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Sample records for advanced sar asar

  1. Land Use/Land Cover Classification of Urban SAR Scenes: An Envisat/ASAR and HJ-1 Joint Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldrighi, M.; Gamba, P.; Lisini, G.

    2013-01-01

    The classification of urban areas in terms of Land-Use/Land-Cover (LULC) maps is a challenging as well as essential task in order to monitor how the urban sprawl is changing the environment. In many case, this phenomenon leads to dramatic changes, since in many parts of the world commercial as well as residential areas are replacing natural environments, such as crops and forests. In this work we present the description of a novel procedure designed to exploit coarse resolution SAR images and obtain both the built-up area extents and a LULC map of the individuated urban area. Moreover, a data fusion approach, able to combine optical (HJ-1) and SAR (ENVISAT/ASAR) data, has been introduced in order to obtain a better vegetation assessment by means of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). An experimental result is presented using a data set of the Beijing megacity acquired by ENVISAT/ASAR and HJ-1.

  2. Temporal Stability of Soil Moisture and Radar Backscatter Observed by the Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR)

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Wolfgang; Pathe, Carsten; Doubkova, Marcela; Sabel, Daniel; Bartsch, Annett; Hasenauer, Stefan; Blöschl, Günter; Scipal, Klaus; Martínez-Fernández, José; Löw, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The high spatio-temporal variability of soil moisture is the result of atmospheric forcing and redistribution processes related to terrain, soil, and vegetation characteristics. Despite this high variability, many field studies have shown that in the temporal domain soil moisture measured at specific locations is correlated to the mean soil moisture content over an area. Since the measurements taken by Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) instruments are very sensitive to soil moisture it is hypothesized that the temporally stable soil moisture patterns are reflected in the radar backscatter measurements. To verify this hypothesis 73 Wide Swath (WS) images have been acquired by the ENVISAT Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) over the REMEDHUS soil moisture network located in the Duero basin, Spain. It is found that a time-invariant linear relationship is well suited for relating local scale (pixel) and regional scale (50 km) backscatter. The observed linear model coefficients can be estimated by considering the scattering properties of the terrain and vegetation and the soil moisture scaling properties. For both linear model coefficients, the relative error between observed and modelled values is less than 5 % and the coefficient of determination (R2) is 86 %. The results are of relevance for interpreting and downscaling coarse resolution soil moisture data retrieved from active (METOP ASCAT) and passive (SMOS, AMSR-E) instruments.

  3. Synergistic Usage of ERS, ASAR and PALSAR Data for PS InSAR Based Mining Induced Subsidence Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, C. J.; Salepci, N., Jr.; Schmullius, C.; Kuehl, A., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    For the derivation of the temporal evolution and the spatial pattern of the mining induced subsidence in Sondershausen, Germany, this study employs persistent scatterer interferometry (PSI) to multiple sets of SAR scenes from different sensors. The work is a part of the ongoing INFLUINS project funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. In order to improve the model of subsidence derived from a single sensor, a novel methodology for integration of multiple PSI data sets is introduced. The proposed approach allows the combination of subsidence information derived from different SAR data sets with different temporal coverage and/or spatial resolution. After long and intensive mining activities, the subsidence rate in Sondershausen has gradually increased almost to a rate of 250 mm/year reaching its maximum in the early 1990s. However, since 1996 the mine is backfilled leading to a gradual decrease in the subsidence rate in the undermined part of the city. The SAR scenes cover the period of backfilling between 1995 and 2010. The displacement rates for the first ten years (1995 -2005) are derived by ERS-1/2 scenes and by an ENVISAT-ASAR stack for the following years (2004-2010). In addition, for the span of 3 years from 2007 to 2010 an ALOS-PALSAR stack is processed in order to exploit the different information provided by different sensors. The vertical linear deformation rates derived by PSI clearly indicate the regions of subsidence in each set. Furthermore, they confirm the influence of backfilling, i.e. gradual decreasing of subsidence rates. These results are compared and validated with leveling measurements collected by the mine management company during 1995-2010. After the validation, the results are integrated in order to improve the quality of the subsidence model for the entire time span. With the objective of spatially refining the model derived from a single sensor, the approach exploits the PS points available in the other stacks by

  4. SiSAR: advanced SAR simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, Ferdinand

    1995-11-01

    SiSAR was planned as a realistic as possible, modular, user-friendly and fast SAR raw data simulator running on ordinary workstations. Interest in (interferometric) SAR products is growing on an international scale. There is a concentration of manpower and financial resources. Dead ends, respectively failures, have to be avoided during design and mission of every SAR project by simulating the system thoroughly before the experiment. Another reason to make use of extensive reproducible simulations during design and development is the reduction of time and manpower costs. As it comes down to verifying and comparing different processing algorithms we see that (interferometric) SAR simulation is an indispensable tool for testing individual processing steps. SiSAR is a modular SAR raw data simulator for realistic description of the functions of a SAR-system. It contains an implementation of diverse models to characterize radar targets, various approaches to describe the trajectory and the motion of the footprint on the target surface and different raw data formation algorithms. Beyond there is a wide supply of tools for manipulation, analysis and user-friendly simulation handling. Results obtained by SiSAR and some first simulated interferometric SAR raw data are shown in the paper.

  5. Interferometry With ENVISAT ASAR Alternating Polarization Mode Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiao; Zeng, Qiming; Liang, Cunren; Cui, Xiai; Jiao, Jian

    2010-10-01

    The Environmental Satellite Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) sensor has been designed to provide enhanced capabilities for interferometric applications [?]. Different types of interferometric products can be obtained by combining the various ASAR modes, most of which are stripmap [image mode (IM)] and ScanSAR [wide swath (WS) mode]. However, the Alternating Polarization [AP mode] has been rarely used for interferometric experiments. This letter deals with the possibility of using AP mode data to produce two kinds of differential interferograms (HH/HH and HH/VV). We propose a complete processing chain of AP mode interferometry and the results are encouraging, of which the specialty of meaning is explained. The data is processed by the newly developed Peking University Multi-mode SAR Interferometry Processing Kit (PUMSIP v1.0), supported by ROI_PAC of JPL/Caltech.

  6. The EnviSAT ASAR Mission: A Look Back At 10 Years Of Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, N.; Rosich, B.; Meadows, P. J.; Haria, K.; Small, D.; Schubert, A.; Lavalle, M.; Collard, F.; Johnsen, H.; Guarnieri, A. Monti; D'Aria, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) on- board Envisat operated successfully for just over 10 years until the failure of Envisat in April 2012. ASAR was ESA's very first deployment of a C-band phased- array antenna, allowing extended imaging capacity in comparison to its ERS SAR predecessors. As such it operated in various acquisition modes - Image (IM), Alternating Polarisation (AP), Wide Swath (WS), Global Monitoring (GM), and Wave (WV). For IM and AP modes there was a selection of 7 swaths with swath width from 100 km to 56 km: IM was single- polarisation, while AP was dual-pol, offering a choice from HH&VV, HH&HV, or VV&VH. WS and GM modes had a total swath width of 405 km based on the combination of 5 sub-swaths. WV acquired imagettes of 10 km by 10 km every 100 km along the satellite track. This paper is a look back to the 10 years of ASAR operations, covering topics such as the ASAR Instrument (characteristics, acquisition modes, product tree and observation scenario), Instrument Calibration and Performance Verification (including instrument stability, internal calibration, external calibration, absolute radiometric calibration, localisation accuracy, absolute geolocation accuracy, performance verification and product calibration), ASAR specific missions (wave and polarimetric), particular ASAR events such as antenna resets, burst synchronisation, AP swath modifications and the Envisat orbit change in October 2010.

  7. Synergy of ASAR and RADARSAT-2 ultra-fine acquisitions for ground deformation monitoring by means of DInSAR and PSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Panagiotis; Briole, Pierre; Sykioti, Olga

    2010-05-01

    consideration the raised seismisity of the area. The Psathopyrgos fault zone as well as the Rion-Patras transfer fault zone are investigated for any detectable ground deformations that could be indications/precursors or inter-seismic accumulation processes before a main event. The city of Patras are investigated for any detectable ground/buildings deformation due to human interventions or geophysical processes. The potential of Rion-Antirion bridge monitoring for any detectable deformation as well as the surrounding ground on the two edges of it, are also investigated and assessed. The study area presents major difficulties for DInSAR/PSI applications, due to its intense vegetation coverage and high topography presenting various facets, varying high slopes and shadowing effects. Moreover its intense topography in conjunction with its location between Aegean and Ionian seas is leading to high precipitation rates and extend cloud coverage. All these characteristics of the study area contribute to high decorrelation of the interferometric products. For the estimation of the ocuured deformations a series of ASAR/ENVISAT (image swath 2) data are processed by means of PSI and DInSAR techniques, but RADARSAT-2 (ultra-fine beam mode) data are processed only by means of DInSAR technique due to its lack of historical data. The processing will be carried out exploiting commercial and in-house software. The medium and high ground resolution added value products of the acquired data are combined in the thematic level.

  8. Advanced digital SAR processing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinson, L. W.; Gaffney, B. P.; Liu, B.; Perry, R. P.; Ruvin, A.

    1982-01-01

    A highly programmable, land based, real time synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processor requiring a processed pixel rate of 2.75 MHz or more in a four look system was designed. Variations in range and azimuth compression, number of looks, range swath, range migration and SR mode were specified. Alternative range and azimuth processing algorithms were examined in conjunction with projected integrated circuit, digital architecture, and software technologies. The advaced digital SAR processor (ADSP) employs an FFT convolver algorithm for both range and azimuth processing in a parallel architecture configuration. Algorithm performace comparisons, design system design, implementation tradeoffs and the results of a supporting survey of integrated circuit and digital architecture technologies are reported. Cost tradeoffs and projections with alternate implementation plans are presented.

  9. Synergistic use of ENVISAT ASAR Global Mode Soil Moisture Products in the Okavango Delta: Runoff & Wetland Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartsch, A.; Doubkova, M.; Pathe, C.; Sabel, D.; Wagner, W.

    2007-12-01

    The Okavango Delta of northern Botswana is a fast-changing system of canals and floodplains which serves as an important wetland habitat. The area of the wetland is highly dependent on local source of precipitation as well as on external inflow from the upper Okavango River. The Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) is an active remote sensing instrument onboard ENVISAT platform operating at C-band. The data from the ASAR Global ScanSAR Mode (GM) have amply demonstrated the ability for inland wetland monitoring as well as for near surface soil moisture derivation. The processing chain for ENVISAT derived soil moisture was setup within the ESA Tiger DUE Innovator project SHARE for hydrometeorological applications in the Southern African Development Community (SADC). The ASAR GM provides up to weekly samples of the Okavango delta with 1 km spatial resolution. The extent of the Okavango Delta wetlands is derived from the ENVISAT ASAR GM data applying threshold of absolute backscatter values. The relations of the wetland size, river discharge, and the relative mean soil moisture in the upper Okavango catchment are studied. Correlation above 0.9 can be observed between the relative mean soil moisture and river discharge. High dependence of the wetland extent on the relative mean soil moisture in the upper Okavango is also clearly evident. With this work we demonstrate that the relative soil moisture derived from the ENVISAT ASAR GM data can be clearly related to the river discharge measurements in subtropic environments. Additionally, we show the ability of ENVISAT ASAR Global Mode to monitor dynamics of wetland areas as a response to the relative soil moisture in the upper Okavango catchment. This allows for prediction of the wetland extent up to six months in advance. An incorporation of spatially improved soil moisture and wetland products may improve prediction models for the wetland region.

  10. Land cover in the Guayas Basin using SAR images from low resolution ASAR Global mode to high resolution Sentinel-1 images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourrel, Luc; Brodu, Nicolas; Frappart, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    Remotely sensed images allow a frequent monitoring of land cover variations at regional and global scale. Recently launched Sentinel-1 satellite offers a global cover of land areas at an unprecedented spatial (20 m) and temporal (6 days at the Equator). We propose here to compare the performances of commonly used supervised classification techniques (i.e., k-nearest neighbors, linear and Gaussian support vector machines, naive Bayes, linear and quadratic discriminant analyzes, adaptative boosting, loggit regression, ridge regression with one-vs-one voting, random forest, extremely randomized trees) for land cover applications in the Guayas Basin, the largest river basin of the Pacific coast of Ecuator (area ~32,000 km²). The reason of this choice is the importance of this region in Ecuatorian economy as its watershed represents 13% of the total area of Ecuador where 40% of the Ecuadorian population lives. It also corresponds to the most productive region of Ecuador for agriculture and aquaculture. Fifty percents of the country shrimp farming production comes from this watershed, and represents with agriculture the largest source of revenue of the country. Similar comparisons are also performed using ENVISAT ASAR images acquired in global mode (1 km of spatial resolution). Accuracy of the results will be achieved using land cover map derived from multi-spectral images.

  11. Mapping Yangtze coastal surface velocities from ASAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Zhou, Y.; Ge, J.

    2013-12-01

    The routine sea surface current velocity measurement is principal and essential for assimilation in ocean circulation models, further for resolving coastal ocean dynamics. The obvious and unique advantages of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems have been successfully demonstrated over variously routine ocean surface phenomena. In this paper, the detailed procedures to derive the sea surface range Doppler velocities are presented from ASAR Wide Swath Mode (WSM) products. Doppler anomaly and Doppler range velocity are analyzed in measurements by three different WSM scenes over Yangtze Estuary. At the meantime, this Doppler centroid method is validated with simulated current fields from the numerical circulation model Finite-Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) and the results are promising. Comparisons to FVCOM data show that ASAR are capable to retrieve large gradient variation of surface velocities and capture quantitative information of strong surface currents, which are immensely attractive for the routine quantitative observation of sea surface currents from the radial Doppler anomaly. Surface Doppler velocity (V_D) from ASAR WSM scene on 31 Jan 2005 with the corresponding simulated surface currents based on FVCOM superimposed. Doppler anomaly RMS bias over land of the scenes

  12. Operational Quality Control of SAR Data under the IDEAS Contract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Emma; Haria, Kajal; Meadowws, Peter; Miranda, Nuno

    2010-12-01

    Operational Quality Control (QC) of ERS-1/2 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), Envisat's Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) and the Phased-Array L-band SAR (PALSAR) on board JAXA's Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) is currently carried out under the Image Data quality Evaluation and Analysis Service (IDEAS). This paper introduces the concept of IDEAS as it applies to SAR QC including the daily and long-term analysis and shows the interaces to related services, including ESA's user-facing Earth Observation (EO) Help Desk

  13. Monitoring of infrastructural sites by means of advanced multi-temporal DInSAR methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollrath, Andreas; Zucca, Francesco; Stramondo, Salvatore

    2013-10-01

    With the launch of Sentinel-1, advanced interferometric measurements will become more applicable then ever. The foreseen standard Wide Area Product (WAP), with its higher spatial and temporal resolution than comparable SAR missions, will provide the basement for the use of new wide scale and multitemporal analysis. By now the use of SAR interferometry methods with respect to risk assessment are mainly conducted for active tectonic zones, plate boundaries, volcanoes as well as urban areas, where local surface movement rates exceed the expected error and enough pixels per area contain a relatively stable phase. This study, in contrast, aims to focus on infrastructural sites that are located outside cities and are therefore surrounded by rural landscapes. The stumbling bock was given by the communication letter by the European Commission with regard to the stress tests of nuclear power plants in Europe in 2012. It is mentioned that continuously re-evaluated risk and safety assessments are necessary to guarantee highest possible security to the European citizens and environment. This is also true for other infrastructural sites, that are prone to diverse geophysical hazards. In combination with GPS and broadband seismology, multitemporal Differential Interferometric SAR approaches demonstrated great potential in contributing valuable information to surface movement phenomenas. At this stage of the project, first results of the Stamps-MTI approach (combined PSInSAR and SBAS) will be presented for the industrial area around Priolo Gargallo in South East Sicily by using ENVISAT ASAR IM mode data from 2003-2010. This area is located between the Malta Escarpment fault system and the Hyblean plateau and is prone to earthquake and tsunami risk. It features a high density of oil refineries that are directly located at the coast. The general potential of these techniques with respect to the SENTINEL-1 mission will be shown for this area and a road-map for further improvements

  14. Recent Advances in Radar Polarimetry and Polarimetric SAR Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boerner, Wolfgang-Martin

    2005-01-01

    The development of Radar Polarimetry and Radar Interferometry is advancing rapidly, and these novel radar technologies are revamping Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging decisively. In this exposition the successive advancements are sketched; beginning with the fundamental formulations and high-lighting the salient points of these diverse remote sensing techniques. Whereas with radar polarimetry the textural fine-structure, target-orientation and shape, symmetries and material constituents can be recovered with considerable improvements above that of standard amplitude-only Polarization Radar ; with radar interferometry the spatial (in depth) structure can be explored. In Polarimetric-Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (POL-IN-SAR) Imaging it is possible to recover such co-registered textural plus spatial properties simultaneously. This includes the extraction of Digital Elevation Maps (DEM) from either fully Polarimetric (scattering matrix) or Interferometric (dual antenna) SAR image data takes with the additional benefit of obtaining co-registered three-dimensional POL-IN-DEM information. Extra-Wide-Band POL-IN-SAR Imaging - when applied to Repeat-Pass Image Overlay Interferometry - provides differential background validation and measurement, stress assessment, and environmental stress-change monitoring capabilities with hitherto unattained accuracy, which are essential tools for improved global biomass estimation. More recently, by applying multiple parallel repeat-pass EWB-POL-D(RP)-IN-SAR imaging along stacked (altitudinal) or displaced (horizontal) flight-lines will result in Tomographic (Multi- Interferometric) Polarimetric SAR Stereo-Imaging , including foliage and ground penetrating capabilities. It is shown that the accelerated advancement of these modern EWB-POL-D(RP)-IN-SAR imaging techniques is of direct relevance and of paramount priority to wide-area dynamic homeland security surveillance and local-to-global environmental ground-truth measurement

  15. Evaluating the value of ENVISAT ASAR Data for the mapping and monitoring of peatland water table depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtold, Michel; Schlaffer, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    The Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) onboard ENVISAT collected C-Band microwave backscatter data from 2005 to 2012. Backscatter in the C-Band depends to a large degree on the roughness and the moisture status of vegetation and soil surface with a penetration depth of ca. 3 cm. In wetlands with stable high water levels, the annual soil surface moisture dynamics are very distinct compared to the surrounding areas, which allows the monitoring of such environments with ASAR data (Reschke et al. 2012). Also in drained peatlands, moisture status of vegetation and soil surface strongly depends on water table depth due to high hydraulic conductivities of many peat soils in the low suction range (Dettmann et al. 2014). We hypothesize that this allows the characterization of water table depths with ASAR data. Here we analyze whether ASAR data can be used for the spatial and temporal estimation of water table depths in different peatlands (natural, near-natural, agriculturally-used and rewetted). Mapping and monitoring of water table depths is of crucial importance, e.g. for upscaling greenhouse gas emissions and evaluating the success of peatland rewetting projects. Here, ASAR data is analyzed with a new map of water table depths for the organic soils in Germany (Bechtold et al. 2014) as well as with a comprehensive data set of monitored peatland water levels from 1100 dip wells and 54 peatlands. ASAR time series from the years 2005-2012 with irregular temporal sampling intervals of 3-14 days were processed. Areas covered by snow were masked. Primary results about the accuracy of spatial estimates show significant correlations between long-term backscatter statistics and spatially-averaged water table depths extracted from the map at the resolution of the ASAR data. Backscatter also correlates with long-term averages of point-scale water table depth data of the monitoring wells. For the latter, correlation is highest between the dry reference backscatter values and

  16. ASAR images a diverse set of deformation patterns at Kilauea volcano, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, Michael P.

    2007-01-01

    Since 2003, 27 independent look angles have been acquired by ENVISAT’s Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) instrument over the island of Hawai`i, allowing for the formation of thousands of interferograms showing deformation of the ground surface. On Kīlauea volcano, a transition from minor to broad-scale summit inflation was observed by interferograms that span 2003 to 2006. In addition, radar interferometry (InSAR) observations of Kīlauea led to the discovery of several previously unknown areas of localized subsidence in the caldera and along the volcano’s east rift zone. These features are probably caused by the cooling and contraction of accumulated lavas. After November 2005, a surface instability near the point that lava entered the ocean on the south flank of Kīlauea was observed in interferograms. The motion is most likely a result of unbuttressing of a portion of the coast following the collapse of a large lava delta in November 2005. InSAR data can also be used to map lava flow development over time, providing ~30 m spatial resolution maps at approximately monthly intervals. Future applications of InSAR to Kīlauea will probably result in more discoveries and insights, both as the style of volcano deformation changes and as data from new instruments are acquired.

  17. A Modular and Configurable Instrument Electronics Architecture for "MiniSAR"- An Advanced Smallsat SAR Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Jaime; Pastena, Max; Bierens, Laurens

    2013-08-01

    MiniSAR is a Dutch program focused on the development of a commercial smallsat featuring a SAR instrument, led by SSBV as prime contractor. In this paper an Instrument Electronics (IEL) system concept to meet the MiniSAR demands is presented. This system has several specificities wrt similar initiatives in the European space industry, driven by our main requirement: keep it small.

  18. Using the MicroASAR on the NASA SIERRA UAS in the Characterization of Arctic Sea Ice Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaugg, Evan; Long, David; Edwards, Matthew; Fladeland, Matthew; Kolyer, Richard; Crocker, Ian; Maslanik, James; Herzfeld, Ute; Wallin, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    The MicroASAR is a flexible, robust SAR system built on the successful legacy of the BYU microSAR. It is a compact LFM-CW SAR system designed for low-power operation on small, manned aircraft or UAS. The NASA SIERRA UAS was designed to test new instruments and support flight experiments. NASA used the MicroASAR on the SIERRA during a science field campaign in 2009 to study sea ice roughness and break-up in the Arctic and high northern latitudes. This mission is known as CASIE-09 (Characterization of Arctic Sea Ice Experiment 2009). This paper describes the MicroASAR and its role flying on the SIERRA UAS platform as part of CASIE-09.

  19. Advanced InSAR Processing in the Footsteps of SqueeSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Even, Markus

    2015-05-01

    Several years ago a promising approach for processing InSAR time series was introduced under the name SqueeSAR [1]. The successful application of this framework poses some delicate questions. This paper focuses on the problem that real data do rarely behave perfectly Gaussian. An augmentation of the stochastic model underlying the phase linking step is presented and the applicability under the assumption of complex elliptically symmetric distribution is discussed. Results from tests with two time series of TerraSAR-X HRS data are presented and preliminary conclusions drawn.

  20. Monitoring of the water-area variations of Lake Dongting in China with ENVISAT ASAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, XianWen; Li, XiaoFeng

    2011-12-01

    As an active microwave remote sensing sensor, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can image the Earth surface with high spatial resolution in both day and night under all weather conditions. In this paper, a digital image processing technique was implemented to extract water area information from SAR images and the result is used to monitor the water area variation of Lake Dongting, the second largest freshwater lake in China. 8-year time series of European Space Agency's ENVISAT ASAR (Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar) images acquired between 2002 and 2009 were obtained and a land-water classification scheme was implemented. Using independent in situ water level data measured at a lake-side hydrologic station during study period, we derived the relationship between water level and water area of Lake Dongting. The results show that, (1) during dry seasons, the water area is 518 km 2 larger than that in the 1990s reported by Yangtze BHYRWRC (Bureau of Hydrology and Yangtze River Water Resources Commission), 2000; (2) the water area of Lake Dongting increased significantly in the 2000s after the Chinese Government's "return land to lake" policy took effect in 1998; (3) the water level of Lake Dongting could be low during a rainy season due to drought; but could be high in a dry season due to discharges from the upstream Three Gorges Dam. In addition, the relationship between water storage change and water area/level change is obtained.

  1. Interferometric processing of C-band SAR data for the improvement of stand age estimation in rubber plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trisasongko, Bambang H.; Paull, David J.; Panuju, Dyah R.

    2015-01-01

    Rubber ranks the second largest plantation in Indonesia after oil palm. While oil palm plantations have been exploited mainly by large companies, many rubber plantations are still managed by peasant farmers who maintain its biodiversity. Due to its broad and scattered location, monitoring tropical rubber plantation is a crucial application of active remote sensing. In this paper, the backscatter coefficient of Envisat Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) is compared to interferometric coherence to study the relationship between stand age and SAR parameters. It is shown that VV polarized C-band SAR achieves its saturation level in plantations aged about 5-10 years. Extension of saturation level can be achieved by processing an interferometric pair of ASAR data, which results in interferometric coherence. In this paper, coherence can take up to 20 years stand age to achieve prior to saturation. Since stand age is highly related to biomass, this finding argues that the biomass can be best estimated using coherence.

  2. Advanced fractal approach for unsupervised classification of SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Triloki; Singh, Dharmendra; Srivastava, Tanuja

    2010-06-01

    Unsupervised classification of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images is the alternative approach when no or minimum apriori information about the image is available. Therefore, an attempt has been made to develop an unsupervised classification scheme for SAR images based on textural information in present paper. For extraction of textural features two properties are used viz. fractal dimension D and Moran's I. Using these indices an algorithm is proposed for contextual classification of SAR images. The novelty of the algorithm is that it implements the textural information available in SAR image with the help of two texture measures viz. D and I. For estimation of D, the Two Dimensional Variation Method (2DVM) has been revised and implemented whose performance is compared with another method, i.e., Triangular Prism Surface Area Method (TPSAM). It is also necessary to check the classification accuracy for various window sizes and optimize the window size for best classification. This exercise has been carried out to know the effect of window size on classification accuracy. The algorithm is applied on four SAR images of Hardwar region, India and classification accuracy has been computed. A comparison of the proposed algorithm using both fractal dimension estimation methods with the K-Means algorithm is discussed. The maximum overall classification accuracy with K-Means comes to be 53.26% whereas overall classification accuracy with proposed algorithm is 66.16% for TPSAM and 61.26% for 2DVM.

  3. SBAS-InSAR analysis of surface deformation at Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casu, F.; Lanari, Riccardo; Sansosti, E.; Solaro, G.; Tizzani, Pietro; Poland, M.; Miklius, Asta

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the deformation of Mauna Loa and K??lauea volcanoes, Hawai'i, by exploiting the advanced differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) technique referred to as the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) algorithm. In particular, we present time series of line-of-sight (LOS) displacements derived from SAR data acquired by the ASAR instrument, on board the ENVISAT satellite, from the ascending (track 93) and descending (track 429) orbits between 2003 and 2008. For each coherent pixel of the radar images we compute time-dependent surface displacements as well as the average LOS deformation rate. Our results quantify, in space and time, the complex deformation of Mauna Loa and K??lauea volcanoes. The derived InSAR measurements are compared to continuous GPS data to asses the quality of the SBAS-InSAR products. ??2009 IEEE.

  4. Spaceborne SAR data for global urban mapping at 30 m resolution using a robust urban extractor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Yifang; Jacob, Alexander; Gamba, Paolo

    2015-05-01

    With more than half of the world population now living in cities and 1.4 billion more people expected to move into cities by 2030, urban areas pose significant challenges on local, regional and global environment. Timely and accurate information on spatial distributions and temporal changes of urban areas are therefore needed to support sustainable development and environmental change research. The objective of this research is to evaluate spaceborne SAR data for improved global urban mapping using a robust processing chain, the KTH-Pavia Urban Extractor. The proposed processing chain includes urban extraction based on spatial indices and Grey Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) textures, an existing method and several improvements i.e., SAR data preprocessing, enhancement, and post-processing. ENVISAT Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) C-VV data at 30 m resolution were selected over 10 global cities and a rural area from six continents to demonstrate the robustness of the improved method. The results show that the KTH-Pavia Urban Extractor is effective in extracting urban areas and small towns from ENVISAT ASAR data and built-up areas can be mapped at 30 m resolution with very good accuracy using only one or two SAR images. These findings indicate that operational global urban mapping is possible with spaceborne SAR data, especially with the launch of Sentinel-1 that provides SAR data with global coverage, operational reliability and quick data delivery.

  5. Atmospheric Phenomena Observed Over The South China Sea By The Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar Onboard the ENVISAT Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpers, Werner; Huang, Weigen; Chan, Pak Wai; Wong, Wai Kin; Cheng, Cho Ming; Mouche, Alexis

    2010-10-01

    Atmospheric phenomena often leave fingerprints on the sea surface, which are detectable by synthetic aperture radar (SAR). Here we present some representative examples of SAR images acquired by the Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) onboard the Envisat satellite over the South China Sea (SCS) which show radar signatures of atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) and of coastal wind fields. On SAR images of the SCS also often radar signatures of oceanic internal waves (OIWs) are visible which have similar spatial scales as the ones originating from AGWs. Therefore we first present criteria how to distinguish between them by analyzing the structure of the radar signatures. Then we present two examples of ASAR images which show radar signatures of AGWs over the SCS. Furthermore, we present a SAR image showing radar signatures of a northerly Winter Monsoon surge event over the coastal area south of Hong Kong and compare it with a cloud image and a weather radar image. From the ASAR image we retrieve the near-surface wind field and compare it with the wind field simulated by the AIR model of the Hong Kong Observatory. The comparison shows that the AIR model can simulate quite well the wind speed as well as the position and shape of the frontal line measured by ASAR.

  6. Advanced InSAR imaging for dune mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havivi, Shiran; August, Yitzhak; Blumberg, Dan G.; Rotman, Stanley R.

    2015-04-01

    Aeolian morphologies are formed in the presence of sufficient wind energy and available particles. These processes occur naturally or are further enhanced or reduced by human intervention. The dimensions of change are dependent primarily on the wind energy and surface properties. Since the 1970's, remote sensing imagery both optical and radar, are used for documentation and interpretation of the geomorphologic changes of sand dunes. Remote sensing studies of Aeolian morphologies is mostly useful to document major changes, yet, subtle changes, occurring in a period of days or months in scales of centimeters, are very difficult to detect in imagery. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is an imaging technique for measuring Earth's surface topography and deformation. InSAR images are produced by measuring the radar phase difference between two separated antennas that view the same surface area. Classical InSAR is based on high coherence between two images or more. The output (interferogram) can show subtle changes with an accuracy of several millimeters to centimeters. Very little work has been done on measuring or identifying the changes in dunes using InSAR. The reason is that dunes tend to be less coherent than firm, stable, surfaces. This research aims to demonstrate how interferometric decorrelation, or, coherence change detection, can be used for identifying dune instability. We hypothesize and demonstrate that the loss of radar coherence over time on dunes can be used as an indication of the dune's instability. When SAR images are acquired at sufficiently close intervals one can measure the time it takes to lose coherence and associate this time with geomorphic stability. To achieve our goals, the Nitzanim coastal dunes along the Mediterranean, 40 km south of Tel-Aviv, Israel, were chosen as a case study. The dunes in this area are of varying levels of stability and vegetation cover and have been monitored meteorologically, geomorphologically and

  7. Advanced SAR simulator with multi-beam interferometric capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reppucci, Antonio; Márquez, José; Cazcarra, Victor; Ruffini, Giulio

    2014-10-01

    State of the art simulations are of great interest when designing a new instrument, studying the imaging mechanisms due to a given scenario or for inversion algorithm design as they allow to analyze and understand the effects of different instrument configurations and targets compositions. In the framework of the studies about a new instruments devoted to the estimation of the ocean surface movements using Synthetic Aperture Radar along-track interferometry (SAR-ATI) an End-to-End simulator has been developed. The simulator, built in a high modular way to allow easy integration of different processing-features, deals with all the basic operations involved in an end to end scenario. This includes the computation of the position and velocity of the platform (airborne/spaceborne) and the geometric parameters defining the SAR scene, the surface definition, the backscattering computation, the atmospheric attenuation, the instrument configuration, and the simulation of the transmission/reception chains and the raw data. In addition, the simulator provides a inSAR processing suit and a sea surface movement retrieval module. Up to four beams (each one composed by a monostatic and a bistatic channel) can be activated. Each channel provides raw data and SLC images with the possibility of choosing between Strip-map and Scansar modes. Moreover, the software offers the possibility of radiometric sensitivity analysis and error analysis due atmospheric disturbances, instrument-noise, interferogram phase-noise, platform velocity and attitude variations. In this paper, the architecture and the capabilities of this simulator will be presented. Meaningful simulation examples will be shown.

  8. COMPUTATIONAL TOXICOLOGY ADVANCES: EMERGING CAPABILITIES FOR DATA EXPLORATION AND SAR MODEL DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational Toxicology Advances: Emerging capabilities for data exploration and SAR model development
    Ann M. Richard and ClarLynda R. Williams, National Health & Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA; email: richard.ann@epa.gov

  9. Comparison of Envisat ASAR and Submarine Sea Ice Thickness Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Nicolas E.; Rodrigues, Joao; Wadhams, Peter

    2010-12-01

    In April 2004 and March 2007 the Royal Navy sent the submarine HMS Tireless on missions into the Arctic Ocean. On both occasions the submarine traversed the area of remaining multi-year sea ice at latitude 85°N north of Greenland acquiring ice draft measurements using upward-looking sonar. The area is outside of the "Gore Box" used for the release of U.S. Submarine data and was beyond the latitude range of the radar altimeter satellites available at that time. This paper compares ice draft statistics with contemporary data from Envisat ASAR to evaluate the level of correlation between SAR backscatter and sea ice thickness. The decline in sea ice volume over the past decade has predominantly been caused by the loss of old multi-year ice due to increased outflow through Fram Strait. Although Tireless found little decrease in the overall ice thickness between 2004 and 2007, the ice rheology was significantly changed with greatly increased quantities of first- and second-year ice in 2007 than had been encountered in 2004. These are evident in changes to the ice draft probability density functions (PDFs) and the ice appearance as seen by the SAR, and presented here.

  10. Operational Application of Envisat ASAR in Tropical Production Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimadoya, M.; Trisasongko, B.

    2003-04-01

    A joint research between European Space Agency (ESA) and Bogor Agricultural University (IPB), Indonesia, has been approved under Envisat AO (AO-ID 869). The research is intended to study the operational application of Advanced Synthetic-Aperture Radar (ASAR) for production forest management in Indonesia. Two test sites in forest plantation area of PT Riau Andalan Pulp and Paper (Riaupulp) in Riau Province, Central Sumatera, Indonesia, have been selected recently for the implementation of this joint research. This paper briefs the recent progress of this two-year research (2002-2004) activity. The main objective is to explore the potential of ASAR image analysis application, including POLINSAR, for better and more efficient operational management of tropical plantation forest and its environment. Several interesting operational applications have been identified for the test sites. First application is vegetative cover classification of Acacias, mixed hardwoods, shrubs, oil palms and bare lands. The second is biomass-related application, which study Envisat data on biomass monitoring related to forest plantation. The third is environmental study particularly for site degradation, including issues on monitoring of water bodies and burn site.

  11. EPOSAR: an innovative service to provide EPOS community with advanced DInSAR products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manunta, Michele; De Luca, Claudio; Elefante, Stefano; Lanari, Riccardo; Pepe, Antonio; Zinno, Ivana; Casu, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    The quantitative evaluation of ground deformation is traditionally based on in-situ surveying techniques that, through the intensive use of GPS stations, automatic total stations and levelling benchmarks, can measure up to sub-centimetre displacements. In the last decades, the extensive use of satellite remote sensing data, such as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images, has represented an important breakthrough in the context of non-invasive ground deformation analyses over large areas, thanks to their large spatial coverage and relatively short revisit time, as well as to their medium-high ground resolution. In such a context, the well-known Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR) technique allows us to map and measure deformation phenomena due to both natural and man-made causes with centimetre to millimetre accuracy. The Earth Science community has a wide interest in the use of DInSAR displacement maps both for crisis management and risk mitigation activities, and for surveillance, monitoring and analysis of geophysical phenomena. In areas characterized by high level of hazards the availability of routinely generated advanced DInSAR products would allow a fast analysis of their current status, providing a near real time monitoring. Similarly, an on-demand service would allow the customization of the products by selecting the area of interest, the SAR data to be processed, and other processing parameters to be set by the users to edit/correct/improve the final products. In this work we discuss the Satellite Data Thematic Core Service of EPOS and we present the EPOSAR service. In particular, the EPOSAR service, based on the well-known DInSAR approach referred to as Small Baseline Subset (SBAS), accomplishes a shared and synergic Earth Observation (EO) service aimed at designing, implementing and harmonizing efficient satellite data processing chains capable of ingesting the significantly increased data stream expected from the ESA Sentinel-1 satellites. EPOSAR

  12. Snow density retrieval using SAR data: algorithm validation and applications in part of North Western Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, P. K.; Garg, R. D.; Aggarwal, S. P.; Garg, P. K.; Snehmani; Shi, J.

    2013-05-01

    The current study has been done using Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data to estimate the dry snow density in Manali sub-basin of Beas River located in state of Himachal Pradesh, India. SAR data from Radarsat-2 (RS2), Environmental Satellite (ENVISAT), Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) and Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS)-Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) have been used. The SAR based inversion models were implemented separately for fully polarimetric RS2, PALSAR and dual polarimetric ASAR Alternate polarization System (APS) datasets in Mathematica and MATLAB software and have been used for finding out dry snow dielectric constant and snow density. Masks for forest, built area, layover and shadow were considered in estimating snow parameters. Overall accuracy in terms of R2 value and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) was calculated as 0.85 and 0.03 g cm-3 for snow density based on the ground truth data. The retrieved snow density is highly useful for snow avalanche and snowmelt runoff modeling related studies of this region.

  13. Evidence of a topographic signal in surface soil moisture derived from ENVISAT ASAR wide swath data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, D. C.; Garcia-Pintado, J.; Cloke, H. L.; Dance, S. L.

    2016-03-01

    The susceptibility of a catchment to flooding is affected by its soil moisture prior to an extreme rainfall event. While soil moisture is routinely observed by satellite instruments, results from previous work on the assimilation of remotely sensed soil moisture into hydrologic models have been mixed. This may have been due in part to the low spatial resolution of the observations used. In this study, the remote sensing aspects of a project attempting to improve flow predictions from a distributed hydrologic model by assimilating soil moisture measurements are described. Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) Wide Swath data were used to measure soil moisture as, unlike low resolution microwave data, they have sufficient resolution to allow soil moisture variations due to local topography to be detected, which may help to take into account the spatial heterogeneity of hydrological processes. Surface soil moisture content (SSMC) was measured over the catchments of the Severn and Avon rivers in the South West UK. To reduce the influence of vegetation, measurements were made only over homogeneous pixels of improved grassland determined from a land cover map. Radar backscatter was corrected for terrain variations and normalized to a common incidence angle. SSMC was calculated using change detection. To search for evidence of a topographic signal, the mean SSMC from improved grassland pixels on low slopes near rivers was compared to that on higher slopes. When the mean SSMC on low slopes was 30-90%, the higher slopes were slightly drier than the low slopes. The effect was reversed for lower SSMC values. It was also more pronounced during a drying event. These findings contribute to the scant information in the literature on the use of high resolution SAR soil moisture measurement to improve hydrologic models.

  14. A joint method to retrieve directional ocean wave spectra from SAR and wave spectrometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Lin; Yang, Jingsong; Zheng, Gang; Wang, Juan

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes a joint method to simultaneously retrieve wave spectra at different scales from spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and wave spectrometer data. The method combines the output from the two different sensors to overcome retrieval limitations that occur in some sea states. The wave spectrometer sensitivity coefficient is estimated using an effective significant wave height (SWH), which is an average of SAR-derived and wave spectrometer-derived SWH. This averaging extends the area of the sea surface sampled by the nadir beam of the wave spectrometer to improve the accuracy of the estimated sensitivity coefficient in inhomogeneous sea states. Wave spectra are then retrieved from SAR data using wave spectrometer-derived spectra as first guess spectra to complement the short waves lost in SAR data retrieval. In addition, the problem of 180° ambiguity in retrieved spectra is overcome using SAR imaginary cross spectra. Simulated data were used to validate the joint method. The simulations demonstrated that retrieved wave parameters, including SWH, peak wave length (PWL), and peak wave direction (PWD), agree well with reference parameters. Collocated data from ENVISAT advanced SAR (ASAR), the airborne wave spectrometer STORM, the PHAROS buoy, and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) were then used to verify the proposed method. Wave parameters retrieved from STORM and two ASAR images were compared to buoy and ECMWF wave data. Most of the retrieved parameters were comparable to reference parameters. The results of this study show that the proposed joint retrieval method could be a valuable complement to traditional methods used to retrieve directional ocean wave spectra, particularly in inhomogeneous sea states.

  15. A joint method to retrieve directional ocean wave spectra from SAR and wave spectrometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Lin; Yang, Jingsong; Zheng, Gang; Wang, Juan

    2015-11-01

    This paper proposes a joint method to simultaneously retrieve wave spectra at different scales from spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and wave spectrometer data. The method combines the output from the two different sensors to overcome retrieval limitations that occur in some sea states. The wave spectrometer sensitivity coefficient is estimated using an effective significant wave height (SWH), which is an average of SAR-derived and wave spectrometer-derived SWH. This averaging extends the area of the sea surface sampled by the nadir beam of the wave spectrometer to improve the accuracy of the estimated sensitivity coefficient in inhomogeneous sea states. Wave spectra are then retrieved from SAR data using wave spectrometer-derived spectra as first guess spectra to complement the short waves lost in SAR data retrieval. In addition, the problem of 180° ambiguity in retrieved spectra is overcome using SAR imaginary cross spectra. Simulated data were used to validate the joint method. The simulations demonstrated that retrieved wave parameters, including SWH, peak wave length (PWL), and peak wave direction (PWD), agree well with reference parameters. Collocated data from ENVISAT advanced SAR (ASAR), the airborne wave spectrometer STORM, the PHAROS buoy, and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) were then used to verify the proposed method. Wave parameters retrieved from STORM and two ASAR images were compared to buoy and ECMWF wave data. Most of the retrieved parameters were comparable to reference parameters. The results of this study show that the proposed joint retrieval method could be a valuable complement to traditional methods used to retrieve directional ocean wave spectra, particularly in inhomogeneous sea states.

  16. Analysis of Envisat Orbit Maintenance Strategies to Improve/Increase Envisat ASAR Interferometry Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuijper, D.; Matatoros, Garcia

    2007-01-01

    The biggest and most advanced Earth Observation Satellite in-orbit, developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) and its member states, is Envisat. It was launched on March 1, 2002 by an Ariane V from French Guyana and holds a total of 10 multi-disciplinary Earth observation instruments, among which an Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR). The ASAR user community requested the Flight Dynamics division of the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) to investigate how the orbit control maintenance strategy for Envisat could be changed to optimize ASAR interferometry opportunities overall and in addition support the International Polar Year 2007/2008 initiative. The Polar Regions play a pivotal role in understanding our planet and our impact on it as they are recognized as sensitive barometers of environmental change. One of the main themes of the International Polar Year 2007/2008 is therefore the study of Earth s changing ice and snow, and its impact on our planet and our lives. Naturally, ESA would like to support this very important initiative. This paper presents the investigations that have been conducted to support these requests in the best possible way. It discusses the orbit maintenance strategy that has been in place since its launch, ensuring the actual orbit to be within 1 km of a so-called reference orbit, and presents the new orbit maintenance strategy that is aimed at improving/increasing the opportunities for Envisat ASAR interferometry, while preserving the fuel on board the spacecraft. The hydrazine on-board Envisat happens to be a precious resource as only approximately 300 kg of it was available at launch, like ERS-2. The difference being however that the mass of Envisat is approximately 3.2 times that of ERS-2.

  17. Object-oriented approach to oil spill detection using ENVISAT ASAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konik, M.; Bradtke, K.

    2016-08-01

    The growing importance of oil spill detection as part of a rapid response system to oil pollution requires the ongoing development of algorithms. The aim of this study was to create a methodology for improving manual classification at the scale of entire water bodies, focusing on its repeatability. This paper took an object-oriented approach to radar image analysis and put particular emphasis on adaptation to the specificity of seas like the Baltic. Pre-processing using optimised filters enhanced the capability of a multilevel hierarchical segmentation, in order to detect spills of different sizes, forms and homogeneity, which occur as a result of shipping activities. Confirmed spills detected in ENVISAT/ASAR images were used to create a decision-tree procedure that classifies every distinct dark object visible in SAR images into one out of four categories, which reflect growing probability of the oil spill presence: look-alikes, dubious spots, blurred spots and potential oil spills. Our objective was to properly mark known spills on ASAR scenes and to reduce the number of false-positives by eliminating (classifying as background or look-alike) as many objects as possible from the vast initial number of objects appearing on full-scale images. A number of aspects were taken into account in the classification process. The method's performance was tested on a group of 26 oil spills recorded by HELCOM: 96.15% of them were successfully identified. The final target group was narrowed down to about 4% of dark objects extracted from ASAR images. Although a specialist is still needed to supervise the whole process of oil spill detection, this method gives an initial view, substantial for further evaluation of the scenes and risk estimation. It may significantly accelerate the pace of manual image analysis and enhance the objectivity of assessments, which are key aspects in operational monitoring systems.

  18. Flood detection from multi-temporal SAR data using harmonic analysis and change detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlaffer, Stefan; Matgen, Patrick; Hollaus, Markus; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    Flood mapping from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data has attracted considerable attention in recent years. Most available algorithms typically focus on single-image techniques which do not take into account the backscatter signature of a land surface under non-flooded conditions. In this study, harmonic analysis of a multi-temporal time series of >500 ENVISAT Advanced SAR (ASAR) scenes with a spatial resolution of 150 m was used to characterise the seasonality in backscatter under non-flooded conditions. Pixels which were inundated during a large-scale flood event during the summer 2007 floods of the River Severn (United Kingdom) showed strong deviations from normal seasonal behaviour as inferred from the harmonic model. The residuals were classified by means of an automatic threshold optimisation algorithm after masking out areas which are unlikely to be flooded using a topography-derived index. The results were validated against a reference dataset derived from high-resolution airborne imagery. For the water class, accuracies > 80% were found for non-urban land uses. A slight underestimation of the reference flood extent can be seen, mostly due to the lower spatial resolution of the ASAR imagery. Finally, an outlook for the proposed algorithm is given in the light of the Sentinel-1 mission.

  19. Spaceborne SAR Imaging Algorithm for Coherence Optimized

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhiwei; Yue, Jianping; Wang, Xueqin; Yue, Shun

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes SAR imaging algorithm with largest coherence based on the existing SAR imaging algorithm. The basic idea of SAR imaging algorithm in imaging processing is that output signal can have maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by using the optimal imaging parameters. Traditional imaging algorithm can acquire the best focusing effect, but would bring the decoherence phenomenon in subsequent interference process. Algorithm proposed in this paper is that SAR echo adopts consistent imaging parameters in focusing processing. Although the SNR of the output signal is reduced slightly, their coherence is ensured greatly, and finally the interferogram with high quality is obtained. In this paper, two scenes of Envisat ASAR data in Zhangbei are employed to conduct experiment for this algorithm. Compared with the interferogram from the traditional algorithm, the results show that this algorithm is more suitable for SAR interferometry (InSAR) research and application. PMID:26871446

  20. Object-Based Fusion of Envisat ASAR and HJ-1 Multispectral Images for Urban Landcover Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Tuong-Thuy; Ban, Yifang

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the synergy of ESA ENVISAT ASAR data and the Chinese HJ-1 multispectral data for urban land cover mapping in Beijing, China. A newly developed fusion approach is applied to map a complex urban area, which consists of both old and new built-up areas, using ENVISAT ASAR data acquired on 31 July 2008 and HJ-1B multispectral imagery acquired on 12 May 2009. First, radar and optical images are classified and segmented separately with scale-space analysis in integration with shape analysis, hybrid pixel/object based unsupervised classification and histogram intersection technique. Second, based on a set of predefined rules, extracted objects from the first step will be fused to produce the final classified map. The developed fusion method is fully automatic with less user interaction and would be a suitable tool for operational uses if satisfactory accuracy could be achieved. Future research is planned to improve the algorithm performance with addition of multi-temporal SAR data.

  1. Advanced DInSAR analysis at Campi Flegrei and Vesuvius, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiampo, K. F.; Camacho, A. G.; Fernandez, J.; Gonzalez, P. J.; Samsonov, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    Geodetic data, the spatial and temporal surface expression of complex geophysical processes in the earth, is being acquired today at unprecedented rates and accuracies. Differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (DInSAR) is a satellite remote sensing technique used extensively today for mapping ground deformation with high spatial resolution and sub-centimeter precision over large areas that is particularly useful for volcanic monitoring [Massonnet and Feigl, 1998; Rosen et al., 2000]. Here we apply the advanced Multidimensional Small Baseline Subset (MSBAS) InSAR algorithm [Samsonov and d'Oreye, 2012] to several thousand Envisat and RADARSAT-2 images from 1993-2013 and compute time series of ground deformation over the Naples Bay region of Italy. Vesuvius and Campi Flegrei are located in this area in close proximity to the densely populated city of Naples and, as a result, it is one of the most hazardous volcanic areas in the world. We obtain time series of ground deformation at high spatial and temporal resolution that span, for the first time, twenty years. Campi Flegrei underwent continuous subsidence through 1999. Uplift began in 2005, reaching approximately 13 cm by 2013. We model the observed deformation to determine source parameters for subsidence and uplift epochs [Samsonov et al., 2014]. In addition, a typical DInSAR image can contain significant signals from with several different, nonvolcanic sources. For example, we clearly observe decade-long elevation-dependent seasonal oscillations of the vertical displacement component at Vesuvius that are substantially larger than the long-term deformation rate (<0.6 cm/yr). As a result, we employ an eigenpattern decomposition technique known as Karhunen-Loeve expansion (KLE) analysis in order to identify the unique, finite set of correlated deformation patterns associated with volcanic sources at different depths [Tiampo et al., 2004; Tiampo et al., 2012]. Both the inflation and deflation mechanisms

  2. Coherence-based land cover classification in forested areas of Chattisgarh, Central India, using environmental satellite--advanced synthetic aperture radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizalapur, Vyjayanthi; Madugundu, Rangaswamy; Jha, Chandra Shekhar

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, the potential of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometric coherence in land cover classification is studied over forested areas of Bilaspur, Chattisgarh, India using Environmental Satellite--Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ENVISAT-ASAR) C-band data. Single look complex (SLC) interferometric pair ASAR data of 24th September 2006 (SLC-1) and 29th October 2006 (SLC-2) covering the study area were acquired and processed to generate backscatter and interferometric coherence images. A false colored composite of coherence, backscatter difference, and mean backscatter was generated and subjected to maximum likelihood classification to delineate major land cover classes of the study area viz., water, barren, agriculture, moist deciduous forest, and sal mixed forests. Accuracy assessment of the classified map is carried out using kappa statistics. Results of the study suggested potential use of ENVISAT-ASAR C-band data in land cover classification of the study area with an overall classification accuracy of 82.5%, average producer's accuracy of 83.69%, and average user's accuracy of 81%. The present study gives a unique scope of SAR data application in land cover classification over the tropical deciduous forest systems of India, which is still waiting for its indigenous SAR system.

  3. Evaluation of Filters for Envisat Asar Speckle Suppression in Pasture Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Ge, L.; Li, X.

    2012-07-01

    In order to quantify real time pasture biomass from SAR image, regression model between ground measurements of biomass and ENVISAT ASAR backscattering coefficient should be built up. An important prerequisite of valid and accurate regression model is accurate grass backscattering coefficient which, however, cannot be obtained when there is speckle. Speckle noise is the best known problem of SAR images because of the coherent nature of radar illumination imaging system. This study aims to choose better adaptive filter from NEST software to reduce speckle noise in homogeneous pasture area, with little regard to linear feature (e.g. edge between pasture and forest) or point feature (e.g. pond, tree) preservation. This paper presents the speckle suppression result of ENVISAT ASAR VV/VH images in pasture of Western Australia (WA) using four built-in adaptive filters of the NEST software: Frost, Gamma Map, Lee, and Refined Lee filter. Two indices are usually used for evaluation of speckle suppression ability: ENL (Equivalent Number of Looks) and SSI (Speckle Suppression Index). These two, however, are not reliable because sometimes they overestimate mean value. Therefore, apart from ENL and SSI, the authors also used a new index SMPI (Speckle Suppression and Mean Preservation Index). It was found that, Lee filter with window size 7×7 and Frost filter (damping factor = 2) with window size 5×5 gave the best performance for VV and VH polarization, respectively. The filtering, together with radiometric calibration and terrain correction, paves the way to extraction of accurate backscattering coefficient of grass in homogeneous pasture area in WA.

  4. Feature Analysis of Ocean Waves in North Central Pacific Ocean Based ASAR Wave Spectral Data and Wave Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jichao; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Jungang; Meng, Junmin

    2013-01-01

    Directional Spectrum of the ocean waves could be obtained form Envisat advanced synthetic aperture radar (ASAR) wave spectral data. The wave model WAVEWATCH III (WW3) is applied to simulate the ocean wave field. Study area is 185°E-215°E and 15°N-30°N, time range is from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2008. Based on ASAR and buoy data, the wave numerical simulation and assimilation of the north central Pacific Ocean is carried out. The validation and assessment of ASAR ocean wave spectra products is performed. The optimal interpolation (OI) algorithm is used in model WW3 for assimilating ASAR wave spectra data. Based on the result of the simulation and assimilation, mean waves direction (MWD), significant wave height (SWH) and mean wave period (MWP) are analysed. SWH and MWP are larger in winter and SWH reach to more than 2.5 meters. Seasonal change of SWH and MWP are significant.

  5. New perspectives and advanced approaches on effectively processing Big InSAR data: from long term ERS archives to new Sentinel-1 massive data flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casu, Francesco; De Luca, Claudio; Elefante, Stefano; Lanari, Riccardo; Manunta, Michele; Zinno, Ivana

    2015-04-01

    Advanced differential Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Interferometry (InSAR) usually identifies a set of algorithms, tools and methodologies for the generation of Earth's surface deformation maps and time series computed from a sequence of multi-temporal differential SAR interferograms. Such techniques found their success on the large availability of SAR data archives acquired over time by several satellite systems. Indeed, the current radar Earth Observation (EO) scenario takes advantage of the widely diffused long-term C-band ESA (e.g. ERS-1, ERS-2 and ENVISAT) and Canadian (RADARSAT-1/2) SAR data archives, which have been acquired during the last 20 years, as well as of data sequences provided by the X-band generation SAR sensors, such as the COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) and TerraSAR-X (TSX) constellations. Moreover, a massive and ever increasing data flow will be further supplied by the recently launched (April 2014) Copernicus (European Union) SENTINEL-1A SAR satellite, which will also be paired during 2016 with the SENTINEL-1B twin system that will allow halving the constellation revisit time (from 12 to 6 days). In this context, the massive exploitation of these Big InSAR Data archives for the generation of advanced products will open new research perspectives to understand Earth's surface deformation dynamics at global scale. However, to reach this ambitious goal, Big InSAR Data has to be effectively exploited to generate accurate advanced products in short time frames. Therefore the need of new InSAR processing approaches, efficient algorithms and high performance computing facilities represents the basis for fully benefiting from such a Big Data. In this work we first present the recently proposed Parallel Small BAseline Subset (P-SBAS) InSAR algorithm that has been designed to process big volumes of InSAR data in short times and unsupervised manner by exploiting High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities. Then, we show how the P-SBAS approach is well suitable for

  6. A new Persistent Scatterer InSAR method based on phase decomposition, with application to subsidence in greater Houston area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, N.; Lee, H.; Jung, H. C.

    2014-12-01

    A Phase-Decomposition-based Persistent Scatterer InSAR (PD-PSInSAR) method is developed in this study to improve the coherence and spatial density of targets. The general idea of conventional PSInSAR is to find and analyze pointwise stable persistent scatterers (PS). In order to improve the PS network density, distributed scatterers (DS) has also been utilized in several advanced PSInSAR techniques. Unlike these techniques which assumes that a DS involves many independent small scatterers sharing the same scatterering mechanism, this study considers additional two general cases: (1) a DS that contains many small scatterers sharing two or more different scatterering mechanisms, (2) two or more dominant scatterers with different scatterering mechanisms that exist within the same resolution pixel. DSs with multiple scatterering mechanisms can occur in rural areas and some urban areas, especially with low spatial resolution. Extracting information from DSs with multiple scatterering mechanisms is difficult for the existing DS algorithms because of the interference between different scatterering mechanisms. The new PD-PSInSAR method is developed to overcome this limit by using Eigen-decomposition to estimate the phases corresponding to the different scatterering mechanisms, and then implement these estimated phases in conventional PSInSAR process. Therefore, the interference between different scatterering mechanisms becomes mitigated and the obtained phases are expected to have better coherence. This PD-PSInSAR technique is used to estimate the land deformation over the greater Houston area using 25 ENVISAT ASAR data spanning from July 2004 to June 2010. The deformation map reveals significant subsidence up to approximately 2 cm/year over north and northwestern part of greater Houston. Comparison between the conventional PSInSAR and PD-PSInSAR method verifies that the proposed method can detect more PSs and provide better coherences.

  7. Surface Soil Moisture Assimilation From ASAR Imagery for Root Zone Moisture Predictions at Basin Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caschili, A.; Montaldo, N.; Mancini, M.; Albertson, J. D.; Botti, P.; Dessena, M. A.; Carboni, E.

    2003-12-01

    The state of the root-zone soil moisture is a key variable controlling surface water and energy balances. Emerging efforts in data assimilation seek to guide land surface models (LSMs) with periodic observations of surface soil moisture. Montaldo et al. (Water Resour. Res., 2001) and Montaldo and Albertson (Adv. Water Resour., 2003) developed an operational multi-scale assimilation system for robust root zone soil moisture predictions at the local scale. The assimilation scheme, developed for a force-restore method based LSM, updates the measured surface soil moisture, the root zone soil water content and the soil hydraulic conductivity, in a manner that compensates for both inaccurate initial conditions and model parameter estimates. In this presentation we describe the development and testing of an operational assimilation system for robust root-zone soil moisture predictions at the basin scale. High resolution data of the new ASAR (advanced synthetic aperture radar) sensor aboard European Space Agency's Envisat satellite offers the opportunity for monitoring surface soil moisture at high resolution (up to 30 m), which is suitable for distributed mapping within the small scales of typical Mediterranean basins. Indeed, adequate spatio-temporal monitoring of the soil moisture is essential to improve our capability to simulate the water balance. As part of a recently-approved European Space Agency (ESA) Envisat AO project, ASAR-based soil moisture mapping of the Mulargia basin (area of about 65 sq.km), sub-basin of the Flumendosa basin in Sardinia, are available . This semi-arid basin has a key role in the water resources management of Sardinia. Semi-arid regions, such as Sardinia island, suffers from water scarcity, which is increasingly due to the broad desertification processes of the Mediterranean area. Within the basin, land surface fluxes are well monitored through two evapotraspiration measurement systems (one eddy correlation technique based station, and one

  8. Analysis of ASAR Wide Swath Mode time series for the retrieval of soil moisture in mountainous areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greifeneder, Felix; Notarnicola, Claudia; Cuozzo, Giovanni; Spindler, Nadine; Bertoldi, Giacomo; Della Chiesa, Stefano; Niedrist, Georg; Stamenkovic, Jelena; Wagner, Wolgang

    2014-05-01

    Soil moisture is a key element in the global cycles of water, energy, and carbon. Knowledge on the spatial and temporal distribution of the soil moisture content (SMC) is therefore essential for a number of hydrological applications as well as earth sciences like meteorology or climatology (Heathman et al., 2003). In the last few years there has been an increasing interest towards the estimation of SMC at local scales using active microwave sensors (Barret et al., 2009). Compared to passive microwave sensors, SAR offers the potential to provide data at high spatial resolution (modern sensors can acquire images with up to approximately 1 m), which is particularly important in mountainous areas. So far, these areas have been considered only marginally in research and only pioneer studies can be found in the literature (Brocca et al., 2012; Bertoldi et al. 2013). In this work we analyzed the temporal and spatial dynamics of the surface SMC (0 - 5 cm depth) on the basis of ground data collected by fixed meteorological stations located in the emerging Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site Mazia Valley (Province of Bolzano, South Tyrol, Italy), SAR data from ENVISATs ASAR sensor, wide swath (WS) mode (acquired between 2005 and 2012), and SMC estimates from the hydrological model GEOtop (Endrizzi et al., 2013). The SMC retrieval process was based on the support vector regression (SVR) method introduced by Pasolli et al. (2011). The training of the algorithm was based on data acquired in 2010. Furthermore, the SAR backscatter and derived SMC have been compared with time-series derived from the distributed hydrological model GEOtop. The differences in terms of temporal and spatial dynamic have been analyzed. The main goal of this work is to evaluate the spatial and temporal patterns of SAR derived SMC at field scale and to correlate them with ground information. This is a preparatory study to establish a methodology for the retrieval of SMC with high spatial and

  9. Active landslides detection at regional scale: comparing multitemporal InSAR with "handmade" inventories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derron, Marc-Henri; Michoud, Clément; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Runne Lauknes, Tom

    2013-04-01

    Advanced multitemporal differential SAR interferometry has proved to be able to detect unexpected active landslides in areas difficult to access. That makes this technique very useful to complete inventories. But that does not mean that applying A-DInSAR is a sufficient tool to build an inventory. Some A-DInSAR results have been compared in areas where independent landslides inventories exists, in Norway (J. Dehls at the Geological Survey of Norway) and Italy (A. Tamburini, TRE Milano). Roughly, depending on the surface cover, geomorphology and images availability, from 0 to 50% of the already known landslides can be detected with A-DInSAR results. We are testing a similar approach in Switzerland, in the county of Vaud where two landslides inventories are available (DUTI 1985, Jaboyedoff 2009). A set of 24 Envisat ASAR images (single frame/ single track) have been processed with PS-INSAR and SBAS techniques. Because of the large variety of surface cover (urban, forested, rocky) and morphology (plane and mountainous areas), both techniques provides very different results depending on local conditions.

  10. Timely Low Resolution SAR Imagery To Support Floodplain Modelling: a Case Study Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Baldassarre, Giuliano; Schumann, Guy; Brandimarte, Luigia; Bates, Paul

    2011-05-01

    It is widely recognised that remote sensing can support flood monitoring, modelling and management. In particular, satellites carrying Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensors are valuable as radar wavelengths can penetrate cloud cover and are insensitive to daylight. However, given the strong inverse relationship between spatial resolution and revisit time, monitoring floods from space in near real time is currently only possible through low resolution (about 100 m pixel size) SAR imagery. For instance, ENVISAT-ASAR (Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar) in WSM (wide swath mode) revisit times are of the order of 3 days and the data can be obtained within 24 h at no (or low) cost. Hence, this type of space-borne data can be used for monitoring major floods on medium-to-large rivers. This paper aims to discuss the potential for, and uncertainties of, coarse resolution SAR imagery to monitor floods and support hydraulic modelling. The paper first describes the potential of globally and freely available space-borne data to support flood inundation modelling in near real time. Then, the uncertainty of SAR-derived flood extent maps is discussed and the need to move from deterministic binary maps (wet/dry) of flood extent to uncertain flood inundation maps is highlighted.

  11. Change detection of polarimetric SAR images based on the KummerU Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Quan; Zou, Pengfei; Li, Zhen; Zhang, Ping

    2014-11-01

    In the society of PolSAR image segmentation, change detection and classification, the classical Wishart distribution has been used for a long time, but it especially suit to low-resolution SAR image, because in traditional sensors, only a small number of scatterers are present in each resolution cell. With the improving of SAR systems these years, the classical statistical models can therefore be reconsidered for high resolution and polarimetric information contained in the images acquired by these advanced systems. In this study, SAR image segmentation algorithm based on level-set method, added with distance regularized level-set evolution (DRLSE) is performed using Envisat/ASAR single-polarization data and Radarsat-2 polarimetric images, respectively. KummerU heterogeneous clutter model is used in the later to overcome the homogeneous hypothesis at high resolution cell. An enhanced distance regularized level-set evolution (DRLSE-E) is also applied in the later, to ensure accurate computation and stable level-set evolution. Finally, change detection based on four polarimetric Radarsat-2 time series images is carried out at Genhe area of Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, NorthEastern of China, where a heavy flood disaster occurred during the summer of 2013, result shows the recommend segmentation method can detect the change of watershed effectively.

  12. A User-Oriented Methodology for DInSAR Time Series Analysis and Interpretation: Landslides and Subsidence Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notti, Davide; Calò, Fabiana; Cigna, Francesca; Manunta, Michele; Herrera, Gerardo; Berti, Matteo; Meisina, Claudia; Tapete, Deodato; Zucca, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    Recent advances in multi-temporal Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Interferometry (DInSAR) have greatly improved our capability to monitor geological processes. Ground motion studies using DInSAR require both the availability of good quality input data and rigorous approaches to exploit the retrieved Time Series (TS) at their full potential. In this work we present a methodology for DInSAR TS analysis, with particular focus on landslides and subsidence phenomena. The proposed methodology consists of three main steps: (1) pre-processing, i.e., assessment of a SAR Dataset Quality Index (SDQI) (2) post-processing, i.e., application of empirical/stochastic methods to improve the TS quality, and (3) trend analysis, i.e., comparative implementation of methodologies for automatic TS analysis. Tests were carried out on TS datasets retrieved from processing of SAR imagery acquired by different radar sensors (i.e., ERS-1/2 SAR, RADARSAT-1, ENVISAT ASAR, ALOS PALSAR, TerraSAR-X, COSMO-SkyMed) using advanced DInSAR techniques (i.e., SqueeSAR™, PSInSAR™, SPN and SBAS). The obtained values of SDQI are discussed against the technical parameters of each data stack (e.g., radar band, number of SAR scenes, temporal coverage, revisiting time), the retrieved coverage of the DInSAR results, and the constraints related to the characterization of the investigated geological processes. Empirical and stochastic approaches were used to demonstrate how the quality of the TS can be improved after the SAR processing, and examples are discussed to mitigate phase unwrapping errors, and remove regional trends, noise and anomalies. Performance assessment of recently developed methods of trend analysis (i.e., PS-Time, Deviation Index and velocity TS) was conducted on two selected study areas in Northern Italy affected by land subsidence and landslides. Results show that the automatic detection of motion trends enhances the interpretation of DInSAR data, since it provides an objective

  13. Assessing sinkhole activity in the Ebro Valley mantled evaporite karst using advanced DInSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galve, Jorge Pedro; Castañeda, Carmen; Gutiérrez, Francisco; Herrera, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Sinkholes in karst areas may cause subsidence damage in transportation infrastructures, demolition of buildings and even the loss of human lives when they occur in a catastrophic way. Differential Interferometry (DInSAR) is a promising technology for detecting and characterizing sinkholes, as well as for reducing the associated risk when combined with other sources of data such as a sinkhole inventory. In this work, the usefulness of InSAR techniques and data for sinkhole risk management has been analyzed through the comparison of three DInSAR-derived velocity maps with a comprehensive sinkhole inventory in the Ebro Valley, NE Spain. The DInSAR maps have contributed to improve the sinkhole inventory in different ways: (1) detection of non-inventoried sinkholes; (2) revision of sinkhole areas previously classified as inactive as active; and (3) refinement of underestimated sinkhole boundaries. The obtained results suggest that DInSAR products are suitable for analyzing active dissolution-induced subsidence. The application of these techniques may help in recognizing and better characterizing previously unknown karst subsidence problems and in preventing personal and property losses. However, the analysis reveals that the available DInSAR maps combined overlook about 70% of the previously mapped active sinkholes mainly due to decorrelation.

  14. Recent Advances in Highly Accurate Range Measurements with TerraSAR-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eineder, Michael; Balss, Ulrich; Gisinger, Christoph; Cong, Xiao Ying; Brcic, Ramon; Steigenberger, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Earth surface displacement measurement from space using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery is an interesting alternative to SAR interferometry (InSAR). The advantages are that 2D information can be retrieved (InSAR only 1D), absolute displacements can be retrieved (no reference point required) and it is very robust (phase unwrapping not required). On the other hand, the accuracy is limited by the pixel resolution, the object contrast, the orbit accuracy, by wave propagation distortion and by geodetic effects. Therefore the accuracy was more in the meter / decimeter level in the past, compared to millimeter accuracy of InSAR. During the recent years our team established a test and validation site at the geodetic observatory Wettzell, Germany and developed compensation methods to reduce the overall error of absolute range measurements from decimeters to only one centimeter. The methods include correction of dry and wet atmospheric delays, ionospheric corrections, solid earth tides, continental drift, atmospheric pressure loading and ocean tidal loading. For more one year a radar reflector was monitored and each image evaluated. Our presentation gives and overview of methods and achieved results. Futhermore, examples of real world applications and an outlook on more applications is given such as phase unwrapping augmentation.

  15. Study of Discrimination Between Plantation and Dense Scrub Based on Backscattering Behavior of C Band SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyyappan, M.; Ramakrishnan, S. S.; Srinivasa Raju, K.

    2014-11-01

    The study about on landuse and landcover classification using multi polarization and multi temporal C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data of recently launched multi-mode of RISAT-1 (Radar Imaging Satellite) by Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) and European satellite, Envisat ASAR data. The backscattering coefficient were extracted for various land features from Cband SAR data. The training sample collecting from satellite optical imagery of study and field visit for verification. The training samples are used for the supervised classification technique of maximum Likelihood (ML) algorithms, Neural Network (NN) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) algorithms were applied for fourteen different polarizations combination of multi temporal and multiple polarizations. The previous study was carried only four band combination of RISAT 1 data, the continuation of work both SAR data were used in this study. The Classification results are verified with confusion matrix. The pixel based classification gives the good results in the dual polarization of CRS - HH and HV of RISAT -1 compared to dual polarization Envisat ASAR data. Meanwhile the quad Polarization combination of Envisat ASAR data got better classification accuracy. The SVM classifiers has given better classification results for all band combination followed by ML and NN. The Scrub are better identified in EnviSat ASAR - VV & VH Polarization and Plantation are better identified in EnviSat ASAR - HH, HH-HV & HV Polarization. The classification accuracy of both Scrub and Plantation is about 80 % in EnviSat ASAR - HH, VH & VV Polarization combination.

  16. SAR Product Control Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meadows, P. J.; Hounam, D.; Rye, A. J.; Rosich, B.; Börner, T.; Closa, J.; Schättler, B.; Smith, P. J.; Zink, M.

    2003-03-01

    As SAR instruments and their operating modes become more complex, as new applications place more and more demands on image quality and as our understanding of their imperfections becomes more sophisticated, there is increasing recognition that SAR data quality has to be controlled more completely to keep pace. The SAR product CONtrol software (SARCON) is a comprehensive SAR product control software suite tailored to the latest generation of SAR sensors. SARCON profits from the most up-to-date thinking on SAR image performance derived from other spaceborne and airborne SAR projects and is based on the newest applications. This paper gives an overview of the structure and the features of this new software tool, which is a product of a co-operation between teams at BAE SYSTEMS Advanced Technology Centre and DLR under contract to ESA (ESRIN). Work on SARCON began in 1999 and is continuing.

  17. Rice-planted area extraction by time series analysis of ENVISAT ASAR WS data using a phenology-based classification approach: A case study for Red River Delta, Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, D.; Wagner, W.; Naeimi, V.; Cao, S.

