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Sample records for advanced scientific computer

  1. 75 FR 43518 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-26

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Office of Science, DOE. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory..., Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research; SC-21/Germantown Building; U. S. Department of...

  2. 78 FR 6087 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-29

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Advanced Scientific Computing..., Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research; SC-21/Germantown Building; U. S. Department of...

  3. 76 FR 41234 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee Charter Renewal AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of... Administration, notice is hereby given that the Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee will be renewed... concerning the Advanced Scientific Computing program in response only to charges from the Director of...

  4. 76 FR 9765 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Science, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Advanced Scientific Computing..., Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, SC-21/Germantown Building, U.S. Department of...

  5. 78 FR 41046 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-09

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION... hereby given that the Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee will be renewed for a two-year... (DOE), on the Advanced Scientific Computing Research Program managed by the Office of...

  6. 75 FR 9887 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Advanced Scientific Computing... Baker, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research; SC-21/Germantown Building; U.S. Department...

  7. 78 FR 56871 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Science, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Advanced Scientific Computing... Baker, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research; SC-21/Germantown Building; U.S. Department...

  8. Advanced Scientific Computing Research Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, Charles; Bell, Greg; Canon, Shane; Dart, Eli; Dattoria, Vince; Goodwin, Dave; Lee, Jason; Hicks, Susan; Holohan, Ed; Klasky, Scott; Lauzon, Carolyn; Rogers, Jim; Shipman, Galen; Skinner, David; Tierney, Brian

    2013-03-08

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In October 2012, ESnet and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) of the DOE SC organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the ASCR program office. The requirements identified at the review are summarized in the Findings section, and are described in more detail in the body of the report.

  9. 76 FR 45786 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Office of Science, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Advanced Scientific... INFORMATION CONTACT: Melea Baker, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research; SC-21/Germantown...

  10. 75 FR 57742 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-22

    ... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION... Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC). Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770...: Melea Baker, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research; SC-21/Germantown Building;...

  11. 77 FR 45345 - DOE/Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-31

    ... Update from Committee of Visitors for Computer Science activities Facilities update including early science efforts ] Early Career technical talks Recompetition results for Scientific Discovery through.../Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Science, Department of Energy....

  12. 76 FR 64330 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... Workshop on Mathematics for the Analysis, Simulation, and Optimization of Complex Systems Report from ASCR..., Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research; SC-21/Germantown Building; U. S. Department of Energy... Department of Energy on scientific priorities within the field of advanced scientific computing...

  13. OPENING REMARKS: Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Good morning. Welcome to SciDAC 2006 and Denver. I share greetings from the new Undersecretary for Energy, Ray Orbach. Five years ago SciDAC was launched as an experiment in computational science. The goal was to form partnerships among science applications, computer scientists, and applied mathematicians to take advantage of the potential of emerging terascale computers. This experiment has been a resounding success. SciDAC has emerged as a powerful concept for addressing some of the biggest challenges facing our world. As significant as these successes were, I believe there is also significance in the teams that achieved them. In addition to their scientific aims these teams have advanced the overall field of computational science and set the stage for even larger accomplishments as we look ahead to SciDAC-2. I am sure that many of you are expecting to hear about the results of our current solicitation for SciDAC-2. I’m afraid we are not quite ready to make that announcement. Decisions are still being made and we will announce the results later this summer. Nearly 250 unique proposals were received and evaluated, involving literally thousands of researchers, postdocs, and students. These collectively requested more than five times our expected budget. This response is a testament to the success of SciDAC in the community. In SciDAC-2 our budget has been increased to about 70 million for FY 2007 and our partnerships have expanded to include the Environment and National Security missions of the Department. The National Science Foundation has also joined as a partner. These new partnerships are expected to expand the application space of SciDAC, and broaden the impact and visibility of the program. We have, with our recent solicitation, expanded to turbulence, computational biology, and groundwater reactive modeling and simulation. We are currently talking with the Department’s applied energy programs about risk assessment, optimization of complex systems - such

  14. Advanced Scientific Computing Environment Team new scientific database management task

    SciTech Connect

    Church, J.P.; Roberts, J.C.; Sims, R.N.; Smetana, A.O.; Westmoreland, B.W.

    1991-06-01

    The mission of the ASCENT Team is to continually keep pace with, evaluate, and select emerging computing technologies to define and implement prototypic scientific environments that maximize the ability of scientists and engineers to manage scientific data. These environments are to be implemented in a manner consistent with the site computing architecture and standards and NRTSC/SCS strategic plans for scientific computing. The major trends in computing hardware and software technology clearly indicate that the future computer'' will be a network environment that comprises supercomputers, graphics boxes, mainframes, clusters, workstations, terminals, and microcomputers. This network computer'' will have an architecturally transparent operating system allowing the applications code to run on any box supplying the required computing resources. The environment will include a distributed database and database managing system(s) that permits use of relational, hierarchical, object oriented, GIS, et al, databases. To reach this goal requires a stepwise progression from the present assemblage of monolithic applications codes running on disparate hardware platforms and operating systems. The first steps include converting from the existing JOSHUA system to a new J80 system that complies with modern language standards, development of a new J90 prototype to provide JOSHUA capabilities on Unix platforms, development of portable graphics tools to greatly facilitate preparation of input and interpretation of output; and extension of Jvv'' concepts and capabilities to distributed and/or parallel computing environments.

  15. 77 FR 12823 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... final report, Advanced Networking update Status from Computer Science COV Early Career technical talks Summary of Applied Math and Computer Science Workshops ASCR's new SBIR awards Data-intensive Science... Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science....

  16. Computational Biology, Advanced Scientific Computing, and Emerging Computational Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    2007-06-27

    This CRADA was established at the start of FY02 with $200 K from IBM and matching funds from DOE to support post-doctoral fellows in collaborative research between International Business Machines and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to explore effective use of emerging petascale computational architectures for the solution of computational biology problems. 'No cost' extensions of the CRADA were negotiated with IBM for FY03 and FY04.

  17. Advances in computing, and their impact on scientific computing.

    PubMed

    Giles, Mike

    2002-01-01

    This paper begins by discussing the developments and trends in computer hardware, starting with the basic components (microprocessors, memory, disks, system interconnect, networking and visualization) before looking at complete systems (death of vector supercomputing, slow demise of large shared-memory systems, rapid growth in very large clusters of PCs). It then considers the software side, the relative maturity of shared-memory (OpenMP) and distributed-memory (MPI) programming environments, and new developments in 'grid computing'. Finally, it touches on the increasing importance of software packages in scientific computing, and the increased importance and difficulty of introducing good software engineering practices into very large academic software development projects. PMID:12539947

  18. DOE Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Subcommittee Report on Scientific and Technical Information

    SciTech Connect

    Hey, Tony; Agarwal, Deborah; Borgman, Christine; Cartaro, Concetta; Crivelli, Silvia; Van Dam, Kerstin Kleese; Luce, Richard; Arjun, Shankar; Trefethen, Anne; Wade, Alex; Williams, Dean

    2015-09-04

    The Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) was charged to form a standing subcommittee to review the Department of Energy’s Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and to begin by assessing the quality and effectiveness of OSTI’s recent and current products and services and to comment on its mission and future directions in the rapidly changing environment for scientific publication and data. The Committee met with OSTI staff and reviewed available products, services and other materials. This report summaries their initial findings and recommendations.

  19. OPENING REMARKS: SciDAC: Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Good morning. Welcome to SciDAC 2005 and San Francisco. SciDAC is all about computational science and scientific discovery. In a large sense, computational science characterizes SciDAC and its intent is change. It transforms both our approach and our understanding of science. It opens new doors and crosses traditional boundaries while seeking discovery. In terms of twentieth century methodologies, computational science may be said to be transformational. There are a number of examples to this point. First are the sciences that encompass climate modeling. The application of computational science has in essence created the field of climate modeling. This community is now international in scope and has provided precision results that are challenging our understanding of our environment. A second example is that of lattice quantum chromodynamics. Lattice QCD, while adding precision and insight to our fundamental understanding of strong interaction dynamics, has transformed our approach to particle and nuclear science. The individual investigator approach has evolved to teams of scientists from different disciplines working side-by-side towards a common goal. SciDAC is also undergoing a transformation. This meeting is a prime example. Last year it was a small programmatic meeting tracking progress in SciDAC. This year, we have a major computational science meeting with a variety of disciplines and enabling technologies represented. SciDAC 2005 should position itself as a new corner stone for Computational Science and its impact on science. As we look to the immediate future, FY2006 will bring a new cycle to SciDAC. Most of the program elements of SciDAC will be re-competed in FY2006. The re-competition will involve new instruments for computational science, new approaches for collaboration, as well as new disciplines. There will be new opportunities for virtual experiments in carbon sequestration, fusion, and nuclear power and nuclear waste, as well as collaborations

  20. DOE Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Report: Exascale Computing Initiative Review

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Daniel; Berzins, Martin; Pennington, Robert; Sarkar, Vivek; Taylor, Valerie

    2015-08-01

    On November 19, 2014, the Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) was charged with reviewing the Department of Energy’s conceptual design for the Exascale Computing Initiative (ECI). In particular, this included assessing whether there are significant gaps in the ECI plan or areas that need to be given priority or extra management attention. Given the breadth and depth of previous reviews of the technical challenges inherent in exascale system design and deployment, the subcommittee focused its assessment on organizational and management issues, considering technical issues only as they informed organizational or management priorities and structures. This report presents the observations and recommendations of the subcommittee.

  1. Advanced Scientific Computing Environment Team new scientific database management task. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Church, J.P.; Roberts, J.C.; Sims, R.N.; Smetana, A.O.; Westmoreland, B.W.

    1991-06-01

    The mission of the ASCENT Team is to continually keep pace with, evaluate, and select emerging computing technologies to define and implement prototypic scientific environments that maximize the ability of scientists and engineers to manage scientific data. These environments are to be implemented in a manner consistent with the site computing architecture and standards and NRTSC/SCS strategic plans for scientific computing. The major trends in computing hardware and software technology clearly indicate that the future ``computer`` will be a network environment that comprises supercomputers, graphics boxes, mainframes, clusters, workstations, terminals, and microcomputers. This ``network computer`` will have an architecturally transparent operating system allowing the applications code to run on any box supplying the required computing resources. The environment will include a distributed database and database managing system(s) that permits use of relational, hierarchical, object oriented, GIS, et al, databases. To reach this goal requires a stepwise progression from the present assemblage of monolithic applications codes running on disparate hardware platforms and operating systems. The first steps include converting from the existing JOSHUA system to a new J80 system that complies with modern language standards, development of a new J90 prototype to provide JOSHUA capabilities on Unix platforms, development of portable graphics tools to greatly facilitate preparation of input and interpretation of output; and extension of ``Jvv`` concepts and capabilities to distributed and/or parallel computing environments.

  2. 77 FR 62231 - DOE/Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE.... Computational Science Graduate Fellowship (CSGF) Longitudinal Study. Update on Exascale. Update from DOE data... contact Melea Baker, (301) 903-7486 or by email at: Melea.Baker@science.doe.gov . You must make...

  3. UNEDF: Advanced Scientific Computing Collaboration Transforms the Low-Energy Nuclear Many-Body Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, H.; Stoitsov, M.; Nazarewicz, W.; Bulgac, A.; Hagen, G.; Kortelainen, M.; Maris, P.; Pei, J. C.; Roche, K. J.; Schunck, N.; Thompson, I.; Vary, J. P.; Wild, S. M.

    2012-12-20

    The demands of cutting-edge science are driving the need for larger and faster computing resources. With the rapidly growing scale of computing systems and the prospect of technologically disruptive architectures to meet these needs, scientists face the challenge of effectively using complex computational resources to advance scientific discovery. Multi-disciplinary collaborating networks of researchers with diverse scientific backgrounds are needed to address these complex challenges. The UNEDF SciDAC collaboration of nuclear theorists, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists is developing a comprehensive description of nuclei and their reactions that delivers maximum predictive power with quantified uncertainties. This paper describes UNEDF and identifies attributes that classify it as a successful computational collaboration. Finally, we illustrate significant milestones accomplished by UNEDF through integrative solutions using the most reliable theoretical approaches, most advanced algorithms, and leadership-class computational resources.

  4. National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Horst; Kramer, William; Saphir, William; Shalf, John; Bailey, David; Oliker, Leonid; Banda, Michael; McCurdy, C. William; Hules, John; Canning, Andrew; Day, Marc; Colella, Philip; Serafini, David; Wehner, Michael; Nugent, Peter

    2004-04-02

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) proposes to create a National Facility for Advanced Computational Science (NFACS) and to establish a new partnership between the American computer industry and a national consortium of laboratories, universities, and computing facilities. NFACS will provide leadership-class scientific computing capability to scientists and engineers nationwide, independent of their institutional affiliation or source of funding. This partnership will bring into existence a new class of computational capability in the United States that is optimal for science and will create a sustainable path towards petaflops performance.

  5. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC): Advancing the frontiers of computational science and technology

    SciTech Connect

    Hules, J.

    1996-11-01

    National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) provides researchers with high-performance computing tools to tackle science`s biggest and most challenging problems. Founded in 1974 by DOE/ER, the Controlled Thermonuclear Research Computer Center was the first unclassified supercomputer center and was the model for those that followed. Over the years the center`s name was changed to the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center and then to NERSC; it was relocated to LBNL. NERSC, one of the largest unclassified scientific computing resources in the world, is the principal provider of general-purpose computing services to DOE/ER programs: Magnetic Fusion Energy, High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Basic Energy Sciences, Health and Environmental Research, and the Office of Computational and Technology Research. NERSC users are a diverse community located throughout US and in several foreign countries. This brochure describes: the NERSC advantage, its computational resources and services, future technologies, scientific resources, and computational science of scale (interdisciplinary research over a decade or longer; examples: combustion in engines, waste management chemistry, global climate change modeling).

  6. DOE Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Subcommittee (ASCAC) Report: Top Ten Exascale Research Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, Robert; Ang, James; Bergman, Keren; Borkar, Shekhar; Carlson, William; Carrington, Laura; Chiu, George; Colwell, Robert; Dally, William; Dongarra, Jack; Geist, Al; Haring, Rud; Hittinger, Jeffrey; Hoisie, Adolfy; Klein, Dean Micron; Kogge, Peter; Lethin, Richard; Sarkar, Vivek; Schreiber, Robert; Shalf, John; Sterling, Thomas; Stevens, Rick; Bashor, Jon; Brightwell, Ron; Coteus, Paul; Debenedictus, Erik; Hiller, Jon; Kim, K. H.; Langston, Harper; Murphy, Richard Micron; Webster, Clayton; Wild, Stefan; Grider, Gary; Ross, Rob; Leyffer, Sven; Laros III, James

    2014-02-10

    Exascale computing systems are essential for the scientific fields that will transform the 21st century global economy, including energy, biotechnology, nanotechnology, and materials science. Progress in these fields is predicated on the ability to perform advanced scientific and engineering simulations, and analyze the deluge of data. On July 29, 2013, ASCAC was charged by Patricia Dehmer, the Acting Director of the Office of Science, to assemble a subcommittee to provide advice on exascale computing. This subcommittee was directed to return a list of no more than ten technical approaches (hardware and software) that will enable the development of a system that achieves the Department's goals for exascale computing. Numerous reports over the past few years have documented the technical challenges and the non¬-viability of simply scaling existing computer designs to reach exascale. The technical challenges revolve around energy consumption, memory performance, resilience, extreme concurrency, and big data. Drawing from these reports and more recent experience, this ASCAC subcommittee has identified the top ten computing technology advancements that are critical to making a capable, economically viable, exascale system.

