in 349: 30% had evidence of significant muscle mass reduction. The body mass index (BMI) was normal or increased in most patients. Calculated resting energy expenditure (REE) ( n=324) was high in 41%. C-reactive protein was elevated in 74% of those measured ( n=50). We conclude that: (1).most of this group of cancer patients referred to palliative medicine had severe weight loss; (2).there was a gender difference in the severity and type of weight loss; (3).males lost more weight overall and more muscle than females; (4).males with any degree of weight loss had a higher REE than females; (5).a significant correlation existed between the time from diagnosis to death and the severity of weight loss in the prior month; (6).BMI was normal in most patients, suggesting precancer diagnosis obesity; and (7).both TSF and AMA correlated well with body composition of both fat and protein as determined by bioelectrical impedance.

  1. Olaparib and Hsp90 Inhibitor AT13387 in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery or Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, Primary Peritoneal, or Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-10

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; High Grade Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; High Grade Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Primary Peritoneal High Grade Serous Adenocarcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma; Unresectable Solid Neoplasm

  2. Lapatinib Ditosylate in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  3. Application of a Drug-Induced Apoptosis Assay to Identify Treatment Strategies in Recurrent or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bosserman, Linda; Rogers, Karl; Willis, Carl; Davidson, Dirk; Whitworth, Pat; Karimi, Misagh; Upadhyaya, Gargi; Rutledge, James; Hallquist, Allan; Perree, Mathieu; Presant, Cary A.

    2015-01-01

    Background A drug-induced apoptosis assay has been developed to determine which chemotherapy drugs or regimens can produce higher cell killing in vitro. This study was done to determine if this assay could be performed in patients with recurrent or metastatic breast cancer patients, to characterize the patterns of drug-induced apoptosis, and to evaluate the clinical utility of the assay. A secondary goal was to correlate assay use with clinical outcomes. Methods In a prospective, non-blinded, multi institutional controlled trial, 30 evaluable patients with recurrent or metastatic breast cancer who were treated with chemotherapy had tumor samples submitted for the MiCK drug-induced apoptosis assay. After receiving results within 72 hours after biopsy, physicians could use the test to determine therapy (users), or elect to not use the test (non-users). Results The assay was able to characterize drug-induced apoptosis in tumor specimens from breast cancer patients and identified which drugs or combinations gave highest levels of apoptosis. Patterns of drug activity were also analyzed in triple negative breast cancer. Different drugs from a single class of agents often produced significantly different amounts of apoptosis. Physician frequently (73%) used the assay to help select chemotherapy treatments in patients, Patients whose physicians were users had a higher response (CR+PR) rate compared to non-users (38.1% vs 0%, p = 0.04) and a higher disease control (CR+PR+Stable) rate (81% vs 25%, p<0.01). Time to relapse was longer in users 7.4 mo compared to non-users 2.2 mo (p<0.01). Conclusions The MiCK assay can be performed in breast cancer specimens, and results are often used by physicians in breast cancer patients with recurrent or metastatic disease. These results from a good laboratory phase II study can be the basis for a future larger prospective multicenter study to more definitively establish the value of the assay. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT

  4. Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Metastatic Recurrent Major or Minor Salivary Gland Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-25

    Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Minor Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IV Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma

  5. Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-27

    High-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Acinic Cell Tumor; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Salivary Gland Poorly Differentiated Carcinoma; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer

  6. Sunitinib Malate in Treating Patients With Iodine-Refractory Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  7. Vaccine Therapy With or Without Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Male Breast Cancer; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Intraductal Carcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Invasive Ductal Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  8. Improving quality of life in patients with advanced cancer: Targeting metastatic bone pain.

    PubMed

    von Moos, Roger; Costa, Luis; Ripamonti, Carla Ida; Niepel, Daniela; Santini, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    Metastatic bone disease in patients with advanced cancer is frequently associated with skeletal complications. These can be debilitating, causing pain, impaired functioning and decreased quality of life, as well as reduced survival. This review considers how the management of metastatic bone pain might be optimised, to limit the considerable burden it can impose on affected patients. Cancer-related pain is notoriously under-reported and under-treated, despite the availability of many therapeutic options. Non-opioid and opioid analgesics can be used; the latter are typically administered with radiotherapy, which forms the current standard of care for patients with metastatic bone pain. Surgery is appropriate for certain complicated cases of metastatic bone disease, and other options such as radiopharmaceuticals may provide additional relief. Treatments collectively referred to as bone-targeted agents (BTAs; bisphosphonates and denosumab) can offer further pain reduction. Initiation of therapy with BTAs is recommended for all patients with metastatic bone disease because these agents delay not only the onset of skeletal-related events but also the onset of bone pain. With evidence also emerging for pain control properties of new anticancer agents, the potential to individualise care for these patients is increased further. Optimisation of care depends on physicians' thorough appreciation of the complementary benefits that might be achieved with the various agents, as well as their limitations. Appropriate anti-tumour treatment combined with early initiation of BTAs and adequate analgesia plays a key role in the holistic approach to cancer pain management and may minimise the debilitating effects of metastatic bone pain. Copyright © 2016 Amgen Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Survival impact of integrative cancer care in advanced metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Block, Keith I; Gyllenhaal, Charlotte; Tripathy, Debu; Freels, Sally; Mead, Mark N; Block, Penny B; Steinmann, William C; Newman, Robert A; Shoham, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Integrative cancer treatment is of substantial interest to many cancer patients. Research is needed to evaluate the effects of integrative treatment on patient outcomes. We report survival data for a consecutive case series of advanced metastatic breast cancer patients who received a comprehensive clinical program combining conventional treatments with nutrition and supplementation, fitness and mind-spirit instruction at the Block Center for Integrative Cancer Treatment. Treatment outcomes using integrative care for this disease have not previously been documented; survival data will thus contribute to decisions concerning future research directions and design. Ninety consecutive patients with metastatic breast cancer diagnosed during 1984-1997 who received chemotherapy at the integrative cancer center were included. Prognostic factors, treatments and survival from onset of metastases were determined from analysis of scans, labs, pathology and medical records. The log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards analyses were used, and a Kaplan-Meier curve was calculated. All patients had metastatic disease at baseline, 96% were relapsed and 52% had received prior chemotherapy for metastatic disease. Median age at onset of metastasis was 46 years. Median survival was 38 months (95% CI 27,48). Published literature on populations with somewhat more favorable prognostic factors treated in conventional clinics showed median survivals of 20 to 23 months. Through the 1990s, median survival reported in metastatic breast cancer trials or observations generally ranged from 12 to 24 months. Five-year survival was 27% for Center versus 17% for comparison patients. Despite a higher proportion of younger and relapsed patients, survival of metastatic breast cancer patients at the Center was approximately double that of comparison populations and possibly even higher compared to trials published during this period. Explanations for the advantage relative to conventional treatment alone

  10. Phase II study of the PI3K inhibitor BKM120 in patients with advanced or recurrent endometrial carcinoma: a stratified type I-type II study from the GINECO group.

    PubMed

    Heudel, P-E; Fabbro, M; Roemer-Becuwe, C; Kaminsky, M C; Arnaud, A; Joly, F; Roche-Forestier, S; Meunier, J; Foa, C; You, B; Priou, F; Tazi, Y; Floquet, A; Selle, F; Berton-Rigaud, D; Lesoin, A; Kalbacher, E; Lortholary, A; Favier, L; Treilleux, I; Ray-Coquard, I

    2017-01-01

    Backround:Patients with metastatic endometrial carcinoma have a poor prognosis and PIK3CA mutations and amplifications are common in these cancers. This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of the pure PI3K inhibitor BKM120 in advanced or recurrent endometrial carcinoma.

  11. Phase Ib, Dose Escalation Study of Oral LDE225 in Combination With BKM120 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-18

    Dose Escalation; Safety; Preliminary Efficacy; Advanced Solid Tumors; Metastatic Breast Cancer; Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Colorectal Cancer; Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme; Gastric Cancer; Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer; Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Hormone Receptor Positive (ER+/PR+, and Her2-) Metastatic Breast Cancer

  12. Treatment of advanced, metastatic soft tissue sarcoma: latest evidence and clinical considerations

    PubMed Central

    In, Gino K.; Hu, James S.; Tseng, William W.

    2017-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcoma (STS) is a biologically heterogeneous malignancy with over 50 subtypes. Historically, there have been few systemic treatment options for this relatively rare disease. Traditional cytotoxic agents, such as anthracyclines, alkylating agents, and taxanes have limited clinical benefit beyond the first-line setting; across all high-grade STS subtypes, median overall survival remains approximately 12–18 months for advanced metastatic disease. The development of targeted therapies has led to recent US Food and Drug Administration approval of four new treatments for high-grade STS in the advanced metastatic setting. Among these, olaratumab is most notable for its improvement in overall survival for patients with anthracycline-naïve disease. Further progress in STS management will rely on novel trial design, subtype-specific therapies and validation of biomarkers to tailor therapy. Immunotherapy has shown promise as a new, but yet undiscovered frontier in the management of STS. PMID:28794805

  13. Entinostat, Nivolumab, and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery or Locally Advanced or Metastatic HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-10

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Metastatic Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Unresectable Solid Neoplasm

  14. Ribociclib and Doxorubicin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Advanced Soft Tissue Sarcomas That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-10

    Metastatic Angiosarcoma; Metastatic Epithelioid Sarcoma; Metastatic Fibrosarcoma; Metastatic Leiomyosarcoma; Metastatic Liposarcoma; Metastatic Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Metastatic Synovial Sarcoma; Metastatic Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma; Myxofibrosarcoma; Pleomorphic Rhabdomyosarcoma; Stage III Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Undifferentiated (Embryonal) Sarcoma

  15. Nimotuzumab Combined with Chemotherapy is a Promising Treatment for Locally Advanced and Metastatic Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Han, Xinghua; Lu, Nannan; Pan, Yueyin; Xu, Jianming

    2017-01-24

    BACKGROUND Nimotuzumab is an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody which has been widely used in cancer treatment. However, the safety and efficacy of nimotuzumab combined with chemotherapy in locally advanced or metastatic esophageal cancer patients remain unclear. MATERIAL AND METHODS To address this open question, we collected a total data of 21 patients diagnosed with locally advanced or metastatic esophageal cancer between 2012 and 2016 in a, retrospective study. The patient characteristics, efficacy safety, and toxicity were evaluated in our study. RESULTS We observed 1 (4.8%) patient with complete response, 7 (33.3%) patients with partial response, 9 (42.9%) patients with stable response and 4 (19%) patients with progression response. The objective response rate was 38.1% and disease control rate was 81%. The mean progression-free-survival was 7 months and the 18-month overall survival (OS) was 10%. The incidence rate of anemia and leukopenia was 71.4% and 81%, respectively. Two patients showed the serious adverse event of myelosuppression, with nausea, fatigue, and anorexia. No long-term drug-related toxicity was observed during the follow-up. CONCLUSIONS Nimotuzumab combined with chemotherapy can achieve promising clinical outcomes in locally advanced or metastatic esophageal cancer, without accumulation of toxicity and was well-tolerated.

  16. Nimotuzumab Combined with Chemotherapy is a Promising Treatment for Locally Advanced and Metastatic Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xinghua; Lu, Nannan; Pan, Yueyin; Xu, Jianming

    2017-01-01

    Background Nimotuzumab is an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody which has been widely used in cancer treatment. However, the safety and efficacy of nimotuzumab combined with chemotherapy in locally advanced or metastatic esophageal cancer patients remain unclear. Material/Methods To address this open question, we collected a total data of 21 patients diagnosed with locally advanced or metastatic esophageal cancer between 2012 and 2016 in a, retrospective study. The patient characteristics, efficacy safety, and toxicity were evaluated in our study. Results We observed 1 (4.8%) patient with complete response, 7 (33.3%) patients with partial response, 9 (42.9%) patients with stable response and 4 (19%) patients with progression response. The objective response rate was 38.1% and disease control rate was 81%. The mean progression-free-survival was 7 months and the 18-month overall survival (OS) was 10%. The incidence rate of anemia and leukopenia was 71.4% and 81%, respectively. Two patients showed the serious adverse event of myelosuppression, with nausea, fatigue, and anorexia. No long-term drug-related toxicity was observed during the follow-up. Conclusions Nimotuzumab combined with chemotherapy can achieve promising clinical outcomes in locally advanced or metastatic esophageal cancer, without accumulation of toxicity and was well-tolerated. PMID:28115730

  17. Management of locally advanced and metastatic colon cancer in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Kurniali, Peter C; Hrinczenko, Borys; Al-Janadi, Anas

    2014-02-28

    Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States with a median age at diagnosis of 69 years. Sixty percent are diagnosed over the age of 65 years and 36% are 75 years or older. At diagnosis, approximately 58% of patients will have locally advanced and metastatic disease, for which systemic chemotherapy has been shown to improve survival. Treatment of cancer in elderly patients is more challenging due to multiple factors, including disabling co-morbidities as well as a decline in organ function. Cancer treatment of elderly patients is often associated with more toxicities that may lead to frequent hospitalizations. In locally advanced disease, fewer older patients receive adjuvant chemotherapy despite survival benefit and similar toxicity when compared to their younger counterparts. A survival benefit is also observed in the palliative chemotherapy setting for elderly patients with metastatic disease. When treating elderly patients with colon cancer, one has to consider drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Since chronological age is a poor marker of a patient's functional status, several methods of functional assessment including performance status and activities of daily living (ADL) or instrumental ADL, or even a comprehensive geriatric assessment, may be used. There is no ideal chemotherapy regimen that fits all elderly patients and so a regimen needs to be tailored for each individual. Important considerations when treating elderly patients include convenience and tolerability. This review will discuss approaches to the management of elderly patients with locally advanced and metastatic colon cancer.

  18. Cetuximab for the treatment of recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, J; Bagust, A; Boland, A; Fleeman, N; McLeod, C; Dundar, Y; Proudlove, C; Shaw, R

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents a summary of the evidence review group (ERG) report into the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of cetuximab for recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) based upon a review of the manufacturer's submission to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) as part of the single technology appraisal (STA) process. The submission's evidence came from a single reasonably high-quality randomised controlled trial (RCT) [EXTREME (Erbitux in First-Line Treatment of Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer); n = 442] comparing cetuximab plus chemotherapy (CTX) with CTX alone. Cetuximab plus CTX had significant effects compared with CTX alone on the primary outcome of overall survival (10.1 versus 7.4 months respectively) and the secondary outcomes of progression-free survival (PFS) (5.6 versus 3.3 months), best overall response to therapy (35.6% versus 19.5%), disease control rate (81.1% versus 60%) and time-to-treatment failure (4.8 versus 3.0 months), but not on duration of response (5.6 months versus 4.7 months). No safety issues with cetuximab arose beyond those already previously documented. The manufacturer developed a two-arm state-transition Markov model to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of cetuximab plus CTX versus CTX alone, using clinical data from the EXTREME trial. The ERG recalculated the base-case cost-effectiveness results taking changes in parameters and assumptions into account. Subgroup and threshold analyses were also explored. The manufacturer reported an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of 121,367 pounds per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained and an incremental cost per life-year gained of 92,226 pounds. Univariate sensitivity analysis showed that varying the cost of day-case infusion and the utility values in the stable/response health state of the cetuximab plus CTX arm had the greatest impact on the ICER. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis

  19. Iodine I-131 With or Without Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-15

    Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  20. Trametinib in Increasing Tumoral Iodine Incorporation in Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    BRAF Gene Mutation; Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  1. Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-01

    High-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Low-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Acinic Cell Tumor; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Anaplastic Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Malignant Mixed Cell Type Tumor; Salivary Gland Poorly Differentiated Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer

  2. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Vinorelbine Ditartrate in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-27

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA1; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA2; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  3. [Advanced and Metastatic Lung Cancer – What is new in the Diagnosis and Therapy?].

    PubMed

    Rothschild, Sacha I

    2015-07-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common types of malignancies worldwide. The majority of patients are diagnosed with an incurable advanced/metastatic stage disease. Palliative treatment approaches improve the survival and the quality of life of these patients. Lung cancer is subdivided according to histology and molecular biology. The most important classification separates small cell from non-small cell lung cancer. In the subgroup of non-small cell lung cancer novel treatment approaches coming along with an improved prognosis have been established during the last decade. The current manuscript provides an overview on current treatment options for metastatic lung cancer. Furthermore, an outlook on promising future treatment options is provided.

  4. Management of afferent loop obstruction from recurrent metastatic pancreatic cancer using a venting gastrojejunostomy

    PubMed Central

    Bakes, Debbie; Cain, Christian; King, Michael; Dong, Xiang Da (Eric)

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy potentially curable with surgical intervention. Following pancreaticoduodenectomy for suspected pancreatic head malignancy, patients have a high risk for both immediate and delayed problems due to surgical complications and recurrent disease. We report here a patient with pancreatic cancer treated with pancreaticoduodenectomy who developed recurrent disease resulting in obstruction of the afferent limb. The patient developed biliary obstruction and cholangitis at presentation. Her biliary tree failed to dilate which precluded safe percutaneous biliary decompression. During surgical exploration, she was found to have a dilated afferent limb at the level of the transverse mesocolon. The patient underwent decompression of the afferent limb as well as the biliary tree using a venting gastrojejunostomy to the blind loop. This represents a novel surgical approach for management of this complicated and difficult problem. PMID:24363832

  5. Management of afferent loop obstruction from recurrent metastatic pancreatic cancer using a venting gastrojejunostomy.

    PubMed

    Bakes, Debbie; Cain, Christian; King, Michael; Dong, Xiang Da Eric

    2013-12-15

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy potentially curable with surgical intervention. Following pancreaticoduodenectomy for suspected pancreatic head malignancy, patients have a high risk for both immediate and delayed problems due to surgical complications and recurrent disease. We report here a patient with pancreatic cancer treated with pancreaticoduodenectomy who developed recurrent disease resulting in obstruction of the afferent limb. The patient developed biliary obstruction and cholangitis at presentation. Her biliary tree failed to dilate which precluded safe percutaneous biliary decompression. During surgical exploration, she was found to have a dilated afferent limb at the level of the transverse mesocolon. The patient underwent decompression of the afferent limb as well as the biliary tree using a venting gastrojejunostomy to the blind loop. This represents a novel surgical approach for management of this complicated and difficult problem.

  6. Nonamplification ERBB2 genomic alterations in 5605 cases of recurrent and metastatic breast cancer: An emerging opportunity for anti-HER2 targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jeffrey S; Gay, Laurie M; Wang, Kai; Ali, Siraj M; Chumsri, Saranya; Elvin, Julia A; Bose, Ron; Vergilio, Jo-Anne; Suh, James; Yelensky, Roman; Lipson, Doron; Chmielecki, Juliann; Waintraub, Stanley; Leyland-Jones, Brian; Miller, Vincent A; Stephens, Philip J

    2016-09-01

    Activating, nonamplification ERBB2 mutations (ERBB2mut) are not detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), but are detected by DNA sequencing and may predict clinical responses to human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2)-targeted therapy. The authors queried 5605 advanced/metastatic breast cancers (mBC) to uncover the frequency of ERBB2mut genomic alterations. Clinical responses to anti-HER2 therapeutics were identified. DNA was extracted from 40 µm of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) sections. Comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) was used to evaluate up to 315 genes (592× mean coverage depth). Results were analyzed for base substitutions, short indels, copy number changes, and selected rearrangements. Of 5605 cases, 698 (12.5%) featured ERBB2 alterations, including 596 (10.6%) ERBB2 amplifications (ERBB2amp) and 138 (2.4%) ERBB2mut; 38 cases (0.7%) had co-occurring ERBB2amp and ERBB2mut. ERBB2mut predominantly affected the kinase (124 cases; 90%) or extracellular (15 cases; 11%) domains. Both primary BC (52 cases; 38%) and metastatic site biopsies (86 cases; 62%) were found to harbor ERBB2mut, which were distributed across carcinoma not otherwise specified (NOS) (69 cases; 50%), invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) (40 cases; 29%), invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) (27 cases; 20%), and mucinous mBC (2 cases; 1%). Genes commonly coaltered with ERBB2 were tumor protein 53 (TP53) (49%); phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) (42%); cadherin 1, type 1 (CDH1) (37%); MYC (17%); and cyclin D1 protein (CCND1) (16%). CDH1 mutations were enriched in ERBB2mut mBC (P<0.0006) and associated with recurrent mBC. Selected patients with ERBB2mut, without ERBB2amp, who responded to anti-HER2 targeted therapies are presented herein. Within this large series, 1.8% of cases harbored ERBB2mut, which are undetectable by standard-of-care IHC or FISH tests. Metastatic BC driven by ERBB2mut respond to anti-HER2

  7. Recurrent Stroke Due to Metastatic Pulmonary Tumor Emboli as an Important Clinical Entity.

    PubMed

    Takasugi, Junji; Sakaguchi, Manabu; Oyama, Naoki; Gon, Yasufumi; Terasaki, Yasukazu; Sasaki, Tsutomu; Nakahara, Susumu; Ohshima, Kenji; Hori, Yumiko; Morii, Eiichi; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2017-03-30

    We present an autopsy case of repetitive stroke due to tumor emboli, indistinguishable from thromboembolism with a hypercoagulable state in its clinical course. A 72-year-old man diagnosed with stage IVA oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma received chemoradiotherapy. Follow-up imaging revealed mediastinal lymph nodes and pulmonary metastasis. One year later, the patient experienced right arm weakness, and brain magnetic resonance imaging showed acute ischemic lesions in multiple vascular territories. He was diagnosed with paradoxical cerebral embolism due to cancer-associated venous thrombosis and treated with rivaroxaban. However, newly developed cerebral infarcts were confirmed 1 month later. Then, rivaroxaban treatment was switched to subcutaneous unfractionated heparin injection. He was admitted again for stroke recurrence and died of respiratory failure 8 days after admission. Autopsy demonstrated pulmonary metastasis invading the veins and tumor emboli in the culprit cerebral arteries. D-dimer was kept constant at a slightly higher level, ranging from 1 to 3 µg/mL during the course of recurrence. We should consider tumor embolism in the differential diagnosis of recurrent stroke along with pulmonary tumor and resistance to heparin preparations with unchanged D-dimer levels.

  8. Surgical salvage improves overall survival for patients with HPV-positive and HPV-negative recurrent locoregional and distant metastatic oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Theresa; Qualliotine, Jesse R; Ha, Patrick K; Califano, Joseph A; Kim, Young; Saunders, John R; Blanco, Ray G; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Zhang, Zhe; Chung, Christine H; Kiess, Ana; Gourin, Christine G; Koch, Wayne; Richmon, Jeremy D; Agrawal, Nishant; Eisele, David W; Fakhry, Carole

    2015-06-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) tumor status and surgical salvage are associated with improved prognosis for patients with recurrent oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Current data regarding types of surgery and the impact of surgery for patients with distant metastatic disease are limited. A retrospective analysis of patients with recurrent OPSCC from 2 institutions between 2000 and 2012 was performed. p16 immunohistochemistry and/or in situ hybridization, as clinically available, were used to determine HPV tumor status. Clinical characteristics, distribution of recurrence site, and treatment modalities were compared by HPV tumor status. Overall survival (OS) was examined using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards methods. The current study included 108 patients with 65 locoregional and 43 distant metastatic first recurrences. The majority of patients were HPV-positive (80 patients). HPV-positive tumor status was associated with longer time to disease recurrence (P<.01). Anatomic site distribution of disease recurrences did not differ by HPV tumor status. HPV-positive tumor status (adjusted HR [aHR], 0.23; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.09-0.58 [P = .002]), longer time to disease recurrence (≥ 1 year; aHR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.18-0.74 [P = .006]), and surgical salvage (aHR, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.12-0.61 [P = .002]) were found to be independently associated with OS after disease recurrence. Surgical salvage was independently associated with improved OS compared with nonsurgical treatment among patients with both locoregional (aHR, 0.15; 95% CI, 0.04-0.56 [P = .005]) and distant (aHR, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.05-0.75 [P = .018]) metastatic disease recurrences. Surgical salvage was found to be associated with improved OS for patients with recurrent locoregional and distant metastatic OPSCC, independent of HPV tumor status. Further prospective data are needed to confirm the role of surgical salvage for distant metastases. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  9. Phase I Trial of Triapine-Cisplatin-Paclitaxel Chemotherapy for Advanced Stage or Metastatic Solid Tumor Cancers.

    PubMed

    Kunos, Charles A; Chu, Edward; Makower, Della; Kaubisch, Andreas; Sznol, Mario; Ivy, Susan Percy

    2017-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is an enzyme involved in the de novo synthesis of deoxyribonucleotides, which are critical for DNA replication and DNA repair. Triapine is a small-molecule RNR inhibitor. A phase I trial studied the safety of triapine in combination with cisplatin-paclitaxel in patients with advanced stage or metastatic solid tumor cancers in an effort to capitalize on disrupted DNA damage repair. A total of 13 patients with various previously treated cancers were given a 96-h continuous intravenous (i.v.) infusion of triapine (40-120 mg/m(2)) on day 1, and then 3-h i.v. paclitaxel (80 mg/m(2)) followed by 1-h i.v. cisplatin (50-75 mg/m(2)) on day 3. This combination regimen was repeated every 21 days. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) for each agent was identified to be triapine (80 mg/m(2)), cisplatin (50 mg/m(2)), and paclitaxel (80 mg/m(2)). Common grade 3 or 4 toxicities included reversible anemia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, or electrolyte abnormalities. The combination regimen of triapine-cisplatin-paclitaxel resulted in no objective responses; however, five (83%) of six patients treated at the MTD had stable disease between 1 and 8 months duration. This phase I study showed that the combination regimen of triapine-cisplatin-paclitaxel was safe and provides a rational basis for a follow-up phase II trial to evaluate efficacy and progression-free survival in women with metastatic or recurrent uterine cervix cancer.

  10. Factors that influence survival in unresectable metastatic or locally advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chao-Wen; King, Tai-Ming; Wang, Hsin-Tai; Wang, Jui-Ho

    2011-12-01

    Half of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) have metastasis during the whole course of the disease. Fewer than 10% of those are still alive at 5 years. Locally advanced CRC accounts for 7% to 33% of CRC relapses. Of these, only a small number of patients are resectable with a curative intent. Management of unresectable metastatic or locally advanced CRC is a significant challenge. In this study, we focus on patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic CRC and analyze survival rate and prognostic factors influencing the survival. There were 277 patients identified. Several clinicopathologic parameters were evaluated. To determine the prognostic impact of the factors in survival, all parameters were tested from their relationship in Cox-regression model and Cox proportional hazards model. Survival curves were generated according to Kaplan-Meier method and the differences in survival were determined by employing the log-rank test. Three factors that influence the survival were identified: one or more than two organs involved (p = 0.041), higher carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level (p = 0.001), and different salvage treatment (p < 0.001). In Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, there were significant differences between patients with one and more than two organs involved (p = 0.027), different ranges of CEA level (p = 0.004), and different salvage treatment (p < 0.001). We clearly demonstrated three factors that influence the survival, including more than two organs involved, higher CEA level, and different salvage treatment. The higher the CEA level and the more organs (≥2) involved, the worse the survival. Even in patients with unresectable metastatic or locally advanced, aggressive treatment with target therapy seems to have survival benefit.

  11. Selumetinib and Cyclosporine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-28

    Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  12. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Metastatic Epidural Spinal Cord Compression and Recurrent Spinal Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Lo, Simon Shek-Man; Ryu, Samuel; Chang, Eric L; Galanopoulos, Nicholas; Jones, Joshua; Kim, Edward Y; Kubicky, Charlotte D; Lee, Charles P; Rose, Peter S; Sahgal, Arjun; Sloan, Andrew E; Teh, Bin S; Traughber, Bryan J; Van Poznak, Catherine; Vassil, Andrew D

    2015-07-01

    Metastatic epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC) is an oncologic emergency and if left untreated, permanent paralysis will ensue. The treatment of MESCC is governed by disease, patient, and treatment factors. Patient's preferences and goals of care are to be weighed into the treatment plan. Ideally, a patient with MESCC is evaluated by an interdisciplinary team promptly to determine the urgency of the clinical scenario. Treatment recommendations must take into consideration the risk-benefit profiles of surgical intervention and radiotherapy for the particular individual's circumstance, including neurologic status, performance status, extent of epidural disease, stability of the spine, extra-spinal disease status, and life expectancy. In patients with high spinal instability neoplastic score (SINS) or retropulsion of bone fragments in the spinal canal, surgical intervention should be strongly considered. The rate of development of motor deficits from spinal cord compression may be a prognostic factor for ultimate functional outcome, and should be taken into account when a treatment recommendation is made. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.

  13. A phase II trial of second-line pemetrexed in adults with advanced/metastatic osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Duffaud, Florence; Egerer, Gerlinde; Ferrari, Stefano; Rassam, Hisham; Boecker, Ulrike; Bui-Nguyen, B

    2012-03-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignant tumour in young adults. An effective treatment strategy for relapsed patients is still not defined. Pemetrexed is a multitargeted antifolate with a mode of action similar to, and a range of action broader than that of methotrexate. The primary objective of this phase II study was to determine tumour response rate in patients with high-grade, advanced/metastatic osteosarcoma. Secondary end-points included progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and safety. Pemetrexed 500mg/m(2) was administered on day 1 of 21-day cycles with folic acid and vitamin B(12) supplementation. At least 5 tumour responses in a targeted population of 32 were required to consider further investigation. Thirty-two patients (median age, 43.3 years; range, 18.6-76.0) with 1 prior chemotherapy regimen for high-grade advanced/metastatic osteosarcoma were enrolled. Thirty (93.8%) patients had an ECOG performance status ≤ 1 and 29 (90.6%) had metastases in the lung. One patient had partial response (3.1%) and 5 (15.6%) had stable disease. Median PFS and OS were 1.4 months (95% CI: 1.4-1.7) and 5.5 months (95% CI: 2.3-10.5), respectively. The most common drug-related grade 3/4 toxicities were leukopaenia, asthaenia and elevated alanine aminotransferase in 3 (9.4%) patients each. One patient died due to multi-organ failure considered possibly related to the study drug. Pemetrexed 500mg/m(2) administered on day 1 of 21-day cycles as second-line treatment to patients with advanced/metastatic high-grade osteosarcoma was generally well tolerated but did not meet minimal response expectations for further investigation in this patient population. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Rehabilitation in advanced, progressive, recurrent cancer: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jones, Louise; Fitzgerald, Gail; Leurent, Baptiste; Round, Jeffrey; Eades, Jane; Davis, Sarah; Gishen, Faye; Holman, Amanda; Hopkins, Katherine; Tookman, Adrian

    2013-09-01

    Two million people across the U.K. are living with cancer, often experienced as a long-term condition. They may have unmet needs after active treatment. Rehabilitation aims to address these needs, maximize psychological and physical function, and enable minimum dependency regardless of life expectancy. We aimed to test, in a randomized controlled trial, the clinical and cost effectiveness of a rehabilitation intervention for patients with advanced, recurrent cancer. We conducted a two-arm, wait-list control, randomized trial of a complex rehabilitation intervention delivered by a hospice-based multidisciplinary team vs. usual care for active, progressive, recurrent hematological and breast malignancies, with a follow-up at three months. The primary outcome was the psychological subscale of the Supportive Care Needs Survey (SCNS). Secondary outcomes were other domains of the SCNS, psychological status, continuity of care, quality of life, and resource use. Forty-one participants were enrolled and 36 completed the trial. The primary outcome was significantly lower in the intervention arm (adjusted difference -16.8, 95% CI -28.34 to -5.3; P = 0.006). The SCNS physical and patient care subscales (-14.2, 95% CI -26.2 to -2.2; P = 0.02 and -7.4, 95% CI -13.7 to -1.1; P = 0.02, respectively) and self-reported health state (12.8, 95% CI 3.2 to 22.4; P = 0.01) also differed significantly. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was £19,390 per quality-adjusted life year. This intervention significantly reduced the unmet needs of cancer survivors and it is likely that it is cost-effective. Despite small numbers, the main effect size was robust. We recommend implementation alongside evaluation in wider clinical settings and patient populations. Copyright © 2013 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Phase II study of ispinesib in recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Tang, Patricia A; Siu, Lillian L; Chen, Eric X; Hotte, Sebastien J; Chia, Stephen; Schwarz, James K; Pond, Gregory R; Johnson, Caitlin; Colevas, A Dimitrios; Synold, Timothy W; Vasist, Lakshmi S; Winquist, Eric

    2008-06-01

    Ispinesib (SB-715992) inhibits the mitotic kinesin spindle protein (KSP), a novel target for anticancer therapy. A phase II study was conducted to examine the efficacy of ispinesib in recurrent or metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (RMHNSC). Patients with up to one prior line of chemotherapy for RMHNSC were treated with ispinesib 18 mg/m2 IV over 1 hour every 21 days. Twenty-one patients were enrolled onto this study with a target stage I sample size of 19. Of 20 evaluable patients, no objective responses were seen and stable disease > 2 cycles was observed in five patients (25%). The median time to progression was 1.4 (95% CI 1.3-2.3) months, median survival was 3.5 (95% CI 2.8-7.8) months, and 1 year overall survival was 20% (95% CI 8.3-48.1%). The most frequent attributable grades III-V adverse events were neutropenia (60% of patients) and leukopenia (55%). The pharmacokinetic profile was consistent with results from phase I studies. Archival tissues (n = 14) demonstrated low to moderate KSP expression by immunohistochemistry. In addition, no pharmacodynamic changes were observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We detected no antitumor activity of ispinesib in RMHNSC on this dosing schedule.

  16. Treatments and costs for recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, Naomi; Buter, Jan; Pescott, Chris P; Lalisang, Roy I; de Boer, Jan Paul; de Graeff, Alexander; van Herpen, Carla M L; Baatenburg de Jong, Robert J; Uyl-de Groot, Carin A

    2016-02-01

    For patients with recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (R/M SCCHN), chemotherapy can prolong life and alleviate symptoms. However, expected gains may be small, not necessarily outweighing considerable toxicity and high costs. Treatment choice is to a large extent dependent on preferences of doctors and patients and data on these choices are scarce. The purpose of this study is to obtain real-world information on palliative systemic treatment and costs of R/M SCCHN in the Netherlands. In six Dutch head and neck treatment centers, data were collected on patient and tumor characteristics, treatment patterns, disease progression, survival, adverse events, and resource use for R/M SCCHN, between 2006 and 2013. 125 (14 %) out of 893 R/M SCCHN patients received palliative, non-trial first-line systemic treatment, mainly platinum + 5FU + cetuximab (32 %), other platinum-based combination therapy (13 %), methotrexate monotherapy (27 %) and capecitabine monotherapy (14 %). Median progression-free survival and overall survival were 3.4 and 6.0 months, respectively. 34 (27 %) patients experienced severe adverse events. Mean total hospital costs ranged from € 10,075 (± € 9,891) (methotrexate monotherapy) to € 39,459 (± € 21,149) (platinum + 5FU + cetuximab). Primary cost drivers were hospital stays and anticancer drug treatments. Major health care utilization and costs are involved in systemically treating R/M SCCHN patients with a limited survival.

  17. Galectin-8 is associated with recurrence and survival of patients with non-metastatic gastric cancer after surgery.

    PubMed

    Wu, Songyang; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Heng; Lin, Chao; Li, Ruochen; Cao, Yifan; He, Hongyong; Li, He; Shen, Zhenbin; Qin, Jing; Xu, Jiejie

    2016-09-01

    The expression of galectin family has been unraveled in many malignant tumors and related with clinical outcomes. Our current study aims to investigate the prognostic value of galectin-8 expression and refine the current risk stratification system in non-metastatic gastric cancer patients. We retrospectively enrolled 421 patients with gastric cancer from Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University in 2008. The expression of galectin-8 was detected by immunohistochemistry, and its association with clinicopathological features and prognostic outcomes were assessed. We found that galectin-8 expression was significantly associated with tumor size (P = 0.007), T stage (P = 0.001), N stage (P < 0.001), and tumor node metastasis (TNM) stage (P < 0.001). In addition, low galectin-8 expression indicated poor overall survival (OS) (P < 0.001) and disease-free survival (DFS) (P < 0.001). Furthermore, galectin-8 expression level was identified as an independent favorable prognostic factor for OS (P < 0.001). A predictive nomogram was generated with identified independent prognosticators to evaluate patient OS at 3 and 5 years. Our study suggested that galectin-8 is a potential independent favorable prognostic biomarker for survival and recurrence of patients with gastric cancer after surgical resection and the integration of intratumoral galectin-8 expression level into current TNM staging system would help to refine individual risk stratification.

  18. CanWalk: a feasibility study with embedded randomised controlled trial pilot of a walking intervention for people with recurrent or metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsianakas, Vicki; Ream, Emma; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke; Purushotham, Arnie; Mucci, Lorelei; Green, James S A; Fewster, Jacquetta; Armes, Jo

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Walking is an adaptable, inexpensive and accessible form of physical activity. However, its impact on quality of life (QoL) and symptom severity in people with advanced cancer is unknown. This study aimed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of a community-based walking intervention to enhance QoL in people with recurrent/metastatic cancer. Design We used a mixed-methods design comprising a 2-centre RCT and nested qualitative interviews. Participants Patients with advanced breast, prostate, gynaecological or haematological cancers randomised 1:1 between intervention and usual care. Intervention The intervention comprised Macmillan's ‘Move More’ information, a short motivational interview with a recommendation to walk for at least 30 min on alternate days and attend a volunteer-led group walk weekly. Outcomes We assessed feasibility and acceptability of the intervention and RCT by evaluating study processes (rates of recruitment, consent, retention, adherence and adverse events), and using end-of-study questionnaires and qualitative interviews. Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) assessing QoL, activity, fatigue, mood and self-efficacy were completed at baseline and 6, 12 and 24 weeks. Results We recruited 42 (38%) eligible participants. Recruitment was lower than anticipated (goal n=60), the most commonly reported reason being unable to commit to walking groups (n=19). Randomisation procedures worked well with groups evenly matched for age, sex and activity. By week 24, there was a 45% attrition rate. Most PROMs while acceptable were not sensitive to change and did not capture key benefits. Conclusions The intervention was acceptable, well tolerated and the study design was judged acceptable and feasible. Results are encouraging and demonstrate that exercise was popular and conveyed benefit to participants. Consequently, an effectiveness RCT is warranted, with some modifications to the

  19. To treat or not to treat: balancing therapeutic outcomes, toxicity and quality of life in patients with recurrent and/or metastatic head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Barbara A

    2013-12-01

    There are a number of challenges facing head and neck cancer patients who present with metastatic or locally recurrent head and neck cancer; such as, limited treatment options, overall poor prognosis, and high symptom burden secondary to tumor and treatment. Disease and symptom management can be difficult, and requires that the potential benefits versus the adverse effects of systemic therapy be weighed very carefully. Individual patient characteristics including performance status, weight loss, symptom burden, comorbidities, and social supports must be taken into consideration. Unfortunately, reliable data describing the impact of therapy on symptom burden and quality of life (QOL) is lacking. Recently completed randomized phase III treatment trials have demonstrated the feasibility of incorporating patient reported outcome measures to assess symptoms and QOL into clinical studies. Nonetheless, obstacles to accurate and thorough QOL reporting remain. Development of tools directed at symptom burden and functional impairment in the metastatic or recurrent head and neck cancer population is needed. Such tools would enhance our ability to assess the impact of treatment, thus optimizing treatment decisions for patients with recurrent and/or metastatic head and neck cancer.

  20. Molecular targeted therapies in advanced or metastatic chordoma patients: facts and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Lebellec, Loïc; Aubert, Sébastien; Zaïri, Fahed; Ryckewaert, Thomas; Chauffert, Bruno; Penel, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    Chordomas, derived from undifferentiated notochordal remnants, represent less than 4% of bone primary tumors. Despite surgery followed by radiotherapy, local and metastatic relapses are frequent. In case of locally advanced or metastatic chordomas, medical treatment is frequently discussed. While chemotherapy is ineffective, it would appear that some molecular targeted therapies, in particular imatinib, could slow down the tumor growth in case-reports, retrospective series, and phase I or II trials. Nineteen publications, between January 1990 and September 2014, have been found describing the activity of these targeted therapies. A systematic analysis of these publications shows that the best objective response with targeted therapies was stabilization in 52 to 69% of chordomas. Given the indolent course of advanced chordoma and because of the absence of randomized trial, the level of evidence to treat chordomas with molecular therapy is low (level III), whatever the drug. Furthermore, we could not draw firm conclusion on the activity of imatinib. Other putative targets have also been described. Therefore, further clinical trials are expected, especially with these targets. Nevertheless, it seems essential, in those future studies, to consider the naturally slow course of the disease.

  1. SPARC gene variants predict clinical outcome in locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Arqueros, Cristina; Salazar, Juliana; Arranz, M J; Sebio, Ana; Mora, Josefina; Sullivan, Ivana; Tobeña, María; Martín-Richard, Marta; Barnadas, Agustí; Baiget, Montserrat; Páez, David

    2017-08-01

    Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) is a glycoprotein of the extracellular matrix whose expression can be altered in malignant pancreatic cells and in the adjacent stromal fibroblasts. We evaluated the possible role of SPARC gene variants as prognostic markers for locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancer. We analyzed eight tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (TagSNPs) in the SPARC gene in 74 patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma treated with chemotherapy alone or combined with radiotherapy. TagSNPs were chosen using the HapMap genome browser and Haploview software 4.2 based on two predefined criteria: (1) coefficient cutoff of 0.80 and (2) minor allele frequency (MAF) ≥ 0.10. Univariate analyses revealed significant associations between four SNPs (rs17718347, rs2347128, rs3210714, and rs967527) and PFS. The rs3210714 genetic variant was also associated with OS. In the multivariate analyses, rs17718347 (HR 0.4; 95% CI 0.2-0.8; p = 0.013) and rs2347128 (HR 0.5; 95% CI 0.3-0.9; p = 0.049) remained statistically associated with PFS. In addition, patients harboring the T-A-G haplotype (rs17718347, rs1978707, rs2347128) had a better PFS (p = 0.002). Our findings suggest that SPARC polymorphisms may be useful in predicting outcome in patients with locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancer.

  2. Clinically advanced and metastatic pure mucinous carcinoma of the breast: a comprehensive genomic profiling study.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jeffrey S; Gay, Laurie M; Nozad, Sahar; Wang, Kai; Ali, Siraj M; Boguniewicz, Ann; Khaira, Depinder; Johnson, Adrienne; Elvin, Julia A; Vergilio, Jo-Anne; Suh, James; Miller, Vincent A; Stephens, Philip J

    2016-01-01

    Pure mucinous breast carcinoma (pmucBC) is a distinctive variant of breast cancer (BC) featuring an excellent overall prognosis. However, on rare occasions, pmucBC pursues an aggressive clinical course. We queried whether comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) would uncover clinically relevant genomic alterations (CRGA) that could lead to targeted therapy treatment for patients with an advanced and metastatic form of pmucBC. From a series of 51,238 total cancer samples, which included 5605 cases of clinically advanced BC and 22 cases of stage IV pmucBC, DNA was extracted from 40 microns of FFPE sections. Comprehensive genomic profiling was performed using a hybrid-capture, adaptor ligation-based next generation sequencing assay to a mean coverage depth of 564X. The results were analyzed for all classes of genomic alterations (GA) including base substitutions, insertions and deletions, select rearrangements, and copy number changes. Clinically relevant genomic alterations were defined as those indicating possible treatment with anti-cancer drugs on the market or in registered clinical trials. Samples were obtained from breast (11), lymph nodes (3), chest wall (2), liver (2), soft tissue (2), bone (1), and pleura (1). The median age of the 22 pmucBC patients was 57 years (range 32-79 years). Three pmucBCs were grade 1, 17 were grade 2, and 2 were grade 3. Twenty-one (95 %) pmucBC were ER+, 18 (82 %) were PR+, and 3 (14 %) were HER2+ by IHC and/or FISH. A total of 132 GA were identified (6.0 GA per tumor), including 53 CRGA, for a mean of 2.4 GA per tumor. Amplification of FGFR1 or ZNF703, located within the same amplicon, was found in 8 of 22 cases (36 %). This enrichment of FGFR1 amplification in 36 % of pmucBC versus 11 % of non-mucinous ER+ BC (601 cases) was significant (p < 0.005). Other frequently altered genes of interest in pmucBC were CCND1 and the FGF3/FGF4/FGF19 amplicon (27 %), often co-amplified together. ERBB2/HER2 alterations were identified in 5 pmuc

  3. The natural history of metastatic progression in men with prostate-specific antigen recurrence after radical prostatectomy: long-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.; Feng, Zhaoyong; Trock, Bruce J.; Humphreys, Elizabeth B.; Carducci, Michael A.; Partin, Alan W.; Walsh, Patrick C.; Eisenberger, Mario A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe metastasis-free survival (MFS) in men with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) recurrence following radical prostatectomy, and to define clinical prognostic factors modifying metastatic risk. PATIENTS AND METHODS We conducted a retrospective analysis of 450 men treated with prostatectomy at a tertiary hospital between July 1981 and July 2010 who developed PSA recurrence (≥0.2 ng/mL) and never received adjuvant or salvage therapy before the development of metastatic disease. We estimated MFS using the Kaplan–Meier method, and investigated factors influencing the risk of metastasis using Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS Median follow-up after prostatectomy was 8.0 years, and after biochemical recurrence was 4.0 years. At last follow-up, 134 of 450 patients (29.8%) had developed metastases, while median MFS was 10.0 years. Using multivariable regressions, two variables emerged as independently predictive of MFS: PSA doubling time (<3.0 vs 3.0–8.9 vs 9.0–14.9 vs ≥15.0 months) and Gleason score (≤6 vs 7 vs 8–10). Using these stratifications of Gleason score and PSA doubling time, tables were constructed to predict median, 5- and 10-year MFS after PSA recurrence. In different patient subsets, median MFS ranged from 1 to 15 years. CONCLUSIONS In men undergoing prostatectomy, MFS after PSA recurrence is variable and is most strongly influenced by PSA doubling time and Gleason score. These parameters serve to stratify men into different risk groups with respect to metastatic progression. Our findings may provide the background for appropriate selection of patients, treatments and endpoints for clinical trials. PMID:21777360

  4. Management of Recurrent and Metastatic HPV-Positive Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma after Transoral Robotic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sims, John R; Van Abel, Kathryn; Martin, Eliot J; Lohse, Christine M; Price, Daniel L; Olsen, Kerry D; Moore, Eric J

    2017-03-01

    Objective To describe management and oncologic outcomes for patients who develop locoregional recurrence (LRR) or distant metastasis (DM) following transoral robotic surgery for human papilloma virus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting Tertiary care referral center. Subjects and Methods A total of 286 patients with HPV-positive OPSCC who underwent transoral robotic surgery-based treatment from May 2007 to May 2015. Results Of 286 patients (12.2%), 35 met inclusion criteria. Of these, 19 experienced an LRR and 16 developed a DM; 2 patients with LRR subsequently developed DM. In those patients with an LRR, 79% had T1/T2 tumors, and 47% had N0/N1 nodal disease, compared with 75% and 6% in the DM group, respectively. The median time to LRR or DM was 0.6 years (interquartile range [IQR], 0.4-1.0) and 1.8 years (IQR, 1.0-2.1), respectively. Salvage treatment with intent to cure was attempted in 23 patients (16 LRR, 7 DM). The median time from LRR or DM to last follow-up for the 18 patients who were still alive after salvage was 1.9 years (IQR, 0.4-3.8; range, 7 days-6.2 years). Estimated cancer-specific survival rates at 3 years following intent-to-cure treatment were 63% (95% CI, 39-100; number still at risk, 5) in the LRR group and 100% (95% CI, 100-100; number still at risk, 2) in the DM group. Conclusion Overall, LRR and DM for HPV-positive OPSCC following transoral robotic surgery-based therapy are infrequent. In our subset of patients who underwent intent-to-cure treatment, cancer-specific survival rates were favorable. Therefore, aggressive salvage treatment for LRR and DM for HPV-positive OPSCC should be recommended for appropriate candidates.

  5. Advances in recurrence and malignant transformation of sinonasal inverted papillomas

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qingjia; An, Lifeng; Zheng, Jun; Zhu, Dongdong

    2017-01-01

    Sinonasal inverted papilloma (SIP) is a benign tumor of the nasal cavity and sinus. SIP is characterized by aggressive malignant transformation and a high rate of recurrence. Inadequate removal of the tumor during surgery is one of the most significant contributors to SIP recurrence. A growing body of evidence suggests that molecular alteration in SIP, including human papilloma virus infections, single nucleotide polymorphisms of key genes, deregulation of signaling pathways and immunological changes, may lead to SIP occurrence and malignant transformation. However, the extent to which these molecular mechanisms contribute to SIP pathology and transformation remains unclear due to limited research. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the primary dependent factors that contribute to SIP etiology. The present article reviewed risk factors of progression and recurrence of SIP, including outdoor and industrial occupational exposure, smoking, septal deviation, SIP location, recurrent cases, stage of SIP-associated squamous cell carcinoma and choice of surgical method. PMID:28599459

  6. Phase 2, multicenter, single-arm study of eribulin mesylate with trastuzumab as first-line therapy for locally recurrent or metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilks, Sharon; Puhalla, Shannon; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce; Schwartzberg, Lee; Berrak, Erhan; Song, James; Cox, David; Vahdat, Linda

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess efficacy and safety of eribulin with trastuzumab as first-line therapy for locally recurrent or metastatic HER2+ breast cancer. In this multicenter, phase II, single-arm study, patients with recurrent or metastatic HER2+ breast cancer received eribulin mesylate at 1.4 mg/m(2) intravenously (I.V.) on days 1 and 8 of each 21-day cycle with an initial trastuzumab dose of 8 mg/kg I.V. on day 1, followed by 6 mg/kg of trastuzumab on day 1 of each subsequent cycle. Tumor assessments were conducted every 6 weeks for the first 6 cycles and every 12 weeks thereafter. The primary end point was ORR, and secondary end points included PFS, TTR, DOR, and safety. Fifty-two patients were enrolled. Fifty-one patients (98.1%) had metastatic disease, 25 (48.1%) with liver metastases, 24 (46.2%) with lung metastases, and 19 (36.5%) with bone metastases. Patients received a median of 10.0 cycles of eribulin and 11.0 cycles of trastuzumab. The ORR was 71.2% (n = 37) with median TTR of 1.3 months, DOR of 11.1 months, and PFS of 11.6 months. The most common Grade 3/4 treatment-emergent adverse events were neutropenia in 20 (38.5%) patients, peripheral neuropathy in 14 (26.9%; all Grade 3) patients, fatigue in 4 (7.7%) patients, and febrile neutropenia in 4 (7.7%) patients. Because of the high ORR, prolonged median PFS, and acceptable safety profile, combination eribulin/trastuzumab is an acceptable treatment option for locally recurrent or metastatic HER2+ breast cancer. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Phase II study of oxaliplatin in patients with unresectable, metastatic, or recurrent hepatocellular cancer: a California Cancer Consortium Trial.

    PubMed

    Yen, Y; Lim, Dean W; Chung, Vincent; Morgan, Robert J; Leong, Lucille A; Shibata, Stephen I; Wagman, Lawrence D; Wagman, Stephen D; Marx, Howard; Chu, Peiguo G; Longmate, Jeffrey A; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Ramanathan, Ramesh K; Belani, Chandra P; Gandara, David R

    2008-08-01

    Prolonged survival for patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is consistently reported at lower than 6 months. Oxaliplatin has recently demonstrated activity in HCC. The objective of this study was to determine the response rate, survival, time to progression, and toxicity in patients with poor prognosis HCC when treated with oxaliplatin. Patients were required to have measurable recurrent, metastatic or unresectable HCC, and to have previously been exposed to no more than 2 prior chemotherapy regimens. Karnofsky performance of 70% or above and adequate organ and hematologic function were required. All patients received treatment with oxaliplatin 100 mg/m on day 1 and 15 as a 2-hour intravenous infusion and were pretreated with antiemetics. Treatment was repeated every 28 days. Thirty-six patients were enrolled and evaluated, although 6 expired before the first planned evaluation. Karnofsky performance status was 70/80/90/100% in 5/9/9/13 patients, respectively. The median time to progression was 2 months; median survival was 6 months. The 6-month overall survival was 55% (95% confidence interval 41%-74%), and the 6 month event-free survival was 11% (95% confidence interval 4%-28%). Single agent, oxaliplatin, has produced one partial response of good duration in 36 patients, but failed to meet the a priori criterion for promise in this trial. Sixteen patients were observed to have stable disease with a well tolerated toxicity profile. The combination of oxaliplatin and other agents should be considered to treat HCC in those patients with good functional status.

  8. Impact of symptom burden on work-related abilities in patients with locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer: Results from a substudy of the VIRGO observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Cleeland, Charles S; Mayer, Musa; Dreyer, Nancy A; Yim, Yeun Mi; Yu, Elaine; Su, Zhaohui; Mun, Yong; Sloan, Jeff A; Kaufman, Peter A

    2014-12-01

    Limited data exist on the association of symptom burden, daily activity impairment, and work productivity (WP) in patients with advanced breast cancer. This cross-sectional analysis evaluated baseline patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in patients with locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer (MBC) receiving first-line hormonal therapy or chemotherapy and/or targeted therapy in the VIRGO observational study. The primary PRO study endpoint, symptom severity and interference score, was measured using the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI). Secondary endpoints included Activity Level Scale (ALS), health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire (WPAI:SHP) scores. Overall, 152 patients (chemotherapy cohort, 104; hormonal therapy cohort, 48) answered questionnaires. Fatigue, decreased sexual interest, disturbed sleep, emotional distress, and drowsiness were the most common severe symptoms, and were of moderate-to-severe intensity in 38.8%-52.0% of patients. Mean percent daily activity impairment was 30% for study patients, and WP impairment ranged from 20% to 40% across indices in employed patients (n, 58). Significant positive correlations existed for MDASI severity and interference scores with activity impairment and WP indices (Pearson correlation coefficients [R] = 0.47-0.82; p < 0.0001). ALS and overall HRQOL correlated negatively with these indices (R = -0.41 to -0.60; p ≤ 0.001). After adjustment for potential confounders, MDASI symptom interference and ALS were significant predictors of activity and WP impairment. Our results indicate patients receiving treatment for MBC are symptomatic with significant daily activity and/or WP impairment. Symptom severity and interference, functional status, and overall HRQOL were moderately correlated with perceived work-related ability.

  9. Inverse correlation between body mass index and clinical outcomes in men with advanced castration-recurrent prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Halabi, Susan; Ou, San-San; Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Small, Eric J

    2007-10-01

    Obesity has a variety of adverse health outcomes, but to the authors' knowledge, the effect of obesity on outcome in patients with advanced prostate cancer is not known. For this reason, the correlation between an elevated body mass index (BMI) and clinical outcomes in patients with metastatic, castration-recurrent prostate cancer (CRPC) was evaluated. A total of 1226 men with CRPC who were enrolled in 9 prospective clinical trials conducted by the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) for the treatment of metastatic disease were considered. Eligible patients had progressive prostate cancer during androgen deprivation therapy (with documented castrate levels of testosterone); an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 to 2; and adequate hematologic, renal, and hepatic function. Patients were classified based on BMI as normal (18.5-24.9 kg/m(2)), overweight (25-29.9 kg/m(2)), and mildly to severely obese (> or =30 kg/m(2)). Approximately 24% of the patients had a normal BMI, 43% were overweight, and 33% were mildly to severely obese. On multivariable analysis, BMI was found to be a statistically significant predictor of overall survival and prostate cancer-specific mortality. Compared with men with normal BMIs, the hazard ratios for death for overweight men and mildly to severely obese men were 0.80 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.68-0.93; P = .001) and 0.80 (95% CI, 0.68-0.94; P = .010), respectively. In patients with metastatic CRPC, obesity (as defined by an elevated BMI) appears to have a protective effect against overall mortality and prostate cancer-specific mortality. Alternatively, a higher BMI may reflect different cancer biology (ie, the lack of cachexia-producing substances). Further studies to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms behind these clinical observations are needed.