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have shown the potential of Synthetic Aperture Radars (SAR) for mapping of rice fields and some other vegetation types. For rice field classification, conventional classification techniques have been mostly used including manual threshold-based and supervised classification approaches. The challenge of the threshold-based approach is to find acceptable thresholds to be used for each individual SAR scene. Furthermore, the influence of local incidence angle on backscatter hinders using a single threshold for the entire scene. Similarly, the supervised classification approach requires different training samples for different output classes. In case of rice crop, supervised classification using temporal data requires different training datasets to perform classification procedure which might lead to inconsistent mapping results. In this study we present an automatic method to identify rice crop areas by extracting phonological parameters after performing an empirical regression-based normalization of the backscatter to a reference incidence angle. The method is evaluated in the Red River Delta (RRD), Vietnam using the time series of ENVISAT Advanced SAR (ASAR) Wide Swath (WS) mode data. The results of rice mapping algorithm compared to the reference data indicate the Completeness (User accuracy), Correctness (Producer accuracy) and Quality (Overall accuracies) of 88.8%, 92.5 % and 83.9 % respectively. The total area of the classified rice fields corresponds to the total rice cultivation areas given by the official statistics in Vietnam (R2  0.96). The results indicates that applying a phenology-based classification approach using backscatter time series in optimal incidence angle normalization can achieve high classification accuracies. In addition, the method is not only useful for large scale early mapping of rice fields in the Red River Delta using the current and future C-band Sentinal-1A&B backscatter data but also might be applied for other rice

  18. Advanced Unsupervised Classification Methods to Detect Anomalies on Earthen Levees Using Polarimetric SAR Imagery.

    PubMed

    Marapareddy, Ramakalavathi; Aanstoos, James V; Younan, Nicolas H

    2016-01-01

    Fully polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (polSAR) data analysis has wide applications for terrain and ground cover classification. The dynamics of surface and subsurface water events can lead to slope instability resulting in slough slides on earthen levees. Early detection of these anomalies by a remote sensing approach could save time versus direct assessment. We used L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to screen levees for anomalies. SAR technology, due to its high spatial resolution and soil penetration capability, is a good choice for identifying problematic areas on earthen levees. Using the parameters entropy (H), anisotropy (A), alpha (α), and eigenvalues (λ, λ₁, λ₂, and λ₃), we implemented several unsupervised classification algorithms for the identification of anomalies on the levee. The classification techniques applied are H/α, H/A, A/α, Wishart H/α, Wishart H/A/α, and H/α/λ classification algorithms. In this work, the effectiveness of the algorithms was demonstrated using quad-polarimetric L-band SAR imagery from the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL's) Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR). The study area is a section of the lower Mississippi River valley in the Southern USA, where earthen flood control levees are maintained by the US Army Corps of Engineers. PMID:27322270

  19. Advances in Digital Calibration Techniques Enabling Real-Time Beamforming SweepSAR Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, James P.; Perkovic, Dragana; Ghaemi, Hirad; Horst, Stephen; Shaffer, Scott; Veilleux, Louise

    2013-01-01

    Real-time digital beamforming, combined with lightweight, large aperture reflectors, enable SweepSAR architectures, which promise significant increases in instrument capability for solid earth and biomass remote sensing. These new instrument concepts require new methods for calibrating the multiple channels, which are combined on-board, in real-time. The benefit of this effort is that it enables a new class of lightweight radar architecture, Digital Beamforming with SweepSAR, providing significantly larger swath coverage than conventional SAR architectures for reduced mass and cost. This paper will review the on-going development of the digital calibration architecture for digital beamforming radar instrument, such as the proposed Earth Radar Mission's DESDynI (Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice) instrument. This proposed instrument's baseline design employs SweepSAR digital beamforming and requires digital calibration. We will review the overall concepts and status of the system architecture, algorithm development, and the digital calibration testbed currently being developed. We will present results from a preliminary hardware demonstration. We will also discuss the challenges and opportunities specific to this novel architecture.

  20. Advanced Unsupervised Classification Methods to Detect Anomalies on Earthen Levees Using Polarimetric SAR Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Marapareddy, Ramakalavathi; Aanstoos, James V.; Younan, Nicolas H.

    2016-01-01

    Fully polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (polSAR) data analysis has wide applications for terrain and ground cover classification. The dynamics of surface and subsurface water events can lead to slope instability resulting in slough slides on earthen levees. Early detection of these anomalies by a remote sensing approach could save time versus direct assessment. We used L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to screen levees for anomalies. SAR technology, due to its high spatial resolution and soil penetration capability, is a good choice for identifying problematic areas on earthen levees. Using the parameters entropy (H), anisotropy (A), alpha (α), and eigenvalues (λ, λ1, λ2, and λ3), we implemented several unsupervised classification algorithms for the identification of anomalies on the levee. The classification techniques applied are H/α, H/A, A/α, Wishart H/α, Wishart H/A/α, and H/α/λ classification algorithms. In this work, the effectiveness of the algorithms was demonstrated using quad-polarimetric L-band SAR imagery from the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s (JPL’s) Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR). The study area is a section of the lower Mississippi River valley in the Southern USA, where earthen flood control levees are maintained by the US Army Corps of Engineers. PMID:27322270

  1. Study strong wind events with erosional effect at coastal areas in Southern Italy comparing SAR vs METMAST vs High Resolution Mesoscale Model Output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calaudi, Rosamaria; Avolio, Elenio; Gullì, Daniel; Lo Feudo, Teresa; Calidonna, Claudia

    2015-04-01

    This study focus on evaluating the use of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) together with experimental data, and output of High Resolution Mesoscale Model for evaluation of coastal erosional effect in Southern Mediterranean areas, where spatial wind information is only provided by sparse buoys, often with long periods of missing data. Since in Mediterranean seas there are limited offshore experimental data, we have performed a qualitative analysis of satellite observations comparing SAR with the available experimental data from the Calabrian Regional Environmental Protection Agency (Functional Multirisk Center) for the case study of Lamezia Terme for the period of 2011-2012. Wind climate for the coastal waters off South Italy were made based on images from March 2002 to April 2012 of the Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) onboard the ENVISAT satellite. Wind speed fields were derived from the SAR images using the Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) software APL/NOAA SAR Wind Retrieval System (ANSWRS version 2.0) with the geophysical model function CMOD5.N. Mean wind speed and energy density were estimated using the Weibull distribution function. This new technique is seen as a supplement to classical wind sampling and modelling efforts, not as a stand-alone alternative. Some evidence on test cases of wind storm, in the considered region, will be described regarding some events happened in winter 2011-2012 comparing data from SAR, Metmast and Output of High Resolution Mesoscale Model.

  2. Monitoring duration and extent of storm-surge and flooding in Western Coastal Louisiana marshes with Envisat ASAR data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsey, E.; Lu, Zhiming; Suzuoki, Y.; Rangoonwala, A.; Werle, D.

    2011-01-01

    Inundation maps of coastal marshes in western Louisiana were created with multitemporal Envisat Advanced Synthetic Aperture (ASAR) scenes collected before and during the three months after Hurricane Rita landfall in September 2005. Corroborated by inland water-levels, 7 days after landfall, 48% of coastal estuarine and palustrine marshes remained inundated by storm-surge waters. Forty-five days after landfall, storm-surge inundated 20% of those marshes. The end of the storm-surge flooding was marked by an abrupt decrease in water levels following the passage of a storm front and persistent offshore winds. A complementary dramatic decrease in flood extent was confirmed by an ASAR-derived inundation map. In nonimpounded marshes at elevations 80cm during the first month after Rita landfall. After this initial period, drainage from marshes-especially impounded marshes-was hastened by the onset of offshore winds. Following the abrupt drops in inland water levels and flood extent, rainfall events coinciding with increased water levels were recorded as inundation re-expansion. This postsurge flooding decreased until only isolated impounded and palustrine marshes remained inundated. Changing flood extents were correlated to inland water levels and largely occurred within the same marsh regions. Trends related to incremental threshold increases used in the ASAR change-detection analyses seemed related to the preceding hydraulic and hydrologic events, and VV and HH threshold differences supported their relationship to the overall wetland hydraulic condition. ?? 2010 IEEE.

  3. Advanced InSAR techniques for the management and characterization of geothermal resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellotti, F.; Falorni, G.; Morgan, J.; Rucci, A.; Ferretti, A.

    2012-04-01

    InSAR is a remote sensing tool that has applications in both geothermal exploitation and in the management of producing fields. The technique has developed rapidly in recent years and the most evolved algorithms, now capable of providing precise ground movement measurements with unprecedented spatial density over large areas, allow the monitoring of the effects of fluid injection and extraction on surface deformation and the detection of active faults. Multi-interferogram approaches have been used at several geothermal sites in different stages of development. SqueeSAR™, which represents the latest breakthrough in InSAR technology, provides a significant increase in the spatial density of measurement points by exploiting signal returns from both point-like and distributed scatterers. Furthermore, recent satellite radar sensors have a higher spatial resolution (down to 1 m), as well as a higher temporal frequency of image acquisitions (down to a few days). The coupling of the new algorithm with this new generation of satellites provides a valuable tool for monitoring the different phases of geothermal production and in support of the decision making process. Some examples from the US are presented here: the first case study involves the use of InSAR within a suite of tools for exploration of the San Emidio geothermal field in Nevada. This project aimed to develop geophysical techniques to identify and map large aperture fractures for the placement of new production/exploration wells. The second and third examples examine two zones in California: the Salton Sea area, where multi-interferogram InSAR provided an overview of surface deformation at a producing geothermal reservoir. Surface deformation in this area was complex, and the added detail provided insight into the interplay of tectonics and production activities. Additional InSAR studies have also been carried out at the Geysers field in order to evaluate the behavior of an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) in

  4. Advanced Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Imaging Radar (InSAR) for Dune Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havivi, Shiran; Amir, Doron; Schvartzman, Ilan; August, Yitzhak; Mamman, Shimrit; Rotman, Stanely R.; Blumberg, Dan G.

    2016-04-01

    Aeolian morphologies are formed in the presence of sufficient wind energy and available lose particles. These processes occur naturally or are further enhanced or reduced by human intervention. The dimensions of change are dependent primarily on the wind energy and surface properties. Since the 1970s, remote sensing imagery, both optical and radar, have been used for documentation and interpretation of the geomorphologic changes of sand dunes. Remote sensing studies of aeolian morphologies is mostly useful to document major changes, yet, subtle changes, occurring in a period of days or months in scales of centimeters, are very difficult to detect in imagery. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is an imaging technique for measuring Earth's surface topography and deformation. InSAR images are produced by measuring the radar phase difference between two separated antennas that view the same surface area. Classical InSAR is based on high coherence between two or more images. The output (interferogram) can show subtle changes with an accuracy of several millimeters to centimeters. Very little work has been done on measuring or identifying the changes in dunes using InSAR methods. The reason is that dunes tend to be less coherent than firm, stable, surfaces. This work aims to demonstrate how interferometric decorrelation can be used for identifying dune instability. We hypothesize and demonstrate that the loss of radar coherence over time on dunes can be used as an indication of the dune's instability. When SAR images are acquired at sufficiently close intervals one can measure the time it takes to lose coherence and associate this time with geomorphic stability. To achieve our goals, the coherence change detection method was used, in order to identify dune stability or instability and the dune activity level. The Nitzanim-Ashdod coastal dunes along the Mediterranean, 40 km south of Tel-Aviv, Israel, were chosen as a case study. The dunes in this area are of

  5. On the progress of the nano-satellite SAR based mission TOPMEX-9 and specification of potential applications advancing the Earth Observation Programme of the Mexican Space Agency.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Gutiérrez-Nava, Antonio; Ponce, Octavio; Vicente-Vivas, Esaú; Pacheco, Enrique

    2013-04-01

    TOPMEX-9 is put forward in this paper, advancing a mission for the Earth Observation Programme of the Mexican Space Agency, a distributed Micro-SAR concept within a Master and Slaves flight formation. International collaboration is essential and a start project is being developed between the Microwaves and Radar Institute of the German Aerospace Centre (DLR), the Mexican Space Agency (AEM). While the basic idea is making use of the transmitting component of a SAR on a microsatellite and the receiving component on a nano-satellites cluster, only a brief illustration is given here. The objective of this work is mainly to present some SAR characteristics and the most important potential applications. Special attention is given to the capabilities and limitations of SAR systems to properly detect ocean surface waves. We do take into account the nonlinear nature of the ocean surface imaging porcesses, mainly based upon the SAR and the waves characteristics, and certainly considering the K band SAR being proposed. Some other ocean applications are also overview, regarding coastal erosion-deposition estimation, as well as ship detection and monitoring. International co-operation is also addressed as an essential component of TOPMEX-9 Mission. This work represents a DOT Project (CONACYT-SRE 186144) contribution.

  6. How operational Advanced-DInSAR Analysis can improve knowledge on natural and anthropogenic deformations for Nuclear Power Plant areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollrath, Andreas; Zucca, Francesco; Stramondo, Salvatore; Bignami, Christian; Roeder, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    The application of Advanced Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (A-DINSAR) techniques has strongly emerged in the last two decades and became an important part in georelated fields. State-of-the-art A-DInSAR methods, such as Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) or the Small BASeline (SBAS) approach have demonstrated their usefulness in monitoring urban areas and single buildings, up to critical infrastructures. Combined with additional data from GPS networks or levelling, it could prove its large potential for an operational, cost-effective mapping of surface deformations. Given a reasonable amount of images, changes in surface deformation can be detected down to 1 mm/y. Compared to point-wise field measurements it offers a spatially consistent mapping approach from local to regional scales. In this review we want to provide a synopsis how A-DInSAR can be utilized in the framework of Nuclear Power Plant safety. Indeed, A-DInSAR is able to provide a detailed spatial analysis of slow movements occurring at NPP structures directly, as well as within the surrounding areas of the NPPs. Different phenomena of surface motion can be subject of such a monitoring. Natural causes, like active tectonics and terrain instability of slope which lead to landslides, as well as human-induced subsidence phenomena due to heavy construction or water pumping can be detected. We start by presenting techniques to determine the feasibility of the analysis for a given area and show its limitations. Then we propose a short insight into state-of-the-art studies where landslides, interseismic and human-induced deformation of the surface were mapped by A-DInSAR, to point out the relevance of a consequent analysis over an area of a NPP. Furthermore we present results of case studies from international projects (TERRAFIRMA) as well as preliminary results from the Krsko NPP in Slovenia. Finally, we provide a outlook into present and future trends concerning the use of freely

  7. Statistical information of ASAR observations over wetland areas: An interaction model interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grings, F.; Salvia, M.; Karszenbaum, H.; Ferrazzoli, P.; Perna, P.; Barber, M.; Jacobo Berlles, J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained after studying the relation between the statistical parameters that describe the backscattering distribution of junco marshes and their biophysical variables. The results are based on the texture analysis of a time series of Envisat ASAR C-band data (APP mode, V V +HH polarizations) acquired between October 2003 and January 2005 over the Lower Paraná River Delta, Argentina. The image power distributions were analyzed, and we show that the K distribution provides a good fitting of SAR data extracted from wetland observations for both polarizations. We also show that the estimated values of the order parameter of the K distribution can be explained using fieldwork and reasonable assumptions. In order to explore these results, we introduce a radiative transfer based interaction model to simulate the junco marsh σ0 distribution. After analyzing model simulations, we found evidence that the order parameter is related to the junco plant density distribution inside the junco marsh patch. It is concluded that the order parameter of the K distribution could be a useful parameter to estimate the junco plant density. This result is important for basin hydrodynamic modeling, since marsh plant density is the most important parameter to estimate marsh water conductance.

  8. A time series deformation estimation in the NW Himalayas using SBAS InSAR technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, V.; Venkataraman, G.

    2012-12-01

    A time series land deformation studies in north western Himalayan region has been presented in this study. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry (InSAR) is an important tool for measuring the land displacement caused by different geological processes [1]. Frequent spatial and temporal decorrelation in the Himalayan region is a strong impediment in precise deformation estimation using conventional interferometric SAR approach. In such cases, advanced DInSAR approaches PSInSAR as well as Small base line subset (SBAS) can be used to estimate earth surface deformation. The SBAS technique [2] is a DInSAR approach which uses a twelve or more number of repeat SAR acquisitions in different combinations of a properly chosen data (subsets) for generation of DInSAR interferograms using two pass interferometric approach. Finally it leads to the generation of mean deformation velocity maps and displacement time series. Herein, SBAS algorithm has been used for time series deformation estimation in the NW Himalayan region. ENVISAT ASAR IS2 swath data from 2003 to 2008 have been used for quantifying slow deformation. Himalayan region is a very active tectonic belt and active orogeny play a significant role in land deformation process [3]. Geomorphology in the region is unique and reacts to the climate change adversely bringing with land slides and subsidence. Settlements on the hill slopes are prone to land slides, landslips, rockslides and soil creep. These hazardous features have hampered the over all progress of the region as they obstruct the roads and flow of traffic, break communication, block flowing water in stream and create temporary reservoirs and also bring down lot of soil cover and thus add enormous silt and gravel to the streams. It has been observed that average deformation varies from -30.0 mm/year to 10 mm/year in the NW Himalayan region . References [1] Massonnet, D., Feigl, K.L.,Rossi, M. and Adragna, F. (1994) Radar interferometry mapping of

  9. Applications Of EnviSAT SAR For The Identification Of Seasonally Flooded Areas In Archaeological Semi-Arid Contexts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conesa, C. F.; Devanthery, N.; Balbo, A.; Madella, M.; Rondelli, B.

    2013-12-01

    This work explores the potential of amplitude information from advanced ENVISAT ASAR C-band data for understanding surface and near-surface water dynamics in the semi-arid archaeological landscape of North Gujarat (India). Research is done within the framework of an explorative Earth Observation project (ESA) proposal between the North Gujarat Archaeological Project (NoGAP) and the Active Remote Sensing Unit from the Institute of Geomatics. The amplitude component of multi-temporal ASAR Single Look Complex (SLC) images from pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon seasons have been used. The mean extent of floodable areas has been estimated by comparing the mean amplitude of seasonal periods. The integration of SAR data and geoarchaeological data has provided new insights to understand present-day landscape dynamics affecting archaeological preservation and visibility. Furthermore, preliminary results suggest a good correlation between Mid- Holocene settlement patterns and the distribution and extension of seasonal floodable areas, opening interesting inroads to study settlement distribution and resource availability in past socio-ecological systems in semi-arid areas.

  10. Recent advances and plans in processing and geocoding of SAR data at the DFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noack, W.

    1993-01-01

    Because of the needs of future projects like ENVISAT and the experiences made with the current operational ERS-1 facilities, a radical change in the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processing scenarios can be predicted for the next years. At the German PAF several new developments were initialized which are driven mainly either by user needs or by system and operational constraints ('lessons learned'). At the end there will be a major simplification and uniformation of all used computer systems. Especially the following changes are likely to be implemented at the German PAF: transcription before archiving, processing of all standard products with high throughput directly at the receiving stations, processing of special 'high-valued' products at the PAF, usage of a single type of processor hardware, implementation of a large and fast on-line data archive, and improved and unified fast data network between the processing and archiving facilities. A short description of the current operational SAR facilities as well as the future implementations are given.

  11. Polarimetric Measurements Over the Sea-Surface with the Airborne STORM Radar in the Context of the Geophysical Validation of the ENVISAT ASAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podvin, D. Hauser. T.; Dechambre, M.; Valentin, R.; Caudal, G.; Daloze, J.-F.; Mouche, A.

    2003-04-01

    Among the new specificities of the ENVISAT/ASAR particular polarization diversity make the instrument very promising, but require complementary studies in addition to those already completed with the ERS data. Moreover, in the context of the preparation of other missions which will embark polarimetric SAR (e.g. RADARSAT2) it is important to better assess the benefit of multi-polarization or polarimetric SAR systems. In particular, over the ocean the question remains open regarding the estimate of wind speed, directional spectra of surface ocean waves and maybe other parameters related to wave breaking. CETP has designed and developed a new airborne radar called STORM], which has a full polarimetric capability. STORM is a new-version of the RESSAC airborne radar already used in previous experiments (Hauser et al, JGR 1992). STORM is a real-aperture, C-Band system with a FM/CW transmission and with a rotating antenna to explore in azimuth. In addition to RESSAC (which was mono-polarized) it offers a polarization diversity (receiving simultaneously in H and V polarizations) which enables us to analyze the radar cross- section in HH, VV, HV, and other cross-polarized terms related to the scattering matrix. In the context of the validation of the ASAR wave mode of ENVISAT, a field experiment will be carried out in October and November 2002 over the ocean (offshore the coasts of Brittany, France), with STORM] embarked on the MERLIN-IV aircraft of Meteo-France. We intend to perform about 20 flights under the ENVISAT SAR swath during a one-month experiment, with overpasses over a directional wave buoy also equipped with wind measurements. The ASAR image mode (in HH or VV) or alternating polarization mode will be requested during these flights. STORM will be used in a mode which will permit to measure the full complex scattering matrix over the sea surface at incidence angles ranging from 10 to 35°. In addition to conventional analysis of the radar cross-sections in HH

  12. VOLInSAR-PF, the InSAR Volcano Observatory Service at Piton de la Fournaise Volcano (La Reunion Island).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froger, Jean-Luc; Cayol, Valérie; Augier, Aurélien; Souriot, Thierry

    2010-05-01

    Since 2003, we carry out a systematic InSAR survey of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano, Reunion Island, in the framework of an AO-ENVISAT project. Since 2005 this activity gets the status of Observatory Service of the Observatoire de Physique du Globe de Clermont-Ferrand (OPGC). From 375 ASAR images acquired between 2003 and 2010, we have produced more than 2100 interferograms that allowed us to map the deformations related to 21 eruptions and thus to better understand the internal processes acting during each eruption. In the same time, we have developed an automatic procedure to provide full resolution interferograms, trough a dedicated WEB site, to the Volcano Observatory of Piton de la Fournaise (OVPF), and our other partners, within a few hours after receiving the ASAR images. In this way, our work is a first step toward an operational system of InSAR monitoring of volcanic activity. Since the beginning of 2010, the VOLInSAR-PF database is also open to the entire community, trough an anonymous login that gives access to slightly reduced resolution interferograms. We will present the VOLInSAR-PF database, the main results it provides concerning the way Piton de la Fournaise is deforming, and the main perspectives for monitoring provided by the new InSAR data (PALSAR-ALOS, TerraSAR-X, RADARSAT-2, COSMO-Skymed) we are beginning to integrate in the database.

  13. InSAR Detection of Ground Deformation in Megalopolises of Pearl River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qing

    Megalopolises in the Pearl River Delta, including Guangzhou and Hong Kong, have experienced various degree of ground subsidence. The causes can be divided into two categories: natural subsidence and the human-induced subsidence. Monitoring the ground subsidence can not only help people to find out the distributions in both spatial and temporal fields, but also guide people to minimize the hazard ahead. Thus, it is significant to monitor the ground subsidence accurately, timely and frequently. This dissertation research uses the Environmental Satellite Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ENVISAT ASAR) data received at the Chinese University of Hong Kong Satellite Remote Sensing Receiving Station and SAR Interferometry (InSAR) technology as a powerful tool for large-scale ground deformation monitoring in Guangzhou and Hong Kong areas. Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) method is used to detect ground deformation in the urban area of Guangzhou city. A ground deformation rate map with scattered distribution of point targets shows the maximum subsidence (rise) rate as high as -26 to -20 mma-1 (16-21 mma-1 ), implying that the study area is an active zone for ground deformation. Based on the point target map, a contour ground deformation rate map is generated. All the six ground collapse accidents that occurred in 2007-2008 fall within the subsidence zones, qualitatively validating the IPTA results. Ground subsidence and geological conditions on Datansha Island are examined. The results indicate that the local geological conditions and underground engineering projects are responsible for ground subsidence and ground collapse accidents occurred there. To interpret the distribution of active ground subsidence zones, a local geological map is used as a reference for generating a series of thematic maps. The results show that geological faults, rock distribution, over-development, and underground engineering projects may be four factors leading to the distribution of

  14. Long-term deformation analysis of historical buildings through the advanced SBAS-DInSAR technique: the case study of the city of Rome, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeni, G.; Bonano, M.; Casu, F.; Manunta, M.; Manzo, M.; Marsella, M.; Pepe, A.; Lanari, R.

    2011-09-01

    Monitoring of deformation phenomena affecting urban areas and man-made structures is of key relevance for the preservation of the artistic, archaeological and architectural heritage. The differential SAR interferometry (DInSAR) technique has already been demonstrated to be an effective tool for non-invasive deformation analyses over large areas by producing spatially dense deformation maps with centimetre to millimetre accuracy. Moreover, by exploiting long sequences of SAR data acquired by different sensors, the advanced DInSAR technique referred to as the small baseline subset (SBAS) approach allows providing long-term deformation time series, which are strategic for guaranteeing the monitoring of urban area displacements. In this work, we investigate the effectiveness of the two-scale multi-sensor SBAS-DInSAR approach to detect and monitor displacements affecting historical and artistic monuments. The presented results, achieved by applying the full resolution SBAS technique to a huge set of ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT data, spanning the 1992-2010 time interval and relevant to the city of Rome (Italy), show the capability of this approach to detect and analyse the temporal evolution of possible deformation phenomena affecting historical buildings and archaeological sites. Accordingly, our analysis demonstrates the effectiveness of the full resolution multi-sensor SBAS approach to operate as a surface deformation tool for supporting the study and conservation strategies of the historical, cultural and artistic heritage.

  15. Long term volcano monitoring by using advanced Persistent Scatterer SAR Interferometry technique: A case study at Unimak Island, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, W.; Meyer, F. J.; Freymueller, J. T.; Lu, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Unimak Island, the largest island in the eastern Aleutians of Alaska, is home to three major active volcanoes: Shishaldin, Fisher, and Westdahl. Shishaldin and Westdahl erupted within the past 2 decades and Fisher has shown persistent hydrothermal activity (Mann and Freymueller, 2003). Therefore, Unimak Island is of particular interest to geoscientists. Surface deformation on Unimak Island has been studied in several previous efforts. Lu et al. (2000, 2003) applied conventional InSAR techniques to study surface inflation at Westdahl during 1991 and 2000. Mann and Freymueller (2003) used GPS measurements to analyze inflation at Westdahl and subsidence at Fisher during 1998-2001. Moran et al., ( 2006) reported that Shishaldin, the most active volcano in the island , experienced no significant deformation during the 1993 to 2003 period bracketing two eruptions. In this paper, we present deformation measurements at Unimak Islank during 2003-2010 using advanced persistent scatterer InSAR (PSI). Due to the non-urban setting in a subarctic environment and the limited data acquisition, the number of images usable for PSI processing is limited to about 1-3 acquisitions per year. The relatively smaller image stack and the irregular acquisition distribution in time pose challenges in the PSI time-series processing. Therefore, we have developed a modified PSI technique that integrates external atmospheric information from numerical weather predication models to assist in the removal of atmospheric artifacts [1]. Deformation modeling based on PSI results will be also presented. Our new results will be combined with previous findings to address the magma plumbing system at Unimak Island. 1) W. Gong, F. J. Meyer (2012): Optimized filter design for irregular acquired data stack in Persistent Scatterers Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry, Proceeding of Geosciences and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS), 2012 IEEE International, Munich, Germany.

  16. Analysis of ASAR Wide Swath Mode time series for the retrieval of soil moisture in mountainous areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greifeneder, Felix; Notarnicola, Claudia; Cuozzo, Giovanni; Spindler, Nadine; Bertoldi, Giacomo; Della Chiesa, Stefano; Niedrist, Georg; Stamenkovic, Jelena; Wagner, Wolgang

    2014-05-01

    Soil moisture is a key element in the global cycles of water, energy, and carbon. Knowledge on the spatial and temporal distribution of the soil moisture content (SMC) is therefore essential for a number of hydrological applications as well as earth sciences like meteorology or climatology (Heathman et al., 2003). In the last few years there has been an increasing interest towards the estimation of SMC at local scales using active microwave sensors (Barret et al., 2009). Compared to passive microwave sensors, SAR offers the potential to provide data at high spatial resolution (modern sensors can acquire images with up to approximately 1 m), which is particularly important in mountainous areas. So far, these areas have been considered only marginally in research and only pioneer studies can be found in the literature (Brocca et al., 2012; Bertoldi et al. 2013). In this work we analyzed the temporal and spatial dynamics of the surface SMC (0 - 5 cm depth) on the basis of ground data collected by fixed meteorological stations located in the emerging Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site Mazia Valley (Province of Bolzano, South Tyrol, Italy), SAR data from ENVISATs ASAR sensor, wide swath (WS) mode (acquired between 2005 and 2012), and SMC estimates from the hydrological model GEOtop (Endrizzi et al., 2013). The SMC retrieval process was based on the support vector regression (SVR) method introduced by Pasolli et al. (2011). The training of the algorithm was based on data acquired in 2010. Furthermore, the SAR backscatter and derived SMC have been compared with time-series derived from the distributed hydrological model GEOtop. The differences in terms of temporal and spatial dynamic have been analyzed. The main goal of this work is to evaluate the spatial and temporal patterns of SAR derived SMC at field scale and to correlate them with ground information. This is a preparatory study to establish a methodology for the retrieval of SMC with high spatial and

  17. Advanced Algorithms and High-Performance Testbed for Large-Scale Site Characterization and Subsurface Target Detecting Using Airborne Ground Penetrating SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Collier, James B.; Citak, Ari

    1997-01-01

    A team of US Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District and Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville, let Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Stanford Research Institute (SRI), and Montgomery Watson is currently in the process of planning and conducting the largest ever survey at the Former Buckley Field (60,000 acres), in Colorado, by using SRI airborne, ground penetrating, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). The purpose of this survey is the detection of surface and subsurface Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) and in a broader sense the site characterization for identification of contaminated as well as clear areas. In preparation for such a large-scale survey, JPL has been developing advanced algorithms and a high-performance restbed for processing of massive amount of expected SAR data from this site. Two key requirements of this project are the accuracy (in terms of UXO detection) and speed of SAR data processing. The first key feature of this testbed is a large degree of automation and a minimum degree of the need for human perception in the processing to achieve an acceptable processing rate of several hundred acres per day. For accurate UXO detection, novel algorithms have been developed and implemented. These algorithms analyze dual polarized (HH and VV) SAR data. They are based on the correlation of HH and VV SAR data and involve a rather large set of parameters for accurate detection of UXO. For each specific site, this set of parameters can be optimized by using ground truth data (i.e., known surface and subsurface UXOs). In this paper, we discuss these algorithms and their successful application for detection of surface and subsurface anti-tank mines by using a data set from Yuma proving Ground, A7, acquired by SRI SAR.

  18. Advanced algorithms and high-performance testbed for large-scale site characterization and subsurface target detection using airborne ground-penetrating SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fijany, Amir; Collier, James B.; Citak, Ari

    1999-08-01

    A team of US Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District and Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville, JPL, Stanford Research Institute (SRI), and Montgomery Watson is currently in the process of planning and conducting the largest ever survey at the Former Buckley Field, in Colorado, by using SRI airborne, ground penetrating, SAR. The purpose of this survey is the detection of surface and subsurface Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) and in a broader sense the site characterization for identification of contaminated as well as clear areas. In preparation for such a large-scale survey, JPL has been developing advanced algorithms and a high-performance testbed for processing of massive amount of expected SAR data from this site. Two key requirements of this project are the accuracy and speed of SAR data processing. The first key feature of this testbed is a large degree of automation and maximum degree of the need for human perception in the processing to achieve an acceptable processing rate of several hundred acres per day. For accuracy UXO detection, novel algorithms have been developed and implemented. These algorithms analyze dual polarized SAR data. They are based on the correlation of HH and VV SAR data and involve a rather large set of parameters for accurate detection of UXO. For each specific site, this set of parameters can be optimized by using ground truth data. In this paper, we discuss these algorithms and their successful application for detection of surface and subsurface anti-tank mines by using a data set from Yuma Proving Ground, AZ, acquired by SRI SAR.

  19. Biomass estimation of wetland vegetation in Poyang Lake area using ENVISAT advanced synthetic aperture radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jingjuan; Shen, Guozhuang; Dong, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Biomass estimation of wetlands plays a role in understanding dynamic changes of the wetland ecosystem. Poyang Lake is the largest freshwater lake in China, with an area of about 3000 km2. The lake's wetland ecosystem has a significant impact on leveraging China's environmental change. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data are a good choice for biomass estimation during rainy and dry seasons in this region. In this paper, we discuss the neural network algorithms (NNAs) to retrieve wetland biomass using the alternating-polarization ENVISAT advanced synthetic aperture radar (ASAR) data. Two field measurements were carried out coinciding with the satellite overpasses through the hydrological cycle in April to November. A radiative transfer model of forest canopy, the Michigan Microwave Canopy Scattering (MIMICS) model, was modified to fit to herbaceous wetland ecosystems. With both ASAR and MIMICS simulations as input data, the NNA-estimated biomass was validated with ground-measured data. This study indicates the capability of NNA combined with a modified MIMICS model to retrieve wetland biomass from SAR imagery. Finally, the overall biomass of Poyang Lake wetland vegetation has been estimated. It reached a level of 1.09×109, 1.86×108, and 9.87×108 kg in April, July, and November 2007, respectively.

  20. One year after the Abruzzo 2009 earthquake: pre-, co- and post-seismic surface deformation investigation through advanced InSAR analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanari, Riccardo

    2010-05-01

    On 6 April 2009, at 01:33 UTC, a magnitude (Mw) 6.3 earthquake struck central Italy, partially destroying L'Aquila, several surrounding villages, and causing hundreds of casualties. Immediately, the Italian Civil Protection and the scientific community started the work to mitigate the effects and analyze the causes of the natural catastrophe. At the same time almost all the existing spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems imaged the L'Aquila area revealing, through InSAR analyses, the undeniable scar produced by the seismic event on the Earth's surface. Moreover, some of these sensors continued to image the area affected by the seismic displacements, including the advanced SAR sensors of the COSMO/Skymed constellation of the Italian Space Agency (ASI). We present in this study the results achieved by the InSAR group of the IREA-CNR institute, through an extended InSAR-based analysis carried out on the displacements of the area affected by the seismic event. We show first the results achieved by applying the Differential SAR Interferometry (InSAR) algorithm referred to as Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) technique (Berardino et al., 2002) to analyze the temporal evolution of the detected displacements retrieved through the data acquired, from ascending and descending orbits, by the C-band ENVISAT sensor of the European Space Agency (ESA) starting from 2002. This permitted us to investigate possible long term pre-seismic phenomena and provided several co-seismic deformation maps; the latter have been combined with the homologous co-seismic deformation maps retrieved by processing InSAR data pairs acquired by X-band (COSMO/Skymed and TERRASAR-X) and L-band (ALOS-PALSAR) SAR sensors. These co-seismic displacements have been jointly inverted in order to provide insights on the deformation source. The final results are focused on the exploitation of COSMO/SkyMed data acquired on both right ascending and descending orbits. The ascending dataset is composed by 32

  1. Soil moisture monitoring over a semiarid region using Envisat ASAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amriche, Atef A. E.; Guerfi, Mokhtar

    2012-09-01

    Soil moisture (SM) is of fundamental importance to many agricultural, hydrological and climate studies. In this paper, a simple approach for mapping near-surface SM from Envisat ASAR data was developed. Four high-resolution images covering a semiarid region in Algeria were acquired with the same sensor configuration. We performed the pretreatment using the Basic Envisat SAR Toolbox of the European Space Agency. Then, we extracted the backscattering coefficient σ0 (dB) from the filtered and calibrated images. On the other hand, five training sites with different soil physical properties and vegetation cover were selected for monitoring SM. The field campaigns were conducted concurrent to satellite image acquisitions to measure soil water content in the top five centimeters using the gravimetric method. The study of linear regressions associated to the change detection approach allowed the expression of the backscattering coefficient as a function of volumetric soil moisture (σ0 = a*θ + b). The coefficients "a" and "b" of the equation slightly differ from one site to another and also from one season to the next. This difference is mainly due to the effects of surface roughness and vegetation biomass variations. Our study confirms a good agreement between the volumetric nearsurface SM and the radar backscattering coefficient for all the test fields. The comparison between measured and estimated SM proves the accuracy of the inversion models used here with a mean average error of less than 5%. At the end, high resolution maps of soil moisture distribution were obtained from the acquired radar images.

  2. An operational soil moisture product from ENVISAT ASAR GM for Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubkova, M.; Bartsch, A.; Sabel, D.; Wagner, W.

    2009-04-01

    Soil moisture is a key element in the global cycles of water, energy and carbon and belongs to the Essential Climate Variables defined by the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS). Soil moisture represents a switch that controls the proportion of rainfall that percolates, runs off, or evaporates from land. Its quantitative representation can bring further improvement in hydrological monitoring and modelling. Since 1970's the microwave technology dominated the soil moisture retrieval. A variety of coarse resolution datasets became available from active and passive microwave systems (ERS-1/2, METOP ASCAT or AMSR-E) and the potential of these datasets for improvement in hydrological, climatological, and vegetation studies has been amply demonstrated. To address the needs of the hydrological community for medium resolution soil moisture dataset an approach developed at the TU WIEN for the coarse resolution ERS/METOP datasets has been transferred to medium resolution SAR data. This work was performed within the ESA Tiger Innovator project SHARE. The used sensor is the ENVISAR ASAR. Its Global Mode with 1 km spatial resolution provides frequent data coverage which allows for detection of the highly variable soil moisture patterns. The original product is available for the region of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) since June 2007 and is regularly updated (www.ipf.tuwien.ac.at/radar/share). In June 2008 a similar service has been implemented for the entire Australian continent with exception of Tasmania. The new dataset provides twice weekly measurements for 92% of the continent leaving the reminding regions with at least 1 acquisition a week. The datasets also allow for downscaling of the coarser resolution datasets (ERS, ASCAT) for operational applications.

  3. Subway Subsidence Monitoring and Analysis in Beijing through Envisat-Asar and Terrasar-X DATA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, G.; Gong, H.; Chen, B.; Li, X.

    2014-12-01

    Subway plays a significant role in public transport in Beijing, China. The safe operation of such underground rail transports are serious threatened by ground subsidence that mainly caused by groundwater over-exploitation. It is necessary to carry out a continuous observation and analysis of the surface deformation along the newly built rails. The paper mainly studied four subways which were built in different periods(see attachment). Envisat-ASAR and Terrasar-X images of the study area were selected to measure the ground deformation. Interferometric Point Target Analysis method was gathered to process the SAR data. The method is developed based on the idea of the Permanent Scatterers SAR Interferometry method which can overcome the decorrelation and atmospheric effect to gain more precise estimation of the ground deformation. The master image can be selected according to the perpendicular, Doppler and temporal baselines to minimize the potential decorrelation. After the registration of all slave images to the master image, the PS candidates would be detected on the basis of the scattering properties of the images. A complex operation of the PSs was conducted to obtain the interferometric phase which was composed of terrain phase, atmospheric phase, deformation phase and noise. A model used for the evaluation of the contribution of each component was built by means of the least squares method. The deformation phase would be the remaining of the interferometric phase minus disturbance terms. Deformation information that came from two different kinds of data was jointly analyzed to reveal the temporal character of the rails before, during and after they were built. The regional LOS(line-of-sight) velocity around a special subway station shows that the rail has suffered from a serious uneven settlement along the rail during the observation period. In addition, time series data revealed the characteristic stages of each PS point. There is a clear accelerating trend of

  4. Ground deformation tracking over Mt. Baekdu with DInSAR time series analysis and atmospheric correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, S.; Kim, J.; Lin, S.; yun, H.; Seo, H.; Choi, Y.

    2013-12-01

    (Hopper et al., 2007) with ENVISAT ASAR images was employed. Subsequently, the StaMPS/MTI processing results from Mt. Baekdu were analyzed and interpreted together with the two-pass D-InSAR result using Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) data and Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to suppress the atmospheric errors. The DInSAR processing with ENVISAT ASAR and ALOS APLSAR in this study showed clear surface deformations over the northern and southern Crater Lake during 2007-2010. Although it still not fully clear whether such activations are just temporal episodes or an event that may result in an eruption in the future, considering the huge impact that Mt. Baekdu's potential eruption would have on all eastern Asian countries, international collaboration to exploit all advanced sensor capabilities, together with ground truth, should be established.

  5. Application of small baseline subsets D-InSAR technique to estimate time series land deformation of Jinan area, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangtong; Cao, Qiuxiang; Xiong, Zhuguo; Yin, Haitao; Xiao, Genru

    2016-04-01

    Jinan, located in the South of the North China Plain, is an area where underground water has been exploited excessively. However, land deformation surveys only focus on the small district obtained by GPS and Leveling. Here, we use interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time-series of ASAR data to resolve land subsidence in the entire Jinan region. In our research, we get 20 interferograms with a temporal threshold of 700 days and spatial-baseline threshold of 300 m from 14 ASAR satellite images on a descending orbit, and then get the surface displacement using Small Baseline InSAR (SBAS D-InSAR) retrained with a periodic model. Meanwhile, the accuracy of our work is proved by the results of GPS measurements. Finally, several settlement funnels are observed with extreme values of -20 cm, and their generation is related to massive groundwater extraction.

  6. New evidence for active tectonics at the boundary of the Kashi Depression, China, from time series InSAR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ping; Wen, Yangmao; Xu, Caijun; Liu, Yang; Fok, H. S.

    2015-06-01

    Kashi Depression is one of the most complex active tectonic areas in the southern flank of Tianshan, China. Due to the lack of ground observations, the boundary of basin mountain transition zone and the interseismic activity of the Tianshan have not been clearly determined. In this study, 48 Envisat Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) imagery acquired from 2003 to 2010 are used to construct interferograms for measuring high-resolution interseismic deformation in the Kashi Depression area. A global atmospheric model ERA-Interim provided by the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) and a global network orbital correction are applied to remove atmospheric effect, and the long-wavelength orbital errors, respectively, for the interferograms. Interferometric SAR time series with Atmospheric Estimation Model (InSAR TS + AEM) are then used to obtain a deformation rate map for the Kashi Depression area. The InSAR rate map indicates that the north part of South Atushi Fault has ~ 3 mm/year uplift relative to that of the south part. This result manifests the main tectonic deformation potentially occurs along the Southern Atushi Fault. Based on a simple edge dislocation model, the dip angle of 31 ± 0.6°, slip rate of 2.3 ± 0.1 mm/year, and locking depth of 10.6 ± 0.4 km for the Southern Atushi Fault between Tianshan Orogenic Belt and the Kashi Depression are obtained. This modeling result shows in good agreement with the InSAR derived rates. Our results show that the Southern Atushi Fault is the main active fault in block boundary region between the south of Tianshan and the Tarim Basin.

  7. Active anthropogenic and surface salt deformation measured by InSAR, northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colon, C.; Webb, A. G.; Lasserre, C.; Doin, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Despite the global occurrence of salt, very few salt bodies outcrop and are presently preserved at the surface. Because of this much of our knowledge on salt structures is sourced from subsurface imaging and modeling and less from field based studies. Using interferometry of synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) we monitor surface displacements across four surface salt outcrops in the western margin of the Kuqa fold-thrust belt of Xinjiang Province, China. An InSAR time series was constructed from 40 Envisat ASAR C-band images between June 2003 and October 2010. Interferometric processing was completed using the New Small Baseline Algorithm Subset (NSBAS). These poorly studied salt structures provide a fresh opportunity to study how salt behaves on the surface. The salt bodies outcrop along an active intracontinental thrust system between the Tian Shan and Tarim basin to the south. The four surface namakiers (salt glaciers) were analyzed in this study include: the Quele, Awate, Bozidun, and an unnamed structure referred to as the Western namakier. The ~35 km long Quele namakier is a line-sourced structure advancing along the Quele salt thrust. The other three namakiers range between ~1-3 km long and are point-sourced structures. The namakiers studied display non-steady deformation with rates of displacement varying between uplifts of up to +4 cm/yr and subsidence rates of -4 cm/yr. Additionally, the Kuqa fold-thrust belt hosts a number of hydrocarbon fields and InSAR measurements detect significant anthropogenic deformation associated with hydrocarbon extraction and fluid injection.

  8. Archaeological prospection of cultural heritage in the Nasca region, Peru, by coupling ENVISAT ASAR 2003-2007 and optical-VHR time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapete, Deodato; Cigna, Francesca; Masini, Nicola; Lasaponara, Rosa

    2013-04-01

    We present the radar-interpretation of a 4year-long stack of ENVISAT ASAR imagery, integrated and cross-validated with optical-Very High Resolution (VHR) data from QuickBird2, GeoEye and WorldView-1/2, and carried out over the cultural and natural heritage of the Nasca region in Southern Peru. This research is performed thanks to the provision of free-access archive SAR data from the European Space Agency (ESA) through the Cat-1 project 11073, and is supporting the activities of the Italian mission of heritage Conservation and Archaeogeophysics (ITACA), which directly involve researchers from the Institute for Archaeological and Monumental Heritage (IBAM) and the Institute of Methodologies for Environmental Analysis (IMAA), National Research Council (CNR) of Italy. The whole ENVISAT ASAR imagery archive, consisting of 8 ASAR IS2 scenes acquired in descending mode between 04/02/2003 and 15/11/2005 and 5 images in ascending mode between 24/07/2005 and 11/11/2007, was processed by exploiting and analyzing SAR amplitude information and change detection to reconstruct the temporal evolution of radar signatures and related backscattering coefficient (σ0) of the targets on the ground in the monitoring period 2003-2007. The selection of a SAR amplitude-based change detection method was made to explore its actual potentials for archaeological prospection and monitoring purposes, complementarily to approaches of interferometric coherence used by other scholars over the same region of investigation. The novel contribution to heritage studies over Nasca includes remote sensing insights into the renowned UNESCO-WHL Nasca geoglyphs and archaeological mounds of the adobe Ceremonial Centre of Cahuachi, as well as the ancient puquios within the Rio Grande drainage basin. The latter are prehispanic underground aqueducts, and nowadays represent not only important cultural features to preserve, but also a potential driver to revitalize waterways and oases in such a dry region

  9. Long-term and wide-area subsidence pattern from time series of Envisat Asar Data in Konya Basin, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustun, Aydin

    2016-04-01

    Konya Basin as a sub-part of Konya Closed Basin is dominated by the Neogene and Quaternary sediments that are largely fluvial and lacustrine characteristic. The wide plains cultivated over the last 10000 years are the remnants of the Pluvial lake basin during wet and humid climate environment after the last glacial period. With the form of isolated depression-block, the geomorphological landscape has been mainly driven by the neotectonic activity of striking normal fault systems of the region. Konya that has doubled in size over the last two and half decades is both expanding into the agricultural areas and increasing its building expansion in the city center. The level observations recorded at the monitoring stations indicate that groundwater resources have been exploited permanently or seasonally in some parts where water demand exceeds supply. In this study, a long-term and wide area subsidence pattern in Konya Basin has been analyzed by stacking the deformation interferograms for time series. The study area that covers approximately 7500 km squared was investigated through a large number of the raw images of Asar sensor onboard Envisat from December 2002 to October 2010. Almost a hundred SAR scenes imaged over three tracks in both ascending and descending modes have been used to create a set of 127 differential interferograms using GMTSAR processing system. A continuous deformation map on the basinwide scale has been produced by combining the stacked interferograms. The average contour map shows that the DInSAR detected line of sight subsidence (or uplift) rates vary between 0.6 and -3.3 cm/yr throughout 8 years. The subsidence pattern significantly is correlated with the land and groundwater use within the basin and it states that the anthropogenic effect is much greater than the identified geological and hydrogeological processes.

  10. Comparison Of Optical And SAR Data In Tropical Land CoverClassification For REDD+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirro, Laura; Hame, Tuomas; Rauste, Yrjo; Antropov, Oleg; Hamalainen, Jarno; Lativa-Kayra, Petri; Paz, Fernando; de Jong, Bernardus

    2013-12-01

    A comparison study was performed to evaluate the applicability of optical and SAR data for land cover classification for REDD+ services on a test site in Chiapas State in Mexico. The accuracy of the maps was assessed using an independent data set that was collected from very high resolution optical data. The overall accuracy of the maps varied between 79 % of ENVISAT ASAR and 94 % of RapidEye for the forest - non-forest classifications. The accuracies for the six IPCC compliant classes were from 5 to 9 percentage units lower. Results that were obtained with the optical data were somewhat better than the results using the SAR data. However, the difference between the optical and SAR results was fairly small when L-band SAR data were used. L-band SAR data seem to be competitive alternative for optical data particularly in the areas with frequent cloud cover.

  11. Preliminary results of ESA Category-1 Project 5834 "Application of DInSAR technique to areas of active ground deformations"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, B.; D'Auria, L.

    2009-04-01

    We have established a processing chain of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data for identification and parametrisation of deformation sources in areas of active ground deformation (e.g. seismogenic areas, volcanic districts). SAR data from European Space Agency (ESA) satellites ERS-2 and ENVISAT are used. SAR and InSAR data processing LEVEL 0 SAR data are focussed to Single Look Complex (SLC) through ROI_PAC (Copyright 2002-2008, Caltech/Jet Propulsion Laboratory). We perform an advanced data processing using Doris (Kampes and Usai, 1999) a single program that can do most common steps of the interferometric radar processing starting from SLC data to generation of interferometric products and geocoding. Unwrapping of interferometric phase is performed using the public domain software snaphu (Chen and Zebker, 2001). Modeling of deformation sources We propose a novel inversion approach base on non-linear inversion. The forward modeling is provided by the semi-analytic deformation model for point sources and finite faults. The parameters of the fault (center position, width, height, rake and seismic moment) are inverted using a combination of non-linear optimization algorithms (as Monte-Carlo, Nelder&Mead Simplex and Simulated Annealing). The misfit function defined for the optimization is based on the L2 norm of the error weighted by the coherence of the considered spatial point. Test datasets To test our modeling procedure we chose three different study areas, refer to mainly strike-slip seismogenic sources with different orientation to respect satellite Line Of Sight (LOS): December 26 2003 Iranian earthquake (Bam e.), data from both ascending and descending passes of ENVISAT ASAR narrow swath IS2 (RAW and SLCs); August 17 1999 Turkey earthquake (Izmit e.), data from both ascending and descending passes of ERS-2 AMI SAR (SLCs); June 17-21 2000 Iceland earthquakes, data from both ascending and descending passes of ERS-2 AMI SAR (SLCs). Tests carried over real

  12. Multi-Temporal SAR Interferometry for Landslide Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, R.; Narayan, A. B.; Tiwari, A.; Dikshit, O.; Singh, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    In the past few years, SAR Interferometry specially InSAR and D-InSAR were extensively used for deformation monitoring related applications. Due to temporal and spatial decorrelation in dense vegetated areas, effectiveness of InSAR and D-InSAR observations were always under scrutiny. Multi-temporal InSAR methods are developed in recent times to retrieve the deformation signal from pixels with different scattering characteristics. Presently, two classes of multi-temporal InSAR algorithms are available- Persistent Scatterer (PS) and Small Baseline (SB) methods. This paper discusses the Stanford Method for Persistent Scatterer (StaMPS) based PS-InSAR and the Small Baselines Subset (SBAS) techniques to estimate the surface deformation in Tehri dam reservoir region in Uttarkhand, India. Both PS-InSAR and SBAS approaches used sixteen ENVISAT ASAR C-Band images for generating single master and multiple master interferograms stack respectively and their StaMPS processing resulted in time series 1D-Line of Sight (LOS) mean velocity maps which are indicative of deformation in terms of movement towards and away from the satellites. From 1D LOS velocity maps, localization of landslide is evident along the reservoir rim area which was also investigated in the previous studies. Both PS-InSAR and SBAS effectively extract measurement pixels in the study region, and the general results provided by both approaches show a similar deformation pattern along the Tehri reservoir region. Further, we conclude that StaMPS based PS-InSAR method performs better in terms of extracting more number of measurement pixels and in the estimation of mean Line of Sight (LOS) velocity as compared to SBAS method. It is also proposed to take up a few major landslides area in Uttarakhand for slope stability assessment.

  13. 3-D movement mapping of the alpine glacier in Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau by integrating D-InSAR, MAI and Offset-Tracking: Case study of the Dongkemadi Glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jun; Li, Zhi-Wei; Li, Jia; Zhang, Lei; Ding, Xiao-Li; Zhu, Jian-Jun; Sun, Qian

    2014-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) movements of the Dongkemadi Glacier in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau over 2007-2010 are fully determined by using L-band Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) ascending and C-band Environmental Satellite (ENVISAT) Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) descending acquisitions. In order to yield an optimal 3-D solution, a variance component estimation (VCE) algorithm is applied to weigh the D-InSAR and MAI measurements derived from PALSAR data and the Offset-Tracking measurements from ASAR data under the scheme of weighted least squares adjustment. By exploiting the InSAR measurements themselves to determine the weights iteratively, the presented approach results in an accuracy of centimeter to decimeter per year for all the three velocity vectors. The horizontal component shows that the four main tributary streams in the Dongkemadi Glacier are all flowing from the central area of the glacier to its surroundings, along the steepest slope descent direction and with a rate up to about 5 m/yr. The glacier thickening or thinning is resolved from the vertical component by subtracting the down-slope movement. A number of interesting accumulation and ablation areas are also detected, with vertical variations of 1-2 m/yr, as a result of the horizontal glacier movement or the existence of concave terrain. This can be used as a good indication of the ice dynamics and the location of the subglacial water in the alpine glacier.

  14. SAR observation and model tracking of an oil spill event in coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yongcun; Li, Xiaofeng; Xu, Qing; Garcia-Pineda, Oscar; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Pichel, William G

    2011-02-01

    Oil spills are a major contributor to marine pollution. The objective of this work is to simulate the oil spill trajectory of oil released from a pipeline leaking in the Gulf of Mexico with the GNOME (General NOAA Operational Modeling Environment) model. The model was developed by NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) to investigate the effects of different pollutants and environmental conditions on trajectory results. Also, a Texture-Classifying Neural Network Algorithm (TCNNA) was used to delineate ocean oil slicks from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) observations. During the simulation, ocean currents from NCOM (Navy Coastal Ocean Model) outputs and surface wind data measured by an NDBC (National Data Buoy Center) buoy are used to drive the GNOME model. The results show good agreement between the simulated trajectory of the oil spill and synchronous observations from the European ENVISAT ASAR (Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar) and the Japanese ALOS (Advanced Land Observing Satellite) PALSAR (Phased Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar) images. Based on experience with past marine oil spills, about 63.0% of the oil will float and 18.5% of the oil will evaporate and disperse. In addition, the effects from uncertainty of ocean currents and the diffusion coefficient on the trajectory results are also studied. PMID:21067783

  15. Comparison and Analysis of Geometric Correction Models of Spaceborne SAR

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Weihao; Yu, Anxi; Dong, Zhen; Wang, Qingsong

    2016-01-01

    Following the development of synthetic aperture radar (SAR), SAR images have become increasingly common. Many researchers have conducted large studies on geolocation models, but little work has been conducted on the available models for the geometric correction of SAR images of different terrain. To address the terrain issue, four different models were compared and are described in this paper: a rigorous range-doppler (RD) model, a rational polynomial coefficients (RPC) model, a revised polynomial (PM) model and an elevation derivation (EDM) model. The results of comparisons of the geolocation capabilities of the models show that a proper model for a SAR image of a specific terrain can be determined. A solution table was obtained to recommend a suitable model for users. Three TerraSAR-X images, two ALOS-PALSAR images and one Envisat-ASAR image were used for the experiment, including flat terrain and mountain terrain SAR images as well as two large area images. Geolocation accuracies of the models for different terrain SAR images were computed and analyzed. The comparisons of the models show that the RD model was accurate but was the least efficient; therefore, it is not the ideal model for real-time implementations. The RPC model is sufficiently accurate and efficient for the geometric correction of SAR images of flat terrain, whose precision is below 0.001 pixels. The EDM model is suitable for the geolocation of SAR images of mountainous terrain, and its precision can reach 0.007 pixels. Although the PM model does not produce results as precise as the other models, its efficiency is excellent and its potential should not be underestimated. With respect to the geometric correction of SAR images over large areas, the EDM model has higher accuracy under one pixel, whereas the RPC model consumes one third of the time of the EDM model. PMID:27347973

  16. Comparison and Analysis of Geometric Correction Models of Spaceborne SAR.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weihao; Yu, Anxi; Dong, Zhen; Wang, Qingsong

    2016-01-01

    Following the development of synthetic aperture radar (SAR), SAR images have become increasingly common. Many researchers have conducted large studies on geolocation models, but little work has been conducted on the available models for the geometric correction of SAR images of different terrain. To address the terrain issue, four different models were compared and are described in this paper: a rigorous range-doppler (RD) model, a rational polynomial coefficients (RPC) model, a revised polynomial (PM) model and an elevation derivation (EDM) model. The results of comparisons of the geolocation capabilities of the models show that a proper model for a SAR image of a specific terrain can be determined. A solution table was obtained to recommend a suitable model for users. Three TerraSAR-X images, two ALOS-PALSAR images and one Envisat-ASAR image were used for the experiment, including flat terrain and mountain terrain SAR images as well as two large area images. Geolocation accuracies of the models for different terrain SAR images were computed and analyzed. The comparisons of the models show that the RD model was accurate but was the least efficient; therefore, it is not the ideal model for real-time implementations. The RPC model is sufficiently accurate and efficient for the geometric correction of SAR images of flat terrain, whose precision is below 0.001 pixels. The EDM model is suitable for the geolocation of SAR images of mountainous terrain, and its precision can reach 0.007 pixels. Although the PM model does not produce results as precise as the other models, its efficiency is excellent and its potential should not be underestimated. With respect to the geometric correction of SAR images over large areas, the EDM model has higher accuracy under one pixel, whereas the RPC model consumes one third of the time of the EDM model. PMID:27347973

  17. SARS Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... waiting room or office. Top of Page CDC’s response to SARS during the 2003 outbreak CDC worked ... Center to provide round-the-clock coordination and response. Committed more than 800 medical experts and support ...

  18. Limits, complementarity and improvement of Advanced SAR Interferometry monitoring of anthropogenic subsidence/uplift due to long term CO2 storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Michele, M.; Raucoules, D.; Rohmer, J.; Loschetter, A.; Raffard, D.; Le Gallo, Y.

    2013-12-01

    A prerequisite to the large scale industrial development of CO2 Capture and geological Storage is the demonstration that the storage is both efficient and safe. In this context, precise uplift/subsidence monitoring techniques constitute a key component of any CO2 storage risk management. Space-borne Differential SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) interferometry is a promising monitoring technique. It can provide valuable information on vertical positions of a set of scatterer undergoing surface deformation induced by volumetric changes through time and space caused by CO2 injection in deep aquifers. To what extent ? To date, InSAR techniques have been successfully used in a variety of case-studies involving the measure of surface deformation caused by subsurface fluid withdrawal / injection. For instance, groundwater flow characterization in complex aquifers systems, oil / gas field characterization, verification of enhanced oil recovery efficiency, monitoring of seasonal gas storage. The successful use of InSAR is strictly related to the favourable scattering conditions in terms of spatial distribution of targets and their temporal stability. In arid regions, natural radar scatterers density can be very high, exceeding 1,000 per square km. But future onshore industrial-scale CO2 storage sites are planned in more complex land-covers such as agricultural or vegetated terrains. Those terrains are characterized by poor to moderate radar scatterers density, which decrease the detection limits of the space-borne interferometric technique. The present study discusses the limits and constraints of advanced InSAR techniques applied to deformation measurements associated with CO2 injection/storage into deep aquifers in the presence of agricultural and vegetated land-covers. We explore different options to enhance the measurement performances of InSAR techniques. As a first option, we propose to optimize the deployment of a network of 'artificial' scatterers, i.e. corner

  19. Sea ice concentration and sea ice drift for the Arctic summer using C- and L-band SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Malin; Berg, Anders; Eriksson, Leif

    2014-05-01

    The decreasing amount of sea ice and changes from multi-year ice to first year ice within the Arctic Ocean opens up for increased maritime activities. These activities include transportation, fishing and tourism. One of the major threats for the shipping is the presence of sea ice. Should an oil spill occur, the search and rescue is heavily dependent on constant updates of sea ice movements, both to enable a safer working environment and to potentially prevent the oil from reaching the sea ice. It is therefore necessary to have accurate and updated sea ice charts for the Arctic Ocean during the entire year. During the melt season that ice is subject to melting conditions making satellite observations of sea ice more difficult. This period coincides with the peak in marine shipping activities and therefore requires highly accurate sea ice concentration estimates. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) are not hindered by clouds and do not require daylight. The continuous record and high temporal resolution makes C-band data preferable as input data for operational sea ice mapping. However, with C-band SAR it is sometimes difficult to distinguish between a wet sea ice surface and surrounding open water. L-band SAR has a larger penetration depth and has been shown to be less sensitive to less sensitive than C-band to the melt season. Inclusion of L-band data into sea chart estimates during the melt season in particular could therefore improve sea ice monitoring. We compare sea ice concentration melt season observations using Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) L-band images with Envisat ASAR C-band images. We evaluate if L-band images can be used to improve separation of wet surface ice from open water and compare with results for C-band.

  20. ASAR Surface Velocity Retrievals In The Northeast Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Morten W.; Dagestad, Knut-Frode; Johannessen, Johnny A.; Mouche, Alexis; Collard, Fabrice

    2010-04-01

    Chapron et al. (2005), Collard et al. (2008), and Johannessen et al. (2008) have demonstrated that the Doppler centroid anomaly of SAR signals is related to the line-of-sight velocity of the moving ocean surface. In this study, the Doppler technique is applied to studies of the main current regimes in Norwegian waters including the Norwegian Coastal Current (NCC) and the Norwegian Atlantic Current (NwAC). Results are in consistence with the large scale circulation pattern of the area, and qualitatively compares well with Mean Dynamic Topography (MDT), and drifter deduced and modelled climatologies. In summary, the mean range Doppler surface velocity map depict clear signals of the major currents in the North Sea and Norwegian Sea with magnitudes ranging from 20 to 50 cm/s.

  1. Comparative study of ocean wave spectrum using ENVISAT SAR data and wave rider buoy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadeesha Pai, B.; Kumar, Raj; Sarkar, Abhijit; Hegde, A. Vittal; Dwarakish, G. S.

    2006-12-01

    A comparative study of ENVISAT ASAR data and corresponding wave rider buoy data has been attempted. An algorithm has been developed to retrieve Ocean Wave Spectrum from SAR data. The resulting spectrum is compared with the wave rider buoy measured wave spectrum. To compute the 2-D image spectrum from multi-look SAR data, various corrections to the original SAR data has been applied. Thereafter, Modulation Transfer Function has been computed and utilized to convert image spectrum to the Ocean Wave Spectrum. This final ocean wave height spectrum is used to estimate the ocean wave spectral parameters and has been compared with the in-situ measurements and model derived wave spectrum. An attempt has also been made to process the Single Look Complex (SLC) data to reduce the speckle noise in the SAR data using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT).

  2. Alteration zone Mapping in the Meiduk and Sar Cheshmeh Porphyry Copper Mining Districts of Iran using Advanced Land Imager (ALI) Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiranvand Pour, A.; Hashim, M.

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluates the capability of Earth Observing-1 (EO1) Advanced Land Imager (ALI) data for hydrothermal alteration mapping in the Meiduk and Sar Cheshmeh porphyry copper mining districts, SE Iran. Feature-oriented principal components selection, 4/2, 8/9, 5/4 band ratioing were applied to ALI data for enhancing the hydrothermally altered rocks associated with porphyry copper mineralization, lithological units and vegetation. Mixture-tuned matched-filtering (MTMF) was tested to discriminate the hydrothermal alteration areas of porphyry copper mineralization from surrounding environment using the shortwave infrared bands of ALI. Results indicate that the tested methods are able to yield spectral information for identifying vegetation, iron oxide/hydroxide and clay minerals, lithological units and the discrimination of hydrothermally altered rocks from unaltered rocks using ALI data.

  3. Long-range ground deformation monitoring by InSAR analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokugawa, S.; Nakamura, T.

    2015-11-01

    InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) analysis is an effective technique to map 3-dimensional surface deformation with high spatial resolution. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capability of InSAR analysis when applied to ground monitoring of an environmental disaster. We performed a time series InSAR analysis using ENVISAT/ASAR and ALOS/PALSAR data and commercial software to investigate subsidence around the Kanto District of Japan. We also investigated techniques for efficient early detection of landslides in Kyushu using time series analysis that incorporated synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. ENVISAT/ASAR data acquired from 2003-2010 and ALOS/PALSAR data acquired from 2006-2011 were used to detect poorly expressed geomorphological deformation by conducting time series analyses of periodically acquired SAR data. In addition, to remove noise caused by geographical feature stripes or phase retardation, we applied median filtering, histogram extraction processing, and clarification of the displacement with a Laplacian filter. The main functions of the InSAR time series analysis are the calculation of phase differences between two images and the inversion with smoothness constraint for the estimation of deformation along the line of sight. The results enabled us to establish criteria for the selection of suitable InSAR data pairs, and provided the final error estimation of the derived surface deformation. The results of the analysis in the Kanto District suggested that localized areas of uplift and subsidence have occurred at irregular intervals in this area. Furthermore, the method offers the possibility of early warning of environmental disasters such as landslide and abrupt subsidence. Our results confirm the effectiveness of InSAR analysis for the monitoring of ground deformation over wide areas via the detection of localized subsidence and landslides.

  4. Assessment of slope stability using PS-InSAR technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, R.; Varshney, P.; Tiwari, A.; Singh, A. K.; Dikshit, O.

    2014-11-01

    In this research work, PS-InSAR approach is envisaged to monitor slope stability of landslides prone areas in Nainital and Tehri region of Uttarakhand, India. For the proposed work, Stanford Method for Persistent Scatterers (StaMPS) based PS-InSAR is used for processing ENVISAT ASAR C-Band data stacks of study area which resulted in a time series 1D-Line of Sight (LOS) map of surface displacement. StaMPS efficiently extracted the PS pixels on the unstable slopes in both areas and the time series 1D-LOS displacement map of PS pixels indicates that those areas in Nainital and Tehri region have measurement pixels with maximum displacement away from the satellite of the order of 22 mm/year and 17.6 mm/year respectively

  5. ERS-1 SAR data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, K.; Bicknell, T.; Vines, K.

    1986-01-01

    To take full advantage of the synthetic aperature radar (SAR) to be flown on board the European Space Agency's Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-1) (1989) and the Canadian Radarsat (1990), the implementation of a receiving station in Alaska is being studied to gather and process SAR data pertaining in particular to regions within the station's range of reception. The current SAR data processing requirement is estimated to be on the order of 5 minutes per day. The Interim Digital Sar Processor (IDP) which was under continual development through Seasat (1978) and SIR-B (1984) can process slightly more than 2 minutes of ERS-1 data per day. On the other hand, the Advanced Digital SAR Processore (ADSP), currently under development for the Shuttle Imaging Radar C (SIR-C, 1988) and the Venus Radar Mapper, (VMR, 1988), is capable of processing ERS-1 SAR data at a real time rate. To better suit the anticipated ERS-1 SAR data processing requirement, both a modified IDP and an ADSP derivative are being examined. For the modified IDP, a pipelined architecture is proposed for the mini-computer plus array processor arrangement to improve throughout. For the ADSP derivative, a simplified version is proposed to enhance ease of implementation and maintainability while maintaing real time throughput rates. These processing systems are discussed and evaluated.

  6. Spatiotemporal analysis and interpretation of 1993-2013 ground deformation at Campi Flegrei, Italy, observed by advanced DInSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonov, Sergey V.; Tiampo, Kristy F.; Camacho, Antonio G.; Fernández, José; González, Pablo J.

    2014-09-01

    Campi Flegrei is one of the most hazardous volcanic areas in the world because of its close proximity to the city of Naples. Here we apply the multidimensional small baseline subset (MSBAS) differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (DInSAR) technique to obtain vertical and horizontal components of ground deformation for Campi Flegrei at high spatial and temporal resolutions that span, for the first time, 20 years. The area underwent continuous subsidence from 1993 through 1999. Moderate uplift began in 2010 and substantially increased through 2012, reaching approximately 13 cm by 2013. We model the observed deformation to determine source parameters for subsidence and uplift epochs. Both the inflation and deflation mechanisms involve large, extended sources in a layered hydrothermal system whose location is controlled by the caldera structure and stratigraphy. The temporal resolution of MSBAS approaches that of GPS daily time series, with superior precision and spatial resolution, making it an excellent alternative for volcano monitoring.

  7. A novel approach for the characterization of tundra wetland regions with C-band SAR satellite data

    PubMed Central

    Widhalm, Barbara; Bartsch, Annett; Heim, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    A circumpolar representative and consistent wetland map is required for a range of applications ranging from upscaling of carbon fluxes and pools to climate modelling and wildlife habitat assessment. Currently available data sets lack sufficient accuracy and/or thematic detail in many regions of the Arctic. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data from satellites have already been shown to be suitable for wetland mapping. Envisat Advanced SAR (ASAR) provides global medium-resolution data which are examined with particular focus on spatial wetness patterns in this study. It was found that winter minimum backscatter values as well as their differences to summer minimum values reflect vegetation physiognomy units of certain wetness regimes. Low winter backscatter values are mostly found in areas vegetated by plant communities typically for wet regions in the tundra biome, due to low roughness and low volume scattering caused by the predominant vegetation. Summer to winter difference backscatter values, which in contrast to the winter values depend almost solely on soil moisture content, show expected higher values for wet regions. While the approach using difference values would seem more reasonable in order to delineate wetness patterns considering its direct link to soil moisture, it was found that a classification of winter minimum backscatter values is more applicable in tundra regions due to its better separability into wetness classes. Previous approaches for wetland detection have investigated the impact of liquid water in the soil on backscatter conditions. In this study the absence of liquid water is utilized. Owing to a lack of comparable regional to circumpolar data with respect to thematic detail, a potential wetland map cannot directly be validated; however, one might claim the validity of such a product by comparison with vegetation maps, which hold some information on the wetness status of certain classes. It was shown that the Envisat ASAR-derived classes

  8. Unsupervised SBAS-DInSAR time series generation: a small brick for building a Supersites ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casu, F.; De Luca, C.; Elefante, S.; Imperatore, P.; Lanari, R.; Manunta, M.; Zinno, I.; Farres, J.; Lengert, W.

    2013-12-01

    Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR) is an effective tool to detect and monitor ground displacements with centimeter accuracy. The geoscience communities, as well as those related to hazard monitoring and risk mitigation, make extensively use of DInSAR. They take advantage from the current huge amount of SAR data and will benefit the incoming big data stream of Sentinel 1 system. The availability of this information makes possible the generation of Earth's surface displacement maps and time series with large spatial coverage and long time span and, often in conjunction to in-situ data, fosters advances in science. However, the managing, processing and analysis of such a huge amount of data is expected to be the major bottleneck, particularly when crisis phases occur. The emerging need of creating a common ecosystem in which data (space born and in-situ), results and processing tools are shared, is envisaged to be a successful way to address such a problem and contribute to information and knowledge spreading. The Supersites initiative as well as the ESA SuperSites Exploitation Platform (SSEP), through the ESA Grid Processing On Demand (G-POD) and Cloud Computing Operational Pilot (CIOP) projects, provide effective answers to this need. The existent tools for querying and analysing SAR data are required to be redesigned for both processing big data and for quickly replying to simultaneous user requests, mainly during emergency situations. These requirements push for the development of automatic and unsupervised processing tools as well as of scalable, widely accessible and high performance computing capabilities. The cloud-computing environment successfully responds to these objectives, particularly in case of spike and peak requests of processing resources linked to disaster events. In this work we present a parallel computational model for the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) DInSAR algorithm as it was implemented within the computing environment provided by the

  9. EARSEC SAR processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protheroe, Mark; Sloggett, David R.; Sieber, Alois J.