  7. UNEDF: Advanced Scientific Computing Transforms the Low-Energy Nuclear Many-Body Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Stoitsov, Mario; Nam, Hai Ah; Nazarewicz, Witold; Bulgac, Aurel; Hagen, Gaute; Kortelainen, E. M.; Pei, Junchen; Roche, K. J.; Schunck, N.; Thompson, I.; Vary, J. P.; Wild, S.

    2011-01-01

    The UNEDF SciDAC collaboration of nuclear theorists, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists is developing a comprehensive description of nuclei and their reactions that delivers maximum predictive power with quantified uncertainties. This paper illustrates significant milestones accomplished by UNEDF through integration of the theoretical approaches, advanced numerical algorithms, and leadership class computational resources.

  8. Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC-3) Partnership Project Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Forest M.; Bochev, Pavel B.; Cameron-Smith, Philip J..; Easter, Richard C; Elliott, Scott M.; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Lowrie, Robert B.; Lucas, Donald D.; Ma, Po-lun; Sacks, William J.; Shrivastava, Manish; Singh, Balwinder; Tautges, Timothy J.; Taylor, Mark A.; Vertenstein, Mariana; Worley, Patrick H.

    2014-01-15

    The Applying Computationally Efficient Schemes for BioGeochemical Cycles ACES4BGC Project is advancing the predictive capabilities of Earth System Models (ESMs) by reducing two of the largest sources of uncertainty, aerosols and biospheric feedbacks, with a highly efficient computational approach. In particular, this project is implementing and optimizing new computationally efficient tracer advection algorithms for large numbers of tracer species; adding important biogeochemical interactions between the atmosphere, land, and ocean models; and applying uncertainty quanti cation (UQ) techniques to constrain process parameters and evaluate uncertainties in feedbacks between biogeochemical cycles and the climate system.

  9. Advanced computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Advanced concepts in hardware, software and algorithms are being pursued for application in next generation space computers and for ground based analysis of space data. The research program focuses on massively parallel computation and neural networks, as well as optical processing and optical networking which are discussed under photonics. Also included are theoretical programs in neural and nonlinear science, and device development for magnetic and ferroelectric memories.

  10. Modeling, Simulation and Analysis of Complex Networked Systems: A Program Plan for DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D L

    2009-05-01

    Many complex systems of importance to the U.S. Department of Energy consist of networks of discrete components. Examples are cyber networks, such as the internet and local area networks over which nearly all DOE scientific, technical and administrative data must travel, the electric power grid, social networks whose behavior can drive energy demand, and biological networks such as genetic regulatory networks and metabolic networks. In spite of the importance of these complex networked systems to all aspects of DOE's operations, the scientific basis for understanding these systems lags seriously behind the strong foundations that exist for the 'physically-based' systems usually associated with DOE research programs that focus on such areas as climate modeling, fusion energy, high-energy and nuclear physics, nano-science, combustion, and astrophysics. DOE has a clear opportunity to develop a similarly strong scientific basis for understanding the structure and dynamics of networked systems by supporting a strong basic research program in this area. Such knowledge will provide a broad basis for, e.g., understanding and quantifying the efficacy of new security approaches for computer networks, improving the design of computer or communication networks to be more robust against failures or attacks, detecting potential catastrophic failure on the power grid and preventing or mitigating its effects, understanding how populations will respond to the availability of new energy sources or changes in energy policy, and detecting subtle vulnerabilities in large software systems to intentional attack. This white paper outlines plans for an aggressive new research program designed to accelerate the advancement of the scientific basis for complex networked systems of importance to the DOE. It will focus principally on four research areas: (1) understanding network structure, (2) understanding network dynamics, (3) predictive modeling and simulation for complex networked systems

  11. Advancing Scientific Research in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towne, Lisa, Ed.; Wise, Lauress L., Ed.; Winters, Tina M., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    Transforming education into an evidence-based field depends in no small part on a strong base of scientific knowledge to inform educational policy and practice. Advancing Scientific Research in Education makes select recommendations for strengthening scientific education research and targets federal agencies, professional associations, and…

  12. Advanced Artificial Science. The development of an artificial science and engineering research infrastructure to facilitate innovative computational modeling, analysis, and application to interdisciplinary areas of scientific investigation.

    SciTech Connect

    Saffer, Shelley I.

    2014-12-01

    This is a final report of the DOE award DE-SC0001132, Advanced Artificial Science. The development of an artificial science and engineering research infrastructure to facilitate innovative computational modeling, analysis, and application to interdisciplinary areas of scientific investigation. This document describes the achievements of the goals, and resulting research made possible by this award.

  13. Advancing Scientific Research in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towne, Lisa, Ed.; Wise, Lauress L., Ed.; Winters, Tina M., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    The title of this report reveals its purpose precisely: to spur actions that will advance scientific research in education. The recommendations for accomplishing this goal, detailed in this report, build on the National Research Council (NRC) report "Scientific Research in Education" (National Research Council, 2002). That report offers an…

  14. Advances in scientific visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R. |

    1995-01-11

    This paper discusses scientific visualization of scalar and vector fields, particularly relating to clouds and climate modeling. One cloud rendering method applies a 3-D texture to cloudiness contour surfaces, to simulate a view from outer space. The texture is advected by the wind flow, so that it follows the cloud motion. Another technique simulates multiple scattering of incident light from the sun and sky. This paper also presents a simulation of the microscopic cross-bridge motion which powers muscle contraction. It was rendered by ray-tracing contour surfaces of summed Gaussian ellipsoids approximating the actin and myosin protein shapes.

  15. Parallel processing for scientific computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkhatib, Hasan S.

    1995-01-01

    The scope of this project dealt with the investigation of the requirements to support distributed computing of scientific computations over a cluster of cooperative workstations. Various experiments on computations for the solution of simultaneous linear equations were performed in the early phase of the project to gain experience in the general nature and requirements of scientific applications. A specification of a distributed integrated computing environment, DICE, based on a distributed shared memory communication paradigm has been developed and evaluated. The distributed shared memory model facilitates porting existing parallel algorithms that have been designed for shared memory multiprocessor systems to the new environment. The potential of this new environment is to provide supercomputing capability through the utilization of the aggregate power of workstations cooperating in a cluster interconnected via a local area network. Workstations, generally, do not have the computing power to tackle complex scientific applications, making them primarily useful for visualization, data reduction, and filtering as far as complex scientific applications are concerned. There is a tremendous amount of computing power that is left unused in a network of workstations. Very often a workstation is simply sitting idle on a desk. A set of tools can be developed to take advantage of this potential computing power to create a platform suitable for large scientific computations. The integration of several workstations into a logical cluster of distributed, cooperative, computing stations presents an alternative to shared memory multiprocessor systems. In this project we designed and evaluated such a system.

  16. Computers and Computation. Readings from Scientific American.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Robert R.; Weizenbaum, Joseph

    A collection of articles from "Scientific American" magazine has been put together at this time because the current period in computer science is one of consolidation rather than innovation. A few years ago, computer science was moving so swiftly that even the professional journals were more archival than informative; but today it is much easier…

  17. Comparisons of some large scientific computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Credeur, K. R.

    1981-01-01

    In 1975, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) began studies to assess the technical and economic feasibility of developing a computer having sustained computational speed of one billion floating point operations per second and a working memory of at least 240 million words. Such a powerful computer would allow computational aerodynamics to play a major role in aeronautical design and advanced fluid dynamics research. Based on favorable results from these studies, NASA proceeded with developmental plans. The computer was named the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulator (NAS). To help insure that the estimated cost, schedule, and technical scope were realistic, a brief study was made of past large scientific computers. Large discrepancies between inception and operation in scope, cost, or schedule were studied so that they could be minimized with NASA's proposed new compter. The main computers studied were the ILLIAC IV, STAR 100, Parallel Element Processor Ensemble (PEPE), and Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) computer. Comparison data on memory and speed were also obtained on the IBM 650, 704, 7090, 360-50, 360-67, 360-91, and 370-195; the CDC 6400, 6600, 7600, CYBER 203, and CYBER 205; CRAY 1; and the Advanced Scientific Computer (ASC). A few lessons learned conclude the report.

  18. Intel Woodcrest: An Evaluation for Scientific Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Philip C; Vetter, Jeffrey S

    2007-01-01

    Intel recently began shipping its Xeon 5100 series processors, formerly known by their 'Woodcrest' code name. To evaluate the suitability of the Woodcrest processor for high-end scientific computing, we obtained access to a Woodcrest-based system at Intel and measured its performance first using computation and memory micro-benchmarks, followed by full applications from the areas of climate modeling and molecular dynamics. For computational benchmarks, the Woodcrest showed excellent performance compared to a test system that uses Opteron processors from Advanced Micro Devices (AMD), though its performance advantage for full applications was less definitive. Nevertheless, our evaluation suggests the Woodcrest to be a compelling foundation for future leadership class systems for scientific computing.

  19. Exploiting scientific advances. Philip Russell.

    PubMed

    1992-04-01

    The Children's Vaccine Initiative (CVI) will hopefully accelerate the vaccine development process, make it more efficient, and produce new and better vaccines which will prevent most, if not all, of today's preventable diseases which lead to childhood mortality. The technology exists, but has simply not been exploited. Many exciting approaches to vaccine development never advance beyond the product development stage because, until now, there has been no mechanism for overseeing the entire process from the initial conception of a vaccine in the laboratory to its development by industry and its incorporation into vaccine programs. The CVI, however, has been established to provide such oversight and to coordinate the process. Recently developed technologies which could advance the attainment of CVI goals are the microencapsulation process and the use of live viral or attenuated bacterial vectors, genetically engineered to express desired vaccine antigen structures and induce immunity to specific infectious agents. The scientific obstacles are simply challenges which can be overcome. However, for the CVI to achieve its goals, it requires both adequate public sector resources and the collaboration of private industry. PMID:12321835

  20. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Damevski, Kostadin

    2009-03-30

    A resounding success of the Scientific Discover through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program is that high-performance computational science is now universally recognized as a critical aspect of scientific discovery [71], complementing both theoretical and experimental research. As scientific communities prepare to exploit unprecedened computing capabilities of emerging leadership-class machines for multi-model simulations at the extreme scale [72], it is more important than ever to address the technical and social challenges of geographically distributed teams that combine expertise in domain science, applied mathematics, and computer science to build robust and flexible codes that can incorporate changes over time. The Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) tackles these issues by exploiting component-based software development to facilitate collaborative hig-performance scientific computing.

  1. Parallel processing for scientific computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkhatib, Hasan S.

    1991-01-01

    The main contribution of the effort in the last two years is the introduction of the MOPPS system. After doing extensive literature search, we introduced the system which is described next. MOPPS employs a new solution to the problem of managing programs which solve scientific and engineering applications on a distributed processing environment. Autonomous computers cooperate efficiently in solving large scientific problems with this solution. MOPPS has the advantage of not assuming the presence of any particular network topology or configuration, computer architecture, or operating system. It imposes little overhead on network and processor resources while efficiently managing programs concurrently. The core of MOPPS is an intelligent program manager that builds a knowledge base of the execution performance of the parallel programs it is managing under various conditions. The manager applies this knowledge to improve the performance of future runs. The program manager learns from experience.

  2. Accelerating Scientific Discovery Through Computation and Visualization

    PubMed Central

    Sims, James S.; Hagedorn, John G.; Ketcham, Peter M.; Satterfield, Steven G.; Griffin, Terence J.; George, William L.; Fowler, Howland A.; am Ende, Barbara A.; Hung, Howard K.; Bohn, Robert B.; Koontz, John E.; Martys, Nicos S.; Bouldin, Charles E.; Warren, James A.; Feder, David L.; Clark, Charles W.; Filla, B. James; Devaney, Judith E.

    2000-01-01

    The rate of scientific discovery can be accelerated through computation and visualization. This acceleration results from the synergy of expertise, computing tools, and hardware for enabling high-performance computation, information science, and visualization that is provided by a team of computation and visualization scientists collaborating in a peer-to-peer effort with the research scientists. In the context of this discussion, high performance refers to capabilities beyond the current state of the art in desktop computing. To be effective in this arena, a team comprising a critical mass of talent, parallel computing techniques, visualization algorithms, advanced visualization hardware, and a recurring investment is required to stay beyond the desktop capabilities. This article describes, through examples, how the Scientific Applications and Visualization Group (SAVG) at NIST has utilized high performance parallel computing and visualization to accelerate condensate modeling, (2) fluid flow in porous materials and in other complex geometries, (3) flows in suspensions, (4) x-ray absorption, (5) dielectric breakdown modeling, and (6) dendritic growth in alloys. PMID:27551642

  3. Accelerating Scientific Computations using FPGAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pell, O.; Atasu, K.; Mencer, O.

    Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are semiconductor devices that contain a grid of programmable cells, which the user configures to implement any digital circuit of up to a few million gates. Modern FPGAs allow the user to reconfigure these circuits many times each second, making FPGAs fully programmable and general purpose. Recent FPGA technology provides sufficient resources to tackle scientific applications on large-scale parallel systems. As a case study, we implement the Fast Fourier Transform [1] in a flexible floating point implementation. We utilize A Stream Compiler [2] (ASC) which combines C++ syntax with flexible floating point support by providing a 'HWfloat' data-type. The resulting FFT can be targeted to a variety of FPGA platforms in FFTW-style, though not yet completely automatically. The resulting FFT circuit can be adapted to the particular resources available on the system. The optimal implementation of an FFT accelerator depends on the length and dimensionality of the FFT, the available FPGA area, the available hard DSP blocks, the FPGA board architecture, and the precision and range of the application [3]. Software-style object-orientated abstractions allow us to pursue an accelerated pace of development by maximizing re-use of design patterns. ASC allows a few core hardware descriptions to generate hundreds of different circuit variants to meet particular speed, area and precision goals. The key to achieving maximum acceleration of FFT computation is to match memory and compute bandwidths so that maximum use is made of computational resources. Modern FPGAs contain up to hundreds of independent SRAM banks to store intermediate results, providing ample scope for optimizing memory parallelism. At 175Mhz, one of Maxeler's Radix-4 FFT cores computes 4x as many 1024pt FFTs per second as a dual Pentium-IV Xeon machine running FFTW. Eight such parallel cores fit onto the largest FPGA in the Xilinx Virtex-4 family, providing a 32x speed-up over

  4. Advanced Aerobots for Scientific Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto; Raymond, Carol A.; Matthews, Janet B.; Nicaise, Fabien; Jones, Jack A.

    2010-01-01

    The Picosat and Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Systems Engineering (PAUSE) project is developing balloon-borne instrumentation systems as aerobots for scientific exploration of remote planets and for diverse terrestrial purposes that can include scientific exploration, mapping, and military surveillance. The underlying concept of balloon-borne gondolas housing outer-space-qualified scientific instruments and associated data-processing and radio-communication equipment is not new. Instead, the novelty lies in numerous design details that, taken together, make a PAUSE aerobot smaller, less expensive, and less massive, relative to prior aerobots developed for similar purposes: Whereas the gondola (including the instrumentation system housed in it) of a typical prior aerobot has a mass of hundreds of kilograms, the mass of the gondola (with instrumentation system) of a PAUSE aerobot is a few kilograms.

  5. Interfaces for Advanced Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, James D.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the coming generation of supercomputers that will have the power to make elaborate "artificial realities" that facilitate user-computer communication. Illustrates these technological advancements with examples of the use of head-mounted monitors which are connected to position and orientation sensors, and gloves that track finger and…

  6. Advances in Scientific Investigation and Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abt, Jeffrey; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Six articles address: (1) the impact of science on the physical examination and treatment of books; (2) equipment for physical examination of books; (3) research using the cyclotron for historical analysis; (4) scientific analysis of paper and ink in early maps; (5) recent advances in automation; and (6) cataloging standards. (MES)

  7. Scientific computing environment for the 1980s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, F. R.

    1986-01-01

    An emerging scientific computing environment in which computers are used not only to solve large-scale models, but are also integrated into the daily activities of scientists and engineers, is discussed. The requirements of the scientific user in this environment are reviewed, and the hardware environment is described, including supercomputers, work stations, mass storage, and communications. Significant increases in memory capacity to keep pace with performance increases, the introduction of powerful graphics displays into the work station, and networking to integrate many computers are stressed. The emerging system software environment is considered, including the operating systems, communications software, and languages. New scientific user tools and utilities that will become available are described.