  10. Roles and types of radiation in breast cancer treatment: early breast cancer, locoregionally advanced, and metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    McCloskey, Susan A; Lee, Steve P; Steinberg, Michael L

    2011-02-01

    To describe the current role of radiation therapy and specific types of radiation therapy used in the management of early stage, locoregionally advanced, and metastatic breast cancer. The role of radiation therapy in the management of breast cancer has not changed in recent decades, however methods of treatment delivery have advanced considerably. Hypofractionation and accelerated partial breast irradiation, which substantially reduce radiation treatment duration, have emerged as appropriate alternatives to conventional whole breast radiation in select patient subsets, and intensity modulated radiation therapy, breathing-adapted radiation therapy, and prone-positioning technique address challenging anatomic issues and reduce treatment-associated toxicity. Stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiation therapy continue to advance the management of distant metastatic disease. Radiation therapy plays a significant role in the management of early stage, locoregionally advanced, and metastatic breast cancer. Technological advances are allowing for greater patient convenience and comfort in locoregional radiation therapy delivery and for expanded radiation therapy indications in the setting of metastatic disease.

  11. Changes in PIK3CA mutation status are not associated with recurrence, metastatic disease or progression in endocrine-treated breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Arthur, L M; Turnbull, A K; Renshaw, L; Keys, J; Thomas, J S; Wilson, T R; Lackner, M R; Sims, A H; Dixon, J M

    2014-08-01

    The phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase pathway plays an important role in proliferation, migration and survival in breast cancer and may play a role in resistance to endocrine therapy. Pathway activation occurs as a result of mutations in PIK3CA or loss of functional PTEN. Matched primary and recurrent samples from 120 breast cancer patients treated with endocrine therapy were profiled with a qPCR-based mutation assay covering eight mutational hotspots in PIK3CA. PTEN was assayed by immunohistochemistry. Samples were well characterized with respect to anatomic location of recurrence (metastatic nodal or local recurrence as opposed to contralateral or ipsilateral new primary cancers). In total, 43 % of patients had at least one PIK3CA mutation at diagnosis, and 41 % had a mutation at the time of recurrence. Only 8 % of patients with local recurrence, metastatic disease or progression on primary endocrine treatment changed their PIK3CA mutation status (four gains, two losses, total 76). The most common changes in PIK3CA mutation status were seen in patients who developed a new cancer either in the treated or contralateral breast (64 %, three gains, four losses, total 11). PIK3CA mutation status does not change in the majority of patients with breast cancer and the acquisition of mutations in PIK3CA is not responsible for the development of endocrine resistance. PTEN loss at diagnosis is associated with a significantly shorter time to progression compared with tumours in which PTEN was retained. These are the most comprehensive data currently available correlating PIK3CA status, site of recurrence and endocrine resistance.

  12. Zoledronic acid in metastatic chondrosarcoma and advanced sacrum chordoma: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Montella, Liliana; Addeo, Raffaele; Faiola, Vincenzo; Cennamo, Gregorio; Guarrasi, Rosario; Capasso, Elena; Mamone, Rosanna; Michele, Caraglia; Del Prete, Salvatore

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Chondrosarcomas and chordomas are usually chemoresistant bone tumors and may have a poor prognosis when advanced. They are usually associated with worsening pain difficult to control. Patients and Methods Zoledronic acid was used in a 63-year-old man with metastatic chondrosarcoma and in a 66-year-old woman with a diagnosis of sacrum chordoma both reporting severe pain related to tumor. Results In the first case, zoledronic acid was able to maintain pain control despite disease progression following chemotherapy, in the other case, zoledronic acid only produced significant clinical benefit. Conclusion Control of pain associated with bone tumors such as chondrosarcoma and chondroma may significantly improve from use of zoledronic acid, independently from tumor response to other treatments. Evaluation on larger series are needed to confirm the clinical effect of this bisphosphonate on such tumors. PMID:19144109

  13. Recent Advances in Targeting the EGFR Signaling Pathway for the Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yuji; Suyama, Koichi; Baba, Hideo

    2017-04-02

    Outcomes for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients have been improved by treatment with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) antibodies, particularly when combined with predictive biomarkers to select patients lacking RAS mutations. New technologies such as liquid biopsy and next-generation sequencing have revealed that potential mechanisms of resistance to anti-EGFR therapies act through acquired mutations of KRAS and the EGFR ectodomain. Mutations in cross-talking molecular effectors that participate in downstream EGFR signaling are also negative predictors for anti-EGFR therapy. In the current review, we describe recent advances in anti-EGFR therapy and discuss new treatment strategies to target downstream RAS-MAPK signaling in mCRC.

  14. Locally advanced and metastatic basal cell carcinoma: molecular pathways, treatment options and new targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Salas, Veronica; Alegre, Marta; Garcés, Joan Ramón; Puig, Lluis

    2014-06-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been identified as important to normal embryonic development in living organisms and it is implicated in processes including cell proliferation, differentiation and tissue patterning. Aberrant Hh pathway has been involved in the pathogenesis and chemotherapy resistance of different solid and hematologic malignancies. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and medulloblastoma are two well-recognized cancers with mutations in components of the Hh pathway. Vismodegib has recently approved as the first inhibitor of one of the components of the Hh pathway (smoothened). This review attempts to provide current data on the molecular pathways involved in the development of BCC and the therapeutic options available for the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic BCC, and the new targeted therapies in development.

  15. Phase II trial to evaluate gemcitabine and etoposide for locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Marianne K; Webb, Craig P; Richardson, Patrick J; Luttenton, Charles R; Campbell, Alan D; Monroe, Thomas J; O'Rourke, Timothy J; Yost, Kathleen J; Szczepanek, Connie M; Bassett, Michelle R; Truszkowski, Kimberly J; Stein, Phyllis; Van Brocklin, Matthew W; Davis, Alan T; Bedolla, Gabriela; Vande Woude, George F; Koo, Han-Mo

    2010-08-01

    Prior studies suggest that tumor cell lines harboring RAS mutations display remarkable sensitivity to gemcitabine and etoposide. In a phase II clinical trial of patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer, we evaluated the response rate to a combination of these drugs. Forty chemo-naïve patients with nonresectable and histologically confirmed pancreatic cancer were accrued. Patients received gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m(2) (days 1 and 8) and etoposide 80 mg/m(2) (days 8, 9, and 10; 21-day cycle). The primary end point was radiological response rate. Secondary objectives were determination of overall survival, response duration (time to progression), quality of life, toxicity, and CA 19-9 biomarker response. In 35 evaluable patients, 10 exhibited a radiological partial response and 12 had stable disease in response to treatment. Twenty patients exhibited a >20% decrease in CA 19-9 biomarker levels. Median overall survival was 6.7 months for all patients (40) and 7.2 months for evaluable patients (35). Notably, four patients survived for longer than 1 year, with two patients surviving for more than 2 years. Median time to progression for evaluable patients was 3.1 months. The median overall survival for locally advanced patients was 8.8 months and 6.75 months for metastatic patients. One-year survival was 10% for all patients and 11.4% for evaluable patients. Quality of life improved in 12 patients and remained stable in 3 of the evaluable patients. The primary dose-limiting toxicities were hematologic toxicity and fatigue. These results show that the gemcitabine and etoposide combination is generally well-tolerated and exhibits a response rate similar to other published studies. (c) 2010 AACR.

  16. Metabolism, Excretion, and Pharmacokinetics of Oral Brivanib in Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Masson, Eric; Fischer, Bruce S.; Gong, Jiachang; Iyer, Ramaswamy; Gan, Jinping; Pursley, Janice; Patricia, Daniel; Williams, Daphne; Ganapathi, Ram

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics, mass balance, metabolism, routes and extent of elimination, and safety of a single oral dose of 14C-labeled brivanib alaninate and the safety and tolerability of brivanib after multiple doses in patients with advanced or metastatic solid tumors. This was a two-part, single-center, open-label, single oral-dose (part A) followed by multiple-dose (part B) study in patients with advanced or metastatic solid tumors. In part A, patients received a single dose of [14C]brivanib alaninate and in part B patients received 800 mg of nonradiolabeled brivanib alaninate every day. Four patients (two white, two black: two with non–small-cell lung cancer, one with ovarian cancer, and one with renal cell carcinoma) were treated in both parts. The median time to reach the maximal plasma concentration of brivanib was 1 h, geometric mean maximal plasma concentration was 6146 ng/ml, mean terminal half-life was 13.8 h, and geometric mean apparent oral clearance was 14.7 l/h. After a single oral dose of [14C]brivanib alaninate, 12.2 and 81.5% of administered radioactivity was recovered in urine and feces, respectively. Brivanib alaninate was completely converted to the active moiety, brivanib, and the predominant route of elimination was fecal. Renal excretion of unchanged brivanib was minimal. Brivanib was well tolerated; fatigue was the most frequent adverse event occurring in all patients and the most frequent treatment-related adverse event in three (75%). The best clinical response in one patient was stable disease; the other three had progressive disease. Brivanib alaninate was rapidly absorbed and extensively metabolized after a single 800-mg oral dose; the majority of drug-related radioactivity was excreted in feces. PMID:20671097

  17. Advances in Personalized Targeted Treatment of Metastatic Melanoma and Non-Invasive Tumor Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Klinac, Dragana; Gray, Elin S.; Millward, Michael; Ziman, Mel

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive scientific progress in the melanoma field, treatment of advanced stage melanoma with chemotherapeutics and biotherapeutics has rarely provided response rates higher than 20%. In the past decade, targeted inhibitors have been developed for metastatic melanoma, leading to the advent of more personalized therapies of genetically characterized tumors. Here we review current melanoma treatments and emerging targeted molecular therapies. In particular we discuss the mutant BRAF inhibitors Vemurafenib and Dabrafenib, which markedly inhibit tumor growth and advance patients’ overall survival. However this response is almost inevitably followed by complete tumor relapse due to drug resistance hampering the encouraging initial responses. Several mechanisms of resistance within and outside the MAPK pathway have now been uncovered and have paved the way for clinical trials of combination therapies to try and overcome tumor relapse. It is apparent that personalized treatment management will be required in this new era of targeted treatment. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) provide an easily accessible means of monitoring patient relapse and several new approaches are available for the molecular characterization of CTCs. Thus CTCs provide a monitoring tool to evaluate treatment efficacy and early detection of drug resistance in real time. We detail here how advances in the molecular analysis of CTCs may provide insight into new avenues of approaching therapeutic options that would benefit personalized melanoma management. PMID:23515890

  18. Osteoradionecrosis of the upper cervical spine after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer: differentiation from recurrent or metastatic disease with MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-An; Liu, Hon-Man; Wang, Chun-Wei; Chen, Ya-Fang; Hong, Ruey-Long; Ko, Jenq-Yuh

    2012-07-01

    To compare the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of upper cervical spine osteoradionecrosis (ORN) with those of recurrent or metastatic disease after the treatment of head and neck malignancies. This retrospective study was approved by the hospital institutional review board, and the requirement to obtain informed consent was waived. From January 2005 to December 2010, 35 patients who had undergone irradiation of head and neck cancer and who had subsequent C1 or C2 lesions at MR imaging were enrolled. Pathology reports, clinical records, and follow-up MR images were reviewed to classify patients into one of two groups-those with ORN or those with recurrence. The MR imaging characteristics in these patients were evaluated. Statistical significance of intergroup differences was assessed by means of the Pearson χ2 or Fisher exact test for categorical variables and the two-sample t test for continuous variables. ORN was diagnosed in 20 of the 35 patients (57%), and recurrent or metastatic disease was diagnosed in 15 (43%). Ten of the 35 patients (29%) had undergone biopsy of the cervical spine or paraspinal soft tissue. The MR images in the ORN group showed significantly more contiguous involvement of the atlantoaxial or atlanto-occipital bones with intervening joint change (P<.001), more cases of vertebral body collapse (P<.01), more bilateral symmetric involvement of the vertebral body (P<.01), and continuation of vertebral body changes with posterior pharyngeal wall ulceration (P<.01). Posterior arch or other cervical level involvement, paraspinal solid mass, epidural involvement, lateral border cortical destruction, and cervical lymphadenopathy were noted more frequently in the recurrence group than in the ORN group (P=.03, P<.001, P=.02, P<.001, and P<.01, respectively). Various MR imaging characteristics can be used to help differentiate between cervical ORN and recurrent disease. © RSNA, 2012.

  19. Combined Whole Body and Multiparametric Prostate Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a 1-Step Approach to the Simultaneous Assessment of Local Recurrence and Metastatic Disease after Radical Prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Nicola L; Sala, Evis; Benz, Matthias; Landa, Jonathan; Scardino, Peter; Scher, Howard I; Hricak, Hedvig; Vargas, Hebert A

    2017-07-01

    We report our initial experience with whole body and dedicated prostate magnetic resonance imaging as a single examination to assess local recurrence and metastatic disease in patients with suspected recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy. In this institutional review board approved, retrospective, single center study 76 consecutive patients with clinically suspected recurrent prostate cancer following radical prostatectomy underwent combined whole body and dedicated prostate magnetic resonance imaging at a single session from October 2014 to January 2016. Scans were evaluated to detect disease in the prostate bed and regional nodes, and at distant sites. Comparison was made to other imaging tests, and prostate bed, node and bone biopsies performed within 90 days. Whole body and dedicated prostate magnetic resonance imaging was completed successfully in all patients. Median prostate specific antigen was 0.36 ng/ml (range less than 0.05 to 56.12). Whole body and dedicated prostate magnetic resonance imaging identified suspected disease recurrence in 16 of 76 patients (21%), including local recurrence in the radical prostatectomy bed in 6, nodal metastases in 3, osseous metastases in 4 and multifocal metastatic disease in 3. In 43 patients at least 1 standard staging scan was done in addition to whole body and dedicated prostate magnetic resonance imaging. Concordance was demonstrated between the imaging modalities in 36 of 43 cases (84%). All metastatic lesions detected by other imaging tests were detected on magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, the magnetic resonance imaging modality detected osseous metastases in 4 patients with false-negative findings on other imaging tests, including 2 bone scans and 3 computerized tomography scans. It also excluded osseous disease in 1 patient with positive (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computerized tomography and subsequent negative bone biopsy. Combined whole body and dedicated

  20. Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin and gemcitabine in the front-line treatment of recurrent/metastatic breast cancer: a multicentre phase II study.

    PubMed

    Adamo, V; Lorusso, V; Rossello, R; Adamo, B; Ferraro, G; Lorusso, D; Condemi, G; Priolo, D; Di Lullo, L; Paglia, A; Pisconti, S; Scambia, G; Ferrandina, G

    2008-06-17

    This multicentre phase II study was aimed at investigating the activity and safety of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) and gemcitabine (GEM) as front-line therapy in a large series of chemotherapy-naïve recurrent/metastatic breast cancer patients. From June 2003 to December 2006, a total of 71 recurrent/metastatic breast cancer patients were enrolled. Median age was 63 years (range=37-79), and 31 patients (43.7%) were > or =65 years old. Patients received PLD, 25 mg m(-2), day 1, followed by GEM, 800 mg m(-2), days 1 and 8, q21. Response was evaluable in 64 cases. Eight complete (12.5%) and 17 partial responses (26.6%) were registered, with an overall response rate of 39.1%. Thirty patients (46.9%) experienced stable disease, with an overall clinical benefit of 85.9%. Median time to progression (TTP) was 11 months, whereas median overall survival (OS) was not reached. The rate of 1- and 2-year OS was 79 and 61%, respectively. A total of 443 courses were evaluable for toxicity: grade 3 and 4 neutropaenia affected 14 patients (20.3%) and 3 patients (4.3%), respectively. Grade 3 and 4 palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome was documented in five cases (7.2%) and one case (1.4%), whereas grade 3 and 4 mucositis occurred in six cases (8.7%) and two cases (2.9%), respectively. Grade 2 cardiac toxicity was observed in only one case. Interestingly enough, there was no difference in the percentage and severity of either haematological or non-haematological toxicity according to the age of the patients (<65 vs > or =65 years). We confirmed in a large, very homogenous study sample of chemotherapy-naïve recurrent/metastatic breast cancer patients the efficacy and safety of PLD/GEM combination, providing response rates, median TTP and OS values comparable with those achieved with more toxic combinations.

  1. Circulating dendritic cells in early and advanced cancer patients: diminished percent in the metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Lissoni, P; Vigore, L; Ferranti, R; Bukovec, R; Meregalli, S; Mandala, M; Barni, S; Tancini, G; Fumagalli, L; Giani, L

    1999-01-01

    Despite the well demonstrated fundamental role of dendritic cells (DC) in generating antitumor immunity in experimental conditions, to date there are only few preliminary studies which investigate the percent of DC in the peripheral blood of cancer patients. Several cell surface markers have now been described which are specific to cultured DC, however their expression in vivo is still controversial. Recently, however, two DC subsets, consisting of immature and mature DC, have been shown to be present in peripheral blood, which can be recognized as CD123+ and CD11c+ cells, respectively. On this basis, we decided to investigate the presence of both mature and immature DC in the peripheral blood of early or advanced cancer patients. The study included 40 solid tumor patients, 18 of whom had a locally limited disease, while the other 22 showed distant organ metastases. CD123+ and CD11c+ cells were detected by FACS using monoclonal antibodies, and expressed as the percent of total leukocytes. The control group consisted of 50 healthy subjects. The mean percent of both CD123+ and CD11c+ cells was significantly lower in cancer patients than in controls. Moreover, the mean percent of both DC subsets was significantly lower in metastatic patients than in the non-metastatic ones. This study, demonstrating significantly lower percents of both immature and mature DC in the peripheral blood of cancer patients, particularly in those with distant organ metastases, suggests that DC deficiency may play a role in inducing cancer-related immunosuppression. Therefore, the demonstration of a diminished percent of DC in peripheral blood may represent a new interesting biological marker predicting a poor prognosis in human neoplasms, as with lymphocytopenia, the unfavourable prognostic significance of which has been well demonstrated.

  2. Impact of locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer on the quality of life.

    PubMed

    López-Calderero, I; López-Fando, L; Ríos-González, E; Maisonobe, P; Hernández-Yuste, E; Sarmiento-Jordán, M

    The aim of this study was to assess the health-related quality of life of patients with prostate cancer in advanced phases to obtain additional information on the patients' health. The growing interest in understanding the patient's perspective and the scarcity of prospective studies of this population motivated this research study. We present an observational study performed on 131 urology consultations, with a sample of 601 patients with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer, assessed during 2 visits: baseline and at 12 months. We collected demographic, clinical, quality-of-life (PROSQoLI and EuroQoL-5D-5L questionnaires) and anxiety/depression (HADS questionnaire) endpoints. The mean age (SD) was 73.8 (8.2) years, and 87.2% of the participants were retired or pensioners. Some 58.7% of the patients presented locally advanced prostate cancer. Urinary symptoms were the most common, decreasing significantly after one year (P<.05). Urinary problems and fatigue were the most affected measures, and pain/discomfort was the dimension present in most patients (65.3%). According to the linear regression model, asthenia and pain were 2 of the factors most closely related to a poorer quality of life. The presence of anxiety/depression was low. Finally, the health condition as assessed by the clinician was more positive than when assessed by the patients. This study broadens the scarce information on the quality of life of the population with advanced prostate cancer, information of use for the clinical management of these patients. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Phase II trial of nab-paclitaxel in the treatment of recurrent or persistent advanced cervix cancer: A gynecologic oncology group study

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, David S.; Blessing, John A.; Landrum, Lisa M.; Warshal, David P.; Martin, Lainie P.; Rose, Stephen L.; Bonebrake, Albert J.; Ramondetta, Lois M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Metastatic and recurrent, platinum resistant cervix cancer has an extremely poor prognosis. The Gynecologic Oncology Group has studied >20 cytotoxic drugs or drug combinations in the second-line, phase II setting of advanced, drug resistant cervix cancer. Methods Nanoparticle, albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) was administered at 125 mg/m2 IV over 30 minutes on days 1, 8 and 15 of each 28 day cycle to 37 women with metastatic or recurrent cervix cancer that had progressed or relapsed following first-line cytotoxic drug treatment. A flexible, 2-stage accrual design that allowed stopping early for lack of treatment activity was utilized. Because of slow patient accrual, the second stage was not completed. Results Of 37 patients enrolled, 2 were ineligible due to no prior cytotoxic chemotherapy, which left 35 eligible patients evaluable for response and tolerability. All of the eligible patients had 1 prior chemotherapy regimen and 27 of them had prior radiation therapy with concomitant cisplatin. The median number of nab-paclitaxel cycles were 4 (range 1–15). Ten (28.6%; CI 14.6%–46.3%) of the 35 patients had a partial response and another 15 patients (42.9%) had stable disease. The median progression-free and overall survival were 5.0 and 9.4 months, respectively. The only NCI CTCAE grade 4 event was neutropenia in 2 patients (5.7%) which resolved following dose reduction. Grade 3 neurotoxicity was reported in 1 (2.9%) patient and resolved to grade 2 following dose discontinuation. Conclusions Nab-paclitaxel has considerable activity and moderate toxicity in the treatment of drug resistant, metastatic and recurrent cervix cancer. PMID:22986144

  4. Viral Therapy In Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Cancer or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; HER2/Neu Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  5. Once-Weekly, High-Dose Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer: 6-Year Analysis of 60 Early-Stage, 42 Locally Advanced, and 7 Metastatic Lung Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, Omar M. Sandhu, Taljit S.; Lattin, Paul B.; Chang, Jung H.; Lee, Choon K.; Groshko, Gayle A.; Lattin, Cheryl J.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To explore once-weekly stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in nonoperable patients with localized, locally advanced, or metastatic lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 102 primary (89 untreated plus 13 recurrent) and 7 metastatic tumors were studied. The median follow-up was 38 months, the average patient age was 75 years. Of the 109 tumors studied, 60 were Stage I (45 IA and 15 IB), 9 were Stage II, 30 were Stage III, 3 were Stage IV, and 7 were metastases. SBRT only was given in 73% (40 Gy in four fractions to the planning target volume to a total dose of 53 Gy to the isocenter for a biologically effective dose of 120 Gy{sub 10}). SBRT was given as a boost in 27% (22.5 Gy in three fractions once weekly for a dose of 32 Gy at the isocenter) after 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the primary plus the mediastinum. The total biologically effective dose was 120 Gy{sub 10}. Respiration gating was used in 46%. Results: The overall response rate was 75%; 33% had a complete response. The overall response rate was 89% for Stage IA patients (40% had a complete response). The local control rate was 82%; it was 100% and 93% for Stage IA and IB patients, respectively. The failure rate was 37%, with 17% within the planning target volume. No Grade 3-4 acute toxicities developed in any patient; 12% and 7% of patients developed Grade 1 and 2 toxicities, respectively. Late toxicity, all Grade 2, developed in 3% of patients. The 5-year cause-specific survival rate for Stage I was 70% and was 74% and 64% for Stage IA and IB patients, respectively. The 3-year Stage III cause-specific survival rate was 30%. The patients with metastatic lung cancer had a 57% response rate, a 27% complete response rate, an 86% local control rate, a median survival time of 19 months, and 23% 3-year survival rate. Conclusions: SBRT is noninvasive, convenient, fast, and economically attractive; it achieves results similar to surgery for early or metastatic lung cancer patients who are older

  6. Once-weekly, high-dose stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer: 6-year analysis of 60 early-stage, 42 locally advanced, and 7 metastatic lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Omar M; Sandhu, Taljit S; Lattin, Paul B; Chang, Jung H; Lee, Choon K; Groshko, Gayle A; Lattin, Cheryl J

    2008-11-01

    To explore once-weekly stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in nonoperable patients with localized, locally advanced, or metastatic lung cancer. A total of 102 primary (89 untreated plus 13 recurrent) and 7 metastatic tumors were studied. The median follow-up was 38 months, the average patient age was 75 years. Of the 109 tumors studied, 60 were Stage I (45 IA and 15 IB), 9 were Stage II, 30 were Stage III, 3 were Stage IV, and 7 were metastases. SBRT only was given in 73% (40 Gy in four fractions to the planning target volume to a total dose of 53 Gy to the isocenter for a biologically effective dose of 120 Gy(10)). SBRT was given as a boost in 27% (22.5 Gy in three fractions once weekly for a dose of 32 Gy at the isocenter) after 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the primary plus the mediastinum. The total biologically effective dose was 120 Gy(10). Respiration gating was used in 46%. The overall response rate was 75%; 33% had a complete response. The overall response rate was 89% for Stage IA patients (40% had a complete response). The local control rate was 82%; it was 100% and 93% for Stage IA and IB patients, respectively. The failure rate was 37%, with 17% within the planning target volume. No Grade 3-4 acute toxicities developed in any patient; 12% and 7% of patients developed Grade 1 and 2 toxicities, respectively. Late toxicity, all Grade 2, developed in 3% of patients. The 5-year cause-specific survival rate for Stage I was 70% and was 74% and 64% for Stage IA and IB patients, respectively. The 3-year Stage III cause-specific survival rate was 30%. The patients with metastatic lung cancer had a 57% response rate, a 27% complete response rate, an 86% local control rate, a median survival time of 19 months, and 23% 3-year survival rate. SBRT is noninvasive, convenient, fast, and economically attractive; it achieves results similar to surgery for early or metastatic lung cancer patients who are older, debilitated, and with comorbidities. Elderly patients and

  7. The Role of Irradiation in the Management of Locally Recurrent Non-Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremity/Trunkal Locations

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Michael P.; Lucas, David R.; Miller, Peter R.; Kraut, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Patients who have had initial curative intent therapy for non-metastatic soft tissue sarcoma, and who subsequently relapse at the initial site without evidence of metastatic disease, have various options regarding local treatment. The treatment options available will be determined by the extent of relapse, previous therapy rendered, and patient characteristics. We reported on a series of 31 patients treated initially with only surgery for extremity/trunkal high-grade soft tissue sarcoma and then seen for recurrence at our institution between 1980 and 1999. Local re-treatment consisted of combined modality therapy, most often aggressive surgical debulking/resection and irradiation, in an effort to reduce the need for amputation and, where anatomically allowable, to maintain a functional limb. We report our results in re-establishing local control, subsequent survival, and complication rates. Methods: Thirty-one patients with locally recurrent, non-metastatic high-grade soft tissue sarcoma, (excluding extraabdominal desmoid) were retrospectively reviewed to determine local control, survival, and complication rates associated with the relapsed disease. All patients had multimodality re-treatment most often utilizing aggressive surgical debulking and irradiation. The irradiation consisted of either external beam alone, brachytherapy alone, or a combination of external beam and brachytherapy. Nine patients also received multi-agent, multi-cycle chemotherapy using various regimens. In addition, the impact of surgical margin at the time of re-resection (gross versus microscopic disease), radiation treatment type, total radiation dose delivered, size of relapse, histological sub-type, sex and age, were evaluated to determine if they had any impact on the re-establishment of local control and subsequent survival. Results: Local control was re-established in 25 of 31 (80.6%) patients. Two additional patients with isolated local relapse after irradiation were

  8. Metastatic recurrence in a pancreatic cancer patient derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) nude mouse model is inhibited by neoadjuvant chemotherapy in combination with fluorescence-guided surgery with an anti-CA 19-9-conjugated fluorophore.

    PubMed

    Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Maawy, Ali; Zhang, Yong; Murakami, Takashi; Momiyama, Masashi; Mori, Ryutaro; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Katz, Matthew H G; Fleming, Jason B; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M; Bouvet, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) with gemcitabine (GEM) in combination with fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) on a pancreatic cancer patient derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) model. A PDOX model was established from a CA19-9-positive, CEA-negative tumor from a patient who had undergone a pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Mice were randomized to 4 groups: bright light surgery (BLS) only; BLS+NAC; FGS only; and FGS+NAC. An anti-CA19-9 or anti-CEA antibody conjugated to DyLight 650 was administered intravenously via the tail vein of mice with the pancreatic cancer PDOX 24 hours before surgery. The PDOX was brightly labeled with fluorophore-conjugated anti-CA19-9, but not with a fluorophore-conjugated anti-CEA antibody. FGS was performed using the fluorophore-conjugated anti-CA19-9 antibody. FGS had no benefit over BLS to prevent metastatic recurrence. NAC in combination with BLS did not convey an advantage over BLS to prevent metastatic recurrence. However, FGS+NAC significantly reduced the metastatic recurrence frequency to one of 8 mice, compared to FGS only after which metastasis recurred in 6 out of 8 mice, and BLS+NAC with metastatic recurrence in 7 out of 8 mice (p = 0.041). Thus NAC in combination with FGS can reduce or even eliminate metastatic recurrence of pancreatic cancer sensitive to NAC. The present study further emphasizes the power of the PDOX model which enables metastasis to occur and thereby identify the efficacy of NAC in combination with FGS on metastatic recurrence.

  9. A phase II study of sorafenib in recurrent and/or metastatic salivary gland carcinomas: Translational analyses and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Locati, L D; Perrone, F; Cortelazzi, B; Bergamini, C; Bossi, P; Civelli, E; Morosi, C; Lo Vullo, S; Imbimbo, M; Quattrone, P; Dagrada, G P; Granata, R; Resteghini, C; Mirabile, A; Alfieri, S; Orlandi, E; Mariani, L; Saibene, G; Pilotti, S; Licitra, L

    2016-12-01

    Pre-clinical and clinical evidence suggests a rationale for the use of anti-angiogenic agents, including sorafenib, in recurrent and/or metastatic salivary gland carcinomas (RMSGCs). This study evaluates the activity of sorafenib in patients with RMSGCs and also investigates whether the activity of sorafenib could be related to its main tailored targets (i.e. BRAF, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 [VEGFR2], platelet-derived growth factor receptor α [PDGFRα] and β, RET, KIT). Patients received sorafenib at 400 mg BID. The primary end-point was response rate (RR) including complete response or partial response (PR); secondary end-points included RR according to Choi criteria, disease control rate (DCR), overall survival (OS), and progression-free survival (PFS). Thirty-seven patients (19 adenoid cystic cancers, ACC) were enrolled. Six PRs were recorded. RR was 16% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 6-32; 11% in ACC and 22% in non-ACC). Choi criteria could be applied in 30 out of 37 cases with a RR of 50% (95% CI: 31-69%); DCR was 76% (95% CI: 59-88%). Incidence of ≥G3 adverse events was 29.7%. Median PFS and OS for the entire population were 5.9 months and 23.4 months, respectively. Median PFS and OS were 8.9 and 26.4 months for ACC versus 4.2 and 12.3 months for non-ACC patients. All the cases showed expression of PDGFRβ in the stroma and VEGFR2 in endothelial cells; PDGFRα positivity was found in the stroma of four (27%) cases. All except for two cases showed no PDGFRβ, VEGFR2 and PDGFRα expression in the tumour cells. KIT expression was restricted to ACC and a weak RET expression was limited to one adenocarcinoma, not otherwise specified (NOS). No BRAF mutation was found. No correlation was observed between the sorafenib activity and the expression of its markers although all six responders (two ACC, one adenocarcinoma, NOS, one salivary duct cancer [SDC], one high-grade mucoepidermoid [HG-MEC] and one poorly-differentiated cancer) are enriched

  10. Aflibercept in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer That Did Not Respond to Radioactive Iodine Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  11. New strategies in metastatic melanoma: oncogene-defined taxonomy leads to therapeutic advances.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Keith T; Fisher, David E

    2011-08-01

    The discovery of BRAF and KIT mutations provided the first basis for a molecular classification of cutaneous melanoma on therapeutic grounds. As BRAF-targeted therapy quickly moves toward regulatory approval and incorporation as standard therapy for patients with metastatic disease, proof of concept has also been established for targeting mutated KIT in melanoma. NRAS mutations have long been known to be present in a subset of melanomas and represent an elusive subgroup for targeted therapies. Matching patient subgroups defined by genetic aberrations in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase and p16/cyclin dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) pathways with appropriate targeted therapies has not yet been realized. And, an increasing understanding of lineage-specific transcriptional regulators, most notably MITF, and how they may play a role in melanoma pathophysiology, has provided another axis to approach with therapies. The foundation has been established for individual oncogene targeting, and current investigations seek to understand the intersection of these susceptibilities and other described potential targets and pathways. The melanoma field stands poised to take the lead among cancer subtypes in advancing combination therapy strategies that simultaneously target multiple biologic underpinnings of the disease.

  12. Resilience and hope during advanced disease: a pilot study with metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Solano, Joao Paulo Consentino; da Silva, Amanda Gomes; Soares, Ivan Agurtov; Ashmawi, Hazem Adel; Vieira, Joaquim Edson

    2016-08-02

    The balance between hope-hopelessness plays an important role in the way terminally ill patients report quality of life, and personal resilience may be related to hope at the end of life. The objective of this study was to explore associations between personal resilience, hope, and other possible predictors of hope in advanced cancer patients. A cross-sectional pilot study was carried out with metastatic colorectal cancer patients in a tertiary hospital. The patients answered the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, Herth Hope Index, Barthel Index, an instrument addressing family and social support, visual-numeric scales for pain and suffering, a two-item screening for depression, socio-demographic and socio-economic information about the family. Forty-four patients were interviewed (mean age 56 years; range 29-86). A strong correlation was noted between resilience and hope (0.63; p < 0.05). No correlation was found between hope and independence for activities of daily living, support from family and community, and pain and suffering levels. Of the 44 patients, 20 presented with depressive symptoms. These depressive patients had lower resilience (p = 0.005) and hope (p = 0.003), and higher scores of suffering (p < 0.001). The association between resilience and hope kept stable after adjusting for age, gender, and presence of depression (p < 0.001). Given that resilience is a dynamic, changeable path that can improve hope, resilience-fostering interventions should be most valued in palliative care settings and should be commenced as soon as possible with cancer patients. Patients with advanced stages of non-malignant conditions would also probably benefit from such interventions.

  13. Network meta-analysis of the efficacy and adverse effects of several treatments for advanced/metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Chen, Wei-Kang; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Jin-Song; Liu, Jian-He; Jiang, Yong-Ming; Fang, Ke-Wei

    2017-08-29

    This network meta-analysis was conducted to compare the efficacy and adverse effects of several treatments for advanced/metastatic prostate cancer (PC). The PubMed and Cochrane Library databases were searched for randomized controlled trials of treatments for advanced/metastatic PC. Eighteen studies covering 6,340 patients were included in this analysis. The calculated were odds ratios, 95% confidence intervals, and the surface under the cumulative ranking (SUCRA) curve. Pairwise meta-analysis showed that overall survival rates achieved with radiotherapy or endocrine therapy were lower than obtained with radiotherapy + endocrine therapy. The endocrine therapy includes estrogen therapy, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist (LHRH-A), anti-androgen therapy (ADT), ADT + LHRH-A and estrogen therapy + LHRH-A, and its SUCRA values indicated that for overall response rate, estrogen therapy + LHRH-A ranked the highest (92.6%); for overall survival rate, ADT ranked the highest (75.2%); for anemia, estrogen therapy ranked the highest (88.2%); and for diarrhea and hot flushes, ADT ranked the highest (diarrhea, 87.4%; hot flushes, 89.3%). Cluster analysis on the endocrine therapy showed that ADT + LHRH-A achieved the highest overall survival and overall response rates in the treatment of advanced/metastatic PC. Estrogen therapy and ADT had the lowest incidences of diarrhea and anemia. Thus, combined radiotherapy + endocrine therapy had higher overall survival rate, and among the endocrine therapy, in terms of overall response rate and overall survival rate, ADT + LHRH-A may be a better regimen in the treatment of advanced or metastatic PC.

  14. A phase II trial of sunitinib in women with metastatic or recurrent endometrial carcinoma: a study of the Princess Margaret, Chicago and California Consortia.

    PubMed

    Castonguay, Vincent; Lheureux, Stephanie; Welch, Stephen; Mackay, Helen J; Hirte, Hal; Fleming, Gini; Morgan, R; Wang, Lisa; Blattler, Chantale; Ivy, Percy S; Oza, Amit M

    2014-08-01

    Treatment options remain limited for women with relapsed/metastatic endometrial cancer (EC). Angiogenesis is one of the major components of tumor progression and thus an attractive target. The aim of this phase II trial was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of sunitinib, an oral multitargeted receptor tyrosine-kinase inhibitor with antiangiogenic and antitumor activity in the treatment of recurrent EC. We performed a multicenter, single arm, two-stage phase II study of sunitinib, 50mg daily administered on a 4 weeks on-2 weeks off schedule. Eligibility criteria included recurrent/metastatic EC or carcinosarcoma with no more than one prior line of chemotherapy. The primary endpoint was objective response rate. 34 women were enrolled; 33 received at least one dose of sunitinib and were included in the analyses. Six women (18.1%) had a partial response and six additional women (18.1%) stable disease. In total, ten patients (30.3%) had disease control for at least 6 months and of these, seven were controlled for more than one year. Median progression free and overall survival times were 3 months and 19.4 months, respectively. Adverse events related to treatment were frequent. At least one grade 3 toxicity occurred in 30 patients and dose reductions were required in 17 patients (52%). The most common grade 3 toxicities were fatigue, hypertension, palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia, diarrhea and hematologic. Sunitinib therapy showed promising activity in women with recurrent EC. Toxicity was seen frequently but was manageable. Anti-angiogenic agents warrant further investigation in EC to define which patients will derive the greatest benefit. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Lapatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Adenoid Cystic Cancer or Other Salivary Gland Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-10

    High-grade Salivary Gland Carcinoma; High-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Low-grade Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Low-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Acinic Cell Tumor; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Malignant Mixed Cell Type Tumor

  16. Combination of radiotherapy and double blockade HER2 with pertuzumab and trastuzumab for HER2-positive metastatic or locally recurrent unresectable and/or metastatic breast cancer: Assessment of early toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ajgal, Z; de Percin, S; Diéras, V; Pierga, J Y; Campana, F; Fourquet, A; Kirova, Y M

    2017-04-01

    We evaluate the early toxicity of concurrent use of radiotherapy, pertuzumab and trastuzumab in patients with HER2-positive metastatic or locally recurrent unresectable breast cancer. A retrospective study was performed in a population of 23 consecutive patients between 2013 and 2015. Radiotherapy was performed on the chest area or metastatic sites during maintenance with pertuzumab and trastuzumab after six cycles of pertuzumab, trastuzumab and docetaxel. Toxicity was assessed according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria version 4. Irradiation volumes were whole breast (8 patients) and chest wall (9 patients) at 50Gy in 25 fractions, the supraclavicular nodes (16 patients), the axillary area (nine patients) and the internal mammary nodes (9 patients) at 46Gy in 23 fractions. For five patients, radiotherapy was palliative: bone irradiation (4 patients), whole brain radiotherapy (one patient). Median follow-up was 12.6 months (range: 6.1-21.6 months) since the start of pertuzumab and trastuzumab. One patient presented an asymptomatic decrease of left ventricular ejection fraction below 50%. No symptomatic cardiac events were reported. Two patients presented asymptomatic grade I radiation pneumonitis. Acute skin toxicity was grade III (one patient), grade II (6 patients), and grade I (5 patients). There were two grade II esophagitis. Combination of pertuzumab, trastuzumab and radiotherapy was well tolerated, which should be confirmed by the results of larger studies. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Recombinant EphB4-HSA Fusion Protein With Standard Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-15

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Non-Resectable Cholangiocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gallbladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Carcinoma; Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

  18. Performance of the Genomic Evaluators of Metastatic Prostate Cancer (GEMCaP) Tumor Biomarker for Identifying Recurrent Disease in African American Patients

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Albert M.; Lindquist, Karla J.; Avila, Andrew; Witte, John S.; Paris, Pamela L.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of prostate cancer prognosis after surgery is increasingly relying upon genomic analyses of tumor DNA. We assessed the ability of the biomarker panel Genomic Evaluators of Metastatic Prostate Cancer (GEMCaP) to predict biochemical recurrence in 33 European American and 28 African American prostate cancer cases using genome-wide copy number data from a previous study. “Biomarker positive” was defined as ≥20% of the 38 constituent copy number gain/loss GEMCaP loci affected in a given tumor; based on this threshold, the frequency of a positive biomarker was significantly lower in African Americans (n=2; 7%) than European Americans (n=11; 33%; p=0.013). GEMCaP positivity was associated with risk of recurrence (HR=5.92; 95%CI=2.32–15.11; p=3*10−4) in the full sample and among European Americans (HR=3.45; 95%CI=1.13–10.51; p=0.032) but was not estimable in African Americans due to the low rate of GEMCaP positivity. Overall, the GEMCaP recurrence positive predictive value (PPV) was 85%; in African Americans, PPV was 100%. When we expanded the definition of loss to include copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (i.e. loss of one allele with concomitant duplication of the other), recurrence PPV was 83% for European American subjects. Under this definition, five African American subjects had a positive GEMCaP test value; four went on to develop biochemical recurrence (PPV=80%). Our results suggest that the GEMCaP biomarker set could be an effective predictor for both European American and African American men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer who may benefit from immediate aggressive therapy after radical prostatectomy. PMID:24891551

  19. Prognostic Factors for Risk Stratification of Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Who Were Treated with Gemcitabine-Based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Inkeun; Choi, Seung Joon; Kim, Young Saing; Ahn, Hee Kyung; Hong, Junshik; Sym, Sun Jin; Park, Jinny; Cho, Eun Kyung; Lee, Jae Hoon; Shin, Yong Ju; Shin, Dong Bok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to verify prognostic factors including sarcopenia in patients with recurrent or metastatic pancreatic cancer receiving gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. Materials and Methods Medical records and computed tomography scan of consecutive patients treated with palliative gemcitabine-based chemotherapy from 2008 to 2014 were reviewed. The lumbar skeletal muscle index at third lumbar spine level was computed, and together with clinicolaboratory factors, univariate and multivariable analyses for overall survival (OS) were performed. Results A total of 88 patients were found. Median age was 65 years, and male patients were predominant (67.0%). Most patients had initially metastatic disease (72.7%), and gemcitabine monotherapy was administered in 29 patients (33.0%) while gemcitabine plus erlotinib was administered in 59 patients (67.0%). Seventy-six patients (86.3%) had sarcopenia. With a median follow-up period of 44.3 months (range, 0.6 to 44.3 months), median OS was 5.35 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.11 to 6.59). In univariate and multivariable analysis, high carcinoembryonic antigen level (hazard ratio [HR], 4.18; 95% CI, 1.95 to 8.97; p < 0.001), initially metastatic disease (HR, 3.37; 95% CI, 1.55 to 7.32; p=0.002), sarcopenia (HR, 2.97; 95% CI, 1.20 to 7.36; p=0.019), neutrophilia (HR, 2.94; 95% CI, 1.27 to 6.79; p=0.012), and high lactate dehydrogenase level (HR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.07 to 3.58; p=0.029) were identified as independent prognostic factors for OS. Conclusion Five independent prognostic factors in patients with recurrent or metastatic pancreatic cancer who received gemcitabine-based chemotherapy were identified. These findings may be helpful in prediction of prognosis in clinical practice and can be used as a stratification factor for clinical trials. PMID:27034148

  20. Risk of recurrence and conditional survival in complete responders treated with TKIs plus or less locoregional therapies for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Santini, Daniele; Santoni, Matteo; Conti, Alessandro; Procopio, Giuseppe; Verzoni, Elena; Galli, Luca; di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; De Giorgi, Ugo; De Lisi, Delia; Nicodemo, Maurizio; Maruzzo, Marco; Massari, Francesco; Buti, Sebastiano; Altobelli, Emanuela; Biasco, Elisa; Ricotta, Riccardo; Porta, Camillo; Vincenzi, Bruno; Papalia, Rocco; Marchetti, Paolo; Burattini, Luciano; Berardi, Rossana; Muto, Giovanni; Montironi, Rodolfo; Cascinu, Stefano; Tonini, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We retrospectively analyzed the risk of recurrence and conditional Disease-Free Survival (cDFS) in 63 patients with complete remission during treatment with tirosin kinase inhibitor (TKI), alone or with local treatment in metastatic renal cell carcinoma. RESULTS 37% patients achieve CR with TKI alone, while 63% with additional loco-regional treatments. 49% patients recurred after CR, with a median Disease free survival of 28.2 months. Patients treated with multimodal approaches present lower rate of recurrence (40% vs 61%) and longer Disease free survival compared to patient treated with TKI alone (16.5 vs 41.9 months, p=0.039).Furthermore the rate of recurrence was higher in patients with brain (88%), pancreatic (71%) and bone metastasis (50%). Patients who continued TKI therapy after complete response had a longer disease free survival than patients who stopped therapy, although the difference was not significant (42.1 vs 25.1 months, p=0.254). 2y-cDFS was better in patients treated with multimodal treatment and who continued TKIs than the other patient arms. CONCLUSIONS The prognostic value of CR depends on the site where was obtained and how was obtained (with or without locoregional treatment). Cessation of TKI should be carefully considered in complete responder patients. PMID:27027342

  1. MS-275 and Isotretinoin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  2. A late phase II study of RP56976 (docetaxel) in patients with advanced or recurrent breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, I.; Watanabe, T.; Takashima, S.; Narabayashi, M.; Horikoshi, N.; Aoyama, H.; Taguchi, T.

    1996-01-01

    A late phase II clinical trial of RP56976 (docetaxel), derived from Taxus baccata was performed to evaluate anti-tumour activity, time to progression and clinical toxicity in patients with advanced or recurrent breast cancer. The patients, between 15 and 80 years old with performance status (PS) of 0-2, received at least two cycles of docetaxel 60 mg m-2 intravenously at 3-4 week intervals. Of the 81 patients enrolled, the 72 eligible for the study were given a total of 327 cycles, with a median of four cycles each. Five patients obtained a complete response (CR) and 27 a partial response (PR); the response rate (RR) was 44.4% (95% confidence interval 32.7-56.6%). A relatively high RR of 9/28 (32.1%) was observed in patients who had received prior chemotherapy involving anthracyclines. The dose-limiting toxicity was grade 3-4 leucocytopenia or neutropenia, found in 78.9% and 85.9% patients respectively. Other severe (grade > 3) toxicities included alopecia (38%), anorexia (18.3%), nausea/vomiting (11.3%), and fatigue (9.9%). Hypersensitivity reactions, oedema and skin toxicity were not severe and were reversible. One therapy-related death occurred 10 days after the initial dose was given. These findings indicate that docetaxel has potent activity against metastatic breast cancer, and that the dose of 60 mg m-2 is safe. PMID:8546908

  3. Pertuzumab and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Locally Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-11

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  4. Ziv-aflibercept in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Unresectable, or Metastatic Gynecologic Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Fallopian Tube Cancer; Female Reproductive Cancer; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Uterine Carcinosarcoma; Uterine Leiomyosarcoma

  5. Propranolol Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Solid Tumors That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-28

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Melanoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Hepatocellular Carcinoma

  6. Cediranib combined with carboplatin and paclitaxel in patients with metastatic or recurrent cervical cancer (CIRCCa): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2 trial

    PubMed Central

    Symonds, R Paul; Gourley, Charlie; Davidson, Susan; Carty, Karen; McCartney, Elaine; Rai, Debbie; Banerjee, Susana; Jackson, David; Lord, Rosemary; McCormack, Mary; Hudson, Emma; Reed, Nicholas; Flubacher, Maxine; Jankowska, Petra; Powell, Melanie; Dive, Caroline; West, Catharine M L; Paul, James

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Patients treated with standard chemotherapy for metastatic or relapsed cervical cancer respond poorly to conventional chemotherapy (response achieved in 20–30% of patients) with an overall survival of less than 1 year. High tumour angiogenesis and high concentrations of intratumoural VEGF are adverse prognostic features. Cediranib is a potent tyrosine kinase inhibitor of VEGFR1, 2, and 3. In this trial, we aimed to assess the effect of the addition of cediranib to carboplatin and paclitaxel chemotherapy in patients with metastatic or recurrent cervical cancer. Methods In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2 trial, which was done in 17 UK cancer treatment centres, patients aged 18 years or older initially diagnosed with metastatic carcinoma or who subsequently developed metastatic disease or local pelvic recurrence after radical treatment that was not amenable to exenterative surgery were recruited. Eligible patients received carboplatin AUC of 5 plus paclitaxel 175 mg/m2 by infusion every 3 weeks for a maximum of six cycles and were randomised centrally (1:1) through a minimisation approach to receive cediranib 20 mg or placebo orally once daily until disease progression. The stratification factors were disease site, disease-free survival after primary therapy or primary stage IVb disease, number of lines of previous treatment, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, and investigational site. All patients, investigators, and trial personnel were masked to study drug allocation. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival. Efficacy analysis was by intention to treat, and the safety analysis included all patients who received at least one dose of study drug. This trial is registered with the ISCRTN registry, number ISRCTN23516549, and has been completed. Findings Between Aug 19, 2010, and July 27, 2012, 69 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to cediranib (n=34) or placebo (n=35). After a median

  7. Cediranib combined with carboplatin and paclitaxel in patients with metastatic or recurrent cervical cancer (CIRCCa): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2 trial.

    PubMed

    Symonds, R Paul; Gourley, Charlie; Davidson, Susan; Carty, Karen; McCartney, Elaine; Rai, Debbie; Banerjee, Susana; Jackson, David; Lord, Rosemary; McCormack, Mary; Hudson, Emma; Reed, Nicholas; Flubacher, Maxine; Jankowska, Petra; Powell, Melanie; Dive, Caroline; West, Catharine M L; Paul, James

    2015-11-01

    Patients treated with standard chemotherapy for metastatic or relapsed cervical cancer respond poorly to conventional chemotherapy (response achieved in 20-30% of patients) with an overall survival of less than 1 year. High tumour angiogenesis and high concentrations of intratumoural VEGF are adverse prognostic features. Cediranib is a potent tyrosine kinase inhibitor of VEGFR1, 2, and 3. In this trial, we aimed to assess the effect of the addition of cediranib to carboplatin and paclitaxel chemotherapy in patients with metastatic or recurrent cervical cancer. In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2 trial, which was done in 17 UK cancer treatment centres, patients aged 18 years or older initially diagnosed with metastatic carcinoma or who subsequently developed metastatic disease or local pelvic recurrence after radical treatment that was not amenable to exenterative surgery were recruited. Eligible patients received carboplatin AUC of 5 plus paclitaxel 175 mg/m(2) by infusion every 3 weeks for a maximum of six cycles and were randomised centrally (1:1) through a minimisation approach to receive cediranib 20 mg or placebo orally once daily until disease progression. The stratification factors were disease site, disease-free survival after primary therapy or primary stage IVb disease, number of lines of previous treatment, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, and investigational site. All patients, investigators, and trial personnel were masked to study drug allocation. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival. Efficacy analysis was by intention to treat, and the safety analysis included all patients who received at least one dose of study drug. This trial is registered with the ISCRTN registry, number ISRCTN23516549, and has been completed. Between Aug 19, 2010, and July 27, 2012, 69 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to cediranib (n=34) or placebo (n=35). After a median follow-up of 24·2 months (IQR 21·9

  8. Multidisciplinary management of locally advanced and widely metastatic paraganglioma in a patient with life-threatening compressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Neychev, Vladimir; Straughan, David; Pacak, Karel; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-12-01

    Patients presenting with locally advanced, metastatic paraganglioma with life-threatening compressive symptoms of critical anatomic structure pose a significant management challenge. We present a case of a 15-year-old patient with enlarging right neck mass causing dysphagia and respiratory compromise from near complete obstruction of the oropharynx. Evaluation of the patient's family history led to the identification of a mutation in the succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (SDSD) gene (G725A). Laboratory and imaging workup revealed an 8.8 × 6.6 × 4.1 cm metabolically and biochemically active right neck mass, a tumor in the left para-aortic region, and multiple bony lesions consistent with widely metastatic disease. Multidisciplinary management included preoperative clinical optimization, coil embolization, and palliative resection of the neck mass. Although the currently available treatment options for patients with advanced metastatic paraganglioma render no survival benefit, a multidisciplinary management approach aimed at relief of tumor-related symptoms and catecholamine excess should be undertaken. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Advanced Imaging for the Early Diagnosis of Local Recurrence Prostate Cancer after Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Musio, Daniela; Proietti, Camilla; Indino, Elena Lucia; Megna, Valentina; Schillaci, Orazio; Catalano, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Currently the diagnosis of local recurrence of prostate cancer (PCa) after radical prostatectomy (RT) is based on the onset of biochemical failure which is defined by two consecutive values of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) higher than 0.2 ng/mL. The aim of this paper was to review the current roles of advanced imaging in the detection of locoregional recurrence. A nonsystematic literature search using the Medline and Cochrane Library databases was performed up to November 2013. Bibliographies of retrieved and review articles were also examined. Only those articles reporting complete data with clinical relevance for the present review were selected. This review article is divided into two major parts: the first one considers the role of PET/CT in the restaging of PCa after RP; the second part is intended to provide the impact of multiparametric-MRI (mp-MRI) in the depiction of locoregional recurrence. Published data indicate an emerging role for mp-MRI in the depiction of locoregional recurrence, while the performance of PET/CT still remains unclear. Moreover Mp-MRI, thanks to functional techniques, allows to distinguish between residual glandular healthy tissue, scar/fibrotic tissue, granulation tissue, and tumour recurrence and it may also be able to assess the aggressiveness of nodule recurrence. PMID:24757679

  10. Advanced imaging for the early diagnosis of local recurrence prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Panebianco, Valeria; Barchetti, Flavio; Musio, Daniela; De Felice, Francesca; Proietti, Camilla; Indino, Elena Lucia; Megna, Valentina; Schillaci, Orazio; Catalano, Carlo; Tombolini, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Currently the diagnosis of local recurrence of prostate cancer (PCa) after radical prostatectomy (RT) is based on the onset of biochemical failure which is defined by two consecutive values of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) higher than 0.2 ng/mL. The aim of this paper was to review the current roles of advanced imaging in the detection of locoregional recurrence. A nonsystematic literature search using the Medline and Cochrane Library databases was performed up to November 2013. Bibliographies of retrieved and review articles were also examined. Only those articles reporting complete data with clinical relevance for the present review were selected. This review article is divided into two major parts: the first one considers the role of PET/CT in the restaging of PCa after RP; the second part is intended to provide the impact of multiparametric-MRI (mp-MRI) in the depiction of locoregional recurrence. Published data indicate an emerging role for mp-MRI in the depiction of locoregional recurrence, while the performance of PET/CT still remains unclear. Moreover Mp-MRI, thanks to functional techniques, allows to distinguish between residual glandular healthy tissue, scar/fibrotic tissue, granulation tissue, and tumour recurrence and it may also be able to assess the aggressiveness of nodule recurrence.

  11. Insurance Status and Hospital Payer Mix Are Linked With Variation in Metastatic Site Resection in Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancers.

    PubMed

    Healy, Mark A; Pradarelli, Jason C; Krell, Robert W; Regenbogen, Scott E; Suwanabol, Pasithorn A

    2016-11-01

    Despite substantially improved survival with metastatic site resection in colorectal cancers, uptake of aggressive surgical approaches remains low among certain patients. It is unknown whether financial determinants of care, such as insurance status, play a role in this treatment gap. We sought to evaluate the effect of insurance status on metastasectomy in patients with advanced colorectal cancers. This was a retrospective cohort study. Using the National Cancer Data Base Participant User File, incident cases of colorectal cancer metastatic to the lung and/or liver with diagnosis from 2010 to 2013 were identified. We identified 42,300 patients in our cohort with a mean age 64 years. Controlling for patient, tumor, and hospital characteristics, hierarchical regression was used to examine associations between hospital payer mix and metastatic site resection. Metastatic site resection occurred in 12.3% of all patients. Adjusting for patient and hospital fixed effects, we found that patients who were uninsured or on Medicaid were 38% less likely to undergo metastasectomy (OR = 0.62 (95% CI, 0.56-0.66)). Patients in hospitals with staff treating a high percentage of uninsured patients or patients with Medicaid were less likely to undergo metastasectomy, even after controlling for individual patient insurance status. The study was limited by its retrospective design and the granularity and accuracy of the National Cancer Data Base. Differences in insurance status and hospital payer mix are associated with differences in rates of metastatic site resection in patients with colorectal cancer that is metastatic to the lung and/or liver. There is a need for improved access to metastatic site resection for individual patients who are uninsured or who have Medicaid insurance, as well as for all patients who seek care at hospitals treating a large proportion of patients who are uninsured or on Medicaid. Remedies for individual patients could include improved access to private

  12. Phase II clinical study of valproic acid plus cisplatin and cetuximab in recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of Head and Neck-V-CHANCE trial.

