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Sample records for advanced recurrent metastatic

  1. MLN0264 in Previously Treated Asian Participants With Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma or Metastatic or Recurrent Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma Expressing Guanylyl Cyclase C

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-08

    Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma; Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoma

  2. Nonsurgical Management of Cervical Cancer: Locally Advanced, Recurrent, and Metastatic Disease, Survivorship, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Helen J.; Wenzel, Lari; Mileshkin, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Overview Despite the declining incidence of cervical cancer as a result of the introduction of screening programs, globally it remains a leading cause of cancer-related death in women. Outcomes for patients who are diagnosed with anything but early-stage disease remain poor. Here we examine emerging strategies to improve the treatment of locally advanced disease. We discuss emerging biologic data, which are informing our investigation of new therapeutic interventions in persistent, recurrent, and metastatic cervical cancer. We recognize the importance of interventions to improve quality of life and to prevent long-term sequelae in women undergoing treatment. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, we recognize the need for global collaboration and advocacy to improve the outcome for all women at risk of and diagnosed with this disease. PMID:25993189

  3. VEGF Trap in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Locally Advanced, or Metastatic Cancer of the Urothelium

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-10

    Adenocarcinoma of the Bladder; Distal Urethral Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urethral Cancer Associated With Invasive Bladder Cancer

  4. Veliparib, Capecitabine, and Temozolomide in Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, and Recurrent Neuroendocrine Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-10

    Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Malignant Somatostatinoma; Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2A; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2B; Neuroendocrine Neoplasm; Non-Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Thymic Carcinoid Tumor; VIP-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Well Differentiated Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Zollinger Ellison Syndrome

  5. U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval: vismodegib for recurrent, locally advanced, or metastatic basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Axelson, Michael; Liu, Ke; Jiang, Xiaoping; He, Kun; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Hong; Kufrin, Dubravka; Palmby, Todd; Dong, Zedong; Russell, Anne Marie; Miksinski, Sarah; Keegan, Patricia; Pazdur, Richard

    2013-05-01

    The data and regulatory considerations leading to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) January 30, 2012 approval of Erivedge (vismodegib) capsules for the treatment of patients with recurrent, locally advanced, or metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC) are described. The FDA's approval decision was based primarily on the results observed in a single-arm, parallel cohort, international trial of vismodegib, administered orally at 150 mg daily until disease progression, in patients with pathologically confirmed, recurrent, locally advanced basal cell carcinoma (laBCC) or metastatic basal cell carcinoma (mBCC). An independent review committee confirmed an overall response rate (ORR) of 30.3% [95% confidence interval (CI): 15.6-48.2] in 33 patients with mBCC and an ORR of 42.9% (95% CI: 30.5-56.0) in 63 patients with laBCC; median response durations were 7.6 months and 7.6 months for patients with mBCC and laBCC, respectively. The most common adverse reactions were muscle spasms, alopecia, dysgeusia, weight loss, fatigue, nausea, diarrhea, decreased appetite, constipation, cough, arthralgias, vomiting, headache, ageusia, insomnia, and upper respiratory tract infection. Animal toxicology studies confirmed that vismodegib is a potent teratogenic agent. Approval was based on durable objective tumor responses supported by knowledge of the pathologic role of Hedgehog signaling in BCC and acceptable toxicity in a population without effective alternative therapies.

  6. Targeted Therapy in Locally Advanced and Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (LA-R/M HNSCC)

    PubMed Central

    Echarri, María José; Lopez-Martin, Ana; Hitt, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Surgery and radiotherapy are the standard treatment options for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Chemoradiotherapy is an alternative for patients with locally advanced disease. In recurrent/metastatic disease and after progression to platin-based regimens, no standard treatments other than best supportive care are currently available. Most SCCHN tumours overexpress the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). This receptor is a tyrosine-kinase membrane receptor that has been implicated in angiogenesis, tumour progression and resistance to different cancer treatments. In this review, we analysed the different drugs and pathways under development to treat SCCHN, especially recurrent/metastatic disease. Until now, the EGFR signalling pathway has been considered the most important target with respect to new drugs; however, new drugs, such as immunotherapies, are currently under study. As new treatments for SCCHN are developed, the influence of therapies with respect to overall survival, progression free survival and quality of life in patients with this disease is changing. PMID:26927178

  7. Pemetrexed disodium in recurrent locally advanced or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Pivot, X; Raymond, E; Laguerre, B; Degardin, M; Cals, L; Armand, J P; Lefebvre, J L; Gedouin, D; Ripoche, V; Kayitalire, L; Niyikiza, C; Johnson, R; Latz, J; Schneider, M

    2001-01-01

    This phase II study determined response rate of patients with locally advanced or metastatic head and neck cancer treated with pemetrexed disodium, a new multitargeted antifolate that inhibits thymidylate synthase, dihydrofolate reductase and glycinamide ribonucleotide formyl transferase. 35 patients with local or metastatic relapse of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (31 male, 4 female; median age 53 years) were treated with pemetrexed 500 mg m2 administered as a 10-minute infusion on day 1 of a 21-day cycle. Patients received 1 to 8 cycles of therapy. 9 patients (26.5%) had an objective response, with a median response duration of 5.6 months (range 2.9–20 months). 15 (44.1%) had stable disease, and 8 (23.5%) had progressive disease. 2 patients were not assessable for response. Median overall survival was 6.4 months (range 0.7–28.1 months; 95% CI: 3.9–7.7 months). 24 patients (68.6%) experienced grade 3/4 neutropenia, with febrile neutropenia in 4 (11.4%). Grade 3/4 anaemia and thrombocytopenia occurred in 11 (34.3%) and 6 (17.1%) patients, respectively. The most frequent non-haematological toxicity was grade 3/4 mucositis (17.1%; 6 patients). In conclusion, pemetrexed is active in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Although substantial haematological toxicities were experienced by patients, subsequent studies have shown that these toxicities can be proactively managed by folic acid and vitamin B12 supplementation. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11531245

  8. Combination Chemotherapy and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Metastatic, or Recurrent Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  9. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Metastatic, Locally Advanced, or Recurrent Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    Adult Angiosarcoma; Adult Epithelioid Sarcoma; Adult Leiomyosarcoma; Adult Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma; Adult Neurofibrosarcoma; Adult Synovial Sarcoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Uterine Carcinosarcoma; Uterine Leiomyosarcoma

  10. AZD0530 in Treating Patients With Recurrent Locally Advanced or Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-02

    Adult Fibrosarcoma; Adult Leiomyosarcoma; Adult Liposarcoma; Adult Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans; Endometrial Stromal Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Uterine Carcinosarcoma; Uterine Leiomyosarcoma

  11. Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Locally Advanced Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-05

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IVA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IVB Endometrial Carcinoma

  12. Recent Advances in the Medical Treatment of Recurrent or Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kumbla, Rekha A; Figlin, Robert A; Posadas, Edwin M

    2017-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) historically has had limited treatment options in the metastatic setting but in the last decade, a significant arsenal of new therapies has emerged. Specifically, targeted anti-angiogenic therapies through vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibition and immunotherapy through PD-1 inhibition have become the foundation of metastatic RCC treatment increasing not only progression-free survival but also an improved overall survival with improved toxicity profiles compared with older therapies such as IL-2 and interferon. With the development of these newer medications, the optimal sequence and pairing of treatments is not yet well understood but important studies are ongoing as this information will allow for more effective and safe treatment of patients.

  13. Feasibility and Timing of Cytoreduction Surgery in Advanced (Metastatic or Recurrent) Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors During the Era of Imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shih-Chun; Liao, Chien-Hung; Wang, Shang-Yu; Tsai, Chun-Yi; Chiang, Kun-Chun; Cheng, Chi-Tung; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Chen, Yen-Yang; MA, Ming-Chun; Liu, Chien-Ting; Yeh, Chun-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The prognosis of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) was dramatically improved in the era of imatinib. Cytoreduction surgery was advocated as an additional treatment for advanced GISTs, especially when patients having poor response to imatinib or developing resistance to it. However, the efficacy and benefit of cytoreduction were still controversial. Likewise, the sequence between cytoreduction surgery and imatinib still need evaluation. In this study, we tried to assess the feasibility and efficiency of cytoreduction in advanced GISTs. Furthermore, we analyzed the impact of timing of the cytoreduction surgery on the prognosis of advanced GISTs. We conducted a prospective collecting retrospective review of patients with advanced GISTs (metastatic, unresectable, and recurrent GISTs) treated in Chang Gung memorial hospital (CGMH) since 2001 to 2013. We analyzed the impact of cytoreduction surgery to response to imatinib, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced GISTs. Moreover, by the timing of cytoreduction to imatinib, we divided the surgical patients who had surgery before imatinib use into early group and those who had surgery after imatinib into late. We compared the clinical response to imatinib, PFS and OS between early and late cytoreduction surgical groups. Totally, 182 patients were enrolled into this study. Seventy-six patients underwent cytoreduction surgery. The demographic characteristics and tumor presentation were similar between surgical and non-surgical groups. The surgical group showed better complete response rate (P < 0.001) and partial response rate (P = 0.008) than non-surgical group. The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year PFS were significantly superior in surgical group (P = 0.003). The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year OS were superior in surgical group, but without statistical significance (P = 0.088). Dividing by cytoreduction surgical timing, the demographic

  14. Cetuximab for the treatment of locally advanced and recurrent/metastatic oral cancer: An investigation of distant metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Naruse, Tomofumi; Yanamoto, Souichi; Matsushita, Yuki; Sakamoto, Yuki; Morishita, Kota; Ohba, Seigo; Shiraishi, Takeshi; Yamada, Shin-Ichi; Asahina, Izumi; Umeda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the efficacy and safety of cetuximab therapy for patients with locally advanced (LA) and recurrent/metastatic (R/M) oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), with a specific focus on distant metastases (DMs). Data from 21 patients with unresectable LA and R/M OSCC treated with cetuximab therapy in our department between December, 2012 and July, 2015 were reviewed. The endpoint was the time-to-progression and the assessments made were tumor response rate, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and safety. The overall response rate was 57.1%, with a complete response (CR) rate of 33.3%. The overall median PFS and OS were 5.5 and 8.0 months, respectively. For patients with DMs, the overall response rate was 60.0%, with a CR rate of 40.0%. The median PFS and OS were 3.8 and 5.8 months, respectively. In addition, improved 1-year OS was observed following approval of cetuximab, although the differences between the group of patients treated after that time and historical controls were not statistically significantly (P=0.246). Grade 3–4 adverse events included infusion reaction (4 cases), neutropenia, hypophosphatemia, upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, liver toxicity and mucositis (1 case each). There was one cetuximab-related death due to interstitial pneumonia. An acne-like rash was observed in all cases, but no grade 3 or 4 rash was reported. Hypomagnesemia was observed in 10 cases. Our results suggest that cetuximab may display significant therapeutic efficacy in patients with unresectable LA and R/M OSCC, including those with DMs. PMID:27446558

  15. Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid in Treating Patients With Metastatic and/or Locally Advanced or Locally Recurrent Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-23

    Insular Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage II Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage II Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  16. TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Recurrent, or Metastatic Squamous Cell Cancer of Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-03

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage

  17. Sapanisertib or Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    High Grade Sarcoma; Metastatic Leiomyosarcoma; Metastatic Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Metastatic Synovial Sarcoma; Metastatic Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma; Myxofibrosarcoma; Recurrent Leiomyosarcoma; Recurrent Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Recurrent Synovial Sarcoma; Recurrent Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma; Uterine Corpus Leiomyosarcoma

  18. Talazoparib and HSP90 Inhibitor AT13387 in Treating Patients With Metastatic Advanced Solid Tumor or Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, Primary Peritoneal, or Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-22

    Adult Solid Neoplasm; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Fallopian Tube Serous Neoplasm; HER2/Neu Negative; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Tumor; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  19. Indications for surgery in advanced/metastatic GIST.

    PubMed

    Ford, Samuel J; Gronchi, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are a relatively rare entity and often present as a locally advanced tumour or with metastatic disease. Complete surgical resection is the only means of cure in localised disease; however, imatinib therapy has greatly advanced the management of GIST and is established as both an adjunct to surgery in high-risk cases and as principle therapy in metastatic disease. Surgery in advanced GIST has undergone a renaissance in recent years with the potential for a combined treatment approach with either neoadjuvant imatinib in locally advanced primary disease or as an adjunct to imatinib in those with metastases or recurrent disease. Neoadjuvant imatinib can render a locally advanced primary GIST resectable, allow less invasive procedures or promote preservation of function, especially if the tumour is located in an anatomically difficult position. The role of surgery in metastatic or recurrent disease is more controversial and case selection is critical. The potential benefit is difficult to quantify, although surgery may have a limited favourable impact on progression-free survival and overall survival for those patients whose disease is responding to imatinib or those with limited focal progression. Patients with imatinib resistant disease should not be offered surgery unless as an emergency where palliative intervention may be justified.

  20. Exemestane With or Without Entinostat in Treating Patients With Recurrent Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer That is Locally Advanced or Metastatic

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-13

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  1. Systemic Treatment in HPV-Induced Recurrent or Metastatic HNSCC.

    PubMed

    Rieke, Damian T; Keilholz, Ulrich

    Recurrent or metastatic head and neck cancer describes tumor deposits that arise locally, regionally, or at distant sites after treatment or distant metastases at the time of primary diagnosis. Prognosis for R/M squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (HNSCC) is poor and treatment options are limited in this situation. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is an important risk factor for HNSCC. About 40 % of all HNSCC have been attributed to HPV in Europe. HPV positivity at initial diagnosis is the single best prognostic factor for survival. However, data for the prognostic and predictive value of HPV in the R/M situation are still scarce. Due to the rising incidence of HPV-associated cancers, the number of R/M HPV+ carcinomas is also expected to rise. This chapter therefore aims to give an overview of the current knowledge concerning the role of HPV as a prognostic and predictive marker in recurrent or metastatic HNSCC.

  2. GTI-2040 and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Metastatic, or Unresectable Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Prostate Cancer, or Other Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  3. Bortezomib Followed by the Addition of Doxorubicin at Disease Progression in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Recurrent, or Metastatic Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma (Cancer) of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer

  4. Gamma-secretase/Notch Signalling Pathway Inhibitor RO4929097 in Treating Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, or Recurrent Triple Negative Invasive Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-28

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  5. Recent Advances in Immunotherapy in Metastatic NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Pranshu; Osman, Diaa; Gan, Gregory N.; Simon, George R.; Boumber, Yanis

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of most common malignancies and the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Despite advances in targeted therapies, majority of NSCLC patients do not have targetable genomic alterations. Nevertheless, recent discovery that NSCLC is an immunogenic tumor type, and several breakthroughs in immunotherapies have led to rapid expansion of this new treatment modality in NSCLC with recent FDA approvals of programed death receptor-1 inhibitors, such as nivolumab and pembrolizumab. Here, we review promising immunotherapeutic approaches in metastatic NSCLC, including checkpoint inhibitors, agents with other mechanisms of action, and immunotherapy combinations with other drugs. With advent of immunotherapy, therapeutic options in metastatic NSCLC are rapidly expanding with the hope to further expand life expectancy in metastatic lung cancer. PMID:27896216

  6. Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Newly Diagnosed Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IV Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IV Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Neck With Occult Primary

  7. Collecting and Studying Blood and Tissue Samples From Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Prostate or Bladder/Urothelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-06

    Healthy Control; Localized Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  8. Identifying patients at risk for recurrent or advanced BCC.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Omid; Goldenberg, Gary

    2013-11-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is a common skin cancer and its incidence is on the rise worldwide. Clinical presentation and histologic examination are used for diagnosis and to stratify BCCs as either low- or high-risk for recurrence or development of advanced disease. A number of surgical and nonsurgical options are available for BCC. BCC is most often managed with a surgical approach, but not all tumors and patients are suitable for surgery. Vismodegib is a recently approved first-in-class hedgehog pathway inhibitor that has expanded options for patients who have locally advanced or metastatic BCC.

  9. Cabozantinib-S-Malate in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-20

    Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mixed Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IV Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  10. The role of the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors as therapy for advanced, metastatic, and recurrent non-small-cell lung cancer: a Canadian national consensus statement

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, P.M.; Morzycki, W.; Melosky, B.; Butts, C.; Hirsh, V.; Krasnoshtein, F.; Murray, N.; Shepherd, F.A.; Soulieres, D.; Tsao, M.S.; Goss, G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To provide consensus recommendations on the use of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (egfr-tkis) in patients with advanced or meta-static non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc). Methods Using a systematic literature search, phase ii trials, randomized phase iii trials, and meta-analyses were identified for inclusion. Results A total of forty-six trials were included. Clear evidence is available that egfr-tkis should not be administered concurrently with platinum-based chemotherapy as first-line therapy in advanced or metastatic nsclc. Evidence is currently insufficient to recommend single-agent egfr-tkis as first-line therapy either in unselected populations or in populations selected on the basis of molecular or clinical characteristics. Following failure of platinum-based chemotherapy, the evidence suggests that second-line egfr-tkis or second-line chemotherapy result in similar survival. Quality of life and symptom improvement for patients treated with an egfr-tki appear better than they do for patients treated with second-line docetaxel. Sequence of therapy may not appear to be important, but if survival is the outcome of interest, the goal should be to optimize the number of patients receiving three lines of therapy. Based on available data, molecular markers and clinical characteristics do not appear to be predictive of a differential survival benefit from an egfr-tki and therefore those factors should not be used to select patients for egfr-tki therapy. Conclusions The egfr-tkis represent an additional therapy in the treatment of advanced or metastatic nsclc. The results of ongoing clinical trials may define the optimal role for these agents and the effectiveness of combinations of these agents with other targeted agents. PMID:19229369

  11. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-13

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity

  12. TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Metastatic, Persistent, Recurrent, or Progressive Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-17

    Colorectal Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Melanoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer

  13. Sapanisertib in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Bladder Cancer With TSC1 and/or TSC2 Mutations

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-16

    Metastatic Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Stage III Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; TSC1 Gene Mutation; TSC2 Gene Mutation

  14. S0420, Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-27

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  15. Radiation Therapy and MK-3475 for Patients With Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer, Renal Cell Cancer, Melanoma, and Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Lung Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  16. Vismodegib: in locally advanced or metastatic basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2012-07-30

    Vismodegib is the first Hedgehog pathway inhibitor to be approved in the US, where it is indicated for the treatment of adults with metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC), or with locally advanced BCC that has recurred following surgery or who are not candidates for surgery, and who are not candidates for radiation. Vismodegib selectively and potently inhibits the Hedgehog signalling pathway by binding to Smoothened, thereby inhibiting the activation of Hedgehog target genes. Oral vismodegib was effective in the treatment of patients with locally advanced (n = 63) or metastatic (n = 33) BCC, according to the results of an ongoing, noncomparative, multinational, pivotal, phase II trial (ERIVANCE BCC). In this trial (using a clinical cutoff date of 26 November 2010), the independent review facility overall response rate was 42.9% in patients with locally advanced BCC and 30.3% in patients with metastatic BCC. In both patients with locally advanced BCC and those with metastatic BCC, the median duration of response was 7.6 months and median progression-free survival was 9.5 months. Oral vismodegib had an acceptable tolerability profile in patients with advanced BCC.

  17. Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-17

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  18. Genetic landscape of metastatic and recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hedberg, Matthew L.; Goh, Gerald; Chiosea, Simion I.; Bauman, Julie E.; Freilino, Maria L.; Zeng, Yan; Wang, Lin; Diergaarde, Brenda B.; Gooding, William E.; Lui, Vivian W.Y.; Herbst, Roy S.; Lifton, Richard P.; Grandis, Jennifer R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Recurrence and/or metastasis occurs in more than half of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), and these events pose the greatest threats to long-term survival. We set out to identify genetic alterations that underlie recurrent/metastatic HNSCC. METHODS. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed on genomic DNA extracted from fresh-frozen whole blood and patient-matched tumor pairs from 13 HNSCC patients with synchronous lymph node metastases and 10 patients with metachronous recurrent tumors. Mutational concordance within and between tumor pairs was used to analyze the spatiotemporal evolution of HNSCC in individual patients and to identify potential therapeutic targets for functional evaluation. RESULTS. Approximately 86% and 60% of single somatic nucleotide variants (SSNVs) identified in synchronous nodal metastases and metachronous recurrent tumors, respectively, were transmitted from the primary index tumor. Genes that were mutated in more than one metastatic or recurrent tumor, but not in the respective primary tumors, include C17orf104, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, type 3 (ITPR3), and discoidin domain receptor tyrosine kinase 2 (DDR2). Select DDR2 mutations have been shown to confer enhanced sensitivity to SRC-family kinase (SFK) inhibitors in other malignancies. Similarly, HNSCC cell lines harboring endogenous and engineered DDR2 mutations were more sensitive to the SFK inhibitor dasatinib than those with WT DDR2. CONCLUSION. In this WES study of patient-matched tumor pairs in HNSCC, we found synchronous lymph node metastases to be genetically more similar to their paired index primary tumors than metachronous recurrent tumors. This study outlines a compendium of somatic mutations in primary, metastatic, and/or recurrent HNSCC cancers, with potential implications for precision medicine approaches. FUNDING. National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society, Agency for Science, Technology and Research of Singapore

  19. Emerging and Mechanism-Based Therapies for Recurrent or Metastatic Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Natalie J.; Bhatia, Shailender; Parvathaneni, Upendra; Iyer, Jayasri G.; Nghiem, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Opinion statement Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare but aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer with a disease-specific mortality of approximately 40 %. The association of MCC with a recently discovered polyomavirus, combined with the increased incidence and mortality of MCC among immunocompromised patients, highlight the importance of the immune system in controlling this cancer. Initial management of MCC is summarized within the NCCN guidelines and in recently published reviews. The high rate of recurrent and metastatic disease progression in MCC, however, presents a major challenge in a cancer that lacks mechanism-based, disease-specific therapies. Traditional treatment approaches have focused on cytotoxic chemotherapy that, despite frequent initial efficacy, rarely provides durable responses and has high morbidity among the elderly. In addition, the immunosuppressive nature of chemotherapy is of concern when treating a virus-associated cancer for which survival is unusually tightly linked to immune function. With a median survival of 9.6 months after development of an initial metastasis (n=179, described herein), and no FDA-approved agents for this cancer, there is an urgent need for more effective treatments. We review diverse management options for patients with advanced MCC, with a focus on emerging and mechanism-based therapies, some of which specifically target persistently expressed viral antigens. These treatments include single-dose radiation and novel immunotherapies, some of which are in clinical trials. Due to their encouraging efficacy, low toxicity, and lack of immune suppression, these therapies may offer viable alternatives to traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy. PMID:23436166

  20. Insulin-like growth factor II-producing metastatic colon cancer with recurrent hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Teramae, Satoshi; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Muguruma, Naoki; Okada, Yasuyuki; Goji, Takahiro; Kitamura, Shinji; Kimura, Tetsuo; Kimura, Masako; Bando, Yoshimi; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2015-02-01

    A 45-year-old man was referred to our hospital and found to have a tubular adenocarcinoma of the descending colon with multiple liver metastases. During hospitalization, the patient suffered recurrent hypoglycemic attacks that required intravenous 50% glucose infusion. He was diagnosed with non-islet cell tumor hypoglycemia (NICTH) because the colon cancer tissue obtained by biopsy was strongly stained for insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) by immunohistochemistry. He received chemotherapy with oxaliplatin, 5-FU and leucovorin (FOLFOX) plus bevacizumab (Bmab), and showed a partial response. As the metastatic lesions decreased in size, the hypoglycemic attacks gradually disappeared. Subsequently, he received outpatient chemotherapy and maintained a high quality of life for about 10 months. Western blot analysis of IGF-II in serum at the time of admission showed a high-molecular-weight form of IGF-II, which was considered to have caused hypoglycemia. This patient presents a very rare case of colorectal cancer associated with NICTH syndrome due to production of high-molecular-weight IGF-II by cancer cells. It is important to investigate IGF-II expression in cancer tissues for establishing the diagnosis of NICTH in cases with intractable hypoglycemia complicated by advanced cancer.

  1. Saracatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-02

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of

  2. Cisplatin and Fluorouracil Compared With Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Inoperable Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Anal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-22

    Anal Basaloid Carcinoma; Anal Canal Cloacogenic Carcinoma; Anal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Anal Canal Carcinoma; Recurrent Anal Canal Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Anal Canal Cancer; Stage IV Anal Canal Cancer

  3. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. The outcome of patients with metastatic cervical cancer is poor. We reviewed the relevant literature concerning the treatment and diagnosis of metastatic cervical cancer. There are two types of metastasis related to different treatments and survival rates: hematogenous metastasis and lymphatic metastasis. Patients with hematogenous metastasis have a higher risk of death than those with lymphatic metastasis. In terms of diagnosis, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and PET-computed tomography are effective tools for the evaluation of distant metastasis. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy and subsequent chemotherapy are well-tolerated and efficient for lymphatic metastasis. As for lung metastasis, chemotherapy and/or surgery are valuable treatments for resistant, recurrent metastatic cervical cancer and chemoradiotherapy may be the optimal choice for stage IVB cervical cancer. Chemotherapy and bone irradiation are promising for bone metastasis. A better survival is achieved with multimodal therapy. Craniotomy or stereotactic radiosurgery is an optimal choice combined with radiotherapy for solitary brain metastases. Chemotherapy and palliative brain radiation may be considered for multiple brain metastases and other organ metastases. PMID:27171673

  4. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoran; Wu, Xiaohua; Cheng, Xi

    2016-07-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. The outcome of patients with metastatic cervical cancer is poor. We reviewed the relevant literature concerning the treatment and diagnosis of metastatic cervical cancer. There are two types of metastasis related to different treatments and survival rates: hematogenous metastasis and lymphatic metastasis. Patients with hematogenous metastasis have a higher risk of death than those with lymphatic metastasis. In terms of diagnosis, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and PET-computed tomography are effective tools for the evaluation of distant metastasis. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy and subsequent chemotherapy are well-tolerated and efficient for lymphatic metastasis. As for lung metastasis, chemotherapy and/or surgery are valuable treatments for resistant, recurrent metastatic cervical cancer and chemoradiotherapy may be the optimal choice for stage IVB cervical cancer. Chemotherapy and bone irradiation are promising for bone metastasis. A better survival is achieved with multimodal therapy. Craniotomy or stereotactic radiosurgery is an optimal choice combined with radiotherapy for solitary brain metastases. Chemotherapy and palliative brain radiation may be considered for multiple brain metastases and other organ metastases.

  5. APN401 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, or Other Solid Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-16

    Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Metastatic Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Solid Neoplasm; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Unresectable Solid Neoplasm

  6. Treatment advances in liver-limited metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Steven R; Poston, Graeme J

    2011-12-01

    Over the last several decades advances in the management and treatment of patients with liver metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC) has changed a disease with a dismal prognosis to one with a potential for cure in some patients. Advances have been made through coordinated management of patients by surgeons, medical oncologists, radiologists, and other health care professionals coupled with advances in treatment options. Although these advances have clearly impacted patient outcomes, it is clear that the benefit of traditional surgical approaches and the use of cytoxic chemotherapy are reaching a plateau. Continued research to develop new and more active therapies, including targeted or biologic agents, is needed. This review discusses the advances made in management of patients with liver-limited metastatic disease.

  7. Vismodegib: the first drug approved for advanced and metastatic basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dubey, A K; Dubey, S; Handu, S S; Qazi, M A

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) usually involves surgical interventions and laser ablation, but in locally advanced BCC, which arise either from earlier untreated lesions or from recurrence of aggressive BCC, surgery and radiotherapy are not helpful. Vismodegib, the first oral-targeted therapy for locally advanced and metastatic BCC, unsuitable for surgery or radiotherapy, was recently approved by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The drug was under the priority review program of FDA and was approved on the basis of promising results of phase II trial. Vismodegib acts by targeting the hedgehog pathway, which is activated abnormally in most BCCs. Approval of vismodegib is a big step ahead in the treatment of advanced BCC, where there was no other effective drug therapy till now.

  8. Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, Cetuximab, and Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  9. Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Previously Treated, Locally Advanced, or Metastatic Cancer of the Urothelium

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Distal Urethral Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urethral Cancer Associated With Invasive Bladder Cancer

  10. Downregulation of osteoprotegerin expression in metastatic colorectal carcinoma predicts recurrent metastasis and poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Youn-Wha

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported the downregulation of osteoprotegerin expression in primary colorectal carcinoma and its significant association with aggressive oncogenic behavior, which suggest that this process contributes to colorectal carcinoma development and progression. In this study, we used immunohistochemical staining to evaluate osteoprotegerin expression in 81 colorectal liver metastasis tissue samples and investigated its possible association with the clinicopathological characteristics and outcomes of patients with colorectal liver metastasis. These tissues exhibited significantly reduced expression of osteoprotegerin compared to primary colorectal carcinomas and normal colorectal mucosa. This reduced expression was significantly associated with the extent of colorectal liver metastasis, including multiplicity of metastatic tumors, involvement of the bilateral hepatic lobes, and higher histological grade. In addition, reduced osteoprotegerin expression was an independent significant predictor of recurrent liver metastasis and prognostic factor for reduced patient survival. These findings suggest that osteoprotegerin expression may be a novel predictor of recurrent liver metastasis and a prognostic biomarker in patients with colorectal liver metastasis. Patients harboring colorectal liver metastasis with reduced osteoprotegerin expression should be carefully monitored after hepatic resection for colorectal liver metastasis to enable early detection of potentially resectable metastatic recurrences. PMID:27764814

  11. Molecular characterization of permanent cell lines from primary, metastatic and recurrent malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) with underlying neurofibromatosis-1.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuqiang; Elahi, Abul; Denley, Ryan C; Rao, Pulivarthi H; Brennan, Murray F; Jhanwar, Suresh C

    2009-04-01

    lines was observed, as reported by others. The role of biallelic inactivation of p53 gene in MPNST with underlying NF1 mutations, however, needs further study. Overexpression of Rb1-protein observed in metastatic and recurrent cell lines is indicative of its role in the progression of the disease. One of the most important observations of this study is that Nm23-H1 expression is closely associated with advanced or metastatic disease. In summary, MPNST cell lines derived from a patient with metastatic and recurrent disease with NF1 disorder were characterized and a gene associated with metastatic potential which is amenable to therapeutic and chemo-preventative approaches was identified. These cell lines with extensive characterization of genetic abnormalities are likely to provide important reagents for biochemical, molecular and pharmacological studies related to MPNST.

  12. [Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosing recurrent and metastatic ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Bulanova, I M; Bulanova, T V; Burenchev, D V

    2006-01-01

    The paper deals with the capacities of ultrasonography (USG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing recurrent and metastatic ovarian cancer along with routine clinical and laboratory studies (physical examination, measurement of the tumor-associated serum antigen CA-125) in 95 patients with ovarian cancer after primary special treatment. MRI is preferable to USG in evaluating the extent of a tumorous process and the invasion of a tumor into the adjacent tissues, which is of great value in defining a further treatment policy.

  13. Vorinostat in Combination With Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Solid Tumors and HIV Infection

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-11

    HIV Infection; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  14. Enhanced Metastatic Recurrence Via Lymphatic Trafficking of a High-Metastatic Variant of Human Triple-Negative Breast Cancer After Surgical Resection in Orthotopic Nude Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Yano, Shuya; Takehara, Kiyoto; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Bouvet, Michael; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Hoffman, Robert M

    2017-03-01

    We previously developed and characterized a highly invasive and metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) variant by serial orthotopic implantation of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells in nude mice. Eventually, a highly invasive and metastatic variant of human TNBC was isolated after lymph node metastases was harvested and orthotopically re-implanted into the mammary gland of nude mice for two cycles. The variant thereby isolated is highly invasive in the mammary gland and metastasized to lymph nodes in 10 of 12 mice compared to 2 of 12 of the parental cell line. In the present report, we observed that high-metastatic MDA-MB-231H-RFP cells produced significantly larger subcutaneous tumors compared with parental MDA-MB-231 cells in nude mice. Extensive lymphatic trafficking by high-metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells was also observed. High-metastatic MDA-MB-231 developed larger recurrent tumors 2 weeks after tumor resection compared with tumors that were not resected in orthotopic models. Surgical resection of the MDA-MB-231 high-metastatic variant primary tumor in orthotopic models also resulted in rapid and enhanced lymphatic trafficking of residual cancer cells and extensive lymph node and lung metastasis that did not occur in the non-surgical mice. These results suggest that surgical resection of high metastatic TNBC can greatly increase the malignancy of residual cancer. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 559-569, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Paclitaxel Plus Oxaliplatin for Recurrent or Metastatic Cervical Cancer: A New York Cancer Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Dennis Yi-Shin; Blank, Stephanie V.; Christo, Paul J.; Kim, Mimi; Caputo, Thomas A.; Pothuri, Bhavana; Hershman, Dawn; Goldman, Noah; Ivy, Percy S.; Runowicz, Carolyn D.; Muggia, Franco; Goldberg, Gary L.; Einstein, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Survival in women with recurrent or metastatic cervical cancer remains poor. More effective and less toxic regimens are needed. Cisplatin is an effective radiosensitizer, but its single agent activity in recurrent cervical cancer, especially after prior cisplatin exposure, is disappointing, with a response rate of only 13%. Oxaliplatin has preclinical activity in cisplatin-resistant tumors and may have synergic activity when combined with paclitaxel. Our objective is determine the efficacy and toxicity of paclitaxel and oxaliplatin in patients with recurrent or metastatic cervical cancer. Methods Patients with histologic confirmation of primary metastatic or recurrent cervical cancer not amenable to surgical management were eligible. Treatment consisted of paclitaxel 175 mg/m2 IV and oxaliplatin 130 mg/m2 IV every 21 days. The primary endpoints were toxicity, recorded every cycle, and response, determined by RECIST criteria were assessed every 9 weeks, with subsequent confirmation as required. Sample size determinations were made using a Simon's two-stage design with a projected overall response proportion of 13% with cisplatin alone. Survival rates were calculated with Kaplan-Meier methods. Results Of the 35 patients enrolled, 32 were evaluable. The median age was 56(27-78); 30 had had prior radiation (23 concomitant with cisplatin). Patients completed a mean of 4.2 cycles (1-11). There were 2 complete and 5 partial responses for a total response rate of 7/32 (22%; 95% CI: 9.3%-40.0%). Eight patients had stable disease for an overall clinical benefit rate of 15/32 (47%; 95% CI: 29.1% - 65.3%). The mean time to best response was 13.5 weeks (95% C.I.: 10.6, 16.4). The mean progression-free survival was 21 weeks (95% C.I.: 14.7, 27.2) and mean overall survival was 52.1weeks (95% C.I.: 39.4, 64.8). A total of 135 cycles were administered. There were 28 (20.1%) grade 3/4 hematologic toxicities and 46 (34.1%) grade 3/4 non-hematologic toxicities, which were

  16. [An advanced metastatic breast cancer patient successfully treated with combination therapy including docetaxel, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide (TAC) as salvage therapy].

    PubMed

    Sato, Yasushi; Takayama, Tetsuji; Sagawa, Tamotsu; Sato, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Kumiko; Takahashi, Shou; Abe, Seiichiro; Iyama, Satoshi; Murase, Kazuyuki; Kato, Junji; Niitsu, Yoshiro

    2008-03-01

    We reported here a case of advanced breast cancer successfully treated with combination therapy including docetaxel, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide (TAC) as salvage therapy. A 56-year-old male was referred to our hospital for treatment of recurrent metastatic breast cancer. When he was admitted, his general condition was poor due to massive intraperitoneal metastasis. We administered TAC chemotherapy (docetaxel 75 mg/m(2), doxorubicin 50 mg/m(2), and cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m(2), every 3 weeks). During chemotherapy, he showed no major adverse effects except grade 3 neutropenia, which could be easily managed with G-CSF administration. Metastatic lesions almost disappeared after 4 cycles of TAC. TAC therapy was considered to be acceptable as salvage therapy for a metastatic male breast cancer patient.

  17. Evolving treatment paradigms for locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Dorff, Tanya B; Quek, Marcus L; Daneshmand, Siamak; Pinski, Jacek

    2006-11-01

    While men with early stage prostate cancer typically enjoy long-term survival after definitive management, for those who present with locally advanced or metastatic disease, survival is compromised. Multimodality therapy can prolong survival in these patients, with state-of-the-art options including intensity-modulated radiation or brachytherapy in conjunction with androgen ablation, adjuvant androgen ablation and/or chemotherapy with radical retropubic prostatectomy. In addition, novel biological therapies are being explored to target the unique molecular changes in prostate cancer cells and their interactions with the microenvironment. With these advances the outlook will undoubtedly improve, even for patients presenting with advanced disease. Careful application of these emerging therapies to a select group of prostate cancer patients most likely to obtain benefit from them is the challenge for urologists, medical oncologists and radiation oncologists for the future.

  18. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Metastatic and Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma and Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lindsay C.; Lester, Rachael A.; Grams, Michael P.; Haddock, Michael G.; Olivier, Kenneth R.; Arndt, Carola A. S.; Rose, Peter S.; Laack, Nadia N.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Radiotherapy has been utilized for metastatic and recurrent osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma (ES), in order to provide palliation and possibly prolong overall or progression-free survival. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is convenient for patients and offers the possibility of increased efficacy. We report our early institutional experience using SBRT for recurrent and metastatic osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma. Methods. We reviewed all cases of osteosarcoma or ES treated with SBRT between 2008 and 2012. Results. We identified 14 patients with a total of 27 lesions from osteosarcoma (n = 19) or ES (n = 8). The median total curative/definitive SBRT dose delivered was 40 Gy in 5 fractions (range, 30–60 Gy in 3–10 fractions). The median total palliative SBRT dose delivered was 40 Gy in 5 fractions (range, 16–50 Gy in 1–10 fractions). Two grade 2 and 1 grade 3 late toxicities occurred, consisting of myonecrosis, avascular necrosis with pathologic fracture, and sacral plexopathy. Toxicity was seen in the settings of concurrent chemotherapy and reirradiation. Conclusions. This descriptive report suggests that SBRT may be a feasible local treatment option for patients with osteosarcoma and ES. However, significant toxicity can result, and thus systematic study is warranted to clarify efficacy and characterize long-term toxicity. PMID:25548538

  19. Alisertib in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-01

    Myxofibrosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Leiomyosarcoma; Recurrent Liposarcoma; Recurrent Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Recurrent Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma; Stage III Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  20. Phase II study of capecitabine as palliative treatment for patients with recurrent and metastatic squamous head and neck cancer after previous platinum-based treatment

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Trufero, J; Isla, D; Adansa, J C; Irigoyen, A; Hitt, R; Gil-Arnaiz, I; Lambea, J; Lecumberri, M J; Cruz, J J

    2010-01-01

    Background: Platinum-based therapy (PBT) is the standard therapy for recurrent and/or metastatic head and neck cancer (HNC), but the incidence of recurrence remains high. This study evaluates the efficacy and tolerability of capecitabine as palliative monotherapy for recurrent HNC previously treated with PBT. Methods: Patients aged 18–75 years, with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0–2, squamous HNC with locoregional and/or metastatic recurrence previously treated with PBT and adequate organ functions, were included. Capecitabine (1.250 mg m−2 BID) was administered on days 1–14 every 21 days for at least two cycles. Results: A total of 40 male patients with a median age of 58 years were analysed. All patients received a median number of four cycles of capecitabine (range: 1–9) and the median relative dose intensity was 91%. Seven patients were not evaluable for response. Overall response rate was 24.2%. Median time to progression and overall survival were 4.8 and 7.3 months, respectively. Haematological adverse events (AEs) grade 3/4 were reported in six patients. Most common grade 3/4 non-haematological AEs were asthenia (12.5%), palmar-plantar eritrodisestesia (10%), mucositis (10%), dysphagia (10%) and diarrhoea (7.5%). Conclusions: Capecitabine seems to be an active, feasible and well-tolerated mode of palliative treatment for advanced HNC patients who have previously received PBT schedules. PMID:20485287

  1. Robotic Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy, for Isolated Recurrent Primary, Lymph Node or Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Beltramo, Giancarlo; Fariselli, Laura; Fodor, Cristiana; Santoro, Luigi; Vavassori, Andrea; Zerini, Dario; Gherardi, Federica; Ascione, Carmen; Bossi-Zanetti, Isa; Mauro, Roberta; Bregantin, Achille; Bianchi, Livia Corinna; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Orecchia, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of robotic CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA)-based stereotactic radiotherapy (CBK-SRT) for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2007 and December 2009, 34 consecutive patients/38 lesions were treated (15 patients reirradiated for local recurrence [P], 4 patients reirradiated for anastomosis recurrence [A], 16 patients treated for single lymph node recurrence [LN], and 3 patients treated for single metastasis [M]). In all but 4 patients, [{sup 11}C]choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography was performed. CBK-SRT consisted of reirradiation and first radiotherapy in 27 and 11 lesions, respectively. The median CBK-SRT dose was 30 Gy in 4.5 fractions (P, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; A, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; LN, 33 Gy in 3 fractions; and M, 36 Gy in 3 fractions). In 18 patients (21 lesions) androgen deprivation was added to CBK-SRT (median duration, 16.6 months). Results: The median follow-up was 16.9 months. Acute toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event). Late toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event and 1 Grade 2 event). Biochemical response was observed in 32 of 38 evaluable lesions. Prostate-specific antigen stabilization was seen for 4 lesions, and in 2 cases prostate-specific antigen progression was reported. The 30-month progression-free survival rate was 42.6%. Disease progression was observed for 14 lesions (5, 2, 5, and 2 in Groups P, A, LN, and M respectively). In only 3 cases, in-field progression was seen. At the time of analysis (May 2010), 19 patients are alive with no evidence of disease and 15 are alive with disease. Conclusions: CyberKnife-based stereotactic radiotherapy is a feasible approach for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer, offering excellent in-field tumor

  2. Sorafenib Tosylate, Cisplatin, and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-01

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  3. Vincristine, cisplatin, teniposide, and cyclophosphamide combination in the treatment of recurrent or metastatic adrenocortical cancer.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tanweera S; Sundin, Anders; Juhlin, Claes; Wilander, Erik; Oberg, Kjell; Eriksson, Barbro

    2004-01-01

    The efficacy and tolerability of a combination of vincristine, cisplatin, teniposide, and cyclophosphamide (OPEC) in 11 patients (median age, 45 yr) with recurrent and/or metastatic adrenocortical cancer (ACC) (seven functional and four nonfunctional) were evaluated. All patients received this regimen after the failure of streptozocin and o,p'-DDD (SO) combination therapy. The regimen comprised cyclophosphamide, 600 mg/m2, and vincristine, 1.5 mg/m2, maximum dose 2.0 mg (d 1); cisplatin, 100 mg/m2 (d 2) and teniposide, 150 mg/m2 (d 4). Cycles were repeated every 4 wk. One to eight cycles (median, six cycles) of OPEC were administered to each patient. The median duration of treatment was 6 mo. The overall 2-yr survival rate was 82% and the median survival since diagnosis was 44 mo while it was 21 mo since start of OPEC therapy. Responses were obtained in nine patients: partial response in two patients, and stable disease in seven patients. The median duration of response was 6.75 mo. A total of 60 cycles of chemotherapy were given to all patients; grade 1-2 toxicity occurred in 57 cycles, while grade 3 toxicity was observed only in two cycles, according to NCI's Common Toxicity Criteria. We conclude that the OPEC regimen may be considered in recurrent or metastatic ACC as a second-line medical treatment. However, the combination is accompanied by considerable side effects and dose modifications are necessary in order to be able to recommend the treatment. This regimen needs further evaluation compared with SO therapy preferably in a randomized multicenter trial.

  4. Chemotherapy With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-12

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Tongue Carcinoma; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Neck With Occult Primary

  5. Energy balance in patients with advanced NSCLC, metastatic melanoma and metastatic breast cancer receiving chemotherapy--a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Harvie, M N; Howell, A; Thatcher, N; Baildam, A; Campbell, I

    2005-02-28

    Chemotherapy exerts a variable effect on nutritional status. It is not known whether loss of body fat or fat-free mass (FFM) during chemotherapy relates to diminished dietary intake, failure to meet elevated energy requirements, or to the presence of an acute-phase response. We sought to determine prospective measurements of body mass and composition, resting energy expenditure, energy and protein intake, and C-reactive protein over a course of chemotherapy in 82 patients with advanced cancer. There was a large dropout from the study. Prospective measurements were obtained in 19 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 12 with metastatic melanoma and 10 with metastatic breast cancer. There were significant increases in energy intake among patients with metastatic breast cancer, 873 (266-1480) kJ (mean 95% CI; P<0.01), and metastatic melanoma, 2513 (523-4503) kJ (P<0.01). Breast cancer patients gained percentage body fat over the course of treatment, 2.1 (0.8-3.5%). Gain or loss of body fat correlated to mean energy intake throughout chemotherapy in patients with NSCLC (Rs=0.751; P<0.01) and metastatic breast cancer (Rs=0.617; P<0.05). The ability to meet or exceed energy requirements led to gains in body fat among patients with metastatic breast cancer and NSCLC, but did not prevent loss of FFM in these groups.

  6. Management of muscle invasive, locally advanced and metastatic urothelial carcinoma of the bladder: a literature review with emphasis on the role of surgery

    PubMed Central

    Abufaraj, Mohammad; Gust, Kilian; Moschini, Marco; Foerster, Beat; Soria, Francesco; Mathieu, Romain

    2016-01-01

    Locally advanced (T3b, T4 and N1−N3) and metastatic urothelial bladder cancer (BCa) is a lethal disease with poor survival outcomes. Combination chemotherapy remains the treatment of choice in patients with metastatic disease and an important part of treatment in addition to radical cystectomy (RC) in patients with locally advanced tumour. Approximately half of patients who underwent RC for muscle invasive BCa relapse after surgery with either local recurrence or distant metastasis. This review focuses on the management of muscle invasive, locally advanced and metastatic BCa with emphasis on the role of surgery; to summarize the current knowledge in order to enhance clinical decision-making and counselling process. PMID:27785430

  7. PI3K Inhibitor BKM120 and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-09

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  8. Cetuximab and Everolimus in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Colon Cancer or Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-07-06

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Colon

  9. Successful resection of metachronous para-aortic, Virchow lymph node and liver metastatic recurrence of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Nobuyoshi; Fukunaga, Toru; Kimura, Masayuki; Sugamoto, Yuji; Tasaki, Kentaro; Hoshino, Isamu; Ota, Takumi; Maruyama, Tetsuro; Tamachi, Tomohide; Hosokawa, Takashi; Asai, Yo; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2015-11-28

    A 66-year-old female presented with the main complaint of defecation trouble and abdominal distention. With diagnosis of rectal cancer, cSS, cN0, cH0, cP0, cM0 cStage II, Hartmann's operation with D3 lymph node dissection was performed and a para-aortic lymph node and a disseminated node near the primary tumor were resected. Histological examination showed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, pSS, pN3, pH0, pP1, pM1 (para-aortic lymph node, dissemination) fStage IV. After the operation, the patient received chemotherapy with FOLFIRI regimen. After 12 cycles of FOLFIRI regimen, computed tomography (CT) detected an 11 mm of liver metastasis in the postero-inferior segment of right hepatic lobe. With diagnosis of liver metastatic recurrence, we performed partial hepatectomy. Histological examination revealed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma as a metastatic rectal cancer with cut end microscopically positive. After the second operation, the patient received chemotherapy with TS1 alone for 2 years. Ten months after the break, CT detected a 20 mm of para-aortic lymph node metastasis and a 10 mm of lymph node metastasis at the hepato-duodenal ligament. With diagnosis of lymph node metastatic recurrences, we performed lymph node dissection. Histological examination revealed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma as metastatic rectal cancer in para-aortic and hepato-duodenal ligament areas. After the third operation, we started chemotherapy with modified FOLFOX6 regimen. After 2 cycles of modified FOLFOX6 regimen, due to the onset of neutropenia and liver dysfunction, we switched to capecitabine alone and continued it for 6 mo and then stopped. Eleven months after the break, CT detected two swelling 12 mm of lymph nodes at the left supraclavicular region. With diagnosis of Virchow lymph node metastatic recurrence, we started chemotherapy with capecitabine plus bevacizumab regimen. Due to the onset of neutropenia and hand foot syndrome (Grade 3), we managed to

  10. Vismodegib: a guide to its use in locally advanced or metastatic basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lyseng-Williamson, Katherine A; Keating, Gillian M

    2013-02-01

    Vismodegib is the first Hedgehog pathway inhibitor to be approved in the USA, where it is indicated for the treatment of adults with metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC), or with locally advanced BCC that has recurred following surgery or who are not candidates for surgery, and who are not candidates for radiation. In an ongoing, noncomparative, phase II trial, oral vismodegib was effective in and had an acceptable tolerability profile in the treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic BCC.

  11. Mitomycin C pharmacokinetics in patients with recurrent or metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Erlichman, C; Rauth, A M; Battistella, R; Fine, S

    1987-03-01

    The pharmacokinetics of mitomycin C as a single agent have been determined in 25 treatment courses given to 18 patients with recurrent or metastatic colorectal carcinoma using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay to analyze plasma and urine samples. The plasma pharmacokinetics conformed to a two-compartment linear model in 21 of 25 courses monitored with a mean t1/2 lambda 1 of 9.8 +/- 1.2 (SEM) min and mean t1/2 lambda z of 64.1 +/- 8.9 (SEM) min. The large variation observed in t1/2 lambda z was not related to dose or treatment, but an interaction of these two factors approached significance (p = 0.057). Renal excretion in the 12 courses in which it was determined averaged only 2.3% of the total administered dose during the first 4 h monitored and no mitomycin C metabolites were detected in plasma or urine by the HPLC technique used. The most common toxicity, thrombocytopenia, did not correlate with t1/2 lambda z or the area under the curve. This may be due to a failure to monitor active metabolites of mitomycin C; other factors besides plasma drug concentrations that mediate toxicity towards marrow elements; or the small number of courses associated with thrombocytopenia (less than 100,000/mm3). Our study indicates that an interaction of drug dose and treatment course may be associated with increasing t1/2 lambda z; the renal clearance contributes a small component of mitomycin C elimination; metabolites of mitomycin C cannot be detected by the present HPLC technique; and routine monitoring of mitomycin C using present methods cannot be recommended for clinical use to predict toxicity.

  12. Pharmacodynamic study of Disulfiram in Men with Non-metastatic Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Michael T.; Lin, Jianqing; Blackford, Amanda; Bardia, Aditya; King, Serina; Armstrong, Andrew J.; Rudek, Michelle A.; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; Carducci, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Preclinical drug screens identified disulfiram as a potent in vitro inhibitor of prostate cancer cell growth. Although many mechanisms for its anticancer activity have been proposed, tumor suppressor gene re-expression through promoter demethylation emerged as one of the more plausible. Methods We conducted an open-label, dose escalation trial of disulfiram in men with non-metastatic recurrent prostate cancer after local therapy. Dose escalation occurred if a demethylating “response” [i.e. ≥10% decrease in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) global 5meC content] was observed in <3 patients in cohort 1. Cohort 1 and 2 received disulfiram 250 mg and 500 mg daily respectively. The primary endpoint was the proportion of subjects with a demethylation response. Secondary endpoints included rate of PSA progression at 6 months, changes in PSA doubling time and safety/tolerability. Results Changes in global 5meC content were observed in 2 of 9 patients (22.2%) in cohort 1 and 3 of 10 (30.0%) in cohort 2. Only 5 subjects were on trial for ≥6 months, all were in cohort 1 and all had PSA progression by 6 months. No changes in PSA kinetics were observed in either cohort. Disulfiram was poorly tolerated with 6 patients experiencing grade 3 AEs (3 per cohort). Three of the responders displayed pre-treatment instability in their 5meC content. Conclusions A minority of patients had transient global PBMC demethylation changes. Instability in 5meC may limit the reproducibility of these findings, limiting our ability to confirm our hypothesis. Given the toxicities and no clinical benefits, further development of disulfiram should not be pursued in this population. PMID:23958896

  13. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Primary, Recurrent, and Metastatic Tumors in the Head-and-Neck Region

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Farzan; Patel, Mehul; Khan, Mumtaz; McLean, Scott; Dragovic, Jadranka; Jin, J.-Y.; Movsas, Benjamin; Ryu, Samuel

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), also known as radiosurgery, in patients with head-and-neck cancers. Methods and Materials: Patients with pathologically proven malignant lesions in the head-and-neck region were treated using single-dose SBRT (S-SBRT) or fractionated SBRT (F-SBRT). Radiation doses were either single-fraction 13-18 Gy for S-SBRT or 36-48 Gy in five to eight fractions for F-SBRT. Response evaluation was based on clinical examinations and computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging scans. Pre- and post-SBRT tumor dimensions were measured in three axes, and tumor volumes were calculated. Response evaluation also was performed using World Health Organization criteria. Results: Fifty-five lesions were treated in 44 patients (25 men, 19 women). There were three groups of patients: those with primary (n = 10), recurrent (n = 21), and metastatic tumors (n = 13). The predominant histologic type was squamous cell carcinoma (n = 33). The majority of lesions were treated using F-SBRT (n = 37). Based on radiographic and clinical assessment, a 77% (complete + partial response) response rate was noted. Percentage of reduction in tumor volume was 52% {+-} 38% based on follow-up scans in 24 patients. Tumor control rates at 1 year were 83.3% and 60.6% in the primary and recurrent groups, respectively. Median overall survival was 28.7, 6.7, and 5.6 months for the primary, recurrent, and metastatic groups, respectively. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 1-2 mucositis was noted in all patients treated for oropharyngeal or laryngeal lesions. Conclusions: The SBRT in single or fractionated doses offers a viable treatment option for selected patients with primary, recurrent, and metastatic head-and-neck cancers with functional preservation.

  14. A Long-Term Survivor of Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Free of Recurrence 12 Years After Treatment of Oligometastatic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Zenta; Chang, Bryan W; Hochster, Howard S; Johung, Kimberly L

    2017-01-01

    Aggressive local therapy for patients with oligometastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has traditionally not been pursued due to high rates of distant progression. We describe a 62-year-old male initially presenting with resectable PDAC who underwent the Whipple procedure but developed multiple liver metastases within two months of starting adjuvant gemcitabine. Oxaliplatin was added to the regimen and complete resolution of the liver lesions resulted. He remained disease-free for five years until re-staging revealed a small lung nodule. This was resected and confirmed to be metastatic PDAC. After additional adjuvant gemcitabine, the patient remained free of recurrence for 12 years after diagnosis of metastatic disease and ultimately passed away from complications of ascending cholangitis associated with stricture at the biliary-enteric anastomosis site. He had no evidence of disease recurrence at the time of death. Next-generation sequencing of the tumor was unrevealing, showing only an activating mutation of KRAS and a deleterious mutation of tumor protein p53 (TP53). Our case suggests that while the prognosis for metastatic PDAC is poor, the population is nonetheless heterogeneous. Prognostic biomarkers are needed for the identification of patients for whom aggressive local treatment of oligometastatic PDAC may be warranted. PMID:28293485

  15. Hsp90 Inhibitor AT13387, Dabrafenib, and Trametinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent Melanoma or Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-13

    BRAF V600E Mutation Present; BRAF V600K Mutation Present; Metastatic Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Melanoma; Stage III Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Unresectable Solid Neoplasm

  16. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Cisplatin With or Without Veliparib or Veliparib Alone in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-24

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; PALB2 Gene Mutation; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  17. Vismodegib and Gamma-Secretase/Notch Signalling Pathway Inhibitor RO4929097 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    Adult Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Adult Angiosarcoma; Adult Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Adult Epithelioid Hemangioendothelioma; Adult Epithelioid Sarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Myxoid Chondrosarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma; Adult Fibrosarcoma; Adult Leiomyosarcoma; Adult Liposarcoma; Adult Malignant Mesenchymoma; Adult Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Adult Synovial Sarcoma; Adult Unclassified Pleomorphic Sarcoma; Chondrosarcoma; Clear Cell Sarcoma of the Kidney; Conjunctival Kaposi Sarcoma; Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Osteosarcoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult Unclassified Pleomorphic Sarcoma of Bone; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Kaposi Sarcoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Sarcoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Unclassified Pleomorphic Sarcoma of Bone

  18. Temsirolimus With or Without Cetuximab in Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer Who Did Not Respond to Previous Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-23

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma

  19. Capecitabine and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-01

    Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  20. Sunitinib Malate in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Carcinosarcoma; Uterine Corpus Carcinosarcoma

  1. Atezolizumab and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Persistent, or Metastatic Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-08

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  2. Metronomic cyclophosphamide therapy in hormone-naive patients with non-metastatic biochemical recurrent prostate cancer: a phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, Fabien; Mouillet, Guillaume; Adotevi, Olivier; Maurina, Tristan; Nguyen, Thierry; Montcuquet, Philippe; Curtit, E; Kleinclauss, F; Pivot, Xavier; Borg, Christophe; Thiery-Vuillemin, Antoine

    2016-08-01

    After curative local therapy, biochemical recurrence is a mode of relapse among patient with prostate cancer (PC). Deferring androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) or offering non-hormonal therapies may be an appropriate option for these non-symptomatic patients with no proven metastases. Metronomic cyclophosphamide (MC) has shown activity in metastatic PC setting and was chosen to be assessed in biochemical relapse. This prospective single-arm open-label phase II study was conducted to evaluate MC regimen in patients with biochemical recurrent PC. MC was planned to be administered orally at a daily dose of 50 mg for 6 months. Primary endpoint was PSA response. Thirty-eight patients were included and treated. Median follow-up was 45.5 months (range 17-100). Among them, 14 patients (37 %) achieved PSA stabilisation and 22 patients (58 %) experienced PSA progression. Response rate was 5 % with one complete response (2.6 %), and 1 partial response with PSA decrease >50 % (2.6 %). The median time until androgen deprivation therapy initiation was around 15 months. The treatment was well tolerated. Neither grade 3-4 toxicity nor serious adverse events were observed. This first prospective clinical trial with MC therapy in patients with non-metastatic biochemical recurrence of PC displayed modest efficacy when measured with PSA response rate, without significant toxicity. It might offer a new safe and non-expensive option to delay initiation of ADT. These results would need to be confirmed with larger prospective randomised trials.

  3. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Progressive, Recurrent, or Metastatic Adenoid Cyst Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-14

    Recurrent Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma

  4. Cixutumumab and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Unresectable, Locally Advanced, or Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-16

    Adult Angiosarcoma; Adult Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Adult Epithelioid Sarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Myxoid Chondrosarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma; Adult Fibrosarcoma; Adult Leiomyosarcoma; Adult Liposarcoma; Adult Malignant Mesenchymoma; Adult Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Adult Synovial Sarcoma; Adult Undifferentiated High Grade Pleomorphic Sarcoma of Bone; Childhood Angiosarcoma; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Childhood Epithelioid Sarcoma; Childhood Fibrosarcoma; Childhood Leiomyosarcoma; Childhood Liposarcoma; Childhood Malignant Mesenchymoma; Childhood Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Childhood Pleomorphic Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma With Mixed Embryonal and Alveolar Features; Childhood Synovial Sarcoma; Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans; Malignant Adult Hemangiopericytoma; Malignant Childhood Hemangiopericytoma; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Untreated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma

  5. Olaparib and Hsp90 Inhibitor AT13387 in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery or Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, Primary Peritoneal, or Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-10

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; High Grade Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; High Grade Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Primary Peritoneal High Grade Serous Adenocarcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma; Unresectable Solid Neoplasm

  6. Lapatinib Ditosylate in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  7. A Study of Epacadostat in Combination With a PD-1 Inhibitor and Chemotherapy in Subjects With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors (ECHO-207)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-20

    Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors; Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer (CRC); Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC); Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC; Squamous or Nonsquamous); Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumor That Progressed on Previous Therapy With a Programmed Cell Death Protein 1 (PD-1) Inhibitor; Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumor That Progressed on Previous Therapy With a Programmed Cell Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1) Inhibitor

  8. Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-27

    High-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Acinic Cell Tumor; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Salivary Gland Poorly Differentiated Carcinoma; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer

  9. Sunitinib Malate in Treating Patients With Iodine-Refractory Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  10. Critical appraisal of pazopanib as treatment for patients with advanced metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2011-01-01

    The management of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has undergone significant changes during the past 10 years, with the treatment of metastatic RCC undergoing the most radical changes. These developments reflect an enhanced understanding of this tumor's underlying biology, which was then translated into the development of a new treatment paradigm. Current therapeutic approaches for the management of patients with metastatic RCC utilize knowledge of histology, molecular abnormalities, clinical prognostic factors, the natural history of this malignancy, and the treatment efficacy and toxicity of available agents. The treatment options available for patients with metastatic RCC have changed dramatically over the past 6 years. Interferon-α and interleukin-2 were the previous mainstays of therapy, but since December 2005, six new agents have been approved in the US for the treatment of advanced RCC. Three are multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) including sunitinib, sorafenib, and pazopanib, two target the mammalian target of rapamycin (temsirolimus and everolimus), and one is a humanized monoclonal antibody (bevacizumab in combination with interferon-α). The current review focuses on the newest TKI available to treat patients with metastatic RCC, pazopanib. The development of this agent both preclinically and clinically is reviewed. The efficacy and safety data from the pivotal clinical trials are discussed, and the potential role of pazopanib in the treatment of patients with metastatic RCC in comparison to other treatment alternatives is critically appraised. This agent has a favorable overall risk benefit, and the available data demonstrate efficacy in patients with metastatic RCC who are either treatment-naïve or cytokine refractory. It therefore represents another alternative for treatment of metastatic RCC patients.

  11. Advanced new strategies for metastatic cancer treatment by therapeutic stem cells and oncolytic virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Geon-Tae; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-09-06

    The field of therapeutic stem cell and oncolytic virotherapy for cancer treatment has rapidly expanded over the past decade. Oncolytic viruses constitute a promising new class of anticancer agent because of their ability to selectively infect and destroy tumor cells. Engineering of viruses to express anticancer genes and specific cancer targeting molecules has led to the use of these systems as a novel platform of metastatic cancer therapy. In addition, stem cells have a cancer specific migratory capacity, which is available for metastatic cancer targeting. Prodrug activating enzyme or anticancer cytokine expressing stem cells successfully inhibited the proliferation of cancer cells. Preclinical models have clearly demonstrated anticancer activity of these two platforms against a number of different cancer types and metastatic cancer. Several systems using therapeutic stem cells or oncolytic virus have entered clinical trials, and promising results have led to late stage clinical development. Consequently, metastatic cancer therapies using stem cells and oncolytic viruses are extremely promising. The following review will focus on the metastatic cancer targeting mechanism of therapeutic stem cells and oncolytic viruses, and potential challenges ahead for advancing the field.

  12. Advanced new strategies for metastatic cancer treatment by therapeutic stem cells and oncolytic virotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Geon-Tae; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-01-01

    The field of therapeutic stem cell and oncolytic virotherapy for cancer treatment has rapidly expanded over the past decade. Oncolytic viruses constitute a promising new class of anticancer agent because of their ability to selectively infect and destroy tumor cells. Engineering of viruses to express anticancer genes and specific cancer targeting molecules has led to the use of these systems as a novel platform of metastatic cancer therapy. In addition, stem cells have a cancer specific migratory capacity, which is available for metastatic cancer targeting. Prodrug activating enzyme or anticancer cytokine expressing stem cells successfully inhibited the proliferation of cancer cells. Preclinical models have clearly demonstrated anticancer activity of these two platforms against a number of different cancer types and metastatic cancer. Several systems using therapeutic stem cells or oncolytic virus have entered clinical trials, and promising results have led to late stage clinical development. Consequently, metastatic cancer therapies using stem cells and oncolytic viruses are extremely promising. The following review will focus on the metastatic cancer targeting mechanism of therapeutic stem cells and oncolytic viruses, and potential challenges ahead for advancing the field. PMID:27494901

  13. Evaluation of nutritional status in advanced metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Sarhill, N; Mahmoud, F; Walsh, D; Nelson, K A; Komurcu, S; Davis, M; LeGrand, S; Abdullah, O; Rybicki, L

    2003-10-01

    Consecutive cancer referrals to a palliative medicine program were evaluated to assess nutritional status using a standard protocol. The study included 352 patients (180 men, 172 women; median age 61 years, range 22-94 years). The most common diagnosis was lung cancer. All had metastatic disease, 139 with gastrointestinal involvement. The most common gastrointestinal symptoms were weight loss ( n=307), anorexia ( n=285), and early satiety ( n=243). Of those with any weight loss, 71% had lost >or0% of their pre-illness weight. The most common factor identified which might have contributed to weight loss was hypophagia ( n=275/307). Men had lost weight more often and to a greater extent than women. Triceps skinfold (TSF) was measured in 337: 51% had values that suggested severe fat deficiency. Upper mid-arm muscle area (AMA) was measured in 349: 30% had evidence of significant muscle mass reduction. The body mass index (BMI) was normal or increased in most patients. Calculated resting energy expenditure (REE) ( n=324) was high in 41%. C-reactive protein was elevated in 74% of those measured ( n=50). We conclude that: (1).most of this group of cancer patients referred to palliative medicine had severe weight loss; (2).there was a gender difference in the severity and type of weight loss; (3).males lost more weight overall and more muscle than females; (4).males with any degree of weight loss had a higher REE than females; (5).a significant correlation existed between the time from diagnosis to death and the severity of weight loss in the prior month; (6).BMI was normal in most patients, suggesting precancer diagnosis obesity; and (7).both TSF and AMA correlated well with body composition of both fat and protein as determined by bioelectrical impedance.