  8. Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences: Accelerating Scientific Discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hules, John A

    2008-12-12

    Scientists today rely on advances in computer science, mathematics, and computational science, as well as large-scale computing and networking facilities, to increase our understanding of ourselves, our planet, and our universe. Berkeley Lab's Computing Sciences organization researches, develops, and deploys new tools and technologies to meet these needs and to advance research in such areas as global climate change, combustion, fusion energy, nanotechnology, biology, and astrophysics.

  9. Scientific Computing on the Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Gabrielle; Seidel, Edward; Shalf, John

    2001-12-12

    Computer simulations are becoming increasingly important as the only means for studying and interpreting the complex processes of nature. Yet the scope and accuracy of these simulations are severely limited by available computational power, even using today's most powerful supercomputers. As we endeavor to simulate the true complexity of nature, we will require much larger scale calculations than are possible at present. Such dynamic and large scale applications will require computational grids and grids require development of new latency tolerant algorithms, and sophisticated code frameworks like Cactus to carry out more complex and high fidelity simulations with a massive degree of parallelism.

  10. InSAR Scientific Computing Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurrola, E. M.; Rosen, P. A.; Sacco, G.; Zebker, H. A.; Simons, M.; Sandwell, D. T.

    2010-12-01

    The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE) is a software development effort in its second year within the NASA Advanced Information Systems and Technology program. The ISCE will provide a new computing environment for geodetic image processing for InSAR sensors that will enable scientists to reduce measurements directly from radar satellites and aircraft to new geophysical products without first requiring them to develop detailed expertise in radar processing methods. The environment can serve as the core of a centralized processing center to bring Level-0 raw radar data up to Level-3 data products, but is adaptable to alternative processing approaches for science users interested in new and different ways to exploit mission data. The NRC Decadal Survey-recommended DESDynI mission will deliver data of unprecedented quantity and quality, making possible global-scale studies in climate research, natural hazards, and Earth's ecosystem. The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment is planned to become a key element in processing DESDynI data into higher level data products and it is expected to enable a new class of analyses that take greater advantage of the long time and large spatial scales of these new data, than current approaches. At the core of ISCE is both legacy processing software from the JPL/Caltech ROI_PAC repeat-pass interferometry package as well as a new InSAR processing package containing more efficient and more accurate processing algorithms being developed at Stanford for this project that is based on experience gained in developing processors for missions such as SRTM and UAVSAR. Around the core InSAR processing programs we are building object-oriented wrappers to enable their incorporation into a more modern, flexible, extensible software package that is informed by modern programming methods, including rigorous componentization of processing codes, abstraction and generalization of data models, and a robust, intuitive user interface with

  11. Advances and Challenges in Computational Plasma Science

    SciTech Connect

    W.M. Tang; V.S. Chan

    2005-01-03

    Scientific simulation, which provides a natural bridge between theory and experiment, is an essential tool for understanding complex plasma behavior. Recent advances in simulations of magnetically-confined plasmas are reviewed in this paper with illustrative examples chosen from associated research areas such as microturbulence, magnetohydrodynamics, and other topics. Progress has been stimulated in particular by the exponential growth of computer speed along with significant improvements in computer technology.

  12. Component-Based Software for High-Performance Scientific Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Alexeev, Yuri; Allan, Benjamin A.; Armstrong, Robert C.; Bernholdt, David E.; Dahlgren, Tamara L.; Gannon, Dennis B.; Janssen, Curtis; Kenny, Joseph P.; Krishnan, Manoj Kumar; Kohl, James A.; Kumfert, Gary K.; McInnes, Lois C.; Nieplocha, Jarek; Parker, Steven G.; Rasmussen, Craig; Windus, Theresa L.

    2005-06-26

    Recent advances in both computational hardware and multidisciplinary science have given rise to an unprecedented level of complexity in scientific simulation software. This paper describes an ongoing grass roots effort aimed at addressing complexity in high-performance computing through the use of Component-Based Software Engineering (CBSE). Highlights of the benefits and accomplishments of the Common Component Architecture (CCA) Forum and SciDAC ISIC are given, followed by an illustrative example of how the CCA has been applied to drive scientific discovery in quantum chemistry. Thrusts for future research are also described briefly.

  13. Advances and challenges in computational plasma science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, W. M.

    2005-02-01

    Scientific simulation, which provides a natural bridge between theory and experiment, is an essential tool for understanding complex plasma behaviour. Recent advances in simulations of magnetically confined plasmas are reviewed in this paper, with illustrative examples, chosen from associated research areas such as microturbulence, magnetohydrodynamics and other topics. Progress has been stimulated, in particular, by the exponential growth of computer speed along with significant improvements in computer technology. The advances in both particle and fluid simulations of fine-scale turbulence and large-scale dynamics have produced increasingly good agreement between experimental observations and computational modelling. This was enabled by two key factors: (a) innovative advances in analytic and computational methods for developing reduced descriptions of physics phenomena spanning widely disparate temporal and spatial scales and (b) access to powerful new computational resources. Excellent progress has been made in developing codes for which computer run-time and problem-size scale well with the number of processors on massively parallel processors (MPPs). Examples include the effective usage of the full power of multi-teraflop (multi-trillion floating point computations per second) MPPs to produce three-dimensional, general geometry, nonlinear particle simulations that have accelerated advances in understanding the nature of turbulence self-regulation by zonal flows. These calculations, which typically utilized billions of particles for thousands of time-steps, would not have been possible without access to powerful present generation MPP computers and the associated diagnostic and visualization capabilities. In looking towards the future, the current results from advanced simulations provide great encouragement for being able to include increasingly realistic dynamics to enable deeper physics insights into plasmas in both natural and laboratory environments. This

  14. Advances in Computational Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Calder, Alan C.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2009-03-01

    I was invited to be the guest editor for a special issue of Computing in Science and Engineering along with a colleague from Stony Brook. This is the guest editors' introduction to a special issue of Computing in Science and Engineering. Alan and I have written this introduction and have been the editors for the 4 papers to be published in this special edition.

  15. Exploring HPCS Languages in Scientific Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, Richard F; Alam, Sadaf R; de Almeida, Valmor F; Bernholdt, David E; Elwasif, Wael R; Kuehn, Jeffery A; Poole, Stephen W; Shet, Aniruddha G

    2008-01-01

    As computers scale up dramatically to tens and hundreds of thousands of cores, develop deeper computational and memory hierarchies, and increased heterogeneity, developers of scientific software are increasingly challenged to express complex parallel simulations effectively and efficiently. In this paper, we explore the three languages developed under the DARPA High-Productivity Computing Systems (HPCS) program to help address these concerns: Chapel, Fortress, and X10. These languages provide a variety of features not found in currently popular HPC programming environments and make it easier to express powerful computational constructs, leading to new ways of thinking about parallel programming. Though the languages and their implementations are not yet mature enough for a comprehensive evaluation, we discuss some of the important features, and provide examples of how they can be used in scientific computing. We believe that these characteristics will be important to the future of high-performance scientific computing, whether the ultimate language of choice is one of the HPCS languages or something else.

  16. CRISP (COMPUTER RETRIEVED INFORMATION ON SCIENTIFIC PROJECTS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    CRISP (Computer Retrieval of Information on Scientific Projects) is a biomedical database system containing information on research projects and programs supported by the Department of Health and Human Services. Most of the research falls within the broad category of extramural p...

  17. Scientific Advances in Lung Cancer 2015.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Anne S; Scagliotti, Giorgio V; Bunn, Paul A; Carbone, David P; Warren, Graham W; Bai, Chunxue; de Koning, Harry J; Yousaf-Khan, A Uraujh; McWilliams, Annette; Tsao, Ming Sound; Adusumilli, Prasad S; Rami-Porta, Ramón; Asamura, Hisao; Van Schil, Paul E; Darling, Gail E; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Gomez, Daniel R; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E; Zimmermann, Stefan; Peters, Solange; Ignatius Ou, Sai-Hong; Reungwetwattana, Thanyanan; Jänne, Pasi A; Mok, Tony S; Wakelee, Heather A; Pirker, Robert; Mazières, Julien; Brahmer, Julie R; Zhou, Yang; Herbst, Roy S; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki A; Redman, Mary W; Wynes, Murry W; Gandara, David R; Kelly, Ronan J; Hirsch, Fred R; Pass, Harvey I

    2016-05-01

    Lung cancer continues to be a major global health problem; the disease is diagnosed in more than 1.6 million new patients each year. However, significant progress is underway in both the prevention and treatment of lung cancer. Lung cancer therapy has now emerged as a "role model" for precision cancer medicine, with several important therapeutic breakthroughs occurring during 2015. These advances have occurred primarily in the immunotherapy field and in treatments directed against tumors harboring specific oncogenic drivers. Our knowledge about molecular mechanisms for oncogene-driven tumors and about resistance to targeted therapies has increased quickly over the past year. As a result, several regulatory approvals of new agents that significantly improve survival and quality of life for patients with lung cancer who have advanced disease have occurred. The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer has gathered experts in different areas of lung cancer research and management to summarize the most significant scientific advancements related to prevention and therapy of lung cancer during the past year. PMID:27013409

  18. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Frances M. Marshall; Jeff Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2011-08-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

  19. Institute for Scientific Computing Research Annual Report: Fiscal Year 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, D E

    2005-02-07

    Large-scale scientific computation and all of the disciplines that support and help to validate it have been placed at the focus of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) by the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) initiative of the Office of Science of the Department of Energy (DOE). The maturation of computational simulation as a tool of scientific and engineering research is underscored in the November 2004 statement of the Secretary of Energy that, ''high performance computing is the backbone of the nation's science and technology enterprise''. LLNL operates several of the world's most powerful computers--including today's single most powerful--and has undertaken some of the largest and most compute-intensive simulations ever performed. Ultrascale simulation has been identified as one of the highest priorities in DOE's facilities planning for the next two decades. However, computers at architectural extremes are notoriously difficult to use efficiently. Furthermore, each successful terascale simulation only points out the need for much better ways of interacting with the resulting avalanche of data. Advances in scientific computing research have, therefore, never been more vital to LLNL's core missions than at present. Computational science is evolving so rapidly along every one of its research fronts that to remain on the leading edge, LLNL must engage researchers at many academic centers of excellence. In Fiscal Year 2004, the Institute for Scientific Computing Research (ISCR) served as one of LLNL's main bridges to the academic community with a program of collaborative subcontracts, visiting faculty, student internships, workshops, and an active seminar series. The ISCR identifies researchers from the academic community for computer science and computational science collaborations with LLNL and hosts them for short- and

  20. Scientific Computing Kernels on the Cell Processor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Samuel W.; Shalf, John; Oliker, Leonid; Kamil, Shoaib; Husbands, Parry; Yelick, Katherine

    2007-04-04

    The slowing pace of commodity microprocessor performance improvements combined with ever-increasing chip power demands has become of utmost concern to computational scientists. As a result, the high performance computing community is examining alternative architectures that address the limitations of modern cache-based designs. In this work, we examine the potential of using the recently-released STI Cell processor as a building block for future high-end computing systems. Our work contains several novel contributions. First, we introduce a performance model for Cell and apply it to several key scientific computing kernels: dense matrix multiply, sparse matrix vector multiply, stencil computations, and 1D/2D FFTs. The difficulty of programming Cell, which requires assembly level intrinsics for the best performance, makes this model useful as an initial step in algorithm design and evaluation. Next, we validate the accuracy of our model by comparing results against published hardware results, as well as our own implementations on a 3.2GHz Cell blade. Additionally, we compare Cell performance to benchmarks run on leading superscalar (AMD Opteron), VLIW (Intel Itanium2), and vector (Cray X1E) architectures. Our work also explores several different mappings of the kernels and demonstrates a simple and effective programming model for Cell's unique architecture. Finally, we propose modest microarchitectural modifications that could significantly increase the efficiency of double-precision calculations. Overall results demonstrate the tremendous potential of the Cell architecture for scientific computations in terms of both raw performance and power efficiency.

  1. National Laboratory for Advanced Scientific Visualization at UNAM - Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, Marina; Constantin Manea, Vlad; Varela, Alfredo

    2016-04-01

    In 2015, the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) joined the family of Universities and Research Centers where advanced visualization and computing plays a key role to promote and advance missions in research, education, community outreach, as well as business-oriented consulting. This initiative provides access to a great variety of advanced hardware and software resources and offers a range of consulting services that spans a variety of areas related to scientific visualization, among which are: neuroanatomy, embryonic development, genome related studies, geosciences, geography, physics and mathematics related disciplines. The National Laboratory for Advanced Scientific Visualization delivers services through three main infrastructure environments: the 3D fully immersive display system Cave, the high resolution parallel visualization system Powerwall, the high resolution spherical displays Earth Simulator. The entire visualization infrastructure is interconnected to a high-performance-computing-cluster (HPCC) called ADA in honor to Ada Lovelace, considered to be the first computer programmer. The Cave is an extra large 3.6m wide room with projected images on the front, left and right, as well as floor walls. Specialized crystal eyes LCD-shutter glasses provide a strong stereo depth perception, and a variety of tracking devices allow software to track the position of a user's hand, head and wand. The Powerwall is designed to bring large amounts of complex data together through parallel computing for team interaction and collaboration. This system is composed by 24 (6x4) high-resolution ultra-thin (2 mm) bezel monitors connected to a high-performance GPU cluster. The Earth Simulator is a large (60") high-resolution spherical display used for global-scale data visualization like geophysical, meteorological, climate and ecology data. The HPCC-ADA, is a 1000+ computing core system, which offers parallel computing resources to applications that requires

  2. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) Consolidated Progress Report July 2006 - March 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Bernholdt, D E; McInnes, L C; Govindaraju, M; Bramley, R; Epperly, T; Kohl, J A; Nieplocha, J; Armstrong, R; Shasharina, S; Sussman, A L; Sottile, M; Damevski, K

    2009-04-14

    A resounding success of the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program is that high-performance computational science is now universally recognized as a critical aspect of scientific discovery [71], complementing both theoretical and experimental research. As scientific communities prepare to exploit unprecedented computing capabilities of emerging leadership-class machines for multi-model simulations at the extreme scale [72], it is more important than ever to address the technical and social challenges of geographically distributed teams that combine expertise in domain science, applied mathematics, and computer science to build robust and flexible codes that can incorporate changes over time. The Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) tackles these issues by exploiting component-based software development to facilitate collaborative high-performance scientific computing.

  3. Software Engineering for Scientific Computer Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, Douglass E.; Henderson, Dale B.; Kendall, Richard P.; Whitney, Earl M.

    2004-11-01

    Computer simulation is becoming a very powerful tool for analyzing and predicting the performance of fusion experiments. Simulation efforts are evolving from including only a few effects to many effects, from small teams with a few people to large teams, and from workstations and small processor count parallel computers to massively parallel platforms. Successfully making this transition requires attention to software engineering issues. We report on the conclusions drawn from a number of case studies of large scale scientific computing projects within DOE, academia and the DoD. The major lessons learned include attention to sound project management including setting reasonable and achievable requirements, building a good code team, enforcing customer focus, carrying out verification and validation and selecting the optimum computational mathematics approaches.