    1994-12-01

    Traditionally, the production of high quality Synthetic Aperture Radar imagery has been an area where a potential user would have to expend large amounts of money in either the bespoke development of a processing chain dedicated to his requirements or in the purchase of a dedicated hardware platform adapted using accelerator boards and enhanced memory management. Whichever option the user adopted there were limitations based on the desire for a realistic throughput in data load and time. The user had a choice, made early in the purchase, for either a system that adopted innovative algorithmic manipulation, to limit the processing time of the purchase of expensive hardware. The former limits the quality of the product, while the latter excludes the user from any visibility into the processing chain. Clearly there was a need for a SAR processing architecture that gave the user a choice into the methodology to be adopted for a particular processing sequence, allowing him to decide on either a quick (lower quality) product or a detailed slower (high quality) product, without having to change the algorithmic base of his processor or the hardware platform. The European Commission, through the Advanced Techniques unit of the Joint Research Centre (JRC) Institute for Remote Sensing at Ispra in Italy, realizing the limitations on current processing abilities, initiated its own program to build airborne SAR and Electro-Optical (EO) sensor systems. This program is called the European Airborne Remote Sensing Capabilities (EARSEC) program. This paper describes the processing system developed for the airborne SAR sensor system. The paper considers the requirements for the system and the design of the EARSEC Airborne SAR Processing System. It highlights the development of an open SAR processing architecture where users have full access to intermediate products that arise from each of the major processing stages. It also describes the main processing stages in the overall

  10. Influence of the external DEM on PS-InSAR processing and results on Northern Appennine slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, B.; Schmidt, D. A.; Simoni, A.

    2014-12-01

    We present an InSAR analysis of slow moving landslide in the Northern Appennines, Italy, and assess the dependencies on the choice of DEM. In recent years, advanced processing techniques for synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) have been applied to measure slope movements. The persistent scatterers (PS-InSAR) approach is probably the most widely used and some codes are now available in the public domain. The Stanford method of Persistent Scatterers (StamPS) has been successfully used to analyze landslide areas. One problematic step in the processing chain is the choice of an external DEM that is used to model and remove the topographic phase in a series of interferograms in order to obtain the phase contribution caused by surface deformation. The choice is not trivial, because the PS InSAR results differ significantly in terms of PS identification, positioning, and the resulting deformation signal. We use four different DEMs to process a set of 18 ASAR (Envisat) scenes over a mountain area (~350 km2) of the Northern Appennines of Italy, using StamPS. Slow-moving landslides control the evolution of the landscape and cover approximately 30% of the territory. Our focus in this presentation is to evaluate the influence of DEM resolution and accuracy by comparing PS-InSAR results. On an areal basis, we perform a statistical analysis of displacement time-series to make the comparison. We also consider two case studies to illustrate the differences in terms of PS identification, number and estimated displacements. It is clearly shown that DEM accuracy positively influences the number of PS, while line-of-sight rates differ from case to case and can result in deformation signals that are difficult to interpret. We also take advantage of statistical tools to analyze the obtained time-series datasets for the whole study area. Results indicate differences in the style and amount of displacement that can be related to the accuracy of the employed DEM.

  11. TerraSAR-X mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werninghaus, Rolf

    2004-01-01

    The TerraSAR-X is a German national SAR- satellite system for scientific and commercial applications. It is the continuation of the scientifically and technologically successful radar missions X-SAR (1994) and SRTM (2000) and will bring the national technology developments DESA and TOPAS into operational use. The space segment of TerraSAR-X is an advanced high-resolution X-Band radar satellite. The system design is based on a sound market analysis performed by Infoterra. The TerraSAR-X features an advanced high-resolution X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar based on the active phased array technology which allows the operation in Spotlight-, Stripmap- and ScanSAR Mode with various polarizations. It combines the ability to acquire high resolution images for detailed analysis as well as wide swath images for overview applications. In addition, experimental modes like the Dual Receive Antenna Mode allow for full-polarimetric imaging as well as along track interferometry, i.e. moving target identification. The Ground Segment is optimized for flexible response to (scientific and commercial) User requests and fast image product turn-around times. The TerraSAR-X mission will serve two main goals. The first goal is to provide the strongly supportive scientific community with multi-mode X-Band SAR data. The broad spectrum of scientific application areas include Hydrology, Geology, Climatology, Oceanography, Environmental Monitoring and Disaster Monitoring as well as Cartography (DEM Generation) and Interferometry. The second goal is the establishment of a commercial EO-market in Europe which is driven by Infoterra. The commercial goal is the development of a sustainable EO-business so that the e.g. follow-on systems can be completely financed by industry from the profit. Due to its commercial potential, the TerraSAR-X project will be implemented based on a public-private partnership with the Astrium GmbH. This paper will describe first the mission objectives as well as the

  12. ASCAT-Envisat ASAR Downscaled Soil Moisture Product: Soil Wetness Index Retrieval over Luxembourg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitz, S.; Matgen, P.; Hasenauer, S.; Hissler, C.; Pfister, L.; Hoffmann, L.; Wagner, W.

    2010-12-01

    The present case study focuses on the usefulness for hydrological applications of downscaling, from 25km to approximately 1km spatial resolution, coarse resolution soil moisture estimates retrieved from the ASCAT instrument on board the METOP-A satellite. The method is based on the use of long records of archived ENVISAT-ASAR images. The experimental Bibeschbach catchment (10.8km) is located within the Alzette River basin (1175km2) in the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg and is equipped since 2005 with a set of 16 standard ECH2O DecagonTM soil moisture sensors, which measure hourly dielectric values of the top soil layer depths ranging from 4 to 7cm. The objectives of this research are (i) to retrieve downscaled Soil Wetness Indices (SWI) from the coupling of ASCAT and ENVISAT-ASAR data sets, (ii) to compare the ASCAT and ASCAT-ASAR-derived estimates of basin-averaged soil moisture with in situ measurements of soil wetness and (iii) to evaluate the usefulness of both products with respect to hydrological applications. The high correlation of in situ soil moisture measurements and remote sensing-derived soil moisture indices indicates that the processed coarse resolution active microwave remote sensing data is useful for monitoring catchment saturation and has the potential to complement and eventually replace time and resource intensive field measurement networks. The data can be used for periodically updating soil moisture values simulated by hydrological models. We further conclude that the benefit of the high resolution ASCAT-ASAR product mainly relies in the mapping of hydrological similarity within a catchment. These maps help our understanding of catchment behaviour and may thus be used for calibrating and validating hydrological models.

  13. The Advancement of Intraplate Tectonic Motion Detection by the Use of Atmospherically Corrected InSAR Time-series and its Decomposition into a 3D Field Vector in South-East Sicily, Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollrath, A.; Bekaert, D. P.; Bonforte, A.; Guglielmino, F.; Hooper, A. J.; Stramondo, S.; Zucca, F.

    2014-12-01

    This study provides insights into the advancements gained by applying a tropospheric correction to a time-series InSAR small baseline network processed using the StaMPS software for the Hyblean Plateau in south-east Sicily, Italy. The contribution of the atmosphere is one of the major error sources in repeat-pass InSAR in general. For time-series analysis spatial and temporal "filtering" of the interferometric phase can be used to address atmospheric signals. This however might be at the cost of smoothing and removal of the "tectonic deformation". We applied a tropospheric correction to each interferogram based on estimates of the ERA-Interim weather model, provided by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF). This approach is part of the InSAR Atmospheric Correction Toolbox (Bekaert et al, in prep) and converts the tropospheric water vapor content into the phase-delay of the radar line-of-sight. For the analysis we used 49 descending and 58 ascending Envisat SAR images, which cover the time period from 2003 until 2010. In addition, we have processed 30 SAR images of RADARSAT-2 for the period between 2010-2012. Furthermore, we used the different viewing geometries and the integration of GPS data to decompose the single line-of-sight velocities into a 3-dimensional field vector by applying the SISTEM approach (Guglielmino et al. 2011). First results reveal that the atmospherically corrected data retain the deformation signal along geological structures like the Scicli-Ragusa fault whilst the standard filtering approach is canceling out these very slow deformation patterns. Simultaneously, the variability of the signal in space is diminished and thus gives more confidence on the deformation patterns observed by the SAR. Consequently, the decomposition of the line-of-sight velocities and the integration with the GPS data allows us to retrieve a more realistic deformation field.

  14. SAR Ice Classification Using Fuzzy Screening Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, R. S.

    2003-04-01

    A semi-automatic SAR sea ice classification algorithm is described. It is based on combining the information in the original SAR data with those in the three 'image' products derived from it, namely Power-to-Mean Ratio (PMR), the Gamma distribution and the second order texture parameter entropy, respectively. The latter products contain information which is often useful during the manual interpretation of the images. The technique used to fuse the information in these products is based on a method c lled Multi Experts Multi Criteria Decision Making fuzzy a screening. The Multiple Experts in this case are the above four 'image' products. The two criteria used currently for making decisions are the Kolmogorov-Smirnov distribution matching and the statistical mean of different surface classes. The algorithm classifies an image into any number of predefined classes of sea ice and open water. The representative classes of these surface types are manually identified by the user. Further, as SAR signals from sea ice covered regions and open water are ambiguous, it was found that a minimum of 4 pre-identified surface classes (calm and turbulent water and sea ice with low and high backscatter values) are required to accurately classify an image. Best results are obtained when a total of 8 surface classes (2 each of sea ice and open water in the near range and a similar number in the far range of the SAR image) are used. The main advantage of using this image classification scheme is that, like neural networks, no prior knowledge is required of the statistical distribution of the different surface types. Furthermore, unlike the methods based on neural networks, no prior data sets are required to train the algorithm. All the information needed for image classification by the method is contained in the individual SAR images and associated products. Initial results illustrating the potential of this ice classification algorithm using the RADARSAT ScanSAR Wide data are presented

  15. Environmental evolution of the Rio Grande drainage basin and Nasca region (Peru) in 2003-2007 using ENVISAT ASAR and ASTER time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigna, Francesca; Tapete, Deodato; Lasaponara, Rosa; Masini, Nicola

    2013-04-01

    Recent palaeo-environmental studies and remote sensing investigations demonstrated that the Rio Grande drainage basin in Southern Peru is a still evolving landscape, and impacts due to its changes have implications for the preservation of both the natural and cultural features of the Nasca region, well-known for the evidences of the ancient Paracas and Nasca Civilizations, who flourished from the 4th century BC to the 6th century AD. To image the modifications occurred in the last decade, we exploited the entire 4year-long stack of ENVISAT ASAR C-band archive imagery available over the region, which was provided by the European Space Agency (ESA) via the Cat-1 project 11073. The latter supports the activities of the Italian mission of heritage Conservation and Archaeogeophysics (ITACA), which directly involve researchers from the Institute for Archaeological and Monumental Heritage (IBAM) and the Institute of Methodologies for Environmental Analysis (IMAA), National Research Council (CNR) of Italy. With the aim of reconstructing the temporal evolution of the Rio Grande drainage basin and its effects and implications for the heritage of the region, we processed 8 ASAR Image Mode IS2 scenes acquired in descending mode between 04/02/2003 and 15/11/2005 and 5 images in ascending mode between 24/07/2005 and 11/11/2007, and focused on SAR backscattering information, amplitude change detection methods and extraction of ASAR-derived time series of the backscattering coefficient over target areas of interest. The ASAR 2003-2007 analysis was coupled and integrated with NDVI-based soil moisture and vegetation change assessment performed by using ASTER multi-spectral data acquired during the same time frame of the ASAR stacks, on 30/05/2003, 01/06/2004 and 10/06/2007. The research was performed both at the regional scale over the entire Rio Grande drainage basin, with particular focus on its tributaries Rio Ingenio, Rio Nazca and Rio Taruga, and at the local scale over the

  16. Next generation SAR demonstration on space station

    SciTech Connect

    Edelstein, Wendy; Kim, Yunjin; Freeman, Anthony; Jordan, Rolando

    1999-01-22

    This paper describes the next generation synthetic aperture radar (SAR) that enables future low cost space-borne radar missions. In order to realize these missions, we propose to use an inflatable, membrane, microstrip antenna that is particularly suitable for low frequency science radar missions. In order to mitigate risks associated with this revolutionary technology, the space station demonstration will be very useful to test the long-term survivability of the proposed antenna. This experiment will demonstrate several critical technology challenges associated with space-inflatable technologies. Among these include space-rigidization of inflatable structures, controlled inflation deployment, flatness and uniform separation of thin-film membranes and RF performance of membrane microstrip antennas. This mission will also verify the in-space performance of lightweight, high performance advanced SAR electronics. Characteristics of this SAR instrument include a capability for high resolution polarimetric imaging. The mission will acquire high quality scientific data using this advanced SAR to demonstrate the utility of these advanced technologies. We will present an inflatable L-band SAR concept for commercial and science applications and a P-band design concept to validate the Biomass SAR mission concept. The ionospheric effects on P-band SAR images will also be examined using the acquired data.

  17. On the Combined Assimilation of RA-@ Altimeter and ASAR Wave Data for the Improvement of Wave Forcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aouf, Lefèvre, J.-M.; Hauser, D.; Chapron, B.

    2006-07-01

    Two months of RA-2 altimeter wave data and ASAR wave spectra have been assimilated conjointly in the wave model WAM. A quality control procedure on ASAR level-2 wave mode is applied before the assimilation to avoid including spurious data in the analysis process. To investigate the optimal choice of wavelength cut-off on ASAR wave spectra, two test runs have been performed with different values of wavelength cut-off (200 and 240 meters). The assimilation skill with respect to no assimilation case is examined for the analysis and forecast periods. The results show a significant impact on the estimation of mean wave parameters (wave height and mean period). Statistical analysis using independent wave data such as those provided by the altimeter Jason-1 and buoys is discussed. Furthermore, the impact in specific ocean areas is also analyzed.

  18. Observation of Planetary Oceans with Fully Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Wooil M.

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is one of the most cost effective and powerful all weather tools for observation of planetary surface without sun light. The SAR systems can observe planetary surfaces with the very high resolution and large spatial coverage. We have developed and improved the algorithms for extracting quantitative information on geophysical parameters using various types of SAR data available on Earth's surface, both space-borne SAR (ERS-1/2, RADARSAT, and ENVISAT ASAR) and airborne SAR (NASA(JPL) AIRSAR). SAR is the only system that can provide a synoptic view of find wind fields near the coastal area on Earth. Many SAR images including RADARSAT and ENVISAT ASAR's alternating polarization mode and wide swath mode were to investigate the ability of retrieving sea surface wind field and the results are quite accurate and operationally acceptable. We installed corner reflectors on the nearby beach to calibrate the SAR data, and we obtained in-situ measurements from the several coast-based automatic weather systems and ocean buoys. Using the simultaneously acquired polarization ENVISAT ASAR data (HH and VV), the most appropriate polarization ratio was evaluated and applied for improving the wind retrieval model. In addition, the best combinations depending on given sea states and incidence angle ranges were investigated. The characteristics of short-period and long-period (near-inertial) internal waves are also investigated with several space-borne SAR systems. The possibility of inferring characteristics of the interior ocean dynamics from the SAR image associated with internal solitary waves was tested using a hydrodynamic interaction model (action balance equation) and a radar backscattering model (two-scale tilted Bragg model). These models were used iteratively to fit the observed SAR data to the simulated SAR. The estimated results were compared with in-situ measurements. The typical scales and the spatial and temporal characteristics of internal

  19. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... when the virus spread from small mammals in China. When someone with SARS coughs or sneezes, infected ... causes SARS include: Antibody tests for SARS Direct isolation of the SARS virus Rapid polymerase chain reaction ( ...

  20. Exploring multi/full polarised SAR imagery for understanding surface soil moisture and roughness by using semi-empirical and theoretical models and field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lu; Marzahn, Philip; Ludwig, Ralf

    2010-05-01

    Mediterranean countries are at high risk for an even pronounced susceptibility to water stress and drought, which is expected to have severe direct impact on agricultural productivity. Improved knowledge of the spatial and temporal patterns of near surface soil moisture, as monitored by remote sensing, can be used to better mitigate and adapt to severe drought situations by means of adjusted irrigation strategies. The presented project is aiming to conjointly employ field monitoring and spaceborne SAR to support adaptive water resources management and best agricultural practice. To make substantial progress in decision-making for an optimised irrigation strategy, a regular, e.g. weekly, monitoring of near surface soil moisture in various agricultural land-uses is anticipated. This becomes possible with current co-polarised ENVISAT/ASAR Alternating Polarisation (AP) Mode imagery (C-band). However, since the backscattering signal is affected by several surface characteristics, a better measurement/estimation of surface roughness is crucial in retrieving near-surface soil moisture. The sensor PALSAR, on board ALOS, and the more recently launched satellite-Radarsat-2 provide new opportunities to retrieve information about surface roughness by means of full-polarised, high-resolution L-band and C-band radar data respectively. It is expected that these data sources can be utilised to better separate the dielectric from the surface roughness component in radar backscattering. For parameter retrieval and validation, intensive in-situ measurements are conducted in a fully equipped agricultural area in a Mediterranean environment in Sardinia, Italy, while ENVISAT/ASAR, ALOS/PALSAR and Radarsat-2 data are acquired. A close range digital photogrammetric technique is applied to monitor surface roughness. This paper is aiming at exploring the capability of ENVISAT/ASAR AP Mode imagery and Radarsat-2 data for near surface soil moisture inversion using ALOS/PALSAR and close

  1. SAR wind retrieval: from Singlecore to Multicore and GPU computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myasoedov, Alexander; Monzikova, Anna

    The large spatial coverage and high resolution of spaceborne synthetic aperture radars (SAR) offers a unique opportunity to derive mesoscale wind fields over the ocean surface, providing high resolution wind fields near the shore. On the other hand, due to the large size of SAR images their processing might be a headache when dealing with operational tasks or doing long-period statistical analysis. Algorithms for satellite image processing often offer many possibilities for parallelism (e.g., pixel-by-pixel processing) which makes them good candidates for execution on high-performance parallel computing hardware such as Multicore CPUs and modern graphic processing units (GPUs). In this study we implement different SAR wind speed retrieval algorithms (e.g. CMOD4, CMOD5) for Singlecore and Multicore systems, including GPUs. For this purpose both serial and parallelized versions of CMOD algorithms were written in Matlab, Python, CPython and PyOpenCL. We apply these algorithms to an Envisat ASAR image, compare the results received with different versions of the algorithms executed on both Intel CPU and a Tesla GPU. As a result of our experiments we not only show the up to 400 times speedup of GPU comparing to CPU but also try to give some advises on how much time we have spent and efforts were made for writing the same algorithm using different programming languages. We hope that our experience will help other scientist to achieve all the goodness from the GPU/Multicore computing.

  2. Aoutomatic Oil Spill Detection Using TerraSAR-X Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulipiye, Kaiyoumu; Balik Sanli, Fusun

    2016-07-01

    Oil release into the ocean may affect marine ecosystems and cause environmental pollution. Thus, oil spill detection and identification becomes critical important. Characterized by synoptic view over large regions, remote sensing has been proved to be a reliable tool for oil spill detection. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery shows returned signal that clearly distinguish oil from oil-free surface under optimal wind conditions, which makes it the most frequent used remote sensing technique in oil spill detection. Algorithms of automatic oil spill detection has already been developed for different SAR sensors, including RADARSAT and ENVISAT. In this study, we want to apply automatic oil spill detection algorithms on TerraSAR-X data which is previously developed for ASAR data. The applied methodology includes two steps as segmentation and classification. First segmentation algorithms compiled by C# have been applied under a Bayesian framework adopting a multi-level logistic. After segmentation different classification methods such as feature selection, filter, and embedded selection have been applied. As a result the used classifiers for oil spill detection will be compared, and the complete processing chain will be evaluated.

  3. How far SAR has fulfilled its expectation for soil moisture retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Hari Shanker; Patel, Parul; Navalgund, Ranganath R.

    2006-12-01

    Microwave remote sensing is one of the most promising tools for soil moisture estimation owing to its high sensitivity to dielectric properties of the target. Many ground-based scatterometer experiments were carried out for exploring this potential. After the launch of ERS-1, expectation was generated to operationally retrieve large area soil moisture information. However, along with its strong sensitivity to soil moisture, SAR is also sensitive to other parameters like surface roughness, crop cover and soil texture. Single channel SAR was found to be inadequate to resolve the effects of these parameters. Low and high incidence angle RADARSAT-1 SAR was exploited for resolving these effects and incorporating the effects of surface roughness and crop cover in the soil moisture retrieval models. Since the moisture and roughness should remain unchanged between low and high angle SAR acquisition, the gap period between the two acquisitions should be minimum. However, for RADARSAT-1 the gap is typically of the order of 3 days. To overcome this difficulty, simultaneously acquired ENVISAT-1 ASAR HH/VV and VV/VH data was studied for operational soil moisture estimation. Cross-polarised SAR data has been exploited for its sensitivity to vegetation for crop-covered fields where as co-pol ratio has been used to incorporate surface roughness for the case of bare soil. Although there has not been any multi-frequency SAR system onboard a satellite platform, efforts have also been made to understand soil moisture sensitivity and penetration capability at different frequencies using SIR-C/X-SAR and multi-parametric Airborne SAR data. This paper describes multi-incidence angle, multi-polarised and multi-frequency SAR approaches for soil moisture retrieval over large agricultural area.

  4. Development of an Advanced Technique to Correct Along-Track InSAR-Derived Surface Current Fields for Contributions of Wave Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C.; Romeiser, R.; Reniers, A.; MacMahan, J.

    2014-12-01

    The feasibility of surface current measurements by airborne and spaceborne along-track interferometric synthetic aperture radar (along-track InSAR) has been demonstrated on a number of occasions. Since the Doppler shifts detected by the radar include contributions of surface wave motions, a correction for these contributions has to be applied, which is often estimated as a mean correction for the entire current field on the basis of a simple theoretical model. In coastal areas and river estuaries with complex current and wave patterns, this approach is not adequate because one has to account for spatial variations in the wave field and in the corresponding corrections for the current field, which can be on the same order of magnitude as the actual surface currents of interest. Here we test the ability of a numerical near-shore hindcast model (Delft3D) to produce a wave field to be used for more appropriate computations of corrections for the along-track InSAR data. Our study was conducted at the mouth of the Columbia River on the West Coast of the U.S. during the spring of 2013. Over the course of the experiment, seven TerraSAR-X along-track InSAR images were acquired as well as a variety of in-situ data sets, such as trajectories of GPS-equipped Lagrangian drifters and velocity profiles from acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP). We use the in-situ data to validate our Delft3D model results, and we try to relate spatially varying differences between the measured and simulated surface currents and the TerraSAR-X derived Doppler velocities to the wave spectra obtained from Delft3D and to wave patterns observed in the SAR images. The long-term objective of this work is to derive the wave information and the corresponding velocity corrections from signatures contained in the along-track InSAR data set itself, such that a completely self-consistent correction of along-track InSAR-derived surface current fields for the contributions of spatially varying wave motions

  5. Recent advances in airborne terrestrial remote sensing with the NASA airborne visible/infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS), airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR), and thermal infrared multispectral scanner (TIMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vane, Gregg; Evans, Diane L.; Kahle, Anne B.

    1989-01-01

    Significant progress in terrestrial remote sensing from the air has been made with three NASA-developed sensors that collectively cover the solar-reflected, thermal infrared, and microwave regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. These sensors are the airborne visible/infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS), the thermal infrared mapping spectrometer (TIMS) and the airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR), respectively. AVIRIS and SAR underwent extensive in-flight engineering testing in 1987 and 1988 and are scheduled to become operational in 1989. TIMS has been in operation for several years. These sensors are described.

  6. On the application of DInSAR to deformation monitoring in desert areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Xiao-Tao; Guo, Jin-Yun; Zhang, Yong-Hong; Wang, Xiao-Qing

    2011-03-01

    The DInSAR technique is used for monitoring the desert height changes to study sandstorms. Hunshandake Sandy Land, as the test area, is one of the main sources of sandstorms in Beijing. In order to study the sandstorm source and its impact, a pair of EnviSat ASAR images of Oct. 11, 2005, and Oct. 26, 2004, is processed on the basis of analysis of six ERS-2 and EnviSat radar images. After the image configuration, flat earth effect correction, data filtering, phase unwrapping, and geo-coding, a deformation model over Hunshandake desert is built. According to the results, the height decreased in most areas and increased in a few areas, which basically coincides with the strong sandstorm appearing in Beijing in the Spring of 2005. The results show DInSAR has an important role in monitoring of desert surface deformation.

  7. Using SAR and GPS for Hazard Management and Response: Progress and Examples from the Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, S. E.; Simons, M.; Hua, H.; Yun, S. H.; Agram, P. S.; Milillo, P.; Sacco, G. F.; Webb, F.; Rosen, P. A.; Lundgren, P.; Milillo, G.; Manipon, G. J. M.; Moore, A. W.; Liu, Z.; Polet, J.; Cruz, J.

    2014-12-01

    ARIA is a joint JPL/Caltech project to automate synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and GPS imaging capabilities for scientific understanding, hazard response, and societal benefit. We have built a prototype SAR and GPS data system that forms the foundation for hazard monitoring and response capability, as well as providing imaging capabilities important for science studies. Together, InSAR and GPS have the ability to capture surface deformation in high spatial and temporal resolution. For earthquakes, this deformation provides information that is complementary to seismic data on location, geometry and magnitude of earthquakes. Accurate location information is critical for understanding the regions affected by damaging shaking. Regular surface deformation measurements from SAR and GPS are useful for monitoring changes related to many processes that are important for hazard and resource management such as volcanic deformation, groundwater withdrawal, and landsliding. Observations of SAR coherence change have a demonstrated use for damage assessment for hazards such as earthquakes, tsunamis, hurricanes, and volcanic eruptions. These damage assessment maps can be made from imagery taken day or night and are not affected by clouds, making them valuable complements to optical imagery. The coherence change caused by the damage from hazards (building collapse, flooding, ash fall) is also detectable with intelligent algorithms, allowing for rapid generation of damage assessment maps over large areas at fine resolution, down to the spatial scale of single family homes. We will present the progress and results we have made on automating the analysis of SAR data for hazard monitoring and response using data from the Italian Space Agency's (ASI) COSMO-SkyMed constellation of X-band SAR satellites. Since the beginning of our project with ASI, our team has imaged deformation and coherence change caused by many natural hazard events around the world. We will present progress on our

  8. Investigating the Creeping Segment of the San Andreas Fault using InSAR time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolandone, Frederique; Ryder, Isabelle; Agram, Piyush S.; Burgmann, Roland; Nadeau, Robert M.

    2010-05-01

    We exploit the advanced Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) technique referred to as the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) algorithm to analyze the creeping section of the San Andreas Fault in Central California. Various geodetic creep rate measurements along the Central San Andreas Fault (CSAF) have been made since 1969 including creepmeters, alignment arrays, geodolite, and GPS. They show that horizontal surface displacements increase from a few mm/yr at either end to a maximum of up to ~34 mm/yr in the central portion. They also indicate some discrepancies in rate estimates, with the range being as high as 10 mm/yr at some places along the fault. This variation is thought to be a result of the different geodetic techniques used and of measurements being made at variable distances from the fault. An interferometric stack of 12 interferograms for the period 1992-2001 shows the spatial variation of creep that occurs within a narrow (<2 km) zone close to the fault trace. The creep rate varies spatially along the fault but also in time. Aseismic slip on the CSAF shows several kinds of time dependence. Shallow slip, as measured by surface measurements across the narrow creeping zone, occurs partly as ongoing steady creep, along with brief episodes with slip from mm to cm. Creep rates along the San Juan Bautista segment increased after the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake and slow slip transients of varying duration and magnitude occurred in both transition segments The main focus of this work is to use the SBAS technique to identify spatial and temporal variations of creep on the CSAF. We will present time series of line-of-sight (LOS) displacements derived from SAR data acquired by the ASAR instrument, on board the ENVISAT satellite, between 2003 and 2009. For each coherent pixel of the radar images we compute time-dependent surface displacements as well as the average LOS deformation rate. We compare our results with characteristic repeating microearthquakes that

  9. SAR change detection MTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarborough, Steven; Lemanski, Christopher; Nichols, Howard; Owirka, Gregory; Minardi, Michael; Hale, Todd

    2006-05-01

    This paper examines the theory, application, and results of using single-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data with Moving Reference Processing (MRP) to focus and geolocate moving targets. Moving targets within a standard SAR imaging scene are defocused, displaced, or completely missing in the final image. Building on previous research at AFRL, the SAR-MRP method focuses and geolocates moving targets by reprocessing the SAR data to focus the movers rather than the stationary clutter. SAR change detection is used so that target detection and focusing is performed more robustly. In the cases where moving target returns possess the same range versus slow-time histories, a geolocation ambiguity results. This ambiguity can be resolved in a number of ways. This paper concludes by applying the SAR-MRP method to high-frequency radar measurements from persistent continuous-dwell SAR observations of a moving target.

  10. Evaluation Of A Sea Ice Algorithm For SAR Data From The Bay Of Bothnia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Anders; Eriksson, Leif

    2010-04-01

    A sea ice drift algorithm published by M. Thomas et. al. (2008) has been implemented and evaluated. Input to the algorithm is Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images, which are processed using phase correlation in a multi-resolution processing system. The algorithm has been tested with horizontally co-polarized (HH) ENVISAT ASAR Wide Swath images and RADARSAT-2 ScanSAR images. The possible benefits of using cross-polarized (HV) RADARSAT-2 ScanSAR data are investigated, and initial testing of the algorithm for L-band SAR data from ALOS PALSAR has been done. The validity of the produced motion fields has been tested in three different ways. Most of the SAR images in this analysis were acquired over the Bay of Bothnia. Five meteorological stations located in this region have been collecting wind data with a temporal resolution of three hours. It is confirmed that the wind data correlates with the derived sea ice motion. Another source of validation data that has been used is the daily ice charts published by the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI). The third method used for validation is straightforward, visual tracking of sea ice features. The algorithm is facing some difficulties when it comes to ice tracking close to the shoreline, in archipelagoes etc, since the motionless solution will be favoured. It can however be suppressed by filtering areas of land. This addition gives a more robust algorithm.

  11. An Analysis of Surface Subsidence in Chiba Using PSInSAR Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R. H.; Zhao, Z.; Duan, M. Y.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wang, P.

    2015-06-01

    Currently, surface subsidence has become an important problem what we are facing. Because of complex topography, uneven distribution of rainfall, and the fast development of urbanization, many cities of the world have undergone surface subsidence disaster, such as Chiba, Paris, Tokyo, Beijing. The surface subsidence has occurred in Chiba since the early twenty-first century. The surface subsidence seriously threatens the safety of human life and property. In order to monitor surface subsidence, people have done a lot of research, and time-series InSAR technique with its better coverage, lower cost and high measurement accuracy advantages shows great potentiality for monitoring surface subsidence. Time-series InSAR technique can be applied for analysis of subtle surface subsidence which occurred consistently for a long term period. This paper uses time-series InSAR technique, Permanent Scatterers Interferometric SAR (PSInSAR), to monitor surface subsidence of Chiba. The used dataset consists of thirty-four Envisat ASAR images from September 2006 to August 2010. For the experimental results, this paper uses GPS data to verify the reliability of the results, and the results can provide information for local government to prevent the occurrence of surface subsidence.

  12. Non-invasive deformation analysis of historical buildings through the advanced SBAS-DInSAR technique: the case of the city of Roma (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manunta, Michele; Bonano, Manuela; Marsella, Maria; Lanari, Riccardo

    2010-05-01

    The monitoring of urban areas and man-made structures is of key importance for the preservation of artistic, archaeological and architectural heritage. In this context, the remote sensing techniques may allow non-invasive analysis of large areas by exploiting long time series of satellite data. Among these techniques, the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Interferometry (InSAR) has already demonstrated to be an effective tool for monitoring the displacements occurring in the historical and artistic heritage located in the historical city centers. As a matter of fact, the InSAR technique allows producing spatially dense deformation maps with centimeter to millimeter accuracy, by exploiting the phase difference (interferogram) of temporally separated SAR images relevant to the same analyzed area. In order to guarantee the monitoring of urban area displacements, it is strategic to provide very long term deformation time series by also exploiting SAR data acquired by different sensors. Accordingly, ERS/ENVISAT data archive, providing acquisitions spanning the 1992-2010 time period, might allow us generating very long term deformation time-series. However, an ERS/ENVISAT data combination is limited by the two sensors slightly different carrier frequencies: 5.331 GHz for the ENVISAT sensor and 5.3 GHz for the ERS one. Therefore, because the interferometric phase is dependent on the radiation wavelength, the generation of conventional ERS/ENVISAT cross-interferograms is strongly affected by the induced decorrelation effects. In this work we show the effectiveness of the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) (Berardino et al., 2002; Lanari et al., 2004) approach for the conservation, monitoring and risk prevention of cultural heritage. Indeed, the SBAS technique allows us to produce deformation time series at the scale of the single building by processing very long sequences of ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT (IS2 swath) SAR data, acquired with the same illumination geometry. In particular, the

  13. Climate change effects on Glacier recession in Himalayas using Multitemporal SAR data and Automatic Weather Station observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, V.; Singh, S. K.; Venkataraman, G.

    2009-04-01

    The Himalaya is the highest but the youngest mountain belt (20 to 60 million years B.P.) of the earth running in arc shape for about 2500 km. It has more than 90 peaks above 6000 m and contains about 50% of all glaciers outside of the polar environments (Bahadur, 1993). All glaciers in this region are in general recession since last 150 years (Paul et al.,1979). Gangotri, Siachen, Bara Shigri and Patsio are major glaciers in this region which are showing retreat with different rates and their respective tributary glaciers are completely disconnected from main body of glaciers. Spaceborne synthetic aperture radar data provide an important tool for monitoring the fluctuation of the glaciers. In this paper attempt has been made for quantifying the glacier retreat using multitemporal synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. SAR intensity and phase information will be exploited separately under SAR intensity tracking and interferometric SAR (InSAR) coherence tracking (Strozzi et al., 2002) respectively. Glacier retreat study have been done using time series coregistered multi temporal SAR images. Simultaneously InSAR coherence thresholding is applied for tracking the snout of Gangotri glacier. It is observed that glacier is retreating at the rate of 21 m/a. Availability of high resolution spotlight mode TerraSAR-X SAR data will supplement the ENVISAT ASAR and ERS-1/2 based observations. The observatory in the proximity of Gangotri glacier has been made functional at Bhojbasa and all weather parameters viz. Snow fall, temperature, pressure, air vector, column water vapor and humidity are recorded twice a day as per WMO standards manually and automatically. Three Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) have been established in the glacier area at Bhojbasa , Kalindipass and Nandaban. Since Himalayan environment is presently under great stress of decay and degeneration, AWS data will be analyzed in the context of climate change effects on fluctuation of glaciers. References 1.Jagdish

  14. Different scale land subsidence and ground fissure monitoring with multiple InSAR techniques over Fenwei basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, C.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, C.; Zhang, J.; Zhu, W.; Qu, F.; Liu, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Fenwei basin, China, composed by several sub-basins, has been suffering severe geo-hazards in last 60 years, including large scale land subsidence and small scale ground fissure, which caused serious infrastructure damages and property losses. In this paper, we apply different InSAR techniques with different SAR data to monitor these hazards. Firstly, combined small baseline subset (SBAS) InSAR method and persistent scatterers (PS) InSAR method is used to multi-track Envisat ASAR data to retrieve the large scale land subsidence covering entire Fenwei basin, from which different land subsidence magnitudes are analyzed of different sub-basins. Secondly, PS-InSAR method is used to monitor the small scale ground fissure deformation in Yuncheng basin, where different spatial deformation gradient can be clearly discovered. Lastly, different track SAR data are contributed to retrieve two-dimensional deformation in both land subsidence and ground fissure region, Xi'an, China, which can be benefitial to explain the occurrence of ground fissure and the correlation between land subsidence and ground fissure.

  15. Investigation of ionospheric effects on SAR Interferometry (InSAR): A case study of Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wu; Ding, Xiao-Li; Jung, Hyung-Sup; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Bo-Chen; Qu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) has demonstrated its potential for high-density spatial mapping of ground displacement associated with earthquakes, volcanoes, and other geologic processes. However, this technique may be affected by the ionosphere, which can result in the distortions of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images, phases, and polarization. Moreover, ionospheric effect has become and is becoming further significant with the increasing interest in low-frequency SAR systems, limiting the further development of InSAR technique. Although some research has been carried out, thorough analysis of ionospheric influence on true SAR imagery is still limited. Based on this background, this study performs a thorough investigation of ionospheric effect on InSAR through processing L-band ALOS-1/PALSAR-1 images and dual-frequency Global Positioning System (GPS) data over Hong Kong, where the phenomenon of ionospheric irregularities often occurs. The result shows that the small-scale ionospheric irregularities can cause the azimuth pixel shifts and phase advance errors on interferograms. Meanwhile, it is found that these two effects result in the stripe-shaped features in InSAR images. The direction of the stripe-shaped effects keep approximately constant in space for our InSAR dataset. Moreover, the GPS-derived rate of total electron content change index (ROTI), an index to reflect the level of ionospheric disturbances, may be a useful indicator for predicting the ionospheric effect for SAR images. This finding can help us evaluate the quality of SAR images when considering the ionospheric effect.

  16. Change Detection of the Amery Ice Shelf Front (2004-2012) Using ENVISAT ASAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, C.; Cheng, X.; Liu, Y.

    2012-12-01

    events occurred, there would be more mass loss in the whole Lambert Ice Sheet system, which would accelerate the global sea level rise. Figure 1. The 11 test areas in the Amery Ice Shelf front. The colorized solid lines are the coastlines of the Amery Ice Shelf extracted from ENVISAT ASAR (2004~2012) with the background image of ENVISAT ASAR on February 17, 2012. The black dash line is the ice flow lines of the Antarctic.

  17. Ionospheric Specifications for SAR Interferometry (ISSI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pi, Xiaoqing; Chapman, Bruce D; Freeman, Anthony; Szeliga, Walter; Buckley, Sean M.; Rosen, Paul A.; Lavalle, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The ISSI software package is designed to image the ionosphere from space by calibrating and processing polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) data collected from low Earth orbit satellites. Signals transmitted and received by a PolSAR are subject to the Faraday rotation effect as they traverse the magnetized ionosphere. The ISSI algorithms combine the horizontally and vertically polarized (with respect to the radar system) SAR signals to estimate Faraday rotation and ionospheric total electron content (TEC) with spatial resolutions of sub-kilometers to kilometers, and to derive radar system calibration parameters. The ISSI software package has been designed and developed to integrate the algorithms, process PolSAR data, and image as well as visualize the ionospheric measurements. A number of tests have been conducted using ISSI with PolSAR data collected from various latitude regions using the phase array-type L-band synthetic aperture radar (PALSAR) onboard Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Advanced Land Observing Satellite mission, and also with Global Positioning System data. These tests have demonstrated and validated SAR-derived ionospheric images and data correction algorithms.

  18. Federated query services provided by the Seamless SAR Archive project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, S.; Bryson, G.; Buechler, B.; Meertens, C. M.; Crosby, C. J.; Fielding, E. J.; Nicoll, J.; Youn, C.; Baru, C.

    2013-12-01

    The NASA Advancing Collaborative Connections for Earth System Science (ACCESS) seamless synthetic aperture radar (SAR) archive (SSARA) project is a 2-year collaboration between UNAVCO, the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and OpenTopography at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) to design and implement a seamless distributed access system for SAR data and derived data products (i.e. interferograms). A major milestone for the first year of the SSARA project was a unified application programming interface (API) for SAR data search and results at ASF and UNAVCO (WInSAR and EarthScope data archives) through the use of simple web services. A federated query service was developed using the unified APIs, providing users a single search interface for both archives (http://www.unavco.org/ws/brokered/ssara/sar/search). A command line client that utilizes this new service is provided as an open source utility for the community on GitHub (https://github.com/bakerunavco/SSARA). Further API development and enhancements added more InSAR specific keywords and quality control parameters (Doppler centroid, faraday rotation, InSAR stack size, and perpendicular baselines). To facilitate InSAR processing, the federated query service incorporated URLs for DEM (from OpenTopography) and tropospheric corrections (from the JPL OSCAR service) in addition to the URLs for SAR data. This federated query service will provide relevant QC metadata for selecting pairs of SAR data for InSAR processing and all the URLs necessary for interferogram generation. Interest from the international community has prompted an effort to incorporate other SAR data archives (the ESA Virtual Archive 4 and the DLR TerraSAR-X_SSC Geohazard Supersites and Natural Laboratories collections) into the federated query service which provide data for researchers outside the US and North America.

  19. Forest and Forest Change Mapping with C- and L-band SAR in Liwale, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haarpaintner, J.; Davids, C.; Hindberg, H.; Zahabu, E.; Malimbwi, R. E.

    2015-04-01

    As part of a Tanzanian-Norwegian cooperation project on Monitoring Reporting and Verification (MRV) for REDD+, 2007-2011 Cand L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) backscatter data from Envisat ASAR and ALOS Palsar, respectively, have been processed, analysed and used for forest and forest change mapping over a study side in Liwale District in Lindi Region, Tanzania. Land cover observations from forest inventory plots of the National Forestry Resources Monitoring and Assessment (NAFORMA) project have been used for training Gaussian Mixture Models and k-means classifier that have been combined in order to map the study region into forest, woodland and non-forest areas. Maximum forest and woodland extension masks have been extracted by classifying maximum backscatter mosaics in HH and HV polarizations from the 2007-2011 ALOS Palsar coverage and could be used to map efficiently inter-annual forest change by filtering out changes in non-forest areas. Envisat ASAR APS (alternate polarization mode) have also been analysed with the aim to improve the forest/woodland/non-forest classification based on ALOS Palsar. Clearly, the combination of C-band SAR and L-band SAR provides useful information in order to smooth the classification and especially increase the woodland class, but an overall improvement for the wall-to-wall land type classification has yet to be confirmed. The quality assessment and validation of the results is done with very high resolution optical data from WorldView, Ikonos and RapidEye, and NAFORMA field observations.

  20. A Scheme of Intelligent Oil Spill Monitoring System by SAR for Operational Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Kan; Ma, Youjun; Ding, Xingtao; Zhao, Chaofang; He, Mingxia

    2014-11-01

    A scheme of intelligent oil spill monitoring system by SAR for operational application is presented. The system includes four key techniques. 1) Picking out dark targets from SAR images using a new adaptive threshold segmentation algorithm based on evaluating the trends of background of SAR image along the range direction. The algorithm is applicable for SAR images of different satellites. 2) Filtering out some of look-alikes from dark targets by a chain of rules. 3) Extracting features from all the remained dark targets, selecting the most useful features and then discriminating the targets between oil spill and look-alikes by an artificial neural network (ANN). The feature extraction is based on lots of targets. The ANN experiences enough training. 4) Using an intelligent feedback with expert knowledge and relevant environment parameters to continually optimize system and improve the detection rate. So far, the test on 1448 oil spill and look-alike targets from Envisat/ASAR images shows that the correct recognition rate of the system can reach 88 % without the intelligent feedback.

  1. Advanced interpretation of land subsidence by validating multi-interferometric SAR data: the case study of the Anthemountas basin (northern Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raspini, F.; Loupasakis, C.; Rozos, D.; Moretti, S.

    2013-04-01

    The potential of repeat-pass space borne SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) interferometry has been exploited to investigate spatial patterns of land subsidence in the Anthemountas basin, in the northern part of Greece. The PSI (Persistent Scatterer Interferometry) approach, based on the processing of long series of SAR acquisitions, has been applied to forty-two images acquired in 1995-2001 by ERS1/2 satellites. Interferometric results have been analyzed at a basin scale as support for land motion mapping and at local scale for the characterization of ground motion events affecting the village of Perea in the Thermaikos municipality and the "Macedonia" international airport. PSI results revealed a moderate subsidence phenomenon along the wider coastal zone of Anthemountas basin corresponding to intense groundwater extraction. Highest values, exceeding 20 mm yr-1, were measured in the airport area where the thickest sequence of compressible Quaternary sediments occurs. Intense subsidence has been detected also in the Perea village (maximum deformation up to 10-15 mm yr-1), where a series of fractures, causing damages to both buildings and infrastructure, occurred in 2005-2006. Furthermore, a linear pattern of deformation, elongated parallel to the major normal Thermi fault, has been observed, indicating movements with a probable tectonic component.

  2. Advanced interpretation of land subsidence by validating multi-interferometric SAR data: the case study of the Anthemountas basin (Northern Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raspini, F.; Loupasakis, C.; Rozos, D.; Moretti, S.

    2013-10-01

    The potential of repeat-pass space borne SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) interferometry has been exploited to investigate spatial patterns of land subsidence in the Anthemountas basin, in the northern part of Greece. The PSI (Persistent Scatterer Interferometry) approach, based on the processing of long series of SAR acquisitions, has been applied to forty-two images acquired in 1995-2001 by ERS1/2 satellites. Interferometric results have been analysed at a basin scale as support for land motion mapping and at a local scale for the characterisation of ground motion events affecting the village of Perea in the Thermaikos municipality and the "Macedonia" international airport. PSI results revealed a moderate subsidence phenomenon along the wider coastal zone of Anthemountas basin corresponding to intense groundwater extraction. Highest values, exceeding -20 mm yr-1, were measured in the airport area where the thickest sequence of compressible Quaternary sediments occurs. Intense subsidence has been detected also in the Perea village (maximum deformation of -10 to -15 mm yr-1), where a series of fractures, causing damages to both buildings and infrastructure, occurred in 2005-2006.

  3. Advanced DInSAR analysis for building damage assessment in large urban areas: an application to the city of Roma, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Aranno, Peppe J. V.; Marsella, Maria; Scifoni, Silvia; Scutti, Marianna; Sonnessa, Alberico; Bonano, Manuela

    2015-10-01

    Remote sensing data play an important role for the environmental monitoring because they allow to provide systematic information on very large areas and for a long period of time. Such information must be analyzed, validated and incorporated into proper modeling tools in order to become useful for performing risk assessment analysis. These approaches has been already applied in the field of natural hazard evaluation (i.e. for monitoring seismic, volcanic areas and landslides). However, not enough attention has been devoted to the development of validated methods for implementing quantitative analysis on civil structures. This work is dedicated to the comprehensive utilization of ERS / ENVISAT data store ESA SAR used to detect deformation trends and perform back-analysis of the investigated structures useful to calibrate the damage assessment models. After this preliminary analysis, SAR data of the new satellite mission (ie Cosmo SkyMed) were adopted to monitor the evolution of existent surface deformation processes and to detect new occurrence. The specific objective was to set up a data processing and data analysis chain tailored on a service that sustains the safe maintenance of the built-up environment, including critical construction such as public (schools, hospital, etc), strategic (dam, highways, etc) and also the cultural heritage sites. The analysis of the test area, in the southeastern sector of Roma, has provided three different levels and sub-levels of products from metropolitan area scale (territorial analysis), settlement scale (aggregated analysis) to single structure scale (damage degree associated to the structure).

  4. Complex faulting in the Quetta Syntaxis: fault source modeling of the October 28, 2008 earthquake sequence in Baluchistan, Pakistan, based on ALOS/PALSAR InSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, Muhammad; Furuya, Masato

    2015-09-01

    The Quetta Syntaxis in western Baluchistan, Pakistan, is the result of an oroclinal bend of the western mountain belt and serves as a junction for different faults. As this area also lies close to the left-lateral strike-slip Chaman fault, which marks the boundary between the Indian and Eurasian plates, the resulting seismological behavior of this regime is very complex. In the region of the Quetta Syntaxis, close to the fold and thrust belt of the Sulaiman and Kirthar Ranges, an earthquake with a magnitude of 6.4 (Mw) occurred on October 28, 2008, which was followed by a doublet on the very next day. Six more shocks associated with these major events then occurred (one foreshock and five aftershocks), with moment magnitudes greater than 4. Numerous researchers have tried to explain the source of this sequence based on seismological, GPS, and Environmental Satellite (ENVISAT)/Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) data. Here, we used Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS)/Phased Array-type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) InSAR data sets from both ascending and descending orbits that allow us to more completely detect the deformation signals around the epicentral region. The results indicated that the shock sequence can be explained by two right-lateral and two left-lateral strike-slip faults that also included reverse slip. The right-lateral faults have a curved geometry. Moreover, whereas previous studies have explained the aftershock crustal deformation with a different fault source, we found that the same left-lateral segment of the conjugate fault was responsible for the aftershocks. We thus confirmed the complex surface deformation signals from the moderate-sized earthquake. Intra-plate crustal bending and shortening often seem to be accommodated as conjugate faulting, without any single preferred fault orientation. We also detected two possible landslide areas along with the crustal deformation pattern.

  5. Observation of Directional Ocean Wave Spectra in China Seas and Northwest Pacific Ocean Using SAR Retrieval Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Zeng, Kan; He, Mingxia

    2014-11-01

    A software to retrieve directional ocean wave spectra from SAR images has been developed for China seas and northwest Pacific. The software, written with C programming language, is based on the MPI method proposed by Hasselmann. It is designed to support the wave mode SAR data of ERS, Envisat, Sentinel and so on. The directional ocean wave spectra produced by this software are validated with buoy data in global ocean area, northwest Pacific and China seas and the retrieved significant wave height (SWH) errors are 5.2%, 4.9% and 9.3% respectively. About 15,000 directional ocean wave spectra are obtained with the software from the wave mode data of Envisat/ASAR over the China seas and northwest Pacific during the period between Jan 2003 and Jan 2012. The preliminary analysis is presented.

  6. Land Subsidence Detection in Agricultural Areas of Konya Closed Basin by PS-InSAR and GNSS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canaslan Comut, Fatma; Lazecky, Milan; Ustun, Aydin; Yalvack, Sefa

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to determine and to monitor the areas affected by land subsidence caused by the decrease of groundwater, by using geodetic methods in Konya Closed Basin, Turkey. The GPS and InSAR techniques which complement each other perfectly will be used to deduce spatial deformations caused by the land subsidence. The land subsidence activity in the area of Küçükköy situated at the Konya Closed Basin (KCB) of the Central Anatolia Region in Turkey has been studied using the Stanford Method for Persistent Scatterers (StaMPS) InSAR technique. Significant movements of land subsidence ranging from mm to cm per year were detected with ENVISAT ASAR data between 2003 and 2010 above the city center. Results are also compared with GNSS measurements. Estimated deformation rate of KCKY GPS station is approximately - 2 cm/yr.

  7. SAR image registration in absolute coordinates using GPS carrier phase position and velocity information

    SciTech Connect

    Burgett, S.; Meindl, M.

    1994-09-01

    It is useful in a variety of military and commercial application to accurately register the position of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery in absolute coordinates. The two basic SAR measurements, range and doppler, can be used to solve for the position of the SAR image. Imprecise knowledge of the SAR collection platform`s position and velocity vectors introduce errors in the range and doppler measurements and can cause the apparent location of the SAR image on the ground to be in error by tens of meters. Recent advances in carrier phase GPS techniques can provide an accurate description of the collection vehicle`s trajectory during the image formation process. In this paper, highly accurate carrier phase GPS trajectory information is used in conjunction with SAR imagery to demonstrate a technique for accurate registration of SAR images in WGS-84 coordinates. Flight test data will be presented that demonstrates SAR image registration errors of less than 4 meters.

  8. Multi-frequency SAR data help improving the monitoring of intertidal flats on the German North Sea coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gade, Martin; Melchionna, Sabrina; Stelzer, Kerstin; Kohlus, Jörn

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate that Synthetic Apertur Radar (SAR) data have great potential to improve an existing monitoring system based on optical data for intertidal flats and to complement the classification of sediments, macrophytes, and mussels in the German Wadden Sea. Multi-satellite SAR data acquired at different radar bands (L, C, and X band, from ALOS PALSAR, from ERS SAR, Radarsat-2 and ENVISAT ASAR, and from TerraSAR-X, respectively) were used to investigate whether they can be jointly used for crude sediment classification on dry-fallen intertidal flats and for detecting benthic fauna such as blue mussel or oyster beds. In this respect, we show that both multi-satellite and multi-temporal analyses provide valuable input for the routine monitoring of exposed intertidal flats on the German North Sea coast, the latter already improving the identification of the spatial extent of mussel (oyster) beds. In addition, we demonstrate that high-resolution SAR is capable of detecting residuals of historical land use in areas that were lost to the sea during major storm surges in the 14th and 17th centuries.

  9. Integration of SMOS and ENVISAT ASAR data for sea ice change study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LUO, S.; Cheng, X.; Hui, F.

    2013-12-01

    Observations of nearly 30 years show that Arctic sea ice is changing rapidly since the 21st century. The coverage as well as the thickness of sea ice decreased year by year, indicating that the ice condition is getting lighter. The Northeast passage is the connection of the North Atlantic and North Pacific. The Northeast passage is expected to be open as a trading channel in the near future, which will shorten the journey, greatly reducing the transport costs from East Asia to northern Europe. The suitable navigation time of Northeast passage varies greatly year by year, which is mainly dominated by the sea ice conditions among Russia's New Siberian Island, severnaya zemlya and mainland. In this study, we choose the ocean surface area near New Siberian Island and Vilkitskogo Strait near severnaya zemlya as study area. The sea ice thickness data in the area (from October 15th to March 31st of the second year, 2010-2012) inverted from SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) brightness temperature are used to study the sea ice thickness change in the 3 years. ENVISAT ASAR data (2010-2012) were used to validate the accuracy of sea ice thickness inverted by brightness temperature of SMOS data, and also to study the spatio-temporal dynamic of sea ice. Preliminary results showed that: 1) The sea ice thickness has decreased in the area around New Siberian Island from 2012 to 2012, while the sea ice thickness of Vilkitskogo Strait near severnaya zemlya changes less. 2)As the most critical factor affectting navigation,sea ice thickness is of significant seasonal change. The freezing time in October is postponing. 3) The sea ice thickness data inverted by brightness temperature of SMOS data are more accurate in winter.

  10. Monitoring and analyzing surface subsidence based on SBAS-InSAR in Beijing region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L.; Guo, J. M.; Li, X.

    2015-12-01

    Surface subsidence is the main regional environmental geological disaster in plain area in China. The rapid growth of population, the over-exploitation of groundwater and the rapid development of urbanization impacts the occurrence and development of surface subsidence to some extent. The city of Beijing, located in the Beijing Plain, is one of international metropolis in China that experiences the severe surface subsidence. Because of conventional measurement methods with low spatial resolution, differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar(D-InSAR) is susceptible to signal decorrelation and atmospheric delay, persistent scatterer interferometric synthetic aperture radar(PS-InSAR) is based on a large number of SAR images, but small baseline subset interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SBASInSAR) only needs a small number of images and performs better than PS-InSAR for obtaining nonlinear deformation information, in this paper, SBAS-InSAR was used to obtain the high resolution surface subsidence information in Beijing region, China. A spatial-temporal analysis of the surface subsidence in Beijing region during the years of 2007- 2010 was performed utilizing eighteen C-band ENVISAT ASAR images (from August 1, 2007 to September 29, 2010). The results show that subsidence in Beijing region is severe uneven, subsidence funnels appear in Changping District, Shunyi District, Tongzhou District, Daxing District, etc., and many subsidence funnels are interconnected and have an eastward expansion trend; during the period of 2007 to 2010, the subsidence velocities are in the range of -158.5 mm/year to 12.4 mm/year and the maximum subsidence of subsidence center is over 400 mm; surface subsidence is influenced by groundwater exploitation and urbanization significantly.

  11. SAR antenna calibration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carver, K. R.; Newell, A. C.

    1978-01-01

    Calibration of SAR antennas requires a measurement of gain, elevation and azimuth pattern shape, boresight error, cross-polarization levels, and phase vs. angle and frequency. For spaceborne SAR antennas of SEASAT size operating at C-band or higher, some of these measurements can become extremely difficult using conventional far-field antenna test ranges. Near-field scanning techniques offer an alternative approach and for C-band or X-band SARs, give much improved accuracy and precision as compared to that obtainable with a far-field approach.

  12. On the assessment of re-assimilation of ASAR Wave Spectra in the ERA-Interim Reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bué, Isabel; Semedo, Alvaro; Aouf, Lotfi; Catalão, João

    2016-04-01

    The Sentinel-1A satellite, launched on April 3 2014, is the first of the new European Spatial Agency (ESA) missions developed for the Copernicus initiative. The European Earth observations program Copernicus will offer vital environmental information for the global monitoring of climate, for meteorological forecast, as well as for new security aspects concerning environment catastrophes. The Sentinel-1 platform will ensure the continuity of global wave spectra measurements from space, already available since 1991 with ERS-1, ERS-2 and ENVISAT/ASAR, thanks to one mode of acquisition that is dedicated to swell measurements in open ocean, the wave mode. This satellite constellation comprises two polar orbiting satellites, operating in a tandem mode, with the second (the Sentinel 1B), sharing the same orbital plane with a 180° orbital phasing difference, being launched during 2016. The satellites will perform as a C-band ASAR imagers and will operate day and night, regardless of the weather. In this study significant wave height (SWH) comparisons between wave altimetry measurements from ERS-2 and ENVISAT and several wave buoy measurements in the North Atlantic, and the ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) ERA-Interim reanalysis, are presented trough the triple-collocation method. The triple collocation method is needed to use all the different data (due to the different acquisitions, resolutions, time and space positioning), having the buoy positions as the key element for the positioning of all measurements. The triple collocated data will then be compared with SWH computed from the wave spectra retrievals from the ENVISAT ASAR wave mode. After that the ERA-Interim wave spectra is statistically corrected with the ENVISAT measured spectra, with an evaluation of the gains of this process.

  13. SAR calibration technology review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. L.; Larson, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) calibration technology including a general description of the primary calibration techniques and some of the factors which affect the performance of calibrated SAR systems are reviewed. The use of reference reflectors for measurement of the total system transfer function along with an on-board calibration signal generator for monitoring the temporal variations of the receiver to processor output is a practical approach for SAR calibration. However, preliminary error analysis and previous experimental measurements indicate that reflectivity measurement accuracies of better than 3 dB will be difficult to achieve. This is not adequate for many applications and, therefore, improved end-to-end SAR calibration techniques are required.

  14. Mapping tillage operations over a peri-urban region using combined SPOT4 and ASAR/ENVISAT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaudour, E.; Baghdadi, N.; Gilliot, J. M.

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed at assessing the potential of combining synchronous SPOT4 and ENVISAT/ASAR images (HH and HV polarizations) for mapping tillage operations (TOs) of bare agricultural fields over a peri-urban area characterized by conventional tillage system in the western suburbs of Paris (France). The reference spatial units for spatial modeling are 57 within-field areas named “reference zones” (RZs) homogeneous for their soil properties, constructed in the vicinity of 57 roughness measurement locations, spread across 20 agricultural fields for which TOs were known. The total RZ dataset was half dedicated to successive random selections of training/validating RZs, the remaining half (29 RZs) being kept for validating the final map results. Five supervised per-pixels classifiers were used in order to map 2 TOs classes (seedbed&harrowed and late winter plough) in addition to 4 landuse classes (forest, urban, crops and grass, water bodies): support vector machine with polynomial kernel (pSVM), SVM with radial basis kernel (rSVM), artificial neural network (ANN), Maximum Likelihood (ML), and regression tree (RT). All 5 classifiers were implemented in a bootstrapping approach in order to assess the uncertainty of map results. The best results were obtained with pSVM for the SPOT4/ASAR pair with producer's and user's mean validation accuracies (PmVA/UmVA) of 91.7%/89.8% and 73.2%/73.3% for seedbed&harrowed and late winter plough conditions, respectively. Whatever classifier, the SPOT4/ASAR pair appeared to perform better than each of the single images, particularly for late winter plough: PmVA/UmVA of 61.6%/53.0% for the single SPOT4 image; 0%/6% for the single ASAR image. About 73% of the validation agricultural fields (79% of the RZs) were correctly predicted in terms of TOs in the best pSVM-derived final map. Final map results could be improved through masking non-agricultural areas with land use identification system layer prior to classifying images. Such

  15. SARS/avian coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Monceyron Jonassen, C

    2006-01-01

    In the hunt for the aetiology of the SARS outbreak in 2003, a newly developed virus DNA micro-array was successfully used to hybridise PCR products obtained by random amplification of nucleic acids extracted from a cell culture infected with material from a SARS patient. The SARS agent was found to hybridise with micro-array probes from both coronaviruses and astroviruses, but one of the coronavirus probes and the four astrovirus probes contained redundant sequences, spanning a highly conserved motif, named s2m, found at the 3' end of the genomes of almost all astroviruses, one picornavirus, and the poultry coronaviruses. The three other coronavirus probes, that hybridised with the SARS agent, were located in the replicase gene, and it could be concluded that the SARS agent was a novel coronavirus, harbouring s2m. The presence of this motif in different virus families is probably the result of recombinations between unrelated viruses, but its presence in both poultry and SARS coronaviruses could suggest a bird involvement in the history of the SARS coronavirus. A recent screening of wild birds for the presence of coronaviruses, using a pan-coronavirus RT-PCR, led to the identification of novel coronaviruses in the three species studied. Phylogenetic analyses performed on both replicase gene and nucleocapsid protein could not add support to a close relationship between avian and SARS coronaviruses, but all the novel avian coronaviruses were found to harbour s2m. The motif is inserted at a homologous place in avian and SARS coronavirus genomes, but in a somewhat different context for the SARS coronavirus. If the presence of s2m in these viruses is a result of two separate recombination events, this suggests that its particular position in these genomes is the only one that would not be deleterious for coronaviral replication, or that it is the result of a copy-choice recombination between coronaviruses, following an ancestral introduction in the coronavirus family by

  16. Characteristics of short-period internal waves in the Kara Sea inferred from satellite SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, I. E.; Kudryavtsev, V. N.; Zubkova, E. V.; Zimin, A. V.; Chapron, B.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we present the results of short-period internal wave (SIW) observations in the Kara Sea on the basis of satellite ENVISAT ASAR data between July and October 2007. Altogether, 248 internal wave (IW) packets and solitons are identified in 89 SAR images. Detailed spatial statistics of IW signatures and their properties in the Kara Sea is presented. The primary regions of IW activity are the areas near the Kara Gates Strait, the southeastern part of the Novaya Zemlya Trough, and in the vicinity of Cape Zhelaniya. We identify the regions where large IW packets are observed with wavelengths up to 2-3 km and the front length exceeding 200 km. The mean interpacket distance for observed IWs is about 20 km, but it may reach 50-60 km. Consequent IW packets are observed to travel up to 500 km from the presumed generation points. The results of satellite observations are compared with results of previous studies.

  17. Monitoring Structure and Regional-Level Displacements for Lisbon Using Mltitemporal InSAR Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roque, Dora; Perissin, Daniele Falcao, Ana Paula; Fonseca, Ana Maria; Henriques, Maria Joao

    2015-05-01

    The city of Lisbon is the capital of Portugal and has been devastated by catastrophic events in the past, such as earthquakes and tsunamis. This study provides a regional analysis of displacements for the city and its neighbourhoods, between 2008 and 2010, through the application of mutitemporal InSAR techniques on Envisat ASAR images. Smaller areas with identified problems were subjected to a more refined processing. Besides, the behaviour of some key infrastructures, such as important buildings or railways, was carefully analysed in order to evaluate their safety. Subsidence was detected at the regional and small areas, in which the highest subsidence rates were verified on industrial parks or on landfills close to the river. Seasonal trends were found for the small areas, mainly related with structure thermal expansion or variations in underground water.

  18. Volcano deformation analysis based an on-demand DInSAR-GRID system: the SBAS-GPOD solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manunta, M.; Casu, F.; Cossu, R.; Fusco, L.; Guarino, S.; Lanari, R.; Mazzarella, G.; Sansosti, E.

    2009-04-01

    Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR) has already demonstrated to be an effective technique to detect and monitor ground displacements with centimeter accuracy. Moreover, the recent development of advanced DInSAR techniques, aimed at the generation of deformation time series, has led to the exploitation of the large archive of SAR data acquired all over the world, during the last 16 years, by the ERS, ENVISAT and RADARSAT satellites. Among these advanced approaches, we focus on the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) algorithm that relies on the combination of DInSAR data pairs, characterized by a small separation between the acquisition orbits (baseline), in order to produce mean deformation velocity maps and the corresponding time series, maximizing the coherent pixel density of the investigated area. One of the main capabilities of the SBAS approach is the possibility to work at two spatial resolution scales, thus allowing us to investigate deformation phenomena affecting both extended areas (with resolution of about 100 by 100 m) and selected zones, in the latter case highlighting localized displacements that may affect single structures or buildings (at the full instrument resolution). Similarly to other advanced DInSAR techniques, the SBAS approach requires extended data storage and processing capabilities due to the large amount of data exploited for the generation of the final products. Accordingly, we present in this work the results of the first experiment to "plug" the robustness of the SBAS algorithm into the high computing capability provided by a GRID-based system. In particular, we have exploited the low-resolution SBAS algorithm [1] and the ESA Grid Processing-on-Demand (G-POD) system. This environment is one of the results achieved by the ESA Science and Application Department of Earth Observation Programmes Directorate at ESRIN that focused, following the participation to the DATAGRID project (the first large European Commission funded Grid project

  19. Monitoring ground subsidence in Shanghai maglev area using two kinds of SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jicang; Zhang, Lina; Chen, Jie; Li, Tao

    2012-11-01

    Shanghai maglev is a very fast traffic tool, so it is very strict with the stability of the roadbed. However, the ground subsidence is a problem in Shanghai because of the poor geological condition and human-induced factors. So it is necessary to monitor ground subsidence in the area along the Shanghai maglev precisely and frequently. Traditionally, a precise levelling method is used to survey along the track. It is expensive and time consuming, and can only get the ground subsidence information on sparse benchmarks. Recently, the small baseline differential SAR technique plays a valuable part in monitoring ground subsidence, which can extract ground subsidence information with high spatial resolution in a wide area. In this paper, L-band ALOS PALSAR data and C-band Envisat ASAR data are used to extract ground subsidence information using the SBAS method in the Shanghai maglev area. The results show that the general pattern of ground subsidence from InSAR processing of two differential bands of SAR images is similar. Both results show that there is no significant ground subsidence on the maglev line. Near the railway line, there are a few places with subsidence rates at about -20 mm/y or even more, such as Chuansha town, the junction of the maglev and Waihuan road.

  20. A novel multi-band SAR data technique for fully automatic oil spill detection in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Frate, Fabio; Latini, Daniele; Taravat, Alireza; Jones, Cathleen E.

    2013-10-01

    With the launch of the Italian constellation of small satellites for the Mediterranean basin observation COSMO-SkyMed and the German TerraSAR-X missions, the delivery of very high-resolution SAR data to observe the Earth day or night has remarkably increased. In particular, also taking into account other ongoing missions such as Radarsat or those no longer working such as ALOS PALSAR, ERS-SAR and ENVISAT the amount of information, at different bands, available for users interested in oil spill analysis has become highly massive. Moreover, future SAR missions such as Sentinel-1 are scheduled for launch in the very next years while additional support can be provided by Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle (UAV) SAR systems. Considering the opportunity represented by all these missions, the challenge is to find suitable and adequate image processing multi-band procedures able to fully exploit the huge amount of data available. In this paper we present a new fast, robust and effective automated approach for oil-spill monitoring starting from data collected at different bands, polarizations and spatial resolutions. A combination of Weibull Multiplicative Model (WMM), Pulse Coupled Neural Network (PCNN) and Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) techniques is proposed for achieving the aforementioned goals. One of the most innovative ideas is to separate the dark spot detection process into two main steps, WMM enhancement and PCNN segmentation. The complete processing chain has been applied to a data set containing C-band (ERS-SAR, ENVISAT ASAR), X-band images (Cosmo-SkyMed and TerraSAR-X) and L-band images (UAVSAR) for an overall number of more than 200 images considered.

  1. Detecting Moorland Wildfire Scars and their Persistence in the Landscape using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) in the Peak District National Park, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millin-chalabi, G. R.; McMorrow, J.; Agnew, C.

    2012-12-01

    The overall aim of this research is to assess the ability of SAR to detect moorland wildfire scars and their persistence in the landscape using the Peak District National Park (PDNP) in the UK as a case study. Spatially-robust data to monitor wildfire scar size and severity in UK moorlands is currently rare. Fires can burn deep into peat soils and contribute to the release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere and may also affect the water quality of nearby streams. Information on fire extent would be useful for conservation organisations such as Moors For The Future who are trying to preserve the delicate peatland environment. Knowing the size and location of fire scars would help the Fire and Rescue Service to plan future response to moorland fires. Fire scar boundaries can be mapped in the field using Global Positioning Systems (GPS), however this is labour intensive. Indeed in the PDNP wildfire scar mapping is conducted by park rangers which provides essential ground truth data for assessing against the SAR data. Therefore this particular area provides a unique opportunity for testing an alternative SAR technique for monitoring wildfire scars in the moorland landscape. Previous research shows that SAR has been successfully applied for wildfire scar detection in other types of environments such as boreal (Bourgeau-Chavez et al, 1997) and the tropics (Huang and Siegert, 2004). This research presents some of the first results of the project which tests the capability of ERS 2; ASAR (C-band) and PALSAR (L-band) data to detect several wildfire scars from 2003 - 2008 of various spatial scales and fire severity. Some of the key areas of interest the paper will explore are at Bleaklow and the Kinder plateau. The Bleaklow peat fire of 18th April 2003 was larger (7km2) and more severe than at Kinder, which burned between 26-29th May 2008 and covered an area of 10 ha. All the wildfire scars were GPS, mapped just after the fire event. Archival time-series SAR imagery was

  2. Mapping tillage operations over peri-urban croplands using a synchronous SPOT4/ASAR ENVISAT pair and soil roughness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaudour, Emmanuelle; Baghdadi, Nicolas; Gilliot, Jean-Marc

    2014-05-01

    Tillage operations (TOs) affect nutrient uptake, carbon sequestration, water and CO2 exchanges in soil, and therefore impact soil ecology together with biophysical processes such as soil erosion, leaching, run-off and infiltration. They are critical for parameterizing complex dynamic models of carbon and nitrogen. This study done in the framework of the Prostock-Gessol3 project presents an approach for mapping TOs of bare agricultural fields over a peri-urban area characterized by conventional tillage system in the western suburbs of Paris (France), combining synchronous SPOT4 and ENVISAT/ASAR images (HH and HV polarizations). Spatial modeling relied on 57 reference within-field areas named 'reference zones' (RZs) homogeneous for their soil properties, constructed in the vicinity of 57 roughness measurement locations and spread across 20 agricultural fields for which TOs were known. Soil roughness expressed as the standard deviation of surface height (Hrms) was estimated on the ground with a fully automatic photogrammetric method based on the processing of a set of overlapping pictures taken from different viewpoints from a simple digital camera all around a rectangular frame. The relationship was studied between the mean backscattering coefficient of the ASAR image and Hrms choosing a limited set of 28 RZs, on which successive random selections of training/validating RZs were then performed; the remaining 29 RZs were kept for validating the final map results. Six supervised per-pixel classifiers were used in order to map 2 TOs classes (seedbed&harrowed and late winter plough) in addition to 4 landuse classes (forest, urban,crops and grass, water bodies): support vector machine with polynomial kernel (pSVM), SVM with radial basis kernel (rSVM), artificial neural network (ANN), Maximum Likelihood (ML), regression tree (RT), and random forests (RF). All 6 classifiers were implemented in a bootstrapping approach in order to assess the uncertainty of map results. The

  3. On Level Ice Thickness Retrieval in the Kara Sea Using MODIS and Envisat ASAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makynen, Marko; Simila, Markku; Cheng, Bin

    2010-12-01

    We propose here an approach to use jointly ENVISAT SAR and MODIS data and high-resolution thermodynamic snow/ice model (HIGHTSI) to estimate the thickness of first-year sea ice in cold winter conditions. For thin ice areas the sea ice thickness is retrieved from the MODIS based ice surface temperature (Ts) and HIRLAM forcing data. When estimating the ice thickness in the older and thicker drift ice areas, ice thickness field produced by HIGHTSI is used as a background field which constraints backscattering coefficient based ice thickness range. Our test data set consists of four MODIS-SAR image pairs taken over the Kara Sea in Dec 2008 - Mar 2009. The MODIS based ice thickness retrievals were consistent with each other. We estimated their uncertainty to be less than 25% for young ice. However, the HIRLAM modelled air temperature seems to be somewhat lower than could be inferred from Ts. This bias affected the MODIS ice thickness retrieval process by decreasing the retrieved ice thickness significantly for thicker ice fields. On a scale 10-100 km the spatial distribution of the ice thickness provided by our algorithm follows roughly the AARI ice charts which were used as a ground truth.