  14. Phase II study of the PI3K inhibitor BKM120 in patients with advanced or recurrent endometrial carcinoma: a stratified type I-type II study from the GINECO group.

    PubMed

    Heudel, P-E; Fabbro, M; Roemer-Becuwe, C; Kaminsky, M C; Arnaud, A; Joly, F; Roche-Forestier, S; Meunier, J; Foa, C; You, B; Priou, F; Tazi, Y; Floquet, A; Selle, F; Berton-Rigaud, D; Lesoin, A; Kalbacher, E; Lortholary, A; Favier, L; Treilleux, I; Ray-Coquard, I

    2017-01-01

    Backround:Patients with metastatic endometrial carcinoma have a poor prognosis and PIK3CA mutations and amplifications are common in these cancers. This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of the pure PI3K inhibitor BKM120 in advanced or recurrent endometrial carcinoma.

  15. Vaccine Therapy With or Without Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Male Breast Cancer; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Intraductal Carcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Invasive Ductal Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  16. Entinostat, Nivolumab, and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery or Locally Advanced or Metastatic HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-10

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Metastatic Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Unresectable Solid Neoplasm

  17. Cetuximab for the treatment of recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, J; Bagust, A; Boland, A; Fleeman, N; McLeod, C; Dundar, Y; Proudlove, C; Shaw, R

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents a summary of the evidence review group (ERG) report into the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of cetuximab for recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) based upon a review of the manufacturer's submission to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) as part of the single technology appraisal (STA) process. The submission's evidence came from a single reasonably high-quality randomised controlled trial (RCT) [EXTREME (Erbitux in First-Line Treatment of Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer); n = 442] comparing cetuximab plus chemotherapy (CTX) with CTX alone. Cetuximab plus CTX had significant effects compared with CTX alone on the primary outcome of overall survival (10.1 versus 7.4 months respectively) and the secondary outcomes of progression-free survival (PFS) (5.6 versus 3.3 months), best overall response to therapy (35.6% versus 19.5%), disease control rate (81.1% versus 60%) and time-to-treatment failure (4.8 versus 3.0 months), but not on duration of response (5.6 months versus 4.7 months). No safety issues with cetuximab arose beyond those already previously documented. The manufacturer developed a two-arm state-transition Markov model to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of cetuximab plus CTX versus CTX alone, using clinical data from the EXTREME trial. The ERG recalculated the base-case cost-effectiveness results taking changes in parameters and assumptions into account. Subgroup and threshold analyses were also explored. The manufacturer reported an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of 121,367 pounds per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained and an incremental cost per life-year gained of 92,226 pounds. Univariate sensitivity analysis showed that varying the cost of day-case infusion and the utility values in the stable/response health state of the cetuximab plus CTX arm had the greatest impact on the ICER. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis

  18. Phase Ib, Dose Escalation Study of Oral LDE225 in Combination With BKM120 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-18

    Dose Escalation; Safety; Preliminary Efficacy; Advanced Solid Tumors; Metastatic Breast Cancer; Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Colorectal Cancer; Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme; Gastric Cancer; Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer; Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Hormone Receptor Positive (ER+/PR+, and Her2-) Metastatic Breast Cancer

  19. Trametinib in Increasing Tumoral Iodine Incorporation in Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    BRAF Gene Mutation; Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  20. Iodine I-131 With or Without Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-15

    Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  1. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Vinorelbine Ditartrate in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-27

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA1; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA2; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  2. Ribociclib and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients Metastatic or Advanced Soft Tissue Sarcomas That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-30

    Metastatic Angiosarcoma; Metastatic Epithelioid Sarcoma; Metastatic Fibrosarcoma; Metastatic Leiomyosarcoma; Metastatic Liposarcoma; Metastatic Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Metastatic Synovial Sarcoma; Metastatic Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma; Myxofibrosarcoma; Pleomorphic Rhabdomyosarcoma; Stage III Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Undifferentiated (Embryonal) Sarcoma

  3. Management of afferent loop obstruction from recurrent metastatic pancreatic cancer using a venting gastrojejunostomy.

    PubMed

    Bakes, Debbie; Cain, Christian; King, Michael; Dong, Xiang Da Eric

    2013-12-15

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy potentially curable with surgical intervention. Following pancreaticoduodenectomy for suspected pancreatic head malignancy, patients have a high risk for both immediate and delayed problems due to surgical complications and recurrent disease. We report here a patient with pancreatic cancer treated with pancreaticoduodenectomy who developed recurrent disease resulting in obstruction of the afferent limb. The patient developed biliary obstruction and cholangitis at presentation. Her biliary tree failed to dilate which precluded safe percutaneous biliary decompression. During surgical exploration, she was found to have a dilated afferent limb at the level of the transverse mesocolon. The patient underwent decompression of the afferent limb as well as the biliary tree using a venting gastrojejunostomy to the blind loop. This represents a novel surgical approach for management of this complicated and difficult problem.

  4. Recurrent Stroke Due to Metastatic Pulmonary Tumor Emboli as an Important Clinical Entity.

    PubMed

    Takasugi, Junji; Sakaguchi, Manabu; Oyama, Naoki; Gon, Yasufumi; Terasaki, Yasukazu; Sasaki, Tsutomu; Nakahara, Susumu; Ohshima, Kenji; Hori, Yumiko; Morii, Eiichi; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2017-03-30

    We present an autopsy case of repetitive stroke due to tumor emboli, indistinguishable from thromboembolism with a hypercoagulable state in its clinical course. A 72-year-old man diagnosed with stage IVA oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma received chemoradiotherapy. Follow-up imaging revealed mediastinal lymph nodes and pulmonary metastasis. One year later, the patient experienced right arm weakness, and brain magnetic resonance imaging showed acute ischemic lesions in multiple vascular territories. He was diagnosed with paradoxical cerebral embolism due to cancer-associated venous thrombosis and treated with rivaroxaban. However, newly developed cerebral infarcts were confirmed 1 month later. Then, rivaroxaban treatment was switched to subcutaneous unfractionated heparin injection. He was admitted again for stroke recurrence and died of respiratory failure 8 days after admission. Autopsy demonstrated pulmonary metastasis invading the veins and tumor emboli in the culprit cerebral arteries. D-dimer was kept constant at a slightly higher level, ranging from 1 to 3 µg/mL during the course of recurrence. We should consider tumor embolism in the differential diagnosis of recurrent stroke along with pulmonary tumor and resistance to heparin preparations with unchanged D-dimer levels.

  5. Management of locally advanced and metastatic colon cancer in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Kurniali, Peter C; Hrinczenko, Borys; Al-Janadi, Anas

    2014-02-28

    Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States with a median age at diagnosis of 69 years. Sixty percent are diagnosed over the age of 65 years and 36% are 75 years or older. At diagnosis, approximately 58% of patients will have locally advanced and metastatic disease, for which systemic chemotherapy has been shown to improve survival. Treatment of cancer in elderly patients is more challenging due to multiple factors, including disabling co-morbidities as well as a decline in organ function. Cancer treatment of elderly patients is often associated with more toxicities that may lead to frequent hospitalizations. In locally advanced disease, fewer older patients receive adjuvant chemotherapy despite survival benefit and similar toxicity when compared to their younger counterparts. A survival benefit is also observed in the palliative chemotherapy setting for elderly patients with metastatic disease. When treating elderly patients with colon cancer, one has to consider drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Since chronological age is a poor marker of a patient's functional status, several methods of functional assessment including performance status and activities of daily living (ADL) or instrumental ADL, or even a comprehensive geriatric assessment, may be used. There is no ideal chemotherapy regimen that fits all elderly patients and so a regimen needs to be tailored for each individual. Important considerations when treating elderly patients include convenience and tolerability. This review will discuss approaches to the management of elderly patients with locally advanced and metastatic colon cancer.

  6. Nimotuzumab Combined with Chemotherapy is a Promising Treatment for Locally Advanced and Metastatic Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xinghua; Lu, Nannan; Pan, Yueyin; Xu, Jianming

    2017-01-01

    Background Nimotuzumab is an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody which has been widely used in cancer treatment. However, the safety and efficacy of nimotuzumab combined with chemotherapy in locally advanced or metastatic esophageal cancer patients remain unclear. Material/Methods To address this open question, we collected a total data of 21 patients diagnosed with locally advanced or metastatic esophageal cancer between 2012 and 2016 in a, retrospective study. The patient characteristics, efficacy safety, and toxicity were evaluated in our study. Results We observed 1 (4.8%) patient with complete response, 7 (33.3%) patients with partial response, 9 (42.9%) patients with stable response and 4 (19%) patients with progression response. The objective response rate was 38.1% and disease control rate was 81%. The mean progression-free-survival was 7 months and the 18-month overall survival (OS) was 10%. The incidence rate of anemia and leukopenia was 71.4% and 81%, respectively. Two patients showed the serious adverse event of myelosuppression, with nausea, fatigue, and anorexia. No long-term drug-related toxicity was observed during the follow-up. Conclusions Nimotuzumab combined with chemotherapy can achieve promising clinical outcomes in locally advanced or metastatic esophageal cancer, without accumulation of toxicity and was well-tolerated. PMID:28115730

  7. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Metastatic Epidural Spinal Cord Compression and Recurrent Spinal Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Lo, Simon Shek-Man; Ryu, Samuel; Chang, Eric L; Galanopoulos, Nicholas; Jones, Joshua; Kim, Edward Y; Kubicky, Charlotte D; Lee, Charles P; Rose, Peter S; Sahgal, Arjun; Sloan, Andrew E; Teh, Bin S; Traughber, Bryan J; Van Poznak, Catherine; Vassil, Andrew D

    2015-07-01

    Metastatic epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC) is an oncologic emergency and if left untreated, permanent paralysis will ensue. The treatment of MESCC is governed by disease, patient, and treatment factors. Patient's preferences and goals of care are to be weighed into the treatment plan. Ideally, a patient with MESCC is evaluated by an interdisciplinary team promptly to determine the urgency of the clinical scenario. Treatment recommendations must take into consideration the risk-benefit profiles of surgical intervention and radiotherapy for the particular individual's circumstance, including neurologic status, performance status, extent of epidural disease, stability of the spine, extra-spinal disease status, and life expectancy. In patients with high spinal instability neoplastic score (SINS) or retropulsion of bone fragments in the spinal canal, surgical intervention should be strongly considered. The rate of development of motor deficits from spinal cord compression may be a prognostic factor for ultimate functional outcome, and should be taken into account when a treatment recommendation is made. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.

  8. [Advanced and Metastatic Lung Cancer – What is new in the Diagnosis and Therapy?].

    PubMed

    Rothschild, Sacha I

    2015-07-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common types of malignancies worldwide. The majority of patients are diagnosed with an incurable advanced/metastatic stage disease. Palliative treatment approaches improve the survival and the quality of life of these patients. Lung cancer is subdivided according to histology and molecular biology. The most important classification separates small cell from non-small cell lung cancer. In the subgroup of non-small cell lung cancer novel treatment approaches coming along with an improved prognosis have been established during the last decade. The current manuscript provides an overview on current treatment options for metastatic lung cancer. Furthermore, an outlook on promising future treatment options is provided.

  9. CanWalk: a feasibility study with embedded randomised controlled trial pilot of a walking intervention for people with recurrent or metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsianakas, Vicki; Ream, Emma; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke; Purushotham, Arnie; Mucci, Lorelei; Green, James S A; Fewster, Jacquetta; Armes, Jo

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Walking is an adaptable, inexpensive and accessible form of physical activity. However, its impact on quality of life (QoL) and symptom severity in people with advanced cancer is unknown. This study aimed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of a community-based walking intervention to enhance QoL in people with recurrent/metastatic cancer. Design We used a mixed-methods design comprising a 2-centre RCT and nested qualitative interviews. Participants Patients with advanced breast, prostate, gynaecological or haematological cancers randomised 1:1 between intervention and usual care. Intervention The intervention comprised Macmillan's ‘Move More’ information, a short motivational interview with a recommendation to walk for at least 30 min on alternate days and attend a volunteer-led group walk weekly. Outcomes We assessed feasibility and acceptability of the intervention and RCT by evaluating study processes (rates of recruitment, consent, retention, adherence and adverse events), and using end-of-study questionnaires and qualitative interviews. Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) assessing QoL, activity, fatigue, mood and self-efficacy were completed at baseline and 6, 12 and 24 weeks. Results We recruited 42 (38%) eligible participants. Recruitment was lower than anticipated (goal n=60), the most commonly reported reason being unable to commit to walking groups (n=19). Randomisation procedures worked well with groups evenly matched for age, sex and activity. By week 24, there was a 45% attrition rate. Most PROMs while acceptable were not sensitive to change and did not capture key benefits. Conclusions The intervention was acceptable, well tolerated and the study design was judged acceptable and feasible. Results are encouraging and demonstrate that exercise was popular and conveyed benefit to participants. Consequently, an effectiveness RCT is warranted, with some modifications to the

  10. To treat or not to treat: balancing therapeutic outcomes, toxicity and quality of life in patients with recurrent and/or metastatic head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Barbara A

    2013-12-01

    There are a number of challenges facing head and neck cancer patients who present with metastatic or locally recurrent head and neck cancer; such as, limited treatment options, overall poor prognosis, and high symptom burden secondary to tumor and treatment. Disease and symptom management can be difficult, and requires that the potential benefits versus the adverse effects of systemic therapy be weighed very carefully. Individual patient characteristics including performance status, weight loss, symptom burden, comorbidities, and social supports must be taken into consideration. Unfortunately, reliable data describing the impact of therapy on symptom burden and quality of life (QOL) is lacking. Recently completed randomized phase III treatment trials have demonstrated the feasibility of incorporating patient reported outcome measures to assess symptoms and QOL into clinical studies. Nonetheless, obstacles to accurate and thorough QOL reporting remain. Development of tools directed at symptom burden and functional impairment in the metastatic or recurrent head and neck cancer population is needed. Such tools would enhance our ability to assess the impact of treatment, thus optimizing treatment decisions for patients with recurrent and/or metastatic head and neck cancer.

  11. The natural history of metastatic progression in men with prostate-specific antigen recurrence after radical prostatectomy: long-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.; Feng, Zhaoyong; Trock, Bruce J.; Humphreys, Elizabeth B.; Carducci, Michael A.; Partin, Alan W.; Walsh, Patrick C.; Eisenberger, Mario A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe metastasis-free survival (MFS) in men with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) recurrence following radical prostatectomy, and to define clinical prognostic factors modifying metastatic risk. PATIENTS AND METHODS We conducted a retrospective analysis of 450 men treated with prostatectomy at a tertiary hospital between July 1981 and July 2010 who developed PSA recurrence (≥0.2 ng/mL) and never received adjuvant or salvage therapy before the development of metastatic disease. We estimated MFS using the Kaplan–Meier method, and investigated factors influencing the risk of metastasis using Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS Median follow-up after prostatectomy was 8.0 years, and after biochemical recurrence was 4.0 years. At last follow-up, 134 of 450 patients (29.8%) had developed metastases, while median MFS was 10.0 years. Using multivariable regressions, two variables emerged as independently predictive of MFS: PSA doubling time (<3.0 vs 3.0–8.9 vs 9.0–14.9 vs ≥15.0 months) and Gleason score (≤6 vs 7 vs 8–10). Using these stratifications of Gleason score and PSA doubling time, tables were constructed to predict median, 5- and 10-year MFS after PSA recurrence. In different patient subsets, median MFS ranged from 1 to 15 years. CONCLUSIONS In men undergoing prostatectomy, MFS after PSA recurrence is variable and is most strongly influenced by PSA doubling time and Gleason score. These parameters serve to stratify men into different risk groups with respect to metastatic progression. Our findings may provide the background for appropriate selection of patients, treatments and endpoints for clinical trials. PMID:21777360

  12. Management of Recurrent and Metastatic HPV-Positive Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma after Transoral Robotic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sims, John R; Van Abel, Kathryn; Martin, Eliot J; Lohse, Christine M; Price, Daniel L; Olsen, Kerry D; Moore, Eric J

    2017-03-01

    Objective To describe management and oncologic outcomes for patients who develop locoregional recurrence (LRR) or distant metastasis (DM) following transoral robotic surgery for human papilloma virus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting Tertiary care referral center. Subjects and Methods A total of 286 patients with HPV-positive OPSCC who underwent transoral robotic surgery-based treatment from May 2007 to May 2015. Results Of 286 patients (12.2%), 35 met inclusion criteria. Of these, 19 experienced an LRR and 16 developed a DM; 2 patients with LRR subsequently developed DM. In those patients with an LRR, 79% had T1/T2 tumors, and 47% had N0/N1 nodal disease, compared with 75% and 6% in the DM group, respectively. The median time to LRR or DM was 0.6 years (interquartile range [IQR], 0.4-1.0) and 1.8 years (IQR, 1.0-2.1), respectively. Salvage treatment with intent to cure was attempted in 23 patients (16 LRR, 7 DM). The median time from LRR or DM to last follow-up for the 18 patients who were still alive after salvage was 1.9 years (IQR, 0.4-3.8; range, 7 days-6.2 years). Estimated cancer-specific survival rates at 3 years following intent-to-cure treatment were 63% (95% CI, 39-100; number still at risk, 5) in the LRR group and 100% (95% CI, 100-100; number still at risk, 2) in the DM group. Conclusion Overall, LRR and DM for HPV-positive OPSCC following transoral robotic surgery-based therapy are infrequent. In our subset of patients who underwent intent-to-cure treatment, cancer-specific survival rates were favorable. Therefore, aggressive salvage treatment for LRR and DM for HPV-positive OPSCC should be recommended for appropriate candidates.

  13. Phase II trial of 4'-epi-doxorubicin in locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Cazap, E; Estevez, R; Bruno, M; Levy, D; Algamiz, C; Chacon, R; Badano, C; Romero, A; Desimone, G; Roca, E

    1988-06-30

    Patients with locally advanced or metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma received an i.v. bolus of 4'-epi-doxorubicin, 75/mg/m2/cycle, every 21 days. Partial responses were observed in 5 of 23 evaluable patients (21.7%). Treatment was generally well tolerated and toxicity was mild. The response rate to epirubicin appears to be very similar to that reported for doxorubicin. Larger doses of epirubicin could be safely used in future studies, and further evaluation of epirubicin in phase III trials is indicated.

  14. Impact of symptom burden on work-related abilities in patients with locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer: Results from a substudy of the VIRGO observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Cleeland, Charles S; Mayer, Musa; Dreyer, Nancy A; Yim, Yeun Mi; Yu, Elaine; Su, Zhaohui; Mun, Yong; Sloan, Jeff A; Kaufman, Peter A

    2014-12-01

    Limited data exist on the association of symptom burden, daily activity impairment, and work productivity (WP) in patients with advanced breast cancer. This cross-sectional analysis evaluated baseline patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in patients with locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer (MBC) receiving first-line hormonal therapy or chemotherapy and/or targeted therapy in the VIRGO observational study. The primary PRO study endpoint, symptom severity and interference score, was measured using the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI). Secondary endpoints included Activity Level Scale (ALS), health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire (WPAI:SHP) scores. Overall, 152 patients (chemotherapy cohort, 104; hormonal therapy cohort, 48) answered questionnaires. Fatigue, decreased sexual interest, disturbed sleep, emotional distress, and drowsiness were the most common severe symptoms, and were of moderate-to-severe intensity in 38.8%-52.0% of patients. Mean percent daily activity impairment was 30% for study patients, and WP impairment ranged from 20% to 40% across indices in employed patients (n, 58). Significant positive correlations existed for MDASI severity and interference scores with activity impairment and WP indices (Pearson correlation coefficients [R] = 0.47-0.82; p < 0.0001). ALS and overall HRQOL correlated negatively with these indices (R = -0.41 to -0.60; p ≤ 0.001). After adjustment for potential confounders, MDASI symptom interference and ALS were significant predictors of activity and WP impairment. Our results indicate patients receiving treatment for MBC are symptomatic with significant daily activity and/or WP impairment. Symptom severity and interference, functional status, and overall HRQOL were moderately correlated with perceived work-related ability.

  15. Changes in PIK3CA mutation status are not associated with recurrence, metastatic disease or progression in endocrine-treated breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Arthur, L M; Turnbull, A K; Renshaw, L; Keys, J; Thomas, J S; Wilson, T R; Lackner, M R; Sims, A H; Dixon, J M

    2014-08-01

    The phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase pathway plays an important role in proliferation, migration and survival in breast cancer and may play a role in resistance to endocrine therapy. Pathway activation occurs as a result of mutations in PIK3CA or loss of functional PTEN. Matched primary and recurrent samples from 120 breast cancer patients treated with endocrine therapy were profiled with a qPCR-based mutation assay covering eight mutational hotspots in PIK3CA. PTEN was assayed by immunohistochemistry. Samples were well characterized with respect to anatomic location of recurrence (metastatic nodal or local recurrence as opposed to contralateral or ipsilateral new primary cancers). In total, 43 % of patients had at least one PIK3CA mutation at diagnosis, and 41 % had a mutation at the time of recurrence. Only 8 % of patients with local recurrence, metastatic disease or progression on primary endocrine treatment changed their PIK3CA mutation status (four gains, two losses, total 76). The most common changes in PIK3CA mutation status were seen in patients who developed a new cancer either in the treated or contralateral breast (64 %, three gains, four losses, total 11). PIK3CA mutation status does not change in the majority of patients with breast cancer and the acquisition of mutations in PIK3CA is not responsible for the development of endocrine resistance. PTEN loss at diagnosis is associated with a significantly shorter time to progression compared with tumours in which PTEN was retained. These are the most comprehensive data currently available correlating PIK3CA status, site of recurrence and endocrine resistance.

  16. Molecular targeted therapies in advanced or metastatic chordoma patients: facts and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Lebellec, Loïc; Aubert, Sébastien; Zaïri, Fahed; Ryckewaert, Thomas; Chauffert, Bruno; Penel, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    Chordomas, derived from undifferentiated notochordal remnants, represent less than 4% of bone primary tumors. Despite surgery followed by radiotherapy, local and metastatic relapses are frequent. In case of locally advanced or metastatic chordomas, medical treatment is frequently discussed. While chemotherapy is ineffective, it would appear that some molecular targeted therapies, in particular imatinib, could slow down the tumor growth in case-reports, retrospective series, and phase I or II trials. Nineteen publications, between January 1990 and September 2014, have been found describing the activity of these targeted therapies. A systematic analysis of these publications shows that the best objective response with targeted therapies was stabilization in 52 to 69% of chordomas. Given the indolent course of advanced chordoma and because of the absence of randomized trial, the level of evidence to treat chordomas with molecular therapy is low (level III), whatever the drug. Furthermore, we could not draw firm conclusion on the activity of imatinib. Other putative targets have also been described. Therefore, further clinical trials are expected, especially with these targets. Nevertheless, it seems essential, in those future studies, to consider the naturally slow course of the disease.

  17. Exceptional Response to Systemic Therapy in Advanced Metastatic Gastric Cancer: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Marion; Manning, Maria A; Carroll, John E; Xiu, Joanne; Smaglo, Brandon G; Mikhail, Sameh; Salem, Mohamed E

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas represent one of the top five most common types of cancer worldwide. Despite significant advancement, it is still not known which first-line chemotherapy option is best matched to an individual patient. The vast advances in molecular biology have led to the discovery of many potential predictive biomarkers, such as HER-2 neu, thymidylate synthase (TS), excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1), and topoisomerase-1 (TOPO1). These markers could allow us to select treatment based on an individual’s tumor profile, resulting in an improvement of outcome. Our report highlights two patients with metastatic gastric cancer that achieved an exceptional response with traditional therapy and provides insights into the future perspectives of molecular profile-directed chemotherapy. PMID:26918225

  18. Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin and gemcitabine in the front-line treatment of recurrent/metastatic breast cancer: a multicentre phase II study.

    PubMed

    Adamo, V; Lorusso, V; Rossello, R; Adamo, B; Ferraro, G; Lorusso, D; Condemi, G; Priolo, D; Di Lullo, L; Paglia, A; Pisconti, S; Scambia, G; Ferrandina, G

    2008-06-17

    This multicentre phase II study was aimed at investigating the activity and safety of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) and gemcitabine (GEM) as front-line therapy in a large series of chemotherapy-naïve recurrent/metastatic breast cancer patients. From June 2003 to December 2006, a total of 71 recurrent/metastatic breast cancer patients were enrolled. Median age was 63 years (range=37-79), and 31 patients (43.7%) were > or =65 years old. Patients received PLD, 25 mg m(-2), day 1, followed by GEM, 800 mg m(-2), days 1 and 8, q21. Response was evaluable in 64 cases. Eight complete (12.5%) and 17 partial responses (26.6%) were registered, with an overall response rate of 39.1%. Thirty patients (46.9%) experienced stable disease, with an overall clinical benefit of 85.9%. Median time to progression (TTP) was 11 months, whereas median overall survival (OS) was not reached. The rate of 1- and 2-year OS was 79 and 61%, respectively. A total of 443 courses were evaluable for toxicity: grade 3 and 4 neutropaenia affected 14 patients (20.3%) and 3 patients (4.3%), respectively. Grade 3 and 4 palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome was documented in five cases (7.2%) and one case (1.4%), whereas grade 3 and 4 mucositis occurred in six cases (8.7%) and two cases (2.9%), respectively. Grade 2 cardiac toxicity was observed in only one case. Interestingly enough, there was no difference in the percentage and severity of either haematological or non-haematological toxicity according to the age of the patients (<65 vs > or =65 years). We confirmed in a large, very homogenous study sample of chemotherapy-naïve recurrent/metastatic breast cancer patients the efficacy and safety of PLD/GEM combination, providing response rates, median TTP and OS values comparable with those achieved with more toxic combinations.

  19. Zoledronic acid in metastatic chondrosarcoma and advanced sacrum chordoma: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Montella, Liliana; Addeo, Raffaele; Faiola, Vincenzo; Cennamo, Gregorio; Guarrasi, Rosario; Capasso, Elena; Mamone, Rosanna; Michele, Caraglia; Del Prete, Salvatore

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Chondrosarcomas and chordomas are usually chemoresistant bone tumors and may have a poor prognosis when advanced. They are usually associated with worsening pain difficult to control. Patients and Methods Zoledronic acid was used in a 63-year-old man with metastatic chondrosarcoma and in a 66-year-old woman with a diagnosis of sacrum chordoma both reporting severe pain related to tumor. Results In the first case, zoledronic acid was able to maintain pain control despite disease progression following chemotherapy, in the other case, zoledronic acid only produced significant clinical benefit. Conclusion Control of pain associated with bone tumors such as chondrosarcoma and chondroma may significantly improve from use of zoledronic acid, independently from tumor response to other treatments. Evaluation on larger series are needed to confirm the clinical effect of this bisphosphonate on such tumors. PMID:19144109

  20. Locally advanced and metastatic basal cell carcinoma: molecular pathways, treatment options and new targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Salas, Veronica; Alegre, Marta; Garcés, Joan Ramón; Puig, Lluis

    2014-06-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been identified as important to normal embryonic development in living organisms and it is implicated in processes including cell proliferation, differentiation and tissue patterning. Aberrant Hh pathway has been involved in the pathogenesis and chemotherapy resistance of different solid and hematologic malignancies. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and medulloblastoma are two well-recognized cancers with mutations in components of the Hh pathway. Vismodegib has recently approved as the first inhibitor of one of the components of the Hh pathway (smoothened). This review attempts to provide current data on the molecular pathways involved in the development of BCC and the therapeutic options available for the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic BCC, and the new targeted therapies in development.

  1. Recent Advances in Targeting the EGFR Signaling Pathway for the Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yuji; Suyama, Koichi; Baba, Hideo

    2017-04-02

    Outcomes for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients have been improved by treatment with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) antibodies, particularly when combined with predictive biomarkers to select patients lacking RAS mutations. New technologies such as liquid biopsy and next-generation sequencing have revealed that potential mechanisms of resistance to anti-EGFR therapies act through acquired mutations of KRAS and the EGFR ectodomain. Mutations in cross-talking molecular effectors that participate in downstream EGFR signaling are also negative predictors for anti-EGFR therapy. In the current review, we describe recent advances in anti-EGFR therapy and discuss new treatment strategies to target downstream RAS-MAPK signaling in mCRC.

  2. Metabolism, Excretion, and Pharmacokinetics of Oral Brivanib in Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Masson, Eric; Fischer, Bruce S.; Gong, Jiachang; Iyer, Ramaswamy; Gan, Jinping; Pursley, Janice; Patricia, Daniel; Williams, Daphne; Ganapathi, Ram

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics, mass balance, metabolism, routes and extent of elimination, and safety of a single oral dose of 14C-labeled brivanib alaninate and the safety and tolerability of brivanib after multiple doses in patients with advanced or metastatic solid tumors. This was a two-part, single-center, open-label, single oral-dose (part A) followed by multiple-dose (part B) study in patients with advanced or metastatic solid tumors. In part A, patients received a single dose of [14C]brivanib alaninate and in part B patients received 800 mg of nonradiolabeled brivanib alaninate every day. Four patients (two white, two black: two with non–small-cell lung cancer, one with ovarian cancer, and one with renal cell carcinoma) were treated in both parts. The median time to reach the maximal plasma concentration of brivanib was 1 h, geometric mean maximal plasma concentration was 6146 ng/ml, mean terminal half-life was 13.8 h, and geometric mean apparent oral clearance was 14.7 l/h. After a single oral dose of [14C]brivanib alaninate, 12.2 and 81.5% of administered radioactivity was recovered in urine and feces, respectively. Brivanib alaninate was completely converted to the active moiety, brivanib, and the predominant route of elimination was fecal. Renal excretion of unchanged brivanib was minimal. Brivanib was well tolerated; fatigue was the most frequent adverse event occurring in all patients and the most frequent treatment-related adverse event in three (75%). The best clinical response in one patient was stable disease; the other three had progressive disease. Brivanib alaninate was rapidly absorbed and extensively metabolized after a single 800-mg oral dose; the majority of drug-related radioactivity was excreted in feces. PMID:20671097

  3. Sorafenib Tosylate With or Without Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Liver Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-30

    Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage C Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage D Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma

  4. Advances in Personalized Targeted Treatment of Metastatic Melanoma and Non-Invasive Tumor Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Klinac, Dragana; Gray, Elin S.; Millward, Michael; Ziman, Mel

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive scientific progress in the melanoma field, treatment of advanced stage melanoma with chemotherapeutics and biotherapeutics has rarely provided response rates higher than 20%. In the past decade, targeted inhibitors have been developed for metastatic melanoma, leading to the advent of more personalized therapies of genetically characterized tumors. Here we review current melanoma treatments and emerging targeted molecular therapies. In particular we discuss the mutant BRAF inhibitors Vemurafenib and Dabrafenib, which markedly inhibit tumor growth and advance patients’ overall survival. However this response is almost inevitably followed by complete tumor relapse due to drug resistance hampering the encouraging initial responses. Several mechanisms of resistance within and outside the MAPK pathway have now been uncovered and have paved the way for clinical trials of combination therapies to try and overcome tumor relapse. It is apparent that personalized treatment management will be required in this new era of targeted treatment. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) provide an easily accessible means of monitoring patient relapse and several new approaches are available for the molecular characterization of CTCs. Thus CTCs provide a monitoring tool to evaluate treatment efficacy and early detection of drug resistance in real time. We detail here how advances in the molecular analysis of CTCs may provide insight into new avenues of approaching therapeutic options that would benefit personalized melanoma management. PMID:23515890

  5. Viral Therapy In Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Cancer or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; HER2/Neu Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  6. The Role of Irradiation in the Management of Locally Recurrent Non-Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremity/Trunkal Locations

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Michael P.; Lucas, David R.; Miller, Peter R.; Kraut, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Patients who have had initial curative intent therapy for non-metastatic soft tissue sarcoma, and who subsequently relapse at the initial site without evidence of metastatic disease, have various options regarding local treatment. The treatment options available will be determined by the extent of relapse, previous therapy rendered, and patient characteristics. We reported on a series of 31 patients treated initially with only surgery for extremity/trunkal high-grade soft tissue sarcoma and then seen for recurrence at our institution between 1980 and 1999. Local re-treatment consisted of combined modality therapy, most often aggressive surgical debulking/resection and irradiation, in an effort to reduce the need for amputation and, where anatomically allowable, to maintain a functional limb. We report our results in re-establishing local control, subsequent survival, and complication rates. Methods: Thirty-one patients with locally recurrent, non-metastatic high-grade soft tissue sarcoma, (excluding extraabdominal desmoid) were retrospectively reviewed to determine local control, survival, and complication rates associated with the relapsed disease. All patients had multimodality re-treatment most often utilizing aggressive surgical debulking and irradiation. The irradiation consisted of either external beam alone, brachytherapy alone, or a combination of external beam and brachytherapy. Nine patients also received multi-agent, multi-cycle chemotherapy using various regimens. In addition, the impact of surgical margin at the time of re-resection (gross versus microscopic disease), radiation treatment type, total radiation dose delivered, size of relapse, histological sub-type, sex and age, were evaluated to determine if they had any impact on the re-establishment of local control and subsequent survival. Results: Local control was re-established in 25 of 31 (80.6%) patients. Two additional patients with isolated local relapse after irradiation were

  7. Metastatic recurrence in a pancreatic cancer patient derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) nude mouse model is inhibited by neoadjuvant chemotherapy in combination with fluorescence-guided surgery with an anti-CA 19-9-conjugated fluorophore.

    PubMed

    Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Maawy, Ali; Zhang, Yong; Murakami, Takashi; Momiyama, Masashi; Mori, Ryutaro; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Katz, Matthew H G; Fleming, Jason B; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M; Bouvet, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) with gemcitabine (GEM) in combination with fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) on a pancreatic cancer patient derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) model. A PDOX model was established from a CA19-9-positive, CEA-negative tumor from a patient who had undergone a pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Mice were randomized to 4 groups: bright light surgery (BLS) only; BLS+NAC; FGS only; and FGS+NAC. An anti-CA19-9 or anti-CEA antibody conjugated to DyLight 650 was administered intravenously via the tail vein of mice with the pancreatic cancer PDOX 24 hours before surgery. The PDOX was brightly labeled with fluorophore-conjugated anti-CA19-9, but not with a fluorophore-conjugated anti-CEA antibody. FGS was performed using the fluorophore-conjugated anti-CA19-9 antibody. FGS had no benefit over BLS to prevent metastatic recurrence. NAC in combination with BLS did not convey an advantage over BLS to prevent metastatic recurrence. However, FGS+NAC significantly reduced the metastatic recurrence frequency to one of 8 mice, compared to FGS only after which metastasis recurred in 6 out of 8 mice, and BLS+NAC with metastatic recurrence in 7 out of 8 mice (p = 0.041). Thus NAC in combination with FGS can reduce or even eliminate metastatic recurrence of pancreatic cancer sensitive to NAC. The present study further emphasizes the power of the PDOX model which enables metastasis to occur and thereby identify the efficacy of NAC in combination with FGS on metastatic recurrence.

  8. Aflibercept in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer That Did Not Respond to Radioactive Iodine Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  9. Once-Weekly, High-Dose Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer: 6-Year Analysis of 60 Early-Stage, 42 Locally Advanced, and 7 Metastatic Lung Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, Omar M. Sandhu, Taljit S.; Lattin, Paul B.; Chang, Jung H.; Lee, Choon K.; Groshko, Gayle A.; Lattin, Cheryl J.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To explore once-weekly stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in nonoperable patients with localized, locally advanced, or metastatic lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 102 primary (89 untreated plus 13 recurrent) and 7 metastatic tumors were studied. The median follow-up was 38 months, the average patient age was 75 years. Of the 109 tumors studied, 60 were Stage I (45 IA and 15 IB), 9 were Stage II, 30 were Stage III, 3 were Stage IV, and 7 were metastases. SBRT only was given in 73% (40 Gy in four fractions to the planning target volume to a total dose of 53 Gy to the isocenter for a biologically effective dose of 120 Gy{sub 10}). SBRT was given as a boost in 27% (22.5 Gy in three fractions once weekly for a dose of 32 Gy at the isocenter) after 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the primary plus the mediastinum. The total biologically effective dose was 120 Gy{sub 10}. Respiration gating was used in 46%. Results: The overall response rate was 75%; 33% had a complete response. The overall response rate was 89% for Stage IA patients (40% had a complete response). The local control rate was 82%; it was 100% and 93% for Stage IA and IB patients, respectively. The failure rate was 37%, with 17% within the planning target volume. No Grade 3-4 acute toxicities developed in any patient; 12% and 7% of patients developed Grade 1 and 2 toxicities, respectively. Late toxicity, all Grade 2, developed in 3% of patients. The 5-year cause-specific survival rate for Stage I was 70% and was 74% and 64% for Stage IA and IB patients, respectively. The 3-year Stage III cause-specific survival rate was 30%. The patients with metastatic lung cancer had a 57% response rate, a 27% complete response rate, an 86% local control rate, a median survival time of 19 months, and 23% 3-year survival rate. Conclusions: SBRT is noninvasive, convenient, fast, and economically attractive; it achieves results similar to surgery for early or metastatic lung cancer patients who are older

  10. Lapatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Adenoid Cystic Cancer or Other Salivary Gland Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-10

    High-grade Salivary Gland Carcinoma; High-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Low-grade Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Low-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Acinic Cell Tumor; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Malignant Mixed Cell Type Tumor

  11. Prognostic Factors for Risk Stratification of Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Who Were Treated with Gemcitabine-Based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Inkeun; Choi, Seung Joon; Kim, Young Saing; Ahn, Hee Kyung; Hong, Junshik; Sym, Sun Jin; Park, Jinny; Cho, Eun Kyung; Lee, Jae Hoon; Shin, Yong Ju; Shin, Dong Bok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to verify prognostic factors including sarcopenia in patients with recurrent or metastatic pancreatic cancer receiving gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. Materials and Methods Medical records and computed tomography scan of consecutive patients treated with palliative gemcitabine-based chemotherapy from 2008 to 2014 were reviewed. The lumbar skeletal muscle index at third lumbar spine level was computed, and together with clinicolaboratory factors, univariate and multivariable analyses for overall survival (OS) were performed. Results A total of 88 patients were found. Median age was 65 years, and male patients were predominant (67.0%). Most patients had initially metastatic disease (72.7%), and gemcitabine monotherapy was administered in 29 patients (33.0%) while gemcitabine plus erlotinib was administered in 59 patients (67.0%). Seventy-six patients (86.3%) had sarcopenia. With a median follow-up period of 44.3 months (range, 0.6 to 44.3 months), median OS was 5.35 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.11 to 6.59). In univariate and multivariable analysis, high carcinoembryonic antigen level (hazard ratio [HR], 4.18; 95% CI, 1.95 to 8.97; p < 0.001), initially metastatic disease (HR, 3.37; 95% CI, 1.55 to 7.32; p=0.002), sarcopenia (HR, 2.97; 95% CI, 1.20 to 7.36; p=0.019), neutrophilia (HR, 2.94; 95% CI, 1.27 to 6.79; p=0.012), and high lactate dehydrogenase level (HR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.07 to 3.58; p=0.029) were identified as independent prognostic factors for OS. Conclusion Five independent prognostic factors in patients with recurrent or metastatic pancreatic cancer who received gemcitabine-based chemotherapy were identified. These findings may be helpful in prediction of prognosis in clinical practice and can be used as a stratification factor for clinical trials. PMID:27034148

  12. Risk of recurrence and conditional survival in complete responders treated with TKIs plus or less locoregional therapies for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Santini, Daniele; Santoni, Matteo; Conti, Alessandro; Procopio, Giuseppe; Verzoni, Elena; Galli, Luca; di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; De Giorgi, Ugo; De Lisi, Delia; Nicodemo, Maurizio; Maruzzo, Marco; Massari, Francesco; Buti, Sebastiano; Altobelli, Emanuela; Biasco, Elisa; Ricotta, Riccardo; Porta, Camillo; Vincenzi, Bruno; Papalia, Rocco; Marchetti, Paolo; Burattini, Luciano; Berardi, Rossana; Muto, Giovanni; Montironi, Rodolfo; Cascinu, Stefano; Tonini, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We retrospectively analyzed the risk of recurrence and conditional Disease-Free Survival (cDFS) in 63 patients with complete remission during treatment with tirosin kinase inhibitor (TKI), alone or with local treatment in metastatic renal cell carcinoma. RESULTS 37% patients achieve CR with TKI alone, while 63% with additional loco-regional treatments. 49% patients recurred after CR, with a median Disease free survival of 28.2 months. Patients treated with multimodal approaches present lower rate of recurrence (40% vs 61%) and longer Disease free survival compared to patient treated with TKI alone (16.5 vs 41.9 months, p=0.039).Furthermore the rate of recurrence was higher in patients with brain (88%), pancreatic (71%) and bone metastasis (50%). Patients who continued TKI therapy after complete response had a longer disease free survival than patients who stopped therapy, although the difference was not significant (42.1 vs 25.1 months, p=0.254). 2y-cDFS was better in patients treated with multimodal treatment and who continued TKIs than the other patient arms. CONCLUSIONS The prognostic value of CR depends on the site where was obtained and how was obtained (with or without locoregional treatment). Cessation of TKI should be carefully considered in complete responder patients. PMID:27027342

  13. Propranolol Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Solid Tumors That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-28

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Melanoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Hepatocellular Carcinoma

  14. New strategies in metastatic melanoma: oncogene-defined taxonomy leads to therapeutic advances.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Keith T; Fisher, David E

    2011-08-01

    The discovery of BRAF and KIT mutations provided the first basis for a molecular classification of cutaneous melanoma on therapeutic grounds. As BRAF-targeted therapy quickly moves toward regulatory approval and incorporation as standard therapy for patients with metastatic disease, proof of concept has also been established for targeting mutated KIT in melanoma. NRAS mutations have long been known to be present in a subset of melanomas and represent an elusive subgroup for targeted therapies. Matching patient subgroups defined by genetic aberrations in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase and p16/cyclin dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) pathways with appropriate targeted therapies has not yet been realized. And, an increasing understanding of lineage-specific transcriptional regulators, most notably MITF, and how they may play a role in melanoma pathophysiology, has provided another axis to approach with therapies. The foundation has been established for individual oncogene targeting, and current investigations seek to understand the intersection of these susceptibilities and other described potential targets and pathways. The melanoma field stands poised to take the lead among cancer subtypes in advancing combination therapy strategies that simultaneously target multiple biologic underpinnings of the disease.

  15. Recombinant EphB4-HSA Fusion Protein With Standard Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-15

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Non-Resectable Cholangiocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gallbladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Carcinoma; Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

  16. A late phase II study of RP56976 (docetaxel) in patients with advanced or recurrent breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, I.; Watanabe, T.; Takashima, S.; Narabayashi, M.; Horikoshi, N.; Aoyama, H.; Taguchi, T.

    1996-01-01

    A late phase II clinical trial of RP56976 (docetaxel), derived from Taxus baccata was performed to evaluate anti-tumour activity, time to progression and clinical toxicity in patients with advanced or recurrent breast cancer. The patients, between 15 and 80 years old with performance status (PS) of 0-2, received at least two cycles of docetaxel 60 mg m-2 intravenously at 3-4 week intervals. Of the 81 patients enrolled, the 72 eligible for the study were given a total of 327 cycles, with a median of four cycles each. Five patients obtained a complete response (CR) and 27 a partial response (PR); the response rate (RR) was 44.4% (95% confidence interval 32.7-56.6%). A relatively high RR of 9/28 (32.1%) was observed in patients who had received prior chemotherapy involving anthracyclines. The dose-limiting toxicity was grade 3-4 leucocytopenia or neutropenia, found in 78.9% and 85.9% patients respectively. Other severe (grade > 3) toxicities included alopecia (38%), anorexia (18.3%), nausea/vomiting (11.3%), and fatigue (9.9%). Hypersensitivity reactions, oedema and skin toxicity were not severe and were reversible. One therapy-related death occurred 10 days after the initial dose was given. These findings indicate that docetaxel has potent activity against metastatic breast cancer, and that the dose of 60 mg m-2 is safe. PMID:8546908

  17. MS-275 and Isotretinoin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  18. Pembrolizumab and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Recurrent Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer or Salivary Gland Cancer That Is Metastatic and/or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-07

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharynx Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage III Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  19. Ziv-aflibercept in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Unresectable, or Metastatic Gynecologic Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Fallopian Tube Cancer; Female Reproductive Cancer; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Uterine Carcinosarcoma; Uterine Leiomyosarcoma

  20. The combination of insulin-like growth factor receptor 1 (IGF1R) antibody cixutumumab and mitotane as a first-line therapy for patients with recurrent/metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma: a multi-institutional NCI-sponsored trial.

    PubMed

    Lerario, Antonio M; Worden, Francis P; Ramm, Carole A; Hesseltine, Elizabeth A; Hasseltine, Elizabeth A; Stadler, Walter M; Else, Tobias; Shah, Manisha H; Agamah, Edem; Rao, Krishna; Hammer, Gary D

    2014-08-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is an aggressive malignancy, which lacks an effective systemic treatment. Abnormal activation of insulin-like growth factor receptor 1 (IGF1R) has been frequently observed. Preclinical studies demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of IGF1R signaling in ACC has antiproliferative effects. A previous phase I trial with an IGF1R inhibitor has demonstrated biological activity against ACC. The objective of this study is to assess the efficacy of the combination of the IGF1R inhibitor cixutumumab (IMC-A12) in association with mitotane as a first-line treatment for advanced/metastatic ACC. We conducted a multicenter, randomized double-arm phase II trial in patients with irresectable recurrent/metastatic ACC. The original protocol included two treatment groups: IMC-A12 + mitotane and mitotane as a single agent, after an initial single-arm phase for safety evaluation with IMC-A12 + mitotane. IMC-A12 was dosed at 10 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks. The starting dose for mitotane was 2 g daily, subsequently adjusted according to serum levels/symptoms. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS) according to RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors). This study was terminated before the randomization phase due to slow accrual and limited efficacy. Twenty patients (13 males, 7 females) with a median age of 50.2 years (range 21.9-79.6) were enrolled for the single-arm phase. Therapeutic effects were observed in 8/20 patients, including one partial response and seven stable diseases. The median PFS was 6 weeks (range 2.66-48). Toxic events included two grade 4 (hyperglycemia and hyponatremia) and one grade 5 (multiorgan failure). Although the regimen demonstrated activity in some patients, the relatively low therapeutic efficacy precluded further studies with this combination of drugs.

  1. Phase II study of OSI-211 (liposomal lurtotecan) in patients with metastatic or loco-regional recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. An EORTC New Drug Development Group study.

    PubMed

    Duffaud, F; Borner, M; Chollet, P; Vermorken, J B; Bloch, J; Degardin, M; Rolland, F; Dittrich, C; Baron, B; Lacombe, D; Fumoleau, P

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the activity and safety of OSI-211, the liposomal form of lurtotecan, in patients ineligible for curative surgery or radiotherapy and with metastatic/locoregional recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) and target lesions either within a previously irradiated field ("within") or outside a previously irradiated field ("outside"). OSI-211 was given intravenously over 30 min on days 1 and 8 at 2.4 mg/m2/day, repeated every 21 days (1 cycle). From July 2001 to March 2002, 32 patients from 14 institutions were enrolled in the "within" arm and 18 in the "outside" arm. In the "within" arm, two patients were ineligible because their tumour site was not allowed in the protocol (nasopharynx, skin) and two other patients never started treatment. Of the 46 eligible patients who started treatment, there was one objective response (response rate: 2.2% (95% Confidence Interval (CI): [0-11.5%]). Twelve patients in the "within" arm and 6 in the "outside" arm had stable disease, with a median duration of 18 weeks, 95% CI (12.7-25.7). The median time to progression was 6 weeks (95%CI: [5.9-12.7] weeks). Haematological toxicity was moderate in both arms. The most common haematological toxicity was grade 1-2 anaemia in 79% of patients. Non-haematological toxicity was mild in both arms. The most common grade 3-4 non-haematological toxicity was infection in 8.5% of patients. OSI-211 administered on d1 and d8, every 3 weeks, is well tolerated, but shows only minimal activity in locally advanced/metastatic SCCHN.

  2. Prognostic factors predicting functional outcomes, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival after radiotherapy for metastatic spinal cord compression in breast cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk . E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Schulte, Rainer; Hoskin, Peter J.; Poortmans, Philip; Schild, Steven E.; Rudat, Volker

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To identify significant prognostic factors after irradiation of metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) in 335 breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The potential prognostic factors investigated included involved vertebra, other bone metastases, visceral metastases, performance status, pretreatment ambulatory status, time until motor deficits developed before RT, radiation schedule (shorter-course RT [one fraction of 8 Gy/five fractions of 4 Gy] vs. longer-course RT [10 fractions of 3 Gy/15 fractions of 2.5 Gy/20 fractions of 2 Gy), and the response to RT. Results: On multivariate analysis, better functional outcome was associated with slower development of motor deficits (p <0.001) and being ambulatory before RT (p <0.001). The overall recurrence rate of MSCC was greater if other bone metastases were present (p <0.001) and if shorter-course RT was used (p <0.001). In-field recurrences alone were more frequent after shorter-course RT (p = 0.008). Survival was negatively affected by the presence of visceral metastases (p <0.001), deterioration of motor function after RT (p <0.001), reduced performance status (p <0.001), and the rapid development of motor deficits (p = 0.044). Conclusion: Outcomes and survival after RT for MSCC in breast cancer patients are associated with several prognostic factors. Patients with poor expected survival may be treated with shorter-course RT to keep the overall treatment time short. If survival is expected to be relatively favorable, longer-course RT appears preferable, because it is associated with fewer MSCC recurrences.

  3. Sunitinib, Cetuximab, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  4. Salvage surgery for locoregional recurrences of advanced pharyngolaryngeal squamous cell carcinoma after organ preservation failure.

    PubMed

    López Delgado, I; Riestra Ayora, J; Arenas Brítez, O; García López, I; Martínez Guirado, T; Scola Yurrita, B

    2014-12-01

    Organ preservation treatment for advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is associated with poor outcomes due to locoregional recurrences. Salvage surgery is the main therapeutic option for some of these patients. The aim of this study was to analyse the results of salvage surgery for advanced pharyngolaryngeal squamous cell carcinoma previously treated with radiochemotherapy. We performed a retrospective study on 38 patients (36 men, 2 women). The median age at diagnosis was 60 years with a mean follow-up period of 49.8 months. Recurrences were diagnosed at a mean of 395 days after finalising organ preservation treatment. Patients went under different salvage surgeries, including 22 total laryngectomies, 6 partial laryngectomies (3 transoral laser surgeries and 3 opened surgeries), 8 functional neck dissections and 2 tongue base surgeries. Nineteen patients had no postoperative complications after a mean hospital stay of 2 weeks. However, 5 patients died of significant recurrent bleedings. There were 4 salivary fistulas that responded to conservative management, while 7 patients had important pharyngostomas that required reconstruction with either regional or free flaps. The mean hospital stay was of 61.60 days for all patients. Five-year overall survival from diagnosis, overall survival after salvage surgery and survival after salvage surgery were 44.20, 37.90 and 45.70%, respectively. In summary, we conclude that salvage surgery is an optimal treatment for pharyngolaryngeal and regional recurrences and provides improvement in locoregional control and survival, despite the severe complications.

  5. Saracatinib in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Stomach or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-19

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  6. Interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy in locally advanced and recurrent vulvar cancer

    PubMed Central

    Białas, Brygida; Fijałkowski, Marek; Wojcieszek, Piotr; Szlag, Marta; Cholewka, Agnieszka; Ślęczka, Maciej; Kołosza, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was to report our experience with high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) in locally advanced and recurrent vulvar cancer. Material and methods Between 2004 and 2014, fourteen women with locally advanced or recurrent vulvar cancer were treated using HDR-ISBT in our Centre. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy was performed as a separate treatment or in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (given prior to brachytherapy). Results Patients were divided into: group I (n = 6) with locally advanced tumors, stages III-IVA after an incisional biopsy only, and group II (n = 8) with recurrent vulvar cancer after previous radical surgery. In group I, median follow up was 12 months (range 7-18 months); 1-year overall survival (OS) was 83%. Transient arrest of cancer growth or tumor regression was noticed in all patients but 4/6 developed relapse. Median time to failure was 6.3 months (range 3-11 months). The 1-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 33%. In group II, median follow up was 28 months (range 13-90 months). The 1-year and 3-year OS was 100% and 80%, respectively. The arrest of cancer growth or tumor regression was achieved in all patients. In 4/8 patients neither clinical nor histological symptoms of relapse were observed but 4/8 women experienced relapse. Median time to failure was 31 months (range 13-76 months). The 1-year and 3-year PFS was 100% and 62.5%, respectively. Two patients (14.3%) in group II had severe late toxicity (G3). Conclusions High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy is a well-tolerated treatment option in selected patients with advanced or recurrent vulvar cancer. It is a safe and effective treatment modality for advanced and recurrent vulvar cancer, yielding good local control with acceptable late treatment related side effects. In our study, patients with recurrent vulvar cancer had better results in HDR-ISBT treatment, probably because of the smaller tumor volume. This

  7. A structured review of health utility measures and elicitation in advanced/metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yanni; Wolfram, Verena; Cook, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Background Health utilities are increasingly incorporated in health economic evaluations. Different elicitation methods, direct and indirect, have been established in the past. This study examined the evidence on health utility elicitation previously reported in advanced/metastatic breast cancer and aimed to link these results to requirements of reimbursement bodies. Methods Searches were conducted using a detailed search strategy across several electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and EconLit databases), online sources (Cost-effectiveness Analysis Registry and the Health Economics Research Center), and web sites of health technology assessment (HTA) bodies. Publications were selected based on the search strategy and the overall study objectives. Results A total of 768 publications were identified in the searches, and 26 publications, comprising 18 journal articles and eight submissions to HTA bodies, were included in the evidence review. Most journal articles derived utilities from the European Quality of Life Five-Dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D). Other utility measures, such as the direct methods standard gamble (SG), time trade-off (TTO), and visual analog scale (VAS), were less frequently used. Several studies described mapping algorithms to generate utilities from disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL) instruments such as European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire – Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30), European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire – Breast Cancer 23 (EORTC QLQ-BR23), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy – General questionnaire (FACT-G), and Utility-Based Questionnaire-Cancer (UBQ-C); most used EQ-5D as the reference. Sociodemographic factors that affect health utilities, such as age, sex, income, and education, as well as disease progression, choice of utility elicitation method, and country settings, were identified

  8. Tanespimycin in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Leukemia or Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Osteosarcoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma

  9. Efficacy and safety of oxaliplatin, bevacizumab and oral S-1 for advanced recurrent colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shuji; Shimazaki, Jiro; Morishita, Keiichi; Koike, Nobusada; Harada, Nobuhiko; Hayashi, Tsuneo; Suzuki, Mamoru

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of co-administration of oral S-1 and oxaliplatin (SOX) in combination with bevacizumab (bev) in patients with advanced recurrent colorectal cancer. A retrospective study of 36 patients with advanced recurrent colorectal cancer was performed, of whom 27 received first-line and 9 received second-line SOX+bev chemotherapy between 2010 and 2013 at the Hachioji Digestive Disease Hospital (Hachioji, Japan). The SOX+bev regimen consisted of administration of intravenous oxaliplatin (85 mg/m(2)) on days 1 and 14, bevacizumab (5 mg/kg) on day 1, and co-administration of oral S-1 twice daily on days 1-14. The drug regimen was repeated every 4 weeks. SOX+bev treatment was associated with a response rate of 45.2%, a disease control rate of 71%, and a median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of 9.9 and 21.9 months, respectively. Patients who received first-line chemotherapy benefited from treatment in terms of prolonged PFS (13.8 months) and OS (28.2 months). Grade 3/4 adverse events were infrequent and included anaemia, thrombocytopenia, anorexia, diarrhea, sensory neuropathy, increased aspartate aminotransferase level and skin rash. In conclusion, SOX+bev therapy was found to be feasible and safe for patients with advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

  10. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-13

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  11. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Controlling Severe Bleeding From Recurrent Locally-Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Şefika; Akçe, Bülent; Kılıçkesmez, Özgür; Gürsü, Rıza Umar; Çakır, Mehmet Semih; Nazlı, Mehmet Ali; Aren, Acar

    2016-01-01

    One of the rare but most challenging issues in the management of the locally-advanced breast cancer (LABC) is life-threatening bleeding from the fungating and/or ulcerating focus (foci) of these tumors. Breast surgeons may need the assistance of interventional radiologists to solve this urgent condition if surgery cannot provide sufficient benefit. Herein, we report a case of recurrent locally-advanced breast cancer that presented with sudden severe bleeding, which was stopped by an interventional radiologist via transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). In addition, we evaluate the role of interventional radiology in patients with breast cancer who present with bleeding from the breast by reviewing the relevant literature.

  12. Veliparib and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-04

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  13. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Progressive Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-14

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma; WDHA Syndrome

  14. Pembrolizumab and Lenvatinib in Treating Metastatic or Recurrent Differentiated Thyroid Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Columnar Cell Variant Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Follicular Variant Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Tall Cell Variant Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Oncocytic Follicular Carcinoma

  15. Recurrent and pathological gene fusions in breast cancer: current advances in genomic discovery and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Veeraraghavan, Jamunarani; Ma, Jiacheng; Hu, Yiheng; Wang, Xiao-Song

    2016-07-01

    Gene fusions have long been considered principally as the oncogenic events of hematologic malignancies, but have recently gained wide attention in solid tumors due to several milestone discoveries and the advancement of deep sequencing technologies. With the progress in deep sequencing studies of breast cancer transcriptomes and genomes, the discovery of recurrent and pathological gene fusions in breast cancer is on the focus. Recently, driven by new deep sequencing studies, several recurrent or pathological gene fusions have been identified in breast cancer, including ESR1-CCDC170, SEC16A-NOTCH1, SEC22B-NOTCH2, and ESR1-YAP1 etc. More important, most of these gene fusions are preferentially identified in the more aggressive breast cancers, such as luminal B, basal-like, or endocrine-resistant breast cancer, suggesting recurrent gene fusions as additional key driver events in these tumors other than the known drivers such as the estrogen receptor. In this paper, we have comprehensively summarized the newly identified recurrent or pathological gene fusion events in breast cancer, reviewed the contributions of new genomic and deep sequencing technologies to new fusion discovery and the integrative bioinformatics tools to analyze these data, highlighted the biological relevance and clinical implications of these fusion discoveries, and discussed future directions of gene fusion research in breast cancer.

  16. Development and validation of a risk score for advanced colorectal adenoma recurrence after endoscopic resection

    PubMed Central

    Facciorusso, Antonio; Di Maso, Marianna; Serviddio, Gaetano; Vendemiale, Gianluigi; Muscatiello, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To develop and validate a risk score for advanced colorectal adenoma (ACA) recurrence after endoscopic polypectomy. METHODS: Out of 3360 patients who underwent colon polypectomy at University of Foggia between 2004 and 2008, data of 843 patients with 1155 ACAs was retrospectively reviewed. Surveillance intervals were scheduled by guidelines at 3 years and primary endpoint was considered 3-year ACA recurrence. Baseline clinical parameters and the main features of ACAs were entered into a Cox regression analysis and variables with P < 0.05 in the univariate analysis were then tested as candidate variables into a stepwise Cox regression model (conditional backward selection). The regression coefficients of the Cox regression model were multiplied by 2 and rounded in order to obtain easy to use point numbers facilitating the calculation of the score. To avoid overoptimistic results due to model fitting and evaluation in the same dataset, we performed an internal 10-fold cross-validation by means of bootstrap sampling. RESULTS: Median lesion size was 16 mm (12-23) while median number of adenomas was 2.5 (1-3), whereof the number of ACAs was 1.5 (1-2). At 3 years after polypectomy, recurrence was observed in 229 ACAs (19.8%), of which 157 (13.5%) were metachronous neoplasms and 72 (6.2%) local recurrences. Multivariate analysis, after exclusion of the variable “type of resection” due to its collinearity with other predictive factors, confirmed lesion size, number of ACAs and grade of dysplasia as significantly associated to the primary outcome. The score was then built by multiplying the regression coefficients times 2 and the cut-off point 5 was selected by means of a Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis. In particular, 248 patients with 365 ACAs fell in the higher-risk group (score ≥ 5) where 3-year recurrence was detected in 174 ACAs (47.6%) whereas the remaining 595 patients with 690 ACAs were included in the low-risk group (score < 5) where 3

  17. A Trial of PT2977 Tablets In Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-22

    Advanced Solid Tumors; Solid Tumor; Solid Carcinoma; Solid Tumor, Adult; ccRCC; RCC, Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; RCC; Kidney Cancer; Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma; Renal Cell Carcinoma, Metastatic; Renal Cell Carcinoma Recurrent; Renal Cell Carcinoma, Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma

  18. Scoring of Prognostic Parameters in Patients with Unresectable Advanced or Recurrent Colorectal Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ikeguchi, Masahide; Shimoda, Ryugo; Yamamoto, Manabu; Maeta, Yoshihiko; Ashida, Keigo; Saito, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    Background Suitable chemotherapy is needed to prolong the survival of patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer. We scored the periodical changes of several prognostic markers during chemotherapy in patients with this type of cancer to discern the effectiveness of chemotherapy. Methods Twenty consecutive patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer were enrolled. All patients underwent combination chemotherapy with oxaliplatin or irinotecan plus 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin. Neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR), serum C-reactive protein (CRP), serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and serum albumin (ALB) were compared between the two periods (before chemotherapy and 3 months after it was started) in each patient. The scoring system was as follows: points are added when a patient shows a decrease of NLR, CRP and CEA and an increase of ALB at 3 months after the start of chemotherapy with a possible final score of +4. On the other hand, points are reduced if a patient shows an elevation of NLR, CRP and CEA and a decrease of ALB at 3 months after the start of chemotherapy with a possible final score of −4. Results At 3 months after the start of first line chemotherapy, 13 patients showed positive scores but 7 patients showed zero or minus scores. According to our scoring system, we found the mean survival time (MST) of the 13 patients with plus scores was 34 months and this was significantly better than that of the 7 patients who showed zero or minus scores (P = 0.0008). Conclusion Our new scoring system is useful but when we find that first line chemotherapy is ineffective, we need to change it to second line chemotherapy as soon as possible. That may be the best treatment for patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer. PMID:24179314

  19. Carboplatin and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride With or Without ATR Kinase Inhibitor VX-970 in Treating Patients With Recurrent and Metastatic Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    High Grade Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Tumor; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  20. Clinical benefit of nanoparticle albumin-bound-paclitaxel in recurrent/metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma resistant to cremophor-based paclitaxel or docetaxel.