  4. Scientific Visualization and Computational Science: Natural Partners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uselton, Samuel P.; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Scientific visualization is developing rapidly, stimulated by computational science, which is gaining acceptance as a third alternative to theory and experiment. Computational science is based on numerical simulations of mathematical models derived from theory. But each individual simulation is like a hypothetical experiment; initial conditions are specified, and the result is a record of the observed conditions. Experiments can be simulated for situations that can not really be created or controlled. Results impossible to measure can be computed.. Even for observable values, computed samples are typically much denser. Numerical simulations also extend scientific exploration where the mathematics is analytically intractable. Numerical simulations are used to study phenomena from subatomic to intergalactic scales and from abstract mathematical structures to pragmatic engineering of everyday objects. But computational science methods would be almost useless without visualization. The obvious reason is that the huge amounts of data produced require the high bandwidth of the human visual system, and interactivity adds to the power. Visualization systems also provide a single context for all the activities involved from debugging the simulations, to exploring the data, to communicating the results. Most of the presentations today have their roots in image processing, where the fundamental task is: Given an image, extract information about the scene. Visualization has developed from computer graphics, and the inverse task: Given a scene description, make an image. Visualization extends the graphics paradigm by expanding the possible input. The goal is still to produce images; the difficulty is that the input is not a scene description displayable by standard graphics methods. Visualization techniques must either transform the data into a scene description or extend graphics techniques to display this odd input. Computational science is a fertile field for visualization

  5. Scientifically advanced solutions for chestnut ink disease.

    PubMed

    Choupina, Altino Branco; Estevinho, Letícia; Martins, Ivone M

    2014-05-01

    On the north regions of Portugal and Spain, the Castanea sativa Mill. culture is extremely important. The biggest productivity and yield break occurs due to the ink disease, the causal agent being the oomycete Phytophthora cinnamomi. This oomycete is also responsible for the decline of many other plant species in Europe and worldwide. P. cinnamomi and Phytophthora cambivora are considered, by the generality of the authors, as the C. sativa ink disease causal agents. Most Phytophthora species secrete large amounts of elicitins, a group of unique highly conserved proteins that are able to induce hypersensitive response (HR) and enhances plant defense responses in a systemic acquired resistance (SAR) manner against infection by different pathogens. Some other proteins involved in mechanisms of infection by P. cinnamomi were identified by our group: endo-1,3-beta-glucanase (complete cds); exo-glucanase (partial cds) responsible by adhesion, penetration, and colonization of host tissues; glucanase inhibitor protein (GIP) (complete cds) responsible by the suppression of host defense responses; necrosis-inducing Phytophthora protein 1 (NPP1) (partial cds); and transglutaminase (partial cds) which inducts defense responses and disease-like symptoms. In this mini-review, we present some scientifically advanced solutions that can contribute to the resolution of ink disease. PMID:24622889

  6. Enabling Computational Technologies for Terascale Scientific Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, S.F.

    2000-08-24

    We develop scalable algorithms and object-oriented code frameworks for terascale scientific simulations on massively parallel processors (MPPs). Our research in multigrid-based linear solvers and adaptive mesh refinement enables Laboratory programs to use MPPs to explore important physical phenomena. For example, our research aids stockpile stewardship by making practical detailed 3D simulations of radiation transport. The need to solve large linear systems arises in many applications, including radiation transport, structural dynamics, combustion, and flow in porous media. These systems result from discretizations of partial differential equations on computational meshes. Our first research objective is to develop multigrid preconditioned iterative methods for such problems and to demonstrate their scalability on MPPs. Scalability describes how total computational work grows with problem size; it measures how effectively additional resources can help solve increasingly larger problems. Many factors contribute to scalability: computer architecture, parallel implementation, and choice of algorithm. Scalable algorithms have been shown to decrease simulation times by several orders of magnitude.

  7. Future Directions in Computational Mathematics, Algorithms, and Scientific Software. Report of the Panel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Philadelphia, PA.

    The critical role of computers in scientific advancement is described in this panel report. With the growing range and complexity of problems that must be solved and with demands of new generations of computers and computer architecture, the importance of computational mathematics is increasing. Multidisciplinary teams are needed; these are found…

  8. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Componet Software (TASCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Govindaraju, Madhusudhan

    2010-10-31

    Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science FY 2010Report Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software: Distributed CCA State University of New York, Binghamton, NY, 13902 Summary The overall objective of Binghamton's involvement is to work on enhancements of the CCA environment, motivated by the applications and research initiatives discussed in the proposal. This year we are working on re-focusing our design and development efforts to develop proof-of-concept implementations that have the potential to significantly impact scientific components. We worked on developing parallel implementations for non-hydrostatic code and worked on a model coupling interface for biogeochemical computations coded in MATLAB. We also worked on the design and implementation modules that will be required for the emerging MapReduce model to be effective for scientific applications. Finally, we focused on optimizing the processing of scientific datasets on multi-core processors. Research Details We worked on the following research projects that we are working on applying to CCA-based scientific applications. 1. Non-Hydrostatic Hydrodynamics: Non-static hydrodynamics are significantly more accurate at modeling internal waves that may be important in lake ecosystems. Non-hydrostatic codes, however, are significantly more computationally expensive, often prohibitively so. We have worked with Chin Wu at the University of Wisconsin to parallelize non-hydrostatic code. We have obtained a speed up of about 26 times maximum. Although this is significant progress, we hope to improve the performance further, such that it becomes a practical alternative to hydrostatic codes. 2. Model-coupling for water-based ecosystems: To answer pressing questions about water resources requires that physical models (hydrodynamics) be coupled with biological and chemical models. Most hydrodynamics codes are written in Fortran, however, while most ecologists work in MATLAB. This

  9. Educational NASA Computational and Scientific Studies (enCOMPASS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Memarsadeghi, Nargess

    2013-01-01

    Educational NASA Computational and Scientific Studies (enCOMPASS) is an educational project of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center aimed at bridging the gap between computational objectives and needs of NASA's scientific research, missions, and projects, and academia's latest advances in applied mathematics and computer science. enCOMPASS achieves this goal via bidirectional collaboration and communication between NASA and academia. Using developed NASA Computational Case Studies in university computer science/engineering and applied mathematics classes is a way of addressing NASA's goals of contributing to the Science, Technology, Education, and Math (STEM) National Objective. The enCOMPASS Web site at http://encompass.gsfc.nasa.gov provides additional information. There are currently nine enCOMPASS case studies developed in areas of earth sciences, planetary sciences, and astrophysics. Some of these case studies have been published in AIP and IEEE's Computing in Science and Engineering magazines. A few university professors have used enCOMPASS case studies in their computational classes and contributed their findings to NASA scientists. In these case studies, after introducing the science area, the specific problem, and related NASA missions, students are first asked to solve a known problem using NASA data and past approaches used and often published in a scientific/research paper. Then, after learning about the NASA application and related computational tools and approaches for solving the proposed problem, students are given a harder problem as a challenge for them to research and develop solutions for. This project provides a model for NASA scientists and engineers on one side, and university students, faculty, and researchers in computer science and applied mathematics on the other side, to learn from each other's areas of work, computational needs and solutions, and the latest advances in research and development. This innovation takes NASA science and

  10. Center for Advanced Computational Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.

    2000-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Computational Technology (ACT) was established to serve as a focal point for diverse research activities pertaining to application of advanced computational technology to future aerospace systems. These activities include the use of numerical simulations, artificial intelligence methods, multimedia and synthetic environments, and computational intelligence, in the modeling, analysis, sensitivity studies, optimization, design and operation of future aerospace systems. The Center is located at NASA Langley and is an integral part of the School of Engineering and Applied Science of the University of Virginia. The Center has four specific objectives: 1) conduct innovative research on applications of advanced computational technology to aerospace systems; 2) act as pathfinder by demonstrating to the research community what can be done (high-potential, high-risk research); 3) help in identifying future directions of research in support of the aeronautical and space missions of the twenty-first century; and 4) help in the rapid transfer of research results to industry and in broadening awareness among researchers and engineers of the state-of-the-art in applications of advanced computational technology to the analysis, design prototyping and operations of aerospace and other high-performance engineering systems. In addition to research, Center activities include helping in the planning and coordination of the activities of a multi-center team of NASA and JPL researchers who are developing an intelligent synthesis environment for future aerospace systems; organizing workshops and national symposia; as well as writing state-of-the-art monographs and NASA special publications on timely topics.

  11. Recent advances in computational aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Ramesh K.; Desse, Jerry E.

    1991-04-01

    The current state of the art in computational aerodynamics is described. Recent advances in the discretization of surface geometry, grid generation, and flow simulation algorithms have led to flowfield predictions for increasingly complex and realistic configurations. As a result, computational aerodynamics is emerging as a crucial enabling technology for the development and design of flight vehicles. Examples illustrating the current capability for the prediction of aircraft, launch vehicle and helicopter flowfields are presented. Unfortunately, accurate modeling of turbulence remains a major difficulty in the analysis of viscosity-dominated flows. In the future inverse design methods, multidisciplinary design optimization methods, artificial intelligence technology and massively parallel computer technology will be incorporated into computational aerodynamics, opening up greater opportunities for improved product design at substantially reduced costs.

  12. Advanced flight computer. Special study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coo, Dennis

    1995-01-01

    This report documents a special study to define a 32-bit radiation hardened, SEU tolerant flight computer architecture, and to investigate current or near-term technologies and development efforts that contribute to the Advanced Flight Computer (AFC) design and development. An AFC processing node architecture is defined. Each node may consist of a multi-chip processor as needed. The modular, building block approach uses VLSI technology and packaging methods that demonstrate a feasible AFC module in 1998 that meets that AFC goals. The defined architecture and approach demonstrate a clear low-risk, low-cost path to the 1998 production goal, with intermediate prototypes in 1996.

  13. Final Report for "Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software"

    SciTech Connect

    Svetlana Shasharina

    2010-12-01

    The goal of the Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software is to fundamentally changing the way scientific software is developed and used by bringing component-based software development technologies to high-performance scientific and engineering computing. The role of Tech-X work in TASCS project is to provide an outreach to accelerator physics and fusion applications by introducing TASCS tools into applications, testing tools in the applications and modifying the tools to be more usable.

  14. Institute for Scientific Computing Research Fiscal Year 2002 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, D E; McGraw, J R; Bodtker, L K

    2003-03-11

    The Institute for Scientific Computing Research (ISCR) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is jointly administered by the Computing Applications and Research Department (CAR) and the University Relations Program (URP), and this joint relationship expresses its mission. An extensively externally networked ISCR cost-effectively expands the level and scope of national computational science expertise available to the Laboratory through CAR. The URP, with its infrastructure for managing six institutes and numerous educational programs at LLNL, assumes much of the logistical burden that is unavoidable in bridging the Laboratory's internal computational research environment with that of the academic community. As large-scale simulations on the parallel platforms of DOE's Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASCI) become increasingly important to the overall mission of LLNL, the role of the ISCR expands in importance, accordingly. Relying primarily on non-permanent staffing, the ISCR complements Laboratory research in areas of the computer and information sciences that are needed at the frontier of Laboratory missions. The ISCR strives to be the ''eyes and ears'' of the Laboratory in the computer and information sciences, in keeping the Laboratory aware of and connected to important external advances. It also attempts to be ''feet and hands, in carrying those advances into the Laboratory and incorporating them into practice. In addition to conducting research, the ISCR provides continuing education opportunities to Laboratory personnel, in the form of on-site workshops taught by experts on novel software or hardware technologies. The ISCR also seeks to influence the research community external to the Laboratory to pursue Laboratory-related interests and to train the workforce that will be required by the Laboratory. Part of the performance of this function is interpreting to the external community appropriate (unclassified) aspects of the Laboratory's own contributions

  15. Accurate modeling of parallel scientific computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.; Townsend, James C.

    1988-01-01

    Scientific codes are usually parallelized by partitioning a grid among processors. To achieve top performance it is necessary to partition the grid so as to balance workload and minimize communication/synchronization costs. This problem is particularly acute when the grid is irregular, changes over the course of the computation, and is not known until load time. Critical mapping and remapping decisions rest on the ability to accurately predict performance, given a description of a grid and its partition. This paper discusses one approach to this problem, and illustrates its use on a one-dimensional fluids code. The models constructed are shown to be accurate, and are used to find optimal remapping schedules.

  16. ASCR Cybersecurity for Scientific Computing Integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Piesert, Sean

    2015-02-27

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has the responsibility to address the energy, environmental, and nuclear security challenges that face our nation. Much of DOE’s enterprise involves distributed, collaborative teams; a signi¬cant fraction involves “open science,” which depends on multi-institutional, often international collaborations that must access or share signi¬cant amounts of information between institutions and over networks around the world. The mission of the Office of Science is the delivery of scienti¬c discoveries and major scienti¬c tools to transform our understanding of nature and to advance the energy, economic, and national security of the United States. The ability of DOE to execute its responsibilities depends critically on its ability to assure the integrity and availability of scienti¬c facilities and computer systems, and of the scienti¬c, engineering, and operational software and data that support its mission.

  17. A Scientific Cloud Computing Platform for Condensed Matter Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorissen, K.; Johnson, W.; Vila, F. D.; Rehr, J. J.

    2013-03-01

    Scientific Cloud Computing (SCC) makes possible calculations with high performance computational tools, without the need to purchase or maintain sophisticated hardware and software. We have recently developed an interface dubbed SC2IT that controls on-demand virtual Linux clusters within the Amazon EC2 cloud platform. Using this interface we have developed a more advanced, user-friendly SCC Platform configured especially for condensed matter calculations. This platform contains a GUI, based on a new Java version of SC2IT, that permits calculations of various materials properties. The cloud platform includes Virtual Machines preconfigured for parallel calculations and several precompiled and optimized materials science codes for electronic structure and x-ray and electron spectroscopy. Consequently this SCC makes state-of-the-art condensed matter calculations easy to access for general users. Proof-of-principle performance benchmarks show excellent parallelization and communication performance. Supported by NSF grant OCI-1048052

  18. The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.; Gurrola, Eric; Sacco, Gian Franco; Zebker, Howard

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a flexible and extensible Interferometric SAR (InSAR) Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE) for geodetic image processing. ISCE was designed from the ground up as a geophysics community tool for generating stacks of interferograms that lend themselves to various forms of time-series analysis, with attention paid to accuracy, extensibility, and modularity. The framework is python-based, with code elements rigorously componentized by separating input/output operations from the processing engines. This allows greater flexibility and extensibility in the data models, and creates algorithmic code that is less susceptible to unnecessary modification when new data types and sensors are available. In addition, the components support provenance and checkpointing to facilitate reprocessing and algorithm exploration. The algorithms, based on legacy processing codes, have been adapted to assume a common reference track approach for all images acquired from nearby orbits, simplifying and systematizing the geometry for time-series analysis. The framework is designed to easily allow user contributions, and is distributed for free use by researchers. ISCE can process data from the ALOS, ERS, EnviSAT, Cosmo-SkyMed, RadarSAT-1, RadarSAT-2, and TerraSAR-X platforms, starting from Level-0 or Level 1 as provided from the data source, and going as far as Level 3 geocoded deformation products. With its flexible design, it can be extended with raw/meta data parsers to enable it to work with radar data from other platforms