    PubMed

    Caponigro, Francesco; Di Gennaro, Elena; Ionna, Franco; Longo, Francesco; Aversa, Corrado; Pavone, Ettore; Maglione, Maria Grazia; Di Marzo, Massimiliano; Muto, Paolo; Cavalcanti, Ernesta; Petrillo, Antonella; Sandomenico, Fabio; Maiolino, Piera; D'Aniello, Roberta; Botti, Gerardo; De Cecio, Rossella; Losito, Nunzia Simona; Scala, Stefania; Trotta, Annamaria; Zotti, Andrea Ilaria; Bruzzese, Francesca; Daponte, Antonio; Calogero, Ester; Montano, Massimo; Pontone, Monica; De Feo, Gianfranco; Perri, Francesco; Budillon, Alfredo

    2016-11-25

    Recurrent/metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) has a poor prognosis and the combination of cisplatin and cetuximab, with or without 5-fluorouracil, is the gold standard treatment in this stage. Thus, the concomitant use of novel compounds represents a critical strategy to improve treatment results. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) enhance the activity of several anticancer drugs including cisplatin and anti-Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (anti-EGFR) compounds. Preclinical studies in models have shown that vorinostat is able to down regulate Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) expression and to revert epithelial to mesenchimal transition (EMT). Due to its histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibiting activity and its safe use as a chronic therapy for epileptic disorders, valproic acid (VPA) has been considered a good candidate for anticancer therapy. A reasonable option may be to employ the combination of cisplatin, cetuximab and VPA in recurrent/metastatic SCCHN taking advantage of the possible positive interaction between histone deacetylase inhibitors, cisplatin and/or anti-EGFR. V-CHANCE is a phase 2 clinical trial evaluating, in patients with recurrent/metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck never treated with first-line chemotherapy, the concomitant standard administration of cisplatin (on day 1, every 3 weeks) and cetuximab (on day 1, weekly), in combination with oral VPA given daily from day -14 with a titration strategy in each patient (target serum level of 50-100 μg/ml). Primary end point is the objective response rate measured according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). Sample size, calculated according to Simon 2 stage minimax design will include 21 patients in the first stage with upper limit for rejection being 8 responses, and 39 patients in the second stage, with upper limit for rejection being 18 responses. Secondary endpoints are time to progression, duration of response

  13. Human monoclonal antibody 99mTc-88BV59: detection of colorectal cancer, recurrent or metastatic disease and immunogenicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Krause, B J; Baum, R P; Staib-Sebler, E; Lorenz, M; Niesen, A; Hör, G

    1997-01-01

    This study presents immunoscintigraphic results in 24 patients suffering from primary colorectal cancer, recurrent or metastatic disease after the injection of 1197-1351 MBq technetium-99m labelled totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59. Labelling efficacy of 99mTc-88BV59 ranged from 97% to 99%. Immunoscintigraphy was performed 18-20 h after injection. Scintigraphic findings were compared with those of computed tomography (CT). Patients underwent surgery in order to evaluate immunoscintigraphic findings histologically. Sera of the patients (before injection and 1 and 3 months post infusion) were analysed for the presence of human anti-human antibodies (HAHA). None of the patients showed a HAHA response as assessed by a solid-phase ELISA assay. The antibody scan detected about 25% more lesions than CT. In the detection of extrahepatic disease, the sensitivity of the antibody scan proved to be 68%, whereas the sensitivity of CT was 41%.

  14. Gemcitabine plus cisplatin versus fluorouracil plus cisplatin in recurrent or metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a multicentre, randomised, open-label, phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Huang, Yan; Hong, Shaodong; Yang, Yunpeng; Yu, Gengsheng; Jia, Jun; Peng, Peijian; Wu, Xuan; Lin, Qing; Xi, Xuping; Peng, Jiewen; Xu, Mingjun; Chen, Dongping; Lu, Xiaojun; Wang, Rensheng; Cao, Xiaolong; Chen, Xiaozhong; Lin, Zhixiong; Xiong, Jianping; Lin, Qin; Xie, Conghua; Li, Zhihua; Pan, Jianji; Li, Jingao; Wu, Shixiu; Lian, Yingni; Yang, Quanlie; Zhao, Chong

    2016-10-15

    Outcomes are poor for patients with recurrent or metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma and no well established first-line chemotherapy is available for the disease. We compared the efficacy and safety of gemcitabine plus cisplatin versus fluorouracil plus cisplatin in patients with recurrent or metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma. In this multicentre, randomised, open-label, phase 3 trial, patients with recurrent or metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma were recruited from 22 hospitals in China. Key inclusion criteria were Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 or 1, adequate organ function, and measurable lesions according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors version 1.1. Patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive either gemcitabine (1 g/m(2) intravenously on days 1 and 8) and cisplatin (80 mg/m(2) intravenously on day 1), or fluorouracil (4 g/m(2) in continuous intravenous infusion over 96 h) and cisplatin (80 mg/m(2) on day 1 given intravenously) once every 3 weeks for a maximum of six cycles. The randomisation was done centrally via an interactive phone response system using block randomisation with a size of six. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival assessed by the independent image committee in the intention-to-treat population. Safety analyses were done in patients who received at least one cycle of study drug. This study is ongoing and is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01528618. Between Feb 20, 2012, and Oct 30, 2015, 362 patients were randomly assigned to a group (181 to the gemcitabine [plus cisplatin] group and 181 to the fluorouracil [plus cisplatin] group). Median follow-up time for progression-free survival was 19·4 months (IQR 12·1-35·6). The median progression-free survival was 7·0 months (4·4-10·9) in the gemcitabine group and 5·6 months (3·0-7·0) in the fluorouracil group (hazard ratio [HR] 0·55 [95% CI 0·44-0·68]; p<0·0001). A total of 180 patients in the

  15. A prognostic model for advanced colorectal neoplasia recurrence.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Messer, Karen; Baron, John A; Lieberman, David A; Jacobs, Elizabeth T; Cross, Amanda J; Murphy, Gwen; Martinez, Maria Elena; Gupta, Samir

    2016-10-01

    Following colonoscopic polypectomy, US Multisociety Task Force (USMSTF) guidelines stratify patients based on risk of subsequent advanced neoplasia (AN) using number, size, and histology of resected polyps, but have only moderate sensitivity and specificity. We hypothesized that a state-of-the-art statistical prediction model might improve identification of patients at high risk of future AN and address these challenges. Data were pooled from seven prospective studies which had follow-up ascertainment of metachronous AN within 3-5 years of baseline polypectomy (combined n = 8,228). Pooled data were randomly split into training (n = 5,483) and validation (n = 2,745) sets. A prognostic model was developed using best practices. Two risk cut-points were identified in the training data which achieved a 10 percentage point improvement in sensitivity and specificity, respectively, over current USMSTF guidelines. Clinical benefit of USMSTF versus model-based risk stratification was then estimated using validation data. The final model included polyp location, prior polyp history, patient age, and number, size and histology of resected polyps. The first risk cut-point improved sensitivity but with loss of specificity. The second risk cut-point improved specificity without loss of sensitivity (specificity 46.2 % model vs. 42.1 % guidelines, p < 0.001; sensitivity 75.8 % model vs. 74.0 % guidelines, p = 0.64). Estimated AUC was 65 % (95 % CI: 62-69 %). This model-based approach allows flexibility in trading sensitivity and specificity, which can optimize colonoscopy over- versus underuse rates. Only modest improvements in prognostic power are possible using currently available clinical data. Research considering additional factors such as adenoma detection rate for risk prediction appears warranted.

  16. A pilot phase II trial of all-trans retinoic acid (Vesanoid) and paclitaxel (Taxol) in patients with recurrent or metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Margarette; Pulte, E Dianne; Toomey, Kathleen C; Pliner, Lillian; Pavlick, Anna C; Saunders, Tracie; Wieder, Robert

    2011-12-01

    We investigated a combination therapy with weekly paclitaxel and all trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) for tolerability, response to treatment, time to progression and survival in previously treated patients with metastatic or recurrent breast cancer. Our rationale was based on preclinical studies demonstrating potentiation of the cytotoxic effects of taxanes and induction of differentiation by ATRA. Seventeen patients with previously treated metastatic or recurrent breast cancer were enrolled to a regimen of all-trans retinoic acid (Vesanoid, tretinoin, Hoffman-La Roche, Inc.) 45 mg/m(2) PO daily for 4 days starting 2 days before a 1 h treatment with paclitaxel (Taxol, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Plainsboro, NJ) 80 mg/m(2) IV administered weekly for 3 weeks, repeated in 28 day cycles until disease progression or until no longer tolerated. Patients were evaluated for toxicity, response, time to progression and survival. Patients were primarily African American and Latino, representative of the population served by our Cancer Center. The regimen was relatively well tolerated. There were nine grade 3 and one grade 4 toxic events. We administered 162 treatment cycles with a mean of 7.5 per patient (range 1-22, median 5). Three patients had a partial response (17.6%) and ten patients had stable disease (58.8%), with an overall clinical benefit of 76.4%. Median time to progression was 6.0 months (range 1-21, mean 7.7 months). Fourteen evaluable patients had a median survival of 16 months (range 1-68 months, mean 25.2 months). The data suggest this is a well tolerated regimen with modest response rates but with time to progression and survival rates similar to those reported for paclitaxel alone and relatively high rates of stable disease in this sample of patients.

  17. Sorafenib Tosylate With or Without Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Liver Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-22

    Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Non-Resectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage III Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVA Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7

  18. Pembrolizumab and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Recurrent Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer or Salivary Gland Cancer That Is Metastatic and/or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-07

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharynx Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage III Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  19. Sunitinib, Cetuximab, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  20. Phase II study of OSI-211 (liposomal lurtotecan) in patients with metastatic or loco-regional recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. An EORTC New Drug Development Group study.

    PubMed

    Duffaud, F; Borner, M; Chollet, P; Vermorken, J B; Bloch, J; Degardin, M; Rolland, F; Dittrich, C; Baron, B; Lacombe, D; Fumoleau, P

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the activity and safety of OSI-211, the liposomal form of lurtotecan, in patients ineligible for curative surgery or radiotherapy and with metastatic/locoregional recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) and target lesions either within a previously irradiated field ("within") or outside a previously irradiated field ("outside"). OSI-211 was given intravenously over 30 min on days 1 and 8 at 2.4 mg/m2/day, repeated every 21 days (1 cycle). From July 2001 to March 2002, 32 patients from 14 institutions were enrolled in the "within" arm and 18 in the "outside" arm. In the "within" arm, two patients were ineligible because their tumour site was not allowed in the protocol (nasopharynx, skin) and two other patients never started treatment. Of the 46 eligible patients who started treatment, there was one objective response (response rate: 2.2% (95% Confidence Interval (CI): [0-11.5%]). Twelve patients in the "within" arm and 6 in the "outside" arm had stable disease, with a median duration of 18 weeks, 95% CI (12.7-25.7). The median time to progression was 6 weeks (95%CI: [5.9-12.7] weeks). Haematological toxicity was moderate in both arms. The most common haematological toxicity was grade 1-2 anaemia in 79% of patients. Non-haematological toxicity was mild in both arms. The most common grade 3-4 non-haematological toxicity was infection in 8.5% of patients. OSI-211 administered on d1 and d8, every 3 weeks, is well tolerated, but shows only minimal activity in locally advanced/metastatic SCCHN.

  1. The combination of insulin-like growth factor receptor 1 (IGF1R) antibody cixutumumab and mitotane as a first-line therapy for patients with recurrent/metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma: a multi-institutional NCI-sponsored trial.

    PubMed

    Lerario, Antonio M; Worden, Francis P; Ramm, Carole A; Hesseltine, Elizabeth A; Hasseltine, Elizabeth A; Stadler, Walter M; Else, Tobias; Shah, Manisha H; Agamah, Edem; Rao, Krishna; Hammer, Gary D

    2014-08-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is an aggressive malignancy, which lacks an effective systemic treatment. Abnormal activation of insulin-like growth factor receptor 1 (IGF1R) has been frequently observed. Preclinical studies demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of IGF1R signaling in ACC has antiproliferative effects. A previous phase I trial with an IGF1R inhibitor has demonstrated biological activity against ACC. The objective of this study is to assess the efficacy of the combination of the IGF1R inhibitor cixutumumab (IMC-A12) in association with mitotane as a first-line treatment for advanced/metastatic ACC. We conducted a multicenter, randomized double-arm phase II trial in patients with irresectable recurrent/metastatic ACC. The original protocol included two treatment groups: IMC-A12 + mitotane and mitotane as a single agent, after an initial single-arm phase for safety evaluation with IMC-A12 + mitotane. IMC-A12 was dosed at 10 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks. The starting dose for mitotane was 2 g daily, subsequently adjusted according to serum levels/symptoms. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS) according to RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors). This study was terminated before the randomization phase due to slow accrual and limited efficacy. Twenty patients (13 males, 7 females) with a median age of 50.2 years (range 21.9-79.6) were enrolled for the single-arm phase. Therapeutic effects were observed in 8/20 patients, including one partial response and seven stable diseases. The median PFS was 6 weeks (range 2.66-48). Toxic events included two grade 4 (hyperglycemia and hyponatremia) and one grade 5 (multiorgan failure). Although the regimen demonstrated activity in some patients, the relatively low therapeutic efficacy precluded further studies with this combination of drugs.

  2. [Examination of the safety of docetaxel/cyclophosphamide combination therapy for advanced recurrent breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Kimiyasu; Koshida, Yoshitomo; Toriumi, Fumiki; Murayama, Takaya; Toeda, Hiroyuki; Imazu, Yoshihiro; Motegi, Katsuhiko; Akamatsu, Hidetoshi; Ohyama, Renpei

    2006-10-01

    In the treatment of recurrent breast cancer in patients previously treated with anthracycline drugs, taxane drugs are generally used. This time, we retrospectively studied the safety of docetaxel/cyclophosphamide combination therapy (hereinafter referred to as TC therapy). Ten patients (mean age: 52.8 years old) were included in the study. Metastatic/recurrent sites included 3 skin, 2 each of contralateral breast, lung and bone, and 1 each of liver, carcinomatous pleurisy and supraclavicular lymph node. Seven patients had a history of anthracycline treatment. The patients received TC at doses of 60 mg/m(2) and 500 mg/m(2), respectively, every 3 weeks. With regard to adverse events, non-hematotoxic events included alopecia in all the patients, generalized malaise in 5, and abnormal nail in 1. Hematotoxic events were grades 2 and 3 decreased neutrophil count in 5 patients. One patient had grade 4 pyrexia associated with oral candida. The patient was admitted and treated with fluid replacement and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). There were no other patients in whom the treatment was prolonged or dosage was reduced due to adverse reactions. TC therapy is considered to be a beneficial treatment method in terms of safety since it can be instituted on an outpatient basis.

  3. Saracatinib in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Stomach or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-19

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  4. Salvage surgery for locoregional recurrences of advanced pharyngolaryngeal squamous cell carcinoma after organ preservation failure.

    PubMed

    López Delgado, I; Riestra Ayora, J; Arenas Brítez, O; García López, I; Martínez Guirado, T; Scola Yurrita, B

    2014-12-01

    Organ preservation treatment for advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is associated with poor outcomes due to locoregional recurrences. Salvage surgery is the main therapeutic option for some of these patients. The aim of this study was to analyse the results of salvage surgery for advanced pharyngolaryngeal squamous cell carcinoma previously treated with radiochemotherapy. We performed a retrospective study on 38 patients (36 men, 2 women). The median age at diagnosis was 60 years with a mean follow-up period of 49.8 months. Recurrences were diagnosed at a mean of 395 days after finalising organ preservation treatment. Patients went under different salvage surgeries, including 22 total laryngectomies, 6 partial laryngectomies (3 transoral laser surgeries and 3 opened surgeries), 8 functional neck dissections and 2 tongue base surgeries. Nineteen patients had no postoperative complications after a mean hospital stay of 2 weeks. However, 5 patients died of significant recurrent bleedings. There were 4 salivary fistulas that responded to conservative management, while 7 patients had important pharyngostomas that required reconstruction with either regional or free flaps. The mean hospital stay was of 61.60 days for all patients. Five-year overall survival from diagnosis, overall survival after salvage surgery and survival after salvage surgery were 44.20, 37.90 and 45.70%, respectively. In summary, we conclude that salvage surgery is an optimal treatment for pharyngolaryngeal and regional recurrences and provides improvement in locoregional control and survival, despite the severe complications.

  5. A structured review of health utility measures and elicitation in advanced/metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yanni; Wolfram, Verena; Cook, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Health utilities are increasingly incorporated in health economic evaluations. Different elicitation methods, direct and indirect, have been established in the past. This study examined the evidence on health utility elicitation previously reported in advanced/metastatic breast cancer and aimed to link these results to requirements of reimbursement bodies. Searches were conducted using a detailed search strategy across several electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and EconLit databases), online sources (Cost-effectiveness Analysis Registry and the Health Economics Research Center), and web sites of health technology assessment (HTA) bodies. Publications were selected based on the search strategy and the overall study objectives. A total of 768 publications were identified in the searches, and 26 publications, comprising 18 journal articles and eight submissions to HTA bodies, were included in the evidence review. Most journal articles derived utilities from the European Quality of Life Five-Dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D). Other utility measures, such as the direct methods standard gamble (SG), time trade-off (TTO), and visual analog scale (VAS), were less frequently used. Several studies described mapping algorithms to generate utilities from disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL) instruments such as European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire - Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30), European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire - Breast Cancer 23 (EORTC QLQ-BR23), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - General questionnaire (FACT-G), and Utility-Based Questionnaire-Cancer (UBQ-C); most used EQ-5D as the reference. Sociodemographic factors that affect health utilities, such as age, sex, income, and education, as well as disease progression, choice of utility elicitation method, and country settings, were identified within the journal articles. Most

  6. A structured review of health utility measures and elicitation in advanced/metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yanni; Wolfram, Verena; Cook, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Background Health utilities are increasingly incorporated in health economic evaluations. Different elicitation methods, direct and indirect, have been established in the past. This study examined the evidence on health utility elicitation previously reported in advanced/metastatic breast cancer and aimed to link these results to requirements of reimbursement bodies. Methods Searches were conducted using a detailed search strategy across several electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and EconLit databases), online sources (Cost-effectiveness Analysis Registry and the Health Economics Research Center), and web sites of health technology assessment (HTA) bodies. Publications were selected based on the search strategy and the overall study objectives. Results A total of 768 publications were identified in the searches, and 26 publications, comprising 18 journal articles and eight submissions to HTA bodies, were included in the evidence review. Most journal articles derived utilities from the European Quality of Life Five-Dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D). Other utility measures, such as the direct methods standard gamble (SG), time trade-off (TTO), and visual analog scale (VAS), were less frequently used. Several studies described mapping algorithms to generate utilities from disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL) instruments such as European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire – Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30), European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire – Breast Cancer 23 (EORTC QLQ-BR23), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy – General questionnaire (FACT-G), and Utility-Based Questionnaire-Cancer (UBQ-C); most used EQ-5D as the reference. Sociodemographic factors that affect health utilities, such as age, sex, income, and education, as well as disease progression, choice of utility elicitation method, and country settings, were identified

  7. Interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy in locally advanced and recurrent vulvar cancer

    PubMed Central

    Białas, Brygida; Fijałkowski, Marek; Wojcieszek, Piotr; Szlag, Marta; Cholewka, Agnieszka; Ślęczka, Maciej; Kołosza, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was to report our experience with high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) in locally advanced and recurrent vulvar cancer. Material and methods Between 2004 and 2014, fourteen women with locally advanced or recurrent vulvar cancer were treated using HDR-ISBT in our Centre. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy was performed as a separate treatment or in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (given prior to brachytherapy). Results Patients were divided into: group I (n = 6) with locally advanced tumors, stages III-IVA after an incisional biopsy only, and group II (n = 8) with recurrent vulvar cancer after previous radical surgery. In group I, median follow up was 12 months (range 7-18 months); 1-year overall survival (OS) was 83%. Transient arrest of cancer growth or tumor regression was noticed in all patients but 4/6 developed relapse. Median time to failure was 6.3 months (range 3-11 months). The 1-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 33%. In group II, median follow up was 28 months (range 13-90 months). The 1-year and 3-year OS was 100% and 80%, respectively. The arrest of cancer growth or tumor regression was achieved in all patients. In 4/8 patients neither clinical nor histological symptoms of relapse were observed but 4/8 women experienced relapse. Median time to failure was 31 months (range 13-76 months). The 1-year and 3-year PFS was 100% and 62.5%, respectively. Two patients (14.3%) in group II had severe late toxicity (G3). Conclusions High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy is a well-tolerated treatment option in selected patients with advanced or recurrent vulvar cancer. It is a safe and effective treatment modality for advanced and recurrent vulvar cancer, yielding good local control with acceptable late treatment related side effects. In our study, patients with recurrent vulvar cancer had better results in HDR-ISBT treatment, probably because of the smaller tumor volume. This

  8. Radioimmunoscintigraphy of recurrent, metastatic, or occult colorectal cancer with technetium 99m-labeled totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59: results of pivotal, phase III multicenter studies.

    PubMed

    Serafini, A N; Klein, J L; Wolff, B G; Baum, R; Chetanneau, A; Pecking, A; Fischman, A J; Hoover, H C; Wynant, G E; Subramanian, R; Goroff, D K; Hanna, M G

    1998-05-01

    To assess the performance and potential clinical impact of a totally human monoclonal antibody, 88BV59 (HumaSPECT) (INTRACEL, Corp, Rockville, MD), in 202 assessable presurgical patients with recurrent, metastatic, or occult colorectal cancer. 88BV59, labeled with technetium Tc 99m (99mTc) (HumaSPECT-Tc), was injected intravenously, and planar and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) images were obtained 14 to 20 hours postinjection. Surgical and pathologic verification of tumor were used as the standard against which the performance of HumaSPECT-Tc imaging and computed tomography (CT) analysis were evaluated. All patients entered onto the recurrent disease study had at least one tumor site defined on CT. The sensitivity of HumaSPECT-Tc in those CT-positive patients was 87%. The specificity of HumaSPECT-Tc was 57% compared with 17% for CT and the difference was statistically significant (P < .001). The diagnostic information provided by HumaSPECT-Tc significantly (P < .001) improved the accuracy of the identification of resectable and nonresectable disease over that of CT (80% v 62%). HumaSPECT-Tc scans resulted in a significant (P < .001) reduction versus CT in terms of the proportion of patients understaged (27% v 41%) and overstaged (4% v 26%). In patients with occult disease (increasing carcinoembryonic antigen [CEA] titer, negative diagnostic work-up, negative CT), HumaSPECT-Tc correctly identified disease in 15 of 22 (68%) patients. HumaSPECT-Tc images provided additional clinical data that would have affected patient management decisions in 40 of 202 (19.8%) patients. In 365 patients who received 88BV59, only a single detectable human anti-human antibody (HAHA) response (90 ng/mL) at 9 weeks postinfusion was observed. HumaSPECT-Tc can provide important and accurate information about the presence and location of disease in patients with a high clinical suspicion of metastatic or recurrent colorectal cancer and either positive (known disease) or negative

  9. Superselective embolization as palliative treatment of recurrent hemorrhage in advanced carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Sittel, C; Gossmann, A; Jungehülsing, M; Zähringer, M

    2001-12-01

    We report a case of recurrent major hemorrhage in a patient with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Before and between the bleeding episodes, the functional level of the patient was remarkably high. Therefore, an attempt at bleeding control with superselective embolization with Ethibloc was made. Because of its specific characteristics, this substance is almost ideal for the purpose of palliative embolization. The material used and the technique of application are described in detail. After the procedure, no hemorrhage occurred for more than 4 months. We recommend superselective embolization, preferably with Ethibloc, for minimally invasive control of recurrent bleeding as palliative treatment in selected patients with advanced head and neck carcinoma, since significant benefit in terms of the quality of life may result.

  10. Prognostic factors predicting functional outcomes, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival after radiotherapy for metastatic spinal cord compression in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Rades, Dirk; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J A; Schulte, Rainer; Hoskin, Peter J; Poortmans, Philip; Schild, Steven E; Rudat, Volker

    2006-01-01

    To identify significant prognostic factors after irradiation of metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) in 335 breast cancer patients. The potential prognostic factors investigated included involved vertebra, other bone metastases, visceral metastases, performance status, pretreatment ambulatory status, time until motor deficits developed before RT, radiation schedule (shorter-course RT [one fraction of 8 Gy/five fractions of 4 Gy] vs. longer-course RT [10 fractions of 3 Gy/15 fractions of 2.5 Gy/20 fractions of 2 Gy), and the response to RT. On multivariate analysis, better functional outcome was associated with slower development of motor deficits (p <0.001) and being ambulatory before RT (p <0.001). The overall recurrence rate of MSCC was greater if other bone metastases were present (p <0.001) and if shorter-course RT was used (p <0.001). In-field recurrences alone were more frequent after shorter-course RT (p = 0.008). Survival was negatively affected by the presence of visceral metastases (p <0.001), deterioration of motor function after RT (p <0.001), reduced performance status (p <0.001), and the rapid development of motor deficits (p = 0.044). Outcomes and survival after RT for MSCC in breast cancer patients are associated with several prognostic factors. Patients with poor expected survival may be treated with shorter-course RT to keep the overall treatment time short. If survival is expected to be relatively favorable, longer-course RT appears preferable, because it is associated with fewer MSCC recurrences.

  11. Prognostic factors predicting functional outcomes, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival after radiotherapy for metastatic spinal cord compression in breast cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk . E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Schulte, Rainer; Hoskin, Peter J.; Poortmans, Philip; Schild, Steven E.; Rudat, Volker

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To identify significant prognostic factors after irradiation of metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) in 335 breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The potential prognostic factors investigated included involved vertebra, other bone metastases, visceral metastases, performance status, pretreatment ambulatory status, time until motor deficits developed before RT, radiation schedule (shorter-course RT [one fraction of 8 Gy/five fractions of 4 Gy] vs. longer-course RT [10 fractions of 3 Gy/15 fractions of 2.5 Gy/20 fractions of 2 Gy), and the response to RT. Results: On multivariate analysis, better functional outcome was associated with slower development of motor deficits (p <0.001) and being ambulatory before RT (p <0.001). The overall recurrence rate of MSCC was greater if other bone metastases were present (p <0.001) and if shorter-course RT was used (p <0.001). In-field recurrences alone were more frequent after shorter-course RT (p = 0.008). Survival was negatively affected by the presence of visceral metastases (p <0.001), deterioration of motor function after RT (p <0.001), reduced performance status (p <0.001), and the rapid development of motor deficits (p = 0.044). Conclusion: Outcomes and survival after RT for MSCC in breast cancer patients are associated with several prognostic factors. Patients with poor expected survival may be treated with shorter-course RT to keep the overall treatment time short. If survival is expected to be relatively favorable, longer-course RT appears preferable, because it is associated with fewer MSCC recurrences.

  12. Eribulin mesylate: a promising new antineoplastic agent for locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Javier; Lorca, Rebeca

    2011-03-01

    More than one million women worldwide are diagnosed with breast cancer every year. For those diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer, the 5-year survival rates are low as, ultimately, patients develop tumors that become refractory to treatment. In clinical trials, eribulin mesylate (E7389) - a novel nontaxane microtubule dynamics inhibitor - demonstrated efficacy in patients with various solid tumors, in particular, those with heavily pretreated metastatic breast cancer. The Eisai Metastatic Breast Cancer Study Assessing Physician's Choice Versus E7389 (EMBRACE) study observed a significant increase in overall survival with eribulin compared with treatment of physician's choice (median: 13.1 vs 10.6 months, respectively). Based on these results, eribulin recently received approval by the US FDA for the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer who have received at least two prior chemotherapeutic regimens including an anthracyline and a taxane. In addition, eribulin has a manageable tolerability profile, requires no premedication and has shorter infusion times than most other microtubule-targeted agents.

  13. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-13

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  14. Efficacy and safety of oxaliplatin, bevacizumab and oral S-1 for advanced recurrent colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shuji; Shimazaki, Jiro; Morishita, Keiichi; Koike, Nobusada; Harada, Nobuhiko; Hayashi, Tsuneo; Suzuki, Mamoru

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of co-administration of oral S-1 and oxaliplatin (SOX) in combination with bevacizumab (bev) in patients with advanced recurrent colorectal cancer. A retrospective study of 36 patients with advanced recurrent colorectal cancer was performed, of whom 27 received first-line and 9 received second-line SOX+bev chemotherapy between 2010 and 2013 at the Hachioji Digestive Disease Hospital (Hachioji, Japan). The SOX+bev regimen consisted of administration of intravenous oxaliplatin (85 mg/m(2)) on days 1 and 14, bevacizumab (5 mg/kg) on day 1, and co-administration of oral S-1 twice daily on days 1-14. The drug regimen was repeated every 4 weeks. SOX+bev treatment was associated with a response rate of 45.2%, a disease control rate of 71%, and a median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of 9.9 and 21.9 months, respectively. Patients who received first-line chemotherapy benefited from treatment in terms of prolonged PFS (13.8 months) and OS (28.2 months). Grade 3/4 adverse events were infrequent and included anaemia, thrombocytopenia, anorexia, diarrhea, sensory neuropathy, increased aspartate aminotransferase level and skin rash. In conclusion, SOX+bev therapy was found to be feasible and safe for patients with advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

  15. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Controlling Severe Bleeding From Recurrent Locally-Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Şefika; Akçe, Bülent; Kılıçkesmez, Özgür; Gürsü, Rıza Umar; Çakır, Mehmet Semih; Nazlı, Mehmet Ali; Aren, Acar

    2016-01-01

    One of the rare but most challenging issues in the management of the locally-advanced breast cancer (LABC) is life-threatening bleeding from the fungating and/or ulcerating focus (foci) of these tumors. Breast surgeons may need the assistance of interventional radiologists to solve this urgent condition if surgery cannot provide sufficient benefit. Herein, we report a case of recurrent locally-advanced breast cancer that presented with sudden severe bleeding, which was stopped by an interventional radiologist via transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). In addition, we evaluate the role of interventional radiology in patients with breast cancer who present with bleeding from the breast by reviewing the relevant literature.

  16. Impact of tumor HPV status on outcome in patients with recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck receiving chemotherapy with or without cetuximab: retrospective analysis of the phase III EXTREME trial

    PubMed Central

    Vermorken, J. B.; Psyrri, A.; Mesía, R.; Peyrade, F.; Beier, F.; de Blas, B.; Celik, I.; Licitra, L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumor human papillomavirus (HPV) status is an important prognostic factor in locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Prognostic value in recurrent and/or metastatic (R/M) disease remains to be confirmed. This retrospective analysis of the EXTREME trial, comparing chemotherapy plus cetuximab with chemotherapy first line in R/M SCCHN, investigated efficacy and prognosis according to tumor p16 and HPV status. Patients and methods Paired tissue samples were used: p16INK4A expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry, and HPV status determined in extracted DNA samples using oligonucleotide hybridization assays. Results Altogether, 416 of 442 patients had tumor samples available for p16 and HPV: 10% of tumors were p16 positive and 5% were HPV positive. Adding cetuximab to chemotherapy improved survival, irrespective of tumor p16 or HPV status. This pattern remained in a combined analysis of p16 and HPV. p16 positivity and HPV positivity were associated with prolonged survival compared with p16 negativity and HPV negativity. Subgroup analysis of patients with oropharyngeal cancer demonstrated a similar pattern to all evaluable patients. Conclusion The results from this analysis suggest that p16 and HPV status have prognostic value in R/M SCCHN and survival benefits of chemotherapy plus cetuximab over chemotherapy alone are independent of tumor p16 and HPV status. PMID:24577117

  17. Postoperative 125I brachytherapy delivered by digital model obturators for recurrent or locally advanced maxillary cancers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-wei; Zhang, Jian-guo; Tong, Dai; Zhang, Jie; Zheng, Lei; Zhang, Yi; Yu, Guang-yan

    2012-11-01

    We aimed to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of postoperative (125) I brachytherapy delivered by use of digital model obturators for recurrent or locally advanced maxillary cancers. Retrospective study. From 2006 to 2008, 12 patients (seven females; median age, 65 years; range, 22-86 years) with recurrent or locally advanced maxillary cancers showing positive margins after surgery underwent (125) I brachytherapy by use of digital model obturators and interstitial implants. The radioactivity was 18.5 to 33.3 MBq per seed, and the prescription dose was 80 to 160 Gy. Functional outcome of patients was evaluated by the Performance Status Scale (PSS) for head and neck cancer before and after brachytherapy. The (125) I seeds and dosages were well distributed in the radiation fields, and all patients had higher PSS scores after than before treatment with obturators. During a median follow-up of 53 months (range, 28-62 months), local control at 3 and 5 years was 83.3% and 66.7%, respectively, with a mean local control time of 53.5 ± 3.79 months. Overall survival at 3 and 5 years was 91.7% and 71.4%, respectively, with a mean survival time of 56.6 ± 2.99 months. Two patients died due to local recurrence, and one patient died due to lung metastasis. No patient had severe complications during follow-up. (125) I brachytherapy delivered by digital model obturator is effective in treating maxillary cancers with positive margins after maxillectomy for advanced or recurrent cancer. The method may improve the quality of life of patients with maxillary defects. Laryngoscope, 2012. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. Repeated iodine-125 seed implantations combined with external beam radiotherapy for the treatment of locally recurrent or metastatic stage III/IV non-small cell lung cancer: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Dan, Gang; Jiang, Jianqing; Zheng, Yifeng; Zheng, Xiushan; Deng, Dan

    2016-09-13

    Recurrent or metastatic lung cancer is difficult to manage. This retrospective study aimed to assess the efficacy of repeated iodine-125 seed implantations combined with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for locally recurrent or metastatic stage-III/IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Eighteen previously treated stage-III/IV NSCLC patients with local or metastatic recurrences underwent 1-to-3 iodine-125 implantations. Six of these patients received palliative EBRT and six patients received combined chemotherapy using gemcitabine and cisplatin. Near-term treatment efficacy was evaluated 3 months after seed implantation by comparing changes in tumor size on computed tomography images; the evaluated outcomes were complete response, partial response, stable disease, and local tumor control rate. Long-term efficacy was assessed based on 1- and 2-year survival rates. Patients were followed up for 6 to 50 months. The overall (i.e., complete + partial) response rate was 87.4 %. The local control rates after the first, second, and third years were 94.1, 58.8 and 41.2 %, respectively. The results of this study demonstrated that repeated implantation of radioactive particles combined with EBRT is a safe treatment that effectively controlled local recurrence and metastasis of stage III/IV NSCLC.

  19. Erlotinib and bevacizumab in patients with recurrent or metastatic squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck: a phase I/II study.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ezra E W; Davis, Darren W; Karrison, Theodore G; Seiwert, Tanguy Y; Wong, Stuart J; Nattam, Sreenivasa; Kozloff, Mark F; Clark, Joseph I; Yan, Duen-Hwa; Liu, Wen; Pierce, Carolyn; Dancey, Janet E; Stenson, Kerstin; Blair, Elizabeth; Dekker, Allison; Vokes, Everett E

    2009-03-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a validated target in squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck, but in patients with recurrent or metastatic disease, EGFR targeting agents have displayed modest efficacy. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-mediated angiogenesis has been implicated as a mechanism of resistance to anti-EGFR therapy. In this multi-institutional phase I/II study we combined an EGFR inhibitor, erlotinib, with an anti-VEGF antibody, bevacizumab. Between April 15, 2003, and Jan 27, 2005, patients with recurrent or metastatic squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck were enrolled from seven centres in the USA and were given erlotinib (150 mg daily) and bevacizumab in escalating dose cohorts. The primary objectives in the phase I and II sections, respectively, were to establish the maximum tolerated dose and dose-limiting toxicity of bevacizumab when administered with erlotinib and to establish the proportion of objective responses and time to disease progression. Pretreatment serum and tissues were collected and analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunofluorescence quantitative laser analysis, respectively. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00055913. In the phase I section of the trial, ten patients were enrolled in three successive cohorts with no dose-limiting toxic effects noted. 46 patients were enrolled in the phase II section of the trial (including three patients from the phase I section) on the highest dose of bevacizumab (15 mg/kg every 3 weeks). Two additional patients were accrued beyond the protocol-stipulated 46, leaving a total of 48 patients for the phase II assessment. The most common toxic effects of any grade were rash and diarrhoea (41 and 16 of 48 patients, respectively). Three patients had serious bleeding events of grade 3 or higher. Seven patients had a response, with four showing a complete response allowing rejection of the null hypothesis. Median time of overall

  20. [Multicentre randomized trial comparing triptorelin medical castration versus surgical castration in the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Botto, Henry; Rouprêt, Morgan; Mathieu, François; Richard, François

    2007-04-01

    To report the results of a trial comparing the efficacy of triptorelin and surgical castration in the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer. 80 patients with previously untreated locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer prostate cancer were included in a one-year multicentre, randomized, prospective, open-label therapeutic trial. Patients either received a monthly injection of triptorelin (group 1; n = 40), or were treated by pulpectomy (group 2; n = 40). Patients were reviewed every 3 months, then every 6 months. The mean age of the patients was 71.22 +/- 8.25 years. At 1 month, 38 patients were castrated (plasma testosterone < 0.5 mg/ml) in the pulpectomy group versus 35 in the triptorelin group. The mean follow-up was 38.8 +/- 26 months in the triptorelin group and 36.3 +/- 25 months in the pulpectomy group. On multivariate analysis, age, impaired performance status and PAP level (> 3.2 ng/ml) were predictive factors of a poor outcome. The median survival was 37.5 +/- 9 months in the triptorelin group and 33 +/- 3 months in the pulpectomy group. At 3 years, no significant difference in specific survival was observed between the 2 groups. At 8 years of follow-up, 63 patients had died. This study demonstrates an equivalent specific survival between patients treated by triptorelin or surgical castration. Castration is rapidly obtained with triptorelin (< 2 months) and is maintained over time throughout the duration of treatment.

  1. Recurrent and pathological gene fusions in breast cancer: current advances in genomic discovery and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Veeraraghavan, Jamunarani; Ma, Jiacheng; Hu, Yiheng; Wang, Xiao-Song

    2016-07-01

    Gene fusions have long been considered principally as the oncogenic events of hematologic malignancies, but have recently gained wide attention in solid tumors due to several milestone discoveries and the advancement of deep sequencing technologies. With the progress in deep sequencing studies of breast cancer transcriptomes and genomes, the discovery of recurrent and pathological gene fusions in breast cancer is on the focus. Recently, driven by new deep sequencing studies, several recurrent or pathological gene fusions have been identified in breast cancer, including ESR1-CCDC170, SEC16A-NOTCH1, SEC22B-NOTCH2, and ESR1-YAP1 etc. More important, most of these gene fusions are preferentially identified in the more aggressive breast cancers, such as luminal B, basal-like, or endocrine-resistant breast cancer, suggesting recurrent gene fusions as additional key driver events in these tumors other than the known drivers such as the estrogen receptor. In this paper, we have comprehensively summarized the newly identified recurrent or pathological gene fusion events in breast cancer, reviewed the contributions of new genomic and deep sequencing technologies to new fusion discovery and the integrative bioinformatics tools to analyze these data, highlighted the biological relevance and clinical implications of these fusion discoveries, and discussed future directions of gene fusion research in breast cancer.

  2. Tanespimycin in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Leukemia or Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Osteosarcoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma

  3. Veliparib and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-04

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  4. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Progressive Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-14

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma; WDHA Syndrome

  5. Detection of parasternal metastatic lymph nodes by sentinel lymph node methods in a patient with recurrence in the conserved breast.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Toshinari; Fujita, Takashi; Hayashi, Hironori; Ando, Yoshiaki; Hato, Yukari; Horio, Akiyo; Toyoshima, Chieko; Yamada, Mai; Iwata, Hiroji

    2014-03-01

    We herein report a case of second sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB). A 57-year-old woman underwent breast-conserving surgery including axillary clearance at Aichi Cancer Center on October 20, 2003. Recurrent tumor in the conserved breast was diagnosed in March 2006. She received SLNB using radioactive tracer. Preoperative lymphoscintigraphy detected 2 parasternal lymph nodes as hot spots. No abnormal lymph nodes were revealed on preoperative computed tomography. Salvage mastectomy was performed along with dissection of the Rotter and infraclavicular lymph nodes and biopsy of the detected parasternal lymph nodes. Micrometastases were discovered in both parasternal lymph nodes detected as sentinel lymph nodes. No more metastases were seen in the other lymph nodes. Reoperative SLNB offers the possibility of detecting metastasis in residual lymph nodes and determining whether chemotherapy should be used.

  6. Pembrolizumab and Lenvatinib in Treating Metastatic or Recurrent Differentiated Thyroid Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Columnar Cell Variant Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Follicular Variant Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Tall Cell Variant Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Oncocytic Follicular Carcinoma

  7. Development and validation of a risk score for advanced colorectal adenoma recurrence after endoscopic resection

    PubMed Central

    Facciorusso, Antonio; Di Maso, Marianna; Serviddio, Gaetano; Vendemiale, Gianluigi; Muscatiello, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To develop and validate a risk score for advanced colorectal adenoma (ACA) recurrence after endoscopic polypectomy. METHODS: Out of 3360 patients who underwent colon polypectomy at University of Foggia between 2004 and 2008, data of 843 patients with 1155 ACAs was retrospectively reviewed. Surveillance intervals were scheduled by guidelines at 3 years and primary endpoint was considered 3-year ACA recurrence. Baseline clinical parameters and the main features of ACAs were entered into a Cox regression analysis and variables with P < 0.05 in the univariate analysis were then tested as candidate variables into a stepwise Cox regression model (conditional backward selection). The regression coefficients of the Cox regression model were multiplied by 2 and rounded in order to obtain easy to use point numbers facilitating the calculation of the score. To avoid overoptimistic results due to model fitting and evaluation in the same dataset, we performed an internal 10-fold cross-validation by means of bootstrap sampling. RESULTS: Median lesion size was 16 mm (12-23) while median number of adenomas was 2.5 (1-3), whereof the number of ACAs was 1.5 (1-2). At 3 years after polypectomy, recurrence was observed in 229 ACAs (19.8%), of which 157 (13.5%) were metachronous neoplasms and 72 (6.2%) local recurrences. Multivariate analysis, after exclusion of the variable “type of resection” due to its collinearity with other predictive factors, confirmed lesion size, number of ACAs and grade of dysplasia as significantly associated to the primary outcome. The score was then built by multiplying the regression coefficients times 2 and the cut-off point 5 was selected by means of a Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis. In particular, 248 patients with 365 ACAs fell in the higher-risk group (score ≥ 5) where 3-year recurrence was detected in 174 ACAs (47.6%) whereas the remaining 595 patients with 690 ACAs were included in the low-risk group (score < 5) where 3

  8. A Trial of PT2977 Tablets In Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-22

    Advanced Solid Tumors; Solid Tumor; Solid Carcinoma; Solid Tumor, Adult; ccRCC; RCC, Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; RCC; Kidney Cancer; Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma; Renal Cell Carcinoma, Metastatic; Renal Cell Carcinoma Recurrent; Renal Cell Carcinoma, Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma

  9. Scoring of Prognostic Parameters in Patients with Unresectable Advanced or Recurrent Colorectal Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ikeguchi, Masahide; Shimoda, Ryugo; Yamamoto, Manabu; Maeta, Yoshihiko; Ashida, Keigo; Saito, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    Background Suitable chemotherapy is needed to prolong the survival of patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer. We scored the periodical changes of several prognostic markers during chemotherapy in patients with this type of cancer to discern the effectiveness of chemotherapy. Methods Twenty consecutive patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer were enrolled. All patients underwent combination chemotherapy with oxaliplatin or irinotecan plus 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin. Neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR), serum C-reactive protein (CRP), serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and serum albumin (ALB) were compared between the two periods (before chemotherapy and 3 months after it was started) in each patient. The scoring system was as follows: points are added when a patient shows a decrease of NLR, CRP and CEA and an increase of ALB at 3 months after the start of chemotherapy with a possible final score of +4. On the other hand, points are reduced if a patient shows an elevation of NLR, CRP and CEA and a decrease of ALB at 3 months after the start of chemotherapy with a possible final score of −4. Results At 3 months after the start of first line chemotherapy, 13 patients showed positive scores but 7 patients showed zero or minus scores. According to our scoring system, we found the mean survival time (MST) of the 13 patients with plus scores was 34 months and this was significantly better than that of the 7 patients who showed zero or minus scores (P = 0.0008). Conclusion Our new scoring system is useful but when we find that first line chemotherapy is ineffective, we need to change it to second line chemotherapy as soon as possible. That may be the best treatment for patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer. PMID:24179314

  10. First-line cetuximab-based chemotherapies for patients with advanced or metastatic KRAS wild-type colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, Mamoru; Kim, Ho Min; Hata, Tsuyoshi; Sakata, Kazuya; Okuyama, Masaki; Takemoto, Hiroyoshi; Fujii, Hitoshi; Fukuzaki, Takayuki; Morita, Tetsushi; Hata, Taishi; Takemasa, Ichiro; Satoh, Taroh; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Maski

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly occurring cancers worldwide. A burgeoning number of studies have demonstrated that the addition of cetuximab to another standard first-line regimen markedly improves the outcome of CRC treatment. However, at present, the efficacy and safety of cetuximab-based combination chemotherapy has not been well described in Japan. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of first-line chemotherapies that included cetuximab for patients with advanced or metastatic Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) wild-type CRC in Japan. This prospective multicenter observational study was conducted at 13 affiliated medical institutions. A total of 64 patients were enrolled between 2010 and 2013. The patients met the following criteria for eligibility: i) histologically confirmed, advanced or metastatic KRAS wild-type CRC; and ii) cetuximab-based chemotherapies administered as a first-line treatment. First-line cetuximab-based treatments were administered as follows: 29 patients (45.3%) received a combination of infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin and oxaliplatin; 14 patients (21.9%) received a combination of capecitabine and oxaliplatin; and 10 patients (15.6%) received a combination of infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin and irinotecan. The overall response rate (including complete plus partial responses) was 50% (32/64 patients). Initially, 48 lesions were diagnosed as unresectable. Among those, 13 lesions (27.1%) were converted to a resectable status following cetuximab-based combination chemotherapy treatments. The median overall survival time and the progression-free survival time were 1,189 and 359 days, respectively. The most frequent grade 3/4 adverse event was neutropenia, which occurred in 20.3% of the patients. The incidence of grade 3/4 skin toxicity was 17.2% (11/64 patients). Cetuximab-based therapies may represent a promising first-line regimen for patients with advanced or

  11. High Dry Bean Intake and Reduced Risk of Advanced Colorectal Adenoma Recurrence among Participants in the Polyp Prevention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lanza, Elaine; Hartman, Terryl J.; Albert, Paul S.; Shields, Rusty; Slattery, Martha; Caan, Bette; Paskett, Electra; Iber, Frank; Kikendall, James Walter; Lance, Peter; Daston, Cassandra; Schatzkin, Arthur

    2006-01-01

    Adequate fruit and vegetable intake was suggested to protect against colorectal cancer and colorectal adenomas; however, several recent prospective studies reported no association. We examined the association between fruits and vegetables and adenomatous polyp recurrence in the Polyp Prevention Trial (PPT). The PPT was a low-fat, high-fiber, high-fruit, and vegetable dietary intervention trial of adenoma recurrence, in which there were no differences in the rate of adenoma recurrence in participants in the intervention and control arms of the trial. In this analysis of the entire PPT trial–based cohort, multiple logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) of advanced and nonadvanced adenoma recurrence within quartiles of baseline and change (baseline minus the mean over 3 y) in fruit and vegetable intake, after adjustment for age, total energyy intake, use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, BMI, and gender. There were no significant associations between nonadvanced adenoma recurrence and overall change in fruit and vegetable consumption; however, those in the highest quartile of change in dry bean intake (greatest increase) compared with those in the lowest had a significantly reduced OR for advanced adenoma recurrence (OR = 0.35; 95% CI, 0.18–0.69; P for trend = 0.001). The median in the highest quartile of change in dry bean intake was 370% higher than the baseline intake. The PPT trial–based cohort provides evidence that dry beans may be inversely associated with advanced adenoma recurrence. PMID:16772456

  12. High dry bean intake and reduced risk of advanced colorectal adenoma recurrence among participants in the polyp prevention trial.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Elaine; Hartman, Terryl J; Albert, Paul S; Shields, Rusty; Slattery, Martha; Caan, Bette; Paskett, Electra; Iber, Frank; Kikendall, James Walter; Lance, Peter; Daston, Cassandra; Schatzkin, Arthur

    2006-07-01

    Adequate fruit and vegetable intake was suggested to protect against colorectal cancer and colorectal adenomas; however, several recent prospective studies reported no association. We examined the association between fruits and vegetables and adenomatous polyp recurrence in the Polyp Prevention Trial (PPT). The PPT was a low-fat, high-fiber, high-fruit, and vegetable dietary intervention trial of adenoma recurrence, in which there were no differences in the rate of adenoma recurrence in participants in the intervention and control arms of the trial. In this analysis of the entire PPT trial-based cohort, multiple logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) of advanced and nonadvanced adenoma recurrence within quartiles of baseline and change (baseline minus the mean over 3 y) in fruit and vegetable intake, after adjustment for age, total energyy intake, use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, BMI, and gender. There were no significant associations between nonadvanced adenoma recurrence and overall change in fruit and vegetable consumption; however, those in the highest quartile of change in dry bean intake (greatest increase) compared with those in the lowest had a significantly reduced OR for advanced adenoma recurrence (OR = 0.35; 95% CI, 0.18-0.69; P for trend = 0.001). The median in the highest quartile of change in dry bean intake was 370% higher than the baseline intake. The PPT trial-based cohort provides evidence that dry beans may be inversely associated with advanced adenoma recurrence.

  13. Molecular Evolution Patterns in Metastatic Lymph Nodes Reflect the Differential Treatment Response of Advanced Primary Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Um, Sang-Won; Joung, Je-Gun; Lee, Hyun; Kim, Hojoong; Kim, Kyu-Tae; Park, Jinha; Hayes, D Neil; Park, Woong-Yang

    2016-11-15

    Tumor heterogeneity influences the clinical outcome of patients with cancer, and the diagnostic method to measure the tumor heterogeneity needs to be developed. We analyzed genomic features on pairs of primary and multiple metastatic lymph nodes from six patients with lung cancer using whole-exome sequencing and RNA sequencing. Although somatic single-nucleotide variants were shared in primary lung cancer and metastases, tumor evolution predicted by the pattern of genomic alterations was matched to anatomic location of the tumors. Four of six cases exhibited a branched clonal evolution pattern. Lymph nodes with acquired somatic variants demonstrated resistance to the cancer treatment. In this study, we demonstrated that multiple biopsies and sequencing strategies for different tumor regions are required for a comprehensive understanding of the landscape of genetic alteration and for guiding targeted therapy in advanced primary lung cancer. Cancer Res; 76(22); 6568-76. ©2016 AACR.

  14. A pilot phase II study of capecitabine in advanced or recurrent breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Toshiaki; Kimura, Tsunehito; Toi, Masakazu; Taguchi, Tetsuo

    2006-01-01

    A pilot phase II study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the Japanese intermittent regimen of capecitabine (Xeloda) in patients with advanced or recurrent breast cancer. A total of 23 patients who had received no more than one prior chemotherapy regimen received oral 828 mg/m2 capecitabine twice daily for 3 weeks followed by a 1-week rest period. The response to capecitabine was evaluated in 22 patients (one patient ineligible). The overall response rate was 45.5% (95% CI, 24.4-67.8%), including 1 complete response (4.5%) and 9 patients with partial response (40.9%). A further 7 patients (31.8%) had stable disease. The median duration of response was 7.2 months (range, 3.0-15.8 months) and the median time to progression was 6.4 months (95% CI, 4.1-15.1 months). Treatment-related adverse events >or= grade 3 were observed in 7 patients (30.1%). Intermittent capecitabine therapy (828 mg/m(2) twice daily for 3 weeks followed by a 1-week rest period) was shown to be effective and well tolerated as second-line treatment for advanced or recurrent breast cancer. The Japanese regimen is worthy of further study in larger numbers of patients in phase II / III clinical trials.

  15. [The usefulness and adverse events of bevacizumab combined with chemotherapy against advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Oga, Junichi; Sakata, Makiko; Sato, Sumito; Matsumura, Naoki; Hatakeyama, Toshiyuki; Nagayama, Hiroyuki; Sakurai, Osamu; Ishida, Yasuo; Hataya, Kiyoshi

    2010-06-01

    We examined clinical results of 35 patients on bevacizumab(BV)combined with chemotherapy at our hospital. The subjects were 35 patients with advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer who received BV combined with chemotherapy for approximately 2 years. Their median age was 66 years(41 to 86 years), PS was 2 or less for all; it was first-line therapy in 21 patients, second-line in 12 patients and thirdline in 2 patients. The concomitant chemotherapy was mFOLFOX 6 in 24 / patients, 5-FU/LV in 8 patients and FOLFIRI in 3 patients. Therapeutic efficacy was CR in 2 patients, PR in 10 patients, and the overall response rate was 35%. There were 7 adverse events of Grade 3 or higher, among which 4 events were leucopenia. Neither overall survival nor any concomitant chemotherapy reached the median periods. Moreover, the median periods of / progression-free survival in mFOLFOX6/FOLFIRI were 191 days. BV combined with chemotherapy should be actively introduced as first-line therapy against advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer because of its high therapeutic efficacy.

  16. Health-related quality of life in patients with locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer treated with etirinotecan pegol versus treatment of physician's choice: Results from the randomised phase III BEACON trial.

    PubMed

    Twelves, Chris; Cortés, Javier; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce; Awada, Ahmad; Perez, Edith A; Im, Seock-Ah; Gómez-Pardo, Patricia; Schwartzberg, Lee S; Diéras, Véronique; Yardley, Denise A; Potter, David A; Mailliez, Audrey; Moreno-Aspitia, Alvaro; Ahn, Jin-Seok; Zhao, Carol; Hoch, Ute; Tagliaferri, Mary; Hannah, Alison L; Rugo, Hope S

    2017-05-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) enhances understanding of treatment effects that impact clinical decision-making. Although the primary end-point was not achieved, the BEACON (BrEAst Cancer Outcomes with NKTR-102) trial established etirinotecan pegol, a long-acting topoisomerase-1 (TOP1) inhibitor, as a promising therapeutic for patients with advanced/metastatic breast cancer (MBC) achieving clinically meaningful benefits in median overall survival (OS) for patients with stable brain metastases, with liver metastases or ≥ 2 sites of metastatic disease compared to treatment of physician's choice (TPC). Reported herein are the findings from the preplanned secondary end-point of HRQoL. HRQoL, assessed by European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 (QLQ-C30) (version 3.0) supplemented by the breast cancer-specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-BR23), was evaluated post randomisation in 733 of 852 patients with either anthracycline-, taxane- and capecitabine-pretreated locally recurrent or MBC randomised to etirinotecan pegol (n = 378; 145 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks (q3wk)) or single-agent TPC (n = 355). Patients completed assessments at screening, every 8 weeks (q8wk) during treatment, and end-of-treatment. Changes from baseline were analysed, and the proportions of patients achieving differences (≥5 points) in HRQoL scores were compared. Differences were seen favouring etirinotecan pegol up to 32 weeks for global health status (GHS) and physical functioning scales (P < 0.02); numerical improvement was reported in other functional scales. The findings from HRQoL symptom scales were consistent with adverse event profiles; etirinotecan pegol was associated with worsening gastrointestinal symptoms whereas TPC was associated with worsened dyspnoea and other systemic side-effects. Analysis of GHS and physical functioning at disease progression showed a decline in HRQoL in both treatment arms

  17. Carboplatin and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride With or Without ATR Kinase Inhibitor VX-970 in Treating Patients With Recurrent and Metastatic Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    High Grade Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Tumor; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  18. Clinical benefit of nanoparticle albumin-bound-paclitaxel in recurrent/metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma resistant to cremophor-based paclitaxel or docetaxel.