    PubMed

    Ley, Jessica; Wildes, Tanya M; Daly, Kristin; Oppelt, Peter; Adkins, Douglas

    2017-02-01

    The clinical benefit of nab-paclitaxel monotherapy for recurrent/metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (RM-HNSCC) that progressed on other taxanes (cremophor-based paclitaxel or docetaxel) is unknown. A retrospective analysis of patients treated at a single institution with nab-paclitaxel for taxane-resistant RM-HNSCC. The exploratory hypothesis was that nab-paclitaxel would result in clinical benefit (tumor response) in patients with taxane-resistant RM-HNSCC. Twelve patients who were treated with nab-paclitaxel monotherapy for taxane-resistant RM-HNSCC and met all eligibility criteria were identified. The majority of patients (n = 9; 75%) received three or more lines of therapy for RM-HNSCC. All patients had platin-resistant, and ten patients (83%) had cetuximab-resistant disease. Patients had RM-HNSCC that progressed on cremophor-based paclitaxel (8), docetaxel (1), or both (3). With prior taxane, the best tumor response was partial (PR) in 4 patients (33%), stable (SD) in 3 (25%), and progression in 5 (42%). The median time-to-progression (TTP) with prior taxane was 1.7 (range 0.7-9.0) months. The median interval from last dose of taxane to first dose of nab-paclitaxel was 3 (0.7-31.3) months. With nab-paclitaxel, tumor response occurred in two patients (17%; PR in both) and disease control (PR and SD) occurred in five (42%). Median TTP with nab-paclitaxel was 2.1 months (range 0.6-6.2), and median overall survival was 4.9 months (range 1.9-13.5). nab-Paclitaxel provided clinical benefit in some patients with taxane-resistant RM-HNSCC. The median TTP with nab-paclitaxel and with prior taxane were similar. This exploratory observation warrants further investigation in prospective studies.

  1. High dry bean intake and reduced risk of advanced colorectal adenoma recurrence among participants in the polyp prevention trial.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Elaine; Hartman, Terryl J; Albert, Paul S; Shields, Rusty; Slattery, Martha; Caan, Bette; Paskett, Electra; Iber, Frank; Kikendall, James Walter; Lance, Peter; Daston, Cassandra; Schatzkin, Arthur

    2006-07-01

    Adequate fruit and vegetable intake was suggested to protect against colorectal cancer and colorectal adenomas; however, several recent prospective studies reported no association. We examined the association between fruits and vegetables and adenomatous polyp recurrence in the Polyp Prevention Trial (PPT). The PPT was a low-fat, high-fiber, high-fruit, and vegetable dietary intervention trial of adenoma recurrence, in which there were no differences in the rate of adenoma recurrence in participants in the intervention and control arms of the trial. In this analysis of the entire PPT trial-based cohort, multiple logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) of advanced and nonadvanced adenoma recurrence within quartiles of baseline and change (baseline minus the mean over 3 y) in fruit and vegetable intake, after adjustment for age, total energyy intake, use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, BMI, and gender. There were no significant associations between nonadvanced adenoma recurrence and overall change in fruit and vegetable consumption; however, those in the highest quartile of change in dry bean intake (greatest increase) compared with those in the lowest had a significantly reduced OR for advanced adenoma recurrence (OR = 0.35; 95% CI, 0.18-0.69; P for trend = 0.001). The median in the highest quartile of change in dry bean intake was 370% higher than the baseline intake. The PPT trial-based cohort provides evidence that dry beans may be inversely associated with advanced adenoma recurrence.

  2. Molecular Evolution Patterns in Metastatic Lymph Nodes Reflect the Differential Treatment Response of Advanced Primary Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Um, Sang-Won; Joung, Je-Gun; Lee, Hyun; Kim, Hojoong; Kim, Kyu-Tae; Park, Jinha; Hayes, D Neil; Park, Woong-Yang

    2016-11-15

    Tumor heterogeneity influences the clinical outcome of patients with cancer, and the diagnostic method to measure the tumor heterogeneity needs to be developed. We analyzed genomic features on pairs of primary and multiple metastatic lymph nodes from six patients with lung cancer using whole-exome sequencing and RNA sequencing. Although somatic single-nucleotide variants were shared in primary lung cancer and metastases, tumor evolution predicted by the pattern of genomic alterations was matched to anatomic location of the tumors. Four of six cases exhibited a branched clonal evolution pattern. Lymph nodes with acquired somatic variants demonstrated resistance to the cancer treatment. In this study, we demonstrated that multiple biopsies and sequencing strategies for different tumor regions are required for a comprehensive understanding of the landscape of genetic alteration and for guiding targeted therapy in advanced primary lung cancer. Cancer Res; 76(22); 6568-76. ©2016 AACR.

  3. [The usefulness and adverse events of bevacizumab combined with chemotherapy against advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Oga, Junichi; Sakata, Makiko; Sato, Sumito; Matsumura, Naoki; Hatakeyama, Toshiyuki; Nagayama, Hiroyuki; Sakurai, Osamu; Ishida, Yasuo; Hataya, Kiyoshi

    2010-06-01

    We examined clinical results of 35 patients on bevacizumab(BV)combined with chemotherapy at our hospital. The subjects were 35 patients with advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer who received BV combined with chemotherapy for approximately 2 years. Their median age was 66 years(41 to 86 years), PS was 2 or less for all; it was first-line therapy in 21 patients, second-line in 12 patients and thirdline in 2 patients. The concomitant chemotherapy was mFOLFOX 6 in 24 / patients, 5-FU/LV in 8 patients and FOLFIRI in 3 patients. Therapeutic efficacy was CR in 2 patients, PR in 10 patients, and the overall response rate was 35%. There were 7 adverse events of Grade 3 or higher, among which 4 events were leucopenia. Neither overall survival nor any concomitant chemotherapy reached the median periods. Moreover, the median periods of / progression-free survival in mFOLFOX6/FOLFIRI were 191 days. BV combined with chemotherapy should be actively introduced as first-line therapy against advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer because of its high therapeutic efficacy.

  4. Sirolimus, Docetaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Metastatic Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-10

    Castration Levels of Testosterone; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; PSA Progression; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  5. Stereotactic Radiosurgery Using CyberKnife in Treating Women With Advanced or Recurrent Gynecological Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Recurrent Vulvar Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IV Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer

  6. Advances and new perspectives in the treatment of metastatic colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Recondo, Gonzalo Jr; Díaz-Cantón, Enrique; de la Vega, Máximo; Greco, Martin; Recondo, Gonzalo Sr; Valsecchi, Matias E

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade we have witnessed an unprecedented outburst of new treatment approaches for the management of metastatic colon cancer. Anti-angiogenic drugs, epidermal growth factor receptor blockers and multi-kinase inhibitors have all resulted in small but consistent improvement in clinical outcomes. However, this progress has paradoxically leaded us into new challenges. In many cases the clinical development was done in parallel and the lack of head-to-head comparison evolved into circumstances where several valid new “standards of care” are available. Even though desirable in essence, the availability of many options as well as different possible combinations frequently leaves the busy clinician in the difficult situation of having to choose between one or the other, sometimes without solid evidence to support each decision. In addition, progress never stops and new agents are continuously tested. For these reason this review will try to summarize all the clinical trials that constitute the theoretical framework that support our daily practice but will also procure the reader with rational answers to common clinical dilemmas by critically appraising the current literature. Lastly, we will provide with a compilation of promising new agents that may soon become our next line of defense against this deadly disease. PMID:25024813

  7. Boron neutron capture therapy outcomes for advanced or recurrent head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Minoru; Kato, Ituro; Aihara, Teruhito; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Yoshimura, Kenichi; Niimi, Miyuki; Kimura, Yoshihiro; Ariyoshi, Yasunori; Haginomori, Shin-Ichi; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kinashi, Yuko; Masunaga, Shin-Ichiro; Fukushima, Masanori; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We retrospectively review outcomes of applying boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) to unresectable advanced or recurrent head and neck cancers. Patients who were treated with BNCT for either local recurrent or newly diagnosed unresectable head or neck cancers between December 2001 and September 2007 were included. Clinicopathological characteristics and clinical outcomes were retrieved from hospital records. Either a combination of borocaptate sodium and boronophenylalanine (BPA) or BPA alone were used as boron compounds. In all the treatment cases, the dose constraint was set to deliver a dose <10-12 Gy-eq to the skin or oral mucosa. There was a patient cohort of 62, with a median follow-up of 18.7 months (range, 0.7-40.8). A total of 87 BNCT procedures were performed. The overall response rate was 58% within 6 months after BNCT. The median survival time was 10.1 months from the time of BNCT. The 1- and 2-year overall survival (OS) rates were 43.1% and 24.2%, respectively. The major acute Grade 3 or 4 toxicities were hyperamylasemia (38.6%), fatigue (6.5%), mucositis/stomatitis (9.7%) and pain (9.7%), all of which were manageable. Three patients died of treatment-related toxicity. Three patients experienced carotid artery hemorrhage, two of whom had coexistent infection of the carotid artery. This study confirmed the feasibility of our dose-estimation method and that controlled trials are warranted.

  8. A randomized, phase II study of afatinib versus cetuximab in metastatic or recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck†

    PubMed Central

    Seiwert, T. Y.; Fayette, J.; Cupissol, D.; del Campo, J. M.; Clement, P. M.; Hitt, R.; Degardin, M.; Zhang, W.; Blackman, A.; Ehrnrooth, E.; Cohen, E. E. W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Afatinib is an oral, irreversible ErbB family blocker that has shown activity in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutated lung cancer. We hypothesized that the agent would have greater antitumor activity compared with cetuximab in recurrent or metastatic (R/M) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients, whose disease has progressed after platinum-containing therapy. Patients and methods An open-label, randomized, phase II trial was conducted in 43 centers; 124 patients were randomized (1 : 1) to either afatinib (50 mg/day) or cetuximab (250 mg/m2/week) until disease progression or intolerable adverse events (AEs) (stage I), with optional crossover (stage II). The primary end point was tumor shrinkage before crossover assessed by investigator (IR) and independent central review (ICR). Results A total of 121 patients were treated (61 afatinib, 60 cetuximab) and 68 crossed over to stage II (32 and 36 respectively). In stage I, mean tumor shrinkage by IR/ICR was 10.4%/16.6% with afatinib and 5.4%/10.1% with cetuximab (P = 0.46/0.30). Objective response rate was 16.1%/8.1% with afatinib and 6.5%/9.7% with cetuximab (IR/ICR). Comparable disease control rates were observed with afatinib (50%) and cetuximab (56.5%) by IR; similar results were seen by ICR. Most common grade ≥3 drug-related AEs (DRAEs) were rash/acne (18% versus 8.3%), diarrhea (14.8% versus 0%), and stomatitis/mucositis (11.5% versus 0%) with afatinib and cetuximab, respectively. Patients with DRAEs leading to treatment discontinuation were 23% with afatinib and 5% with cetuximab. In stage II, disease control rate (IR/ICR) was 38.9%/33.3% with afatinib and 18.8%/18.8% with cetuximab. Conclusion Afatinib showed antitumor activity comparable to cetuximab in R/M HNSCC in this exploratory phase II trial, although more patients on afatinib discontinued treatment due to AEs. Sequential EGFR/ErbB treatment with afatinib and cetuximab provided sustained clinical benefit in patients

  9. Phase II Study of Temsirolimus in Women With Recurrent or Metastatic Endometrial Cancer: A Trial of the NCIC Clinical Trials Group

    PubMed Central

    Oza, Amit M.; Elit, Laurie; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Biagi, Jim; Provencher, Diane Michele; Gotlieb, Walter H.; Hoskins, Paul J.; Ghatage, Prafull; Tonkin, Katia S.; Mackay, Helen J.; Mazurka, John; Sederias, Joana; Ivy, Percy; Dancey, Janet E.; Eisenhauer, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is a tumor suppressor gene, and loss of function mutations are common and appear to be important in the pathogenesis of endometrial carcinomas. Loss of PTEN causes deregulated phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/serine-threonine kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/Akt/mTOR) signaling which may provide neoplastic cells with a selective survival advantage by enhancing angiogenesis, protein translation, and cell cycle progression. Temsirolimus, an ester derivative of rapamycin that inhibits mTOR, was evaluated in this setting. Patients and Methods Sequential phase II studies evaluated single-agent activity of temsirolimus in women with recurrent or metastatic chemotherapy-naive or chemotherapy-treated endometrial cancer. Temsirolimus 25 mg intravenously was administered weekly in 4-week cycles. Results In the chemotherapy-naive group, 33 patients received a median of four cycles (range, one to 23 cycles). Of the 29 patients evaluable for response, four (14%) had an independently confirmed partial response and 20 (69%) had stable disease as best response, with a median duration of 5.1 months (range, 3.7 to 18.4 months) and 9.7 months (range, 2.1 to 14.6 months). Only five patients (18%) had progressive disease. In the chemotherapy-treated group, 27 patients received a median of three cycles (range, one to six cycles). Of the 25 patients evaluable for response, one (4%) had an independently confirmed partial response, and 12 patients (48%) had stable disease, with a median duration of 4.3 months (range, 3.6 to 4.9 months) and 3.7 months (range, 2.4 to 23.2 months). PTEN loss (immunohistochemistry and mutational analysis) and molecular markers of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway did not correlate with the clinical outcome. Conclusion mTOR inhibition with temsirolimus has encouraging single-agent activity in endometrial cancer which is higher in chemotherapy-naive patients than in chemotherapy-treated patients and is independent of PTEN

  10. Phase II trial of dasatinib for recurrent or metastatic c-KIT expressing adenoid cystic carcinoma and for nonadenoid cystic malignant salivary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wong, S. J.; Karrison, T.; Hayes, D. N.; Kies, M. S.; Cullen, K. J.; Tanvetyanon, T.; Argiris, A.; Takebe, N.; Lim, D.; Saba, N. F.; Worden, F. P.; Gilbert, J.; Lenz, H. J.; Razak, A. R. A.; Roberts, J. D.; Vokes, E. E.; Cohen, E. E. W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a subtype of malignant salivary gland tumors (MSGT), in which 90% of cases express cKIT. Dasatinib is a potent and selective inhibitor of five oncogenic protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs)/kinase families including cKIT. We conducted a phase II study to determine the antitumor activity of dasatinib in ACC and non-ACC MSGT. Patients and methods In a two-stage design, patients with progressive, recurrent/metastatic ACC (+cKIT) and non-ACC MSGT (separate cohort) were treated with dasatinib 70 mg p.o. b.i.d. Response was assessed every 8 weeks using RECIST. Results Of 54 patients: 40 ACC, 14 non-ACC (1, ineligible excluded); M:F = 28 : 26, median age 56 years (range 20–82 years), ECOG performance status 0 : 1 : 2 = 24 : 28 : 2, prior radiation: 44, prior chemotherapy: 21. The most frequent adverse events (AEs) (as % of patients, worst grade 2 or higher) were: fatigue (28%), nausea (19%), headache (15%), lymphopenia (7%), dyspnea (11%), alanine aminotransferase increased (7%), anorexia (7%), vomiting (7%), alkaline phosphatase increased (6%), diarrhea (6%), neutropenia (6%), and noncardiac chest pain (6%). No grade 4 AE occurred, 15 patients experienced a grade 3 AE, primarily dyspnea (5) and fatigue (4), and cardiac toxicity (1 prolonged QTc). Among ACC patients, best response to dasatinib: 1 patient (2.5%) had partial response, 20 patients (50%) had stable disease (SD) (3–14 months), 12 patients (30%) had PD, 2 withdrew, 3 discontinued therapy due to AE, and 2 died before cycle 2. Median progression-free survival was 4.8 months. Median overall survival was 14.5 months. For 14 assessable non-ACC patients, none had objective response, triggering early stopping rule. Seven had SD (range 1–7 months), 4 PD, 2 discontinued therapy due to AE, and 1 died before cycle 2. Conclusion Although there was only one objective response, dasatinib is well tolerated, with tumor stabilization achieved by 50% of ACC patients. Dasatinib

  11. Oncolytic Reovirus in Combination With Chemotherapy in Metastatic or Recurrent Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients With KRAS-Activated Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Villalona-Calero, Miguel A.; Lam, Elaine; Otterson, Gregory A.; Zhao, Weiqiang; Timmons, Matthew; Subramaniam, Deepa; Hade, Erinn M.; Gill, George M.; Coffey, Matthew; Selvaggi, Giovanni; Bertino, Erin; Chao, Bo; Knopp, Michael V.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The type 3 Dearing reovirus (Reolysin) is a naturally occurring virus that preferentially infects and causes oncolysis in tumor cells with a Ras-activated pathway. It induces host immunity and cell cycle arrest and acts synergistically with cytotoxic agents. METHODS This study evaluated Reolysin combined with paclitaxel and carboplatin in patients with metastatic/recurrent KRAS-mutated or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–mutated/amplified non–small cell lung cancer. RESULTS Thirty-seven patients were treated. Molecular alterations included 20 KRAS mutations, 10 EGFR amplifications, 3 EGFR mutations, and 4 BRAF-V600E mutations. In total, 242 cycles (median, 4; range, 1-47) were completed. The initial doses were area under the curve (AUC) 6 mg/mL/min for carboplatin, 200 mg/m2 for paclitaxel on day 1, and 3×1010 50% tissue culture infective dose for Reolysin on days 1 to 5 of each 21-day cycle. Because of diarrhea and febrile neutropenia (in the first 2 patients), subsequent doses were reduced to 175 mg/m2 for paclitaxel and AUC 5 mg/mL/min for carboplatin. Toxicities included fatigue, diarrhea, nausea/vomiting, neutropenia, arthralgia/myalgia, anorexia, and electrolyte abnormalities. Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.0 responses included the following: partial response for 11 patients, stable disease (SD) for 20 patients, progressive disease for 4 patients, and not evaluable for 2 patients (objective response rate, 31%; 90% 1-sided lower confidence interval, 21%). Four SD patients had >40% positron emission tomography standardized uptake value reductions. The median progression-free survival, median overall survival, and 12-month overall survival rate were 4 months, 13.1 months, and 57%, respectively. Seven patients were alive after a median follow-up of 34.2 months; they included 2 patients without disease progression at 37 and 50 months. CONCLUSIONS Reolysin in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin was well tolerated. The

  12. Vorinostat and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Nasopharyngeal Cancer or Nasal Natural Killer T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-10

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Undifferentiated Carcinoma AJCC v7

  13. Copanlisib in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-20

    Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mixed Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Metastatic Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma

  14. Role of salvage radiotherapy for regional lymph node recurrence after radical surgery in advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byoung Hyuck; Kim, Jae-Sung; Kim, Hyung-Ho; Park, Do Joong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the role of salvage radiotherapy (RT) for the treatment of regional lymph node recurrence (RLNR) after radical surgery in advanced gastric cancer. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed medical records of 26 patients who underwent salvage treatment after diagnosis of RLNR between 2006 and 2011. Patients with peritoneal seeding or distant metastasis were excluded. Eighteen patients received RT with or without chemotherapy and the other 8 did chemotherapy only without RT. A three-dimensional conformal RT was performed with median dose of 56 Gy (range, 44 to 60 Gy). Sixteen patients had fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy, 5 did taxane-based chemotherapy, and irinotecan was applied in 4. Results With a median follow-up of 20 months (range, 5 to 57 months), median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) after diagnosis of RLNR were 29 months and 12 months in the entire patients, respectively. Radiotherapy (p = 0.007) and disease-free interval (p = 0.033) were statistically significant factors for OS in multivariate analysis. Median OS was 36 months in patients who received RT and 16 months in those who did not. Furthermore, delivery of RT (p < 0.001), complete remission after salvage treatment (p = 0.040) and performance status (p = 0.023) were associated with a significantly better PFS. Gastrointestinal toxicities from RT were mild in most patients. Conclusion Salvage RT combined with systemic chemotherapy may be an effective treatment managing RLNR from advanced gastric cancer. PMID:24137560

  15. Vaccine Therapy and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Hormone-Resistant, Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-23

    Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  16. Emergence of chemoresistance in a metastatic basal cell carcinoma patient after complete response to hedgehog pathway inhibitor vismodegib (GDC-0449).

    PubMed

    Meani, Rowena E; Lim, Shueh-Wen; Chang, Anne Lynn S; Kelly, John W

    2014-08-01

    Vismodegib (GDC-0449, Genentech, USA), a small molecule inhibitor of the Hedgehog signalling pathway, has potent anti-tumour activity in advanced basal cell carcinoma (BCC). We report a case of a 67-year-old Australian man with metastatic BCC including pulmonary disease with malignant effusion who showed a dramatic complete response to vismodegib but subsequently experienced a recurrence of pulmonary disease, indicative of chemoresistance to vismodegib. This case is the first to illustrate chemoresistance in a patient with metastatic BCC, and demonstrates the need for closely monitoring metastatic BCC patients even after an apparently complete response.

  17. Afatinib versus methotrexate in older patients with second-line recurrent and/or metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: subgroup analysis of the LUX-Head & Neck 1 trial†

    PubMed Central

    Clement, P. M.; Gauler, T.; Machiels, J. P.; Haddad, R. I.; Fayette, J.; Licitra, L. F.; Tahara, M.; Cohen, E. E. W.; Cupissol, D.; Grau, J. J.; Guigay, J.; Caponigro, F.; de Castro, G.; de Souza Viana, L.; Keilholz, U.; del Campo, J. M.; Cong, X. J.; Ehrnrooth, E.; Vermorken, J. B.

    2016-01-01

    Background In the phase III LUX-Head & Neck 1 (LHN1) trial, afatinib significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) versus methotrexate in recurrent and/or metastatic (R/M) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients progressing on/after platinum-based therapy. This report evaluates afatinib efficacy and safety in prespecified subgroups of patients aged ≥65 and <65 years. Patients and methods Patients were randomized (2:1) to 40 mg/day oral afatinib or 40 mg/m2/week intravenous methotrexate. PFS was the primary end point; overall survival (OS) was the key secondary end point. Other end points included: objective response rate (ORR), patient-reported outcomes, tumor shrinkage, and safety. Disease control rate (DCR) was also assessed. Results Of 483 randomized patients, 27% (83 afatinib; 45 methotrexate) were aged ≥65 years (older) and 73% (239 afatinib; 116 methotrexate) <65 years (younger) at study entry. Similar PFS benefit with afatinib versus methotrexate was observed in older {median 2.8 versus 2.3 months, hazard ratio (HR) = 0.68 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.45–1.03], P = 0.061} and younger patients [2.6 versus 1.6 months, HR = 0.79 (0.62–1.01), P = 0.052]. In older and younger patients, the median OS with afatinib versus methotrexate was 7.3 versus 6.4 months [HR = 0.84 (0.54–1.31)] and 6.7 versus 6.2 months [HR = 0.98 (0.76–1.28)]. ORRs with afatinib versus methotrexate were 10.8% versus 6.7% and 10.0% versus 5.2%; DCRs were 53.0% versus 37.8% and 47.7% versus 38.8% in older and younger patients, respectively. In both subgroups, the most frequent treatment-related adverse events were rash/acne (73%–77%) and diarrhea (70%–80%) with afatinib, and stomatitis (43%) and fatigue (31%–34%) with methotrexate. Fewer treatment-related discontinuations were observed with afatinib (each subgroup 7% versus 16%). A trend toward improved time to deterioration of global health status, pain, and swallowing with afatinib was observed in

  18. Pertuzumab in combination with trastuzumab and docetaxel for the treatment of HER2-positive metastatic or locally recurrent unresectable breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fleeman, Nigel; Bagust, Adrian; Beale, Sophie; Dwan, Kerry; Dickson, Rumona; Proudlove, Chris; Dundar, Yenal

    2015-01-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of pertuzumab (Roche) to submit evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of pertuzumab + trastuzumab + docetaxel for the treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (HER2+) metastatic or locally recurrent unresectable breast cancer in accordance with the Institute's Single Technology Appraisal (STA) process. The Liverpool Reviews and Implementation Group (LRiG) at the University of Liverpool was commissioned to act as the Evidence Review Group (ERG). This article summarises the ERG's review of the evidence submitted by the manufacturer and provides a summary of the Appraisal Committee's (AC) initial decision. At the time of writing, final guidance had not been published by NICE. The clinical evidence was mainly derived from an ongoing phase III randomised double-blind placebo-controlled international multicentre clinical trial (CLEOPATRA), designed to evaluate efficacy and safety in 808 patients, which compared pertuzumab + trastuzumab + docetaxel (pertuzumab arm) with placebo + trastuzumab + docetaxel (control arm). Both progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were analysed at two data cut-off points-May 2011 (median follow-up of 18 months) and May 2012 (median follow-up of 30 months). At both time points, PFS was significantly longer in the pertuzumab arm (18.5 months compared with 12.4 months in the control arm at the first data cut-off point and 18.7 versus 12.4 months at the second data cut-off point). Assessment of OS benefit suggested an improvement for patients in the pertuzumab arm with a strong trend towards an OS benefit at the second data cut-off point; however, due to the immaturity of the OS data, the magnitude of the OS benefit was uncertain. Importantly, cardiotoxicity was not increased in patients treated with a combination of pertuzumab + trastuzumab + docetaxel. The ERG's main concern with the

  19. A Case of Metastatic Melanoma in the Ureter

    PubMed Central

    Hossack, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Advances in the treatment of melanoma are resulting in patients living for extended periods after being diagnosed with metastatic disease. Metastases to the ureter are rare, but they have been described in the literature on a number of occasions. In this case report, we describe a patient with established metastatic melanoma who, whilst taking and responding to immunomodulatory therapy, was found to have an obstructive mass in the middle of his left ureter. Rather than performing either a nephroureterectomy or partial resection of the ureter, we opted to perform an endoscopic resection of the melanoma. Follow-up imaging at 12 months shows no evidence of local disease recurrence. We submit that primary endoscopic management of metastatic melanoma in the ureter is a viable alternative to a radical approach. PMID:27818830

  20. Wnt3a expression is associated with MMP-9 expression in primary tumor and metastatic site in recurrent or stage IV colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is known to affect in cancer oncogenesis and progression by interacting with the tumor microenvironment. However, the roles of wnt3a and wnt5a in colorectal cancer (CRC) have not been thoroughly studied. In the present study, we investigated the expression of wnt protein and the concordance rate in primary tumor and metastatic sites in CRC. To determine the relationship of wnt proteins with invasion related protein, we also analyzed the association between wnt protein expression and the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2). Methods Tumor tissue was obtained from eighty-three paraffin- embedded blocks which were using resected tissue from both the primary tumor and metastatic sites for each patient. We performed immunohistochemical staining for wnt3a, wnt5a, β-catenin, MMP-9 and VEGFR-2. Results Wnt3a, wnt5a, β-catenin, and MMP-9 expression was high; the proteins were found in over 50% of the primary tumors, but the prevalence was lower in tissue from metastatic sites. The concordance rates between the primary tumor and metastatic site were 76.2% for wnt5a and 79.4% for wnt3a and β-catenin, but VEGFR-2 was expressed in 67.4% of the metastatic sites even when not found in the primary tumor. Wnt3a expression in primary tumors was significantly associated with lymph node involvement (p = 0.038) and MMP-9 expression in the primary tumor (p = 0.0387), mesenchyme adjacent to tumor (p = 0.022) and metastatic site (p = 0.004). There was no other relationship in the expression of these proteins. Vascular invasion in primary tumor tissue may be a potential prognostic marker for liver metastasis, but no significant association was observed among the wnt protein, MMP-9, and VEGFR-2 for peritoneal seeding. In survival analysis, β-catenin expression was significantly correlated with overall survival (p = 0.05). Conclusions Wnt3a and wnt5a

  1. Upregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in advanced gastric cancer contributes to bone metastatic osteolysis by inducing long pentraxin 3

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Bongkun; Lee, Eun-Jin; Shin, Min-Kyung; Park, Young Soo; Ryu, Min-Hee; Kim, Sang-Min; Kim, Eun-Young; Lee, Hyung Keun; Chang, Eun-Ju

    2016-01-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) activates its receptor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB; also called NTRK2) that has been shown to promote the malignant progression of several cancers. In this study, we investigated the clinical and biological significance of the BDNF/TrkB axis in the progression of human gastric cancer. The increased co-expression of the BDNF/TrkB axis was significantly correlated with bone metastatic properties in advanced gastric cancers. BDNF acting via TrkB receptors increased the levels of long pentraxin 3 (PTX3) that was related to bone metastatic status of gastric cancer by enhancing gastric cancer–osteoblastic niche interactions. In bone metastatic gastric cancer, PTX3 knockdown using small interfering RNA significantly inhibited BDNF-induced interactions of cancer cells with osteoblasts. Moreover, BDNF-derived PTX3 induction supported subsequent osteoclastogenesis, and this effect was significantly reversed by PTX3 silencing. These findings suggest that a functional interaction between BDNF/TrkB and PTX3 enhances the osteolysis of bone metastatic gastric cancer, thereby providing potential prognostic factors for the development of bone metastasis of gastric cancer. PMID:27458153

  2. Molecularly targeted therapies for advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Soley; Rocha-Lima, Caio M

    2013-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains the leading cause of cancer-related death in both men and women in the United States. Platinum-based doublet chemotherapy has been a standard for patients with advanced stage disease. Improvements in overall survival and quality of life have been modest. Improved knowledge of the aberrant molecular signaling pathways found in NSCLC has led to the development of biomarkers with associated targeted therapeutics, thus changing the treatment paradigm for many NSCLC patients. In this review, we present a summary of many of the currently investigated biologic targets in NSCLC, discuss their current clinical trial status, and also discuss the potential for development of other targeted agents. PMID:23696960

  3. Bortezomib With or Without Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  4. Sorafenib Tosylate and Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Unresectable, or Metastatic Gallbladder Cancer or Cholangiocarcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Extrahepatic Bile Duct Adenocarcinoma; Gallbladder Adenocarcinoma; Gallbladder Adenocarcinoma With Squamous Metaplasia; Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Recurrent Gallbladder Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Gallbladder Carcinoma; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Unresectable Gallbladder Carcinoma

  5. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis on the Role of Chemotherapy in Advanced and Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumor (NET)

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Matthew H.; Lee, Adrian; Li, Bob T.; Lumba, Sumit; Clarke, Stephen J.; Samra, Jaswinder; Pavlakis, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives In the era of somatostatin analogues and targeted therapies, the role of chemotherapy in NET remains largely undefined. This systematic review aimed to assess the effect of chemotherapy on response rates (RR), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and toxicity compared to other chemotherapies/systemic therapies or best supportive care in patients with advanced or metastatic NET. Methods Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) from 1946 to 2015 were identified from MEDLINE, EMBASE, other databases and conference proceedings. Review of abstracts, quality assessment and data abstraction were performed independently by two investigators. Meta-analyses were conducted using Mantel-Haenszel analysis with random-effects modelling. Results Six RCTs comparing standard streptozotocin plus 5-fluorouacil (STZ/5FU) chemotherapy to other chemotherapy regimens, and 2 comparing this to interferon (IFN) were included. Only 1 study was considered at low risk of bias. STZ/5-FU was no different to other chemotherapies in response rate [RR 0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.72–1.27], PFS (RR 0.95; CI 0.81–1.13), or OS (RR 1.03; CI 0.77–1.39). IFN may produce higher response than STZ/5FU (RR 0.20; CI 0.04–1.13), but event rates were small and survival was no different. Interferon was associated with higher overall haematological (RR 0.47; CI 0.27–0.82) and lower overall renal toxicity (RR 3.61; CI 1.24–10.51). Conclusion Strong evidence is lacking in the area of chemotherapy in neuroendocrine tumors. There is currently no evidence that one chemotherapeutic regimen is significantly better than the other, nor is interferon better than chemotherapy. There is an urgent need to design RCTs comparing modern chemotherapy to other agents in NET. PMID:27362760

  6. U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval: crizotinib for treatment of advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer that is anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive.

    PubMed

    Malik, Shakun M; Maher, Virginia Ellen; Bijwaard, Karen E; Becker, Robert L; Zhang, Lijun; Tang, Shenghui W; Song, Pengfei; Liu, Qi; Marathe, Anshu; Gehrke, Brenda; Helms, Whitney; Hanner, Diane; Justice, Robert; Pazdur, Richard

    2014-04-15

    On August 26, 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved crizotinib (XALKORI Capsules, Pfizer Inc.) for treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that is anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive as detected by an FDA-approved test. The Vysis ALK Break-Apart FISH Probe Kit (Abbott Molecular, Inc.) was approved concurrently. In two multicenter, single-arm trials, patients with locally advanced or metastatic ALK-positive NSCLC previously treated with one or more systemic therapies received crizotinib orally at a dose of 250 mg twice daily. In 119 patients with ALK-positive NSCLC by local trial assay, the objective response rate (ORR) was 61% [95% confidence intervals (CI), 52%-70%] with a median response duration of 48 weeks. In 136 patients with ALK-positive NSCLC by the to-be-marketed test, the ORR was 50% (95% CI, 42%-59%) with a median response duration of 42 weeks. The most common adverse reactions (≥25%) were vision disorder, nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, edema, and constipation. Accelerated approval was granted on the basis of the high ORRs and durable responses. On November 20, 2013, crizotinib received full approval based on an improvement in progression-free survival in patients with metastatic ALK-positive NSCLC previously treated with one platinum-based chemotherapy regimen.

  7. Recurrence patterns of locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma after 3D conformal (chemo)-radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To establish recurrence patterns among locally advanced head and neck non-nasopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients treated with radical (chemo-) radiotherapy and to correlate the sites of loco-regional recurrence with radiotherapy doses and target volumes Method 151 locally advanced HNSCC patients were treated between 2004-2005 using radical three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Patients with prior surgery to the primary tumour site were excluded. The sites of locoregional relapses were correlated with radiotherapy plans by the radiologist and a planning dosimetrist. Results Median age was 59 years (range:34-89). 35 patients had stage III disease, 116 patients had stage IV A/B. 36 patients were treated with radiotherapy alone, 42 with induction chemotherapy, 63 with induction and concomitant chemoradiotherapy and 10 concomitant chemoradiotherapy. Median follow-up was 38 months (range 3-62). 3-year cause specific survival was 66.8%. 125 of 151 (82.8%) achieved a complete response to treatment. Amongst these 125 there were 20 local-regional recurrence, comprising 8 local, 5 regional and 7 simultaneous local and regional; synchronous distant metastases occurred in 7 of the 20. 9 patients developed distant metastases in the absence of locoregional failure. For the 14 local recurrences with planning data available, 12 were in-field, 1 was marginal, and 1 was out-of-field. Of the 11 regional failures with planning data available, 7 were in-field, 1 was marginal and 3 were out-of-field recurrences. Conclusion The majority of failures following non-surgical treatment for locally advanced HNSCC were loco-regional, within the radiotherapy target volume. Improving locoregional control remains a high priority. PMID:21609453

  8. Pembrolizumab and Ziv-aflibercept in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    Adult Solid Neoplasm; Metastatic Melanoma; Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer

  9. Pemetrexed single agent chemotherapy in previously treated patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Francesca; Bearz, Alessandra; Pampaloni, Gianni

    2008-01-01

    Background The main objective of this study was to evaluate the safety of second-line pemetrexed in Stage IIIB or IV NSCLC. Methods Overall, 95 patients received pemetrexed 500 mg/m2 i.v. over Day 1 of a 21-day cycle. Patients also received oral dexamethasone, oral folic acid and i.m. vitamin B12 supplementation to reduce toxicity. NCI CTC 2.0 was used to rate toxicity. All the adverse events were graded in terms of severity and relation to study treatment. Dose was reduced in case of toxicity and treatment was delayed for up to 42 days from Day 1 of any cycle to allow recovering from study drug-related toxicities. Tumor response was measured using the RECIST criteria. Results Patients received a median number of 4 cycles and 97.8% of the planned dose. Overall, 75 patients (78.9% of treated) reported at least one adverse event: 34 (35.8%) had grade 3 as worst grade and only 5 (5.2%) had grade 4. Drug-related events occurred in 57.9% of patients. Neutropenia (8.4%) and leukopenia (6.3 %) were the most common grade 3/4 hematological toxicities. Grade 3 anemia and thrombocytopenia were reported in 3.2% and 2.1% of patients, respectively. Diarrhea (6.3%), fatigue (3.2%) and dyspnea (3.2%) were the most common grade 3/4 non-hematological toxicities. The most common drug-related toxicities (any grade) were pyrexia (11.6%), vomiting, nausea, diarrhea and asthenia (9.5%) and fatigue (8.4%). Tumor Response Rate (CR/PR) in treated patients was 9.2%. The survival at 4.5 months (median follow-up) was 79% and the median PFS was 3.1 months. Twenty patients (21.1%) died mainly because of disease progression. Conclusion Patients with locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC could benefit from second-line pemetrexed, with a low incidence of hematological and non-hematological toxicities. PMID:18667090

  10. Relative bioavailability of three formulations of galunisertib administered as monotherapy in patients with advanced or metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gueorguieva, Ivelina; Cleverly, Ann; Desaiah, Durisala; Azaro, Analia; Seoane, Joan; Braña, Irene; Sicart, Elisabet; Miles, Colin; Lahn, Michael M; Mitchell, Malcolm I; Rodon, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Galunisertib (LY2157299 monohydrate), an inhibitor of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) pathway, is currently under investigation in several clinical trials involving multiple tumor types. The primary objective of this study was to assess relative bioavailability of two new galunisertib formulations developed using the roller compaction (RC) dry-milled (RCD) and RC slurry-milled (RCS) processes, compared with the existing formulation developed using the high-sheer wet granulation (HSWG) process. The secondary objective was to report the safety profile after a single dose of the three formulations. Methods Patients with advanced or metastatic cancer were enrolled into this single-center, 3-period, 6-sequence crossover study. Patients were assigned sequentially to 1 of 6 sequences in blocks of 6 to ensure that all 6 sequences have the same number of completers. A patient entering a sequence received a different galunisertib formulation as a single 150 mg dose orally during each of the 3 periods. Each period was separated from the next by a washout interval of at least 48 hours. Pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters, including area under curve (AUC) and Cmax, were computed using standard non-compartmentalized methods of analysis. For comparison of exposures between formulations, log-transformed AUC and Cmax values were analyzed using a linear mixed-effects model. Safety assessments included adverse event monitoring, physical examinations, and laboratory tests. Results Of the 14 patients who entered and completed the study, 13 patients were included in the final statistical analysis. AUC(0-tlast), AUC(0–48 h), and AUC(0-∞) for the RC formulations and the HSWG formulation were similar. Cmax was reduced by approximately 22% and tmax was longer by at least 1.00 h for the RCD and RCS formulations compared with the HSWG formulation. The RC formulations demonstrated a safety profile after a single dose similar to the HSWG formulation. Conclusions In this

  11. Efficacy and safety of gemcitabine plus erlotinib for locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Hu, Guo-fang; Zhang, Qian-qian; Tang, Ning; Guo, Jun; Liu, Li-yan; Han, Xiao; Wang, Xia; Wang, Zhe-hai

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is considered as a chemoresistant neoplasm with extremely dismal prognosis. Gemcitabine is recommended as the standard agent for locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. A series of trials have been conducted to improve the outcome of advanced pancreatic cancer with other anticancer drugs in combination with gemcitabine. Unfortunately, the designers of the clinical trials failed to improve the poor prognosis of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Erlotinib was the first additional drug that improved the overall survival of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer with gemcitabine. We performed this systematic review and meta-analysis to explore the efficacy and safety of the combination of gemcitabine with erlotinib (GemErlo) for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer using the currently available evidence. Methods PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and relevant abstracts of major conferences were comprehensively searched. Data results on objective response rate, disease control rate, and 1-year survival were pooled by using MetaAnalyst with a random-effects model. Results on progression-free survival and overall survival were only summarized descriptively. Results A total of 24 studies with 1,742 patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer treated with GemErlo were included. Combined objective response rate was 14.4% (95% CI: 11.6%–17.7%), disease control rate was 55.0% (95% CI: 51.5%–58.5%), and 1-year survival rate was 28.5% (95% CI: 24.0%–33.4%). Progression-free survival ranged from 2.63 to 9.6 months, and overall survival varied from 6 to 10 months. As for the toxicity profile, the most common adverse events (AEs) were hematologic reactions, skin rash, and gastrointestinal reactions. Other severe AEs, which had low incidence, included treatment-induced death and interstitial lung disease. Conclusion Our study showed that GemErlo is associated with reasonable activity in treating

  12. Concomitant endometrial and gallbladder metastasis in advanced multiple metastatic invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Bezpalko, Kseniya; Mohamed, Mohamed A.; Mercer, Leo; McCann, Michael; Elghawy, Karim; Wilson, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction At time of presentation, fewer than 10% of patients have metastatic breast cancer. The most common sites of metastasis in order of frequency are bone, lung, pleura, soft tissue, and liver. Breast cancer metastasis to the uterus or gallbladder is rare and has infrequently been reported in the English literature. Presentation of case A 47 year old female with a recent history of thrombocytopenia presented with abnormal vaginal bleeding. Pelvic ultrasound revealed multiple uterine fibroids and endometrial curettings revealed cells consistent with lobular carcinoma of the breast. Breast examination revealed edema and induration of the lower half of the right breast. Biopsy of the right breast revealed invasive lobular carcinoma. Bone marrow aspiration obtained at a previous outpatient visit revealed extensive involvement by metastatic breast carcinoma. Shortly after discharge, the patient presented with acute cholecystitis and underwent cholecystectomy. Microscopic examination of the gallbladder revealed metastatic infiltrating lobular carcinoma. The final diagnosis was invasive lobular carcinoma of the right breast with metastasis to the bone marrow, endometrium, gallbladder, regional lymph nodes, and peritoneum. Discussion The growth pattern of invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast is unique and poses a challenge in diagnosing the cancer at an early stage. Unlike other types of breast cancer, it tends to metastasize more to the peritoneum, ovary, and gastrointestinal tract. Metastasis to the endometrium or gallbladder is rare. Conclusion Metastatic spread should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with invasive lobular breast carcinoma presenting with abnormal vaginal bleeding or acute cholecystitis. PMID:26275738

  13. Phase II study of continuous infusional 5-fluorouracil with epirubicin and carboplatin (instead of cisplatin) in patients with metastatic/locally advanced breast cancer (infusional ECarboF): a very active and well-tolerated outpatient regimen.

    PubMed Central

    Bonnefoi, H.; Smith, I. E.; O'Brien, M. E.; Seymour, M. T.; Powles, T. J.; Allum, W. H.; Ebbs, S.; Baum, M.

    1996-01-01

    Infusional 5-fluorouracil (F) with cisplatin (C) and epirubicin (E), so-called infusional ECF, is a highly active new schedule against locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer. Cisplatin, however, is a major contributor to toxicity and usually requires inpatient treatment. In an attempt to overcome this, we have investigated the effect of substituting carboplatin for cisplatin in our original infusional ECF regimen. Fifty-two patients with metastatic (n = 36) or locally advanced/inflammatory (n = 16) breast cancer were treated with 5-fluorouracil 200 mg m-2 day-1 via a Hickman line using an ambulatory pump for for 6 months, with epirubicin 50 mg m-2 intravenously (i.v.) and carboplatin AUC5 i.v. every 4 weeks, for six courses (infusional ECarboF). The overall response rate (complete plus partial) was 81% (95% CI 67%-90%), with a complete response rate of 17% (95% CI 6-33%) in patients with metastatic disease and 56% (95% CI 30-80%) in patients with locally advanced disease. Median response duration and survival for metastatic disease was 8 and 14 months respectively, and two patients with locally advanced disease have relapsed. These results are very similar to those previously achieved with infusional ECF. Severe grade 3/4 toxicity was low. Infusional ECarboF is a highly active, well-tolerated, outpatient regimen effective against advanced/metastatic breast cancer and now warrants evaluation against conventional chemotherapy in high-risk early breast cancer. PMID:8562348

  14. Long-Term Outcomes With Intraoperative Radiotherapy as a Component of Treatment for Locally Advanced or Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, Brandon M.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Dowdy, Sean C.; Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie N.; Haddock, Michael G.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To report our institutional experience with intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) as a component of treatment for women with locally advanced or recurrent uterine sarcoma. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 2010, 16 women with primary (n = 3) or locoregionally recurrent (n = 13) uterine sarcoma received IORT as a component of combined modality treatment. Tumor histology studies found leiomyosarcoma (n = 9), endometrial stromal sarcoma (n = 4), and carcinosarcoma (n = 3). Surgery consisted of gross total resection in 2 patients, subtotal resection in 6 patients, and resection with close surgical margins in 8 patients. The median IORT dose was 12.5 Gy (range, 10-20 Gy). All patients received perioperative external beam radiotherapy (EBRT; median dose, 50.4 Gy; range, 20-62.5 Gy), and 6 patients also received perioperative systemic therapy. Results: Seven of the 16 patients are alive at a median follow-up of 44 months (range, 11-203 months). The 3-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of local relapse (within the EBRT field) was 7%, and central control (within the IORT field) was 100%. No local failures occurred in any of the 6 patients who underwent subtotal resection. The 3-year freedom from distant relapse was 48%, with failures occurring most frequently in the lungs or mediastinum. Median survival was 18 months, and 3-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of cause-specific and overall survival were 58% and 53%, respectively. Three patients (19%) experienced late Grade 3 toxicity. Conclusions: A combined modality approach with perioperative EBRT, surgery, and IORT for locally advanced or recurrent uterine sarcoma resulted in excellent local disease control with acceptable toxicity, even in patients with positive resection margins. With this approach, some patients were able to experience long-term freedom from recurrence.

  15. 6.3 MeV fast neutrons in the treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikaya, V. V.; Musabaeva, L. I.; Lisin, V. A.; Startseva, Zh. A.

    2016-08-01

    The study included 135 breast cancer patients (70 patients with locally recurrent breast cancer and 65 patients with locally advanced breast cancer with unfavorable prognostic factors) who received the neutron therapy alone or in combination with the photon therapy. The neutron therapy was shown to be effective in multimodality treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer. The 8-year survival rate in patients without repeated breast cancer recurrence was 87.6 ± 8.7% after the neutron and neutron-photon therapy and 54.3 ± 9.2% after the electron beam therapy.

  16. Sorafenib for Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared sorafenib (Nexavar®) and a placebo for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer that is no longer responding to treatment with radioactive iodine

  17. Veliparib in Combination With Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-22

    Adult Solid Neoplasm; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  18. Phase II Study of Intraventricular Methotrexate in Children With Recurrent or Progressive Malignant Brain Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-12

    Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Childhood Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor; Embryonal Tumor With Abundant Neuropil and True Rosettes; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm to the Leptomeninges

  19. Metastatic Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Massagué, Joan; Obenauf, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of death from cancer. To colonize distant organs, circulating cancer cells must overcome many obstacles through mechanisms that we are starting to understand. Infiltrating distant tissue, evading immune defences, adapting to supportive niches, surviving as latent tumour-initiating seeds, and eventually breaking out to replace the host tissue, are key steps for metastatic colonization. These obstacles make metastasis a highly inefficient process, but once metastases are established current treatments frequently fail to provide durable responses. A better understanding of the mechanistic determinants of metastatic colonization is needed to better prevent and treat metastatic cancer. PMID:26791720

  20. Development and validation of automatic tools for interactive recurrence analysis in radiation therapy: optimization of treatment algorithms for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In radiation oncology recurrence analysis is an important part in the evaluation process and clinical quality assurance of treatment concepts. With the example of 9 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer we developed and validated interactive analysis tools to support the evaluation workflow. Methods After an automatic registration of the radiation planning CTs with the follow-up images, the recurrence volumes are segmented manually. Based on these volumes the DVH (dose volume histogram) statistic is calculated, followed by the determination of the dose applied to the region of recurrence and the distance between the boost and recurrence volume. We calculated the percentage of the recurrence volume within the 80%-isodose volume and compared it to the location of the recurrence within the boost volume, boost + 1 cm, boost + 1.5 cm and boost + 2 cm volumes. Results Recurrence analysis of 9 patients demonstrated that all recurrences except one occurred within the defined GTV/boost volume; one recurrence developed beyond the field border/outfield. With the defined distance volumes in relation to the recurrences, we could show that 7 recurrent lesions were within the 2 cm radius of the primary tumor. Two large recurrences extended beyond the 2 cm, however, this might be due to very rapid growth and/or late detection of the tumor progression. Conclusion The main goal of using automatic analysis tools is to reduce time and effort conducting clinical analyses. We showed a first approach and use of a semi-automated workflow for recurrence analysis, which will be continuously optimized. In conclusion, despite the limitations of the automatic calculations we contributed to in-house optimization of subsequent study concepts based on an improved and validated target volume definition. PMID:24499557

  1. Benefits of Recurrent Colonic Stent Insertion in a Patient with Advanced Gastric Cancer with Carcinomatosis Causing Colonic Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Park, Semi; Shin, Sang Joon; Ahn, Joong Bae; Jeung, Hei-Cheul; Rha, Sun Young; Lee, Sang Kil

    2009-01-01

    Malignant obstruction develops frequently in advanced gastric cancer. Although it is primarily the gastric outlet that is obstructed, there are occasional reports of colonic obstruction. Treating intestinal obstruction usually requires emergency surgery or stent insertion. There are several kinds of complications with stent insertion, such as bowel perforation, stent migration, bleeding, abdominal pain and reobstruction. Nevertheless, endoscopic stent insertion could be a better treatment than emergency surgery in cases of malignant bowel obstruction in cancer patients with poor performance status. We report a case of advanced gastric cancer with carcinomatosis in which a recurrent colonic stent was inserted at the same site because of cancer growth into the stent. The patient maintained a good condition for chemotherapy, thus improving their chances for survival. PMID:19430568

  2. Intracavitary chemotherapy (Gliadel) for recurrent esthesioneuroblastoma: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Park, Michael C; Weaver, Charles E; Donahue, John E; Sampath, Prakash

    2006-03-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma is an uncommon malignancy of the nasal vault with a treatment regimen consisting of surgical resection followed by radiotherapy for primary lesions and addition of chemotherapy for patients with advanced, recurrent or metastatic lesions. We report a case of a 39-year-old female with a history of esthesioneuroblastoma, previously treated with resection, radiation and chemotherapy, presenting with a recurrent disease that was successfully treated with re-resection and placement of Gliadel) wafers in the surgical resection cavity. The novel option of controlled-release and local delivery of a chemotherapeutic agent for treatment of recurrent esthesioneuroblastoma should be recognized and considered.

  3. Beta-human chorionic gonadotropin expression in recurrent and metastatic giant cell tumors of bone: a potential mimicker of germ cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Lawless, Margaret E; Jour, George; Hoch, Benjamin L; Rendi, Mara H

    2014-10-01

    Giant cell tumors of bone (GCTs) are generally benign, locally aggressive neoplasms that rarely metastasize. The beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-hCG) is expressed in syncytiotrophoblasts and several nongynecologic neoplasms but has not been described in GCT. At our institution, we observed cases of elevated beta-hCG in patients with GCT leading to diagnostic difficulty and in one case, concern for metastatic choriocarcinoma. This study aims to determine the frequency of beta-hCG expression in GCT and any relationship to clinical aggressiveness. We evaluated tissue expression of beta-hCG by immunohistochemistry with 58% of cases staining for beta-hCG. Additionally, 2 of 11 patients with available serum and/or urine beta-hCG measurements demonstrated elevated beta-hCG due to tumor. It is important to be aware of beta-hCG expression by GCT and the potential for elevated urine and serum beta-hCG levels in patients with GCT so as to avoid misdiagnosis of pregnancy or gestational trophoblastic disease.

  4. Comparison of cost-effectiveness of regorafenib and trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet for treating advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Michio; Usami, Eiseki; Iwai, Mina; Go, Makiko; Teramachi, Hitomi; Yoshimura, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    Regorafenib and trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet regimens are standard third-line or later treatments for advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer with no significant difference in efficacy. The present study aimed to compare the cost-effectiveness of using regorafenib vs. the trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet. The expected cost was calculated based on data from patients with advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer who were treated with regorafenib or trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet. The median survival time (MST) from the CORRECT and the RECOURSE study was used to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of the regimens. The cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated from the expected cost and MST for the two regimens. The expected cost per patient for the regorafenib and the trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet regimen was ¥705,330.3 and ¥371,198.7, respectively, and the cost-effectiveness ratio was ¥110,207.9/MST and ¥52,281.5/MST, respectively. In conclusion, the findings of the present study demonstrated that the trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet regimen is more cost-effective compared with the regorafenib regimen. PMID:27900102

  5. Fluorescence-guided surgery of a highly-metastatic variant of human triple-negative breast cancer targeted with a cancer-specific GFP adenovirus prevents recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Shuya; Takehara, Kiyoto; Miwa, Shinji; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Urata, Yasuo; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Bouvet, Michael; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously developed a genetically-engineered GFP-expressing telomerase-dependent adenovirus, OBP-401, which can selectively illuminate cancer cells. In the present report, we demonstrate that targeting a triple-negative high-invasive human breast cancer, orthotopically-growing in nude mice, with OBP-401 enables curative fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS). OBP-401 enabled complete resection and prevented local recurrence and greatly inhibited lymph-node metastasis due to the ability of the virus to selectively label and subsequently kill cancer cells. In contrast, residual breast cancer cells become more aggressive after bright (white)-light surgery (BLS). OBP-401-based FGS also improved the overall survival compared with conventional BLS. Thus, metastasis from a highly-aggressive triple-negative breast cancer can be prevented by FGS in a clinically-relevant mouse model. PMID:27689331

  6. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Older Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-14

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  7. The association between EGFR variant III, HPV, p16, c-MET, EGFR gene copy number and response to EGFR inhibitors in patients with recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We examine the potential prognostic and predictive roles of EGFR variant III mutation, EGFR gene copy number (GCN), human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, c-MET and p16INK4A protein expression in recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (R/M SCCHN). Methods We analyzed the archival tumor specimens of 53 patients who were treated in 4 phase II trials for R/M SCCHN. Two trials involved the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib, and 2 trials involved non-EGFR targeted agents. EGFRvIII mutation was determined by quantitative RT-PCR, HPV DNA by Linear Array Genotyping, p16 and c-MET protein expression by immunohistochemistry, and EGFR GCN by FISH. Results EGFRvIII mutation, detected in 22 patients (42%), was associated with better disease control, but no difference was seen between erlotinib-treated versus non-erlotinib treated patients. EGFRvIII was not associated with TTP or OS. The presence of HPV DNA (38%), p16 immunostaining (32%), c-MET high expression (58%) and EGFR amplification (27%), were not associated with response, TTP or OS. Conclusion EGFRvIII mutation, present in about 40% of SCCHN, appears to be an unexpected prognostic biomarker associated with better disease control in R/M SCCHN regardless of treatment with erlotinib. Larger prospective studies are required to validate its significance. PMID:21352589

  8. The interplay of epigenetic therapy and immunity in locally recurrent or metastatic estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer: Correlative analysis of ENCORE 301, a randomized, placebo-controlled phase II trial of exemestane with or without entinostat

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Yusuke; Lee, Min-Jung; Lee, Sunmin; Tomita, Saori; Chumsri, Saranya; Cruickshank, Scott; Ordentlich, Peter; Trepel, Jane B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Entinostat, a class I-selective histone deacetylase inhibitor, has shown promising activity in ENCORE 301, a randomized, placebo-controlled, phase II trial of exemestane with or without entinostat in women with locally recurrent or metastatic estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer progressing on a nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor. ENCORE 301 showed an 8.3-mo improvement in median overall survival among patients who received entinostat. We investigated the impact of entinostat on immune subsets with CD40, HLA-DR, and immune checkpoint receptor expression analyses in 34 patient blood samples from ENCORE 301. We found that entinostat significantly decreased granulocytic and monocytic MDSCs at cycle 1 day 15. MDSC CD40 was significantly downregulated by entinostat. A significant increase in HLA-DR expression on CD14+ monocytes by entinostat was observed. Entinostat did not impact T-cell subsets or T-cell immune checkpoint receptor expression. Our findings suggest that a significant interplay between this epigenetic regimen and host immune homeostatic mechanisms may impact therapeutic outcome. PMID:27999738

  9. Changes in and Associations Among Functional Status and Perceived Quality of Life of Patients With Metastatic/Locally Advanced Cancer Receiving Rehabilitation for General Disability.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Ryuichi; Ogata, Masami; Uchiyama, Ikuyo; Miyakoshi, Koichi; Uruma, Megumi; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya

    2015-11-01

    The primary aims were to clarify the changes in the functional status and quality of life of patients with metastatic/locally advanced cancer who received rehabilitation therapy. This is a cohort study, and all consecutive patients who received rehabilitation therapy were evaluated before and 2 weeks after. Outcome measures were the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), perceived independence, and overall quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer C30). A total of 128 patients were included. Although the FIM score significantly decreased, the overall quality of life significantly increased. Even in the patients with deteriorated FIM scores, the overall quality of life was maintained despite a significantly decreased perceived independence. Terminally ill patients with cancer who received a rehabilitation program maintained their overall quality of life despite an objective decline in the physical functional status.

  10. Randomized Phase II Study of Cabazitaxel Versus Methotrexate in Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Previously Treated With Platinum-Based Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Van Maanen, Aline; Vandenbulcke, Jean-Marie; Filleul, Bertrand; Seront, Emmanuel; D’Hondt, Lionel; Lonchay, Christophe; Holbrechts, Stéphane; Boegner, Petra; Brohee, Dany; Dequanter, Didier; Louviaux, Ingrid; Sautois, Brieuc; Whenham, Nicolas; Berchem, Guy; Vanderschueren, Brigitte; Fontaine, Christel; Schmitz, Sandra; Gillain, Aline; Schoonjans, Joelle; Rottey, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Lessons Learned Cabazitaxel has activity in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) and taxane-resistant cell lines. For the first time, cabazitaxel was investigated in incurable patients with recurrent SCCHN. Patients were randomly assigned to cabazitaxel every 3 weeks or weekly methotrexate. This phase II study did not meet its primary endpoint. Cabazitaxel has low activity in SCCHN. The toxicity profile in this population also was not favorable owing to the high rate of febrile neutropenia observed (17%). Background. Cabazitaxel is a second-generation taxane that improves the survival of patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer following docetaxel therapy. Cabazitaxel has activity in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) and taxane-resistant cell lines. In this randomized phase II trial, we investigated cabazitaxel in patients with recurrent SCCHN. Methods. Patients with incurable SCCHN with progression after platinum-based therapy were randomly assigned to cabazitaxel every 3 weeks (cycle 1, 20 mg/m2, increased to 25 mg/m2 for subsequent cycles in the absence of nonhematological adverse events [AEs] greater than grade 2 and hematological AEs greater than grade 3) or methotrexate (40 mg/m2/week). The patients were stratified according to their performance status and previous platinum-based chemotherapy for palliation versus curative intent. The primary endpoint was the progression-free survival rate (PFSR) at 18 weeks. Results. Of the 101 patients, 53 and 48, with a median age of 58.0 years (range, 41–80), were randomly assigned to cabazitaxel or methotrexate, respectively. The PFSR at 18 weeks was 13.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 5%–25%) for cabazitaxel and 8.3% (95% CI, 2%–20%) for methotrexate. The median progression-free survival was 1.9 months in both arms. The median overall survival was 5.0 and 3.6 months for cabazitaxel and methotrexate, respectively. More patients experienced serious adverse

  11. Pemetrexed combined with paclitaxel in patients with advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: a phase I-II trial.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, George P; Dimitroulis, John; Toubis, Michael; Katis, Costas; Karaindros, Dimitris; Stathopoulos, John; Koutandos, John

    2007-07-01

    Pemetrexed, a novel multi-targeted agent established for the treatment of mesothelioma, has been under investigation for other malignancies, and in recent years particularly for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the present trial we investigated pemetrexed in combination with paclitaxel as front-line treatment in advanced or metastatic NSCLC. Our objectives were to determine the response rate, median and overall survival and toxicity. From April 2005 until May 2006, 51 patients with advanced or metastatic NSCLC were enrolled and 48 were considered evaluable. There were 39 males and nine females, median age 62 years (range 37-81 years), one patient stage IIIA N(2), 23 patients, IIIB and 24, stage IV. All patients had a cytologically- or histologically-confirmed diagnosis. Pemetrexed was administered at a standard dose of 500mg/m(2) and paclitaxel at an escalating dose starting at 135mg/m(2), then 150mg/m(2) and ending at a dose of 175mg/m(2); the level was increased every three patients. Both agents were administered on day 1, repeated every 3 weeks for six courses. A 39.6% partial response rate was observed with a median survival of 14 months. Toxicity was mild with 8.3% grade 3 and 4 neutropenia and other very mild hematologic and non-hematologic adverse reactions. The combination of pemetrexed and paclitaxel at doses of 500mg/m(2) and 175mg/m(2), respectively, has been shown to be an effective combination with very limited toxicity.