  19. Scientific and Computational Challenges of the Fusion Simulation Program (FSP)

    SciTech Connect

    William M. Tang

    2011-02-09

    This paper highlights the scientific and computational challenges facing the Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) a major national initiative in the United States with the primary objective being to enable scientific discovery of important new plasma phenomena with associated understanding that emerges only upon integration. This requires developing a predictive integrated simulation capability for magnetically-confined fusion plasmas that are properly validated against experiments in regimes relevant for producing practical fusion energy. It is expected to provide a suite of advanced modeling tools for reliably predicting fusion device behavior with comprehensive and targeted science-based simulations of nonlinearly-coupled phenomena in the core plasma, edge plasma, and wall region on time and space scales required for fusion energy production. As such, it will strive to embody the most current theoretical and experimental understanding of magnetic fusion plasmas and to provide a living framework for the simulation of such plasmas as the associated physics understanding continues to advance over the next several decades. Substantive progress on answering the outstanding scientific questions in the field will drive the FSP toward its ultimate goal of developing the ability to predict the behavior of plasma discharges in toroidal magnetic fusion devices with high physics fidelity on all relevant time and space scales. From a computational perspective, this will demand computing resources in the petascale range and beyond together with the associated multi-core algorithmic formulation needed to address burning plasma issues relevant to ITER - a multibillion dollar collaborative experiment involving seven international partners representing over half the world's population. Even more powerful exascale platforms will be needed to meet the future challenges of designing a demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO). Analogous to other major applied physics modeling projects (e

  20. Review of An Introduction to Parallel and Vector Scientific Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.; Lefton, Lew

    2006-06-30

    On one hand, the field of high-performance scientific computing is thriving beyond measure. Performance of leading-edge systems on scientific calculations, as measured say by the Top500 list, has increased by an astounding factor of 8000 during the 15-year period from 1993 to 2008, which is slightly faster even than Moore's Law. Even more importantly, remarkable advances in numerical algorithms, numerical libraries and parallel programming environments have led to improvements in the scope of what can be computed that are entirely on a par with the advances in computing hardware. And these successes have spread far beyond the confines of large government-operated laboratories, many universities, modest-sized research institutes and private firms now operate clusters that differ only in scale from the behemoth systems at the large-scale facilities. In the wake of these recent successes, researchers from fields that heretofore have not been part of the scientific computing world have been drawn into the arena. For example, at the recent SC07 conference, the exhibit hall, which long has hosted displays from leading computer systems vendors and government laboratories, featured some 70 exhibitors who had not previously participated. In spite of all these exciting developments, and in spite of the clear need to present these concepts to a much broader technical audience, there is a perplexing dearth of training material and textbooks in the field, particularly at the introductory level. Only a handful of universities offer coursework in the specific area of highly parallel scientific computing, and instructors of such courses typically rely on custom-assembled material. For example, the present reviewer and Robert F. Lucas relied on materials assembled in a somewhat ad-hoc fashion from colleagues and personal resources when presenting a course on parallel scientific computing at the University of California, Berkeley, a few years ago. Thus it is indeed refreshing to see

  1. Advances in scientific balloon thermal modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohaboj, T.; Cathey, H.

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Balloon Program Office has long acknowledged that the accurate modeling of balloon performance and flight prediction is dependant on how well the balloon is thermally modeled. This ongoing effort is focused on developing accurate balloon thermal models that can be used to quickly predict balloon temperatures and balloon performance. The ability to model parametric changes is also a driver for this effort. This paper will present the most recent advances made in this area. This research effort continues to utilize the ``Thermal Desktop'' addition to AUTO CAD for the modeling. Recent advances have been made by using this analytical tool. A number of analyses have been completed to test the applicability of this tool to the problem with very positive results. Progressively detailed models have been developed to explore the capabilities of the tool as well as to provide guidance in model formulation. A number of parametric studies have been completed. These studies have varied the shape of the structure, material properties, environmental inputs, and model geometry. These studies have concentrated on spherical ``proxy models'' for the initial development stages and then to transition to the natural shaped zero pressure and super pressure balloons. An assessment of required model resolution has also been determined. Model solutions have been cross checked with known solutions via hand calculations. The comparison of these cases will also be presented. One goal is to develop analysis guidelines and an approach for modeling balloons for both simple first order estimates and detailed full models. This paper presents the step by step advances made as part of this effort, capabilities, limitations, and the lessons learned. Also presented are the plans for further thermal modeling work.

  2. Advances in Scientific Balloon Thermal Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohaboj, T.; Cathey, H. M., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Balloon Program office has long acknowledged that the accurate modeling of balloon performance and flight prediction is dependant on how well the balloon is thermally modeled. This ongoing effort is focused on developing accurate balloon thermal models that can be used to quickly predict balloon temperatures and balloon performance. The ability to model parametric changes is also a driver for this effort. This paper will present the most recent advances made in this area. This research effort continues to utilize the "Thrmal Desktop" addition to AUTO CAD for the modeling. Recent advances have been made by using this analytical tool. A number of analyses have been completed to test the applicability of this tool to the problem with very positive results. Progressively detailed models have been developed to explore the capabilities of the tool as well as to provide guidance in model formulation. A number of parametric studies have been completed. These studies have varied the shape of the structure, material properties, environmental inputs, and model geometry. These studies have concentrated on spherical "proxy models" for the initial development stages and then to transition to the natural shaped zero pressure and super pressure balloons. An assessment of required model resolution has also been determined. Model solutions have been cross checked with known solutions via hand calculations. The comparison of these cases will also be presented. One goal is to develop analysis guidelines and an approach for modeling balloons for both simple first order estimates and detailed full models. This papa presents the step by step advances made as part of this effort, capabilities, limitations, and the lessons learned. Also presented are the plans for further thermal modeling work.

  3. On combining computational differentiation and toolkits for parallel scientific computing.

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C. H.; Buecker, H. M.; Hovland, P. D.

    2000-06-08

    Automatic differentiation is a powerful technique for evaluating derivatives of functions given in the form of a high-level programming language such as Fortran, C, or C++. The program is treated as a potentially very long sequence of elementary statements to which the chain rule of differential calculus is applied over and over again. Combining automatic differentiation and the organizational structure of toolkits for parallel scientific computing provides a mechanism for evaluating derivatives by exploiting mathematical insight on a higher level. In these toolkits, algorithmic structures such as BLAS-like operations, linear and nonlinear solvers, or integrators for ordinary differential equations can be identified by their standardized interfaces and recognized as high-level mathematical objects rather than as a sequence of elementary statements. In this note, the differentiation of a linear solver with respect to some parameter vector is taken as an example. Mathematical insight is used to reformulate this problem into the solution of multiple linear systems that share the same coefficient matrix but differ in their right-hand sides. The experiments reported here use ADIC, a tool for the automatic differentiation of C programs, and PETSC, an object-oriented toolkit for the parallel solution of scientific problems modeled by partial differential equations.

  4. Computational Simulations and the Scientific Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, Bil; Wood, Bill

    2005-01-01

    As scientific simulation software becomes more complicated, the scientific-software implementor's need for component tests from new model developers becomes more crucial. The community's ability to follow the basic premise of the Scientific Method requires independently repeatable experiments, and model innovators are in the best position to create these test fixtures. Scientific software developers also need to quickly judge the value of the new model, i.e., its cost-to-benefit ratio in terms of gains provided by the new model and implementation risks such as cost, time, and quality. This paper asks two questions. The first is whether other scientific software developers would find published component tests useful, and the second is whether model innovators think publishing test fixtures is a feasible approach.

  5. Constructing Scientific Arguments Using Evidence from Dynamic Computational Climate Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pallant, Amy; Lee, Hee-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Modeling and argumentation are two important scientific practices students need to develop throughout school years. In this paper, we investigated how middle and high school students (N = 512) construct a scientific argument based on evidence from computational models with which they simulated climate change. We designed scientific argumentation…

  6. Scientific and computational challenges of the fusion simulation project (FSP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, W. M.

    2008-07-01

    This paper highlights the scientific and computational challenges facing the Fusion Simulation Project (FSP). The primary objective is to develop advanced software designed to use leadership-class computers for carrying out multiscale physics simulations to provide information vital to delivering a realistic integrated fusion simulation model with unprecedented physics fidelity. This multiphysics capability will be unprecedented in that in the current FES applications domain, the largest-scale codes are used to carry out first-principles simulations of mostly individual phenomena in realistic 3D geometry while the integrated models are much smaller-scale, lower-dimensionality codes with significant empirical elements used for modeling and designing experiments. The FSP is expected to be the most up-to-date embodiment of the theoretical and experimental understanding of magnetically confined thermonuclear plasmas and to provide a living framework for the simulation of such plasmas as the associated physics understanding continues to advance over the next several decades. Substantive progress on answering the outstanding scientific questions in the field will drive the FSP toward its ultimate goal of developing a reliable ability to predict the behavior of plasma discharges in toroidal magnetic fusion devices on all relevant time and space scales. From a computational perspective, the fusion energy science application goal to produce high-fidelity, whole-device modeling capabilities will demand computing resources in the petascale range and beyond, together with the associated multicore algorithmic formulation needed to address burning plasma issues relevant to ITER — a multibillion dollar collaborative device involving seven international partners representing over half the world's population. Even more powerful exascale platforms will be needed to meet the future challenges of designing a demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO). Analogous to other major applied

  7. InSAR Scientific Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.; Sacco, Gian Franco; Gurrola, Eric M.; Zabker, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    This computing environment is the next generation of geodetic image processing technology for repeat-pass Interferometric Synthetic Aperture (InSAR) sensors, identified by the community as a needed capability to provide flexibility and extensibility in reducing measurements from radar satellites and aircraft to new geophysical products. This software allows users of interferometric radar data the flexibility to process from Level 0 to Level 4 products using a variety of algorithms and for a range of available sensors. There are many radar satellites in orbit today delivering to the science community data of unprecedented quantity and quality, making possible large-scale studies in climate research, natural hazards, and the Earth's ecosystem. The proposed DESDynI mission, now under consideration by NASA for launch later in this decade, would provide time series and multiimage measurements that permit 4D models of Earth surface processes so that, for example, climate-induced changes over time would become apparent and quantifiable. This advanced data processing technology, applied to a global data set such as from the proposed DESDynI mission, enables a new class of analyses at time and spatial scales unavailable using current approaches. This software implements an accurate, extensible, and modular processing system designed to realize the full potential of InSAR data from future missions such as the proposed DESDynI, existing radar satellite data, as well as data from the NASA UAVSAR (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar), and other airborne platforms. The processing approach has been re-thought in order to enable multi-scene analysis by adding new algorithms and data interfaces, to permit user-reconfigurable operation and extensibility, and to capitalize on codes already developed by NASA and the science community. The framework incorporates modern programming methods based on recent research, including object-oriented scripts controlling legacy and

  8. A high performance scientific cloud computing environment for materials simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorissen, K.; Vila, F. D.; Rehr, J. J.

    2012-09-01

    We describe the development of a scientific cloud computing (SCC) platform that offers high performance computation capability. The platform consists of a scientific virtual machine prototype containing a UNIX operating system and several materials science codes, together with essential interface tools (an SCC toolset) that offers functionality comparable to local compute clusters. In particular, our SCC toolset provides automatic creation of virtual clusters for parallel computing, including tools for execution and monitoring performance, as well as efficient I/O utilities that enable seamless connections to and from the cloud. Our SCC platform is optimized for the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2). We present benchmarks for prototypical scientific applications and demonstrate performance comparable to local compute clusters. To facilitate code execution and provide user-friendly access, we have also integrated cloud computing capability in a JAVA-based GUI. Our SCC platform may be an alternative to traditional HPC resources for materials science or quantum chemistry applications.

  9. Performance of scientific computing platforms running MCNP4B

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, H.E.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1997-11-01

    A performance study has been made for the MCNP4B Monte Carlo radiation transport code on a wide variety of scientific computing platforms ranging from personal computers to Cray mainframes. We present the timing study results using MCNP4B and its new test set and libraries. This timing study is unlike other timing studies because of its widespread reproducibility, its direct comparability to the predecessor study in 1993, and its focus upon a nuclear engineering code. Our results, derived from using the new 29-problem test set for MCNP4B, (1) use a highly versatile and readily available physics code; (2) show that timing studies are very problem dependent; (3) present the results as raw data allowing comparisons of performance to other computing platforms not included in this study to those platforms that were included; (4) are reproducible; and (5) provide a measure of improvement in performance with the MCNP code due to advancements in software and hardware over the past 4 years. In the 1993 predecessor study using MCNP4A, the performances were based on a 25 problem test set. We present our data based on MCNP4B`s new 29 problem test set which cover 97% of all the FORTRAN physics code lines in MCNP4B. Like the previous study the new test problems and the test data library are available from the Radiation Shielding and Information Computational Center (RSICC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Our results are reproducible because anyone with the same workstation, compiler, and operating system can duplicate the results presented here. The computing platforms included in this study are the Sun Sparc2, Sun Sparc5, Cray YMP 8/128, HP C180,SGI origin 2000, DBC 3000/600, DBC AiphaStation 500(300 MHz), IBM RS/6000-590, HP /9000-735, Micron Milienia Pro 200 MHz PC, and the Cray T94/128.

  10. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2007 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hules, John A.; Bashor, Jon; Wang, Ucilia; Yarris, Lynn; Preuss, Paul

    2008-10-23

    This report presents highlights of the research conducted on NERSC computers in a variety of scientific disciplines during the year 2007. It also reports on changes and upgrades to NERSC's systems and services aswell as activities of NERSC staff.

  11. Basic mathematical function libraries for scientific computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galant, David C.

    1989-01-01

    Ada packages implementing selected mathematical functions for the support of scientific and engineering applications were written. The packages provide the Ada programmer with the mathematical function support found in the languages Pascal and FORTRAN as well as an extended precision arithmetic and a complete complex arithmetic. The algorithms used are fully described and analyzed. Implementation assumes that the Ada type FLOAT objects fully conform to the IEEE 754-1985 standard for single binary floating-point arithmetic, and that INTEGER objects are 32-bit entities. Codes for the Ada packages are included as appendixes.

  12. Computational Epigenetics: the new scientific paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Shen Jean; Tan, Tin Wee; Tong, Joo Chuan

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetics has recently emerged as a critical field for studying how non-gene factors can influence the traits and functions of an organism. At the core of this new wave of research is the use of computational tools that play critical roles not only in directing the selection of key experiments, but also in formulating new testable hypotheses through detailed analysis of complex genomic information that is not achievable using traditional approaches alone. Epigenomics, which combines traditional genomics with computer science, mathematics, chemistry, biochemistry and proteomics for the large-scale analysis of heritable changes in phenotype, gene function or gene expression that are not dependent on gene sequence, offers new opportunities to further our understanding of transcriptional regulation, nuclear organization, development and disease. This article examines existing computational strategies for the study of epigenetic factors. The most important databases and bioinformatic tools in this rapidly growing field have been reviewed. PMID:20978607

  13. Scientific computations section monthly report, November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M.R.

    1993-12-30

    This progress report from the Savannah River Technology Center contains abstracts from papers from the computational modeling, applied statistics, applied physics, experimental thermal hydraulics, and packaging and transportation groups. Specific topics covered include: engineering modeling and process simulation, criticality methods and analysis, plutonium disposition.

  14. Advancing manufacturing through computational chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Noid, D.W.; Sumpter, B.G.; Tuzun, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    The capabilities of nanotechnology and computational chemistry are reaching a point of convergence. New computer hardware and novel computational methods have created opportunities to test proposed nanometer-scale devices, investigate molecular manufacturing and model and predict properties of new materials. Experimental methods are also beginning to provide new capabilities that make the possibility of manufacturing various devices with atomic precision tangible. In this paper, we will discuss some of the novel computational methods we have used in molecular dynamics simulations of polymer processes, neural network predictions of new materials, and simulations of proposed nano-bearings and fluid dynamics in nano- sized devices.

  15. TOPICAL REVIEW: Advances and challenges in computational plasma science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, W. M.; Chan, V. S.