  4. SAR calibration: A technology review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. W.; Politis, D. T.; Shuchman, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Various potential applications of amplitude-calibrated SAR systems are briefly described, along with an estimate of calibration performance requirements. A review of the basic SAR calibration problem is given. For background purposes and to establish consistent definition of terms, various conventional SAR performance parameters are reviewed along with three additional parameters which are directly related to calibrated SAR systems. Techniques for calibrating a SAR are described. Included in the results presented are: calibration philosophy and procedures; review of the calibration signal generator technology development with results describing both the development of instrumentation and internal calibration measurements for two SAR systems; summary of analysis and measurements required to determine optimum retroreflector design and configuration for use as a reference for the absolute calibration of a SAR system; and summary of techniques for in-flight measurements of SAR antenna response.

  5. Segmentation Of Polarimetric SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, Eric J. M.; Chellappa, Rama

    1994-01-01

    Report presents one in continuing series of studies of segmentation of polarimetric synthetic-aperture-radar, SAR, image data into regions. Studies directed toward refinement of method of automated analysis of SAR data.

  6. Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benveniste, Jerome; Lucas, Bruno; DInardo, Salvatore

    2015-04-01

    The prime objective of the SEOM (Scientific Exploitation of Operational Missions) element is to federate, support and expand the large international research community that the ERS, ENVISAT and the Envelope programmes have build up over the last 20 years for the future European operational Earth Observation missions, the Sentinels. Sentinel-3 builds directly on a proven heritage of ERS-2 and Envisat, and CryoSat-2, with a dual-frequency (Ku and C band) advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar Altimeter (SRAL) that provides measurements at a resolution of ~300m in SAR mode along track. Sentinel-3 will provide exact measurements of sea-surface height along with accurate topography measurements over sea ice, ice sheets, rivers and lakes. The first of the two Sentinels is expected to be launched in early 2015. The current universal altimetry toolbox is BRAT (Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox) which can read all previous and current altimetry mission's data, but it does not have the capabilities to read the upcoming Sentinel-3 L1 and L2 products. ESA will endeavour to develop and supply this capability to support the users of the future Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Mission. BRAT is a collection of tools and tutorial documents designed to facilitate the processing of radar altimetry data. This project started in 2005 from the joint efforts of ESA (European Space Agency) and CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales), and it is freely available at http://earth.esa.int/brat. The tools enable users to interact with the most common altimetry data formats, the BratGUI is the front-end for the powerful command line tools that are part of the BRAT suite. BRAT can also be used in conjunction with Matlab/IDL (via reading routines) or in C/C++/Fortran via a programming API, allowing the user to obtain desired data, bypassing the data-formatting hassle. BRAT can be used simply to visualise data quickly, or to translate the data into other formats such as netCDF, ASCII text files, KML (Google Earth

  7. The Accuratre Signal Model and Imaging Processing in Geosynchronous SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Cheng

    With the development of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) application, the disadvantage of low earth orbit (LEO) SAR becomes more and more apparent. The increase of orbit altitude can shorten the revisit time and enlarge the coverage area in single look, and then satisfy the application requirement. The concept of geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO) SAR system is firstly presented and deeply discussed by K.Tomiyasi and other researchers. A GEO SAR, with its fine temporal resolution, would overcome the limitations of current imaging systems, allowing dense interpretation of transient phenomena as GPS time-series analysis with a spatial density several orders of magnitude finer. Until now, the related literatures about GEO SAR are mainly focused in the system parameter design and application requirement. As for the signal characteristic, resolution calculation and imaging algorithms, it is nearly blank in the related literatures of GEO SAR. In the LEO SAR, the signal model analysis adopts the `Stop-and-Go' assumption in general, and this assumption can satisfy the imaging requirement in present advanced SAR system, such as TerraSAR, Radarsat2 and so on. However because of long propagation distance and non-negligible earth rotation, the `Stop-and-Go' assumption does not exist and will cause large propagation distance error, and then affect the image formation. Furthermore the long propagation distance will result in the long synthetic aperture time such as hundreds of seconds, therefore the linear trajectory model in LEO SAR imaging will fail in GEO imaging, and the new imaging model needs to be proposed for the GEO SAR imaging processing. In this paper, considering the relative motion between satellite and earth during signal propagation time, the accurate analysis method for propagation slant range is firstly presented. Furthermore, the difference between accurate analysis method and `Stop-and-Go' assumption is analytically obtained. Meanwhile based on the derived

  8. Ground deformation monitoring using small baseline DInSAR technique: A case study in Taiyuan City from 2003 to 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, H.-A.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Chen, X.-Y.; Lu, T.; Du, J.; Sun, Z.-H.; Sun, G.-T.

    2011-01-01

    DInSAR technique based on time series of SAR images has been very popular to monitor ground stow deformation in recent years such as permanent scatterers (PS) method small baseline subsets (SBAS) method and coherent targets (CT) method. By taking advantage of PS method and CT method in this paper small baseline DTnSAR technique is used to investigate the ground deformation of Taiyuan City Shanxi Province from 2003 to 2009 by using 23 ENVISAT ASAR images. The experiment results demonstrate that: (1) during this period four significant subsidence centers have been developed in Taiyuan namely Xiayuan Wujiabu Xiaodian Sunjiazhai. The largest subsidence center is Sunjiazhai with an average subsidence rate of -77. 28 mm/a; (2) The subsidence of the old center Wanbolin has sHowed down. And the subsidence in the northern region has stopped and some areas even rebounded. (3) The change of subsidence centers indicates that the control measures of "closing wells and reducing exploitation" taken by the Taiyuan government has achieved initial effects. (4) The experiment results have been validated with leveling data and the acouracy is 2. 90 mm which shows that the small baseline DInSAR technique can be used to monitor urban ground deformation.

  9. PHARUS airborne SAR concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoeij, Paul; Pouwels, Henk; Koomen, Peter J.; Hoogeboom, Peter

    1995-11-01

    PHARUS (phased array universal SAR) is an airborne SAR concept which is being developed in the Netherlands. The PHARUS system differs from other airborne SARs by the use of a phased array antenna, which provides both for the flexibility in the design as well as for a compact, light-weight instrument that can be carried on small aircraft. The concept allows for the construction of airborne SAR systems on a common generic basis but tailored to specific user needs and can be seen as a preparation for future spaceborne SAR systems using solid state transmitters with electronically steerable phased array antenna. The whole approach is aimed at providing an economic and yet technically sophisticated solution to remote sensing or surveying needs of a specific user. The solid state phased array antenna consists of a collection of radiating patches; the design flexibility for a large part resides in the freedom to choose the number of patches, and thereby the essential radar performance parameters such as resolution and swath width. Another consequence of the use of the phased array antenna is the system's compactness and the possibility to rigidly mount it on a small aircraft. The use of small aircraft of course considerably improves the cost/benefit ratio of the use of airborne SAR. Flight altitude of the system is flexible between about 7,000 and 40,000 feet, giving much operational freedom within the meteo and airspace control limits. In the PHARUS concept the airborne segment is complemented by a ground segment, which consists of a SAR processor, possibly extended by a matching image processing package. (A quick look image is available in real-time on board the aircraft.) The SAR processor is UNIX based and runs on easily available hardware (SUN station). Although the additional image processing software is available, the SAR processing software is nevertheless designed to be able to interface with commercially available image processing software, as well as being able

  10. MR enterography in Crohn's disease: current consensus on optimal imaging technique and future advances from the SAR Crohn's disease-focused panel.

    PubMed

    Grand, David J; Guglielmo, Flavius F; Al-Hawary, Mahmoud M

    2015-06-01

    MR enterography is a powerful tool for the non-invasive evaluation of patients with Crohn's disease (CD) without ionizing radiation. The following paper describes the current consensus on optimal imaging technique, interpretation, and future advances from the Society of Abdominal Radiology CD-focused panel. PMID:25666967

  11. Interseismic strain accumulation across the Ashkabad fault (NE Iran) from MERIS-corrected ASAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, R. J.; Elliott, J. R.; Li, Z.; Parsons, B. E.

    2011-12-01

    The right-lateral Ashkabad Fault separates deforming NE Iran from the stable Turkmenistan platform to the north, and also facilitates the north-westwards extrusion of the South Caspian block (along with the left-lateral Shahrud fault zone). The fault represents the northernmost boundary of significant deformation of the Arabia-Eurasia collision in NE Iran. The 1948 M 7.3 Ashkabad earthquake, which killed around 110,000 people and was the deadliest earthquake to hit Europe or the Middle East in the 20th Century, also possibly occurred on this fault. However, the slip rate and therefore the seismic hazard that the Ashkabad fault represents are not well known. GPS data in NE Iran are sparse, and there are no direct geological or quaternary rates for the main strand of the fault. We use Envisat ASAR data acquired between 2003 and 2010 to measure interseismic strain accumulation across the fault, and hence estimate the slip rate across it. Due to the proximity of this region to the Caspian Sea and the presence of highly variable weather systems, we use data from Envisat's Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) instrument, as well as modelled weather data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF), to correct interferograms for differences in water vapour and atmospheric pressure. We mitigate the effects of remaining noise by summing the 13 corrected interferograms that cover the fault, effectively creating a 30 year interferogram with improved signal-to-noise ratio, and we empirically correct for orbital errors. Our measurements of rates of displacement are consistent with an interseismic model for the Ashkabad fault where deformation occurs at depth on a narrow shear zone below a layer in which the fault is locked. We invert the data to solve for best fitting model parameters, estimating both the slip rate and the depth to which the fault is locked. Our measurements show that the Ashkabad fault is accumulating strain at a rate of 9 mm

  12. Polarization effects and multipolarization SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    Imaging radar polarimeters are usually implemented using a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) approach to give a high resolution image in two dimensions: range and azimuth. For each pixel in the image a polarimetric SAR gives sufficient information to characterize the polarimetric scattering properties of the imaged area (or target) as seen by the radar. Using a polarimetric SAR system as opposed to a single-polarization SAR system provides significantly more information about the target scattering mechanisms and allows better discrimination between different types of surfaces. In these notes a brief overview of SAR polarimetry is offered. The notes are intended as a text to accompany a lecture on SAR polarimetry as part of an AGARD-NATO course. Covered in the notes are the following: the polarization properties of electromagnetic waves; the concepts of radar scattering and measuring radar backscatter with a SAR; polarization synthesis; scattering matrix, Stokes matrix, and covariance matrix representations of polarimetric SAR data; polarization signature plots; design and calibration of polarimetric SAR systems; polarization filtering for target detection; fitting a simple model to polarimetric SAR measurements of naturally occurring features; and supervised classification of polarimetric SAR data.

  13. Understanding SARS with Wolfram approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Da-Wei; Pan, Yu-Xi; Duan, Yun; Hung, Zhen-De; Xu, Ming-Qing; He, Lin

    2004-01-01

    Stepping acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) as another type of disease has been threatening mankind since late last year. Many scientists worldwide are making great efforts to study the etiology of this disease with different approaches. 13 species of SARS virus have been sequenced. However, most people still largely rely on the traditional methods with some disadvantages. In this work, we used Wolfram approach to study the relationship among SARS viruses and between SARS viruses and other types of viruses, the effect of variations on the whole genome and the advantages in the analysis of SARS based on this novel approach. As a result, the similarities between SARS viruses and other coronaviruses are not really higher than those between SARS viruses and non-coronaviruses. PMID:14732867

  14. Bistatic SAR: Proof of Concept.

    SciTech Connect

    Yocky, David A.; Doren, Neall E.; Bacon, Terry A.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Eichel, Paul H.; Jakowatz, Charles V,; Delaplain, Gilbert G.; Dubbert, Dale F.; Tise, Bertice L.; White, Kyle R.

    2014-10-01

    Typical synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) imaging employs a co-located RADAR transmitter and receiver. Bistatic SAR imaging separates the transmitter and receiver locations. A bistatic SAR configuration allows for the transmitter and receiver(s) to be in a variety of geometric alignments. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) / New Mexico proposed the deployment of a ground-based RADAR receiver. This RADAR receiver was coupled with the capability of digitizing and recording the signal collected. SNL proposed the possibility of creating an image of targets the illuminating SAR observes. This document describes the developed hardware, software, bistatic SAR configuration, and its deployment to test the concept of a ground-based bistatic SAR. In the proof-of-concept experiments herein, the RADAR transmitter will be a commercial SAR satellite and the RADAR receiver will be deployed at ground level, observing and capturing RADAR ground/targets illuminated by the satellite system.

  15. Calibration/Validation of Soil Moisture Estimated from ASAR Wide Swath Mode Observations Collected over the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Velde, Rogier; Wen, Jun; Paloscia, Simonetta; Santi, Emanuele; Ferrazzoli, Paolo; Yang, Kun; Keer, Yann; Su, Bob

    2014-11-01

    The Tibetan Plateau Observatory (Tibet-Obs) holds three regional scale soil moisture and temperature monitoring networks situated in representative climatic regions. These three networks are utilized within this Dragon 3 project for calibration/validation of soil moisture estimated from coarse as well as high resolution microwave observations. In this contribution, soil moisture retrievals from ASAR WS data are presented for the cold semi-arid and the cold arid monitoring networks. A retrieval algorithm that makes direct use of the Integral Equation Method (IEM) surface scattering model has been adopted for the cold semi-arid and the cold arid data sets have been subjected to an Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) approach for the soil moisture estimation.

  16. Satellite SAR data assessment for Silk Road archaeological prospection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fulong; Lasaponara, Rosa; Masini, Nicola; Yang, Ruixia

    2015-04-01

    direction of observed targets is beneficial for improved detection of potential linear remains (e.g. Great Wall in Han-dynasty surrounding the Yumen Frontier Pass) owing to the formation of dihedral and helix scatterings based on the theory of radar physics. Morevorer, spatial resolution of multi-mode SAR images for archaeology was compared in the sites of Niya, Yumen Frontier Pass and suspected protectorate of the western regions. Results indicated that high resolution tended to easier detection of ancient targets through the identification of backscattering anomalies. Finally, interferometric analysis was also evaluated to provide complementary information rather than the backscattering. The variation of coherence is closely related to the physical parameters of observed surface, e.g. soil moisture, mild-relief as well as materials; and consequently it is useful for the relic feature enhancement and identification, validated by the PALSAR coherence images in Niya site. Acknowledgement This research was performed within the framework of the project "Smart management of cultural heritage sites in Italy and China: Earth Observation and pilot projects", funded by the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Hundred Talents Program of the Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth, Chinese Academy of Sciences (Y2ZZ27101B). The PALSAR data were provided by the European Space Agency to the authors through the Category-1 Project Id. 28640. Reference [1] Lasaponara R., Masini N. 2013, Satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar in Archaeology and Cultural Landscape: An Overview. Archaeological Prospection, 20, 71-78, doi: 10.1002/arp.1452 [2] Chen F., Masini N., Yang R., Milillo P., Feng D., Lasaponara R., 2015 A Space View of Radar Archaeological Marks: First Applications of COSMO-SkyMed X-Band Data. Remote Sens. 2015, 7, 24-50; doi:10.3390/rs70100024. [3] Cigna, F.; Tapete, D.; Lasaponara, R.; Masini, N. Amplitude change detection with Envisat ASAR to image the cultural landscape

  17. PS-InSAR processing methodologies in the detection of field surface deformation—Study of the Granada basin (Central Betic Cordilleras, southern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Joaquim J.; Ruiz, Antonio M.; Hanssen, Ramon F.; Bastos, Luisa; Gil, Antonio J.; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Sanz de Galdeano, Carlos

    2010-04-01

    Differential SAR interferometry (DInSAR) is a very effective technique for measuring crustal deformation. However, almost all interferograms include large areas where the signals decorrelate and no measurements are possible. Persistent scatterer interferometry (PS-InSAR) overcomes the decorrelation problem by identifying resolution elements whose echo is dominated by a single scatterer in a series of interferograms. Two time series of 29 ERS-1/2 and 22 ENVISAT ASAR acquisitions of the Granada basin, located in the central sector of the Betic Cordillera (southern Spain), covering the period from 1992 to 2005, were analyzed. Rough topography of the study area associated to its moderate activity geodynamic setting, including faults and folds in an uplifting relief by the oblique Eurasian-African plate convergence, poses a challenge for the application of interferometric techniques. The expected tectonic deformation rates are in the order of ˜1 mm/yr, which are at the feasibility limit of current InSAR techniques. In order to evaluate whether, under these conditions, InSAR techniques can still be used to monitor deformations we have applied and compared two PS-InSAR approaches: DePSI, the PS-InSAR package developed at Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) and StaMPS (Stanford Method for Persistent Scatterers) developed at Stanford University. Ground motion processes have been identified for the first time in the study area, the most significant process being a subsidence bowl located at the village of Otura. The idea behind this comparative study is to analyze which of the two PS-InSAR approaches considered might be more appropriate for the study of specific areas/environments and to attempt to evaluate the potentialities and benefits that could be derived for the integration of those methodologies.

  18. Monitoring of land subsidence and ground fissures in Xian, China 2005-2006: Mapped by sar Interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhao, C.Y.; Zhang, Q.; Ding, X.-L.; Lu, Zhiming; Yang, C.S.; Qi, X.M.

    2009-01-01

    The City of Xian, China, has been experiencing significant land subsidence and ground fissure activities since 1960s, which have brought various severe geohazards including damages to buildings, bridges and other facilities. Monitoring of land subsidence and ground fissure activities can provide useful information for assessing the extent of, and mitigating such geohazards. In order to achieve robust Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) results, six interferometric pairs of Envisat ASAR data covering 2005-2006 are collected to analyze the InSAR processing errors firstly, such as temporal and spatial decorrelation error, external DEM error, atmospheric error and unwrapping error. Then the annual subsidence rate during 2005-2006 is calculated by weighted averaging two pairs of D-InSAR results with similar time spanning. Lastly, GPS measurements are applied to calibrate the InSAR results and centimeter precision is achieved. As for the ground fissure monitoring, five InSAR cross-sections are designed to demonstrate the relative subsidence difference across ground fissures. In conclusion, the final InSAR subsidence map during 2005-2006 shows four large subsidence zones in Xian hi-tech zones in western, eastern and southern suburbs of Xian City, among which two subsidence cones are newly detected and two ground fissures are deduced to be extended westward in Yuhuazhai subsidence cone. This study shows that the land subsidence and ground fissures are highly correlated spatially and temporally and both are correlated with hi-tech zone construction in Xian during the year of 2005-2006. ?? Springer-Verlag 2008.

  19. The use of polarimetric and interferometric SAR data in floodplain mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zyl, J. J. van; Kim, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Recent advances in polarimetric SAR show promise for augmenting the capability of traditional interferometric SAR. In particular, a polarimetric topography technique provides useful slope information, and polarimetric interferometry may be used to decompose the response into vegetation and ground surface contributions.

  20. Wind-wave-induced velocity in ATI SAR ocean surface currents: First experimental evidence from an airborne campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Adrien C. H.; Gommenginger, Christine; Marquez, Jose; Doody, Sam; Navarro, Victor; Buck, Christopher

    2016-03-01

    Conventional and along-track interferometric (ATI) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) senses the motion of the ocean surface by measuring the Doppler shift of reflected signals. Measurements are affected by a Wind-wave-induced Artifact Surface Velocity (WASV) which was modeled theoretically in past studies and has been estimated empirically only once before with Envisat ASAR by Mouche et al. (2012). An airborne campaign in the tidally dominated Irish Sea served to evaluate this effect and the current retrieval capabilities of a dual-beam SAR interferometer known as Wavemill. A comprehensive collection of Wavemill airborne data acquired in a star pattern over a well-instrumented validation site made it possible for the first time to estimate the magnitude of the WASV, and its dependence on azimuth and incidence angle from data alone. In light wind (5.5 m/s) and moderate current (0.7 m/s) conditions, the wind-wave-induced contribution to the measured ocean surface motion reaches up to 1.6 m/s upwind, with a well-defined second-order harmonic dependence on direction to the wind. The magnitude of the WASV is found to be larger at lower incidence angles. The airborne WASV results show excellent consistency with the empirical WASV estimated from Envisat ASAR. These results confirm that SAR and ATI surface velocity estimates are strongly affected by WASV and that the WASV can be well characterized with knowledge of the wind knowledge and of the geometry. These airborne results provide the first independent validation of Mouche et al. (2012) and confirm that the empirical model they propose provides the means to correct airborne and spaceborne SAR and ATI SAR data for WASV to obtain accurate ocean surface current measurements. After removing the WASV, the airborne Wavemill-retrieved currents show very good agreement against ADCP measurements with a root-mean-square error (RMSE) typically around 0.1 m/s in velocity and 10° in direction.

  1. Terrain-Corrected Gamma: Improved Thematic Land-Cover Retrieval for SAR with Robust Radiometric Terrain Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, David; Miranda, Nuno; Zuberbuhler, Lukas; Schubert, Adrian; Meier, Erich

    2010-12-01

    In regions with significant terrain variations, the modulation of SAR backscatter by mountain slopes can dominate interpretation of the radar imagery unless effective countermeasures are first applied. We first demonstrate deficiencies in conventional radiometric treatments. Geocoded-terrain-corrected (GTC) products assume an ellipsoid-model for the radiometry, even if they improve upon geocoded-ellipsoid-corrected (GEC) imagery by properly compensating for the effects of terrain variations on image geometry. Both the sigma nought and gamma nought radiometric normalisation conventions as applied to distributed targets have an ellipsoidal Earth assumption at their core. Simply using a local-incidence-angle-mask (LIM) to normalise image radiometry fails to adequately model the image formation process. We prefer to use instead a product that we refer to as terrain-corrected gamma for backscatter analysis. The product makes use of SAR image simulation, incorporating shadow checks and proper accounting of local illuminated area in foreshortened and even layover areas: the result is a substantially improved sensor model in comparison to LIM-based backscatter retrieval. Use of terrain- corrected gamma in a radiometrically terrain-corrected (RTC) product enables multi-track and even multi- sensor image overlays, as terrain-induced backscatter variations are normalised using the available DEM. By properly normalising the hills and mountains, the growing availability of SAR images from diverse sensors can be compared on a Ò level playing fieldÓ . Time series analysis of hundreds of multi-track ASAR wide swath images covering Switzerland is shown to benefit when comparisons are made using terrain-corrected gamma rather than GTC or LIM- normalised SAR backscatter retrievals. We show how the spring snow melt period can be followed well using multi-track ASAR WS data only if terrain-corrected gamma backscatter values are used as the basis for comparison. Finally, we recommend

  2. SAR based adaptive GMTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Duc; Guo, Bin; Xu, Luzhou; Li, Jian

    2010-04-01

    We consider ground moving target indication (GMTI) and target velocity estimation based on multi-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. Via forming velocity versus cross-range images, we show that small moving targets can be detected even in the presence of strong stationary ground clutter. Moreover, the velocities of the moving targets can be estimated, and the misplaced moving targets can be placed back to their original locations based on the estimated velocities. Adaptive beamforming techniques, including Capon and generalizedlikelihood ratio test (GLRT), are used to form velocity versus cross-range images for each range bin of interest. The velocity estimation ambiguities caused by the multi-channel array geometry are analyzed. We also demonstrate the effectiveness of our approaches using the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) publicly-released Gotcha SAR based GMTI data set.

  3. Modified Multilook Cross Correlation technique for Doppler centroid estimation in SAR image signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bee Cheng, Sew

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is one of the widely used remote sensing sensors which produces high resolution image by using advance signal processing technique. SAR managed to operate in all sorts of weather and cover wide range of area. To produce a high-quality image, accurate parameters such as Doppler centroid are required for precise SAR signal processing. In the azimuth matched filtering of SAR signal processing, Doppler centroid is an important azimuth parameter that helps to focus the image pixels. Doppler centroid has always been overlooked during SAR signal processing. It is due to the fact that estimation of Doppler centroid involved complicated calculation and increased computational load. Therefore, researcher used to apply only the approximate Doppler value which is not precise and cause defocus effort in the generated SAR image. In this study, several conventional Doppler centroid estimation algorithms are reviewed and developed using Matlab software program to extract the Doppler parameter from received SAR data, namely Spectrum Fit Algorithm, Wavelength Diversity Algorithm (WDA), Multilook Cross Correlation Algorithm (MLCC), and Multilook Beat Frequency Algorithm (MLBF). Two sets of SAR data are employed to evaluate the performance of each estimator, i.e. simulated point target data and RADARSAT-1 Vancouver scene raw data. These experiments gave a sense of accuracy for the estimated results together with computational time consumption. Point target is simulated to generate ideal case SAR data with pre-defined SAR system parameters.

  4. Study on Seismogenic Tectonic based on InSAR Measurement of Long-term fault Deformation and Co-seismic Deformation in Dangxiong, Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Zhang, J.; Liu, B.; Hu, L.

    2010-12-01

    There are some earthquakes in Oct 2008 and May 2010 in Dangxiong, Tibet(Tab1); their epicenters were quite near and all located on Yadong-Gulou fault belt,which is a significant boundary between eastern and western geological structure and physiognomy of Tibet plates. The structural belt is normal strike-skip fault, and has experienced strong tectonic activity. The development of Yadong-Yangbajing-Gulou graben system is dominated by Yadong-Gulou fault belt, which is the main dominating boundary fault of graben system, and also is a famous extensional crustal structural system of Late Cenozoic. The Yadong-Gulou fault belt can be divided into three parts. The northern part is nearly SN striking. The middle part is NE striking, which is named Dangxiong-Yangbajing fault. And the southern part is nearly SN striking, which is named Yangbajing-Nimu fault. The epicenter of Ms6.6 earthquake is located on Yangbajing-Nimu fault, where an M8.0 strong earthquake took place in 1411. The two epicenters were just twenty kilometers away. So we can see the area is affected greatly by Yadong-Gulou fault belt. We have focused our InSAR study on this area ever since 2001 and ordered ENVISAT ASAR data continuously between 2003 and 2010 under Dragon Programme (ESA/NRSCC Cooperation Programme). Also we have begun to order TerraSAR-X spotlight and strimap model data since Mar. 2010. Acquisitions of ASAR differential modes are collected, including WS and IM(I2) of ascending and descending orbits. Though most of them have different track ,even polarization and long space baseline, time interval, there are many data for our InSAR process.We obtained time serial deformation before and after those earthquakes using PS and SBAS InSAR technique (data: IM model, track 176,nearly 50 scenes ), and Co-seismic Deformation of M6.6 earthquake(data: IM model,track 176/448;WS model, track 441). We have carried on field investigation separately at 2007,2009 and 2010. The movement mechanism of the fault is

  5. Bayesian SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhaofu; Tan, Xing; Xue, Ming; Li, Jian

    2010-04-01

    We introduce a maximum a posteriori (MAP) algorithm and a sparse learning via iterative minimization (SLIM) algorithm to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging. Both MAP and SLIM are sparse signal recovery algorithms with excellent sidelobe suppression and high resolution properties. The former cyclically maximizes the a posteriori probability density function for a given sparsity promoting prior, while the latter cyclically minimizes a regularized least squares cost function. We show how MAP and SLIM can be adapted to the SAR imaging application and used to enhance the image quality. We evaluate the performance of MAP and SLIM using the simulated complex-valued backscattered data from a backhoe vehicle. The numerical results show that both MAP and SLIM satisfactorily suppress the sidelobes and yield higher resolution than the conventional matched filter or delay-and-sum (DAS) approach. MAP and SLIM outperform the widely used compressive sampling matching pursuit (CoSaMP) algorithm, which requires the delicate choice of user parameters. Compared with the recently developed iterative adaptive approach (IAA), MAP and SLIM are computationally more efficient, especially with the help of fast Fourier transform (FFT). Also, the a posteriori distribution given by the algorithms provides us with a basis for the analysis of the statistical properties of the SAR image pixels.

  6. Circular SAR GMTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Douglas; Owirka, Gregory; Nichols, Howard; Scarborough, Steven

    2014-06-01

    We describe techniques for improving ground moving target indication (GMTI) performance in multi-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems. Our approach employs a combination of moving reference processing (MRP) to compensate for defocus of moving target SAR responses and space-time adaptive processing (STAP) to mitigate the effects of strong clutter interference. Using simulated moving target and clutter returns, we demonstrate focusing of the target return using MRP, and discuss the effect of MRP on the clutter response. We also describe formation of adaptive degrees of freedom (DOFs) for STAP filtering of MRP processed data. For the simulated moving target in clutter example, we demonstrate improvement in the signal to interference plus noise (SINR) loss compared to more standard algorithm configurations. In addition to MRP and STAP, the use of tracker feedback, false alarm mitigation, and parameter estimation techniques are also described. A change detection approach for reducing false alarms from clutter discretes is outlined, and processing of a measured data coherent processing interval (CPI) from a continuously orbiting platform is described. The results demonstrate detection and geolocation of a high-value target under track. The endoclutter target is not clearly visible in single-channel SAR chips centered on the GMTI track prediction. Detections are compared to truth data before and after geolocation using measured angle of arrival (AOA).

  7. [Spatial-temporal evolution characterization of land subsidence by multi-temporal InSAR method and GIS technology].

    PubMed

    Chen, Bei-Bei; Gong, Hui-Li; Li, Xiao-Juan; Lei, Kun-Chao; Duan, Guang-Yao; Xie, Jin-Rong

    2014-04-01

    Long-term over-exploitation of underground resources, and static and dynamic load increase year by year influence the occurrence and development of regional land subsidence to a certain extent. Choosing 29 scenes Envisat ASAR images covering plain area of Beijing, China, the present paper used the multi-temporal InSAR method incorporating both persistent scatterer and small baseline approaches, and obtained monitoring information of regional land subsidence. Under different situation of space development and utilization, the authors chose five typical settlement areas; With classified information of land-use, multi-spectral remote sensing image, and geological data, and adopting GIS spatial analysis methods, the authors analyzed the time series evolution characteristics of uneven settlement. The comprehensive analysis results suggests that the complex situations of space development and utilization affect the trend of uneven settlement; the easier the situation of space development and utilization, the smaller the settlement gradient, and the less the uneven settlement trend. PMID:25007621

  8. TerraSAR InSAR Investigation of Active Crustal Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, L.; Burgmann, R.

    2009-12-01

    We aim to utilize advanced analysis of TerraSAR-X data to investigate the dynamics and interactions of solid Earth deformation processes, such as earthquakes and fault creep, and Earth surface processes, such as land subsidence and groundwater movements, in a densely populated, urban region, the San Francisco Bay Area. Ongoing deformation imaging reveals a number of natural hazards including elastic strain accumulation about seismologic faults, active landsliding, land subsidence and rebound, and settling of unconsolidated sediments that are highly susceptible to liquefaction. Up to now, we have ordered and received 20 more TerraSAR-X Spotlight Single Look Complex (SLC) images and a few Stripmap SLC images delivered by DLR and got a few preliminary results. The TerraSAR-X images were acquired over the San Francisco Bay Area particularly around an area of active landsliding, coastal subsidence and shallow Hayward fault creep near the city of Berkeley. Berkeley is situated between latitude 37.45 and 38.00, longitude 237.30 and 238.00. The data acquisition interval is from November, 2008 to now. Four types of Spotlight images and one type of Stripmap images in time sequence were ordered and acquired: spot_012, spot_038, spot_049, spot_075 and strip_003, having different look angles and pass directions. Access to the SAR data is via ftp about 10 days after acquisition date. The data is supplied in TerraSAR-X standard SLC COSAR (COmplex SAR) format with orbital information in an Extensible Markup Language (XML) header. The file contains integer real-complex components with double sampling and calibration constants for values. I am using ROI_PAC to do the interferograms. But ROI_PAC was designed to process the raw data rather SLC images. So there are some problems in azimuth processing with TerraSAR SLC data especially the Spotlight data. We now have some preliminary results of Stripmap interferograms and Spotlight interferograms but still work on those problems and

  9. Wetland InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wdowinski, S.; Kim, S.; Amelung, F.; Dixon, T.

    2006-12-01

    Wetlands are transition zones where the flow of water, the nutrient cycling, and the sun energy meet to produce a unique and very productive ecosystem. They provide critical habitat for a wide variety of plant and animal species, including the larval stages of many ocean fish. Wetlands also have a valuable economical importance, as they filter nutrients and pollutants from fresh water used by human and provide aquatic habitats for outdoor recreation, tourism, and fishing. Globally, many such regions are under severe environmental stress, mainly from urban development, pollution, and rising sea level. However, there is increasing recognition of the importance of these habitats, and mitigation and restoration activities have begun in a few regions. A key element in wetlands conservation, management, and restoration involves monitoring its hydrologic system, as the entire ecosystem depends on its water supply. Heretofore, hydrologic monitoring of wetlands are conducted by stage (water level) stations, which provide good temporal resolution, but suffer from poor spatial resolution, as stage station are typically distributed several, or even tens of kilometers, from one another. Wetland application of InSAR provides the needed high spatial resolution hydrological observations, complementing the high temporal resolution terrestrial observations. Although conventional wisdom suggests that interferometry does not work in vegetated areas, several studies have shown that both L- and C-band interferograms with short acquisition intervals (1-105 days) can maintain excellent coherence over wetlands. In this study we explore the usage of InSAR for detecting water level changes in various wetland environments around the world, including the Everglades (south Florida), Louisiana Coast (southern US), Chesapeake Bay (eastern US), Pantanal (Brazil), Okavango Delta (Botswana), and Lena Delta (Siberia). Our main study area is the Everglades wetland (south Florida), which is covered by

  10. Calibration of inundation models using uncertain SAR-derived maps of flood extent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Baldassarre, Giuliano; Schumann, Guy; Bates, Paul

    2010-05-01

    This presentation deals with the calibration of hydraulic models using uncertain inundation maps derived from SAR imagery. The study was performed on a river reach of the Lower Dee, UK, where coarse (ENVISAT ASAR) and high (ERS-2 SAR) resolution imagery were acquired at the same time during the December 2006 flood event. Ten different flood extent maps were derived from the two flood imagery by using five different image processing techniques. These flood extent maps were used to perform a sensitivity analysis of a simple raster-based inundation model (LISFLOOD-FP). Thus, the capability of the two images to calibrate the friction parameters of the model was investigated. The analysis showed that the optimal parameters of the model depend on the type of satellite image used to evaluate the model as well as on the particular procedure used to derive the flood extent map. Then, a methodology is developed to calibrate flood inundation models by comparing the model results to uncertain inundation maps, which are obtained by combining the ten different flood extent maps.

  11. SAR coherent change detection (CCD) for search and rescue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Arthur W.; Poehler, Paul L.; Rais, Houra

    1997-06-01

    Recent advances in the areas of phase history processing, interferometry, and radargrammetric adjustment have made possible extremely accurate information extraction from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image pairs by means of interferometric techniques. The potential gain in accuracy is significant since measurements can theoretically be determined to within a fraction of a wavelength (subcentimeter accuracy) as opposed to a fraction of pixel distance (meter accuracy). One promising application of interferometric SAR (IFSAR) is the use of coherent change detection (CCD) over large areas to locate downed aircraft. This application poses an additional challenge since IFSAR must be processed at longer wavelengths to achieve foliage penetration. In this paper a combination of advanced techniques is described for using airborne SAR imagery to carry out this mission. Performance parameters are derived, and some examples are given from actual data.

  12. Progress on the calibration of channel geometry and friction parameters of the LISFLOOD-FP hydraulic model using time series of SAR flood images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, M.; Neal, J. C.; Hostache, R.; Corato, G.; Bates, P. D.; Chini, M.; Giustarini, L.; Matgen, P.; Wagener, T.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this work is to calibrate channel depth and roughness parameters of the LISFLOOD-FP Sub-Grid 2D hydraulic model using SAR image-derived flood extent maps. The aim is to reduce uncertainty in flood model predictions for those rivers where channel geometry is unknown and/or cannot be easily measured. In particular we consider the effectiveness of using real SAR data for calibration and whether the number and timings of SAR acquisitions is of benefit to the final result. Terrain data are processed from 2m LiDAR images and inflows to the model are taken from gauged data. As a test case we applied the method to the River Severn between Worcester and Tewkesbury. We firstly applied the automatic flood mapping algorithm of Giustarini[1] et al. (2013) to ENVISAT ASAR (wide swath mode) flood images; generating a series of flood maps. We then created an ensemble of flood extent maps with the hydraulic model (each model representing a unique parameter set). Where there is a favourable comparison between the modelled flood map and the SAR obtained flood map we may suggest an optimal parameter set. Applying the method to a sequence of SAR acquisitions provides insight into the advantages, disadvantages and limitations of using series of acquired images. To complete the investigation we simultaneously explore parameter 'identifiabilty' within a sequence of available satellite observations by adopting the DYNIA method proposed by Wagener[2] et al. (2003). We show where we might most easily detect the depth and roughness parameters within the SAR acquisition sequence. [1] Giustarini. 2013. 'A Change Detection Approach to Flood Mapping in Urban Areas Using TerraSAR-X'. IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, vol. 51, no. 4. [2] Wagener. 2003. 'Towards reduced uncertainty in conceptual rainfall-runoff modelling: Dynamic identifiability analysis'. Hydrol. Process. 17, 455-476.

  13. FlexSAR, a high quality, flexible, cost effective, prototype SAR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Mark; Knight, Chad; Haslem, Brent

    2016-05-01

    The FlexSAR radar system was designed to be a high quality, low-cost, flexible research prototype instrument. Radar researchers and practitioners often desire the ability to prototype new or advanced configurations, yet the ability to enhance or upgrade existing radar systems can be cost prohibitive. FlexSAR answers the need for a flexible radar system that can be extended easily, with minimal cost and time expenditures. The design approach focuses on reducing the resources required for developing and validating new advanced radar modalities. Such an approach fosters innovation and provides risk reduction since actual radar data can be collected in the appropriate mode, processed, and analyzed early in the development process. This allows for an accurate, detailed understanding of the corresponding trade space. This paper is a follow-on to last years paper and discusses the advancements that have been made to the FlexSAR system. The overall system architecture is discussed and presented along with several examples illustrating the system utility.

  14. Physical and polarimetric C-band microwave scattering properties of first-year Arctic sea ice during the advanced melt season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharien, Randall

    In this thesis, the physical, dielectric, and polarimetric microwave C-band properties of first-year sea ice (FYI) during the advanced melt season are investigated. Advanced melt is the most dynamic and least understood season in the annual cycle of Arctic sea ice due to rapid, small-scale, phase changes associated with melt processes and the occurrence of melt ponds on the ice surface. Measurements of the physical, structural, and dielectric properties of advanced melt FYI, combined with in-situ and spaced-based measurements of C-band microwave scattering, form the basis of this research. A physical model of the medium is created and physical controls on its C-band, like-polarized, backscatter response are evaluated using a multi-layer surface and volume scattering model and in-situ scattering observations. C-band microwave scattering from bare FYI is shown to be dominated by volumetric moisture content driven fluctuations in the dielectric properties, as well as structural variability, of desalinated upper ice layers. The C-band polarimetric scattering properties of surface features---wet snow, bare ice, and melt ponds---are investigated for high-Arctic and marginal ice environments, and dominant scattering mechanisms are theorized. Results demonstrate the potential for the exploitation of polarization diversity for the detection of advanced melt FYI geophysical information using spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR). This knowledge is extended to the application of ENVISAT-ASAR imagery for the regional scale mapping of advanced melt FYI surface albedo using a multi-scale, object-based image analysis (OBIA) approach.

  15. Recovering Seasat SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, T. A.; Arko, S. A.; Rosen, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of orbital remote sensing for global ocean observations, NASA launched Seasat on June 27th, 1978. Being the first space borne SAR mission, Seasat produced the most detailed SAR images of Earth from space ever seen to that point in time. While much of the data collected in the USA was processed optically, a mere 150 scenes had been digitally processed by March 1980. In fact, only an estimated 3% of Seasat data was ever digitally processed. Thus, for over three decades, the majority of the SAR data from this historic mission has been dormant, virtually unavailable to scientists in the 21st century. Over the last year, researchers at the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) have processed the Seasat SAR archives into imagery products. A telemetry decoding system was created and the data were filtered into readily processable signal files. Due to nearly 35 years of bit rot, the bit error rate (BER) for the ASF DAAC Seasat archives was on the order of 1 out of 100 to 1 out of 100,000. This extremely high BER initially seemed to make much of the data undecodable - because the minor frame numbers are just 7 bits and no range line numbers exist in the telemetry even the 'simple' tasks of tracking the minor frame number or locating the start of each range line proved difficult. Eventually, using 5 frame numbers in sequence and a handful of heuristics, the data were successfully decoded into full range lines. Concurrently, all metadata were stored into external files. Recovery of this metadata was also problematic, the BER making the information highly suspect and, initially at least, unusable in any sort of automated fashion. Because of the BER, all of the single bit metadata fields proved unreliable. Even fields that should be constant for a data take (e.g. receiving station, day of the year) showed high variability, each requiring a median filter to be usable. The most challenging, however, were the

  16. Dual frequency Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) mission for monitoring our dynamic planet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilland, J.; Bard, S.; Key, R.; Kim, Y.; Vaze, P.; Huneycutt, B.

    2000-01-01

    Advances in spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) remote sensing technology make it possible to acquire global-scale data sets that provide unique information about the Earth's continually changing surface characteristics.

  17. Evaluation of the predicted error of the soil moisture retrieval from C-band SAR by comparison against modelled soil moisture estimates over Australia.

    PubMed

    Doubková, Marcela; Van Dijk, Albert I J M; Sabel, Daniel; Wagner, Wolfgang; Blöschl, Günter

    2012-05-15

    The Sentinel-1 will carry onboard a C-band radar instrument that will map the European continent once every four days and the global land surface at least once every twelve days with finest 5 × 20 m spatial resolution. The high temporal sampling rate and operational configuration make Sentinel-1 of interest for operational soil moisture monitoring. Currently, updated soil moisture data are made available at 1 km spatial resolution as a demonstration service using Global Mode (GM) measurements from the Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) onboard ENVISAT. The service demonstrates the potential of the C-band observations to monitor variations in soil moisture. Importantly, a retrieval error estimate is also available; these are needed to assimilate observations into models. The retrieval error is estimated by propagating sensor errors through the retrieval model. In this work, the existing ASAR GM retrieval error product is evaluated using independent top soil moisture estimates produced by the grid-based landscape hydrological model (AWRA-L) developed within the Australian Water Resources Assessment system (AWRA). The ASAR GM retrieval error estimate, an assumed prior AWRA-L error estimate and the variance in the respective datasets were used to spatially predict the root mean square error (RMSE) and the Pearson's correlation coefficient R between the two datasets. These were compared with the RMSE calculated directly from the two datasets. The predicted and computed RMSE showed a very high level of agreement in spatial patterns as well as good quantitative agreement; the RMSE was predicted within accuracy of 4% of saturated soil moisture over 89% of the Australian land mass. Predicted and calculated R maps corresponded within accuracy of 10% over 61% of the continent. The strong correspondence between the predicted and calculated RMSE and R builds confidence in the retrieval error model and derived ASAR GM error estimates. The ASAR GM and Sentinel-1 have

  18. Evaluation of the predicted error of the soil moisture retrieval from C-band SAR by comparison against modelled soil moisture estimates over Australia

    PubMed Central

    Doubková, Marcela; Van Dijk, Albert I.J.M.; Sabel, Daniel; Wagner, Wolfgang; Blöschl, Günter

    2012-01-01

    The Sentinel-1 will carry onboard a C-band radar instrument that will map the European continent once every four days and the global land surface at least once every twelve days with finest 5 × 20 m spatial resolution. The high temporal sampling rate and operational configuration make Sentinel-1 of interest for operational soil moisture monitoring. Currently, updated soil moisture data are made available at 1 km spatial resolution as a demonstration service using Global Mode (GM) measurements from the Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) onboard ENVISAT. The service demonstrates the potential of the C-band observations to monitor variations in soil moisture. Importantly, a retrieval error estimate is also available; these are needed to assimilate observations into models. The retrieval error is estimated by propagating sensor errors through the retrieval model. In this work, the existing ASAR GM retrieval error product is evaluated using independent top soil moisture estimates produced by the grid-based landscape hydrological model (AWRA-L) developed within the Australian Water Resources Assessment system (AWRA). The ASAR GM retrieval error estimate, an assumed prior AWRA-L error estimate and the variance in the respective datasets were used to spatially predict the root mean square error (RMSE) and the Pearson's correlation coefficient R between the two datasets. These were compared with the RMSE calculated directly from the two datasets. The predicted and computed RMSE showed a very high level of agreement in spatial patterns as well as good quantitative agreement; the RMSE was predicted within accuracy of 4% of saturated soil moisture over 89% of the Australian land mass. Predicted and calculated R maps corresponded within accuracy of 10% over 61% of the continent. The strong correspondence between the predicted and calculated RMSE and R builds confidence in the retrieval error model and derived ASAR GM error estimates. The ASAR GM and Sentinel-1 have

  19. Bistatic SAR: Imagery & Image Products.

    SciTech Connect

    Yocky, David A.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Jakowatz, Charles V,

    2014-10-01

    While typical SAR imaging employs a co-located (monostatic) RADAR transmitter and receiver, bistatic SAR imaging separates the transmitter and receiver locations. The transmitter and receiver geometry determines if the scattered signal is back scatter, forward scatter, or side scatter. The monostatic SAR image is backscatter. Therefore, depending on the transmitter/receiver collection geometry, the captured imagery may be quite different that that sensed at the monostatic SAR. This document presents imagery and image products formed from captured signals during the validation stage of the bistatic SAR research. Image quality and image characteristics are discussed first. Then image products such as two-color multi-view (2CMV) and coherent change detection (CCD) are presented.

  20. Some thoughts on error-contributions to reconstruct 3D coseismic displacement field using the model of combining multiple independent InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Zhang, Jingfa; Luo, Yi

    2012-07-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) has proved an immensely powerful tool in studying earthquakes with millimetre-scale accuracy at a high spatial resolution. However, each interferogram records only the component of displacement in the direction of the satellite line of sight (LOS). Thus previous InSAR studies of displacement due to earthquakes were generally limited to one or two components of the surface displacement field. Three- dimensional (3D) surface displacement maps can provide a more comprehensive understanding of source geometry associated with earthquake. By combining interferograms from multiple look angles, it is possible to constrain the three-dimensional components of displacement [Jung et al., 2011; Wright, et al., 2004; Hong et al., 2010]. In this work, we take 2008 Gaize Ms6.9 earthquake (Tibet) for example, derive LOS surface displacement from several paths of ENVISAT ASAR images (Image mode: Track 348, descending pass; Track 341, 427, and 155, ascending pass. ScanSAR mode: Track 341, 112, 155, and 384, ascending pass), and reconstruct the 3D coseismic displacement field with the model named multiple independent InSAR with different viewing angles. Because it is difficult to distinguish tectonic signal from phase noise (eg. orbital errors, atmospheric errors, and unwrapping errors), these error-contributions may be propagated to the 3D coseismic components (vertical, north, east). In addition, for ENVISAT ASAR, it is worth notice that the radar antenna is fixed with respect to the current satellite, which may lead to different LOS observations with nearly identical viewing angles in parallel passes. Thus, when inverting 3D components with least square solution, InSAR observation errors may be magnified by the ill-conditioned system of equations in the solution. Although the ill-conditioned system of equations may result in bad solution, some InSAR observation errors can be detected by the system. In our study, we will introduce the

  1. Offshore Wind Mapping Mediterranean area using SAR. A case study of retrieval around peninsular regions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calaudi, Rosamaria; Arena, Felice; Badger, Merete; Sempreviva, Anna Maria

    2013-04-01

    Satellite observations like Scatterometers e.g. QuickScat, and Synthetic Aperture Radars (SAR) of the ocean surface provide information about the spatial wind variability over large areas. This is very valuable, for mapping offshore wind resources for offshore wind farm installation, where the most suitable locations within a given region must be identified using at least 5 year wind data over the whole domain. This is a special issue in the Mediterranean, where spatial information is not readily available because buoys or masts are sparse, with long periods of missing data, and measurements represent only one point. Here, we focus on the SAR images that have the advantage of high spatial resolution (down to 100m) allowing to derive information close to the coast but with the disadvantage of low time resolution causing lack of information on regimes with low time scale. We retrieved SAR (ENVISAT ASAR scenes acquired in Wide Swath Mode-WSM-) wind speed in the Mediterranean from March 2002 to April 2012 using the Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) software APL/NOAA SAR Wind Retrieval System (ANSWRS version 2.0) (Monaldo 2000; Monaldo et al. 2006). The ANSWRS software produces per default wind speed fields initialized using wind directions determined by the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System (NOGAPS) models interpolated in time and space to match the satellite data. NOGAPS data are available at 6-hour intervals mapped to a 1° latitude/longitude grid. Here, we present a case study in Calabria, a long, narrow and mountainous peninsula in South Italy that causes a significant wind conditions variability from one coast to the other. We considered a 10m mast, measuring hourly wind speed and direction located at the coastline at the harbor of the town Crotone, belonging to the marine network of sensors of ISPRA (Institute for Environmental Protection and Research). Three points of the SAR images were chosen at offshore

  2. Optimizing deep hyperthermia treatments: are locations of patient pain complaints correlated with modelled SAR peak locations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canters, R. A. M.; Franckena, M.; van der Zee, J.; van Rhoon, G. C.

    2011-01-01

    During deep hyperthermia treatment, patient pain complaints due to heating are common when maximizing power. Hence, there exists a good rationale to investigate whether the locations of predicted SAR peaks by hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP) are correlated with the locations of patient pain during treatment. A retrospective analysis was performed, using the treatment reports of 35 patients treated with deep hyperthermia controlled by extensive treatment planning. For various SAR indicators, the average distance from a SAR peak to a patient discomfort location was calculated, for each complaint. The investigated V0.1 closest (i.e. the part of the 0.1th SAR percentile closest to the patient complaint) performed the best, and leads to an average distance between the SAR peak and the complaint location of 3.9 cm. Other SAR indicators produced average distances that were all above 10 cm. Further, the predicted SAR peak location with V0.1 provides a 77% match with the region of complaint. The current study demonstrates that HTP is able to provide a global indication of the regions where hotspots during treatment will most likely occur. Further development of this technology is necessary in order to use HTP as a valuable toll for objective and advanced SAR steering. The latter is especially valid for applications that enable 3D SAR steering.

  3. Persistent Scatterer InSAR monitoring of Bratislava urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakon, Matus; Perissin, Daniele; Papco, Juraj; Lazecky, Milan

    2014-05-01

    ) technique, covering the target area with 57 Envisat ASAR images from Ascending Track No. 229 (32) and Descending Track No. 265 (25) captured between years 2002 and 2010. Processing involves Sarproz (Copyright (c) 2009 Daniele Perissin) a powerful software solution for obtaining differential interferograms and performing PSInSAR methodology. The area of interest to investigate the deformation phenomena is covering approximately 16 by 16 kilometers (256 sqkm). For evaluation of PSInSAR potential to detect and monitor ground displacements, PS derived time series of deformation signal were compared to the field GNSS data from three GNSS stations coded PIL1, BRAT and GKU4. By the detailed look on the deformation maps the investigated urban area of Bratislava is relatively stable with the deformation rates within the few (±5) millimeters. The comparison of PSInSAR derived time series with GNSS data indicates good correlation and confirms achievable precision and applicability of InSAR measurements for ground stability monitoring purposes. Data for this work were provided by European Space Agency within the Category-1 project ID 9981: "Detection of ground deformation using radar interferometry techniques". The authors are grateful to the Tatrabanka Foundation and The National Scholarship Programme of the Slovak Republic for the opportunity to work together. Data have been processed by the Sarproz (Copyright (c) 2009 Daniele Perissin) and visualised in Google Earth. This paper is also the result of the implementation of the project: the National Centre of Earth's Surface Deformation Diagnostic in the area of Slovakia, ITMS 26220220108 supported by the Research and Development Operational Programme funded by the ERDF and the grant No. 1/0642/13 of the Slovak Grant Agency VEGA.

  4. Processor architecture for airborne SAR systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    Digital processors for spaceborne imaging radars and application of the technology developed for airborne SAR systems are considered. Transferring algorithms and implementation techniques from airborne to spaceborne SAR processors offers obvious advantages. The following topics are discussed: (1) a quantification of the differences in processing algorithms for airborne and spaceborne SARs; and (2) an overview of three processors for airborne SAR systems.

  5. Anatomy of a SAR impulse response.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-08-01

    A principal measure of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image quality is the manifestation in the SAR image of a spatial impulse, that is, the SAR's Impulse Response (IPR). IPR requirements direct certain design decisions in a SAR. Anomalies in the IPR can point to specific anomalous behavior in the radar's hardware and/or software.

  6. Automatic Calculation of Oil Slick Area from Multiple SAR Acquisitions for Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmanoğlu, B.; Özkan, C.; Sunar, F.; Staples, G.

    2012-07-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill occurred in the Gulf of Mexico in April 2010 and became the largest accidental marine oil spill in history. Oil leaked continuously between April 20th and July 15th of 2010, releasing about 780, 000m3 of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico. The oil spill caused extensive economical and ecological damage to the areas it reached, affecting the marine and wildlife habitats along with fishing and tourism industries. For oil spill mitigation efforts, it is important to determine the areal extent, and most recent position of the contaminated area. Satellitebased oil pollution monitoring systems are being used for monitoring and in hazard response efforts. Due to their high accuracy, frequent acquisitions, large area coverage and day-and-night operation Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellites are a major contributer of monitoring marine environments for oil spill detection. We developed a new algorithm for determining the extent of the oil spill from multiple SAR images, that are acquired with short temporal intervals using different sensors. Combining the multi-polarization data from Radarsat-2 (C-band), Envisat ASAR (C-band) and Alos-PALSAR (L-band) sensors, we calculate the extent of the oil spill with higher accuracy than what is possible from only one image. Short temporal interval between acquisitions (hours to days) allow us to eliminate artifacts and increase accuracy. Our algorithm works automatically without any human intervention to deliver products in a timely manner in time critical operations. Acquisitions using different SAR sensors are radiometrically calibrated and processed individually to obtain oil spill area extent. Furthermore the algorithm provides probability maps of the areas that are classified as oil slick. This probability information is then combined with other acquisitions to estimate the combined probability map for the spill.

  7. Flood Extent Mapping for Namibia Using Change Detection and Thresholding with SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Stephanie; Fatoyinbo, Temilola E.; Policelli, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    A new method for flood detection change detection and thresholding (CDAT) was used with synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery to delineate the extent of flooding for the Chobe floodplain in the Caprivi region of Namibia. This region experiences annual seasonal flooding and has seen a recent renewal of severe flooding after a long dry period in the 1990s. Flooding in this area has caused loss of life and livelihoods for the surrounding communities and has caught the attention of disaster relief agencies. There is a need for flood extent mapping techniques that can be used to process images quickly, providing near real-time flooding information to relief agencies. ENVISAT/ASAR and Radarsat-2 images were acquired for several flooding seasons from February 2008 to March 2013. The CDAT method was used to determine flooding from these images and includes the use of image subtraction, decision based classification with threshold values, and segmentation of SAR images. The total extent of flooding determined for 2009, 2011 and 2012 was about 542 km2, 720 km2, and 673 km2 respectively. Pixels determined to be flooded in vegetation were typically <0.5 % of the entire scene, with the exception of 2009 where the detection of flooding in vegetation was much greater (almost one third of the total flooded area). The time to maximum flooding for the 2013 flood season was determined to be about 27 days. Landsat water classification was used to compare the results from the new CDAT with SAR method; the results show good spatial agreement with Landsat scenes.

  8. Landslide Mapping Using SqueeSAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, A.; Bellotti, F.; Alberti, S.; Allievi, J.; Del Conte, S.; Tamburini, A.; Broccolato, M.; Ratto, S.; Alberto, W.

    2011-12-01

    SqueeSAR represents the most recent advancement of PSInSAR algorithm. By exploiting signal radar returns both from Permanent and Distributed Scatterers (PS and DS), it is able to detect millimetre displacements over long periods and large areas and to obtain a significant increase in the spatial density of ground measurement points. SqueeSAR analysis is complementary to conventional geological and geomorphological studies in landslide mapping over wide areas, traditionally based on aerial-photo interpretation and field surveys. However, whenever surface displacement rates are low (mm to cm per year), assessing landslide activity is difficult or even impossible without a long-term monitoring tool, as in the case of Deep-seated Gravitational Slope Deformations (DGSD), typically characterized by large areal extent and subtle surface displacement. The availability of surface displacement time series per each measurement point allows one to have both a synoptic overview, at regional scale, as well as an in depth characterization of the instability phenomena analyzed, a meaningful support to the design of traditional monitoring networks and the efficiency testing of remedial works. When data archives are available, SqueeSAR can also provide valuable information before the installation of any terrestrial measurement system. The Italian authorities increasing interest in the application of SqueeSAR as a standard monitoring tool to help hydrogeological risk assessment, resulted in a national project, Piano Straordinario di Telerilevamento (PST), founded by the Ministry of the Environment. The aim of the project was to create the first interferometric database on a national scale for mapping unstable areas. More than 12,000 ERS and ENVISAT radar scenes acquired over Italy were processed spanning the period 1992-2010, proving that, in less than ten years, radar interferometry has become a standard monitoring tool. Recently, many regional governments in Italy have applied

  9. Studies of ice sheet hydrology using SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, R. A.; Vornberger, P. L.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of SAR data of the Greenland ice sheet in summer and winter suggest the use of SAR to monitor the temporal hydrology of ice sheets. Comparisons of each SAR data set with summer Landsat TM imagery show an areal-positive correlation with summer SAR data and a negative correlation with winter SAR data. It is proposed that the summer SAR data are most sensitive to the variable concentrations of free water in the surface snow and that the winter SAR data indicate variations in snow grain size.

  10. SAR/InSAR observation by an HF sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Ono, T.

    2007-03-01

    Application of SAR imaging algorithm to spaceborne HF sounder observation was studied. Two types of image ambiguity problems were addressed in the application. One is surface/subsurface image ambiguity arising from deep penetration of HF wave, and another is mirror image ambiguity that is inherent to dipole antenna SAR. A numerical model demonstrated that the surface/subsurface ambiguity can be mitigated by taking a synthetic aperture large enough to defocus subsurface objects. In order to resolve the mirror image ambiguity problem, an image superposition technique was proposed. The performance of the technique was demonstrated by using simulation data of the HF sounder observation to confirm the feasibility of HF SAR and HF InSAR observation.

  11. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckner, F. L.; Ahr, H. A.; Ausherman, D. A.; Cutrona, L. J.; Francisco, S.; Harrison, R. E.; Heuser, J. S.; Jordan, R. L.; Justus, J.; Manning, B.

    1978-01-01

    The available and optimal methods for generating SAR imagery for NASA applications were identified. The SAR image quality and data processing requirements associated with these applications were studied. Mathematical operations and algorithms required to process sensor data into SAR imagery were defined. The architecture of SAR image formation processors was discussed, and technology necessary to implement the SAR data processors used in both general purpose and dedicated imaging systems was addressed.

  12. Characterization of sarR, a Modulator of sar Expression in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Adhar; Cheung, Ambrose L.

    2001-01-01

    The expression of virulence determinants in Staphylococcus aureus is controlled by global regulatory loci (e.g., sar and agr). The sar locus is composed of three overlapping transcripts (sar P1, P3, and P2 transcripts from P1, P3, and P2 promoters, respectively), all encoding the 372-bp sarA gene. The level of SarA, the major regulatory protein, is partially controlled by the differential activation of sar promoters. We previously partially purified a ∼12 kDa protein with a DNA-specific column containing a sar P2 promoter fragment. In this study, the putative gene, designated sarR, was identified and found to encode a 13.6-kDa protein with homology to SarA. Transcriptional and immunoblot studies revealed the sarR gene to be expressed in other staphylococcal strains. Recombinant SarR protein bound sar P1, P2, and P3 promoter fragments in gel shift and footprinting assays. A sarR mutant expressed a higher level of P1 transcript than the parent, as confirmed by promoter green fluorescent protein fusion assays. As the P1 transcript is the predominant sar transcript, we confirmed that the sarR mutant expressed more SarA than the parental strain. We thus proposed that SarR is a regulatory protein that binds to the sar promoters to down-regulate P1 transcription and the ensuing SarA protein expression. PMID:11159982

  13. InSAR Scientific Computing Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurrola, E. M.; Rosen, P. A.; Sacco, G.; Zebker, H. A.; Simons, M.; Sandwell, D. T.

    2010-12-01

    The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE) is a software development effort in its second year within the NASA Advanced Information Systems and Technology program. The ISCE will provide a new computing environment for geodetic image processing for InSAR sensors that will enable scientists to reduce measurements directly from radar satellites and aircraft to new geophysical products without first requiring them to develop detailed expertise in radar processing methods. The environment can serve as the core of a centralized processing center to bring Level-0 raw radar data up to Level-3 data products, but is adaptable to alternative processing approaches for science users interested in new and different ways to exploit mission data. The NRC Decadal Survey-recommended DESDynI mission will deliver data of unprecedented quantity and quality, making possible global-scale studies in climate research, natural hazards, and Earth's ecosystem. The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment is planned to become a key element in processing DESDynI data into higher level data products and it is expected to enable a new class of analyses that take greater advantage of the long time and large spatial scales of these new data, than current approaches. At the core of ISCE is both legacy processing software from the JPL/Caltech ROI_PAC repeat-pass interferometry package as well as a new InSAR processing package containing more efficient and more accurate processing algorithms being developed at Stanford for this project that is based on experience gained in developing processors for missions such as SRTM and UAVSAR. Around the core InSAR processing programs we are building object-oriented wrappers to enable their incorporation into a more modern, flexible, extensible software package that is informed by modern programming methods, including rigorous componentization of processing codes, abstraction and generalization of data models, and a robust, intuitive user interface with

  14. Comparison of automatic segmentation of full polarimetric SAR sea ice images with manually drawn ice charts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moen, M.-A. N.; Doulgeris, A. P.; Anfinsen, S. N.; Renner, A. H. H.; Hughes, N.; Gerland, S.; Eltoft, T.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we investigate the performance of an algorithm for automatic segmentation of full polarimetric, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sea ice scenes. The algorithm uses statistical and polarimetric properties of the backscattered radar signals to segment the SAR image into a specified number of classes. This number was determined in advance from visual inspection of the SAR image and by available in-situ measurements. The segmentation result was then compared to ice charts drawn by ice service analysts. The comparison revealed big discrepancies between the charts of the analysts, and between the manual and the automatic segmentations. In the succeeding analysis, the automatic segmentation chart was labeled into ice types by sea ice experts, and the SAR features used in the segmentation were interpreted in terms of physical sea ice properties. Studies of automatic and robust estimation of the number of ice classes in SAR sea ice scenes will be highly relevant for future work.

  15. Methods of InSAR atmosphere correction for volcano activity monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gong, W.; Meyer, F.; Webley, P.W.; Lu, Zhiming

    2011-01-01

    When a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) signal propagates through the atmosphere on its path to and from the sensor, it is inevitably affected by atmospheric effects. In particular, the applicability and accuracy of Interferometric SAR (InSAR) techniques for volcano monitoring is limited by atmospheric path delays. Therefore, atmospheric correction of interferograms is required to improve the performance of InSAR for detecting volcanic activity, especially in order to advance its ability to detect subtle pre-eruptive changes in deformation dynamics. In this paper, we focus on InSAR tropospheric mitigation methods and their performance in volcano deformation monitoring. Our study areas include Okmok volcano and Unimak Island located in the eastern Aleutians, AK. We explore two methods to mitigate atmospheric artifacts, namely the numerical weather model simulation and the atmospheric filtering using Persistent Scatterer processing. We investigate the capability of the proposed methods, and investigate their limitations and advantages when applied to determine volcanic processes. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  16. Earth observing SAR data processing systems at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory - Seasat to EOS SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, David A.; Curlander, John C.

    1991-01-01

    The evolution of SAR digital data processing and management ground systems developed at the JPL for earth science missions is discussed. Attention is given to the SAR ground data system requirements, the early data processing systems, the Seasat SAR system, and the SIR-B data processing system. Special consideration is given to two currently operational SAR data systems: the JPL aircraft SAR processing system that flies on the NASA DC-8 and the Alaska SAR Facility at Fairbanks.

  17. SAR imaging - Seeing the unseen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobrick, M.

    1982-01-01

    The functional abilities and operations of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) are described. SAR employs long wavelength radio waves in bursts, imaging a target by 'listening' to the small frequency changes that result from the Doppler shift due to the relative motion of the imaging craft and the motions of the target. The time delay of the signal return allows a determination of the location of the target, leading to the build up of a two-dimensional image. The uses of both Doppler shifts and time delay enable detailed imagery which is independent of distance. The synthetic aperture part of the name of SAR derives from the beaming of multiple pulses, which result in a picture that is effectively the same as using a large antenna. Mechanisms contributing to the fineness of SAR images are outlined.

  18. SARS Antibody Test for Serosurveillance

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Po-Ren; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Lee, Chun-Nan; Chen, Li-Kuan; Ho, Mei-Shang; Sia, Charles; De Fang, Xin; Lynn, Shugene; Chang, Tseng Yuan; Liu, Shi Kau; Walfield, Alan M.

    2004-01-01

    A peptide-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) can be used for retrospective serosurveillance of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) by helping identify undetected chains of disease transmission. The assay was developed by epitope mapping, using synthetic peptides from the spike, membrane, and nucleocapsid protein sequences of SARS-associated coronavirus. The new peptide ELISA consistently detected seroconversion by week 2 of onset of fever, and seropositivity remained through day 100. Specificity was 100% on normal blood donor samples, on serum samples associated with infection by other pathogens, and on an interference panel. The peptide-based test has advantages of safety, standardization, and automation over previous immunoassays for SARS. The assay was used for a retrospective survey of healthy healthcare workers in Taiwan who treated SARS patients. Asymptomatic seroconversions were detected in two hospitals that had nosocomial disease. PMID:15498156

  19. Spatial-temporal heterogeneity of land subsidence evolution in Beijing based on InSAR and cluster analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Ke, Y.; Gong, H.; Li, X.; Zhu, L.; Chen, B.

    2014-12-01

    Land subsidence is a common natural hazard occurring in extensive areas in the world. In Beijing, the capital city of China, there has been serious land subsidence due to overexploitation of ground water during the recent decades. Five major subsidence tunnels have formed. Across the Beijing plain area, the ground is sinking at the rate of 30-100mm/year. Uneven subsidence leads to ground fissure and building destruction, and has caused great economical and property loss. To better characterize and understand regional land subsidence evolution, it is critical to monitor the time-series dynamics of subsidence, and capture the spatial-temporal heterogeneity of the subsidence evolution. Interferometric SAR technique, as it provides high spatial resolution and wide range of observation, have been successfully used to monitor regional ground deformation. The objective of this study is to derive time-series regional land subsidence dynamics in Beijing, and based on which, analyze and assess the spatial-temporal heterogeneity of the evolution using cluster analysis. First, ENVISAT ASAR (2003-2009 years, 28 scenes, track number: 218) datasets during 2003-2010 covering Beijing plain area were utilized to obtain time-series subsidence rate using Persistent Scatter InSAR (PS-InSAR) technique provided in SARProz software. Second, time-series subsidence characteristics of the PS points were analyzed and the PS points were clustered based on Self-Organization feature Maps (SOM) algorithm considering environmental factors such as groundwater level and lithologic characters. This study demonstrates that based on InSAR measurements and SOMs algorithm, the spatial-temporal heterogeneity of land subsidence evolution can be captured. Each cluster shows unique spatial-temporal evolution pattern. The results of this study will facilitate further land subsidence modeling and prediction at regional spatial scale.

  20. Spatial-temporal heterogeneity of land subsidence evolution in Beijing based on InSAR and cluster analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Y.; Li, Y.; Gong, H.; Pan, Y.; Zhu, L.; Chen, B.

    2015-12-01

    Land subsidence is a common natural hazard occurring in extensive areas in the world. In Beijing, the capital city of China, there has been serious land subsidence due to overexploitation of ground water during the recent decades. Five major subsidence tunnels have formed. Across the Beijing plain area, the ground is sinking at the rate of 30-100mm/year. Uneven subsidence leads to ground fissure and building destruction, and has caused great economical and property loss. To better characterize and understand regional land subsidence evolution, it is critical to monitor the time-series dynamics of subsidence, and capture the spatial-temporal heterogeneity of the subsidence evolution. Interferometric SAR technique, as it provides high spatial resolution and wide range of observation, have been successfully used to monitor regional ground deformation. The objective of this study is to derive time-series regional land subsidence dynamics in Beijing, and based on which, analyze and assess the spatial-temporal heterogeneity of the evolution using cluster analysis. First, ENVISAT ASAR (2003-2009 years, 28 scenes, track number: 218) datasets during 2003-2010 covering Beijing plain area were utilized to obtain time-series subsidence rate using Persistent Scatter InSAR (PS-InSAR) technique provided in SARProz software. Second, time-series subsidence characteristics of the PS points were analyzed and the PS points were clustered based on Self-Organization feature Maps (SOM) algorithm considering environmental factors such as groundwater level and lithologic characters. This study demonstrates that based on InSAR measurements and SOMs algorithm, the spatial-temporal heterogeneity of land subsidence evolution can be captured. Each cluster shows unique spatial-temporal evolution pattern. The results of this study will facilitate further land subsidence modeling and prediction at regional spatial scale.

  1. The X-SAR System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oettl, Herwig

    1986-01-01

    During the past few years, there has been significant progress made in the planning for an X-band SAR, designed to fly in the shuttle together with the SIR-C system of NASA/JPL. New work and studies have been initiated to enable the goal of two missions in 1990 to be met. The antennas of X-SAR and SIR-C will be placed side-by-side on a pivoted steerable foldable structure, which will allow antenna movement without changing the attitude of the shuttle. This figure also shows the pallet, underneath the antenna structure, which houses the electronic sub-systems of both radars. Although the two radar systems, X-band SAR and the L- and C-band SAR of SIR-C, have different technical designs, their overall system performance, in terms of image quality, is expected to be similar. The current predicted performance of the X-SAR system based on results of the continuing Phase B studies is detailed. Differences between the performance parameters of X-SAR and those of SIR-C are only detailed in as far as they affect planning decisions to be made by experimenters.