  12. Cancer-related inflammation as predicting tool for treatment outcome in locally advanced and metastatic non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Korsic, Marta; Mursic, Davorka; Samarzija, Miroslav; Cucevic, Branka; Roglic, Mihovil; Jakopovic, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths and the non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents 80% of all cases. In most cases when diagnosed, it is in locally advanced or metastatic stage, when platinum based doublet chemotherapy is the established therapeutic option for majority of the patients. Predictive factors to filter the patients who will benefit the most from the chemotherapy are not clearly defined. Objective of this study was to explore predictive value of pre-treatment C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen and their interaction, for the response to the frontline chemotherapy. Methods In this retrospective cohort study 170 patients with locally advanced and metastatic NSCLC were included. Relationship between baseline level of CRP and fibrinogen and response to the frontline chemotherapy was assessed. Results We found that pre-treatment CRP and fibrinogen values were statistically significantly correlated. Chemotherapy and CRP, fibrinogen, and their interaction were independently significantly associated with disease control rate at re-evaluation. There was statistically significant difference in median pre-treatment CRP level between the patients with disease control or progression at re-evaluation, 13.8 vs. 30.0 mg/L respectively, P=0.026. By Johnson-Neyman technique we found that in patients with initial fibrinogen value below 3.5 g/L, CRP level was significantly associated with disease control or progression of the disease. Above this fibrinogen value the association of CRP and disease control was lost. Conclusions The findings from this study support the growing evidence of inflammation and cancer relationship, where elevated pre-treatment level of CRP has negative predictive significance on the NSCLC frontline chemotherapy response. PMID:27499936

  13. Phase II trial of modified FOLFOX6 and erlotinib in patients with metastatic or advanced adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus and gastro-oesophageal junction

    PubMed Central

    Wainberg, Z A; Lin, L-S; DiCarlo, B; Dao, K M; Patel, R; Park, D J; Wang, H-J; Elashoff, R; Ryba, N; Hecht, J R

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is increased recognition that cancers of the upper GI tract comprise distinct epidemiological and molecular entities. Erlotinib has shown activity in patients with adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus/gastro-oesophageal junction (GEJ), but not in distal gastric cancer. mFOLFOX6 is one of several active regimens used to treat adenocarcinoma of the Eso/GEJ. This study evaluates the efficacy and safety of mFOLFOX6 and erlotinib in patients with metastatic or advanced Eso/GEJ cancers. Methods: Patients with previously untreated advanced or metastatic Eso/GEJ adenocarcinoma are treated with oxaliplatin 85 mg m–2, 5-FU 400 mg m–2, LV 400 mg m–2 on day 1, 5-FU 2400 mg m–2 over 48 h and erlotinib 150 mg PO daily. Treatment was repeated every 14 days. The primary objective was response rate (RR), secondary objectives include toxicity, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and to correlate clinical outcome with expression patterns and molecular alterations in the epidermal growth factor receptor-dependent pathways. Results: A total of 33 patients were treated and evaluable: there were two complete responses, 15 partial responses for an objective RR of 51.5% (95% CI, 34.5–68.6%). Median PFS was 5.5 months (95% CI, 3.1–7.5 months) and median OS was 11.0 months (95% CI, 8.0–17.4 months). The most common grade 3–4 toxicities were: diarrhoea (24%), nausea/vomiting (11%), skin rash (8%) and peripheral neuropathy (8%). The frequency of alterations was KRAS mutations (8%), EGFR mutations (0%) and HER2 amplification (19%). Conclusion: In patients with Eso/GEJ adenocarcinoma, mFOLFOX6 and erlotinib is active, has an acceptable toxicity profile and FOLFOX±erlotinib could be considered for further development. PMID:21811258

  14. Nivolumab With or Without Ipilimumab in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Sarcomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    Childhood Solid Neoplasm; Metastatic Melanoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Rhabdomyosarcoma; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  15. VEGF Trap in Treating Patients With Recurrent Stage III or Stage IV Melanoma That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-02

    Ciliary Body and Choroid Melanoma, Medium/Large Size; Extraocular Extension Melanoma; Iris Melanoma; Metastatic Intraocular Melanoma; Recurrent Intraocular Melanoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Stage III Melanoma; Stage IV Melanoma

  16. Rationale and design of LUX-Head & Neck 1: a randomised, Phase III trial of afatinib versus methotrexate in patients with recurrent and/or metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma who progressed after platinum-based therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with recurrent and/or metastatic (R/M) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) receiving platinum-based chemotherapy as their first-line treatment have a dismal prognosis, with a median overall survival (OS) of ~7 months. Methotrexate is sometimes used following platinum failure or in patients not fit enough for platinum therapy, but this agent has not demonstrated any OS improvement. Targeted therapies are a novel approach, with the EGFR-targeting monoclonal antibody cetuximab (plus platinum-based chemotherapy) approved in the US and Europe in the first-line R/M setting, and as monotherapy following platinum failure in the US. However, there is still a high unmet medical need for new treatments that improve outcomes in the second-line R/M setting following failure on first-line platinum-containing regimens. Afatinib, an irreversible ErbB family blocker, was recently approved for the first-line treatment of EGFR mutation-positive metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. Afatinib has also shown clinical activity similar to cetuximab in a Phase II proof-of-concept HNSCC trial. Based on these observations, the Phase III, LUX-Head & Neck 1 study is evaluating afatinib versus methotrexate in R/M HNSCC patients following progression on platinum-based chemotherapy in the R/M setting. Methods/Design Patients with progressive disease after one first-line platinum-based chemotherapy are randomised 2:1 to oral afatinib (starting dose 40 mg once daily) or IV methotrexate (starting dose 40 mg/m2 once weekly) administered as monotherapy with best supportive care until progression or intolerable adverse events. Efficacy of afatinib versus methotrexate will be assessed in terms of progression-free survival (primary endpoint). Disease progression will be evaluated according to RECIST v1.1 by investigator and independent central review. Secondary endpoints include OS, tumour response and safety. Health-related quality of life and biomarker assessments will

  17. Efficacy and safety of nivolumab in Japanese patients with advanced or recurrent squamous non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hida, Toyoaki; Nishio, Makoto; Nogami, Naoyuki; Ohe, Yuichiro; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Sakai, Hiroshi; Satouchi, Miyako; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Takenoyama, Mitsuhiro; Isobe, Hiroshi; Fujita, Shiro; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Minato, Koichi; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Maemondo, Makoto; Takeda, Koji; Saka, Hideo; Goto, Koichi; Atagi, Shinji; Hirashima, Tomonori; Sumiyoshi, Naoki; Tamura, Tomohide

    2017-03-07

    Limited treatment options are available for stage IIIB/IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Nivolumab, a programmed cell death-1 immune checkpoint inhibitor antibody, has been shown to be effective for the treatment of NSCLC. This study investigated the effectiveness and safety of nivolumab in Japanese patients with advanced or recurrent squamous NSCLC that progressed after platinum-containing chemotherapy. In this multicenter phase II study, patients were treated with nivolumab (3mg/kg, intravenously) every 2 weeks until progressive disease or unacceptable toxicity was seen. The primary endpoint was overall response rate (ORR) assessed by independent radiology review committee (IRC) and secondary endpoints included a study site-assessed ORR, overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), duration of response, time to response, best overall response (BOR), and safety. The study included 35 patients from 17 sites in Japan. Patients had IRC-assessed ORR of 25.7% (95% CI 14.2, 42.1) and the study site-assessed ORR was 20.0% (95% CI 10.0, 35.9). The median OS, median time to response and median PFS were 16.3 (95% CI 12.4-25.4), 2.7 (range 1.2-5.5) and 4.2 (95% CI 1.4-7.1) months, respectively. The IRC-assessed BOR was partial response, stable disease, and progressive disease for 25.7%, 28.6%, and 45.7% of patients, respectively. Treatment-related adverse events were reported in 24 patients (68.6%), most of which resolved with appropriate treatment including steroid therapy or ‎discontinuation of nivolumab. Nivolumab was effective and well tolerated in Japanese patients with advanced or recurrent squamous NSCLC that progressed after platinum-containing chemotherapy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Long-term follow-up after transoral laser microsurgery and adjuvant radiotherapy for advanced recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, Hans . E-mail: hchrist@gwdg.de; Hermann, Robert Michael; Martin, Alexios; Florez, Rodrigo; Kahler, Elke; Nitsche, Mirko; Hille, Andrea; Steiner, Wolfgang; Hess, Clemens F.; Pradier, Olivier

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy after transoral laser microsurgery for advanced recurrent head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Patients and Methods: Between 1988 and 2000, 37 patients with advanced local recurrences (23 local and 14 locoregional recurrences) of HNSCC without distant metastases were treated in curative intent with organ-preserving transoral laser microsurgery and adjuvant radiotherapy (before 1994 split-course radiotherapy with carboplatinum, after 1994 conventional radiotherapy). Initial therapy of the primary (8.1% oral cavity, 35.1% oropharynx, 13.5% hypopharynx, and 43.3% larynx) before relapse was organ-preserving transoral laser microsurgery without any adjuvant therapy. Results: After a median follow-up of 124 months, the 5-year overall survival rate was 21.3%, the loco-regional control rate 48.3%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, stage of original primary tumor (Stage I/II vs. Stage III/IV), and patient age (<58 years vs. {>=}58 years) showed statistically significant impact on prognosis. In laryngeal cancer, larynx preservation rate after treatment for recurrent tumor was 50% during follow-up. Conclusion: Our data show that organ-preserving transoral laser microsurgery followed by adjuvant radiotherapy is a curative option for patients who have advanced recurrence after transoral laser surgery and is an alternative to radical treatment.

  19. A pilot study of nimotuzumab plus single agent chemotherapy as second- or third-line treatment or more in patients with recurrent, persistent or metastatic cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cetina, Lucely; Crombet, Tania; Jiménez-Lima, Roberto; Zapata, Sergio; Ramos, Mayra; Avila, Sandra; Coronel, Jaime; Charco, Eduardo; Bojalil, Rafael; Astudillo, Horacio; Bazán, Blanca; Dueñas-González, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Nimotuzumab is a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody against the EGFR extracellular domain that has been evaluated in solid tumors as a single agent or in combination with chemotherapy and radiation. Cervical cancer patients who are refractory or progressive to first-line chemotherapy have a dismal prognosis, and no second- or third-line chemotherapy is considered standard. This pilot trial aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of nimotuzumab in 17 patients with pre-treated advanced refractory or progressive cervical cancer. Nimotuzumab was administered weekly at 200 mg/m2 as single agent for 4 weeks (induction phase), then concurrent with 6 21-day cycles of gemcitabine (800 mg/m2) or cisplatin (50 mg/m2) for 18 weeks (concurrent phase) and then once every 2 weeks (maintenance phase). Nimotuzumab could be continued beyond disease progression. Seventeen patients were accrued and evaluated for safety and efficacy. The median number of nimotuzumab applications was 20 (5–96). The median number of chemotherapy cycles administered was 6 (1-6). No toxicity occurred during induction and maintenance phases (single agent nimotuzumab). In the concurrent phase, grade 3 toxicity events observed were leucopenia, anemia and diarrhea in 11.7%, 5.8% and 11.7% respectively. No complete or partial responses were observed. The stable disease (SD) rate was 35%. The median PFS and OS rates were163 days (95% CI, 104 to 222), and 299 days (95% IC, 177 to 421) respectively. Nimotuzumab is well tolerated and may have a role in the treatment of advanced cervical cancer. PMID:25802932

  20. BRCA1 loss pre-existing in small subpopulations of prostate cancer is associated with advanced disease and metastatic spread to lymph nodes and peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    Bednarz, Natalia; Eltze, Elke; Semjonow, Axel; Rink, Michael; Andreas, Antje; Mulder, Lennart; Hannemann, Juliane; Fisch, Margit; Pantel, Klaus; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Bielawski, Krzysztof P.; Brandt, Burkhard

    2011-01-01

    Purpose A preliminary study performed on a small cohort of multifocal prostate cancer (PCa) detected BRCA1 allelic imbalances (AI) among circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The present analysis was aimed to elucidate the biological and clinical role of BRCA1 losses on metastatic spread and tumor progression in prostate cancer patients. Experimental Design To map molecular progression in PCa outgrowth we used FISH analysis of tissue microarrays (TMA), lymph node sections and CTC from peripheral blood. Results We found that 14% of 133 tested patients carried monoallelic BRCA1 loss in at least one tumor focus. Extended molecular analysis of chr17q revealed that this aberration was often a part of larger cytogenetic rearrangement involving chr17q21 accompanied by AI of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN and lack of the BRCA1 promoter methylation. The BRCA1 losses correlated with advanced T stage (p < 0.05), invasion to pelvic lymph nodes (LN, p < 0.05) as well as BR (p < 0.01). Their prevalence was twice as high within 62 LN metastases (LNMs) as in primary tumors (27%, p < 0.01). The analysis of 11 matched primary PCa – LNM pairs confirmed the suspected transmission of genetic abnormalities between those two sites. In 4 of 7 patients with metastatic disease, BRCA1 losses appeared in a minute fraction of cytokeratin- and vimentin-positive CTCs. Conclusions Small subpopulations of PCa cells bearing BRCA1 losses might be one confounding factor initiating tumor dissemination and might provide an early indicator of shortened disease-free survival. PMID:20592016

  1. Phase I active immunotherapy with combination of two chimeric, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, B-cell epitopes fused to a promiscuous T-cell epitope in patients with metastatic and/or recurrent solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Kaumaya, Pravin T P; Foy, Kevin Chu; Garrett, Joan; Rawale, Sharad V; Vicari, Daniele; Thurmond, Jennifer M; Lamb, Tammy; Mani, Aruna; Kane, Yahaira; Balint, Catherine R; Chalupa, Donald; Otterson, Gregory A; Shapiro, Charles L; Fowler, Jeffrey M; Grever, Michael R; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios S; Carson, William E

    2009-11-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), safety profile, and immunogenicity of two chimeric, B-cell epitopes derived from the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2) extracellular domain in a combination vaccine with a promiscuous T-cell epitope (ie, MVF) and nor-muramyl-dipeptide as adjuvant emulsified in SEPPIC ISA 720. PATIENTS AND METHODS Eligible patients with metastatic and/or recurrent solid tumors received three inoculations on days 1, 22, and 43 at doses of total peptide that ranged from 0.5 to 3.0 mg. Immunogenicity was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, flow cytometry, and HER2 signaling assays. Results Twenty-four patients received three inoculations at the intended dose levels, which elicited antibodies able to recognize native HER2 receptor and inhibited both the proliferation of HER2-expressing cell lines and phosphorylation of the HER2 protein. The MTD was determined to be the highest dose level of 3.0 mg of the combination vaccine. There was a significant increase from dose level 1 (0.5 mg) to dose level 4 (3.0 mg) in HER2-specific antibodies. Four patients (one each with adrenal, colon, ovarian, and squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary) were judged to have stable disease; two patients (one each with endometrial and ovarian cancer) had partial responses; and 11 patients had progressive disease. Patients with stable disease received 6-month boosts, and one patient received a 20-month boost. CONCLUSION The combination vaccines were safe and effective in eliciting antibody responses in a subset of patients (62.5%) and were associated with no serious adverse events, autoimmune disease, or cardiotoxicity. There was preliminary evidence of clinical activity in several patients.

  2. Cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and cetuximab (PFE) with or without cilengitide in recurrent/metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: results of the randomized phase I/II ADVANTAGE trial (phase II part)

    PubMed Central

    Vermorken, J. B.; Peyrade, F.; Krauss, J.; Mesía, R.; Remenar, E.; Gauler, T. C.; Keilholz, U.; Delord, J. P.; Schafhausen, P.; Erfán, J.; Brümmendorf, T. H.; Iglesias, L.; Bethe, U.; Hicking, C.; Clement, P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (R/M-SCCHN) overexpresses αvβ5 integrin. Cilengitide selectively inhibits αvβ3 and αvβ5 integrins and is investigated as a treatment strategy. Patients and methods The phase I/II study ADVANTAGE evaluated cilengitide combined with cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and cetuximab (PFE) in R/M-SCCHN. The phase II part reported here was an open-label, randomized, controlled trial investigating progression-free survival (PFS). Patients received up to six cycles of PFE alone or combined with cilengitide 2000 mg once (CIL1W) or twice (CIL2W) weekly. Thereafter, patients received maintenance therapy (cilengitide arms: cilengitide plus cetuximab; PFE-alone arm: cetuximab only) until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Results One hundred and eighty-two patients were treated. Median PFS per investigator read was similar for CIL1W + PFE, CIL2W + PFE, and PFE alone (6.4, 5.6, and 5.7 months, respectively). Accordingly, median overall survival and objective response rates were not improved with cilengitide (12.4 months/47%, 10.6 months/27%, and 11.6 months/36%, respectively). No clinically meaningful safety differences were observed between groups. None of the tested biomarkers (expression of integrins, CD31, Ki-67, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, vascular endothelial-cadherin, type IV collagen, epidermal growth factor receptor, or p16 for human papillomavirus) were predictive of outcome. Conclusion Neither of the cilengitide-containing regimens demonstrated a PFS benefit over PFE alone in R/M-SCCHN patients. PMID:24567516

  3. Recent advances in systemic therapy. When HER2 is not the target: advances in the treatment of HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miles, David W

    2009-01-01

    The anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) agent trastuzumab has improved outcomes in breast cancer patients with HER2 over-expressing tumours. However, systemic treatment for patients with HER2-negative disease is still limited to endocrine and cytotoxic therapies. The increasing use of the anthracyclines and taxanes in early stage disease has reduced the available therapeutic options for patients with relapsed disease, and choices are further limited for patients with triple-negative tumours, who typically have a poor prognosis. The novel agents bevacizumab and ixabepilone were recently approved for metastatic breast cancer, and numerous other agents are currently in clinical development that may contribute further valuable therapeutic options. PMID:19744307

  4. Pembrolizumab and Ruxolitinib Phosphate in Treating Patients With Metastatic Stage IV Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-15

    Breast Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  5. Entinostat and Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors or Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-18

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  6. Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Gallbladder Cancer or Bile Duct Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  7. SU2C Phase Ib Study of Paclitaxel and MK-2206 in Advanced Solid Tumors and Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Krop, Ian; Akcakanat, Argun; Chen, Huiqin; Liu, Shuying; Li, Yisheng; Culotta, Kirk S.; Tarco, Emily; Piha-Paul, Sarina; Moulder-Thompson, Stacy; Velez-Bravo, Vivianne; Sahin, Aysegul A.; Doyle, Laurence A.; Do, Kim-Anh; Winer, Eric P.; Mills, Gordon B.; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is preclinical synergism between taxanes and MK-2206. We aim to determine the maximum tolerated dose, safety, and activity of combining MK-2206 and paclitaxel in metastatic cancer. Methods: Patients received weekly doses of paclitaxel at 80mg/m2 on day 1, followed by MK-2206 orally on day 2 escalated at 90mg, 135mg, and 200mg. Treatment continued until progression, excessive toxicity, or patient request. Blood and tissue were collected for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics markers. A cycle consisted of three weeks of therapy. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as unacceptable toxicity during the first cycle. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Twenty-two patients were treated, nine in dose escalation and 13 in dose expansion. Median age was 55 years. Median number of cycles was four. Dose escalation was completed with no DLT. CTCAE Grade 3 or higher adverse events were fatigue (n = 2), rash (n = 2), hyperglycemia (n = 1), and neutropenia (n = 7). Four patients in the expansion phase required MK-2206 dose reduction. Phase II recommended dose was established as paclitaxel 80mg/m2 weekly on day 1, and MK-2206 135mg weekly on day 2. Paclitaxel systemic exposure was similar in the presence or absence of MK-2206. Plasma MK-2206 concentrations were similar to data from previous phase I monotherapy. There was a statistically significant decrease in expression of pAKT S473 (P = .01) and pAKT T308 (P = .002) after therapy. PI3K/AKT/mTOR downregulation in tumor tissues and circulating markers did not correlate with tumor response or clinical benefit. There were five objective responses, and nine patients had stable disease. Conclusion: MK-2206 was well tolerated with paclitaxel. Preliminary antitumor activity was documented. PMID:25688104

  8. Prospective Study of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Concurrent With Individualized Radiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jing; Xia Tingyi; Wang Yingjie; Li Hongqi; Li Ping; Wang Jidong; Chang Dongshu; Liu Liyyuan; Di Yupeng; Wang Xuan; Wu Weizhang

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To establish the safety profile and efficacy of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) concurrent with individualized radiotherapy (RT) in patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: Between June 2007 and January 2010, 26 patients with Stage III/IV NSCLC were enrolled in this prospective study. These patients were treated with EGFR-TKIs (gefitinib 250 mg or erlotinib 150 mg, oral daily) concurrent with individualized RT with curative intent. The thoracic RT plans were individually designed on the basis of tumor size and normal tissue volume constraints. All patients were assessed for toxicity, and 25 patients were available for efficacy. The primary endpoints were acute toxicity, overall survival, and median survival time. The secondary endpoints included local control rate, time to tumor progression, and progression-free survival (PFS). Results: Median gross tumor volume, mean lung dose, and lung V20 were 56 cm{sup 3}, 8.6 Gy, and 14%, respectively. Median thoracic radiation dose was 70 Gy at a margin of gross tumor volume (range, 42-82 Gy), and median biological equivalent dose was 105 Gy (range, 60-119 Gy). Acute skin, hematologic, esophageal, and pulmonary toxicities were acceptable and manageable. Severe adverse events included neutropenia (Grade 4, 4%) and thrombocytopenia (Grade 4, 8%), esophagitis (Grade 3, 4%), and pneumonitis (Grade 3, 4%). With a median follow-up of 10.2 months, a local control rate of 96% was achieved for thoracic tumor. Median time to progression, median PFS, and median survival time were 6.3, 10.2, and 21.8 months, respectively. The 1- and 2-year PFS rates were both 42%, and 1-, 2-, and 3-year overall survival rates were 57%, 45%, and 30%, respectively. Conclusion: Concurrent EGFR-TKIs with individualized RT shows a favorable safety profile and promising outcome, therefore serving as a therapeutic option for patients with locally

  9. Vemurafenib for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic BRAF V600 mutation-positive malignant melanoma: a NICE single technology appraisal.

    PubMed

    Beale, Sophie; Dickson, Rumona; Bagust, Adrian; Blundell, Michaela; Dundar, Yenal; Boland, Angela; Marshall, Ernie; Plummer, Ruth; Proudlove, Chris

    2013-12-01

    Vemurafenib is an oral BRAF inhibitor licenced for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic BRAF V600-mutation positive malignant melanoma. The manufacturer of vemurafenib, Roche Products Limited, was invited by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) to submit evidence of the drug's clinical- and cost-effectiveness for its licenced indication, to inform the Institute's Single Technology Appraisal (STA) process. The Liverpool Reviews and Implementation Group (LRiG) at the University of Liverpool was commissioned to act as the Evidence Review Group (ERG) for this appraisal. This article summarises the ERG's review of the evidence submitted by the manufacturer and also includes a summary of the NICE Appraisal Committee (AC) decision. The ERG reviewed the clinical- and cost-effectiveness evidence in accordance with the decision problem defined by NICE. The ERG's analysis of the submitted economic model assessed the appropriateness of the approach taken by the manufacturer in modelling the decision problem. It also included an assessment of the reliability of model implementation and the extent of conformity to published standards and prevailing norms of practice within the health economics modelling community. Particular attention was paid to issues likely to impact substantially on the base-case cost-effectiveness results. The clinical evidence was derived from BRIM 3 (BRAF Inhibitor in Melanoma 3), a well-designed, multi-centre, multi-national, phase III, randomised controlled trial (RCT). Clinical outcome results from the October 2011 data cut showed that median overall survival for patients treated with vemurafenib was 13.2 months compared with 9.6 months for those treated with dacarbazine. The ERG's main concern with the trial was the potential for confounding because of the early introduction of the crossover from the comparator drug to vemurafenib or another BRAF inhibitor. The submitted incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER

  10. Phase I dose-finding study of sorafenib with FOLFOX4 as first-line treatment in patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Yihebali; Yang, Jianliang; Yang, Sheng; Sun, Yongkun; Jia, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and efficacy of sorafenib in combination with FOLFOX4 (oxaliplatin/leucovorin (LV)/5-fluorouracil) as first-line treatment for advanced gastric cancer, we performed a phase I dose-finding study in nine evaluable patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. Methods According to modified Fibonacci method, the design of this study was to guide elevation of the sorafenib dosage to the next level (from 200 mg twice daily to 400 mg twice daily and then, if tolerated, 600 mg twice daily). If the patient achieved complete response (CR), partial response (PR) or stable disease (SD) after eight cycles of treatment, combination chemotherapy was scheduled to be discontinued and sorafenib monotherapy continued at the original dose until either disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Results In sorafenib 200 mg twice daily group, DLT was observed in 1 of 6 patients, and in 400 mg twice daily group, it was observed in 2 of 3 patients. Seven of 9 (77.8%) evaluable patients achieved PR, with a median overall survival (OS) of 11.8 [95% confidence interval (CI): 8.9-14.7] months. Common adverse effects include hand-foot syndrome, leukopenia, neutropenia, anorexia, and nausea. Conclusions Twice-daily dosing of sorafenib 200 mg in combination with FOLFOX4 was proven effective and safe for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer, and could be an appropriate dosage for subsequent phase II clinical studies. PMID:26157320

  11. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, or Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  12. Stereotactic Ablative Radiosurgery for Locally Advanced or Recurrent Skull Base Malignancies with Prior External Beam Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Karen M.; Quan, Kimmen; Clump, David A.; Ferris, Robert L.; Heron, Dwight E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is an attractive modality to treat malignancies invading the skull base as it can deliver a highly conformal dose with minimal toxicity. However, variation exists in the prescribed dose and fractionation. The purpose of our study is to examine the local control, survival, and toxicities in SABR for the treatment of previously irradiated malignant skull base tumors. Materials and methods: A total of 31 patients and 40 locally advanced or recurrent head and neck malignancies involving the skull base treated with a common SABR regimen, which delivers a radiation dose of 44 Gy in 5 fractions from January 1st, 2004 to December 31st, 2013, were retrospectively reviewed. The local control rate (LC), progression-free survival rate, overall survival (OS) rate, and toxicities were reported. Results: The median follow-up time of all patients was 11.4 months (range: 0.6–67.2 months). The median tumor volume was 27 cm3 (range: 2.4–205 cm3). All patients received prior external beam radiation therapy with a median radiation dose of 64 Gy (range: 24–75.6 Gy) delivered in 12–42 fractions. Twenty patients had surgeries prior to SABR. Nineteen patients received chemotherapy. Specifically, eight patients received concurrent cetuximab (Erbitux™) with SABR. The median time-to-progression (TTP) was 3.3 months (range: 0–16.9 months). For the 29 patients (93.5%) who died, the median time from the end of first SABR to death was 10.3 months (range: 0.5–41.4 months). The estimated 1-year OS rate was 35%. The estimated 2-year OS rate was 12%. Treatment was well-tolerated without grade 4 or 5 treatment-related toxicities. Conclusion: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy has been shown to achieve low toxicities in locally advanced or recurrent, previously irradiated head and neck malignancies invading the skull base. PMID:25853093

  13. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine and Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Triple Negative Breast Cancer (Currently Accruing Only Triple-negative Breast Cancer Patients Since 6/8/2007)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Borderline Ovarian Surface Epithelial-stromal Tumor; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral

  14. [Advanced rectal cancer in an older patient, in whom metastatic liver lesions were effectively controlled with oral UFT+LV and venous CPT-11 administration--case report].

    PubMed

    Shibaki, Taiichiro; Morimoto, Norio

    2006-06-01

    An 81-year-old man was admitted to our department due to acute ileus. He was diagnosed with sigmoid colon cancer with multiple metastatic lesions in the right lobe of the liver. Two weeks after insertion of an ileus tube, he underwent sigmoidectomy and permanent colostomy. The final diagnosis was stage IV sigmoid colon cancer with metastasis to the omentum. One month after the operation, adjuvant chemotherapy with oral administration of tegafur/uracil compound (UFT) and Leucovorin (LV), and drip venous infusion of irinotecan hydrochloride (CPT-11) was initiated (UFT 300 mg/day for 14 days, LV 75 mg/day for 14 days, CPT-11 90 mg/m(2) on the 1 st day, with 1 course consisting of 21 days). The levels of tumor markers, CA19-9 and CEA, and the size of metastases on CT were reduced remarkably after one and 4 courses of this therapy, respectively. Although the administration was temporarily discontinued due to low-grade nausea, we continued the treatment. Adjuvant chemotherapy with an oral administering agent is favorable for older patients with advanced colorectal cancer to reduce side effects and preserve the quality of life.

  15. Radiosensitization of Chemotherapy-Refractory, Locally Advanced or Locally Recurrent Breast Cancer With Trastuzumab: A Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Janet K.; Halle, Jan; Ferraro, Madlyn; Carey, Lisa; Moore, Dominic T.; Ollila, David; Sartor, Carolyn I.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Trastuzumab (Herceptin), an anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) antibody, has been shown to be an effective radiosensitizer in preclinical studies. The present Phase II trial evaluated trastuzumab plus radiotherapy in patients with HER2-positive, chemotherapy-refractory, locally advanced or locoregionally recurrent breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had measurable disease, normal cardiac function, and biopsy-confirmed residual HER2-positive disease. Patients received weekly trastuzumab (2 mg/kg intravenously), concurrent with radiotherapy (50 Gy) to the breast and regional lymph nodes for 5 weeks. If feasible, surgery followed radiotherapy. The primary endpoint was safety, and the secondary endpoint was efficacy (pathologic response and interval to symptomatic local progression). Results: Of the 19 patients enrolled, 7 were ineligible and received radiotherapy alone and 12 received therapy per protocol. Of these 12 patients, 11 had a Stage T4 diagnosis. Grade 3 toxicities included skin (n = 2) and lymphopenia (n = 1). One patient experienced delayed wound healing after surgery. No patients developed symptomatic cardiac dysfunction. Of the 7 patients who had undergone mastectomy, 3 (43%) had a substantial pathologic response (complete response or microscopic residual disease), significantly more than a comparison cohort (2 of 38 or 5%, p = .02). The median interval to symptomatic local progression was not reached. The median overall survival was 39 months. Conclusion: This is the first prospective trial providing evidence for a radiosensitizing effect of trastuzumab in breast cancer. The combination of trastuzumab and radiotherapy was well tolerated.

  16. Phase II study of necitumumab plus modified FOLFOX6 as first-line treatment in patients with locally advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Elez, E; Hendlisz, A; Delaunoit, T; Sastre, J; Cervantes, A; Varea, R; Chao, G; Wallin, J; Tabernero, J

    2016-01-01

    Background: This single-arm phase II study investigated the EGFR monoclonal antibody necitumumab plus modified FOLFOX6 (mFOLFOX6) in first-line treatment of locally advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Methods: Patients received 800-mg intravenous necitumumab (day 1; 2-week cycles), followed by oxaliplatin 85 mg m−2, folinic acid 400 mg m−2, and 5-fluorouracil (400 mg m−2 bolus then 2400 mg m−2 over 46 h). Radiographic evaluation was performed every 8 weeks until progression. Primary endpoint was objective response rate. Results: Forty-four patients were enrolled and treated. Objective response rate was 63.6% (95% confidence interval 47.8–77.6); complete response was observed in four patients; median duration of response was 10.0 months (7.0–16.0). Median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 22.5 (11.0–30.0) and 10.0 months (7.0–12.0), respectively. Clinical outcome was better in patients with KRAS exon 2 wild type (median OS 30.0 months (23.0–NA); median PFS 12.0 (8.0–20.0)), compared with KRAS exon 2 mutant tumours (median OS 7.0 months (5.0–37.0); median PFS 7.0 (4.0–18.0)). The most common grade ⩾3 adverse events were neutropenia (29.5%), asthenia (27.3%), and rash (20.5%). Conclusion: First-line necitumumab+mFOLFOX6 was active with manageable toxicity in locally advanced or mCRC; additional evaluation of the impact of tumour RAS mutation status is warranted. PMID:26766738

  17. BRCA1 loss pre-existing in small subpopulations of prostate cancer is associated with advanced disease and metastatic spread to lymph nodes and peripheral blood

    SciTech Connect

    Bednarz, Natalia; Eltze, Elke; Semjonow, Axel; Rink, Michael; Andreas, Antje; Mulder, Lennart; Hannemann, Juliane; Fisch, Margit; Pantel, Klaus; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Bielawski, Krzysztof P.; Brandt, Burkhard

    2010-03-19

    A recent study concluded that serum prostate specific antigen (PSA)-based screening is beneficial for reducing the lethality of PCa, but was also associated with a high risk of 'overdiagnosis'. Nevertheless, also PCa patients who suffered from organ confined tumors and had negative bone scans succumb to distant metastases after complete tumor resection. It is reasonable to assume that those tumors spread to other organs long before the overt manifestation of metastases. Our current results confirm that prostate tumors are highly heterogeneous. Even a small subpopulation of cells bearing BRCA1 losses can initiate PCa cell regional and distant dissemination indicating those patients which might be at high risk of metastasis. A preliminary study performed on a small cohort of multifocal prostate cancer (PCa) detected BRCA1 allelic imbalances (AI) among circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The present analysis was aimed to elucidate the biological and clinical role of BRCA1 losses on metastatic spread and tumor progression in prostate cancer patients. Experimental Design: To map molecular progression in PCa outgrowth we used FISH analysis of tissue microarrays (TMA), lymph node sections and CTC from peripheral blood. We found that 14% of 133 tested patients carried monoallelic BRCA1 loss in at least one tumor focus. Extended molecular analysis of chr17q revealed that this aberration was often a part of larger cytogenetic rearrangement involving chr17q21 accompanied by AI of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN and lack of the BRCA1 promoter methylation. The BRCA1 losses correlated with advanced T stage (p < 0.05), invasion to pelvic lymph nodes (LN, p < 0.05) as well as BR (p < 0.01). Their prevalence was twice as high within 62 LN metastases (LNMs) as in primary tumors (27%, p < 0.01). The analysis of 11 matched primary PCa-LNM pairs confirmed the suspected transmission of genetic abnormalities between those two sites. In 4 of 7 patients with metastatic disease, BRCA1 losses

  18. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Docetaxel With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Uterine Leiomyosarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-11

    Recurrent Uterine Corpus Sarcoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIC Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVB Uterine Sarcoma; Uterine Corpus Leiomyosarcoma

  19. TORC1/2 Inhibitor MLN0128 and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent Glioblastoma or Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Adult Glioblastoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  20. Immunoendocrine therapy with low-dose subcutaneous interleukin-2 plus melatonin of locally advanced or metastatic endocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Lissoni, P; Barni, S; Tancini, G; Mainini, E; Piglia, F; Maestroni, G J; Lewinski, A

    1995-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that endocrine tumors are under an endocrine and an immune regulation, and that biotherapies with interferon or the long-acting somatostatin analog octreotide may be effective in the control of tumor growth and clinical symptomatology. Within the biotherapies of tumors, interleukin-2(IL-2) has appeared to play an essential role in the antitumor immune response. Despite its important antitumor role, very few studies have been carried out to investigate the possible use of IL-2 in the treatment of advanced endocrine tumors. Its potential toxicity would represent the main limiting factor for the clinical experiments with IL-2. Our previous studies have shown that the pineal hormone melatonin (MLT) may amplify the antitumor activity of IL-2, either through immunomodulating mechanisms or through a direct cytostatic activity by inhibiting tumor growth factor production. On this basis, we have performed a phase II pilot study with low-dose IL-2 plus MLT in 14 patients with untreatable endocrine tumors because of disseminated disease, lack of response to previous standard biotherapies or chemotherapies, or tumors for whom no effective therapy is available. Thyroid cancers, carcinoid and endodrine pancreatic tumors were the most frequent neoplasms. IL-2 was given at 3 million IU/day s.c. at 8 p.m. for 6 days/week for 4 weeks, corresponding to one cycle. MLT was given orally at 40 mg/day at 8 p.m. every day. In nonprogressed patients, a second cycle was given after a 21-day rest period. Patients were considered as evaluable when they received at least one complete cycle, and 12 patients were fully evaluable. According to WHO criteria, a partial response was achieved in 3/12 (25%) patients (carcinoid tumor: 1; neuroendocrine lung tumor: 1; pancreatic islet cell tumor: 1). Another patient with gastrinoma had a more than 50% reduction of tumor markers. Toxicity was low in all patients. This preliminary study suggests that low-dose IL-2 immunotherapy in

  1. Effects on quality of life of weekly docetaxel-based chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer: results of a single-centre randomized phase 3 trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To evaluate whether weekly schedules of docetaxel-based chemotherapy were superior to 3-weekly ones in terms of quality of life in locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer. Methods Patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer, aged ≤ 70 years, performance status 0-2, chemotherapy-naive for metastatic disease, were eligible. They were randomized to weekly or 3-weekly combination of docetaxel and epirubicin, if they were not treated with adjuvant anthracyclines, or docetaxel and capecitabine, if treated with adjuvant anthracyclines. Primary end-point was global quality of life change at 6-weeks, measured by EORTC QLQ-C30. With two-sided alpha 0.05 and 80% power for 35% effect size, 130 patients per arm were needed. Results From February 2004 to March 2008, 139 patients were randomized, 70 to weekly and 69 to 3-weekly arm; 129 and 89 patients filled baseline and 6-week questionnaires, respectively. Global quality of life was better in the 3-weekly arm (p = 0.03); patients treated with weekly schedules presented a significantly worsening in role functioning and financial scores (p = 0.02 and p < 0.001). Neutropenia and stomatitis were worse in the 3-weekly arm, where two toxic deaths were observed. Overall response rate was 39.1% and 33.3% in 3-weekly and weekly arms; hazard ratio of progression was 1.29 (95% CI: 0.84-1.97) and hazard ratio of death was 1.38 (95% CI: 0.82-2.30) in the weekly arm. Conclusions In this trial, the weekly schedules of docetaxel-based chemotherapy appear to be inferior to the 3-weekly one in terms of quality of life in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00540800. PMID:21324184

  2. Is the routine use of bevacizumab in the treatment of women with advanced or recurrent cancer of the cervix sustainable?

    PubMed Central

    Klag, Natalie; Walter, Adam C; Sheely, Kristen M; Manahan, Kelly J; Geisler, John P

    2016-01-01

    Background New chemotherapy combinations are being tested for the treatment of women with advanced, persistent or recurrent cervical cancer. We sought to evaluate the cost effectiveness of some newer combination therapies in cervical cancer. Patients and methods A cost effectiveness decision model was used to analyze Gynecologic Oncology Group 240. All regimens were modeled for seven cycles. The regimens studied are as follows: regimen 1, cisplatin/paclitaxel (CP); regimen 2, CP with bevacizumab (CP+B); regimen 3, paclitaxel/topotecan (PT); and regimen 4, PT with bevacizumab (PT+B). Overall survival, cost, and complications were studied. Sensitivity analyses were performed. Results Mean chemotherapy costs over mean total costs for seven cycles of each follows: CP $571/$32,966; CP+B $61,671/$96,842; PT $9,211/$71,620; and PT+B $70,312/$109,211. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for CP+B was $133,559/quality adjusted life year (QALY). ICER for PT+B was $124,576/QALY. To achieve an incremental ICER for CP+B:CP of <$50,000/QALY gained, the mean overall survival has to increase from 1.1 years with CP to 3.5 years with CP+B. An ICER <$50,000/QALY for the other regimens would take a survival of >10 years for PT and 4.1 years for PT+B. Treating 1,000 women with cervical cancer with CP+B would cost almost double the cost of treating >18,000 women with ovarian cancer annually (carboplatin/paclitaxel). Conclusion CP is the most cost effective regimen. A 12-month increase in overall survival will not even make the newer combinations cost effective. Currently, the use of bevacizumab is not sustainable at today’s costs. PMID:27382318

  3. Intraarterial Chemotherapy or Chemoembolization for Locally Advanced and/or Recurrent Hepatic Tumors: Evaluation of the Feeding Artery with an Interventional CT System

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Toshinori; Korogi, Yukunori; Ono, Ken; Maruoka, Kousei; Harada, Kazunori; Aridomi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Mutsumasa

    2001-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of an interventional CT system for intraarterial chemotherapy or chemoembolization for locally advanced and/or recurrent hepatic tumors.Methods: Thirty-eight patients with locally advanced or recurrent hepatic tumors underwent 73 intraarterial contrast-enhanced CT (IA-CECT) examinations immediately before chemotherapy or chemoembolization. The degree of tumor vascularity on angiography and enhancement on IA-CECT was classified into three grades: no, mild, or marked vascularity. The IA-CECT grades were compared with the angiographic grades.Results: Twenty-nine (69%) of 42 examinations that were interpreted as having no or mild vascularity on angiography were classified as marked enhancement on IA-CECT. Based on IA-CECT findings, the position of the catheter was changed in 14 (19%) of 73 CT examinations. The reasons for the reposition were as follows: weak or no enhancement of the tumor (n = 11) or strong enhancement of the gallbladder wall (n = 3). The treatment strategy was changed in three patients (8%). No major complications relating to the interventional procedures were observed.Conclusions: IA-CECT is a reliable method when evaluating the perfusion of the tumor and adjacent normal tissues. The interventional CT system is useful for performing safe and effective intraarterial chemotherapy or chemoembolization in patients with locally advanced and/or recurrent hepatic tumors.

  4. Outcomes in a Multi-institutional Cohort of Patients Treated With Intraoperative Radiation Therapy for Advanced or Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Paly, Jonathan J.; Hallemeier, Christopher L.; Biggs, Peter J.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Roeder, Falk; Martínez-Monge, Rafael; Whitson, Jared; Calvo, Felipe A.; Fastner, Gerd; Sedlmayer, Felix; Wong, William W.; Ellis, Rodney J.; Haddock, Michael G.; Choo, Richard; Shipley, William U.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Efstathiou, Jason A.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): This study aimed to analyze outcomes in a multi-institutional cohort of patients with advanced or recurrent renal cell carcinoma (RCC) who were treated with intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). Methods and Materials: Between 1985 and 2010, 98 patients received IORT for advanced or locally recurrent RCC at 9 institutions. The median follow-up time for surviving patients was 3.5 years. Overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Chained imputation accounted for missing data, and multivariate Cox hazards regression tested significance. Results: IORT was delivered during nephrectomy for advanced disease (28%) or during resection of locally recurrent RCC in the renal fossa (72%). Sixty-nine percent of the patients were male, and the median age was 58 years. At the time of primary resection, the T stages were as follows: 17% T1, 12% T2, 55% T3, and 16% T4. Eighty-seven percent of the patients had a visibly complete resection of tumor. Preoperative or postoperative external beam radiation therapy was administered to 27% and 35% of patients, respectively. The 5-year OS was 37% for advanced disease and 55% for locally recurrent disease. The respective 5-year DSS was 41% and 60%. The respective 5-year DFS was 39% and 52%. Initial nodal involvement (hazard ratio [HR] 2.9-3.6, P<.01), presence of sarcomatoid features (HR 3.7-6.9, P<.05), and higher IORT dose (HR 1.3, P<.001) were statistically significantly associated with decreased survival. Adjuvant systemic therapy was associated with decreased DSS (HR 2.4, P=.03). For locally recurrent tumors, positive margin status (HR 2.6, P=.01) was associated with decreased OS. Conclusions: We report the largest known cohort of patients with RCC managed by IORT and have identified several factors associated with survival. The outcomes for patients receiving IORT in the setting of local recurrence compare favorably to

  5. Early hormonal data from a multicentre phase II trial using transdermal oestrogen patches as first-line hormonal therapy in patients with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Langley, Ruth E.; Godsland, Ian F.; Kynaston, Howard; Clarke, Noel W.; Rosen, Stuart D.; Morgan, Rachel C.; Pollock, Philip; Kockelbergh, Roger; Lalani, El-Nasir; Dearnaley, David; Parmar, Mahesh; Abel, Paul D.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the hormonal effects of Fem7® (Merck, KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany) 100 μg transdermal oestrogen patches on men undergoing first-line androgen-deprivation therapy for prostate cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS PATCH is a multicentre, randomized, phase II trial for men with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer, comparing luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist therapy with oestrogen patches. To assess the dosing schedule for the patches, as this was the first time that this brand of patch had been used in men, and to reassure patients and participating clinicians, the Independent Data Monitoring Committee agreed to early release of hormonal data from this study. RESULTS Oestradiol, testosterone and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels are presented for the first group of 14 patients who received the patches (with 1 withdrawal) and for whom there were ≥12 weeks of follow-up by March 2007. After 12 weeks, testosterone levels (nmol/L) in eight of the 13 patients were <1.7, two were 1.7–2 and three were >2. The median (range) serum oestradiol levels was 442 (52.1–1542) pmol/L and all patients had a PSA response, with eight having a PSA level of <4 ng/mL. CONCLUSION These results confirm that oestrogen patches produce castrate levels of testosterone and concomitant PSA responses. They also highlighted the potential differences between different brands of oestrogen patches, and the need to monitor hormonal response, toxicity and efficacy until more experience with oestrogen patches for this clinical indication is obtained. The number of patches recommended in the PATCH study has now been increased. PMID:18422771

  6. Metastatic Chordoma: Report of the Two Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rohatgi, Saurabh; Ramaiya, Nikhil H; Jagannathan, Jyothi P.; Howard, Stephanie A.; Shinagare, Atul B.; Krajewski, Katherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Chordomas are rare malignant bone tumours with a predilection for the axial skeleton, especially the sacrum and skull base. Median survival in patients with metastatic disease is usually dismal. Treatment is challenging due to the propensity for local recurrence, metastatic disease as well as lack of clear consensus regarding the optimal management. Our case report highlights two cases of sacral chordoma with locally recurrent and widespread metastatic disease, stable on molecular targeted therapy. PMID:26180502

  7. Everolimus and Vatalanib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-21

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Pheochromocytoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  8. Temsirolimus With or Without Megestrol Acetate and Tamoxifen Citrate in Treating Patients With Advanced, Persistent, or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-11

    Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC1 Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC2 Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  9. Long-Term Outcomes After Maximal Surgical Resection and Intraoperative Electron Radiotherapy for Locoregionally Recurrent or Locoregionally Advanced Primary Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hallemeier, Christopher L.; Choo, Richard; Davis, Brian J.; Pisansky, Thomas M.; Gunderson, Leonard L.; Leibovich, Bradley C.; Haddock, Michael G.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes of a multimodality therapy combining maximal surgical resection and intraoperative electron radiotherapy (IOERT) for patients with locoregionally (LR) recurrent renal cell carcinoma (RCC) after radical nephrectomy or LR advanced primary RCC. Methods and Materials: From 1989 through 2005, a total of 22 patients with LR recurrent (n = 19) or LR advanced primary (n = 3) RCC were treated with this multimodality approach. The median patient age was 63 years (range 46-78). Twenty-one patients (95%) received perioperative external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) with a median dose of 4,500 cGy (range, 4,140-5,500). Surgical resection was R0 (negative margins) in 5 patients (23%) and R1 (residual microscopic disease) in 17 patients (77%). The median IOERT dose delivered was 1,250 cGy (range, 1,000-2,000). Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) and relapse patterns were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up for surviving patients was 9.9 years (range, 3.6-20 years). The OS and DFS at 1, 5, and 10 years were 91%, 40%, and 35% and 64%, 31%, and 31%, respectively. Central recurrence (within the IOERT field), LR relapse (tumor bed or regional lymph nodes), and distant metastases at 5 years were 9%, 27%, and 64%, respectively. Mortality within 30 days of surgery and IOERT was 0%. Five patients (23%) experienced acute or late National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (NCI-CTCAE) Version 4 Grade 3 to 5 toxicities. Conclusions: In patients with LR recurrent or LR advanced primary RCC, a multimodality approach of perioperative EBRT, maximal surgical resection, and IOERT yielded encouraging results. This regimen warrants further investigation.

  10. Recurrent recurrent gallstone ileus.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Z; Ahmed, M S; Alexander, D J; Miller, G V; Chintapatla, S

    2010-07-01

    We describe the second reported case of three consecutive episodes of gallstone ileus and ask the question whether recurrent gallstone ileus justifies definitive surgery to the fistula itself or can be safely managed by repeated enterotomies.

  11. Everolimus, Erlotinib Hydrochloride, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer Previously Treated With Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Cancer

  12. Rectal Neuroendocrine Tumor G1 with a Solitary Hepatic Metastatic Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Kohei; Tajiri, Kazuto; Shimada, Seitarou; Ando, Takayuki; Hosokawa, Ayumu; Matsui, Koshi; Imura, Joji; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2017-01-01

    Rectal neuroendocrine tumor (NET) is a relatively rare tumor. NET is classified as G1, G2, or G3 according to the degree of mitosis or Ki-67 proliferation index, which reflect the malignant potential of the tumor, such as metastasis. Advanced cases with metastasis are indicated for chemotherapy treatment. However, the efficacy of chemotherapy is limited. Therefore, resection is considered, even in metastatic cases, if complete resection is possible. We herein report a case of small rectal NET discovered with hepatic metastasis classified as G1. The patient showed good progress with no recurrence after undergoing hepatectomy and endoscopic resection of rectal NET. PMID:28154272

  13. Efficacy and safety of adding an agent to bevacizumab/taxane regimens for the first-line treatment of Her2-negative patients with locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer: results from seven randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoqun; Liu, Xiangdong; Qiao, Tiankui; Chen, Wei; Yuan, Sujuan

    2016-01-01

    Background The combined therapy of bevacizumab (BEV) with taxane (paclitaxel or docetaxel) has shown an improvement on progression-free survival (PFS) and objective remission in Her2-negative patients with locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer (LR/MBC). However, there was no benefit in overall survival (OS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of adding an agent to the BEV/taxane regimens for the treatment of Her2-negative patients with LR/MBC in a first-line setting. Materials and methods We searched PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, EBSCO, and the Cochrane Library databases for eligible trials. A meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager 5.0 freeware package. We calculated the hazard ratio (HR) for PFS and OS. The odds ratio (OR) was used to calculate objective response rate (ORR) and grade 3/4 drug-related adverse events. The heterogeneity of study outcomes was calculated by the χ2 test or I2 statistics. Results A total of 1,124 patients from seven randomized controlled trials were analyzed. Our meta-analysis showed that the ORR was significantly improved in the BEV/taxane-based triplet group when compared with the BEV/taxane-based doublet group (OR =1.31, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03–1.67, P=0.03). A subset analysis showed that a similar result was achieved in the triplet group in which a cytotoxic agent was added (OR =1.46, 95% CI: 1.09–1.95, P=0.01). However, the PFS and OS had no statistically significant differences between the two groups (HR =0.87, 95% CI: 0.68–1.13, P=0.31; HR =0.98, 95% CI: 0.82–1.16, P=0.78, respectively). Regarding safety, thromboembolic events, fatigue, and diarrhea (all $grade 3) were more frequently observed in the BEV/taxane-based triplet group (OR =3.8, 95% CI: 1.86–7.79, P=0.0003; OR =1.55, 95% CI: 1.05–2.27, P=0.03; OR =2.1, 95% CI: 1.29–3.41, P=0.003, respectively). Other toxic effects had no statistically significant differences between the two groups. Conclusion Our

  14. Mayo Clinic Cancer Center Experience of Metastatic Extramammary Paget Disease 1998-2012

    PubMed Central

    Padrnos, Leslie; Karlin, Nina; Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R.

    2016-01-01

    Extramammary Paget disease (EMPD) is a rare cutaneous malignancy. The most common presentation of EMPD is the vulva followed by perianal involvement. Most cases are localized to the dermis with treatment focused on surgery, topical treatment or radiotherapy. Recurrence is frequent despite therapies utilized. Metastatic extramammary Paget disease is uncommon and, as such, standard treatment guidelines do not exist. This study sought to evaluate the treatment regimens and outcomes of patients treated at a Mayo Clinic Center from 1998-2012. Cancer registry inquiry revealed 261 patients with report advanced Paget disease during these years. Ten cases of metastatic EPMD were identified with sufficient documentation for review. This review reveals support for utilizing localized radiation therapy for bulky disease sequentially with systemic chemotherapy consisting of carboplatin and paclitaxel or irinotecan. Further studies are necessary to define the optimal treatment regimen. PMID:27994832

  15. Mayo Clinic Cancer Center Experience of Metastatic Extramammary Paget Disease 1998-2012.

    PubMed

    Padrnos, Leslie; Karlin, Nina; Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R

    2016-11-17

    Extramammary Paget disease (EMPD) is a rare cutaneous malignancy. The most common presentation of EMPD is the vulva followed by perianal involvement. Most cases are localized to the dermis with treatment focused on surgery, topical treatment or radiotherapy. Recurrence is frequent despite therapies utilized. Metastatic extramammary Paget disease is uncommon and, as such, standard treatment guidelines do not exist. This study sought to evaluate the treatment regimens and outcomes of patients treated at a Mayo Clinic Center from 1998-2012. Cancer registry inquiry revealed 261 patients with report advanced Paget disease during these years. Ten cases of metastatic EPMD were identified with sufficient documentation for review. This review reveals support for utilizing localized radiation therapy for bulky disease sequentially with systemic chemotherapy consisting of carboplatin and paclitaxel or irinotecan. Further studies are necessary to define the optimal treatment regimen.

  16. Carboplatin, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Mifepristone in Treating Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer or Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-28

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  17. Cytoreductive Surgery plus Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy to Treat Advanced/Recurrent Epithelial Ovarian Cancer: Results from a Retrospective Study on Prospectively Established Database1

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian-Hua; Ji, Zhong-He; Yu, Yang; Wu, Hai-Tao; Huang, Chao-Qun; Zhang, Qian; Yang, Xiao-Jun; Yonemura, Yutaka; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite the best standard treatment, optimal cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and platinum/taxane-based chemotherapy, prognosis of advanced epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) remains poor. Recently, CRS plus hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) has been developed to treat peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC). This study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CRS+HIPEC to treat PC from advanced/recurrent EOC. METHODS: Forty-six PC patients from advanced EOC (group A) or recurrent EOC (group B) were treated by 50 CRS+HIPEC procedures. The primary endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS); the secondary endpoints were safety profiles. RESULTS: The median OS was 74.0 months [95% confidence interval (CI) 8.5-139.5] for group A versus 57.5 months (95% CI 29.8-85.2) for group B (P = .68). The median PFS was not reached for group A versus 8.5 months (95% CI 0-17.5) for group B (P = .034). Better median OS correlated with peritoneal cancer index (PCI) < 20 (76.6 months for PCI ≤ 20 group vs 38.5 months for PCI > 20 group, P = .01), complete cyroreduction (residual disease ≤ 2.5 mm) [79.5 months for completeness of cytoreduction (CC) score 0-1 vs 24.3 months for CC 2-3, P = .00], and sensitivity to platinum (65.3 months for platinum-sensitive group vs 20.0 for platinum-resistant group, P = .05). Serious adverse events occurred in five patients (10.0%). Multivariate analysis identified CC score as the only independent factor for better survival. CONCLUSION: For advanced/recurrent EOC, CRS+HIPEC could improve OS with acceptable safety. PMID:27084429

  18. The prognostic values of CYP2B6 genetic polymorphisms and metastatic sites for advanced breast cancer patients treated with docetaxel and thiotepa.

    PubMed

    Song, Qingkun; Zhou, Xinna; Yu, Jing; Dong, Ningning; Wang, Xiaoli; Yang, Huabing; Ren, Jun; Lyerly, H Kim

    2015-11-25

    This study investigated interactive effects of CYP2B6 genotypes and liver metastasis on the prognosis of metastatic breast cancer patients who received combined chemotherapy of docetaxel and thiotepa. Totally 153 patients were retrospectively genotyped rs8192719 (c.1294 + 53C > T) and rs2279343 (c.785A > G). Kaplan-Meier method and Cox Proportional Hazard Regression model were used to estimate the survival. Patients with liver metastasis had worsen prognosis, conferring a 2.26-fold high risk of progression and 1.93-fold high risk of death (p < 0.05). Both CT/TT genotype of rs8192719 (c.1294 +  3C > T) and AG genotype of rs2279343 (c.785A > G) prolonged survival (p < 0.05). Furthermore, among liver metastatic patients, AG genotype of rs2279343 (c.785A > G) was associated with a 47% reduced risk of death and a 6-month-longer overall survival (p < 0.05). Among non-liver metastatic patients, hazard ratios of CT/TT genotype of rs8192719 (c.1294 + 53C > T) were 0.45 for progression and 0.40 for death; and the corresponding survival was improved by 6 months and 16 months, respectively (p < 0.05). Genotypes of CYP2B6 had an interaction with clinical efficacy of docetaxel and thiotepa on metastatic breast cancer patients; and metastatic sites also affected clinical responses. Further therapies should take into account of chemotherapy regimen, genotypes of metabolizing enzymes and metastatic sites for the particular subpopulation.

  19. Genomic Sequencing in Determining Treatment in Patients With Metastatic Cancer or Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Metastatic Neoplasm; Recurrent Neoplasm; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Unresectable Malignant Neoplasm

  20. Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Pleura: A Rare Complication of Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    PubMed Central

    Joglekar, Kiran; Jackson, Christopher; Kadaria, Dipen; Sodhi, Amik

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 46 Final Diagnosis: Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma Symptoms: Short of breath Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Pleural biopsy Specialty: Oncology Objective: Rare disease Background: Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), also known as Marjolin ulcer, is a rare complication of hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Metastatic SCC from HS typically involves the axial skeleton or abdominopelvic viscera. Metastatic disease to the lungs is a rare phenomenon with only three reported cases of lung parenchyma. We present a biopsy proven case of metastatic SCC to the pleura from gluteal HS. Case Report: A 46-year-old male with a history of recently diagnosed Marjolin ulcer secondary to gluteal HS was transferred to our intensive care unit for acute hypoxemic respiratory failure secondary to recurrent pleural effusion. On examination, patient was febrile (38.3°C), normotensive (blood pressure 98/65 mm Hg), tachycardic (116 beats/minute) and tachypneic (40 breaths/minute) with oxygen saturation of 93% on room air. He was in moderate distress requiring endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. Chest examination revealed decreased breath sounds bilaterally and skin examination was significant for 18 cm wide sacral lesion. CT thorax showed bilateral pleural effusions, pleural thickening, and scattered nodular densities within both lungs concerning for metastatic disease. Thoracentesis showed lymphocyte predominant exudate with negative cytology for malignant cells. A video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) illustrated thickened pleural rind with histopathology and positive p40 stain consistent with invasive well-to-moderately differentiated keratinizing SCC. Conclusions: SCC arising from HS is rare and metastatic disease to the pleura has not been reported previously. Strong clinical suspicion for malignancy is warranted in patients with advanced HS and evolving pulmonary symptoms despite negative cytology. PMID:28028308

  1. Treatment of Advanced or Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma with Doxorubicin in Patients Progressing after Paclitaxel/Carboplatin: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) Experience from 1995-2009

    PubMed Central

    Makker, Vicky; Hensley, Martee L.; Zhou, Qin; Iasonos, Alexia; Aghajanian, Carol. A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Long-term survival for patients with advanced endometrial carcinoma is poor, and limited options exist for the management of recurrent disease. Our goal was to investigate the activity of doxorubicin in the second-line setting in patients who progressed after paclitaxel/carboplatin adjuvant treatment. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients with recurrent endometrial carcinoma who were treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center from 1995-2009, and who received paclitaxel/carboplatin adjuvant chemotherapy followed by second-line doxorubicin therapy at time of recurrence. The median PFS and OS times following paclitaxel/carboplatin and following second-line doxorubicin therapy were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was assessed by the treating physician at each visit and graded using version 4.0 of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). Patient presentation, treatment, patterns of recurrence, and patient outcomes were summarized. Results Seventeen patients were included in study analyses. The median PFS from completion of paclitaxel/carboplatin was 8.0 months (95% CI: 4.5-13.6 months). At the time of recurrence, all 17 patients were treated with doxorubicin as second-line therapy. No patient achieved objective response of stable disease. The median PFS of this cohort following doxorubicin treatment was 2.1 months (95% CI: 0.95-2.7) months. Median OS was 5.8 months (95% CI: 1.0-15.0 months). There is only one patient still alive; her median follow-up time is 49.4 months. Predominant doxorubicin-related grade 2 toxicities included nausea/vomiting (18.8%), fatigue (18.8%), and neutropenia (12.5%). No grade 3 or 4 toxicities occurred. Conclusions Among patients with advanced endometrial carcinoma who had received adjuvant paclitaxel/carboplatin, treatment with doxorubicin at time of disease recurrence failed to achieve any objective responses and was associated with a very short (2 months) time to

  2. [A patient with advanced recurrent breast cancer who firmly resisted hair loss and was then treated by combination therapy with high-dose toremifene and capecitabine].

    PubMed

    Akahane, Tsutomu; Chiba, Tomofumi; Yano, Hideshi; Hashimoto, Yu

    2007-03-01

    The patient was a 36-year-old woman, who found a mass in her right breast around April 2002, visited a physician in June, and was referred to our department because of suspected right breast cancer. It was confirmed that the cancer had metastasized to the right axillary lymph nodes and the skin of the right breast. After undergoing an operation on July 11 (Bt+Ax), the patient was placed on tamoxifen (TAM). Then, the course was followed while the patient was treated with CEF and 5'-DFUR. In April 2004, she had a recurrence manifesting itself as bone metastasis, partly because of poor compliance with the hospital-visit and dosing schedules. After chemotherapy with paclitaxel, etc., combination therapy with docetaxel (DOC), capecitabine, and high-dose (120 mg/day) toremifene (TOR) was started on October 15, 2004. Subsequently, because the patient firmly resisted hair loss, chemotherapy was continued with a double-drug regimen with capecitabine and high-dose TOR. Treatment was temporarily discontinued because the patient developed hand-foot syndrome, which was probably attributable to capecitabine, but the symptoms improved after administration of vitamin B(6). Thereafter,the patient complied well with the dosing schedule, and no new metastatic focus has been detected by any examination as of October 2005. These findings suggest that the double-drug regimen with capecitabine and high-dose TOR is an effective treatment for patients who can not be treated with anthracyclines or taxanes.

  3. Pilot Trial of CRLX101 in Treatment of Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Stomach, Gastroesophageal, or Esophageal Cancer That Cannot be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  4. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-13

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  5. Pretreatment Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio: A Predictor of Advanced Prostate Cancer and Biochemical Recurrence in Patients Receiving Radical Prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gui-Ming; Zhu, Yao; Ma, Xiao-Cheng; Qin, Xiao-Jian; Wan, Fang-Ning; Dai, Bo; Sun, Li-Jiang; Ye, Ding-Wei

    2015-10-01

    The pretreatment neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is reportedly associated with the clinical outcomes of many cancers. However, it has not been widely investigated whether the pretreatment NLR is associated with the pathological characteristics of prostate cancer (PCa) and biochemical recurrence in PCa patients receiving radical prostatectomy (RP).In this cohort study, a total of 1688 PCa patients who had undergone RP were analyzed retrospectively, and a subset of 237 of these patients were evaluated to determine the relationship between pretreatment NLR and biochemical recurrence. Patients were divided into a high-NLR group (NLR ≥2.36) and a low-NLR group (NLR < 2.36) according to the pretreatment NLR. The association between the pretreatment NLR and pathological stage and lymph node involvement was evaluated using logistic regression analysis. Time of biochemical recurrence was determined using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox's proportional hazard regression model was used to compare the time of biochemical recurrence between the groups.As compared with patients in the low-NLR group, those in the high-NLR group had an increased risk of pT3-4 disease (odds ratio (OR), 1.883; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.419-2.500; P < 0.001), and a 1.7-fold increased risk of lymph node involvement (OR, 1.685; 95% CI, 1.101-2.579; P = 0.016). For the subset of 237 patients, those with a high NLR showed a significantly shorter median biochemical recurrence-free survival time (51.9 months) than those with a low NLR (76.5 months; log-rank test, P = 0.019). However, multivariate analysis indicated that the NLR was not an independent predictor of biochemical recurrence (hazard ratio, 1.388; 95% CI, 0.909-2.118; P = 0.129).Our findings suggest that the pretreatment NLR may be associated with pathological stage and lymph node involvement in PCa patients receiving RP, and that PCa patients with a high NLR may have a higher rate of biochemical recurrence following

  6. Selumetinib and Akt Inhibitor MK-2206 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Advanced Gallbladder or Bile Duct Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-08

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adenocarcinoma With Squamous Metaplasia of the Gallbladder; Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Stage II Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IVA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IVB Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

  7. Sorafenib therapy following resection prolongs disease-free survival in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma at a high risk of recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yadi; Zheng, Yun; He, Wei; Li, Qijiong; Shen, Jingxian; Hong, Jian; Zou, Ruhai; Qiu, Jiliang; Li, Binkui; Yuan, Yunfei

    2017-01-01

    Sorafenib is the standard systemic treatment for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC); however, its therapeutic value in patients with HCC following resection remains controversial. The current retrospective study was undertaken to assess the effects of sorafenib treatment following surgical resection in patients with advanced HCC disease who were at a high risk for recurrence. Between July 2010 and July 2013, a consecutive cohort of 42 patients with advanced HCC and at a high risk of recurrence (i.e., those with portal vein tumor thrombosis, adjacent organ involvement or tumor rupture) who underwent resection were analyzed. The patients were categorized into the sorafenib group (n=14) or the best supportive care (BSC) group (n=28). Although the histological grade, Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer Stage, tumor size, nodule number and proportion of patients with high serum α-fetoprotein levels were comparable between the sorafenib and BSC groups, those receiving sorafenib following resection had significantly longer disease-free survival (DFS) of 5.2 months [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.2–9.2 months] compared with the BSC group [1.8 months (95% CI, 0.6–3.0 months)]. No differences in overall survival were noted between the groups. Furthermore, no drug-related adverse events resulted in discontinuation of sorafenib therapy. Univariate log-rank analysis revealed that sorafenib treatment (P=0.002) and treatment prior to resection (P=0.012) were significantly associated with longer DFS; however, sorafenib therapy (P=0.027) and tumor size (P=0.028) were associated with longer DFS by multivariate analysis. Furthermore, sorafenib was well-tolerated and improved DFS in patients with advanced HCC who underwent hepatic resection. Thus, tumor resection followed by sorafenib therapy may represent an effective therapeutic strategy for patients with advanced HCC. This possibility should be confirmed in larger, multicenter studies. PMID:28356989

  8. Nivolumab for Metastatic Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A K; Daigle, D

    2016-03-01

    Melanoma is an aggressive skin cancer with a generally poor prognosis at Stage III-IV disease. Traditionally, metastatic melanoma was treated by surgical resection, when possible, and with systemic chemotherapy. New developments in molecular biology have led to the identification of immune checkpoints which are exploited by malignant cells, allowing them to go undetected by the immune system. Nivolumab (Opdivo®) is a human monoclonal antibody which prevents immune inhibition by interacting with PD-1 on tumor cells; thus, increasing tumor-specific T cell proliferation. Nivolumab has demonstrated efficacy superior to that of standard chemotherapy and relative safety in clinical trials. Indeed, the outcomes for patients with advanced melanoma are being improved by novel biologic agents such as nivolumab.