    2005-02-01

    Scientific simulation, which provides a natural bridge between theory and experiment, is an essential tool for understanding complex plasma behaviour. Recent advances in simulations of magnetically confined plasmas are reviewed in this paper, with illustrative examples, chosen from associated research areas such as microturbulence, magnetohydrodynamics and other topics. Progress has been stimulated, in particular, by the exponential growth of computer speed along with significant improvements in computer technology. The advances in both particle and fluid simulations of fine-scale turbulence and large-scale dynamics have produced increasingly good agreement between experimental observations and computational modelling. This was enabled by two key factors: (a) innovative advances in analytic and computational methods for developing reduced descriptions of physics phenomena spanning widely disparate temporal and spatial scales and (b) access to powerful new computational resources. Excellent progress has been made in developing codes for which computer run-time and problem-size scale well with the number of processors on massively parallel processors (MPPs). Examples include the effective usage of the full power of multi-teraflop (multi-trillion floating point computations per second) MPPs to produce three-dimensional, general geometry, nonlinear particle simulations that have accelerated advances in understanding the nature of turbulence self-regulation by zonal flows. These calculations, which typically utilized billions of particles for thousands of time-steps, would not have been possible without access to powerful present generation MPP computers and the associated diagnostic and visualization capabilities. In looking towards the future, the current results from advanced simulations provide great encouragement for being able to include increasingly realistic dynamics to enable deeper physics insights into plasmas in both natural and laboratory environments. This

  16. Using Advanced Scientific Diving Technologies to Assess the Underwater Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Southard, John A.; Williams, Greg D.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Blanton, Michael L.

    2003-03-31

    Scientific diving can provide unique information for addressing complex environmental issues in the marine environment and is applied to a variety of increasingly important issues throughout Puget Sound, including habitat degradation, endangered species, biological availability of contaminants, and the effects of overwater structures and shoreline protection features. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory uses trained scientific divers in conjunction with advanced technologies to collect in-situ information best obtained through direct observation and requiring minimal environmental disturbance. For example, advances in underwater communications allow divers to discuss observations and data collection techniques in real time, both with each other and with personnel on the surface. Other examples include the use of Dual frequency IDentification SONar (DIDSON), an underwater camera used to capture digital images of benthic structures, fish, and organisms during low light and high turbidity levels; the use of voice-narrated underwater video; and the development of sediment collection methods yielding one-meter cores. The combination of using trained scientific SCUBA divers and advanced underwater technologies is a key element in addressing multifaceted environmental problems, resulting in a more comprehensive understanding of the underwater environment and more reliable data with which to make resource management decisions.

  17. Building Cognition: The Construction of Computational Representations for Scientific Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandrasekharan, Sanjay; Nersessian, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    Novel computational representations, such as simulation models of complex systems and video games for scientific discovery (Foldit, EteRNA etc.), are dramatically changing the way discoveries emerge in science and engineering. The cognitive roles played by such computational representations in discovery are not well understood. We present a…

  18. Quantum chromodynamics with advanced computing

    SciTech Connect

    Kronfeld, Andreas S.; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    We survey results in lattice quantum chromodynamics from groups in the USQCD Collaboration. The main focus is on physics, but many aspects of the discussion are aimed at an audience of computational physicists.

  19. Activities of the Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliger, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) was established by the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) at the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) on June 6, 1983. RIACS is privately operated by USRA, a consortium of universities with research programs in the aerospace sciences, under contract with NASA. The primary mission of RIACS is to provide research and expertise in computer science and scientific computing to support the scientific missions of NASA ARC. The research carried out at RIACS must change its emphasis from year to year in response to NASA ARC's changing needs and technological opportunities. Research at RIACS is currently being done in the following areas: (1) parallel computing; (2) advanced methods for scientific computing; (3) high performance networks; and (4) learning systems. RIACS technical reports are usually preprints of manuscripts that have been submitted to research journals or conference proceedings. A list of these reports for the period January 1, 1994 through December 31, 1994 is in the Reports and Abstracts section of this report.

  20. Introduction to the LaRC central scientific computing complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoosmith, John N.

    1993-01-01

    The computers and associated equipment that make up the Central Scientific Computing Complex of the Langley Research Center are briefly described. The electronic networks that provide access to the various components of the complex and a number of areas that can be used by Langley and contractors staff for special applications (scientific visualization, image processing, software engineering, and grid generation) are also described. Flight simulation facilities that use the central computers are described. Management of the complex, procedures for its use, and available services and resources are discussed. This document is intended for new users of the complex, for current users who wish to keep appraised of changes, and for visitors who need to understand the role of central scientific computers at Langley.

  1. Aerodynamic Analyses Requiring Advanced Computers, Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Papers are presented which deal with results of theoretical research on aerodynamic flow problems requiring the use of advanced computers. Topics discussed include: viscous flows, boundary layer equations, turbulence modeling and Navier-Stokes equations, and internal flows.

  2. Bringing Advanced Computational Techniques to Energy Research

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Julie C

    2012-11-17

    Please find attached our final technical report for the BACTER Institute award. BACTER was created as a graduate and postdoctoral training program for the advancement of computational biology applied to questions of relevance to bioenergy research.

  3. Aerodynamic Analyses Requiring Advanced Computers, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Papers given at the conference present the results of theoretical research on aerodynamic flow problems requiring the use of advanced computers. Topics discussed include two-dimensional configurations, three-dimensional configurations, transonic aircraft, and the space shuttle.

  4. Accelerating scientific computations with mixed precision algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baboulin, Marc; Buttari, Alfredo; Dongarra, Jack; Kurzak, Jakub; Langou, Julie; Langou, Julien; Luszczek, Piotr; Tomov, Stanimire

    2009-12-01

    On modern architectures, the performance of 32-bit operations is often at least twice as fast as the performance of 64-bit operations. By using a combination of 32-bit and 64-bit floating point arithmetic, the performance of many dense and sparse linear algebra algorithms can be significantly enhanced while maintaining the 64-bit accuracy of the resulting solution. The approach presented here can apply not only to conventional processors but also to other technologies such as Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA), Graphical Processing Units (GPU), and the STI Cell BE processor. Results on modern processor architectures and the STI Cell BE are presented. Program summaryProgram title: ITER-REF Catalogue identifier: AECO_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECO_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 7211 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 41 862 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN 77 Computer: desktop, server Operating system: Unix/Linux RAM: 512 Mbytes Classification: 4.8 External routines: BLAS (optional) Nature of problem: On modern architectures, the performance of 32-bit operations is often at least twice as fast as the performance of 64-bit operations. By using a combination of 32-bit and 64-bit floating point arithmetic, the performance of many dense and sparse linear algebra algorithms can be significantly enhanced while maintaining the 64-bit accuracy of the resulting solution. Solution method: Mixed precision algorithms stem from the observation that, in many cases, a single precision solution of a problem can be refined to the point where double precision accuracy is achieved. A common approach to the solution of linear systems, either dense or sparse, is to perform the LU

  5. Ferrofluids: Modeling, numerical analysis, and scientific computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomas, Ignacio

    This dissertation presents some developments in the Numerical Analysis of Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) describing the behavior of ferrofluids. The most widely accepted PDE model for ferrofluids is the Micropolar model proposed by R.E. Rosensweig. The Micropolar Navier-Stokes Equations (MNSE) is a subsystem of PDEs within the Rosensweig model. Being a simplified version of the much bigger system of PDEs proposed by Rosensweig, the MNSE are a natural starting point of this thesis. The MNSE couple linear velocity u, angular velocity w, and pressure p. We propose and analyze a first-order semi-implicit fully-discrete scheme for the MNSE, which decouples the computation of the linear and angular velocities, is unconditionally stable and delivers optimal convergence rates under assumptions analogous to those used for the Navier-Stokes equations. Moving onto the much more complex Rosensweig's model, we provide a definition (approximation) for the effective magnetizing field h, and explain the assumptions behind this definition. Unlike previous definitions available in the literature, this new definition is able to accommodate the effect of external magnetic fields. Using this definition we setup the system of PDEs coupling linear velocity u, pressure p, angular velocity w, magnetization m, and magnetic potential ϕ We show that this system is energy-stable and devise a numerical scheme that mimics the same stability property. We prove that solutions of the numerical scheme always exist and, under certain simplifying assumptions, that the discrete solutions converge. A notable outcome of the analysis of the numerical scheme for the Rosensweig's model is the choice of finite element spaces that allow the construction of an energy-stable scheme. Finally, with the lessons learned from Rosensweig's model, we develop a diffuse-interface model describing the behavior of two-phase ferrofluid flows and present an energy-stable numerical scheme for this model. For a

  6. Scientific advances in headache research: an update on neurostimulation.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Jan; Magis, Delphine

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiological understanding of migraine and other primary headaches has been substantially improved over the last 20 years. A milestone that paved the way for successful research was the development of the International Classification of Headache Disorders published by the International Headache Society in 1988. The classification facilitated a clear clinical diagnosis of headache disorders and allowed research efforts to be focused on clearly defined syndromes. Recent advances in the understanding of headache disorders have been driven by the availability of new research tools, such as advanced imaging techniques, genetic tools, pharmaceutical compounds and devices for electrical or magnetic stimulation. The latest scientific and clinical advances were presented at the recent European Headache and Migraine Trust International Congress (EHMTIC) in London (UK). PMID:23253387

  7. Constructing Scientific Arguments Using Evidence from Dynamic Computational Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallant, Amy; Lee, Hee-Sun

    2015-04-01

    Modeling and argumentation are two important scientific practices students need to develop throughout school years. In this paper, we investigated how middle and high school students ( N = 512) construct a scientific argument based on evidence from computational models with which they simulated climate change. We designed scientific argumentation tasks with three increasingly complex dynamic climate models. Each scientific argumentation task consisted of four parts: multiple-choice claim, openended explanation, five-point Likert scale uncertainty rating, and open-ended uncertainty rationale. We coded 1,294 scientific arguments in terms of a claim's consistency with current scientific consensus, whether explanations were model based or knowledge based and categorized the sources of uncertainty (personal vs. scientific). We used chi-square and ANOVA tests to identify significant patterns. Results indicate that (1) a majority of students incorporated models as evidence to support their claims, (2) most students used model output results shown on graphs to confirm their claim rather than to explain simulated molecular processes, (3) students' dependence on model results and their uncertainty rating diminished as the dynamic climate models became more and more complex, (4) some students' misconceptions interfered with observing and interpreting model results or simulated processes, and (5) students' uncertainty sources reflected more frequently on their assessment of personal knowledge or abilities related to the tasks than on their critical examination of scientific evidence resulting from models. These findings have implications for teaching and research related to the integration of scientific argumentation and modeling practices to address complex Earth systems.

  8. Final Technical Report - Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, Alan

    2014-10-21

    This is a final technical report for the University of Maryland work in the SciDAC Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS). The Maryland work focused on software tools for coupling parallel software components built using the Common Component Architecture (CCA) APIs. Those tools are based on the Maryland InterComm software framework that has been used in multiple computational science applications to build large-scale simulations of complex physical systems that employ multiple separately developed codes.

  9. Advanced laptop and small personal computer technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Roger L.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced laptop and small personal computer technology is presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following areas of hand carried computers and mobile workstation technology are covered: background, applications, high end products, technology trends, requirements for the Control Center application, and recommendations for the future.

  10. Advanced Biomedical Computing Center (ABCC) | DSITP

    Cancer.gov

    The Advanced Biomedical Computing Center (ABCC), located in Frederick Maryland (MD), provides HPC resources for both NIH/NCI intramural scientists and the extramural biomedical research community. Its mission is to provide HPC support, to provide collaborative research, and to conduct in-house research in various areas of computational biology and biomedical research.

  11. Amdahl's Laws and Extreme Data-Intensive Scientific Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalay, A.

    2011-07-01

    Scientific computing is increasingly revolving around massive amounts of data. In astronomy, observations and numerical simulations are on the verge of generating many Petabytes of data. This new, data-centric computing requires a new look at computing architectures and strategies. The talk will revisit Amdahl's Law establishing the relation between CPU and I/O in a balanced computer system, and use this to analyze current computing architectures and workloads. We will discuss how existing hardware can be used to build systems that are much closer to an ideal Amdahl machine. Scaling existing architectures to the yearly doubling of data will soon require excessive amounts of electrical power. We have deployed various scientific test cases, mostly drawn from astronomy, over different architectures and compare performance and scaling laws. We discuss an inexpensive, yet high performance multi-petabyte system currently under construction at JHU.

  12. Scientific Grand Challenges: Crosscutting Technologies for Computing at the Exascale - February 2-4, 2010, Washington, D.C.

    SciTech Connect

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-02-06

    The goal of the "Scientific Grand Challenges - Crosscutting Technologies for Computing at the Exascale" workshop in February 2010, jointly sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research and the National Nuclear Security Administration, was to identify the elements of a research and development agenda that will address these challenges and create a comprehensive exascale computing environment. This exascale computing environment will enable the science applications identified in the eight previously held Scientific Grand Challenges Workshop Series.

  13. Advances and trends in computational structural mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Recent developments in computational structural mechanics are reviewed with reference to computational needs for future structures technology, advances in computational models for material behavior, discrete element technology, assessment and control of numerical simulations of structural response, hybrid analysis, and techniques for large-scale optimization. Research areas in computational structural mechanics which have high potential for meeting future technological needs are identified. These include prediction and analysis of the failure of structural components made of new materials, development of computational strategies and solution methodologies for large-scale structural calculations, and assessment of reliability and adaptive improvement of response predictions.

  14. Scientific and technological advancements in inertial fusion energy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hinkel, D. E.

    2013-09-26

    Scientific advancements in inertial fusion energy (IFE) were reported on at the IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, October 2012. Results presented transect the different ways to assemble the fuel, different scenarios for igniting the fuel, and progress in IFE technologies. The achievements of the National Ignition Campaign within the USA, using the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to indirectly drive laser fusion, have found beneficial the achievements in other IFE arenas such as directly driven laser fusion and target fabrication. Moreover, the successes at NIF have pay-off to alternative scenarios such as fast ignition, shock ignition, and heavy-ion fusion as well asmore » to directly driven laser fusion. As a result, this synergy is summarized here, and future scientific studies are detailed.« less

  15. Scientific and technological advancements in inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkel, D. E.

    2013-09-26

    Scientific advancements in inertial fusion energy (IFE) were reported on at the IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, October 2012. Results presented transect the different ways to assemble the fuel, different scenarios for igniting the fuel, and progress in IFE technologies. The achievements of the National Ignition Campaign within the USA, using the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to indirectly drive laser fusion, have found beneficial the achievements in other IFE arenas such as directly driven laser fusion and target fabrication. Moreover, the successes at NIF have pay-off to alternative scenarios such as fast ignition, shock ignition, and heavy-ion fusion as well as to directly driven laser fusion. As a result, this synergy is summarized here, and future scientific studies are detailed.

  16. Opportunities in computational mechanics: Advances in parallel computing

    SciTech Connect

    Lesar, R.A.

    1999-02-01

    In this paper, the authors will discuss recent advances in computing power and the prospects for using these new capabilities for studying plasticity and failure. They will first review the new capabilities made available with parallel computing. They will discuss how these machines perform and how well their architecture might work on materials issues. Finally, they will give some estimates on the size of problems possible using these computers.

  17. A scientific case study of an advanced LISA mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xuefei; Xu, Shengnian; Bai, Shan; Cao, Zhoujian; Chen, Gerui; Chen, Yanbei; He, Xiaokai; Heinzel, Gerhard; Lau, Yun-Kau; Liu, Chenzhou; Luo, Jun; Luo, Ziren; Pulido Patón, Antonio; Rüdiger, Albrecht; Shao, Mingxue; Spurzem, Rainer; Wang, Yan; Xu, Peng; Yeh, Hsien-Chi; Yuan, Yefei; Zhou, Zebing

    2011-05-01

    A brief status report of an ongoing scientific case study of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Antenna (ALIA) mission is presented. Key technology requirements and primary science objectives of the mission are covered in the study. Possible descope options for the mission and the corresponding compromise in science are also considered and compared. Our preliminary study indicates that ALIA holds promise in mapping out the mass and spin distribution of intermediate mass black holes possibly present in dense star clusters at low redshift as well as in shedding important light on the structure formation in the early Universe.