  2. Satellite SAR data assessment for Silk Road archaeological prospection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fulong; Lasaponara, Rosa; Masini, Nicola; Yang, Ruixia

    2015-04-01

    direction of observed targets is beneficial for improved detection of potential linear remains (e.g. Great Wall in Han-dynasty surrounding the Yumen Frontier Pass) owing to the formation of dihedral and helix scatterings based on the theory of radar physics. Morevorer, spatial resolution of multi-mode SAR images for archaeology was compared in the sites of Niya, Yumen Frontier Pass and suspected protectorate of the western regions. Results indicated that high resolution tended to easier detection of ancient targets through the identification of backscattering anomalies. Finally, interferometric analysis was also evaluated to provide complementary information rather than the backscattering. The variation of coherence is closely related to the physical parameters of observed surface, e.g. soil moisture, mild-relief as well as materials; and consequently it is useful for the relic feature enhancement and identification, validated by the PALSAR coherence images in Niya site. Acknowledgement This research was performed within the framework of the project "Smart management of cultural heritage sites in Italy and China: Earth Observation and pilot projects", funded by the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Hundred Talents Program of the Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth, Chinese Academy of Sciences (Y2ZZ27101B). The PALSAR data were provided by the European Space Agency to the authors through the Category-1 Project Id. 28640. Reference [1] Lasaponara R., Masini N. 2013, Satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar in Archaeology and Cultural Landscape: An Overview. Archaeological Prospection, 20, 71-78, doi: 10.1002/arp.1452 [2] Chen F., Masini N., Yang R., Milillo P., Feng D., Lasaponara R., 2015 A Space View of Radar Archaeological Marks: First Applications of COSMO-SkyMed X-Band Data. Remote Sens. 2015, 7, 24-50; doi:10.3390/rs70100024. [3] Cigna, F.; Tapete, D.; Lasaponara, R.; Masini, N. Amplitude change detection with Envisat ASAR to image the cultural landscape

  3. [Breeding habitat characteristics of red-crowned crane at Zhalong of Northeast China: a multi-scale approach based on TM and ASAR image data].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Yue; Jiang, Hong-Xing; Zhang, Shu-Qing; Hou, Yun-Qiu; Lu, Jun

    2012-02-01

    Based on the Landsat TM and Envisat ASAR HH/HV imagery data and by using the GPS data of red-crowned crane nesting sites (n = 28) at Zhalong National Nature Reserve of Northeast China, the models of the breeding habitat selection of red-crowned crane at the Reserve were established by binary Logistic regression to identify the key variables for the habitat selection at eight spatial scales (30-240 m). The relative performance of the two models based on the Landsat TM and Envisat ASAR HH/HV databases was compared, and the prediction capacity of the models across the eight scales was approached. The overall precisions of the two models were satisfactory (> or = 69.0%). At scale 30 m, only variable TCA_2 entered with negative value into the model based on Landsat TM database, which indicated that the crane at this scale avoided selecting higher density reed marshes. At scales 60-120 m, the variable PCA_2 entered with positive value into the two models, indicating that the crane at these scales had higher demand of high density reed marshes to improve its concealment. At scale 90 m, the variable HV backward scatting coefficient also entered into the combined model, which indicated that water condition was the important factor for the habitat selection of the crane at this scale. At scales > 120 m, the texture information of the two satellite sensors started to be involved into the two models, indicating that at larger scales, the crane had decreasing demand on the vegetation features for its breeding habitat selection but increasing sensitivity to the anthropogenic disturbance factors. The introduction of ASAR variables into the models increased the prediction accuracy of the models markedly at all scales. PMID:22586977

  4. Lightweight SAR GMTI radar technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, John C.; Lin, Kai; Gray, Andrew; Hseih, Chung; Darden, Scott; Kwong, Winston; Majumder, Uttam; Scarborough, Steven

    2013-05-01

    A small and lightweight dual-channel radar has been developed for SAR data collections. Using standard Displaced Phase Center Antenna (DPCA) radar digital signal processing, SAR GMTI images have been obtained. The prototype radar weighs 5-lbs and has demonstrated the extraction of ground moving targets (GMTs) embedded in high-resolution SAR imagery data. Heretofore this type of capability has been reserved for much larger systems such as the JSTARS. Previously, small lightweight SARs featured only a single channel and only displayed SAR imagery. Now, with the advent of this new capability, SAR GMTI performance is now possible for small UAV class radars.

  5. InSAR data for monitoring land subsidence: time to think big

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, A.; Colombo, D.; Fumagalli, A.; Novali, F.; Rucci, A.

    2015-11-01

    Satellite interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data have proven effective and valuable in the analysis of urban subsidence phenomena based on multi-temporal radar images. Results obtained by processing data acquired by different radar sensors, have shown the potential of InSAR and highlighted the key points for an operational use of this technology, namely: (1) regular acquisition over large areas of interferometric data stacks; (2) use of advanced processing algorithms, capable of estimating and removing atmospheric disturbances; (3) access to significant processing power for a regular update of the information over large areas. In this paper, we show how the operational potential of InSAR has been realized thanks to the recent advances in InSAR processing algorithms, the advent of cloud computing and the launch of new satellite platforms, specifically designed for InSAR analyses (e.g. Sentinel-1a operated by the ESA and ALOS2 operated by JAXA). The processing of thousands of SAR scenes to cover an entire nation has been performed successfully in Italy in a project financed by the Italian Ministry of the Environment. The challenge for the future is to pass from the historical analysis of SAR scenes already acquired in digital archives to a near real-time monitoring program where up to date deformation data are routinely provided to final users and decision makers.

  6. Atmospheric correction in time-series SAR interferometry for land surface deformation mapping - A case study of Taiyuan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wei; Liao, Mingsheng; Yuan, Peng

    2016-08-01

    The dominant error source of Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) is atmospheric phase screen (APS), resulting in phase delay of the radar signal propagating through the atmosphere. The APS in the atmosphere can be decomposed into stratified and turbulent components. In this paper, we introduced a method to compensate for stratified component in a radar interferogram using ERA-Interim reanalysis products obtained from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). Our comparative results with radiosonde data demonstrated that atmospheric condition from ERA-Interim could produce reasonable patterns of vertical profiles of atmospheric states. The stratified atmosphere shows seasonal changes which are correlated with time. It cannot be properly estimated by temporal high-pass filtering which assumes that atmospheric effects are random in time in conventional persistent scatterer InSAR (PSI). Thus, the estimated deformation velocity fields are biased. Therefore, we propose the atmosphere-corrected PSI method that the stratified delay are corrected on each interferogram by using ERA-Interim. The atmospheric residuals after correction of stratified delay were interpreted as random variations in space and time which are mitigated by using spatial-temporal filtering. We applied the proposed method to ENVISAT ASAR images covering Taiyuan basin, China, to study the ground deformation associated with groundwater withdrawal. Experimental results show that the proposed method significantly mitigate the topography-correlated APS and the estimated ground displacements agree more closely with GPS measurements than the conventional PSI.

  7. Multi-temporal InSAR monitoring of landslides in a tropical urban environment: focus on Bukavu (DR Congo)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Adriano; Monsieurs, Elise; Dewitte, Olivier; d'Oreyes, Nicolas; Kervyn, Francois

    2016-04-01

    The western branch of the East African Rift System, in Central Africa, is characterized by the presence of several geohazards: earthquakes, volcanoes, and landslides. Every year, landslides cause fatalities, structural and functional damage to infrastructure and private properties with serious disruptions of the organization of societies and severe impact on the populations. These impacts are particularly important in the city of Bukavu (DR Congo) located within the Rift, on the southern shore of Lake Kivu. Large slow-moving landslides continuously affect highly populated slopes in the city. However little is known about their actual kinematics and the processes at play. Here we use multi-temporal InSAR technique to monitor these ground deformations. Using 50 Cosmo-SkyMed SAR images, acquired between March - October 2015 with a revisiting time of 8 days (ascending and descending orbits), we produce displacement-rate maps and ground deformation time series using the PS technique. Movements with a velocity >5cm/yr are detected, which is consistent with field observations. DGPS measurements, taken at 21 benchmarks in the area during the same period, allow validating the results. Similar ground deformation rates are found for the period 2002-2008 using Envisat ASAR images. Furthermore, comparison with rainfall monitoring data acquire on site should help us to understand the influence of water and the tropical seasonality in the slide mechanisms.

  8. Land subsidence in the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, 1 Baja California, Mexico, from 1994 to 2005. An integrated analysis of DInSAR, levelingand geological data.

    SciTech Connect

    Sarychikhina, O; Glowacka, E; Mellors, R; Vidal, F S

    2011-03-03

    Cerro Prieto is the oldest and largest Mexican geothermal field in operation and has been producing electricity since 1973. The large amount of geothermal fluids extracted to supply steam to the power plants has resulted in considerable deformation in and around the field. The deformation includes land subsidence and related ground fissuring and faulting. These phenomena have produced severe damages to infrastructure such as roads, irrigation canals and other facilities. In this paper, the technique of Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) is applied using C-band ENVISAR ASAR data acquired between 2003 and 2006 to determine the extent and amount of land subsidence in the Mexicali Valley near Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field. The DInSAR results were compared with published data from precise leveling surveys (1994- 1997 and 1997-2006) and detailed geological information in order to improve the understanding of temporal and spatial distributions of anthropogenic subsidence in the Mexicali Valley. The leveling and DInSAR data were modeled to characterize the observed deformation in terms of fluid extraction. The results confirm that the tectonic faults control the spatial extent of the observed subsidence. These faults likely act as groundwater flow barriers for aquifers and reservoirs. The shape of the subsiding area coincides with the Cerro Prieto pull-apart basin. In addition, the spatial pattern of the subsidence as well as changes in rate are highly correlated with the development of the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field.

  9. Mapping Changes and Damages in Areas of Conflict: From Archive C-Band SAR Data to New HR X-Band Imagery, Towards the Sentinels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapete, Deodato; Cigna, Francesca; Donoghue, Daniel N. M.; Philip, Graham

    2015-05-01

    On the turn of radar space science with the recent launch of Sentinel-1A, we investigate how to better exploit the opportunities offered by large C-band SAR archives and increasing datasets of HR to VHR X-band data, to map changes and damages in urban and rural areas affected by conflicts. We implement a dual approach coupling multi-interferogram processing and amplitude change detection, to assess the impact of the recent civil war on the city of Homs, Western Syria, and the surrounding semi-arid landscape. More than 280,000 coherent pixels are retrieved from Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) processing of the 8year-long ENVISAT ASAR IS2 archive, to quantify land subsidence due to pre-war water abstraction in rural areas. Damages in Homs are detected by analysing the changes of SAR backscattering (σ0), comparing 3m-resolution StripMap TerraSAR-X pairs from 2009 to 2014. Pre-war alteration is differentiated from war-related damages via operator-driven interpretation of the σ0 patterns.

  10. Spatio-temporal evolution of aseismic ground deformation in the Mexicali Valley (Baja California, Mexico) from 1993 to 2010, using differential SAR interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarychikhina, O.; Glowacka, E.

    2015-11-01

    Ground deformation in Mexicali Valley, Baja California, Mexico, the southern part of the Mexicali-Imperial valley, is influenced by active tectonics and human activity, mainly that of geothermal fluid extraction in the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field. Significant ground deformation, mainly subsidence (~ 18 cm yr-1), and related ground fissures cause severe damage to local infrastructure. The technique of Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) has been demonstrated to be a very effective remote sensing tool for accurately measuring the spatial and temporal evolution of ground displacements over broad areas. In present study ERS-1/2 SAR and ENVISAT ASAR images acquired between 1993 and 2010 were used to perform a historical analysis of aseismic ground deformation in Mexicali Valley, in an attempt to evaluate its spatio-temporal evolution and improve the understanding of its dynamic. For this purpose, the conventional 2-pass DInSAR was used to generate interferograms which were used in stacking procedure to produce maps of annual aseismic ground deformation rates for different periods. Differential interferograms that included strong co-seismic deformation signals were not included in the stacking and analysis. The changes in the ground deformation pattern and rate were identified. The main changes occur between 2000 and 2005 and include increasing deformation rate in the recharge zone and decreasing deformation rate in the western part of the CPGF production zone. We suggested that these changes are mainly caused by production development in the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field.

  11. Multi-frequency, polarimetric SAR analysis for archaeological prospection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Christopher; Lasaponara, Rosa; Schiavon, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the sensitivity to buried archaeological structures of C- and L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) in various polarisations. In particular, single and dual polarised data from the Phased Array type L-band SAR (PALSAR) sensor on-board the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) is used, together with quadruple polarised (quad pol) data from the SAR sensor on Radarsat-2. The study region includes an isolated area of open fields in the eastern outskirts of Rome where buried structures are documented to exist. Processing of the SAR data involved multitemporal averaging, analysis of target decompositions, study of the polarimetric signatures over areas of suspected buried structures and changes of the polarimetric bases in an attempt to enhance their visibility. Various ancillary datasets were obtained for the analysis, including geological and lithological charts, meteorological data, Digital Elevation Models (DEMs), optical imagery and an archaeological chart. For the Radarsat-2 data analysis, results show that the technique of identifying the polarimetric bases that yield greatest backscatter over anomaly features, and subsequently changing the polarimetric bases of the time series, succeeded in highlighting features of interest in the study area. It appeared possible that some of the features could correspond with structures documented on the reference archaeological chart, but there was not a clear match between the chart and the results of the Radarsat-2 analysis. A similar conclusion was reached for the PALSAR data analysis. For the PALSAR data, the volcanic nature of the soil may have hindered the visibility of traces of buried features. Given the limitations of the accuracy of the archaeological chart and the spatial resolution of both the SAR datasets, further validation would be required to draw any precise conclusions on the sensitivity of the SAR data to buried structures. Such a validation could include geophysical

  12. SAR data exploitation: computational technology enabling SAR ATR algorithm development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, Uttam K.; Casteel, Curtis H., Jr.; Buxa, Peter; Minardi, Michael J.; Zelnio, Edmund G.; Nehrbass, John W.

    2007-04-01

    A fundamental issue with synthetic aperture radar (SAR) application development is data processing and exploitation in real-time or near real-time. The power of high performance computing (HPC) clusters, FPGA, and the IBM Cell processor presents new algorithm development possibilities that have not been fully leveraged. In this paper, we will illustrate the capability of SAR data exploitation which was impractical over the last decade due to computing limitations. We can envision that SAR imagery encompassing city size coverage at extremely high levels of fidelity could be processed at near-real time using the above technologies to empower the warfighter with access to critical information for the war on terror, homeland defense, as well as urban warfare.

  13. On Ambiguities in SAR Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Ambiguities are an aliasing effect caused by the periodic sampling of the scene backscatter inherent to pulsed radar systems such as Synthetic Aperture radar (SAR). In this paper we take a fresh look at the relationship between SAR range and azimuth ambiguity constraints on the allowable pulse repetition frequency (PRF) and the antenna length. We show that for high squint angles smaller antennas may be feasible in some cases. For some applications, the ability to form a synthetic aperture at high squint angles is desirable, but the size of the antenna causes problems in the design of systems capable of such operation. This is because the SAR system design is optimized for a side-looking geometry. In two examples design examples we take a suboptimum antenna size and examine the performance in terms of azimuth resolution and swath width as a function of squint angle. We show that for stripmap SARs, the swath width is usually worse for off-boresight squint angles, because it is severely limited by range walk, except in cases where we relax the spatial resolution. We consider the implications for the design of modest-resolution, narrow swath, scanning SAR scatterometers .

  14. SARS Patients and Their Close Contacts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fact Sheet for SARS Patients and Their Close Contacts Format: Select one PDF [256 KB] Recommend on ... that are not now known. What does "close contact" mean? In the context of SARS, close contact ...

  15. Method for removing RFI from SAR images

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2003-08-19

    A method of removing RFI from a SAR by comparing two SAR images on a pixel by pixel basis and selecting the pixel with the lower magnitude to form a composite image. One SAR image is the conventional image produced by the SAR. The other image is created from phase-history data which has been filtered to have the frequency bands containing the RFI removed.

  16. Registration of interferometric SAR images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Qian; Vesecky, John F.; Zebker, Howard A.

    1992-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (INSAR) is a new way of performing topography mapping. Among the factors critical to mapping accuracy is the registration of the complex SAR images from repeated orbits. A new algorithm for registering interferometric SAR images is presented. A new figure of merit, the average fluctuation function of the phase difference image, is proposed to evaluate the fringe pattern quality. The process of adjusting the registration parameters according to the fringe pattern quality is optimized through a downhill simplex minimization algorithm. The results of applying the proposed algorithm to register two pairs of Seasat SAR images with a short baseline (75 m) and a long baseline (500 m) are shown. It is found that the average fluctuation function is a very stable measure of fringe pattern quality allowing very accurate registration.

  17. Monsoon '90 - Preliminary SAR results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubois, Pascale C.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.; Guerra, Abel G.

    1992-01-01

    Multifrequency polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the Walnut Gulch watershed near Tombstone, Arizona were acquired on 28 Mar. 1990 and on 1 Aug. 1990. Trihedral corner reflectors were deployed prior to both overflights to allow calibration of the two SAR data sets. During both overflights, gravimetric soil moisture and dielectric constant measurements were made. Detailed vegetation height, density, and water content measurements were made as part of the Monsoon 1990 Experiment. Preliminary results based on analysis of the multitemporal polarimetric SAR data are presented. Only the C-band data (5.7-cm wavelength) radar images show significant difference between Mar. and Aug., with the strongest difference observed in the HV images. Based on the radar data analysis and the in situ measurements, we conclude that these differences are mainly due to changes in the vegetation and not due to the soil moisture changes.

  18. Monsoon 1990: Preliminary SAR results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, Jakob J.; Dubois, Pascale; Guerra, Abel

    1991-01-01

    Multifrequency polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the Walnut Gulch watershed near Tombstone, Arizona were acquired on 28 Mar. 1990 and on 1 Aug. 1990. Trihedral corner reflectors were deployed prior to both overflights to allow calibration of the two SAR data sets. During both overflights, gravimetric soil moisture and dielectric constant measurements were made. Detailed vegetation height, density, and water content measurements were made as part of the Monsoon 1990 Experiment. Preliminary results based on analysis of the multitemporal polarimetric SAR data are presented. Only the C-band data (5.7-cm wavelength) radar images show significant difference between Mar. and Aug., with the strongest difference observed in the HV images. Based on the radar data analysis and the in situ measurements, we conclude that these differences are mainly due to changes in the vegetation and not due to the soil moisture changes.

  19. Monitoring Ground Deformation in Taiyuan Basin (China) with PS-InSAR and Continuous GPS Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wei; Liao, Mingsheng; Zhang, Lu; Balz, Timo; Yuan, Peng; Qin, Changwei

    2014-11-01

    Since the late 1950s, several areas of the Taiyuan basin have undergone accelerated ground subsidence and have developed associated fracturing and faulting. Through a combined analysis of GPS position time series from 2009.3438 to 2013.3109 for 5 reference stations and thousands of observations of InSAR persistent scatterers using ENVISAT-ASAR images from 2009.0849 to 2010.7150, we determine that the maximum subsidence rate at the study area is 80 mm/yr. Taiyuan city subsided at a rate of 15-20 mm/yr, in contrast to previous studies in the last decade of the 20th Century suggesting that the subsidence have become stabilized. Comparison to the independent GPS data indicates RMS agreement between the two techniques of 5.7 mm/yr. The main cause of subsidence is due to the long-term overexploitation of groundwater and coal-mining, so that our results could provide scientific evidence to improve the management of groundwater and coal exploitation in this area.

  20. Monitoring land subsidence rates with permanent scatterers SAR interferometry: a case study of Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jun; Li, Xiaojuan; Yu, Jie; Wang, Yanbing; Wan, Yanyan; An, Zhihui

    2015-12-01

    The ground subsidence phenomenon is more serious in Beijing, large-scale land subsidence seriously threats to urban planning and construction and the safety of residents. In order to study the subsidence condition, it is necessary to monitor land subsidence. Choosing 28 scenes Envisat ASAR images covering Beijing city from December 2003 to March 2009, permanent scatterer SAR interferometry (PSI) technique was applied to obtained time series land subsidence information. Then the trend characteristics and factors of subsidence were analyzed, comparing land subsidence result with the groundwater data and geological structure data. Comparison between the PSI-derived subsidence rates and leveling data obtained shows that the result of PSI is agreed with the leveling data. The results indicate that the PSI technique is capable of providing high-level accuracy subsidence information. The results show that:(1) The deformation rates derived PSI ranging from -45.80 to 4.36mm/a;(2) In the study area, the serious subsidence areas distribute in Chaoyang District, Shunyi District, Tongzhou District and Pinggu District;(3) The subsidence tends to become more and more concentrated in 6 years from 2003 to 2009.

  1. Registration Of SAR Images With Multisensor Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Diane L.; Burnette, Charles F.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.

    1993-01-01

    Semiautomated technique intended primarily to facilitate registration of polarimetric synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) images with other images of same or partly overlapping terrain while preserving polarization information conveyed by SAR data. Technique generally applicable in sense one or both of images to be registered with each other generated by polarimetric or nonpolarimetric SAR, infrared radiometry, conventional photography, or any other applicable sensing method.

  2. Progress towards SAR based ecosystem analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranson, K. Jon; Sun, Guoqing

    1991-01-01

    Recent progress towards a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) based system for determining forest ecosystem attributes is discussed. Our SAR data processing and analysis sequence, from calibration through classification, is described. In addition, the usefulness of SAR image data for identifying ecosystem classes is discussed.

  3. SAR and InSAR georeferencing algorithms for inertial navigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, M.; Kulpa, K.; Pinelli, G.; Samczynski, P.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents the concept of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and Interferemetric SAR (InSAR) georeferencing algorithms dedicated for SAR based augmented Inertial Navigation Architecture (SARINA). The SARINA is a novel concept of the Inertial Navigation System (INS), which utilized the SAR radar as an additional sensor to provide information about the platform trajectory position and compensate an aircraft drift due to Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) errors, Global Positioning System (GPS) lack of integrity, etc.

  4. Realtime processor of SAR systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schotter, R.

    Attention is given to potential applications of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) real time processor which was developed for Space Shuttle-based earth sensing, and which may prove useful in military surveillance, ocean wave studies, ship movements in territorial waters, land conservation, geology, and mineralogical prospecting. The SAR processor's signal processing task is characterized by complex algorithms and large quantities of raw data/time unit. A 'pipeline' configuration has been judged optimal for this type of processing, and it will consist of digital hardware modules for Fourier transform, digital filtering, two-dimensional image memory, and complex multiplication.

  5. Squint mode SAR processing algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. Y.; Jin, M.; Curlander, J. C.

    1989-01-01

    The unique characteristics of a spaceborne SAR (synthetic aperture radar) operating in a squint mode include large range walk and large variation in the Doppler centroid as a function of range. A pointing control technique to reduce the Doppler drift and a new processing algorithm to accommodate large range walk are presented. Simulations of the new algorithm for squint angles up to 20 deg and look angles up to 44 deg for the Earth Observing System (Eos) L-band SAR configuration demonstrate that it is capable of maintaining the resolution broadening within 20 percent and the ISLR within a fraction of a decibel of the theoretical value.

  6. Polarization Filtering of SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubois, Pascale C.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of polarization filtering of synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) returns provide hybrid method applied to either (1) maximize signal-to-noise ratio of return from given target or (2) enhance contrast between targets of two different types (that have different polarization properties). Method valid for both point and extended targets and for both monostatic and bistatic radars as well as SAR. Polarization information in return signals provides more complete description of radar-scattering properties of targets and used to obtain additional information about targets for use in classifying them, discriminating between them, or enhancing features of radar images.

  7. Antarctic mass budget from 1975-2015 using InSAR, Landsat and RACMO-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouginot, J.; Scheuchl, B.; Rignot, E. J.; Li, X.

    2015-12-01

    Ice Sheet Mass balance is measured from the difference between the ice discharge along the coast and surface mass balance of the drainage basins of the glaciers. Precise estimation of the mass balance of each glacier needs an exact delineation of their drainage basin, which, ultimately, is defined by the flow of the ice. The precision of mapping is, however, limited by the precision of the actual maps of ice flow, mainly based on speckle tracking, which is not sufficient to fully capture the direction of flow in slow-moving parts of the ice sheets. Here we revisit prior drainage basins of Antarctica using a new precise velocity map based on the interferometric phase by combining InSAR tracks from ALOS/PALSAR-1, ENVISAT/ASAR, ERS-1/-2 and RADARSAT-1/-2. We map ice flow in the interior of the ice sheet at the meter/year level precision. We discuss differences observed between new divides and topographic divides. In addition, we combine this information with a new bed topography from the mass conservation approach and a time history of glacier velocity from Landsat 1975-2015 and InSAR 1992-2015 to calculate the continental discharge since 1975. The results are combined with RACMO2 output products to reconstruct the mass balance of the ice sheet for the past 40 years. The results indicate a significant increase in mass loss from Antarctica starting in the 1990s. This work was performed at UC Irvine and Caltech's Jet Propulsion Laboratory under a contract with NASA.

  8. Remote sensing measurements of thermokarst subsidence using InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Schaefer, K. M.; Chen, A. C.; Gusmeroli, A.; Zebker, H. A.; Zhang, T.

    2015-09-01

    Thawing of ice-rich permafrost followed by surface subsidence results in irregular, depressed landforms known as thermokarst. Many remote sensing studies have identified thermokarst landforms and mapped their changes. However, the intrinsic dynamic thermokarst process of surface subsidence remains a challenge to quantify and is seldom examined using remote sensing methods. In this study we used spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data to map surface subsidence trends at a thermokarst landform located near Deadhorse on the North Slope of Alaska. A pipeline access road constructed in the 1970s triggered the thawing of the permafrost, causing subsequent expansion of the thermokarst landform. Using Phased Array type L band Synthetic Aperture Radar images acquired by the Advanced Land Observing Satellite-1, our InSAR analysis reveals localized thermokarst subsidence of 2-8 cm/yr between 2006 and 2010, equivalent to an ice volume loss of about 1.2 × 107 m3/yr. Comparisons between InSAR subsidence trends and lidar microtopography suggest a characteristic time of 8 years of thermokarst development. We also quantitatively explain the difficulty, uncertainties, and possible biases in separating thermokarst-induced, irreversible subsidence from cyclic seasonal deformation. Our study illustrates that InSAR is an effective tool for mapping and studying active thermokarst processes and quantifying ice loss.

  9. A SAR Observation and Numerical Study on Ocean Surface Imprints of Atmospheric Vortex Streets

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Weizhong; Zou, Cheng-Zhi; Pichel, William G.

    2008-01-01

    The sea surface imprints of Atmospheric Vortex Street (AVS) off Aleutian Volcanic Islands, Alaska were observed in two RADARSAT-1 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images separated by about 11 hours. In both images, three pairs of distinctive vortices shedding in the lee side of two volcanic mountains can be clearly seen. The length and width of the vortex street are about 60-70 km and 20 km, respectively. Although the AVS's in the two SAR images have similar shapes, the structure of vortices within the AVS is highly asymmetrical. The sea surface wind speed is estimated from the SAR images with wind direction input from Navy NOGAPS model. In this paper we present a complete MM5 model simulation of the observed AVS. The surface wind simulated from the MM5 model is in good agreement with SAR-derived wind. The vortex shedding rate calculated from the model run is about 1 hour and 50 minutes. Other basic characteristics of the AVS including propagation speed of the vortex, Strouhal and Reynolds numbers favorable for AVS generation are also derived. The wind associated with AVS modifies the cloud structure in the marine atmospheric boundary layer. The AVS cloud pattern is also observed on a MODIS visible band image taken between the two RADARSAT SAR images. An ENVISAT advance SAR image taken 4 hours after the second RADARSAT SAR image shows that the AVS has almost vanished.

  10. Persistent Scatterer InSAR time series analysis of the creeping section of the North Anatolian Fault at Ismetpasa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetin, E.; Cakir, Z.; Akoglu, A. M.; Ergintav, S.; Dogan, U.; Ozener, H.; Meghraoui, M.

    2012-04-01

    Although the creep along the Ismetpasa section of the North Anatolian Fault was noticed over half a century ago, its spatiotemporal nature is still poorly known due to lack of geodetic and seismological studies along the fault. Analysis of ERS (C-band) data acquired between 1992 and 2001 suggested an average creep rate of 9±3 mm along a fault segment of ~70 km long despite the difficulties arising from limited number of images available, atmospheric artefacts and low coherency that are common in classical long-term InSAR studies (Cakir et al., 2005). These inferences have been supported by a recent study of stacked PALSAR (L-band) interferograms spanning the period between 2007 and 2010 (Fialko et al., 2011). In this study, we use the Persistent Scatterer InSAR technique to better constrain the spatiotemporal characteristics of the surface creep. InSAR time series have been calculated using 27 Envisat ASAR images that were acquired between 2003 and 2010 in descending track 479. The results clearly reveal the gradual transition between the creeping and locked segments of the NAF west of Ismetpasa. Its eastern termination cannot be determined since the surface creep appears to continue further east (east of 33.4E) along the fault outside the Envisat image frame. The length of the creeping section therefore appears to be longer than 70 km. The creep rate is also tightly constrained and found to be in the range of 10-11 mm/yr along most of its length, consistent with the GPS measurements from a small-aperture geodetic network near Ismetpasa and recently reported PALSAR measurements (Fialko et al., 2011). Preliminary analysis confirms shallow locking depths for creeping as inferred by the previous studies.

  11. Detection of Slope Instabilities Along the National Road 7, Mendoza Province, Argentina, Using Multi-Temporal InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michoud, Clément; Derron, Marc-Henri; Baumann, Valérie; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Rune Lauknes, Tom

    2013-04-01

    About 2'230 vehicles per day pass through the National Road 7 that link Buenos Aires to Santiago de Chile, crossing Andes Cordillera. This extremely important corridor, being the most important land pass between Argentina and Chile, is exposed to numerous natural hazards, such as snow avalanches, rockfalls and debris flows and remains closed by natural hazards several days per year. This goal of this study is to perform a regional mapping of geohazard susceptibilities along the Road 7 corridor, as started by Baumann et al. (2005), using modern remote sensing and numerical approaches with field checking. The area of interest is located in the Mendoza Province, between the villages Potrerillos and Las Cuevas near the Chilean border. The diversity of soil and rock conditions, the active geomorphological processes associated to post-glacial decompression, seasonal freeze and thaw and severe storms along the road corridor, increase the risk to natural hazard. With the support of the European Space Agency (ESA Category-1 Project 7154), we have in this study processed a large number of ERS and Envisat ASAR scenes, covering the period from 1995 to 2000. We applied both the small-baseline (SB) and the persistent scatterer (PSI) multi-temporal interferometric SAR (InSAR) techniques. The study area contains sparse vegetation, and the SB InSAR method is therefore well suited to map the area containing mainly distributed scatterers. Furthermore, PSI algorithms are also used for comparison for selected landslides in the inventory. Both approaches show a relatively good coherence within mountain areas, which is a good point for the landslide detections along the road. Indeed, the authors identified several large slope instabilities even active scree deposits. This inventory is finally compared with field observations and with existing susceptibility maps regarding snow avalanches, debris-flows and rockfalls. The final objective of this project is to develop a risk strategy that

  12. ENVISAT.MERIS spectral bands and ENVISAT ASAR - discussion on applications of Sentinel 1 and 2 for agriculture in Poland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowska-Zielinska, K.; Budzynska, M.; Tomaszewska, M.; Bartold, M.; Turlej, K.

    2012-04-01

    Presented studies were based on application of ENVISAT MERIS data for assessment of crop conditions in 04.05.2003; 26.04.2007 and 04.09.2004. Sentinel 2 will have better spatial resolution than MERIS and additionally short wave infrared band, but the results of LAI assessment were presented using various indices from MERIS and the same study will be repeated using Sentinel data. Also the indices derived from MERIS were correlated with the ASAR data to indicate the possibilities of LAI assessment using Sentinel 1. The study has been conducted at agricultural region Wielkopolska located in the West part of Poland - The dominating crops are: winter and spring wheat, winter rye, winter and spring triticale, winter and spring barley, winter rape, corn, alfalfa, and sugar beet. Also, grassland area is presented. For the test area ENVISAT.MERIS images has been obtained for the ESA projects: C1P.1427, AOALO.3677, and C1P.7389. Simultaneously to satellite overpasses ground measurement of various soil-vegetation parameters have been carried out including wet and dry biomass taken from 1 m2 (in the laboratory), LAI using LAI-2000 Plant Canopy Analyser, height of the vegetation, and soil moisture using TRIME-FM. These measurements were applied for statistical analysis of parameters with satellite-derived indices. In this article only data for biomass and Leaf Area Index have been used in order to find the relationship between measured and satellite derived index. There has been found the high correlation between biomass and LAI for each of the studied crops, the highest for beet root and alfalfa (R2=0.95 and R2=0.90), the lowest for rape For the statistical analyses between LAI and satellite data the following indices calculated from Meris have been taken into account: 2/8 (443/681), 5/12 (550/779), 10/5 (754/560), 10/9 (754/709), 12/5 (779/560), and using red edge (10-9)/(10+9), using blue spectrum (10-2)/(10+2), (12-8)/(12+8), (13-7)/(13+7). MERIS blue bands are 1-3, green 4

  13. Bioelectromagnetic effects measurements - SAR and induced current.

    PubMed

    Dlugosz, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses several theoretical and practical aspects of the application of currents flowing through the body of a radiotelephone operator and Specific Absorption Rate (SAR). SAR is known as the physical quantity which is a perfect solution for biological experiments. Unfortunately, SAR cannot be measured directly. Contrary to SAR, which is limited to the penetration depth, a current induced in a point of a body is measurable in any other point of the body. The main objective of this paper is to show that the current induced in a human body when using a radiotelephone or mobile phone is significant and should be analyzed as widely as SAR is. Computer simulations of a human's hand with a radiotelephone were made. Experiments were also conducted. The results of the experiments show that induced current is also as important as SAR and it cannot be omitted in bioelectromagnetic experiments. In biomedical studies both parameters: induced current and SAR play a major role. PMID:25585976

  14. Further SEASAT SAR coastal ocean wave analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasischke, E. S.; Shuchman, R. A.; Meadows, G. A.; Jackson, P. L.; Tseng, Y.

    1981-01-01

    Analysis techniques used to exploit SEASAT synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data of gravity waves are discussed and the SEASAT SAR's ability to monitor large scale variations in gravity wave fields in both deep and shallow water is evaluated. The SAR analysis techniques investigated included motion compensation adjustments and the semicausal model for spectral analysis of SAR wave data. It was determined that spectra generated from fast Fourier transform analysis (FFT) of SAR wave data were not significantly altered when either range telerotation adjustments or azimuth focus shifts were used during processing of the SAR signal histories, indicating that SEASAT imagery of gravity waves is not significantly improved or degraded by motion compensation adjustments. Evaluation of the semicausal (SC) model using SEASAT SAR data from Rev. 974 indicates that the SC spectral estimates were not significantly better than the FFT results.

  15. Preliminary study for the long wavelength planetary SAR sensor design and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Rack; Sumantyo, Josaphat; Lin, Shih-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    The SAR observation over planetary surface has been conducted mainly in two ways. The first case is the subsurface monitoring of planetary surface, for examples Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionosphere Sounding (MARSIS) and Shallow Surface Radar (SHARAD). In which the long wavelength electromagnetic wave for ground penetration was applied although the functionality for mining spatial distribution of subsurface substances was limited. Imaging SAR sensors using burst mode design, which is another case, have been employed to acquire planet/satellite's surface observations mostly with the presences thick atmosphere such as Venus and Titan's cases. However, the drawbacks of burst mode SAR for the extraction of topographic information of planet/satellite was obvious as shown in the CASSSINI and Magellan SAR missions, where the interferometric capability was absence in existing burst mode planetary SAR and the quality of radargrammetry is largely limited due to the insufficient resolution and the signal-to-noise ratio of acquired images. Therefore, in this study, we proposed the exploitation of the long wavelength SAR system capable of extracting topographic information through both InSAR and radargrammetry techniques and monitoring shallow subsurface with the spatial resolving power. Although imaging SAR sensor has limited penetration depth compared with GPR such as MASIS and SHARAD, P and/or L band SARs will be certainly useful to observe a few meters depth subsurface which includes the most interesting layers in planet/satellite such as permafrost in Mars, underlying regolith of Moon, beneath of resurfacing topography of Venus, inner crust of ice satellite and bathymetry of Titan lakes. Meanwhile, those data can be used not only for the detailed surface imaging but also for the extraction of precise 3D topography reconstruction by either InSAR or stereo radargrammetry in the condition that sufficient orbital tracking accuracy is available. Based on the ideas

  16. [Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)].

    PubMed

    Gillissen, Adrian; Ruf, Bernhard R

    2003-06-15

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a viral disease, observed primarily in Southern China in November 2002, with variable flu-like symptoms and pneumonia, in approx. 5% leading to death from respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). The disease was spread over more than 30 states all over the globe by SARS-virus-infected travelers. WHO and CDC received first information about a new syndrome by the end of February 2003, after the first cases outside the Republic of China had been observed. A case in Hanoi, Vietnam, led to the first precise information about the new disease entity to WHO, by Dr. Carlo Urbani, a co-worker of WHO/Doctors without Borders, who had been called by local colleagues to assist in the management of a patient with an unknown severe disease by the end of February 2003. Dr. Urbani died from SARS, as did many other health care workers. In the meantime, more than 7,000 cases have been observed worldwide, predominantly in China and Hong Kong, but also in Taiwan, Canada, Singapore, and the USA, and many other countries, and more than 600 of these patients died from RDS. Since the beginning of March 2003, when WHO and CDC started their activities, in close collaboration with a group of international experts, including the Bernhard-Nocht-Institute in Hamburg and the Department of Virology in Frankfurt/Main, a previously impossible success in the disclosure of the disease was achieved. Within only 8 weeks of research it was possible to describe the infectious agent, a genetically modified coronavirus, including the genetic sequence, to establish specific diagnostic PCR methods and to find possible mechanisms for promising therapeutic approaches. In addition, intensifying classical quarantine and hospital hygiene measures, it was possible to limit SARS in many countries to sporadic cases, and to reduce the disease in countries such as Canada and Vietnam. This review article summarizes important information about many issues of SARS (May 15th, 2003

  17. Helmand river hydrologic studies using ALOS PALSAR InSAR and ENVISAT altimetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Kim, J.-W.; Lee, H.; Shum, C.K.; Duan, J.; Ibaraki, M.; Akyilmaz, O.; Read, C.-H.

    2009-01-01

    The Helmand River wetland represents the only fresh-water resource in southern Afghanistan and one of the least mapped water basins in the world. The relatively narrow wetland consists of mostly marshes surrounded by dry lands. In this study, we demonstrate the use of the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) Interferometric SAR (InSAR) to detect the changes of the Helmand River wetland water level. InSAR images are combined with the geocentric water level measurements from the retracked high-rate (18-Hz) Environmental Satellite (Envisat) radar altimetry to construct absolute water level changes over the marshes. It is demonstrated that the integration of the altimeter and InSAR can provide spatio-temporal measurements of water level variation over the Helmand River marshes where in situ measurements are absent. ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  18. Long-Term Monitoring of Water Dynamics in the Sahel Region Using the Multi-Sar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, A.; Wendleder, A.; Schmitt, A.; Huber, M.

    2016-06-01

    Fresh water is a scarce resource in the West-African Sahel region, seasonally influenced by droughts and floods. Particularly in terms of climate change, the importance of wetlands increases for flora, fauna, human population, agriculture, livestock and fishery. Hence, access to open water is a key factor. Long-term monitoring of water dynamics is of great importance, especially with regard to the spatio-temporal extend of wetlands and drylands. It can predict future trends and facilitate the development of adequate management strategies. Lake Tabalak, a Ramsar wetland of international importance, is one of the most significant ponds in Niger and a refuge for waterbirds. Nevertheless, human population growth increased the pressure on this ecosystem, which is now degrading for all uses. The main objective of the study is a long-term monitoring of the Lake Tabalak's water dynamics to delineate permanent and seasonal water bodies, using weather- and daytime-independent multi-sensor and multi-temporal Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data available for the study area. Data of the following sensors from 1993 until 2016 are used: Sentinel-1A, TerraSARX, ALOS PALSAR-1/2, Envisat ASAR, RADARSAT-1/2, and ERS-1/2. All SAR data are processed with the Multi-SAR-System, unifying the different characteristics of all above mentioned sensors in terms of geometric, radiometric and polarimetric resolution to a consistent format. The polarimetric representation in Kennaugh elements allows fusing single-polarized data acquired by older sensors with multi-polarized data acquired by current sensors. The TANH-normalization guarantees a consistent and therefore comparable description in a closed data range in terms of radiometry. The geometric aspect is solved by projecting all images to an earth-fixed coordinate system correcting the brightness by the help of the incidence angle. The elevation model used in the geocoding step is the novel global model produced by the TanDEM-X satellite

  19. DInSAR time series generation within a cloud computing environment: from ERS to Sentinel-1 scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casu, Francesco; Elefante, Stefano; Imperatore, Pasquale; Lanari, Riccardo; Manunta, Michele; Zinno, Ivana; Mathot, Emmanuel; Brito, Fabrice; Farres, Jordi; Lengert, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    requests of processing resources linked to disaster events. This work aims at presenting a parallel computational model for the widely used DInSAR algorithm named as Small BAseline Subset (SBAS), which has been implemented within the cloud computing environment provided by the ESA-CIOP platform. This activity has resulted in developing a scalable, unsupervised, portable, and widely accessible (through a web portal) parallel DInSAR computational tool. The activity has rewritten and developed the SBAS application algorithm within a parallel system environment, i.e., in a form that allows us to benefit from multiple processing units. This requires the devising a parallel version of the SBAS algorithm and its subsequent implementation, implying additional complexity in algorithm designing and an efficient multi processor programming, with the final aim of a parallel performance optimization. Although the presented algorithm has been designed to work with Sentinel-1 data, it can also process other satellite SAR data (ERS, ENVISAT, CSK, TSX, ALOS). Indeed, the performance analysis of the implemented SBAS parallel version has been tested on the full ASAR archive (64 acquisitions) acquired over the Napoli Bay, a volcanic and densely urbanized area in Southern Italy. The full processing - from the raw data download to the generation of DInSAR time series - has been carried out by engaging 4 nodes, each one with 2 cores and 16 GB of RAM, and has taken about 36 hours, with respect to about 135 hours of the sequential version. Extensive analysis on other test areas significant from DInSAR and geophysical viewpoint will be presented. Finally, preliminary performance evaluation of the presented approach within the Sentinel-1 scenario will be provided.

  20. Controlling Data Collection to Support SAR Image Rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.; Cordaro, J. Thomas; Burns, Bryan L.

    2008-10-14

    A desired rotation of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image can be facilitated by adjusting a SAR data collection operation based on the desired rotation. The SAR data collected by the adjusted SAR data collection operation can be efficiently exploited to form therefrom a SAR image having the desired rotational orientation.

  1. Asymptomatic SARS coronavirus infection among healthcare workers, Singapore.

    PubMed

    Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Teleman, Monica D; Heng, Bee H; Earnest, Arul; Ling, Ai E; Leo, Yee S

    2005-07-01

    We conducted a study among healthcare workers (HCWs) exposed to patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) before infection control measures were instituted. Of all exposed HCWs, 7.5% had asymptomatic SARS-positive cases. Asymptomatic SARS was associated with lower SARS antibody titers and higher use of masks when compared to pneumonic SARS. PMID:16022801

  2. The SARS-associated stigma of SARS victims in the post-SARS era of Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Siu, Judy Yuen-man

    2008-06-01

    This article explores the disease-associated stigma attached to the SARS victims in the post-SARS era of Hong Kong. I argue that the SARS-associated stigma did not decrease over time. Based on the ethnographic data obtained from 16 months of participant observation in a SARS victims' self-help group and semistructured interviews, I argue that the SARS-associated stigma was maintained, revived, and reconstructed by the biomedical encounters, government institutions, and public perception. I also provide new insight on how the SARS-associated stigma could create problems for public health development in Hong Kong. As communicable diseases will be a continuing threat for the human society, understanding how the disease-associated stigma affects the outcomes of epidemic control measures will be crucial in developing a more responsive public health policy as well as medical follow-up and social support service to the diseased social groups of future epidemic outbreaks. PMID:18503014

  3. Seven years of postseismic deformation in the Mw=6.8, 2003 Zemmouri (Algeria) earthquake area from PS-InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetin, E.; Meghraoui, M.; Cakir, Z.; Mimouni, O.; Belabbes, S.; Akoglu, A.; Bouraoui, S.; Chebbah, M.

    2012-04-01

    We study the postseismic deformation of the Mw 6.9, 2003 Zemmouri earthquake using both Persistent Scatterer (PS) and Small Baseline (SB) InSAR techniques. InSAR time series calculated from 31 Envisat ASAR images reveal subtle (sub cm) ground movements along the shoreline between Cap Matifou and Dellys between 2003 and 2010 where remarkable coseismic uplift was observed after the earthquake. Measurements show line of sight (LOS) ground subsidence at rates up to 4 mm/yr in the region of coseismic surface deformation. There are two lobes of subsidence in the deformation field at a maximum rate of ~2.0 mm/yr in Cap Djenet and ~3.5 mm/yr in Zemmouri-Boumerdes. These lobes correlate well with the regions of maximum coseismic uplift determined by InSAR and coastal uplift measurements, supporting the previous inferences that the earthquake was associated with two segments. Modeling with elastic dislocations on rectangular faults suggests that subsidence in the area of high coseismic uplift and GPS measurements can be adequately explained by afterslip on the shallow sections of the coseismic fault rupture. The impact of coseismic rupture and geologic background made of soft sedimentation allow us to characterize the ground deformation of non-tectonic origin away from the earthquake area. Indeed, ground movements also recorded in PS-InSAR time series in the Quaternary Mitidja Basin seem to result largely from seasonal water level fluctuation and water pumping for farming. Comparison of PS time series with water level changes in the eastern Mitidja Basin displays a remarkable correlation; it also indicates that the postseismic ground deformation in the western end of the 2003 earthquake rupture can be considered as negligible.

  4. Determination of creep rate and extent at Ismetpasa section of the North Anatolian Fault using Persistent Scatterer InSAR and GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetin, E.; Cakir, Z.; Dogan, U.; Akoglu, A. M.; Ozener, H.; Ergintav, S.; Meghraoui, M.

    2012-12-01

    Although fault creep was discovered over half a century ago along the Ismetpasa section of the North Anatolian Fault, its spatiotemporal nature is still poorly known due to lack of geodetic and seismological studies along the fault. Despite the difficulties arising from atmospheric artifacts and low coherency, classical long-term InSAR analysis of ERS (C-band) data between 1992 and 2001 suggested an average creep rate of 9±3 mm along a fault segment of ~70 km long (Cakir et al., 2005). Even though these estimations were obtained from a limited number of available images, these results have been supported by a recent study of stacked PALSAR (L-band) interferograms spanning the period between 2007 and 2010 (Fialko et al., 2011). In this study, we use the Persistent Scatterer InSAR technique to better constrain spatiotemporal characteristics of the surface creep. We analyzed 55 Envisat ASAR images on 2 descending tracks (479 and 207) between 2003 and 2010 and calculated InSAR time series. The PS-InSAR results show clearly the gradual transition between the creeping and locked sections of the NAF west of Ismetpasa. On the contrary, its eastern boundary is crudely determined near 33.4E since the signal is disturbed by the postseismic deformation of the Orta earthquake (June 6, 2000, Mw=6.0). The extent of the creeping section therefore appears to be approximately 81.5 km. The creep rate is also robustly constrained and found to be in the range of 10±2 mm/yr near to Ismetpasa, consistent with the GPS measurements from a small-aperture geodetic network near Ismetpasa and recently reported PALSAR measurements (Fialko et al., 2011). Furthermore, elastic dislocation modeling suggests shallow creeping depth (< 5 km).

  5. SARS and MERS: recent insights into emerging coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Emmie; van Doremalen, Neeltje; Falzarano, Darryl; Munster, Vincent J

    2016-08-01

    The emergence of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in 2012 marked the second introduction of a highly pathogenic coronavirus into the human population in the twenty-first century. The continuing introductions of MERS-CoV from dromedary camels, the subsequent travel-related viral spread, the unprecedented nosocomial outbreaks and the high case-fatality rates highlight the need for prophylactic and therapeutic measures. Scientific advancements since the 2002-2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) pandemic allowed for rapid progress in our understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of MERS-CoV and the development of therapeutics. In this Review, we detail our present understanding of the transmission and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV, and discuss the current state of development of measures to combat emerging coronaviruses. PMID:27344959

  6. Applying PolSAR and PolInSAR to Forest Structure Information Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, E.; Li, Z.; Li, W.; Feng, Q.; Zhou, W.; Pottier, E.; Hong, W.

    2013-01-01

    The key research activities and achievements in the field of applying PolSAR and PolInSAR to forest structure information extraction in DRAGON 2 are summarized in this paper. The limitation of the ALOS PolInSAR dataset acquired in the Culai test site for forest height extraction because of its long temporal baseline (46 days), and how the PolInSAR coherence optimization methods can help improve the topography inversion accuracy under forest canopy were presented. We have analyzed and evaluated the capability of multiple polarization parameters extracted from different frequency PolSAR data for forest scar mapping in the Shibazhan test site, and developed the land cover classification method based on SVM (Support Vector Machine) using PolSAR data. With the L-band E-SAR PolInSAR data acquired in the test site in Germany, we developed forest above ground biomass (AGB) estimation approach based on polarization coherence tomography (PCT).

  7. 5. SWITCH TOWER AND JUNCTION OF S.A.R. #1 & S.A.R. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. SWITCH TOWER AND JUNCTION OF S.A.R. #1 & S.A.R. #2 TRANSMISSION LINES, MARCH 7, 1916. SCE drawing no. 4932. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Transmission Lines, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  8. SAR Image Complex Pixel Representations

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2015-03-01

    Complex pixel values for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images of uniform distributed clutter can be represented as either real/imaginary (also known as I/Q) values, or as Magnitude/Phase values. Generally, these component values are integers with limited number of bits. For clutter energy well below full-scale, Magnitude/Phase offers lower quantization noise than I/Q representation. Further improvement can be had with companding of the Magnitude value.

  9. Reflectors for SAR performance testing.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) performance testing and estimation is facilitated by observing the system response to known target scene elements. Trihedral corner reflectors and other canonical targets play an important role because their Radar Cross Section (RCS) can be calculated analytically. However, reflector orientation and the proximity of the ground and mounting structures can significantly impact the accuracy and precision with which measurements can be made. These issues are examined in this report.

  10. Representing SAR complex image pixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerry, A. W.

    2016-05-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images are often complex-valued to facilitate specific exploitation modes. Furthermore, these pixel values are typically represented with either real/imaginary (also known as I/Q) values, or as Magnitude/Phase values, with constituent components comprised of integers with limited number of bits. For clutter energy well below full-scale, Magnitude/Phase offers lower quantization noise than I/Q representation. Further improvement can be had with companding of the Magnitude value.

  11. Building detection in SAR imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbach, Ryan Matthew

    2015-04-01

    Current techniques for building detection in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery can be computationally expensive and/or enforce stringent requirements for data acquisition. I present two techniques that are effective and efficient at determining an approximate building location. This approximate location can be used to extract a portion of the SAR image to then perform a more robust detection. The proposed techniques assume that for the desired image, bright lines and shadows, SAR artifact effects, are approximately labeled. These labels are enhanced and utilized to locate buildings, only if the related bright lines and shadows can be grouped. In order to find which of the bright lines and shadows are related, all of the bright lines are connected to all of the shadows. This allows the problem to be solved from a connected graph viewpoint, where the nodes are the bright lines and shadows and the arcs are the connections between bright lines and shadows. For the first technique, constraints based on angle of depression and the relationship between connected bright lines and shadows are applied to remove unrelated arcs. The second technique calculates weights for the connections and then performs a series of increasingly relaxed hard and soft thresholds. This results in groups of various levels on their validity. Once the related bright lines and shadows are grouped, their locations are combined to provide an approximate building location. Experimental results demonstrate the outcome of the two techniques. The two techniques are compared and discussed.

  12. Multiresolution FOPEN SAR image formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiPietro, Robert C.; Fante, Ronald L.; Perry, Richard P.; Soumekh, Mehrdad; Tromp, Laurens D.

    1999-08-01

    This paper presents a new technique for FOPEN SAR (foliage penetration synthetic aperture radar) image formation of Ultra Wideband UHF radar data. Planar Subarray Processing (PSAP) has successfully demonstrated the capability of forming multi- resolution images for X and Ka band radar systems under MITRE IR&D and the DARPA IBC program. We have extended the PSAP algorithm to provide the capability to form strip map, multi- resolution images for Ultra Wideband UHF radar systems. The PSAP processing can accommodate very large SAR integration angles and the resulting very large range migration. It can also accommodate long coherent integration times and wide swath coverage. Major PSAP algorithm features include: multiple SAR sub-arrays providing different look angles at the same image area that can enable man-made target responses to be distinguished from other targets and clutter by their angle dependent specular characteristics, the capability to provide a full resolution image in these and other selected areas without the processing penalty of full resolution in non required areas, and the capability to include angle-dependent motion compensation within the image formation process.

  13. InSAR Forensics: Tracing InSAR Scatterers in High Resolution Optical Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhu, XiaoXiang

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a step towards a better interpretation of the scattering mechanism of different objects and their deformation histories in SAR interferometry (InSAR). The proposed technique traces individual SAR scatterer in high resolution optical images where their geometries, materials, and other properties can be better analyzed and classified. And hence scatterers of a same object can be analyzed in group, which brings us to a new level of InSAR deformation monitoring.

  14. Interseismic strain accumulation across the North Anatolian Fault measured using InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, R. J.; Parsons, B. E.; Wright, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    The North Anatolian Fault (NAF) is a major feature of Middle Eastern tectonics, facilitating the westwards 'escape' of the Anatolian block away from the Arabia-Eurasia continental collision. In order to understand the role that the NAF plays in regional tectonics it is important to accurately determine the slip rate across the fault. Many slip rate estimates for the NAF have been made over Quaternary and longer time-scales but few geodetic estimates currently exist, especially in eastern Turkey. Here we construct satellite radar interferograms using Envisat ASAR data to measure ground displacements around the NAF and hence estimate the slip rate across it. We make use of SAR data from two satellite tracks, one ascending and one descending, that overlap across the NAF, providing a check on the assumption of horizontal fault-parallel motion that has previously been used in interseismic modelling of the fault. We mitigate the effects of atmospheric errors by constructing multiple interferograms over the fault and summing them, effectively creating a longer timespan interferogram and improving the signal-to-noise ratio. We empirically correct for orbital errors by flattening the radar swaths on the Anatolian Plateau, an area with little expected deformation. Our measurements of rates of displacement are consistent with an interseismic model for the NAF where deformation occurs at depth on a narrow shear zone below a layer in which the fault is locked. We jointly invert data from both satellite tracks to solve for best fitting model parameters, estimating both the slip rate and the depth to which the fault is locked. Our best-fitting model gives a slip rate of 23 mm/yr and a locking depth of 19 km, which is in agreement with a previous estimate made from a single track of ERS SAR data (Wright et al., 2001, GRL 28, 2117-2120), and with existing GPS data. We also construct a velocity field using a combination of InSAR and GPS data for eastern Turkey.

  15. Chirp Scaling Algorithms for SAR Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, M.; Cheng, T.; Chen, M.

    1993-01-01

    The chirp scaling SAR processing algorithm is both accurate and efficient. Successful implementation requires proper selection of the interval of output samples, which is a function of the chirp interval, signal sampling rate, and signal bandwidth. Analysis indicates that for both airborne and spaceborne SAR applications in the slant range domain a linear chirp scaling is sufficient. To perform nonlinear interpolation process such as to output ground range SAR images, one can use a nonlinear chirp scaling interpolator presented in this paper.

  16. Study on the properties of the Integrated Precipitable Water (IPW) maps derived by GPS, SAR interferometry and numerical forecasting models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateus, Pedro; Nico, Giovanni; Tomé, Ricardo; Catalão, João.; Miranda, Pedro

    2010-05-01

    The knowledge of spatial distribution of relative changes in atmospheric Integrated Precipitable Water (IPW) density is important for climate studies and numerical weather forecasting. An increase (or decrease) of the IPW density affects the phase of electromagnetic waves. For this reason, this quantity can be measured by techniques such as GPS and space-borne SAR interferometry (InSAR). The aim of this work is to study the isotropic properties of the IPW maps obtained by GPS and SAR InSAR measurements and derived by a Numerical Weather Forecasting Model. The existence of a power law in their phase spectrum is verified. The relationship between the interferometric phase delay and the topographic height of the observed area is also investigated. The Lisbon region, Portugal, was chosen as a study area. This region is monitored by a network of GPS permanent stations covering an area of about squared kilometers. The network consists of 12 GPS stations of which 4 belonging to the Instituto Geográfico Português (IGP) and 8 to Instituto Geográfico do Exercito (IGEOE). All stations were installed between 1997 and the beginning of 2009. The GAMIT package was used to process GPS data and to estimate the total zenith delay with a temporal sampling of 15 minutes. A set of 25 SAR interferograms with a 35-day temporal baseline were processed using ASAR-ENVISAT data acquired over the Lisbon region during the period from 2003 to 2005 and from 2008 to 2009. These interferograms give an estimate of the variation of the global atmospheric delay. Terrain deformations related to known geological phenomena in the Lisbon area are negligible at this time scale of 35 days. Furthermore, two interferometric SAR images acquired by ERS-1/2 over the Lisbon region on 20/07/1995 and 21/07/1995, respectively, and so with a temporal baseline of just 1 day, were also processed. The Weather Research & Forecasting Model (WRF) was used to generate the three-dimensional fields of temperature

  17. High resolution SAR applications and instrument design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dionisio, C.; Torre, A.

    1993-01-01

    The Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) has viewed, in the last two years, a huge increment of interest from many preset and potential users. The good spatial resolution associated to the all weather capability lead to considering SAR not only a scientific instrument but a tool for verifying and controlling the daily human relationships with the Earth Environment. New missions were identified for SAR as spatial resolution became lower than three meters: disasters, pollution, ships traffic, volcanic eruptions, earthquake effect are only a few of the possible objects which can be effectively detected, controlled and monitored by SAR mounted on satellites. High resolution radar design constraints and dimensioning are discussed.

  18. Bistatic SAR: Signal Processing and Image Formation.

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Daniel E.; Yocky, David A.

    2014-10-01

    This report describes the significant processing steps that were used to take the raw recorded digitized signals from the bistatic synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) hardware built for the NCNS Bistatic SAR project to a final bistatic SAR image. In general, the process steps herein are applicable to bistatic SAR signals that include the direct-path signal and the reflected signal. The steps include preprocessing steps, data extraction to for a phase history, and finally, image format. Various plots and values will be shown at most steps to illustrate the processing for a bistatic COSMO SkyMed collection gathered on June 10, 2013 on Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico.

  19. Coastal flood inundation monitoring with Satellite C-band and L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsey, Elijah W., III; Rangoonwala, Amina; Bannister, Terri

    2013-01-01

    Satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) was evaluated as a method to operationally monitor the occurrence and distribution of storm- and tidal-related flooding of spatially extensive coastal marshes within the north-central Gulf of Mexico. Maps representing the occurrence of marsh surface inundation were created from available Advanced Land Observation Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array type L-Band SAR (PALSAR) (L-band) (21 scenes with HH polarizations in Wide Beam [100 m]) data and Environmental Satellite (ENVISAT) Advanced SAR (ASAR) (C-band) data (24 scenes with VV and HH polarizations in Wide Swath [150 m]) during 2006-2009 covering 500 km of the Louisiana coastal zone. Mapping was primarily based on a decrease in backscatter between reference and target scenes, and as an extension of previous studies, the flood inundation mapping performance was assessed by the degree of correspondence between inundation mapping and inland water levels. Both PALSAR- and ASAR-based mapping at times were based on suboptimal reference scenes; however, ASAR performance seemed more sensitive to reference-scene quality and other types of scene variability. Related to water depth, PALSAR and ASAR mapping accuracies tended to be lower when water depths were shallow and increased as water levels decreased below or increased above the ground surface, but this pattern was more pronounced with ASAR. Overall, PALSAR-based inundation accuracies averaged 84% (n = 160), while ASAR-based mapping accuracies averaged 62% (n = 245).

  20. Sea state monitoring over Socotra Rock (Ieodo) by dual polarization SAR image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Kim, J.; Yun, H.; yun, H.

    2013-12-01

    The application SAR in sea state monitoring have been conducted in the large number of fields such as the vessel tracing using the wake in SAR amplitude, the measurement of sea wave height and the oil spill detection. The true merit of SAR application in sea state monitoring is the full independence from the climate conditions. Hence, it is highly useful to secure safety of the anthropogenic activities in ocean and the understanding of the marine environment. Especially the dual and full polarization modes of new L band and X band SAR such as Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR)'s Fine Beam double Polarization (FDB) and Polarimetry mode (PLR) and terraSAR-X polarization mode provided innovative means to extract sea state information exploiting the different amplitude and phase angle responses by electromagnetic and sea wave interactions. Thus a sample projects for mining the maximum possible sea state information from the ALOS PLASAR FDB SAR/InSAR pairs compared with the in-suit observation of sea state is being conducted. Test site was established over Socotra Rock (Ieodo in Korean), which is located at the Western Sea of Korea. At first, it aimed the measurement of sea waves using ALOS PLASAR multi-polarization images and its doppler-shift analysis. Together with sea state monitoring, auxiliary data analyses to combine the sea state outputs with the other in-orbital sensing image and non image information to trace the influence of sea states in the marine environment are actively undergoing. For instance, MERIS chlorophyll-a products are under investigation to identify the correlation with sea state. However, an significant obstacles to apply SAR interpretation scheme for mining sea state is the temporal gap between SAR image acquisitions in spite of the improved revising time of contemporary in-orbital SAR sensors. To tackle this problem, we are also introducing the multi view angle optical sensor

  1. Seven years of postseismic deformation following the 2003 Mw = 6.8 Zemmouri earthquake (Algeria) from InSAR time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetin, Esra; Meghraoui, Mustapha; Cakir, Ziyadin; Akoglu, Ahmet M.; Mimouni, Omar; Chebbah, Mouloud

    2012-05-01

    We study the postseismic surface deformation of the Mw 6.8, 2003 Zemmouri earthquake (northern Algeria) using the Multi-Temporal Small Baseline InSAR technique. InSAR time series obtained from 31 Envisat ASAR images from 2003 to 2010 reveal sub-cm coastline ground movements between Cap Matifou and Dellys. Two regions display subsidence at a maximum rate of 2 mm/yr in Cap Djenet and 3.5 mm/yr in Boumerdes. These regions correlate well with areas of maximum coseismic uplifts, and their association with two rupture segments. Inverse modeling suggest that subsidence in the areas of high coseismic uplift can be explained by afterslip on shallow sections (<5 km) of the fault above the areas of coseismic slip, in agreement with previous GPS observations. The earthquake impact on soft sediments and the ground water table southwest of the earthquake area, characterizes ground deformation of non-tectonic origin. The cumulative postseismic moment due to 7 years afterslip is equivalent to an Mw 6.3 earthquake. Therefore, the postseismic deformation and stress buildup has significant implications on the earthquake cycle models and recurrence intervals of large earthquakes in the Algiers area.

  2. Developing a small multi frequency synthetic aperture radar for UAS operation: the SlimSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaugg, Evan; Edwards, Matthew; Margulis, Alex

    2010-04-01

    The SlimSAR is a small, low-cost, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and represents a new advancement in high-performance SAR. ARTEMIS employed a unique design methodology in designing the SlimSAR that exploits previous developments. The system is designed to be smaller, lighter, and more flexible while consuming less power than typical SAR systems. The system consists of an L-band core and frequency block converters and is very suitable for use on a number of small UAS's. Both linear-frequency-modulated continuous-wave (LFM-CW) and pulsed modes have been tested. The LFM-CW operation achieves high signal-to-noise ratio while transmitting with less peak power than a comparable pulsed system. The flexible control software allows us to change the radar parameters in flight. The system has a built-in high quality GPS/IMU motion measurement solution and can also be packaged with a small data link and a gimbal for high frequency antennas. Multi-frequency SAR provides day and night imaging through smoke, dust, rain, and clouds with the advantages of additional capabilities at different frequencies (i.e. dry ground and foliage penetration at low frequencies, and change detection at high frequencies.)

  3. Three-dimensional surface reconstruction from multistatic SAR images.

    PubMed

    Rigling, Brian D; Moses, Randolph L

    2005-08-01

    This paper discusses reconstruction of three-dimensional surfaces from multiple bistatic synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. Techniques for surface reconstruction from multiple monostatic SAR images already exist, including interferometric processing and stereo SAR. We generalize these methods to obtain algorithms for bistatic interferometric SAR and bistatic stereo SAR. We also propose a framework for predicting the performance of our multistatic stereo SAR algorithm, and, from this framework, we suggest a metric for use in planning strategic deployment of multistatic assets. PMID:16121463

  4. Geodetic integration of Sentinel-1A IW data using PSInSAR in Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, Péter; Hevér, Renáta; Grenerczy, Gyula

    2015-04-01

    ESA's latest Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) mission Sentinel-1 is a huge step forward in SAR interferometry. With its default acquisition mode called the Interferometric Wide Swath Mode (IW) areas through all scales can be mapped with an excellent return time of 12 days (while only the Sentinel-1A is in orbit). Its operational data policy is also a novelty, it allows scientific users free and unlimited access to data. It implements a new type of ScanSAR mode called Terrain Observation with Progressive Scan (TOPS) SAR. It has the same resolution as ScanSAR but with better signal-to-noise ratio distribution. The bigger coverage is achieved by rotation of the antenna in the azimuth direction, therefore it requires very precise co-registration because even errors under a pixel accuracy can introduce azimuth phase variations caused by differences in Doppler-centroids. In our work we will summarize the benefits and the drawbacks of the IW mode. We would like to implement the processing chain of GAMMA Remote Sensing of such data for mapping surface motion with special attention to the co-registration step. Not only traditional InSAR but the advanced method of Persistent Scatterer InSAR (PSInSAR) will be performed and presented as well. PS coverage, along with coherence, is expected to be good due to the small perpendicular and temporal baselines. We would also like to integrate these measurements into national geodetic networks using common reference points. We have installed trihedral corner reflectors at some selected sites to aid precise collocation. Thus, we aim to demonstrate that Sentinel-1 can be effectively used for surface movement detection and monitoring and it can also provide valuable information for the improvement of our networks.

  5. Pol(In)SAR Soil Moisture Study by using Pi-SAR 2L and GB-SAR Data in Preparation of the upcoming ALOS-2/PALSAR-2 Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, C.; Sato, M.

    2013-12-01

    Recently Earth Observation by means of active microwave is advancing rapidly. The evolution started from first-generation classical single-channel systems like JERS (JAXA), ERS (ESA) or Radarsat-1 (CSA). With the launch of ALOS-1 (JAXA), the first fully polarimetric SAR measurements became available followed by Radarsat-2 (CSA) and TerraSAR-X (DLR), making polarimetric L-, C-, and X-band data available. In Japanese fiscal year 2013, the third generation of SAR satellites will begin with the launch of ALOS-2. The JAXA cutting-edge follow-on mission to the highly acclaimed ALOS-1 will carry the state-of-the-art PALSAR-2 sensor aboard. Due to its much better orbital revisit cycle of only 14 days and its very high spatial resolution (3 m) the system will be highly suitable for interferometric analysis of polarimetric data obtained from repeat-pass acquisitions. The combination of polarimetry and interferometry is probably the most promising approach for a better estimation of geophysical parameters from SAR data acquired over natural terrain and thus will greatly improve the capabilities to estimate soil moisture under all kinds of vegetation with high accuracy and with high temporal and spatial resolutions. In advent of the 3rd generation of Japanese SAR EO satellites, our group conducts a variety of fundamental research on low-frequency SAR surface scattering/interactions. Here, we present first results from soil moisture experiments based on fully polarimetric GB-SAR (Tohoku University) and Pi-SAR 2L (JAXA) measurements. These experiments comprise investigations of the effective soil moisture measuring depth of L-band SAR. The experimental set-up consists of an array of receiving di-pole antennas installed in different depths to quantify the penetration (and reflection) capabilities of the incoming EM waves. We use a fully polarimetric GB-SAR system based on a high-end VNA capable of coherent measurement of the [S2] scattering matrix. It uses 2 large horn antennas

  6. InfoTerra/TerraSAR initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, Manfred W.

    2004-01-01

    The overarching goal of the InfoTerra/TerraSAR Initiative is to establish a self-sustaining operational/commercial business built on Europe"s know-how and experience in space-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) technology, in SAR data processing as well as in SAR applications. InfoTerra stands for a new business concept based on supplying innovative geo-information products and services. TerraSAR is a space and ground system conceived to consist of an initial deployment and operation of 2 Radar satellites (one in X- and one in L-band) flying in a tandem configuration in the same orbit. The design of TerraSAR is driven by the market and is user-oriented. TerraSAR is key to capturing a significant proportion of the existing market and to opening new market opportunities, when it becomes operational. The InfoTerra/TerraSAR Initiative has evolved gradually. It started in 1997 as a joint venture between German (DSS) and British (MMS-UK) space industry, strongly supported by both space agencies, DLR and BNSC. In early 2001, DLR and BNSC submitted to ESA the Formal Programme Proposal for InfoTerra/TerraSAR to become an essential element of ESA"s Earth Watch Programme. In summer 2001, when it became evident that there was not yet sufficient support from the ESA Member States to allow immediate start entering into TerraSAR Phase C/D, it has been decided to implement first a TerraSAR consolidation phase. In early 2002, in order to avoid further delays, a contract was signed between DLR and Astrium GmbH on the development of one component of TerraSAR, the TerraSAR-X, in the frame of a national programme, governed by a Public Private Partnership Agreement. Even if now the different launch dates for TerraSAR-X and TerraSAR-L are narrowing down the window of common data acquisition, it is a reasonable starting point, but it should always be kept in mind that the utmost goal for the longterm is to achieve self sustainability by supplying geo-information products and services

  7. Wavelet Analysis of SAR Images for Coastal Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Antony K.; Wu, Sunny Y.; Tseng, William Y.; Pichel, William G.

    1998-01-01

    The mapping of mesoscale ocean features in the coastal zone is a major potential application for satellite data. The evolution of mesoscale features such as oil slicks, fronts, eddies, and ice edge can be tracked by the wavelet analysis using satellite data from repeating paths. The wavelet transform has been applied to satellite images, such as those from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), Advanced Very High-Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), and ocean color sensor for feature extraction. In this paper, algorithms and techniques for automated detection and tracking of mesoscale features from satellite SAR imagery employing wavelet analysis have been developed. Case studies on two major coastal oil spills have been investigated using wavelet analysis for tracking along the coast of Uruguay (February 1997), and near Point Barrow, Alaska (November 1997). Comparison of SAR images with SeaWiFS (Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor) data for coccolithophore bloom in the East Bering Sea during the fall of 1997 shows a good match on bloom boundary. This paper demonstrates that this technique is a useful and promising tool for monitoring of coastal waters.