  9. Mucoadhesive Oral Wound Rinse in Preventing and Treating Stomatitis in Patients With ER- or PR-Positive Metastatic or Locally Recurrent Breast Cancer That Cannot be Removed by Surgery Receiving Everolimus

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-07

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Oral Complications; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  10. Iodine I 131 and Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer Previously Treated With Iodine I 131 That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-04

    Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Papillary Thyroid Cancer

  11. The use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to monitor treatment response and disease recurrence in locally advanced rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Carpinetti, Paola; Donnard, Elisa; Bettoni, Fabiana; Asprino, Paula; Koyama, Fernanda; Rozanski, Andrei; Sabbaga, Jorge; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Parmigiani, Raphael B.; Galante, Pedro A.F.; Perez, Rodrigo O.; Camargo, Anamaria A.

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) followed by surgery is the mainstay treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Variable degrees of tumor regression are observed after nCRT and alternative treatment strategies, including close surveillance without immediate surgery, have been investigated to spare patients with complete tumor regression from potentially adverse outcomes of radical surgery. However, clinical and radiological assessment of response does not allow accurate identification of patients with complete response. In addition, surveillance for recurrence is similarly important for these patients, as early detection of recurrence allows salvage resections and adjuvant interventions. We report the use of liquid biopsies and personalized biomarkers for monitoring treatment response to nCRT and detecting residual disease and recurrence in patients with rectal cancer. We sequenced the whole-genome of four rectal tumors to identify patient-specific chromosomal rearrangements that were used to monitor circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in liquid biopsies collected at diagnosis and during nCRT and follow-up. We compared ctDNA levels to clinical, radiological and pathological response to nCRT. Our results indicate that personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies may not be sensitive for the detection of microscopic residual disease. However, it can be efficiently used to monitor treatment response to nCRT and detect disease recurrence, preceding increases in CEA levels and radiological diagnosis. Similar good results were observed when assessing tumor response to systemic therapy and disease progression. Our study supports the use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to tailor the management of rectal cancer patients, however, replication in a larger cohort is necessary to introduce this strategy into clinical practice. PMID:26451609

  12. A phase I study on combined therapy with proton-beam radiotherapy and in situ tumor vaccination for locally advanced recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Proton-beam radiotherapy (PBT) has been shown to be effective to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) as a nonsurgical local treatment option. However, HCC still remains as one of the most difficult cancers to be cured because of frequent recurrences. Thus, methods to inhibit the recurrence need to be explored. To prevent the HCC recurrence, we here report on a prospective phase I study of ‘in situ’ tumor vaccination using CalTUMP, a newly developed immunoadjuvant consisting of BCG extract bound to hydroxyapatite and microparticulated tuberculin, following local PBT for HCC. Methods Patients with locally advanced recurrent HCC, which had been heavily pretreated with various treatments, were enrolled. PBT was performed with the conventional method to the target HCC. Subsequently, CalTUMP was injected into the same irradiated-tumor three times at one-week intervals. Three dose-levels of CalTUMP (1/10, 1/3, and 1/1) were administered to 3 patients each. Vital signs, blood samples, ultrasound, and computed tomographic scans were monitored to evaluate the safety. Results Three intratumoral injections of CalTUMP following PBT (median dose: 72.6 GyE) were accomplished in 9 patients. Transient low-grade fever and minor laboratory changes were observed in 7 patients after CalTUMP injections. No other treatment-related adverse events were observed. Median progression-free survival was 6.0 months (range: 2.1-14.2) and 4 patients were progression-free for more than 1 year. Conclusions Intratumoral injection of CalTUMP following PBT was feasible and safe in patients with heavily pre-treated HCC. Further clinical studies to evaluate the efficacy of this in situ tumor vaccination are warranted. PMID:24131485

  13. The use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to monitor treatment response and disease recurrence in locally advanced rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Carpinetti, Paola; Donnard, Elisa; Bettoni, Fabiana; Asprino, Paula; Koyama, Fernanda; Rozanski, Andrei; Sabbaga, Jorge; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Parmigiani, Raphael B; Galante, Pedro A F; Perez, Rodrigo O; Camargo, Anamaria A

    2015-11-10

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) followed by surgery is the mainstay treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Variable degrees of tumor regression are observed after nCRT and alternative treatment strategies, including close surveillance without immediate surgery, have been investigated to spare patients with complete tumor regression from potentially adverse outcomes of radical surgery. However, clinical and radiological assessment of response does not allow accurate identification of patients with complete response. In addition, surveillance for recurrence is similarly important for these patients, as early detection of recurrence allows salvage resections and adjuvant interventions. We report the use of liquid biopsies and personalized biomarkers for monitoring treatment response to nCRT and detecting residual disease and recurrence in patients with rectal cancer. We sequenced the whole-genome of four rectal tumors to identify patient-specific chromosomal rearrangements that were used to monitor circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in liquid biopsies collected at diagnosis and during nCRT and follow-up. We compared ctDNA levels to clinical, radiological and pathological response to nCRT. Our results indicate that personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies may not be sensitive for the detection of microscopic residual disease. However, it can be efficiently used to monitor treatment response to nCRT and detect disease recurrence, preceding increases in CEA levels and radiological diagnosis. Similar good results were observed when assessing tumor response to systemic therapy and disease progression. Our study supports the use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to tailor the management of rectal cancer patients, however, replication in a larger cohort is necessary to introduce this strategy into clinical practice.

  14. Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Reduces Local Recurrence Rates in Patients With Microscopically Involved Circumferential Resection Margins After Resection of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Alberda, Wijnand J.; Verhoef, Cornelis; Nuyttens, Joost J.; Meerten, Esther van; Rothbarth, Joost; Wilt, Johannes H.W. de; Burger, Jacobus W.A.

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is advocated by some for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) who have involved or narrow circumferential resection margins (CRM) after rectal surgery. This study evaluates the potentially beneficial effect of IORT on local control. Methods and Materials: All surgically treated patients with LARC treated in a tertiary referral center between 1996 and 2012 were analyzed retrospectively. The outcome in patients treated with IORT with a clear but narrow CRM (≤2 mm) or a microscopically involved CRM was compared with the outcome in patients who were not treated with IORT. Results: A total of 409 patients underwent resection of LARC, and 95 patients (23%) had a CRM ≤ 2 mm. Four patients were excluded from further analysis because of a macroscopically involved resection margin. In 43 patients with clear but narrow CRMs, there was no difference in the cumulative 5-year local recurrence-free survival of patients treated with (n=21) or without (n=22) IORT (70% vs 79%, P=.63). In 48 patients with a microscopically involved CRM, there was a significant difference in the cumulative 5-year local recurrence-free survival in favor of the patients treated with IORT (n=31) compared with patients treated without IORT (n=17) (84 vs 41%, P=.01). Multivariable analysis confirmed that IORT was independently associated with a decreased local recurrence rate (hazard ratio 0.24, 95% confidence interval 0.07-0.86). There was no significant difference in complication rate of patients treated with or without IORT (65% vs 52%, P=.18) Conclusion: The current study suggests that IORT reduces local recurrence rates in patients with LARC with a microscopically involved CRM.

  15. A phase I pilot study of the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor pathway modulator AXL1717 in combination with gemcitabine HCl and carboplatin in previously untreated, locally advanced, or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Holgersson, Georg; Bergström, Stefan; Harmenberg, Johan; Ringbom, Magnus; Klockare, Maria; Jerling, Markus; Ekman, Simon; Lundström, Kristina Lamberg; Koyi, Hirsh; Brandén, Eva; Larsson, Olle; Bergqvist, Michael

    2015-04-01

    AXL1717 is an orally bioavailable IGF-1R pathway modulator that has been shown to have anti-tumoral effects. The objectives of the present study were to define maximum tolerated dose and the recommended phase II dose (RPTD) of AXL1717 in combination with gemcitabine HCl and carboplatin in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with previously untreated, locally advanced, or metastatic NSCLC (squamous cell cancer or adenocarcinoma) in good performance status and with preserved major organ functions were enrolled in the study. The study was an open-label phase I study with planned cohorts of three patients per dose level of AXL1717 (215, 290, and 390 mg BID). In total, 12 patients were enrolled in the study, and of these, two were prematurely excluded. AXL1717 was administered at one dose level, 215 mg BID. A total number of 81 unique adverse events were reported. Bone marrow toxicity was reported in 10 out of 12 patients, and this organ class showed the largest number of related events. AXL1717 in combination with gemcitabine HCl and carboplatin is a possible treatment approach in previously untreated, locally advanced, or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. However, due to the bone marrow toxicity profile shown in the present study, further dose increases of AXL1717 above 215 mg BID will probably not be feasible. Therefore, 215 mg BID constitutes maximum tolerated dose and RPTD.

  16. Tamoxifen Citrate or Z-Endoxifen Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic, Estrogen Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-12

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  17. Pembrolizumab and Capecitabine in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Triple Negative or Hormone-Refractory Breast Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-07

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  18. [Efficacy and Safety of the Selective Estrogen Receptor Down-Regulator "Fulvestrant" in Japanese Patients with Advanced, Recurrent, ER-Positive Postmenopausal Breast Cancer].

    PubMed

    Egawa, Chiyomi; Okishiro, Masatsugu; Takatsuka, Yuichi

    2015-07-01

    Fulvestrant is a novel endocrine therapy for breast cancer that exerts both anti-estrogenic and down-regulatory effects by binding to and degrading estrogen receptors (ERs). In the present study, the safety and effectiveness of 500 mg fulvestrant in 69 patients with advanced, recurrent, ER-positive postmenopausal breast cancer were investigated retrospectively. Outcomes were favorable for fulvestrant. The objective response rate was 24.6%, the clinical benefit rate was 49.2%, the median progression-free survival (PFS) was 203 days, and the median overall survival was 794 days. PFS tended to be longer in patients without a history of previous treatment or visceral metastasis. The main adverse events included injection site reactions and hot flushes; however, the majority of these events were mild to moderate. The present findings suggest that, among Japanese patients with advanced, recurrent, ER-positive postmenopausal breast cancer, 500 mg fulvestrant is effective and safe in those without metastasis and a minimal history of receipt of previous treatment regimens.

  19. Gemcitabine, Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin in Metastatic or Unresectable Bladder Cancer With Decreased Kidney Function

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-19

    Distal Urethral Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urethral Cancer Associated With Invasive Bladder Cancer

  20. Long-term survival after high-dose chemotherapy followed by peripheral stem cell rescue for high-risk, locally advanced/inflammatory, and metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    VanderWalde, A; Ye, W; Frankel, P; Asuncion, D; Leong, L; Luu, T; Morgan, R; Twardowski, P; Koczywas, M; Pezner, R; Paz, I B; Margolin, K; Wong, J; Doroshow, J H; Forman, S; Shibata, S; Somlo, G

    2012-08-01

    Patients with high-risk locally advanced/inflammatory and oligometastatic (≤3 sites) breast cancer frequently relapse or experience early progression. High-dose chemotherapy combined with peripheral stem cell rescue may prolong progression-free survival/relapse-free survival (PFS/RFS) and overall survival (OS). In this study, patients initiated high-dose chemotherapy with STAMP-V (carboplatin, thiotepa, and cyclophosphamide), ACT (doxorubicin, paclitaxel, and cyclophosphamide), or tandem melphalan and STAMP-V. Eighty-six patients were diagnosed with locally advanced/inflammatory (17 inflammatory) breast cancer, and 12 were diagnosed with oligometastatic breast cancer. Median follow-up was 84 months (range, 6-136 months) for patients with locally advanced cancer and 40 months (range, 24-62 months) for those with metastatic cancer. In the patients with locally advanced cancer, 5-year RFS and OS were 53% (95% CI, 41%-63%) and 71% (95% CI, 60%-80%), respectively, hormone receptors were positive in 74%, and HER2 overexpression was seen in 23%. In multivariate analysis, hormone receptor-positive disease and lower stage were associated with better 5-year RFS (60% for ER [estrogen receptor]/PR [progesterone receptor]-positive versus 30% for ER/PR-negative; P < .01) and OS (83% for ER/PR-positive versus 38% for ER/PR-negative; P < .001). In the patients with metastatic cancer, 3-year PFS and OS were 49% (95% CI, 19%-73%) and 73% (95% CI, 38%-91%), respectively. The favorable long-term RFS/PFS and OS for high-dose chemotherapy with peripheral stem cell rescue in this selected patient population reflect the relative safety of the procedure and warrant validation in defined subgroups through prospective, randomized, multi-institutional trials.

  1. Cystic Meningioma Masquerading as a Metastatic Tumor: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Nithya; Kamaruddin, Khairul Azmi; Othman, Aizzat; Mustafa, Fadhli; Awang, Mohamed Saufi

    2016-01-01

    Cystic meningioma is a rare form of intracranial meningioma. Meningiomas are typically solid tumors but may rarely have cystic components. The diagnosis of cystic meningioma is clinically challenging as the finding of multiple intra-axial tumors, including metastatic tumors, is relatively common. We report a case of cystic meningioma initially diagnosed as a metastatic tumor from a recurrence of acute lymphoid leukemia. However, postoperative histopathological examination demonstrated an atypical meningioma. PMID:27418876

  2. Clinical effects of prior trastuzumab on combination eribulin mesylate plus trastuzumab as first-line treatment for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer: results from a Phase II, single-arm, multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Puhalla, Shannon; Wilks, Sharon; Brufsky, Adam M; O’Shaughnessy, Joyce; Schwartzberg, Lee S; Berrak, Erhan; Song, James; Vahdat, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Eribulin mesylate, a novel nontaxane microtubule dynamics inhibitor in the halichondrin class of antineoplastic drugs, is indicated for the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer who previously received ≥2 chemotherapy regimens in the metastatic setting. Primary data from a Phase II trial for the first-line combination of eribulin plus trastuzumab in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive patients showed a 71% objective response rate and tolerability consistent with the known profile of these agents. Here, we present prespecified analyses of efficacy of this combination based on prior trastuzumab use. Patients received eribulin mesylate 1.4 mg/m2 (equivalent to 1.23 mg/m2 eribulin [expressed as free base]) intravenously on days 1 and 8 plus trastuzumab (8 mg/kg intravenously/cycle 1, then 6 mg/kg) on day 1 of each 21-day cycle. Objective response rates, progression-free survival, and tolerability were assessed in patients who had and had not received prior adjuvant or neoadjuvant (neo/adjuvant) trastuzumab treatment. Fifty-two patients (median age: 59.5 years) received eribulin/trastuzumab for a median treatment duration of ~31 weeks; 40.4% (n=21) had been previously treated with neo/adjuvant trastuzumab prior to treatment with eribulin plus trastuzumab for metastatic disease (median time between neo/adjuvant and study treatment: 23 months). In trastuzumab-naïve patients (n=31) compared with those who had received prior trastuzumab, objective response rate was 77.4% versus 61.9%, respectively; duration of response was 11.8 versus 9.5 months, respectively; clinical benefit rate was 87.1% versus 81.0%, respectively; and median progression-free survival was 12.2 versus 11.5 months, respectively. The most common grade 3/4 treatment-emergent adverse events (occuring in ≥5% of patients) in patients who received prior trastuzumab versus trastuzumab naïve patients, respectively, were neutropenia (47.6% vs 32.3%), peripheral neuropathy (14

  3. Role of External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Nonanaplastic Thyroid Cancer: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Terezakis, Stephanie A. Lee, Kyungmouk S.; Ghossein, Ronald A.; Rivera, Michael; Tuttle, Robert M.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Wong, Richard J.; Patel, Snehal G.; Pfister, David G.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) plays a controversial role in the management of nonanaplastic thyroid cancer. We reviewed our institution's outcomes in patients treated with EBRT for advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 1989 and April 2006, 76 patients with nonanaplastic thyroid cancer were treated with EBRT. The median follow-up for the surviving patients was 35.3 months (range, 4.2-178.4). The lesions were primarily advanced and included Stage T2 in 5 (7%), T3 in 5 (7%), and T4 in 64 (84%) patients. Stage N1 disease was present in 60 patients (79%). Distant metastases before EBRT were identified in 27 patients (36%). The median total EBRT dose delivered was 6,300 cGy. The histologic features examined included medullary in 12 patients (16%) and nonmedullary in 64 (84%). Of the 76 patients, 71 (93%) had undergone surgery before RT, and radioactive iodine treatment was used in 56 patients (74%). Results: The 2- and 4-year overall locoregional control rate for all histologic types was 86% and 72%, respectively, and the 2- and 4-year overall survival rate for all patients was 74% and 55%, respectively. No significant differences were found in locoregional control, overall survival, or distant metastases-free survival for patients with complete resection, microscopic residual disease, or gross residual disease. Grade 3 acute mucositis and dysphagia occurred in 14 (18%) and 24 (32%) patients, respectively. Late adverse toxicity was notable for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube use in 4 patients (5%). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that EBRT is effective for locoregional control of selected locally advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid malignancies, with acceptable acute toxicity.

  4. Paranasal Sinus Involvement in Metastatic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Abi-Fadel, Francois; Smith, Peter R.; Ayaz, Asim; Sundaram, Krishnamurthi

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic carcinoma involving the paranasal sinuses is uncommon. One hundred-sixty seven cases have been published in the literature since 1951. Symptoms, signs, and rhinoscopic and imaging findings are often nonspecific, and the diagnosis may be missed for considerable time. Therefore, a high level of suspicion is warranted in patients with known malignancies presenting with persistent or recurrent rhinosinusitis or facial complaints. PMID:23946928

  5. Repurposing Itraconazole as a Treatment for Advanced Prostate Cancer: A Noncomparative Randomized Phase II Trial in Men With Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Elisabeth I.; Smith, David C.; Rathkopf, Dana; Blackford, Amanda L.; Danila, Daniel C.; King, Serina; Frost, Anja; Ajiboye, A. Seun; Zhao, Ming; Mendonca, Janet; Kachhap, Sushant K.; Rudek, Michelle A.; Carducci, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The antifungal drug itraconazole inhibits angiogenesis and Hedgehog signaling and delays tumor growth in murine prostate cancer xenograft models. We conducted a noncomparative, randomized, phase II study evaluating the antitumor efficacy of two doses of oral itraconazole in men with metastatic prostate cancer. Patients and Methods. We randomly assigned 46 men with chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) to receive low-dose (200 mg/day) or high-dose (600 mg/day) itraconazole until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary endpoint was the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression-free survival (PPFS) rate at 24 weeks; a 45% success rate in either arm was prespecified as constituting clinical significance. Secondary endpoints included the progression-free survival (PFS) rate and PSA response rate (Prostate Cancer Working Group criteria). Exploratory outcomes included circulating tumor cell (CTC) enumeration, serum androgen measurements, as well as pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses. Results. The high-dose arm enrolled to completion (n = 29), but the low-dose arm closed early (n = 17) because of a prespecified futility rule. The PPFS rates at 24 weeks were 11.8% in the low-dose arm and 48.0% in the high-dose arm. The median PFS times were 11.9 weeks and 35.9 weeks, respectively. PSA response rates were 0% and 14.3%, respectively. In addition, itraconazole had favorable effects on CTC counts, and it suppressed Hedgehog signaling in skin biopsy samples. Itraconazole did not reduce serum testosterone or dehydroepiandrostenedione sulfate levels. Common toxicities included fatigue, nausea, anorexia, rash, and a syndrome of hypokalemia, hypertension, and edema. Conclusion. High-dose itraconazole (600 mg/day) has modest antitumor activity in men with metastatic CRPC that is not mediated by testosterone suppression. PMID:23340005

  6. Talazoparib in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery and Liver or Kidney Dysfunction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-06

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Solid Neoplasm; Stage III Mesothelioma; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Mesothelioma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  7. Oral health-related quality of life and depression/anxiety in long-term recurrence-free patients after treatment for advanced oral squamous cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Hassel, Alexander J; Danner, Daniel; Freier, Kolja; Hofele, Christof; Becker-Bikowski, Kirsten; Engel, Michael

    2012-06-01

    This report focuses on the association between oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) and depression/anxiety of a homogeneous group of cancer patients who were recurrence-free for 8 years after treatment for advanced oral squamous cell. Participants were 24 patients (mean age 55 years, 75% men) treated with neoadjuvant concurrent radiochemotherapy followed by surgery with a mean recurrence-free period of 95 months (from 39 to 164 months). The OHRQoL (OHIP) and the anxiety/depression (HADS) were assessed twice (1 year between t1 and t2). OHRQoL was impaired in this group (mean OHIP score 65 units). In cross-lagged correlation analysis, the correlation between OHRQoL to t1 and depression to t2 was significant and greater than the non-significant correlation for depression to t1 and OHRQoL to t2 indicating that OHRQoL predicts depression better than vice versa. However, the difference in the correlation coefficients was not significant (ZPF-test). The same was true for OHRQoL and anxiety. The OHRQoL measured with the OHIP was impaired in comparison to the normal population. In the limitations of the study design and bearing the small sample size in mind, the results give evidence that OHRQoL predicts psychological outcomes, namely depression and anxiety, better than vice versa.

  8. Osimertinib and Navitoclax in Treating Patients With EGFR-Positive Previously Treated Advanced or Metastatic Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    EGFR Activating Mutation; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  9. Dormancy of metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ossowski, Liliana; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Metastatic dormancy of melanoma has not received sufficient attention, most likely because once detectable, metastasis is almost invariably fatal and, understandably, the focus has been on finding ways to prolong life of patients with overt recurrences. Nevertheless, analysis of the published clinical and experimental data on melanoma indicates that some aspect of melanoma biology imitate traits recently associated with dormancy in other solid cancers. Among them the ability of some melanomas to disseminate early during primary tumor progression and once disseminated, to remain undetected (dormant) for years. Comparison of cutaneous and uveal melanoma indicates that, in spite of being of the same origin, they differ profoundly in their clinical progression. Importantly for this discussion, between 40 and 50% of uveal melanoma remain undetected for longer than a decade, while less than 5% of cutaneous melanoma show this behavior. Both types of melanoma have activating oncogene mutations that provide autonomous pro-proliferative signals, yet the consensus is that those are not sufficient for tumor progression. If that is the case, it is possible to envision that signals from outside the tumor cell, (microenvironment) shape the fate of an individual disseminated cell, regardless of an oncogene mutation, to progress or to pause in a state of dormancy. To stimulate further debate and inquiry we describe here a few examples of potential signals that might modify the fate of disseminated cell and provide brief description of the current knowledge on dormancy in other cancers. Our hope is to convince the reader that disseminated melanoma cells do enter periods of prolonged dormancy and that finding ways to induce it, or to prolong it, might mean an extension of symptoms-free life for melanoma patients. Ultimately, understanding the biology of dormancy and the mechanisms of dormant cell survival, might allow for their specific targeting and elimination. PMID

  10. Esthesioneuroblastoma metastatic to the trachea.

    PubMed

    Mattavelli, F; Pizzi, N; Pennacchioli, E; Radaelli, S; Calarco, G; Quattrone, P; Patelli, L; Spinelli, P

    2009-06-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma is a rare tumour, for which a multimodal approach, including a combination of surgery and radiation, appears to provide the best disease-free and overall survival. Well-known for its tendency for local recurrence and distant spreading by both lymphatic and haematogenous routes, the most common sites of metastases are lungs and bones, followed by liver, spleen, scalp, breast, adrenals and ovary. One single case of metastasis to the trachea has been reported in the literature. The case is reported here of a patient who developed metastatic esthesioneuroblastoma to the trachea 18 months after primary surgery and radiation therapy. The patient was treated by two subsequent N-YAG laser endoscopic resections and chemotherapy.

  11. Breast-conserving surgery in locally advanced breast cancer submitted to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Safety and effectiveness based on ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence and long-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Carrara, Guilherme Freire Angotti; Scapulatempo-Neto, Cristovam; Abrahão-Machado, Lucas Faria; Brentani, Maria Mitzi; Nunes, João Soares; Folgueira, Maria Aparecida Azevedo Koike; da Costa Vieira, René Aloisio

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence after breast-conserving surgery for locally advanced breast cancer. METHODS: A retrospective observational cohort study was performed in patients with locally advanced breast cancer submitted to breast-conserving surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy based on an adriamycin-cyclophosphamide-paclitaxel regimen. We evaluated the clinical, pathologic, immunohistochemistry, and surgical factors that contribute to ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence and locoregional recurrence. A Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox model were used to evaluate the main factors related to disease-free survival. RESULTS: Of the 449 patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 98 underwent breast-conserving surgery. The average diameter of the tumors was 5.3 cm, and 87.2% reached a size of up to 3 cm. Moreover, 86.7% were classified as clinical stage III, 74.5% had T3-T4 tumors, 80.5% had N1-N2 axilla, and 89.8% had invasive ductal carcinoma. A pathologic complete response was observed in 27.6% of the tumors, and 100.0% of samples had free margins. The 5-year actuarial overall survival rate was 81.2%, and the mean follow-up was 72.8 months. The rates of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence and locoregional recurrence were 11.2% and 15.3%, respectively. Multifocal morphology response was the only factor related to ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence disease-free survival (p=0.04). A multivariate analysis showed that the pathologic response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST)-breast cutoff was the only factor related to locoregional recurrence disease-free survival (p=0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Breast-conserving surgery is a safe and effective therapy for selected locally advanced breast tumors. PMID:28355358

  12. Metastatic Tumors of the Penis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ke; Da, Jun; Yao, Hai-jun; Zheng, Da-chao; Cai, Zhi-kang; Jiang, Yue-qing; Xu, Ming-xi; Wang, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to report the clinical characteristics, treatments, and outcomes of secondary penile cancers and review the literature of this rare condition. The records of 8 patients with metastatic penile cancer treated at our hospital from 2006 to 2013 were analyzed. A search of medical databases was conducted. Patient symptoms included penile mass (n = 7, 5 had concomitant pain) and acute urine retention (n = 1). The primary cancers included bladder, lung, gastric, liver, and prostate malignancies and 1 case of pulmonary epithelioid hemangioendothelioma. The longest time from diagnosis of the primary cancer to metastatic penile cancer was 16 years and the shortest was 7 months. Six patients were treated with phallectomy, 1 with resection of the mass, and 1 with only a biopsy because of advanced metastatic disease. Five patients are deceased at the time of this report, and the longest and shortest survival times (from the diagnosis of primary cancer to the death) were 16 years and 9 months, respectively. The literature review identified 17 cases reported since 2011, bringing the total number of reported cases to 480. Genitourinary cancer, primarily bladder and prostate, account for approximately 70 of the primary cancer sites and gastrointestinal cancers account for approximately 21%. Approximately half of the patients had died of their disease within 1 year of the diagnosis of penile metastasis. The prognosis of metastatic penile cancer is poor. Most primary cancers are in the urologic or gastrointestinal systems. Surgery and adjunctive therapy may improve symptoms, but fail to prolong survival. PMID:25569637

  13. Comparing nodal versus bony metastatic spread using tumour phylogenies

    PubMed Central

    Mangiola, Stefano; Hong, Matthew K. H.; Cmero, Marek; Kurganovs, Natalie; Ryan, Andrew; Costello, Anthony J.; Corcoran, Niall M.; Macintyre, Geoff; Hovens, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    The role of lymph node metastases in distant prostate cancer dissemination and lethality is ill defined. Patients with metastases restricted to lymph nodes have a better prognosis than those with distant metastatic spread, suggesting the possibility of distinct aetiologies. To explore this, we traced patterns of cancer dissemination using tumour phylogenies inferred from genome-wide copy-number profiling of 48 samples across 3 patients with lymph node metastatic disease and 3 patients with osseous metastatic disease. Our results show that metastatic cells in regional lymph nodes originate from evolutionary advanced extraprostatic tumour cells rather than less advanced central tumour cell populations. In contrast, osseous metastases do not exhibit such a constrained developmental lineage, arising from either intra or extraprostatic tumour cell populations, at early and late stages in the evolution of the primary. Collectively, this comparison suggests that lymph node metastases may not be an intermediate developmental step for distant osseous metastases, but rather represent a distinct metastatic lineage. PMID:27653089

  14. [Bi-weekly nab-paclitaxel and trastuzumab therapy effective against recurrent breast cancer with multiple lung metastases in elderly patient who had previously undergone two chemotherapeutic regimens for treatment of metastatic disease-a case Report].

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Teruhisa; Jinta, Eri; Suzuma, Takaomi; Yoshimura, Gorou; Umemura, Teiji; Sakurai, Takeo

    2012-11-01

    We herein report a 75-year-old patient with recurrent hormone-nonresponsive, HER2-positive breast cancer who presented with multiple lung metastases. She had undergone a mastectomy followed by adjuvant chemotherapy with FEC, CMF, and UFT. Forty-six months after the surgery, multiple lung, liver, and bone metastases were observed. Docetaxel and trastuzumab were administered as first-line chemotherapy for 13 months. A partial response and stable disease were observed, but progressive disease in the lung and brain was subsequently revealed. The patient then underwent g-knife treatment for brain metastasis. Lapatinib and capecitabine treatment was administered as second-line chemotherapy for 9 months. Stable disease was observed, but progressive disease in the lung metastases with clinical symptoms including cough, exertional dyspnea, and general malaise was revealed. As third-line chemotherapy, the patient was administered low-dose, bi-weekly nab-paclitaxel(150mg/m2)and trastuzumab therapy. Four weeks after beginning the nab-paclitaxel and trastuzumab treatment, the cough disappeared; 2 months after beginning the therapy, a partialresponse in the lung metastases was seen. The patient is well and the treatment has been continued for 50 weeks. No progression has been seen. Bi-weekly nab-paclitaxel treatment appears to have few side effects and might be an effective treatment option for patients with recurrent breast cancer.

  15. Phase II multi-institutional prospective randomised trial comparing S-1+paclitaxel with S-1+cisplatin in patients with unresectable and/or recurrent advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mochiki, E; Ogata, K; Ohno, T; Toyomasu, Y; Haga, N; Fukai, Y; Aihara, R; Ando, H; Uchida, N; Asao, T; Kuwano, H

    2012-01-01

    Background: A combination of S-1 and cisplatin has been shown to be effective with acceptable safety for the first-line treatment of far-advanced gastric cancer in Japan. This is the first randomised phase II trial to compare S-1+paclitaxel with S-1+cisplatin in this setting. Methods: Patients with unresectable and/or recurrent advanced gastric cancer were randomly assigned to receive one of the two regimens: S-1 (40 mg m−2 twice daily) on days 1–14 plus paclitaxel (60 mg m−2) on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 4-week cycle (S-1+paclitaxel) or S-1 (40 mg m−2 twice daily) on days 1–21 plus cisplatin (60 mg m−2) on day 8 of a 5-week cycle (S-1+cisplatin). The primary end point was the response rate (RR). Secondary end points included progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and safety. Results: A total of 83 patients were eligible for safety and efficacy analyses. In the S-1+paclitaxel and S-1+cisplatin groups, RRs (52.3% vs 48.7% P=0.74) and median PFS (9 vs 6 months; P=0.50) were similar. The median OS was similar in the S-1+paclitaxel and S-1+cisplatin groups (16 vs 17 months; P=0.84). The incidence of grade 3 or higher haematological toxicity was 19.0% with S-1+paclitaxel and 19.5% with S-1+cisplatin. The incidence of grade 3 or higher non-haematological toxicity was 14.2% with S-1+paclitaxel and 17.1% with S-1+cisplatin. Conclusion: S-1+paclitaxel was suggested to be a feasible and effective non-platinum-based regimen for chemotherapy in patients with advanced gastric cancer. Our results should be confirmed in multicenter, phase III-controlled clinical trials. PMID:22617130

  16. Predictors of Recurrent AKI.

    PubMed

    Siew, Edward D; Parr, Sharidan K; Abdel-Kader, Khaled; Eden, Svetlana K; Peterson, Josh F; Bansal, Nisha; Hung, Adriana M; Fly, James; Speroff, Ted; Ikizler, T Alp; Matheny, Michael E

    2016-04-01

    Recurrent AKI is common among patients after hospitalized AKI and is associated with progressive CKD. In this study, we identified clinical risk factors for recurrent AKI present during index AKI hospitalizations that occurred between 2003 and 2010 using a regional Veterans Administration database in the United States. AKI was defined as a 0.3 mg/dl or 50% increase from a baseline creatinine measure. The primary outcome was hospitalization with recurrent AKI within 12 months of discharge from the index hospitalization. Time to recurrent AKI was examined using Cox regression analysis, and sensitivity analyses were performed using a competing risk approach. Among 11,683 qualifying AKI hospitalizations, 2954 patients (25%) were hospitalized with recurrent AKI within 12 months of discharge. Median time to recurrent AKI within 12 months was 64 (interquartile range 19-167) days. In addition to known demographic and comorbid risk factors for AKI, patients with longer AKI duration and those whose discharge diagnosis at index AKI hospitalization included congestive heart failure (primary diagnosis), decompensated advanced liver disease, cancer with or without chemotherapy, acute coronary syndrome, or volume depletion, were at highest risk for being hospitalized with recurrent AKI. Risk factors identified were similar when a competing risk model for death was applied. In conclusion, several inpatient conditions associated with AKI may increase the risk for recurrent AKI. These findings should facilitate risk stratification, guide appropriate patient referral after AKI, and help generate potential risk reduction strategies. Efforts to identify modifiable factors to prevent recurrent AKI in these patients are warranted.

  17. A randomised multicentre phase II study with cisplatin/docetaxel vs oxaliplatin/docetaxel as first-line therapy in patients with advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Atmaca, A; Al-Batran, S-E; Werner, D; Pauligk, C; Güner, T; Koepke, A; Bernhard, H; Wenzel, T; Banat, A-G; Brueck, P; Caca, K; Prasnikar, N; Kullmann, F; Günther Derigs, H; Koenigsmann, M; Dingeldein, G; Neuhaus, T; Jäger, E

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study was designed to compare cisplatin/docetaxel with oxaliplatin/docetaxel in patients with advanced and metastatic non-small lung cancer as a first-line treatment. Methods: Patients were randomly assigned to receive either cisplatin 75 mg m−2 and docetaxel 75 mg m−2 every 3 weeks or oxaliplatin 85 mg m−2 and docetaxel 50 mg m−2 every 2 weeks. The primary end point was response rate, and secondary end points were toxicity, time to progression and overall survival. Results: A total of 88 patients (median age: 65 (39–86) years; stage IV: 93%) were randomly assigned. Response rate (complete and partial response) was 47% (95% CI: 33–61%) in the cisplatin/docetaxel arm and 28% (95% CI: 17–43%) in the oxaliplatin/docetaxel arm (P=0.118). There was no significant difference in time to progression (6.3 vs 4.9 months, P=0.111) and median overall survival (11.6 vs 7.0 months, P=0.102) with cisplatin/docetaxel vs oxaliplatin/docetaxel, although slight trends favouring cisplatin were seen. Oxaliplatin/docetaxel was associated with significantly less (any grade) renal toxicity (56% vs 11%), any grade fatigue (81% vs 59%), complete alopecia (76% vs 27%), any grade leukopenia (84% vs 61%) and grade 3/4 leukopenia (44% vs 14%) and neutropenia (56% vs 27%). Conclusion: Oxaliplatin/docetaxel has activity in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer, but it seems to be inferior to cisplatin/docetaxel. PMID:23329236

  18. Therapeutic Angiotensin-(1-7) in Treating Patients With Metastatic Sarcoma That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-10

    Bone Cancer; Chondrosarcoma; Clear Cell Sarcoma of the Kidney; Metastatic Osteosarcoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma

  19. Temsirolimus and Vinorelbine Ditartrate in Treating Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Hereditary Paraganglioma; Male Breast Cancer; Malignant Paraganglioma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Pheochromocytoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Regional Pheochromocytoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage III Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IV Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  20. [Metastatic bronchial carcinoid tumors].

    PubMed

    Bouledrak, K; Walter, T; Souquet, P J; Lombard-Bohas, C

    2016-02-01

    Bronchial carcinoids are uncommon pulmonary neoplasms and represent 1 to 2 % of all lung tumors. In early stage of disease, the mainstay and only curative treatment is surgery. Bronchial carcinoids are generally regarded as low-grade carcinomas and metastatic dissemination is unusual. The management of the metastatic stage is not currently standardized due to a lack of relevant studies. As bronchial carcinoids and in particular their metastatic forms are rare, we apply treatment strategies that have been evaluated in gastrointestinal and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, bronchial carcinoids have their own characteristic. A specific therapeutic feature of these metastatic tumors is that they require a dual approach: both anti-secretory for the carcinoid syndrome, and anti-tumoral.

  1. Renal cell carcinoma metastatic to gallbladder: a survival advantage to simultaneous nephrectomy and cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Hellenthal, Nicholas J; Stewart, Gregory S; Cambio, Angelo J; Delair, Sean M

    2007-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is a relatively uncommon cancer. Patients presenting with a renal adenocarcinoma are often found to have evidence of metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. Herein, we describe the case of a 39-year-old male with renal cell carcinoma and a synchronous metastatic focus to the gallbladder. The patient underwent a successful simultaneous nephrectomy and cholecystectomy and is doing well 30 months after surgery without evidence of disease recurrence. A thorough metastatic work-up along with aggressive surgical intervention in patients with renal cell carcinoma and unusual metastatic foci can provide a long-term favorable outcome.

  2. Metastatic Mechanisms in Follicular Cell-Derived Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Phay, John E.; Ringel, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid cancer incidence is rising annually largely related to enhanced detection and of early stage well-differentiated primary tumors. The prognosis for patients with early stage thyroid cancer is outstanding with most patients being cured with surgery. In selected cases, I-131 is administered to treat known or suspected residual or metastatic disease. Even patients with loco-regional metastases typically have an outstanding long-term prognosis, albeit with monitoring and occasional intervention for residual or recurrent disease. In contrast, individuals with distant metastases from thyroid cancer, particular older patients with larger metastatic burdens and those with poorly differentiated tumors, have a poor prognosis. Patients with metastatic anaplastic thyroid cancer have a particularly poor prognosis. Published clinical trials indicate that transient disease control and partial remissions can be achieved with kinase inhibitor therapy directed toward angiogenic targets, and that in some cases, I-131 uptake can be enhanced. However, the direct targets of activity in metastatic lesions are incompletely defined and clear evidence that these treatments increase the duration or quality of life of patients is lacking, underscoring the need for improved knowledge regarding the metastatic process to inform the development of new therapies. In this review, we will focus on current data and hypotheses regarding key regulators of metastatic dormancy, metastatic progression, and the role of putative cancer stem cells. PMID:24036131

  3. Invasion Patterns of Metastatic Extrauterine High-grade Serous Carcinoma With BRCA Germline Mutation and Correlation With Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Yaser R; Ducie, Jennifer A; Arnold, Angela G; Kauff, Noah D; Vargas-Alvarez, Hebert A; Sala, Evis; Levine, Douglas A; Soslow, Robert A

    2016-03-01

    Characteristic histopathologic features have been described in high-grade serous carcinoma associated with BRCA abnormalities (HGSC-BRCA), which are known to have relatively favorable clinical outcomes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical significance of invasion patterns in metastatic HGSC-BRCA cases. Of the 37 cases of advanced-stage HGSC with known BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutation retrieved from our institutional files, 23 patients had a germline mutation of BRCA1 and 14 had a BRCA2 mutation. The pattern of invasion at metastatic sites was recorded and classified as a pushing pattern (either predominantly or exclusively), an exclusively micropapillary infiltrative pattern, or an infiltrative pattern composed of papillae, micropapillae, glands, and nests (mixed infiltrative pattern). Histologic evaluation of metastases was performed without knowledge of genotype or clinical outcome. Clinical data were abstracted from medical records. Median age was 56 years (range, 31 to 73 y). All patients presented at stage IIIC or IV and underwent complete surgical staging followed by chemotherapy. All 37 HGSC-BRCA cases showed either pushing pattern metastases (30; 81%) or infiltrative micropapillary metastases (7; 19%). No HGSC-BRCA case exhibited metastases composed solely of mixed infiltrative patterns. Among the 7 infiltrative micropapillary cases, 6 had a BRCA1 germline mutation versus 1 with a BRCA2 mutation. The median time of follow-up was 26 months (range, 13 to 49 mo). All 7 patients with infiltrative micropapillary metastases either experienced recurrence or died of disease (5 recurrences and 2 deaths), which was significantly worse than what was seen in patients with predominantly pushing pattern metastases, of whom 16 of 30 (53%) experienced recurrence (n=14) or died of disease (n=2) (P=0.03). In conclusion, the recognition of different invasion patterns of metastatic extrauterine HGSC-BRCA has prognostic implications. The infiltrative

  4. Pelvic Lymph Node Status Assessed by 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Predicts Low-Risk Group for Distant Recurrence in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Sokbom; Park, Jung-Yeol; Lim, Myung-Chul; Song, Yong-Joong; Park, Se-Hyun; Kim, Seok-Ki; Chung, Dae-Chul; Seo, Sang-Soo; Kim, Joo-Young; Park, Sang-Yoon

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To develop a prediction model to identify a low-risk group for distant recurrence in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated by concurrent chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Prospectively, 62 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were recruited as a training cohort. Clinical variables and parameters obtained from positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging were analyzed by logistic regression. For the test set, 54 patients were recruited independently. To identify the low-risk group, negative likelihood ratio (LR) less than 0.2 was set to be a cutoff. Results: Among the training cohort, multivariate logistic analysis revealed that advanced International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage and a high serum squamous cancer cell (SCC) antigen level were significant risk factors (p = 0.015 and 0.025, respectively). Using the two parameters, criteria to determine a low-risk subset for distant recurrence were postulated: (1) FIGO Stage IIB or less and (2) pretreatment SCC < 2.4 (Model A). Positive pelvic node on PET completely predicted all cases with distant recurrence and thus was considered as another prediction model (Model B). In the test cohort, although Model A did not showed diagnostic performance, Model B completely predicted all cases with distant recurrence and showed a sensitivity of 100% with negative LR of 0. Across the training and test cohort (n = 116), the false negative rate was 0 (95% confidence interval 0%-7.6%). Conclusions: Positive pelvic node on PET is a useful marker in prediction of distant recurrence in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who are treated with concurrent chemoradiation.

  5. Metastatic melanoma mimicking solitary fibrous tumor: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Bekers, Elise M; van Engen-van Grunsven, Adriana C H; Groenen, Patricia J T A; Westdorp, Harm; Koornstra, Rutger H T; Bonenkamp, Johannes J; Flucke, Uta; Blokx, Willeke A M

    2014-02-01

    Malignant melanomas are known for their remarkable morphological variation and aberrant immunophenotype with loss of lineage-specific markers, especially in recurrences and metastases. Hot spot mutations in BRAF, NRAS, GNAQ, and GNA11 and mutations in KIT are oncogenic events in melanomas. Therefore, genotyping can be a useful ancillary diagnostic tool. We present one case each of recurrent and metastatic melanoma, both showing histological and immunohistochemical features of solitary fibrous tumor (SFT). Mutational analysis detected BRAF and NRAS mutations in the primary and secondary lesions, respectively. This result confirmed the diagnosis of recurrent/metastastic melanoma.

  6. Phase I dose-escalation study of cabazitaxel administered in combination with gemcitabine in patients with metastatic or unresectable advanced solid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Puzanov, Igor; LoRusso, Patricia M.; Cohen, Roger B.; Morris, John C.; Olowokure, Olugbenga O.; Yin, Jian Y.; Doroumian, Séverine; Shen, Liji; Olszanski, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Taxane–gemcitabine combinations have demonstrated antitumor activity. This phase I study (NCT01001221) aimed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of cabazitaxel plus gemcitabine and to assess the preliminary efficacy of this combination. The patients included had metastatic or unresectable solid tumors and had exhausted standard treatment. Cohorts of three to six patients received cabazitaxel (15–20 mg/m2) before (part 1a) or after (part 1b) gemcitabine (700–1000 mg/m2) on Day 1 and gemcitabine alone on Day 8. Prophylactic growth factors were not allowed in cycle 1. In part 1a (n=12), five patients received 20 mg/m2 cabazitaxel plus 1000 mg/m2 gemcitabine (20/1000), five received 15/900, two received 15/700. In part 1b, all six patients received the lowest dose (700/15). At all doses, two or more patients experienced a DLT, regardless of administration sequence, including febrile neutropenia (n=4), grade 4 neutropenia (n=2), grade 4 thrombocytopenia (n=2), and grade 3 aspartate transaminase increase (n=1). The MTD was not established as all cohorts exceeded the MTD by definition. All patients experienced an adverse event; the most frequent all-grade nonhematologic events were fatigue (66.7%), decreased appetite (50.0%), and diarrhea (44.4%). The most frequent grade 3–4 hematologic abnormalities were neutropenia (83.3%), leukopenia (77.8%), and lymphopenia (72.2%). Toxicity was sequence-independent but appeared worse with gemcitabine followed by cabazitaxel. Durable partial responses were observed in three patients (prostate cancer, appendiceal cancer, and melanoma). The unacceptable DLTs with cabazitaxel plus gemcitabine, at doses reduced more than 25% from single-agent doses, preclude further investigation. PMID:26020806

  7. Case report and literature review: surgical treatment of a right atrial metastatic melanoma from a previously resected "advanced" primary site with regional lymph nodes involvement.

    PubMed

    Parissis, Haralabos; Al-Alao, Bassel Suffian; Young, Vincent K

    2012-10-01

    Although melanoma of the right atrium is a rare cardiac tumor, melanoma in general has a high propensity to involve the heart. Unfortunately, however, when the tumor is involving the heart, widespread metastasis ensues and hence surgery becomes a questionable option. We report a case of a young female who presented with an advanced skin primary melanoma and regional lymph node involvement and a metastasis into the right atrium. Postoperatively tumor dissemination was controlled with adjuvant chemotherapy. A vigorous attempt aiming at tumor clearance followed by adjuvant multimodality therapy along with a tumor surveillance program may improve survival even in advanced cases.

  8. [Experience with radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of unresectable pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Mátrai, Zoltán; Fehér, István; Péley, Gábor; Rényi Vámos, Ferenc; Farkas, Emil; Sulyok, Zoltán; Kovács, Tibor; Köves, István

    2005-02-01

    More than half of colorectal cancers are located in the rectum, and the number of such cancers is increasing. In Hungary colorectal cancers are diagnosed predominantly in advanced stages. In the last five years 736 patients with colorectal cancer were operated on at our Department, with the following stage distribution: Dukes A 10%, BI 10%, B2 31%, C 36% and D 13%. The local recurrence rate is decreasing since the introduction of total mesorectal excision and preoperative radiation. Effective treatment options are however poor for unresectable pelvic recurrences. Chemo- and radiotherapy have severe limitations in this advanced stage cancer. In recent years there are a few publications on the minimal-invasive radiofrequency tumour ablation (RFTA) technique, which is an effective treatment for primary and metastatic liver carcinomas and is a new palliative for the local treatment of pelvic recurrence. The aim of this study was to assess the response to treatment using ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation in two patients with unresectable pelvic recurrent rectal cancer.

  9. Recurrent vulvovaginitis.

    PubMed

    Powell, Anna M; Nyirjesy, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Vulvovaginitis (VV) is one of the most commonly encountered problems by a gynecologist. Many women frequently self-treat with over-the-counter medications, and may present to their health-care provider after a treatment failure. Vulvovaginal candidiasis, bacterial vaginosis, and trichomoniasis may occur as discreet or recurrent episodes, and have been associated with significant treatment cost and morbidity. We present an update on diagnostic capabilities and treatment modalities that address recurrent and refractory episodes of VV.

  10. Meningioma recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Bencze, János; Varkoly, Gréta; Kouhsari, Mahan C; Klekner, Álmos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Meningioma accounts for more than 30% of all intracranial tumours. It affects mainly the elderly above the age of 60, at a female:male ratio of 3:2. The prognosis is variable: it is usually favourable with no progression in tumour grade and no recurrence in WHO grade 1 tumours. However, a minority of tumours represent atypical (grade 2) or anaplastic (grade 3) meningiomas; this heterogeneity is also reflected in histopathological appearances. Irrespective of the grade, the size of the tumour and the localisation may have severe, sometimes lethal consequences. Following neurosurgical interventions to remove the tumour, recurrence and progression in WHO grade may occur. Our knowledge on predisposing histomorphological and molecular factors of recurrence is rather limited. These can be classified as I) demographic II) environmental, III) genetic and epigenetic IV) imaging, V) neuropathological, and VI) neurosurgical. In view of the complex background of tumour recurrence, the recognition of often subtle signs of increased risk of recurrence requires close collaboration of experts from several medical specialties. This multidisciplinary approach results in better therapy and fewer complications related to tumour recurrence. PMID:28352788

  11. Comparison of the safety and efficacy of paclitaxel plus gemcitabine combination in young and elderly patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. A retrospective analysis of the Southern Italy Cooperative Oncology Group trials.

    PubMed

    Comella, Pasquale; Gambardella, Antonio; Frasci, Giuseppe; Avallone, Antonio; Costanzo, Raffaele

    2008-02-01

    We retrospectively assessed tolerability and efficacy of paclitaxel plus gemcitabine combination in 259 patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) enrolled in three randomized SICOG trials according to their age (70 years) at study entry. Apart from age, demographic and clinical characteristics were similar in the two groups. Response rate of paclitaxel plus gemcitabine was similar in younger and in elderly (36% versus 30%). Chemotherapy was well tolerated, but severe neutropenia (12% versus 7%), anaemia (6.6% versus 1.8%), and vomiting (5% versus 0) were more frequent in elderly patients. Both median progression-free survival (PFS, 5.5 months versus 4.2 months), and overall survival (OS, 11.1 months versus 9.1 months) resulted slightly prolonged for younger patients. However, only stage and performance status resulted independently affecting PFS and OS. In conclusion, paclitaxel plus gemcitabine were similarly tolerated and active in younger and elderly patients. This regimen should be considered an option for the management of fit elderly patients.

  12. Palbociclib in Treating Patients With Metastatic HER-2 Positive or Triple-Negative Breast Cancer With Brain Metastasis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-13

    Breast Carcinoma Metastatic in the Brain; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; HER2/Neu Positive; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  13. Evaluate Risk/Benefit of Nab Paclitaxel in Combination With Gemcitabine and Carboplatin Compared to Gemcitabine and Carboplatin in Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer (or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-30

    Breast Tumor; Breast Cancer; Cancer of the Breast; Estrogen Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; HER2- Negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  14. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Regional or Metastatic Cancer of the Urothelium

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-20

    Adenocarcinoma of the Bladder; Distal Urethral Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urethral Cancer Associated With Invasive Bladder Cancer

  15. Phase I trial of GTI-2040, oxaliplatin, and capecitabine in the treatment of advanced metastatic solid tumors: a California Cancer Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    Doroshow, James H.; Frankel, Paul; Synold, Timothy W.; Yen, Yun; Gandara, David R.; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Chow, Warren A.; Leong, Lucille A.; Lim, Dean; Margolin, Kim A.; Morgan, Robert J.; Somlo, George; Newman, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    Background GTI-2040 is a 20-mer antisense oligonucleotide targeting the mRNA of ribonucleotide reductase M2. It was combined with oxaliplatin and capecitabine in a phase I trial in patients with advance solid tumors based on previous studies demonstrating potentiation of chemotherapy with ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors. Methods Patients at least 18 years of age with advanced incurable solid tumors and normal organ function as well as a Karnofsky performance status of ≥60% were eligible. One prior chemotherapy regimen for advanced disease or relapse within 12 months of adjuvant chemotherapy was required. Patients could have received prior fluoropyrimidines, including capecitabine, but not oxaliplatin. Treatment cycles were 21 days. In each cycle, GTI-2040 was given as a continuous intravenous infusion over 14 days, oxaliplatin as a 2-h intravenous infusion on day 1, and capecitabine orally twice a day for 14 days. In cycle 1 only, oxaliplatin and capecitabine were started on day 2 to allow ribonucleotide reductase mRNA levels to be measured with and without oxaliplatin and capecitabine. Doses were escalated in cohorts of three patients using a standard 3 + 3 design until the maximum tolerated dose was established, defned as no more than one first-cycle dose-limiting toxicity among six patients treated at a given dose level. Results The maximum tolerated dose was estimated to be the combination of GTI-2040 3 mg/kg per day for 14 days, capecitabine 600 mg/m2 twice daily for 14 days, and oxaliplatin 100 mg/m2 every 21 days. Dose-limiting toxicities were hematologic. GTI-2040 pharmacokinetics, obtained at steady-state on days 7 and 14, showed the high inter-patient variability previously reported. Two of six patients had stable disease at the maximum tolerated dose and one patient, with heavily pre-treated non-small cell lung cancer, had a partial response at a higher dose level. In samples from a limited number of patients, there was no clear decrease in

  16. Chemotherapy in metastatic retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kingston, J E; Hungerford, J L; Plowman, P N

    1987-03-01

    Eleven children with metastatic retinoblastoma diagnosed during the period 1970-1984 were treated with chemotherapy. Short-term complete responses were observed in three children treated with a four-drug combination which included cisplatinum, and in one child treated with vincristine and cyclophosphamide. The median duration of survival of the 11 children receiving chemotherapy was nine months, whilst the median survival of 13 children with metastatic retinoblastoma who were not given chemotherapy was only 2.3 months (p = 0.06). This suggests that retinoblastoma is a chemosensitive tumour and therefore adjuvant chemotherapy may have a role in children with retinoblastoma who at diagnosis are thought to be at high risk of developing metastatic disease.

  17. Non-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin combined with gemcitabine as first-line treatment for metastatic or locally advanced breast cancer. Final results of a phase I/II trial.

    PubMed

    Del Barco, S; Colomer, R; Calvo, L; Tusquets, I; Adrover, E; Sánchez, P; Rifà, J; De la Haba, J; Virizuela, J A

    2009-07-01

    Doxorubicin and gemcitabine are active as single agents in breast cancer, have different mechanisms of action, and mainly have non-overlapping side effects. Dose-dependent doxorubicin-related cardiac toxicity is the principal limitation in the metastatic setting. This open, multicenter, single-arm phase I/II study assessed the safety and activity of gemcitabine in combination with non-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (Myocet), a more cardiac-friendly anthracycline, in the first-line treatment of patients with advanced breast cancer. We aimed to determine the optimal recommended dose (RD) of gemcitabine combined with Myocet in a population, with performance status >or=2 and LVEF >or=50%. A formal phase II study was performed afterwards. A total of 53 patients were recruited. Gemcitabine 900 mg/m(2) intravenously day 1 and 8 combined with Myocet 55 mg/m(2) intravenously day 1, every 21 days, was the final RD. The principal toxicity observed was hematological, and 48% of patients developed grade 3-4 neutropenia. Other toxicities were mild and infrequent, including nausea and vomiting. There were no symptomatic cardiac events despite the fact that 36% of the patients had received prior treatment with adjuvant anthracyclines. Objective responses were observed in 51.1% of 47 evaluable patients (95% CI: 36-66%), including two complete response. In addition, 14 patients (29.8%) demonstrated stable disease. The combination of Myocet and gemcitabine at the RD is safe and has encouraging clinical activity in patients with advanced breast cancer, without apparent cardiac toxicity in anthracycline-pretreated patients. These data support further development of this combination.

  18. Neutropenia as a prognostic factor and safety of second-line therapy with S-1 for advanced or recurrent pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Ikagawa, Makiko; Kimura, Michio; Iwai, Mina; Usami, Eiseki; Yoshimura, Tomoaki; Yasuda, Kimio

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the safety of S-1 as second-line therapy and to evaluate the association between neutropenia occurring during first-line gemcitabine (GEM) therapy and survival for advanced or recurrent pancreatic cancer (APC). Between January, 2010 and December, 2014, 123 APC patients received chemotherapy at the Ogaki Municipal Hospital (Ogaki, Japan). Of those, 37 received GEM as first-line and S-1 as a second-line therapy (GEM→S-1 group). A further 60 patients received GEM as first-line therapy, but did not receive second-line therapy (GEM group). The median overall survival in the GEM→S-1 (n=37) and GEM (n=60) groups was 323 days [95% confidence interval (CI): 138-218.9 days] and 172 days (95% CI: 105-184.4 days), respectively (P=0.0004). The median overall survival in the mild (grade ≤2; n=63) and severe (grade ≥3; n=34) neutropenia groups was 178 days (95% CI: 182-275 days) and 330 days (95% CI: 297-514 days), respectively (log-rank test, P=0.0023). The severe non-haematological toxicities associated with S-1 as second-line therapy were nausea (2.7%) and hand-foot syndrome (2.7%). Second-line S-1 treatment was discontinued due to adverse events in 5.4% (2/37) of the cases. In conclusion, neutropenia occurring during GEM therapy administered as first-line treatment to APC patients was strongly associated with a better prognosis. S-1 therapy as second-line treatment was associated with a low incidence of severe adverse events and the patients were able to successfully continue treatment.

  19. The AURORA initiative for metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zardavas, D; Maetens, M; Irrthum, A; Goulioti, T; Engelen, K; Fumagalli, D; Salgado, R; Aftimos, P; Saini, K S; Sotiriou, C; Campbell, P; Dinh, P; von Minckwitz, G; Gelber, R D; Dowsett, M; Di Leo, A; Cameron, D; Baselga, J; Gnant, M; Goldhirsch, A; Norton, L; Piccart, M

    2014-11-11

    Metastatic breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality among women in the Western world. To date most research efforts have focused on the molecular analysis of the primary tumour to dissect the genotypes of the disease. However, accumulating evidence supports a molecular evolution of breast cancer during its life cycle, with metastatic lesions acquiring new molecular aberrations. Recognising this critical gap of knowledge, the Breast International Group is launching AURORA, a large, multinational, collaborative metastatic breast cancer molecular screening programme. Approximately 1300 patients with metastatic breast cancer who have received no more than one line of systemic treatment for advanced disease will, after giving informed consent, donate archived primary tumour tissue, as well as will donate tissue collected prospectively from the biopsy of metastatic lesions and blood. Both tumour tissue types, together with a blood sample, will then be subjected to next generation sequencing for a panel of cancer-related genes. The patients will be treated at the discretion of their treating physicians per standard local practice, and they will be followed for clinical outcome for 10 years. Alternatively, depending on the molecular profiles found, patients will be directed to innovative clinical trials assessing molecularly targeted agents. Samples of outlier patients considered as 'exceptional responders' or as 'rapid progressors' based on the clinical follow-up will be subjected to deeper molecular characterisation in order to identify new prognostic and predictive biomarkers. AURORA, through its innovative design, will shed light onto some of the unknown areas of metastatic breast cancer, helping to improve the clinical outcome of breast cancer patients.

  20. Outcomes After Radiation Therapy to Metastatic Sites in Patients With Stage 4 Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kandula, Shravan; Prabhu, Roshan S.; Nanda, Ronica; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; Cash, Thomas; Qayed, Muna; Katzenstein, Howard; Esiashvili, Natia

    2016-01-01

    Summary In patients with high-risk metastatic neuroblastoma, the benefit of radiation therapy (RT) to metastatic sites as part of primary treatment has not been fully investigated. The purpose of this single-institution study was to evaluate local control of irradiated metastatic sites, and characterize metastatic disease burden and anatomic distribution in patients with high-risk metastatic neuroblastoma. The records of all patients diagnosed with stage 4 neuroblastoma between August 2000 and January 2010 were reviewed. Exclusion criteria included: bone-marrow only metastatic site, total body irradiation, or no imaging follow-up. A total of 37 patients met eligibility criteria. Median follow-up period for patients without relapse was 61 months. Five-year overall survival for all patients was 67%. Thirteen patients (35%) received RT to a metastatic site as part of their primary treatment. Among these patients, in-field recurrence occurred in three patients (23%), including two of three treated calvarial sites. In patients treated with or without RT to a metastatic site, respectively, there was no significant difference in 5-year overall survival (73% vs. 63%, P = 0.84) or relapse-free survival (46% and 55%, P = 0.48). Current metastatic site RT dose may be suboptimal, and certain locations may predict for a poor response. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the optimal role of RT to metastatic sites. PMID:25238225

  1. Outcomes After Radiation Therapy to Metastatic Sites in Patients With Stage 4 Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kandula, Shravan; Prabhu, Roshan S; Nanda, Ronica; Switchenko, Jeffrey M; Cash, Thomas; Qayed, Muna; Katzenstein, Howard; Esiashvili, Natia

    2015-04-01

    In patients with high-risk metastatic neuroblastoma, the benefit of radiation therapy (RT) to metastatic sites as part of primary treatment has not been fully investigated. The purpose of this single-institution study was to evaluate local control of irradiated metastatic sites, and characterize metastatic disease burden and anatomic distribution in patients with high-risk metastatic neuroblastoma. The records of all patients diagnosed with stage 4 neuroblastoma between August 2000 and January 2010 were reviewed. Exclusion criteria included: bone-marrow only metastatic site, total body irradiation, or no imaging follow-up. A total of 37 patients met eligibility criteria. Median follow-up period for patients without relapse was 61 months. Five-year overall survival for all patients was 67%. Thirteen patients (35%) received RT to a metastatic site as part of their primary treatment. Among these patients, in-field recurrence occurred in three patients (23%), including two of three treated calvarial sites. In patients treated with or without RT to a metastatic site, respectively, there was no significant difference in 5-year overall survival (73% vs. 63%, P=0.84) or relapse-free survival (46% and 55%, P=0.48). Current metastatic site RT dose may be suboptimal, and certain locations may predict for a poor response. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the optimal role of RT to metastatic sites.

  2. Recurrent novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hack, Margherita; Selvelli, Pierluigi

    1993-01-01

    Recurrent novae seem to be a rather inhomogeneous group: T CrB is a binary with a M III companion; U Sco probably has a late dwarf as companion. Three are fast novae; two are slow novae. Some of them appear to have normal chemical composition; others may present He and CNO excess. Some present a mass-loss that is lower by two orders of magnitude than classical novae. However, our sample is too small for saying whether there are several classes of recurrent novae, which may be related to the various classes of classical novae, or whether the low mass-loss is a general property of the class or just a peculiarity of one member of the larger class of classical novae and recurrent novae.

  3. Molecular Heterogeneity in Primary and Metastatic Prostate Tumor Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    melatonin levels, sleep disruption, and risk of prostate cancer in elderly men. European Urology 2014 Advance online publication. doi: 10.1016/j.eururo...multi-focal and metastatic prostate cancer . Aim 1 focuses on a 4-gene signature of prostate cancer prognosis, and whether the signature differs...involved in metastatic progression of prostate cancer . Scope: In year 1, Dr. Batista has received IRB approval, completed a series of courses to augment

  4. Medulloblastoma subgroups remain stable across primary and metastatic compartments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Dubuc, Adrian M; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Mack, Stephen; Gendoo, Deena M A; Remke, Marc; Wu, Xiaochong; Garzia, Livia; Luu, Betty; Cavalli, Florence; Peacock, John; López, Borja; Skowron, Patryk; Zagzag, David; Lyden, David; Hoffman, Caitlin; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Eberhart, Charles; MacDonald, Tobey; Li, Xiao-Nan; Van Meter, Timothy; Northcott, Paul A; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Hawkins, Cynthia; Rutka, James T; Bouffet, Eric; Pfister, Stefan M; Korshunov, Andrey; Taylor, Michael D

    2015-03-01

    Medulloblastoma comprises four distinct molecular variants with distinct genetics, transcriptomes, and outcomes. Subgroup affiliation has been previously shown to remain stable at the time of recurrence, which likely reflects their distinct cells of origin. However, a therapeutically relevant question that remains unanswered is subgroup stability in the metastatic compartment. We assembled a cohort of 12-paired primary-metastatic tumors collected in the MAGIC consortium, and established their molecular subgroup affiliation by performing integrative gene expression and DNA methylation analysis. Frozen tissues were collected and profiled using Affymetrix gene expression arrays and Illumina methylation arrays. Class prediction and hierarchical clustering were performed using existing published datasets. Our molecular analysis, using consensus integrative genomic data, establishes the unequivocal maintenance of molecular subgroup affiliation in metastatic medulloblastoma. We further validated these findings by interrogating a non-overlapping cohort of 19 pairs of primary-metastatic tumors from the Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute using an orthogonal technique of immunohistochemical staining. This investigation represents the largest reported primary-metastatic paired cohort profiled to date and provides a unique opportunity to evaluate subgroup-specific molecular aberrations within the metastatic compartment. Our findings further support the hypothesis that medulloblastoma subgroups arise from distinct cells of origin, which are carried forward from ontogeny to oncology.