    PubMed

    Ley, Jessica; Wildes, Tanya M; Daly, Kristin; Oppelt, Peter; Adkins, Douglas

    2017-02-01

    The clinical benefit of nab-paclitaxel monotherapy for recurrent/metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (RM-HNSCC) that progressed on other taxanes (cremophor-based paclitaxel or docetaxel) is unknown. A retrospective analysis of patients treated at a single institution with nab-paclitaxel for taxane-resistant RM-HNSCC. The exploratory hypothesis was that nab-paclitaxel would result in clinical benefit (tumor response) in patients with taxane-resistant RM-HNSCC. Twelve patients who were treated with nab-paclitaxel monotherapy for taxane-resistant RM-HNSCC and met all eligibility criteria were identified. The majority of patients (n = 9; 75%) received three or more lines of therapy for RM-HNSCC. All patients had platin-resistant, and ten patients (83%) had cetuximab-resistant disease. Patients had RM-HNSCC that progressed on cremophor-based paclitaxel (8), docetaxel (1), or both (3). With prior taxane, the best tumor response was partial (PR) in 4 patients (33%), stable (SD) in 3 (25%), and progression in 5 (42%). The median time-to-progression (TTP) with prior taxane was 1.7 (range 0.7-9.0) months. The median interval from last dose of taxane to first dose of nab-paclitaxel was 3 (0.7-31.3) months. With nab-paclitaxel, tumor response occurred in two patients (17%; PR in both) and disease control (PR and SD) occurred in five (42%). Median TTP with nab-paclitaxel was 2.1 months (range 0.6-6.2), and median overall survival was 4.9 months (range 1.9-13.5). nab-Paclitaxel provided clinical benefit in some patients with taxane-resistant RM-HNSCC. The median TTP with nab-paclitaxel and with prior taxane were similar. This exploratory observation warrants further investigation in prospective studies.

  19. Activity of weekly paclitaxel-cetuximab chemotherapy in unselected patients with recurrent/metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Bernad, I Pajares; Trufero, J Martínez; Urquizu, L Calera; Pazo Cid, R A; de Miguel, A Cebollero; Agustin, M J; Lanzuela, M; Antón, A

    2017-06-01

    Standard treatment for recurrent/metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (RM-SCCHN) is based in on platinum and cetuximab combination therapy. Unfortunately, not all patients are candidates to receive platinum-based treatment, because of different conditions as comorbidity and poor performance status. Weekly paclitaxel and cetuximab (WPC) is an active therapeutic alternative, based on a phase II study, with less toxicity. Our main objective is to confirm its activity in unselected patients, mostly unfit for aggressive therapies, analysing also some clinically relevant prognostic factors (PFs). Retrospective data was collected for RM-SCCHN patients, treated at our institution between January 2008 and July 2014 with weekly paclitaxel (80 mg/m(2)) and cetuximab (400/250 mg/m(2)). 148 patients were treated. The objective response rate (OR) was as follows: 13 patients (8.78%) complete response (CR); 57 patients (38.51%) partial response (PR) and 30 patients (20.3%) stable disease (SD). Median overall survival (OS) was 10 months (95% CI 8.31-11.69) and median progression free survival (PFS) was 7 months (95% CI 5.88-8.12). Response to treatment showed independent prognosis relevance as PF in multivariate analysis for PFS and OS. Furthermore, decline in serum magnesium during the treatment was also an independent PF for OS. WPC activity was confirmed as a useful therapy on real-life unselected RM-SCCHN patients, with similar benefit to that obtained in the phase II study, and comparable to platinum and cetuximab based treatment, confirming its value in unfit patients. In addition to treatment response, a change in serum magnesium values during treatment was proved as independent PF on OS.

  20. Phase II clinical trial of metronomic chemotherapy with combined irinotecan and tegafur-gimeracil-oteracil potassium in metastatic and recurrent breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Hiroko; Fujii, Teruhiko; Toh, Uhi; Iwakuma, Nobutaka; Takahashi, Ryuji; Mishima, Mai; Takenaka, Miki; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Tanaka, Maki; Shirouzu, Kazuo

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the efficacy and safety of metronomic chemotherapy with combined irinotecan and tegafur-gimeracil-oteracil potassium (TS-1) in patients with metastatic and recurrent breast cancer (MRBC), and the association between irinotecan metabolizing enzyme UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) gene polymorphisms and adverse events. The study group comprised 40 patients aged 35-79 years. Irinotecan (60 mg/m(2) in 5 % dextrose) was administered by 120-min infusion on days 1, 8, and 15 every 4 weeks. TS-1 (prescribed in a standard quantity) was administered at 80 mg/m(2)/day orally on days 3-7, 10-14, and 17-21 every 4 weeks. Tumor response data were available for 34 patients. Median follow-up was 12 months (range 1-45 months). Response rate was 47 % (one complete and 15 partial responses). Stable disease was observed in 17 patients (50 %). One patient had disease progression (3 %). Median progression-free survival was 14 months [95 % confidence interval (CI), 10-26]. Median overall survival was 26 months (95 % CI not calculable owing to sample size), and 79.3 % of patients survived for 1 year. The most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events were neutropenia (15 %), leukopenia (12.5 %), diarrhea (7.5 %), and anemia (2.5 %). All other adverse events were grade 1 or 2. Treatment-related toxicity was generally modest and manageable. No significant correlation was observed between UGT1A1 polymorphisms and hematological or non-hematological toxicities. Metronomic chemotherapy with combined irinotecan and TS-1 was effective in MRBC patients. Adverse effects were mild and the regimen was safely administered without identifying UGT1A1 polymorphisms.

  1. A phase II study of temsirolimus and erlotinib in patients with recurrent and/or metastatic, platinum-refractory head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Julie E; Arias-Pulido, Hugo; Lee, Sang-Joon; Fekrazad, M Houman; Ozawa, Hiroyuki; Fertig, Elana; Howard, Jason; Bishop, Justin; Wang, Hao; Olson, Garth T; Spafford, Michael J; Jones, Dennie V; Chung, Christine H

    2013-05-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a validated target in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). In recurrent and/or metastatic (R/M) HNSCC, resistance to anti-EGFR therapy inevitably occurs. Downstream activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway is an established resistance mechanism. Concurrent mTOR blockade may improve efficacy of anti-EGFR therapy. Erlotinib 150 mg daily and temsirolimus 15 mg weekly were administered to patients with platinum-refractory R/M HNSCC and ECOG performance status 0-2. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Correlative studies determined PIK3CA and HRAS mutation status; p16, EGFR, pS6K, pAkt and PTEN expression; and pre- and post-treatment plasma levels of 20 immunomodulatory cytokines. Twelve patients enrolled; six withdrew within 6 weeks due to toxicity or death, prompting early closure of the trial. Grade ≥ 3 toxicities included fatigue, diarrhea, gastrostomy tube infection, peritonitis, pneumonia, dyspnea, and HN edema. Median PFS was 1.9 months. Median overall survival was 4.0 months. Six/12 tumors were p16(+), 9/11 lacked measurable PTEN expression, and 1/12 harbored a PIK3CA mutation. On exploratory analysis, high baseline plasma VEGF and interferon-gamma levels marginally associated with tumor progression. The combination of erlotinib and temsirolimus was poorly tolerated. Low prevalence of PTEN expression and 8% incidence of PIK3CA mutations indicate biological relevance of this pathway in R/M disease. Investigation of more tolerable combinations of EGFR and PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway inhibitors in selected HNSCC patients is warranted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Sorafenib Tosylate and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Liver Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-15

    Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Child-Pugh Class A; Stage III Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IV Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Hepatocellular Carcinoma

  3. Impact of lymphadenectomy on survival after recurrence in patients with advanced ovarian cancer without suspected lymph node metastasis.

    PubMed

    Paik, E Sun; Shim, Minhee; Choi, Hyun Jin; Lee, Yoo-Young; Kim, Tae-Joong; Lee, Jeong-Won; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Bae, Duk-Soo; Choi, Chel Hun

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the impact of pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy during primary debulking surgery (PDS) on recurrence pattern and survival after recurrence in patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) without suspected lymph node (LN) metastasis in preoperative imaging studies and intraoperative findings. A retrospective review of patients with FIGO stage III and IV EOC without suspected lymph node metastasis was performed. Patients with stage III EOC due to LN metastasis without peritoneal disease were excluded from this study. Survival comparisons for progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and survival after recurrence were performed between patients with or without lymphadenectomy. Of the 261 EOC patients fulfilling inclusion criteria, 194 (74.3%) experienced relapse and a further 132 (50.6%) died within a median follow-up period of 48months (range, 6-139months). Patterns of recurrence and CA-125 level at recurrence were not different between patients with lymphadenectomy and without lymphadenectomy; however, patients with lymphadenectomy showed longer survival after recurrence than those without lymphadenectomy (43 vs. 32months, p=0.013). This difference was pronounced in the group with residual tumor <1cm (48 vs. 30months, p=0.010). The survival advantage of lymphadenectomy after recurrence remained significant in multivariate analysis (HR 0.57, 95% CI 0.38-0.84, p=0.005). Lymphadenectomy during PDS was associated with longer survival, especially survival after recurrence. The underlying mechanism should be elucidated in future studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Advances and new perspectives in the treatment of metastatic colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Recondo, Gonzalo Jr; Díaz-Cantón, Enrique; de la Vega, Máximo; Greco, Martin; Recondo, Gonzalo Sr; Valsecchi, Matias E

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade we have witnessed an unprecedented outburst of new treatment approaches for the management of metastatic colon cancer. Anti-angiogenic drugs, epidermal growth factor receptor blockers and multi-kinase inhibitors have all resulted in small but consistent improvement in clinical outcomes. However, this progress has paradoxically leaded us into new challenges. In many cases the clinical development was done in parallel and the lack of head-to-head comparison evolved into circumstances where several valid new “standards of care” are available. Even though desirable in essence, the availability of many options as well as different possible combinations frequently leaves the busy clinician in the difficult situation of having to choose between one or the other, sometimes without solid evidence to support each decision. In addition, progress never stops and new agents are continuously tested. For these reason this review will try to summarize all the clinical trials that constitute the theoretical framework that support our daily practice but will also procure the reader with rational answers to common clinical dilemmas by critically appraising the current literature. Lastly, we will provide with a compilation of promising new agents that may soon become our next line of defense against this deadly disease. PMID:25024813

  5. Phase II trial of the combination of bryostatin-1 and cisplatin in advanced or recurrent carcinoma of the cervix: a New York Gynecologic Oncology Group study.

    PubMed

    Nezhat, Farr; Wadler, Scott; Muggia, Franco; Mandeli, John; Goldberg, Gary; Rahaman, Jamal; Runowicz, Carolyn; Murgo, Anthony J; Gardner, Ginger J

    2004-04-01

    Bryostatin-1 is a macrocyclic lactone that has been shown to regulate protein kinase C (PKC) activity and thereby potentially inhibit tumor invasion, angiogenesis, cell adhesion, and multidrug resistance. In preclinical experiments, bryostatin-1 induces tumor growth inhibition and enhances cytotoxicity when combined with other agents including cisplatin in cervical cancer cells. It was therefore anticipated that combination bryostatin-1-cisplatin therapy would be effective in patients with cervical cancer. The current study was conducted to evaluate this therapeutic approach in patients with recurrent or advanced-stage cervical carcinoma. An IRB-approved New York Gynecologic Oncology Group (NYGOG) trial was activated for patients with a histological diagnosis of metastatic cervical cancer or in patients with recurrent disease not eligible for surgery or radiation. Enrolled patients received bryostatin-1 (50-65 microg/m(2)) as a 1-h infusion followed by cisplatin (50 mg/m(2)). The combined treatment was administered every 21 days. Fourteen patients were enrolled. The majority of patients had squamous cell carcinoma. Ten out of fourteen patients had recurrent disease. Fifty percent of the patients received bryostatin at 50 microg/m(2) and 50% received bryostatin at 65 microg/m(2). Seventy-one percent completed two cycles of treatment. The most common grade II-III toxicities were myalgia, anemia, and nausea or vomiting. One patient developed a hypersensitivity reaction and one developed grade III nephrotoxicity. Seventy-one percent (10/14) of patients were evaluated for tumor response. Eight out of ten (80%) of patients had progressive disease and 2/10 (20%) had stable disease. There were no treatment responses. Despite promising preclinical data, this clinical trial indicates that the combination of cisplatin and bryostatin-1 at the doses and schedule used is not effective in patients with advanced-stage or recurrent cervical cancer. There is even the possibility of

  6. Sirolimus, Docetaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Metastatic Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-10

    Castration Levels of Testosterone; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; PSA Progression; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  7. Interstitial Photodynamic Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-11

    Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma

  8. Boron neutron capture therapy outcomes for advanced or recurrent head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Minoru; Kato, Ituro; Aihara, Teruhito; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Yoshimura, Kenichi; Niimi, Miyuki; Kimura, Yoshihiro; Ariyoshi, Yasunori; Haginomori, Shin-Ichi; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kinashi, Yuko; Masunaga, Shin-Ichiro; Fukushima, Masanori; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We retrospectively review outcomes of applying boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) to unresectable advanced or recurrent head and neck cancers. Patients who were treated with BNCT for either local recurrent or newly diagnosed unresectable head or neck cancers between December 2001 and September 2007 were included. Clinicopathological characteristics and clinical outcomes were retrieved from hospital records. Either a combination of borocaptate sodium and boronophenylalanine (BPA) or BPA alone were used as boron compounds. In all the treatment cases, the dose constraint was set to deliver a dose <10-12 Gy-eq to the skin or oral mucosa. There was a patient cohort of 62, with a median follow-up of 18.7 months (range, 0.7-40.8). A total of 87 BNCT procedures were performed. The overall response rate was 58% within 6 months after BNCT. The median survival time was 10.1 months from the time of BNCT. The 1- and 2-year overall survival (OS) rates were 43.1% and 24.2%, respectively. The major acute Grade 3 or 4 toxicities were hyperamylasemia (38.6%), fatigue (6.5%), mucositis/stomatitis (9.7%) and pain (9.7%), all of which were manageable. Three patients died of treatment-related toxicity. Three patients experienced carotid artery hemorrhage, two of whom had coexistent infection of the carotid artery. This study confirmed the feasibility of our dose-estimation method and that controlled trials are warranted.

  9. Stereotactic Radiosurgery Using CyberKnife in Treating Women With Advanced or Recurrent Gynecological Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Recurrent Vulvar Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IV Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer

  10. Hyperthermia and radiation therapy for locally advanced or recurrent breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Tamer; Sachdev, Sean; Sathiaseelan, Vythialinga; Helenowski, Irene; Abdelmoneim, Salah; Pierce, Margaret C; Woloschak, Gayle; Small, William; Mittal, Bharat; Kiel, Krystyna D

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to report the outcome and toxicity of combined hyperthermia (HT) and radiation therapy (RT) in treatment of locally advanced or loco-regionally recurrent breast cancer. Patients treated with HT and RT from January 1991 to December 2007 were reviewed. RT doses for previously irradiated patients were > 40 Gy and for RT naïve patients > 60 Gy, at 1.8-2 Gy/day. HT was planned for 2 sessions/week, immediately after RT, for a minimum of 20 min and for > 4 sessions. Superficial or interstitial applicators were used with temperature measured by superficial or interstitial thermistors based on target thickness. HT treatment was assessed by thermal equivalent dose (TED), > 42.5 °C and > 43 °C. Endpoints included treatment response, lack of local progression (local control), and survival. 127 patients received HT and RT to 167 sites. These included the intact breast (24.4%), chest wall/skin (67.7%), and breast/chest wall and nodes (7.9%). At a median follow-up of 13 months (mean 30 ± 38), improved overall survival was significantly associated with increasing RT dose (p < 0.0001), median TED 42.5 °C ≥ 200 min (p = 0.003), and local control (p = 0.0002). Local control at last follow-up was seen in 55.1% of patients. Complete response was significantly associated with median TED 42.5 °C ≥ 200 min (p = 0.002) and median TED 43 °C ≥ 100 min (p = 0.03). HT and RT are effective for locally advanced or recurrent breast cancer in patients that have been historically difficult to treat by RT alone. Over 50% of patients achieved control of locoregional disease. Overall survival was improved with local control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. HYPERTHERMIA AND RADIATION THERAPY FOR LOCALLY ADVANCED OR RECURRENT BREAST CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Refaat, Tamer; Sachdev, Sean; Sathiaseelan, Vythialinga; Helenowski, Irene; Abdelmoneim, Salah; Pierce, Margaret C; Woloschak, Gayle; Small, William; Mittal, Bharat; Kiel, Krystyna D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study aims to report the outcome and toxicity of combined hyperthermia (HT) and radiation therapy (RT) in treatment of locally advanced or loco-regionally recurrent breast cancer. Patients and Methods Patients treated with HT and RT from January 1991 to December 2007 were reviewed. RT doses for previously irradiated patients were >40 Gy and for RT naïve patients >60 Gy, at 1.8–2 Gy/day. HT was planned for 2 sessions/week, immediately after RT, for a minimum of 20 minutes and for >4 sessions. Superficial or interstitial applicators were used with temperature measured by superficial or interstitial thermisters based on target thickness. HT treatment was assessed by thermal equivalent dose (TED), >42.5°C and >43°C. Endpoints included treatment response, lack of local progression (local control), and survival. Results 127 patients received HT and RT to 167 sites. These included the intact breast (24.4%), chest wall/skin (67.7%), and breast/chest wall and nodes (7.9%). At a median follow-up of 13 months (mean 30±38), improved overall survival was significantly associated with increasing RT dose (p<0.0001), median TED 42.5°C≥200 minutes (p=0.003), and local control (p=0.0002). Local control at last follow-up was seen in 55.1% of patients. Complete response was significantly associated with median TED 42.5°C≥200 minutes (p=0.002) and median TED 43°C≥100 minutes (p=0.03). Conclusion HT and RT are effective for locally advanced or recurrent breast cancer in patients that have been historically difficult to treat by RT alone. Over 50% of patients achieved control of locoregional disease. Overall survival was improved with local control. PMID:25900383

  12. New advances on critical implications of tumor- and metastasis-initiating cells in cancer progression, treatment resistance and disease recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Mimeault, M.; Batra, S.K.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Accumulating lines of experimental evidence have revealed that the malignant transformation of multipotent tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cells into cancer stem/progenitor cells endowed with a high self-renewal capacity and aberrant multilineage differentiation potential may be at origin of the most types of human aggressive and recurrent cancers. Based on new cancer stem/progenitor cell concepts of carcinogenesis, it is suggested that a small subpopulation of highly tumorigenic and migrating cancer stem/progenitor cells, also designated as cancer- and metastasis-initiating cells, can provide critical roles for primary tumor growth, metastases at distant tissues and organs, treatment resistance and disease relapse. Particularly, cancer initiation and progression to locally invasive and metastatic stages is often associated with a persistent activation of distinct developmental signaling pathways in these immature cells during epithelial-mesenchymal transition program. The signaling cascades that are often deregulated in cancer stem/progenitor cells include hedgehog, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), Wnt/β-catenin, NOTCH, polycomb gene product BMI-1 and/or stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)/CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4). Importantly, the results from recent investigations have also indicated that different cancer subtypes may harbor distinct subsets and/or number of cancer-initiating cells during cancer progression as well as before or after therapy initiation and disease recurrence. Therefore, the identification of the molecular transforming events that frequently occur in cancer- and metastasis-initiating cells versus their differentiated progenies is of immense interest to develop new targeting approach for improving current therapies against aggressive, metastatic, recurrent and lethal cancers. PMID:20552555

  13. Combined nimotuzumab with chemoradiotherapy in patients with locally advanced or metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xiaojing; Gu, Qing; Zheng, Xiao; Liu, Guan; Feng, Wei; Lin, Xiao; Mao, Weimin

    2016-10-01

    To observe the efficacy and toxicities of combined nimotuzumab with chemoradiotherapy as the first-line treatment to advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). The clinical data of 43 patients with local advanced or metastatic ESCC treated with nimotuzumab combined with chemoradiotherapy in our hospital were included in this retrospective study. The overall response, adverse events, overall survival (OS), and progressive-free survival (PFS) were analyzed. At 1 month after the treatment, objective response rate (complete response [CR] + partial response [PR]) was 65.12%, and disease control rate (CR + PR + stable disease [SD]) was 86.05%, with one patient (2.33%) showing CR, 27 (62.79%) patients with PR, 9 (20.93%) with SD, and 6 (13.95%) with progressive disease, respectively. The median OS was 15.5 months, and the median PFS was 8.83 months. Multivariate analysis showed that the patients with more cycles (>6 times) of nimotuzumab treatment had better PFS and OS than those with fewer cycles (≤6 times). Patients received high-dose radiation (>55 Gy) had a better PFS than those patients received low-dose radiation (≤55 Gy). Three patients suffered severe esophageal fistula, and three patients showed superficial skin erosion. Chemoradiotherapy in combination with more than 6 weekly doses of nimotuzumab (>1400 mg) had a survival benefit to the patients with advanced ESCC. High-dose radiation therapy for primary tumor has been confirmed to improve PFS in these patients. Patients treated with nimotuzumab showed no increased risk of adverse events.

  14. Cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy for the treatment of advanced epithelial and recurrent ovarian carcinoma: a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Maja J; Ceranic, Miljan S; Latincic, Stojan M; Sabljak, Predrag V; Kecmanovic, Dragutin M; Sugarbaker, Paul H

    2017-09-07

    With standard treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), prognosis is very poor. The aim of this study is to show early and late results in patients who underwent cytoreductive surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy. This was a retrospective single centre study. All patients with advanced and recurrent ovarian cancer treated with cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) or modified early postoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (EPIC) were included in the study. In the period 1995-2014, 116 patients were treated, 55 with primary EOC and 61 with recurrent EOC. The mean age was 59 years (26-74). Statistically, median survival time was significantly longer in the group with primary advanced cancer of the ovary (41.3 months) compared to relapsed ovarian cancer (27.3 months). Survival for the primary EOC was 65 and 24% at 3 and 5 years, respectively. Survival for recurrent EOC was 33 and 16% at 3 and 5 years, respectively. Mortality was 1/116 (0.8%). Morbidity was 11/116 (9.5%). Peritoneal cancer index (PCI) was ≤20 in 59 (51%) patients and statistically, their average survival was significantly longer than in the group of 57 (49%) patients with PCI >20 (p = 0.014). In advanced or recurrent EOC, a curative therapeutic approach was pursued that combined optimal cytoreductive surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy. PCI and timing of the intervention (primary or recurrent) were the strongest independent prognostic factors.

  15. Differentiation between Treatment-Induced Necrosis and Recurrent Tumors in Patients with Metastatic Brain Tumors: Comparison among (11)C-Methionine-PET, FDG-PET, MR Permeability Imaging, and MRI-ADC-Preliminary Results.

    PubMed

    Tomura, N; Kokubun, M; Saginoya, T; Mizuno, Y; Kikuchi, Y

    2017-08-01

    In patients with metastatic brain tumors after gamma knife radiosurgery, the superiority of PET using (11)C-methionine for differentiating radiation necrosis and recurrent tumors has been accepted. To evaluate the feasibility of MR permeability imaging, it was compared with PET using (11)C-methionine, FDG-PET, and DWI for differentiating radiation necrosis from recurrent tumors. The study analyzed 18 lesions from 15 patients with metastatic brain tumors who underwent gamma knife radiosurgery. Ten lesions were identified as recurrent tumors by an operation. In MR permeability imaging, the transfer constant between intra- and extravascular extracellular spaces (/minute), extravascular extracellular space, the transfer constant from the extravascular extracellular space to plasma (/minute), the initial area under the signal intensity-time curve, contrast-enhancement ratio, bolus arrival time (seconds), maximum slope of increase (millimole/second), and fractional plasma volume were calculated. ADC was also acquired. On both PET using (11)C-methionine and FDG-PET, the ratio of the maximum standard uptake value of the lesion divided by the maximum standard uptake value of the symmetric site in the contralateral cerebral hemisphere was measured ((11)C-methionine ratio and FDG ratio, respectively). The receiver operating characteristic curve was used for analysis. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for differentiating radiation necrosis from recurrent tumors was the best for the (11)C-methionine ratio (0.90) followed by the contrast-enhancement ratio (0.81), maximum slope of increase (millimole/second) (0.80), the initial area under the signal intensity-time curve (0.78), fractional plasma volume (0.76), bolus arrival time (seconds) (0.76), the transfer constant between intra- and extravascular extracellular spaces (/minute) (0.74), extravascular extracellular space (0.68), minimum ADC (0.60), the transfer constant from the extravascular

  16. Role of salvage radiotherapy for regional lymph node recurrence after radical surgery in advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byoung Hyuck; Kim, Jae-Sung; Kim, Hyung-Ho; Park, Do Joong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the role of salvage radiotherapy (RT) for the treatment of regional lymph node recurrence (RLNR) after radical surgery in advanced gastric cancer. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed medical records of 26 patients who underwent salvage treatment after diagnosis of RLNR between 2006 and 2011. Patients with peritoneal seeding or distant metastasis were excluded. Eighteen patients received RT with or without chemotherapy and the other 8 did chemotherapy only without RT. A three-dimensional conformal RT was performed with median dose of 56 Gy (range, 44 to 60 Gy). Sixteen patients had fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy, 5 did taxane-based chemotherapy, and irinotecan was applied in 4. Results With a median follow-up of 20 months (range, 5 to 57 months), median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) after diagnosis of RLNR were 29 months and 12 months in the entire patients, respectively. Radiotherapy (p = 0.007) and disease-free interval (p = 0.033) were statistically significant factors for OS in multivariate analysis. Median OS was 36 months in patients who received RT and 16 months in those who did not. Furthermore, delivery of RT (p < 0.001), complete remission after salvage treatment (p = 0.040) and performance status (p = 0.023) were associated with a significantly better PFS. Gastrointestinal toxicities from RT were mild in most patients. Conclusion Salvage RT combined with systemic chemotherapy may be an effective treatment managing RLNR from advanced gastric cancer. PMID:24137560

  17. Oncolytic Reovirus in Combination With Chemotherapy in Metastatic or Recurrent Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients With KRAS-Activated Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Villalona-Calero, Miguel A.; Lam, Elaine; Otterson, Gregory A.; Zhao, Weiqiang; Timmons, Matthew; Subramaniam, Deepa; Hade, Erinn M.; Gill, George M.; Coffey, Matthew; Selvaggi, Giovanni; Bertino, Erin; Chao, Bo; Knopp, Michael V.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The type 3 Dearing reovirus (Reolysin) is a naturally occurring virus that preferentially infects and causes oncolysis in tumor cells with a Ras-activated pathway. It induces host immunity and cell cycle arrest and acts synergistically with cytotoxic agents. METHODS This study evaluated Reolysin combined with paclitaxel and carboplatin in patients with metastatic/recurrent KRAS-mutated or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–mutated/amplified non–small cell lung cancer. RESULTS Thirty-seven patients were treated. Molecular alterations included 20 KRAS mutations, 10 EGFR amplifications, 3 EGFR mutations, and 4 BRAF-V600E mutations. In total, 242 cycles (median, 4; range, 1-47) were completed. The initial doses were area under the curve (AUC) 6 mg/mL/min for carboplatin, 200 mg/m2 for paclitaxel on day 1, and 3×1010 50% tissue culture infective dose for Reolysin on days 1 to 5 of each 21-day cycle. Because of diarrhea and febrile neutropenia (in the first 2 patients), subsequent doses were reduced to 175 mg/m2 for paclitaxel and AUC 5 mg/mL/min for carboplatin. Toxicities included fatigue, diarrhea, nausea/vomiting, neutropenia, arthralgia/myalgia, anorexia, and electrolyte abnormalities. Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.0 responses included the following: partial response for 11 patients, stable disease (SD) for 20 patients, progressive disease for 4 patients, and not evaluable for 2 patients (objective response rate, 31%; 90% 1-sided lower confidence interval, 21%). Four SD patients had >40% positron emission tomography standardized uptake value reductions. The median progression-free survival, median overall survival, and 12-month overall survival rate were 4 months, 13.1 months, and 57%, respectively. Seven patients were alive after a median follow-up of 34.2 months; they included 2 patients without disease progression at 37 and 50 months. CONCLUSIONS Reolysin in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin was well tolerated. The

  18. Phase II trial of dasatinib for recurrent or metastatic c-KIT expressing adenoid cystic carcinoma and for nonadenoid cystic malignant salivary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wong, S. J.; Karrison, T.; Hayes, D. N.; Kies, M. S.; Cullen, K. J.; Tanvetyanon, T.; Argiris, A.; Takebe, N.; Lim, D.; Saba, N. F.; Worden, F. P.; Gilbert, J.; Lenz, H. J.; Razak, A. R. A.; Roberts, J. D.; Vokes, E. E.; Cohen, E. E. W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a subtype of malignant salivary gland tumors (MSGT), in which 90% of cases express cKIT. Dasatinib is a potent and selective inhibitor of five oncogenic protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs)/kinase families including cKIT. We conducted a phase II study to determine the antitumor activity of dasatinib in ACC and non-ACC MSGT. Patients and methods In a two-stage design, patients with progressive, recurrent/metastatic ACC (+cKIT) and non-ACC MSGT (separate cohort) were treated with dasatinib 70 mg p.o. b.i.d. Response was assessed every 8 weeks using RECIST. Results Of 54 patients: 40 ACC, 14 non-ACC (1, ineligible excluded); M:F = 28 : 26, median age 56 years (range 20–82 years), ECOG performance status 0 : 1 : 2 = 24 : 28 : 2, prior radiation: 44, prior chemotherapy: 21. The most frequent adverse events (AEs) (as % of patients, worst grade 2 or higher) were: fatigue (28%), nausea (19%), headache (15%), lymphopenia (7%), dyspnea (11%), alanine aminotransferase increased (7%), anorexia (7%), vomiting (7%), alkaline phosphatase increased (6%), diarrhea (6%), neutropenia (6%), and noncardiac chest pain (6%). No grade 4 AE occurred, 15 patients experienced a grade 3 AE, primarily dyspnea (5) and fatigue (4), and cardiac toxicity (1 prolonged QTc). Among ACC patients, best response to dasatinib: 1 patient (2.5%) had partial response, 20 patients (50%) had stable disease (SD) (3–14 months), 12 patients (30%) had PD, 2 withdrew, 3 discontinued therapy due to AE, and 2 died before cycle 2. Median progression-free survival was 4.8 months. Median overall survival was 14.5 months. For 14 assessable non-ACC patients, none had objective response, triggering early stopping rule. Seven had SD (range 1–7 months), 4 PD, 2 discontinued therapy due to AE, and 1 died before cycle 2. Conclusion Although there was only one objective response, dasatinib is well tolerated, with tumor stabilization achieved by 50% of ACC patients. Dasatinib

  19. Phase II Study of Temsirolimus in Women With Recurrent or Metastatic Endometrial Cancer: A Trial of the NCIC Clinical Trials Group

    PubMed Central

    Oza, Amit M.; Elit, Laurie; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Biagi, Jim; Provencher, Diane Michele; Gotlieb, Walter H.; Hoskins, Paul J.; Ghatage, Prafull; Tonkin, Katia S.; Mackay, Helen J.; Mazurka, John; Sederias, Joana; Ivy, Percy; Dancey, Janet E.; Eisenhauer, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is a tumor suppressor gene, and loss of function mutations are common and appear to be important in the pathogenesis of endometrial carcinomas. Loss of PTEN causes deregulated phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/serine-threonine kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/Akt/mTOR) signaling which may provide neoplastic cells with a selective survival advantage by enhancing angiogenesis, protein translation, and cell cycle progression. Temsirolimus, an ester derivative of rapamycin that inhibits mTOR, was evaluated in this setting. Patients and Methods Sequential phase II studies evaluated single-agent activity of temsirolimus in women with recurrent or metastatic chemotherapy-naive or chemotherapy-treated endometrial cancer. Temsirolimus 25 mg intravenously was administered weekly in 4-week cycles. Results In the chemotherapy-naive group, 33 patients received a median of four cycles (range, one to 23 cycles). Of the 29 patients evaluable for response, four (14%) had an independently confirmed partial response and 20 (69%) had stable disease as best response, with a median duration of 5.1 months (range, 3.7 to 18.4 months) and 9.7 months (range, 2.1 to 14.6 months). Only five patients (18%) had progressive disease. In the chemotherapy-treated group, 27 patients received a median of three cycles (range, one to six cycles). Of the 25 patients evaluable for response, one (4%) had an independently confirmed partial response, and 12 patients (48%) had stable disease, with a median duration of 4.3 months (range, 3.6 to 4.9 months) and 3.7 months (range, 2.4 to 23.2 months). PTEN loss (immunohistochemistry and mutational analysis) and molecular markers of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway did not correlate with the clinical outcome. Conclusion mTOR inhibition with temsirolimus has encouraging single-agent activity in endometrial cancer which is higher in chemotherapy-naive patients than in chemotherapy-treated patients and is independent of PTEN

  20. Biomarkers predict enhanced clinical outcomes with afatinib versus methotrexate in patients with second-line recurrent and/or metastatic head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Cohen, E E W; Licitra, L F; Burtness, B; Fayette, J; Gauler, T; Clement, P M; Grau, J J; Del Campo, J M; Mailliez, A; Haddad, R I; Vermorken, J B; Tahara, M; Guigay, J; Geoffrois, L; Merlano, M C; Dupuis, N; Krämer, N; Cong, X J; Gibson, N; Solca, F; Ehrnrooth, E; Machiels, J-P H

    2017-10-01

    In the phase III LUX-Head & Neck 1 (LUX-H&N1) trial, second-line afatinib significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) versus methotrexate in patients with recurrent/metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (R/M HNSCC). Here, we evaluated association of prespecified biomarkers with efficacy outcomes in LUX-H&N1. Randomized patients with R/M HNSCC and progression following ≥2 cycles of platinum therapy received afatinib (40 mg/day) or methotrexate (40 mg/m2/week). Tumor/serum samples were collected at study entry for patients who volunteered for inclusion in biomarker analyses. Tumor biomarkers, including p16 (prespecified subgroup; all tumor subsites), EGFR, HER2, HER3, c-MET and PTEN, were assessed using tissue microarray cores and slides; serum protein was evaluated using the VeriStrat® test. Biomarkers were correlated with efficacy outcomes. Of 483 randomized patients, 326 (67%) were included in the biomarker analyses; baseline characteristics were consistent with the overall study population. Median PFS favored afatinib over methotrexate in patients with p16-negative [2.7 versus 1.6 months; HR 0.70 (95% CI 0.50-0.97)], EGFR-amplified [2.8 versus 1.5 months; HR 0.53 (0.33-0.85)], HER3-low [2.8 versus 1.8 months; HR 0.57 (0.37-0.88)], and PTEN-high [1.6 versus 1.4 months; HR 0.55 (0.29-1.05)] tumors. Afatinib also improved PFS in combined subsets of patients with p16-negative and EGFR-amplified tumors [2.7 versus 1.5 months; HR 0.47 (0.28-0.80)], and patients with p16-negative tumors who were EGFR therapy-naïve [4.0 versus 2.4 months; HR 0.55 (0.31-0.98)]. PFS was improved in afatinib-treated patients who were VeriStrat 'Good' versus 'Poor' [2.7 versus 1.5 months; HR 0.71 (0.49-0.94)], but no treatment interaction was observed. Afatinib improved tumor response versus methotrexate in all subsets analyzed except for those with p16-positive disease (n = 35). Subgroups of HNSCC patients who may achieve increased benefit

  1. A randomized, phase II study of afatinib versus cetuximab in metastatic or recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck†

    PubMed Central

    Seiwert, T. Y.; Fayette, J.; Cupissol, D.; del Campo, J. M.; Clement, P. M.; Hitt, R.; Degardin, M.; Zhang, W.; Blackman, A.; Ehrnrooth, E.; Cohen, E. E. W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Afatinib is an oral, irreversible ErbB family blocker that has shown activity in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutated lung cancer. We hypothesized that the agent would have greater antitumor activity compared with cetuximab in recurrent or metastatic (R/M) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients, whose disease has progressed after platinum-containing therapy. Patients and methods An open-label, randomized, phase II trial was conducted in 43 centers; 124 patients were randomized (1 : 1) to either afatinib (50 mg/day) or cetuximab (250 mg/m2/week) until disease progression or intolerable adverse events (AEs) (stage I), with optional crossover (stage II). The primary end point was tumor shrinkage before crossover assessed by investigator (IR) and independent central review (ICR). Results A total of 121 patients were treated (61 afatinib, 60 cetuximab) and 68 crossed over to stage II (32 and 36 respectively). In stage I, mean tumor shrinkage by IR/ICR was 10.4%/16.6% with afatinib and 5.4%/10.1% with cetuximab (P = 0.46/0.30). Objective response rate was 16.1%/8.1% with afatinib and 6.5%/9.7% with cetuximab (IR/ICR). Comparable disease control rates were observed with afatinib (50%) and cetuximab (56.5%) by IR; similar results were seen by ICR. Most common grade ≥3 drug-related AEs (DRAEs) were rash/acne (18% versus 8.3%), diarrhea (14.8% versus 0%), and stomatitis/mucositis (11.5% versus 0%) with afatinib and cetuximab, respectively. Patients with DRAEs leading to treatment discontinuation were 23% with afatinib and 5% with cetuximab. In stage II, disease control rate (IR/ICR) was 38.9%/33.3% with afatinib and 18.8%/18.8% with cetuximab. Conclusion Afatinib showed antitumor activity comparable to cetuximab in R/M HNSCC in this exploratory phase II trial, although more patients on afatinib discontinued treatment due to AEs. Sequential EGFR/ErbB treatment with afatinib and cetuximab provided sustained clinical benefit in patients

  2. Phase II trial of dasatinib for recurrent or metastatic c-KIT expressing adenoid cystic carcinoma and for nonadenoid cystic malignant salivary tumors.

    PubMed

    Wong, S J; Karrison, T; Hayes, D N; Kies, M S; Cullen, K J; Tanvetyanon, T; Argiris, A; Takebe, N; Lim, D; Saba, N F; Worden, F P; Gilbert, J; Lenz, H J; Razak, A R A; Roberts, J D; Vokes, E E; Cohen, E E W

    2016-02-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a subtype of malignant salivary gland tumors (MSGT), in which 90% of cases express cKIT. Dasatinib is a potent and selective inhibitor of five oncogenic protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs)/kinase families including cKIT. We conducted a phase II study to determine the antitumor activity of dasatinib in ACC and non-ACC MSGT. In a two-stage design, patients with progressive, recurrent/metastatic ACC (+cKIT) and non-ACC MSGT (separate cohort) were treated with dasatinib 70 mg p.o. b.i.d. Response was assessed every 8 weeks using RECIST. Of 54 patients: 40 ACC, 14 non-ACC (1, ineligible excluded); M:F = 28 : 26, median age 56 years (range 20-82 years), ECOG performance status 0 : 1 : 2 = 24 : 28 : 2, prior radiation: 44, prior chemotherapy: 21. The most frequent adverse events (AEs) (as % of patients, worst grade 2 or higher) were: fatigue (28%), nausea (19%), headache (15%), lymphopenia (7%), dyspnea (11%), alanine aminotransferase increased (7%), anorexia (7%), vomiting (7%), alkaline phosphatase increased (6%), diarrhea (6%), neutropenia (6%), and noncardiac chest pain (6%). No grade 4 AE occurred, 15 patients experienced a grade 3 AE, primarily dyspnea (5) and fatigue (4), and cardiac toxicity (1 prolonged QTc). Among ACC patients, best response to dasatinib: 1 patient (2.5%) had partial response, 20 patients (50%) had stable disease (SD) (3-14 months), 12 patients (30%) had PD, 2 withdrew, 3 discontinued therapy due to AE, and 2 died before cycle 2. Median progression-free survival was 4.8 months. Median overall survival was 14.5 months. For 14 assessable non-ACC patients, none had objective response, triggering early stopping rule. Seven had SD (range 1-7 months), 4 PD, 2 discontinued therapy due to AE, and 1 died before cycle 2. Although there was only one objective response, dasatinib is well tolerated, with tumor stabilization achieved by 50% of ACC patients. Dasatinib demonstrated no activity in non-ACC MSGT. © The Author 2015

  3. Superior therapeutic efficacy of nab-paclitaxel over cremophor-based paclitaxel in locally advanced and metastatic models of human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Rajeshkumar, N V; Yabuuchi, Shinichi; Pai, Shweta G; Tong, Zeen; Hou, Shihe; Bateman, Scott; Pierce, Daniel W; Heise, Carla; Von Hoff, Daniel D; Maitra, Anirban; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2016-08-09

    Albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel, nab-PTX) plus gemcitabine (GEM) combination has demonstrated efficient antitumour activity and statistically significant overall survival of patients with metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) compared with GEM monotherapy. This regimen is currently approved as a standard of care treatment option for patients with metastatic PDAC. It is unclear whether cremophor-based PTX combined with GEM provide a similar level of therapeutic efficacy in PDAC. We comprehensively explored the antitumour efficacy, effect on metastatic dissemination, tumour stroma and survival advantage following GEM, PTX and nab-PTX as monotherapy or in combination with GEM in a locally advanced, and a highly metastatic orthotopic model of human PDAC. Nab-PTX treatment resulted in significantly higher paclitaxel tumour plasma ratio (1.98-fold), robust stromal depletion, antitumour efficacy (3.79-fold) and survival benefit compared with PTX treatment. PTX plus GEM treatment showed no survival gain over GEM monotherapy. However, nab-PTX in combination with GEM decreased primary tumour burden, metastatic dissemination and significantly increased median survival of animals compared with either agents alone. These therapeutic effects were accompanied by depletion of dense fibrotic tumour stroma and decreased proliferation of carcinoma cells. Notably, nab-PTX monotherapy was equivalent to nab-PTX plus GEM in providing survival advantage to mice in a highly aggressive metastatic PDAC model, indicating that nab-PTX could potentially stop the progression of late-stage pancreatic cancer. Our data confirmed that therapeutic efficacy of PTX and nab-PTX vary widely, and the contention that these agents elicit similar antitumour response was not supported. The addition of PTX to GEM showed no survival advantage, concluding that a clinical combination of PTX and GEM may unlikely to provide significant survival advantage over GEM monotherapy and may not be a

  4. Superior therapeutic efficacy of nab-paclitaxel over cremophor-based paclitaxel in locally advanced and metastatic models of human pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rajeshkumar, N V; Yabuuchi, Shinichi; Pai, Shweta G; Tong, Zeen; Hou, Shihe; Bateman, Scott; Pierce, Daniel W; Heise, Carla; Von Hoff, Daniel D; Maitra, Anirban; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel, nab-PTX) plus gemcitabine (GEM) combination has demonstrated efficient antitumour activity and statistically significant overall survival of patients with metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) compared with GEM monotherapy. This regimen is currently approved as a standard of care treatment option for patients with metastatic PDAC. It is unclear whether cremophor-based PTX combined with GEM provide a similar level of therapeutic efficacy in PDAC. Methods: We comprehensively explored the antitumour efficacy, effect on metastatic dissemination, tumour stroma and survival advantage following GEM, PTX and nab-PTX as monotherapy or in combination with GEM in a locally advanced, and a highly metastatic orthotopic model of human PDAC. Results: Nab-PTX treatment resulted in significantly higher paclitaxel tumour plasma ratio (1.98-fold), robust stromal depletion, antitumour efficacy (3.79-fold) and survival benefit compared with PTX treatment. PTX plus GEM treatment showed no survival gain over GEM monotherapy. However, nab-PTX in combination with GEM decreased primary tumour burden, metastatic dissemination and significantly increased median survival of animals compared with either agents alone. These therapeutic effects were accompanied by depletion of dense fibrotic tumour stroma and decreased proliferation of carcinoma cells. Notably, nab-PTX monotherapy was equivalent to nab-PTX plus GEM in providing survival advantage to mice in a highly aggressive metastatic PDAC model, indicating that nab-PTX could potentially stop the progression of late-stage pancreatic cancer. Conclusions: Our data confirmed that therapeutic efficacy of PTX and nab-PTX vary widely, and the contention that these agents elicit similar antitumour response was not supported. The addition of PTX to GEM showed no survival advantage, concluding that a clinical combination of PTX and GEM may unlikely to provide significant survival

  5. Vorinostat and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Nasopharyngeal Cancer or Nasal Natural Killer T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-10

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Undifferentiated Carcinoma AJCC v7

  6. Outpatient advance care planning for patients with metastatic cancer: a pilot quality improvement initiative.

    PubMed

    Obel, Jennifer; Brockstein, Bruce; Marschke, Michael; Robicsek, Ari; Konchak, Chad; Sefa, Meredith; Ziomek, Nicole; Benfield, Tiffany; Peterson, Carrie; Gustafson, Cory; Eriksson, Joann; Harper, Abigail; Tabachow, Cory; Raymond, Michael; Hensing, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Despite American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines recommending that oncologists discuss advance care planning (ACP) with patients with stage IV cancer early in treatment, in standard practice ACP remains a late step of a terminal illness. ACP preserves comfort and dignity at the end of life, ensuring patients receive the care that they desire. A feasibility study in patients with stage IV cancer was developed to test whether incorporating ACP immediately after a stage IV cancer diagnosis is feasible. Inclusion criteria were consecutive new gastrointestinal and thoracic oncology patients treated by one of two oncologists. The project included creation of new workflow; development of an ACP patient education guidebook; training seminars for oncology staff; and enhancements to the electronic health record (EHR) to improve ACP documentation. The oncologists recorded 33 of 48 (69%) advance directive notes (ADNs) and 22 of 48 (46%) code status orders (CSOs) in the EHR of patients newly diagnosed with stage IV cancer by following ACP protocol during the 6-month trial period. Twenty-one of 33 ADNs were entered within 7 days of first consultation. The median time to ADN placement was 1 day after consultation. Twenty-two of 33 patients with ADNs had CSOs placed, of which 16 were do-not-resuscitate (DNR) and 6 were full code. One year prior to the feasibility study, only 1 of 75 deceased patients of the two oncologists had outpatient ADNs and CSOs. Outpatient ACP is feasible early in the care of patients with stage IV cancer through systematic improvement in workflow and motivated providers. Education and infrastructure were pivotal to routine development of advance care plans.

  7. Total pelvic exenteration for the treatment of advanced primary or recurrent pelvic neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Carballo, Laura; Enríquez-Navascués, José M; Saralegui, Yolanda; Placer, Carlos; Timoteo, Ander; Borda, Nerea; Carrillo, Alberto; Sainz-Lete, Aitor

    2015-03-01

    Complete resection with clear margins in locally advanced pelvic visceral tumors, primary or recurrent, occasionally requires total pelvic exenteration (TPE). We reviewed the results of EFA in 34 consecutive patients operated on between June 2006 and December 2013. Median age was 62 (40-82) years; 24 (70%) were male. The tumor origin most frequent was advanced primary rectal tumor (APRT), with 19 cases (55.9%) and most common type of exenteration was supraelevator (61.8%). R₀ resection was achieved in 24 (70.6%) patients and in 16 (85%) of the APRT. Fifteen (79%) patients had pT₄ APRT, and 4 (20%) pN +. Reconstruction of the bowel and bladder was performed with two stomas in 17 cases (50%), colorectal anastomosis and Bricker in 11 (32.3%) and wet double barreled colostomy in 6 (17.6%). There was no postoperative mortality; 23 (67,5%) patients had complications, and 5 (14.6%) required a postoperative reoperation to solve them. Median follow-up was 23 (13-45) months. Overall survival (OS) and disease free survival (DFS) at 2 years were 67% and 58% respectively, and the median OS and DFS was 59 months (95% CI 26-110) and 39 months (95% CI 14-64), respectively. The DFS of R₀ was significantly better (p=0.003) than R₁. TPE is a potentially curative procedure for advanced pelvic visceral malignancies with similar morbi-mortality than other extended excisional surgery. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Intraoperative Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced and Recurrent Soft-Tissue Sarcomas in Adults

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Phuoc T.; Hara, Wendy; Su Zheng; Lin, H. Jill; Bendapudi, Pavan K.; Norton, Jeffrey; Teng, Nelson; King, Christopher R.; Kapp, Daniel S.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze the outcomes of and identify prognostic factors for patients treated with surgery and intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for locally advanced and recurrent soft-tissue sarcoma in adults from a single institution. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 50 consecutive patients treated with IORT to 62 sites of disease. Primary sites included retroperitoneum-pelvis (78%), extremity (8%), and other (14%). Seventy percent of patients had recurrent disease failing prior surgery (70%) and/or radiation (32%). Mean disease-free interval (DFI) before IORT was 1.9 years (range, 2 weeks-5.4 years). The IORT was delivered with orthovoltage X-rays using individually sized beveled cone applicators. Clinical characteristics were as follows: mean tumor size, 10 cm (range, 1-25 cm); high-grade histologic subtype (72%); and mean dose, 1,159 cGy (range, 600-1,600 cGy). Postoperative radiation or chemotherapy was administered to 37% of IORT Sites and 32% of patients, respectively. Outcomes measured were infield control (IFC), locoregional control (LRC), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and treatment-related complications. Mean and median follow-up of alive patients were 59 and 35 months, respectively. Results: Kaplan-Meier 5-year IFC, LRC, DMFS, and DSS probabilities for the entire group were 55%, 26%, 51%, and 25%, respectively. Prognostic factors found to be significant (p < 0.05) on multivariate analysis were prior DFI and tumor size for LRC, extremity location and leiomyosarcoma histologic subtype for DMFS, and prior DFI for DSS. Our cohort had five Grade 3/4 complications associated with treatment or a 5-year Kaplan-Meier Grade 3/4 complication-free survival rate of 85%. Conclusions: IORT after tumor reductive surgery is well tolerated and seems to confer IFC in carefully selected patients.

  9. Transvaginal single-incision mesh reconstruction for recurrent or advanced anterior vaginal wall prolapse.

    PubMed

    Marschke, J; Hengst, L; Schwertner-Tiepelmann, N; Beilecke, K; Tunn, R

    2015-05-01

    Single-incision transvaginal mesh for reconstruction of Level I and II prolapses in women with recurrent or advanced prolapse. We evaluated functional, anatomical, sonomorphological and quality-of-life outcome. Data were collected retrospectively for preoperative parameters and at follow-up visits. Anatomical cure was assessed with vaginal examination using the ICS-POP-Q system; introital-ultrasound scan for postvoidal residual and description of mesh characteristics was performed. We applied a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the German Pelvic Floor Questionnaire to assess quality-of-life. Seventy women with cystocele (III: 61.3%/IV: 16%), all post-hysterectomy and in majority (81.4%) after previous cystocele repair, were operated using a single-incision transvaginal technique. Overall anatomical success rate was 95.7% with significant improvement in quality-of-life (p < 0.0001). Mesh erosion occurred in 5.7%, one patient presented symptomatic vaginal vault prolapse. Postvoidal residual declined significantly (58 vs. 2.9%). Sonographic mesh length was 55.7% of implanted mesh with a wide range of mesh position, but no signs of mesh dislocation. There was no de novo dyspareunia reported, one case of preoperative existing dyspareunia worsened. No severe adverse event was observed. We hereby present a trial of a high-risk group of patients requiring reconstruction of anterior and apical vaginal wall in mostly recurrent prolapse situation. Our data support the hypothesis of improved anatomical and functional results and less mesh shrinkage caused by the single-incision technique with fixation in sacrospinous ligament in combination with modification in mesh quality compared to former multi-incision techniques.