  18. A Component Architecture for High-Performance Scientific Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Bernholdt, D E; Allan, B A; Armstrong, R; Bertrand, F; Chiu, K; Dahlgren, T L; Damevski, K; Elwasif, W R; Epperly, T W; Govindaraju, M; Katz, D S; Kohl, J A; Krishnan, M; Kumfert, G; Larson, J W; Lefantzi, S; Lewis, M J; Malony, A D; McInnes, L C; Nieplocha, J; Norris, B; Parker, S G; Ray, J; Shende, S; Windus, T L; Zhou, S

    2004-12-14

    The Common Component Architecture (CCA) provides a means for software developers to manage the complexity of large-scale scientific simulations and to move toward a plug-and-play environment for high-performance computing. In the scientific computing context, component models also promote collaboration using independently developed software, thereby allowing particular individuals or groups to focus on the aspects of greatest interest to them. The CCA supports parallel and distributed computing as well as local high-performance connections between components in a language-independent manner. The design places minimal requirements on components and thus facilitates the integration of existing code into the CCA environment. The CCA model imposes minimal overhead to minimize the impact on application performance. The focus on high performance distinguishes the CCA from most other component models. The CCA is being applied within an increasing range of disciplines, including combustion research, global climate simulation, and computational chemistry.

  19. A Component Architecture for High-Performance Scientific Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Bernholdt, David E; Allan, Benjamin A; Armstrong, Robert C; Bertrand, Felipe; Chiu, Kenneth; Dahlgren, Tamara L; Damevski, Kostadin; Elwasif, Wael R; Epperly, Thomas G; Govindaraju, Madhusudhan; Katz, Daniel S; Kohl, James A; Krishnan, Manoj Kumar; Kumfert, Gary K; Larson, J Walter; Lefantzi, Sophia; Lewis, Michael J; Malony, Allen D; McInnes, Lois C; Nieplocha, Jarek; Norris, Boyana; Parker, Steven G; Ray, Jaideep; Shende, Sameer; Windus, Theresa L; Zhou, Shujia

    2006-07-03

    The Common Component Architecture (CCA) provides a means for software developers to manage the complexity of large-scale scientific simulations and to move toward a plug-and-play environment for high-performance computing. In the scientific computing context, component models also promote collaboration using independently developed software, thereby allowing particular individuals or groups to focus on the aspects of greatest interest to them. The CCA supports parallel and distributed computing as well as local high-performance connections between components in a language-independent manner. The design places minimal requirements on components and thus facilitates the integration of existing code into the CCA environment. The CCA model imposes minimal overhead to minimize the impact on application performance. The focus on high performance distinguishes the CCA from most other component models. The CCA is being applied within an increasing range of disciplines, including combustion research, global climate simulation, and computational chemistry.

  20. Exploring Cloud Computing for Large-scale Scientific Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Guang; Han, Binh; Yin, Jian; Gorton, Ian

    2013-06-27

    This paper explores cloud computing for large-scale data-intensive scientific applications. Cloud computing is attractive because it provides hardware and software resources on-demand, which relieves the burden of acquiring and maintaining a huge amount of resources that may be used only once by a scientific application. However, unlike typical commercial applications that often just requires a moderate amount of ordinary resources, large-scale scientific applications often need to process enormous amount of data in the terabyte or even petabyte range and require special high performance hardware with low latency connections to complete computation in a reasonable amount of time. To address these challenges, we build an infrastructure that can dynamically select high performance computing hardware across institutions and dynamically adapt the computation to the selected resources to achieve high performance. We have also demonstrated the effectiveness of our infrastructure by building a system biology application and an uncertainty quantification application for carbon sequestration, which can efficiently utilize data and computation resources across several institutions.

  1. Role of HPC in Advancing Computational Aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.

    2004-01-01

    On behalf of the High Performance Computing and Modernization Program (HPCMP) and NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division (NAS) a study is conducted to assess the role of supercomputers on computational aeroelasticity of aerospace vehicles. The study is mostly based on the responses to a web based questionnaire that was designed to capture the nuances of high performance computational aeroelasticity, particularly on parallel computers. A procedure is presented to assign a fidelity-complexity index to each application. Case studies based on major applications using HPCMP resources are presented.

  2. Creating science-driven computer architecture: A new patch to scientific leadership

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Horst D.; McCurdy, C. William; Kramer, T.C.; Stevens, Rick; McCoy,Mike; Seager, Mark; Zacharia, Thomas; Bair, Ray; Studham, Scott; Camp, William; Leland, Robert; Morrison, John; Feiereisen, William

    2003-05-16

    We believe that it is critical for the future of high end computing in the United States to bring into existence a new class of computational capability that is optimal for science. In recent years scientific computing has increasingly become dependent on hardware that is designed and optimized for commercial applications. Science in this country has greatly benefited from the improvements in computers that derive from advances in microprocessors following Moore's Law, and a strategy of relying on machines optimized primarily for business applications. However within the last several years, in part because of the challenge presented by the appearance of the Japanese Earth Simulator, the sense has been growing in the scientific community that a new strategy is needed. A more aggressive strategy than reliance only on market forces driven by business applications is necessary in order to achieve a better alignment between the needs of scientific computing and the platforms available. The United States should undertake a program that will result in scientific computing capability that durably returns the advantage to American science, because doing so is crucial to the country's future. Such a strategy must also be sustainable. New classes of computer designs will not only revolutionize the power of supercomputing for science, but will also affect scientific computing at all scales. What is called for is the opening of a new frontier of scientific capability that will ensure that American science is greatly enabled in its pursuit of research in critical areas such as nanoscience, climate prediction, combustion, modeling in the life sciences, and fusion energy, as well as in meeting essential needs for national security. In this white paper we propose a strategy for accomplishing this mission, pursuing different directions of hardware development and deployment, and establishing a highly capable networking and grid infrastructure connecting these platforms to the broad

  3. Tpetra, and the use of generic programming in scientific computing

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Christopher G; Heroux, Dr. Michael A

    2012-01-01

    We present Tpetra, a Trilinos package for parallel linear algebra primitives implementing the Petra object model. We describe Tpetra s design, based on generic programming via C++ templated types and template metaprogramming. We discuss some benefits of this approach in the context of scientific computing, with illustrations consisting of code and notable empirical results.

  4. Connecting Minds: Computer-Mediated Communication and Scientific Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, John P.; Kucker, Stephanie; Maloney, Nancy G.; Gabbay, Shaul

    2000-01-01

    Summarizes the preliminary findings from a recent study of scientists in four disciplines with regard to computer-mediated communication (CMC) use and effects. Findings from surveys of 333 scientists indicate that CMC use is central to both professional and research-related aspects of scientific work, and that this use differs by field. CMC use is…

  5. Ontology-Driven Discovery of Scientific Computational Entities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brazier, Pearl W.

    2010-01-01

    Many geoscientists use modern computational resources, such as software applications, Web services, scientific workflows and datasets that are readily available on the Internet, to support their research and many common tasks. These resources are often shared via human contact and sometimes stored in data portals; however, they are not necessarily…

  6. Applications of parallel supercomputers: Scientific results and computer science lessons

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, G.C.

    1989-07-12

    Parallel Computing has come of age with several commercial and inhouse systems that deliver supercomputer performance. We illustrate this with several major computations completed or underway at Caltech on hypercubes, transputer arrays and the SIMD Connection Machine CM-2 and AMT DAP. Applications covered are lattice gauge theory, computational fluid dynamics, subatomic string dynamics, statistical and condensed matter physics,theoretical and experimental astronomy, quantum chemistry, plasma physics, grain dynamics, computer chess, graphics ray tracing, and Kalman filters. We use these applications to compare the performance of several advanced architecture computers including the conventional CRAY and ETA-10 supercomputers. We describe which problems are suitable for which computers in the terms of a matching between problem and computer architecture. This is part of a set of lessons we draw for hardware, software, and performance. We speculate on the emergence of new academic disciplines motivated by the growing importance of computers. 138 refs., 23 figs., 10 tabs.

  7. Introducing scientific computation from high school to college: the case of Modellus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodoro, Vítor; Neves, Rui

    2009-03-01

    The development of computational tools and methods has changed the way science is done. This change, however, is far from being accomplished on high school and college curricula, where computers are mainly used for showing text, images and animations. Most curricula do not consider the use of computational scientific tools, particularly tools where students can manipulate and build mathematical models, as an integral part of the learning experiences all students must have. In this paper, we discuss how Modellus, a freely available software tool (created in Java and available for all operating systems) can be used to support curricula where students from the age of 12 to college years can be introduced to scientific computation. We will also show how such a wide range of learners and their teachers can use Modellus to implement simple numerical methods and interactive animations based on those methods to explore advanced mathematical and physical reasoning.

  8. The advanced computational testing and simulation toolkit (ACTS)

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, L.A.; Marques, O.

    2002-05-21

    During the past decades there has been a continuous growth in the number of physical and societal problems that have been successfully studied and solved by means of computational modeling and simulation. Distinctively, a number of these are important scientific problems ranging in scale from the atomic to the cosmic. For example, ionization is a phenomenon as ubiquitous in modern society as the glow of fluorescent lights and the etching on silicon computer chips; but it was not until 1999 that researchers finally achieved a complete numerical solution to the simplest example of ionization, the collision of a hydrogen atom with an electron. On the opposite scale, cosmologists have long wondered whether the expansion of the Universe, which began with the Big Bang, would ever reverse itself, ending the Universe in a Big Crunch. In 2000, analysis of new measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation showed that the geometry of the Universe is flat, and thus the Universe will continue expanding forever. Both of these discoveries depended on high performance computer simulations that utilized computational tools included in the Advanced Computational Testing and Simulation (ACTS) Toolkit. The ACTS Toolkit is an umbrella project that brought together a number of general purpose computational tool development projects funded and supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These tools, which have been developed independently, mainly at DOE laboratories, make it easier for scientific code developers to write high performance applications for parallel computers. They tackle a number of computational issues that are common to a large number of scientific applications, mainly implementation of numerical algorithms, and support for code development, execution and optimization. The ACTS Toolkit Project enables the use of these tools by a much wider community of computational scientists, and promotes code portability, reusability, reduction of duplicate efforts

  9. Frontiers of research in advanced computations

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The principal mission of the Institute for Scientific Computing Research is to foster interactions among LLNL researchers, universities, and industry on selected topics in scientific computing. In the area of computational physics, the Institute has developed a new algorithm, GaPH, to help scientists understand the chemistry of turbulent and driven plasmas or gases at far less cost than other methods. New low-frequency electromagnetic models better describe the plasma etching and deposition characteristics of a computer chip in the making. A new method for modeling realistic curved boundaries within an orthogonal mesh is resulting in a better understanding of the physics associated with such boundaries and much quicker solutions. All these capabilities are being developed for massively parallel implementation, which is an ongoing focus of Institute researchers. Other groups within the Institute are developing novel computational methods to address a range of other problems. Examples include feature detection and motion recognition by computer, improved monitoring of blood oxygen levels, and entirely new models of human joint mechanics and prosthetic devices.

  10. Advanced Computed-Tomography Inspection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Lowell D.; Gupta, Nand K.; Smith, Charles R.; Bernardi, Richard T.; Moore, John F.; Hediger, Lisa

    1993-01-01

    Advanced Computed Tomography Inspection System (ACTIS) is computed-tomography x-ray apparatus revealing internal structures of objects in wide range of sizes and materials. Three x-ray sources and adjustable scan geometry gives system unprecedented versatility. Gantry contains translation and rotation mechanisms scanning x-ray beam through object inspected. Distance between source and detector towers varied to suit object. System used in such diverse applications as development of new materials, refinement of manufacturing processes, and inspection of components.

  11. A Computing Environment to Support Repeatable Scientific Big Data Experimentation of World-Wide Scientific Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Schlicher, Bob G; Kulesz, James J; Abercrombie, Robert K; Kruse, Kara L

    2015-01-01

    A principal tenant of the scientific method is that experiments must be repeatable and relies on ceteris paribus (i.e., all other things being equal). As a scientific community, involved in data sciences, we must investigate ways to establish an environment where experiments can be repeated. We can no longer allude to where the data comes from, we must add rigor to the data collection and management process from which our analysis is conducted. This paper describes a computing environment to support repeatable scientific big data experimentation of world-wide scientific literature, and recommends a system that is housed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in order to provide value to investigators from government agencies, academic institutions, and industry entities. The described computing environment also adheres to the recently instituted digital data management plan mandated by multiple US government agencies, which involves all stages of the digital data life cycle including capture, analysis, sharing, and preservation. It particularly focuses on the sharing and preservation of digital research data. The details of this computing environment are explained within the context of cloud services by the three layer classification of Software as a Service , Platform as a Service , and Infrastructure as a Service .

  12. [Activities of Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor); Leiner, Barry M.

    2001-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) carries out basic research and technology development in computer science, in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations missions. RIACS is located at the NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. RIACS research focuses on the three cornerstones of IT research necessary to meet the future challenges of NASA missions: 1. Automated Reasoning for Autonomous Systems Techniques are being developed enabling spacecraft that will be self-guiding and self-correcting to the extent that they will require little or no human intervention. Such craft will be equipped to independently solve problems as they arise, and fulfill their missions with minimum direction from Earth. 2. Human-Centered Computing Many NASA missions require synergy between humans and computers, with sophisticated computational aids amplifying human cognitive and perceptual abilities. 3. High Performance Computing and Networking Advances in the performance of computing and networking continue to have major impact on a variety of NASA endeavors, ranging from modeling and simulation to analysis of large scientific datasets to collaborative engineering, planning and execution. In addition, RIACS collaborates with NASA scientists to apply IT research to a variety of NASA application domains. RIACS also engages in other activities, such as workshops, seminars, visiting scientist programs and student summer programs, designed to encourage and facilitate collaboration between the university and NASA IT research communities.

  13. Accelerating Scientific Discovery Through Computation and Visualization II

    PubMed Central

    Sims, James S.; George, William L.; Satterfield, Steven G.; Hung, Howard K.; Hagedorn, John G.; Ketcham, Peter M.; Griffin, Terence J.; Hagstrom, Stanley A.; Franiatte, Julien C.; Bryant, Garnett W.; Jaskólski, W.; Martys, Nicos S.; Bouldin, Charles E.; Simmons, Vernon; Nicolas, Oliver P.; Warren, James A.; am Ende, Barbara A.; Koontz, John E.; Filla, B. James; Pourprix, Vital G.; Copley, Stefanie R.; Bohn, Robert B.; Peskin, Adele P.; Parker, Yolanda M.; Devaney, Judith E.