  5. Health-related quality of life in locally advanced and metastatic breast cancer: methodological and clinical issues in randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Ghislain, Irina; Zikos, Efstathios; Coens, Corneel; Quinten, Chantal; Balta, Vasiliki; Tryfonidis, Konstantinos; Piccart, Martine; Zardavas, Dimitrios; Nagele, Eva; Bjelic-Radisic, Vesna; Cardoso, Fatima; Sprangers, Mirjam A G; Velikova, Galina; Bottomley, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among women worldwide, and increasingly, randomised controlled trials of this disease are measuring the health-related quality of life of these patients. In this systematic Review, we assess the adequacy of methods used to report health-related quality of life (HRQOL) from 49 eligible randomised controlled trials of advanced breast cancer. We compare our findings with those from the literature to investigate whether the standard of HRQOL reporting in this field has changed. We conclude that the overall reporting of HRQOL has improved, but some crucial aspects remain problematic, such as the absence of HRQOL research hypotheses and the overemphasis on statistical rather than clinical significance. Additionally, new challenges are arising with the emergence of novel treatments and the advent of personalised medicine, and improved HRQOL tools are required to cover the range of side-effects of newer therapies.

  6. Bafetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent High-Grade Glioma or Brain Metastases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-18

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Tumors Metastatic to Brain; Adult Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma

  7. Efficacy of Second-line Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in the Treatment of Metastatic Advanced Non-small-cell Lung Cancer Harboring Exon 19 and 21 EGFR Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhen; Jin, Xiance; Lin, Baochai; Su, Huafang; Chen, Hanbin; Fei, Shaoran; Zhao, Lihao; Deng, Xia; Xie, Deyao; Xie, Congying

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although superior clinical benefits of first-line epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) had been reported with different sensitivity, the sensitivity of second-line TKIs in NSCLC patients with different EFGR mutations was unknown. The purpose of this study is to investigate the clinical outcome of second-line EGFR-TKIs in the treatment of NSCLC patients according to different EGFR genotypes. Methods: The treatment outcomes of 166 NSCLC patients with different EGFR mutations treated by second-line TKIs were retrospectively reviewed. The efficacy was evaluated with Pearson chi-square or Fisher's exact tests, Log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards model. Results: The disease control rate (DCR) and objective response rate (ORR) of enrolled NSCLC patients were 77.7% and 11.4%, respectively. The exon 19 deletion group had a significantly longer median progression-free survival (PFS) (6.7 vs. 4.5 months, P=0.002) and overall survival (OS) (13.7 vs. 11.7 months, P=0.02) compared with the exon 19 L858R mutation group for NSCLC patients, as well for patients with brain metastasis [PFS: (6.7 vs. 3.9 months, p<0.001), OS: (13.7 vs. 7.9 months, p=0.006)]. No significant difference on PFS and OS was observed between exon 19 deletion and L858R mutation group for patients with bone metastasis. EGFR genotype and ECOG PS were independent predictors of PFS. Never smoking, exon 19 deletion, EGOC PS (0-1) and no brain metastasis were correlated with longer OS. No significant difference on side effect between exon 19 and 21 mutation group was observed. Conclusions: NSCLC patients harboring exon 19 deletion achieved better PFS and OS than those with L858R mutation, indicating that EGFR mutation is a significant prognostic factor for advanced NSCLC patients with and without brain metastasis receiving second-line EGFR-TKIs treatment. PMID:28367239

  8. Burden of illness for metastatic melanoma in Canada, 2011–2013

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, D.S.; Petrella, T.; Joshua, A.M.; Hamou, A.; Thabane, M.; Vantyghem, S.; Gwadry-Sridhar, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Detailed epidemiology for patients with advanced metastatic melanoma in Canada is not well characterized. We conducted an analysis of patients with this disease in the province of Ontario, with the aim being to study the presentation, disease characteristics and course, and treatment patterns for malignant melanoma. Methods In this Canadian observational prospective and retrospective study of patients with malignant melanoma, we used data collected in the Canadian Melanoma Research Network (cmrn) Patient Registry. We identified patients who were seen at 1 of 3 cancer treatment centres between April 2011 and 30 April 2013. Patient data from 2011 and 2012 were collected retrospectively using chart records and existing registry data. Starting January 2013, data were collected prospectively. Variables investigated included age, sex, initial stage, histology, mutation type, time to recurrence, sites of metastases, resectability, and previous therapies. Results A cohort of 810 patients with melanoma was identified from the cmrn registry. Mean age was 58.7 years, and most patients were men (60% vs. 40%). Factors affecting survival included unresectable or metastatic melanoma, initial stage at diagnosis, presence of brain metastasis, and BRAF mutation status. The proportion of surviving patients decreased with higher initial disease stages. Conclusions Using registry data, we were able to determine the detailed epidemiology of patients with melanoma in the Canadian province of Ontario, validating the comprehensive and detailed information that can be obtained from registry data. PMID:28050145

  9. The Management of Early Stage and Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Anders, Carey K.; Zagar, Timothy M.; Carey, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) defined as lacking expression of the estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and HER2, comprises approximately 15% of incident breast cancers and is over-represented among those with metastatic disease. It is increasingly clear that TNBC is heterogeneous and that there are several biologically distinct subtypes within TNBC, in particular the basal-like subtype but also the claudin-low, among others. While the incidence of BRCA mutations across all subsets of breast cancer is quite low (~5%), BRCA mutations are more common among those with TNBC (~20%) and may have therapeutic implications. The general principles guiding the use of chemotherapy and radiation therapy do not differ dramatically between early stage TNBC and non-TNBC. There is a trend, however, to treat TNBC at a lower stage with chemotherapy as this is the only way to systemically reduce recurrence risk. In the metastatic setting, while cytotoxic chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment for advanced TNBC, there are many promising targeted therapies in development in both the preclinical and early phase clinical trial settings. While the treatment of TNBC remains a challenge, coordinated efforts between clinician/scientist partnerships providing a comprehensive understanding of TNBC genomic, proteomic and other biologic processes may result in individualized therapy for TNBC faster than other subtypes -- driven by both the heterogeneity we know exists within this clinical entity and the intense need for improved treatment. PMID:23915742

  10. Vandetanib for the treatment of symptomatic or progressive medullary thyroid cancer in patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic disease: U.S. Food and Drug Administration drug approval summary.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Katherine; Kim, Geoffrey; Maher, V Ellen; Chattopadhyay, Somesh; Tang, Shenghui; Moon, Young Jin; Song, Pengfei; Marathe, Anshu; Balakrishnan, Suchitra; Zhu, Hao; Garnett, Christine; Liu, Qi; Booth, Brian; Gehrke, Brenda; Dorsam, Robert; Verbois, Leigh; Ghosh, Debasis; Wilson, Wendy; Duan, John; Sarker, Haripada; Miksinski, Sarah Pope; Skarupa, Lisa; Ibrahim, Amna; Justice, Robert; Murgo, Anthony; Pazdur, Richard

    2012-07-15

    On April 6, 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved vandetanib (Caprelsa tablets; AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP) for the treatment of symptomatic or progressive medullary thyroid cancer in patients with unresectable, locally advanced, or metastatic disease. Vandetanib is the first drug approved for this indication, and this article focuses on the basis of approval. Approval was based on the results of a double-blind trial conducted in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma. Patients were randomized 2:1 to vandetanib, 300 mg/d orally (n = 231), or to placebo (n = 100). The primary objective was demonstration of improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) with vandetanib compared with placebo. Other endpoints included evaluation of overall survival and objective response rate. The PFS analysis showed a marked improvement for patients randomized to vandetanib (hazard ratio = 0.35; 95% confidence interval, 0.24-0.53; P < 0.0001). The objective response rate for the vandetanib arm was 44% compared with 1% for the placebo arm. The most common grade 3 and 4 toxicities (>5%) were diarrhea and/or colitis, hypertension and hypertensive crisis, fatigue, hypocalcemia, rash, and corrected QT interval (QTc) prolongation. This approval was based on a statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvement in PFS. Given the toxicity profile, which includes prolongation of the QT interval and sudden death, only prescribers and pharmacies certified through the vandetanib Risk Evaluation Mitigation Strategy Program are able to prescribe and dispense vandetanib. Treatment-related risks should be taken into account when considering the use of vandetanib in patients with indolent, asymptomatic, or slowly progressing disease.

  11. Epidemiologic Study of Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Expression in Advanced/Metastatic Gastric Cancer: an Assessment of Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Status in Tumor Tissue Samples of Gastric and Gastro-Esophageal Junction Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Kyung Won; Jeon, Taeyong; Kim, Sewon; Kim, Sung Soo; Kim, Kwanghee; Suh, Byoung-Jo; Hwang, Sunhwi; Choi, SeongHee; Ryu, Seungwan; Min, Jae Seok; Lee, Young-Joon; Jee, Ye Seob; Chae, Hyeondong

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The Trastuzumab for gastric cancer (GC) trial identified human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) as a predictor of successful treatment with trastuzumab (HER2 receptor targeting agent) among patients with advanced/metastatic GC. To date, the prevalence of HER2 overexpression in the Korean population is unknown. The present study aimed to assess the incidence of HER2 positivity among GC and gastroesophageal (GE) junction cancer samples and the relationship between HER2 overexpression and clinicopathological characteristics in Korean patients. Materials and Methods Tumor samples collected from 1,695 patients with histologically proven GC or GE junction enrolled at 14 different hospitals in Korea were examined. After gathering clinicopathological data of all patients, HER2 status was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) at each hospital, and IHC 2+ cases were subjected to silver-enhanced in situ hybridization at 3 central laboratories. Results A total of 182 specimens tested positive for HER2, whereas 1,505 tested negative. Therefore, the overall HER2-positive rate in this study was 10.8% (95% confidence interval=9.3%–12.3%). The HER2-positive rate was higher among intestinal-type cases (17.6%) than among other types, and was higher among patients older than 70 years and 50 years of age, compared to other age groups. Conclusions Our evaluation of the HER2 positivity rate (10.8%) among Korean patients with GC and GE junction indicated the necessity of epidemiological data when conducting studies related to HER2 expression in GC and GE junction. PMID:28337363

  12. Metastatic Basosquamous Carcinoma: Report of Two Cases and Clinicopathological Considerations.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Tommaso; Santoro, Angela; Pannone, Giuseppe; Rodriguez, Javier; Fior, Andrea; Nocini, Pier Francesco

    2016-12-01

    Basosquamous carcinoma is a rare cutaneous tumor considered by some authors as an aggressive type of basal cell carcinoma having a propensity for local recurrence and a potential risk for regional and distant metastatic spread. Herein we present 2 cases of basosquamous carcinoma of head and neck region, with metastatic spread to parotid gland (case 1) and to cervical nodes (case 2). Both patients had recurrence 2 years after initial treatment of the primary lesion (first patient: surgery; second patient: radiotherapy) and at the same time developed regional metastases. We conclude that basosquamous carcinoma must be considered as an aggressive variant of basal cell carcinoma having a great propensity to metastasize even at an early tumor stage. The clinical features, the morphologic aspects, and the treatment of this rare entity are discussed in this article.

  13. CT and MRI of primary and metastatic fibrolamellar carcinoma: a case series of 37 patients

    PubMed Central

    McErlean, A; Ang, C S; DeMatteo, R P; Abou-Alfa, G K

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Fibrolamellar carcinoma (FLC) is a rare disease, with limited radiographic reported information. We assessed the imaging patterns of primary and metastatic FLC. Methods: CT and MR examinations of patients with FLC were retrospectively reviewed. Imaging features were assessed for primary and recurrent liver tumours, including dimension, enhancement characteristics, and presence or absence of central scars. Locations of nodal and extranodal metastases were also recorded. Results: Of 37 patients (18 males and 19 females; average age, 23.5 years) with FLC, 24 had imaging of their primary tumour; 13 had metastases at presentation and 7 developed metastases on follow-up. The remaining 13 patients had follow-up imaging of metastatic disease. Primary FLC had a mean diameter >11 cm, with central scars in ten (46%) patients. Most tumours enhanced heterogeneously (96%) and showed arterial enhancement (81%). On MRI, 62% of FLCs were hypointense on T1 weighted imaging and 54% were hyperintense on T2 weighted imaging. 13 patients (54%) had nodal metastases at presentation, mostly in the upper abdomen (92%) and commonly in the chest (38%). Extrahepatic metastases were most frequently pulmonary or peritoneal. Predominantly small and homogeneous intrahepatic recurrences were detected on follow-up in 15 patients. Conclusion: FLC often presents as a large hepatic tumour with nodal and distant metastases. Thoracic adenopathy and lung metastases were frequently found in our series, suggesting the need for pre-operative and follow-up chest imaging. Advances in knowledge: Thoracic nodal and lung metastases are common in FLC; therefore, dedicated chest imaging should be part of the evaluation of a patient with FLC. PMID:24896196

  14. Metastatic carcinoid tumor obstructing left ventricular outflow.

    PubMed

    Chrysant, George S; Horstmanshof, Douglas A; Guniganti, Uma M

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are rare and usually indicate metastatic disease. Characterizing a tumor and reaching an exact diagnosis can be difficult. Diagnosis has been aided greatly by advances in imaging, such as cardiovascular magnetic resonance with the use of gadolinium-pentetic acid. Carcinoid tumors are neuroendocrine neoplasms that are found most often in the intestinal tract, although they can also develop in the lung, stomach, or heart. Herein, we report the case of a 72-year-old woman with a history of intestinal carcinoid disease and presenting symptoms of dizziness, fatigue, and chest pain. We used cardiovascular magnetic resonance with gadolinium enhancement to identify a large mass obstructing left ventricular outflow. The histopathologic results of an endomyocardial biopsy confirmed that the mass was a left-sided metastatic carcinoid cardiac tumor. To our knowledge, we are reporting the 1st combined use of clinical evaluation, cardiovascular magnetic resonance, and histopathologic studies to reach such a diagnosis.

  15. Determinants of metastatic competency in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Tauriello, Daniele V F; Calon, Alexandre; Lonardo, Enza; Batlle, Eduard

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancer types and represents a major therapeutic challenge. Although initial events in colorectal carcinogenesis are relatively well characterized and treatment for early-stage disease has significantly improved over the last decades, the mechanisms underlying metastasis - the main cause of death - remain poorly understood. Correspondingly, no effective therapy is currently available for advanced or metastatic disease. There is increasing evidence that colorectal cancer is hierarchically organized and sustained by cancer stem cells, in concert with various stromal cell types. Here, we review the interplay between cancer stem cells and their microenvironment in promoting metastasis and discuss recent insights relating to both patient prognosis and novel targeted treatment strategies. A better understanding of these topics may aid the prevention or reduction of metastatic burden.

  16. Mechanosensitive pannexin-1 channels mediate microvascular metastatic cell survival.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Paul W; Zhang, Steven; Soong, T David; Halberg, Nils; Goodarzi, Hani; Mangrum, Creed; Wu, Y Gloria; Elemento, Olivier; Tavazoie, Sohail F

    2015-07-01

    During metastatic progression, circulating cancer cells become lodged within the microvasculature of end organs, where most die from mechanical deformation. Although this phenomenon was first described over a half-century ago, the mechanisms enabling certain cells to survive this metastasis-suppressive barrier remain unknown. By applying whole-transcriptome RNA-sequencing technology to isogenic cancer cells of differing metastatic capacities, we identified a mutation encoding a truncated form of the pannexin-1 (PANX1) channel, PANX1(1-89), as recurrently enriched in highly metastatic breast cancer cells. PANX1(1-89) functions to permit metastatic cell survival during traumatic deformation in the microvasculature by augmenting ATP release from mechanosensitive PANX1 channels activated by membrane stretch. PANX1-mediated ATP release acts as an autocrine suppressor of deformation-induced apoptosis through P2Y-purinergic receptors. Finally, small-molecule therapeutic inhibition of PANX1 channels is found to reduce the efficiency of breast cancer metastasis. These data suggest a molecular basis for metastatic cell survival on microvasculature-induced biomechanical trauma.

  17. Novel Insights of Oligometastases and Oligo-Recurrence and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Niibe, Yuzuru; Chang, Joe Y.

    2012-01-01

    Oligometastases and oligo-recurrence are among the most important notions of metastatic and recurrent cancer. The concept of oligometastases is related to the notion that cancer patients with 1–5 metastatic or recurrent lesions that could be treated by local therapy achieve long-term survival or cure, while the concept of oligo-recurrence is related to the notion that cancer patients with 1–5 metastatic or recurrent lesions that could be treated by local therapy have controlled primary lesions. Achievement of long-term survival or cure in patients with oligometastases and oligo-recurrence is cancer and organ specific. These facts rely on the seed and soil theory and multiple steps of cancer progression. Oligo-recurrence is considered to have a better prognosis than oligometastases. In patients with oligometastases and oligo-recurrence, the oligometastases and oligo-recurrence are sometimes cured with only local therapy, which is an example of the abscopal effect, previously described in relation to cure of lesions outside of the field of radiation therapy without systemic therapy. Oligometastases and oligo-recurrence can now be cured by less invasive local treatment methods combined with systemic therapy. The mechanisms of oligometastases and oligo-recurrence, as well as novel insights into these important concepts, are presented in this paper. PMID:22966429

  18. Pathways to Breast Cancer Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer remains a deadly disease, even with all the recent technological advancements. Early intervention has made an impact, but an overwhelmingly large number of breast cancer patients still live under the fear of “recurrent” disease. Breast cancer recurrence is clinically a huge problem and one that is largely not well understood. Over the years, a number of factors have been studied with an overarching aim of being able to prognose recurrent disease. This paper attempts to provide an overview of our current knowledge of breast cancer recurrence and its associated challenges. Through a survey of the literature on cancer stem cells (CSCs), epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), various signaling pathways such as Notch/Wnt/hedgehog, and microRNAs (miRNAs), we also examine the hypotheses that are currently under investigation for the prevention of breast cancer recurrence. PMID:23533807

  19. Excellent Response to 177Lu-PSMA-617 Radioligand Therapy in a Patient With Advanced Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer Evaluated by 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Roll, Wolfgang; Bode, Axel; Weckesser, Matthias; Bögemann, Martin; Rahbar, Kambiz

    2017-02-01

    Recently radiolabeled ligands targeting prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) have been introduced for diagnostics and treatment of prostate cancer. Labeled with Lutetium, PSMA radioligand therapy (RLT) is one of the most promising new treatments of metastatic castration refractory prostate cancer. We present images of Ga-PSMA PET/CT and parameters of response of a 75-year-old heavily pretreated metastatic castration refractory prostate cancer patient with extended bone metastases, showing an extraordinary biochemical response in PSA-levels concordant to SUV decline in bone metastases. Furthermore, this case shows that CT is of no use in assessing response in bone metastases of prostate cancer.

  20. Successful hepatectomy for metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal—a case report

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Tercia Tarciane; Belotto, Marcos; Peixoto, Renata D’Alpino

    2016-01-01

    Despite rare, metastatic anal carcinoma confers a poor prognosis. Systemic chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment for advanced disease while the role of biologics and/or surgical resection of metastatic disease are anecdotal. Compared to isolated liver colorectal or neuroendocrine cancer liver metastases, there is far less experience with resection or nonsurgical local ablative procedures for patients with metastatic anal carcinoma to the liver. We report the case of a 67-year-old woman with metastatic anal carcinoma to the liver who was successfully treated with liver resection and remains free of relapse more than one year later. PMID:28078133

  1. Trastuzumab Emtansine for Treating HER2-Positive, Unresectable, Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer After Treatment with Trastuzumab and a Taxane: An Evidence Review Group Perspective of a NICE Single Technology Appraisal.

    PubMed

    Squires, Hazel; Stevenson, Matt; Simpson, Emma; Harvey, Rebecca; Stevens, John

    2016-07-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) (Kadcyla(®); Roche) to submit evidence of its clinical and cost-effectiveness for treating human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive, unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer after treatment with trastuzumab and a taxane. The School of Health and Related Research Technology Appraisal Group (ScHARR-TAG) at the University of Sheffield were the independent Evidence Review Group (ERG) who produced a critical review of the company's submission to NICE. The ERG also independently searched for relevant evidence and modified the submitted decision analytic model to produce a revised estimate of cost-effectiveness and examine the impact of altering some of the key assumptions. The clinical effectiveness data were taken from two randomised controlled trials that reported a significant advantage in progression-free survival (PFS) for T-DM1 over lapatinib in combination with capecitabine (EMILIA trial), and over the treatment of physician's choice (TH3RESA trial). A network meta-analysis suggested T-DM1 was the best treatment in terms of both overall survival and PFS compared with lapatinib in combination with capecitabine; trastuzumab in combination with capecitabine; and capecitabine monotherapy. Adverse event (AE) data were taken from a pooled analysis of additional trials of T-DM1 as a single agent. The most common grade 3 or greater AEs for T-DM1 were thrombocytopenia and hepatotoxicity. Following the clarification process, the manufacturer reported a deterministic incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for T-DM1 compared with lapatinib in combination with capecitabine of £167,236, the latter of which was estimated to have an ICER of £49,798 compared with capecitabine monotherapy. The ERG produced similar values of £166,429 and £50,620 respectively. All other comparators were dominated. During the appraisal, the

  2. Temsirolimus and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Endometrial, Ovarian, Liver, Carcinoid, or Islet Cell Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-17

    Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Malignant Pancreatic Gastrinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Malignant Pancreatic Insulinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Somatostatinoma; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Surface Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Beta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic G-Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Carcinosarcoma

  3. Role of the neural niche in brain metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Termini, John; Neman, Josh; Jandial, Rahul

    2014-08-01

    Metastasis is the relentless pursuit of cancer to escape its primary site and colonize distant organs. This malignant evolutionary process is biologically heterogeneous, yet one unifying element is the critical role of the microenvironment for arriving metastatic cells. Historically, brain metastases were rarely investigated because patients with advanced cancer were considered terminal. Fortunately, advances in molecular therapies have led to patients living longer with metastatic cancer. However, one site remains recalcitrant to our treatment efforts, the brain. The central nervous system is the most complex biologic system, which poses unique obstacles but also harbors opportunities for discovery. Much of what we know about the brain microenvironment comes from neuroscience. We suggest that the interrelated cellular responses in traumatic brain injury may guide us toward new perspectives in understanding brain metastases. In this view, brain metastases may be conceptualized as progressive oncologic injury to the nervous system. This review discusses our evolving understanding of bidirectional interactions between the brain milieu and metastatic cancer.

  4. Combined Therapy against Recurrent Hemangiopericytoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-dong; Jiang, Jing-ting; Wu, Chang-ping

    2012-01-01

    Department of Oncology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Changzhou 213003, China A patient with a seven-year history of recurrent metastatic hemangiopericytoma (HPC) was admitted. During his treatment, he received surgical resection, radiotherapy, radiofrequency hyperthermia and chemotherapy using combined doxorubicin, dacarbazin, vincristine, ginsenoside Rg3, and recombinant human endostatin. This synergistic method provides an encouraging model for treating HPC. PMID:23691471

  5. Unusual presentation of metastatic gall bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Piyush; Roy, Soumyajit; Tiwari, Vivek; Mohanti, Bidhu K

    2014-01-01

    To report the first case of rare isolated breast metastasis from carcinoma gall bladder. Single patient case report. A 35-year-old pre-menopausal female presented with 2 * 2 cm right upper outer quadrant breast lump. Post-mastectomy, histology confirmed it to be metastatic adenocarcinoma positive for both Cytokeratin (CK) 7 and CK20. Past history as told by the patient revealed that 2 years back, cholecystectomy was performed for gall stones, of which no histology reports were present; she had a port site scar recurrence which showed it to be adenocarcinoma. Adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy was advised which the patient did not complete. This is probably the first case reported of isolated breast metastasis from gall bladder carcinoma, diagnosed retrospectively. It also highlights the importance of adjuvant treatment in gall bladder malignancy.

  6. Efficacy of goserelin plus anastrozole in premenopausal women with advanced or recurrent breast cancer refractory to an LH-RH analogue with tamoxifen: results of the JMTO BC08-01 phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Reiki; Anan, Keisei; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Higaki, Kenji; Tanaka, Maki; Shibuta, Kenji; Sagara, Yasuaki; Ohno, Shinji; Tsuyuki, Shigeru; Mase, Takahiro; Teramukai, Satoshi

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) analogue plus an aromatase inhibitor following failure to respond to standard LH-RH analogue plus tamoxifen (TAM) in premenopausal patients. Premenopausal women with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and/or progesterone-receptor positive, advanced or recurrent breast cancer refractory to an LH-RH analogue plus TAM received goserelin (GOS) in conjunction with anastrozole (ANA). The primary endpoint was the objective response rate (ORR). Secondary endpoints included progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), clinical benefit rate (CBR) and safety. Between September 2008 and November 2010, 37 patients were enrolled. Thirty-five patients (94.6%) had ER-positive tumors, and 36 (97.3%) had human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) 2-negative tumors. Thirty-six (97.3%) had measurable lesions and 1 (2.7%) had only bone metastasis. The ORR was 18.9% [95% confidence interval (CI), 8.0-35.2%], the CBR was 62.2% (95% CI, 44.8-77.5%) and the median PFS was 7.3 months. Eight patients had adverse drug reactions but none resulted in discontinuation of treatment. GOS plus ANA is a safe effective treatment for premenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive, recurrent or advanced breast cancer. The treatment may become viable treatment in the future, particularly when TAM is ineffective or contraindicated. Further studies and discussion are warranted.

  7. Autologous cord blood transplantation for metastatic neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ning, Botao; Cheuk, Daniel Ka-Leung; Chiang, Alan Kwok-Shing; Lee, Pamela Pui-Wah; Ha, Shau-Yin; Chan, Godfrey Chi-Fung

    2016-03-01

    Auto-SCT is a common approach for metastatic neuroblastoma with the intention to rescue hematopoiesis after megadose chemotherapy. PBSC or BM is the usual stem cell source for auto-SCT. Auto-CBT for neuroblastoma has very rarely been performed. Currently, case reports are available for two patients only. We performed 13 auto-SCTs for high-risk neuroblastoma from 2007 to 2013, including four cases of metastatic neuroblastoma aged 11-64 months treated with auto-CBT. All four patients had partial or CR to upfront treatments before auto-CBT. Nucleated cell dose and CD34+ cell dose infused were 2.8-8.7 × 10(7) /kg and 0.36-3.9 × 10(5) /kg, respectively. Post-thawed viability was 57-76%. Neutrophil engraftment (>0.5 × 10(9) /L) occurred at 15-33 days, while platelet engraftment occurred at 31-43 days (>20 × 10(9) /L) and 33-65 days (>50 × 10(9) /L) post-transplant, respectively. There was no severe acute or chronic complication. Three patients survived for 1.9-7.7 yr without evidence of recurrence. One patient relapsed at 16 months post-transplant and died of progressive disease. Cord blood may be a feasible alternative stem cell source for auto-SCT in patients with stage 4 neuroblastoma, and outcomes may be improved compared to autologous PBSC or BM transplants.

  8. Metastatic Basal cell carcinoma accompanying gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bilir, Yeliz; Gokce, Erkan; Ozturk, Banu; Deresoy, Faik Alev; Yuksekkaya, Ruken; Yaman, Emel

    2014-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by skeletal anomalies, numerous cysts observed in the jaw, and multiple basal cell carcinoma of the skin, which may be accompanied by falx cerebri calcification. Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly skin tumor with slow clinical course and low metastatic potential. Its concomitance with Gorlin syndrome, resulting from a mutation in a tumor suppressor gene, may substantially change morbidity and mortality. A 66-year-old male patient with a history of recurrent basal cell carcinoma was presented with exophthalmus in the left eye and the lesions localized in the left lateral orbita and left zygomatic area. His physical examination revealed hearing loss, gapped teeth, highly arched palate, and frontal prominence. Left orbital mass, cystic masses at frontal and ethmoidal sinuses, and multiple pulmonary nodules were detected at CT scans. Basal cell carcinoma was diagnosed from biopsy of ethmoid sinus. Based on the clinical and typical radiological characteristics (falx cerebri calcification, bifid costa, and odontogenic cysts), the patient was diagnosed with metastatic skin basal cell carcinoma accompanied by Gorlin syndrome. Our case is a basal cell carcinoma with aggressive course accompanying a rarely seen syndrome.

  9. Gastric type endocervical adenocarcinoma: an aggressive tumor with unusual metastatic patterns and poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Karamurzin, Yevgeniy S.; Kiyokawa, Takako; Parkash, Vinita; Jotwani, Anjali R.; Patel, Prusha; Pike, Malcolm C.; Soslow, Robert A.; Park, Kay J.

    2016-01-01

    Gastric type adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix (GAS) is a rare variant of mucinous endocervical adenocarcinoma not etiologically associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, with minimal deviation adenocarcinoma (MDA) at the well-differentiated end of the morphologic spectrum. These tumors are reported to have worse prognosis than usual HPV-associated endocervical adenocarcinoma (UEA). A retrospective review of GAS was performed from the pathology databases of three institutions spanning 20 years. Stage, metastatic patterns, and overall survival were documented. Forty GAS cases were identified, with clinical follow-up data available for 38. The tumors were subclassified as MDA (n=13) and non-MDA GAS (n=27). Two patients were syndromic (one Li-Fraumeni, one Peutz-Jeghers). At presentation, 59% were advanced stage (FIGO II–IV), 50% had lymph node metastases, 35% had ovarian involvement, 20% had abdominal disease, 39% had at least one site of metastasis at the time of initial surgery, and 12% of patients experienced distant recurrence. The metastatic sites included lymph nodes, adnexa, omentum, bowel, peritoneum, diaphragm, abdominal wall, bladder, vagina, appendix, and brain. Follow-up ranged from 1.4 to 136.0 months (mean, 33.9 months); 20/38 (52.6%) had no evidence of disease, 3/38 (7.9%) were alive with disease, and 15/38 (39.5%) died of disease. Disease specific survival at 5 years was 42% for GAS vs. 91% for UEA. There were no survival differences between MDA and non-MDA GAS. GAS represents a distinct, biologically aggressive type of endocervical adenocarcinoma. The majority of patients present at advanced stage and pelvic, abdominal, and distant metastases are not uncommon. PMID:26457350

  10. Single-cell analysis reveals a stem-cell program in human metastatic breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Devon A; Bhakta, Nirav R; Kessenbrock, Kai; Prummel, Karin D; Yu, Ying; Takai, Ken; Zhou, Alicia; Eyob, Henok; Balakrishnan, Sanjeev; Wang, Chih-Yang; Yaswen, Paul; Goga, Andrei; Werb, Zena

    2015-10-01

    Despite major advances in understanding the molecular and genetic basis of cancer, metastasis remains the cause of >90% of cancer-related mortality. Understanding metastasis initiation and progression is critical to developing new therapeutic strategies to treat and prevent metastatic disease. Prevailing theories hypothesize that metastases are seeded by rare tumour cells with unique properties, which may function like stem cells in their ability to initiate and propagate metastatic tumours. However, the identity of metastasis-initiating cells in human breast cancer remains elusive, and whether metastases are hierarchically organized is unknown. Here we show at the single-cell level that early stage metastatic cells possess a distinct stem-like gene expression signature. To identify and isolate metastatic cells from patient-derived xenograft models of human breast cancer, we developed a highly sensitive fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based assay, which allowed us to enumerate metastatic cells in mouse peripheral tissues. We compared gene signatures in metastatic cells from tissues with low versus high metastatic burden. Metastatic cells from low-burden tissues were distinct owing to their increased expression of stem cell, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, pro-survival, and dormancy-associated genes. By contrast, metastatic cells from high-burden tissues were similar to primary tumour cells, which were more heterogeneous and expressed higher levels of luminal differentiation genes. Transplantation of stem-like metastatic cells from low-burden tissues showed that they have considerable tumour-initiating capacity, and can differentiate to produce luminal-like cancer cells. Progression to high metastatic burden was associated with increased proliferation and MYC expression, which could be attenuated by treatment with cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors. These findings support a hierarchical model for metastasis, in which metastases are initiated

  11. Late presentation of metastatic pheochromocytoma: A problem case solved by I-131 MIBG scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Geatti, O.; Shapiro, B.; Virgolini, L. )

    1990-02-01

    A patient presented with recurrent pheochromocytoma 10 years following the apparently successful surgical cure of a right adrenal pheochromocytoma. Conventional medical imaging techniques, (chest radiograph, abdominal ultrasound, and abdominal CT) suggested local recurrence for which surgery was planned. I-131 MIBG scintigraphy revealed disseminated metastatic disease that rendered attempts at surgical cure futile. The patient was treated with three therapeutic doses of I-131 MIBG with good symptomatic palliation and improvement of some biochemical parameters.

  12. Depsipeptide (Romidepsin) in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-03

    Adult Alveolar Soft-part Sarcoma; Adult Angiosarcoma; Adult Epithelioid Sarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Chondrosarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma; Adult Fibrosarcoma; Adult Leiomyosarcoma; Adult Liposarcoma; Adult Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma; Adult Malignant Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Malignant Mesenchymoma; Adult Neurofibrosarcoma; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Adult Synovial Sarcoma; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  13. Developments in Intralesional Therapy for Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Sloot, Sarah; Rashid, Omar M.; Sarnaik, Amod A.; Zager, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Locoregional advanced melanoma poses a complex clinical challenge that requires a multidisciplinary, patient-centered approach. Numerous agents have been studied for their suitability as intralesional therapy in the past decades, but few have successfully completed phase 3 clinical trial testing. Methods The relevant medical literature was searched for articles regarding use of intralesional therapies in metastatic melanoma. Therapies with data from phase 2 or higher studies were selected for review. This review also summarizes the mechanisms of action, adverse-event profiles, and clinical data for these agents. Results Intralesional therapies demonstrate promising effects in select patients and are a valuable asset to the current treatment options in advanced melanoma. The optimal approach should be tailored to the individual patient and consists of a combination of intralesional therapies, regional perfusions, systemic immunotherapies, targeted therapies and/or surgery. Conclusions Due to relatively good local response rates and tolerable adverse-event profile, intralesional therapy may be a treatment option for patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic melanoma. PMID:27009452

  14. Optimizing initial chemotherapy for metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Mantripragada, Kalyan C; Safran, Howard

    2016-05-01

    The two combination chemotherapy regimens FOLFIRINOX and gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel represent major breakthroughs in the management of metastatic pancreatic cancer. Both regimens showed unprecedented survival advantage in the setting of front-line therapy. However, their application for treatment of patients in the community is challenging because of significant toxicities, thus limiting potential benefits to a narrow population of patients. Modifications to the dose intensity or schedule of those regimens improve their tolerability, while likely retaining survival advantage over single-agent chemotherapy. Newer strategies to optimize these two active regimens in advanced pancreatic cancer are being explored that can help personalize treatment to individual patients.

  15. TH-E-BRF-08: Subpopulations of Similarly-Responding Lesions in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C; Harmon, S; Perk, T; Jeraj, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In patients with multiple lesions, resistance to cancer treatments and subsequent disease recurrence may be due to heterogeneity of response across lesions. This study aims to identify subpopulations of similarly-responding metastatic prostate cancer lesions in bone using quantitative PET metrics. Methods: Seven metastatic prostate cancer patients treated with AR-directed therapy received pre-treatment and mid-treatment [F-18]NaF PET/CT scans. Images were registered using an articulated CT registration algorithm and transformations were applied to PET segmentations. Midtreatment response was calculated on PET-based texture features. Hierarchical agglomerative clustering was used to form groups of similarly-responding lesions, with the number of natural clusters (K) determined by the inconsistency coefficient. Lesion clustering was performed within each patient, and for the pooled population. The cophenetic coefficient (C) quantified how well the data was clustered. The Jaccard Index (JI) assessed similarity of cluster assignments from patient clustering and from population clustering. Results: 188 lesions in seven patients were identified for analysis (between 6 to 53 lesions per patient). Lesion response was defined as percent change relative to pre-treatment for 23 uncorrelated PET-based feature identifiers. . High response heterogeneity was found across all lesions (i.e. range ΔSUVmax =−95.98% to 775.00%). For intra-patient clustering, K ranged from 1–20. Population-based clustering resulted in 75 clusters, of 1-6 lesions each. Intra-patient clustering resulted in higher quality clusters than population clustering (mean C=0.95, range=0.89 to 1.00). For all patients, cluster assignments from population clustering showed good agreement to intra-patient clustering (mean JI=0.87, range=0.68 to 1.00). Conclusion: Subpopulations of similarly-responding lesions were identified in patients with multiple metastatic lesions. Good agreement was found between

  16. Ixabepilone in Treating Patients With Advanced Urinary Tract Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Distal Urethral Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urethral Cancer Associated With Invasive Bladder Cancer

  17. Cancer Metastases: Early Dissemination and Late Recurrences

    PubMed Central

    Friberg, Sten; Nyström, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Metastatic cells from a primary tumor can occur before the primary cancer is detected. Metastatic cells can also remain in the patient for many years after removal of the primary tumor without proliferating. These dormant malignant cells can awaken and cause recurrent disease decades after the primary treatment. The purpose of this article is to review the clinical evidence for early dissemination and late recurrences in human malignant tumors. We used the following definitions: dormancy of cells may be defined as a nonproliferating state or an arrest in the cell cycle that results in a prolonged G0 phase. If one accepts the term “late metastases” to indicate a period exceeding 10 years from the removal of the primary tumor, then the two malignancies in which this occurs most frequently are cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). METHODS PubMed, Web of Science, and Scopus were searched with the keywords “metastases,” “early dissemination,” “late recurrences,” “inadvertently transmitted cancer,” “tumor growth rate,” “dormancy,” “circulating tumor cells,” and “transplantation of cancer.” RESULTS Several case reports of early dissemination and late recurrences of various types of malignancies were found. Analyses of the growth rates of several malignant tumors in the original host indicated that the majority of cancers had metastasized years before they were detected. CMM, RCC, and malignant glioblastoma were the three most common malignancies resulting from an organ transplantation. CMM and RCC were also the two most common malignancies that showed dormancy. In several cases of transplanted CMM and RCC, the donor did not have any known malignancy or had had the malignancy removed so long ago that the donor was regarded as cured. CONCLUSION (1) Metastases can frequently exist prior to the detection of the primary tumor. (2) Metastatic cells may reside in organs in the original host that are not

  18. Management of an invasive and metastatic Sertoli cell tumor with associated myelotoxicosis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Withers, Sita S; Lawson, Corinne M; Burton, Andrew G; Rebhun, Robert B; Steffey, Michele A

    2016-03-01

    We describe the surgical and post-operative management of a large, invasive, and metastatic functional Sertoli cell tumor in a 9-year-old cryptorchid male Labrador retriever dog. Despite residual disease after surgery, bone marrow recovery occurred without administration of bone marrow stimulants and serum estradiol accurately predicted tumor recurrence.

  19. Management of an invasive and metastatic Sertoli cell tumor with associated myelotoxicosis in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Withers, Sita S.; Lawson, Corinne M.; Burton, Andrew G.; Rebhun, Robert B.; Steffey, Michele A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the surgical and post-operative management of a large, invasive, and metastatic functional Sertoli cell tumor in a 9-year-old cryptorchid male Labrador retriever dog. Despite residual disease after surgery, bone marrow recovery occurred without administration of bone marrow stimulants and serum estradiol accurately predicted tumor recurrence. PMID:26933269

  20. Metastatic melanoma after 23 years of primary ocular melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Karde, Supriya Ramesh; Bhand, Prashant Ramesh; Ramesh, Nagabathula; Arockiam, Sacchin

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of 52-year-old man who presented with an episode of tonic–clonic seizures. He had right ocular melanoma 23 years ago with subsequent enucleation which was the standard treatment at that time. CT scans of the brain and of the thorax-abdomen-pelvis revealed widespread metastatic lesions in the brain, lung and liver. Further investigations including bronchoscopy with cytopathology uncovered that the metastatic disease was a recurrence of ocular melanoma. He received palliative radiotherapy and died 6 months later. Ocular melanoma is often associated with fulminant metastatic disease after a period of dormancy. Thus, despite successful treatment of the localised disease at initial presentation, an effort is needed for optimal long-term follow-up plan in order to improve survival in case of recurrence. PMID:27881589

  1. Nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis with embolic cerebral vascular accidents in a patient with advanced, recurrent clear cell carcinoma of the ovary: A case report.

    PubMed

    Liang, Lusha W; Perez, Alexander R; Cangemi, Nicholas A; Young, Robert J; Makker, Vicky

    2016-04-01

    •Nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis can occur in ovarian clear cell carcinoma.•We report on NBTE-associated embolic cerebrovascular infarcts in advanced OCCC.•Further NBTE-associated embolic events can be prevented with anticoagulant therapy.

  2. Phase I Trial of Adenovirus-Mediated IL-12 Gene Transduction in Patients with Recurrent Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer Following Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    radiation therapy who are presently not on hormonal therapy. An important part of the screening process is a needle biopsy of the prostate to confirm the...has been amended (see below) to also include patients who had their locally advanced prostate cancer treated with hormonal ablative therapy...the lack of effective therapies for men who have failed definitive radiotherapy or who have locally advanced cancer despite hormone ablative therapy

  3. Metastatic Testicular Choriocarcinoma: A Rare Cause of Upper GI Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Jacqueline; Armstrong, Sharon; Walsh, Shaun; Groome, Max; Mowat, Craig

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in an otherwise healthy 18-year-old man who presented with melena. Endoscopy revealed an ulcerated mass in the stomach and pathology confirmed this to be a malignant, poorly differentiated choriocarcinoma. Further imaging showed a left testicular mass with evidence of pulmonary, gastric, and brain metastases, and blood tests revealed an hCG level of 32,219 U/L. He was diagnosed with advanced metastatic testicular choriocarcinoma and underwent intensive induction chemotherapy and an orchidectomy. Metastatic testicular choriocarcinoma is a rare cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26504875

  4. Pancreaticoduodenectomy for metastatic tumors to the periampullary region.

    PubMed

    Medina-Franco, H; Halpern, N B; Aldrete, J S

    1999-01-01

    Although operative resection of metastatic lesions to the liver, lung, and brain has proved to be useful, only recently have there been a few reports of pancreaticoduodenectomies in selected cases of metastases to the periampullary region. In this report we present four cases of proven metastatic disease to the periampullary region in which the lesions were treated by pancreaticoduodenectomy. Metastatic tumors corresponded to a melanoma of unknown primary site, choriocarcinoma, high-grade liposarcoma of the leg, and a small cell cancer of the lung. All four patients survived the operation and had no major complications. Two patients died of recurrence of their tumors, 6 and 63 months, respectively, after operation; the other two patients are alive 21 and 12 months, respectively, after operation. It can be inferred from this small but documented experience, as well as a review of the literature, that pancreaticoduodenectomy for metastatic disease can be considered in selected patients, as long as this operation is performed by experienced surgeons who have achieved minimal or no morbidity and mortality with it.

  5. Megakaryocytes mimicking metastatic breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hoda, Syed A; Resetkova, Erika; Yusuf, Yasmin; Cahan, Anthony; Rosen, Paul P

    2002-05-01

    False-positive diagnosis of lymph nodes occurs when a benign element in a lymph node, or in its capsule, is interpreted as metastatic carcinoma. This report describes a patient with breast carcinoma who had megakaryocytes in axillary sentinel lymph nodes mimicking metastatic carcinoma. The patient had no history of a hematologic disease, and we found no evidence of a concurrent hematopoietic disorder. The megakaryocytes were reactive for CD31, CD61, and von Willebrand factor, but not for cytokeratin (AE1/AE3). Megakaryocytes should be added to the list of benign histologic abnormalities that may simulate metastatic carcinoma in a sentinel lymph node.

  6. Improvement of survival and prospect of cure in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yee Chung; Ueno, Naoto T

    2012-07-01

    Patients with metastatic breast cancer have traditionally been considered incurable with conventional treatment. However, 5-10% of those patients survive more than 5 years, and 2-5% survive more than 10 years. Recent studies suggest that the survival of patients with metastatic breast cancer has been slowly improving. In this review, we examine the possible curative approach for a certain group of patients with metastatic breast cancer. We identify that patients most likely to benefit from such an aggressive approach are young and have good performance status, adequate body functional reserve, long disease-free interval before recurrence, oligometastatic disease, and low systemic tumor load. An aggressive multidisciplinary approach including both local treatment of macroscopic disease and systemic treatment of microscopic disease can result in prolonged disease control in certain patients with metastatic breast cancer. Whether patients with prolonged disease control are "cured" remains controversial.

  7. Targeted Therapy for Metastatic Renal Carcinoma: an Update

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Rodrigo Donalisio; Gustafson, Diedra; Nogueira, Leticia; Werahera, Priya N.; Molina, Wilson R.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is associated with poor outcomes in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Advances in the understanding of tumor molecular biology and the implementation of new drugs that target these molecular pathways have increased the arsenal against advanced RCC and improved outcomes in these patients. Herein, we briefly describe the latest data on targeted therapies used in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. Search strategy was performed according to PRISMA guidelines. Abstracts of relevant studies published in PubMed between 2000 and 2014 were analyzed by two authors. Abstracts were selected if they were published in English, data reported was of phase II or III clinical trials, and outcomes followed FDA approval. If consensus between the two authors was achieved, they were included in the review. Key words used were “target therapy” and “metastatic renal cell carcinoma”. The results of the studies analyzed in this review support the benefits of targeted therapy in metastatic RCC. These include improved progression-free survival, overall survival, and quality of life as well as reduced toxicities compared to immunotherapy. The improvement in outcomes in metastatic RCC makes these drugs a preferred option as a primary treatment for these patients.

  8. Radiotherapy and brachytherapy for recurrent colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, S. )

    1991-05-01

    Radical surgical excision of locoregional recurrence of colorectal carcinoma usually produces the best survival and should be attempted whenever possible. However, recurrences are often unresectable; hence palliative local therapy may be indicated. There are several options for the radiation therapy of local, unresectable, recurrent, or metastatic colorectal cancer. Whole pelvis irradiation of 4,000-5,000 cGy followed by a coned-down boost of 1,000-1,500 cGy generally provides good symptomatic palliation in 80-90% of patients, but long-term control or cure is rarely achieved. External beam irradiation of 2,000-3,000 cGy to the whole liver with or without concurrent chemotherapy may be used for palliation of metastatic disease to the liver. A combination of intraoperative radiation therapy applied directly to the tumor bed and external beam irradiation may improve local control and survival rates. Multiple options are available for the intraoperative use of brachytherapy which can deliver high radiation doses to the residual tumor, or tumor bed, sparing normal tissue.

  9. Drug Development Against Metastatic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Huang, Sui

    2017-01-01

    While combinational diagnostic and treatment strategies over the past decades have significantly improved the overall survival of cancer patients, metastatic cancer remains a leading cause of death in developed countries. The lack of successful treatment strategies for the disease is in large part due to the complexity of the metastatic transformation, which embodies extensive cellular and extracellular alterations, enabling metastatic cancer cells to reach and colonize other organs. The mode of action for the majority of anti-cancer drugs used in clinics today is primarily tumor growth inhibition. While they are effective in destroying cancer cells, they fall short in blocking metastasis. Here we discuss the evolution of past and current anti-cancer drug development, the limits of current strategies, and possible alternative approaches for future drug development against metastatic cancers. PMID:28356899

  10. Metastatic pancreatic cancer presenting as linitis plastica of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Garg, Shivani; Mulki, Ramzi; Sher, Daniel

    2016-03-08

    Metastatic disease from pancreatic carcinoma involving the stomach is an unusual event, and the pattern of spread in the form of linitis plastica, to our knowledge, has not been reported previously. Local recurrence after curative resection for pancreatic cancer is the most common pattern of disease. We report a case of metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma presenting as linitis plastica of the stomach 4 years after curative resection. A 52-year-old man presented with epigastric pain and melaena 4 years after undergoing a Whipple's procedure for a poorly-differentiated pancreatic adenocarcinoma, stage IB; T2N0M0. CT imaging of the abdomen revealed thickening of the gastric wall, and subsequent oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) revealed diffuse friable erythaematous tissue. The biopsy specimen obtained during the OGD revealed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, with similar appearance to the prior specimen obtained from the pancreas.

  11. Inflammatory Breast Cancer from Metastatic Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Achariyapota, Vuthinun; Chuangsuwanich, Tuenjai

    2016-01-01

    Metastases to the breast from tumors other than breast carcinomas are extremely rare and represent only 0.2–1.3% of all diagnosed malignant breast tumors. Furthermore, while the most common sites for advanced ovarian cancer metastases are the liver, lung, and pleura, metastasis to the breast from a primary ovarian cancer is uncommon and has only been reported in 0.03–0.6% of all breast cancers. Here we describe a case report of a 50-year-old female patient with a rare case of breast metastases from an advanced ovarian cancer, presenting as inflammatory breast cancer. Our observations emphasize the clinical importance of distinguishing between primary and metastatic breast cancer during diagnosis for the purpose of appropriate prognosis and treatment. PMID:27047697

  12. Breast cancer (metastatic)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Median survival from metastatic breast cancer is 12 months without treatment, but young people can survive up to 20 years with the disease, whereas in other metastatic cancers this would be considered unusual. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of first-line hormonal treatment? What are the effects of second-line hormonal treatment in women who have not responded to tamoxifen? What are the effects of first-line chemotherapy? What are the effects of first-line chemotherapy in combination with a monoclonal antibody? What are the effects of second-line chemotherapy? What are the effects of treatments for bone metastases? What are the effects of treatments for spinal cord metastases? What are the effects of treatments for cerebral or choroidal metastases? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 77 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: first-line hormonal treatment using anti-oestrogens (tamoxifen), ovarian ablation, progestins, selective aromatase inhibitors, or combined gonadorelin analogues plus tamoxifen; second-line hormonal treatment using progestins or selective aromatase inhibitors; first-line non-taxane combination chemotherapy; first-line taxane-based combination chemotherapy; first-line high- versus low-dose standard chemotherapy

  13. Efficacy of goserelin plus anastrozole in premenopausal women with advanced or recurrent breast cancer refractory to an LH-RH analogue with tamoxifen: Results of the JMTO BC08-01 phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    NISHIMURA, REIKI; ANAN, KEISEI; YAMAMOTO, YUTAKA; HIGAKI, KENJI; TANAKA, MAKI; SHIBUTA, KENJI; SAGARA, YASUAKI; OHNO, SHINJI; TSUYUKI, SHIGERU; MASE, TAKAHIRO; TERAMUKAI, SATOSHI

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) analogue plus an aromatase inhibitor following failure to respond to standard LH-RH analogue plus tamoxifen (TAM) in premenopausal patients. Premenopausal women with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and/or progesterone-receptor positive, advanced or recurrent breast cancer refractory to an LH-RH analogue plus TAM received goserelin (GOS) in conjunction with anastrozole (ANA). The primary endpoint was the objective response rate (ORR). Secondary endpoints included progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), clinical benefit rate (CBR) and safety. Between September 2008 and November 2010, 37 patients were enrolled. Thirty-five patients (94.6%) had ER-positive tumors, and 36 (97.3%) had human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) 2-negative tumors. Thirty-six (97.3%) had measurable lesions and 1 (2.7%) had only bone metastasis. The ORR was 18.9% [95% confidence interval (CI), 8.0–35.2%], the CBR was 62.2% (95% CI, 44.8–77.5%) and the median PFS was 7.3 months. Eight patients had adverse drug reactions but none resulted in discontinuation of treatment. GOS plus ANA is a safe effective treatment for premenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive, recurrent or advanced breast cancer. The treatment may become viable treatment in the future, particularly when TAM is ineffective or contraindicated. Further studies and discussion are warranted. PMID:23446822

  14. Phase II study of the effectiveness and safety of trastuzumab and paclitaxel for taxane‐ and trastuzumab‐naïve patients with HER2‐positive, previously treated, advanced, or recurrent gastric cancer (JFMC45‐1102)

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Tsunehiro; Takaishi, Hiromasa; Miki, Akira; Noshiro, Hirokazu; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Nishida, Yasunori; Iwasa, Satoru; Miwa, Hiroto; Masuishi, Toshiki; Boku, Narikazu; Yamada, Yasuhide; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Morita, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Junichi; Saji, Shigetoyo

    2016-01-01

    Paclitaxel is a standard second‐line gastric cancer treatment in Japan. Trastuzumab could be active as second‐line chemotherapy for taxane/trastuzumab‐naïve patients with epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2)‐positive advanced gastric cancer. Patients aged ≥20 years with HER2‐positive, previously treated (except for trastuzumab and taxane), unresectable or recurrent gastric adenocarcinoma underwent combined trastuzumab (first and subsequent doses of 8 and 6 mg kg−1, respectively, every 3 weeks) and paclitaxel (days 1, 8, 15, every 4 weeks) treatment. Study endpoints were best overall response, progression‐free survival, overall survival, and safety. From September 2011 to March 2012, 47 Japanese patients were enrolled. Forty patients discontinued treatment after a median of 128.5 (range 4–486) days. Complete and partial responses were obtained in one and 16 patients (response rate of 37% [95% CI 23–52]), respectively. Median progression‐free survival and overall survival were 5.1 (95% CI 3.8–6.5) and 17.1 (95% CI 13.5–18.6) months, respectively. Grade 3/4 adverse events were neutropenia (32.6%), leukopenia (17.4%), anemia (15.2%) and hypoalbuminemia (8.7%). There was no clinically significant cardiotoxicity or cumulative toxicity. Three (disturbed consciousness, pulmonary fibrosis, and rapid disease progression) grade 5 events occurred. In conclusion, trastuzumab combined with paclitaxel was well tolerated and was a promising regimen for patients with HER2‐positive, previously treated, advanced or recurrent gastric cancer. PMID:27521503

  15. Recurrent brachial plexus neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bradley, W G; Madrid, R; Thrush, D C; Campbell, M J

    1975-09-01

    The clinical, electrophysiological and pathological changes in 3 patients with recurrent attacks of non-traumatic brachial plexus neuropathy have been described. Two had recurrent attacks and a dominant family history of similar attacks, together with evidence of lesser degrees of nerve involvement outside the brachial plexus. In one patient the attacks were moderately painful, while in the other there was little or no pain. Only one showed undue slowing of motor nerve conduction during ischaemia, but in both cases the sural nerves had the changes of tomaculous neuropathy, with many sausage-shaped swellings of the myelin sheaths, and extensive segmental demyelination and remyelination. The third patient had two attacks of acute brachial plexus neuropathy which were both extremely painful. The clinical features were compatible with a diagnosis of neuralgic amuotrophy. In the second attack, there was vagus nerve involvement and the sural nerve showed evidence of healed extensive segmental demyelination. The various syndromes presenting with acute non-traumatic brachial plexus neuropathy are reviewed, and a tentative nonsological classification advanced. Most patients fall into the category of acute, painful paralysis with amyotrophy, with no family history and no evidence of lesions outside the brachial plexus. It is suggested that the term "neuralgic amyotrophy" be restricted to this group. Patients with features outside this clinical picture probably suffer from other disease entities presenting with brachial plexus neuropathy. The familial cases constitute one or more aetioliogical subgroups, differing from neuralgic amyotrophy in the frequency of recurrences, the relative freedom from pain in the attacks, the frequency of nerve lesions outside the brachial plexus, and of hypotelorism. Individual attacks of acute brachial plexus neuropathy, however, may be identical in patients with the different diseases, and further pathological and biochemical studies are

  16. Systemic treatment approaches in her2-negative advanced breast cancer—guidance on the guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Joy, A.A.; Ghosh, M.; Fernandes, R.; Clemons, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite advancements in the treatment of early-stage breast cancer, many patients still develop disease recurrence; others present with de novo metastatic disease. For most patients with advanced breast cancer, the primary treatment intent is noncurative—that is, palliative—in nature. The goals of treatment should therefore focus on maximizing symptom control and extending survival. Treatments should be evaluated on an individualized basis in terms of evidence, but also with full respect for the wishes of the patient in terms of acceptable toxicity. Given the availability of extensive reviews on the roles of endocrine therapy and her2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2)–targeted therapies for advanced disease, we focus here mainly on treatment guidelines for the non-endocrine management of her2-negative advanced breast cancer in a Canadian health care context. PMID:25848337

  17. [Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase Activity during Fulvestrant Therapy for Aromatase Inhibitor-Resistant Metastatic Breast Cancer].

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Kenichi; Fujisaki, Shigeru; Suzuki, Shuhei; Adachi, Keita; Nagashima, Saki; Masuo, Yuki; Tomita, Ryouichi; Gonda, Kenji; Enomoto, Katsuhisa; Amano, Sadao; Matsuo, Sadanori; Umeda, Nao

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated the clinical significance of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) during fulvestrant therapy for aromatase inhibitor (AI)-resistant metastatic breast cancer. IDO activity can be measured by the tryptophan (Trp)/kynurenine (Kyn) ratio. Trp and Kyn were measured with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Patients with AI resistant metastatic breast cancer had a 28.6% response rate to fulvestrant therapy, and the clinical benefit rate was 76.2%. AI-resistant metastatic breast cancer patients with distant metastases had a lower serum Trp/Kyn level than patients who had local recurrences. During fulvestrant therapy, IDO activity significantly decreased in the fulvestrant responder group compared to that in the fulvestrant non-responder group. During fulvestrant therapy, the IDO activity correlated with the number of metastatic lesions. These results suggest that measuring the Trp/Kyn ratio is useful for evaluating immunological metastatic status during endocrine therapy.

  18. [Therapeutic strategy for recurrent gastric cancer and efforts aimed at finding a cure].

    PubMed

    Asayama, Masako; Yamada-Murano, Toko; Hara, Hiroki; Ooki, Akira; Yoshii, Takako; Yamaguchi, Kensei

    2013-08-01

    Recurrent gastric cancer, in general, is an incurable systemic disease for which the standard of care is systemic chemotherapy. Combination treatment with fluoropyrimidine plus platinum and the addition of trastuzumab for patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2(HER2)-positive tumors are widely accepted standard regimens. Fluoropyrimidines include 5-fluorouracil(5-FU), S-1, and capecitabine. There has been an accumulation of data showing the non-inferiority of oxaliplatin to cisplatin. Moreover, the importance of salvage chemotherapy has also been proven in prospective studies. However, retrospective analyses still indicate that the 5-year survival rates associated with metastatic gastric cancer are only a few percent with chemotherapy. To improve survival, newer triplet regimens, such as a combination of docetaxel, cisplatin, and S-1(DCS)and modified folinic acid, 5-FU, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan(modified FOLFOXIRI), are now under clinical investigation. Despite the limitations of retrospective data, surgical resection for gastric cancer liver metastases appears to be beneficial in carefully selected patients. Currently, the implication of surgical resection for metastatic gastric cancer is being evaluated in clinical trials. These efforts will result in further clinical advances with tailored treatment strategies.

  19. Design of a phase I clinical trial to evaluate intratumoral delivery of ErbB-targeted chimeric antigen receptor T-cells in locally advanced or recurrent head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    van Schalkwyk, May C I; Papa, Sophie E; Jeannon, Jean-Pierre; Guerrero Urbano, Teresa; Spicer, James F; Maher, John

    2013-09-01

    Despite several advances, 5-year survival in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remains unchanged at only 50%. The commonest cause of death is locally advanced/recurrent disease. Consequently, there is an unmet need for new approaches to improve local control in HNSCC. T4 immunotherapy is an autologous cell therapy in which peripheral blood T-cells are genetically engineered using a retroviral vector to coexpress two chimeric receptors: (i) T1E28z is a chimeric antigen receptor that engages multiple ErbB dimers that are commonly upregulated in HNSCC; (ii) 4αβ is a chimeric cytokine receptor that converts the weak mitogenic stimulus provided by interleukin (IL)-4 into a strong and selective growth signal, allowing preferential expansion and enrichment of T4(+) T-cells ex vivo. T4 immunotherapy exerts antitumor activity against HNSCC cell lines and tumors in vivo, without significant toxicity. Human T4(+) T-cells also engage mouse ErbB receptors, permitting safety testing in SCID Beige mice. Severe toxicity caused by cytokine release syndrome ensues when human T4(+) T-cells are administered at high doses to mice, particularly with advanced tumor burdens. However, such toxicity is not required for efficacy and is never seen if T-cells are administered by the intratumoral route. To exploit this, we have designed a first-in-man clinical trial in which T4(+) T-cells are administered to patients with locally advanced/recurrent HNSCC. Cells will be administered at a single sitting to multiple sites around the viable tumor circumference. A 3+3 dose escalation design will be used, starting at 10(7) cells (cohort 1), escalating to 10(9) cells (cohort 5). If maximum tolerated dose remains undefined, cohorts 6/7 will receive either low- or high-dose cyclophosphamide before 10(9) T4(+) T-cells. A panel of routine/in-house assays and imaging techniques will be used to monitor safety, efficacy, perturbation of endogenous antitumor immunity

  20. Metastatic brain tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... them create an advance directive and power of attorney for health care. Support Groups You can ease ... surgery Brain tumor - children Breast cancer Increased intracranial pressure Lung cancer - small cell Melanoma Renal cell carcinoma ...

  1. Higher overall survival in metastatic pancreatic cancer: the impact of where and how treatment is delivered

    PubMed Central

    Usón, Pedro Luiz Serrano; França, Monique Sedlmaier; Rodrigues, Heloisa Veasey; Macedo, Antônio Luiz de Vasconcellos; Goldenberg, Alberto; Smaletz, Oren; Armentano, Daniela Pezzutti Domingues; Simon, Sergio Daniel; Gansl, Rene Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the overall survival of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer and evaluate factors that impact prognosis in a private cancer center. Methods Data from the Hospital Cancer Registry at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein were retrospectively collected. The patients enrolled had metastatic cancer at diagnosis or earlier staging and subsequent recurrence. Cases of neuroendocrine tumors were excluded. Results A total of 65 patients were evaluated, including 63 with adenocarcinoma. The median overall survival for patients in all stages was 20.7 months (95%CI: 15.6-25.7), while the overall survival of metastatic disease was 13.3 months. Among the 33 cases with stage IV cancer, there was no evidence of a statistically significant association between median survival and CA19-9 dosage (p=0.212), tumor location (p=0.482), first treatment performed (p=0.337), lymphovascular invasion (p=0.286), and age (p=0.152). However, the number of lines of chemotherapy was significantly associated with survival (log-rank p=0.013), with an estimated median survival of 10.2 months for patients who received up to two lines of treatment and 23.5 months for those receiving more than two lines of chemotherapy. Conclusion The survival of patients treated was longer than that reported in the literature. The only statistically significant factor related to increased survival was higher number of lines of chemotherapy received. We believe that the higher socioeconomic status of patients surveyed in this study, as well as their greater access to treatment options, may have influenced their overall survival. PMID:26313433

  2. Abiraterone in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Mostaghel, Elahe A

    2014-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy remains the single most effective treatment for the initial therapy of advanced prostate cancer, but is uniformly marked by progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Residual tumor androgens and androgen axis activation are now recognized to play a prominent role in mediating CRPC progression. Despite suppression of circulating testosterone to castrate levels, castration does not eliminate androgens from the prostate tumor microenvironment and residual androgen levels are well within the range capable of activating the androgen receptor (AR) and AR-mediated gene expression. Accordingly, therapeutic strategies that more effectively target production of intratumoral androgens are necessary. The introduction of abiraterone, a potent suppressor of cytochrome P450 17 α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-mediated androgen production, has heralded a new era in the hormonal treatment of men with metastatic CRPC. Herein, the androgen and AR-mediated mechanisms that contribute to CRPC progression and establish cytochrome P450 17 α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase as a critical therapeutic target are briefly reviewed. The mechanism of action and pharmacokinetics of abiraterone are reviewed and its recently described activity against AR and 3-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase is discussed. The Phase I and II data initially demonstrating the efficacy of abiraterone and Phase III data supporting its approval for patients with metastatic CRPC are reviewed. The safety and tolerability of abiraterone, including the incidence and management of side effects and potential drug interactions, are discussed. The current place of abiraterone in CRPC therapy is reviewed and early evidence regarding cross-resistance of abiraterone with taxane therapy, mechanisms of resistance to abiraterone, and observations of an abiraterone withdrawal response are presented. Future directions in the use of abiraterone, including optimal dosing strategies, the role of

  3. TH-C-12A-07: Implementation of a Pulsed Low Dose Date Radiotherapy (PLRT) Protocol for Recurrent Cancers Using Advanced Beam Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C; Lin, M; Chen, L; Price, R; Li, J; Kang, S; Wang, P; Lang, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Recent in vitro and in vivo experimental findings provided strong evidence that pulsed low-dose-rate radiotherapy (PLDR) produced equivalent tumor control as conventional radiotherapy with significantly reduced normal tissue toxicities. This work aimed to implement a PLDR clinical protocol for the management of recurrent cancers utilizing IMRT and VMAT. Methods: Our PLDR protocol requires that the daily 2Gy dose be delivered in 0.2Gy×10 pulses with a 3min interval between the pulses. To take advantage of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity the mean dose to the target is set at 0.2Gy and the maximum dose is limited to 0.4Gy per pulse. Practical planning strategies were developed for IMRT and VMAT: (1) set 10 ports for IMRT and 10 arcs for VMAT with each angle/arc as a pulse; (2) set the mean dose (0.2Gy) and maximum dose (0.4Gy) to the target per pulse as hard constraints (no constraints to OARs); (3) select optimal port/arc angles to avoid OARs; and (4) use reference structures in or around target/OARs to reduce maximum dose to the target/OARs. IMRT, VMAT and 3DCRT plans were generated for 60 H and N, breast, lung, pancreas and prostate patients and compared. Results: All PLDR treatment plans using IMRT and VMAT met the dosimetry requirements of the PLDR protocol (mean target dose: 0.20Gy±0.01Gy; maximum target dose < 0.4Gy). In comparison with 3DCRT, IMRT and VMAT exhibited improved target dose conformity and OAR dose sparing. A single arc can minimize the difference in the target dose due to multi-angle incidence although the delivery time is longer than 3DCRT and IMRT. Conclusion: IMRT and VMAT are better modalities for PLDR treatment of recurrent cancers with superior target dose conformity and critical structure sparing. The planning strategies/guidelines developed in this work are practical for IMRT/VMAT treatment planning to meet the dosimetry requirements of the PLDR protocol.