  8. SuperSAR: A Mission to Detect Earth Surface Deformation in Three Dimensions from a Single Satellite Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Andrew

    2010-05-01

    Earth surface deformation occurs in three dimensions. The technique of repeat-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar InSAR is a powerful tool for monitoring the deformation that arises through a broad spectrum of natural hazards and commercial processes. Applications of InSAR include studies of co-seismic, inter-seismic, and post-seismic deformation, tectonic rifting, volcanic uplift, land subsidence, landslides, glacier motion, the extent of grounded ice sheets, atmospheric water vapour, wetland flooding, canopy biomass, and signals associated with the commercial extraction and injection of gases, fluids, and solids. The major limitation of the current generation of InSAR sensors remains their ability to detect only a single component of the Earth surface deformation vector, in a direction perpendicular to the instrument flight path. SuperSAR is a novel, multi-azimuth SAR that is capable of detecting Earth surface deformation in three dimensions. The instrument will sample deformation perpendicular and parallel to the satellite ground track, simultaneously, using the established techniques of repeat pass, conventional InSAR and multiple aperture InSAR, respectively. The third component of the deformation vector is resolved through a combination of observations recorded in ascending and descending satellite orbits. The key design feature of SuperSAR is the addition of multiple beams in the azimuth direction that are generated using simultaneous or sequential excitation of the same antenna. The multi-azimuth concept means that SuperSAR is uniquely able to resolve the full three-dimensional deformation vector using only a single satellite platform, providing a fundamental advance in the capacity of the present and planned generations of InSAR sensors.

  9. Detection of airborne severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus and environmental contamination in SARS outbreak units.

    PubMed

    Booth, Timothy F; Kournikakis, Bill; Bastien, Nathalie; Ho, Jim; Kobasa, Darwyn; Stadnyk, Laurie; Li, Yan; Spence, Mel; Paton, Shirley; Henry, Bonnie; Mederski, Barbara; White, Diane; Low, Donald E; McGeer, Allison; Simor, Andrew; Vearncombe, Mary; Downey, James; Jamieson, Frances B; Tang, Patrick; Plummer, Frank

    2005-05-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is characterized by a risk of nosocomial transmission; however, the risk of airborne transmission of SARS is unknown. During the Toronto outbreaks of SARS, we investigated environmental contamination in SARS units, by employing novel air sampling and conventional surface swabbing. Two polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-positive air samples were obtained from a room occupied by a patient with SARS, indicating the presence of the virus in the air of the room. In addition, several PCR-positive swab samples were recovered from frequently touched surfaces in rooms occupied by patients with SARS (a bed table and a television remote control) and in a nurses' station used by staff (a medication refrigerator door). These data provide the first experimental confirmation of viral aerosol generation by a patient with SARS, indicating the possibility of airborne droplet transmission, which emphasizes the need for adequate respiratory protection, as well as for strict surface hygiene practices. PMID:15809906

  10. The application of satellite differential SAR interferometry-derived ground displacements in hydrogeology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galloway, D.L.; Hoffmann, J.

    2007-01-01

    The application of satellite differential synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry, principally coherent (InSAR) and to a lesser extent, persistent-scatterer (PSI) techniques to hydrogeologic studies has improved capabilities to map, monitor, analyze, and simulate groundwater flow, aquifer-system compaction and land subsidence. A number of investigations over the previous decade show how the spatially detailed images of ground displacements measured with InSAR have advanced hydrogeologic understanding, especially when a time series of images is used in conjunction with histories of changes in water levels and management practices. Important advances include: (1) identifying structural or lithostratigraphic boundaries (e.g. faults or transitional facies) of groundwater flow and deformation; (2) defining the material and hydraulic heterogeneity of deforming aquifer-systems; (3) estimating system properties (e.g. storage coefficients and hydraulic conductivities); and (4) constraining numerical models of groundwater flow, aquifer-system compaction, and land subsidence. As a component of an integrated approach to hydrogeologic monitoring and characterization of unconsolidated alluvial groundwater basins differential SAR interferometry contributes unique information that can facilitate improved management of groundwater resources. Future satellite SAR missions specifically designed for differential interferometry will enhance these contributions. ?? Springer-Verlag 2006.

  11. Remote sensing-based Information for crop monitoring: contribution of SAR and Moderate resolution optical data on Asian rice production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschetti, Mirco; Holectz, Francesco; Manfron, Giacinto; Collivignarelli, Francesco; Nelson, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    Updated information on crop typology and status are strongly required to support suitable action to better manage agriculture production and reduce food insecurity. In this field, remote sensing has been demonstrated to be a suitable tool to monitor crop condition however rarely the tested system became really operative. The ones today available, such as the European Commission MARS, are mainly based on the analysis of NDVI time series and required ancillary external information like crop mask to interpret the seasonal signal. This condition is not always guarantied worldwide reducing the potentiality of the remote sensing monitoring. Moreover in tropical countries cloud contamination strongly reduce the possibility of using optical remote sensing data for crop monitoring. In this framework we focused our analysis on the rice production monitoring in Asian tropical area. Rice is in fact the staple food for half of the world population (FAO 2004), in Asia almost 90% of the world's rice is produced and consumed and Rice and poverty often coincide. In this contest the production of reliable rice production information is of extreme interest. We tried to address two important issue in terms of required geospatial information for crop monitoring: rice crop detection (rice map) and seasonal dynamics analysis (phenology). We use both SAR and Optical data in order to exploit the potential complementarity of this system. Multi-temporal ASAR Wide Swath data are in fact the best option to deal with cloud contamination. SAR can easily penetrate the clouds providing information on the surface target. Temporal analysis of archive ASAR data allowed to derived accurate map, at 100m spatial resolution, of permanent rice cultivated areas. On the other and high frequency revisiting optical data, in this case MODIS, have been used to extract seasonal information for the year under analysis. MOD09A1 Surface Reflectance 8-Day L3 Global 500m have been exploited to derive time series of

  12. Special Issue on Results from Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (Sir-C/X-SAR): Foreword

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaut, Jefferey J.

    1996-01-01

    The two flights of the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour represent a major advance in remote sensing technology for studies of planetary surfaces.

  13. Cross-calibration between airborne SAR sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zink, Manfred; Olivier, Philippe; Freeman, Anthony

    1993-01-01

    As Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) system performance and experience in SAR signature evaluation increase, quantitative analysis becomes more and more important. Such analyses require an absolute radiometric calibration of the complete SAR system. To keep the expenditure on calibration of future multichannel and multisensor remote sensing systems (e.g., X-SAR/SIR-C) within a tolerable level, data from different tracks and different sensors (channels) must be cross calibrated. The 1989 joint E-SAR/DC-8 SAR calibration campaign gave a first opportunity for such an experiment, including cross sensor and cross track calibration. A basic requirement for successful cross calibration is the stability of the SAR systems. The calibration parameters derived from different tracks and the polarimetric properties of the uncalibrated data are used to describe this stability. Quality criteria for a successful cross calibration are the agreement of alpha degree values and the consistency of radar cross sections of equally sized corner reflectors. Channel imbalance and cross talk provide additional quality in case of the polarimetric DC-8 SAR.

  14. A Simple Model for a SARS Epidemic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ang, Keng Cheng

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the use of an ordinary differential equation in modelling the SARS outbreak in Singapore. The model provides an excellent example of using mathematics in a real life situation. The mathematical concepts involved are accessible to students with A level Mathematics backgrounds. Data for the SARS epidemic in Singapore are…

  15. Monitoring of Three Case Studies of Creeping Landslides in Ecuador using L-band SAR Interferometry (InSAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayorga Torres, T. M.; Mohseni Aref, M.

    2015-12-01

    Tannia Mayorga Torres1,21 Universidad Central del Ecuador. Faculty of Geology, Mining, Oil, and Environment 2 Hubert H. Humphrey Fellowship 2015-16 IntroductionLandslides lead to human and economic losses across the country, mainly in the winter season. On the other hand, satellite radar data has cost-effective benefits due to open-source software and free availability of data. With the purpose of establishing an early warning system of landslide-related surface deformation, three case studies were designed in the Coast, Sierra (Andean), and Oriente (jungle) regions. The objective of this work was to assess the capability of L-band InSAR to get phase information. For the calculation of the interferograms in Repeat Orbit Interferometry PACkage, the displacement was detected as the error and was corrected. The coherence images (Figure 1) determined that L-band is suitable for InSAR processing. Under this frame, as a first approach, the stacking DInSAR technique [1] was applied in the case studies [2]; however, due to lush vegetation and steep topography, it is necessary to apply advanced InSAR techniques [3]. The purpose of the research is to determine a pattern of data acquisition and successful results to understand the spatial and temporal ground movements associated with landslides. The further work consists of establishing landslide inventories to combine phases of SAR images to generate maps of surface deformation in Tumba-San Francisco and Guarumales to compare the results with ground-based measurements to determine the maps' accuracy. References[1] Sandwell D., Price E. (1998). Phase gradient approach to stacking interferograms. Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 103, N. B12, pp. 30,183-30,204. [2] Mayorga T., Platzeck G. (2014). Using DInSAR as a tool to detect unstable terrain areas in an Andes region in Ecuador. NH3.5-Blue Poster B298, Vol. 16, EGU2014-16203. Austria. [3] Wasowski J., Bovenga F. (2014). Investigating landslides and unstable slopes with

  16. Knowledge based SAR images exploitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, David L.

    1987-01-01

    One of the basic functions of SAR images exploitation system is the detection of man-made objects. The performance of object detection is strongly limited by performance of segmentation modules. This paper presents a detection paradigm composed of an adaptive segmentation algorithm based on a priori knowledge of objects followed by a top-down hierarchical detection process that generates and evaluates object hypotheses. Shadow information and inter-object relationships can be added to the knowledge base to improve performance over that of a statistical detector based only on the attributes of individual objects.

  17. Regularization Analysis of SAR Superresolution

    SciTech Connect

    DELAURENTIS,JOHN M.; DICKEY,FRED M.

    2002-04-01

    Superresolution concepts offer the potential of resolution beyond the classical limit. This great promise has not generally been realized. In this study we investigate the potential application of superresolution concepts to synthetic aperture radar. The analytical basis for superresolution theory is discussed. In a previous report the application of the concept to synthetic aperture radar was investigated as an operator inversion problem. Generally, the operator inversion problem is ill posed. This work treats the problem from the standpoint of regularization. Both the operator inversion approach and the regularization approach show that the ability to superresolve SAR imagery is severely limited by system noise.

  18. Making Mosaics Of SAR Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlander, John C.; Kwok, Ronald; Pang, Shirley S.; Pang, Amy A.

    1990-01-01

    Spaceborne synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) images useful for mapping of planets and investigations in Earth sciences. Produces multiframe mosaic by combining images along ground track, in adjacent cross-track swaths, or in ascending and descending passes. Images registered with geocoded maps such as ones produced by MAPJTC (NPO-17718), required as input. Minimal intervention by operator required. MOSK implemented on DEC VAX 11/785 computer running VMS 4.5. Most subroutines in FORTRAN, but three in MAXL and one in APAL.

  19. Large Scale Assessment of Radio Frequency Interference Signatures in L-band SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, F. J.; Nicoll, J.

    2011-12-01

    Imagery of L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems such as the PALSAR sensor on board the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) has proven to be a valuable tool for observing environmental changes around the globe. Besides offering 24/7 operability, the L-band frequency provides improved interferometric coherence, and L-band polarimetric data has shown great potential for vegetation monitoring, sea ice classification, and the observation of glaciers and ice sheets. To maximize the benefit of missions such as ALOS PALSAR for environmental monitoring, data consistency and calibration are vital. Unfortunately, radio frequency interference (RFI) signatures from ground-based radar systems regularly impair L-band SAR data quality and consistency. With this study we present a large-scale analysis of typical RFI signatures that are regularly observed in L-band SAR data over the Americas. Through a study of the vast archive of L-band SAR data in the US Government Research Consortium (USGRC) data pool at the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) we were able to address the following research goals: 1. Assessment of RFI Signatures in L-band SAR data and their Effects on SAR Data Quality: An analysis of time-frequency properties of RFI signatures in L-band SAR data of the USGRC data pool is presented. It is shown that RFI-filtering algorithms implemented in the operational ALOS PALSAR processor are not sufficient to remove all RFI-related artifacts. In examples, the deleterious effects of RFI on SAR image quality, polarimetric signature, SAR phase, and interferometric coherence are presented. 2. Large-Scale Assessment of Severity, Spatial Distribution, and Temporal Variation of RFI Signatures in L-band SAR data: L-band SAR data in the USGRC data pool were screened for RFI using a custom algorithm. Per SAR frame, the algorithm creates geocoded frame bounding boxes that are color-coded according to RFI intensity and converted to KML files for analysis in Google Earth. From

  20. Reconnaissance with slant plane circular SAR imaging.

    PubMed

    Soumekh, M

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a method for imaging from the slant plane data collected by a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) over the full rotation or a partial segment of a circular flight path. A Fourier analysis for the Green's function of the imaging system is provided. This analysis is the basis of an inversion for slant plane circular SAR data. The reconstruction algorithm and resolution for this SAR system are outlined. It is shown that the slant plane circular SAR, unlike the slant plane linear SAR, has the capability to extract three-dimensional imaging information of a target scene. The merits of the algorithm are demonstrated via a simulated target whose ultra wideband foliage penetrating (FOPEN) or ground penetrating (GPEN) ultrahigh frequency (UHF) radar signature varies with the radar's aspect angle. PMID:18285213

  1. Multi-temporal intensity and coherence analysis of SAR images for land cover change detection on the Island of Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, E.; Sykioti, O.; Elias, P.; Kontoes, C.

    2015-10-01

    This study presents the use of multi-temporal Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images for detection of land cover changes in the eastern part of the Island of Crete (Greece). For this purpose, fourteen Envisat ASAR acquisitions from July 2004 to December 2006 were calibrated and registered. We applied a temporal filter and spatial averaging to the backscatter intensity to reduce the noise. Furthermore, we used the concept that the changes between different backscatter intensity observations can show changes on the target dielectric properties. In order to detect changes due to geometrical characteristics of land cover types, we created coherence maps using twenty-seven interferometric pairs with proper spatial and temporal baselines. In all calculations, layover and shadow effects, as well as the sea, were masked by using information from the digital elevation model of the area. The observed changes in the coherence values were analyzed with respect to different decorrelation factors that can contribute to the loss of coherence. Our results present the different backscatter values for several land cover types (farmland, olive groves, forests, etc.). In addition, some land cover types such as olive groves show variations of backscatter signal due to the density and height of trees. Furthermore, olive groves show good coherence in interferograms with short time intervals. All interferometric pairs have low coherence in farmland because of the rapid growth of plants. Finally, the maps of backscatter temporal changes and coherence changes were superimposed and compared to auxiliary data such as multi-temporal optical satellite imagery (i.e. Landsat/ETM, Terra/Aqua MODIS) and thematic land cover maps (Corinne 2000). We found that changes are mostly due to plant growth and man-made activity. This ongoing study shows the potential of SAR in providing complementary information such as changes in dielectric and geometric properties to optical data in land cover dynamics

  2. SARS and Population Health Technology

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    The recent global outbreak of SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) provides an opportunity to study the use and impact of public health informatics and population health technology to detect and fight a global epidemic. Population health technology is the umbrella term for technology applications that have a population focus and the potential to improve public health. This includes the Internet, but also other technologies such as wireless devices, mobile phones, smart appliances, or smart homes. In the context of an outbreak or bioterrorism attack, such technologies may help to gather intelligence and detect diseases early, and communicate and exchange information electronically worldwide. Some of the technologies brought forward during the SARS epidemic may have been primarily motivated by marketing efforts, or were more directed towards reassuring people that "something is being done," ie, fighting an "epidemic of fear." To understand "fear epidemiology" is important because early warning systems monitoring data from a large number of people may not be able to discriminate between a biological epidemic and an epidemic of fear. The need for critical evaluation of all of these technologies is stressed. PMID:12857670

  3. InSAR time series analysis for monitoring of natural and anthropogenic hazards with high temporal resolution (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonov, S. V.; d'Oreye, N.; Gonzalez, P. J.; Tiampo, K. F.

    2013-12-01

    Modern Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellites and satellite constellations are capable of acquiring data at high spatial resolution and increasing temporal resolution allowing detection of ground deformation signals with a minimal delay. Advanced interferometric SAR (InSAR) processing techniques, such as Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) and Multidimensional Small Baseline Subset (MSBAS) are capable of producing time series of ground deformation with a very high sub-centimeter precision. Additionally MSBAS allows combination of various InSAR data into a single set of vertical and horizontal deformation time series further improving their temporal resolution and precision. Developed methodologies are ready for operational monitoring of natural and anthropogenic hazards, including landslides, volcanoes, earthquakes and tectonic motion and ground subsidence caused by mining and groundwater extraction. Here we present various case studies where an InSAR time series analysis was able to map ground deformation with superior resolution and precision, including mining subsidence in the Greater Luxembourg region and southern Saskatchewan, groundwater extraction related subsidence in the Greater Vancouver Region, volcanic deformation in the Virunga Volcanic Province, and tectonic deformation and landslide in northern California. Often, InSAR is the best cost-efficient solution with no restrictions on spatial coverage, weather or lighting condition and timing. It is anticipated that the use of SAR data for mapping hazards will increase in the future as data access improves.

  4. History of SAR at Lockheed Martin (previously Goodyear Aerospace)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasswell, Stephen W.

    2005-05-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) was invented by Carl Wiley at Goodyear Aircraft Company in Goodyear, Arizona, in 1951. From that time forward, as the company became Goodyear Aerospace Corporation, Loral Corporation, and finally Lockheed Martin Corporation, the Arizona employees past and present played a long and storied role in numerous SAR firsts. These include the original SAR patent (known as Simultaneous Doppler Buildup), the first demonstration SAR and flight test, the first operational SAR system, the first operational SAR data link, the first 5-foot resolution operational SAR system, the first 1-foot resolution SAR system, and the first large scale SAR digital processor. The company has installed and flown over five hundred SAR systems on more than thirty different types of aircraft for numerous countries throughout the world. The company designed and produced all of the evolving high performance SAR systems for the U. S. Air Force SR-71 "Blackbird" spy plane throughout its entire operational history, spanning some twenty-nine years. Recent SAR accomplishments include long-range standoff high performance SAR systems, smaller high resolution podded SAR systems for fighter aircraft, and foliage penetration (FOPEN) SAR. The company is currently developing the high performance SAR/MTI (Moving Target Indication) radar for the Army Aerial Common Sensor (ACS) system.

  5. Combination of Genetic Algorithm and Dempster-Shafer Theory of Evidence for Land Cover Classification Using Integration of SAR and Optical Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, H. T.; Ge, L.

    2012-07-01

    The integration of different kinds of remotely sensed data, in particular Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and optical satellite imagery, is considered a promising approach for land cover classification because of the complimentary properties of each data source. However, the challenges are: how to fully exploit the capabilities of these multiple data sources, which combined datasets should be used and which data processing and classification techniques are most appropriate in order to achieve the best results. In this paper an approach, in which synergistic use of a feature selection (FS) methods with Genetic Algorithm (GA) and multiple classifiers combination based on Dempster-Shafer Theory of Evidence, is proposed and evaluated for classifying land cover features in New South Wales, Australia. Multi-date SAR data, including ALOS/PALSAR, ENVISAT/ASAR and optical (Landsat 5 TM+) images, were used for this study. Textural information were also derived and integrated with the original images. Various combined datasets were generated for classification. Three classifiers, namely Artificial Neural Network (ANN), Support Vector Machines (SVMs) and Self-Organizing Map (SOM) were employed. Firstly, feature selection using GA was applied for each classifier and dataset to determine the optimal input features and parameters. Then the results of three classifiers on particular datasets were combined using the Dempster-Shafer theory of Evidence. Results of this study demonstrate the advantages of the proposed method for land cover mapping using complex datasets. It is revealed that the use of GA in conjunction with the Dempster-Shafer Theory of Evidence can significantly improve the classification accuracy. Furthermore, integration of SAR and optical data often outperform single-type datasets.

  6. InSAR Scientific Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.; Sacco, Gian Franco; Gurrola, Eric M.; Zabker, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    This computing environment is the next generation of geodetic image processing technology for repeat-pass Interferometric Synthetic Aperture (InSAR) sensors, identified by the community as a needed capability to provide flexibility and extensibility in reducing measurements from radar satellites and aircraft to new geophysical products. This software allows users of interferometric radar data the flexibility to process from Level 0 to Level 4 products using a variety of algorithms and for a range of available sensors. There are many radar satellites in orbit today delivering to the science community data of unprecedented quantity and quality, making possible large-scale studies in climate research, natural hazards, and the Earth's ecosystem. The proposed DESDynI mission, now under consideration by NASA for launch later in this decade, would provide time series and multiimage measurements that permit 4D models of Earth surface processes so that, for example, climate-induced changes over time would become apparent and quantifiable. This advanced data processing technology, applied to a global data set such as from the proposed DESDynI mission, enables a new class of analyses at time and spatial scales unavailable using current approaches. This software implements an accurate, extensible, and modular processing system designed to realize the full potential of InSAR data from future missions such as the proposed DESDynI, existing radar satellite data, as well as data from the NASA UAVSAR (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar), and other airborne platforms. The processing approach has been re-thought in order to enable multi-scene analysis by adding new algorithms and data interfaces, to permit user-reconfigurable operation and extensibility, and to capitalize on codes already developed by NASA and the science community. The framework incorporates modern programming methods based on recent research, including object-oriented scripts controlling legacy and

  7. SAR image formation toolbox for MATLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorham, LeRoy A.; Moore, Linda J.

    2010-04-01

    While many synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image formation techniques exist, two of the most intuitive methods for implementation by SAR novices are the matched filter and backprojection algorithms. The matched filter and (non-optimized) backprojection algorithms are undeniably computationally complex. However, the backprojection algorithm may be successfully employed for many SAR research endeavors not involving considerably large data sets and not requiring time-critical image formation. Execution of both image reconstruction algorithms in MATLAB is explicitly addressed. In particular, a manipulation of the backprojection imaging equations is supplied to show how common MATLAB functions, ifft and interp1, may be used for straight-forward SAR image formation. In addition, limits for scene size and pixel spacing are derived to aid in the selection of an appropriate imaging grid to avoid aliasing. Example SAR images generated though use of the backprojection algorithm are provided given four publicly available SAR datasets. Finally, MATLAB code for SAR image reconstruction using the matched filter and backprojection algorithms is provided.

  8. The Alaska SAR processor - Operations and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carande, Richard E.

    1989-01-01

    The Alaska SAR (synthetic-aperture radar) Facility (ASF) will be capable of receiving, processing, archiving, and producing a variety of SAR image products from three satellite-borne SARs: E-ERS-1 (ESA), J-ERS-1 (NASDA) and Radarsat (Canada). Crucial to the success of the ASF is the Alaska SAR processor (ASP), which will be capable of processing over 200 100-km x 100-km (Seasat-like) frames per day from the raw SAR data, at a ground resolution of about 30 m x 30 m. The processed imagery is of high geometric and radiometric accuracy, and is geolocated to within 500 m. Special-purpose hardware has been designed to execute a SAR processing algorithm to achieve this performance. This hardware is currently undergoing acceptance testing for delivery to the University of Alaska. Particular attention has been devoted to making the operations semi-automated and to providing a friendly operator interface via a computer workstation. The operations and control of the Alaska SAR processor are described.

  9. SAR and LIDAR fusion: experiments and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Matthew C.; Zaugg, Evan C.; Bradley, Joshua P.; Bowden, Ryan D.

    2013-05-01

    In recent years ARTEMIS, Inc. has developed a series of compact, versatile Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems which have been operated on a variety of small manned and unmanned aircraft. The multi-frequency-band SlimSAR has demonstrated a variety of capabilities including maritime and littoral target detection, ground moving target indication, polarimetry, interferometry, change detection, and foliage penetration. ARTEMIS also continues to build upon the radar's capabilities through fusion with other sensors, such as electro-optical and infrared camera gimbals and light detection and ranging (LIDAR) devices. In this paper we focus on experiments and applications employing SAR and LIDAR fusion. LIDAR is similar to radar in that it transmits a signal which, after being reflected or scattered by a target area, is recorded by the sensor. The differences are that a LIDAR uses a laser as a transmitter and optical sensors as a receiver, and the wavelengths used exhibit a very different scattering phenomenology than the microwaves used in radar, making SAR and LIDAR good complementary technologies. LIDAR is used in many applications including agriculture, archeology, geo-science, and surveying. Some typical data products include digital elevation maps of a target area and features and shapes extracted from the data. A set of experiments conducted to demonstrate the fusion of SAR and LIDAR data include a LIDAR DEM used in accurately processing the SAR data of a high relief area (mountainous, urban). Also, feature extraction is used in improving geolocation accuracy of the SAR and LIDAR data.

  10. Image Enhancement and Speckle Reduction of Full Polarimetric SAR Data by Gaussian Markov Random Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdian, M.; Motagh, M.; Akbari, V.

    2013-09-01

    In recent years, the use of Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolSAR) data in different applications dramatically has been increased. In SAR imagery an interference phenomenon with random behavior exists which is called speckle noise. The interpretation of data encounters some troubles due to the presence of speckle which can be considered as a multiplicative noise affecting all coherent imaging systems. Indeed, speckle degrade radiometric resolution of PolSAR images, therefore it is needful to perform speckle filtering on the SAR data type. Markov Random Field (MRF) has proven to be a powerful method for drawing out eliciting contextual information from remotely sensed images. In the present paper, a probability density function (PDF), which is fitted well with the PolSAR data based on the goodness-of-fit test, is first obtained for the pixel-wise analysis. Then the contextual smoothing is achieved with the MRF method. This novel speckle reduction method combines an advanced statistical distribution with spatial contextual information for PolSAR data. These two parts of information are combined based on weighted summation of pixel-wise and contextual models. This approach not only preserves edge information in the images, but also improves signal-to-noise ratio of the results. The method maintains the mean value of original signal in the homogenous areas and preserves the edges of features in the heterogeneous regions. Experiments on real medium resolution ALOS data from Tehran, and also high resolution full polarimetric SAR data over the Oberpfaffenhofen test-site in Germany, demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm compared with well-known despeckling methods.

  11. First Results from an Airborne Ka-band SAR Using SweepSAR and Digital Beamforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory; Ghaemi, Hirad; Hensley, Scott

    2012-01-01

    NASA/JPL has developed SweepSAR technique that breaks typical Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) trade space using time-dependent multi-beam DBF on receive. Developing SweepSAR implementation using array-fed reflector for proposed DESDynI Earth Radar Mission concept. Performed first-of-a-kind airborne demonstration of the SweepSAR concept at Ka-band (35.6 GHz). Validated calibration and antenna pattern data sufficient for beam forming in elevation. (1) Provides validation evidence that the proposed Deformation Ecosystem Structure Dynamics of Ice (DESDynI) SAR architecture is sound. (2) Functions well even with large variations in receiver gain / phase. Future plans include using prototype DESDynI SAR digital flight hardware to do the beam forming in real-time onboard the aircraft.

  12. Mars Mission Concepts: SAR and Solar Electric Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsperman, Michael; Clifford, S.; Lawrence, S.; Klaus, K.; Smith, D.

    2013-10-01

    Introduction: The time has come to leverage technology advances to reduce the cost and increase the flight rate of planetary missions, while actively developing a scientific and engineering workforce to achieve national space objectives. Mission Science at Mars: A SAR imaging radar offers an ability to conduct high resolution investigations of the shallow subsurface of Mars, enabling identification of fine-scale layering within the Martian polar layered deposits (PLD), as well as the identification of pingos, investigations of polygonal terrain, and measurements of the thickness of mantling layers at non-polar latitudes. It would allow systematic near-surface prospecting, which is tremendously useful for human exploration purposes. Limited color capabilities in a notional high-resolution stereo imaging system would enable the generation of false color images, resulting in useful science results, and the stereo data could be reduced into high-resolution Digital Elevation Models uniquely useful for exploration planning and science purposes. Mission Concept: Using a common spacecraft for multiple missions reduces costs. Solar electric propulsion (SEP) provides the flexibility required for multiple mission objectives. Our concept involves using a Boeing 702SP with a highly capable SAR imager that also conducts autonomous rendezvous and docking experiments accomplished from Mars orbit. Summary/Conclusions: A robust and compelling Mars mission can be designed to meet the 2018 Mars launch window opportunity. Using advanced in-space power and propulsion technologies like High Power Solar Electric Propulsion provides enormous mission flexibility to execute the baseline science mission and conduct necessary Mars Sample Return Technology Demonstrations in Mars orbit on the same mission. An observation spacecraft platform like the high power 5Kw) 702SP at Mars also enables the use of a SAR instrument to reveal new insights and understanding of the Mars regolith for both

  13. Geometric accuracy in airborne SAR images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blacknell, D.; Quegan, S.; Ward, I. A.; Freeman, A.; Finley, I. P.

    1989-01-01

    Uncorrected across-track motions of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) platform can cause both a severe loss of azimuthal positioning accuracy in, and defocusing of, the resultant SAR image. It is shown how the results of an autofocus procedure can be incorporated in the azimuth processing to produce a fully focused image that is geometrically accurate in azimuth. Range positioning accuracy is also discussed, leading to a comprehensive treatment of all aspects of geometric accuracy. The system considered is an X-band SAR.

  14. Design considerations of GeoSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yunjin; Hensley, Scott; Veilleux, Louise; Edelstein, W.; Lou, Yun-Ling; Burken, A.; Skotnicky, W. F.; Sato, T.; Brown, W.

    1996-06-01

    The primary purpose of GeoSAR is to demonstrate the feasibility of interferometric topographic mapping through foliage penetration. GeoSAR should become a commercially viable instrument after the feasibility demonstration. To satisfy both requirements, we have designed a dual frequency (UHF- and X-band) interferometric radar. For foliage penetration, a lower frequency (UHF) radar is used. To obtain better height accuracy for low backscatter areas, we proposed a high frequency (X-band) interferometric system. In this paper, we present a possible GeoSAR system configuration and associated performance estimation.

  15. Primary studies of Chinese spaceborne SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhen-Song; Wu, Guo-Xiang; Guo, Hua-Dong; Wei, Zhong-Quan; Zhu, Min-Hui

    1993-01-01

    The primary studies on spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) in China are discussed. The SAR will be launched aboard a Chinese satellite and operated at L-band with HH polarization. The purpose of the mission in consideration is dedicated to resources and environment uses, especially to natural disaster monitoring. The ground resolution is designed as 25 m x 25 m for detailed mode and 100 m x 100 m for wide scan-SAR mode. The off-nadir angle can be varied from 20 to 40 deg. The key system concepts are introduced.

  16. NASA/JPL Aircraft SAR Workshop Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donovan, N. (Editor); Evans, D. L. (Editor); Held, D. N. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Speaker-supplied summaries of the talks given at the NASA/JPL Aircraft SAR Workshop on February 4 and 5, 1985, are provided. These talks dealt mostly with composite quadpolarization imagery from a geologic or ecologic prespective. An overview and summary of the system characteristics of the L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) flown on the NASA CV-990 aircraft are included as supplementary information. Other topics ranging from phase imagery and interferometric techniques classifications of specific areas, and the potentials and limitations of SAR imagery in various applications are discussed.

  17. Segmentation Of Multifrequency, Multilook SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, Eric J.; Kwok, Ronald; Chellappa, Rama

    1993-01-01

    Segmentation of multifrequency, multilook synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) image intensity data into regions, within each of which backscattering characteristics of target scene considered homogeneous, enhanced by use of two statistical models. One represents statistics of multifrequency, multilook speckled intensities of SAR picture elements; other represents statistics of labels applied to regions into which picture elements grouped. Each region represents different type of terrain, terrain cover, or other surface; e.g., forest, agricultural land, sea ice, or water. Segmentation of image into regions of neighboring picture elements accomplished by method similar to that described in "Algorithms For Segmentation Of Complex-Amplitude SAR Data" (NPO-18524).

  18. Operational SAR Data Processing in GIS Environments for Rapid Disaster Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meroni, A.; Bahr, T.

    2013-05-01

    Having access to SAR data can be highly important and critical especially for disaster mapping. Updating a GIS with contemporary information from SAR data allows to deliver a reliable set of geospatial information to advance civilian operations, e.g. search and rescue missions. Therefore, we present in this paper the operational processing of SAR data within a GIS environment for rapid disaster mapping. This is exemplified by the November 2010 flash flood in the Veneto region, Italy. A series of COSMO-SkyMed acquisitions was processed in ArcGIS® using a single-sensor, multi-mode, multi-temporal approach. The relevant processing steps were combined using the ArcGIS ModelBuilder to create a new model for rapid disaster mapping in ArcGIS, which can be accessed both via a desktop and a server environment.

  19. Similarity measures of full polarimetric SAR images fusion for improved SAR image matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, H.

    2015-06-01

    China's first airborne SAR mapping system (CASMSAR) developed by Chinese Academy of Surveying and Mapping can acquire high-resolution and full polarimetric (HH, HV, VH and VV) Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. It has the ability to acquire X-band full polarimetric SAR data at a resolution of 0.5m. However, the existence of speckles which is inherent in SAR imagery affects visual interpretation and image processing badly, and challenges the assumption that conjugate points appear similar to each other in matching processing. In addition, researches show that speckles are multiplicative speckles, and most similarity measures of SAR image matching are sensitive to them. Thus, matching outcomes of SAR images acquired by most similarity measures are not reliable and with bad accuracy. Meanwhile, every polarimetric SAR image has different backscattering information of objects from each other and four polarimetric SAR data contain most basic and a large amount of redundancy information to improve matching. Therefore, we introduced logarithmically transformation and a stereo matching similarity measure into airborne full polarimetric SAR imagery. Firstly, in order to transform the multiplicative speckles into additivity ones and weaken speckles' influence on similarity measure, logarithmically transformation have to be taken to all images. Secondly, to prevent performance degradation of similarity measure caused by speckles, measure must be free or insensitive of additivity speckles. Thus, we introduced a stereo matching similarity measure, called Normalized Cross-Correlation (NCC), into full polarimetric SAR image matching. Thirdly, to take advantage of multi-polarimetric data and preserve the best similarity measure value, four measure values calculated between left and right single polarimetric SAR images are fused as final measure value for matching. The method was tested for matching under CASMSAR data. The results showed that the method delivered an effective

  20. SEASAT SAR performance evaluation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The performance of the SEASAT synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensor was evaluated using data processed by the MDA digital processor. Two particular aspects are considered the location accuracy of image data, and the calibration of the measured backscatter amplitude of a set of corner reflectors. The image location accuracy was assessed by selecting identifiable targets in several scenes, converting their image location to UTM coordinates, and comparing the results to map sheets. The error standard deviation is measured to be approximately 30 meters. The amplitude was calibrated by measuring the responses of the Goldstone corner reflector array and comparing the results to theoretical values. A linear regression of the measured against theoretical values results in a slope of 0.954 with a correlation coefficient of 0.970.

  1. Measurement of Sinkhole Formation and Progression with InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. E.; Blom, R. G.

    2013-12-01

    The Bayou Corne Sinkhole initially formed in August 2012 from sidewall collapse of a brine cavern within the Napoleonville Salt Dome in southeastern Louisiana. The sinkhole, initially ~1 hectare in size, has expanded to ~10 hectare surface coverage by July 2013, as material continued to fill the subterranean void. Here we show that synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry (InSAR) could have reliably forecast the formation and location of the Bayou Corne Sinkhole at least a month in advance from the large precursory surface deformation that occurred in the area where the sinkhole later formed. The Mississippi delta region has been imaged since 2009 using the NASA Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR), and radar data over the Napoleonville Salt Dome had been acquired on 2 July 2012, only a month before the sinkhole developed. Using radar interferometry, we show significant surface deformation of up to 250 mm occurred between 23 June 2011, and 2 July 2012, in an extended area encompassing the sinkhole site. The InSAR results show no measurable deformation prior to 23 June 2011. The measured precursory deformation pattern is consistent with compressive loading at the surface due to removal of support caused by a vertically oriented subsurface fracture. The measured strains relate directly to subsurface geology, salt rock properties, and internal stresses caused by the salt dome sidewall collapse. Measurements made with UAVSAR since the sinkhole formation, between August 2012 and July 2013, show progression of the surface deformation well beyond the limited extent of the sinkhole itself, with growth of the sinkhole following the direction of maximum surface deformation. These results show that even in radar-challenging environments such as the swamplands of Bayou Corne, L-band InSAR can be used to study the underlying geophysics of sinkhole formation and, furthermore, that InSAR data collected operationally for hazard monitoring could

  2. The Application of InSAR to the 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan Earthquake, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M.; Kuo, Y.; Suppe, J. E.; Chen, Y.; Hu, J.

    2008-12-01

    On 12 May 2008 a Mw 7.9 earthquake occurred near Wenchuan in Sichuan Province, China. More than 69,000 people were killed and over 4.8 million became homeless. Based on initial seismological reports, the earthquake was generated by slip one or more thrust faults within the Longmen Shan mountain belt, where oblique crustal shortening is taking place the Tibetan Plateau and the Sichuan Basin. In initial results, we are studying the displacements using in SAR techniques on several data types. One descending ASAR image before the earthquake and two after acquired by the satellite ENVISAT, European Space Agency, we are able to obtain two coseismic and one postseismic interferograms. Because of temporal decorrelation, large baseline for each coseismic pair, denser vegetation, and steep relief, it is lacking of reliable phase information on the Longmen Shan mountain belt, which is regarded as the hanging wall of this thrust event. To its east in the Sichuan basin, more than 50 cm subsidence in the direction of line of sight can be observed coseismically. This observed coseismic deformation in the footwall clearly appears as half-circular fringes. Its western boundary enable us to identify the surface rupture that is roughly located along the previously reported Beichuan fault. The postseismic interferogram shows phase differences between two acquisitions, one month after the main shock (16 June - 21 July). Phase signals could be investigated in both of the Longmen Shan mountain belt and the Sichuan Basin with rather small phase differences. However, this task is significantly perturbed by orbit errors and atmospheric effects; therefore, not much information of the surface displacement can be reliably retrieved. In the future we will add one more orbit located in further northeastern Longmen Shan to completely trace the NE-SW surface ruptures of the Wenchuan earthquake. Furthermore, the combined result from InSAR and sub-pixel comparison technique can further allow us

  3. Bridge Deformation Monitoring: Instight From InSAR Time-Series And Finite Element Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamshiri, Roghayeh; Motagh, Mahdi; Baes, Marzieh; Sharifi, Mohammad-Ali

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the capability of advanced InSAR time-series techniques such as Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) for monitoring of civil engineering structures like bridge. Deformation monitoring of bridges are essential to mitigate not only the financial and human losses, but also ecological and environmental-related problems. Assessment of deformation during bridge lifespan can provide invaluable insight for better planning and management. The study area, Lake Urmia Causeway (LUC) in northwest Iran, consists of one bridge and two embankments on both sides of it. The difference between the deformation rate of the embankments on both sides of the bridge may seriously damage the bridge itself, so it is very important to accurately monitor them in space and time in order to assess the state of the bridge concerning deformations. In this study we apply the InSAR time-series technique of SBAS for 58 SAR images including 10 ALOS, 30 Envisat and 18 TerraSAR-X (TSX) to assess deflation of embankments of Urmia bridge during 2003-2013. The InSAR results are used in a 2D Finite Element Model (FEM) to assess structural stability of the embankments.

  4. Accelerating Spaceborne SAR Imaging Using Multiple CPU/GPU Deep Collaborative Computing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Guojun; Li, Wei; Hu, Wei; Hu, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    With the development of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technologies in recent years, the huge amount of remote sensing data brings challenges for real-time imaging processing. Therefore, high performance computing (HPC) methods have been presented to accelerate SAR imaging, especially the GPU based methods. In the classical GPU based imaging algorithm, GPU is employed to accelerate image processing by massive parallel computing, and CPU is only used to perform the auxiliary work such as data input/output (IO). However, the computing capability of CPU is ignored and underestimated. In this work, a new deep collaborative SAR imaging method based on multiple CPU/GPU is proposed to achieve real-time SAR imaging. Through the proposed tasks partitioning and scheduling strategy, the whole image can be generated with deep collaborative multiple CPU/GPU computing. In the part of CPU parallel imaging, the advanced vector extension (AVX) method is firstly introduced into the multi-core CPU parallel method for higher efficiency. As for the GPU parallel imaging, not only the bottlenecks of memory limitation and frequent data transferring are broken, but also kinds of optimized strategies are applied, such as streaming, parallel pipeline and so on. Experimental results demonstrate that the deep CPU/GPU collaborative imaging method enhances the efficiency of SAR imaging on single-core CPU by 270 times and realizes the real-time imaging in that the imaging rate outperforms the raw data generation rate. PMID:27070606

  5. Canadian SAR remote sensing for the Terrestrial Wetland Global Change Research Network (TWGCRN)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaya, Shannon; Brisco, Brian; Cull, Andrew; Gallant, Alisa L.; Sadinski, Walter J.; Thompson, Dean

    2010-01-01

    The Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) has more than 30 years of experience investigating the use of SAR remote sensing for many applications related to terrestrial water resources. Recently, CCRS scientists began contributing to the Terrestrial Wetland Global Change Research Network (TWGCRN), a bi-national research network dedicated to assessing impacts of global change on interconnected wetland-upland landscapes across a vital portion of North America. CCRS scientists are applying SAR remote sensing to characterize wetland components of these landscapes in three ways. First, they are using a comprehensive set of RADARSAT-2 SAR data collected during April to September 2009 to extract multi-temporal surface water information for key TWGCRN study landscapes in North America. Second, they are analyzing polarimetric RADARSAT-2 data to determine areas where double-bounce represents the primary scattering mechanism and is indicative of flooded vegetation in these landscapes. Third, they are testing advanced interferometric SAR techniques to estimate water levels with RADARSAT-2 Fine Quad polarimetric image pairs. The combined information from these three SAR analysis activities will provide TWGCRN scientists with an integrated view and monitoring capability for these dynamic wetland-upland landscapes. These data are being used in conjunction with other remote sensing and field data to study interactions between landscape and animal (birds and amphibians) responses to climate/global change.

  6. Accelerating Spaceborne SAR Imaging Using Multiple CPU/GPU Deep Collaborative Computing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Guojun; Li, Wei; Hu, Wei; Hu, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    With the development of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technologies in recent years, the huge amount of remote sensing data brings challenges for real-time imaging processing. Therefore, high performance computing (HPC) methods have been presented to accelerate SAR imaging, especially the GPU based methods. In the classical GPU based imaging algorithm, GPU is employed to accelerate image processing by massive parallel computing, and CPU is only used to perform the auxiliary work such as data input/output (IO). However, the computing capability of CPU is ignored and underestimated. In this work, a new deep collaborative SAR imaging method based on multiple CPU/GPU is proposed to achieve real-time SAR imaging. Through the proposed tasks partitioning and scheduling strategy, the whole image can be generated with deep collaborative multiple CPU/GPU computing. In the part of CPU parallel imaging, the advanced vector extension (AVX) method is firstly introduced into the multi-core CPU parallel method for higher efficiency. As for the GPU parallel imaging, not only the bottlenecks of memory limitation and frequent data transferring are broken, but also kinds of optimized strategies are applied, such as streaming, parallel pipeline and so on. Experimental results demonstrate that the deep CPU/GPU collaborative imaging method enhances the efficiency of SAR imaging on single-core CPU by 270 times and realizes the real-time imaging in that the imaging rate outperforms the raw data generation rate. PMID:27070606

  7. Combined DEM Extration Method from StereoSAR and InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z.; Zhang, J. X.; Duan, M. Y.; Huang, G. M.; Yang, S. C.

    2015-06-01

    A pair of SAR images acquired from different positions can be used to generate digital elevation model (DEM). Two techniques exploiting this characteristic have been introduced: stereo SAR and interferometric SAR. They permit to recover the third dimension (topography) and, at the same time, to identify the absolute position (geolocation) of pixels included in the imaged area, thus allowing the generation of DEMs. In this paper, StereoSAR and InSAR combined adjustment model are constructed, and unify DEM extraction from InSAR and StereoSAR into the same coordinate system, and then improve three dimensional positioning accuracy of the target. We assume that there are four images 1, 2, 3 and 4. One pair of SAR images 1,2 meet the required conditions for InSAR technology, while the other pair of SAR images 3,4 can form stereo image pairs. The phase model is based on InSAR rigorous imaging geometric model. The master image 1 and the slave image 2 will be used in InSAR processing, but the slave image 2 is only used in the course of establishment, and the pixels of the slave image 2 are relevant to the corresponding pixels of the master image 1 through image coregistration coefficient, and it calculates the corresponding phase. It doesn't require the slave image in the construction of the phase model. In Range-Doppler (RD) model, the range equation and Doppler equation are a function of target geolocation, while in the phase equation, the phase is also a function of target geolocation. We exploit combined adjustment model to deviation of target geolocation, thus the problem of target solution is changed to solve three unkonwns through seven equations. The model was tested for DEM extraction under spaceborne InSAR and StereoSAR data and compared with InSAR and StereoSAR methods respectively. The results showed that the model delivered a better performance on experimental imagery and can be used for DEM extraction applications.

  8. Seismic hazard models for the central Apennines constrained by GPS and InSAR: mid-term review results of the ESA Pathfinder project CHARMING

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merryman Boncori, John Peter; Pezzo, Giuseppe; Visini, Francesco; Carafa, Michele; Devoti, Roberto; Atzori, Simone; Kastelic, Vanja; Berardino, Paolo; Fornaro, Gianfranco; Riguzzi, Federica; Pietrantonio, Grazia; d'Amico, Vera; Meletti, Carlo; Salvi, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    The contribution of space geodetic techniques to earthquake rate estimation, and thus seismic hazard modelling, has been recognized since two decades and made possible in more recent years by the increased availability and accuracy of geodetic measurements. We present the mid-term review results of a feasibility study named "Constraining Seismic Hazard Models with InSAR and GPS (CHARMING)", funded by the European Space Agency's (ESA) Support to Science Element (STSE) Pathfinders 2013 project. The area of interest considered at this stage of the project comprises a 200 km x 200 km area, covering the Abruzzi region (central Italy). In a later stage this area shall be extended to comprise a large portion of central and southern Italy, including most of the highest strain regions identified by recent studies. We present the interseismic velocities derived by ~60 permanent GPS stations and measurements derived from coast-to-coast strips of Synthetic Aperture Radar imagery from the ERS-1/2 AMI, ENVISAT ASAR and ALOS PALSAR sensors. The latter are processed with the Intermittent Small Baseline Subset (ISBAS) techniques, which greatly improves the measurement coverage compared to previous studies. Corrections are applied concerning tropospheric propagation errors, using ENVISAT MERIS precipitable water vapour maps and ERA-Interim numerical weather model parameters, as well as for the recently discovered oscillator drift of the ENVISAT ASAR sensor. Finally, measurements from individual SAR tracks are calibrated using GPS to ensure a common reference frame. For a set of composite seismogenic sources extracted from the DISS v.3.1.1 catalogue (Database of Italian Seismogenic Sources), we use the kinematic finite element NeoKinema model to derive long term average velocity fields and slip rates. We then derive earthquake rates, i.e. the number of earthquakes in a given time period above an established magnitude threshold, following the Seismic Hazard Inferred From Tectonics

  9. Statistical Modeling of SAR Images: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Gui

    2010-01-01

    Statistical modeling is essential to SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) image interpretation. It aims to describe SAR images through statistical methods and reveal the characteristics of these images. Moreover, statistical modeling can provide a technical support for a comprehensive understanding of terrain scattering mechanism, which helps to develop algorithms for effective image interpretation and creditable image simulation. Numerous statistical models have been developed to describe SAR image data, and the purpose of this paper is to categorize and evaluate these models. We first summarize the development history and the current researching state of statistical modeling, then different SAR image models developed from the product model are mainly discussed in detail. Relevant issues are also discussed. Several promising directions for future research are concluded at last. PMID:22315568

  10. An algorithm for segmenting polarimetric SAR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geaga, Jorge V.

    2015-05-01

    We have developed an algorithm for segmenting fully polarimetric single look TerraSAR-X, multilook SIR-C and 7 band Landsat 5 imagery using neural nets. The algorithm uses a feedforward neural net with one hidden layer to segment different surface classes. The weights are refined through an iterative filtering process characteristic of a relaxation process. Features selected from studies of fully polarimetric complex single look TerraSAR-X data and multilook SIR-C data are used as input to the net. The seven bands from Landsat 5 data are used as input for the Landsat neural net. The Cloude-Pottier incoherent decomposition is used to investigate the physical basis of the polarimetric SAR data segmentation. The segmentation of a SIR-C ocean surface scene into four classes is presented. This segmentation algorithm could be a very useful tool for investigating complex polarimetric SAR phenomena.

  11. Polarimetric SAR Interferometry Evaluation in Mangroves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seung-Kuk; Fatoyinbo,Temilola; Osmanoglu, Batuhan; Sun, Guoqing

    2014-01-01

    TanDEM-X (TDX) enables to generate an interferometric coherence without temporal decorrelation effect that is the most critical factor for a successful Pol-InSAR inversion, as have recently been used for forest parameter retrieval. This paper presents mangrove forest height estimation only using single-pass/single-baseline/dual-polarization TDX data by means of new dual-Pol-InSAR inversion technique. To overcome a lack of one polarization in a conventional Pol- InSAR inversion (i.e. an underdetermined problem), the ground phase in the Pol-InSAR model is directly estimated from TDX interferograms assuming flat underlying topography in mangrove forest. The inversion result is validated against lidar measurement data (NASA's G-LiHT data).

  12. Image based SAR product simulation for analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domik, G.; Leberl, F.

    1987-01-01

    SAR product simulation serves to predict SAR image gray values for various flight paths. Input typically consists of a digital elevation model and backscatter curves. A new method is described of product simulation that employs also a real SAR input image for image simulation. This can be denoted as 'image-based simulation'. Different methods to perform this SAR prediction are presented and advantages and disadvantages discussed. Ascending and descending orbit images from NASA's SIR-B experiment were used for verification of the concept: input images from ascending orbits were converted into images from a descending orbit; the results are compared to the available real imagery to verify that the prediction technique produces meaningful image data.

  13. Tracking ocean wave spectrum from SAR images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfinger, A. D.; Beal, R. C.; Monaldo, F. M.; Tilley, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    An end to end algorithm for recovery of ocean wave spectral peaks from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images is described. Current approaches allow precisions of 1 percent in wave number, and 0.6 deg in direction.

  14. SAR/LANDSAT image registration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphrey, S. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Temporal registration of synthetic aperture radar data with LANDSAT-MSS data is both feasible (from a technical standpoint) and useful (from an information-content viewpoint). The greatest difficulty in registering aircraft SAR data to corrected LANDSAT-MSS data is control-point location. The differences in SAR and MSS data impact the selection of features that will serve as a good control points. The SAR and MSS data are unsuitable for automatic computer correlation of digital control-point data. The gray-level data can not be compared by the computer because of the different response characteristics of the MSS and SAR images.

  15. Satellite SAR imagery for site discovery, change detection and monitoring activities in cultural heritage sites: experiments on the Nasca region, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapete, D.; Cigna, F.; Masini, N.; Lasaponara, R.

    2012-04-01

    data stacks were selected: ERS-2 ascending data acquired in 2001-2011, ENVISAT ASAR ascending and descending data acquired in 2003-2007, and ALOS PALSAR descending and ascending data acquired in 2007 and 2008. The feature extraction was specifically addressed to the recognition of buried structures, archaeological deposits and the study of the buried networks of aqueducts, as well as the morphological study of the Nasca geoglyphs. Change detection analysis also included the multi-temporal reconstruction of the evolution of the Rio Nasca catchment basin, while specific tests were performed to demonstrate the usefulness of SAR imagery for monitoring looting activities. The results of the radar-interpretation compared and integrated with the field investigations will support the archaeological activities and contribute to the monitoring and enhancement of archaeological heritage and cultural landscape of the Nasca region.

  16. SAR Polarimetry for Oil at Sea Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliaccio, M.; Nunziata, F.

    2013-03-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) oil slick observation is a topic of great applicative relevance which has been physically recast by a set of new polarimetric approaches that, exploiting the departure from Bragg scattering, allow observing oil at sea in a very robust and effective way. In this study, these polarimetric approaches are reviewed and their performances are discussed with respect to some thought experiments undertaken on quad-pol full-resolution L- and C-band SAR data.

  17. UAVSAR: InSAR and PolSAR Test Bed for the Proposed NI-SAR Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. E.; Hensley, S.; Lou, Y.

    2014-12-01

    UAVSAR, which first became operational in 2009, has served as an operational testbed for the NI-SAR L-band radar concept and a unique instrument in its own right. UAVSAR supports a broad array of basic and applied geoscience, covering on smaller scale all the disciplines NI-SAR would be able to address on a global scale. Although designed specifically to provide high accuracy repeated flight tracks and precise imaging geometry for InSAR-based solid earth studies, its fully polarimetric operation, low noise, and consistent calibration accuracy has made it a premier instrument for PolSAR-based studies also. Since 2009 it has successfully imaged more than 16 million km2 and >4300 quad-polarimetric data products are now publicly available online. Upgrades made in the last year to automate the repeat track processing serve as a model for generating large volumes of InSAR products: Since January 2014 more than 700 interferometric products have been released, exceeding the output of all previous years combined. Standardly available products now include browse images of all InSAR acquisitions and coregistered single-look complex image stacks suitable for standard time series analysis. Here we present an overview of the wide range of studies utilizing UAVSAR data including those based on polarimetry and pair-wise and times series interferometry, highlighting both the unique capabilities of UAVSAR and the ways in which NI-SAR would be able to dramatically extend the capabilities. This research was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  18. Land subsidence in the Yangtze River Delta, China revealed from multi-frequency SAR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenhong; Motagh, Mahdi; Yu, Jun; Gong, Xulong; Wu, Jianqiang; Zhu, Yefei; Chen, Huogen; Zhang, Dengming; Xu, Yulin

    2014-05-01

    Land subsidence is a major worldwide hazard, and its principal causes are subsurface fluid withdrawal, drainage of organic soils, sinkholes, underground mining, hydrocompaction, thawing permafrost, and natural consolidation. Land subsidence causes many problems including: damage to public facilities such as bridges, roads, railroads, electric power lines, underground pipes; damage to private and public buildings; and in some cases of low-lying land, can increase the risk of coastal flooding from storm surges and rising sea-levels. In China, approximately 48600 km2 of land, an area roughly 30 times of the size of the Greater London, has subsided (nearly 50 cities across 16 provinces), and the annual direct economic loss is estimated to be more than RMB 100 million (~12 million). It is believed that the Suzhou-Wuxi-Changzhou region within the Yangtze River Delta is the most severely affected area for subsidence hazards in China. With its global coverage and all-weather imaging capability, Interferometric SAR (InSAR) is revolutionizing our ability to image the Earth's surface and the evolution of its shape over time. In this paper, an advanced InSAR time series technique, InSAR TS + AEM, has been employed to analysed ERS (C-band), Envisat (C-band) and TerraSAR-X (X-band) data collected over the Suzhou-Wuxi-Changzhou region during the period from 1992 to 2013. Validation with precise levelling and GPS data suggest: (1) the accuracy of the InSAR-derived mean velocity measurements is 1-3 mm/yr; (2) InSAR-derived displacements agreed with precise levelling with root mean square errors around 5 mm. It is evident that InSAR TS + AEM can be used to image the evolution of deformation patterns in the Suzhou-Wuxi-Changzhou region over time: the maximum mean velocity decreased from ~12 cm/yr during the period of 1992-1993 to ~2 cm/yr in 2003-2013. This is believed to be a result of the prohibition of groundwater use carried out by Jiangsu provincial government. The combination

  19. Estimation and Analysis of Snow Water Equivalents Based on C-band SAR Data and Field Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, T.

    2015-12-01

    The spatial distribution of the snow water equivalent (SWE) of ground snow cover is one of the most important variables for understanding and simulating cold-region hydrological processes in high mountain areas. In this paper, the characteristics of C-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data in an area of shallow dry snow cover were analyzed based on microwave backscattering models and field snow cover measurements. The analysis revealed that the backscattering of shallow dry snow cover was dominated by the scattering of the snow-ground interface, and the dielectric constant and roughness parameters of the underlying frozen soil were the primary factors that affected the total scattering. The dielectric constant of the soil depended on the amount of liquid water present in the soil, and the amount of liquid water was primarily determined by the soil temperature. Furthermore, the insulation properties (thermal resistance) of the snow cover affected the underlying soil temperature. Consequently, the snow cover characteristics affected the backscattering signal recorded by the SAR sensors. Based on an investigation involving ENVISAT-ASAR data and simultaneous ground-based snow observations conducted on March 14, 2008, we found that the snow temperature decreased with increasing snow depth when the snow depth was less than 20 cm, and the temperature increased with decreasing snow depth when the snow depth exceeded 20 cm. Additionally, the amount of liquid water in the underlying frozen soil rapidly increased with increasing temperature. To estimate the SWE, we used a small number of field measurements data and SAR ratio images to develop two equations. The first equation defined the relationship between the snow's thermal resistance and backscattering ratio, and the second equation yielded the SWE from the estimated thermal resistance of the snow-covered area. The root mean square and relative errors of the estimated SWE were approximately 7.41 mm and 6

  20. Online Health Education on SARS to University Students during the SARS Outbreak

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Mee Lian; Koh, David; Iyer, Prasad; Seow, Adeline; Goh, Lee Gan; Chia, Sin Eng; Lim, Meng Kin; Ng, Daniel; Ong, Choon Nam; Phua, Kai Hong; Tambyah, Paul; Chow, Vincent T K; Chew, Suok Kai; Chandran, Ravi; Lee, Hin Peng

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about how online learning may be used to disseminate health information rapidly and widely to large university populations if there is an infectious disease outbreak. During the SARS outbreak in Singapore in 2003, a six-lesson elearning module on SARS was developed for a large university population of 32,000 students. The module…

  1. 23. OVERVIEW OF SAR3 AREA, SHOWING CORNER OF SAR3 WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. OVERVIEW OF SAR-3 AREA, SHOWING CORNER OF SAR-3 WITH TAILRACE, ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE, TOILET SHED, AND RETAINING WALLS AT FORMER EMPLOYEE HOUSING SITE. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. PANORAMA 1/2. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  2. 20. OVERVIEW OF SAR3 COMPLEX, SHOWING FORMER RESIDENTIAL AREA, SAR3 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. OVERVIEW OF SAR-3 COMPLEX, SHOWING FORMER RESIDENTIAL AREA, SAR-3 SWITCH RACK, MAINTENANCE YARD, AND GREENSPOT BRIDGE. NOTE ALSO LARGE PIPE CONDUCTING TAILRACE WATER INTO IRRIGATION SYSTEM. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  3. Ground deformation of the western rift of Corinth observed by means of PSI, SBAS and DInSAR methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Panagiotis; Briole, Pierre

    2013-04-01

    The rift of Corinth has been long identified as a site of major importance in Europe due to its intense tectonic activity. It is one of the world's most rapidly extending continental regions and it has one of the highest seismicity rates in the Euro-Mediterranean region. It produces in average, an earthquake of magnitude 6 per century. The GPS studies conducted since 1990 indicate a north-south extension rate across the rift of ~1.5 cm year-1 around its western termination. Geological evidences show that the south coast of the rift is uplifting whereas the north part is subsiding. The western termination of the rift in the Patras broader area presents a major scientific and socio-economic importance, with the Psathopyrgos and the Rion-Patras faults being located very close to the city of Patras. The first DInSAR studies were carried out using SAR/ERS data after the Ms= 6.2 June 15, 1995 Aigion earthquake and contributed to its characterization. More recently the ground deformation of the area has been measured using a series of ASAR/ENVISAT, PALSAR/ALOS and RASARSAT-2 acquisitions. All datasets were processed by means of PSI (Persistent Scatterers Interferometry), SBAS (Small Baseline SubSet) and DInSAR (Differential Interferometry with SAR) methodologies. In addition to widely used tools (DIAPASON, ROI-PAC, STAMPS e.t.c.) in-house procedures and tools have been developed in order to exploit of the synergy of multiple characteristics/properties (frequency, viewing angles, sides, etc) of the SAR acquisitions aiming to the minimisation of the noise components. We verified the agreement between GPS and PSI/SBAS velocities at the location of the five permanent GPS stations operated in the rift since ten years. Ground deformations are visible at various scales and at various places in the produced PSI/SBAS maps and several known faults exhibit ground deformation around them with no earthquake occurred during the observations period: (a) On 18th and 22nd of January 2010

  4. SAR405838: An optimized inhibitor of MDM2-p53 interaction that induces complete and durable tumor regression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaomeng; Sun, Wei; Zhao, Yujun; McEachern, Donna; Meaux, Isabelle; Barrière, Cédric; Stuckey, Jeanne; Meagher, Jennifer; Bai, Longchuan; Liu, Liu; Hoffman-Luca, Cassandra Gianna; Lu, Jianfeng; Shangary, Sanjeev; Yu, Shanghai; Bernard, Denzil; Aguilar, Angelo; Dos-Santos, Odette; Besret, Laurent; Guerif, Stéphane; Pannier, Pascal; Gorge-Bernat, Dimitri; Debussche, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Blocking the MDM2-p53 protein-protein interaction has long been considered to offer a broad cancer therapeutic strategy, despite the potential risks of selecting tumors harboring p53 mutations that escape MDM2 control. In this study, we report a novel small molecule inhibitor of the MDM2-p53 interaction, SAR405838 (MI-77301) that has been advanced into Phase I clinical trials. SAR405838 binds to MDM2 with Ki = 0.88 nM and has high specificity over other proteins. A co-crystal structure of the SAR405838:MDM2 complex shows that in addition to mimicking three key p53 amino acid residues, the inhibitor captures additional interactions not observed in the p53-MDM2 complex and induces refolding of the short, unstructured MDM2 N-terminal region to achieve its high affinity. SAR405838 effectively activates wild-type p53 in vitro and in xenograft tumor tissue of leukemia and solid tumors, leading to p53-dependent cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis. At well-tolerated dose schedules, SAR405838 achieves either durable tumor regression or complete tumor growth inhibition in mouse xenograft models of SJSA-1 osteosarcoma, RS4;11 acute leukemia, LNCaP prostate cancer and HCT-116 colon cancer. Remarkably, a single oral dose of SAR405838 is sufficient to achieve complete tumor regression in the SJSA-1 model. Mechanistically, robust transcriptional up-regulation of PUMA induced by SAR405838 results in strong apoptosis in tumor tissue, leading to complete tumor regression. Our findings provide a preclinical basis upon which to evaluate SAR405838 as a therapeutic agent in patients whose tumors retain wild-type p53. PMID:25145672

  5. Studies in RF Power Communication, SAR, and Temperature Elevation in Wireless Implantable Neural Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yujuan; Tang, Lin; Rennaker, Robert; Hutchens, Chris; Ibrahim, Tamer S.

    2013-01-01

    Implantable neural interfaces are designed to provide a high spatial and temporal precision control signal implementing high degree of freedom real-time prosthetic systems. The development of a Radio Frequency (RF) wireless neural interface has the potential to expand the number of applications as well as extend the robustness and longevity compared to wired neural interfaces. However, it is well known that RF signal is absorbed by the body and can result in tissue heating. In this work, numerical studies with analytical validations are performed to provide an assessment of power, heating and specific absorption rate (SAR) associated with the wireless RF transmitting within the human head. The receiving antenna on the neural interface is designed with different geometries and modeled at a range of implanted depths within the brain in order to estimate the maximum receiving power without violating SAR and tissue temperature elevation safety regulations. Based on the size of the designed antenna, sets of frequencies between 1 GHz to 4 GHz have been investigated. As expected the simulations demonstrate that longer receiving antennas (dipole) and lower working frequencies result in greater power availability prior to violating SAR regulations. For a 15 mm dipole antenna operating at 1.24 GHz on the surface of the brain, 730 uW of power could be harvested at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) SAR violation limit. At approximately 5 cm inside the head, this same antenna would receive 190 uW of power prior to violating SAR regulations. Finally, the 3-D bio-heat simulation results show that for all evaluated antennas and frequency combinations we reach FCC SAR limits well before 1 °C. It is clear that powering neural interfaces via RF is possible, but ultra-low power circuit designs combined with advanced simulation will be required to develop a functional antenna that meets all system requirements. PMID:24223123

  6. Random Forest and Rotation Forest for fully polarized SAR image classification using polarimetric and spatial features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Peijun; Samat, Alim; Waske, Björn; Liu, Sicong; Li, Zhenhong

    2015-07-01

    Fully Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolSAR) has the advantages of all-weather, day and night observation and high resolution capabilities. The collected data are usually sorted in Sinclair matrix, coherence or covariance matrices which are directly related to physical properties of natural media and backscattering mechanism. Additional information related to the nature of scattering medium can be exploited through polarimetric decomposition theorems. Accordingly, PolSAR image classification gains increasing attentions from remote sensing communities in recent years. However, the above polarimetric measurements or parameters cannot provide sufficient information for accurate PolSAR image classification in some scenarios, e.g. in complex urban areas where different scattering mediums may exhibit similar PolSAR response due to couples of unavoidable reasons. Inspired by the complementarity between spectral and spatial features bringing remarkable improvements in optical image classification, the complementary information between polarimetric and spatial features may also contribute to PolSAR image classification. Therefore, the roles of textural features such as contrast, dissimilarity, homogeneity and local range, morphological profiles (MPs) in PolSAR image classification are investigated using two advanced ensemble learning (EL) classifiers: Random Forest and Rotation Forest. Supervised Wishart classifier and support vector machines (SVMs) are used as benchmark classifiers for the evaluation and comparison purposes. Experimental results with three Radarsat-2 images in quad polarization mode indicate that classification accuracies could be significantly increased by integrating spatial and polarimetric features using ensemble learning strategies. Rotation Forest can get better accuracy than SVM and Random Forest, in the meantime, Random Forest is much faster than Rotation Forest.

  7. Molecular mechanisms of Sar/Arf GTPases in vesicular trafficking in yeast and plants

    PubMed Central

    Yorimitsu, Tomohiro; Sato, Ken; Takeuchi, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Small GTPase proteins play essential roles in the regulation of vesicular trafficking systems in eukaryotic cells. Two types of small GTPases, secretion-associated Ras-related protein (Sar) and ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf), act in the biogenesis of transport vesicles. Sar/Arf GTPases function as molecular switches by cycling between active, GTP-bound and inactive, GDP-bound forms, catalyzed by guanine nucleotide exchange factors and GTPase-activating proteins, respectively. Activated Sar/Arf GTPases undergo a conformational change, exposing the N-terminal amphipathic α-helix for insertion into membranes. The process triggers the recruitment and assembly of coat proteins to the membranes, followed by coated vesicle formation and scission. In higher plants, Sar/Arf GTPases also play pivotal roles in maintaining the dynamic identity of organelles in the secretory pathway. Sar1 protein strictly controls anterograde transport from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through the recruitment of plant COPII coat components onto membranes. COPII vesicle transport is responsible for the organization of highly conserved polygonal ER networks. In contrast, Arf proteins contribute to the regulation of multiple trafficking routes, including transport through the Golgi complex and endocytic transport. These transport systems have diversified in the plant kingdom independently and exhibit several plant-specific features with respect to Golgi organization, endocytic cycling, cell polarity and cytokinesis. The functional diversification of vesicular trafficking systems ensures the multicellular development of higher plants. This review focuses on the current knowledge of Sar/Arf GTPases, highlighting the molecular details of GTPase regulation in vesicle formation in yeast and advances in knowledge of the characteristics of vesicle trafficking in plants. PMID:25191334

  8. Mars Mission Concepts: SAR and Solar Electric Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsperman, M.; Klaus, K.; Smith, D. B.; Clifford, S. M.; Lawrence, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    Introduction: The time has come to leverage technology advances (including advances in autonomous operation and propulsion technology) to reduce the cost and increase the flight rate of planetary missions, while actively developing a scientific and engineering workforce to achieve national space objectives. Mission Science at Mars: A SAR imaging radar offers an ability to conduct high resolution investigations of the shallow (<10 m depth) subsurface of Mars, enabling identification of fine-scale layering within the Martian polar layered deposits (PLD), as well as the identification of pingos, investigations of polygonal terrain, and measurements of the thickness of mantling layers at non-polar latitudes. It would allow systematic near-surface prospecting, which is tremendously useful for human exploration purposes (in particular, the identification of accessible ice deposits and quantification of Martian regolith properties). Limited color capabilities in a notional high-resolution stereo imaging system would enable the generation of false color images, resulting in useful science results, and the stereo data could be reduced into high-resolution Digital Elevation Models uniquely useful for exploration planning and science purposes. Since the SAR and the notional high-resolution stereo imaging system would be huge data volume producers - to maximize the science return we are currently considering the usage of laser communications systems; this notional spacecraft represents one pathway to evaluate the utility of laser communications in planetary exploration while providing useful science return.. Mission Concept: Using a common space craft for multiple missions reduces costs. Solar electric propulsion (SEP) provides the flexibility required for multiple mission objectives. SEP provides the greatest payload advantage albeit at the sacrifice of mission time. Our concept involves using a SEP enabled space craft (Boeing 702SP) with a highly capable SAR imager that also

  9. A comparative evaluation of SAR and SLAR

    SciTech Connect

    Mastin, G.A.; Manson, J.J.; Bradley, J.D.; Axline, R.M.; Hover, G.L.

    1993-11-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) was evaluated as a potential technological improvement over the Coast Guard`s existing side-looking airborne radar (SLAR) for oil-spill surveillance applications. The US Coast Guard Research and Development Center (R&D Center), Environmental Branch, sponsored a joint experiment including the US Coast Guard, Sandia National Laboratories, and the Naval Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Hazardous Materials Division. Radar imaging missions were flown on six days over the coastal waters off Santa Barbara, CA, where there are constant natural seeps of oil. Both the Coast Guard SLAR and the Sandia National Laboratories SAR were employed to acquire simultaneous images of oil slicks and other natural sea surface features that impact oil-spill interpretation. Surface truth and other environmental data were also recorded during the experiment. The experiment data were processed at Sandia National Laboratories and delivered to the R&D Center on a computer workstation for analysis by experiment participants. Issues such as optimal spatial resolution, single-look vs. multi-look SAR imaging, and the utility of SAR for oil-spill analysis were addressed. Finally, conceptual design requirements for a possible future Coast Guard SAR were outlined and evaluated.