  10. Identification of EGFR expression status association with metastatic lymph node density (ND) by expression microarray analysis of advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Ema, Akira; Waraya, Mina; Yamashita, Keishi; Kokubo, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Hirosuke; Hoshi, Keika; Shinkai, Yoshiko; Kawamata, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kazunori; Nishimiya, Hiroshi; Katada, Natsuya; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic lymph node density (ND) has been reproducibly proven to be a prognostic factor in gastric cancer. The molecular mechanisms that underlie this aggressiveness are underexplored. Here, we aimed to identify molecules associated with this unique phenotype. Tumor specimens from patients with stage III gastric cancer with high or low ND (n = 4 for both) were compared at the mRNA level using Affymetrix microarray (harboring 54,675 genes). The expression data were prioritized, and genes that correlated with ND were selected. Ultimately, the EGFR was validated as such a candidate molecule in patients with primary advanced gastric cancer who underwent standard treatment (n = 167). Expression data of the microarray were prioritized based on gene expression ratio and frequency of gene expression. The first priority genes to be selected were genes that are known to be amplified in cancer, which included NKX2.1, CHST9, CTNND2, SLC25A27, FGFR2, EGFR, and PTGER1. Of these genes, the EGFR gene was of particular interest. EGFR expression in primary gastric cancer was examined using immunohistochemistry (IHC). The Student's t-test elucidated a significant difference in EGFR expression between IHC 2+/3+ and IHC 1+ according to ND (P = 0.0035). The Chi-square test also indicated a significant difference between high and low levels of EGFR immunohistochemical staining (IHC2+/3+ and IHC1+, respectively) and ND status (P = 0.0023). According to the least squares method, as ND increased, the risk that EGFR staining levels changed from IHC 1+ to IHC 2+ also increased. In this study, we determined that high EGFR expression may underlie the aggressive mechanism of advanced gastric cancer with high ND. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Identification of EGFR expression status association with metastatic lymph node density (ND) by expression microarray analysis of advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ema, Akira; Waraya, Mina; Yamashita, Keishi; Kokubo, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Hirosuke; Hoshi, Keika; Shinkai, Yoshiko; Kawamata, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kazunori; Nishimiya, Hiroshi; Katada, Natsuya; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic lymph node density (ND) has been reproducibly proven to be a prognostic factor in gastric cancer. The molecular mechanisms that underlie this aggressiveness are underexplored. Here, we aimed to identify molecules associated with this unique phenotype. Tumor specimens from patients with stage III gastric cancer with high or low ND (n = 4 for both) were compared at the mRNA level using Affymetrix microarray (harboring 54,675 genes). The expression data were prioritized, and genes that correlated with ND were selected. Ultimately, the EGFR was validated as such a candidate molecule in patients with primary advanced gastric cancer who underwent standard treatment (n = 167). Expression data of the microarray were prioritized based on gene expression ratio and frequency of gene expression. The first priority genes to be selected were genes that are known to be amplified in cancer, which included NKX2.1, CHST9, CTNND2, SLC25A27, FGFR2, EGFR, and PTGER1. Of these genes, the EGFR gene was of particular interest. EGFR expression in primary gastric cancer was examined using immunohistochemistry (IHC). The Student's t-test elucidated a significant difference in EGFR expression between IHC 2+/3+ and IHC 1+ according to ND (P = 0.0035). The Chi-square test also indicated a significant difference between high and low levels of EGFR immunohistochemical staining (IHC2+/3+ and IHC1+, respectively) and ND status (P = 0.0023). According to the least squares method, as ND increased, the risk that EGFR staining levels changed from IHC 1+ to IHC 2+ also increased. In this study, we determined that high EGFR expression may underlie the aggressive mechanism of advanced gastric cancer with high ND. PMID:25154973

  12. Ixabepilone alone or with cetuximab as first-line treatment for advanced/metastatic triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Trédan, Olivier; Campone, Mario; Jassem, Jacek; Vyzula, Rostislav; Coudert, Bruno; Pacilio, Carmen; Prausova, Jana; Hardy-Bessard, Anne-Claire; Arance, Ana; Mukhopadhyay, Pralay; Aloe, Alessandra; Roché, Henri

    2015-02-01

    Despite high initial sensitivity to chemotherapy, TNBC is associated with a poor prognosis, highlighting the need for novel therapeutic strategies. The aim of this multicenter, randomized, open-label phase II trial was to assess the efficacy of ixabepilone as monotherapy, and the combination of ixabepilone with cetuximab, as first-line treatment in patients with triple-negative locally advanced nonresectable and/or metastatic breast cancer. Women were randomly assigned to receive either ixabepilone (40 mg/m(2)) every 21 days (n = 40), or ixabepilone (40 mg/m(2)) every 21 days with cetuximab (400 mg/m(2) loading dose, followed by 250 mg/m(2)) once weekly (n = 39). The primary end point of the trial was to estimate the response rates of ixabepilone monotherapy and ixabepilone with cetuximab combination therapy. Of 79 randomized patients, 77 were treated. Based on an intent-to-treat analysis, an objective response rate of 30% (95% confidence interval [CI], 16.6-46.5) was observed in the monotherapy arm, and 35.9% (95% CI, 21.2-52.8) in the combination arm. Median progression-free survival was 4.1 months in both treatment groups. Safety findings were consistent with the known individual toxicity profiles of ixabepilone and cetuximab. Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders were more common with combination therapy, as were discontinuations because of adverse events. Ixabepilone monotherapy and the ixabepilone and cetuximab combination demonstrated similar levels of clinical activity in first-line treatment of advanced TNBC, with a predictable safety profile. Further investigation of novel therapies for TNBC is required to improve patient outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. SIAH and EGFR, Two RAS Pathway Biomarkers, are Highly Prognostic in Locally Advanced and Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    van Reesema, Lauren L Siewertsz; Zheleva, Vasilena; Winston, Janet S; Jansen, Rick J; O'Connor, Carolyn F; Isbell, Andrew J; Bian, Minglei; Qin, Rui; Bassett, Patricia T; Hinson, Virginia J; Dorsch, Kimberly A; Kirby, Brad W; Van Sciver, Robert E; Tang-Tan, Angela M; Harden, Elizabeth A; Chang, David Z; Allen, Cynthia A; Perry, Roger R; Hoefer, Richard A; Tang, Amy H

    2016-09-01

    Metastatic breast cancer exhibits diverse and rapidly evolving intra- and inter-tumor heterogeneity. Patients with similar clinical presentations often display distinct tumor responses to standard of care (SOC) therapies. Genome landscape studies indicate that EGFR/HER2/RAS "pathway" activation is highly prevalent in malignant breast cancers. The identification of therapy-responsive and prognostic biomarkers is paramount important to stratify patients and guide therapies in clinical oncology and personalized medicine. In this study, we analyzed matched pairs of tumor specimens collected from 182 patients who received neoadjuvant systemic therapies (NST). Statistical analyses were conducted to determine whether EGFR/HER2/RAS pathway biomarkers and clinicopathological predictors, alone and in combination, are prognostic in breast cancer. SIAH and EGFR outperform ER, PR, HER2 and Ki67 as two logical, sensitive and prognostic biomarkers in metastatic breast cancer. We found that increased SIAH and EGFR expression correlated with advanced pathological stage and aggressive molecular subtypes. Both SIAH expression post-NST and NST-induced changes in EGFR expression in invasive mammary tumors are associated with tumor regression and increased survival, whereas ER, PR, and HER2 were not. These results suggest that SIAH and EGFR are two prognostic biomarkers in breast cancer with lymph node metastases. The discovery of incorporating tumor heterogeneity-independent and growth-sensitive RAS pathway biomarkers, SIAH and EGFR, whose altered expression can be used to estimate therapeutic efficacy, detect emergence of resistant clones, forecast tumor regression, differentiate among partial responders, and predict patient survival in the neoadjuvant setting, has a clear clinical implication in personalizing breast cancer therapy. This work was supported by the Dorothy G. Hoefer Foundation for Breast Cancer Research (A.H. Tang); Center for Innovative Technology (CIT

  14. Molecularly targeted therapies for advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Soley; Rocha-Lima, Caio M

    2013-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains the leading cause of cancer-related death in both men and women in the United States. Platinum-based doublet chemotherapy has been a standard for patients with advanced stage disease. Improvements in overall survival and quality of life have been modest. Improved knowledge of the aberrant molecular signaling pathways found in NSCLC has led to the development of biomarkers with associated targeted therapeutics, thus changing the treatment paradigm for many NSCLC patients. In this review, we present a summary of many of the currently investigated biologic targets in NSCLC, discuss their current clinical trial status, and also discuss the potential for development of other targeted agents. PMID:23696960

  15. Tobacco use in HPV-positive advanced oropharynx cancer patients related to increased risk of distant metastases and tumor recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Jessica Hooton; Kumar, Bhavna; Feng, Felix Y.; Worden, Francis P.; Lee, Julia; Eisbruch, Avraham; Wolf, Gregory T.; Prince, Mark E.; Moyer, Jeffrey S.; Teknos, Theodoros N.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; McHugh, Jonathan B.; Urba, Susan; Stoerker, Jay; Walline, Heather; Kurnit, David; Cordell, Kitrina G.; Davis, Samantha J.; Ward, Preston D.; Bradford, Carol R.; Carey, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to examine the effect of tobacco use on disease recurrence (local/regional recurrence, distant metastasis, or second primary) among HPV-positive patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx (SCCOP) following a complete response to chemoradiation therapy. Experimental Design Between 1999 and 2007, 124 patients with advanced SCCOP (86% with stage IV) and adequate tumor tissue for HPV analysis who were enrolled in one of two consecutive University of Michigan treatment protocols were prospectively included in this study. Patients were categorized as never, former, or current tobacco users. The primary end-points were risk of disease recurrence and time to recurrence; secondary end-points were disease-specific survival and overall survival. Results One hundred and two patients (82.3%) had HPV-positive tumors. Over two-thirds (68%) of patients with HPV-positive tumors were tobacco users. Among HPV-positive patients, current tobacco users were at significantly higher risk of disease recurrence than never-tobacco users (hazard ratio = 5.2; confidence interval [1.1-24.4]; p=0.038). Thirty-five percent of HPV-positive ever tobacco users recurred compared to only 6% of HPV-positive never users and 50% of HPV-negative patients. All HPV-negative patients were tobacco users and had significantly shorter times to recurrence (p=0.002) and reduced disease-specific survival (p=0.004) and overall survival (p<0.001) compared to HPV-positive patients. Compared to HPV-positive never-tobacco users, those with a tobacco history showed a trend for reduced disease-specific survival (p=0.064) but not overall survival (p=0.221). Conclusion Current tobacco users with advanced, HPV-positive SCCOP are at higher risk of disease recurrence compared to never-tobacco users. PMID:20145161

  16. Upregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in advanced gastric cancer contributes to bone metastatic osteolysis by inducing long pentraxin 3

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Bongkun; Lee, Eun-Jin; Shin, Min-Kyung; Park, Young Soo; Ryu, Min-Hee; Kim, Sang-Min; Kim, Eun-Young; Lee, Hyung Keun; Chang, Eun-Ju

    2016-01-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) activates its receptor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB; also called NTRK2) that has been shown to promote the malignant progression of several cancers. In this study, we investigated the clinical and biological significance of the BDNF/TrkB axis in the progression of human gastric cancer. The increased co-expression of the BDNF/TrkB axis was significantly correlated with bone metastatic properties in advanced gastric cancers. BDNF acting via TrkB receptors increased the levels of long pentraxin 3 (PTX3) that was related to bone metastatic status of gastric cancer by enhancing gastric cancer–osteoblastic niche interactions. In bone metastatic gastric cancer, PTX3 knockdown using small interfering RNA significantly inhibited BDNF-induced interactions of cancer cells with osteoblasts. Moreover, BDNF-derived PTX3 induction supported subsequent osteoclastogenesis, and this effect was significantly reversed by PTX3 silencing. These findings suggest that a functional interaction between BDNF/TrkB and PTX3 enhances the osteolysis of bone metastatic gastric cancer, thereby providing potential prognostic factors for the development of bone metastasis of gastric cancer. PMID:27458153

  17. Copanlisib in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-20

    Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mixed Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Metastatic Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma

  18. Vaccine Therapy and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Hormone-Resistant, Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-23

    Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  19. 125I brachytherapy alone for recurrent or locally advanced adenoid cystic carcinoma of the oral and maxillofacial region.

    PubMed

    Huang, M-W; Zheng, L; Liu, S-M; Shi, Y; Zhang, J; Yu, G-Y; Zhang, J-G

    2013-06-01

    This retrospective study was to evaluate the local control and survival of (125)I brachytherapy for recurrent and/or locally advanced adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of the oral and maxillofacial region. A total of 38 patients with recurrent and/or locally advanced ACC of the oral and maxillofacial region received (125)I brachytherapy alone from 2001-2010. Twenty-nine were recurrent cases following previous surgery and radiation therapy. The other 9 cases involved primary tumors. Overall, 12 tumors were located in the major salivary glands, 12 in the minor salivary glands, and 14 in the paranasal region, the nasal cavity or the skull base. The prescribed dose was 100-160 Gy. Patients were followed for 12-122 months (median 51 months). The 2-, 5-, and 10-year local tumor control rates were 86.3, 59, and 31.5 %, respectively. The 2-, 5-, and 10-year overall survival rates were 92.1, 65 and 34.1 %, respectively. Tumors > 6 cm had significantly lower local control and survival rates. No severe complications were observed during follow-up. (125)I brachytherapy is a feasible and effective modality for the treatment of locally advanced unresectable or recurrent ACC.

  20. Secondary Resistance to Vismodegib After Initial Successful Treatment of Extensive Recurrent Periocular Basal Cell Carcinoma with Orbital Invasion.

    PubMed

    Papastefanou, Vasilios P; René, Cornelius

    Vismodegib is proven to be effective in the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic basal cell carcinoma, but evidence of resistance is beginning to emerge. A case of advanced recurrent periocular basal cell carcinoma which responded dramatically to vismodegib after 3 months but recurred after 9 months due to drug resistance, eventually requiring orbital exenteration, is presented. The mechanism of vismodegib resistance is discussed.

  1. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibitor Therapy for Locally Advanced and Metastatic Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Systematic Review and Pooled Analysis of Interventional Studies.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Audrey A; Aldahan, Adam S; Hughes, Olivia B; Shah, Vidhi V; Strasswimmer, John

    2016-07-01

    Hedgehog pathway inhibitors (HPIs) were made available by US Food and Drug Administration approval in 2012 for vismodegib and 2015 for sonidegib. Both target the Smoothened molecule and are indicated for locally advanced basal cell carcinoma (laBCC) and metastatic basal cell carcinoma (mBCC). To evaluate clinical experience with HPIs, including efficacy and adverse effects. We conducted a systematic review in concordance with the PRISMA guidelines of PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, ClinicalTrials.gov, and EMBASE, using search terms "vismodegib," "sonidegib," "Erivedge," "Odomza," "basal cell carcinoma," and "BCC." We included clinical trials, retrospective medical record reviews, and prospective case series that used HPIs for the treatment of laBCC or mBCC in human subjects. Individual case reports and limited, retrospective case series were excluded from our review. Data were extracted independently by 2 reviewers on a predesigned, standardized form. The following data were recorded: number of patients with laBCC or mBCC, dose and frequency of drug administration, median duration of treatment, clearance and recurrence rates, and adverse effects. Eleven vismodegib articles (published between 2009 and 2015) met criteria for inclusion, and 8 articles were able to be pooled for analysis. The 8 pooled articles included 744 total patients with 704 patients clinically evaluable. Sonidegib did not yield enough publications for a formal analysis. Objective response to vismodegib for laBCC had a weighted average of 64.7% (95% CI, 63.7%-65.6%); complete response averaged 31.1% (95% CI, 30.4%-31.8%). Objective response for mBCC was 33.6% (95% CI, 33.1%-34.2%); complete response averaged 3.9% (95% CI, 3.3%-4.4%). Median duration of therapy was 35.8 weeks (95% CI, 35.1-36.5 weeks). In a systematic review of HPIs for laBCC and mBCC, vismodegib, but not sonidegib, had enough studies to warrant a pooled analysis. Vismodegib was identified to have a

  2. Phase II study of plitidepsin in pretreated patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Peschel, Christian; Hartmann, Joerg T; Schmittel, Alexander; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Schneller, Folker; Keilholz, Ulrich; Buchheidt, Dieter; Millan, Susana; Izquierdo, Miguel Angel; Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter

    2008-06-01

    To evaluate the progression-free rate (PFR) at 3 months (13+/-1 weeks), antitumor response, time-to-event efficacy endpoints, and toxicity profile of plitidepsin administered as a 3-h continuous i.v. infusion at a dose of 5mg/m(2), every 2 weeks, to patients with chemotherapy pretreated advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This was a multicenter, non-randomized, exploratory, phase II study. Treatment lasted until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, patient refusal or treatment delay for >2 weeks. PFR (primary efficacy endpoint) and objective response rate (secondary efficacy endpoint) were evaluated according to RECIST, while the toxic profile of plitidepsin was assessed using the NCI-CTC, version 2.0. A total of 21 patients with a median age of 61 years and with locally advanced or metastatic non-resectable NSCLC, who had previously received only one line of chemotherapy in an advanced setting, received a total of 54 cycles of treatment (median of two cycles per patient; range: 1-8). Antitumor activity was seen in 3 (1 PR, 2 SD) out of 17 evaluable patients according to RECIST. One patient was responder for the primary (PFR at 13+/-1 weeks) and secondary efficacy endpoint (stable disease according to RECIST). Other two patients were non-responders for the primary efficacy endpoint, but had stable disease (not confirmed at weeks 13+/-1 due to previous withdrawal due to adverse events). With a median follow-up of 12.3 months, the median time to progression (TTP) and the median overall survival (OS) were 1.2 months and 4.3 months, respectively. The incidence of plitidepsin-related toxicities was low and most of them were mild-to-moderate in severity. The most common side effects were anemia, and asymptomatic and non-cumulative increases of gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and liver transaminase levels. This study shows that plitidepsin 3-h continuous i.v. infusion (5mg/m(2)) every 2 weeks, was feasible and well tolerated in patients with pretreated

  3. [Clinical trial of non-specific immunotherapy using Lentinan in advanced or recurrent gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Shigefumi; Oka, Masaaki

    2008-11-01

    Randomized phase III study of S-1 alone versus S-1 plus Lentinan (LNT) in advanced or recurrent gastric cancer started in February 2007 conducted by the Japanese Foundation for Multidisciplinary Treatment of Cancer. The objective of this study is to evaluate the superiority of S-1/LNT to S-1 alone. The primary end point is to compare over all survival between both treatment groups. Secondary end points include time to treatment failure, the grade and rate of the adverse events, the evaluation of quality of life (QOL), response rate evaluated by RECIST and immunological parameters. QOL is evaluated by Japanese version of FACT-BRM questionnaire. Immunological parameters include serum complements (CH50, C3) and beta-1, 3 binding monocytes. The sample size is estimated at 150 patients per arm. Registration period is 2 years with 2-year follow-up. This study has a chance to prove the efficacy of the non-specific biological response modifier. We will have to cooperate in order to make this study a success.

  4. Emergence of chemoresistance in a metastatic basal cell carcinoma patient after complete response to hedgehog pathway inhibitor vismodegib (GDC-0449).

    PubMed

    Meani, Rowena E; Lim, Shueh-Wen; Chang, Anne Lynn S; Kelly, John W

    2014-08-01

    Vismodegib (GDC-0449, Genentech, USA), a small molecule inhibitor of the Hedgehog signalling pathway, has potent anti-tumour activity in advanced basal cell carcinoma (BCC). We report a case of a 67-year-old Australian man with metastatic BCC including pulmonary disease with malignant effusion who showed a dramatic complete response to vismodegib but subsequently experienced a recurrence of pulmonary disease, indicative of chemoresistance to vismodegib. This case is the first to illustrate chemoresistance in a patient with metastatic BCC, and demonstrates the need for closely monitoring metastatic BCC patients even after an apparently complete response.

  5. A Case of Metastatic Melanoma in the Ureter

    PubMed Central

    Hossack, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Advances in the treatment of melanoma are resulting in patients living for extended periods after being diagnosed with metastatic disease. Metastases to the ureter are rare, but they have been described in the literature on a number of occasions. In this case report, we describe a patient with established metastatic melanoma who, whilst taking and responding to immunomodulatory therapy, was found to have an obstructive mass in the middle of his left ureter. Rather than performing either a nephroureterectomy or partial resection of the ureter, we opted to perform an endoscopic resection of the melanoma. Follow-up imaging at 12 months shows no evidence of local disease recurrence. We submit that primary endoscopic management of metastatic melanoma in the ureter is a viable alternative to a radical approach. PMID:27818830

  6. Sorafenib Tosylate and Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Unresectable, or Metastatic Gallbladder Cancer or Cholangiocarcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Extrahepatic Bile Duct Adenocarcinoma; Gallbladder Adenocarcinoma; Gallbladder Adenocarcinoma With Squamous Metaplasia; Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Recurrent Gallbladder Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Gallbladder Carcinoma; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Unresectable Gallbladder Carcinoma

  7. Afatinib versus methotrexate in older patients with second-line recurrent and/or metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: subgroup analysis of the LUX-Head & Neck 1 trial†

    PubMed Central

    Clement, P. M.; Gauler, T.; Machiels, J. P.; Haddad, R. I.; Fayette, J.; Licitra, L. F.; Tahara, M.; Cohen, E. E. W.; Cupissol, D.; Grau, J. J.; Guigay, J.; Caponigro, F.; de Castro, G.; de Souza Viana, L.; Keilholz, U.; del Campo, J. M.; Cong, X. J.; Ehrnrooth, E.; Vermorken, J. B.

    2016-01-01

    Background In the phase III LUX-Head & Neck 1 (LHN1) trial, afatinib significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) versus methotrexate in recurrent and/or metastatic (R/M) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients progressing on/after platinum-based therapy. This report evaluates afatinib efficacy and safety in prespecified subgroups of patients aged ≥65 and <65 years. Patients and methods Patients were randomized (2:1) to 40 mg/day oral afatinib or 40 mg/m2/week intravenous methotrexate. PFS was the primary end point; overall survival (OS) was the key secondary end point. Other end points included: objective response rate (ORR), patient-reported outcomes, tumor shrinkage, and safety. Disease control rate (DCR) was also assessed. Results Of 483 randomized patients, 27% (83 afatinib; 45 methotrexate) were aged ≥65 years (older) and 73% (239 afatinib; 116 methotrexate) <65 years (younger) at study entry. Similar PFS benefit with afatinib versus methotrexate was observed in older {median 2.8 versus 2.3 months, hazard ratio (HR) = 0.68 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.45–1.03], P = 0.061} and younger patients [2.6 versus 1.6 months, HR = 0.79 (0.62–1.01), P = 0.052]. In older and younger patients, the median OS with afatinib versus methotrexate was 7.3 versus 6.4 months [HR = 0.84 (0.54–1.31)] and 6.7 versus 6.2 months [HR = 0.98 (0.76–1.28)]. ORRs with afatinib versus methotrexate were 10.8% versus 6.7% and 10.0% versus 5.2%; DCRs were 53.0% versus 37.8% and 47.7% versus 38.8% in older and younger patients, respectively. In both subgroups, the most frequent treatment-related adverse events were rash/acne (73%–77%) and diarrhea (70%–80%) with afatinib, and stomatitis (43%) and fatigue (31%–34%) with methotrexate. Fewer treatment-related discontinuations were observed with afatinib (each subgroup 7% versus 16%). A trend toward improved time to deterioration of global health status, pain, and swallowing with afatinib was observed in

  8. Identification of predictive markers of the therapeutic effect of eribulin chemotherapy for locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Shinichiro; Fukushima, Wakaba; Asano, Yuka; Goto, Wataru; Takada, Koji; Noda, Satoru; Takashima, Tsutomu; Onoda, Naoyoshi; Ohsawa, Masahiko; Hirakawa, Kosei; Ohira, Masaichi

    2017-08-31

    The recently developed reagent, eribulin mesylate (eribulin), is a microtubule dynamics inhibitor with a mechanism of action that differs from those of taxanes and vinca alkaloids. This drug is considered to be a promising chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer (MBC). In this study, we investigated if variables such as tumor expression of β-tubulin class III, glutathione S-transferase pi (GSTP) 1 or transducin-like enhancer of split (TLE) 3 might act as predictive factors on the therapeutic effect of eribulin chemotherapy. The subjects included 52 patients with MBC who underwent chemotherapy with eribulin. The expression levels of Estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR), human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) 2, Ki67, β-tubulin class III, GSTP-1 and TLE-3 were evaluated using immunostaining employing needle biopsy specimens. Patients with TLE3-negative tumors displayed significantly poorer outcomes regarding progression-free survival than patients with TLE3-positive tumors when prognosis within the group of patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) lesions was analyzed (p = 0.011, log-rank). In contrast, no such difference in prognosis was found in a comparison of TLE-3 positive/negative patients in the group of all patients (p = 0.433, log-rank) or of patients with non-TNBC lesions (p = 0.659, log-rank). Based on a univariate analysis of 22 TNBC cases, a better progression-free survival correlated significantly with a positive TLE3 expression in the tumor (p = 0.025). A multivariate logistic regression analysis including 22 patients with TNBC also showed that a positive TLE3 expression significantly correlated with a better progression-free survival (p = 0.037). Our findings suggest that TLE3 is a useful marker for predicting the therapeutic effect of eribulin chemotherapy for TNBC.

  9. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis on the Role of Chemotherapy in Advanced and Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumor (NET).

    PubMed

    Wong, Matthew H; Chan, David L; Lee, Adrian; Li, Bob T; Lumba, Sumit; Clarke, Stephen J; Samra, Jaswinder; Pavlakis, Nick

    2016-01-01

    In the era of somatostatin analogues and targeted therapies, the role of chemotherapy in NET remains largely undefined. This systematic review aimed to assess the effect of chemotherapy on response rates (RR), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and toxicity compared to other chemotherapies/systemic therapies or best supportive care in patients with advanced or metastatic NET. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) from 1946 to 2015 were identified from MEDLINE, EMBASE, other databases and conference proceedings. Review of abstracts, quality assessment and data abstraction were performed independently by two investigators. Meta-analyses were conducted using Mantel-Haenszel analysis with random-effects modelling. Six RCTs comparing standard streptozotocin plus 5-fluorouacil (STZ/5FU) chemotherapy to other chemotherapy regimens, and 2 comparing this to interferon (IFN) were included. Only 1 study was considered at low risk of bias. STZ/5-FU was no different to other chemotherapies in response rate [RR 0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.72-1.27], PFS (RR 0.95; CI 0.81-1.13), or OS (RR 1.03; CI 0.77-1.39). IFN may produce higher response than STZ/5FU (RR 0.20; CI 0.04-1.13), but event rates were small and survival was no different. Interferon was associated with higher overall haematological (RR 0.47; CI 0.27-0.82) and lower overall renal toxicity (RR 3.61; CI 1.24-10.51). Strong evidence is lacking in the area of chemotherapy in neuroendocrine tumors. There is currently no evidence that one chemotherapeutic regimen is significantly better than the other, nor is interferon better than chemotherapy. There is an urgent need to design RCTs comparing modern chemotherapy to other agents in NET.

  10. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis on the Role of Chemotherapy in Advanced and Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumor (NET)

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Matthew H.; Lee, Adrian; Li, Bob T.; Lumba, Sumit; Clarke, Stephen J.; Samra, Jaswinder; Pavlakis, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives In the era of somatostatin analogues and targeted therapies, the role of chemotherapy in NET remains largely undefined. This systematic review aimed to assess the effect of chemotherapy on response rates (RR), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and toxicity compared to other chemotherapies/systemic therapies or best supportive care in patients with advanced or metastatic NET. Methods Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) from 1946 to 2015 were identified from MEDLINE, EMBASE, other databases and conference proceedings. Review of abstracts, quality assessment and data abstraction were performed independently by two investigators. Meta-analyses were conducted using Mantel-Haenszel analysis with random-effects modelling. Results Six RCTs comparing standard streptozotocin plus 5-fluorouacil (STZ/5FU) chemotherapy to other chemotherapy regimens, and 2 comparing this to interferon (IFN) were included. Only 1 study was considered at low risk of bias. STZ/5-FU was no different to other chemotherapies in response rate [RR 0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.72–1.27], PFS (RR 0.95; CI 0.81–1.13), or OS (RR 1.03; CI 0.77–1.39). IFN may produce higher response than STZ/5FU (RR 0.20; CI 0.04–1.13), but event rates were small and survival was no different. Interferon was associated with higher overall haematological (RR 0.47; CI 0.27–0.82) and lower overall renal toxicity (RR 3.61; CI 1.24–10.51). Conclusion Strong evidence is lacking in the area of chemotherapy in neuroendocrine tumors. There is currently no evidence that one chemotherapeutic regimen is significantly better than the other, nor is interferon better than chemotherapy. There is an urgent need to design RCTs comparing modern chemotherapy to other agents in NET. PMID:27362760

  11. FDA Approval Summary: Sunitinib for the Treatment of Progressive Well-Differentiated Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cortazar, Patricia; Zhang, Jenny J.; Tang, Shenghui; Sridhara, Rajeshwari; Murgo, Anthony; Justice, Robert; Pazdur, Richard

    2012-01-01

    On May 20, 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved sunitinib malate capsules (Sutent®; Pfizer, Inc., New York) for the treatment of progressive, well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) in patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic disease. In a phase III randomized trial, 171 patients received either sunitinib (37.5 mg) or placebo once daily. The progression-free survival (PFS) interval was the primary efficacy endpoint. Secondary endpoints included the overall survival (OS) time, objective response rate (ORR), patient-reported outcomes, and safety. Based on early results favoring sunitinib, the independent data monitoring committee recommended trial termination prior to the prespecified interim analysis. This premature analysis may have led to an overestimate of the treatment effect. In the FDA analysis of investigator-assessed PFS times, the median values for the sunitinib and placebo arms were 10.2 months and 5.4 months, respectively. The ORRs were 9.3% and 0% in the sunitinib and placebo arms, respectively. The OS data were not mature at the time of approval and were confounded by 69% crossover. Common adverse reactions in patients receiving sunitinib included diarrhea, nausea, asthenia, fatigue, neutropenia, hypertension, and palmar–plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome. Two patients on sunitinib died as a result of cardiac failure. The Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee voted eight to two that, despite residual uncertainty about the magnitude of the PFS effect because of early trial termination, sunitinib demonstrated a favorable benefit–risk profile in pNET patients. The FDA concurred with the committee's assessment and granted sunitinib regular approval for this rare malignancy with few available therapies. PMID:22836448

  12. FDA approval summary: sunitinib for the treatment of progressive well-differentiated locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Gideon M; Cortazar, Patricia; Zhang, Jenny J; Tang, Shenghui; Sridhara, Rajeshwari; Murgo, Anthony; Justice, Robert; Pazdur, Richard

    2012-01-01

    On May 20, 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved sunitinib malate capsules (Sutent®; Pfizer, Inc., New York) for the treatment of progressive, well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) in patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic disease. In a phase III randomized trial, 171 patients received either sunitinib (37.5 mg) or placebo once daily. The progression-free survival (PFS) interval was the primary efficacy endpoint. Secondary endpoints included the overall survival (OS) time, objective response rate (ORR), patient-reported outcomes, and safety. Based on early results favoring sunitinib, the independent data monitoring committee recommended trial termination prior to the prespecified interim analysis. This premature analysis may have led to an overestimate of the treatment effect. In the FDA analysis of investigator-assessed PFS times, the median values for the sunitinib and placebo arms were 10.2 months and 5.4 months, respectively. The ORRs were 9.3% and 0% in the sunitinib and placebo arms, respectively. The OS data were not mature at the time of approval and were confounded by 69% crossover. Common adverse reactions in patients receiving sunitinib included diarrhea, nausea, asthenia, fatigue, neutropenia, hypertension, and palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome. Two patients on sunitinib died as a result of cardiac failure. The Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee voted eight to two that, despite residual uncertainty about the magnitude of the PFS effect because of early trial termination, sunitinib demonstrated a favorable benefit-risk profile in pNET patients. The FDA concurred with the committee's assessment and granted sunitinib regular approval for this rare malignancy with few available therapies.

  13. Approval summary: pemetrexed maintenance therapy of advanced/metastatic nonsquamous, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    PubMed

    Cohen, Martin H; Cortazar, Patricia; Justice, Robert; Pazdur, Richard

    2010-01-01

    On July 2, 2009, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved pemetrexed injection (Alimta® Injection; Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN) for maintenance treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer whose disease has not progressed after four cycles of platinum-based doublet induction chemotherapy. A double-blind study of pemetrexed plus best supportive care versus placebo plus best supportive care was conducted. Pemetrexed, 500 mg/m(2) i.v., was administered every 21 days until disease progression. Folic acid, vitamin B(12), and a corticosteroid were given to all study patients. There were 663 randomized patients (pemetrexed, 441; placebo, 222). Treatments were well balanced with respect to baseline disease characteristics and stratification factors. The median overall survival (OS) time for intent-to-treat (ITT) patients was 13.4 months for patients receiving pemetrexed and 10.6 months for those receiving placebo (hazard ratio [HR] 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.65-0.95; p = .012). Median OS times were 15.5 months versus 10.3 months for patients with nonsquamous histologies receiving pemetrexed and placebo, respectively (HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.56-0.88). The median OS time in patients with squamous histology receiving pemetrexed was 9.9 months, versus 10.8 months for those receiving placebo (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.77-1.50). A significantly longer progression-free survival interval for both the ITT and nonsquamous patient populations receiving pemetrexed maintenance therapy was also observed. The most common (>5%) adverse reactions in patients receiving pemetrexed were hematologic toxicity, an increase in hepatic enzymes, fatigue, gastrointestinal toxicity, sensory neuropathy, and skin rash.

  14. Approval Summary: Pemetrexed Maintenance Therapy of Advanced/Metastatic Nonsquamous, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    PubMed Central

    Cortazar, Patricia; Justice, Robert; Pazdur, Richard

    2010-01-01

    On July 2, 2009, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved pemetrexed injection (Alimta® Injection; Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN) for maintenance treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer whose disease has not progressed after four cycles of platinum-based doublet induction chemotherapy. A double-blind study of pemetrexed plus best supportive care versus placebo plus best supportive care was conducted. Pemetrexed, 500 mg/m2 i.v., was administered every 21 days until disease progression. Folic acid, vitamin B12, and a corticosteroid were given to all study patients. There were 663 randomized patients (pemetrexed, 441; placebo, 222). Treatments were well balanced with respect to baseline disease characteristics and stratification factors. The median overall survival (OS) time for intent-to-treat (ITT) patients was 13.4 months for patients receiving pemetrexed and 10.6 months for those receiving placebo (hazard ratio [HR] 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.65–0.95; p = .012). Median OS times were 15.5 months versus 10.3 months for patients with nonsquamous histologies receiving pemetrexed and placebo, respectively (HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.56–0.88). The median OS time in patients with squamous histology receiving pemetrexed was 9.9 months, versus 10.8 months for those receiving placebo (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.77–1.50). A significantly longer progression-free survival interval for both the ITT and nonsquamous patient populations receiving pemetrexed maintenance therapy was also observed. The most common (>5%) adverse reactions in patients receiving pemetrexed were hematologic toxicity, an increase in hepatic enzymes, fatigue, gastrointestinal toxicity, sensory neuropathy, and skin rash. PMID:21148615

  15. Phase II study of single-agent bosutinib, a Src/Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer pretreated with chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Campone, M; Bondarenko, I; Brincat, S; Hotko, Y; Munster, P N; Chmielowska, E; Fumoleau, P; Ward, R; Bardy-Bouxin, N; Leip, E; Turnbull, K; Zacharchuk, C; Epstein, R J

    2012-03-01

    This phase II study evaluated single-agent bosutinib in pretreated patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer. Patients received oral bosutinib 400 mg/day. The primary end point was the progression-free survival (PFS) rate at 16 weeks. Secondary end points included objective response rate, clinical benefit rate, 2-year overall survival rate, safety, and changes in levels of bone resorption/formation biomarkers. Seventy-three patients were enrolled and treated. Median time from diagnosis of metastatic disease to initiation of bosutinib treatment was 24.5 months. For the intent-to-treat population, the PFS rate at 16 weeks was 39.6%. Unexpectedly, all responding patients (n = 4) were hormone receptor positive. The clinical benefit rate was 27.4%. The 2-year overall survival rate was 26.4%. The main toxic effects were diarrhea (66%), nausea (55%), and vomiting (47%). Grade 3-4 laboratory aminotransferase elevations occurred in 14 (19%) patients. Myelosuppression was minimal. No consistent changes in the levels of bone resorption/formation biomarkers were seen. Bosutinib showed promising efficacy in prolonging time to progression in chemotherapy-pretreated patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer. Bosutinib was generally well tolerated, with a safety profile different from that of the Src/Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor dasatinib in a similar patient population.

  16. U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval: crizotinib for treatment of advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer that is anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive.

    PubMed

    Malik, Shakun M; Maher, Virginia Ellen; Bijwaard, Karen E; Becker, Robert L; Zhang, Lijun; Tang, Shenghui W; Song, Pengfei; Liu, Qi; Marathe, Anshu; Gehrke, Brenda; Helms, Whitney; Hanner, Diane; Justice, Robert; Pazdur, Richard

    2014-04-15

    On August 26, 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved crizotinib (XALKORI Capsules, Pfizer Inc.) for treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that is anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive as detected by an FDA-approved test. The Vysis ALK Break-Apart FISH Probe Kit (Abbott Molecular, Inc.) was approved concurrently. In two multicenter, single-arm trials, patients with locally advanced or metastatic ALK-positive NSCLC previously treated with one or more systemic therapies received crizotinib orally at a dose of 250 mg twice daily. In 119 patients with ALK-positive NSCLC by local trial assay, the objective response rate (ORR) was 61% [95% confidence intervals (CI), 52%-70%] with a median response duration of 48 weeks. In 136 patients with ALK-positive NSCLC by the to-be-marketed test, the ORR was 50% (95% CI, 42%-59%) with a median response duration of 42 weeks. The most common adverse reactions (≥25%) were vision disorder, nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, edema, and constipation. Accelerated approval was granted on the basis of the high ORRs and durable responses. On November 20, 2013, crizotinib received full approval based on an improvement in progression-free survival in patients with metastatic ALK-positive NSCLC previously treated with one platinum-based chemotherapy regimen.

  17. Recent advances in recurrent urinary tract infection from pathogenesis and biomarkers to prevention

    PubMed Central

    Jhang, Jia-Fong; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) might be one of the most common problems in urological clinics. Recent research has revealed novel evidence about recurrent UTI and it should be considered a different disease from the first infection. The pathogenesis of recurrent UTI might include two mechanisms, bacterial factors and deficiencies in host defense. Bacterial survival in the urinary bladder after antibiotic treatment and progression to form intracellular bacterial communities might be the most important bacterial factors. In host defense deficiency, a defect in pathogen recognition and urothelial barrier function impairment play the most important roles. Immunodeficiency and urogenital tract anatomical abnormalities have been considered the essential risk factors for recurrent UTI. In healthy women, voiding dysfunction and behavioral factors also increase the risk of recurrent UTI. Sexual intercourse and estrogen deficiency in postmenopausal women might have the strongest association with recurrent UTI. Traditional lifestyle factors such as fluid intake and diet are not considered independent risk factors now. Serum and urine biomarkers to predict recurrent UTI from the first infection have also attracted a wide attention recently. Current clinical evidence suggests that serum macrophage colony-stimulating factor and urinary nerve growth factor have potential predictive value for recurrent UTI. Clinical trials have proven the efficacy of the oral immunoactive agent OM-89 for the prevention of UTI. Vaccines for recurrent UTI are recommended by the latest guidelines and are available on the market. PMID:28974905

  18. Pertuzumab in combination with trastuzumab and docetaxel for the treatment of HER2-positive metastatic or locally recurrent unresectable breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fleeman, Nigel; Bagust, Adrian; Beale, Sophie; Dwan, Kerry; Dickson, Rumona; Proudlove, Chris; Dundar, Yenal

    2015-01-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of pertuzumab (Roche) to submit evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of pertuzumab + trastuzumab + docetaxel for the treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (HER2+) metastatic or locally recurrent unresectable breast cancer in accordance with the Institute's Single Technology Appraisal (STA) process. The Liverpool Reviews and Implementation Group (LRiG) at the University of Liverpool was commissioned to act as the Evidence Review Group (ERG). This article summarises the ERG's review of the evidence submitted by the manufacturer and provides a summary of the Appraisal Committee's (AC) initial decision. At the time of writing, final guidance had not been published by NICE. The clinical evidence was mainly derived from an ongoing phase III randomised double-blind placebo-controlled international multicentre clinical trial (CLEOPATRA), designed to evaluate efficacy and safety in 808 patients, which compared pertuzumab + trastuzumab + docetaxel (pertuzumab arm) with placebo + trastuzumab + docetaxel (control arm). Both progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were analysed at two data cut-off points-May 2011 (median follow-up of 18 months) and May 2012 (median follow-up of 30 months). At both time points, PFS was significantly longer in the pertuzumab arm (18.5 months compared with 12.4 months in the control arm at the first data cut-off point and 18.7 versus 12.4 months at the second data cut-off point). Assessment of OS benefit suggested an improvement for patients in the pertuzumab arm with a strong trend towards an OS benefit at the second data cut-off point; however, due to the immaturity of the OS data, the magnitude of the OS benefit was uncertain. Importantly, cardiotoxicity was not increased in patients treated with a combination of pertuzumab + trastuzumab + docetaxel. The ERG's main concern with the

  19. Wnt3a expression is associated with MMP-9 expression in primary tumor and metastatic site in recurrent or stage IV colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is known to affect in cancer oncogenesis and progression by interacting with the tumor microenvironment. However, the roles of wnt3a and wnt5a in colorectal cancer (CRC) have not been thoroughly studied. In the present study, we investigated the expression of wnt protein and the concordance rate in primary tumor and metastatic sites in CRC. To determine the relationship of wnt proteins with invasion related protein, we also analyzed the association between wnt protein expression and the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2). Methods Tumor tissue was obtained from eighty-three paraffin- embedded blocks which were using resected tissue from both the primary tumor and metastatic sites for each patient. We performed immunohistochemical staining for wnt3a, wnt5a, β-catenin, MMP-9 and VEGFR-2. Results Wnt3a, wnt5a, β-catenin, and MMP-9 expression was high; the proteins were found in over 50% of the primary tumors, but the prevalence was lower in tissue from metastatic sites. The concordance rates between the primary tumor and metastatic site were 76.2% for wnt5a and 79.4% for wnt3a and β-catenin, but VEGFR-2 was expressed in 67.4% of the metastatic sites even when not found in the primary tumor. Wnt3a expression in primary tumors was significantly associated with lymph node involvement (p = 0.038) and MMP-9 expression in the primary tumor (p = 0.0387), mesenchyme adjacent to tumor (p = 0.022) and metastatic site (p = 0.004). There was no other relationship in the expression of these proteins. Vascular invasion in primary tumor tissue may be a potential prognostic marker for liver metastasis, but no significant association was observed among the wnt protein, MMP-9, and VEGFR-2 for peritoneal seeding. In survival analysis, β-catenin expression was significantly correlated with overall survival (p = 0.05). Conclusions Wnt3a and wnt5a

  20. Recurrence patterns of locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma after 3D conformal (chemo)-radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To establish recurrence patterns among locally advanced head and neck non-nasopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients treated with radical (chemo-) radiotherapy and to correlate the sites of loco-regional recurrence with radiotherapy doses and target volumes Method 151 locally advanced HNSCC patients were treated between 2004-2005 using radical three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Patients with prior surgery to the primary tumour site were excluded. The sites of locoregional relapses were correlated with radiotherapy plans by the radiologist and a planning dosimetrist. Results Median age was 59 years (range:34-89). 35 patients had stage III disease, 116 patients had stage IV A/B. 36 patients were treated with radiotherapy alone, 42 with induction chemotherapy, 63 with induction and concomitant chemoradiotherapy and 10 concomitant chemoradiotherapy. Median follow-up was 38 months (range 3-62). 3-year cause specific survival was 66.8%. 125 of 151 (82.8%) achieved a complete response to treatment. Amongst these 125 there were 20 local-regional recurrence, comprising 8 local, 5 regional and 7 simultaneous local and regional; synchronous distant metastases occurred in 7 of the 20. 9 patients developed distant metastases in the absence of locoregional failure. For the 14 local recurrences with planning data available, 12 were in-field, 1 was marginal, and 1 was out-of-field. Of the 11 regional failures with planning data available, 7 were in-field, 1 was marginal and 3 were out-of-field recurrences. Conclusion The majority of failures following non-surgical treatment for locally advanced HNSCC were loco-regional, within the radiotherapy target volume. Improving locoregional control remains a high priority. PMID:21609453

  1. Efficacy of Sequential Ipilimumab Monotherapy versus Best Supportive Care for Unresectable Locally Advanced/Metastatic Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bang, Yung-Jue; Cho, Jae Yong; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Jin Won; Di Bartolomeo, Maria; Ajani, Jaffer A; Yamaguchi, Kensei; Balogh, Agnes; Sanchez, Teresa; Moehler, Markus

    2017-10-01

    Purpose: Ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody that blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein-4 interactions, enhances T-cell activation and promotes tumor immunity. This phase II study evaluated the safety and efficacy of ipilimumab monotherapy versus best supportive care (BSC) among patients with advanced/metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction cancer who achieved at least stable disease with first-line chemotherapy.Experimental Design: Eligible patients were randomized to ipilimumab 10 mg/kg every 3 weeks for four doses, then 10 mg/kg every 12 weeks for up to 3 years, or BSC, which could include continuation of fluoropyrimidine until progression or toxicity. The primary endpoint was immune-related progression-free survival (irPFS); secondary endpoints included PFS by modified World Health Organization criteria and overall survival (OS).Results: Of 143 patients screened, 57 were randomized to each arm. irPFS with ipilimumab versus BSC was not improved [2.92 months, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.61-5.16 vs. 4.90 months, 95% CI, 3.45-6.54, HR = 1.44; 80% CI, 1.09-1.91; P = 0.097], resulting in study cessation. At study closeout, which occurred 8 months after the interim analysis, the median OS durations were 12.7 months (95% CI, 10.5-18.9) and 12.1 months (95% CI, 9.3-not estimable), respectively. Grade 3/4 treatment-related adverse events occurred in 23% of ipilimumab-treated patients, in whom diarrhea (9%) and fatigue (5%) were most frequent, and in 9% of active BSC-treated patients.Conclusions: Although ipilimumab at 10 mg/kg was manageable, it did not improve irPFS versus BSC. However, comparable median OS of approximately 1 year and a favorable safety profile support the investigation of ipilimumab in combination with other therapies for advanced gastric cancer. Clin Cancer Res; 23(19); 5671-8. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Gefitinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  3. [Advanced lung cancer with recurrence of liver and tracheal metastases responsive to multimodality therapy - a case report].

    PubMed

    Higaki, Naozumi; Nakane, Shigeru; Uemura, Hisashi; Okada, Kaoru; Miyake, Yasuhiro; Murakami, Masakazu; Hayashida, Hirohito; Oka, Yoshio; Kusakabe, Yoshito; Tsuruta, Naotoshi; Tetsumoto, Satoshi; Saito, Yoshiyuki; Niju, Takashi; Ikeda, Toshiyuki; Nezu, Riichiro

    2014-11-01

    We report a case of advanced lung cancer with recurrence of liver and tracheal metastases that were responsive to multimodality therapy. The patient was a 77-year-old man who suffered from advanced lung cancer with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and alcohol-induced liver cirrhosis. The primary lung cancer was surgically resected. Eight months after resection of the primary lung cancer, a solitary liver tumor appeared and hepatic resection was performed. Histological findings showed that both the primary lung tumor and the solitary liver tumor were squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Subsequently, he developed a recurrence in his trachea 8 months after hepatic resection. Radiotherapy, endobronchial argon plasma coagulation (APC), and systemic chemotherapy were administered. The tracheal tumor remained stable without any liver metastasis for 25 months.

  4. Bortezomib With or Without Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  5. Phase I study of olaparib plus gemcitabine in patients with advanced solid tumours and comparison with gemcitabine alone in patients with locally advanced/metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bendell, J; O'Reilly, E M; Middleton, M R; Chau, I; Hochster, H; Fielding, A; Burke, W; Burris, H

    2015-04-01

    Olaparib (Lynparza) is an oral poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase inhibitor that induces synthetic lethality in cancers with homologous recombination defects. In this phase I, dose-escalation trial, patients with advanced solid tumours received olaparib (50-200 mg capsules b.i.d.) continuously or intermittently (days 1-14, per 28-day cycle) plus gemcitabine [i.v. 600-800 mg/m(2); days 1, 8, 15, and 22 (cycle 1), days 1, 8, and 15 (subsequent cycles)] to establish the maximum tolerated dose. A separate dose-escalation phase evaluated olaparib in tablet formulation (100 mg o.d./b.i.d.; days 1-14) plus gemcitabine (600 mg/m(2)). In an expansion phase, patients with genetically unselected locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer were randomised 2 : 1 to the tolerated olaparib capsule combination dose or gemcitabine alone (1000 mg/m(2)). Sixty-six patients were treated [dose-escalation phase, n = 44 (tablet cohort, n = 12); dose-expansion phase, n = 22 (olaparib plus gemcitabine, n = 15; gemcitabine alone, n = 7)]. In the dose-escalation phase, four patients (6%) experienced dose-limiting toxicities (raised alanine aminotransferase, n = 2; neutropenia, n = 1; febrile neutropenia, n = 1). Grade ≥3 adverse events were reported in 38/47 patients (81%) treated with olaparib capsules plus gemcitabine; most common were haematological toxicities (55%). Tolerated combinations were olaparib 100 mg b.i.d. capsule (intermittently, days 1-14) plus gemcitabine 600 mg/m(2) and olaparib 100 mg o.d. tablet (intermittently, days 1-14) plus gemcitabine 600 mg/m(2). There were no differences in efficacy observed during the dose-expansion phase. Olaparib 100 mg b.i.d. (intermittent dosing; capsules) plus gemcitabine 600 mg/m(2) is tolerated in advanced solid tumour patients, with no unmanageable/unexpected toxicities. Continuous dosing of olaparib or combination with gemcitabine at doses >600 mg/m(2) was not considered to have an acceptable tolerability profile

  6. Phase I study of orally administered S-1 in combination with epirubicin and oxaliplatin in patients with advanced solid tumors and chemotherapy-naïve advanced or metastatic esophagogastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Moehler, Markus; Mahlberg, Rolf; Heinemann, Volker; Obermannová, Radka; Kubala, Eugen; Melichar, Bohuslav; Weinmann, Arndt; Scigalla, Paul; Tesařová, Marietta; Janda, Petr; Hédouin-Biville, Fabienne; Mansoor, Wasat

    2017-03-01

    This phase I study investigated the safety and the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of the oral fluoropyrimidine S-1 when combined with epirubicin and oxaliplatin (EOS). Patients aged ≥18 years with advanced or metastatic solid tumors were enrolled in a 3 + 3 design with S-1 dose escalation (two planned cohorts) performed according to the occurrence of dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). On day 1 of each 21-day cycle, patients received epirubicin 50 mg/m(2) followed by oxaliplatin 130 mg/m(2) (maximum 8 cycles) and then S-1 [20 mg/m(2) (cohort 1) or 25 mg/m(2) (cohort 2), twice daily]: first dose, evening of day 1; subsequent administration on days 2-14, twice daily; last dose, morning of day 15 (unlimited number of S-1 cycles). After protocol amendment, enrollment in a third cohort was restricted to patients with chemotherapy-naïve advanced or metastatic esophagogastric cancer. DLT was reported for two of the five patients in cohort 2, defining 20 mg/m(2) twice daily as the MTD of S-1 combined with epirubicin and oxaliplatin in heavily pretreated patients. Thirteen patients with chemotherapy-naïve advanced or metastatic esophagogastric cancer were subsequently enrolled and treated at an S-1 dose level of 25 mg/m(2) twice daily; no DLTs were reported; median overall survival was 13.1 months. Of the 11 evaluable patients, three (27 %) had partial responses and seven (64 %) had stable disease. The safety profile was in line with expectations. The promising activity of EOS (S-1 dose level, 25 mg/m(2) twice daily) and acceptable safety profile support further clinical development of this combination for the first-line treatment of patients with advanced or metastatic esophagogastric cancer.

  7. Clinical trial of nintedanib in patients with recurrent or metastatic salivary gland cancer of the head and neck: A multicenter phase 2 study (Korean Cancer Study Group HN14-01).

    PubMed

    Kim, Youjin; Lee, Su Jin; Lee, Ji Yun; Lee, Se-Hoon; Sun, Jong-Mu; Park, Keunchil; An, Ho Jung; Cho, Jae Yong; Kang, Eun Joo; Lee, Ha-Young; Kim, Jinsoo; Keam, Bhumsuk; Kim, Hye Ryun; Lee, Kyoung Eun; Choi, Moon Young; Lee, Ki Hyeong; Ahn, Myung-Ju

    2017-06-01

    Salivary gland cancers (SGCs) are uncommon and account for less than 5% of all head and neck cancers, but they are histologically heterogeneous. No specific therapy, including targeted agents, has consistently improved clinical outcomes in recurrent/metastatic SGC. Recent studies suggest that vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) play important roles in SGC. Nintedanib is a potent small-molecule, triple-receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (VEGFR1, VEGFR2, and VEGFR3; fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 [FGFR1], FGFR2, and FGFR3; and PDGFRα and PDGFRß). This study sought to determine the antitumor activity of nintedanib in patients with recurrent or metastatic SGC. This open-label, multicenter, phase 2, single-arm study was conducted at 11 hospitals in South Korea. Patients with pathologically confirmed recurrent and/or metastatic SGC for whom at least 1 line of systemic chemotherapy had failed were enrolled. Nintedanib was given orally at 200 mg twice a day until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary endpoint was the response rate. The secondary endpoints were progression-free survival, overall survival, toxicity, and the disease-control rate. The Simon 2-stage minimax design was used. The median age of the patients was 54 years, 60% were female, and 95% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 or 1. The majority of the patients had adenoid cystic carcinoma (65%), and 40% received at least 2 prior rounds of chemotherapy. After 20 patients were enrolled, the study was stopped because no responders were observed at stage I. There were no partial responses, but the disease-control rate was 75% (15 of 20). The median duration of stable disease was 8.2 months (range, 1.76-12.36 months). At the time of the data cutoff, with a median follow-up of 9.5 months, the median overall survival had not been reached, and the progression-free survival rate at 6 months was

  8. Pemetrexed single agent chemotherapy in previously treated patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Francesca; Bearz, Alessandra; Pampaloni, Gianni

    2008-01-01

    Background The main objective of this study was to evaluate the safety of second-line pemetrexed in Stage IIIB or IV NSCLC. Methods Overall, 95 patients received pemetrexed 500 mg/m2 i.v. over Day 1 of a 21-day cycle. Patients also received oral dexamethasone, oral folic acid and i.m. vitamin B12 supplementation to reduce toxicity. NCI CTC 2.0 was used to rate toxicity. All the adverse events were graded in terms of severity and relation to study treatment. Dose was reduced in case of toxicity and treatment was delayed for up to 42 days from Day 1 of any cycle to allow recovering from study drug-related toxicities. Tumor response was measured using the RECIST criteria. Results Patients received a median number of 4 cycles and 97.8% of the planned dose. Overall, 75 patients (78.9% of treated) reported at least one adverse event: 34 (35.8%) had grade 3 as worst grade and only 5 (5.2%) had grade 4. Drug-related events occurred in 57.9% of patients. Neutropenia (8.4%) and leukopenia (6.3 %) were the most common grade 3/4 hematological toxicities. Grade 3 anemia and thrombocytopenia were reported in 3.2% and 2.1% of patients, respectively. Diarrhea (6.3%), fatigue (3.2%) and dyspnea (3.2%) were the most common grade 3/4 non-hematological toxicities. The most common drug-related toxicities (any grade) were pyrexia (11.6%), vomiting, nausea, diarrhea and asthenia (9.5%) and fatigue (8.4%). Tumor Response Rate (CR/PR) in treated patients was 9.2%. The survival at 4.5 months (median follow-up) was 79% and the median PFS was 3.1 months. Twenty patients (21.1%) died mainly because of disease progression. Conclusion Patients with locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC could benefit from second-line pemetrexed, with a low incidence of hematological and non-hematological toxicities. PMID:18667090

  9. Relative bioavailability of three formulations of galunisertib administered as monotherapy in patients with advanced or metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gueorguieva, Ivelina; Cleverly, Ann; Desaiah, Durisala; Azaro, Analia; Seoane, Joan; Braña, Irene; Sicart, Elisabet; Miles, Colin; Lahn, Michael M; Mitchell, Malcolm I; Rodon, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Galunisertib (LY2157299 monohydrate), an inhibitor of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) pathway, is currently under investigation in several clinical trials involving multiple tumor types. The primary objective of this study was to assess relative bioavailability of two new galunisertib formulations developed using the roller compaction (RC) dry-milled (RCD) and RC slurry-milled (RCS) processes, compared with the existing formulation developed using the high-sheer wet granulation (HSWG) process. The secondary objective was to report the safety profile after a single dose of the three formulations. Methods Patients with advanced or metastatic cancer were enrolled into this single-center, 3-period, 6-sequence crossover study. Patients were assigned sequentially to 1 of 6 sequences in blocks of 6 to ensure that all 6 sequences have the same number of completers. A patient entering a sequence received a different galunisertib formulation as a single 150 mg dose orally during each of the 3 periods. Each period was separated from the next by a washout interval of at least 48 hours. Pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters, including area under curve (AUC) and Cmax, were computed using standard non-compartmentalized methods of analysis. For comparison of exposures between formulations, log-transformed AUC and Cmax values were analyzed using a linear mixed-effects model. Safety assessments included adverse event monitoring, physical examinations, and laboratory tests. Results Of the 14 patients who entered and completed the study, 13 patients were included in the final statistical analysis. AUC(0-tlast), AUC(0–48 h), and AUC(0-∞) for the RC formulations and the HSWG formulation were similar. Cmax was reduced by approximately 22% and tmax was longer by at least 1.00 h for the RCD and RCS formulations compared with the HSWG formulation. The RC formulations demonstrated a safety profile after a single dose similar to the HSWG formulation. Conclusions In this

  10. Efficacy of triptorelin pamoate 11.25 mg administered subcutaneously for achieving medical castration levels of testosterone in patients with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lebret, Thiery; Rouanne, Mathieu; Hublarov, Oleg; Jinga, Viorel; Petkova, Lidiya; Kotsev, Rumen; Sinescu, Ioanel; Dutailly, Pascale

    2015-06-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists are widely used as androgen deprivation therapy in many men with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists are delivered by intramuscular injection every 1, 3 or 6 months, but in some patients subcutaneous injection may be more appropriate. This study assessed the efficacy and safety profile of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist, triptorelin pamoate, when administered by the subcutaneous route. In this multicentre, open-label, single-arm study, androgen deprivation therapy-naïve men with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer received the gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist triptorelin pamoate 11.25 mg (3-month formulation) by the subcutaneous route twice (at baseline and 13 weeks later). The co-primary efficacy endpoints were the proportion of patients with a castration level of serum testosterone (<50 ng/dl) after 4 weeks, and of these, those still castrated after 26 weeks. Of the 126 treated patients, 123 [97.6%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 93.2-99.5)] were castrated 4 weeks after the first subcutaneous injection, and 115/119 patients (96.6%; 95% CI: 91.6-99.1) castrated at 4 weeks maintained castration at 26 weeks. Median prostate-specific antigen levels were reduced by 64.2 and 96.0% at 4 and 26 weeks, respectively. The probability of maintaining a testosterone level <20 ng/dl up to 26 weeks was 90.0% (95% CI: 85.0-95.0). The most frequently occurring treatment-related adverse events were typical of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist treatment (hot flushes, increased weight, erectile dysfunction and hyperhidrosis). This study demonstrates that triptorelin pamoate 11.25 mg administered by the subcutaneous route every 3 months is as efficacious and well tolerated as administration via the intramuscular route in men with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer.