  4. Isolated humeral recurrence in endometrial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Devdas, Santosh Kumar; Digumarti, Leela; Digumarti, Raghunadharao; Patro, Kunha Charan; Nutakki, Ramakoteswararao

    2016-01-01

    Isolated skeletal metastasis in endometrial carcinoma at recurrence is very rare. We report a 52-year-old woman diagnosed to have FIGO Stage 1b, Grade 1 endometrioid adenocarcinoma, presenting with isolated distal humerus metastasis, 2 years after surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy for primary disease. Imaging, bone scintigraphy, and cytology confirmed the diagnosis of poorly differentiated metastatic adenocarcinoma. She was treated with local radiotherapy followed by six cycles of paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy along with zoledronic acid, monthly. She is symptom-free after the treatment and at a first follow-up visit after 3 months. PMID:27688615

  5. Metastatic Chordoma: A Diagnostic Challenge on Fine Needle Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Tranesh, Ghassan; Nassar, Aziza

    2016-01-01

    Chordomas are primary low grade malignant tumors of bone that usually arise within both ends of axial skeleton. The Notochord is a midline, ectoderm-derived structure that defines the phylum of chordates. Chordomas may pose difficult diagnostic challenges when encountered in secondary locations, such as lungs or other parenchymatous organs. We report the cytologic findings of a metastatic chordoma sampled through CT-scan guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) of lower lobe lung nodule in a 54-year-old man diagnosed with recurrent chordoma involving the lumber spine and paraspinal region. PMID:26881166

  6. Metastatic Intracranial Hemangiopericytoma to the Spinal Column: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Myung Sung; Rho, Young Joon; Song, Sang Woo; Roh, Hong Gee; Lim, So-Dug

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial hemangiopericytoma (HPC) is a rare brain tumor with aggressive biologic behavior associated with high recurrence rate and often with extracranial metastasis. The most common sites of extracranial metastasis of the intracranial HPC are the long bones, lung, liver and abdominal cavity in the order of frequencies. Extracranial metastases usually occur long after the initial diagnosis of the primary tumor. Metastatic intracranial HPC to the vertebra has been rarely reported. We present a case of intracranial HPC metastasized to the L2 vertebral body 13 years after multiple surgical resections and radiotherapy of the primary intracranial HPC. PMID:27867924

  7. Preliminary report of a new treatment strategy for advanced pelvic malignancy: surgical resection and radiation therapy using afterloading catheters plus an inflatable displacement prosthesis in the treatment of advanced primary and recurrent rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Edington, H.D.; Hancock, S.; Coe, F.L.; Sugarbaker, P.H.

    1986-09-01

    An unsolved problem in colon and rectal surgery involves the treatment of locally invasive primary and recurrent rectal cancer. An approach is described that uses intracavitary iridium-192 sources in combination with a pelvic displacement prosthesis to augment external beam radiation doses to sites of residual disease identified at surgery. This approach should permit administration of tumoricidal doses of radiation to positive surgical margins minimizing radiation toxicity to the small bowel. The radiation source and all prosthetic materials are removed at the bedside within 2 weeks of surgery, ensuring accurate radiation dosimetry, minimizing infectious complications, and sparing the patient the need for full high-dose pelvic irradiation.

  8. Anti-metastatic functions of type 1 interferons: Foundation for the adjuvant therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Angélica; Fuchs, Serge Y

    2017-01-01

    The anti-tumorigenic effects that type 1 interferons (IFN1) elicited in the in vitro studies prompted consideration of IFN1 as a potent candidate for clinical treatment. Though not all patients responded to IFN1, clinical trials have shown that patients with high risk melanoma, a highly refractory solid malignancy, benefit greatly from intermediate IFN1 treatment in regards to relapse-free and distant-metastasis-free survival. The mechanisms by which IFN1 treatment at early stages of disease suppress tumor recurrence or metastatic incidence are not fully understood. Intracellular IFN1 signaling is known to affect cell differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Moreover, recent studies have revealed specific IFN1-regulated genes that may contribute to IFN1-mediated suppression of cancer progression and metastasis. In concert, expression of these different IFN1 stimulated genes may impede numerous mechanisms that mediate metastatic process. Though, IFN1 treatment is still utilized as part of standard care for metastatic melanoma (alone or in combination with other therapies), cancers find the ways to develop insensitivity to IFN1 treatment allowing for unconstrained disease progression. To determine how and when IFN1 treatment would be most efficacious during disease progression, we must understand how IFN1 signaling affects different metastasis steps. Here, we specifically focus on the anti-metastatic role of endogenous IFN1 and parameters that may help to use pharmaceutical IFN1 in the adjuvant treatment to prevent cancer recurrence and metastatic disease.

  9. Development of a New Subclavian Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy Method for Locally or Recurrent Advanced Breast Cancer Using an Implanted Catheter-Port System After Redistribution of Arterial Tumor Supply

    SciTech Connect

    Takizawa, Kenji Shimamoto, Hiroshi Ogawa, Yukihisa Yoshimatsu, Misako Yagihashi, Kunihiro Nakajima, Yasuo; Kitanosono, Takashi

    2009-09-15

    Locally or recurrent advanced breast cancers can receive arterial blood supply from various arteries, such as the internal thoracic artery (ITA), the lateral thoracic artery, and the other small arterial branches originating from the subclavian artery. Failure to catheterize and subsequent formation of collateral arterial blood supply from various arteries are some of the reasons why the response to conventional selective transarterial infusion chemotherapy is limited and variable. To overcome this problem, we developed a new subclavian arterial infusion chemotherapy method using an implanted catheter-port system after redistribution of arterial tumor blood supply by embolizing the ITA. We named this technique ('redistributed subclavian arterial infusion chemotherapy' (RESAIC)). Using RESAIC, patients can be treated on an outpatient basis for extended periods of time. Eleven patients underwent RESAIC, and the complete remission and partial response rate in 10 evaluable patients was 90%: complete remission [CR] n = 4, partial remission n = 4, stable disease n = 1, and not evaluable n = 1. Three of four patients with CR had no distant metastasis, and modified radical mastectomy was performed 1 month after conclusion of RESAIC. The resected specimens showed no residual cancer cells, and pathologically confirmed complete remission was diagnosed in each of these cases. Although temporary grade-3 myelosuppression was seen in three patients who were previously treated by systemic chemotherapy, there was no other drug-induced toxicity or procedure-related complications. RESAIC produced a better response and showed no major complications compared with other studies despite the advanced stage of the cancers.

  10. Phase 2 trial of erlotinib with or without PF-3512676 (CPG 7909, a Toll-like receptor 9 agonist) in patients with advanced recurrent EGFR-positive non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Belani, Chandra P; Nemunaitis, John J; Chachoua, Abraham; Eisenberg, Peter D; Raez, Luiz E; Cuevas, J Daniel; Mather, Cecile B; Benner, Rebecca J; Meech, Sandra J

    2013-01-01

    This phase 2 study assessed PF-3512676 plus erlotinib in patients with epidermal growth factor receptor-positive advanced non-small cell lung cancer after prior chemotherapy failure. Patients were randomized 1:1 to PF-3512676 (0.20 mg/kg injected subcutaneously once weekly) plus erlotinib (150 mg daily) or erlotinib alone. The primary objective was to estimate progression-free survival (PFS). Patients received PF-3512676 plus erlotinib (n = 18) or erlotinib alone (n = 21). The study was halted because an unplanned interim analysis indicated that large improvement in PFS with addition of PF-3512676 would be unlikely. In the PF-3512676-plus-erlotinib and erlotinib-alone arms, median PFS was 1.6 and 1.7 mo (hazard ratio, 1.00; 95% confidence interval, 0.5–2.0; P = 0.9335), respectively. Salient grade ≥ 3 adverse events in PF-3512676-plus-erlotinib and erlotinib-alone arms were diarrhea (5/0), dyspnea (5/6), fatigue (4/1), other flu-like symptoms (2/0), anemia (2/1), and lymphocytopenia (based on laboratory values, 1/4). Adding PF-3512676 to erlotinib did not show potential for increased progression-free survival over erlotinib alone in patients with advanced recurrent epidermal growth factor receptor-positive non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:23792641

  11. Phase 2 trial of erlotinib with or without PF-3512676 (CPG 7909, a Toll-like receptor 9 agonist) in patients with advanced recurrent EGFR-positive non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Belani, Chandra P; Nemunaitis, John J; Chachoua, Abraham; Eisenberg, Peter D; Raez, Luiz E; Cuevas, J Daniel; Mather, Cecile B; Benner, Rebecca J; Meech, Sandra J

    2013-07-01

    This phase 2 study assessed PF-3512676 plus erlotinib in patients with epidermal growth factor receptor-positive advanced non-small cell lung cancer after prior chemotherapy failure. Patients were randomized 1:1 to PF-3512676 (0.20 mg/kg injected subcutaneously once weekly) plus erlotinib (150 mg daily) or erlotinib alone. The primary objective was to estimate progression-free survival (PFS). Patients received PF-3512676 plus erlotinib (n = 18) or erlotinib alone (n = 21). The study was halted because an unplanned interim analysis indicated that large improvement in PFS with addition of PF-3512676 would be unlikely. In the PF-3512676-plus-erlotinib and erlotinib-alone arms, median PFS was 1.6 and 1.7 mo (hazard ratio, 1.00; 95% confidence interval, 0.5-2.0; P = 0.9335), respectively. Salient grade ≥ 3 adverse events in PF-3512676-plus-erlotinib and erlotinib-alone arms were diarrhea (5/0), dyspnea (5/6), fatigue (4/1), other flu-like symptoms (2/0), anemia (2/1), and lymphocytopenia (based on laboratory values, 1/4). Adding PF-3512676 to erlotinib did not show potential for increased progression-free survival over erlotinib alone in patients with advanced recurrent epidermal growth factor receptor-positive non-small cell lung cancer.

  12. Upregulation of Talin-1 expression associates with advanced pathological features and predicts lymph node metastases and biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ning; Chen, Hui-Jun; Chen, Shao-Hao; Xue, Xue-Yi; Chen, Hong; Zheng, Qing-Shui; Wei, Yong; Li, Xiao-Dong; Huang, Jin-Bei; Cai, Hai; Sun, Xiong-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Talin-1 functions to regulate cell–cell adhesion, and its altered expression was reported to be associated with human carcinogenesis. A total of 280 tissue specimens from prostate cancer (PCa) patients who underwent radical prostatectomy, 75 cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) tissue, and 6 cases of normal prostate tissue specimens were collected for construction of tissue microarray and subsequently subjected to immunohistochemical staining of Talin-1 expression. Talin-1 expression was significantly higher in PCa than both normal and BPH tissues (P <0.001). Talin-1 expression in PCa tissues was associated with preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, Gleason score, tumor stage, lymph node metastasis, positive surgical margin, extracapsular extension and seminal vesicle invasion (all P <0.05). Logistic regression analysis showed that Talin-1 and Gleason score were independent risk factors for lymph node metastasis of PCa (P <0.001). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve indicated that Talin-1 expression (AUC = 0.766) had a better accuracy to predict PCa lymph node metastasis than Gleason score (AUC = 0.697), whereas their combination could further enhance the prediction accuracy (AUC = 0.803). Kaplan–Meier curve analysis showed that increased Talin-1 expression was associated with shortened biochemical-free survival of PCa patients after radical prostatectomy (P <0.001). These findings suggested that Talin-1 protein was significantly upregulated in PCa tissues compared with that of BPH tissue and Talin-1 expression was an independent predictor for lymph node metastasis and biochemical recurrence of PCa. Further study will investigate the underlying molecular mechanism and the role of Talin-1 in PCa. PMID:27442684

  13. The AMORE Protocol for Advanced-Stage and Recurrent Nonorbital Rhabdomyosarcoma in the Head-and-Neck Region of Children: A Radiation Oncology View

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, Leo E.C.M.; Koedooder, Kees; Pieters, Bradley R.; Grient, Hans N.B. van der; Kar, Marlou van de; Buwalda, Joeri; Balm, Alfons J.M.; Merks, Johannes H.M.; Strackee, Simon D.; Freling, Nicole J.; Koning, Caro C.E.

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: A multidisciplinary approach, consisting of consecutive Ablative Surgery, MOld technique with afterloading brachytherapy and immediate surgical REconstruction (AMORE) applied after chemotherapy, was designed for children with rhabdomyosarcoma in the head-and-neck region. Analysis of the first 42 patients was performed. Methods and Materials: After macroscopically radical tumor resection, molds were constructed for each individual to fit into the surgical defect. The molds, made of 5-mm-thick layers of thermoplastic rubber, consisted of different parts. Flexible catheters were positioned between layers. After brachytherapy, the molds were removed. Surgical reconstruction was performed during the same procedure. Results: Dose to the clinical target volume varied from 40 to 50 Gy for the primary treatment (31 patients) and salvage treatment groups (11 patients). There were 18 females and 24 males treated from 1993 until 2007. Twenty-nine tumors were located in the parameningeal region, and 13 were located in the nonparameningeal region. Patient age at the time of AMORE was 1.2-16.9 years (average, 6.5 years). Follow-up was 0.2-14.5 years (average, >5.5 years). Eleven patients died, 3 with local recurrence only, 6 with local and distant disease, 1 died of distant metastases only, and 1 patient died of a second primary tumor. Overall 5-year survival rates were 70% for the primary treatment group and 82% for the salvage group. Treatment was well tolerated, and acute and late toxicity were mild. Conclusions: The AMORE protocol yields good local control and overall survival rates, and side effects are acceptable.

  14. Recurrent groin hernia

    PubMed Central

    Cox, P. J.; Leach, R. D.; Ellis, Harold

    1981-01-01

    One hundred consecutive recurrences following repair of inguinal hernias have been studied; 62 were direct, 30 indirect, 7 pantaloon and one a femoral hernia. Half the indirect recurrences occurred within a year of repair and probably represented failure to detect a small indirect sac. Later indirect recurrences probably represented failure to repair the internal ring. Nine of the direct hernias were medial funicular recurrences and represented failure to anchor the darn medially. The rest of the direct recurrences were attributable to tissue insufficiency and could probably have been averted by larger tissue bites. Recurrences following inguinal herniorrhaphy remain an all too common problem but can be reduced by meticulous surgical technique. PMID:7339602

  15. Metastatic model of HPV+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma demonstrates heterogeneity in tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Vermeer, Daniel W.; Coppock, Joseph D.; Zeng, Erliang; Lee, Kimberly M.; Spanos, William C.; Onken, Michael D.; Uppaluri, Ravindra; Lee, John H.; Vermeer, Paola D.

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus induced (HPV+) cancer incidence is rapidly rising, comprising 60–80% of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCCs); while rare, recurrent/metastatic disease accounts for nearly all related deaths. An in vivo pre-clinical model for these invasive cancers is necessary for testing new therapies. We characterize an immune competent recurrent/metastatic HPV+ murine model of OPSSC which consists of four lung metastatic (MLM) cell lines isolated from an animal with HPV+ OPSCC that failed cisplatin/radiation treatment. These individual metastatic clonal cell lines were tested to verify their origin (parental transgene expression and define their physiological properties: proliferation, metastatic potential, heterogeneity and sensitivity/resistance to cisplatin and radiation. All MLMs retain expression of parental HPV16 E6 and E7 and degrade P53 yet are heterogeneous from one another and from the parental cell line as defined by Illumina expression microarray. Consistent with this, reverse phase protein array defines differences in protein expression/activation between MLMs as well as the parental line. While in vitro growth rates of MLMs are slower than the parental line, in vivo growth of MLM clones is greatly enhanced. Moreover, in vivo resistance to standard therapies is dramatically increased in 3 of the 4 MLMs. Lymphatic and/or lung metastasis occurs 100% of the time in one MLM line. This recurrent/metastatic model of HPV+ OPSCC retains the characteristics evident in refractory human disease (heterogeneity, resistance to therapy, metastasis in lymph nodes/lungs) thus serving as an ideal translational system to test novel therapeutics. Moreover, this system may provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of metastasis. PMID:27013584

  16. Tumor Reduction in Primary and Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer Lesions With nab-Paclitaxel and Gemcitabine

    PubMed Central

    Kunzmann, Volker; Ramanathan, Ramesh K.; Goldstein, David; Liu, Helen; Ferrara, Stefano; Lu, Brian; Renschler, Markus F.; Von Hoff, Daniel D.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Results from the phase 3 Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Clinical Trial (MPACT) led to approval of nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine for first-line treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer. The current analysis evaluated the effects of nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine versus gemcitabine on primary pancreatic and metastatic lesions. Methods In this analysis of the previously described MPACT trial, changes in pancreatic and metastatic tumor burden were assessed using independently measured diameters of lesions on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scans. Changes in the sums of longest tumor diameters were summarized using descriptive statistics and were included in a multivariate analysis of overall survival. Results Primary pancreatic lesion measurement was feasible. Reductions in primary pancreatic tumor burden and metastatic burden from baseline to nadir were significantly greater with nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine versus gemcitabine. Baseline pancreatic tumor burden was independently predictive of survival. Both regimens elicited linear reductions in primary pancreatic and metastatic tumor burden through time. There was a high within-patient concordance of tumor changes between primary pancreatic lesions and metastatic lesions. Conclusions This analysis of MPACT demonstrated significant tumor shrinkage benefit for nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine in both primary pancreatic and metastatic lesions, supporting ongoing evaluation of this regimen in locally advanced disease. PMID:27841795

  17. Management of patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cruz Jurado, J; Richart Aznar, P; García Mata, J; Fernández Martínez, R; Peláez Fernández, I; Sampedro Gimeno, T; Galve Calvo, E; Murillo Jaso, L; Polo Marqués, E; García Palomo, A

    2011-09-01

    Hormone treatment is one of the key strategies in the management of metastatic breast cancer. Hormone treatment is one of the key strategies in the management of metastatic breast cancer. Aromatase inhibitors (AI) have been extensively studied in this setting. This section summarizes the key data regarding the use of AI in advanced breast cancer. In postmenopausal women, AI are the first line of treatment for untreated patients, or those who had prior AI treatment and progress after 12 months of adjuvant therapy. A longer disease-free interval and absence of visceral disease is associated with a better response. If tumors recur in less than 12 months, it is recommended that tamoxifen (TAM) or the estrogen-receptor antagonist fulvestrant (FUL) treatment be initiated. In the second-line setting, the best option after progression is the administration of either FUL or TAM. In the third-line setting, reintroduction of AI is considered an acceptable option. In premenopausal women who have not received prior treatment or who have progressed after 12 months following adjuvant treatment, it is recommended to initiate therapy with a combination of TAM and a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analog. If there is treatment failure with the use of this combination, megestrol acetate or an LHRH agonist plus an AI may be reasonable alternatives. Intensive research is ongoing to understand the mechanisms of resistance to hormone therapy. In human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive-patients, combinations with HER2 antagonists are associated with significant clinical activity.

  18. Radioisotopes in management of metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raval, Amar; Dan, Tu D.; Williams, Noelle L.; Pridjian, Andrew; Den, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Metastatic prostate cancer continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in men with prostate cancer. Over the last decade, the treatment landscape for patients with castrate-resistant disease has drastically changed, with several novel agents demonstrating an improvement in overall survival in large, multi-institutional randomized trials. Traditional treatment with radioisotopes has largely been in the palliative setting. However, the first in class radiopharmaceutical radium-223 has emerged as the only bone-directed treatment option demonstrating an improvement in overall survival. Methods: Medline publications from 1990 to 2016 were searched and reviewed to assess the use of currently approved radioisotopes in the management of prostate cancer including emerging data regarding integration with novel systemic therapies. New positron emission tomography-based radiotracers for advanced molecular imaging of prostate cancer were also queried. Results: Radioisotopes play a crucial role in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer in the definitive and metastatic setting. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer and theranostics are currently being investigated in the clinical arena. Conclusions: The use of modern radioisotopes in selected patients with mCRPC is associated with improvements in overall survival, pain control, and quality of life. PMID:27843209

  19. A Safety and Feasibility Study of an Allogeneic Colon Cancer Cell Vaccine Administered with a Granulocyte–Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor–Producing Bystander Cell Line in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lei; Edil, Barish H.; Soares, Kevin C.; El-Shami, Khaled; Uram, Jennifer N.; Judkins, Carol; Zhang, Zhe; Onners, Beth; Laheru, Daniel; Pardoll, Drew; Jaffee, Elizabeth M.; Schulick, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite recent advances in earlier detection and improvements in chemotherapy, the 5-year survival rate of patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma remains poor. Immunotherapy is a potentially effective therapeutic approach to the treatment of colorectal carcinoma. Preclinical studies have supported the antitumor activity of immunization with a granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) producing murine colon tumor cell vaccine. Methods A novel colorectal cancer vaccine composed of irradiated, allogeneic human colon cancer cells and GM-CSF-producing bystander cells was developed and tested in combination with a single intravenous low dose of cyclophosphamide in a phase 1 study of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Results A total of nine patients were enrolled onto and treated in this study. Six patients had a history of colorectal adenocarcinoma hepatic metastases and underwent curative metastasectomy, while three other patients had unresectable stage IV disease. This study demonstrates the safety and feasibility of this vaccine administered in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. At last follow-up, the six patients who underwent curative metastasectomy survived longer than 36 months, and four of these six patients were without disease recurrence. Immunologic correlate results suggest that the GM-CSF-producing colon cancer vaccine enhances the production of anti-MUC1 antibodies. Conclusions This vaccine is feasible and safe. Future investigation of the efficacy and antitumor immunity of this vaccine is warranted. PMID:24943235

  20. Phase II trial of piroxantrone in metastatic breast cancer. A Southwest Oncology Group study.

    PubMed

    Ravdin, P M; Green, S; Doroshow, J H; Martino, S

    1994-01-01

    Thirty-two eligible patients with advanced metastatic breast cancer who had received no more than 1 prior chemotherapy regimen for metastatic disease (16 had received prior doxorubicin) were treated with piroxantrone at a dose of 120 mg/m2 intravenously every 21 days. In the twenty-seven patients evaluable for response, two partial responses were seen. Toxicities observed were primarily hematologic with grade 3 or greater granulocytopenia occurring in 34% of the patients. One patient developed symptomatic congestive heart failure at a total cumulative dose of 960 mg/m2. We conclude that piroxantrone given at this dose and schedule has minimal activity in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

  1. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Amit; Shetty, Kishore V

    2011-02-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is a common oral ulcerative disease, affecting 10% to 15% of the general US population. This article reviews the epidemiology and clinical presentations of recurrent aphthous stomatitis, including diagnosis and management.

  2. [Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis].

    PubMed

    Marrero Calvo, M; Merino Arribas, J; Rodrigo Palacios, J; Bartolomé Albistegui, M; Camino Fernández, A; Grande Sáez, C

    2001-02-01

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis is a rare disorder of unknown etiology, characterized by multiple bone lesions and a variable clinical course. We present a 10 year old boy with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis who improved after treatment with naproxen.

  3. Treating metastatic cancer with nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Avi; Heller, Daniel A; Winslow, Monte M; Dahlman, James E; Pratt, George W; Langer, Robert; Jacks, Tyler; Anderson, Daniel G

    2011-12-23

    Metastasis accounts for the vast majority of cancer deaths. The unique challenges for treating metastases include their small size, high multiplicity and dispersion to diverse organ environments. Nanoparticles have many potential benefits for diagnosing and treating metastatic cancer, including the ability to transport complex molecular cargoes to the major sites of metastasis, such as the lungs, liver and lymph nodes, as well as targeting to specific cell populations within these organs. This Review highlights the research, opportunities and challenges for integrating engineering sciences with cancer biology and medicine to develop nanotechnology-based tools for treating metastatic disease.

  4. Surgical Management of Metastatic Disease.

    PubMed

    Keung, Emily Z; Fairweather, Mark; Raut, Chandrajit P

    2016-10-01

    Sarcomas are rare cancers of mesenchymal cell origin that include many histologic subtypes and molecularly distinct entities. For primary resectable sarcoma, surgery is the mainstay of treatment. Despite treatment, approximately 50% of patients with soft tissue sarcoma are diagnosed with or develop distant metastases, significantly affecting their survival. Although systemic therapy with conventional chemotherapy remains the primary treatment modality for those with metastatic sarcoma, increased survival has been achieved in select patients who receive multimodality therapy, including surgery, for their metastatic disease. This article provides an overview of the literature on surgical management of pulmonary and hepatic sarcoma metastases.

  5. A Proteogenomic Approach to Understanding MYC Function in Metastatic Medulloblastoma Tumors.

    PubMed

    Staal, Jerome A; Pei, Yanxin; Rood, Brian R

    2016-10-19

    Brain tumors are the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in children, and medulloblastoma is the most prevalent malignant childhood/pediatric brain tumor. Providing effective treatment for these cancers, with minimal damage to the still-developing brain, remains one of the greatest challenges faced by clinicians. Understanding the diverse events driving tumor formation, maintenance, progression, and recurrence is necessary for identifying novel targeted therapeutics and improving survival of patients with this disease. Genomic copy number alteration data, together with clinical studies, identifies c-MYC amplification as an important risk factor associated with the most aggressive forms of medulloblastoma with marked metastatic potential. Yet despite this, very little is known regarding the impact of such genomic abnormalities upon the functional biology of the tumor cell. We discuss here how recent advances in quantitative proteomic techniques are now providing new insights into the functional biology of these aggressive tumors, as illustrated by the use of proteomics to bridge the gap between the genotype and phenotype in the case of c-MYC-amplified/associated medulloblastoma. These integrated proteogenomic approaches now provide a new platform for understanding cancer biology by providing a functional context to frame genomic abnormalities.

  6. A Proteogenomic Approach to Understanding MYC Function in Metastatic Medulloblastoma Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Staal, Jerome A.; Pei, Yanxin; Rood, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Brain tumors are the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in children, and medulloblastoma is the most prevalent malignant childhood/pediatric brain tumor. Providing effective treatment for these cancers, with minimal damage to the still-developing brain, remains one of the greatest challenges faced by clinicians. Understanding the diverse events driving tumor formation, maintenance, progression, and recurrence is necessary for identifying novel targeted therapeutics and improving survival of patients with this disease. Genomic copy number alteration data, together with clinical studies, identifies c-MYC amplification as an important risk factor associated with the most aggressive forms of medulloblastoma with marked metastatic potential. Yet despite this, very little is known regarding the impact of such genomic abnormalities upon the functional biology of the tumor cell. We discuss here how recent advances in quantitative proteomic techniques are now providing new insights into the functional biology of these aggressive tumors, as illustrated by the use of proteomics to bridge the gap between the genotype and phenotype in the case of c-MYC-amplified/associated medulloblastoma. These integrated proteogenomic approaches now provide a new platform for understanding cancer biology by providing a functional context to frame genomic abnormalities. PMID:27775567

  7. Tracking the origins and drivers of subclonal metastatic expansion in prostate cancer

    DOE PAGES

    Hong, Matthew K. H.; Macintyre, Geoff; Wedge, David C.; ...

    2015-04-01

    Tumour heterogeneity in primary prostate cancer is a well-established phenomenon. However, how the subclonal diversity of tumours changes during metastasis and progression to lethality is poorly understood. Here we reveal the precise direction of metastatic spread across four lethal prostate cancer patients using whole-genome and ultra-deep targeted sequencing of longitudinally collected primary and metastatic tumours. We find one case of metastatic spread to the surgical bed causing local recurrence, and another case of cross-metastatic site seeding combining with dynamic remoulding of subclonal mixtures in response to therapy. By ultra-deep sequencing end-stage blood, we detect both metastatic and primary tumour clones,more » even years after removal of the prostate. As a result, analysis of mutations associated with metastasis reveals an enrichment of TP53 mutations, and additional sequencing of metastases from 19 patients demonstrates that acquisition of TP53 mutations is linked with the expansion of subclones with metastatic potential which we can detect in the blood.« less

  8. Expression Profiling of Primary and Metastatic Ovarian Tumors Reveals Differences Indicative of Aggressive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Alexander S.; Fischer, Andrew; Miller, Daniel H.; Vang, Souriya; MacLaughlan, Shannon; Wu, Hsin-Ta; Yu, Jovian; Steinhoff, Margaret; Collins, Colin; Smith, Peter J. S.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Brard, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The behavior and genetics of serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) metastasis, the form of the disease lethal to patients, is poorly understood. The unique properties of metastases are critical to understand to improve treatments of the disease that remains in patients after debulking surgery. We sought to identify the genetic and phenotypic landscape of metastatic progression of EOC to understand how metastases compare to primary tumors. DNA copy number and mRNA expression differences between matched primary human tumors and omental metastases, collected at the same time during debulking surgery before chemotherapy, were measured using microarrays. qPCR and immunohistochemistry validated findings. Pathway analysis of mRNA expression revealed metastatic cancer cells are more proliferative and less apoptotic than primary tumors, perhaps explaining the aggressive nature of these lesions. Most cases had copy number aberrations (CNAs) that differed between primary and metastatic tumors, but we did not detect CNAs that are recurrent across cases. A six gene expression signature distinguishes primary from metastatic tumors and predicts overall survival in independent datasets. The genetic differences between primary and metastatic tumors, yet common expression changes, suggest that the major clone in metastases is not the same as in primary tumors, but the cancer cells adapt to the omentum similarly. Together, these data highlight how ovarian tumors develop into a distinct, more aggressive metastatic state that should be considered for therapy development. PMID:24732363

  9. Tracking the origins and drivers of subclonal metastatic expansion in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Matthew K.H.; Macintyre, Geoff; Wedge, David C.; Van Loo, Peter; Patel, Keval; Lunke, Sebastian; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Sloggett, Clare; Cmero, Marek; Marass, Francesco; Tsui, Dana; Mangiola, Stefano; Lonie, Andrew; Naeem, Haroon; Sapre, Nikhil; Phal, Pramit M.; Kurganovs, Natalie; Chin, Xiaowen; Kerger, Michael; Warren, Anne Y.; Neal, David; Gnanapragasam, Vincent; Rosenfeld, Nitzan; Pedersen, John S.; Ryan, Andrew; Haviv, Izhak; Costello, Anthony J.; Corcoran, Niall M.; Hovens, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Tumour heterogeneity in primary prostate cancer is a well-established phenomenon. However, how the subclonal diversity of tumours changes during metastasis and progression to lethality is poorly understood. Here we reveal the precise direction of metastatic spread across four lethal prostate cancer patients using whole-genome and ultra-deep targeted sequencing of longitudinally collected primary and metastatic tumours. We find one case of metastatic spread to the surgical bed causing local recurrence, and another case of cross-metastatic site seeding combining with dynamic remoulding of subclonal mixtures in response to therapy. By ultra-deep sequencing end-stage blood, we detect both metastatic and primary tumour clones, even years after removal of the prostate. Analysis of mutations associated with metastasis reveals an enrichment of TP53 mutations, and additional sequencing of metastases from 19 patients demonstrates that acquisition of TP53 mutations is linked with the expansion of subclones with metastatic potential which we can detect in the blood. PMID:25827447

  10. Tracking the origins and drivers of subclonal metastatic expansion in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Matthew K. H.; Macintyre, Geoff; Wedge, David C.; Van Loo, Peter; Patel, Keval; Lunke, Sebastian; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Sloggett, Clare; Cmero, Marek; Marass, Francesco; Tsui, Dana; Mangiola, Stefano; Lonie, Andrew; Naeem, Haroon; Sapre, Nikhil; Phal, Pramit M.; Kurganovs, Natalie; Chin, Xiaowen; Kerger, Michael; Warren, Anne Y.; Neal, David; Gnanapragasam, Vincent; Rosenfeld, Nitzan; Pedersen, John S.; Ryan, Andrew; Haviv, Izhak; Costello, Anthony J.; Corcoran, Niall M.; Hovens, Christopher M.

    2015-04-01

    Tumour heterogeneity in primary prostate cancer is a well-established phenomenon. However, how the subclonal diversity of tumours changes during metastasis and progression to lethality is poorly understood. Here we reveal the precise direction of metastatic spread across four lethal prostate cancer patients using whole-genome and ultra-deep targeted sequencing of longitudinally collected primary and metastatic tumours. We find one case of metastatic spread to the surgical bed causing local recurrence, and another case of cross-metastatic site seeding combining with dynamic remoulding of subclonal mixtures in response to therapy. By ultra-deep sequencing end-stage blood, we detect both metastatic and primary tumour clones, even years after removal of the prostate. As a result, analysis of mutations associated with metastasis reveals an enrichment of TP53 mutations, and additional sequencing of metastases from 19 patients demonstrates that acquisition of TP53 mutations is linked with the expansion of subclones with metastatic potential which we can detect in the blood.

  11. Multiple nodal locoregional recurrence of pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Plaza, César Pablo; Cárdenas, Elena Margarita Sanchiz; Humanes, Rocío Soler

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Malignancy is present in 10% of pheochromocytomas (PCC) and is defined as local/vascular infiltration of surrounding tissues or the presence of chromaffin cells deposits in distant organs. The presence of isolated nodal recurrence is very rare and only 7 cases have been reported in the medical literature. Presentation of the case The case of a 32-y male with a symptomatic recurrence of a previously operated (2-years ago) PCC is presented. Radiological and functional imaging studies confirmed the presence of multiple nodules in the surgical site. A radical left nephrectomy with extensive lymphatic clearance in order to get an R0 resection was performed. The pathologist confirmed the diagnosis of massive locoregional nodal invasion. Discussion A detailed histological report and a thorough genetic study must be considered in every operated PCC in order to identify mutations and profiles of risk for malignancy. When recurrence or metastastic disease is suspected, imaging and functional exams are done in order to obtain a proper staging. Radical surgery for the metastatic disease is the only treatment that may provide prolonged survival. If an R0 resection is not possible, then a debulking surgery is a good option when the benefit/risk ratio is acceptable. Conclusion Isolated lymph nodal recurrence is very rare in malignant PCC, with only 7 cases previously published. The role of surgery is essential to get long-term survival because provides clinical and functional control of the disease. PMID:26117450

  12. [Understanding current therapies in metastatic melanoma].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Rocío; Parra, Angela; González, Sergio; Molgó, Montserrat; Droppelmann, Nicolás; Acevedo, Francisco; Peña, José; Uribe, Pablo

    2016-11-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is a highly aggressive tumor developing from melanocytes, its incidence is increasing, and prognosis in advanced stages is daunting. New therapies have been approved during the recent years with unprecedented results, including inhibitors of MAPK/ERK pathway and immune checkpoint blockade (anti-cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) as ipilimumab, anti-programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-L1) as pembrolizumab and anti-programmed cell death protein 1 ligand (PD-L1), among many others). The aim of this paper is to review currently available metastatic melanoma therapies focusing mainly on new therapies that have demonstrated effectiveness, after several decades of little progress in the treatment of this disease.

  13. Combination therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Buonerba, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Current therapy for metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) consists of the serial administration of single agents. Combinations of VEGF and mTOR inhibitors have been disappointing in previous randomized trials. However, the combination of lenvatinib, a multitargeted agent that inhibits VEGF as well as FGF receptors, and everolimus demonstrated promising results in a randomized phase II trial. Moreover, the emergence of programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) inhibitors has spawned the investigation of combinations of these agents with VEGF inhibitors and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) inhibitors. These ongoing phase III trials in conjunction with the development of predictive biomarkers and agents inhibiting novel therapeutic targets may provide much needed advances in this still largely incurable disease. PMID:27047959

  14. New drug development in metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Andrew J; George, Daniel J

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, drug development in castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer (CRPC) remains challenging, due to the number of potentially viable molecular targets and clinical trials available, the lack of established surrogates for overall survival, and competing causes of mortality. This review will highlight the highest impact phase II and phase III trials of novel agents in the current CRPC landscape, and focus on both molecular targets and clinical trial designs that are more likely to demonstrate clinical benefit. The need for tissue correlative studies for target evaluation and drug mechanism is stressed to continue to advance the field and to define biomarkers that may identify patient populations that may derive a greater benefit from these molecular agents.

  15. Management of metastatic thyroid cancer in pregnancy: risk and uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Kirsten; Woods, Andrew; Gupta, Sandeep; Smith, Roger; Wynne, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic thyroid cancer is an uncommon condition to be present at the time of pregnancy, but presents a challenging paradigm of care. Clinicians must balance the competing interests of long-term maternal health, best achieved by iatrogenic hyperthyroidism, regular radioiodine therapy and avoidance of dietary iodine, against the priority to care for the developing foetus, with inevitable compromise. Additionally, epidemiological and cellular data support the role of oestrogen as a growth factor for benign and malignant thyrocytes, although communicating the magnitude of this risk to patients and caregivers, as well as the uncertain impact of any pregnancy on long-term prognosis, remains challenging. Evidence to support treatment decisions in this uncommon situation is presented in the context of a case of a pregnant teenager with known metastatic papillary thyroid cancer and recent radioiodine therapy. Learning points: Pregnancy is associated with the growth of thyroid nodules due to stimulation from oestrogen receptors on thyrocytes and HCG cross-stimulation of the TSH receptor. Thyroid cancer diagnosed during pregnancy has not been shown to be associated with increased rates of persistent or recurrent disease in most studies. There is little evidence to guide the management of metastatic thyroid cancer in pregnancy, where both maternal and foetal wellbeing must be carefully balanced. PMID:27994875

  16. Cytomorphology of metastatic pituitary carcinoma to the bone.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Christopher M; Lin, Xiaoqi

    2017-03-07

    Metastatic pituitary carcinoma to bone is rare. In this report, we present a case of a 59-year-old female with recurrent pituitary adenoma of the sparsely granulated somatotroph subtype with metastasis to a few bony sites 10 years later. Needle core biopsy (NCB) with touch preparations was performed on a 5 mm lesion in left ilium. Diff-Quik stained NCB touch preparation slides showed a few loosely cohesive epithelial polygonal cells that were arranged in nests or acini, or singly, had scant vacuolated cytoplasm and eccentrically located round nuclei (plasmacytoid) with slight nuclear pleomorphism, fine granular chromatin, conspicuous nucleoli, and smooth nuclear membrane. Trilineage hematopoietic cells of bone marrow were also appreciated in the background. H&E stained core sections showed fragments of bone and bone marrow with nests of bland epithelial cells with similar cytomorphology as seen in NCB touch preparation slides. The tumor cells were immunoreactive for juxtanuclear dot-like staining of pan-cytokeratin (CAM 5.2 and AE1/AE3) (a specific feature), neuroendocrine markers (CD56, synaptophysin, and chromogranin. Additionally, scattered cells were immunoreactive for growth hormone. Molecular test showed that tumor cells were negative for the promoter methylation of O-6-Methylguanine-DNA Methyltransferase (MGMT). Final diagnosis of metastatic pituitary carcinoma was rendered. Morphology of metastatic pituitary carcinoma, its differential, clinical presentation and treatment were discussed. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. VICTOR: Vinflunine in advanced metastatic transitional cell carcinoma of the urothelium: A retrospective analysis of the use of vinflunine in multi-centre real life setting as second line chemotherapy through Free of Charge Programme for patients in the UK and Ireland.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Syed A; Ansari, Jawaher; Huddart, Robert; Power, Derek G; Lyons, Jeanette; Wylie, James; Vilarino-Varlela, Maria; Elander, Nils O; McMenemin, Rhona; Pickering, Lisa M; Faust, Guy; Chauhan, Seema; Jackson, Richard J

    2017-03-01

    There is no standard of care in the UK or Ireland for second-line chemotherapy for patients with advanced transitional cell carcinoma (TCCU). Vinflunine is approved for TCCU patients who have failed a platinum-based regimen, and is standard of care in Europe but is not routinely available in the UK. Data were collected retrospectively on patients who received vinfluine as a second-line treatment. The aims were to document the toxicity and efficacy in a real life setting. Data were collected on 49 patients from 9 sites across the UK and Ireland [median age, 64 (IQR, 57-70) years, 33 males]. All patients had advanced metastatic TCCU. Thirteen patients had bone or liver metastases, 4 patients had PS 2 and 11 patients had HB <10. Median vinflunine administration was 3.5 cycles (range 1-18). Most common grade 3-4 toxicities were constipation (4 patients) and fatigue (3 patients). Partial response rate was 29% (14 PR, 11 SD, 19 PD, 4 NE, 1 not available). Median OS was 9.1 (6.0, 12.7) months. Results are consistent with real life data from Europe. Toxicity is further reduced with prophylactic laxative and oral antibiotics. Vinflunine is an efficient and tolerable second line treatment in advanced TCCU.

  18. VICTOR: Vinflunine in advanced metastatic transitional cell carcinoma of the urothelium: A retrospective analysis of the use of vinflunine in multi-centre real life setting as second line chemotherapy through Free of Charge Programme for patients in the UK and Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Syed A.; Ansari, Jawaher; Huddart, Robert; Power, Derek G.; Lyons, Jeanette; Wylie, James; Vilarino-Varlela, Maria; Elander, Nils O.; McMenemin, Rhona; Pickering, Lisa M.; Faust, Guy; Chauhan, Seema; Jackson, Richard J.

    2017-01-01

    There is no standard of care in the UK or Ireland for second-line chemotherapy for patients with advanced transitional cell carcinoma (TCCU). Vinflunine is approved for TCCU patients who have failed a platinum-based regimen, and is standard of care in Europe but is not routinely available in the UK. Data were collected retrospectively on patients who received vinfluine as a second-line treatment. The aims were to document the toxicity and efficacy in a real life setting. Data were collected on 49 patients from 9 sites across the UK and Ireland [median age, 64 (IQR, 57–70) years, 33 males]. All patients had advanced metastatic TCCU. Thirteen patients had bone or liver metastases, 4 patients had PS 2 and 11 patients had HB <10. Median vinflunine administration was 3.5 cycles (range 1–18). Most common grade 3–4 toxicities were constipation (4 patients) and fatigue (3 patients). Partial response rate was 29% (14 PR, 11 SD, 19 PD, 4 NE, 1 not available). Median OS was 9.1 (6.0, 12.7) months. Results are consistent with real life data from Europe. Toxicity is further reduced with prophylactic laxative and oral antibiotics. Vinflunine is an efficient and tolerable second line treatment in advanced TCCU. PMID:28098864

  19. Metastatic triple-negative breast cancer is dependent on SphKs/S1P signaling for growth and survival.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Aparna; Takabe, Kazuaki; Hait, Nitai C

    2017-04-01

    About 40,000 American women die from metastatic breast cancer each year despite advancements in treatment. Approximately, 15% of breast cancers are triple-negative for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2. Triple-negative cancer is characterized by more aggressive, harder to treat with conventional approaches and having a greater possibility of recurrence. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid signaling mediator has emerged as a key regulatory molecule in breast cancer progression. Therefore, we investigated whether cytosolic sphingosine kinase type 1 (SphK1) and nuclear sphingosine kinase type 2 (SphK2), the enzymes that make S1P are critical for growth and PI3K/AKT, ERK-MAP kinase mediated survival signaling of lung metastatic variant LM2-4 breast cancer cells, generated from the parental triple-negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell line. Similar with previous report, SphKs/S1P signaling is critical for the growth and survival of estrogen receptor positive MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, was used as our study control. MDA-MB-231 did not show a significant effect of SphKs/S1P signaling on AKT, ERK, and p38 pathways. In contrast, LM2-4 cells that gained lung metastatic phenotype from primary MDA-MB-231 cells show a significant effect of SphKs/S1P signaling requirement on cell growth, survival, and cell motility. PF-543, a selective potent inhibitor of SphK1, attenuated epidermal growth factor (EGF)-mediated cell growth and survival signaling through inhibition of AKT, ERK, and p38 MAP kinase pathways mainly in LM2-4 cells but not in parental MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. Moreover, K-145, a selective inhibitor of SphK2, markedly attenuated EGF-mediated cell growth and survival of LM2-4 cells. We believe this study highlights the importance of SphKs/S1P signaling in metastatic triple-negative breast cancers and targeted therapies.

  20. Extraneural Metastases of Glioblastoma without Simultaneous Central Nervous System Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wonki; Yoo, Heon; Shin, Sang Hoon; Gwak, Ho Shin

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is well known as the most common malignant primary brain tumor. It could easily spread into the adjacent or distant brain tissue by infiltration, direct extension and cerebro-spinal fluid dissemination. The extranueural metastatic spread of GBM is relatively rare but it could have more progressive disease course. We report a 39-year-old man who had multiple bone metastases and malignant pleural effusion of the GBM without primary site recurrence. PMID:25408938

  1. Cixutumumab, Everolimus, and Octreotide Acetate in Treating Patients With Advanced Low to Intermediate Grade Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-14

    Gastrin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Paraganglioma; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  2. Metastatic cancer to the lung

    MedlinePlus

    ... ray Lung with squamous cell cancer - CT scan Respiratory system References Arenberg DA, Pickens A. Metastatic malignant tumors. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  3. Alvespimycin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-04-09

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Melanoma; Stage III Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip

  4. Risk factors for early recurrence after inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Family history, male gender and age are significant risk factors for inguinal hernia disease. Family history provides evidence for a genetic trait and could explain early recurrence after inguinal hernia repair despite technical advance at least in a subgroup of patients. This study evaluates if age and family history can be identified as risk factors for early recurrence after primary hernia repair. Methods We performed an observational cohort study for 75 patients having at least two recurrent hernias. The impact of age, gender and family history on the onset of primary hernias, age at first recurrence and recurrence rates was investigated. Results 44% (33/75) of recurrent hernia patients had a family history and primary as well as recurrent hernias occurred significantly earlier in this group (p = 0.04). The older the patients were at onset the earlier they got a recurrent hernia. Smoking could be identified as on additional risk factor for early onset of hernia disease but not for hernia recurrence. Conclusion Our data reveal an increased incidence of family history for recurrent hernia patients when compared with primary hernia patients. Patients with a family history have their primary hernias as well as their recurrence at younger age then patients without a family history. Though recurrent hernia has to be regarded as a disease caused by multiple factors, a family history may be considered as a criterion to identify the risk for recurrence before the primary operation. PMID:20003183

  5. Phase I/II study of S-1 combined with paclitaxel in patients with unresectable and/or recurrent advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mochiki, E; Ohno, T; Kamiyama, Y; Aihara, R; Haga, N; Ojima, H; Nakamura, J; Ohsawa, H; Nakabayashi, T; Takeuchi, K; Asao, T; Kuwano, H

    2006-01-01

    Both paclitaxel and S-1 are effective against gastric cancer, but the optimal regimen for combined chemotherapy with these drugs remains unclear. This phase I/II study was designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), recommended dose (RD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), and objective response rate of paclitaxel in combination with S-1. S-1 was administered orally at a fixed dose of 80 mg m−2 day−1 from days 1 to 14 of a 28-day cycle. Paclitaxel was given intravenously on days 1, 8, and 15, starting with a dose of 40 mg m−2 day−1. The dose was increased in a stepwise manner to 70 mg m−2. Treatment was repeated every 4 weeks unless disease progression was confirmed. In the phase I portion, 17 patients were enrolled. The MTD of paclitaxel was estimated to be 70 mg m−2 because 40% of the patients given this dose level (two of five) had DLT. The RD was determined to be 60 mg m−2. In the phase II portion, 24 patients, including five with assessable disease who received the RD in the phase I portion, were evaluated. The median number of treatment courses was six (range: 1–17). The incidence of the worst-grade toxicity in patients given the RD was 28 and 8%, respectively. All toxic effects were manageable. The response rate was 54.1%, and the median survival time was 15.5 months. Our phase I/II trial showed that S-1 combined with paclitaxel is effective and well tolerated in patients with advanced gastric cancer. PMID:17133268

  6. Nanomedicine as an emerging platform for metastatic lung cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Landesman-Milo, Dalit; Ramishetti, Srinivas; Peer, Dan

    2015-06-01

    Metastatic lung cancer is one of the most common cancers leading to mortality worldwide. Current treatment includes chemo- and pathway-dependent therapy aiming at blocking the spread and proliferation of these metastatic lesions. Nanomedicine is an emerging multidisciplinary field that offers unprecedented access to living cells and promises the state of the art in cancer detection and treatment. Development of nanomedicines as drug carriers (nanocarriers) that target cancer for therapy draws upon principles in the fields of chemistry, medicine, physics, biology, and engineering. Given the zealous activity in the field as demonstrated by more than 30 nanocarriers already approved for clinical use and given the promise of recent clinical results in various studies, nanocarrier-based strategies are anticipated to soon have a profound impact on cancer medicine and human health. Herein, we will detail the latest innovations in therapeutic nanomedicine with examples from lipid-based nanoparticles and polymer-based approaches, which are engineered to deliver anticancer drugs to metastatic lung cells. Emphasis will be placed on the latest and most attractive delivery platforms, which are developed specifically to target lung metastatic tumors. These novel nanomedicines may open new avenues for therapeutic intervention carrying new class of drugs such as RNAi and mRNA and the ability to edit the genome using the CRISPER/Cas9 system. Ultimately, these strategies might become a new therapeutic modality for advanced-stage lung cancer.

  7. Novel Targeted Therapies for Metastatic Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Iams, Wade T; Sosman, Jeffrey A; Chandra, Sunandana

    Oncogene-targeted therapy is a major component of precision oncology, and although patients with metastatic melanoma have experienced improved outcomes with this strategy, there are a number of potential therapeutic targets currently under study that may further increase the drug armamentarium for this patient population. In this review, we discuss the landscape of targeted therapies for patients with advanced melanoma, focusing on oncogene mutation-specific targets. In patients with typical BRAF V600-mutant melanoma, combination BRAF and MEK inhibition has surpassed outcomes compared with monotherapy with BRAF or MEK inhibition alone, and current strategies seek to address inevitable resistance mechanisms. For patients with NRAS-mutant melanoma, MEK inhibitor monotherapy and combined MEK and CDK4/6 inhibition are burgeoning strategies; for patients with KIT-mutant melanoma, tyrosine kinase inhibition is being leveraged, and for NF-1-mutant melanoma, mTOR and MEK inhibition is being actively evaluated. In patients with atypical, non-V600 BRAF-mutant melanoma, MEK inhibitor monotherapy is the potential novel targeted approach on the horizon. For advanced uveal melanoma, novel targets such as IMCgp100 and glembatumumab have shown activity in early studies. We review additional strategies that remain in the preclinical and early clinical pipeline, so there is much hope for the future of targeted agents for distinct molecular cohorts of patients with advanced melanoma.

  8. Severe hyponatremia caused by nab-paclitaxel-induced syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion: A case report in a patient with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Neuzillet, Cindy; Babai, Samy; Kempf, Emmanuelle; Pujol, Géraldine; Rousseau, Benoît; Le-Louët, Hervé; Christophe Tournigand

    2016-06-01

    Incidence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is increasing. Most patients have advanced disease at diagnosis and therapeutic options in this setting are limited. Gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel regimen was demonstrated to increase survival compared with gemcitabine monotherapy and is therefore indicated as first-line therapy in patients with metastatic PDAC and performance status Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) 0-2. The safety profile of gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel combination includes neutropenia, fatigue, and neuropathy as most common adverse events of grade 3 or higher. No case of severe hyponatremia associated with the use of nab-paclitaxel for the treatment of PDAC has been reported to date.We report the case of a 72-year-old Caucasian man with a metastatic PDAC treated with gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel regimen, who presented with a severe hyponatremia (grade 4) caused by a documented syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). This SIADH was attributed to nab-paclitaxel after a rigorous imputability analysis, including a rechallenge procedure with dose reduction. After dose and schedule adjustment, nab-paclitaxel was pursued without recurrence of severe hyponatremia and with maintained efficacy.Hyponatremia is a rare but potentially severe complication of nab-paclitaxel therapy that medical oncologists and gastroenterologists should be aware of. Nab-paclitaxel-induced hyponatremia is manageable upon dose and schedule adaptation, and should not contraindicate careful nab-paclitaxel reintroduction. This is of particular interest for a disease in which the therapeutic options are limited.

  9. Recurrent airway obstruction: a review.

    PubMed

    Pirie, R S

    2014-05-01

    Recurrent airway obstruction is a widely recognised airway disorder, characterised by hypersensitivity-mediated neutrophilic airway inflammation and lower airway obstruction in a subpopulation of horses when exposed to suboptimal environments high in airborne organic dust. Over the past decade, numerous studies have further advanced our understanding of different aspects of the disease. These include clarification of the important inhaled airborne agents responsible for disease induction, improving our understanding of the underlying genetic basis of disease susceptibility and unveiling the fundamental immunological mechanisms leading to establishment of the classic disease phenotype. This review, as well as giving a clinical overview of recurrent airway obstruction, summarises much of the work in these areas that have culminated in a more thorough understanding of this debilitating disease.

  10. Mapping of Genetic Abnormalities of Primary Tumours from Metastatic CRC by High-Resolution SNP Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Sayagués, José María; Fontanillo, Celia; Abad, María del Mar; González-González, María; Sarasquete, María Eugenia; del Carmen Chillon, Maria; Garcia, Eva; Bengoechea, Oscar; Fonseca, Emilio; Gonzalez-Diaz, Marcos; De Las Rivas, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Background For years, the genetics of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) have been studied using a variety of techniques. However, most of the approaches employed so far have a relatively limited resolution which hampers detailed characterization of the common recurrent chromosomal breakpoints as well as the identification of small regions carrying genetic changes and the genes involved in them. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we applied 500K SNP arrays to map the most common chromosomal lesions present at diagnosis in a series of 23 primary tumours from sporadic CRC patients who had developed liver metastasis. Overall our results confirm that the genetic profile of metastatic CRC is defined by imbalanced gains of chromosomes 7, 8q, 11q, 13q, 20q and X together with losses of the 1p, 8p, 17p and 18q chromosome regions. In addition, SNP-array studies allowed the identification of small (<1.3 Mb) and extensive/large (>1.5 Mb) altered DNA sequences, many of which contain cancer genes known to be involved in CRC and the metastatic process. Detailed characterization of the breakpoint regions for the altered chromosomes showed four recurrent breakpoints at chromosomes 1p12, 8p12, 17p11.2 and 20p12.1; interestingly, the most frequently observed recurrent chromosomal breakpoint was localized at 17p11.2 and systematically targeted the FAM27L gene, whose role in CRC deserves further investigations. Conclusions/Significance In summary, in the present study we provide a detailed map of the genetic abnormalities of primary tumours from metastatic CRC patients, which confirm and extend on previous observations as regards the identification of genes potentially involved in development of CRC and the metastatic process. PMID:21060790

  11. Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Neuroendocrine Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-15

    Gastrin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor

  12. Case report: metastatic adamantinoma of the tibia--an unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Panchwagh, Yogesh; Puri, Ajay; Agarwal, Manish; Chinoy, Roshni; Jambhekar, Nirmala

    2006-03-01

    A 26-year-old female with a tibial lesion diagnosed as an adamantinoma was treated with intra-lesional curettage, bone grafting and intra-medullary nailing. Six years post-surgery, she presented with an asymptomatic primary site but with a metastatic lesion in the mid-shaft of the ipsilateral femur and lung metastases. The femoral lesion was treated with wide excision and reconstructed with an allograft and plate fixation. Pulmonary metastatectomy was carried out for the lung lesions. A follow-up CT scan of the chest at 1 year after the surgery for the metastatic lesions revealed fresh unresectable bilateral metastases. Although cases of local recurrences and pulmonary metastases in adamantinoma are reported, this case is unusual in presenting without a local recurrence but with simultaneous skeletal and pulmonary metastases.

  13. Neoadjuvant imatinib in locally advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the stomach: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji Seon; Lee, Jae-Lyun; Kim, Mi-Jung; Ryu, Min-Hee; Chang, Heung Moon; Kim, Tae Won; Jang, Se Jin; Yook, Jeong Hwan; Oh, Sung Tae; Kim, Byung Sik; Kang, Yoon-Koo

    2006-01-01

    Neoadjuvant imatinib therapy used to treat locally advanced or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GI ST) remains under active investigation. We studied three cases of locally advanced gastric GISTs treated with imatinib on a neoadjuvant basis, followed by a complete surgical resection. Three patients were diagnosed with locally advanced unresectable GIST of the stomach and were started on imatinib 400 mg/day. After the imatinib treatment, partial responses were achieved in all patients and the tumors were considered resectable. Surgical resection was done after 7, 11, and 8 months of imatinib therapy, respectively. In one case, a metastatic liver lesion was detected during the imatinib treatment using computed tomography scans, so the imatinib therapy was maintained for 11 months postoperatively. In the other two patients without distant metastasis, imatinib treatment was not restarted after surgery. Mutational analysis revealed a mutation in exon 11 of the c-kit gene in two patients, and wild-type c-kit and PDGFRA in one patient. During pathology review of all three cases, we noted several features common to imatinib treatment. There was no evidence of tumor recurrence in all three patients at respective follow-up visits of 22, 15, and 7 months. These results suggest that the neoadjuvant imatinib therapy is a potentially curative approach for selected patients with locally advanced GIST.

  14. Actomyosin tension as a determinant of metastatic cancer mechanical tropism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrail, Daniel J.; Kieu, Quang Minh N.; Iandoli, Jason A.; Dawson, Michelle R.

    2015-04-01

    Despite major advances in the characterization of molecular regulators of cancer growth and metastasis, patient survival rates have largely stagnated. Recent studies have shown that mechanical cues from the extracellular matrix can drive the transition to a malignant phenotype. Moreover, it is also known that the metastatic process, which results in over 90% of cancer-related deaths, is governed by intracellular mechanical forces. To better understand these processes, we identified metastatic tumor cells originating from different locations which undergo inverse responses to altered matrix elasticity: MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells that prefer rigid matrices and SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells that prefer compliant matrices as characterized by parameters such as tumor cell proliferation, chemoresistance, and migration. Transcriptomic analysis revealed higher expression of genes associated with cytoskeletal tension and contractility in cells that prefer stiff environments, both when comparing MDA-MB-231 to SKOV-3 cells as well as when comparing bone-metastatic to lung-metastatic MDA-MB-231 subclones. Using small molecule inhibitors, we found that blocking the activity of these pathways mitigated rigidity-dependent behavior in both cell lines. Probing the physical forces exerted by cells on the underlying substrates revealed that though force magnitude may not directly correlate with functional outcomes, other parameters such as force polarization do correlate directly with cell motility. Finally, this biophysical analysis demonstrates that intrinsic levels of cell contractility determine the matrix rigidity for maximal cell function, possibly influencing tissue sites for metastatic cancer cell engraftment during dissemination. By increasing our understanding of the physical interactions of cancer cells with their microenvironment, these studies may help develop novel therapeutic strategies.

  15. Actomyosin tension as a determinant of metastatic cancer mechanical tropism.

    PubMed

    McGrail, Daniel J; Kieu, Quang Minh N; Iandoli, Jason A; Dawson, Michelle R

    2015-02-23

    Despite major advances in the characterization of molecular regulators of cancer growth and metastasis, patient survival rates have largely stagnated. Recent studies have shown that mechanical cues from the extracellular matrix can drive the transition to a malignant phenotype. Moreover, it is also known that the metastatic process, which results in over 90% of cancer-related deaths, is governed by intracellular mechanical forces. To better understand these processes, we identified metastatic tumor cells originating from different locations which undergo inverse responses to altered matrix elasticity: MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells that prefer rigid matrices and SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells that prefer compliant matrices as characterized by parameters such as tumor cell proliferation, chemoresistance, and migration. Transcriptomic analysis revealed higher expression of genes associated with cytoskeletal tension and contractility in cells that prefer stiff environments, both when comparing MDA-MB-231 to SKOV-3 cells as well as when comparing bone-metastatic to lung-metastatic MDA-MB-231 subclones. Using small molecule inhibitors, we found that blocking the activity of these pathways mitigated rigidity-dependent behavior in both cell lines. Probing the physical forces exerted by cells on the underlying substrates revealed that though force magnitude may not directly correlate with functional outcomes, other parameters such as force polarization do correlate directly with cell motility. Finally, this biophysical analysis demonstrates that intrinsic levels of cell contractility determine the matrix rigidity for maximal cell function, possibly influencing tissue sites for metastatic cancer cell engraftment during dissemination. By increasing our understanding of the physical interactions of cancer cells with their microenvironment, these studies may help develop novel therapeutic strategies.

  16. Tumoral Melanosis Associated with Pembrolizumab-Treated Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R

    2017-01-01

    Tumoral melanosis is a form of completely regressed melanoma that usually presents as darkly pigmented lesions suspicious for malignant melanoma. Histology reveals dense dermal and subcutaneous infiltration of melanophages. Pembrolizumab is an antibody directed against programmed death receptor-1 (PD1) and is frontline treatment for advanced melanoma. An 81-year-old man with metastatic melanoma treated with pembrolizumab who developed tumoral melanosis at previous sites of metastases is described. The PubMed database was searched with the key words: antibody, immunotherapy, melanoma, melanosis, metastasis, pembrolizumab, and tumoral. The papers generated by the search and their references were reviewed. The patient was initially diagnosed with lentigo maligna melanoma on the left cheek three years earlier, and he was treated with wide local excision. The patient was subsequently diagnosed with epidermotropic metastatic malignant melanoma on the left parietal scalp 14 months later and was treated with wide local excision. Three months later, the patient was found to have metastatic melanoma in the same area of the scalp and was started on pembrolizumab immunotherapy. The patient was diagnosed with tumoral melanosis in the site of previous metastases nine months later. The patient remained free of disease 13 months after starting pembrolizumab. Tumoral melanosis may mimic malignant melanoma; hence a workup, including skin biopsy, should be undertaken. Extensive tumoral melanosis has been reported with ipilimumab, and we add a case following treatment with pembrolizumab. Additional cases of tumoral melanosis may present since immunotherapy has become frontline therapy for advanced melanoma.  PMID:28348944

  17. Role of the neural niche in brain metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Termini, John; Neman, Josh; Jandial, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is the relenteless pursuit of cancer to escape its primary site and colonize distant organs. This malignant evolutionary process is biologically heterogeneous, yet one unifying element is the critical role of the microenvironment for arriving metastatic cells. Historically brain metastases were rarely investigated since patients with advanced cancer were considered terminal. Fortunately, advances in molecular therapies have led to patients living longer with metastatic cancer. However, one site remains recalcitrant to our treatment efforts – the brain. The central nervous system is the most complex biological system, which poses unique obstacles but also harbors opportunities for discovery. Much of what we know about the brain microenvironment comes from neuroscience. We suggest that the interrelated cellular responses in traumatic brain injury may guide us towards new perspectives in understanding brain metastases. In this view, brain metastases may be conceptualized as progressive oncologic injury to the nervous system. This review discusses our evolving understanding of the bidirectional interactions between the brain milieu and metastatic cancer. PMID:25035392

  18. Cutaneous metastatic pigmented breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gaitan-Gaona, Francisco; Said, Mirra C; Valdes-Rodriguez, Rodrigo

    2016-03-16

    A 66-year-old woman presented with a 3 cm black, ulcerated nodule located on the skin of the upper abdomen, just below the breast. The lesion was painful to the touch, but the patient reported no other associated symptoms and was otherwise healthy. A 4-mm punch biopsy of the affected skin was obtained and the histological diagnosis was cutaneous metastatic pigmented breast carcinoma.