  10. ICAO's anti-SARS airport activities.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Silvio; Curdt-Christiansen, Claus M

    2003-11-01

    To prevent SARS from spreading through air travel and in order to rebuild the confidence of the traveling public in the safety of air travel, ICAO has set up an "Anti-SARS Airport Evaluation Project." The first phase of this project was to develop a set of protective measures for international airports in affected areas to adopt and implement and then to send out, on the request of Contracting States, a team of inspectors to evaluate and assess airports and issue a "statement of evaluation" that the airport inspected complies with the ICAO anti-SARS protective measures. In cooperation with the World Health Organization (WHO), the first part of phase 1 was completed in early June this year, and the second part of phase 1 followed soon after. By mid-July, five international airports in Southeast Asia had been inspected and found to be in full compliance with the ICAO anti-SARS protective measures. The success of this ICAO project is believed to have contributed significantly to the recovery of international air travel and related industries now taking place. Phase 2 of the project is now being developed. It is aimed at preventing a resurgence of SARS, but it also contains elements to make the methodology developed applicable to future outbreaks of any other communicable disease in which the mode of transmission could involve aviation and/or the need to prevent the spread of the disease by air travel. PMID:14620481

  11. Low complexity efficient raw SAR data compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rane, Shantanu; Boufounos, Petros; Vetro, Anthony; Okada, Yu

    2011-06-01

    We present a low-complexity method for compression of raw Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data. Raw SAR data is typically acquired using a satellite or airborne platform without sufficient computational capabilities to process the data and generate a SAR image on-board. Hence, the raw data needs to be compressed and transmitted to the ground station, where SAR image formation can be carried out. To perform low-complexity compression, our method uses 1-dimensional transforms, followed by quantization and entropy coding. In contrast to previous approaches, which send uncompressed or Huffman-coded bits, we achieve more efficient entropy coding using an arithmetic coder that responds to a continuously updated probability distribution. We present experimental results on compression of raw Ku-SAR data. In those we evaluate the effect of the length of the transform on compression performance and demonstrate the advantages of the proposed framework over a state-of-the-art low complexity scheme called Block Adaptive Quantization (BAQ).

  12. Possible SARS Coronavirus Transmission during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Loutfy, Mona; McDonald, L. Clifford; Martinez, Kenneth F.; Ofner, Mariana; Wong, Tom; Wallington, Tamara; Gold, Wayne L.; Mederski, Barbara; Green, Karen; Low, Donald E.

    2004-01-01

    Infection of healthcare workers with the severe acute respiratory syndrome–associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is thought to occur primarily by either contact or large respiratory droplet transmission. However, infrequent healthcare worker infections occurred despite the use of contact and droplet precautions, particularly during certain aerosol-generating medical procedures. We investigated a possible cluster of SARS-CoV infections in healthcare workers who used contact and droplet precautions during attempted cardiopulmonary resuscitation of a SARS patient. Unlike previously reported instances of transmission during aerosol-generating procedures, the index case-patient was unresponsive, and the intubation procedure was performed quickly and without difficulty. However, before intubation, the patient was ventilated with a bag-valve-mask that may have contributed to aerosolization of SARS-CoV. On the basis of the results of this investigation and previous reports of SARS transmission during aerosol-generating procedures, a systematic approach to the problem is outlined, including the use of the following: 1) administrative controls, 2) environmental engineering controls, 3) personal protective equipment, and 4) quality control. PMID:15030699

  13. SARS revisited: managing "outbreaks" with "communications".

    PubMed

    Menon, K U

    2006-05-01

    "Risk communications" has acquired some importance in the wake of our experience of SARS. Handled well, it helps to build mutual respect between a government or an organisation and the target groups with which it is communicating. It helps nurture public trust and confidence in getting over the crisis. The World Health Organization (WHO) has also come to recognise its importance after SARS and organised the first Expert Consultation on Outbreak Communications conference in Singapore in September 2004. This article assesses the context and the key features which worked to Singapore's advantage. Looking at the data now widely available on the Internet of the experience of SARS-infected countries like China, Taiwan, Canada, the article identifies the key areas of strategic communications in which Singapore fared particularly well. Another issue discussed is whether Singapore's experience has universal applicability or whether it is limited because of Singapore's unique cultural, historical and geographical circumstances. Finally, the article also looks at some of the post-SARS enhancements that have been put in place following the lessons learnt from SARS and the need to confront new infectious outbreaks like avian flu. PMID:16830005

  14. Development of a video SAR for FMV through clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, H. B.

    2015-05-01

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is developing a Video Synthetic Aperture Radar (ViSAR) system designed to provide a targeting capability for the AC-130 gunship in conditions where the current electro-optic systems will not perform. By using radar, the gunship's availability rises from 35% to 72%, as clouds currently obscure the EO/IR camera's view of the ground. Several technical issues must be addressed in the program in order to be successful. In order to achieve frame rates fast to track maneuvering targets, the radar must operate at frequencies over 170 which requires the development of new electronics. Secondly, as targets move in the FOV of a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) their apparent position is translated in the generated imagery. Thirdly, as the imagery generated is range versus azimuth rather than elevation versus azimuth, tall objects appear to be "laid over" unless corrections are made for the true height of the object imaged. This paper will describe the DARPA program striving to overcome these issues and review the approaches be taken to achieve the imagery required for the close air support mission.

  15. Calibration of the Geosar Dual Frequency Interferometric SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapine, Elaine

    1999-01-01

    GeoSAR is an airborne, interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (INSAR) system for terrain mapping, currently under development by a consortium including NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Calgis, Inc., and the California Department of Conservation (CalDOC) with funding provided by the Topographic Engineering Center (TEC) of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). The radar simultaneously maps swaths on both sides of the aircraft at two frequencies, X-Band and P-Band. For the P-Band system, data is collected for two across track interferometric baselines and at the crossed polarization. The aircraft position and attitude are measured using two Honeywell Embedded GPS Inertial Navigation Units (EGI) and an Ashtech Z12 GPS receiver. The mechanical orientation and position of the antennas are actively measured using a Laser Baseline Metrology System (LBMS). In the GeoSAR motion measurement software, these data are optimally combined with data from a nearby ground station using Ashtech PNAV software to produce the position, orientation, and baseline information are used to process the dual frequency radar data. Proper calibration of the GeoSAR system is essential to obtaining digital elevation models (DEMS) with the required sub-meter level planimetric and vertical accuracies. Calibration begins with the determination of the yaw and pitch biases for the two EGI units. Common range delays are determined for each mode, along with differential time and phase delays between channels. Because the antennas are measured by the LBMS, baseline calibration consists primarily of measuring a constant offset between mechanical center and the electrical phase center of the antennas. A phase screen, an offset to the interferometric phase difference which is a function of absolute phase, is applied to the interferometric data to compensate for multipath and leakage. Calibration parameters are calculated for each of the ten

  16. Statistical Approach To Determination Of Texture In SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, Eric J.; Kwok, Ronald

    1993-01-01

    Paper presents statistical approach to analysis of texture in synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) images. Objective: to extract intrinsic spatial variability of distributed target from overall spatial variability of SAR image.

  17. Organ distribution of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in SARS patients: implications for pathogenesis and virus transmission pathways.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yanqing; He, Li; Zhang, Qingling; Huang, Zhongxi; Che, Xiaoyan; Hou, Jinlin; Wang, Huijun; Shen, Hong; Qiu, Liwen; Li, Zhuguo; Geng, Jian; Cai, Junjie; Han, Huixia; Li, Xin; Kang, Wei; Weng, Desheng; Liang, Ping; Jiang, Shibo

    2004-06-01

    We previously identified the major pathological changes in the respiratory and immune systems of patients who died of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) but gained little information on the organ distribution of SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV). In the present study, we used a murine monoclonal antibody specific for SARS-CoV nucleoprotein, and probes specific for a SARS-CoV RNA polymerase gene fragment, for immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, respectively, to detect SARS-CoV systematically in tissues from patients who died of SARS. SARS-CoV was found in lung, trachea/bronchus, stomach, small intestine, distal convoluted renal tubule, sweat gland, parathyroid, pituitary, pancreas, adrenal gland, liver and cerebrum, but was not detected in oesophagus, spleen, lymph node, bone marrow, heart, aorta, cerebellum, thyroid, testis, ovary, uterus or muscle. These results suggest that, in addition to the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal tract and other organs with detectable SARS-CoV may also be targets of SARS-CoV infection. The pathological changes in these organs may be caused directly by the cytopathic effect mediated by local replication of the SARS-CoV; or indirectly as a result of systemic responses to respiratory failure or the harmful immune response induced by viral infection. In addition to viral spread through a respiratory route, SARS-CoV in the intestinal tract, kidney and sweat glands may be excreted via faeces, urine and sweat, thereby leading to virus transmission. This study provides important information for understanding the pathogenesis of SARS-CoV infection and sheds light on possible virus transmission pathways. This data will be useful for designing new strategies for prevention and treatment of SARS. PMID:15141376

  18. Characterizing hydrologic changes of Great Dismal Swamp using SAR/InSAR technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. W.; Lu, Z.; Zhu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Great Dismal Swamp is one of the largest, northernmost peatlands on the Atlantic Coastal Plain, and the swamp is underlain by a thick water-logged organic soil layer (peat) made up of dead and decaying plant material. The peatlands play a role as the sink of large amount of soil organic carbon and methane. However, the disturbance of the peatland negatively impacted the ecosystem and contributed to the climate change caused by the released greenhouse gas. Our SAR/InSAR methods observed the hydrologic changes in the peatlands, which is a key factor to conserve the wetland, through several methods. First, we compared averaged SAR intensity from C- and L-band SAR sensors with groundwater level changes, and deduced a linear relationship between the SAR backscattering intensity and the groundwater level change. Second, we extracted the inundated area during wet season from InSAR coherence. Third, we measured the relative water level changes in the inundated area using the interferometric phases. Finally, we estimated the groundwater level changes corresponding to the soil moisture changes from time-series InSAR method. Our results can provide the unique opportunity to understand the occurring hydrologic and vegetation changes in the Great Dismal Swamp.

  19. Coastal Sea Level From CRYOSAT-2 SAR and SAR-In Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, O. B.; Abulaitijiang, A.; Knudsen, P.; Stenseng, L.

    2014-12-01

    Cryosat-2 offers the first ever possibility to perform coastal altimetric studies using bor SAR-altimetry and SAR-In altimetry. With this technological leap forward Cryosat-2 is now able to observe sea level in very small water bodies and also to provide coastal sea level very close to the shore. We perform an investigation into the retrieval of sea surface height around Denmark and Greenland. These regions have been chosen as the coastal regions around Denmark falls within the SAR mask and the coastal regions of Greenland falls in under the SAR-in mask employed on Cryosat-2. SAR-in was mainly used in coastal regions of Greenland because of its huge topographic changes as Cryosat-2 is designed to map the margins of the ice-sheet. The coastal region around Denmark is a test region of the EU FP7 sponsored project LOTUS esablishing SAR altimetry product in preparation for Sentinel-3. With the increased spatial resolution of Cryosat-2 SAR we provide valuable sea level observations within the Straits around Denmark which are crucial to constrain the waterflow in and out of the Baltic Sea. The investigation of SAR-in data in Greenland adds an entire new dimension to coastal altimetry. An amazing result of the investigation is the ability of Cryosat-2 to detect and recover sea level even though the coast (sealevel) is up to 15 km away from the nadir location of the satellite. This ability of capture and use returns from outside the main (-3Db) loop in theory enables Cryosat-2 SAR-in to map sea level height of fjords more frequently than the 369 days repeat.

  20. The Radarsat SAR multi-beam antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins-Camelo, L.; Cooper, R. T.; Zimcik, D. G.

    1984-10-01

    Radarsat, the Canadian radar imaging satellite, will have a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) antenna as one of its sensors. The requirements on the performance of the SAR antenna are such as to make it a complex system. Radarsat is required to have some unique characteristics which present some new challenges to the antenna designers. The requirements for switchability among 4 shaped beams and high power of transmit operation are major design constraints which strongly impact on the antenna complexity, weight, and cost. A trade-off study was carried out to select the preferred antenna type for the Radarsat SAR function. The antenna types analyzed were planar-array and array-fed reflector. A set of comparison criteria was developed. The antenna concepts studied were then compared against these criteria, and a final decision was reached.

  1. Super resolution for FOPEN SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekarforoush, Hassan; Banerjee, Amit; Chellappa, Rama

    1999-07-01

    Detecting targets occluded by foliage in Foliage penetrating (FOPEN) Ultra-Wide-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (UWB SAR) images is an important and challenging problem. Given the different nature of FOPEN SAR imagery and very low signal- to-clutter ratio in UWB SAR data, conventional detection algorithms usually fail to yield robust target detection results on raw data with minimum false alarms. Hence improving the resolving power by means of a super-resolution algorithm plays an important role in hypothesis testing for false alarm mitigation and target localization. In this paper we present a new single-frame super-resolution algorithm based on estimating the polyphase components of the observed signal projected on an optimal basis. The estimated polyphase components are then combined into a single super-resolved image using the standard inverse polyphase transform, leading to improved target signature while suppressing noise.

  2. New approaches in interferometric SAR data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Qian; Vesecky, John F.; Zebker, Howard A.

    1992-01-01

    It is well established that interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images can be inverted to perform surface elevation mapping. Among the factors critical to the mapping accuracy are registration of the interfering SAR images and phase unwrapping. A novel registration algorithm is presented that determines the registration parameters through optimization. A new figure of merit is proposed that evaluates the registration result during the optimization. The phase unwrapping problem is approached through a new method involving fringe line detection. The algorithms are tested with two SEASAT SAR images of terrain near Yellowstone National Park. These images were collected on Seasat orbits 1334 and 1420, which were very close together in space, i.e., less than 100 m. The resultant elevation map is compared with the USGS digital terrain elevation model.

  3. Stop outbreak of SARS with infrared cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yigang M.

    2004-04-01

    SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, commonly known as Atypical Pneumonia in mainland China) caused 8422 people affected and resulting in 918 deaths worldwide in half year. This disease can be transmitted by respiratory droplets or by contact with a patient's respiratory secretions. This means it can be spread out very rapidly through the public transportations by the travelers with the syndrome. The challenge was to stop the SARS carriers traveling around by trains, airplanes, coaches and etc. It is impractical with traditional oral thermometers or spot infrared thermometers to screen the tens of travelers with elevated body temperature from thousands of normal travelers in hours. The thermal imager with temperature measurement function is a logical choice for this special application although there are some limitations and drawbacks. This paper discusses the real SARS applications of industrial infrared cameras in China from April to July 2003.

  4. INTA-SAR real-time processor

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, B.; Leon, J.

    1996-10-01

    This paper presents the INTASAR real time processor development based on a DSP open architecture for processing Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) signal. The final designed architecture must consider three different constraints sources: (a) SAR signal characteristics : high dynamic range, and complex SAR imaging algorithms with high computational load (multiprocessing is convenient). (b) Flexible: in connectivity and algorithms to be programmed. (c) Suitable: for on-board and ground working. The real time constraints will be defined by the image acquisition time, within it the INTASAR system will process the rawdata image and finally presents the results in the system monitor. At ground, however, the real time processing is not a constraint, but the high quality image is. The first algorithm implemented in the system was a Range - Doppler one. With the multiprocessor architecture selected, a pipeline processing method is used. 17 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. SARS: lessons learned from other coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Navas-Martin, Sonia; Weiss, Susan R

    2003-01-01

    The identification of a new coronavirus as the etiological agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) has evoked much new interest in the molecular biology and pathogenesis of coronaviruses. This review summarizes present knowledge on coronavirus molecular biology and pathogenesis with particular emphasis on mouse hepatitis virus (MHV). MHV, a member of coronavirus group 2, is a natural pathogen of the mouse; MHV infection of the mouse is considered one of the best models for the study of demyelinating disease, such as multiple sclerosis, in humans. As a result of the SARS epidemic, coronaviruses can now be considered as emerging pathogens. Future research on SARS needs to be based on all the knowledge that coronavirologists have generated over more than 30 years of research. PMID:14733734

  6. Linear Approximation SAR Azimuth Processing Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindquist, R. B.; Masnaghetti, R. K.; Belland, E.; Hance, H. V.; Weis, W. G.

    1979-01-01

    A segmented linear approximation of the quadratic phase function that is used to focus the synthetic antenna of a SAR was studied. Ideal focusing, using a quadratic varying phase focusing function during the time radar target histories are gathered, requires a large number of complex multiplications. These can be largely eliminated by using linear approximation techniques. The result is a reduced processor size and chip count relative to ideally focussed processing and a correspondingly increased feasibility for spaceworthy implementation. A preliminary design and sizing for a spaceworthy linear approximation SAR azimuth processor meeting requirements similar to those of the SEASAT-A SAR was developed. The study resulted in a design with approximately 1500 IC's, 1.2 cubic feet of volume, and 350 watts of power for a single look, 4000 range cell azimuth processor with 25 meters resolution.

  7. Calibration of a polarimetric imaging SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarabandi, K.; Pierce, L. E.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1991-01-01

    Calibration of polarimetric imaging Synthetic Aperture Radars (SAR's) using point calibration targets is discussed. The four-port network calibration technique is used to describe the radar error model. The polarimetric ambiguity function of the SAR is then found using a single point target, namely a trihedral corner reflector. Based on this, an estimate for the backscattering coefficient of the terrain is found by a deconvolution process. A radar image taken by the JPL Airborne SAR (AIRSAR) is used for verification of the deconvolution calibration method. The calibrated responses of point targets in the image are compared both with theory and the POLCAL technique. Also, response of a distributed target are compared using the deconvolution and POLCAL techniques.

  8. Slow Moving Hazard Hotspot from InSAR Data: improving communication with decision makers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ping; Casagli, Nicola; Catani, Filippo; Tofani, Veronica

    2010-05-01

    Slow moving hazards are not always taken seriously in the management and governance of mountain risks. This is because of their relatively low threat to human lives compared to rapid mass movement. However, these kinds of slow processes can remain active for long period of time. Also, it could leave a great threat to properties and infrastructures. Hence, for an advanced risk management strategy, it is important to include slow moving hazards when dealing with long-term mountain risks. Thanks to the rapid development of advanced InSAR processing, especially with the advent of long-term InSAR approaches, it is possible to detect ground motion with millimeter precision for a long period of spanning time. However, considering the complexity and ambiguity of the data processing, for those who are mainly dealing with risk management and governance, the technical part of InSAR processing is sometimes equivocal and difficult to understand. Providing an understandable hazard map might be more helpful for them. With this motive, we introduce an approach of producing slow moving hazard hotspot map from previous InSAR outcomes. Compared to traditional InSAR maps, the hotspot map is straightforward and easy to understand. To present the usefulness of hotspot map, an example in the Arno river basin in central Italy is presented. Several landslides activities are confirmed as active from the hotspot map. Some of them are further investigated in order to evaluate the previous mitigation efforts. Also, the map provides an approach of detecting and mapping new landslides rapidly and accurately. Except for landslide hazards, subsidence dangers are identified in the Mugello Circuit which is the race track for Moto GP and the test track for Ferrari Formula 1 team. In all, the hotspot map is proven to be an efficient, effective and easily understandable communication approach between technicians and decision makers.

  9. Improved characterization of slow-moving landslides by means of adaptive NL-InSAR filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albiol, David; Iglesias, Rubén.; Sánchez, Francisco; Duro, Javier

    2014-10-01

    Advanced remote sensing techniques based on space-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) have been developed during the last decade showing their applicability for the monitoring of surface displacements in landslide areas. This paper presents an advanced Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) processing based on the Stable Point Network (SPN) technique, developed by the company Altamira-Information, for the monitoring of an active slowmoving landslide in the mountainous environment of El Portalet, Central Spanish Pyrenees. For this purpose, two TerraSAR-X data sets acquired in ascending mode corresponding to the period from April to November 2011, and from August to November 2013, respectively, are employed. The objective of this work is twofold. On the one hand, the benefits of employing Nonlocal Interferomtric SAR (NL-InSAR) adaptive filtering techniques over vegetated scenarios to maximize the chances of detecting natural distributed scatterers, such as bare or rocky areas, and deterministic point-like scatterers, such as man-made structures or poles, is put forward. In this context, the final PSI displacement maps retrieved with the proposed filtering technique are compared in terms of pixels' density and quality with classical PSI, showing a significant improvement. On the other hand, since SAR systems are only sensitive to detect displacements in the line-of-sight (LOS) direction, the importance of projecting the PSI displacement results retrieved along the steepest gradient of the terrain slope is discussed. The improvements presented in this paper are particularly interesting in these type of applications since they clearly allow to better determine the extension and dynamics of complex landslide phenomena.

  10. Inter- and Post-Seismic Ground Deformation of the 2012 Emilia Seismic Sequence By Means of COSMO-Skymed and Ers-Envisat InSAR Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzo, G.; Tolomei, C.; Salvi, S.; Atzori, S.; Merryman Boncori, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    On May 20, 2012, a moderate earthquake of local magnitude, M 5.9 started a seismic sequence in the central Po Plain of Northern Italy. The mainshock occurred in an area where seismicity of comparable magnitude has neither been recorded nor reported in the historical record over the last 1,000 years. On May 29, 2012 a second large earthquake of M 5.8 occurred 12 km WSW of the mainshock, starting a new seismic sequence in the western area; a total of seven earthquakes with M >5 occurred in the area between May 20 and June 3, 2012. After the first mainshock, a COSMO-SkyMed acquisition plan was going to provide data over a wide area of the Emilia Region covering both the epicentral region and the adjacent West and East areas, and was later extended up to December 31th, 2013 to monitor the post-seismic deformation. Using multitemporal SBAS InSAR technique we measured co and post-seismic deformations; . we used COSMO-SkyMed image datasets spanning the time period 2012-2013, along both ascending and descending orbit. Moreover we studied the pre-seismic (inter-seismic) phase by means of ERS1/2 and ASAR-Envisat data covering the 1992-2010 temporal interval. In this framework the Emilia seismic sequence represents a very interesting case for the study of the complete seismic cycle.

  11. An innovative methodological approach in the frame of Marine Strategy Framework Directive: a statistical model based on ship detection SAR data for monitoring programmes.

    PubMed

    Pieralice, Francesca; Proietti, Raffaele; La Valle, Paola; Giorgi, Giordano; Mazzolena, Marco; Taramelli, Andrea; Nicoletti, Luisa

    2014-12-01

    The Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD, 2008/56/EC) is focused on protection, preservation and restoration of the marine environment by achieving and maintaining Good Environmental Status (GES) by 2020. Within this context, this paper presents a methodological approach for a fast and repeatable monitoring that allows quantitative assessment of seabed abrasion pressure due to recreational boat anchoring. The methodology consists of two steps: a semi-automatic procedure based on an algorithm for the ship detection in SAR imagery and a statistical model to obtain maps of spatial and temporal distribution density of anchored boats. Ship detection processing has been performed on 36 ASAR VV-pol images of Liguria test site, for the three years 2008, 2009 and 2010. Starting from the pointwise distribution layer produced by ship detection in imagery, boats points have been subdivided into 4 areas where a constant distribution density has been assumed for the entire period 2008-2010. In the future, this methodology will be applied also to higher resolution data of Sentinel-1 mission, specifically designed for the operational needs of the European Programme Copernicus. PMID:25096752

  12. Quantifying the dynamics of water bodies, wetlands and biomass in the Poyang Lake region: A multi-polarization SAR remote sensing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Huiyong

    sacchariflorus during its growth period result in over 10 dB spatial and temporal variation in ASAR backscatter in HH- and HV-polarization. The relationship of canopy height with ASAR backscattering coefficient is the most significant among the influencing factors (plant height, fresh biomass, dry biomass, vegetation water content) on radar backscattering mechanism (R2=0.9 for HH-polarization and R2=0.59 for HV-polarization) from Phragmites cummunis Trin. HH- and HV-backscatters are more sensitive to the variation of dry biomass (R2=0.76 for HH and R2=0.56 for HV) than to that of fresh biomass (R 2=0.07 for HV and R2=0.42 for HH). Plant water content plays a negative role and attenuates the backscattering signals in both polarizations. For Phragmites communis Trin. with tall stalks (over 2m) and long, blade-like leaves, HH-polarization is more sensitive to vegetation parameters than HV-polarization for C-band SAR signals. Similar to Phragmites communis Trin., ASAR backscattering coefficient in both polarizations is more sensitive to plant height and dry biomass of non-flooded Miscanthus sacchariflorus, and their regression coefficients (R2) are over 0.5 for HH-polarization and over 0.4 for HV-polarization. Plant water content has no evident effect on the variation of ASAR backscatter. HV-polarization is more sensitive to the variation of above-water canopy parameters than HH-polarization for flooded Miscanthus saccharifiorus. HH- and HV-polarized radar backscatters from Carex spp. wetlands increased significantly with the variation of plant height, fresh biomass and dry biomass, but they reach saturated when vegetation grows up to 30cm. Compared with those tall grass with stalks and long blade-like leaves, the correlation of fresh biomass with HV-polarization is more pronounced (R 2=0.78) than that with HH-polarization (R2=0.41) for Carex spp. Vegetation structure play a more important role in radar backscattering mechanism than plant water content for these three wetland

  13. Deformation of the western Indian Plate boundary: insights from differential and multi-aperture InSAR data inversion for the 2008 Baluchistan (Western Pakistan) seismic sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzo, Giuseppe; Merryman Boncori, John Peter; Atzori, Simone; Antonioli, Andrea; Salvi, Stefano

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we use Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) and multi-aperture interferometry (MAI) to constrain the sources of the three largest events of the 2008 Baluchistan (western Pakistan) seismic sequence, namely two Mw 6.4 events only 12 hr apart and an Mw 5.7 event that occurred 40 d later. The sequence took place in the Quetta Syntaxis, the most seismically active region of Baluchistan, tectonically located between the colliding Indian Plate and the Afghan Block of the Eurasian Plate. Surface displacements estimated from ascending and descending ENVISAT ASAR acquisitions were used to derive elastic dislocation models for the sources of the two main events. The estimated slip distributions have peak values of 120 and 130 cm on a pair of almost parallel and near-vertical faults striking NW-SE, and of 50 cm and 60 cm on two high-angle faults striking NE-SW. Values up to 50 cm were found for the largest aftershock on an NE-SW fault located between the sources of the main shocks. The MAI measurements, with their high sensitivity to the north-south motion component, are crucial in this area to accurately describe the coseismic displacement field. Our results provide insight into the deformation style of the Quetta Syntaxis, suggesting that right-lateral slip released at shallow depths on large NW fault planes is compatible with left-lateral activation on smaller NE-SW faults.

  14. Detection of ground deformation over Sharm El-Sheikh-Ras Nasrani coastal zone, South Sinai (Egypt), by using time series SAR interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seleem, Tarek A.; Parcharidis, Issaak; Foumelis, Michael; Kourkouli, Penelope

    2011-03-01

    The investigation area is located in the most southern part of Sinai Peninsula boarded from the west by the Gulf of Suez and from the east by the Gulf of Aqaba. The present study concerns the application of stacking and persistent scattering of SAR interferometry in order to monitor ground deformation in the southern part of Sharm El-Shiekh area. The specific techniques were applied in order to reduce the influence of atmospheric effects on the ground deformation estimates. For this purpose a total number of 26 ENVISAT ASAR scenes covering the period between 2003 and 2009 were processed and analyzed. Interferometric processing results show both patterns of uplift and downlift in the study area. Specifically an area along the coastline with a N-S direction, corresponding to the build up zone of Sharm El-Sheikh, shows annual average subsidence rates between 5 and 7 mm/yr along the line of sight (LOS). On the contrary, Sharm El-Maya, an inner zone, parallel to the above subsided area; shows maximum slant range uplift of 5 mm/yr. The obtained results of both stacking and persistent scattering indicate that the ground deformation in Sharm El-Sheikh-Ras Nasrani coastal zone is attributed to several effecting factors compromising water pumping, lithology, seismicity, and possible active fracture. The contribution of all these factors is discussed in the context.

  15. First Results from an Airborne Ka-Band SAR Using SweepSAR and Digital Beamforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory A.; Ghaemi, Hirad; Hensley, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    SweepSAR is a wide-swath synthetic aperture radar technique that is being studied for application on the future Earth science radar missions. This paper describes the design of an airborne radar demonstration that simulates an 11-m L-band (1.2-1.3 GHz) reflector geometry at Ka-band (35.6 GHz) using a 40-cm reflector. The Ka-band SweepSAR Demonstration system was flown on the NASA DC-8 airborne laboratory and used to study engineering performance trades and array calibration for SweepSAR configurations. We present an instrument and experiment overview, instrument calibration and first results.

  16. Longitudinal Analysis of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Coronavirus-Specific Antibody in SARS Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shan-Chwen; Wang, Jann-Tay; Huang, Li-Min; Chen, Yee-Chun; Fang, Chi-Tai; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Wang, Jiun-Ling; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yang, Pan-Chyr

    2005-01-01

    The serum antibodies to severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus of 18 SARS patients were checked at 1 month and every 3 months after disease onset. All of them except one, who missed blood sampling at 1 month, tested positive for the immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody at 1 month. Fifteen out of 17 tested positive for the IgM antibody at 1 month. The serum IgM antibody of most patients became undetectable within 6 months after the onset of SARS. The IgG antibody of all 17 patients, whose serum was checked 1 year after disease onset, remained positive. PMID:16339072

  17. SAR measurement in MRI: an improved method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Rocco; Acernese, Fausto; Indovina, Pietro Luigi; Barone, Fabrizio

    2009-03-01

    During an MR procedure, the patient absorbs a portion of the transmitted RF energy, which may result in tissue heating and other adverse effects, such as alterations in visual, auditory and neural functions. The Specific Absorption Rate (SAR), in W/kg, is the RF power absorbed per unit mass of tissue and is one of the most important parameters related with thermal effects and acts as a guideline for MRI safety. Strict limits to the SAR levels are imposed by patient safety international regulations (CEI - EN 60601 - 2 - 33) and SAR measurements are required in order to verify its respect. The recommended methods for mean SAR measurement are quite problematic and often require a maintenance man intervention and long stop machine. For example, in the CEI recommended pulse energy method, the presence of a maintenance man is required in order to correctly connect the required instrumentation; furthermore, the procedure is complex and requires remarkable processing and calculus. Simpler are the calorimetric methods, also if in this case long acquisition times are required in order to have significant temperature variations and accurate heat capacity knowledge (CEI - EN 60601 - 2- 33). The phase transition method is a new method to measure SAR in MRI which has the advantages to be very simple and to overcome all the typical calorimetric method problems. It does not require in gantry temperature measurements, any specific heat or heat capacity knowledge, but only mass and time measurement. Furthermore, in this method, it is possible to show that all deposited SAR power can be considered acquired and measured.

  18. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Prevention in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Hsueh-Erh

    2004-01-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is a newly identified respiratory disease that threatened Taiwan between April 14 and July 5, 2003. Chang Gung University experienced various SARS-related episodes, such as the postponement of classes for 7 days, the reporting of probable SARS cases, and the isolation of students under Level A and B…

  19. SAR-EDU - An education initiative for applied Synthetic Aperture Radar remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckardt, Robert; Richter, Nicole; Auer, Stefan; Eineder, Michael; Roth, Achim; Hajnsek, Irena; Walter, Diana; Braun, Matthias; Motagh, Mahdi; Pathe, Carsten; Pleskachevsky, Andrey; Thiel, Christian; Schmullius, Christiane

    2013-04-01

    Since the 1970s, radar remote sensing techniques have evolved rapidly and are increasingly employed in all fields of earth sciences. Applications are manifold and still expanding due to the continuous development of new instruments and missions as well as the availability of very high-quality data. The trend worldwide is towards operational employment of the various algorithms and methods that have been developed. However, the utilization of operational services does not keep up yet with the rate of technical developments and the improvements in sensor technology. With the enhancing availability and variety of space borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data and a growing number of analysis algorithms the need for a vital user community is increasing. Therefore the German Aerospace Center (DLR) together with the Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena (FSU) and the Technical University Munich (TUM) launched the education initiative SAR-EDU. The aim of the project is to facilitate access to expert knowledge in the scientific field of radar remote sensing. Within this effort a web portal will be created to provide seminar material on SAR basics, methods and applications to support both, lecturers and students. The overall intension of the project SAR-EDU is to provide seminar material for higher education in radar remote sensing covering the topic holistically from the very basics to the most advanced methods and applications that are available. The principles of processing and interpreting SAR data are going to be taught using test data sets and open-source as well as commercial software packages. The material that is provided by SAR-EDU will be accessible at no charge from a DLR web portal. The educational tool will have a modular structure, consisting of separate modules that broach the issue of a particular topic. The aim of the implementation of SAR-EDU as application-oriented radar remote sensing educational tool is to advocate the development and wider use of

  20. A tool for bistatic sar geometry determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, R.; Gibson, J.; Antonik, P.; Saper, R.; Seymour, M.; St Hilaire, M.; Livingstone, C.

    The geometry of wide angle bistatic SAR is somewhat more complex than that of conventional SAR because the transmitter and receiver are displaced considerably. Constant bistatic range contours projected onto the geoid form ellipse-like profiles with the transmitter and receiver located at the two foci. Constant Doppler lines intersect the range ellipses and allow under special circumstances a simple orthogonal basis for processing and analysis. This paper illustrates a simple GUI- based tool developed in a MatLab that uses satellite orbit parameters and RADARSAT-1 data to simulate the bistatic geometry and scattering for a tower- based receiver.

  1. SAR simulation of three-dimensional scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franceschetti, Giorgio; Marino, Raimundo; Migliaccio, Maurizio; Riccio, Daniele

    1994-12-01

    In this paper we examine the SAR raw signal simulation of extended mountainous natural terrain. In order to cope with this goal we need to consider some problems relative to the evaluation of the backscattering pattern and of the efficient and correct inclusion of the SAR system unit response. In particular, and with regard to the first issue inclusion of the third dimension requires accommodation of its coarse description. Subjective and objective norms in order to judge the simulation results are presented and discussed, together with a number of examples.

  2. FOPEN ultrawideband SAR imaging by wavelet interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hanwei; Liang, Diannong; Wang, Yan; Huang, Xiaotao; Dong, Zhen

    2003-09-01

    Wave number Domain Imaging algorithm can deal with the problem of foliage-penetrating ultra-wide band synthesis aperture radar (FOPEN UWB SAR) imaging. Stolt interpolation is a key role in Imaging Algorithm and is unevenly interpolation problem. There is no fast computation algorithm on Stolt interpolation. In this paper, A novel 4-4 tap of integer wavelet filters is used as Stolt interpolation base function. A fast interpolation algorithm is put forwards to. There is only plus and shift operation in wavelet interpolation that is easy to realize by hardware. The real data are processed to prove the wavelet interpolation valid for FOPEN UWB SAR imaging.

  3. CCD architecture for spacecraft SAR image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    A real-time synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image processing architecture amenable to future on-board spacecraft applications is currently under development. Using state-of-the-art charge-coupled device (CCD) technology, low cost and power are inherent features. Other characteristics include the ability to reprogram correlation reference functions, correct for range migration, and compensate for antenna beam pointing errors on the spacecraft in real time. The first spaceborne demonstration is scheduled to be flown as an experiment on a 1982 Shuttle imaging radar mission (SIR-B). This paper describes the architecture and implementation characteristics of this initial spaceborne CCD SAR image processor.

  4. Unsupervised Segmentation Of Polarimetric SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, Eric J.; Dubois, Pascale; Van Zyl, Jakob; Kwok, Ronald; Chellappa, Rama

    1994-01-01

    Method of unsupervised segmentation of polarimetric synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) image data into classes involves selection of classes on basis of multidimensional fuzzy clustering of logarithms of parameters of polarimetric covariance matrix. Data in each class represent parts of image wherein polarimetric SAR backscattering characteristics of terrain regarded as homogeneous. Desirable to have each class represent type of terrain, sea ice, or ocean surface distinguishable from other types via backscattering characteristics. Unsupervised classification does not require training areas, is nearly automated computerized process, and provides nonsubjective selection of image classes naturally well separated by radar.

  5. Estimating IMU heading error from SAR images.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-03-01

    Angular orientation errors of the real antenna for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) will manifest as undesired illumination gradients in SAR images. These gradients can be measured, and the pointing error can be calculated. This can be done for single images, but done more robustly using multi-image methods. Several methods are provided in this report. The pointing error can then be fed back to the navigation Kalman filter to correct for problematic heading (yaw) error drift. This can mitigate the need for uncomfortable and undesired IMU alignment maneuvers such as S-turns.

  6. Engaging students in geodesy: A quantitative InSAR module for undergraduate tectonics and geophysics classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, H.; Charlevoix, D. J.; Pritchard, M. E.; Lohman, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    In the last several decades, advances in geodetic technology have allowed us to significantly expand our knowledge of processes acting on and beneath the Earth's surface. Many of these advances have come as a result of EarthScope, a community of scientists conducting multidisciplinary Earth science research utilizing freely accessible data from a variety of instruments. The geodetic component of EarthScope includes the acquisition of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images, which are archived at the UNAVCO facility. Interferometric SAR complements the spatial and temporal coverage of GPS and allows monitoring of ground deformation in remote areas worldwide. However, because of the complex software required for processing, InSAR data are not readily accessible to most students. Even with these challenges, exposure at the undergraduate level is important for showing how geodesy can be applied in various areas of the geosciences and for promoting geodesy as a future career path. Here we present a module focused on exploring the tectonics of the western United States using InSAR data for use in undergraduate tectonics and geophysics classes. The module has two major objectives: address topics concerning tectonics in the western U.S. including Basin and Range extension, Yellowstone hotspot activity, and creep in southern California, and familiarize students with how imperfect real-world data can be manipulated and interpreted. Module questions promote critical thinking skills and data literacy by prompting students to use the information given to confront and question assumptions (e.g. 'Is there a consistency between seismic rates and permanent earthquake deformation? What other factors might need to be considered besides seismicity?'). The module consists of an introduction to the basics of InSAR and three student exercises, each focused on one of the topics listed above. Students analyze pre-processed InSAR data using MATLAB, or an Excel equivalent, and draw on GPS and

  7. Overview of foliage/ground penetration and interferometric SAR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giglio, Dominick A.

    1994-06-01

    This paper describes foliage/ground-penetration radar experiments and interferometric synthetic aperture radar experiments sponsored by the Advanced Research Projects Agency in 1992-3. In the foliage/ground penetration experiments, airborne synthetic aperture radar data have been collected at a variety of sites in three bands, 20-90 MHz, 100-500 MHz, and 1200-1300 MHz. Foliage penetration data were collected on Panamanian rain forest and on Northern Maine woods, and ground penetration data were collected on buried objects in a desert site in Arizona. Interferometric SAR data have been collected on various terrain to extract terrain height, and on military vehicles such as tanks and trucks to assess the utility of height information for target detection and recognition.

  8. First In-Orbit Experience of TerraSAR-X Flight Dynamics Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, R.; Kazeminejad, B.; Kirschner, M.; Yoon, Y.; Kiehling, R.; D'Amico, S.

    2007-01-01

    TerraSAR-X is an advanced synthetic aperture radar satellite system for scientific and commercial applications that is realized in a public-private partnership between the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the Astrium GmbH. TerraSAR-X was launched at June 15, 2007 on top of a Russian DNEPR-1 rocket into a 514 km sun-synchronous dusk-dawn orbit with an 11-day repeat cycle and will be operated for a period of at least 5 years during which it will provide high resolution SAR-data in the X-band. Due to the objectives of the interferometric campaigns the satellite has to comply to tight orbit control requirements, which are formulated in the form of a 250 m toroidal tube around a pre-flight determined reference trajectory (see [1] for details). The acquisition of the reference orbit was one of the main and key activities during the Launch and Early Orbit Phase (LEOP) and had to compensate for both injection errors and spacecraft safe mode attitude control thruster activities. The paper summarizes the activities of GSOC flight dynamics team during both LEOP and early Commissioning Phase, where the main tasks have been 1) the first-acquisition support via angle-tracking and GPS-based orbit determination, 2) maneuver planning for target orbit acquisition and maintenance, and 3) precise orbit and attitude determination for SAR processing support. Furthermore, a presentation on the achieved results and encountered problems will be addressed.

  9. Rupture parameters of the 21 May 2003, Mw 6.8, Zemmouri (Northern Algeria) earthquake deduced from InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belabbes, S.; Wicks, C.; Meghraoui, M.; Cakir, Z.

    2007-12-01

    We study the surface deformation associated with the 21 May, 2003 (Mw=6.8) Zemmouri (Algeria) earthquake, the strongest seismic event felt in the region since 1716. Global and NEIC focal mechanism solutions of the mainshock indicate reverse faulting with a ~N60E trending rupture dipping ~ 45° SE. The earthquake epicenter relocated along the shoreline caused an average 0.50 m coastal uplift along ~50-km-long coastline. We mapped the coseismic surface displacement field caused by the earthquake using the ENVISAT ASAR (IS2) and RADARSAT standard beam (ST5) data. We were able to obtain coseismic interferograms from both the ascending and descending orbits of ENVISAT satellite. The RADARSAT data proved useful only in the descending mode. While the two RADARSAT interferograms cover the entire area of coastal uplift, ENVISAT data cover only the western half of the epicentral zone. Although the InSAR coherence in the epicenter area is poor, deformation fringes are observed along the coast in different patches. In the Boumerdes area, the maximum deformation is indicated by the high gradient of fringes visible in all interferograms in agreement with field measurements (tape, DGPS and leveling). To constrain the earthquake rupture parameters, we model the interferograms and uplift measurements using elastic dislocations on triangular fault patches in an elastic and homogeneous half space. We invert the coseismic slip using a curved surface constructed from triangular elements using Poly3Dinv program that uses a damped least square minimization. The fault rupture is 65-km-long and dips ~40° to the south with a smooth change in strike north of Boumerdes from N 60°-65° to N 95°-105°.

  10. Investigating the backscatter contrast anomaly in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery of the dunes along the Israel-Egypt border

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenstein, Offer; Siegal, Zehava; Blumberg, Dan G.; Adamowski, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The dune field intersected by the Israel-Egypt borderline has attracted many remote sensing studies over the years because it exhibits unique optical phenomena in several domains, from the visual to the thermal infrared. These phenomena are the result of land-use policies implemented by the two countries, which have differing effects on the two ecosystems. This study explores the surface properties that affect radar backscatter, namely the surface roughness and dielectric properties, in order to determine the cause for the variation across the border. The backscatter contrast was demonstrated for SIR-C, the first synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensor to capture this phenomenon, as well as ASAR imagery that coincides with complementary ground observations. These field observations along the border, together with an aerial image from the same year as the SIR-C acquisition were used to analyze differences in vegetation patterns that can affect the surface roughness. The dielectric permittivity of two kinds of topsoil (sand, biocrust) was measured in the field and in the laboratory. The results suggest that the vegetation structure and spatial distribution differ between the two sides of the border in a manner that is consistent with the radar observations. The dielectric permittivity of sand and biocrust was found to be similar, although they are not constant across the radar spectral region (50 MHz-20 GHz). These findings support the hypothesis that changes to the vegetation, as a consequence of the different land-use practices in Israel and Egypt, are the cause for the radar backscatter contrast across the border.

  11. Quantum-SAR extension of the spectral-SAR algorithm: application to polyphenolic anticancer bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Putz, Mihai V; Putz, Ana-Maria; Lazea, Marius; Ienciu, Luciana; Chiriac, Adrian

    2009-03-01

    Aiming to assess the role of individual molecular structures in the molecular mechanism of ligand-receptor interaction correlation analysis, the recent Spectral-SAR approach is employed to introduce the Quantum-SAR (QuaSAR) "wave" and "conversion factor" in terms of difference between inter-endpoint inter-molecular activities for a given set of compounds; this may account for inter-conversion (metabolization) of molecular (concentration) effects while indicating the structural (quantum) based influential/detrimental role on bio-/eco- effect in a causal manner rather than by simple inspection of measured values; the introduced QuaSAR method is then illustrated for a study of the activity of a series of flavonoids on breast cancer resistance protein. PMID:19399244

  12. The "Myth" of the Minimum SAR Antenna Area Constraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, A.; Johnson, W. T. K.; Huneycutt, B.; Jordan, R.; Hensley, S.; Siqueira, P.; Curlander, J.

    1998-01-01

    A design constraint traceable ot the early days of spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is known as the minimum antenna area constraint for SAR. In this paper, it is confirmed that this constraint strictly applies only to the case where both the best possible resolution and the widest possible swath are the design goals. SAR antennas with area smaller than the constraint allows are shown to be possible, have been used on spaceborne SAR missions in the past, and should permit further, lower-cost SAR mission in the future.

  13. Cryosat-2 SAR and SAR-In Altimetry for Coastal Sea Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltazar Andersen, Ole; Knudsen, Per; Abulaitijiang, Adil; Stenseng, Lars

    2015-04-01

    Cryosat-2 offers the first ever possibility to perform coastal altimetric studies using SAR-Interferometry as well as SAR altimetry. With this technological leap forward Cryosat-2 is now able to observe sea level in very small water bodies and also to provide coastal sea level very close to the shore. We perform an investigation into the retrieval of sea surface height around Denmark and Greenland. These regions have been chosen as the coastal regions around Denmark falls within the SAR mask and the coastal regions of Greenland falls in under the SAR-in mask employed on Cryosat-2. SAR-in was mainly used in coastal regions of Greenland because of its huge topographic changes as Cryosat-2 is designed to map the margins of the ice-sheet. The coastal region around Denmark is a test region of the EU sponsored project LOTUS in which With the increased spatial resolution of Cryosat-2 SAR we provide valuable sea level observations within the Straits around Denmark which are crucial to constrain the waterflow in and out of the Baltic Sea. The investigation of SAR-in data in Greenland adds an entire new dimension to coastal altimetry. An amazing result of the investigation is the ability of Cryosat-2 to detect and recover sea level even though the coast (sealevel) is up to 15 km away from the nadir location of the satellite. This ability of capture and use returns from outside the main (-3Db) loop in theory enables Cryosat-2 SAR-in to map sea level height of fjords more frequently than the 369 days repeat.

  14. In-pixel conversion with a 10 bit SAR ADC for next generation X-ray FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodola, L.; Batignani, G.; Benkechkache, M. A.; Bettarini, S.; Casarosa, G.; Comotti, D.; Dalla Betta, G. F.; Fabris, L.; Forti, F.; Grassi, M.; Latreche, S.; Malcovati, P.; Manghisoni, M.; Mendicino, R.; Morsani, F.; Paladino, A.; Pancheri, L.; Paoloni, E.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Rizzo, G.; Traversi, G.; Vacchi, C.; Verzellesi, G.; Xu, H.

    2016-07-01

    This work presents the design of an interleaved Successive Approximation Register (SAR) ADC, part of the readout channel for the PixFEL detector. The PixFEL project aims at substantially advancing the state-of-the-art in the field of 2D X-ray imaging for applications at the next generation Free Electron Laser (FEL) facilities. For this purpose, the collaboration is developing the fundamental microelectronic building blocks for the readout channel. This work focuses on the design of the ADC carried out in a 65 nm CMOS technology. To obtain a good tradeoff between power consumption, conversion speed and area occupation, an interleaved SAR ADC architecture was adopted.

  15. Epidemic Models for SARS and Measles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozema, Edward

    2007-01-01

    Recent events have led to an increased interest in emerging infectious diseases. This article applies various deterministic models to the SARS epidemic of 2003 and a measles outbreak in the Netherlands in 1999-2000. We take a historical approach beginning with the well-known logistic curve and a lesser-known extension popularized by Pearl and Reed…

  16. Acousto-Optical/Electronic Processor For SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bicknell, T. J.; Farr, W. H.

    1992-01-01

    Lightweight, compact, low-power apparatus processes synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) returns in real time, providing imagery aboard moving aircraft or spacecraft platform. Processor includes optical and electronic subsystems that, together, resolve range and azimuth coordinates of radar targets by combination of spatial and temporal integrations.

  17. SARS: An Emerging Global Microbial Threat.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, James M.

    2004-01-01

    In March 2003, the Institute of Medicine published an update to its 1992 landmark report on emerging infections. The new report, Microbial Threats to Health: Emergence, Detection, and Response, describes the current spectrum of global microbial threats, factors affecting their emergence or resurgence, and measures that should be undertaken to effectively address them. Coincident with this publication came increasing reports of severe atypical pneumonia of unknown etiology among persons in southeast Asia. This new disease, designated severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), spread globally in a matter of weeks, infecting primarily close contacts of index patients (e.g., household members and healthcare workers caring for index patients) but also resulting in community transmission in some areas. An unprecedented worldwide collaborative effort was undertaken to determine the cause of the illness and implement prevention measures. A previously unrecognized coronavirus was identified as the causative agent, and health officials throughout the world struggled to implement measures to contain its spread, including isolation of suspect SARS cases and quarantine of exposed persons. The emergence of SARS is a timely reminder of the need to expect the unexpected and to ensure strong national and global public health partnerships when preparing for and responding to infectious diseases. Effectively addressing the threat of SARS will require enhanced global infectious disease surveillance, the development of rapid diagnostics, new therapies, and vaccines, implementation of aggressive evidence-based infection control strategies, and effective communication. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:17060979

  18. Ambiguity noise analysis of a SAR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Haishan; Chang, Wenge; Li, Xiangyang

    2015-12-01

    The presence of range and azimuth (or Doppler) ambiguities in synthetic aperture radars (SARs) is well known. The ambiguity noise is related to the antenna pattern and the value of pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Because a new frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) SAR has the characters of low cost and small size, and the capacity of real-time signal processing, the antenna will likely vibrate or deform due to a lack of the stabilized platform. And the value of PRF cannot be much high because of the high computation burden for the real-time processing. The aim of this study is to access and improve the performance of a new FMCW SAR system based on the ambiguity noise. First, the quantitative analysis of the system's ambiguity noise level is performed; an antenna with low sidelobes is designed. The conclusion is that the range ambiguity noise is small; the azimuth ambiguity noise is somewhat increased, however, it is sufficiently small to have marginal influence on the image quality. Finally, the ambiguity noise level is measured using the imaging data from a Ku-band FMCW SAR. The results of this study show that the measured noise level coincides with the theoretical noise level.

  19. Discovery and SAR of hydantoin TACE inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Wensheng; Guo, Zhuyan; Orth, Peter; Madison, Vincent; Chen, Lei; Dai, Chaoyang; Feltz, Robert J.; Girijavallabhan, Vinay M.; Kim, Seong Heon; Kozlowski, Joseph A.; Lavey, Brian J.; Li, Dansu; Lundell, Daniel; Niu, Xiaoda; Piwinski, John J.; Popovici-Muller, Janeta; Rizvi, Razia; Rosner, Kristin E.; Shankar, Bandarpalle B.; Shih, Neng-Yang; Siddiqui, M.A.; Sun, J.; Tong, L.; Umland, S.; Wong, M.K.; Yang, D.Y.; Zhou, G.

    2010-09-03

    We disclose inhibitors of TNF-{alpha} converting enzyme (TACE) designed around a hydantoin zinc binding moiety. Crystal structures of inhibitors bound to TACE revealed monodentate coordination of the hydantoin to the zinc. SAR, X-ray, and modeling designs are described. To our knowledge, these are the first reported X-ray structures of TACE with a hydantoin zinc ligand.

  20. The Seamless SAR Archive (SSARA) Project and Other SAR Activities at UNAVCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, S.; Crosby, C. J.; Meertens, C. M.; Fielding, E. J.; Bryson, G.; Buechler, B.; Nicoll, J.; Baru, C.

    2014-12-01

    The seamless synthetic aperture radar archive (SSARA) implements a seamless distributed access system for SAR data and derived data products (i.e. interferograms). SSARA provides a unified application programming interface (API) for SAR data search and results at the Alaska Satellite Facility and UNAVCO (WInSAR and EarthScope data archives) through the use of simple web services. A federated query service was developed using the unified APIs, providing users a single search interface for both archives. Interest from the international community has prompted an effort to incorporate ESA's Virtual Archive 4 Geohazard Supersites and Natural Laboratories (GSNL) collections and other archives into the federated query service. SSARA also provides Digital Elevation Model access for topographic correction via a simple web service through OpenTopography and tropospheric correction products through JPL's OSCAR service. Additionally, UNAVCO provides data storage capabilities for WInSAR PIs with approved TerraSAR-X and ALOS-2 proposals which allows easier distribution to US collaborators on associated proposals and facilitates data access through the SSARA web services. Further work is underway to incorporate federated data discovery for GSNL across SAR, GPS, and seismic datasets provided by web services from SSARA, GSAC, and COOPEUS.

  1. Characteristics of Ionospheric Signals in L-band SAR/INSAR Data and Methods for their Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, F. J.

    2009-12-01

    The impact of ionospheric propagation effects on the signal properties of L-band SAR systems is significant. Recent theoretical analyses of ionospheric distortions in low-frequency SAR signals have indicated many effects that are likely to affect the quality of SAR, interferometric SAR (InSAR), and polarimetric SAR (PolSAR) data acquired in L-band. Faraday rotation, relative range shifts, internal deformations of the image amplitude, range and azimuth blurring, and interferometric phase errors are some of the most significant effects. Several examples have been published that show unambiguous detection of total electron content (TEC), including TEC gradients. While SAR is sensitive to ionospheric delay on all spatial scales, it is the small scale ionospheric disturbances that have the most significant impact on InSAR applications. The significance of the ionosphere for InSAR-derived deformation analysis depends on three general conditions: i) the spatio-temporal signature of the ionospheric path delay and its manifestation in the SAR observables; ii) the spatio-temporal properties of the deformation signal and the temporal sampling of this signal; iii) the sophistication of the applied InSAR technique and the assumptions inherent to the processing method. With this paper we will introduce the spatio-temporal characteristics of ionospheric signals in L-band SAR and InSAR data both from theory and observations. We will focus our investigations on the equatorial anomaly region located ±15 degrees about the magnetic equator, and the Polar Regions, as most small scale ionospheric anomalies occur in these areas. Data from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s (JAXA) Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) sensor aboard the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) will be used to investigate demonstrate and catalogue typical ionospheric signals observed by L-band SAR systems. Ionospheric theory will be presented to explain the origin of observed

  2. Modeling and a correlation algorithm for spaceborne SAR signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C.; Liu, K. Y.; Jin, M.

    1982-01-01

    A mathematical model of a spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) response is presented. Thhe associated SAR system performance, in terms of the resolution capability, is also discussed. The analysis of spaceborne SAR target response indicates that the SAR correlation problem is a two-dimensional one with a linear shift-variant response function. A new digital processing algorithm is proposed here in order to realize an economical digital SAR correlation system. The proposed algorithm treats the two-dimensional correlation by a combination of frequency domain fast correlation in the azimuth dimension and a time-domain convolver type of operation in the range dimension. Finally, digitally correlated SEASAT satellite SAR imagery is used in an exemplary sense to validate the SAR response model and the new digital processing technique developed.

  3. BioSAR Airborne Biomass Sensing System

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R.L.; Johnson, P.

    2007-05-24

    This CRADA was developed to enable ORNL to assist American Electronics, Inc. test a new technology--BioSAR. BioSAR is a an airborne, low frequency (80-120 MHz {approx} FM radio frequencies) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technology which was designed and built for NASA by ZAI-Amelex under Patrick Johnson's direction. At these frequencies, leaves and small branches are nearly transparent and the majority of the energy reflected from the forest and returned to the radar is from the tree trunks. By measuring the magnitude of the back scatter, the volume of the tree trunk and therefore the biomass of the trunks can be inferred. The instrument was successfully tested on tropical rain forests in Panama. Patrick Johnson, with American Electronics, Inc received a Phase II SBIR grant from DOE Office of Climate Change to further test and refine the instrument. Mr Johnson sought ORNL expertise in measuring forest biomass in order for him to further validate his instrument. ORNL provided ground truth measurements of forest biomass at three locations--the Oak Ridge Reservation, Weyerhaeuser Co. commercial pine plantations in North Carolina, and American Energy and Power (AEP) Co. hardwood forests in southern Ohio, and facilitated flights over these forests. After Mr. Johnson processed the signal data from BioSAR instrument, the processed data were given to ORNL and we attempted to derive empirical relationships between the radar signals and the ground truth forest biomass measurements using standard statistical techniques. We were unsuccessful in deriving such relationships. Shortly before the CRADA ended, Mr Johnson discovered that FM signal from local radio station broadcasts had interfered with the back scatter measurements such that the bulk of the signal received by the BioSAR instrument was not backscatter from the radar but rather was local radio station signals.

  4. Analysis of Multipath Pixels in SAR Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. W.; Wu, J. C.; Ding, X. L.; Zhang, L.; Hu, F. M.

    2016-06-01

    As the received radar signal is the sum of signal contributions overlaid in one single pixel regardless of the travel path, the multipath effect should be seriously tackled as the multiple bounce returns are added to direct scatter echoes which leads to ghost scatters. Most of the existing solution towards the multipath is to recover the signal propagation path. To facilitate the signal propagation simulation process, plenty of aspects such as sensor parameters, the geometry of the objects (shape, location, orientation, mutual position between adjacent buildings) and the physical parameters of the surface (roughness, correlation length, permittivity)which determine the strength of radar signal backscattered to the SAR sensor should be given in previous. However, it's not practical to obtain the highly detailed object model in unfamiliar area by field survey as it's a laborious work and time-consuming. In this paper, SAR imaging simulation based on RaySAR is conducted at first aiming at basic understanding of multipath effects and for further comparison. Besides of the pre-imaging simulation, the product of the after-imaging, which refers to radar images is also taken into consideration. Both Cosmo-SkyMed ascending and descending SAR images of Lupu Bridge in Shanghai are used for the experiment. As a result, the reflectivity map and signal distribution map of different bounce level are simulated and validated by 3D real model. The statistic indexes such as the phase stability, mean amplitude, amplitude dispersion, coherence and mean-sigma ratio in case of layover are analyzed with combination of the RaySAR output.

  5. Detecting slow moving targets in SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnehan, Robert; Perlovsky, Leonid; Mutz, Chris W.; Schindler, John

    2004-08-01

    Ground moving target indication (GMTI) radars can detect slow-moving targets if their velocities are high enough to produce distinguishable Doppler frequencies. However, no reliable technique is currently available to detect targets that fall below the minimum detectable velocity (MDV) of GMTI radars. In synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images, detection of moving targets is difficult because of target smear due to motion, which could make low-RCS targets fall below stationary ground clutter. Several techniques for SAR imaging of moving targets have been discussed in the literature. These techniques require sufficient signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR) and adequate MDV for pre-detection. Other techniques require complex changes in hardware. Extracting the maximum information from SAR image data is possible using adaptive, model-based approaches. However, these approaches lead to computational complexity, which exceeds current processing power for more than a single object in an image. This combinatorial complexity is due to the need for having to consider a large number of combinations between multiple target models and the data, while estimating unknown parameters of the target models. We are developing a technique for detecting slow-moving targets in SAR images with low signal-to-clutter ratio, without minimal velocity requirements, and without combinatorial complexity. This paper briefly summarizes the difficulties related to current model-based detection algorithms. A new concept, dynamic logic, is introduced along with an algorithm suitable for the detection of very slow-moving targets in SAR images. This new mathematical technique is inspired by the analysis of biological systems, like the human brain, which combines conceptual understanding with emotional evaluation and overcomes the combinatorial complexity of model-based techniques.

  6. DInSAR and PSI methods for the recognition of landslides: an experience in the Romanian Subcarpathians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floriane, Provost; Jean-Philippe, Malet; Cécile, Doubre; Anne, Puissant; Mihai, Micu

    2015-04-01

    Landslide is one of the common natural hazards in Romania, especially in the Curvature area of the Romanian Subcarpathians. In this region, landslides cause considerable damages to critical infrastructures, build-up environment and cultivated areas. Most of the slopes are affected by translational and rotational landslide types. The objective of this work is to locate and inventory landslides in the Buzau County, and possibly to characterize their dynamics. As the vegetation is abundant in the study area, series of L-band ALOS/PALSAR images are processed using advanced multi-temporal differential SAR interferometry (DInSAR & PSI). To analyze the DInSAR results, an object-oriented segmentation method is proposed to identify possible landslide candidates in the interferograms; to analyze the PSI results, a statistical method is used to identify PS characterized by the same evolution pattern in the time series. Both techniques have proved to be able to detect unrecognised active landslides in the area, and allowed to complete existing geomorphological inventories. Around 700 new areas of landslides were detected after the analysis of the DInSAR results by an expert. However it represents 30% the zones that were detected in total. The false results remained difficult to isolate without a manual assessment. That means that applying SAR interferometry is not a sufficient tool to build exhausting inventories, and depending on the characteristics of the images (frame/track, baseline), the characteristics of the terrain (landcover, slope gradient, geomorphology) and the characteristics of the landslide (size, displacement rate), only a certain percentage (roughly less than 50%) of the already known landslides are detected with InSAR. Moreover, because of the large variety of landcover (urban, forest, cultivated areas, bare soils) and slope morphology in the study area, DInSAR and PSI techniques provide different results depending on local conditions.

  7. Science Results from the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR): Progress Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Diane L. (Editor); Plaut, Jeffrey (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is the most advanced imaging radar system to fly in Earth orbit. Carried in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Endeavour in April and October of 1994, SIR-C/X-SAR simultaneously recorded SAR data at three wavelengths (L-, C-, and X-bands; 23.5, 5.8, and 3.1 cm, respectively). The SIR-C/X-SAR Science Team consists of 53 investigator teams from more than a dozen countries. Science investigations were undertaken in the fields of ecology, hydrology, ecology, and oceanography. This report contains 44 investigator team reports and several additional reports from coinvestigators and other researchers.

  8. InSAR imagery pattern matching validation for landslide assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serbulea, Manole-Stelian; Gogu, Radu; Teleaga, Delia; Marcel Manoli, Daniel; Priceputu, Adrian; Gaitanaru, Dragos Stefan; Ungureanu, Constantin; Anghel, Alexandra; Andronic, Adrian; Niculescu, Alexandru; Liviu Bugea, Adrian

    2013-04-01

    The need for identifying over large areas ongoing instability phenomena and spotting the old ones pushed the boundaries of geotechnical engineering from numerical modeling and point-wise in-situ measurements towards geodesic and geographic sciences. Regardless of the ground-based monitoring techniques' precision and reliability, a larger scale monitoring is often useful to either better correlate the scattered results or to identify additional monitoring points. Using aerial ortho-photogrammetry and site visit recognition represent a good, yet costly method to obtain qualitative information about old inactive landslides. A more suitable approach is using ground-based or satellite radar interferometry (InSAR). The obvious disadvantage of the ground-based system is that the monitoring has to be carried out on a predetermined site while the space-borne system may be set to collect information from various sites in range by each successive passing. The quantitative results acquired through the means of InSAR provide a precise set of information regarding the soil surface displacement, with high accuracy and reliability. They provide a great means of identifying danger zones as well as a way of calibrating and augmenting the classical monitoring techniques. This work describes the possibility of integrating the InSAR measurements with the ground monitoring techniques to identify landslide occurrence hazard and reveal the whole of affected areas even when minute symptoms develop. One of the objectives is to propose InSAR monitoring as a fast and efficient mapping tool to help authorities minimize the damage produced by landslides. It can also provide engineers and scientists additional information to further study landslides dynamics phenomena (such as propagation). Interferometry on SAR data uses phase values from two radar images. When a point changes position, the distance between it and the sensor alters, modifying the phase of the signal. This change is used to

  9. InSAR Tropospheric Correction Methods: A Statistical Comparison over Different Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekaert, D. P.; Walters, R. J.; Wright, T. J.; Hooper, A. J.; Parker, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Observing small magnitude surface displacements through InSAR is highly challenging, and requires advanced correction techniques to reduce noise. In fact, one of the largest obstacles facing the InSAR community is related to tropospheric noise correction. Spatial and temporal variations in temperature, pressure, and relative humidity result in a spatially-variable InSAR tropospheric signal, which masks smaller surface displacements due to tectonic or volcanic deformation. Correction methods applied today include those relying on weather model data, GNSS and/or spectrometer data. Unfortunately, these methods are often limited by the spatial and temporal resolution of the auxiliary data. Alternatively a correction can be estimated from the high-resolution interferometric phase by assuming a linear or a power-law relationship between the phase and topography. For these methods, the challenge lies in separating deformation from tropospheric signals. We will present results of a statistical comparison of the state-of-the-art tropospheric corrections estimated from spectrometer products (MERIS and MODIS), a low and high spatial-resolution weather model (ERA-I and WRF), and both the conventional linear and power-law empirical methods. We evaluate the correction capability over Southern Mexico, Italy, and El Hierro, and investigate the impact of increasing cloud cover on the accuracy of the tropospheric delay estimation. We find that each method has its strengths and weaknesses, and suggest that further developments should aim to combine different correction methods. All the presented methods are included into our new open source software package called TRAIN - Toolbox for Reducing Atmospheric InSAR Noise (Bekaert et al., in review), which is available to the community Bekaert, D., R. Walters, T. Wright, A. Hooper, and D. Parker (in review), Statistical comparison of InSAR tropospheric correction techniques, Remote Sensing of Environment

  10. Answering the right question - integration of InSAR with other datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holley, Rachel; McCormack, Harry; Burren, Richard

    2014-05-01

    The capabilities of satellite Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) are well known, and utilized across a wide range of academic and commercial applications. However there is a tendency, particularly in commercial applications, for users to ask 'What can we study with InSAR?'. When establishing a new technique this approach is important, but InSAR has been possible for 20 years now and, even accounting for new and innovative algorithms, this ground has been thoroughly explored. Too many studies conclude 'We show the ground is moving here, by this much', and mention the wider context as an afterthought. The focus needs to shift towards first asking the right questions - in fields as diverse as hazard awareness, resource optimization, financial considerations and pure scientific enquiry - and then working out how to achieve the best possible answers. Depending on the question, InSAR (and ground deformation more generally) may provide a large or small contribution to the overall solution, and there are usually benefits to integrating a number of techniques to capitalize on the complementary capabilities and provide the most useful measurements. However, there is still a gap between measurements and answers, and unlocking the value of the data relies heavily on appropriate visualization, integrated analysis, communication between technique and application experts, and appropriate use of modelling. We present a number of application examples, and demonstrate how their usefulness can be transformed by moving from a focus on data to answers - integrating complementary geodetic, geophysical and geological datasets and geophysical modeling with appropriate visualization, to enable comprehensive solution-focused interpretation. It will also discuss how forthcoming developments are likely to further advance realisation of the full potential satellite InSAR holds.

  11. Comparison of feature based segmentation of full polarimetric SAR satellite sea ice images with manually drawn ice charts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moen, M.-A. N.; Doulgeris, A. P.; Anfinsen, S. N.; Renner, A. H. H.; Hughes, N.; Gerland, S.; Eltoft, T.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we investigate the performance of an algorithm for automatic segmentation of full polarimetric, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sea ice scenes. The algorithm uses statistical and polarimetric properties of the backscattered radar signals to segment the SAR image into a specified number of classes. This number was determined in advance from visual inspection of the SAR image and by available in situ measurements. The segmentation result was then compared to ice charts drawn by ice service analysts. The comparison revealed big discrepancies between the charts of the analysts, and between the manual and the automatic segmentations. In the succeeding analysis, the automatic segmentation chart was labeled into ice types by sea ice experts, and the SAR features used in the segmentation were interpreted in terms of physical sea ice properties. Utilizing polarimetric information in sea ice charting will increase the efficiency and exactness of the maps. The number of classes used in the segmentation has shown to be of significant importance. Thus, studies of automatic and robust estimation of the number of ice classes in SAR sea ice scenes will be highly relevant for future work.

  12. Surface deformation analysis of the Istanbul (Turkey) city retrieved via the SBAS-DInSAR technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzo, Mariarosaria; Lanari, Riccardo; Manconi, Andrea; Solaro, Giuseppe; Walter, Thomas R.; Zschau, Jochen

    2010-05-01

    Remote sensing techniques make possible to collect information on dangerous or inaccessible areas. In this context, space-based geodetic techniques as Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR) have been used in several areas in order to obtain co-seismic surface deformation maps in a few days or even hours following large earthquakes. The retrieved surface deformation can be used to constrain analytical and/or numerical models to derive parameters such as depth, dimension, orientation, and slip occurred on the fault plane. Moreover, advanced DInSAR techniques allow observing the temporal evolution of the surface displacements, and are thus able to furnish a picture of the pre-seismic state as well as of the post-seismic effects. In this work, we present DInSAR analyses of the deformation patterns in areas that are affected by seismic hazard. In particular, we focus on ground displacements occurred in the greater city area of Istanbul (Turkey) in the last 17 years. To this aim, we exploited the advanced DInSAR algorithm, referred to as Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) technique (Berardino et al., 2002). Displacement time series are retrieved from data acquired by the ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT (Pepe et al., 2005) satellites of the European Space Agency (ESA) between 1992 and 2009. First, we show the results of an analysis carried out at a spatial resolution of about 100 x 100 m. This shows, in addition to the co-seismic displacement caused by the Izmit earthquake (17 August 1999) and associated events, several areas that are subject to subsidence (often in excess of 10 cm per decade) within the city of Istanbul. Moreover, in selected case studies, we further exploited localized phenomena by "zooming" in the areas of interest and carrying out analyses at full spatial resolution scale (10 x 10 m) (Lanari et al., 2004). This additional effort allowed us to discriminate among deformation phenomena occurring at regional and at the building scale. This study provides an updated

  13. Global database of InSAR earthquake source models: A tool for independently assessing seismic catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, A. M.; Weston, J. M.; Funning, G. J.

    2011-12-01

    Earthquake source models are routinely determined using seismic data and are reported in many seismic catalogues, such as the Global Centroid Moment Tensor (GCMT) catalogue. Recent advances in space geodesy, such as InSAR, have enabled the estimation of earthquake source parameters from the measurement of deformation of the Earth's surface, independently of seismic information. The absence of an earthquake catalogue based on geodetic data prompted the compilation of a large InSAR database of CMT parameters from the literature (Weston et al., 2011, hereafter referred to as the ICMT database). Information provided in published InSAR studies of earthquakes is used to obtain earthquake source parameters, and equivalent CMT parameters. Multiple studies of the same earthquake are included in the database, as they are valuable to assess uncertainties in source models. Here, source parameters for 70 earthquakes in an updated version of the ICMT database are compared with those reported in global and regional seismic catalogues. There is overall good agreement between parameters, particularly in fault strike, dip and rake. However, InSAR centroid depths are systematically shallower (5-10 km) than those in the EHB catalogue, but this is reduced for depths from inversions of InSAR data that use a layered half-space. Estimates of the seismic moment generally agree well between the two datasets, but for thrust earthquakes there is a slight tendency for the InSAR-determined seismic moment to be larger. Centroid locations from the ICMT database are in good agreement with those from regional seismic catalogues with a median distance of ~6 km between them, which is smaller than for comparisons with global catalogues (17.0 km and 9.2 km for the GCMT and ISC catalogues, respectively). Systematic tests of GCMT-like inversions have shown that similar mislocations occur for several different degree 20 Earth models (Ferreira et al., 2011), suggesting that higher resolution Earth models

  14. Sinking Chao Phraya delta plain, Thailand, derived from SAR interferometry time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, A.; Mio, A.; Saito, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The Bangkok Metropolitan region and its surrounding provinces are located in a low-lying delta plain of the Chao Phraya River. Extensive groundwater use from the late 1950s has caused the decline of groundwater levels in the aquifers and Holocene clay compaction beneath the Bangkok Region, resulting in significant subsidence of the ground. This ground deformation has been monitored using leveling surveys since 1978, and differential InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) analysis. It shows that the Bangkok Metropolitan region is subsiding at a rate of about 20 mm/year during the recent years due to law-limited groundwater pumping, although the highest subsidence rate as high as 120 mm/year was recorded in 1981. The subsidence rate in the Bangkok area has significantly decreased since the late 1980s; however, the affected area has spread out to the surrounding areas. The maximum subsidence rate up to 30 mm/year occurred in the outlying southeast and southwest coastal zones in 2002. In this study, we apply a SAR interferometry time series analysis to monitor ground deformations in the lower Chao Phraya delta plain (Lower Central Plain), Thailand, using ALOS (Advanced Land Observing Satellite) PALSAR (Phased Array type L-band SAR) data acquired between July 2007 and September 2010. We derive a single reference time series interferogram from the stacking of unwrapped phases under the assumptions that those phases are smoothly and continuously connected, and apply a smoothness-constrained inversion algorithm that optimizes the displacement from the phase unwrapping of multitemporal differential SAR interferograms. The SAR interferometry time series analysis succeeds to monitor the incremental line-of-sight (LOS)-change between SAR scene acquisitions. LOS displacements are converted to vertical displacements, based on the assumption that the ground displacement in this area occurs only in the vertical directions. This reveals an overall pattern of subsidence

  15. Characterizing and estimating noise in InSAR and InSAR time series with MODIS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnhart, William D.; Lohman, Rowena B.