  11. Efficacy of triptorelin pamoate 11.25 mg administered subcutaneously for achieving medical castration levels of testosterone in patients with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rouanne, Mathieu; Hublarov, Oleg; Jinga, Viorel; Petkova, Lidiya; Kotsev, Rumen; Sinescu, Ioanel; Dutailly, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists are widely used as androgen deprivation therapy in many men with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists are delivered by intramuscular injection every 1, 3 or 6 months, but in some patients subcutaneous injection may be more appropriate. This study assessed the efficacy and safety profile of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist, triptorelin pamoate, when administered by the subcutaneous route. Methods: In this multicentre, open-label, single-arm study, androgen deprivation therapy-naïve men with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer received the gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist triptorelin pamoate 11.25 mg (3-month formulation) by the subcutaneous route twice (at baseline and 13 weeks later). The co-primary efficacy endpoints were the proportion of patients with a castration level of serum testosterone (<50 ng/dl) after 4 weeks, and of these, those still castrated after 26 weeks. Results: Of the 126 treated patients, 123 [97.6%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 93.2–99.5)] were castrated 4 weeks after the first subcutaneous injection, and 115/119 patients (96.6%; 95% CI: 91.6–99.1) castrated at 4 weeks maintained castration at 26 weeks. Median prostate-specific antigen levels were reduced by 64.2 and 96.0% at 4 and 26 weeks, respectively. The probability of maintaining a testosterone level <20 ng/dl up to 26 weeks was 90.0% (95% CI: 85.0–95.0). The most frequently occurring treatment-related adverse events were typical of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist treatment (hot flushes, increased weight, erectile dysfunction and hyperhidrosis). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that triptorelin pamoate 11.25 mg administered by the subcutaneous route every 3 months is as efficacious and well tolerated as administration via the intramuscular route in men with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:26161143

  12. Effect of First-Line Chemotherapy Combined With Cetuximab or Bevacizumab on Overall Survival in Patients With KRAS Wild-Type Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Venook, Alan P.; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Innocenti, Federico; Fruth, Briant; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Schrag, Deborah; Greene, Claire; O’Neil, Bert H.; Atkins, James Norman; Berry, Scott; Polite, Blase N.; O’Reilly, Eileen M.; Goldberg, Richard M.; Hochster, Howard S.; Schilsky, Richard L.; Bertagnolli, Monica M.; El-Khoueiry, Anthony B.; Watson, Peter; Benson, Al B.; Mulkerin, Daniel L.; Mayer, Robert J.; Blanke, Charles

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Combining biologic monoclonal antibodies with chemotherapeutic cytotoxic drugs provides clinical benefit to patients with advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer, but the optimal choice of the initial biologic therapy in previously untreated patients is unknown. OBJECTIVE To determine if the addition of cetuximab vsbevacizumab to the combination of leucovorin, fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin (mFOLFOX6) regimen or the combination of leucovorin, fluorouracil, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI) regimen is superior as first-line therapy in advanced or metastatic KRAS wild-type (wt) colorectal cancer. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Patients (≥18 years) enrolled at community and academic centers throughout the National Clinical Trials Network in the United States and Canada (November 2005-March 2012) with previously untreated advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer whose tumors were KRAS wt chose to take either the mFOLFOX6 regimen or the FOLFIRI regimen as chemotherapy and were randomized to receive either cetuximab (n = 578) or bevacizumab (n = 559). The last date of follow-up was December 15, 2015. INTERVENTIONS Cetuximab vs bevacizumab combined with either mFOLFOX6 or FOLFIRI chemotherapy regimen chosen by the treating physician and patient. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary end point was overall survival. Secondary objectives included progression-free survival and overall response rate, site-reported confirmed or unconfirmed complete or partial response. RESULTS Among 1137 patients (median age, 59 years; 440 [39%] women), 1074 (94%) of patients met eligibility criteria. As of December 15, 2015, median follow-up for 263 surviving patients was 47.4 months (range, 0–110.7 months), and 82% of patients (938 of 1137) experienced disease progression. The median overall survival was 30.0 months in the cetuximab-chemotherapy group and 29.0 months in the bevacizumab-chemotherapy group with a stratified hazard ratio (HR) of 0.88 (95% CI, 0.77–1.01; P = .08). The

  13. Efficacy and safety of gemcitabine plus erlotinib for locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Hu, Guo-fang; Zhang, Qian-qian; Tang, Ning; Guo, Jun; Liu, Li-yan; Han, Xiao; Wang, Xia; Wang, Zhe-hai

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is considered as a chemoresistant neoplasm with extremely dismal prognosis. Gemcitabine is recommended as the standard agent for locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. A series of trials have been conducted to improve the outcome of advanced pancreatic cancer with other anticancer drugs in combination with gemcitabine. Unfortunately, the designers of the clinical trials failed to improve the poor prognosis of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Erlotinib was the first additional drug that improved the overall survival of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer with gemcitabine. We performed this systematic review and meta-analysis to explore the efficacy and safety of the combination of gemcitabine with erlotinib (GemErlo) for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer using the currently available evidence. Methods PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and relevant abstracts of major conferences were comprehensively searched. Data results on objective response rate, disease control rate, and 1-year survival were pooled by using MetaAnalyst with a random-effects model. Results on progression-free survival and overall survival were only summarized descriptively. Results A total of 24 studies with 1,742 patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer treated with GemErlo were included. Combined objective response rate was 14.4% (95% CI: 11.6%–17.7%), disease control rate was 55.0% (95% CI: 51.5%–58.5%), and 1-year survival rate was 28.5% (95% CI: 24.0%–33.4%). Progression-free survival ranged from 2.63 to 9.6 months, and overall survival varied from 6 to 10 months. As for the toxicity profile, the most common adverse events (AEs) were hematologic reactions, skin rash, and gastrointestinal reactions. Other severe AEs, which had low incidence, included treatment-induced death and interstitial lung disease. Conclusion Our study showed that GemErlo is associated with reasonable activity in treating

  14. Concomitant endometrial and gallbladder metastasis in advanced multiple metastatic invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Bezpalko, Kseniya; Mohamed, Mohamed A.; Mercer, Leo; McCann, Michael; Elghawy, Karim; Wilson, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction At time of presentation, fewer than 10% of patients have metastatic breast cancer. The most common sites of metastasis in order of frequency are bone, lung, pleura, soft tissue, and liver. Breast cancer metastasis to the uterus or gallbladder is rare and has infrequently been reported in the English literature. Presentation of case A 47 year old female with a recent history of thrombocytopenia presented with abnormal vaginal bleeding. Pelvic ultrasound revealed multiple uterine fibroids and endometrial curettings revealed cells consistent with lobular carcinoma of the breast. Breast examination revealed edema and induration of the lower half of the right breast. Biopsy of the right breast revealed invasive lobular carcinoma. Bone marrow aspiration obtained at a previous outpatient visit revealed extensive involvement by metastatic breast carcinoma. Shortly after discharge, the patient presented with acute cholecystitis and underwent cholecystectomy. Microscopic examination of the gallbladder revealed metastatic infiltrating lobular carcinoma. The final diagnosis was invasive lobular carcinoma of the right breast with metastasis to the bone marrow, endometrium, gallbladder, regional lymph nodes, and peritoneum. Discussion The growth pattern of invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast is unique and poses a challenge in diagnosing the cancer at an early stage. Unlike other types of breast cancer, it tends to metastasize more to the peritoneum, ovary, and gastrointestinal tract. Metastasis to the endometrium or gallbladder is rare. Conclusion Metastatic spread should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with invasive lobular breast carcinoma presenting with abnormal vaginal bleeding or acute cholecystitis. PMID:26275738

  15. Pembrolizumab and Ziv-aflibercept in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    Adult Solid Neoplasm; Metastatic Melanoma; Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer

  16. Phase II study of continuous infusional 5-fluorouracil with epirubicin and carboplatin (instead of cisplatin) in patients with metastatic/locally advanced breast cancer (infusional ECarboF): a very active and well-tolerated outpatient regimen.

    PubMed Central

    Bonnefoi, H.; Smith, I. E.; O'Brien, M. E.; Seymour, M. T.; Powles, T. J.; Allum, W. H.; Ebbs, S.; Baum, M.

    1996-01-01

    Infusional 5-fluorouracil (F) with cisplatin (C) and epirubicin (E), so-called infusional ECF, is a highly active new schedule against locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer. Cisplatin, however, is a major contributor to toxicity and usually requires inpatient treatment. In an attempt to overcome this, we have investigated the effect of substituting carboplatin for cisplatin in our original infusional ECF regimen. Fifty-two patients with metastatic (n = 36) or locally advanced/inflammatory (n = 16) breast cancer were treated with 5-fluorouracil 200 mg m-2 day-1 via a Hickman line using an ambulatory pump for for 6 months, with epirubicin 50 mg m-2 intravenously (i.v.) and carboplatin AUC5 i.v. every 4 weeks, for six courses (infusional ECarboF). The overall response rate (complete plus partial) was 81% (95% CI 67%-90%), with a complete response rate of 17% (95% CI 6-33%) in patients with metastatic disease and 56% (95% CI 30-80%) in patients with locally advanced disease. Median response duration and survival for metastatic disease was 8 and 14 months respectively, and two patients with locally advanced disease have relapsed. These results are very similar to those previously achieved with infusional ECF. Severe grade 3/4 toxicity was low. Infusional ECarboF is a highly active, well-tolerated, outpatient regimen effective against advanced/metastatic breast cancer and now warrants evaluation against conventional chemotherapy in high-risk early breast cancer. PMID:8562348

  17. Reirradiation of locally recurrent nasopharyngeal cancer: history, advances, and promises for the future.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lin; Lu, Jiade J

    2016-04-01

    Local or locoregional recurrence of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) after high-dose radiotherapy remains a significant clinical problem. This is especially important in regions of the world in which NPC is endemic, such as Southern China. In this review, we briefly present the evolution in the definitive treatment of NPC, but focus more so on the historical and contemporary treatment approaches and outcomes utilized in the recurrent setting. Specifically, we highlight the various treatment strategies (repeat surgery, brachytherapy, conventional re-irradiation, SRS/SBRT, and salvage IMRT), and their technical, physical and biological limitations. Special attention is given towards salvage IMRT, as this is becoming the standard of care for locally recurrent NPC. Further, it is the most commonly indicated modality, since it can be used to treat larger tumors and more extensive disease stages, which represent the majority of recurrent cases. Predictive and prognostic factors for the efficacy of repeat treatment are discussed as well. The toxicities brought about by repeat radiotherapy courses are also highlighted, with an emphasis on their impact on mortality and quality of life, which underscore the difficulty that this clinical entity presents. Lastly, the rationale for particle radiation therapy, which is potentially safer and more efficacious, for the treatment of locally recurrent NPC is presented.

  18. Long-term outcomes with intraoperative radiotherapy as a component of treatment for locally advanced or recurrent uterine sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Barney, Brandon M; Petersen, Ivy A; Dowdy, Sean C; Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie N; Haddock, Michael G

    2012-05-01

    To report our institutional experience with intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) as a component of treatment for women with locally advanced or recurrent uterine sarcoma. From 1990 to 2010, 16 women with primary (n = 3) or locoregionally recurrent (n = 13) uterine sarcoma received IORT as a component of combined modality treatment. Tumor histology studies found leiomyosarcoma (n = 9), endometrial stromal sarcoma (n = 4), and carcinosarcoma (n = 3). Surgery consisted of gross total resection in 2 patients, subtotal resection in 6 patients, and resection with close surgical margins in 8 patients. The median IORT dose was 12.5 Gy (range, 10-20 Gy). All patients received perioperative external beam radiotherapy (EBRT; median dose, 50.4 Gy; range, 20-62.5 Gy), and 6 patients also received perioperative systemic therapy. Seven of the 16 patients are alive at a median follow-up of 44 months (range, 11-203 months). The 3-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of local relapse (within the EBRT field) was 7%, and central control (within the IORT field) was 100%. No local failures occurred in any of the 6 patients who underwent subtotal resection. The 3-year freedom from distant relapse was 48%, with failures occurring most frequently in the lungs or mediastinum. Median survival was 18 months, and 3-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of cause-specific and overall survival were 58% and 53%, respectively. Three patients (19%) experienced late Grade 3 toxicity. A combined modality approach with perioperative EBRT, surgery, and IORT for locally advanced or recurrent uterine sarcoma resulted in excellent local disease control with acceptable toxicity, even in patients with positive resection margins. With this approach, some patients were able to experience long-term freedom from recurrence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Long-Term Outcomes With Intraoperative Radiotherapy as a Component of Treatment for Locally Advanced or Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, Brandon M.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Dowdy, Sean C.; Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie N.; Haddock, Michael G.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To report our institutional experience with intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) as a component of treatment for women with locally advanced or recurrent uterine sarcoma. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 2010, 16 women with primary (n = 3) or locoregionally recurrent (n = 13) uterine sarcoma received IORT as a component of combined modality treatment. Tumor histology studies found leiomyosarcoma (n = 9), endometrial stromal sarcoma (n = 4), and carcinosarcoma (n = 3). Surgery consisted of gross total resection in 2 patients, subtotal resection in 6 patients, and resection with close surgical margins in 8 patients. The median IORT dose was 12.5 Gy (range, 10-20 Gy). All patients received perioperative external beam radiotherapy (EBRT; median dose, 50.4 Gy; range, 20-62.5 Gy), and 6 patients also received perioperative systemic therapy. Results: Seven of the 16 patients are alive at a median follow-up of 44 months (range, 11-203 months). The 3-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of local relapse (within the EBRT field) was 7%, and central control (within the IORT field) was 100%. No local failures occurred in any of the 6 patients who underwent subtotal resection. The 3-year freedom from distant relapse was 48%, with failures occurring most frequently in the lungs or mediastinum. Median survival was 18 months, and 3-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of cause-specific and overall survival were 58% and 53%, respectively. Three patients (19%) experienced late Grade 3 toxicity. Conclusions: A combined modality approach with perioperative EBRT, surgery, and IORT for locally advanced or recurrent uterine sarcoma resulted in excellent local disease control with acceptable toxicity, even in patients with positive resection margins. With this approach, some patients were able to experience long-term freedom from recurrence.

  20. Temsirolimus in women with platinum-refractory/resistant ovarian cancer or advanced/recurrent endometrial carcinoma. A phase II study of the AGO-study group (AGO-GYN8).

    PubMed

    Emons, Günter; Kurzeder, Christian; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Neuser, Petra; de Gregorio, Nikolaus; Pfisterer, Jacobus; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Mahner, Sven; Schröder, Willibald; Lück, Hans-Joachim; Heubner, Martin Leonhard; Hanker, Lars; Thiel, Falk; Hilpert, Felix

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate activity and toxicity of mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus in patients with platinum-refractory/resistant ovarian cancer (OC) or advanced/recurrent endometrial carcinoma (EC). Women with epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal cancer were eligible, when they had progression during treatment with a platinum based regimen or within 6 months after receiving a platinum based regimen and a previous taxane treatment. Women with advanced/recurrent EC, no longer amenable to curative surgery and/or radiotherapy were eligible when they had no previous or only adjuvant chemotherapy. Preceding endocrine therapy for metastatic/recurrent disease was allowed. Patients received weekly IV infusions of 25mg temsirolimus. Primary endpoint was progression free survival rate after 4 months (OC) or 6 months (EC). A two stage design was applied. Forty-four patients (OC: n=22; EC: n=22) were enrolled and received temsirolimus treatment. Median age was 56 years (OC) or 63 years (EC). After eight weeks of treatment, 10 of 21 evaluable patients in the OC cohort and 8 of 20 evaluable patients in the EC cohort had progressive disease. Thus efficacy did not meet the predefined levels during the first stage of recruitment and the trial was stopped. Some patients in both cohorts had long lasting PFS (>7 months). Toxicity of temsirolimus was mild. Temsirolimus treatment was well tolerated in our patients, but did not meet the predefined efficacy criteria. In our study as in other trials on rapalogs in OC or EC, a few patients had long lasting disease stabilisations. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. 6.3 MeV fast neutrons in the treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Velikaya, V. V. Startseva, Zh. A.; Musabaeva, L. I. Lisin, V. A.

    2016-08-02

    The study included 135 breast cancer patients (70 patients with locally recurrent breast cancer and 65 patients with locally advanced breast cancer with unfavorable prognostic factors) who received the neutron therapy alone or in combination with the photon therapy. The neutron therapy was shown to be effective in multimodality treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer. The 8-year survival rate in patients without repeated breast cancer recurrence was 87.6 ± 8.7% after the neutron and neutron-photon therapy and 54.3 ± 9.2% after the electron beam therapy.

  2. 6.3 MeV fast neutrons in the treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikaya, V. V.; Musabaeva, L. I.; Lisin, V. A.; Startseva, Zh. A.

    2016-08-01

    The study included 135 breast cancer patients (70 patients with locally recurrent breast cancer and 65 patients with locally advanced breast cancer with unfavorable prognostic factors) who received the neutron therapy alone or in combination with the photon therapy. The neutron therapy was shown to be effective in multimodality treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer. The 8-year survival rate in patients without repeated breast cancer recurrence was 87.6 ± 8.7% after the neutron and neutron-photon therapy and 54.3 ± 9.2% after the electron beam therapy.

  3. Saracatinib in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Locally Advanced Breast Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-02

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  4. Veliparib in Combination With Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-22

    Adult Solid Neoplasm; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  5. Metastatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... stop the growth of primary and metastatic cancer cells. This research includes finding ways to help your immune system ... the steps in the process that allow cancer cells to spread. Visit the Metastatic Cancer Research page to stay informed of ongoing research funded ...

  6. Thermoradiotherapy of the chest wall in locally advanced or recurrent breast cancer with marginal resection.

    PubMed

    Welz, S; Hehr, T; Lamprecht, U; Scheithauer, H; Budach, W; Bamberg, M

    2005-03-01

    Evaluation of the efficacy of combined hyperthermia and radiotherapy (TRT) in high-risk breast cancer patients with microscopic involved margins (R1) after mastectomy or with resected locoregional, early recurrence with close margins or R1-resection. Main endpoint was local tumour control (LC); secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS), disease free survival (DFS) and acute toxicity. Between 1997-2001, 50 patients were treated with TRT. Thirteen patients (group 1) received a post-operative TRT in a high-risk situation (free margin <1 cm or R1, N+), 37 patients (group 2) received TRT after close/R1 resection of a locoregional recurrence. Thirteen out of 37 patients in group 2 already had had two-to-seven recurrences prior to TRT. Median radiation dose was 60 Gy (range: 44-66.4 Gy), the additional local hyperthermia (>41 degrees C, 60 min) was given twice a week. Median follow-up for patients at risk was 28 months. All statistical tests were done using Statistica software. Actuarial OS for all patients at 3 years accounted for 89%, DFS for 68% and LC for 80%. Actuarial OS was 90% for group 1 and 89% for group 2, with four patients having died so far. DFS at 3 years was 64% in group 1 and 69% in group 2, actuarial 3 year LC was 75% and 81%, respectively. For patients with recurrent chest wall disease, there was no difference concerning local control between patients who underwent TRT with or without prior radiation. No prognostic factors could be detected due to the small number of patients investigated. The combined modality treatment was well tolerated. Grade IV toxicity, according to the Common Toxicity Criteria, did not occur. The results concerning local tumour control and overall survival in these high-risk patients are promising, especially for TRT for the treatment of local recurrences. A longer follow-up is needed to estimate late toxicity.

  7. Sorafenib for Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared sorafenib (Nexavar®) and a placebo for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer that is no longer responding to treatment with radioactive iodine

  8. Treatment with two different doses of sonidegib in patients with locally advanced or metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BOLT): a multicentre, randomised, double-blind phase 2 trial.

    PubMed

    Migden, Michael R; Guminski, Alexander; Gutzmer, Ralf; Dirix, Luc; Lewis, Karl D; Combemale, Patrick; Herd, Robert M; Kudchadkar, Ragini; Trefzer, Uwe; Gogov, Sven; Pallaud, Celine; Yi, Tingting; Mone, Manisha; Kaatz, Martin; Loquai, Carmen; Stratigos, Alexander J; Schulze, Hans-Joachim; Plummer, Ruth; Chang, Anne Lynn S; Cornélis, Frank; Lear, John T; Sellami, Dalila; Dummer, Reinhard

    2015-06-01

    Patients with advanced basal cell carcinoma have limited treatment options. Hedgehog pathway signalling is aberrantly activated in around 95% of tumours. We assessed the antitumour activity of sonidegib, a Hedgehog signalling inhibitor, in patients with advanced basal cell carcinoma. BOLT is an ongoing multicentre, randomised, double-blind, phase 2 trial. Eligible patients had locally advanced basal cell carcinoma not amenable to curative surgery or radiation or metastatic basal cell carcinoma. Patients were randomised via an automated system in a 1:2 ratio to receive 200 mg or 800 mg oral sonidegib daily, stratified by disease, histological subtype, and geographical region. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients who achieved an objective response, assessed in the primary efficacy analysis population (patients with fully assessable locally advanced disease and all those with metastatic disease) with data collected up to 6 months after randomisation of the last patient. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01327053. Between July 20, 2011, and Jan 10, 2013, we enrolled 230 patients, 79 in the 200 mg sonidegib group, and 151 in the 800 mg sonidegib group. Median follow-up was 13·9 months (IQR 10·1-17·3). In the primary efficacy analysis population, 20 (36%, 95% CI 24-50) of 55 patients receiving 200 mg sonidegib and 39 (34%, 25-43) of 116 receiving 800 mg sonidegib achieved an objective response. In the 200 mg sonidegib group, 18 (43%, 95% CI 28-59) patients who achieved an objective response, as assessed by central review, were noted among the 42 with locally advanced basal cell carcinoma and two (15%, 2-45) among the 13 with metastatic disease. In the 800 mg group, 35 (38%, 95% CI 28-48) of 93 patients with locally advanced disease had an objective response, as assessed by central review, as did four (17%, 5-39) of 23 with metastatic disease. Fewer adverse events leading to dose interruptions or reductions (25 [32%] of 79

  9. Development and validation of automatic tools for interactive recurrence analysis in radiation therapy: optimization of treatment algorithms for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In radiation oncology recurrence analysis is an important part in the evaluation process and clinical quality assurance of treatment concepts. With the example of 9 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer we developed and validated interactive analysis tools to support the evaluation workflow. Methods After an automatic registration of the radiation planning CTs with the follow-up images, the recurrence volumes are segmented manually. Based on these volumes the DVH (dose volume histogram) statistic is calculated, followed by the determination of the dose applied to the region of recurrence and the distance between the boost and recurrence volume. We calculated the percentage of the recurrence volume within the 80%-isodose volume and compared it to the location of the recurrence within the boost volume, boost + 1 cm, boost + 1.5 cm and boost + 2 cm volumes. Results Recurrence analysis of 9 patients demonstrated that all recurrences except one occurred within the defined GTV/boost volume; one recurrence developed beyond the field border/outfield. With the defined distance volumes in relation to the recurrences, we could show that 7 recurrent lesions were within the 2 cm radius of the primary tumor. Two large recurrences extended beyond the 2 cm, however, this might be due to very rapid growth and/or late detection of the tumor progression. Conclusion The main goal of using automatic analysis tools is to reduce time and effort conducting clinical analyses. We showed a first approach and use of a semi-automated workflow for recurrence analysis, which will be continuously optimized. In conclusion, despite the limitations of the automatic calculations we contributed to in-house optimization of subsequent study concepts based on an improved and validated target volume definition. PMID:24499557

  10. Benefits of Recurrent Colonic Stent Insertion in a Patient with Advanced Gastric Cancer with Carcinomatosis Causing Colonic Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Park, Semi; Shin, Sang Joon; Ahn, Joong Bae; Jeung, Hei-Cheul; Rha, Sun Young; Lee, Sang Kil

    2009-01-01

    Malignant obstruction develops frequently in advanced gastric cancer. Although it is primarily the gastric outlet that is obstructed, there are occasional reports of colonic obstruction. Treating intestinal obstruction usually requires emergency surgery or stent insertion. There are several kinds of complications with stent insertion, such as bowel perforation, stent migration, bleeding, abdominal pain and reobstruction. Nevertheless, endoscopic stent insertion could be a better treatment than emergency surgery in cases of malignant bowel obstruction in cancer patients with poor performance status. We report a case of advanced gastric cancer with carcinomatosis in which a recurrent colonic stent was inserted at the same site because of cancer growth into the stent. The patient maintained a good condition for chemotherapy, thus improving their chances for survival. PMID:19430568

  11. Cost-effectiveness of Pazopanib Versus Sunitinib as First-line Treatment for Locally Advanced or Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma from an Italian National Health Service Perspective.

    PubMed

    Capri, Stefano; Porta, Camillo; Delea, Thomas E

    2017-03-01

    A prior randomized controlled trial (COMPARZ [Comparing the Efficacy, Safety and Tolerability of Pazopanib versus Sunitinib]) found non-inferior progression-free survival for pazopanib versus sunitinib as first-line therapy in patients with advanced or metastatic renal cell carcinoma. The present study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of pazopanib versus sunitinib as first-line treatment for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma from an Italian National Health Service perspective. A partitioned-survival analysis model with 3 health states (progression-free survival, post-progression survival, and dead) was employed. The model time horizon was 5 years. For each treatment strategy, the model generated expected progression-free life years, post-progression life years, overall life years, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and costs. Results were reported as incremental costs per QALY gained and the net monetary benefit of pazopanib versus sunitinib. Probabilistic and deterministic sensitivity analyses were conducted to assess the impact on results of methodological and parameter uncertainty. In the base case, pazopanib was associated with higher QALYs and lower costs and dominated sunitinib. Using willingness-to-pay thresholds of €30,000 and €50,000 per QALY, the net monetary benefits with pazopanib were €6508 and €7702 per patient, respectively, versus sunitinib. The probability that pazopanib is cost-effective versus sunitinib was estimated to be 85% at a cost-effectiveness threshold of €20,000, 86% at a threshold of €30,000, and 81% at a threshold of €50,000 per QALY. Results were robust to changes in key parameter values and assumptions. These results suggest that pazopanib is likely to represent a cost-effective treatment option compared with sunitinib as first-line treatment for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma in Italy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Gemcitabine and ISIS-2503 for patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma: a North Central Cancer Treatment Group phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Steven R; Schroeder, Mark; Erlichman, Charles; Steen, Preston D; Foster, Nathan R; Moore, Dennis F; Rowland, Kendrith M; Nair, Suresh; Tschetter, Loren K; Fitch, Tom R

    2004-12-15

    Gemcitabine remains the standard therapy for metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma (ACA), but has limited activity. ISIS-2503 is an antisense compound directed against H-ras with preclinical activity against pancreatic ACA in tumor models. The combination of ISIS-2503 and gemcitabine has been evaluated in a prior phase I study. Patients with metastatic or locally advanced pancreatic ACA not amenable to surgery or local radiation received gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m(2) intravenously over 30 minutes on days 1 and 8 and ISIS-2503 6 mg/kg/d as a continuous intravenous infusion over 14 days of an every-3-weeks cycle. Responses were monitored by radiologic imaging every 6 weeks. Forty-eight eligible patients were enrolled, 43 with metastatic disease. Median follow-up was 12.6 months (range, 2.2 to 16.8 months) for living patients. A median of four cycles of treatment was given (range, 1 to 18 cycles). All patients were assessable for response and toxicity. The 6-month survival percentage was 57.5% (95% CI, 44.9% to 73.5%) and the median survival was 6.6 months. The response rate was 10.4% (one complete response, four partial responses). Clinically significant toxicity was limited except for one fatal pulmonary embolism. This study shows a promising response rate to the combination of gemcitabine and ISIS-2503 in patients with pancreatic ACA. The observed 6-month survival rate in these patients met our protocol-defined criteria for success. This regimen is tolerable, but is of unclear benefit. Additional studies evaluating the role of gemcitabine and ISIS-2503 in the treatment of pancreatic ACA should be considered.

  13. Target Definition in Salvage Radiotherapy for Recurrent Prostate Cancer: The Role of Advanced Molecular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Amzalag, Gaël; Rager, Olivier; Tabouret-Viaud, Claire; Wissmeyer, Michael; Sfakianaki, Electra; de Perrot, Thomas; Ratib, Osman; Miralbell, Raymond; Giovacchini, Giampiero; Garibotto, Valentina; Zilli, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Salvage radiotherapy (SRT) represents the main treatment option for relapsing prostate cancer in patients after radical prostatectomy. Several open questions remain unanswered in terms of target volumes definition and delivered doses for SRT: the effective dose necessary to achieve biochemical control in the SRT setting may be different if the tumor recurrence is micro- or macroscopic. At the same time, irradiation of only the prostatic bed or of the whole pelvis will depend on the localization of the recurrence, local or locoregional. In the "theragnostic imaging" era, molecular imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) constitutes a useful tool for clinicians to define the site of the recurrence, the extent of disease, and individualize salvage treatments. The best option currently available in clinical routine is the combination of radiolabeled choline PET imaging and multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), associating the nodal and distant metastases identification based on PET with the local assessment by MRI. A new generation of targeted tracers, namely, prostate-specific membrane antigen, show promising results, with a contrast superior to choline imaging and a higher detection rate even for low prostate-specific antigen levels; validation studies are ongoing. Finally, imaging targeting bone remodeling, using whole-body SPECT-CT, is a relevant complement to molecular/metabolic PET imaging when bone involvement is suspected.

  14. Intensity modulated perioperative HDR brachytherapy for recurrent and/or advanced head and neck metastases.

    PubMed

    Teudt, Ingo U; Kovàcs, György; Ritter, Matthias; Melchert, Corinna; Soror, Tamer; Wollenberg, Barbara; Meyer, Jens E

    2016-09-01

    Recurrent neck metastases following surgery and full dose adjuvant radiotherapy of squamous cell head and neck cancer remain a clinical challenge. After revision neck dissection and chemotherapy re-irradiation dosage is often limited and survival prognosis deteriorates. Here, adjuvant high-dose rate intensity modulated perioperative brachytherapy (HDR IMBT) offers a second full radiation dose with a limited volume of normal tissue radiation in the neck. In this retrospective study patients were identified who underwent revision surgery and perioperative HDR IMBT for recurrent neck metastases. Survival rates were estimated and the scarce literature on interstitial brachytherapy of the neck was reviewed. From 2006 to 2014, nine patients were treated for recurrent or palliative neck metastases using salvage surgery and HDR IMBT. Eight patients received previous surgery and external beam radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. Two and five year overall survival was calculated to be 78 and 67 %, respectively. HDR IMBT is a salvage treatment option for selected cases in the neck following surgical revision or last-line treatment strategies. In the literature and this small cohort radiation toxicity and the risk of "carotid blow-out" seemed to be low.

  15. Efficacy and Safety of Nab-Paclitaxel as Second-line Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced and Metastatic Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wenjing; Sun, Ping; Mu, Zhengbin; Liu, Jiannan; Yu, Caiyan; Liu, Aina

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the efficacy and safety of nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) for locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as second-line chemotherapy. We retrospectively reviewed the treatment of 34 patients with advanced NSCLC whose first-line treatment had failed. These patients received nab-paclitaxel 260 mg/m(2) on day 1 and day 8 of a 21-day cycle from July 2014 to February 2016. One cycle of treatment lasted 3 weeks and all patients completed more than two cycles. All patients were assessed for adverse events related to treatment. No patient achieved complete response (CR); 12 patients reached partial response (PR), 12 patients achieved stable disease (SD) and 10 patients progressive disease (PD). The overall response rate (ORR) was 35.3% and the disease control rate (DCR) 70.6 %. There was no significant difference in either ORR or DCR within the subgroups. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 5.7 months (95% confidence interval (CI)=3.8-7.6) and the median overall survival (OS) was 9 months (95% CI=8.3-9.7). There was no statistical difference in OS (p=0.066), but subgroup analysis showed that patients with squamous carcinoma benefited more in PFS (the median PFS of squamous carcinoma vs. adenocarcinoma was 7.3 months vs. 5 months, p=0.001). Major adverse events included myelosuppression, gastrointestinal response, baldness, myalgia and neurotoxicity. Hypersensitivity reactions were not reported. Nab-paclitaxel is an effective chemotherapy for locally advanced and metastatic NSCLC as treatment and has a superior application prospect for squamous NSCLC. Toxicity is generally mild and manageable. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  16. Risk of recurrence of non-metastatic breast cancer in women under 40 years: a population-registry cancer study in a European country.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Ramos, David; Escrig, Javier; Torrella, Ana; Hoashi, Jane S; Alcalde, Miguel; Salvador, Jose L

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer in young patients is relatively uncommon. There is no consensus about the impact of young age on prognosis. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of young age over the risk of recurrence of breast cancer using a population-registry cancer database in Spain. A retrospective study case-control type was designed. A total of 1,210 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. A cutoff at 40 years was used to define two groups of patients: group A, ≤40 years (n = 111); and group B, >40 years (n = 1,099). Younger women showed a higher rate of undifferentiated tumors; a higher percentage of positive lymph nodes; lower rate of positivity of estrogen receptor, higher rate of nonconservative surgery and higher proportion of adjuvant therapies. The risk of recurrence was higher for women ≤40 years: HR =2.59 (95% CI: 1.60-4.18). Breast cancer diagnosed at a young age (≤40 years) is correlated with higher recurrence rates. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Comparison of cost-effectiveness of regorafenib and trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet for treating advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Michio; Usami, Eiseki; Iwai, Mina; Go, Makiko; Teramachi, Hitomi; Yoshimura, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    Regorafenib and trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet regimens are standard third-line or later treatments for advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer with no significant difference in efficacy. The present study aimed to compare the cost-effectiveness of using regorafenib vs. the trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet. The expected cost was calculated based on data from patients with advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer who were treated with regorafenib or trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet. The median survival time (MST) from the CORRECT and the RECOURSE study was used to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of the regimens. The cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated from the expected cost and MST for the two regimens. The expected cost per patient for the regorafenib and the trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet regimen was ¥705,330.3 and ¥371,198.7, respectively, and the cost-effectiveness ratio was ¥110,207.9/MST and ¥52,281.5/MST, respectively. In conclusion, the findings of the present study demonstrated that the trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet regimen is more cost-effective compared with the regorafenib regimen. PMID:27900102

  18. Comparison of cost-effectiveness of regorafenib and trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet for treating advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Michio; Usami, Eiseki; Iwai, Mina; Go, Makiko; Teramachi, Hitomi; Yoshimura, Tomoaki

    2016-11-01

    Regorafenib and trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet regimens are standard third-line or later treatments for advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer with no significant difference in efficacy. The present study aimed to compare the cost-effectiveness of using regorafenib vs. the trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet. The expected cost was calculated based on data from patients with advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer who were treated with regorafenib or trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet. The median survival time (MST) from the CORRECT and the RECOURSE study was used to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of the regimens. The cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated from the expected cost and MST for the two regimens. The expected cost per patient for the regorafenib and the trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet regimen was ¥705,330.3 and ¥371,198.7, respectively, and the cost-effectiveness ratio was ¥110,207.9/MST and ¥52,281.5/MST, respectively. In conclusion, the findings of the present study demonstrated that the trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet regimen is more cost-effective compared with the regorafenib regimen.

  19. Phase II Study of Intraventricular Methotrexate in Children With Recurrent or Progressive Malignant Brain Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-12

    Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Childhood Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor; Embryonal Tumor With Abundant Neuropil and True Rosettes; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm to the Leptomeninges

  20. Metastatic Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Massagué, Joan; Obenauf, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of death from cancer. To colonize distant organs, circulating cancer cells must overcome many obstacles through mechanisms that we are starting to understand. Infiltrating distant tissue, evading immune defences, adapting to supportive niches, surviving as latent tumour-initiating seeds, and eventually breaking out to replace the host tissue, are key steps for metastatic colonization. These obstacles make metastasis a highly inefficient process, but once metastases are established current treatments frequently fail to provide durable responses. A better understanding of the mechanistic determinants of metastatic colonization is needed to better prevent and treat metastatic cancer. PMID:26791720

  1. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Older Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-14

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  2. Phase 2 trial of mifepristone (RU-486) in advanced or recurrent endometrioid adenocarcinoma or low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Ramondetta, Lois M; Johnson, Alaina J; Sun, Charlotte C; Atkinson, Neely; Smith, Judith A; Jung, Maria S; Broaddus, Russel; Iyer, Revathy B; Burke, Thomas

    2009-05-01

    : The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of mifepristone (RU-486) in women with advanced or recurrent endometrioid adenocarcinoma or low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma (LGESS). : Mifepristone (RU-486; 200 mg orally) was given daily to patients with progesterone receptor-positive advanced or recurrent endometrioid adenocarcinoma or LGESS. Patients were evaluated every 4 weeks for toxicity and response. Quality-of-life data were obtained using the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale and Functional Assessment for Cancer Therapy. : Twelve of 13 enrolled patients were evaluable in the first phase of accrual. Stable disease was noted in 3 of 12 patients (at 8 weeks, 12 weeks, and > or =77 weeks, respectively), and the median time to disease progression was 48 days. Among the patients who had stable disease, 2 women had endometrioid endometrial cancer, and 1 woman had LGESS. No partial or complete responses were observed. The most frequent grade 1 and 2 toxicities were anorexia, fatigue, and mood alterations observed in 50%, 50%, and 58% of patients, respectively. The most common grade 3 toxicities were fatigue and dyspnea observed in 25% and 17% of patients, respectively. One patient experienced grade 4 dyspnea. Thirty-three percent of patients had asymptomatic elevations of corticotropin. No serious treatment-related adverse events occurred. There were no significant changes in quality of life. : Single-agent mifepristone used in the treatment of recurrent endometrioid adenocarcinoma or LGESS resulted in a stable disease rate of 25%. One patient who had a biopsy-positive disease recurrence remained stable at 77 weeks. Although mifepristone was tolerated well, as a single agent, it provided limited response as a single agent in women with progesterone receptor-positive uterine tumors. Recently, was been recognized that biologic agents used as single agents may result only in stable disease unless they are combined with cytotoxic agents. The authors

  3. [Sacral resection in surgical treatment of locally advanced primary and recurrent rectal and anal cancer: short-term outcomes].

    PubMed

    Tsarkov, P V; Efetov, S K; Sidorova, L V; Tulina, I A

    2017-01-01

    To assess safety of rectum removal with distal sacral resection. The short-term results of surgical treatment of primary and recurrent locally advanced rectal and anal cancer with sacral fixation have been analyzed. 32 patients underwent combined operations with sacral resection at the level of S2-S5. In 12 patients only one point of tumor fixation (F1) was revealed, 10 patients had two points of fixation (F2), three patients had three fixation points (F3) and in 7 cases the tumor was fixed to four points (F4) of fixation to different pelvic structures. Mean intraoperative blood loss and surgery time was 551±81 ml and 320±20 min in cases of sacral fixation only that was significantly lower compared with F2 cases - 1278±551 ml and 433±45 min, F3 cases - 2200±600 ml and 620±88 min, F4 cases - 2157±512.5 ml and 519±52,3 min, respectively (р<0.05). Complications requiring surgical intervention occurred in 9% patients (n=3). Among 23 patients with intact bladder and ureters urinary disorders occurred in 42% (n=10). Resection margin was negative along posterior surface of the specimen in all cases. Advanced surgery with distal sacral resection is advisable for radical removal of locally advanced and recurrent rectal and anal canal cancer fixed to the sacrum with negative resection margin. These operations are feasible in specialized centers and should be performed by specially trained oncological or colorectal surgeon.

  4. [Palliative radiation treatment for superior mediastinal lymph nodes of a patient with recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy-a case report of advanced lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Eisuke; Koshiishi, Haruya; Takahashi, Masayoshi; Saitoh, Tsutomu; Takei, Hidefumi; Hayashi, Naganobu

    2012-11-01

    The recurrent laryngeal nerve is a branch of the vagus nerve. On the right side, it branches anteriorly to the subclavian artery in the neck. In cases of malignant diseases, lymph node metastasis can lead to recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy. Patients with this condition often suffer from aspiration pneumonia, which requires tube feeding. In this case of an advanced lung cancer, we treated the involved lymph node in the neck with palliative radiotherapy, which restored normal nerve function.

  5. Efficacy and Safety of Durvalumab in Locally Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma: Updated Results From a Phase 1/2 Open-label Study.

    PubMed

    Powles, Thomas; O'Donnell, Peter H; Massard, Christophe; Arkenau, Hendrik-Tobias; Friedlander, Terence W; Hoimes, Christopher J; Lee, Jae Lyun; Ong, Michael; Sridhar, Srikala S; Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Fishman, Mayer N; Zhang, Jingsong; Srinivas, Sandy; Parikh, Jigar; Antal, Joyce; Jin, Xiaoping; Gupta, Ashok K; Ben, Yong; Hahn, Noah M

    2017-09-14

    The data reported herein were accepted for assessment by the US Food and Drug Administration for Biologics License Application under priority review to establish the clinical benefit of durvalumab as second-line therapy for locally advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma (UC), resulting in its recent US approval. To report a planned update of the safety and efficacy of durvalumab in patients with locally advanced/metastatic UC. This is an ongoing phase 1/2 open-label study of 191 adult patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed locally advanced/metastatic UC whose disease had progressed on, were ineligible for, or refused prior chemotherapy from 60 sites in 9 countries as reported herein. Patients were administered durvalumab intravenous infusion, 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks, for up to 12 months or until progression, starting another anticancer therapy, or unacceptable toxic effects. Primary end points were safety and confirmed objective response rate (ORR) per blinded independent central review (Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors [RECIST], version 1.1). A total of 191 patients with UC had received treatment. As of October 24, 2016 (90-day update), the median follow-up was 5.78 months (range, 0.4-25.9 months). The median age of patients was 67.0 years and most were male (136 [71.2%]) and white (123 [71.1%]). All patients had stage 4 disease, and 190 (99.5%) had prior anticancer therapy (182 [95.3%] postplatinum). The ORR was 17.8% (34 of 191; 95% CI, 12.7%-24.0%), including 7 complete responses. Responses were early (median time to response, 1.41 months), durable (median duration of response not reached), and observed regardless of programmed cell death ligand-1 (PD-L1) expression (ORR, 27.6% [n = 27; 95% CI, 19.0%-37.5%] and 5.1% [n = 4; 95% CI, 1.4%-12.5%] in patients with high and low or negative expression of PD-L1, respectively). Median progression-free survival and overall survival were 1.5 months (95% CI, 1.4-1.9 months) and 18

  6. Changes in and Associations Among Functional Status and Perceived Quality of Life of Patients With Metastatic/Locally Advanced Cancer Receiving Rehabilitation for General Disability.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Ryuichi; Ogata, Masami; Uchiyama, Ikuyo; Miyakoshi, Koichi; Uruma, Megumi; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya

    2015-11-01

    The primary aims were to clarify the changes in the functional status and quality of life of patients with metastatic/locally advanced cancer who received rehabilitation therapy. This is a cohort study, and all consecutive patients who received rehabilitation therapy were evaluated before and 2 weeks after. Outcome measures were the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), perceived independence, and overall quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer C30). A total of 128 patients were included. Although the FIM score significantly decreased, the overall quality of life significantly increased. Even in the patients with deteriorated FIM scores, the overall quality of life was maintained despite a significantly decreased perceived independence. Terminally ill patients with cancer who received a rehabilitation program maintained their overall quality of life despite an objective decline in the physical functional status.

  7. Intracavitary chemotherapy (Gliadel) for recurrent esthesioneuroblastoma: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Park, Michael C; Weaver, Charles E; Donahue, John E; Sampath, Prakash

    2006-03-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma is an uncommon malignancy of the nasal vault with a treatment regimen consisting of surgical resection followed by radiotherapy for primary lesions and addition of chemotherapy for patients with advanced, recurrent or metastatic lesions. We report a case of a 39-year-old female with a history of esthesioneuroblastoma, previously treated with resection, radiation and chemotherapy, presenting with a recurrent disease that was successfully treated with re-resection and placement of Gliadel) wafers in the surgical resection cavity. The novel option of controlled-release and local delivery of a chemotherapeutic agent for treatment of recurrent esthesioneuroblastoma should be recognized and considered.

  8. Cancer-related inflammation as predicting tool for treatment outcome in locally advanced and metastatic non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Korsic, Marta; Mursic, Davorka; Samarzija, Miroslav; Cucevic, Branka; Roglic, Mihovil; Jakopovic, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths and the non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents 80% of all cases. In most cases when diagnosed, it is in locally advanced or metastatic stage, when platinum based doublet chemotherapy is the established therapeutic option for majority of the patients. Predictive factors to filter the patients who will benefit the most from the chemotherapy are not clearly defined. Objective of this study was to explore predictive value of pre-treatment C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen and their interaction, for the response to the frontline chemotherapy. Methods In this retrospective cohort study 170 patients with locally advanced and metastatic NSCLC were included. Relationship between baseline level of CRP and fibrinogen and response to the frontline chemotherapy was assessed. Results We found that pre-treatment CRP and fibrinogen values were statistically significantly correlated. Chemotherapy and CRP, fibrinogen, and their interaction were independently significantly associated with disease control rate at re-evaluation. There was statistically significant difference in median pre-treatment CRP level between the patients with disease control or progression at re-evaluation, 13.8 vs. 30.0 mg/L respectively, P=0.026. By Johnson-Neyman technique we found that in patients with initial fibrinogen value below 3.5 g/L, CRP level was significantly associated with disease control or progression of the disease. Above this fibrinogen value the association of CRP and disease control was lost. Conclusions The findings from this study support the growing evidence of inflammation and cancer relationship, where elevated pre-treatment level of CRP has negative predictive significance on the NSCLC frontline chemotherapy response. PMID:27499936

  9. RESILIENCE: Phase III Randomized, Double-Blind Trial Comparing Sorafenib With Capecitabine Versus Placebo With Capecitabine in Locally Advanced or Metastatic HER2-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Baselga, José; Zamagni, Claudio; Gómez, Patricia; Bermejo, Begoña; Nagai, Shigenori E; Melichar, Bohuslav; Chan, Arlene; Mángel, Lászlo; Bergh, Jonas; Costa, Frederico; Gómez, Henry L; Gradishar, William J; Hudis, Clifford A; Rapoport, Bernardo L; Roché, Henri; Maeda, Patricia; Huang, Liping; Meinhardt, Gerold; Zhang, Joshua; Schwartzberg, Lee S

    2017-05-22

    Sorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor with antiangiogenic/antiproliferative activity. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III trial, we assessed first- or second-line capecitabine with sorafenib or placebo in patients with locally advanced/metastatic HER2-negative breast cancer resistant to a taxane and anthracycline and with known estrogen/progesterone receptor status. A total of 537 patients were randomized to capecitabine 1000 mg/m(2) orally twice per day for days 1 to 14 every 21 days with oral sorafenib 600 mg/d or placebo. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Patients were stratified according to hormone receptor status, previous chemotherapies for metastatic breast cancer, and geographic region. Treatment with sorafenib with capecitabine, compared with capecitabine with placebo, did not prolong median PFS (5.5 vs. 5.4 months; hazard ratio [HR], 0.973; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.779-1.217; P = .811) or overall survival (OS; 18.9 vs. 20.3 months; HR, 1.195; 95% CI, 0.943-1.513; P = .140); or enhance overall response rate (ORR; 13.5% vs. 15.5%; P = .515). Any grade toxicities (sorafenib vs. placebo) included palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome (PPES; 79.2% vs. 59.6%), diarrhea (47.3% vs. 37.8%), mucosal inflammation (15.4% vs. 6.7%), and hypertension (26.2% vs. 5.6%). Grade 3/4 toxicities included PPES (15.4% vs. 7.1%), diarrhea (4.2% vs. 6.4%), and vomiting (3.5% vs. 0.7%). The combination of sorafenib with capecitabine did not improve PFS, OS, or ORR in patients with HER2-negative advanced breast cancer. Rates of Grade 3 toxicities were higher in the sorafenib arm. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Pemetrexed combined with paclitaxel in patients with advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: a phase I-II trial.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, George P; Dimitroulis, John; Toubis, Michael; Katis, Costas; Karaindros, Dimitris; Stathopoulos, John; Koutandos, John

    2007-07-01

    Pemetrexed, a novel multi-targeted agent established for the treatment of mesothelioma, has been under investigation for other malignancies, and in recent years particularly for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the present trial we investigated pemetrexed in combination with paclitaxel as front-line treatment in advanced or metastatic NSCLC. Our objectives were to determine the response rate, median and overall survival and toxicity. From April 2005 until May 2006, 51 patients with advanced or metastatic NSCLC were enrolled and 48 were considered evaluable. There were 39 males and nine females, median age 62 years (range 37-81 years), one patient stage IIIA N(2), 23 patients, IIIB and 24, stage IV. All patients had a cytologically- or histologically-confirmed diagnosis. Pemetrexed was administered at a standard dose of 500mg/m(2) and paclitaxel at an escalating dose starting at 135mg/m(2), then 150mg/m(2) and ending at a dose of 175mg/m(2); the level was increased every three patients. Both agents were administered on day 1, repeated every 3 weeks for six courses. A 39.6% partial response rate was observed with a median survival of 14 months. Toxicity was mild with 8.3% grade 3 and 4 neutropenia and other very mild hematologic and non-hematologic adverse reactions. The combination of pemetrexed and paclitaxel at doses of 500mg/m(2) and 175mg/m(2), respectively, has been shown to be an effective combination with very limited toxicity.

  11. Phase II study of nimotuzumab, a humanized monoclonal anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody, in patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Strumberg, Dirk; Schultheis, Beate; Scheulen, M E; Hilger, R A; Krauss, J; Marschner, N; Lordick, F; Bach, F; Reuter, D; Edler, L; Mross, K

    2012-06-01

    Nimotuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to the EGFR. Based on phase I data, the recommended dose has been established at 200 mg weekly. This study was aimed at evaluating the safety and efficacy of nimotuzumab monotherapy in patients (pts) with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Pts who failed first line standard chemotherapy for advanced disease and had at least one measurable lesion were eligible for the study. Nimotuzumab was given intravenously at 200 mg once weekly for 6 weeks (wks). Follow up by CT scan was performed after 8 weeks. Pts continued receiving treatment 3-weekly until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity occurred. Endpoints included tumor response (RECIST), progression-free survival (PFS), and safety. A total of 56 pts were enrolled for treatment (ECOG status of 1 [n = 41] or 0 [n = 15]), the majority (47 pts) had metastatic disease. Nearly half of the pts [n = 26] received ≥2 regimens. Pts evaluable for response: n = 36; CR: 0; PR: 0; SD: 6 pts. Median PFS for pts with SD was 19.2 weeks, for all pts 6.7 weeks (95% CI: 6.43-7.14 weeks). PFS after 1 year was 10.3% with a median overall survival of 18.1 weeks. Treatment-related adverse events were generally mild including rash grade 1 in 5 pts. After a single dose of 200 mg, the t(1/2) was calculated to 45 h. These data confirm that nimotuzumab is safe and very well tolerated. To improve efficacy, a randomized, placebo-controlled trial with Gem has been initiated.

  12. A phase II study of antibody-drug conjugate, TAK-264 (MLN0264) in previously treated patients with advanced or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma expressing guanylyl cyclase C.

    PubMed

    Almhanna, Khaldoun; Wright, David; Mercade, Teresa Macarulla; Van Laethem, Jean-Luc; Gracian, Antonio Cubillo; Guillen-Ponce, Carmen; Faris, Jason; Lopez, Carolina Muriel; Hubner, Richard A; Bendell, Johanna; Bols, Alain; Feliu, Jaime; Starling, Naureen; Enzinger, Peter; Mahalingham, Devalingham; Messersmith, Wells; Yang, Huyuan; Fasanmade, Adedigbo; Danaee, Hadi; Kalebic, Thea

    2017-05-19

    Background This phase II open-label, multicenter study evaluated the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of TAK-264 in previously treated patients with advanced or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma expressing guanylyl cyclase C (GCC). Methods Patients with advanced or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma expressing GCC (H-score ≥ 10) received TAK-264 1.8 mg/kg on day 1 of a 21-day cycle as a 30-min intravenous infusion for up to 1 year or until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary objective was overall response rate (ORR [complete response + partial response (PR)]). Secondary objectives included evaluations of the safety and pharmacokinetic profile of TAK-264 (NCT02202785). Results 43 patients were enrolled and treated with 1.8 mg/kg TAK-264: 11, 15, and 17 patients with low, intermediate, and high GCC expression, respectively. Median number of treatment cycles received was two (range 1-10). The ORR was 3%, including one patient with intermediate GCC expression who achieved a PR. All patients experienced ≥1 adverse events (AE). The majority of patients experienced grade 1/2 AEs affecting the gastrointestinal tract. Fifteen (35%) patients experienced ≥grade 3 drug-related AEs; five (12%) patients had a serious AE. The most common (≥10% of patients) all-grade drug-related AEs were nausea (33%), fatigue (28%), neutropenia (23%), decreased appetite (23%), vomiting (16%), asthenia (16%), and alopecia (14%). Conclusions TAK-264 demonstrated a manageable safety profile; however, the low efficacy of TAK-264 observed in this study did not support further clinical investigation.

  13. Phase II trial of modified FOLFOX6 and erlotinib in patients with metastatic or advanced adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus and gastro-oesophageal junction

    PubMed Central

    Wainberg, Z A; Lin, L-S; DiCarlo, B; Dao, K M; Patel, R; Park, D J; Wang, H-J; Elashoff, R; Ryba, N; Hecht, J R

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is increased recognition that cancers of the upper GI tract comprise distinct epidemiological and molecular entities. Erlotinib has shown activity in patients with adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus/gastro-oesophageal junction (GEJ), but not in distal gastric cancer. mFOLFOX6 is one of several active regimens used to treat adenocarcinoma of the Eso/GEJ. This study evaluates the efficacy and safety of mFOLFOX6 and erlotinib in patients with metastatic or advanced Eso/GEJ cancers. Methods: Patients with previously untreated advanced or metastatic Eso/GEJ adenocarcinoma are treated with oxaliplatin 85 mg m–2, 5-FU 400 mg m–2, LV 400 mg m–2 on day 1, 5-FU 2400 mg m–2 over 48 h and erlotinib 150 mg PO daily. Treatment was repeated every 14 days. The primary objective was response rate (RR), secondary objectives include toxicity, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and to correlate clinical outcome with expression patterns and molecular alterations in the epidermal growth factor receptor-dependent pathways. Results: A total of 33 patients were treated and evaluable: there were two complete responses, 15 partial responses for an objective RR of 51.5% (95% CI, 34.5–68.6%). Median PFS was 5.5 months (95% CI, 3.1–7.5 months) and median OS was 11.0 months (95% CI, 8.0–17.4 months). The most common grade 3–4 toxicities were: diarrhoea (24%), nausea/vomiting (11%), skin rash (8%) and peripheral neuropathy (8%). The frequency of alterations was KRAS mutations (8%), EGFR mutations (0%) and HER2 amplification (19%). Conclusion: In patients with Eso/GEJ adenocarcinoma, mFOLFOX6 and erlotinib is active, has an acceptable toxicity profile and FOLFOX±erlotinib could be considered for further development. PMID:21811258

  14. Beta-human chorionic gonadotropin expression in recurrent and metastatic giant cell tumors of bone: a potential mimicker of germ cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Lawless, Margaret E; Jour, George; Hoch, Benjamin L; Rendi, Mara H

    2014-10-01

    Giant cell tumors of bone (GCTs) are generally benign, locally aggressive neoplasms that rarely metastasize. The beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-hCG) is expressed in syncytiotrophoblasts and several nongynecologic neoplasms but has not been described in GCT. At our institution, we observed cases of elevated beta-hCG in patients with GCT leading to diagnostic difficulty and in one case, concern for metastatic choriocarcinoma. This study aims to determine the frequency of beta-hCG expression in GCT and any relationship to clinical aggressiveness. We evaluated tissue expression of beta-hCG by immunohistochemistry with 58% of cases staining for beta-hCG. Additionally, 2 of 11 patients with available serum and/or urine beta-hCG measurements demonstrated elevated beta-hCG due to tumor. It is important to be aware of beta-hCG expression by GCT and the potential for elevated urine and serum beta-hCG levels in patients with GCT so as to avoid misdiagnosis of pregnancy or gestational trophoblastic disease.