  19. VESPRO: An Individual Patient Data Prospective Meta-Analysis of Selective Internal Radiation Therapy Versus Sorafenib for Advanced, Locally Advanced, or Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma of the SARAH and SIRveNIB Trials

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Emma; Gandhi, Mihir; Chatellier, Gilles; Dinut, Aurelia; Pereira, Helena; Chow, Pierce KH; Vilgrain, Valérie

    2017-01-01

    Background Untreated advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has an overall poor prognosis. Currently there are 2 ongoing prospective randomized controlled trials that are evaluating the efficacy and safety of sorafenib and selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) with yttrium-90 resin microspheres in patients with advanced HCC. The SorAfenib versus Radioembolisation in Advanced Hepatocellular carcinoma (SARAH; 459 patients) trial is being performed in Europe and the SIRt VErsus SorafeNIB (SIRveNIB; 360 patients) trial in the Asia Pacific region. Prospectively combining the results, these trials will not only allow for increased precision to estimate efficacy (in terms of survival), but will also provide increased statistical power for subgroup analyses. Objective To ensure the prospectivity and transparency of the meta-analysis. Methods The sirVEnib and SARAH merge PROject (VESPRO) is an individual, patient-data prospective meta-analysis of the SIRveNIB and SARAH randomized trials. The VESPRO protocol includes prespecified hypotheses, inclusion criteria, and outcome measures. The primary outcome measure is overall survival and secondary outcomes include tumor response rate, progression-free survival, progression in the liver as first event, and disease control in the liver. Pooling of toxicity results will allow for robust safety profiles to be established for both therapies, and provides increased statistical power to investigate treatment effects in key subgroups. Analyses will be performed in the intent-to-treat population stratified by trial. Results Both studies are expected to demonstrate a survival benefit for SIRT together with a better toxicity profile compared with sorafenib. It is also anticipated that liver progression as the first event would be longer in the intervention compared with the control. Conclusions As the results of the 2 trials are not yet known, the methodological strength is enhanced, as biases inherent in conventional meta

  20. Placental calcification: a metastatic process?

    PubMed

    Poggi, S H; Bostrom, K I; Demer, L L; Skinner, H C; Koos, B J

    2001-07-01

    Placental calcification commonly increases with gestational age. The mechanism of apatite mineralization probably involves one of three known mechanisms of tissue calcification: physiological (like bone), dystrophic (ischaemia-related) or metastatic (mineralization in a supersaturated environment). This study was designed to determine the mechanism of calcification by examining (1) the mineral content of placental calcifications in comparison to other physiological and pathological apatites, and (2) the expression of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), which are important in physiological calcification, across gestational age. By energy-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDXA), the Ca/P weight ratio for apatitic mineral from mature calcifications was 2.00+/-0.05 (s.e.), which is similar to that for stones formed in a metastatic, supersaturated environment and lower than that observed in physiological calcification. Biologically active BMP, which was determined by bioassay, was demonstrated in mature and postmature placentae. The BMPs PLAB, PDF and related protein INSL-4 were identified by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), but their mRNA expression was independent of gestational age (7-41 weeks of gestation). We conclude that (1) the identified BMPs were not related directly to placental calcification, which argues against physiological calcification, and (2) the chemical composition of the apatitic mineral was suggestive of rapid formation in a supersaturated environment, which is consistent with a metastatic mechanism of calcification.

  1. Mathematical modeling of tumor growth and metastatic spreading: validation in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Niklas; Mollard, Séverine; Barbolosi, Dominique; Benabdallah, Assia; Chapuisat, Guillemette; Henry, Gerard; Giacometti, Sarah; Iliadis, Athanassios; Ciccolini, Joseph; Faivre, Christian; Hubert, Florence

    2014-11-15

    Defining tumor stage at diagnosis is a pivotal point for clinical decisions about patient treatment strategies. In this respect, early detection of occult metastasis invisible to current imaging methods would have a major impact on best care and long-term survival. Mathematical models that describe metastatic spreading might estimate the risk of metastasis when no clinical evidence is available. In this study, we adapted a top-down model to make such estimates. The model was constituted by a transport equation describing metastatic growth and endowed with a boundary condition for metastatic emission. Model predictions were compared with experimental results from orthotopic breast tumor xenograft experiments conducted in Nod/Scidγ mice. Primary tumor growth, metastatic spread and growth were monitored by 3D bioluminescence tomography. A tailored computational approach allowed the use of Monolix software for mixed-effects modeling with a partial differential equation model. Primary tumor growth was described best by Bertalanffy, West, and Gompertz models, which involve an initial exponential growth phase. All other tested models were rejected. The best metastatic model involved two parameters describing metastatic spreading and growth, respectively. Visual predictive check, analysis of residuals, and a bootstrap study validated the model. Coefficients of determination were [Formula: see text] for primary tumor growth and [Formula: see text] for metastatic growth. The data-based model development revealed several biologically significant findings. First, information on both growth and spreading can be obtained from measures of total metastatic burden. Second, the postulated link between primary tumor size and emission rate is validated. Finally, fast growing peritoneal metastases can only be described by such a complex partial differential equation model and not by ordinary differential equation models. This work advances efforts to predict metastatic spreading

  2. [Examination of percutaneous microwave coagulation and radiofrequency ablation therapy for metastatic liver cancer].

    PubMed

    Ohkawa, Shinichi; Hirokawa, Satoru; Masaki, Takahiro; Miyakawa, Kaoru; Tarao, Kazuo; Akaike, Makoto; Sugimasa, Yukio; Takemiya, Shoji; Sairenji, Motonori; Motohashi, Hisahiko

    2002-11-01

    Percutaneous microwave coagulation therapy (PMCT) and radio frequency ablation therapy (RFA) as treatments for metastatic liver cancer were examined. PMCT or RFA was administered for 18 metastatic liver cancer lesions (primary lesion: 11 colon rectal cancer, one esophagus cancer, one thyroid cancer, one pancreatic cancer, one pheochromocytoma) in 16 patients from July 1999 to March 2002. RFA was performed 1 time for 12 minutes in principle, using a Cool-tip RF system from Radionics. Patients had a mean age of 58.8 years and the mean diameter of the neoplasms was about 22 mm. Critical complications were not seen. The rate of partial recurrence was 35.3% as of March, 2002, in an average observation period of 7.3 months. On the other hand, with the medical treatment for the hepatocellular carcinoma provided during this period, the rate of partial recurrence was 14.8%. The treatment of metastatic liver cancer by PMCT and RFA is associated with a high rate of a recurrence as compared with hepatocellular carcinoma, and needs to be examined to discover ways of adaptation and improvement of the technology.

  3. [Outcome of treatment with surgical resection of the remaining tumor after modified M-VAC treatment for advanced urothelial carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Narita, Shintaro; Nakano, Masahiro; Matsuzaki, Masato; Watanabe, Jyunichi; Morikawa, Hiroshi; Murata, Hirokatsu; Oda, Hiroyuki; Komatsu, Hideki

    2005-03-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the effect of the surgical resection of the remaining tumor after modified M-VAC (methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin and cisplatin) (m-M-VAC) treatment for locally advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma. In m-M-VAC therapy, methotrexate and vinblastine on 15 and 22 days were omitted from the classical M-VAC to avoid the discontinuation and the dose reduction, and duration of 1 course was shortened to 21 days from 28 days of the classical M-VAC. Seven patients with locally invasive or metastatic carcinoma of the renal pelvis, ureter, and bladder, 6 males and 1 female, with a median age 64.1 years, ranging from 49 to 77 years received m-M-VAC chemotherapy without severe side effects. In all patients, the residual viable carcinoma was completely resected and they achieved complete remission. The median survival time was 20 months (range, 7 to 61). Five of these 7 patients were still alive. Two patients had no recurrence and achieved long-term survival (survival duration; 61 and 39 months). Although further studies and long-term follow up are required, these results suggest that patients who present with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma may benefit from surgical resection after m-M-VAC.

  4. Changing Treatment Paradigms in Metastatic Breast Cancer: Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Santa-Maria, Cesar A; Gradishar, William J

    2015-07-01

    Advances in understanding tumor biology, particularly signaling pathways, have led to the development and approval of many novel agents and have changed the landscape of therapy for patients with metastatic breast cancer. This review highlights some of the recent successes and failures in breast cancer drug development, including strategies to overcome endocrine and human epidermal growth factor 2-neu (HER2) resistance, targeting triple-negative breast cancers (which do not express the HER2, estrogen, and progesterone receptors) through novel receptors, harnessing the immune system, and new ways of targeting angiogenesis. For patients with metastatic breast cancer, expanding therapeutic options through clinical trial participation is a crucial part of modern oncology practice. As we continue to learn how to use targeted therapies in the context of genomic medicine, analysis of the tumor in real-time may become increasingly important, giving researchers the information needed to start combining therapies in a biologically informed manner.

  5. Advances in the management of basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Carucci, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC), a malignant neoplasm derived from non-keratinizing cells that originate in the basal layer of the epidermis, is the most common cancer in humans. Several factors such as anatomic location, histologic features, primary or recurrent tumors, and patient characteristics influence the choice of treatment modality for BCC. Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) facilitates optimal margin control and conservation of normal tissue for the management of BCC; however, other treatment modalities may also be implemented in the correct clinical scenario. Other treatment modalities that will be reviewed include simple excision, electrodesiccation and curettage, cryotherapy, topical immunotherapy and chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy, and radiation therapy. In addition, targeted molecular therapeutic options for the treatment of advanced or metastatic BCC will be discussed in this informal review based on recent literature obtained by using PubMed with relevant search terms. PMID:26097726

  6. Sequential hormonal therapy for metastatic breast cancer after adjuvant tamoxifen or anastrozole.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Robert W; Henderson, I Craig

    2003-01-01

    The use of adjuvant endocrine therapy in the treatment of hormone receptor-positive, early breast cancer has become important in both pre- and postmenopausal women. Tamoxifen has been the principal adjuvant hormonal therapy in pre- and postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer for nearly 20 years. Recent data in premenopausal women suggest benefit from ovarian ablation with or without tamoxifen. Early results from the 'Arimidex', Tamoxifen, Alone or in Combination (ATAC) trial have demonstrated that the third-generation, selective aromatase inhibitor (AI) anastrozole ('Arimidex') is a suitable alternative adjuvant therapy for postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive disease. After recurrence or relapse on adjuvant endocrine therapy, responses to the sequential use of additional endocrine agents are common. The increase in the number of options now available for adjuvant therapy will have important implications for the selection of the optimal sequence of endocrine agents in the treatment of recurrent breast cancer. Menopausal status is an important factor in determining the endocrine therapy that a patient receives. For premenopausal women, tamoxifen and/or a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist such as goserelin ('Zoladex') are both options for adjuvant endocrine treatment. After progression on adjuvant and first-line tamoxifen, ovarian ablation is an appropriate second-line therapy. For premenopausal women who have undergone ovarian ablation, the use of third-line therapy with an AI becomes possible. For postmenopausal women, a wide choice of endocrine treatment options is available and an optimal sequence has yet to be determined. Options for first-line therapy of metastatic disease include an AI for women who have received adjuvant tamoxifen or tamoxifen for patients who have received adjuvant anastrozole. In addition, data suggest that fulvestrant ('Faslodex'), a novel estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist that

  7. Metastatic pleomorphic adenoma to the supraspinatus muscle: a case report and review of a rare aggressive clinical entity.

    PubMed

    McGarry, James G; Redmond, Maeve; Tuffy, John B; Wilson, Lorraine; Looby, Seamus

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of a 65-year-old female with a recurrent right parotid pleomorphic adenoma (PA) 24 years after initial surgical excision. Positron-emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) demonstrated an unusual suspicious FDG-avid erosive rim enhancing mass centered in the right supraspinatus muscle. Cytology from CT-guided aspiration of the mass was consistent with a histologically benign PA, and the patient was diagnosed with metastatic pleomorphic adenoma (MPA). The patient later developed diffuse pulmonary metastases and died within 3 months. MPA, although rare, is recognised as a potentially lethal malignant complication of recurrent or longstanding benign PA. As no biochemical or genetic parameters are predictive of malignant change, patients presenting with recurrent PA should be considered for screening for metastatic disease.

  8. Imaging in the evaluation and follow-up of early and advanced breast cancer: When, why, and how often?

    PubMed

    Bychkovsky, Brittany L; Lin, Nancy U

    2017-02-01

    Imaging in the evaluation and follow-up of patients with early or advanced breast cancer is an important aspect of cancer care. The role of imaging in breast cancer depends on the goal and should only be performed to guide clinical decisions. Imaging is valuable if a finding will change the course of treatment and improve outcomes, whether this is disease-free survival, overall survival or quality-of-life. In the last decade, imaging is often overused in oncology and contributes to rising healthcare costs. In this context, we review the data that supports the appropriate use of imaging for breast cancer patients. We will discuss: 1) the optimal use of staging imaging in both early (Stage 0-II) and locally advanced (Stage III) breast cancer, 2) the role of surveillance imaging to detect recurrent disease in Stage 0-III breast cancer and 3) how patients with metastatic breast cancer should be followed with advanced imaging.

  9. Upcoming strategies for the treatment of metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Spagnolo, Francesco; Queirolo, Paola

    2012-04-01

    Prognosis for advanced and metastatic melanoma is poor, with a 5-year survival of 78, 59 and 40% for patients with stage IIIA, IIIB and IIIC, respectively, and a 1-year survival of 62% for M1a, 53% for M1b and 33% for M1c. The unsatisfactory results of actual standard therapies for metastatic melanoma highlight the need for effective new therapeutic strategies. Several drugs, including BRAF, KIT and MEK inhibitors, are currently being evaluated after promising data from Phase I and Phase II studies; Vemurafenib, a BRAF-inhibitor agent, has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of patients with unresectable or metastatic melanoma with the BRAF V600E mutation after a significant impact on both progression-free and overall survival was demonstrated compared with dacarbazine in a Phase III trial. Ipilimumab, an immunotherapeutic drug, has proven to be capable of inducing long-lasting responses and was approved for patients with advanced melanoma in first- and second-line treatment by the FDA and in second-line treatment by the European Medicines Agency. Furthermore, a significant survival benefit of the combination of ipilimumab with dacarbazine compared with dacarbazine alone for first-line treatment was reported. In the near future, patients with BRAF mutations could have the chance to benefit from treatment with BRAF inhibitors; patients harboring BRAF or NRAS mutations could be treated with MEK inhibitors; finally, the subgroup of patients with acral, mucosal or chronic sun-damaged melanoma harboring a KIT mutation could benefit from KIT inhibitors. Ipilimumab could become a standard treatment for metastatic melanoma, both as a single agent and in combination; its efficacy has been proven, and researchers should now address their efforts to understanding the predictive variables of response to treatment.

  10. Computed tomography in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Nyree; Grant, Lee Alexander; Bharwani, Nishat; Sohaib, S Aslam

    2009-08-01

    Recent developments in chemotherapy have resulted in several new drug treatments for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). These therapies have shown improved progression-free survival and are applicable to many more patients than the conventional cytokine-based treatments for metastatic RCC. Consequently imaging is playing a greater part in the management of such patients. Computed tomography (CT) remains the primary imaging modality with other imaging modalities playing a supplementary role. CT is used in the diagnosis and staging of metastatic RCC. It is used in the follow-up of patients after nephrectomy, in assessing the extent of metastatic disease, and in evaluating response to treatment. This review looks at the role of CT in patients with metastatic RCC and describes the appearances of metastatic RCC before and following systemic therapy.

  11. Phase II Trial Of PS-341 (Bortezomib) In Patients With Previously Treated Advanced Urothelial Tract Transitional Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-04

    Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Urethral Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Ureter Cancer

  12. Regulation of Metastatic Breast Cancer Dormancy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    dissemination into metastatic niches such as the brain, bone and liver . Once attaining the metastatic organ the rate-limiting step in metastasis is that...individual cell motility to disseminate and eventually extravasate into common metastatic niches such as the brain, bone and liver . Once attaining the...What were the major goals of the project? SA1. Determine whether the epithelial phenotype allows for cell seeding, survival and dormancy in the liver

  13. Metastin is not involved in metastatic potential of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Karapanagiotou, Eleni M; Dilana, Kalliopi D; Gkiozos, Ioannis; Gratsias, Ioannis; Tsimpoukis, Sotirios; Polyzos, Aris; Syrigos, Kostas N

    2011-06-01

    Metastin, the product of the KISS-1 gene, seems to represent a strong suppressant of metastasis for some types of cancer. The aim of this study is to explore whether circulating levels of metastin could be used as a marker for the metastatic potential of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as well as a diagnostic marker in NSCLC patients. The possible correlation between metastin and leptin circulating levels was also evaluated. Fasting serum levels of metastin and leptin were determined in 96 NSCLC patients at diagnosis (76 with metastatic disease and 21 with locally advanced disease) and 49 healthy volunteers using commercial available ELISA. Serum metastin levels presented no differences between NSCLC patients and healthy volunteers (1.18 ± 0.98 vs. 1.17 ± 0.39 ng/ml, P = 0.979) as well as between patients with metastatic and locally advanced disease (1.17 ± 1.05 vs. 1.21 ± 0.64 ng/ml, P = 0.872). There was no statistically significant correlation between circulating metastin and leptin levels in NSCLC patients and patients with locally advanced and metastatic disease. This study shows a lack of direct involvement of metastin in the diagnosis and metastatic potential of NSCLC.

  14. Recurrent inguinal hernia.

    PubMed Central

    Postlethwait, R W

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of 584 operations for recurrent inguinal hernia was made in an attempt to determine the cause of the recurrence based on the anatomic findings. The recurrence was indirect in 300, direct in 241, and various other in 43 operations. The causes of the indirect recurrences appeared to be an unrecognized hernia, incomplete dissection or improper ligation of the sac, failure to narrow the cord, or inadequate reconstruction of the internal ring. No cause for the diffuse direct recurrences was apparent. Of the 241 hernias in Hesselbach's triangle, 144 were small localized defects, usually (112) just lateral to the symphysis. These were considered to be caused by the cutting action of a suture placed under tension. On the basis of these findings, suggestions are made for primary inguinal hernia operations. PMID:4073990

  15. First-line treatment of metastatic melanoma: role of nivolumab

    PubMed Central

    Force, Jeremy; Salama, April KS

    2017-01-01

    Historically, the median overall survival of metastatic melanoma patients was less than 1 year and long-term survivors were rare. Recent advances in therapies have dramatically shifted this landscape with increased survival rates and the real possibility that long-term disease control is achievable. Advances in immune modulators, including cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 and programmed death-1 based treatments, have been an integral part of this success. In this article, we review previous and recent therapeutic developments for metastatic melanoma patients. We discuss advances in immunotherapy while focusing on the use of nivolumab alone and in combination with other agents, including ipilimumab in advanced melanoma. One major goal in melanoma research is to optimize combination strategies allowing for more patients to experience benefit while minimizing toxicity. A better understanding of the optimal sequencing, combinations, and mechanisms underlying the development of resistance may provide evidence for rational clinical trial designs of novel immunotherapy strategies in melanoma and other cancer subtypes. PMID:28243579

  16. Identifying locally advanced basal cell carcinoma eligible for treatment with vismodegib: an expert panel consensus.

    PubMed

    Peris, Ketty; Licitra, Lisa; Ascierto, Paolo A; Corvò, Renzo; Simonacci, Marco; Picciotto, Franco; Gualdi, Giulio; Pellacani, Giovanni; Santoro, Armando

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer worldwide. Most occur on the head and neck, where cosmetic and functional outcomes are critical. BCC can be locally destructive if not diagnosed early and treated appropriately. Surgery is the treatment of choice for the majority of high-risk lesions. Aggressive, recurrent or unresectable tumors can be difficult to manage. Until recently, no approved systemic therapy was available for locally advanced or metastatic BCC inappropriate for surgery or radiotherapy. Vismodegib provides a systemic treatment option. However, a consensus definition of advanced BCC is lacking. A multidisciplinary panel with expertise in oncology, dermatology, dermatologic surgery and radiation oncology proposes a consensus definition based on published evidence and clinical experience.

  17. Duodenal Recurrence of Fibrolamellar Carcinoma 12 Years After Partial Hepatectomy and Adjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Ruiz, Ismael Antonio; Torre, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Fibrolamellar carcinoma (FLC) has a better prognosis than hepatocellular carcinoma; however, it is a highly recurrent disease. A 17-year-old woman presented with FLC with regional disease at the right lobe of the liver and underwent right hepatic lobe resection plus adjuvant chemotherapy with interferon α and adriamycin. She then presented at age 29 years with anemia. Endoscopy revealed an exofitic lesion in the duodenum, which was a recurrence of FLC. The patient underwent duodenal partial resection of a metastatic FLC tumor with disease-free edges and without neural or lymphoid-vascular involvement, a nonreported site of recurrence. PMID:27921059

  18. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Cisplatin With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Urinary Tract Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-12

    Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Distal Urethral Carcinoma; Infiltrating Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma Associated With Urethral Carcinoma; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Proximal Urethral Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Urethra Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Urethral Cancer; Ureter Carcinoma

  19. Lifetime effectiveness of mifamurtide addition to chemotherapy in nonmetastatic and metastatic osteosarcoma: a Markov process model analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun Jin; Lee, Jun Ah; Han, Euna; Lee, Eui-Kyung

    2015-09-01

    The mortality and progression rates in osteosarcoma differ depending on the presence of metastasis. A decision model would be useful for estimating long-term effectiveness of treatment with limited clinical trial data. The aim of this study was to explore the lifetime effectiveness of the addition of mifamurtide to chemotherapy for patients with metastatic and nonmetastatic osteosarcoma. The target population was osteosarcoma patients with or without metastasis. A Markov process model was used, whose time horizon was lifetime with a starting age of 13 years. There were five health states: disease-free (DF), recurrence, post-recurrence disease-free, post-recurrence disease-progression, and death. Transition probabilities of the starting state, DF, were calculated from the INT-0133 clinical trials for chemotherapy with and without mifamurtide. Quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) increased upon addition of mifamurtide to chemotherapy by 10.5 % (10.13 and 9.17 QALY with and without mifamurtide, respectively) and 45.2 % (7.23 and 4.98 QALY with and without mifamurtide, respectively) relative to the lifetime effectiveness of chemotherapy in nonmetastatic and metastatic osteosarcoma, respectively. Life-years gained (LYG) increased by 10.1 % (13.10 LYG with mifamurtide and 11.90 LYG without mifamurtide) in nonmetastatic patients and 42.2 % (9.43 LYG with mifamurtide and 6.63 LYG without mifamurtide) in metastatic osteosarcoma patients. The Markov model analysis showed that chemotherapy with mifamurtide improved the lifetime effectiveness compared to chemotherapy alone in both nonmetastatic and metastatic osteosarcoma. Relative effectiveness of the therapy was higher in metastatic than nonmetastatic osteosarcoma over lifetime. However, absolute lifetime effectiveness was higher in nonmetastatic than metastatic osteosarcoma.

  20. Coping with Fear of Recurrence

    MedlinePlus

    ... With Fear of Recurrence Request Permissions Coping With Fear of Recurrence Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... affects your life. Tips for coping with the fear of recurrence Living with uncertainty is never easy. ...

  1. Long-term Survival after Metastatic Childhood Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mette Bybjerg; Krag, Christen

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Malignant melanoma in children is very rare and accounts for only 1–3% of all melanomas. A congenital melanocytic nevus depending on the size of the lesion is one of the risk factors for developing childhood melanoma because of the possible malignant transformation. Childhood malignant melanoma is a potentially fatal disease. Surgical excision is the primary treatment of choice for malignant melanoma. Clinicians need to be aware of the possible malignant transformation in children with congenital melanocytic nevus because early diagnosis and treatment improves prognosis. The suspicion of malign melanoma must be in mind when evaluating a pigmented lesion in a pediatric patient. We present a case of a patient born with a congenital nevus diagnosed with metastatic childhood malignant scalp melanoma at the age of 6 years. The patient underwent surgical ablation and reconstruction and has survived 26 years without recurrence, thus representing an uplifting case of long-term survival of childhood melanoma. PMID:25289356

  2. Bone marrow-derived stem cell therapy for metastatic brain cancers.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yuji; Tajiri, Naoki; Staples, Meaghan; Reyes, Stephanny; Lozano, Diego; Sanberg, Paul R; Freeman, Thomas B; van Loveren, Harry; Kim, Seung U; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2015-01-01

    We propose that stem cell therapy may be a potent treatment for metastatic melanoma in the brain. Here we discuss the key role of a leaky blood-brain barrier (BBB) that accompanies the development of brain metastases. We review the need to characterize the immunological and inflammatory responses associated with tumor-derived BBB damage in order to reveal the contribution of this brain pathological alteration to the formation and growth of brain metastatic cancers. Next, we discuss the potential repair of the BBB and attenuation of brain metastasis through transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with the endothelial progenitor cell phenotype. In particular, we review the need for evaluation of the efficacy of stem cell therapy in repairing a disrupted BBB in an effort to reduce neuroinflammation, eventually attenuating brain metastatic cancers. The demonstration of BBB repair through augmented angiogenesis and vasculogenesis will be critical to establishing the potential of stem cell therapy for the treatment/prevention of metastatic brain tumors. The overarching hypothesis we advanced here is that BBB breakdown is closely associated with brain metastatic cancers of melanoma, exacerbating the inflammatory response of the brain during metastasis, and ultimately worsening the outcome of metastatic brain cancers. Abrogating this leaky BBB-mediated inflammation via stem cell therapy represents a paradigm-shifting approach to treating brain cancer. This review article discusses the pros and cons of cell therapy for melanoma brain metastases.

  3. Risk of Recurrence in Laryngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sørum Falk, Ragnhild; Folkvard Evensen, Jan; Boysen, Morten; Brøndbo, Kjell

    2016-01-01

    A cohort study was undertaken to analyze the risk of recurrence among 1616 patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx from 1983 to 2010 at a single, tertiary academic center in Oslo, Norway. The cohort was followed from the date of diagnosis to September 2011. Competing risk regression analysis assessed the association between various risk factors and the risk of recurrence, where death was considered a competing event. Recurrence was observed in 368 patients (23%) during the study period. The majority (71%) of recurrences involved the location of the primary tumor. The overall risk of recurrence during the first three years after initiating treatment was 20.5%. Increased risk of recurrence was observed in patients with supraglottic cancer, younger patients, those with T2–T3 tumors and in patients treated in the earlier part of the study period. Significant factors for recurrence in glottic carcinomas were age, treatment in the earlier part of the study and T-status, whereas age was a significant factor in supraglottic cancer. N-status appeared less significant. In conclusion, follow-up of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma should place particular emphasis on the site of the primary tumor, younger patients, cases of supraglottic cancer and T2-T4 primary tumors, especially during the first three years after treatment. More studies are needed to assess the impact of surgical versus non-surgical treatment, and eventually the significance of recurrence, for disease-specific and overall survival in cases of advanced laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27716797

  4. Metastatic Male Breast Cancer: A Retrospective Cohort Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Foerster, Robert; Schroeder, Lars; Foerster, Frank; Wulff, Volker; Schubotz, Birgit; Baaske, Dieter; Rudlowski, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Metastasized male breast cancer (MMBC) is a rare disease. Given its low incidence, data regarding tumor biology, current treatment options, and survival rates are scarce. Patients and Methods A chart review was performed of MMBC patients consecutively registered in regional cancer registries in Germany between 1995 and 2011. Tumor characteristics, treatment, and survival rates were documented and statistically evaluated. Results 41 men with MMBC represented 25.6% of a total of 160 patients with MBC. 16 (39%) patients showed primary metastases, and 25 (61%) had recurrent metastases. Median survival from occurrence of metastasis was 32 months. Median overall survival (OS) was 68 months. 68.3% (n = 28) of the cohort received systemic therapy favoring endocrine therapy (n = 25, 61.9%). Prolonged metastatic OS (p = 0.02) was observed in patients having had a systemic treatment. Metastatic patients having received endocrine treatment showed significantly prolonged survival rates. Furthermore, patients receiving palliative chemotherapy had a significant survival benefit compared to those in whom chemotherapy was omitted. Conclusion Our results suggest that systemic treatment in the form of both palliative chemotherapy and endocrine therapy improves outcome of R. Foerster and L. Schroeder contributed equally to this article and are listed in alphabetical order. MMBC. Therefore, it seems reasonable that treatment of MMBC should be based on the guidelines for female breast cancer. PMID:25404886

  5. Updated options for liver-limited metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Steven R

    2008-12-01

    Liver metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC) are common in patients presenting with an initial diagnosis of metastatic disease or at the time of recurrence. Without treatment, patients with metastatic disease have a poor prognosis. Surgical resection of the metastases might provide long-term benefit.; however, the size, number, or location of the metastases can limit the ability to perform a resection. The use of chemotherapy, both systemic and via hepatic artery infusion, in patients undergoing surgery for liver metastases from CRC has augmented the long-term survival benefits and even the cure obtained in some patients with surgery. Chemotherapy might also convert a portion of patients with initially unresectable liver metastases to resectable. A growing body of literature is helping to define the role of chemotherapy for potentially resectable liver metastases and for initially unresectable liver metastases. The introduction of newer agents such as oxaliplatin and irinotecan, and targeted agents such as cetuximab and bevacizumab, has led to meaningful improvements in response rates and survival over those previously achieved with 5-fluorouracil. Further trials are needed to refine the use of chemotherapy and targeted agents in the management of patients with liver metastases.

  6. Metastatic Prostate Cancer to the Duodenum: A Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Kaswala, Dharmesh H.; Patel, Nitin; Jadallah, Sana; Wang, Weizheng

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the third most common cancer in man. About 1 in 6 males developed prostate cancer and 1 in 35 males die of this disease. Prostate cancer behavior ranges from microscopic tumors to aggressive cancer with metastatic potential. While metastasis to bone is relatively common, prostate cancer rarely metastasizes to the cecum, pituitary gland, small bowel, maxillary sinus and skin. Our case report presents a rare presentation of metastatic prostate cancer to the duodenum. Our search of the literature found only 2 cases of prostate metastases to duodenum published from 1966 to the present. To our knowledge this is the third case of metastatic prostate cancer presenting with duodenal metastasis. Although it is rare but in symptomatic patients small intestine metastasis should not be ignored with advanced prostate cancer. The case demonstrates a novel presentation of a common malignancy, and should raise awareness in clinicians and radiologists that prostate cancer can present with distant metastases in absence of any local lymphadenopathy. PMID:25161979

  7. Metastatic adenocarcinoma of unknown primary origin.

    PubMed

    Hammar, S P

    1998-12-01

    Adenocarcinomas account for up to 60% of all metastatic neoplasms of unknown primary origin. In general, adenocarcinomas are the most difficult metastatic tumor to accurately identify the primary site. Some metastatic adenocarcinomas have distinctive histological features that allow for their site determination (eg, colonic adenocarcinoma, bronchioloalveolar cell carcinoma), although the majority of metastatic adenocarcinomas have histological features that are not distinctive enough to allow for a specific diagnosis of their origin. For this reason, electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry have been used to help identify the exact type (origin) of metastatic adenocarcinomas. Relatively specific ultrastructural features used to diagnose metastatic adenocarcinomas of unknown primary origin include tubular myelin, intranuclear surfactant apoprotein tubular inclusions, Clara cell granules, uniform short microvilli with filamentous cores and core rootlets, Langerhans cells associated with neoplastic cells, cytoplasmic hyaline globules, lipid droplets, glycogen, and cytoplasmic crystals. Only a few of these ultrastructural features are absolutely specific. Relatively specific immunohistochemical tests used to diagnose metastatic adenocarcinomas of unknown primary origin include prostate-specific antigen, thyroglobulin, estrogen and progesterone receptor proteins, thyroid transcription factor-I, and surfactant apoproteins. Of these, prostate-specific antigen and thyroglobulin are the most specific. The purpose of this article is to discuss the use of electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry in the site-specific diagnosis of metastatic adenocarcinomas of unknown primary origin.

  8. Basic Concepts in Metastatic Cardiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vlachostergios, Panagiotis J.; Daliani, Danai D.; Papandreou, Christos N.

    2012-01-01

    The involvement of the heart in metastatic cancer is a rare clinical diagnosis, as it may be asymptomatic or symptoms, when present, may be attributed to other causes. Issues regarding incidence, intracardiac location, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cardiac tumors will be discussed here.

  9. Cancer and the metastatic substrate

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Seventy percent of cancer patients have detectable metastases when they receive a diagnosis and 90% of cancer deaths result from metastases. These two facts emphasise the urgency for research to study the mechanisms and processes that enable metastasis. We need to develop a greater understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that cause metastasis and also we need to do more. We must also consider the micro- and macro-environmental factors that influence this disease. Studying this environmental context has led us to update the ‘seed and soil’ hypothesis which dates back to the 19th century. This theory describes cancerous cells as seeds and the substrate as the soil in target organs though this may seem antiquated. Nonetheless, the tissue specificity that researchers have recently observed in metastatic colonisation supports the validity of the seed and soil theory. We now know that the metastatic potential of a tumour cell depends on multiple, reciprocal interactions between the primary tumour and distant sites. These interactions determine tumour progression. Studies of metastasis have allowed us to develop treatments that focus on therapeutic effectiveness. These new treatments account for the frequent metastasis of some tumours to target organs such as bones, lungs, brain, and liver. The purpose of this review is first to describe interactions between the cellular and molecular entities and the target organ tumour environment that enables metastasis. A second aim is to describe the complex mechanisms that mediate these interactions. PMID:28105072

  10. Recognition and capture of metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma cells using aptamer-conjugated quantum dots and magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fu-Bing; Rong, Yuan; Fang, Min; Yuan, Jing-Ping; Peng, Chun-Wei; Liu, Shao-Ping; Li, Yan

    2013-05-01

    Metastatic recurrence is the most important biological behavior of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the main cause of treatment failure. Early prediction of metastasis is currently impossible due to the lack of specific molecular probes to recognize metastatic HCC cells. Aptamers have recently emerged as promising potential molecular probes for biomedical applications. Two well-matched HCC cell lines including HCCLM9 with high metastatic potential and MHCC97-L with low metastatic potential, were used to select aptamers for HCC metastasis. With a whole-cell-SELEX strategy, in which HCCLM9 cells were used as target cells and MHCC97-L cells as subtractive cell, 6 potential aptamers had been generated. Detailed study on selected aptamer LY-1 revealed that it could bind metastatic HCC cells with high affinity and specificity, not only in cells culture and animal models of HCC metastasis, but also in clinical HCC specimens. Moreover, the aptamer LY-1 and magnetic particles conjugates could efficiently capture the HCC cells from complex mixture whole blood. These studies demonstrated that this HCC specific aptamer LY-1 could be a promising molecular probe to recognize metastatic HCC cells.

  11. Metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma to the nose: report and review of cutaneous metastases of papillary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma typically appears in local lymph nodes. Skin metastases are rare. Purpose: A man with progressive metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma who developed a cutaneous metastasis on his nose is described. The clinical manifestations of metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma to skin are reviewed. Methods: PubMed was used to search the following terms, separately and in combination: basal, cancer, carcinoma, cell, cutaneous, kinase, inhibitor, metastases, nose, papillary, rearranged during transfection, receptor, RET, thyroid, tyrosine, vandetanib. Results: Pathologic changes observed on the biopsy of the man’s nose lesion were similar to those of his original cancer. Genomic evaluation of the tumor revealed an aberration involving the rearranged during transfection (RET) receptor tyrosine kinase. The residual tumor was excised. Treatment with vandetanib, a RET inhibitor was initiated; his metastatic disease has been stable, without symptoms or recurrent cutaneous metastasis, for 2 years following the discovery of his metastatic nose tumor. Conclusions: Papillary thyroid carcinoma with skin metastases is rare. Nodules usually appear on the scalp or neck; the thyroidectomy scar is also a common site. Metastatic tumor, albeit infrequently, can present as a nose lesion. The prognosis for patients with cutaneous metastases from papillary thyroid carcinoma is poor. However, with the ability to test the tumor for genomic aberrations, molecular targeted therapies—such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors—may provide extended survival in these individuals. PMID:26693082

  12. Likelihood of Bone Recurrence in Prior Sites of Metastasis in Patients With High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Polishchuk, Alexei L.; Li, Richard; Little, Anthony; Hawkins, Randall A.; Hamilton, Jeffrey; Lau, Michael; Tran, Hung Chi; Lemons, Richard S.; Matthay, Katherine K.; DuBois, Steven G.; and others

    2014-07-15

    Purpose/Objectives: Despite recent improvements in outcomes, 40% of children with high-risk neuroblastoma will experience relapse, facing a guarded prognosis for long-term cure. Whether recurrences are at new sites or sites of original disease may guide decision making during initial therapy. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients were retrospectively identified from institutional databases at first metastatic relapse of high-risk neuroblastoma. Included patients had disease involving metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG)-avid metastatic sites at diagnosis and first relapse, achieved a complete or partial response with no more than one residual MIBG-avid site before first relapse, and received no total body irradiation or therapy with {sup 131}I-MIBG before first relapse. Anatomically defined metastatic sites were tracked from diagnosis through first relapse to determine tendency of disease to recur at previously involved versus uninvolved sites and to assess whether this pattern was influenced by site irradiation. Results: Of 159 MIBG-avid metastatic sites identified among 43 patients at first relapse, 131 (82.4%) overlapped anatomically with the set of 525 sites present at diagnosis. This distribution was similar for bone sites, but patterns of relapse were more varied for the smaller subset of soft tissue metastases. Among all metastatic sites at diagnosis in our subsequently relapsed patient cohort, only 3 of 19 irradiated sites (15.8%) recurred as compared with 128 of 506 (25.3%) unirradiated sites. Conclusions: Metastatic bone relapse in neuroblastoma usually occurs at anatomic sites of previous disease. Metastatic sites identified at diagnosis that did not receive radiation during frontline therapy appeared to have a higher risk of involvement at first relapse relative to previously irradiated metastatic sites. These observations support the current paradigm of irradiating metastases that persist after induction chemotherapy in high-risk patients. Furthermore

  13. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Ganitumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-06

    Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone Marrow; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Lung; Metastatic Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor of Bone; Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor of Soft Tissues

  14. Treatment of non-resectable and metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors: experience with the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in a third level hospital in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel Renteria, Alberto; Pluma Jiménez, Miguel; Pérez Martínez, Mario; Martínez Martínez, Gloria; Rivera Rivera, Samuel; Grajales Álvarez, Rocío; Bautista Aragón, Yolanda; Quintana Quintana, Miguel; Alejandro Silva, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Background Stromal tumors of the digestive tract are uncommon malignant diseases, are subclassified as leiomyosarcomas and Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST) depending on the molecular expression of tyrosine kinase receptor KIT (CD117). GISTs represent 1% of malignant tumors affecting this anatomical site. Localized tumours diseases are reasonably well controlled by surgical resection and several criteria define the need for adjuvant therapy. In the case of metastatic disease a poor prognosis has been reported with systemic treatment based on chemotherapy. Recently, significant advances have been shown since tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) were introduced, with median overall survival close to 5 years. Unfortunately in Mexico, even though the therapy has been long used there are no published data of the experience in the treatment of these tumors. Methods We used an electronic data base to obtain clinical, radiological and histological data of patients diagnosed with GIST and treated in the oncological center of the Mexican Institute of Social Security, patients were subclassified by stage, symptoms at diagnosis as well as the initial and subsequent systemic treatment. Finally we made an analysis for progression free survival and overall survival identifying prognostic factors. Results We obtained information of 71 patients with metastatic, non-resectable or recurrent GIST, treated with a TKI, we observed a predominant relation for women (60.4%) with median age of 58 years. Stage at diagnosis was predominantly metastatic (46.5%), most frequently affected sites were lung, liver and retroperitoneum. Median progression free survival was 30.6 months and overall survival was 81.3 months. All patients were initially treated with imatinib at a dose of 400 mg per day. Treatment was well-tolerated in most cases. Conclusions Metastatic GIST evaluated in our center shows a different affection in gender and age, and our population shows a different response to TKIs

  15. A Retrospective Study of Surgery and Reirradiation for Recurrent Ependymoma

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant, Thomas E. Boop, Frederick A.; Kun, Larry E.; Sanford, Robert A.

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To report disease control for patients with recurrent ependymoma (EP) treated with surgery and a second course of radiation therapy (RT{sub 2}). Patients and Methods: Thirty-eight pediatric patients (median age, 2.7 years) with initially localized EP at the time of definitive RT underwent a second course of RT after local (n = 21), metastatic (n = 13), or combined (n = 4) failure. Reirradiation included radiosurgery (n = 6), focal fractionated reirradiation (n = 13), or craniospinal irradiation (CSI; n = 19). Results: Initial time to failure was 16 months, and median age at second treatment was 4.8 years. Radiosurgery resulted in significant brainstem toxicity and one death (median dose, 18 Gy). Progression-free survival ratio was greater than unity for 4 of 6 patients; there was one long-term survivor. Three of 13 patients treated using focal fractionated reirradiation (median combined dose, 111.6 Gy) experienced metastasis. The CSI was administered to 12 patients with metastatic failure, 3 patients with local failure, and 4 patients with combined failure. The 4-year event-free survival rate was 53% {+-} 20% for 12 patients with metastatic failure treated with CSI. Failure after CSI was observed in 1 of 3 patients with a history of local failure and 3 of 4 patients with a history of combined failure. Conclusion: Patients with locally recurrent EP experience durable local tumor control, but remain at risk of metastasis. Patients with metastatic EP failure may receive salvage therapy that includes a component of CSI. Durability of disease control and long-term effects from this approach require further follow-up.

  16. Mipsagargin, a novel thapsigargin-based PSMA-activated prodrug: results of a first-in-man phase I clinical trial in patients with refractory, advanced or metastatic solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, D; Wilding, G; Denmeade, S; Sarantopoulas, J; Cosgrove, D; Cetnar, J; Azad, N; Bruce, J; Kurman, M; Allgood, V E; Carducci, M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mipsagargin (G-202; (8-O-(12-aminododecanoyl)-8-O-debutanoyl thapsigargin)-Asp-γ-Glu-γ-Glu-γ-GluGluOH)) is a novel thapsigargin-based targeted prodrug that is activated by PSMA-mediated cleavage of an inert masking peptide. The active moiety is an inhibitor of the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase (SERCA) pump protein that is necessary for cellular viability. We evaluated the safety of mipsagargin in patients with advanced solid tumours and established a recommended phase II dosing (RP2D) regimen. Methods: Patients with advanced solid tumours received mipsagargin by intravenous infusion on days 1, 2 and 3 of 28-day cycles and were allowed to continue participation in the absence of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The dosing began at 1.2 mg m−2 and was escalated using a modified Fibonacci schema to determine maximally tolerated dose (MTD) with an expansion cohort at the RP2D. Plasma was analysed for mipsagargin pharmacokinetics and response was assessed using RECIST criteria. Results: A total of 44 patients were treated at doses ranging from 1.2 to 88 mg m−2, including 28 patients in the dose escalation phase and 16 patients in an expansion cohort. One dose-limiting toxicity (DLT; Grade 3 rash) was observed in the dose escalation portion of the study. At 88 mg m−2, observations of Grade 2 infusion-related reaction (IRR, 2 patients) and Grade 2 creatinine elevation (1 patient) led to declaration of 66.8 mg m−2 as the recommended phase II dose (RP2D). Across the study, the most common treatment-related adverse events (AEs) were fatigue, rash, nausea, pyrexia and IRR. Two patients developed treatment-related Grade 3 acute renal failure that was reversible during the treatment-free portion of the cycle. To help ameliorate the IRR and creatinine elevations, a RP2D of 40 mg m−2 on day 1 and 66.8 mg m−2 on days 2 and 3 with prophylactic premedications and hydration on each

  17. Bone lesions in recurrent glucagonoma: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Ghetie, Cristian; Cornfeld, Daniel; Ramfidis, Vassilios S; Syrigos, Kostas N; Saif, Muhammad W

    2012-01-01

    Glucagonomas are rare neuroendocrine tumors that arise from α cells of the pancreatic islets. Most of them are malignant and usually present as metastatic disease. Sites most commonly involved in metastases are the liver and regional lymph nodes. Bone metastases are rare events and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. We present the case of a 53-year-old male with a medical history of recurrent non-functioning glucagonoma. He presented 17 years after the initial diagnosis with new blastic bone lesions involving the T1 vertebra and the sacrum. Diagnostic steps and medical management in metastatic glucagonoma are also reviewed. PMID:22737277

  18. Gefitinib in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Head and Neck Cancer or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-11

    Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer; Insular Thyroid Cancer; Metastatic Parathyroid Cancer; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Parathyroid Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IVA Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus

  19. Breast cancer scalp metastasis as first metastatic site after scalp cooling: two cases of occurrence after 7- and 9-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Julie; Desbiens, Christine; Hogue, Jean-Charles

    2011-07-01

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is a commonly feared chemotherapy side effect and can be prevented using scalp cooling. Scalp metastasis is a rare site of recurrence. There is a question about whether or not the risk might be increased with the use of scalp cooling. Two cases of breast cancer with scalp metastases as first metastatic site are presented. The first patient presented with a scalp metastasis as first metastatic site 9 years following breast cancer chemotherapy treatments; she used scalp cooling for the adjuvant treatment. Second case presented a scalp metastasis as first metastatic site 7 years following treatments for her first cancer; overall, she used scalp cooling in only one of her six adjuvant chemotherapy cycles. Scalp metastases as the first site of recurrence are very rare entities. Scalp cooling is unlikely to have contributed in the cases presented here.

  20. Metastatic Insulinoma Following Resection of Nonsecreting Pancreatic Islet Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Ilyssa O.; Van Ha, Thuong G.; Kaplan, Edwin L.; Philipson, Louis H.

    2013-01-01

    A 56-year-old woman presented to our clinic for recurrent hypoglycemia after undergoing resection of an incidentally discovered nonfunctional pancreatic endocrine tumor 6 years ago. She underwent a distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy, after which she developed diabetes and was placed on an insulin pump. Pathology showed a pancreatic endocrine neoplasm with negative islet hormone immunostains. Two years later, computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed multiple liver lesions. Biopsy of a liver lesion showed a well-differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasm, consistent with pancreatic origin. Six years later, she presented to clinic with 1.5 years of recurrent hypoglycemia. Laboratory results showed elevated proinsulin, insulin levels, and c-peptide levels during a hypoglycemic episode. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen redemonstrated multiple liver lesions. Repeated transarterial catheter chemoembolization and microwave thermal ablation controlled hypoglycemia. The unusual features of interest of this case include the transformation of nonfunctioning pancreatic endocrine tumor to a metastatic insulinoma and the occurrence of atrial flutter after octreotide for treatment. PMID:26425568

  1. Successful treatment of metastatic pheochromocytoma in the spine with cement augmentation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Siyi; Kong, Xiangyi; Yan, Chengrui; Liu, Yong; Zhou, Xi; Qiu, Guixing

    2017-01-01

    Metastatic pheochromocytoma in the spine is rare, and there is no standard curative management. Treatment via open surgery is often risky in the perioperative period, while osteoplasty by cement augmentation is a less invasive option.We describe 2 patients with recurrence of pheochromocytoma involving the spine and the pelvis who were successfully treated with osteoplasty by cement augmentation. A 31-year-old female underwent cement augmentation for a pelvic lesion 6 months after the resection and screw fixation of an L3 lesion. A 58-year-old male underwent cement augmentation to directly destroy the functional tumor, with a surgical decompression 6 months later. Both patients showed appropriate destruction of the tumor, adequate pain relief, and the decreased release of catecholamine from metastatic lesions.Osteoplasty by cement augmentation may be a treatment option for patients with metastatic pheochromocytoma who cannot undergo appropriate surgery or decline surgery. This represents a safe approach to sustainably relieve pain and stabilize vertebral bodies with metastatic malignant pheochromocytoma.

  2. Metastatic Tumor of the Spermatic Cord in Adults: A Case Report and Review

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Daisaku; Ohkawa, Mizuho; Hasegawa, Ryo; Okada, Norimichi; Ishizuka, Naoki; Kusumi, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic spermatic cord (SC) tumor is extremely rare. Recently, we experienced a case of late-onset metastatic SC tumor from cecal cancer. This case is a 68-year-old man presenting with a painless right SC mass. He had undergone a right hemicolectomy for cecal cancer 6 years ago. Radical orchiectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1 were performed. No recurrence was found after one year of follow-up. We identified a total of 25 cases, including our case, on a literature search via PubMed from January 2000 to April 2015. The most frequent primary sites of the tumors metastasizing to the SC were the stomach (8 cases, 32%) and the colon (8 cases, 32%), next the liver (2 cases, 8%), and kidney (2 cases, 8%). The majority of the cases underwent radical orchiectomy for the metastatic tumors of the SC. Over half of the cases received adjuvant interventions based on the regimens for the primary tumors. Prognosis in the patients with metastatic tumor of the SC was unfavorable except for late-onset metastasis. In patients with a mass in the SC and a history of neoplasm, especially in gastrointestinal tract, the possibility of metastasis from the primary cancer should be considered. PMID:26770863

  3. Successful treatment of metastatic pheochromocytoma in the spine with cement augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Siyi; Kong, Xiangyi; Yan, Chengrui; Liu, Yong; Zhou, Xi; Qiu, Guixing

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Metastatic pheochromocytoma in the spine is rare, and there is no standard curative management. Treatment via open surgery is often risky in the perioperative period, while osteoplasty by cement augmentation is a less invasive option. We describe 2 patients with recurrence of pheochromocytoma involving the spine and the pelvis who were successfully treated with osteoplasty by cement augmentation. A 31-year-old female underwent cement augmentation for a pelvic lesion 6 months after the resection and screw fixation of an L3 lesion. A 58-year-old male underwent cement augmentation to directly destroy the functional tumor, with a surgical decompression 6 months later. Both patients showed appropriate destruction of the tumor, adequate pain relief, and the decreased release of catecholamine from metastatic lesions. Osteoplasty by cement augmentation may be a treatment option for patients with metastatic pheochromocytoma who cannot undergo appropriate surgery or decline surgery. This represents a safe approach to sustainably relieve pain and stabilize vertebral bodies with metastatic malignant pheochromocytoma. PMID:28121933

  4. A case of acute subdural hematoma due to bleeding from metastatic chondrosarcoma of the skull

    PubMed Central

    Kosugi, Kenzo; Takahashi, Satoshi; Sasaki, Hikaru; Tamura, Ryota; Ohara, Kentaro; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2017-01-01

    Background: Intra or peritumoral hemorrhage of brain and skull tumors sometimes presents as stroke. Skull metastasis of chondrosarcoma is relatively rare, and furthermore, a case of intratumoural hemorrhage of skull metastasis of chondrosarcoma has not been reported. Case Description: A 73-year-old man underwent right lower leg amputation in the past because of chondrosarcoma and was operated for a skull metastasis. He presented with a sudden headache, and head computed tomography revealed a right acute subdural hematoma (SDH) adjacent to the recurrent skull metastatic tumor. The removal of the SDH and tumor resection were performed emergently. The intraoperative findings included metastatic invasion beyond the dura mater to as deep as the subdural space, and the histological diagnosis was metastatic chondrosarcoma. His postoperative course was uneventful. Conclusion: In the event of subdural invasion of a metastatic lesion, intratumoral hemorrhage may induce acute SDH, as in the present case. Similar to our case, most previous reports of intracranial chondrosarcoma hemorrhage have had an unclear etiology. Despite the rarity of this event, a patient with a history of malignancy presenting with nontraumatic acute SDH should be examined for the intratumoral hemorrhage of skull metastasis in the differential diagnosis. PMID:28303203

  5. Photoacoustic detection of metastatic melanoma cells in the human circulatory system.

    PubMed

    Weight, Ryan M; Viator, John A; Dale, Paul S; Caldwell, Charles W; Lisle, Allison E

    2006-10-15

    Detection of disseminating tumor cells among patients suffering from various types and stages of cancer can function as an early warning system, alerting the physician of the metastatic spread or recurrence of the disease. Early detection of such cells can result in preventative treatment of the disease, while late stage detection can serve as an indicator of the effectiveness of chemotherapeutics. The prognostic value of exposing disseminating tumor cells poses an urgent need for an efficient, accurate screening method for metastatic cells. We propose a system for the detection of metastatic circulating tumor cells based on the thermoelastic properties of melanoma. The method employs photoacoustic excitation coupled with a detection system capable of determining the presence of disseminating cells within the circulatory system in vitro. Detection trials consisting of tissue phantoms and a human melanoma cell line resulted in a detection threshold of the order of ten individual cells, thus validating the effectiveness of the proposed mechanism. Results imply the potential to assay simple blood draws, from healthy and metastatic patients, for the presence of cancerous melanoma providing an unprecedented method for routine cancer screening.

  6. Photoacoustic detection of metastatic melanoma cells in the human circulatory system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weight, Ryan M.; Viator, John A.; Dale, Paul S.; Caldwell, Charles W.; Lisle, Allison E.

    2006-10-01

    Detection of disseminating tumor cells among patients suffering from various types and stages of cancer can function as an early warning system, alerting the physician of the metastatic spread or recurrence of the disease. Early detection of such cells can result in preventative treatment of the disease, while late stage detection can serve as an indicator of the effectiveness of chemotherapeutics. The prognostic value of exposing disseminating tumor cells poses an urgent need for an efficient, accurate screening method for metastatic cells. We propose a system for the detection of metastatic circulating tumor cells based on the thermoelastic properties of melanoma. The method employs photoacoustic excitation coupled with a detection system capable of determining the presence of disseminating cells within the circulatory system in vitro. Detection trials consisting of tissue phantoms and a human melanoma cell line resulted in a detection threshold of the order of ten individual cells, thus validating the effectiveness of the proposed mechanism. Results imply the potential to assay simple blood draws, from healthy and metastatic patients, for the presence of cancerous melanoma providing an unprecedented method for routine cancer screening.

  7. Recurrent Fever in Children

    PubMed Central

    Torreggiani, Sofia; Filocamo, Giovanni; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Children presenting with recurrent fever may represent a diagnostic challenge. After excluding the most common etiologies, which include the consecutive occurrence of independent uncomplicated infections, a wide range of possible causes are considered. This article summarizes infectious and noninfectious causes of recurrent fever in pediatric patients. We highlight that, when investigating recurrent fever, it is important to consider age at onset, family history, duration of febrile episodes, length of interval between episodes, associated symptoms and response to treatment. Additionally, information regarding travel history and exposure to animals is helpful, especially with regard to infections. With the exclusion of repeated independent uncomplicated infections, many infective causes of recurrent fever are relatively rare in Western countries; therefore, clinicians should be attuned to suggestive case history data. It is important to rule out the possibility of an infectious process or a malignancy, in particular, if steroid therapy is being considered. After excluding an infectious or neoplastic etiology, immune-mediated and autoinflammatory diseases should be taken into consideration. Together with case history data, a careful physical exam during and between febrile episodes may give useful clues and guide laboratory investigations. However, despite a thorough evaluation, a recurrent fever may remain unexplained. A watchful follow-up is thus mandatory because new signs and symptoms may appear over time. PMID:27023528

  8. Recurrent Fever in Children.

    PubMed

    Torreggiani, Sofia; Filocamo, Giovanni; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-03-25

    Children presenting with recurrent fever may represent a diagnostic challenge. After excluding the most common etiologies, which include the consecutive occurrence of independent uncomplicated infections, a wide range of possible causes are considered. This article summarizes infectious and noninfectious causes of recurrent fever in pediatric patients. We highlight that, when investigating recurrent fever, it is important to consider age at onset, family history, duration of febrile episodes, length of interval between episodes, associated symptoms and response to treatment. Additionally, information regarding travel history and exposure to animals is helpful, especially with regard to infections. With the exclusion of repeated independent uncomplicated infections, many infective causes of recurrent fever are relatively rare in Western countries; therefore, clinicians should be attuned to suggestive case history data. It is important to rule out the possibility of an infectious process or a malignancy, in particular, if steroid therapy is being considered. After excluding an infectious or neoplastic etiology, immune-mediated and autoinflammatory diseases should be taken into consideration. Together with case history data, a careful physical exam during and between febrile episodes may give useful clues and guide laboratory investigations. However, despite a thorough evaluation, a recurrent fever may remain unexplained. A watchful follow-up is thus mandatory because new signs and symptoms may appear over time.

  9. Re-irradiation of brain metastases and metastatic spinal cord compression: clinical practice suggestions.

    PubMed

    Maranzano, Ernesto; Trippa, Fabio; Pacchiarini, Diamante; Chirico, Luigia; Basagni, Maria Luisa; Rossi, Romina; Bellavita, Rita; Schiavone, Concetta; Italiani, Marco; Muti, Marco

    2005-01-01

    The recent improvements of therapeutic approaches in oncology have allowed a certain number of patients with advanced disease to survive much longer than in the past. So, the number of cases with brain metastases and metastatic spinal cord compression has increased, as has the possibility of developing a recurrence in areas of the central nervous system already treated with radiotherapy. Clinicians are reluctant to perform re-irradiation of the brain, because of the risk of severe side effects. The tolerance dose for the brain to a single course of radiotherapy is 50-60 Gy in 2 Gy daily fractions. New metastases appear in 22-73% of the cases after whole brain radiotherapy, but the percentage of reirradiated patients is 3-10%. An accurate selection must be made before giving an indication to re-irradiation. Patients with Karnofsky performance status > 70, age < 65 years, controlled primary and no extracranial metastases are those with the best prognosis. The absence of extracranial disease was the most significant factor in conditioning survival, and maximum tumor diameter was the only variable associated with an increased risk of unacceptable acute and/or chronic neurotoxicity. Re-treatment of brain metastases can be done with whole brain radiotherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Most patients had no relevant radiation-induced toxicity after a second course of whole brain radiotherapy or stereotactic radiosurgery. There are few data on fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in the re-irradiation of brain metastases. In general, the incidence of an "in-field" recurrence of spinal metastasis varies from 2.5-11% of cases and can occur 2-40 months after the first radiotherapy cycle. Radiation-induced myelopathy can occur months or years (6 months-7 years) after radiotherapy, and the pathogenesis remains obscure. Higher radiotherapy doses, larger doses per fraction, and previous exposure to radiation could be associated with a

  10. Discovery of a Metastatic Immune Escape Mechanism Initiated by the Loss of Expression of the Tumour Biomarker Interleukin-33

    PubMed Central

    Saranchova, Iryna; Han, Jeffrey; Huang, Hui; Fenninger, Franz; Choi, Kyung Bok; Munro, Lonna; Pfeifer, Cheryl; Welch, Ian; Wyatt, Alexander W.; Fazli, Ladan; Gleave, Martin E.; Jefferies, Wilfred A.

    2016-01-01

    A new paradigm for understanding immune-surveillance and immune escape in cancer is described here. Metastatic carcinomas express reduced levels of IL-33 and diminished levels of antigen processing machinery (APM), compared to syngeneic primary tumours. Complementation of IL-33 expression in metastatic tumours upregulates APM expression and functionality of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-molecules, resulting in reduced tumour growth rates and a lower frequency of circulating tumour cells. Parallel studies in humans demonstrate that low tumour expression of IL-33 is an immune biomarker associated with recurrent prostate and kidney renal clear cell carcinomas. Thus, IL-33 has a significant role in cancer immune-surveillance against primary tumours, which is lost during the metastatic transition that actuates immune escape in cancer. PMID:27619158

  11. Discovery of a Metastatic Immune Escape Mechanism Initiated by the Loss of Expression of the Tumour Biomarker Interleukin-33.

    PubMed

    Saranchova, Iryna; Han, Jeffrey; Huang, Hui; Fenninger, Franz; Choi, Kyung Bok; Munro, Lonna; Pfeifer, Cheryl; Welch, Ian; Wyatt, Alexander W; Fazli, Ladan; Gleave, Martin E; Jefferies, Wilfred A

    2016-09-13

    A new paradigm for understanding immune-surveillance and immune escape in cancer is described here. Metastatic carcinomas express reduced levels of IL-33 and diminished levels of antigen processing machinery (APM), compared to syngeneic primary tumours. Complementation of IL-33 expression in metastatic tumours upregulates APM expression and functionality of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-molecules, resulting in reduced tumour growth rates and a lower frequency of circulating tumour cells. Parallel studies in humans demonstrate that low tumour expression of IL-33 is an immune biomarker associated with recurrent prostate and kidney renal clear cell carcinomas. Thus, IL-33 has a significant role in cancer immune-surveillance against primary tumours, which is lost during the metastatic transition that actuates immune escape in cancer.

  12. Recurrent wheezing in children

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Michele; Piacentini, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent wheezing have a significant morbidity and it’s estimated that about one third of school-age children manifest the symptom during the first 5 years of life. Proper identification of children at risk of developing asthma at school age may predict long-term outcomes and improve treatment and preventive approach, but the possibility to identify these children at preschool age remains limited. For many years authors focused their studies to identify early children with recurrent wheezing at risk to develop asthma at school age. Different phenotypes have been proposed for a more precise characterization and a personalized plan of treatment. The main criticism concerns the inability to define stable phenotypes with the risk of overestimating or underestimating the characteristics of symptoms in these children. The aim of this review is to report the recent developments on the diagnosis and treatment of recurrent paediatric wheezing. PMID:26835404

  13. Recurrence of angular cheilitis.

    PubMed

    Ohman, S C; Jontell, M; Dahlen, G

    1988-08-01

    The incidence of recurrence of angular cheilitis following a successful antimicrobial treatment was studied in 48 patients. Clinical assessments including a microbial examination were carried out 8 months and 5 yr after termination of treatment. Eighty percent of the patients reported recurrence of their angular cheilitis on one or more occasions during the observation period. Patients with cutaneous disorders associated with dry skin or intraoral leukoplakia had an increased incidence of recrudescence. Neither the presence of denture stomatitis nor the type of microorganisms isolated from the original lesions of angular cheilitis, i.e. Candida albicans and/or Staphylococcus aureus, were associated with the number of recurrences. The present observations indicate that treatment of the majority of patients with angular cheilitis should be considered in a longer perspective than previously supposed, due to the short lasting therapeutic effects of the antimicrobial therapy.

  14. Choroid plexus papillomas: advances in molecular biology and understanding of tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Safaee, Michael; Oh, Michael C; Bloch, Orin; Sun, Matthew Z; Kaur, Gurvinder; Auguste, Kurtis I; Tihan, Tarik; Parsa, Andrew T

    2013-03-01

    Choroid plexus papillomas are rare, benign tumors originating from the choroid plexus. Although generally found within the ventricular system, they can arise ectopically in the brain parenchyma or disseminate throughout the neuraxis. We sought to review recent advances in our understanding of the molecular biology