    2013-01-01

    InSAR time series analysis is increasingly used to image subcentimeter displacement rates of the ground surface. The precision of InSAR observations is often affected by several noise sources, including spatially correlated noise from the turbulent atmosphere. Under ideal scenarios, InSAR time series techniques can substantially mitigate these effects; however, in practice the temporal distribution of InSAR acquisitions over much of the world exhibit seasonal biases, long temporal gaps, and insufficient acquisitions to confidently obtain the precisions desired for tectonic research. Here, we introduce a technique for constraining the magnitude of errors expected from atmospheric phase delays on the ground displacement rates inferred from an InSAR time series using independent observations of precipitable water vapor from MODIS. We implement a Monte Carlo error estimation technique based on multiple (100+) MODIS-based time series that sample date ranges close to the acquisitions times of the available SAR imagery. This stochastic approach allows evaluation of the significance of signals present in the final time series product, in particular their correlation with topography and seasonality. We find that topographically correlated noise in individual interferograms is not spatially stationary, even over short-spatial scales (<10 km). Overall, MODIS-inferred displacements and velocities exhibit errors of similar magnitude to the variability within an InSAR time series. We examine the MODIS-based confidence bounds in regions with a range of inferred displacement rates, and find we are capable of resolving velocities as low as 1.5 mm/yr with uncertainties increasing to ∼6 mm/yr in regions with higher topographic relief.

  16. Synergistic measurements of ocean winds and waves from SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Biao; Li, Xiaofeng; Perrie, William; He, Yijun

    2015-09-01

    In this study we present a synergistic method to retrieve both ocean surface wave and wind fields from spaceborne quad-polarization (QP) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mode data. This algorithm integrates QP-SAR wind vector retrieval model and the wave retrieval model, with consideration to the nonlinear mapping relationship between ocean wave spectra and SAR image spectra, in order to synergistically retrieve wind fields and wave directional spectra. The method does not require a priori information on the sea state. It combines the observed VV-polarized SAR image spectra with the retrieved wind vectors from the VH-polarized SAR image, to estimate the wind-generated wave directional spectra. The differences between the observed SAR spectra and optimal SAR image spectra associated with the wind waves are interpreted as the contributions from the swell waves. The retrieved ocean wave spectra are used to estimate the integrated spectral wave parameters such as significant wave heights, wavelengths, wave directions and wave periods. The wind and wave parameters retrieved by QP-SAR are validated against those measured by the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) directional wave buoys under different sea states. The validation results show that the QP-SAR SAR has potential to simultaneously measure the ocean surface waves and wind fields from space.

  17. Simulation of SAR backscatter for forest vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, Richa; Kumar, Shashi; Agrawal, Shefali

    2016-05-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is one of the most recent imaging technology to study the forest parameters. The invincible characteristics of microwave acquisition in cloudy regions and night imaging makes it a powerful tool to study dense forest regions. A coherent combination of radar polarimetry and interferometry (PolInSAR) enhances the accuracy of retrieved biophysical parameters. This paper attempts to address the issue of estimation of forest structural information caused due to instability of radar platforms through simulation of SAR image. The Terai Central Forest region situated at Haldwani area in Uttarakhand state of India was chosen as the study area. The system characteristics of PolInSAR dataset of Radarsat-2 SAR sensor was used for simulation process. Geometric and system specifications like platform altitude, center frequency, mean incidence angle, azimuth and range resolution were taken from metadata. From the field data it was observed that average tree height and forest stand density were 25 m and 300 stems/ha respectively. The obtained simulated results were compared with the sensor acquired master and slave intensity images. It was analyzed that for co-polarized horizontal component (HH), the mean values of simulated and real master image had a difference of 0.3645 with standard deviation of 0.63. Cross-polarized (HV) channel showed better results with mean difference of 0.06 and standard deviation of 0.1 while co-polarized vertical component (VV) did not show similar values. In case of HV polarization, mean variation between simulated and real slave images was found to be the least. Since cross-polarized channel is more sensitive to vegetation feature therefore better simulated results were obtained for this channel. Further the simulated images were processed using PolInSAR inversion modelling approach using three different techniques DEM differencing, Coherence Amplitude Inversion and Random Volume over Ground Inversion. DEM differencing

  18. A multi-temporal InSAR method incorporating both persistent scatterer and small baseline approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, Andrew

    2008-08-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry is a technique that provides high-resolution measurements of the ground displacement associated with many geophysical processes. Advanced techniques involving the simultaneous processing of multiple SAR acquisitions in time increase the number of locations where a deformation signal can be extracted and reduce associated error. Currently there are two broad categories of algorithms for processing multiple acquisitions, persistent scatterer and small baseline methods, which are optimized for different models of scattering. However, the scattering characteristics of real terrains usually lay between these two end-member models. I present here a new method that combines both approaches, to extract the deformation signal at more points and with higher overall signal-to-noise ratio than can either approach alone. I apply the combined method to data acquired over Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland, and detect time-varying ground displacements associated with two intrusion events.

  19. SAR ATR using a modified learning vector quantization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinelli, Anne Marie P.; Kaplan, Lance M.; Nasrabadi, Nasser M.

    1999-08-01

    We addressed the problem of classifying 10 target types in imagery formed from synthetic aperture radar (SAR). By executing a group training process, we show how to increase the performance of 10 initial sets of target templates formed by simple averaging. This training process is a modified learning vector quantization (LVQ) algorithm that was previously shown effective with forward-looking infrared (FLIR) imagery. For comparison, we ran the LVQ experiments using coarse, medium, and fine template sets that captured the target pose signature variations over 60 degrees, 40 degrees, and 20 degrees, respectively. Using sequestered test imagery, we evaluated how well the original and post-LVQ template sets classify the 10 target types. We show that after the LVQ training process, the coarse template set outperforms the coarse and medium original sets. And, for a test set that included untrained version variants, we show that classification using coarse template sets nearly matches that of the fine template sets. In a related experiment, we stored 9 initial template sets to classify 9 of the target types and used a threshold to separate the 10th type, previously found to be a 'confusing' type. We used imagery of all 10 targets in the LVQ training process to modify the 9 template sets. Overall classification performance increased slightly and an equalization of the individual target classification rates occurred, as compared to the 10-template experiment. The SAR imagery that we used is publicly available from the Moving and Stationary Target Acquisition and Recognition (MSTAR) program, sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

  20. The flight test of Pi-SAR(L) for the repeat-pass interferometric SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nohmi, Hitoshi; Shimada, Masanobu; Miyawaki, Masanori

    2006-09-01

    This paper describes the experiment of the repeat pass interferometric SAR using Pi-SAR(L). The air-borne repeat-pass interferometric SAR is expected as an effective method to detect landslide or predict a volcano eruption. To obtain a high-quality interferometric image, it is necessary to make two flights on the same flight pass. In addition, since the antenna of the Pi-SAR(L) is secured to the aircraft, it is necessary to fly at the same drift angle to keep the observation direction same. We built a flight control system using an auto pilot which has been installed in the airplane. This navigation system measures position and altitude precisely with using a differential GPS, and the PC Navigator outputs a difference from the desired course to the auto pilot. Since the air density is thinner and the speed is higher than the landing situation, the gain of the control system is required to be adjusted during the repeat pass flight. The observation direction could be controlled to some extent by adjusting a drift angle with using a flight speed control. The repeat-pass flight was conducted in Japan for three days in late November. The flight was stable and the deviation was within a few meters for both horizontal and vertical direction even in the gusty condition. The SAR data were processed in time domain based on range Doppler algorism to make the complete motion compensation. Thus, the interferometric image processed after precise phase compensation is shown.

  1. Calibration of 2D Hydraulic Inundation Models with SAR Imagery in the Floodplain Region of the Lower Tagus River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestana, Rita; Matias, Magda; Canelas, Ricardo; Roque, Dora; Araujo, Amelia; Van Zeller, Emilia; Trigo-Teixeira, Antonio; Ferreira, Rui; Oliveira, Rodrigo; Heleno, Sandra; Falcão, Ana Paula; Gonçalves, Alexandre B.

    2014-05-01

    for the different land cover classes. Flood extent maps, derived from satellite-born Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), namely ERS SAR and ENVISAT ASAR imagery, provided the spatially distributed data needed for the calibration of the hydraulic models for the several floods. The flood extent maps obtained for each simulation were then compared with the flood extent maps derived from SAR imagery for each flood and the roughness coefficients changed accordingly. The models were also calibrated in terms of the stage at the gauging station Almourol, located 12km downriver from Tramagal. The combination of the calibration results for the several past floods provided 100 meters resolution Manning coefficient maps of the study area. An application of the obtained calibrated Manning coefficient maps was made for the largest flood of the 20th century (February 1979), for which no SAR imagery was available. In this case validation of the model was made in terms of the stage at the gauging station Almourol and at flood stage marks distributed throughout the floodplain.

  2. Animal models for SARS and MERS coronaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Gretebeck, Lisa M; Subbarao, Kanta

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), two strains of animal coronaviruses that crossed the species barrier to infect and cause severe respiratory infections in humans within the last 12 years, have taught us that coronaviruses represent a global threat that does not recognize international borders. We can expect to see other novel coronaviruses emerge in the future. An ideal animal model should reflect the clinical signs, viral replication and pathology seen in humans. In this review, we present factors to consider in establishing an animal model for the study of novel coronaviruses and compare the different animal models that have been employed to study SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. PMID:26184451

  3. Synergistic combination technique for SAR image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burman, Bhaskar

    1998-07-01

    Classification of earth terrain from satellite radar imagery represents an important and continually developing application of microwave remote sensing. The basic objective of this paper is to derive more information, through combining, than is present in any individual element of input data. Multispectral data has been used to provide complementary information so as to utilize a single SAR data for the purpose of land-cover classification. More recently neural networks have been applied to a number of image classification problems and have shown considerable success in exceeding the performance of conventional algorithms. In this work, a comparison study has been carried out between a conventional Maximum Likelihood (ML) classifier and a neural network (back-error-propagation) classifier in terms of classification accuracy. The results reveal that the combination of SAR and MSS data of the same scene produced better classification accuracy than either alone and the neural network classification has an edge over the conventional classification scheme.

  4. SARS: Safeguards Accounting and Reporting Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammedi, B.; Saadi, S.; Ait-Mohamed, S.

    In order to satisfy the requirements of the SSAC (State System for Accounting and Control of nuclear materials), for recording and reporting objectives; this computer program comes to bridge the gape between nuclear facilities operators and national inspection verifying records and delivering reports. The SARS maintains and generates at-facility safeguards accounting records and generates International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards reports based on accounting data input by the user at any nuclear facility. A database structure is built and BORLAND DELPHI programming language has been used. The software is designed to be user-friendly, to make extensive and flexible management of menus and graphs. SARS functions include basic physical inventory tacking, transaction histories and reporting. Access controls are made by different passwords.

  5. SAR observations in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheres, David

    1992-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico (GOM) exhibits a wealth of energetic ocean features; they include the Loop Current with velocities of about 2 m/s and strong shear fronts, mesoscale eddies, double vortices, internal waves, and the outflow of the 'Mighty Mississippi' river. These energetic features can have a strong impact on the economies of the states surrounding the Gulf. Large fisheries, oil and gas production as well as pollution transport are relevant issues. These circulation features in the Gulf are invisible to conventional IR and visible satellite imagery during the Summer months due to cloud cover and uniform surface temperatures. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery of the Gulf does penetrate the cloud cover and shows a rich assembly of features there year-round. Below are preliminary results from GOM SAR imagery taken by SEASAT in 1978 and by the AIRSAR program in 1991.

  6. International collaboration in SAR ground data systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlander, John C.

    1993-01-01

    A set of considerations that are pertinent to future international cooperation in the area of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) ground data systems are presented. The considerations are as follows: (1) success of future spaceborne SAR missions will require multi-agency and/or multi-national collaboration; (2) ground processing is typically performed by each agency for their user base; (3) international standards are required to achieve a uniform data product independent of the processing center; (4) to reduce the aggregate cost of the ground data systems, collaboration is required in design and development; (5) effective utilization of the data by an international user community; (6) commercialization of data products; and (7) security of data systems.

  7. SAR impulse response with residual chirps.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-06-01

    A Linear Frequency-Modulated (LFM) chirp is a function with unit amplitude and quadratic phase characteristic. In a focused Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image, a residual chirp is undesired for targets of interest, as it coarsens the manifested resolution. However, for undesired spurious signals, a residual chirp is often advantageous because it spreads the energy and thereby diminishes its peak value. In either case, a good understanding of the effects of a residual LFM chirp on a SAR Impulse Response (IPR) is required to facilitate system analysis and design. This report presents an analysis of the effects of a residual chirp on the IPR. As reference, there is a rich body of publications on various aspects of LFM chirps. A quick search reveals a plethora of articles, going back to the early 1950s. We mention here purely as trivia one of the earlier analysis papers on this waveform by Klauder, et al.

  8. Operational SAR Data Processing in GIS Environments for Rapid Disaster Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahr, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The use of SAR data has become increasingly popular in recent years and in a wide array of industries. Having access to SAR can be highly important and critical especially for public safety. Updating a GIS with contemporary information from SAR data allows to deliver a reliable set of geospatial information to advance civilian operations, e.g. search and rescue missions. SAR imaging offers the great advantage, over its optical counterparts, of not being affected by darkness, meteorological conditions such as clouds, fog, etc., or smoke and dust, frequently associated with disaster zones. In this paper we present the operational processing of SAR data within a GIS environment for rapid disaster mapping. For this technique we integrated the SARscape modules for ENVI with ArcGIS®, eliminating the need to switch between software packages. Thereby the premier algorithms for SAR image analysis can be directly accessed from ArcGIS desktop and server environments. They allow processing and analyzing SAR data in almost real time and with minimum user interaction. This is exemplified by the November 2010 flash flood in the Veneto region, Italy. The Bacchiglione River burst its banks on Nov. 2nd after two days of heavy rainfall throughout the northern Italian region. The community of Bovolenta, 22 km SSE of Padova, was covered by several meters of water. People were requested to stay in their homes; several roads, highways sections and railroads had to be closed. The extent of this flooding is documented by a series of Cosmo-SkyMed acquisitions with a GSD of 2.5 m (StripMap mode). Cosmo-SkyMed is a constellation of four Earth observation satellites, allowing a very frequent coverage, which enables monitoring using a very high temporal resolution. This data is processed in ArcGIS using a single-sensor, multi-mode, multi-temporal approach consisting of 3 steps: (1) The single images are filtered with a Gamma DE-MAP filter. (2) The filtered images are geocoded using a reference

  9. Rapid Disaster Analysis based on SAR Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C. H.; Soergel, U.

    2015-03-01

    Due to all-day and all-weather capability spaceborne SAR is a valuable means for rapid mapping during and after disaster. In this paper, three change detection techniques based on SAR data are discussed: (1) initial coarse change detection, (2) flooded area detection, and (3) linear-feature change detection. The 2011 Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami is used as case study, where earthquake and tsunami events provide a complex case for this study. In (1), pre- and post-event TerraSAR-X images are coregistered accurately to produce a false-color image. Such image provides a quick and rough overview of potential changes, which is useful for initial decision making and identifies areas worthwhile to be analysed further in more depth. In (2), the post-event TerraSAR-X image is used to extract the flooded area by morphological approaches. In (3), we are interested in detecting changes of linear shape as indicator for modified man-made objects. Morphological approaches, e.g. thresholding, simply extract pixel-based changes in the difference image. However, in this manner many irrelevant changes are highlighted, too (e.g., farming activity, speckle). In this study, Curvelet filtering is applied in the difference image not only to suppress false alarms but also to enhance the change signals of linear-feature form (e.g. buildings) in settlements. Afterwards, thresholding is conducted to extract linear-shaped changed areas. These three techniques mentioned above are designed to be simple and applicable in timely disaster analysis. They are all validated by comparing with the change map produced by Center for Satellite Based Crisis Information, DLR.

  10. Synthesis and SAR of vinca alkaloid analogues.

    PubMed

    Voss, Matthew E; Ralph, Jeffery M; Xie, Dejian; Manning, David D; Chen, Xinchao; Frank, Anthony J; Leyhane, Andrew J; Liu, Lei; Stevens, Jason M; Budde, Cheryl; Surman, Matthew D; Friedrich, Thomas; Peace, Denise; Scott, Ian L; Wolf, Mark; Johnson, Randall

    2009-02-15

    Versatile intermediates 12'-iodovinblastine, 12'-iodovincristine and 11'-iodovinorelbine were utilized as substrates for transition metal based chemistry which led to the preparation of novel analogues of the vinca alkaloids. The synthesis of key iodo intermediates, their transformation into final products, and the SAR based upon HeLa and MCF-7 cell toxicity assays is presented. Selected analogues 27 and 36 show promising anticancer activity in the P388 murine leukemia model. PMID:19147348

  11. Processing of polarametric SAR images. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Warrick, A.L.; Delaney, P.A.

    1995-09-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a systematic method of combining multifrequency polarized SAR images. It is shown that the traditional methods of correlation, hard targets, and template matching fail to produce acceptable results. Hence, a new algorithm was developed and tested. The new approach combines the three traditional methods and an interpolation method. An example is shown that demonstrates the new algorithms performance. The results are summarized suggestions for future research are presented.

  12. Interferometric SAR coherence classification utility assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Yocky, D.A.

    1998-03-01

    The classification utility of a dual-antenna interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) is explored by comparison of maximum likelihood classification results for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) intensity images and IPSAR intensity and coherence images. The addition of IFSAR coherence improves the overall classification accuracy for classes of trees, water, and fields. A threshold intensity-coherence classifier is also compared to the intensity-only classification results.

  13. Sentinel-1 DInSAR processing chain within Geohazard Exploitation Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinno, Ivana; Bonano, Manuela; Buonanno, Sabatino; Casu, Francesco; De Luca, Claudio; Fusco, Adele; Lanari, Riccardo; Manunta, Michele; Manzo, Mariarosaria; Ojha, Chandrakanta; Pepe, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    The Sentinel-1A (S1A) satellite has been launched on April 2014 to acquire SAR data in continuity with the ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT missions. It presents advanced characteristics in terms of revisit time, spatial coverage and service reliability. Such a satellite will be paired during 2016 with the Sentinel-1B twin system that will reduce the constellation revisit time from 12 to 6 days. Accordingly, a huge and ever-increasing data flow relevant to extended areas on Earth will be delivered with a "free and open access" data policy. The S1-A sensor is equipped with a C-band SAR instrument that is conceived for interferometric applications, thus allowing us to analyze Earth's surface displacements through the Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR) technique. In particular, S1A SAR data are collected through the Terrain Observation by Progressive Scans (TOPS) mode, which generates Interferometric Wide Swath (IWS) acquisitions. To properly handle S1A TOPS data, the existing DInSAR processing chains have to be adapted with new procedures, which properly take into account the characteristics of this new acquisition mode. Furthermore, another critical point to be taken into account in designing a S1A DInSAR processing chain is the achievement of a good computational efficiency. Indeed, the capability to process in reduced time frames the huge data stream expected by S1A (and, very soon, also by S1B) is a key aspect to fully exploit S1 data archives. In this work we present an efficient interferometric processing chain, based on the advanced DInSAR algorithm referred to as Parallel Small BAseline Subset (P-SBAS), for the generation of S1A IWS surface deformation time-series. It ingests the Single Look Complex data and generates, in unsupervised way, interferograms and displacement time-series. This processing chain is able to exploit distributed computing architectures taking advantage of both multi-node and multi-threading programming techniques. The proposed S1A P

  14. A 3-D SAR approach to IFSAR processing

    SciTech Connect

    DOERRY,ARMIN W.; BICKEL,DOUGLAS L.

    2000-03-01

    Interferometric SAR (IFSAR) can be shown to be a special case of 3-D SAR image formation. In fact, traditional IFSAR processing results in the equivalent of merely a super-resolved, under-sampled, 3-D SAR image. However, when approached as a 3-D SAR problem, a number of IFSAR properties and anomalies are easily explained. For example, IFSAR decorrelation with height is merely ordinary migration in 3-D SAR. Consequently, treating IFSAR as a 3-D SAR problem allows insight and development of proper motion compensation techniques and image formation operations to facilitate optimal height estimation. Furthermore, multiple antenna phase centers and baselines are easily incorporated into this formulation, providing essentially a sparse array in the elevation dimension. This paper shows the Polar Format image formation algorithm extended to 3 dimensions, and then proceeds to apply it to the IFSAR collection geometry. This suggests a more optimal reordering of the traditional IFSAR processing steps.

  15. Extraction of linear features on SAR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junyi; Li, Deren; Mei, Xin

    2006-10-01

    Linear features are usually extracted from SAR imagery by a few edge detectors derived from the contrast ratio edge detector with a constant probability of false alarm. On the other hand, the Hough Transform is an elegant way of extracting global features like curve segments from binary edge images. Randomized Hough Transform can reduce the computation time and memory usage of the HT drastically. While Randomized Hough Transform will bring about a great deal of cells invalid during the randomized sample. In this paper, we propose a new approach to extract linear features on SAR imagery, which is an almost automatic algorithm based on edge detection and Randomized Hough Transform. The presented improved method makes full use of the directional information of each edge candidate points so as to solve invalid cumulate problems. Applied result is in good agreement with the theoretical study, and the main linear features on SAR imagery have been extracted automatically. The method saves storage space and computational time, which shows its effectiveness and applicability.

  16. Epidemiologic clues to SARS origin in China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rui-Heng; He, Jian-Feng; Evans, Meiron R; Peng, Guo-Wen; Field, Hume E; Yu, De-Wen; Lee, Chin-Kei; Luo, Hui-Min; Lin, Wei-Sheng; Lin, Peng; Li, Ling-Hui; Liang, Wen-Jia; Lin, Jin-Yan; Schnur, Alan

    2004-06-01

    An epidemic of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) began in Foshan municipality, Guangdong Province, China, in November 2002. We studied SARS case reports through April 30, 2003, including data from case investigations and a case series analysis of index cases. A total of 1,454 clinically confirmed cases (and 55 deaths) occurred; the epidemic peak was in the first week of February 2003. Healthcare workers accounted for 24% of cases. Clinical signs and symptoms differed between children (<18 years) and older persons (> or =65 years). Several observations support the hypothesis of a wild animal origin for SARS. Cases apparently occurred independently in at least five different municipalities; early case-patients were more likely than later patients to report living near a produce market (odds ratio undefined; lower 95% confidence interval 2.39) but not near a farm; and 9 (39%) of 23 early patients, including 6 who lived or worked in Foshan, were food handlers with probable animal contact. PMID:15207054

  17. The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.; Gurrola, Eric; Sacco, Gian Franco; Zebker, Howard

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a flexible and extensible Interferometric SAR (InSAR) Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE) for geodetic image processing. ISCE was designed from the ground up as a geophysics community tool for generating stacks of interferograms that lend themselves to various forms of time-series analysis, with attention paid to accuracy, extensibility, and modularity. The framework is python-based, with code elements rigorously componentized by separating input/output operations from the processing engines. This allows greater flexibility and extensibility in the data models, and creates algorithmic code that is less susceptible to unnecessary modification when new data types and sensors are available. In addition, the components support provenance and checkpointing to facilitate reprocessing and algorithm exploration. The algorithms, based on legacy processing codes, have been adapted to assume a common reference track approach for all images acquired from nearby orbits, simplifying and systematizing the geometry for time-series analysis. The framework is designed to easily allow user contributions, and is distributed for free use by researchers. ISCE can process data from the ALOS, ERS, EnviSAT, Cosmo-SkyMed, RadarSAT-1, RadarSAT-2, and TerraSAR-X platforms, starting from Level-0 or Level 1 as provided from the data source, and going as far as Level 3 geocoded deformation products. With its flexible design, it can be extended with raw/meta data parsers to enable it to work with radar data from other platforms

  18. SAR Image Segmentation Using Morphological Attribute Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldt, M.; Thiele, A.; Schulz, K.; Hinz, S.

    2014-08-01

    In the last years, the spatial resolution of remote sensing sensors and imagery has continuously improved. Focusing on spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensors, the satellites of the current generation (TerraSAR-X, COSMO-SykMed) are able to acquire images with sub-meter resolution. Indeed, high resolution imagery is visually much better interpretable, but most of the established pixel-based analysis methods have become more or less impracticable since, in high resolution images, self-sufficient objects (vehicle, building) are represented by a large number of pixels. Methods dealing with Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA) provide help. Objects (segments) are groupings of pixels resulting from image segmentation algorithms based on homogeneity criteria. The image set is represented by image segments, which allows the development of rule-based analysis schemes. For example, segments can be described or categorized by their local neighborhood in a context-based manner. In this paper, a novel method for the segmentation of high resolution SAR images is presented. It is based on the calculation of morphological differential attribute profiles (DAP) which are analyzed pixel-wise in a region growing procedure. The method distinguishes between heterogeneous and homogeneous image content and delivers a precise segmentation result.

  19. Using APES for interferometric SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Palsetia, Marzban

    1996-06-01

    In this paper, we present an adaptive FIR filtering approach, which is referred to as the APES (amplitude and phase estimation of a sinusoid) algorithm, for interferometric SAR imaging. We apply the APES algorithm on the data obtained from two vertically displaced apertures of a SAR system to obtain the complex amplitude and the phase difference estimates, which are proportional to the radar cross section and the height of the scatterer, respectively, at the frequencies of interest. We also demonstrate how the APES algorithm can be applied to data matrices with large dimensions without incurring high computational overheads. We compare the APES algorithm with other FIR filtering approaches including the Capon and FFT methods. We show via both numerical and experimental examples that the adaptive FIR filtering approaches such as Capon and APES can yield more accurate spectral estimates with much lower sidelobes and narrower spectral peaks than the FFT method. We show that although the APES algorithm yields somewhat wider spectral peaks than the Capon method, the former gives more accurate overall spectral estimates and SAR images than the latter and the FFT method.

  20. Public Health Interventions and SARS Spread, 2003

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) was contained largely through traditional public health interventions, such as finding and isolating case-patients, quarantining close contacts, and enhanced infection control. The independent effectiveness of measures to "increase social distance" and wearing masks in public places requires further evaluation. Limited data exist on the effectiveness of providing health information to travelers. Entry screening of travelers through health declarations or thermal scanning at international borders had little documented effect on detecting SARS cases; exit screening appeared slightly more effective. The value of border screening in deterring travel by ill persons and in building public confidence remains unquantified. Interventions to control global epidemics should be based on expert advice from the World Health Organization and national authorities. In the case of SARS, interventions at a country's borders should not detract from efforts to identify and isolate infected persons within the country, monitor or quarantine their contacts, and strengthen infection control in healthcare settings. PMID:15550198

  1. Rapid extraction of water bodies from SAR imagery assisted by InSAR DEMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao-Ming; Zmuda, Andy

    1998-08-01

    In China, detailed flood maps are produced in near real time using an airborne SAR and data transmission system. Water bodies are extracted and the information is integrated with other thematic data to facilitate the rapid response to economic and humanitarian relief. One problem has been that terrain shadow on SAR images is classified as water and this proves difficult to eliminate without detailed elevation data. However interferometric processing of ERS Tandem Mission data has been used to produce a digital elevation model for a test area in China. This has been used to mask areas of terrain shadow on SAR images therefore improving the automatic classification of water bodies. The result is promising compared with the previously used method that relied on manual elimination of shadow areas.

  2. Forming rotated SAR images by real-time motion compensation.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2012-12-01

    Proper waveform parameter selection allows collecting Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) phase history data on a rotated grid in the Fourier Space of the scene being imaged. Subsequent image formation preserves the rotated geometry to allow SAR images to be formed at arbitrary rotation angles without the use of computationally expensive interpolation or resampling operations. This should be useful where control of image orientation is desired such as generating squinted stripmaps and VideoSAR applications, among others.

  3. A fast, programmable hardware architecture for spaceborne SAR processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, J. R.; Cumming, I. G.; Lim, J.; Wedding, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    The launch of spaceborne SARs during the 1980's is discussed. The satellite SARs require high quality and high throughput ground processors. Compression ratios in range and azimuth of greater than 500 and 150 respectively lead to frequency domain processing and data computation rates in excess of 2000 million real operations per second for C-band SARs under consideration. Various hardware architectures are examined and two promising candidates and proceeds to recommend a fast, programmable hardware architecture for spaceborne SAR processing are selected. Modularity and programmability are introduced as desirable attributes for the purpose of HTSP hardware selection.

  4. Applications of SAR Interferometry in Earth and Environmental Science Research.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaobing; Chang, Ni-Bin; Li, Shusun

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the progress in regard to the InSAR remote sensing technique and its applications in earth and environmental sciences, especially in the past decade. Basic principles, factors, limits, InSAR sensors, available software packages for the generation of InSAR interferograms were summarized to support future applications. Emphasis was placed on the applications of InSAR in seismology, volcanology, land subsidence/uplift, landslide, glaciology, hydrology, and forestry sciences. It ends with a discussion of future research directions. PMID:22573992

  5. Applications of SAR Interferometry in Earth and Environmental Science Research

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaobing; Chang, Ni-Bin; Li, Shusun

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the progress in regard to the InSAR remote sensing technique and its applications in earth and environmental sciences, especially in the past decade. Basic principles, factors, limits, InSAR sensors, available software packages for the generation of InSAR interferograms were summarized to support future applications. Emphasis was placed on the applications of InSAR in seismology, volcanology, land subsidence/uplift, landslide, glaciology, hydrology, and forestry sciences. It ends with a discussion of future research directions. PMID:22573992

  6. Epipolar geometry comparison of SAR and optical camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong; Zhang, Yunhua

    2016-03-01

    In computer vision, optical camera is often used as the eyes of computer. If we replace camera with synthetic aperture radar (SAR), we will then enter a microwave vision of the world. This paper gives a comparison of SAR imaging and camera imaging from the viewpoint of epipolar geometry. The imaging model and epipolar geometry of the two sensors are analyzed in detail. Their difference is illustrated, and their unification is particularly demonstrated. We hope these may benefit researchers in field of computer vision or SAR image processing to construct a computer SAR vision, which is dedicated to compensate and improve human vision by electromagnetically perceiving and understanding the images.

  7. Polymorphism of SARS-CoV genomes.

    PubMed

    Shang, Lei; Qi, Yan; Bao, Qi-Yu; Tian, Wei; Xu, Jian-Cheng; Feng, Ming-Guang; Yang, Huan-Ming

    2006-04-01

    In this work, severe acute respiratory syndrome associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) genome BJ202 (AY864806) was completely sequenced. The genome was directly accessed from the stool sample of a patient in Beijing. Comparative genomics methods were used to analyze the sequence variations of 116 SARS-CoV genomes (including BJ202) available in the NCBI GenBank. With the genome sequence of GZ02 as the reference, there were 41 polymorphic sites identified in BJ202 and a total of 278 polymorphic sites present in at least two of the 116 genomes. The distribution of the polymorphic sites was biased over the whole genome. Nearly half of the variations (50.4%, 140/278) clustered in the one third of the whole genome at the 3' end (19.0 kb-29.7 kb). Regions encoding Orf10-11, Orf3/4, E, M and S protein had the highest mutation rates. A total of 15 PCR products (about 6.0 kb of the genome) including 11 fragments containing 12 known polymorphic sites and 4 fragments without identified polymorphic sites were cloned and sequenced. Results showed that 3 unique polymorphic sites of BJ202 (positions 13 804, 15 031 and 20 792) along with 3 other polymorphic sites (26 428, 26 477 and 27 243) all contained 2 kinds of nucleotides. It is interesting to find that position 18379 which has not been identified to be polymorphic in any of the other 115 published SARS-CoV genomes is actually a polymorphic site. The nucleotide composition of this site is A (8) to G (6). Among 116 SARS-CoV genomes, 18 types of deletions and 2 insertions were identified. Most of them were related to a 300 bp region (27,700-28,000) which encodes parts of the putative ORF9 and ORF10-11. A phylogenetic tree illustrating the divergence of whole BJ202 genome from 115 other completely sequenced SARS-CoVs was also constructed. BJ202 was phylogeneticly closer to BJ01 and LLJ-2004. PMID:16625834

  8. Relationships between autofocus methods for SAR and self-survey techniques for SONAR. [Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, D.E.; Jakowatz, C.V. Jr.; Ghiglia, D.C.; Eichel, P.H.

    1991-01-01

    Autofocus methods in SAR and self-survey techniques in SONAR have a common mathematical basis in that they both involve estimation and correction of phase errors introduced by sensor position uncertainties. Time delay estimation and correlation methods have been shown to be effective in solving the self-survey problem for towed SONAR arrays. Since it can be shown that platform motion errors introduce similar time-delay estimation problems in SAR imaging, the question arises as to whether such techniques could be effectively employed for autofocus of SAR imagery. With a simple mathematical model for motion errors in SAR, we will show why such correlation/time-delay techniques are not nearly as effective as established SAR autofocus algorithms such as phase gradient autofocus or sub-aperture based methods. This analysis forms an important bridge between signal processing methodologies for SAR and SONAR. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Land deformation in Saint Louis, Missouri measured by ALOS InSAR and PolINSAR validated with DGPS base stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghulam, A.

    2011-12-01

    DInSAR is a solid technique to estimate land subsidence and rebound using phase information from multiple SAR acquisitions over the same location from the same orbits, but from a slightly different observing geometry. However, temporal decorrelation and atmospheric effects are often a challenge to the accuracy of the DInSAR measurements. Such uncertainties may be overcome using time series interferogram stacking, e.g., permanent scatterer interferometry (Ferretti, et al., 2000, 2001). However, it requires large number of image collections. In this paper, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data pairs from the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) sensor onboard Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) are used to measure seasonal and annual land surface deformation over Saint Louis, Missouri. The datasets cover four years of time period spanning from 2006 to 2010. With the limited data coverage that is not suitable for permanent scatterer interferometry, the paper demonstrates the efficacy of dual pair interferometry from both fine-beam single polarization mode and dual-pol polarimetric images and short baseline interferometry (SBAS) approach (Berardino, et al., 2002) with an estimation accuracy comparable to differential global position systems (DGPS). We also present the impact of using assumed phase-stable ground control points versus GPS base stations for orbital refinement and phase unwrapping on overall measurement accuracy by comparing the deformation results from DInSAR and Polarimetric InSAR with DGPS base stations and ground truthing.

  10. Legendary lost city Ciudad Blanca found under tropical forest in Honduras, using ERS-2 and JERS-1 SAR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakam-Simen, Francis; Nezry, Edmond; Ewing, James J.; Maschal, Ted

    1998-10-01

    The legendary 'Ciudad Blanca' of Honduras was first referred to under the name Xucutaco by the Spanish conquistador Hernan Cortes already in 1526. Located in the remote, impenetrable and incompletely mapped rainforest of the Mosquito Coast, it was never conquered by the Spanish. With the time, it was slowly abandoned and forgotten. Two JERS-1 and one ERS-2 SLC Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images have been used to identify and to locate the lost city, a task made difficult due to the thick vegetation cover. To this end, advanced processing tools for the detection of artificial targets under forest cover, and for SAR data fusion have been used. Among the techniques used, a new Bayesian Distribution Entropy Maximum A Posteriori (DE-MAP) vector speckle filter, particularly suited for the restoration of a strongly textured scene, has been used to enhance the SAR images. This new speckle filter incorporates a statistical description of the effects of the SAR imaging system: in order to account for the effects due to the spatial correlation of the speckle in SAR images, an estimator originating from the local spatial autocorrelation function (ACF) of the SAR signal are incorporated to this filter, to refine the evaluation of the non-stationary first order local statistics, to improve the restoration of the scene textural properties, and to preserve the useful spatial resolution in the speckle filtered image. On the other hand, radargrammetric techniques have been used to: (1) produce a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the study area; (2) fuse ERS and JERS information in order to allow visual identification of the remnants of Ciudad Blanca by visual photo-interpretation. Using the processed images, geocoded UTM spatio-maps of the region have also been produced to locate accurately our findings, and guide a ground expedition in the future.

  11. Impact of the Regulators SigB, Rot, SarA and sarS on the Toxic Shock Tst Promoter and TSST-1 Expression in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Andrey, Diego O; Jousselin, Ambre; Villanueva, Maite; Renzoni, Adriana; Monod, Antoinette; Barras, Christine; Rodriguez, Natalia; Kelley, William L

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen manifesting virulence through diverse disease forms, ranging from acute skin infections to life-threatening bacteremia or systemic toxic shock syndromes. In the latter case, the prototypical superantigen is TSST-1 (Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin 1), encoded by tst(H), and carried on a mobile genetic element that is not present in all S. aureus strains. Transcriptional regulation of tst is only partially understood. In this study, we dissected the role of sarA, sarS (sarH1), RNAIII, rot, and the alternative stress sigma factor sigB (σB). By examining tst promoter regulation predominantly in the context of its native sequence within the SaPI1 pathogenicity island of strain RN4282, we discovered that σB emerged as a particularly important tst regulator. We did not detect a consensus σB site within the tst promoter, and thus the effect of σB is likely indirect. We found that σB strongly repressed the expression of the toxin via at least two distinct regulatory pathways dependent upon sarA and agr. Furthermore rot, a member of SarA family, was shown to repress tst expression when overexpressed, although its deletion had no consistent measurable effect. We could not find any detectable effect of sarS, either by deletion or overexpression, suggesting that this regulator plays a minimal role in TSST-1 expression except when combined with disruption of sarA. Collectively, our results extend our understanding of complex multifactorial regulation of tst, revealing several layers of negative regulation. In addition to environmental stimuli thought to impact TSST-1 production, these findings support a model whereby sporadic mutation in a few key negative regulators can profoundly affect and enhance TSST-1 expression. PMID:26275216

  12. Impact of the Regulators SigB, Rot, SarA and sarS on the Toxic Shock Tst Promoter and TSST-1 Expression in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Maite; Renzoni, Adriana; Monod, Antoinette; Barras, Christine; Rodriguez, Natalia; Kelley, William L.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen manifesting virulence through diverse disease forms, ranging from acute skin infections to life-threatening bacteremia or systemic toxic shock syndromes. In the latter case, the prototypical superantigen is TSST-1 (Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin 1), encoded by tst(H), and carried on a mobile genetic element that is not present in all S. aureus strains. Transcriptional regulation of tst is only partially understood. In this study, we dissected the role of sarA, sarS (sarH1), RNAIII, rot, and the alternative stress sigma factor sigB (σB). By examining tst promoter regulation predominantly in the context of its native sequence within the SaPI1 pathogenicity island of strain RN4282, we discovered that σB emerged as a particularly important tst regulator. We did not detect a consensus σB site within the tst promoter, and thus the effect of σB is likely indirect. We found that σB strongly repressed the expression of the toxin via at least two distinct regulatory pathways dependent upon sarA and agr. Furthermore rot, a member of SarA family, was shown to repress tst expression when overexpressed, although its deletion had no consistent measurable effect. We could not find any detectable effect of sarS, either by deletion or overexpression, suggesting that this regulator plays a minimal role in TSST-1 expression except when combined with disruption of sarA. Collectively, our results extend our understanding of complex multifactorial regulation of tst, revealing several layers of negative regulation. In addition to environmental stimuli thought to impact TSST-1 production, these findings support a model whereby sporadic mutation in a few key negative regulators can profoundly affect and enhance TSST-1 expression. PMID:26275216

  13. Large and small scale circulation signatures of the ERS-1 SAR over the Gulf Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beal, R.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Thompson, D.; Grodsky, S.; Tilley, D.; Dulov, V.

    1994-01-01

    Since September 1991, the ERS-1 SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) has collected approximately 170 frames of ocean imagery on 28 passes over the western Gulf Stream in support of ESA experiment US8-2c. SAR signatures of the north wall are seen on nearly all passes, with modulation depth varying from 3% to 35% for 100 m samples. Many small and mesoscale circulation features associated with the Stream are evident. The detailed form of the signature varies considerably, however. Narrow bright or dark linear features appear to follow streamlines, and on one occasion a strong dark line was associated with an in situ measurement of a sharp current shear. Similarly, larger spatial scale changes in backscatter over the Stream were associated with in situ measurements of atmospheric stability transitions. Physical explanations for the narrow features are not so obvious. However, the accumulation of surfactants along converging current boundaries or local short wave straining and breaking appear plausible. These preliminary results strongly suggest that a wide swath (approximately 500 km) SAR with at least 100 m resolution would be a useful adjunct to existing satellite AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) imagery.

  14. Retrieving three-dimensional displacement fields of mining areas from a single InSAR pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi Wei; Yang, Ze Fa; Zhu, Jian Jun; Hu, Jun; Wang, Yun Jia; Li, Pei Xian; Chen, Guo Liang

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for retrieving three-dimensional (3-D) displacement fields of mining areas from a single interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) pair. This method fully exploits the mechanism of mining subsidence, specifically the proportional relationship between the horizontal displacement and horizontal gradient of vertical displacements caused by underground mining. This method overcomes the limitations of conventional InSAR techniques that can only measure one-dimensional (1-D) deformation of mining area along the radar line-of-sight direction. The proposed method is first validated with simulated 3-D displacement fields, which are obtained by the FLAC software. The root mean square errors of the 3-D displacements retrieved by the proposed method are 13.7, 27.6 and 3.6 mm for the West-East, North-South, and Up-Down components, respectively. We then apply the proposed method to estimate the 3-D displacements of the Qianyingzi and the Xuzhou coal mines in China, respectively, each along with two Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array Type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar images. Results show that the estimated 3-D displacement is highly consistent with that of the field surveying. This demonstrates that the proposed method is an effective approach for retrieving 3-D mining displacement fields and will play an important role in mining-related hazard prevention and environment assessment under limited InSAR acquisitions.

  15. A sea ice concentration estimation algorithm utilizing radiometer and SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karvonen, J.

    2014-09-01

    We have studied the possibility of combining the high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) segmentation and ice concentration estimated by radiometer brightness temperatures. Here we present an algorithm for mapping a radiometer-based concentration value for each SAR segment. The concentrations are estimated by a multi-layer perceptron (MLP) neural network which has the AMSR-2 (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2) polarization ratios and gradient ratios of four radiometer channels as its inputs. The results have been compared numerically to the gridded Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) ice chart concentrations and high-resolution AMSR-2 ASI (ARTIST Sea Ice) algorithm concentrations provided by the University of Hamburg and also visually to the AMSR-2 bootstrap algorithm concentrations, which are given in much coarser resolution. The differences when compared to FMI daily ice charts were on average small. When compared to ASI ice concentrations, the differences were a bit larger, but still small on average. According to our comparisons, the largest differences typically occur near the ice edge and sea-land boundary. The main advantage of combining radiometer-based ice concentration estimation and SAR segmentation seems to be a more precise estimation of the boundaries of different ice concentration zones.

  16. SAR digital spotlight implementation in MATLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dungan, Kerry E.; Gorham, LeRoy A.; Moore, Linda J.

    2013-05-01

    Legacy synthetic aperture radar (SAR) exploitation algorithms were image-based algorithms, designed to exploit complex and/or detected SAR imagery. In order to improve the efficiency of the algorithms, image chips, or region of interest (ROI) chips, containing candidate targets were extracted. These image chips were then used directly by exploitation algorithms for the purposes of target discrimination or identification. Recent exploitation research has suggested that performance can be improved by processing the underlying phase history data instead of standard SAR imagery. Digital Spotlighting takes the phase history data of a large image and extracts the phase history data corresponding to a smaller spatial subset of the image. In a typical scenario, this spotlighted phase history data will contain much fewer samples than the original data but will still result in an alias-free image of the ROI. The Digital Spotlight algorithm can be considered the first stage in a "two-stage backprojection" image formation process. As the first stage in two-stage backprojection, Digital Spotlighting filters the original phase history data into a number of "pseudo"-phase histories that segment the scene into patches, each of which contain a reduced number of samples compared to the original data. The second stage of the imaging process consists of standard backprojection. The data rate reduction offered by Digital Spotlighting improves the computational efficiency of the overall imaging process by significantly reducing the total number of backprojection operations. This paper describes the Digital Spotlight algorithm in detail and provides an implementation in MATLAB.

  17. Utilizing feedback in adaptive SAR ATR systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsfield, Owen; Blacknell, David

    2009-05-01

    Existing SAR ATR systems are usually trained off-line with samples of target imagery or CAD models, prior to conducting a mission. If the training data is not representative of mission conditions, then poor performance may result. In addition, it is difficult to acquire suitable training data for the many target types of interest. The Adaptive SAR ATR Problem Set (AdaptSAPS) program provides a MATLAB framework and image database for developing systems that adapt to mission conditions, meaning less reliance on accurate training data. A key function of an adaptive system is the ability to utilise truth feedback to improve performance, and it is this feature which AdaptSAPS is intended to exploit. This paper presents a new method for SAR ATR that does not use training data, based on supervised learning. This is achieved by using feature-based classification, and several new shadow features have been developed for this purpose. These features allow discrimination of vehicles from clutter, and classification of vehicles into two classes: targets, comprising military combat types, and non-targets, comprising bulldozers and trucks. The performance of the system is assessed using three baseline missions provided with AdaptSAPS, as well as three additional missions. All performance metrics indicate a distinct learning trend over the course of a mission, with most third and fourth quartile performance levels exceeding 85% correct classification. It has been demonstrated that these performance levels can be maintained even when truth feedback rates are reduced by up to 55% over the course of a mission.

  18. Development of VHF CARABAS II SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellsten, Hans; Ulander, Lars M.; Gustavsson, Anders; Larsson, Bjoern

    1996-06-01

    There is an increasing interest in imaging radar systems operating at low frequencies. Examples of military and civilian applications are detection of stealth-designed man- made objects, targets hidden under foliage, biomass estimation, and penetration into glaciers or ground. The developed CARABAS technology is a contribution to this field of low frequency SAR imagery. The used wavelengths offer a potential of penetration below the upper scattering layer in combination with high spatial resolution. The first prototype of the system (CARABAS I) has been tested in environments ranging from rain forests to deserts, collecting a considerably amount of data often in parallel with other SAR sensors. The work on data analysis proceeds and results obtained so far seem promising, especially for application in forested regions. The experiences gained are used in the development of a new upgraded system (CARABAS II), which is near completion and initial airborne radar tests for system verifications followed by some major field campaign are scheduled to take place during 1996. This paper will summarize the CARABAS I system characteristics and system performance evaluation. The major imperfections discovered in the radar functioning will be identified, and we explain some of the modification made in the system design for CARABAS II. A new algorithm for future real-time CARABAS data processing has been derived, with a structure well-suited for a multi-processor environment. Motion compensation and radio frequency interference mitigation are both included in this scheme. Some comments on low frequency SAR operation at UHF-based versus VHF-band will be given.

  19. A theoretical basis and methodology for the quantitative evaluation of thematic map series from SAR/InSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Paula Jean

    2001-07-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and interferometric SAR (InSAR) data are increasingly being used for specific operational purposes such as detailed elevation maps, detection of military targets, and coastline mapping of perpetually cloud-covered areas. One topic that has been studied extensively since the 1970's is the generation of thematic maps from this data. However, most of the relevant literature relies on highly labor-intensive approaches to yield "accurate" results for a particular scene, by fine-tuning parameters to minimize the "error" in the scene (as compared to sampled ground truth for the same scene). Consequently, it remains to be seen whether or how these data can be used to produce thematic map series efficiently and reliably in the face of varying landscapes, sensors, processors, classifiers, and output requirements. To the best of our knowledge, no one has yet examined the linked, complex, and multi-faceted issues involved in using SAR/InSAR data for this purpose; indeed, even a basis for conducting such a study has not been determined. This study adapts recent ISO (International Organization of Standardization) standards on measurand, repeatability, and reproducibility and applies them to the study of these issues. The standards are applied to analyze the range of measurement uncertainties associated with the end-to-end processes that are involved in generating thematic maps. These processes are: (1) the physical interaction of the SAR/InSAR signal with various terrain and landscape characteristics; (2) antenna characteristics and signal processing steps in generating an image; (3) image classification models and algorithms; and (4) standard map output requirements. The primary outcome is the development of a methodology through applying the ISO principles to thematic map classification of SAR/InSAR data. The methodology is expected to aid in determining the expected quality of a SAR/InSAR-based thematic map series and its fitness for intended

  20. Synthetic aperture design for increased SAR image rate

    DOEpatents

    Bielek, Timothy P.; Thompson, Douglas G.; Walker, Bruce C.

    2009-03-03

    High resolution SAR images of a target scene at near video rates can be produced by using overlapped, but nevertheless, full-size synthetic apertures. The SAR images, which respectively correspond to the apertures, can be analyzed in sequence to permit detection of movement in the target scene.

  1. An Adaptive Ship Detection Scheme for Spaceborne SAR Imagery.

    PubMed

    Leng, Xiangguang; Ji, Kefeng; Zhou, Shilin; Xing, Xiangwei; Zou, Huanxin

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid development of spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and the increasing need of ship detection, research on adaptive ship detection in spaceborne SAR imagery is of great importance. Focusing on practical problems of ship detection, this paper presents a highly adaptive ship detection scheme for spaceborne SAR imagery. It is able to process a wide range of sensors, imaging modes and resolutions. Two main stages are identified in this paper, namely: ship candidate detection and ship discrimination. Firstly, this paper proposes an adaptive land masking method using ship size and pixel size. Secondly, taking into account the imaging mode, incidence angle, and polarization channel of SAR imagery, it implements adaptive ship candidate detection in spaceborne SAR imagery by applying different strategies to different resolution SAR images. Finally, aiming at different types of typical false alarms, this paper proposes a comprehensive ship discrimination method in spaceborne SAR imagery based on confidence level and complexity analysis. Experimental results based on RADARSAT-1, RADARSAT-2, TerraSAR-X, RS-1, and RS-3 images demonstrate that the adaptive scheme proposed in this paper is able to detect ship targets in a fast, efficient and robust way. PMID:27563902

  2. Real-time SAR change-detection using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Christopher J.; White, Richard G.

    1990-11-01

    This paper describes the techniques evolved at RSRE for the production of undistorted, focused synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images, target detection using a neural network method and the automatic detection of changes between pairs of SAR images. All these processes are achievable in a single pipelined process operating on an input data rate in excess of 10 Mbytes/second.

  3. Fully polarimetric data from the ARL RailSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranney, Kenneth; Kirose, Getachew; Phelan, Brian; Sherbondy, Kelly

    2016-05-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has recently upgraded the indoor, rail-mounted synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system, RailSAR, to enable collection of large amounts of low-frequency, ultrawideband (UWB) data. Our intent is to provide a research tool that is capable of emulating airborne SAR configuration and associated data collection geometries against surrogate explosive hazard threat deployments. By having such a capability, ARL's facility will afford a more rapid response to the ever changing improvised characteristics associated with explosive hazards today and in the future. Therefore, upgrades to this RailSAR tool to improve functionality and performance are needed to meet the potential rapid response assessments to be carried out. The new, lighter RailSAR cart puts less strain on the radar positioning hardware and allows the system to move smoothly along a specified portion of the rail. In previous papers, we have presented co-polarized SAR data collected using the ARL RailSAR. Recently, however, researchers at ARL have leveraged this asset to collect polarimetric data against multiple targets. This paper presents the SAR imagery resulting from these experiments and documents characteristics of certain target signatures that should be of interest to developers of automatic target detection (ATD) algorithms.

  4. Risk factors for SARS infection within hospitals in Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Ayako; Wakasugi, Naomi; Kirikae, Teruo; Quy, Tran; Ha, Le Dang; Ban, Vo Van; Long, Hoang Thuy; Keicho, Naoto; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Kuratsuji, Tadatoshi

    2008-09-01

    We investigated a nosocomial infection of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Vietnam in 2003 and attempted to identify risk factors for SARS infection. Of the 146 subjects who came into contact with SARS patients at Hospital A, 43 (29.5%) developed SARS, and an additional 16 (11%) were asymptomatic but SARS-coronavirus (CoV) seropositive. The asymptomatic infection rate accounted for 15.5% of the total number of infected patients at Hospital A, which was higher than that of 6.5% observed at Hospital B, to where all patients from Hospital A were eventually transported (P<0.05). At Hospital A, the risk for developing SARS was 12.6 times higher in individuals not using a mask than in those using a mask. The SARS epidemic in Vietnam resulted in numerous secondary infections due to its unknown etiology and delayed recognition at the beginning of the epidemic. The consistent and proper use of a mask was shown to be crucial for constant protection against infection with SARS. PMID:18806349

  5. The Yellowstone Fires as Observed by SIR-C SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, Eric; Despain, Don; Holecz, Francesco

    1996-01-01

    Covers SIR-C (Spaceborne Imaging Radar C) SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) imaging of the 1988 Yellowstone National Forest fires. Discusses some of the images and data collected, and some conclusions drawn from them about both the fires, and SIR-C SAR imaging capabilities.

  6. Web-GIS-based SARS epidemic situation visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaolin

    2004-03-01

    In order to research, perform statistical analysis and broadcast the information of SARS epidemic situation according to the relevant spatial position, this paper proposed a unified global visualization information platform for SARS epidemic situation based on Web-GIS and scientific virtualization technology. To setup the unified global visual information platform, the architecture of Web-GIS based interoperable information system is adopted to enable public report SARS virus information to health cure center visually by using the web visualization technology. A GIS java applet is used to visualize the relationship between spatial graphical data and virus distribution, and other web based graphics figures such as curves, bars, maps and multi-dimensional figures are used to visualize the relationship between SARS virus tendency with time, patient number or locations. The platform is designed to display the SARS information in real time, simulate visually for real epidemic situation and offer an analyzing tools for health department and the policy-making government department to support the decision-making for preventing against the SARS epidemic virus. It could be used to analyze the virus condition through visualized graphics interface, isolate the areas of virus source, and control the virus condition within shortest time. It could be applied to the visualization field of SARS preventing systems for SARS information broadcasting, data management, statistical analysis, and decision supporting.

  7. (Q)SAR: A Tool for the Toxicologist.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Thomas; Gad-McDonald, Samantha; Kruhlak, Naomi; Powley, Mark; Greene, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    A continuing education (CE) course at the 2014 American College of Toxicology annual meeting covered the topic of (Quantitative) Structure-Activity Relationships [(Q)SAR]. The (Q)SAR methodologies use predictive computer modeling based on predefined rules to describe the relationship between chemical structure and a chemical's associated biological activity or statistical tools to find correlations between biologic activity and the molecular structure or properties of a compound. The (Q)SAR has applications in risk assessment, drug discovery, and regulatory decision making. Pressure within industry to reduce the cost of drug development and societal pressure for government regulatory agencies to produce more accurate and timely risk assessment of drugs and chemicals have necessitated the use of (Q)SAR. Producing a high-quality (Q)SAR model depends on many factors including the choice of statistical methods and descriptors, but first and foremost the quality of the data input into the model. Understanding how a (Q)SAR model is developed and applied is critical to the successful use of such a tool. The CE session covered the basic principles of (Q)SAR, practical applications of these computational models in toxicology, how regulatory agencies use and interpret (Q)SAR models, and potential pitfalls of using them. PMID:25979517

  8. Wave retrieval from SAR imagery in the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Xiulin; Chang, Junfang; Liu, Xiaoyan

    2015-12-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) plays an important role in measuring directional ocean wave spectra with continuous and global coverage. In this article, satellite SAR images were used to estimate the wave parameters in the East China Sea. The Max-Planck Institut (MPI) method was applied to retrieve directional wave spectra from the SAR imagers with the Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN) model data as the first guess wave spectra. In order to validate the SAR retrieved wave spectra, a set of buoy measurements during the SAR imaging times was collected and used. The SAR retrieved significant wave heights (SWHs) were analyzed against the buoy measurements to assess the wave retrieval of this study. The root-mean-square error between the SAR SWHs and the buoy measurements is 0.25 m, which corresponds to a relative error of 12%. The case study here shows that the SWAN model data is a potential first guess wave spectra source to the MPI method to retrieve ocean wave spectra from SAR imagery.

  9. A short note on calculating the adjusted SAR index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple algebraic technique is presented for computing the adjusted SAR Index proposed by Suarez (1981). The statistical formula presented in this note facilitates the computation of the adjusted SAR without the use of either a look-up table, custom computer software or the need to compute exact a...

  10. P3 SAR exploration of biphenyl carbamate based Legumain inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Catherine; Bouazzaoui, Samira; Gaddale, Kishore; D'Costa, Zenobia; Templeman, Amy; O'Rourke, Martin; Young, Andrew; Scott, Christopher; Harrison, Tim; Mullan, Paul; Williams, Rich

    2014-06-01

    This Letter describes the further development and SAR exploration of a novel series of Legumain inhibitors. Based upon a previously identified Legumain inhibitor from our group, we explored the SAR of the carbamate phenyl ring system to probe the P3 pocket of the enzyme. This led to the identification of a sub-nanomolar inhibitor of Legumain. PMID:24775305

  11. SARS in Singapore--key lessons from an epidemic.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chorh-Chuan

    2006-05-01

    The rapid containment of the Singapore severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak in 2003 involved the introduction of several stringent control measures. These measures had a profound impact on the healthcare system and community, and were associated with significant disruptions to normal life, business and social intercourse. An assessment of the relative effectiveness of the various control measures is critical in preparing for future outbreaks of a similar nature. The very "wide-net" surveillance, isolation and quarantine policy adopted was effective in ensuring progressively earlier isolation of probable SARS cases. However, it resulted in nearly 8000 contacts being put on home quarantine and 4300 on telephone surveillance, with 58 individuals eventually being diagnosed with probable SARS. A key challenge is to develop very rapid and highly sensitive tests for SARS infection, which would substantially reduce the numbers of individuals that need to be quarantined without decreasing the effectiveness of the measure. Daily temperature monitoring of all healthcare workers (HCWs) in hospitals was useful for early identification of HCWs with SARS. However, daily temperature screening of children in schools failed to pick up any SARS cases. Similarly, temperature screening at the airport and other points of entry did not yield any SARS cases. Nevertheless, the latter 2 measures probably helped to reassure the public that schools and the community were safe during the SARS outbreak. Strong political leadership and effective command, control and coordination of responses were critical factors for the containment of the outbreak. PMID:16830002

  12. Salt Kinematics and InSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftabi, Pedarm; Talbot, hristopher; Fielding, Eric

    2005-01-01

    As part of a long-term attempt to learn how the climatic and tectonic signal interact to shape a steady state mountain monitored displacement of a markers in SE termination and also near the summit of a small viscous salt fountain extruding onto the Central plateau of Iran. The marker displacements relate to the first InSAR interferograms of salt extrusion (980913 to 990620) calculated Earth tides, winds, air pressures and temperatures. In the first documented staking exercise, hammered wooden stakes vertically through the surgical marl (c. 1 Ocm deep) onto the top of crystalline salt. These stakes installed in an irregular array elongate E-W along the c.50 m high cliff marking the effective SE terminus of the glacier at Qum Kuh(Centra1 Iran) ,just to the E of a NE trending river cliff about 40 m high. We merely measured the distances between pairs of stakes with known azimuth about 2 m apart to calculate sub horizontal strain in a small part of Qum Kuh. Stakes moved and micro strains for up to 46 pairs of stakes (p strain= ((lengthl-length2)/1engthl) x 10-1) was calculated for each seven stake epochs and plotted against their azimuth on simplified array maps. The data fit well the sine curves cxpected of the maximum and minimum strain ellipses. The first documented stakes located on the SE where the InSAR image show -1 1 to 0 mm pink to purple, 0 to lOmm purple to blue, and show high activity of salt in low activity area of the InSAR image (980913 to 990620).Short term micro strains of stake tie lines record anisotropic expansions due to heating and contraction due to cooling. All epochs changed between 7 to 1 17 days (990928 to000 1 16), showed 200 to 400 micro strain lengthening and shortening. The contraction and extension existed in each epoch, but the final strain was extension in E-W in Epoch land 6, contraction in E-W direction during epochs 2-3-4-5 and 7. The second pair of stakes hammered about 20 cm deep into the deep soils(more than 1 m) , near summit

  13. Compression of Complex-Valued SAR Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Eichel P.; Ives, R.W.

    1999-03-03

    Synthetic Aperture Radars are coherent imaging systems that produce complex-valued images of the ground. Because modern systems can generate large amounts of data, there is substantial interest in applying image compression techniques to these products. In this paper, we examine the properties of complex-valued SAR images relevant to the task of data compression. We advocate the use of transform-based compression methods but employ radically different quantization strategies than those commonly used for incoherent optical images. The theory, methodology, and examples are presented.

  14. Detection of land degradation with polarimetric SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Terrill W.; Farr, Tom G.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.

    1992-01-01

    Multispectral radar polarimeter data were collected over the Manix Basin Area of the Mojave desert using an airborne SAR. An analysis of the data reveals unusual polarization responses which are attributed to the formation of wind ripples on the surfaces of fields that have been abandoned for more than 5 years. This hypothesis has been confirmed through field observations, and a second-order perturbation model is shown to effectively model the polarization responses. The results demonstrate the usefulness of remote sensing techniques for the study of land degradation at synoptic scales.

  15. High Resolution Digital Surface Model For Production Of Airport Obstruction Charts Using Spaceborne SAR Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Henrique; Rodrigues, Marco; Radius, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Airport Obstruction Charts (AOCs) are graphical representations of natural or man-made obstructions (its locations and heights) around airfields, according to International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Annexes 4, 14 and 15. One of the most important types of data used in AOCs production/update tasks is a Digital Surface Model (first reflective surface) of the surveyed area. The development of advanced remote sensing technologies provide the available tools for obstruction data acquisition, while Geographic Information Systems (GIS) present the perfect platform for storing and analyzing this type of data, enabling the production of digital ACOs, greatly contributing to the increase of the situational awareness of pilots and enhancing the air navigation safety level [1]. Data acquisition corresponding to the first reflective surface can be obtained through the use of Airborne Laser-Scanning and Light Detection and Ranging (ALS/LIDAR) or Spaceborne SAR Systems. The need of surveying broad areas, like the entire territory of a state, shows that Spaceborne SAR systems are the most adequate in economic and feasibility terms of the process, to perform the monitoring and producing a high resolution Digital Surface Model (DSM). The high resolution DSM generation depends on many factors: the available data set, the used technique and the setting parameters. To increase the precision and obtain high resolution products, two techniques are available using a stack of data: the PS (Permanent Scatterers) technique [2], that uses large stack of data to identify many stable and coherent targets through multi- temporal analysis, removing the atmospheric contribution and to minimize the estimation errors, and the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) technique ([3],[4]), that relies on the use of small baseline SAR interferograms and on the application of the so called singular value decomposition (SVD) method, in order to link independent SAR acquisition data sets, separated by large

  16. InSAR measurements of compaction and subsidence in the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Stephanie A.; Overeem, Irina; Steckler, Michael S.; Syvitski, James P. M.; Seeber, Leonardo; Akhter, S. Humayun

    2014-08-01

    Many of the world's largest river deltas are sinking due to sediment loading, compaction, and tectonics but also recently because of groundwater extraction, hydrocarbon extraction, and reduced aggradation. Little is known, however, about the full spatial variability of subsidence rates in complex delta systems. This study reconstructs subsidence rates in the eastern portion of the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta (GBD), Bangladesh, covering more than 10,000 km2 at a high spatial resolution of 100 m. The map was produced using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) covering the period 2007 to 2011. Eighteen Advanced Land Observing Satellite Phased-Array L-band SAR scenes were used to generate 30 interferograms calibrated with GPS. Interferograms were stacked to yield average subsidence rates over the study period. Small Baseline Subset-InSAR was then applied to validate the results against an additional GPS record from Dhaka, Bangladesh. Land subsidence of 0 to > 10 mm/yr is seen in Dhaka, with variability likely related to local variations in shallow subsurface sediment properties. Outside of the city, rates vary from 0 to > 18 mm/yr, with the lowest rates appearing primarily in Pleistocene Madhupur Clay and the highest rates in Holocene organic-rich muds. Results demonstrate that subsidence in this delta is primarily controlled by local stratigraphy, with rates varying by more than an order of magnitude depending on lithology. The ability of L-band InSAR to differentiate between stratigraphic units in this humid, vegetated subtropical river delta demonstrates the power of interferometry as a tool for studying the subsurface in deltaic environments.

  17. Curvelet-based compressive sensing for InSAR raw data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Marcello G.; da Silva Pinho, Marcelo; Fernandes, David

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the compression performance of SAR raw data for interferometry applications collected by airborne from BRADAR (Brazilian SAR System operating in X and P bands) using the new approach based on compressive sensing (CS) to achieve an effective recovery with a good phase preserving. For this framework is desirable a real-time capability, where the collected data can be compressed to reduce onboard storage and bandwidth required for transmission. In the CS theory, a sparse unknown signals can be recovered from a small number of random or pseudo-random measurements by sparsity-promoting nonlinear recovery algorithms. Therefore, the original signal can be significantly reduced. To achieve the sparse representation of SAR signal, was done a curvelet transform. The curvelets constitute a directional frame, which allows an optimal sparse representation of objects with discontinuities along smooth curves as observed in raw data and provides an advanced denoising optimization. For the tests were made available a scene of 8192 x 2048 samples in range and azimuth in X-band with 2 m of resolution. The sparse representation was compressed using low dimension measurements matrices in each curvelet subband. Thus, an iterative CS reconstruction method based on IST (iterative soft/shrinkage threshold) was adjusted to recover the curvelets coefficients and then the original signal. To evaluate the compression performance were computed the compression ratio (CR), signal to noise ratio (SNR), and because the interferometry applications require more reconstruction accuracy the phase parameters like the standard deviation of the phase (PSD) and the mean phase error (MPE) were also computed. Moreover, in the image domain, a single-look complex image was generated to evaluate the compression effects. All results were computed in terms of sparsity analysis to provides an efficient compression and quality recovering appropriated for inSAR applications

  18. Towards monitoring of geohazards with ESA's Sentinel-1 C-band SAR data: nationwide feasibility mapping over Great Britain calibrated using ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT PSI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigna, Francesca; Bateson, Luke; Dashwood, Claire; Jordan, Colm

    2013-04-01

    the major limitation over most of Britain, and areas of layover and shadow for each satellite mode do not exceed 1% of the entire landmass. Although the results from the landuse feasibility mapping confirm that landcover has stronger control on the potential of these technologies over Britain, the overall number of monitoring targets that might be identified over the entire landmass for each acquisition mode exceeds 12.8M. Based on the results of the feasibility mapping, we identified three categories of landsliding in Britain, over which we will carry out SAR-based ground motions studies with ERS-1/2 SAR and ENVISAT ASAR data covering the past 20 years, based on combination of change detection, SAR Interferometry (InSAR), PSI and Small Baseline (SBAS) approaches. Selected test sites include South Wales Coalfield, the Cotswold Escarpment, the Pennines, the North York Moors, as well as landsliding affecting transport/infrastructure and coastal sites in eastern and southern England. The results of our study act as milestones for future SAR applications and operational uses for a wide range of geohazards in Britain, including landslides, land subsidence/uplift due to groundwater abstraction/recharge, shrink-swell clays, as well as structural deformation of critical infrastructure, and show the potential of future nationwide monitoring of the entire landmass with the new Earth explorers of the Sentinel-1 constellation. Reference: Cigna F., Bateson L., Jordan C., Dashwood C. (2012), Feasibility of InSAR technologies for nationwide monitoring of geohazards in Great Britain. Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry Society Annual Conference, RSPSoc 2012, Greenwich (UK), 12-14 September 2012. Available at: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/19876/

  19. Monitoring of precursor landslide surface deformation using InSAR image in Kuchi-Sakamoto, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H. P.; Nakajima, H.; Nakano, T.; Daimaru, H.

    2014-12-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is the technique to obtain ground surface images using microwave that is emitted from and received on the antenna. The Kuchi-Sakamoto area, 2.2 km2 in precipitous mountains, central Japan, has suffered from frequent landslides, and slow landslide surface deformation has been monitored by on-site extensometer; however, such the monitoring method cannot detect the deformation in the whole area. Because satellite InSAR is effective tool to monitor slow landslide suface deformation, it is a promising tool for detecting precursor deformation and preparing effective measures against serious landslide disasters. In this study Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) / Phased Array type L-band SAR (PALSAR) data were used, and InSAR images were produced from the PALSAR data that were observed between 5 Sep 2008 and 21 Oct 2008 (from descending orbit) and between 20 Jul 2008 and 7 Sep 2009 (from ascending orbit). InSAR image from descending orbit was found to detect clear precursor landslide surface deformation on a slope; however, InSAR image on ascending orbit did not always detect clear precursor deformation. It is thought to be related with atmospheric moisture condition, length of observation baseline and so on. Furthermore, after phase unwrapping on InSAR images, 2.5-dimensional deformation was analized. This analysis needed both ascending and descending InSAR images and culculated quasi east-west deformation component (Figs. (a) and (b)) and quasi up-down deformation component (Figs. (c) and (d)). The resulting 2.5D calculation gave westward deformation and mixture of upward and downward deformations on the precursor landslide surface deformation slope (blue circles in Figs. (c) and (d)), where remarkable disrupted deep landslide occurred during Nov 2012 and 25 Jun 2013, judging from result of airborne LiDAR survey and field survey; the occurrence date is not precisely identified. The figure remains the issue that eliminating "real

  20. Coastal Monitoring Using L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Image Data - Some Case Studies in Asian Delta Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, A.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal geomorphology is highly variable as it is affected by sea-level changes and other naturally- and human-induced fluctuations. To effectively assess and monitor geomorphological changes in various time scales is thus critical for coastal management. Asian mega deltas are vulnerable to a sea-level rise due to its low-lying delta plain, and are dynamic region given a large amount of sediment supply. However, limited data availability and accessibility in the deltas have prevented establishment of systematic coastal monitoring. A variety of remote sensing systems can be used to monitor geomorphological changes in coastal areas as it has wide spatial coverage and high temporal repeatability. Especially, analysis using SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) data not affected by the cloud conditions offer potential for monitoring in the monsoon Asia region. We will present some case studies of Asian coastal regions using L-band SAR data, ALOS (Advanced Land Observing Satellite) PALSAR (Phased Array type L-band SAR) and JERS-1 (Japanese Earth Resource Satellite-1) SAR data. One example is that time-series of radar amplitude images can be used to delineate changes quantitatively of the areal extent of river-mouth bars in distributaries of the Mekong River delta. It shows that the estimated areas of river mouthbars gradually increase on an annual time scale, and seasonal variations of areas were also recognized. Another example is that differential SAR interferometry is applied to the coast of the Yellow River delta in China. It shows very high subsidence rates, likely due to groundwater pumping. A further example is that we apply a SAR interferometry time series analysis to monitor ground deformations in the lower Chao Phraya delta plain, Thailand. A single reference time series interferogram from the stacking of unwrapped phases were applied. The subsidence and uplift pattern observed using the SAR interferometry time series analysis highlights the spatial complexity