  15. Influence of thyroid gland status on the thyroglobulin cutoff level in washout fluid from cervical lymph nodes of patients with recurrent/metastatic papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Ho; Lee, Hyun Chul; Yi, Ha Woo; Kim, Bong Kyun; Bae, Soo Youn; Lee, Se Kyung; Choe, Jun-Ho; Kim, Jung-Han; Kim, Jee Soo

    2016-04-01

    The influence of serum thyroglobulin (Tg) and thyroidectomy status on Tg in fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) washout fluid is unclear. A total of 282 lymph nodes were prospectively subjected to FNAC, fine-needle aspiration (FNA)-Tg measurement, and frozen and permanent biopsies. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of several predetermined FNA-Tg cutoff values for recurrence/metastasis in lymph nodes according to thyroidectomy status. The diagnostic performance of FNA-Tg varied according to thyroidectomy status. The optimized cutoff value of FNA-Tg was 2.2 ng/mL. However, among FNAC-negative lymph nodes, the FNA-Tg cutoff value of 0.9 ng/mL showed better diagnostic performance in patients with a thyroid gland. An FNA-Tg/serum-Tg cutoff ratio of 1 showed the best diagnostic performance in patients without a thyroid gland. Applying the optimal cutoff values of FNA-Tg according to thyroid gland status and serum Tg level facilitates the diagnostic evaluation of neck lymph node recurrences/metastases in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E1705-E1712, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Rectal cancer. Treatment advances that reduce recurrence rates and lengthen survival.

    PubMed

    Sexe, R; Miedema, B W

    1993-07-01

    The risk of malignant disease arising in rectal mucosa is high. Surgery is the most effective form of treatment but results in cure in only 50% of patients. Adjuvant preoperative radiation therapy reduces the likelihood of local recurrence but does not improve survival rates. Fluorouracil is the most effective agent for adjuvant chemotherapy and slightly improves survival when given after surgery. Combining radiation therapy with chemotherapy appears to have a synergistic effect, and recent studies show that providing this combination after surgery improves survival. Future trends in the treatment of rectal cancer are expected to include expanded use of local excision to preserve anal sphincter function, preoperative use of a combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy, perioperative use of chemotherapy combined with immunostimulating therapy, and use of tumor antibodies for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

  17. The efficacy and safety of Endostar combined with chemoradiotherapy for patients with advanced, locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuai; Chen, Binbin; Lu, Taixiang; Zhao, Chong; Han, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the short-term efficacy and safety of recombinant human endostatin (Endostar) combined with chemoradiotherapy for the treatment of advanced, locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Materials and Methods Between March 2010 and October 2013, a total of 22 patients with stage rIII-IVb locally recurrent NPC underwent salvage radiotherapy with Endostar in Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) was delivered. Platinum-based chemotherapy was used in a neoadjuvant protocol. Endostar was continuously administered intravenously (105 mg/m2) for 14 days (Days 1–14) from the first day of treatment during a 21-day cycle. Tumor response and treatment toxicities were observed. Results Until January 2014, the median follow-up time was 13 months (range, 4–41 months). All patients completed the planned radiotherapy. A complete response was achieved in 20 patients, and a partial response was achieved in 2 patients. The incidence of grade 3–5 late radiation injury in this study was 50% (11/22) and that of nasopharyngeal mucosal necrosis was 31.8% (7/22). Conclusions Endostar combined with chemoradiotherapy may be effective in decreasing both the incidence of nasopharyngeal mucosal necrosis. Studies with a larger sample size and longer follow-up are warranted. PMID:26418895

  18. Fluorescence-guided surgery of a highly-metastatic variant of human triple-negative breast cancer targeted with a cancer-specific GFP adenovirus prevents recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Shuya; Takehara, Kiyoto; Miwa, Shinji; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Urata, Yasuo; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Bouvet, Michael; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously developed a genetically-engineered GFP-expressing telomerase-dependent adenovirus, OBP-401, which can selectively illuminate cancer cells. In the present report, we demonstrate that targeting a triple-negative high-invasive human breast cancer, orthotopically-growing in nude mice, with OBP-401 enables curative fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS). OBP-401 enabled complete resection and prevented local recurrence and greatly inhibited lymph-node metastasis due to the ability of the virus to selectively label and subsequently kill cancer cells. In contrast, residual breast cancer cells become more aggressive after bright (white)-light surgery (BLS). OBP-401-based FGS also improved the overall survival compared with conventional BLS. Thus, metastasis from a highly-aggressive triple-negative breast cancer can be prevented by FGS in a clinically-relevant mouse model. PMID:27689331

  19. Molecular Subgroup of Primary Prostate Cancer Presenting with Metastatic Biology.

    PubMed

    Walker, Steven M; Knight, Laura A; McCavigan, Andrena M; Logan, Gemma E; Berge, Viktor; Sherif, Amir; Pandha, Hardev; Warren, Anne Y; Davidson, Catherine; Uprichard, Adam; Blayney, Jaine K; Price, Bethanie; Jellema, Gera L; Steele, Christopher J; Svindland, Aud; McDade, Simon S; Eden, Christopher G; Foster, Chris; Mills, Ian G; Neal, David E; Mason, Malcolm D; Kay, Elaine W; Waugh, David J; Harkin, D Paul; Watson, R William; Clarke, Noel W; Kennedy, Richard D

    2017-10-01

    Approximately 4-25% of patients with early prostate cancer develop disease recurrence following radical prostatectomy. To identify a molecular subgroup of prostate cancers with metastatic potential at presentation resulting in a high risk of recurrence following radical prostatectomy. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering was performed using gene expression data from 70 primary resections, 31 metastatic lymph nodes, and 25 normal prostate samples. Independent assay validation was performed using 322 radical prostatectomy samples from four sites with a mean follow-up of 50.3 months. Molecular subgroups were identified using unsupervised hierarchical clustering. A partial least squares approach was used to generate a gene expression assay. Relationships with outcome (time to biochemical and metastatic recurrence) were analysed using multivariable Cox regression and log-rank analysis. A molecular subgroup of primary prostate cancer with biology similar to metastatic disease was identified. A 70-transcript signature (metastatic assay) was developed and independently validated in the radical prostatectomy samples. Metastatic assay positive patients had increased risk of biochemical recurrence (multivariable hazard ratio [HR] 1.62 [1.13-2.33]; p=0.0092) and metastatic recurrence (multivariable HR=3.20 [1.76-5.80]; p=0.0001). A combined model with Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment post surgical (CAPRA-S) identified patients at an increased risk of biochemical and metastatic recurrence superior to either model alone (HR=2.67 [1.90-3.75]; p<0.0001 and HR=7.53 [4.13-13.73]; p<0.0001, respectively). The retrospective nature of the study is acknowledged as a potential limitation. The metastatic assay may identify a molecular subgroup of primary prostate cancers with metastatic potential. The metastatic assay may improve the ability to detect patients at risk of metastatic recurrence following radical prostatectomy. The impact of adjuvant therapies should be assessed in

  20. [Importance of the primary physician for pain management in patients with recurrent advanced cancer--a questionnaire survey].

    PubMed

    Konishi, Toshiro; Sasaki, Tsuneo; Aiba, Keisuke; Fukutomi, Takashi; Kakegawa, Kimiko; Okubo, Takashi

    2009-03-01

    With the objective of clarifying points that needed improvement to provide earlier and better treatment of pain by assessing the current state of cancer pain management in Japan, we conducted a questionnaire survey about pain management in patients with advanced/recurrent cancer who were suffering from pain. The results of the survey revealed that it is important for primary physician to place greater emphasis on pain management when treating cancer patients, to inform patients that the doctor should always be told if the patient has pain, and provide appropriate information about medical narcotics to their patients. The team approach to management of cancer has been increasing in importance recently. This survey suggested it is important for primary physicians, who play a central role in such teams, to listen to their patients' complaints about symptoms including pain. Furthermore, it should be remembered that patients are eager to establish a good, trusting relationship with their primary physician.

  1. The association between EGFR variant III, HPV, p16, c-MET, EGFR gene copy number and response to EGFR inhibitors in patients with recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We examine the potential prognostic and predictive roles of EGFR variant III mutation, EGFR gene copy number (GCN), human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, c-MET and p16INK4A protein expression in recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (R/M SCCHN). Methods We analyzed the archival tumor specimens of 53 patients who were treated in 4 phase II trials for R/M SCCHN. Two trials involved the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib, and 2 trials involved non-EGFR targeted agents. EGFRvIII mutation was determined by quantitative RT-PCR, HPV DNA by Linear Array Genotyping, p16 and c-MET protein expression by immunohistochemistry, and EGFR GCN by FISH. Results EGFRvIII mutation, detected in 22 patients (42%), was associated with better disease control, but no difference was seen between erlotinib-treated versus non-erlotinib treated patients. EGFRvIII was not associated with TTP or OS. The presence of HPV DNA (38%), p16 immunostaining (32%), c-MET high expression (58%) and EGFR amplification (27%), were not associated with response, TTP or OS. Conclusion EGFRvIII mutation, present in about 40% of SCCHN, appears to be an unexpected prognostic biomarker associated with better disease control in R/M SCCHN regardless of treatment with erlotinib. Larger prospective studies are required to validate its significance. PMID:21352589

  2. The interplay of epigenetic therapy and immunity in locally recurrent or metastatic estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer: Correlative analysis of ENCORE 301, a randomized, placebo-controlled phase II trial of exemestane with or without entinostat

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Yusuke; Lee, Min-Jung; Lee, Sunmin; Tomita, Saori; Chumsri, Saranya; Cruickshank, Scott; Ordentlich, Peter; Trepel, Jane B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Entinostat, a class I-selective histone deacetylase inhibitor, has shown promising activity in ENCORE 301, a randomized, placebo-controlled, phase II trial of exemestane with or without entinostat in women with locally recurrent or metastatic estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer progressing on a nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor. ENCORE 301 showed an 8.3-mo improvement in median overall survival among patients who received entinostat. We investigated the impact of entinostat on immune subsets with CD40, HLA-DR, and immune checkpoint receptor expression analyses in 34 patient blood samples from ENCORE 301. We found that entinostat significantly decreased granulocytic and monocytic MDSCs at cycle 1 day 15. MDSC CD40 was significantly downregulated by entinostat. A significant increase in HLA-DR expression on CD14+ monocytes by entinostat was observed. Entinostat did not impact T-cell subsets or T-cell immune checkpoint receptor expression. Our findings suggest that a significant interplay between this epigenetic regimen and host immune homeostatic mechanisms may impact therapeutic outcome. PMID:27999738

  3. Efficacy and safety of nivolumab in Japanese patients with advanced or recurrent squamous non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hida, Toyoaki; Nishio, Makoto; Nogami, Naoyuki; Ohe, Yuichiro; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Sakai, Hiroshi; Satouchi, Miyako; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Takenoyama, Mitsuhiro; Isobe, Hiroshi; Fujita, Shiro; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Minato, Koichi; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Maemondo, Makoto; Takeda, Koji; Saka, Hideo; Goto, Koichi; Atagi, Shinji; Hirashima, Tomonori; Sumiyoshi, Naoki; Tamura, Tomohide

    2017-03-07

    Limited treatment options are available for stage IIIB/IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Nivolumab, a programmed cell death-1 immune checkpoint inhibitor antibody, has been shown to be effective for the treatment of NSCLC. This study investigated the effectiveness and safety of nivolumab in Japanese patients with advanced or recurrent squamous NSCLC that progressed after platinum-containing chemotherapy. In this multicenter phase II study, patients were treated with nivolumab (3mg/kg, intravenously) every 2 weeks until progressive disease or unacceptable toxicity was seen. The primary endpoint was overall response rate (ORR) assessed by independent radiology review committee (IRC) and secondary endpoints included a study site-assessed ORR, overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), duration of response, time to response, best overall response (BOR), and safety. The study included 35 patients from 17 sites in Japan. Patients had IRC-assessed ORR of 25.7% (95% CI 14.2, 42.1) and the study site-assessed ORR was 20.0% (95% CI 10.0, 35.9). The median OS, median time to response and median PFS were 16.3 (95% CI 12.4-25.4), 2.7 (range 1.2-5.5) and 4.2 (95% CI 1.4-7.1) months, respectively. The IRC-assessed BOR was partial response, stable disease, and progressive disease for 25.7%, 28.6%, and 45.7% of patients, respectively. Treatment-related adverse events were reported in 24 patients (68.6%), most of which resolved with appropriate treatment including steroid therapy or ‎discontinuation of nivolumab. Nivolumab was effective and well tolerated in Japanese patients with advanced or recurrent squamous NSCLC that progressed after platinum-containing chemotherapy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Randomized Phase II Study of Cabazitaxel Versus Methotrexate in Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Previously Treated With Platinum-Based Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Van Maanen, Aline; Vandenbulcke, Jean-Marie; Filleul, Bertrand; Seront, Emmanuel; D’Hondt, Lionel; Lonchay, Christophe; Holbrechts, Stéphane; Boegner, Petra; Brohee, Dany; Dequanter, Didier; Louviaux, Ingrid; Sautois, Brieuc; Whenham, Nicolas; Berchem, Guy; Vanderschueren, Brigitte; Fontaine, Christel; Schmitz, Sandra; Gillain, Aline; Schoonjans, Joelle; Rottey, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Lessons Learned Cabazitaxel has activity in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) and taxane-resistant cell lines. For the first time, cabazitaxel was investigated in incurable patients with recurrent SCCHN. Patients were randomly assigned to cabazitaxel every 3 weeks or weekly methotrexate. This phase II study did not meet its primary endpoint. Cabazitaxel has low activity in SCCHN. The toxicity profile in this population also was not favorable owing to the high rate of febrile neutropenia observed (17%). Background. Cabazitaxel is a second-generation taxane that improves the survival of patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer following docetaxel therapy. Cabazitaxel has activity in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) and taxane-resistant cell lines. In this randomized phase II trial, we investigated cabazitaxel in patients with recurrent SCCHN. Methods. Patients with incurable SCCHN with progression after platinum-based therapy were randomly assigned to cabazitaxel every 3 weeks (cycle 1, 20 mg/m2, increased to 25 mg/m2 for subsequent cycles in the absence of nonhematological adverse events [AEs] greater than grade 2 and hematological AEs greater than grade 3) or methotrexate (40 mg/m2/week). The patients were stratified according to their performance status and previous platinum-based chemotherapy for palliation versus curative intent. The primary endpoint was the progression-free survival rate (PFSR) at 18 weeks. Results. Of the 101 patients, 53 and 48, with a median age of 58.0 years (range, 41–80), were randomly assigned to cabazitaxel or methotrexate, respectively. The PFSR at 18 weeks was 13.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 5%–25%) for cabazitaxel and 8.3% (95% CI, 2%–20%) for methotrexate. The median progression-free survival was 1.9 months in both arms. The median overall survival was 5.0 and 3.6 months for cabazitaxel and methotrexate, respectively. More patients experienced serious adverse

  5. Metastatic osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Daw, Najat C; Billups, Catherine A; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; McCarville, M Beth; Rao, Bhaskar N; Cain, Alvida M; Jenkins, Jesse J; Neel, Michael D; Meyer, William H

    2006-01-15

    The outcome of patients with metastatic osteosarcoma treated in two consecutive trials from 1986 to 1997 was analyzed to evaluate the efficacy of carboplatin-based multiagent chemotherapy and to identify prognostic factors. The initial study (OS-86) used ifosfamide, cisplatin, doxorubicin, and high-dose methotrexate, and the subsequent study (OS-91) used the same agents at similar doses, but carboplatin was substituted for cisplatin. Twelve patients (median age, 15.1 yrs) were treated in OS-86 for osteosarcoma metastatic to the lung only (11 patients) or bone only (1 patient), and 17 patients (median age, 15.1 yrs) were treated in OS-91 for osteosarcoma metastatic to the lung only (12 patients), bone only (2 patients), lung and bone (2 patients), or other site (1 patient). Patients with metastatic disease enrolled in OS-86 and those with metastatic disease enrolled in OS-91 did not differ in terms of demographic features, histologic subtype, site of primary tumor, or site of metastases. There was a difference in survival according to treatment protocol (P = 0.054). All survivors (four of whom were enrolled in OS-86 and one of whom was enrolled in OS-91) had lung metastases only. Five-year survival estimates for patients with lung metastases only were 45.5 +/- 13.7% (OS-86) and 8.3 +/- 5.6% (OS-91) (P = 0.084). Unilateral lung metastases (P = 0.006), no more than three lung nodules (P = 0.014), and surgical remission (P = 0.001) were associated with improved survival probability. The poor outcome of patients with metastatic osteosarcoma treated in OS-91 justifies the use of cisplatin with its associated toxicity in patients with high-risk disease.

  6. Efficacy of imatinib mesylate for the treatment of locally advanced and/or metastatic tenosynovial giant cell tumor/pigmented villonodular synovitis.

    PubMed

    Cassier, Philippe A; Gelderblom, Hans; Stacchiotti, Silvia; Thomas, David; Maki, Robert G; Kroep, Judith R; van der Graaf, Winette T; Italiano, Antoine; Seddon, Beatrice; Dômont, Julien; Bompas, Emanuelle; Wagner, Andrew J; Blay, Jean-Yves

    2012-03-15

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) (also known as diffuse-type giant cell tumor) and tenosynovial giant cell tumors (TGCT) are rare, usually benign neoplasms that affect the synovium and tendon sheaths in young adults. These tumors are driven by the overexpression of colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF1). CSF1 is expressed by a minority of tumor cells, which, in turn attract non-neoplastic inflammatory cells that express CSF1 receptor (CSF1R) through a paracrine effect. Imatinib mesylate (IM) blocks CSF1R, and previous case reports indicated that it also exerts antitumor activity in PVNS. The authors conducted a multi-institutional retrospective study to assess the activity of IM in patients with locally advanced/metastatic PVNS/TGCT. Twenty-nine patients from 12 institutions in Europe, Australia, and the United States were included. There were 13 men, the median age was 41 years, and the most common site of disease was the knee (n = 17; 59%). Two patients had metastatic disease to the lung and/or bone. Five of 27 evaluable patients had Response Evaluation in Solid Tumor (RECIST) responses (overall response rate, 19%; 1 complete response and 4 partial responses), and 20 of 27 patients (74%) had stable disease. Symptomatic improvement was noted in 16 of 22 patients (73%) who were assessable for symptoms. Despite a high rate of symptomatic improvement and a favorable safety profile, 6 patients discontinued because of toxicity, and 4 patients decided to discontinue IM for no clear medical reason. IM displayed interesting activity in patients with PVNS/TGCT, providing proof of concept for targeting CSF1R in this disease. The authors concluded that the benefits of alleviating morbidity in patients with localized PVNS/TGCT must be balanced against the potential toxicity of chronic drug therapy. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  7. BRCA1 loss pre-existing in small subpopulations of prostate cancer is associated with advanced disease and metastatic spread to lymph nodes and peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    Bednarz, Natalia; Eltze, Elke; Semjonow, Axel; Rink, Michael; Andreas, Antje; Mulder, Lennart; Hannemann, Juliane; Fisch, Margit; Pantel, Klaus; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Bielawski, Krzysztof P.; Brandt, Burkhard

    2011-01-01

    Purpose A preliminary study performed on a small cohort of multifocal prostate cancer (PCa) detected BRCA1 allelic imbalances (AI) among circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The present analysis was aimed to elucidate the biological and clinical role of BRCA1 losses on metastatic spread and tumor progression in prostate cancer patients. Experimental Design To map molecular progression in PCa outgrowth we used FISH analysis of tissue microarrays (TMA), lymph node sections and CTC from peripheral blood. Results We found that 14% of 133 tested patients carried monoallelic BRCA1 loss in at least one tumor focus. Extended molecular analysis of chr17q revealed that this aberration was often a part of larger cytogenetic rearrangement involving chr17q21 accompanied by AI of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN and lack of the BRCA1 promoter methylation. The BRCA1 losses correlated with advanced T stage (p < 0.05), invasion to pelvic lymph nodes (LN, p < 0.05) as well as BR (p < 0.01). Their prevalence was twice as high within 62 LN metastases (LNMs) as in primary tumors (27%, p < 0.01). The analysis of 11 matched primary PCa – LNM pairs confirmed the suspected transmission of genetic abnormalities between those two sites. In 4 of 7 patients with metastatic disease, BRCA1 losses appeared in a minute fraction of cytokeratin- and vimentin-positive CTCs. Conclusions Small subpopulations of PCa cells bearing BRCA1 losses might be one confounding factor initiating tumor dissemination and might provide an early indicator of shortened disease-free survival. PMID:20592016

  8. Long-term follow-up after transoral laser microsurgery and adjuvant radiotherapy for advanced recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, Hans . E-mail: hchrist@gwdg.de; Hermann, Robert Michael; Martin, Alexios; Florez, Rodrigo; Kahler, Elke; Nitsche, Mirko; Hille, Andrea; Steiner, Wolfgang; Hess, Clemens F.; Pradier, Olivier

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy after transoral laser microsurgery for advanced recurrent head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Patients and Methods: Between 1988 and 2000, 37 patients with advanced local recurrences (23 local and 14 locoregional recurrences) of HNSCC without distant metastases were treated in curative intent with organ-preserving transoral laser microsurgery and adjuvant radiotherapy (before 1994 split-course radiotherapy with carboplatinum, after 1994 conventional radiotherapy). Initial therapy of the primary (8.1% oral cavity, 35.1% oropharynx, 13.5% hypopharynx, and 43.3% larynx) before relapse was organ-preserving transoral laser microsurgery without any adjuvant therapy. Results: After a median follow-up of 124 months, the 5-year overall survival rate was 21.3%, the loco-regional control rate 48.3%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, stage of original primary tumor (Stage I/II vs. Stage III/IV), and patient age (<58 years vs. {>=}58 years) showed statistically significant impact on prognosis. In laryngeal cancer, larynx preservation rate after treatment for recurrent tumor was 50% during follow-up. Conclusion: Our data show that organ-preserving transoral laser microsurgery followed by adjuvant radiotherapy is a curative option for patients who have advanced recurrence after transoral laser surgery and is an alternative to radical treatment.

  9. Recent advances in systemic therapy. When HER2 is not the target: advances in the treatment of HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miles, David W

    2009-01-01

    The anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) agent trastuzumab has improved outcomes in breast cancer patients with HER2 over-expressing tumours. However, systemic treatment for patients with HER2-negative disease is still limited to endocrine and cytotoxic therapies. The increasing use of the anthracyclines and taxanes in early stage disease has reduced the available therapeutic options for patients with relapsed disease, and choices are further limited for patients with triple-negative tumours, who typically have a poor prognosis. The novel agents bevacizumab and ixabepilone were recently approved for metastatic breast cancer, and numerous other agents are currently in clinical development that may contribute further valuable therapeutic options. PMID:19744307

  10. Molecular Markers and Targeted Therapeutics in Metastatic Tumors of the Spine: Changing the Treatment Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, C Rory; Abu-Bonsrah, Nancy; Rhines, Laurence D; Verlaan, Jorrit-Jan; Bilsky, Mark H; Laufer, Ilya; Boriani, Stefano; Sciubba, Daniel M; Bettegowda, Chetan

    2016-10-15

    A review of the literature. The aim of this study was to discuss the evolution of molecular signatures and the history and development of targeted therapeutics in metastatic tumor types affecting the spinal column. Molecular characterization of metastatic spine tumors is expected to usher in a revolution in diagnostic and treatment paradigms. Molecular characterization will provide critical information that can be used for initial diagnosis, prognosticating the ideal treatment strategy, assessment of treatment efficacy, surveillance and monitoring recurrence, and predicting complications, clinical outcome, and overall survival in patients diagnosed with metastatic cancers to the spinal column. A review of the literature was performed focusing on illustrative examples of the role that molecular-based therapeutics have played in clinical outcomes for patients diagnosed with metastatic tumor types affecting the spinal column. The impact of molecular therapeutics including receptor tyrosine kinases and immune checkpoint inhibitors and the ability of molecular signatures to provide prognostic information are discussed in metastatic breast cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer, melanoma, and renal cell cancer affecting the spinal column. For the providers who will ultimately counsel patients diagnosed with metastases to the spinal column, molecular advancements will radically alter the management/surgical paradigms utilized. Ultimately, the translation of these molecular advancements into routine clinical care will greatly improve the quality and quantity of life for patients diagnosed with spinal malignancies and provide better overall outcomes and counseling for treating physicians. N/A.

  11. VEGF Trap in Treating Patients With Recurrent Stage III or Stage IV Melanoma That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-02

    Ciliary Body and Choroid Melanoma, Medium/Large Size; Extraocular Extension Melanoma; Iris Melanoma; Metastatic Intraocular Melanoma; Recurrent Intraocular Melanoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Stage III Melanoma; Stage IV Melanoma

  12. Nivolumab With or Without Ipilimumab in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Sarcomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    Childhood Solid Neoplasm; Metastatic Melanoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Rhabdomyosarcoma; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  13. Rationale and design of LUX-Head & Neck 1: a randomised, Phase III trial of afatinib versus methotrexate in patients with recurrent and/or metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma who progressed after platinum-based therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with recurrent and/or metastatic (R/M) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) receiving platinum-based chemotherapy as their first-line treatment have a dismal prognosis, with a median overall survival (OS) of ~7 months. Methotrexate is sometimes used following platinum failure or in patients not fit enough for platinum therapy, but this agent has not demonstrated any OS improvement. Targeted therapies are a novel approach, with the EGFR-targeting monoclonal antibody cetuximab (plus platinum-based chemotherapy) approved in the US and Europe in the first-line R/M setting, and as monotherapy following platinum failure in the US. However, there is still a high unmet medical need for new treatments that improve outcomes in the second-line R/M setting following failure on first-line platinum-containing regimens. Afatinib, an irreversible ErbB family blocker, was recently approved for the first-line treatment of EGFR mutation-positive metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. Afatinib has also shown clinical activity similar to cetuximab in a Phase II proof-of-concept HNSCC trial. Based on these observations, the Phase III, LUX-Head & Neck 1 study is evaluating afatinib versus methotrexate in R/M HNSCC patients following progression on platinum-based chemotherapy in the R/M setting. Methods/Design Patients with progressive disease after one first-line platinum-based chemotherapy are randomised 2:1 to oral afatinib (starting dose 40 mg once daily) or IV methotrexate (starting dose 40 mg/m2 once weekly) administered as monotherapy with best supportive care until progression or intolerable adverse events. Efficacy of afatinib versus methotrexate will be assessed in terms of progression-free survival (primary endpoint). Disease progression will be evaluated according to RECIST v1.1 by investigator and independent central review. Secondary endpoints include OS, tumour response and safety. Health-related quality of life and biomarker assessments will

  14. Randomized, Double-Blind Phase II Trial With Prospective Classification by ATM Protein Level to Evaluate the Efficacy and Tolerability of Olaparib Plus Paclitaxel in Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bang, Yung-Jue; Im, Seock-Ah; Lee, Keun-Wook; Cho, Jae Yong; Song, Eun-Kee; Lee, Kyung Hee; Kim, Yeul Hong; Park, Joon Oh; Chun, Hoo Geun; Zang, Dae Young; Fielding, Anitra; Rowbottom, Jacqui; Hodgson, Darren; O'Connor, Mark J; Yin, Xiaolu; Kim, Woo Ho

    2015-11-20

    Gastric cancer cell lines, particularly those with low levels of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), a key activator of DNA damage response, are sensitive to the poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor olaparib. We compared the efficacy of olaparib plus paclitaxel (olaparib/paclitaxel) with paclitaxel alone in patients with recurrent or metastatic gastric cancer and assessed whether low ATM expression is predictive of improved clinical outcome for olaparib/paclitaxel. In this phase II, double-blind study (Study 39; NCT01063517), patients were randomly assigned to oral olaparib 100 mg twice per day (tablets) plus paclitaxel (80 mg/m(2) per day intravenously on days 1, 8, and 15 of every 28-day cycle) or placebo plus paclitaxel (placebo/paclitaxel), followed by maintenance monotherapy with olaparib (200 mg twice per day) or placebo. The study population was enriched to 50% for patients with low or undetectable ATM levels (ATMlow). Primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). One hundred twenty-three of 124 randomly assigned patients received treatment (olaparib/paclitaxel, n = 61; placebo/paclitaxel, n = 62). The screening prevalence of ATMlow patients was 14%. Olaparib/paclitaxel did not lead to a significant improvement in PFS versus placebo/paclitaxel (overall population: hazard ratio [HR], 0.80; median PFS, 3.91 v 3.55 months, respectively; ATMlow population: HR, 0.74; median PFS, 5.29 v 3.68 months, respectively). However, olaparib/paclitaxel significantly improved overall survival (OS) versus placebo/paclitaxel in both the overall population (HR, 0.56; 80% CI, 0.41 to 0.75; P = .005; median OS, 13.1 v 8.3 months, respectively) and the ATMlow population (HR, 0.35; 80% CI, 0.22 to 0.56; P = .002; median OS, not reached v 8.2 months, respectively). Olaparib/paclitaxel was generally well tolerated, with no unexpected safety findings. Olaparib/paclitaxel is active in the treatment of patients with metastatic gastric cancer, with a greater OS benefit in

  15. Entinostat and Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors or Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-18

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  16. Local salvage therapy for late (≥2 years) metastatic and local relapse of renal cell cancer is a potentially curative treatment irrespective of the site of recurrence.

    PubMed

    Grüllich, Carsten; Vallet, Sonia; Hecht, Christopher; Duensing, Stephan; Hadaschik, Boris; Jäger, Dirk; Hohenfellner, Markus; Pahernik, Sascha

    2016-05-01

    The primary treatment approach to locoregional renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is surgical resection. Most relapses occur within the first 2 years but some patients experience late recurrences. Surgical resection of oligometastatic disease may be considered a curative option for relapsed RCC. However, limited data are available of long-term follow-up of late relapse regarding treatment choice. We identified 104 patients with RCC from our database, who relapsed after≥2 years from resection of their primary tumor. Median age at primary diagnosis was 61 years and sex distribution was F:M = 40:64. Histology was clear cell, n = 103 and papillary, n = 1. Sites of relapse were local, n = 14 (13.4%); lung only, n = 25 (24.0%); or extrapulmonary, n = 65 (62.5%). Treatment at first relapse was local therapy (LT) in n = 60 (57.7%) patients, of these, n = 55 patients had surgery done and n = 5 patients had underwent radiotherapy. Systemic therapy was used in n = 9 (8.7%) patients. Overall, 35 patients received best supportive care (33.7%). We found a median overall survival (OS) of 49.8 months (95% CI: 29.3-70.2) and a progression-free survival (PFS) of 21.6 months (95% CI: 12.6-30.5) for all patients. Patients receiving LT had a median OS of 99.9 months (95% CI: 77.2-122.6) and a PFS of 31.1 months (95% CI: 21.5-40.7). Patients treated with systemic therapy, in turn, had an OS of 21.1 months (95% CI: 8.4-33.8) and a PFS of 4 months (95% CI: 1.0-6.2). Patients who received best supportive care had an OS of 10 months (95% CI: 1.3-18.7). This difference was highly significant (log rank for PFS: P<0.001; log rank for OS: P<0.003). Subgroup analysis of the LT group showed a superior outcome for local relapses (OS: not reached, PFS: 61.4mo [95% CI: 28.5-9.2]) compared to visceral relapses (OS: 35.5mo [95% CI: 17.9-53.1], PFS: 21.1mo [95% CI: 19.2-22.9]). Local salvage therapy should be considered the first therapeutic option in late relapse of RCC irrespective of the site of relapse

  17. Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Gallbladder Cancer or Bile Duct Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  18. Vemurafenib for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic BRAF V600 mutation-positive malignant melanoma: a NICE single technology appraisal.

    PubMed

    Beale, Sophie; Dickson, Rumona; Bagust, Adrian; Blundell, Michaela; Dundar, Yenal; Boland, Angela; Marshall, Ernie; Plummer, Ruth; Proudlove, Chris

    2013-12-01

    Vemurafenib is an oral BRAF inhibitor licenced for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic BRAF V600-mutation positive malignant melanoma. The manufacturer of vemurafenib, Roche Products Limited, was invited by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) to submit evidence of the drug's clinical- and cost-effectiveness for its licenced indication, to inform the Institute's Single Technology Appraisal (STA) process. The Liverpool Reviews and Implementation Group (LRiG) at the University of Liverpool was commissioned to act as the Evidence Review Group (ERG) for this appraisal. This article summarises the ERG's review of the evidence submitted by the manufacturer and also includes a summary of the NICE Appraisal Committee (AC) decision. The ERG reviewed the clinical- and cost-effectiveness evidence in accordance with the decision problem defined by NICE. The ERG's analysis of the submitted economic model assessed the appropriateness of the approach taken by the manufacturer in modelling the decision problem. It also included an assessment of the reliability of model implementation and the extent of conformity to published standards and prevailing norms of practice within the health economics modelling community. Particular attention was paid to issues likely to impact substantially on the base-case cost-effectiveness results. The clinical evidence was derived from BRIM 3 (BRAF Inhibitor in Melanoma 3), a well-designed, multi-centre, multi-national, phase III, randomised controlled trial (RCT). Clinical outcome results from the October 2011 data cut showed that median overall survival for patients treated with vemurafenib was 13.2 months compared with 9.6 months for those treated with dacarbazine. The ERG's main concern with the trial was the potential for confounding because of the early introduction of the crossover from the comparator drug to vemurafenib or another BRAF inhibitor. The submitted incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER

  19. A phase II trial of abiraterone acetate plus prednisone in patients with triple-negative androgen receptor positive locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer (UCBG 12-1).

    PubMed

    Bonnefoi, H; Grellety, T; Tredan, O; Saghatchian, M; Dalenc, F; Mailliez, A; L'Haridon, T; Cottu, P; Abadie-Lacourtoisie, S; You, B; Mousseau, M; Dauba, J; Del Piano, F; Desmoulins, I; Coussy, F; Madranges, N; Grenier, J; Bidard, F C; Proudhon, C; MacGrogan, G; Orsini, C; Pulido, M; Gonçalves, A

    2016-05-01

    Several expression array studies identified molecular apocrine breast cancer (BC) as a subtype that expresses androgen receptor (AR) but not estrogen receptor α. We carried out a multicentre single-arm phase II trial in women with AR-positive, estrogen, progesterone receptor and HER2-negative (triple-negative) metastatic or inoperable locally advanced BC to assess the efficacy and safety of abiraterone acetate (AA) plus prednisone. Patients with a metastatic or locally advanced, centrally reviewed, triple-negative and AR-positive (≥10% by immunohistochemistry, IHC) BC were eligible. Any number of previous lines of chemotherapy was allowed. AA (1000 mg) was administered once a day with prednisone (5 mg) twice a day until disease progression or intolerance. The primary end point was clinical benefit rate (CBR) at 6 months defined as the proportion of patients presenting a complete response (CR), partial response (PR) or stable disease (SD) ≥6 months. Secondary end points were objective response rate (ORR), progression-free survival (PFS) and safety. One hundred and forty-six patients from 27 centres consented for IHC central review. Of the 138 patients with sufficient tissue available, 53 (37.6%) were AR-positive and triple-negative, and 34 of them were included from July 2013 to December 2014. Thirty patients were eligible and evaluable for the primary end point. The 6-month CBR was 20.0% [95% confidence interval (CI) 7.7%-38.6%], including 1 CR and 5 SD ≥6 months, 5 of them still being under treatment at the time of analysis (6.4+, 9.2+, 14.5+, 17.6+, 23.4+ months). The ORR was 6.7% (95% CI 0.8%-22.1%). The median PFS was 2.8 months (95% CI 1.7%-5.4%). Fatigue, hypertension, hypokalaemia and nausea were the most common drug-related adverse events; the majority of them being grade 1 or 2. AA plus prednisone treatment is beneficial for some patients with molecular apocrine tumours and five patients are still on treatment. NCT01842321. © The Author 2016

  20. Prospective Study of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Concurrent With Individualized Radiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jing; Xia Tingyi; Wang Yingjie; Li Hongqi; Li Ping; Wang Jidong; Chang Dongshu; Liu Liyyuan; Di Yupeng; Wang Xuan; Wu Weizhang

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To establish the safety profile and efficacy of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) concurrent with individualized radiotherapy (RT) in patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: Between June 2007 and January 2010, 26 patients with Stage III/IV NSCLC were enrolled in this prospective study. These patients were treated with EGFR-TKIs (gefitinib 250 mg or erlotinib 150 mg, oral daily) concurrent with individualized RT with curative intent. The thoracic RT plans were individually designed on the basis of tumor size and normal tissue volume constraints. All patients were assessed for toxicity, and 25 patients were available for efficacy. The primary endpoints were acute toxicity, overall survival, and median survival time. The secondary endpoints included local control rate, time to tumor progression, and progression-free survival (PFS). Results: Median gross tumor volume, mean lung dose, and lung V20 were 56 cm{sup 3}, 8.6 Gy, and 14%, respectively. Median thoracic radiation dose was 70 Gy at a margin of gross tumor volume (range, 42-82 Gy), and median biological equivalent dose was 105 Gy (range, 60-119 Gy). Acute skin, hematologic, esophageal, and pulmonary toxicities were acceptable and manageable. Severe adverse events included neutropenia (Grade 4, 4%) and thrombocytopenia (Grade 4, 8%), esophagitis (Grade 3, 4%), and pneumonitis (Grade 3, 4%). With a median follow-up of 10.2 months, a local control rate of 96% was achieved for thoracic tumor. Median time to progression, median PFS, and median survival time were 6.3, 10.2, and 21.8 months, respectively. The 1- and 2-year PFS rates were both 42%, and 1-, 2-, and 3-year overall survival rates were 57%, 45%, and 30%, respectively. Conclusion: Concurrent EGFR-TKIs with individualized RT shows a favorable safety profile and promising outcome, therefore serving as a therapeutic option for patients with locally

  1. Phase I dose-finding study of sorafenib with FOLFOX4 as first-line treatment in patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Yihebali; Yang, Jianliang; Yang, Sheng; Sun, Yongkun; Jia, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and efficacy of sorafenib in combination with FOLFOX4 (oxaliplatin/leucovorin (LV)/5-fluorouracil) as first-line treatment for advanced gastric cancer, we performed a phase I dose-finding study in nine evaluable patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. Methods According to modified Fibonacci method, the design of this study was to guide elevation of the sorafenib dosage to the next level (from 200 mg twice daily to 400 mg twice daily and then, if tolerated, 600 mg twice daily). If the patient achieved complete response (CR), partial response (PR) or stable disease (SD) after eight cycles of treatment, combination chemotherapy was scheduled to be discontinued and sorafenib monotherapy continued at the original dose until either disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Results In sorafenib 200 mg twice daily group, DLT was observed in 1 of 6 patients, and in 400 mg twice daily group, it was observed in 2 of 3 patients. Seven of 9 (77.8%) evaluable patients achieved PR, with a median overall survival (OS) of 11.8 [95% confidence interval (CI): 8.9-14.7] months. Common adverse effects include hand-foot syndrome, leukopenia, neutropenia, anorexia, and nausea. Conclusions Twice-daily dosing of sorafenib 200 mg in combination with FOLFOX4 was proven effective and safe for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer, and could be an appropriate dosage for subsequent phase II clinical studies. PMID:26157320

  2. A pilot study of nimotuzumab plus single agent chemotherapy as second- or third-line treatment or more in patients with recurrent, persistent or metastatic cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Cetina, Lucely; Crombet, Tania; Jiménez-Lima, Roberto; Zapata, Sergio; Ramos, Mayra; Avila, Sandra; Coronel, Jaime; Charco, Eduardo; Bojalil, Rafael; Astudillo, Horacio; Bazán, Blanca; Dueñas-González, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Nimotuzumab is a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody against the EGFR extracellular domain that has been evaluated in solid tumors as a single agent or in combination with chemotherapy and radiation. Cervical cancer patients who are refractory or progressive to first-line chemotherapy have a dismal prognosis, and no second- or third-line chemotherapy is considered standard. This pilot trial aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of nimotuzumab in 17 patients with pre-treated advanced refractory or progressive cervical cancer. Nimotuzumab was administered weekly at 200 mg/m(2) as single agent for 4 weeks (induction phase), then concurrent with 6 21-day cycles of gemcitabine (800 mg/m(2)) or cisplatin (50 mg/m(2)) for 18 weeks (concurrent phase) and then once every 2 weeks (maintenance phase). Nimotuzumab could be continued beyond disease progression. Seventeen patients were accrued and evaluated for safety and efficacy. The median number of nimotuzumab applications was 20 (5-96). The median number of chemotherapy cycles administered was 6 (1-6). No toxicity occurred during induction and maintenance phases (single agent nimotuzumab). In the concurrent phase, grade 3 toxicity events observed were leucopenia, anemia and diarrhea in 11.7%, 5.8% and 11.7% respectively. No complete or partial responses were observed. The stable disease (SD) rate was 35%. The median PFS and OS rates were 163 days (95% CI, 104 to 222), and 299 days (95% IC, 177 to 421) respectively. Nimotuzumab is well tolerated and may have a role in the treatment of advanced cervical cancer.

  3. A pilot study of nimotuzumab plus single agent chemotherapy as second- or third-line treatment or more in patients with recurrent, persistent or metastatic cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cetina, Lucely; Crombet, Tania; Jiménez-Lima, Roberto; Zapata, Sergio; Ramos, Mayra; Avila, Sandra; Coronel, Jaime; Charco, Eduardo; Bojalil, Rafael; Astudillo, Horacio; Bazán, Blanca; Dueñas-González, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Nimotuzumab is a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody against the EGFR extracellular domain that has been evaluated in solid tumors as a single agent or in combination with chemotherapy and radiation. Cervical cancer patients who are refractory or progressive to first-line chemotherapy have a dismal prognosis, and no second- or third-line chemotherapy is considered standard. This pilot trial aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of nimotuzumab in 17 patients with pre-treated advanced refractory or progressive cervical cancer. Nimotuzumab was administered weekly at 200 mg/m2 as single agent for 4 weeks (induction phase), then concurrent with 6 21-day cycles of gemcitabine (800 mg/m2) or cisplatin (50 mg/m2) for 18 weeks (concurrent phase) and then once every 2 weeks (maintenance phase). Nimotuzumab could be continued beyond disease progression. Seventeen patients were accrued and evaluated for safety and efficacy. The median number of nimotuzumab applications was 20 (5–96). The median number of chemotherapy cycles administered was 6 (1-6). No toxicity occurred during induction and maintenance phases (single agent nimotuzumab). In the concurrent phase, grade 3 toxicity events observed were leucopenia, anemia and diarrhea in 11.7%, 5.8% and 11.7% respectively. No complete or partial responses were observed. The stable disease (SD) rate was 35%. The median PFS and OS rates were163 days (95% CI, 104 to 222), and 299 days (95% IC, 177 to 421) respectively. Nimotuzumab is well tolerated and may have a role in the treatment of advanced cervical cancer. PMID:25802932

  4. Biopsy confirmation of metastatic sites in breast cancer patients: clinical impact and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Determination of hormone receptor (estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status in the primary tumor is clinically relevant to define breast cancer subtypes, clinical outcome, and the choice of therapy. Retrospective and prospective studies suggest that there is substantial discordance in receptor status between primary and recurrent breast cancer. Despite this evidence and current recommendations, the acquisition of tissue from metastatic deposits is not routine practice. As a consequence, therapeutic decisions for treatment in the metastatic setting are based on the features of the primary tumor. Reasons for this attitude include the invasiveness of the procedure and the unreliable outcome of biopsy, in particular for biopsies of lesions at complex visceral sites. Improvements in interventional radiology techniques mean that most metastatic sites are now accessible by minimally invasive methods, including surgery. In our opinion, since biopsies are diagnostic and changes in biological features between the primary and secondary tumors can occur, the routine biopsy of metastatic disease needs to be performed. In this review, we discuss the rationale for biopsy of suspected breast cancer metastases, review issues and caveats surrounding discordance of biomarker status between primary and metastatic tumors, and provide insights for deciding when to perform biopsy of suspected metastases and which one (s) to biopsy. We also speculate on the future translational implications for biopsy of suspected metastatic lesions in the context of clinical trials and the establishment of bio-banks of biopsy material taken from metastatic sites. We believe that such bio-banks will be important for exploring mechanisms of metastasis. In the future, advances in targeted therapy will depend on the availability of metastatic tissue. PMID:25032257

  5. Stereotactic Ablative Radiosurgery for Locally Advanced or Recurrent Skull Base Malignancies with Prior External Beam Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Karen M.; Quan, Kimmen; Clump, David A.; Ferris, Robert L.; Heron, Dwight E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is an attractive modality to treat malignancies invading the skull base as it can deliver a highly conformal dose with minimal toxicity. However, variation exists in the prescribed dose and fractionation. The purpose of our study is to examine the local control, survival, and toxicities in SABR for the treatment of previously irradiated malignant skull base tumors. Materials and methods: A total of 31 patients and 40 locally advanced or recurrent head and neck malignancies involving the skull base treated with a common SABR regimen, which delivers a radiation dose of 44 Gy in 5 fractions from January 1st, 2004 to December 31st, 2013, were retrospectively reviewed. The local control rate (LC), progression-free survival rate, overall survival (OS) rate, and toxicities were reported. Results: The median follow-up time of all patients was 11.4 months (range: 0.6–67.2 months). The median tumor volume was 27 cm3 (range: 2.4–205 cm3). All patients received prior external beam radiation therapy with a median radiation dose of 64 Gy (range: 24–75.6 Gy) delivered in 12–42 fractions. Twenty patients had surgeries prior to SABR. Nineteen patients received chemotherapy. Specifically, eight patients received concurrent cetuximab (Erbitux™) with SABR. The median time-to-progression (TTP) was 3.3 months (range: 0–16.9 months). For the 29 patients (93.5%) who died, the median time from the end of first SABR to death was 10.3 months (range: 0.5–41.4 months). The estimated 1-year OS rate was 35%. The estimated 2-year OS rate was 12%. Treatment was well-tolerated without grade 4 or 5 treatment-related toxicities. Conclusion: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy has been shown to achieve low toxicities in locally advanced or recurrent, previously irradiated head and neck malignancies invading the skull base. PMID:25853093

  6. Clinical value of technetium-99m-labeled octreotide scintigraphy in local recurrent or metastatic medullary thyroid cancers: a comparison of lesions with 18F-FDG-PET and MIBI images.

    PubMed

    Sager, Sait; Kabasakal, Levent; Ocak, Meltem; Maecke, Helmut; Uslu, Lebriz; Halaç, Metin; Asa, Sertac; Sager, Günes; Önsel, Çetin; Kanmaz, Bedii

    2013-12-01

    Various studies have been conducted for determining the most optimal method for the early diagnosis of local recurrent or distant metastatic thyroid cancers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of technetium-99m (Tc-99m)-labeled octreotide derivatives in the detection of recurrence or distant metastases in medullary thyroid cancer patients and to compare the lesions with those detected using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG)-PET and Tc-99m MIBI studies in the same patient group. Sixteen medullary thyroid cancer patients [two male and 14 female; mean age 52.0 ± 14.1 years (range 13-72 years)] were included in this study. All patients underwent a whole-body scan 1 and 4 h after injection with octreotide derivatives and single photon emission computed tomography images were taken of the sites suspicious for metastasis. The lesions seen in Tc-99m HYNIC octreotide studies were compared with those seen in 18F-FDG-PET and Tc-99m MIBI studies. Among the Tc-99m-labeled octreotide scintigraphy studies, nine were evaluated as true positive (56.2%) and one was evaluated as false positive (6.2%); six were false negative (37.5%). In 16 patients, the total number of lesions seen on octreotide scintigraphy was 21. Thirteen of the 16 patients underwent 18F-FDG-PET imaging. Of the 13 patients studied, 10 showed true-positive (76.9%) and three showed false-negative (23.1%) results. The total number of lesions seen on 18F-FDG-PET was 23. The Tc-99m MIBI study yielded positive results in seven of 16 patients (43.7%) and negative results in nine patients (56.3%). The total number of lesions on Tc-99m MIBI was 12. The Tc-99m-labeled somatostatin receptor scintigraphy analogs HYNIC-tyrosine octreotide and HYNIC-TATE are useful imaging alternatives in somatostatin receptor-expressing thyroid cancers. Radiolabeling using these analogs is easy and they are readily available for routine use.

  7. Comparison of 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC and HYNIC-TATE octreotide scintigraphy with FDG PET and 99mTc-MIBI in local recurrent or distant metastatic thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Sager, Sait; Kabasakal, Levent; Halac, Metin; Maecke, Helmut; Uslu, Lebriz; Önsel, Çetin; Kanmaz, Bedii

    2013-05-01

    There have been various studies for early diagnosis of local recurrent or distant metastatic thyroid cancers. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical utility of 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC and 99mTc-HYNIC-TATE, octreotide derivatives, to detect recurrences or distant metastases in 131I-negative thyroglobulin positive thyroid cancer patients and to compare the lesions with FDG PET and 99mTc-MIBI studies in the same patient group. Twenty differentiated thyroid cancer patients, 7 male and 13 female, mean age 54.6 ± 15.3 (range 13-78 years), were included in this study. Eighteen patients had papillary thyroid cancer and 2 had follicular thyroid cancer. Fifteen patients received HYNIC-TOC and 5 patients received HYNIC-TATE as a radiopharmaceutical. All patients underwent whole-body scan 1 and 4 hours after injection of octreotide derivatives and SPECT imagings were performed from the suspicious sites. The lesions that were seen in 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC and 99mTc-HYNIC-TATE studies were compared with 99mTc-MIBI and FDG-PET studies. Among 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC and 99mTc-HYNIC-TATE scintigraphies, 15 patient studies were evaluated as true positive (75%) and 5 were false negative (25%). The total number of lesions in octreotide scintigraphy was 48 in 20 patients. Of 20 patients, 19 had FDG-PET study, 15 of them were evaluated as true positive (78.9%), and 4 them were evaluated as false negative (21.1%). Total number of lesions in FDG PET was 74. 99mTc-MIBI study was positive in 11 patients (55%) and negative in 9 patients (45%). Total number of lesions in 99mTc-MIBI was 25. Technetium-labeled somatostatin receptor scintigraphy analogues HYNIC-TOC and HYNIC-TATE are useful imaging alternatives in somatostatin receptor expressing thyroid cancer patients. Radiolabeling is easy and they are readily available for routine use.

  8. Tobacco use in human papillomavirus-positive advanced oropharynx cancer patients related to increased risk of distant metastases and tumor recurrence.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Jessica H; Kumar, Bhavna; Feng, Felix Y; Worden, Francis P; Lee, Julia S; Eisbruch, Avraham; Wolf, Gregory T; Prince, Mark E; Moyer, Jeffrey S; Teknos, Theodoros N; Chepeha, Douglas B; McHugh, Jonathan B; Urba, Susan G; Stoerker, Jay; Walline, Heather M; Kurnit, David M; Cordell, Kitrina G; Davis, Samantha J; Ward, Preston D; Bradford, Carol R; Carey, Thomas E

    2010-02-15

    The goal of this study was to examine the effect of tobacco use on disease recurrence (local/regional recurrence, distant metastasis, or second primary) among patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx (SCCOP) following a complete response to chemoradiation therapy. Between 1999 and 2007, 124 patients with advanced SCCOP (86% with stage IV) and adequate tumor tissue for HPV analysis who were enrolled in one of two consecutive University of Michigan treatment protocols were prospectively included in this study. Patients were categorized as never-, former, or current tobacco users. The primary end points were risk of disease recurrence and time to recurrence; secondary end points were disease-specific survival and overall survival. One hundred and two patients (82.3%) had HPV-positive tumors. Over two thirds (68%) of patients with HPV-positive tumors were tobacco users. Among HPV-positive patients, current tobacco users were at significantly higher risk of disease recurrence than never-tobacco users (hazard ratio, 5.2; confidence interval, 1.1-24.4; P = 0.038). Thirty-five percent of HPV-positive ever tobacco users recurred compared with only 6% of HPV-positive never users and 50% of HPV-negative patients. All HPV-negative patients were tobacco users and had significantly shorter times to recurrence (P = 0.002), and had reduced disease-specific survival (P = 0.004) and overall survival (P < 0.001) compared with HPV-positive patients. Compared with HPV-positive never-tobacco users, those with a tobacco history showed a trend for reduced disease-specific survival (P = 0.064) but not overall survival (P = 0.221). Current tobacco users with advanced, HPV-positive SCCOP are at higher risk of disease recurrence compared with never-tobacco users.

  9. Phase I active immunotherapy with combination of two chimeric, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, B-cell epitopes fused to a promiscuous T-cell epitope in patients with metastatic and/or recurrent solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Kaumaya, Pravin T P; Foy, Kevin Chu; Garrett, Joan; Rawale, Sharad V; Vicari, Daniele; Thurmond, Jennifer M; Lamb, Tammy; Mani, Aruna; Kane, Yahaira; Balint, Catherine R; Chalupa, Donald; Otterson, Gregory A; Shapiro, Charles L; Fowler, Jeffrey M; Grever, Michael R; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios S; Carson, William E

    2009-11-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), safety profile, and immunogenicity of two chimeric, B-cell epitopes derived from the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2) extracellular domain in a combination vaccine with a promiscuous T-cell epitope (ie, MVF) and nor-muramyl-dipeptide as adjuvant emulsified in SEPPIC ISA 720. PATIENTS AND METHODS Eligible patients with metastatic and/or recurrent solid tumors received three inoculations on days 1, 22, and 43 at doses of total peptide that ranged from 0.5 to 3.0 mg. Immunogenicity was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, flow cytometry, and HER2 signaling assays. Results Twenty-four patients received three inoculations at the intended dose levels, which elicited antibodies able to recognize native HER2 receptor and inhibited both the proliferation of HER2-expressing cell lines and phosphorylation of the HER2 protein. The MTD was determined to be the highest dose level of 3.0 mg of the combination vaccine. There was a significant increase from dose level 1 (0.5 mg) to dose level 4 (3.0 mg) in HER2-specific antibodies. Four patients (one each with adrenal, colon, ovarian, and squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary) were judged to have stable disease; two patients (one each with endometrial and ovarian cancer) had partial responses; and 11 patients had progressive disease. Patients with stable disease received 6-month boosts, and one patient received a 20-month boost. CONCLUSION The combination vaccines were safe and effective in eliciting antibody responses in a subset of patients (62.5%) and were associated with no serious adverse events, autoimmune disease, or cardiotoxicity. There was preliminary evidence of clinical activity in several patients.

  10. First-line bevacizumab plus taxane-based chemotherapy for locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer: safety and efficacy in an open-label study in 2,251 patients.

    PubMed

    Smith, I E; Pierga, J-Y; Biganzoli, L; Cortés-Funes, H; Thomssen, C; Pivot, X; Fabi, A; Xu, B; Stroyakovskiy, D; Franke, F A; Kaufman, B; Mainwaring, P; Pienkowski, T; De Valk, B; Kwong, A; González-Trujillo, J L; Koza, I; Petrakova, K; Pereira, D; Pritchard, K I

    2011-03-01

    First-line bevacizumab combined with chemotherapy significantly improves efficacy versus chemotherapy alone in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer (LR/mBC). This large, open-label study further assesses first-line bevacizumab with taxane-based chemotherapy in routine oncology practice. Patients with HER2-negative LR/mBC, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (PS) of zero to two and no prior chemotherapy for LR/mBC received bevacizumab 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks or 15 mg/kg every 3 weeks plus taxane-based chemotherapy (or other non-anthracycline chemotherapy) until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity or patient withdrawal. The primary end point was safety; time to progression (TtP) was a secondary end point. Median follow-up in 2251 treated patients was 12.7 months. Median age was 53 years and 94% of patients had ECOG PS of zero or one. Bevacizumab was most commonly administered with single-agent paclitaxel (35%), single-agent docetaxel (33%) or taxane-based combination therapy (10%). The most frequent grade ≥3 adverse event (AE) was neutropenia (5.4%). Grade ≥3 AEs previously associated with bevacizumab included hypertension (4.4%), arterial/venous thromboembolism (3.2%), proteinuria (1.7%) and bleeding (1.4%). No new bevacizumab safety signals were observed. Median TtP was 9.5 months (95% confidence interval 9.1-9.9). The study population in ATHENA was more representative of general oncology practice than populations enrolled into randomised trials, although there may have been some bias towards younger, fitter patients. The safety and efficacy of bevacizumab-taxane therapy in this large study were consistent with results from randomised first-line trials.

  11. Cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and cetuximab (PFE) with or without cilengitide in recurrent/metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: results of the randomized phase I/II ADVANTAGE trial (phase II part).

    PubMed

    Vermorken, J B; Peyrade, F; Krauss, J; Mesía, R; Remenar, E; Gauler, T C; Keilholz, U; Delord, J P; Schafhausen, P; Erfán, J; Brümmendorf, T H; Iglesias, L; Bethe, U; Hicking, C; Clement, P M

    2014-03-01

    Recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (R/M-SCCHN) overexpresses αvβ5 integrin. Cilengitide selectively inhibits αvβ3 and αvβ5 integrins and is investigated as a treatment strategy. The phase I/II study ADVANTAGE evaluated cilengitide combined with cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and cetuximab (PFE) in R/M-SCCHN. The phase II part reported here was an open-label, randomized, controlled trial investigating progression-free survival (PFS). Patients received up to six cycles of PFE alone or combined with cilengitide 2000 mg once (CIL1W) or twice (CIL2W) weekly. Thereafter, patients received maintenance therapy (cilengitide arms: cilengitide plus cetuximab; PFE-alone arm: cetuximab only) until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. One hundred and eighty-two patients were treated. Median PFS per investigator read was similar for CIL1W + PFE, CIL2W + PFE, and PFE alone (6.4, 5.6, and 5.7 months, respectively). Accordingly, median overall survival and objective response rates were not improved with cilengitide (12.4 months/47%, 10.6 months/27%, and 11.6 months/36%, respectively). No clinically meaningful safety differences were observed between groups. None of the tested biomarkers (expression of integrins, CD31, Ki-67, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, vascular endothelial-cadherin, type IV collagen, epidermal growth factor receptor, or p16 for human papillomavirus) were predictive of outcome. Neither of the cilengitide-containing regimens demonstrated a PFS benefit over PFE alone in R/M-SCCHN patients.

  12. Cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and cetuximab (PFE) with or without cilengitide in recurrent/metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: results of the randomized phase I/II ADVANTAGE trial (phase II part)

    PubMed Central

    Vermorken, J. B.; Peyrade, F.; Krauss, J.; Mesía, R.; Remenar, E.; Gauler, T. C.; Keilholz, U.; Delord, J. P.; Schafhausen, P.; Erfán, J.; Brümmendorf, T. H.; Iglesias, L.; Bethe, U.; Hicking, C.; Clement, P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (R/M-SCCHN) overexpresses αvβ5 integrin. Cilengitide selectively inhibits αvβ3 and αvβ5 integrins and is investigated as a treatment strategy. Patients and methods The phase I/II study ADVANTAGE evaluated cilengitide combined with cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and cetuximab (PFE) in R/M-SCCHN. The phase II part reported here was an open-label, randomized, controlled trial investigating progression-free survival (PFS). Patients received up to six cycles of PFE alone or combined with cilengitide 2000 mg once (CIL1W) or twice (CIL2W) weekly. Thereafter, patients received maintenance therapy (cilengitide arms: cilengitide plus cetuximab; PFE-alone arm: cetuximab only) until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Results One hundred and eighty-two patients were treated. Median PFS per investigator read was similar for CIL1W + PFE, CIL2W + PFE, and PFE alone (6.4, 5.6, and 5.7 months, respectively). Accordingly, median overall survival and objective response rates were not improved with cilengitide (12.4 months/47%, 10.6 months/27%, and 11.6 months/36%, respectively). No clinically meaningful safety differences were observed between groups. None of the tested biomarkers (expression of integrins, CD31, Ki-67, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, vascular endothelial-cadherin, type IV collagen, epidermal growth factor receptor, or p16 for human papillomavirus) were predictive of outcome. Conclusion Neither of the cilengitide-containing regimens demonstrated a PFS benefit over PFE alone in R/M-SCCHN patients. PMID:24567516

  13. Multimodality therapy including surgical resection and intraoperative electron radiotherapy for recurrent or advanced primary carcinoma of the urinary bladder or ureter.

    PubMed

    Hallemeier, Christopher L; Karnes, Robert J; Pisansky, Thomas M; Davis, Brian J; Gunderson, Leonard L; Leibovich, Bradley C; Haddock, Michael G; Choo, Richard

    2013-12-01

    To report outcomes of multimodality therapy incorporating surgical resection and intraoperative electron radiotherapy (IOERT) for patients with locoregionally (LR) recurrent or advanced primary urothelial carcinoma. From 1983 to 2009, 17 patients, consisting of 11 with LR recurrence after cystectomy for bladder carcinoma, 4 with LR recurrence after nephroureterectomy for ureteral carcinoma, and 2 with advanced primary bladder carcinoma were treated with multimodality therapy. In 8 patients with LR recurrence, the multimodality treatment was a second salvage attempt. Sixteen patients received perioperative external beam radiotherapy (median dose, 50.4 Gy; range, 21.6 to 60 Gy). Extent of resection was R0 (n=7), R1 (n=1), and R2 (n=9). The median IOERT dose was 12.5 Gy (range, 10 to 20 Gy). Overall survival (OS) and relapse patterns were determined from the date of resection and IOERT using the Kaplan-Meier method. The median follow-up for surviving patients was 3.6 years (range, 1.1 to 10 y). OS at 1, 2, and 5 years was 53%, 31%, and 16%, respectively. Central (within the IOERT field), LR (tumor bed or regional lymph nodes), and distant relapses at 2 years were 15%, 49%, and 67%, respectively. On univariate analysis, resection of all gross disease (R0-1) was associated with improved OS (P=0.03). Mortality within 30 days was 0%. Two patients (12%) experienced NCI-CTCAE grades 4 and 5 late adverse events. In patients with recurrent or advanced urothelial carcinoma, this multimodality approach yielded a low rate of recurrence within the IOERT field with acceptable toxicity. However, LR and distant relapse were common, indicating a need for better patient selection, LR therapy, and systemic therapy.

  14. Pembrolizumab and Ruxolitinib Phosphate in Treating Patients With Metastatic Stage IV Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-28

    Breast Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  15. Three-year Follow up of GMCSF/bi-shRNA(furin) DNA-transfected Autologous Tumor Immunotherapy (Vigil) in Metastatic Advanced Ewing's Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Ghisoli, Maurizio; Barve, Minal; Mennel, Robert; Lenarsky, Carl; Horvath, Staci; Wallraven, Gladice; Pappen, Beena O; Whiting, Sam; Rao, Donald; Senzer, Neil; Nemunaitis, John

    2016-08-01

    Ewing's sarcoma is a devastating rare pediatric cancer of the bone. Intense chemotherapy temporarily controls disease in most patients at presentation but has limited effect in patients with progressive or recurrent disease. We previously described preliminary results of a novel immunotherapy, FANG (Vigil) vaccine, in which 12 advanced stage Ewing's patients were safely treated and went on to achieve a predicted immune response (IFNγ ELISPOT). We describe follow-up through year 3 of a prospective, nonrandomized study comparing an expanded group of Vigil-treated advanced disease Ewing's sarcoma patients (n = 16) with a contemporaneous group of Ewing's sarcoma patients (n = 14) not treated with Vigil. Long-term follow-up results show a survival benefit without evidence of significant toxicity (no ≥ grade 3) to Vigil when administered once monthly by intradermal injection (1 × 10e(6) cells/injection to 1 × 10e(7) cells/injection). Specifically, we report a 1-year actual survival of 73% for Vigil-treated patients compared to 23% in those not treated with Vigil. In addition, there was a 17.2-month difference in overall survival (OS; Kaplan-Meier) between the Vigil (median OS 731 days) and no Vigil patient groups (median OS 207 days). In conclusion, these results supply the rational for further testing of Vigil in advanced stage Ewing's sarcoma.

  16. Phase II Study of Biweekly Plitidepsin as Second-Line Therapy for Advanced or Metastatic Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Urothelium

    PubMed Central

    Dumez, Herlinde; Gallardo, Enrique; Culine, Stephane; Galceran, Joan Carles; Schöffski, Patrick; Droz, Jean P.; Extremera, Sonia; Szyldergemajn, Sergio; Fléchon, Aude

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this exploratory, open-label, single-arm, phase II clinical trial was to evaluate plitidepsin (5 mg/m2) administered as a 3-hour continuous intravenous infusion every two weeks to patients with locally advanced/metastatic transitional cell carcinoma of the urothelium who relapsed/progressed after first-line chemotherapy. Treatment cycles were repeated for up to 12 cycles or until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, patient refusal or treatment delay for >2 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint was objective response rate according to RECIST. Secondary endpoints were the rate of SD lasting ≥ 6 months and time-to-event variables. Toxicity was assessed using NCI-CTC v. 3.0. Twenty-one patients received 57 treatment cycles. No objective tumor responses occurred. SD lasting <6 months was observed in two of 18 evaluable patients. With a median follow-up of 4.6 months, the median PFR and the median OS were 1.4 months and 2.3 months, respectively. The most common AEs were mild to moderate nausea, fatigue, myalgia and anorexia. Anemia, lymphopenia, and increases in transaminases, alkaline phosphatase and creatinine were the most frequent laboratory abnormalities. No severe neutropenia occurred. Treatment was feasible and generally well tolerated in this patient population; however the lack of antitumor activity precludes further studies of plitidepsin in this setting. PMID:19841725

  17. Phase II study of biweekly plitidepsin as second-line therapy for advanced or metastatic transitional cell carcinoma of the urothelium.

    PubMed

    Dumez, Herlinde; Gallardo, Enrique; Culine, Stephane; Galceran, Joan Carles; Schöffski, Patrick; Droz, Jean P; Extremera, Sonia; Szyldergemajn, Sergio; Fléchon, Aude

    2009-09-16

    The objective of this exploratory, open-label, single-arm, phase II clinical trial was to evaluate plitidepsin (5 mg/m(2)) administered as a 3-hour continuous intravenous infusion every two weeks to patients with locally advanced/metastatic transitional cell carcinoma of the urothelium who relapsed/progressed after first-line chemotherapy. Treatment cycles were repeated for up to 12 cycles or until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, patient refusal or treatment delay for >2 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint was objective response rate according to RECIST. Secondary endpoints were the rate of SD lasting > or = 6 months and time-to-event variables. Toxicity was assessed using NCI-CTC v. 3.0. Twenty-one patients received 57 treatment cycles. No objective tumor responses occurred. SD lasting <6 months was observed in two of 18 evaluable patients. With a median follow-up of 4.6 months, the median PFR and the median OS were 1.4 months and 2.3 months, respectively. The most common AEs were mild to moderate nausea, fatigue, myalgia and anorexia. Anemia, lymphopenia, and increases in transaminases, alkaline phosphatase and creatinine were the most frequent laboratory abnormalities. No severe neutropenia occurred. Treatment was feasible and generally well tolerated in this patient population; however the lack of antitumor activity precludes further studies of plitidepsin in this setting.

  18. [Advanced rectal cancer in an older patient, in whom metastatic liver lesions were effectively controlled with oral UFT+LV and venous CPT-11 administration--case report].

    PubMed

    Shibaki, Taiichiro; Morimoto, Norio

    2006-06-01

    An 81-year-old man was admitted to our department due to acute ileus. He was diagnosed with sigmoid colon cancer with multiple metastatic lesions in the right lobe of the liver. Two weeks after insertion of an ileus tube, he underwent sigmoidectomy and permanent colostomy. The final diagnosis was stage IV sigmoid colon cancer with metastasis to the omentum. One month after the operation, adjuvant chemotherapy with oral administration of tegafur/uracil compound (UFT) and Leucovorin (LV), and drip venous infusion of irinotecan hydrochloride (CPT-11) was initiated (UFT 300 mg/day for 14 days, LV 75 mg/day for 14 days, CPT-11 90 mg/m(2) on the 1 st day, with 1 course consisting of 21 days). The levels of tumor markers, CA19-9 and CEA, and the size of metastases on CT were reduced remarkably after one and 4 courses of this therapy, respectively. Although the administration was temporarily discontinued due to low-grade nausea, we continued the treatment. Adjuvant chemotherapy with an oral administering agent is favorable for older patients with advanced colorectal cancer to reduce side effects and preserve the quality of life.

  19. Therapies for Advanced Stage Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Macrovascular invasion or Metastatic Disease: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Finn, Richard S; Zhu, Andrew X; Wigdan, Farah; Almasri, Jehad; Zaiem, Feras; Prokop, Larry J; Hassan Murad, Mohammad; Mohammed, Khaled

    2017-09-07

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a complex disease most commonly arising in the background of chronic liver disease. In the past two decades there has been a significant increase in our understanding of both the clinical and molecular heterogeneity of HCC. There has been a robust increase in clinical trial activity in patients with poor prognostic factors such as macrovascular invasion and extrahepatic spread. We aimed to synthesize the evidence for the treatment of patients with advanced HCC based on these baseline characteristics including patients with both Child-Pugh scores of A and B. A comprehensive search of several databases from each database inception to February 15th 2016, any language was conducted.We included 14 studies (3 randomized controlled studies (RCTs) and 11 observational studies).We included studies that compared sorafenib, transarterial bland embolisation/transarterial chemoembolization, yttrium-90/radiation therapy, ablation (or combination) and no therapy. Two RCTs comparing sorafenib to best supportive care demonstrated a consistent improvement in OS for patients with advanced HCC and MVI and/or EHS and Child Pugh-A liver disease (HR 0.66 (95% CI 0.51-0.87), I(2) = 0%). Several observational studies evaluated loco-regional therapies alone or in combination with other treatments and were limited by very low quality of evidence. This was true for both patients with EHS and MVI. In patients with advanced HCC and Child-Pugh A liver function, sorafenib is the only treatment that has been shown to improve overall survival in randomized studies. High quality data supporting the use of other treatment modalities in this setting, or in the setting of patients with less compensated (CP B) liver disease is lacking. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  20. Safety of an oral anticancer agent (trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet) in patients with advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kimura, M; Go, M; Iwai, M; Ito, D; Asano, H; Usami, E; Teramachi, H; Yoshimura, T

    2016-04-01

    We retrospectively studied the safety of trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet (TAS-102) monotherapy in patients with advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer. Adverse events to TAS-102 monotherapy were observed in 22 out of 23 cases (95.7%). The most frequent adverse events were neutropenia (69.6%), nausea (53.2%), and malaise (30.4%). Treatment was postponed in 54 (59.3%) out of 91 courses, and in 34 (66.7%) of these 54 courses, the delay in treatment was due to bone marrow suppression. Seven patients with peritoneal metastases suffered from nausea, whilst none of the patients without peritoneal metastases had nausea (p = 0.0139). Nausea and vomiting during a previous chemotherapy cycle was significantly associated with nausea after TAS-102 treatment (p = 0.0007), and the treatment cycles were significantly longer in patients with grade 3 or 4 neutropenia (p = 0.0061). Our results suggest that the incidence of nausea was higher in patients treated with TAS-102. Therefore, it is important to inform patients of the risk of these toxicities and to provide enhanced supportive care. Moreover, we recommend that, for patients with repeated treatment postponement due to neutropenia, the dosage should be fixed based on therapeutic efficacy and prognosis.

  1. Radiosensitization of Chemotherapy-Refractory, Locally Advanced or Locally Recurrent Breast Cancer With Trastuzumab: A Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Janet K.; Halle, Jan; Ferraro, Madlyn; Carey, Lisa; Moore, Dominic T.; Ollila, David; Sartor, Carolyn I.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Trastuzumab (Herceptin), an anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) antibody, has been shown to be an effective radiosensitizer in preclinical studies. The present Phase II trial evaluated trastuzumab plus radiotherapy in patients with HER2-positive, chemotherapy-refractory, locally advanced or locoregionally recurrent breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had measurable disease, normal cardiac function, and biopsy-confirmed residual HER2-positive disease. Patients received weekly trastuzumab (2 mg/kg intravenously), concurrent with radiotherapy (50 Gy) to the breast and regional lymph nodes for 5 weeks. If feasible, surgery followed radiotherapy. The primary endpoint was safety, and the secondary endpoint was efficacy (pathologic response and interval to symptomatic local progression). Results: Of the 19 patients enrolled, 7 were ineligible and received radiotherapy alone and 12 received therapy per protocol. Of these 12 patients, 11 had a Stage T4 diagnosis. Grade 3 toxicities included skin (n = 2) and lymphopenia (n = 1). One patient experienced delayed wound healing after surgery. No patients developed symptomatic cardiac dysfunction. Of the 7 patients who had undergone mastectomy, 3 (43%) had a substantial pathologic response (complete response or microscopic residual disease), significantly more than a comparison cohort (2 of 38 or 5%, p = .02). The median interval to symptomatic local progression was not reached. The median overall survival was 39 months. Conclusion: This is the first prospective trial providing evidence for a radiosensitizing effect of trastuzumab in breast cancer. The combination of trastuzumab and radiotherapy was well tolerated.

  2. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, or Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  3. Results of a phase II study of pemetrexed as first-line chemotherapy in patients with advanced or metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Robert, Nicholas J; Conkling, Paul R; O'Rourke, Mark A; Kuefler, Paul R; McIntyre, Kristi J; Zhan, Feng; Asmar, Lina; Wang, Yanping; Shonukan, Oluwatoyin O; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce A

    2011-02-01

    Palliation is the primary goal in metastatic breast cancer (MBC), and safe, efficacious, new single-agent options are needed. Pemetrexed, an antifolate, inhibits several folate-dependent enzymes involved in purine biosynthesis. The primary goal of this study was to determine the objective response rate in patients with advanced or MBC given pemetrexed as a first-line, dose-dense, every 2-week chemotherapy. Women with HER2-negative advanced or MBC, without prior cytotoxic treatment for this stage of disease, were treated with intravenous pemetrexed 600 mg/m² on Day 1 of each 14-day cycle. Standard dexamethasone, folic acid, and vitamin B(12) premedications were given. 37 patients enrolled; 36 received ≥ 1 dose of pemetrexed and 35 were evaluable for response. Median age of patients was 61.4 years, 76% were hormone receptor positive (ER+ and/or PR+). Prior treatment included adjuvant chemotherapy (57%) and/or endocrine (65%). Patients received a median of 6 cycles of pemetrexed (range, 1-21). Based on 35 evaluable patients, the overall response rate (ORR) was 26% (1 CR and 8 PR), and the clinical benefit rate (CR+ PR+ stable disease [SD] ≥ 6 months) was 40%. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 4.1 months (range, <1-22.4). Median overall survival (OS) was 18.9 months (range, <1-27.7). Grades 3-4 treatment-related toxicities included: neutropenia (36%), leukopenia (17%), fatigue (14%), and anemia (14%). Grade 1/2 alopecia was seen in 8% of patients. This phase II study of dose-dense, single-agent pemetrexed showed moderate activity in the first-line setting with acceptable toxicity and no significant alopecia.

  4. Long-term results of a multicenter SAKK trial on high-dose ifosfamide and doxorubicin in advanced or metastatic gynecologic sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Leyvraz, S; Zweifel, M; Jundt, G; Lissoni, A; Cerny, T; Sessa, C; Fey, M; Dietrich, D; Honegger, H P

    2006-04-01

    Dose intensive chemotherapy has not been tested prospectively for the treatment of gynecologic sarcomas. We investigated the antitumor activity and toxicity of high-dose ifosfamide and doxorubicin, in the context of a multidisciplinary strategy for the treatment of advanced and metastatic, not pretreated, gynecologic sarcomas. Thirty-nine patients were enrolled onto a phase I-II multicenter trial of ifosfamide, 10 g/m2 as a continuous infusion over 5 days, plus doxorubicin intravenously, 25 mg/m2/day for 3 days with Mesna and granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor every 21 days. Salvage therapy was allowed after chemotherapy. Among the 37 evaluable patients, the tumor was locally advanced (n = 11), with concomitant distant metastases (n = 5) or with distant metastases only (n = 21). After a median of three (range 1-7) chemotherapy cycles, six patients experienced a complete response and 12 a partial response for an overall response rate of 49% (95% CI 32% to 66%). The response rate was higher in poorly differentiated tumors (62%) compared with moderately well differentiated ones (18%), but was not different according to histology subtypes. Eleven patients had salvage therapy, either immediately following chemotherapy (n = 7) or at time of progression (n = 4). With a median follow-up time of 5 years, the median overall survival was 30.5 months. Hematological toxicity was as expected neutropenia, thrombopenia and anemia > or = grade 3 at 50%, 34% and 33% of cycles respectively. No toxic death occurred. High-dose ifosfamide plus doxorubicin is an active regimen for all subtypes of gynecological sarcomas. Its toxicity was manageable in a multicentric setting. The prolonged survival might be due to the multidisciplinary strategy that was possible in one-third of the patients.

  5. Irinotecan plus gemcitabine results in no survival advantage compared with gemcitabine monotherapy in patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer despite increased tumor response rate.

    PubMed

    Rocha Lima, Caio M; Green, Mark R; Rotche, Robert; Miller, Wilson H; Jeffrey, G Mark; Cisar, Laura A; Morganti, Adele; Orlando, Nicoletta; Gruia, Gabriela; Miller, Langdon L

    2004-09-15

    This phase III, randomized, open-label, multicenter study compared the overall survival associated with irinotecan plus gemcitabine (IRINOGEM) versus gemcitabine monotherapy (GEM) in patients with chemotherapy-naive, locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. IRINOGEM patients received starting doses of gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m2 and irinotecan 100 mg/m2 given weekly for 2 weeks every 3-week cycle. GEM patients received gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m2 weekly for 7 of 8 weeks (induction) and then weekly for 3 of 4 weeks. The primary end point of the trial was survival. Secondary end points included tumor response, time to tumor progression (TTP), changes in CA 19-9, and safety. In each arm, 180 randomly assigned patients comprised the intent-to-treat population evaluated for efficacy; 173 IRINOGEM and 169 GEM patients were treated. Median survival times were 6.3 months for IRINOGEM (95% CI, 4.7 to 7.5 months) and 6.6 months for GEM (95% CI, 5.2 to 7.8 months; log-rank P =.789). Tumor response rates were 16.1% (95% CI, 11.1% to 22.3%) for IRINOGEM and 4.4% (95% CI, 1.9% to 8.6%) for GEM (chi2 P <.001). Median TTP was 3.5 months for IRINOGEM versus 3.0 months for GEM (log-rank P =.352). However, subset analyses in patients with locally advanced disease suggested a TTP advantage with IRINOGEM versus GEM (median, 7.7 v 3.9 months). CA 19-9 progression was positively correlated with tumor progression. The incidence of grade 3 diarrhea was higher in the IRINOGEM group but grade 3 to 4 hematologic toxicities and quality-of-life outcomes were similar. IRINOGEM safely improved the tumor response rate compared with GEM but did not alter overall survival.

  6. Phase II study of necitumumab plus modified FOLFOX6 as first-line treatment in patients with locally advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Elez, E; Hendlisz, A; Delaunoit, T; Sastre, J; Cervantes, A; Varea, R; Chao, G; Wallin, J; Tabernero, J

    2016-01-01

    Background: This single-arm phase II study investigated the EGFR monoclonal antibody necitumumab plus modified FOLFOX6 (mFOLFOX6) in first-line treatment of locally advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Methods: Patients received 800-mg intravenous necitumumab (day 1; 2-week cycles), followed by oxaliplatin 85 mg m−2, folinic acid 400 mg m−2, and 5-fluorouracil (400 mg m−2 bolus then 2400 mg m−2 over 46 h). Radiographic evaluation was performed every 8 weeks until progression. Primary endpoint was objective response rate. Results: Forty-four patients were enrolled and treated. Objective response rate was 63.6% (95% confidence interval 47.8–77.6); complete response was observed in four patients; median duration of response was 10.0 months (7.0–16.0). Median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 22.5 (11.0–30.0) and 10.0 months (7.0–12.0), respectively. Clinical outcome was better in patients with KRAS exon 2 wild type (median OS 30.0 months (23.0–NA); median PFS 12.0 (8.0–20.0)), compared with KRAS exon 2 mutant tumours (median OS 7.0 months (5.0–37.0); median PFS 7.0 (4.0–18.0)). The most common grade ⩾3 adverse events were neutropenia (29.5%), asthenia (27.3%), and rash (20.5%). Conclusion: First-line necitumumab+mFOLFOX6 was active with manageable toxicity in locally advanced or mCRC; additional evaluation of the impact of tumour RAS mutation status is warranted. PMID:26766738

  7. Metastatic Breast Cancer, Version 1.2012

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Robert W.; Allred, D. Craig; Anderson, Benjamin O.; Burstein, Harold J.; Edge, Stephen B.; Farrar, William B.; Forero, Andres; Giordano, Sharon Hermes; Goldstein, Lori J.; Gradishar, William J.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Hudis, Clifford A.; Isakoff, Steven Jay; Ljung, Britt-Marie E.; Mankoff, David A.; Marcom, P. Kelly; Mayer, Ingrid A.; McCormick, Beryl; Pierce, Lori J.; Reed, Elizabeth C.; Smith, Mary Lou; Soliman, Hatem; Somlo, George; Theriault, Richard L.; Ward, John H.; Wolff, Antonio C.; Zellars, Richard; Kumar, Rashmi; Shead, Dorothy A.

    2013-01-01

    These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight the important updates/changes specific to the management of metastatic breast cancer in the 2012 version of the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Breast Cancer. These changes/updates include the issue of retesting of biomarkers (estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) on recurrent disease, new information regarding first-line combination endocrine therapy for metastatic disease, a new section on monitoring of patients with metastatic disease, and new information on endocrine therapy combined with an mTOR inhibitor as a subsequent therapeutic option. PMID:22773798

  8. BRCA1 loss pre-existing in small subpopulations of prostate cancer is associated with advanced disease and metastatic spread to lymph nodes and peripheral blood

    SciTech Connect

    Bednarz, Natalia; Eltze, Elke; Semjonow, Axel; Rink, Michael; Andreas, Antje; Mulder, Lennart; Hannemann, Juliane; Fisch, Margit; Pantel, Klaus; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Bielawski, Krzysztof P.; Brandt, Burkhard

    2010-03-19

    A recent study concluded that serum prostate specific antigen (PSA)-based screening is beneficial for reducing the lethality of PCa, but was also associated with a high risk of 'overdiagnosis'. Nevertheless, also PCa patients who suffered from organ confined tumors and had negative bone scans succumb to distant metastases after complete tumor resection. It is reasonable to assume that those tumors spread to other organs long before the overt manifestation of metastases. Our current results confirm that prostate tumors are highly heterogeneous. Even a small subpopulation of cells bearing BRCA1 losses can initiate PCa cell regional and distant dissemination indicating those patients which might be at high risk of metastasis. A preliminary study performed on a small cohort of multifocal prostate cancer (PCa) detected BRCA1 allelic imbalances (AI) among circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The present analysis was aimed to elucidate the biological and clinical role of BRCA1 losses on metastatic spread and tumor progression in prostate cancer patients. Experimental Design: To map molecular progression in PCa outgrowth we used FISH analysis of tissue microarrays (TMA), lymph node sections and CTC from peripheral blood. We found that 14% of 133 tested patients carried monoallelic BRCA1 loss in at least one tumor focus. Extended molecular analysis of chr17q revealed that this aberration was often a part of larger cytogenetic rearrangement involving chr17q21 accompanied by AI of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN and lack of the BRCA1 promoter methylation. The BRCA1 losses correlated with advanced T stage (p < 0.05), invasion to pelvic lymph nodes (LN, p < 0.05) as well as BR (p < 0.01). Their prevalence was twice as high within 62 LN metastases (LNMs) as in primary tumors (27%, p < 0.01). The analysis of 11 matched primary PCa-LNM pairs confirmed the suspected transmission of genetic abnormalities between those two sites. In 4 of 7 patients with metastatic disease, BRCA1 losses

  9. Phase II randomized study of ISIS 3521 and ISIS 5132 in patients with locally advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer: a National Cancer Institute of Canada clinical trials group study.

    PubMed

    Cripps, M Christine; Figueredo, Alvaro T; Oza, Amit M; Taylor, Marianne J; Fields, Anthony L; Holmlund, John T; McIntosh, Lynn W; Geary, Richard S; Eisenhauer, Elizabeth A

    2002-07-01

    Because treatment of metastatic colon cancer is noncurative, new treatments are needed. This trial evaluated the antitumor effects of two targeted anticancer agents: (a) ISIS 3521, an antisense inhibitor of the protein kinase C alpha; and (b) ISIS 5132, an antisense inhibitor of c-raf kinase in patients untreated previously with recurrent or metastatic colorectal carcinoma. All patients had colorectal adenocarcinoma with measurable disease and no prior chemotherapy for metastatic disease. Patients were randomized to receive either ISIS 3521 or ISIS 5132 at a dose of 2 mg/kg/day as a continuous i.v. infusion 21 of 28 days. Cycles were repeated as long as progression was not seen, and doses of both agents were modified according to toxic effects. A two-arm study design was used with each study arm considered independently. Steady-state blood levels of both antisense molecules were measured on days 8, 15, and 22 of the first cycle of therapy. Thirty-seven eligible patients were enrolled, and 32 were evaluable for response (17 receiving ISIS 3521 and 15 receiving ISIS 5132). No responses were noted. Four of the patients receiving ISIS 3521 had stable disease, and 5 patients receiving ISIS 5132 were stable. Neither ISIS 5132 nor ISIS 3521given in the dose and schedule studied induced objective responses in untreated colorectal cancer patients.

  10. A Multicenter Phase II Study of Gemcitabine, Capecitabine, and Bevacizumab for Locally Advanced or Metastatic Biliary Tract Cancer.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Renuka V; Pokuri, Venkata K; Groman, Adrienne; Ma, Wen W; Malhotra, Usha; Iancu, Dan M; Grande, Catherine; Saab, Tanios B

    2016-11-15

    Vascular endothelial growth factor overexpression, seen in 42% to 76% of biliary tract cancers (BTCs), correlates with poor survival. We explored the safety/efficacy and potential biomarkers for bevacizumab in combination with gemcitabine-capecitabine in advanced BTCs. Inoperable stage III/IV BTC patients in our prospective study were given 1000 mg/m of gemcitabine (on days 1, 8), 650 mg/m of capecitabine (on days 1 to 14), and 15 mg/kg of bevacizumab (on day 1) in 21-day cycles. Circulating tumor cells and quality of life were assessed at baseline and before cycle 2 and 3. In total, 50 patients with gallbladder cancer (22%), intrahepatic (58%), and extrahepatic (20%) cholangiocarcinoma, received a median of 8 treatment cycles for median treatment duration of 5.8 months. Common grade 3/4 toxicities were neutropenia (36%), thrombocytopenia (16%), fatigue (20%), infections (14%), and hand-foot syndrome (10%). There were 12 partial response (24%), 24 stable disease (48%) with clinical benefit rate of 72%. Median progression-free survival was 8.1 months (95% confidence interval, 5.3-9.9). Median overall survival was 10.2 months (95% confidence interval, 7.5-13.7). Circulating tumor cells were identified at baseline in 21/46 patients (46%), who had lower median overall survival compared with those without (9.4 vs. 13.7 mo; P=0.29). Patients with quality of life scores greater than the group median by the end of first cycle of treatment had improved survival compared with those who did not (13.3 vs. 9.4 mo; P=0.39). Addition of bevacizumab to gemcitabine/capecitabine did not improve outcome in an unselected group of patients with advanced BTC compared with historical controls. The selective benefit of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibition in BTC remains to be explored.

  11. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Docetaxel With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Uterine Leiomyosarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-13

    Recurrent Uterine Corpus Sarcoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIC Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVB Uterine Sarcoma; Uterine Corpus Leiomyosarcoma

  12. TORC1/2 Inhibitor MLN0128 and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent Glioblastoma or Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-12

    Adult Glioblastoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  13. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine and Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Triple Negative Breast Cancer (Currently Accruing Only Triple-negative Breast Cancer Patients Since 6/8/2007)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Borderline Ovarian Surface Epithelial-stromal Tumor; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral

  14. Health-related quality of life and risk of colorectal cancer recurrence and All-cause death among advanced stages of colorectal cancer 1-year after diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Carlos K H; Law, Wai-Lun; Wan, Yuk-Fai; Poon, Jensen Tung-Chung; Lam, Cindy Lo-Kuen

    2014-05-17

    The study aimed to examine the association between health-related quality of life (HRQOL) assessed with overall survival (OS) and recurrence after diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Overall 160 patients with advanced stage CRC were recruited in an observational study and completed the generic and condition-specific HRQOL questionnaires at the colorectal specialist outpatient clinic in Hong Kong, between 10/2009 and 07/2010. Socio-demographic and clinical characteristics including duration since diagnosis, primary tumor location and treatment modality, were collected to serve as predictor variables in regression models. All-cause death or CRC recurrence was the event of interest. Association between HRQOL with OS was assessed using Cox regression. Association between HRQOL and CRC recurrence was further modeled by competing-risks regression adjusted for the competing-risks of death from any cause. After a median follow-up of 23 months, there were 22 (16.1%) incidents of CRC recurrence and 15 (9.4%) deaths. Decreased physical functioning (hazard ratios, HR = 0.917, 95% CI:0.889-0.981) and general health of domains in SF-12 (HR = 0.846, 95% CI:0.746-0.958) or SF-6D scores (HR = 0.010, 95% CI:0.000-0.573) were associated with an increased risk of death, with adjustment of patients' characteristics. Increased vitality (HR = 1.151, 95% CI:1.027-1.289) and mental health (HR = 1.128, 95% CI:1.005-1.265) were associated with an increased likelihood of death. In models adjusted for competing-risk of death, those with worse HRQOL was not associated with increased risk of CRC recurrence. Although self-reported HRQOL was not a significant prognostic factor for CRC recurrence, the HRQOL provided independent prognostic value about mortality in patients with advanced stage of CRC.

  15. Phase II Study of Gemcitabine, Carboplatin, and Bevacizumab in Patients With Advanced Unresectable or Metastatic Urothelial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Balar, Arjun V.; Apolo, Andrea B.; Ostrovnaya, Irina; Mironov, Svetlana; Iasonos, Alexia; Trout, Alisa; Regazzi, Ashley M.; Garcia-Grossman, Ilana R.; Gallagher, David J.; Milowsky, Matthew I.; Bajorin, Dean F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Although gemcitabine and carboplatin (GCa) is a standard option for patients with advanced urothelial cancer (UC) who are ineligible for cisplatin, outcomes remain poor. This trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab with GCa in advanced UC. Patients and Methods Patients with Karnofsky performance status of 60% to 70%, creatinine clearance less than 60 mL/min, visceral metastasis, or solitary kidney were eligible and received a lead-in dose of bevacizumab 10 mg/kg followed 2 weeks later by gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m2 on days 1 and 8 and carboplatin at area under the [concentration-time] curve (AUC) 5.0 or 4.5 and bevacizumab 15 mg/kg on day 1 every 21 days for six cycles. Patients achieving at least stable disease (SD) continued bevacizumab 15 mg/kg every 21 days for 18 additional cycles. The study was powered to detect a 50% improvement in median progression-free survival (PFS) over a historical control. Results Fifty-one patients, median age 67 years (range, 42 to 83 years), were enrolled onto the study and were evaluable for toxicity. Twenty (39%) experienced grade 3 to 4 toxicity, and 10 (20%) had thromboembolic events (deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism). Four received one or fewer cycles leaving 47 evaluable for outcomes. Twenty-three (49%) achieved response (three complete; 20 partial), and 11 had SD. Median PFS was 6.5 months (95% CI, 4.7 to 7.8 months); PFS was greater in the carboplatin AUC 5.0 group (P = .04). Median overall survival (OS) was 13.9 months. Conclusion The 95% one-sided lower confidence bound of 4.77 months for median PFS did not meet the predesignated PFS of more than 4.8 months considered sufficient for further study. Median OS was greater than expected. An ongoing phase III trial in patients who are eligible for therapy with cisplatin will define the role of bevacizumab in UC. PMID:23341513

  16. Phase II study of gemcitabine, carboplatin, and bevacizumab in patients with advanced unresectable or metastatic urothelial cancer.

    PubMed

    Balar, Arjun V; Apolo, Andrea B; Ostrovnaya, Irina; Mironov, Svetlana; Iasonos, Alexia; Trout, Alisa; Regazzi, Ashley M; Garcia-Grossman, Ilana R; Gallagher, David J; Milowsky, Matthew I; Bajorin, Dean F

    2013-02-20

    Although gemcitabine and carboplatin (GCa) is a standard option for patients with advanced urothelial cancer (UC) who are ineligible for cisplatin, outcomes remain poor. This trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab with GCa in advanced UC. Patients with Karnofsky performance status of 60% to 70%, creatinine clearance less than 60 mL/min, visceral metastasis, or solitary kidney were eligible and received a lead-in dose of bevacizumab 10 mg/kg followed 2 weeks later by gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 8 and carboplatin at area under the [concentration-time] curve (AUC) 5.0 or 4.5 and bevacizumab 15 mg/kg on day 1 every 21 days for six cycles. Patients achieving at least stable disease (SD) continued bevacizumab 15 mg/kg every 21 days for 18 additional cycles. The study was powered to detect a 50% improvement in median progression-free survival (PFS) over a historical control. Fifty-one patients, median age 67 years (range, 42 to 83 years), were enrolled onto the study and were evaluable for toxicity. Twenty (39%) experienced grade 3 to 4 toxicity, and 10 (20%) had thromboembolic events (deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism). Four received one or fewer cycles leaving 47 evaluable for outcomes. Twenty-three (49%) achieved response (three complete; 20 partial), and 11 had SD. Median PFS was 6.5 months (95% CI, 4.7 to 7.8 months); PFS was greater in the carboplatin AUC 5.0 group (P = .04). Median overall survival (OS) was 13.9 months. The 95% one-sided lower confidence bound of 4.77 months for median PFS did not meet the predesignated PFS of more than 4.8 months considered sufficient for further study. Median OS was greater than expected. An ongoing phase III trial in patients who are eligible for therapy with cisplatin will define the role of bevacizumab in UC.

  17. Immunoendocrine therapy with low-dose subcutaneous interleukin-2 plus melatonin of locally advanced or metastatic endocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Lissoni, P; Barni, S; Tancini, G; Mainini, E; Piglia, F; Maestroni, G J; Lewinski, A

    1995-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that endocrine tumors are under an endocrine and an immune regulation, and that biotherapies with interferon or the long-acting somatostatin analog octreotide may be effective in the control of tumor growth and clinical symptomatology. Within the biotherapies of tumors, interleukin-2(IL-2) has appeared to play an essential role in the antitumor immune response. Despite its important antitumor role, very few studies have been carried out to investigate the possible use of IL-2 in the treatment of advanced endocrine tumors. Its potential toxicity would represent the main limiting factor for the clinical experiments with IL-2. Our previous studies have shown that the pineal hormone melatonin (MLT) may amplify the antitumor activity of IL-2, either through immunomodulating mechanisms or through a direct cytostatic activity by inhibiting tumor growth factor production. On this basis, we have performed a phase II pilot study with low-dose IL-2 plus MLT in 14 patients with untreatable endocrine tumors because of disseminated disease, lack of response to previous standard biotherapies or chemotherapies, or tumors for whom no effective therapy is available. Thyroid cancers, carcinoid and endodrine pancreatic tumors were the most frequent neoplasms. IL-2 was given at 3 million IU/day s.c. at 8 p.m. for 6 days/week for 4 weeks, corresponding to one cycle. MLT was given orally at 40 mg/day at 8 p.m. every day. In nonprogressed patients, a second cycle was given after a 21-day rest period. Patients were considered as evaluable when they received at least one complete cycle, and 12 patients were fully evaluable. According to WHO criteria, a partial response was achieved in 3/12 (25%) patients (carcinoid tumor: 1; neuroendocrine lung tumor: 1; pancreatic islet cell tumor: 1). Another patient with gastrinoma had a more than 50% reduction of tumor markers. Toxicity was low in all patients. This preliminary study suggests that low-dose IL-2 immunotherapy in

  18. [Recurrence of esophageal cancer treated by combination TS-1/CDDP therapy].

    PubMed

    Hiraki, Masatsugu; Yunotani, Seiji; Noguchi, Ryo; Shinozaki, Yukari; Tani, Hiroki; Sakai, Masashi; Ishimitsu, Toshiyuki; Tabuchi, Masanobu

    2005-02-01

    A 68-year-old man underwent subtotal esophagectomy with two fields lymphadenectomy and postoperative chemotherapy so called low dose FP therapy for advanced esophageal cancer (Stage IIIa, pT 3, pN 1, M 0) in October 1999. As he was diagnosed with a recurrence of esophageal cancer as metastatic lymph node tumors which were placed in the right anterocervical and supraclavicular region in March 2001, he underwent enucleation of metastatic lymph node tumors and postoperative chemoradiation therapy, so-called low-dose FP-R therapy. Recently, since other metastatic lymph node tumors in the neck appeared again in August 2001, he underwent radical neck lymph node dissection and postoperative chemoradiation treatment, so-called FAP-R therapy. In October 2003, a chest CT showed multiple lung tumors. He was diagnosed with multiple metastatic lung tumors originating from esophageal cancer. Then, two courses of a combined chemotherapy consisting of TS-1 and CDDP were administered at an interval of one month. We judged the effect of this chemotherapy to be a partial response (PR), because the largest metastatic lung tumor 18 mm in diameter showed a reduction rate of 81.9%, and other tumors had almost disappeared in the chest CT after the combined therapy. No severe adverse effects of more than grade 3 were observed during this combined therapy. This combined chemotherapy consisting of TS-1 and CDDP may prove effective for treating recurrent cases of esophageal cancer.

  19. Metastatic brain tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Brain tumor - metastatic (secondary); Cancer - brain tumor (metastatic) ... For many people with metastatic brain tumors, the cancer is not curable. It will eventually spread to other areas of the body. Prognosis depends on the type of tumor and ...

  20. Effects on quality of life of weekly docetaxel-based chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer: results of a single-centre randomized phase 3 trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To evaluate whether weekly schedules of docetaxel-based chemotherapy were superior to 3-weekly ones in terms of quality of life in locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer. Methods Patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer, aged ≤ 70 years, performance status 0-2, chemotherapy-naive for metastatic disease, were eligible. They were randomized to weekly or 3-weekly combination of docetaxel and epirubicin, if they were not treated with adjuvant anthracyclines, or docetaxel and capecitabine, if treated with adjuvant anthracyclines. Primary end-point was global quality of life change at 6-weeks, measured by EORTC QLQ-C30. With two-sided alpha 0.05 and 80% power for 35% effect size, 130 patients per arm were needed. Results From February 2004 to March 2008, 139 patients were randomized, 70 to weekly and 69 to 3-weekly arm; 129 and 89 patients filled baseline and 6-week questionnaires, respectively. Global quality of life was better in the 3-weekly arm (p = 0.03); patients treated with weekly schedules presented a significantly worsening in role functioning and financial scores (p = 0.02 and p < 0.001). Neutropenia and stomatitis were worse in the 3-weekly arm, where two toxic deaths were observed. Overall response rate was 39.1% and 33.3% in 3-weekly and weekly arms; hazard ratio of progression was 1.29 (95% CI: 0.84-1.97) and hazard ratio of death was 1.38 (95% CI: 0.82-2.30) in the weekly arm. Conclusions In this trial, the weekly schedules of docetaxel-based chemotherapy appear to be inferior to the 3-weekly one in terms of quality of life in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00540800. PMID:21324184

  1. QUILT-2.014: Gemcitabine and AMG 479 in Metastatic Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Advanced Solid Tumors; Cancer; Cancer of Pancreas; Cancer of the Pancreas; Metastases; Metastatic Cancer; Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Bone Metastases; Endocrine Cancer; Oncology; Oncology Patients; Solid Tumors; Advanced Malignancy

  2. Is the routine use of bevacizumab in the treatment of women with advanced or recurrent cancer of the cervix sustainable?

    PubMed Central

    Klag, Natalie; Walter, Adam C; Sheely, Kristen M; Manahan, Kelly J; Geisler, John P

    2016-01-01

    Background New chemotherapy combinations are being tested for the treatment of women with advanced, persistent or recurrent cervical cancer. We sought to evaluate the cost effectiveness of some newer combination therapies in cervical cancer. Patients and methods A cost effectiveness decision model was used to analyze Gynecologic Oncology Group 240. All regimens were modeled for seven cycles. The regimens studied are as follows: regimen 1, cisplatin/paclitaxel (CP); regimen 2, CP with bevacizumab (CP+B); regimen 3, paclitaxel/topotecan (PT); and regimen 4, PT with bevacizumab (PT+B). Overall survival, cost, and complications were studied. Sensitivity analyses were performed. Results Mean chemotherapy costs over mean total costs for seven cycles of each follows: CP $571/$32,966; CP+B $61,671/$96,842; PT $9,211/$71,620; and PT+B $70,312/$109,211. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for CP+B was $133,559/quality adjusted life year (QALY). ICER for PT+B was $124,576/QALY. To achieve an incremental ICER for CP+B:CP of <$50,000/QALY gained, the mean overall survival has to increase from 1.1 years with CP to 3.5 years with CP+B. An ICER <$50,000/QALY for the other regimens would take a survival of >10 years for PT and 4.1 years for PT+B. Treating 1,000 women with cervical cancer with CP+B would cost almost double the cost of treating >18,000 women with ovarian cancer annually (carboplatin/paclitaxel). Conclusion CP is the most cost effective regimen. A 12-month increase in overall survival will not even make the newer combinations cost effective. Currently, the use of bevacizumab is not sustainable at today’s costs. PMID:27382318

  3. Sorafenib in radioactive iodine-refractory, locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer: a randomised, double-blind, phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Brose, Marcia S; Nutting, Christopher M; Jarzab, Barbara; Elisei, Rossella; Siena, Salvatore; Bastholt, Lars; de la Fouchardiere, Christelle; Pacini, Furio; Paschke, Ralf; Shong, Young Kee; Sherman, Steven I; Smit, Johannes W A; Chung, John; Kappeler, Christian; Peña, Carol; Molnár, István; Schlumberger, Martin J

    2014-07-26

    Patients with radioactive iodine ((131)I)-refractory locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer have a poor prognosis because of the absence of effective treatment options. In this study, we assessed the efficacy and safety of orally administered sorafenib in the treatment of patients with this type of cancer. In this multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial (DECISION), we investigated sorafenib (400 mg orally twice daily) in patients with radioactive iodine-refractory locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer that had progressed within the past 14 months. Adult patients (≥18 years of age) with this type of cancer were enrolled from 77 centres in 18 countries. To be eligible for inclusion, participants had to have at least one measurable lesion by CT or MRI according to Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST); Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-2; adequate bone marrow, liver, and renal function; and serum thyroid-stimulating hormone concentration lower than 0·5 mIU/L. An interactive voice response system was used to randomly allocate participants in a 1:1 ratio to either sorafenib or matching placebo. Patients, investigators, and the study sponsor were masked to treatment assignment. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival, assessed every 8 weeks by central independent review. Analysis was by intention to treat. Patients in the placebo group could cross over to open-label sorafenib upon disease progression. Archival tumour tissue was examined for BRAF and RAS mutations, and serum thyroglobulin was measured at baseline and at each visit. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00984282, and with the EU Clinical Trials Register, number EudraCT 2009-012007-25. Patients were randomly allocated on a 1:1 basis to sorafenib or placebo. The intention-to-treat population comprised 417 patients (207 in the sorafenib group and 210 in the

  4. Everolimus for the second-line treatment of advanced and/or metastatic renal cell cancer: a critique of the submission from Novartis.

    PubMed

    Pitt, M; Crathorne, L; Moxham, T; Bond, M; Hyde, C

    2010-10-01

    This paper represents a summary of the evidence review group (ERG) report into the clinical efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness of everolimus plus best supportive care (BSC) for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) which has progressed following or on vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted therapy (sunitinib, sorafenib, bevacizumab), compared to BSC alone. The submitting manufacturer's case for clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness was mainly based on a well-conducted randomised controlled trial (RCT), Renal Cell Cancer Treatment with Oral RAD001 Given Daily-1 (RECORD-1), comparing BSC plus everolimus with BSC plus placebo and a de novo economic model. The RCT indicated a marked statistically significant effect on progression-free survival. The base-case incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) estimate was 52,000 pounds per quality-adjusted life-year (this included a reduction in drug cost associated with an approved patient access scheme). The ERG undertook a critical appraisal of the submission. The ERG was generally in agreement with the submitting manufacturer concerning its estimates of effectiveness; however, there was greater concern surrounding the estimates of cost-effectiveness. The ERG judged that if potential errors in the model were corrected, the ICERs offered by the submitting manufacturer would overstate the cost-effectiveness of everolimus for the second-line treatment of metastatic RCC (that this ICER would be a higher value). Concerning the estimates of cost-effectiveness in RCC, the observations in the ERG report provide strong further support for research collecting rigorous estimates of utilities associated with the main health states likely to be experienced by patients with renal cell cancer. At the time of writing, NICE was yet to issue the Appraisal Consultation Document for this appraisal.

  5. Safety and Pharmacokinetics/Pharmacodynamics of the First-in-Class Dual Action HER3/EGFR Antibody MEHD7945A in Locally Advanced or Metastatic Epithelial Tumors.

    PubMed

    Juric, Dejan; Dienstmann, Rodrigo; Cervantes, Andres; Hidalgo, Manuel; Messersmith, Wells; Blumenschein, George R; Tabernero, Josep; Roda, Desamparados; Calles, Antonio; Jimeno, Antonio; Wang, Xiaodong; Bohórquez, Sandra Sanabria; Leddy, Cecilia; Littman, Catherine; Kapp, Amy V; Shames, David S; Penuel, Elicia; Amler, Lukas C; Pirzkall, Andrea; Baselga, José

    2015-06-01

    The novel dual-action humanized IgG1 antibody MEHD7945A targeting HER3 and EGFR inhibits ligand-dependent HER dimer signaling. This phase I study evaluated the safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and antitumor activity of MEHD7945A. Patients with locally advanced or metastatic epithelial tumors received escalating doses of MEHD7945A (1-30 mg/kg) every 2 weeks (q2w) until disease progression or intolerable toxicity. An expansion cohort was enrolled at the recommended phase II dose (14 mg/kg, q2w). Plasma samples, tumor biopsies, FDG-PET were obtained for assessment of pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamic modulation downstream of EGFR and HER3. No dose-limiting toxicities or MEHD7945A-related grade ≥ 4 adverse events (AE) were reported in dose-escalation (n = 30) or expansion (n = 36) cohorts. Related grade 3 AEs were limited to diarrhea and nausea in the same patient (30 mg/kg). Related AEs in ≥20% of patients ≤24 hours after the first infusion included grade 1/2 headache, fever, and chills, which were managed with premedication and/or symptomatic treatment. Pharmacodynamic data indicated target inhibition in 25% of evaluable patients. Best response by RECIST included 2 confirmed partial responses in squamous cell carcinomas of head and neck (SCCHN) patients with high tumor tissue levels of the HER3 ligand heregulin; 14 patients had stable disease ≥8 weeks, including SCCHN (n = 3), colorectal cancer (n = 6), and non-small cell lung cancer (n = 3). MEHD7945A was well-tolerated as single agent with evidence of tumor pharmacodynamic modulation and antitumor activity in SCCHN. Phase II studies were initiated with flat (nonweight-based) dosing at 1,100 mg q2w in SCCHN and colorectal cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Early hormonal data from a multicentre phase II trial using transdermal oestrogen patches as first-line hormonal therapy in patients with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Langley, Ruth E.; Godsland, Ian F.; Kynaston, Howard; Clarke, Noel W.; Rosen, Stuart D.; Morgan, Rachel C.; Pollock, Philip; Kockelbergh, Roger; Lalani, El-Nasir; Dearnaley, David; Parmar, Mahesh; Abel, Paul D.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the hormonal effects of Fem7® (Merck, KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany) 100 μg transdermal oestrogen patches on men undergoing first-line androgen-deprivation therapy for prostate cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS PATCH is a multicentre, randomized, phase II trial for men with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer, comparing luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist therapy with oestrogen patches. To assess the dosing schedule for the patches, as this was the first time that this brand of patch had been used in men, and to reassure patients and participating clinicians, the Independent Data Monitoring Committee agreed to early release of hormonal data from this study. RESULTS Oestradiol, testosterone and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels are presented for the first group of 14 patients who received the patches (with 1 withdrawal) and for whom there were ≥12 weeks of follow-up by March 2007. After 12 weeks, testosterone levels (nmol/L) in eight of the 13 patients were <1.7, two were 1.7–2 and three were >2. The median (range) serum oestradiol levels was 442 (52.1–1542) pmol/L and all patients had a PSA response, with eight having a PSA level of <4 ng/mL. CONCLUSION These results confirm that oestrogen patches produce castrate levels of testosterone and concomitant PSA responses. They also highlighted the potential differences between different brands of oestrogen patches, and the need to monitor hormonal response, toxicity and efficacy until more experience with oestrogen patches for this clinical indication is obtained. The number of patches recommended in the PATCH study has now been increased. PMID:18422771

  7. Intraarterial Chemotherapy or Chemoembolization for Locally Advanced and/or Recurrent Hepatic Tumors: Evaluation of the Feeding Artery with an Interventional CT System

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Toshinori; Korogi, Yukunori; Ono, Ken; Maruoka, Kousei; Harada, Kazunori; Aridomi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Mutsumasa

    2001-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of an interventional CT system for intraarterial chemotherapy or chemoembolization for locally advanced and/or recurrent hepatic tumors.Methods: Thirty-eight patients with locally advanced or recurrent hepatic tumors underwent 73 intraarterial contrast-enhanced CT (IA-CECT) examinations immediately before chemotherapy or chemoembolization. The degree of tumor vascularity on angiography and enhancement on IA-CECT was classified into three grades: no, mild, or marked vascularity. The IA-CECT grades were compared with the angiographic grades.Results: Twenty-nine (69%) of 42 examinations that were interpreted as having no or mild vascularity on angiography were classified as marked enhancement on IA-CECT. Based on IA-CECT findings, the position of the catheter was changed in 14 (19%) of 73 CT examinations. The reasons for the reposition were as follows: weak or no enhancement of the tumor (n = 11) or strong enhancement of the gallbladder wall (n = 3). The treatment strategy was changed in three patients (8%). No major complications relating to the interventional procedures were observed.Conclusions: IA-CECT is a reliable method when evaluating the perfusion of the tumor and adjacent normal tissues. The interventional CT system is useful for performing safe and effective intraarterial chemotherapy or chemoembolization in patients with locally advanced and/or recurrent hepatic tumors.

  8. A phase II study of temsirolimus added to low-dose weekly carboplatin and paclitaxel for patients with recurrent and/or metastatic (R/M) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).

    PubMed

    Dunn, L A; Fury, M G; Xiao, H; Baxi, S S; Sherman, E J; Korte, S; Pfister, C; Haque, S; Katabi, N; Ho, A L; Pfister, D G

    2017-10-01

    Activating events along the PI3K/mTOR pathway are common in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC), and preclinical studies suggest additive or synergistic effects when combining mTORC1 inhibitors with carboplatin and paclitaxel chemotherapy. In this single-institution phase II study, the combination of temsirolimus 25 mg, carboplatin AUC 1.5, and paclitaxel 80 mg/m2 administered on days 1 and 8 of a 21-day cycle was evaluated in 36 patients with recurrent and/or metastatic (R/M) HNSCC. The primary end point was objective response rate after two cycles of treatment. Secondary end points include the safety and tolerability profile and overall survival. Correlative studies with exome mutational analysis were performed in pre-treatment biopsy samples from 21 patients. Fifteen (41.7%) patients had an objective response, which were all partial responses, and 19 (52.3%) patients had stable disease as best response. The two patients who were designated as 'non-responders' were removed from study prior to two cycles of treatment, but are included in the efficacy and safety analyses. The median duration on study was 5.3 months and the median progression-free survival and overall survival were 5.9 months (95% confidence interval, 4.8-7.1) and 12.8 months (95% confidence interval, 9.8-15.8), respectively. The most common grade 3 and 4 adverse events were hematologic toxicities. Three (3.8%) patients developed neutropenic fever on study. Three of four patients with PIK3CA mutations experienced tumor regressions, and responses were also seen in patients with other genetic alterations in the PI3K/mTOR pathway. The combination of temsirolimus with low-dose weekly carboplatin and paclitaxel appears to have meaningful clinical efficacy in the treatment of R/M HNSCC. This regimen has a relatively high response rate compared to other treatments evaluated in R/M HNSCC, and potential associations with genetic alterations in the PI3K/mTOR pathway should be further