    2002-01-01

    This is the second in a series of articles describing a wide variety of projects at NIST that synergistically combine physical science and information science. It describes, through examples, how the Scientific Applications and Visualization Group (SAVG) at NIST has utilized high performance parallel computing, visualization, and machine learning to accelerate research. The examples include scientific collaborations in the following areas: (1) High Precision Energies for few electron atomic systems, (2) Flows of suspensions, (3) X-ray absorption, (4) Molecular dynamics of fluids, (5) Nanostructures, (6) Dendritic growth in alloys, (7) Screen saver science, (8) genetic programming. PMID:27446728

  14. ASCR Cybersecurity for Scientific Computing Integrity - Research Pathways and Ideas Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Peisert, Sean; Potok, Thomas E.; Jones, Todd

    2015-06-03

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science (SC) Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program office, a workshop was held June 2-3, 2015, in Gaithersburg, MD, to identify potential long term (10 to +20 year) cybersecurity fundamental basic research and development challenges, strategies and roadmap facing future high performance computing (HPC), networks, data centers, and extreme-scale scientific user facilities. This workshop was a follow-on to the workshop held January 7-9, 2015, in Rockville, MD, that examined higher level ideas about scientific computing integrity specific to the mission of the DOE Office of Science. Issues included research computation and simulation that takes place on ASCR computing facilities and networks, as well as network-connected scientific instruments, such as those run by various DOE Office of Science programs. Workshop participants included researchers and operational staff from DOE national laboratories, as well as academic researchers and industry experts. Participants were selected based on the submission of abstracts relating to the topics discussed in the previous workshop report [1] and also from other ASCR reports, including "Abstract Machine Models and Proxy Architectures for Exascale Computing" [27], the DOE "Preliminary Conceptual Design for an Exascale Computing Initiative" [28], and the January 2015 machine learning workshop [29]. The workshop was also attended by several observers from DOE and other government agencies. The workshop was divided into three topic areas: (1) Trustworthy Supercomputing, (2) Extreme-Scale Data, Knowledge, and Analytics for Understanding and Improving Cybersecurity, and (3) Trust within High-end Networking and Data Centers. Participants were divided into three corresponding teams based on the category of their abstracts. The workshop began with a series of talks from the program manager and workshop chair, followed by the leaders for each of the three

  15. Initial explorations of ARM processors for scientific computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdurachmanov, David; Elmer, Peter; Eulisse, Giulio; Muzaffar, Shahzad

    2014-06-01

    Power efficiency is becoming an ever more important metric for both high performance and high throughput computing. Over the course of next decade it is expected that flops/watt will be a major driver for the evolution of computer architecture. Servers with large numbers of ARM processors, already ubiquitous in mobile computing, are a promising alternative to traditional x86-64 computing. We present the results of our initial investigations into the use of ARM processors for scientific computing applications. In particular we report the results from our work with a current generation ARMv7 development board to explore ARM-specific issues regarding the software development environment, operating system, performance benchmarks and issues for porting High Energy Physics software.

  16. Advanced networks and computing in healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    As computing and network capabilities continue to rise, it becomes increasingly important to understand the varied applications for using them to provide healthcare. The objective of this review is to identify key characteristics and attributes of healthcare applications involving the use of advanced computing and communication technologies, drawing upon 45 research and development projects in telemedicine and other aspects of healthcare funded by the National Library of Medicine over the past 12 years. Only projects publishing in the professional literature were included in the review. Four projects did not publish beyond their final reports. In addition, the authors drew on their first-hand experience as project officers, reviewers and monitors of the work. Major themes in the corpus of work were identified, characterizing key attributes of advanced computing and network applications in healthcare. Advanced computing and network applications are relevant to a range of healthcare settings and specialties, but they are most appropriate for solving a narrower range of problems in each. Healthcare projects undertaken primarily to explore potential have also demonstrated effectiveness and depend on the quality of network service as much as bandwidth. Many applications are enabling, making it possible to provide service or conduct research that previously was not possible or to achieve outcomes in addition to those for which projects were undertaken. Most notable are advances in imaging and visualization, collaboration and sense of presence, and mobility in communication and information-resource use. PMID:21486877

  17. Advanced networks and computing in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Michael; Locatis, Craig

    2011-01-01

    As computing and network capabilities continue to rise, it becomes increasingly important to understand the varied applications for using them to provide healthcare. The objective of this review is to identify key characteristics and attributes of healthcare applications involving the use of advanced computing and communication technologies, drawing upon 45 research and development projects in telemedicine and other aspects of healthcare funded by the National Library of Medicine over the past 12 years. Only projects publishing in the professional literature were included in the review. Four projects did not publish beyond their final reports. In addition, the authors drew on their first-hand experience as project officers, reviewers and monitors of the work. Major themes in the corpus of work were identified, characterizing key attributes of advanced computing and network applications in healthcare. Advanced computing and network applications are relevant to a range of healthcare settings and specialties, but they are most appropriate for solving a narrower range of problems in each. Healthcare projects undertaken primarily to explore potential have also demonstrated effectiveness and depend on the quality of network service as much as bandwidth. Many applications are enabling, making it possible to provide service or conduct research that previously was not possible or to achieve outcomes in addition to those for which projects were undertaken. Most notable are advances in imaging and visualization, collaboration and sense of presence, and mobility in communication and information-resource use. PMID:21486877

  18. Advanced Algebra and Trigonometry: Supplemental Computer Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dotseth, Karen

    A set of computer-oriented, supplemental activities is offered which can be used with a course in advanced algebra and trigonometry. The activities involve use of the BASIC programming language; it is assumed that the teacher is familiar with programming in BASIC. Students will learn some BASIC; however, the intent is not to develop proficient…

  19. First 3 years of operation of RIACS (Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science) (1983-1985)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    The focus of the Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) is to explore matches between advanced computing architectures and the processes of scientific research. An architecture evaluation of the MIT static dataflow machine, specification of a graphical language for expressing distributed computations, and specification of an expert system for aiding in grid generation for two-dimensional flow problems was initiated. Research projects for 1984 and 1985 are summarized.

  20. The Potential of the Cell Processor for Scientific Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Samuel; Shalf, John; Oliker, Leonid; Husbands, Parry; Kamil, Shoaib; Yelick, Katherine

    2005-10-14

    The slowing pace of commodity microprocessor performance improvements combined with ever-increasing chip power demands has become of utmost concern to computational scientists. As a result, the high performance computing community is examining alternative architectures that address the limitations of modern cache-based designs. In this work, we examine the potential of the using the forth coming STI Cell processor as a building block for future high-end computing systems. Our work contains several novel contributions. We are the first to present quantitative Cell performance data on scientific kernels and show direct comparisons against leading superscalar (AMD Opteron), VLIW (IntelItanium2), and vector (Cray X1) architectures. Since neither Cell hardware nor cycle-accurate simulators are currently publicly available, we develop both analytical models and simulators to predict kernel performance. Our work also explores the complexity of mapping several important scientific algorithms onto the Cells unique architecture. Additionally, we propose modest microarchitectural modifications that could significantly increase the efficiency of double-precision calculations. Overall results demonstrate the tremendous potential of the Cell architecture for scientific computations in terms of both raw performance and power efficiency.

  1. Scientific opportunities with advanced facilities for neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lander, G.H.; Emery, V.J.

    1984-01-01

    The present report documents deliberations of a large group of experts in neutron scattering and fundamental physics on the need for new neutron sources of greater intensity and more sophisticated instrumentation than those currently available. An additional aspect of the Workshop was a comparison between steady-state (reactor) and pulsed (spallation) sources. The main conclusions were: (1) the case for a new higher flux neutron source is extremely strong and such a facility will lead to qualitatively new advances in condensed matter science and fundamental physics; (2) to a large extent the future needs of the scientific community could be met with either a 5 x 10/sup 15/ n cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/ steady state source or a 10/sup 17/ n cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/ peak flux spallation source; and (3) the findings of this Workshop are consistent with the recommendations of the Major Materials Facilities Committee.

  2. Predictive Dynamic Security Assessment through Advanced Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhenyu; Diao, Ruisheng; Jin, Shuangshuang; Chen, Yousu

    2014-11-30

    Abstract— Traditional dynamic security assessment is limited by several factors and thus falls short in providing real-time information to be predictive for power system operation. These factors include the steady-state assumption of current operating points, static transfer limits, and low computational speed. This addresses these factors and frames predictive dynamic security assessment. The primary objective of predictive dynamic security assessment is to enhance the functionality and computational process of dynamic security assessment through the use of high-speed phasor measurements and the application of advanced computing technologies for faster-than-real-time simulation. This paper presents algorithms, computing platforms, and simulation frameworks that constitute the predictive dynamic security assessment capability. Examples of phasor application and fast computation for dynamic security assessment are included to demonstrate the feasibility and speed enhancement for real-time applications.

  3. Technologies for Large Data Management in Scientific Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, intense usage of computing has been the main strategy of investigations in several scientific research projects. The progress in computing technology has opened unprecedented opportunities for systematic collection of experimental data and the associated analysis that were considered impossible only few years ago. This paper focuses on the strategies in use: it reviews the various components that are necessary for an effective solution that ensures the storage, the long term preservation, and the worldwide distribution of large quantities of data that are necessary in a large scientific research project. The paper also mentions several examples of data management solutions used in High Energy Physics for the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments in Geneva, Switzerland which generate more than 30,000 terabytes of data every year that need to be preserved, analyzed, and made available to a community of several tenth of thousands scientists worldwide.

  4. PNNL pushing scientific discovery through data intensive computing breakthroughs

    ScienceCinema

    Deborah Gracio; David Koppenaal; Ruby Leung

    2012-12-31

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratorys approach to data intensive computing (DIC) is focused on three key research areas: hybrid hardware architectures, software architectures, and analytic algorithms. Advancements in these areas will help to address, and solve, DIC issues associated with capturing, managing, analyzing and understanding, in near real time, data at volumes and rates that push the frontiers of current technologies.

  5. I/O-Efficient Scientific Computation Using TPIE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vengroff, Darren Erik; Vitter, Jeffrey Scott

    1996-01-01

    In recent years, input/output (I/O)-efficient algorithms for a wide variety of problems have appeared in the literature. However, systems specifically designed to assist programmers in implementing such algorithms have remained scarce. TPIE is a system designed to support I/O-efficient paradigms for problems from a variety of domains, including computational geometry, graph algorithms, and scientific computation. The TPIE interface frees programmers from having to deal not only with explicit read and write calls, but also the complex memory management that must be performed for I/O-efficient computation. In this paper we discuss applications of TPIE to problems in scientific computation. We discuss algorithmic issues underlying the design and implementation of the relevant components of TPIE and present performance results of programs written to solve a series of benchmark problems using our current TPIE prototype. Some of the benchmarks we present are based on the NAS parallel benchmarks while others are of our own creation. We demonstrate that the central processing unit (CPU) overhead required to manage I/O is small and that even with just a single disk, the I/O overhead of I/O-efficient computation ranges from negligible to the same order of magnitude as CPU time. We conjecture that if we use a number of disks in parallel this overhead can be all but eliminated.

  6. Small Explorer for Advanced Missions - cubesat for scientific mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronenko, Vira; Ivchenko, Nickolay

    2015-04-01

    A class of nanosatellites is defined by the cubesat standard, primarily setting the interface to the launcher, which allows standardizing cubesat preparation and launch, thus making the projects more affordable. The majority of cubesats have been launched are demonstration or educational missions. For scientific and other advanced missions to fully realize the potential offered by the low cost nanosatellites, there are challenges related to limitations of the existing cubesat platforms and to the availability of small yet sufficiently sensitive sensors. The new project SEAM (Small Explorer for Advanced Missions) was selected for realization in frames of FP-7 European program to develop a set of improved critical subsystems and to construct a prototype nanosatellite in the 3U cubesat envelope for electromagnetic measurements in low Earth orbit. The SEAM consortium will develop and demonstrate in flight for the first time the concept of an electromagnetically clean nanosatellite with precision attitude determination, flexible autonomous data acquisition system, high-bandwidth telemetry and an integrated solution for ground control and data handling. As the first demonstration, the satellite is planned to perform the Space Weather (SW) mission using novel miniature electric and magnetic sensors, able to provide science-grade measurements. To enable sensitive magnetic measurements onboard, the sensors must be deployed on booms to bring them away from the spacecraft body. Also other thorough yet efficient procedures will be developed to provide electromagnetic cleanliness (EMC) of the spacecraft. This work is supported by EC Framework 7 funded project 607197.

  7. Advances in Computational Capabilities for Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ajay; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Moss, James N.; Drummond, J. Philip

    1997-01-01

    The paper reviews the growth and advances in computational capabilities for hypersonic applications over the period from the mid-1980's to the present day. The current status of the code development issues such as surface and field grid generation, algorithms, physical and chemical modeling, and validation is provided. A brief description of some of the major codes being used at NASA Langley Research Center for hypersonic continuum and rarefied flows is provided, along with their capabilities and deficiencies. A number of application examples are presented, and future areas of research to enhance accuracy, reliability, efficiency, and robustness of computational codes are discussed.

  8. Building Cognition: The Construction of Computational Representations for Scientific Discovery.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekharan, Sanjay; Nersessian, Nancy J

    2015-11-01

    Novel computational representations, such as simulation models of complex systems and video games for scientific discovery (Foldit, EteRNA etc.), are dramatically changing the way discoveries emerge in science and engineering. The cognitive roles played by such computational representations in discovery are not well understood. We present a theoretical analysis of the cognitive roles such representations play, based on an ethnographic study of the building of computational models in a systems biology laboratory. Specifically, we focus on a case of model-building by an engineer that led to a remarkable discovery in basic bioscience. Accounting for such discoveries requires a distributed cognition (DC) analysis, as DC focuses on the roles played by external representations in cognitive processes. However, DC analyses by and large have not examined scientific discovery, and they mostly focus on memory offloading, particularly how the use of existing external representations changes the nature of cognitive tasks. In contrast, we study discovery processes and argue that discoveries emerge from the processes of building the computational representation. The building process integrates manipulations in imagination and in the representation, creating a coupled cognitive system of model and modeler, where the model is incorporated into the modeler's imagination. This account extends DC significantly, and we present some of the theoretical and application implications of this extended account. PMID:25444018

  9. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Partnerships

    SciTech Connect

    Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; Jeff B. Benson; James I. Cole; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2012-03-01

    In 2007, the United States Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory, as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer's physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, and obtained access to additional PIE equipment. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program enables and facilitates user access to several university and national laboratories. So far, seven universities and one national laboratory have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these universities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user's technical needs. Universities and laboratories included in the ATR NSUF partnership program are as follows: (1) Nuclear Services Laboratories at North Carolina State University; (2) PULSTAR Reactor Facility at North Carolina State University; (3) Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory (1.7 MV Tandetron accelerator) at the University of Michigan; (4) Irradiated Materials at the University of Michigan; (5) Harry Reid Center Radiochemistry Laboratories at University of Nevada, Las Vegas; (6) Characterization Laboratory for Irradiated Materials at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (7) Tandem Accelerator Ion Beam. (1.7 MV terminal voltage tandem ion accelerator) at the University of Wisconsin

  10. Evaluation of leading scalar and vector architectures for scientific computations

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Horst D.; Oliker, Leonid; Canning, Andrew; Carter, Jonathan; Ethier, Stephane; Shalf, John

    2004-04-20

    The growing gap between sustained and peak performance for scientific applications is a well-known problem in high performance computing. The recent development of parallel vector systems offers the potential to reduce this gap for many computational science codes and deliver a substantial increase in computing capabilities. This project examines the performance of the cacheless vector Earth Simulator (ES) and compares it to superscalar cache-based IBM Power3 system. Results demonstrate that the ES is significantly faster than the Power3 architecture, highlighting the tremendous potential advantage of the ES for numerical simulation. However, vectorization of a particle-in-cell application (GTC) greatly increased the memory footprint preventing loop-level parallelism and limiting scalability potential.

  11. Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor); Leiner, Barry M.

    2000-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) carries out basic research and technology development in computer science, in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's missions. RIACS is located at the NASA Ames Research Center. It currently operates under a multiple year grant/cooperative agreement that began on October 1, 1997 and is up for renewal in the year 2002. Ames has been designated NASA's Center of Excellence in Information Technology. In this capacity, Ames is charged with the responsibility to build an Information Technology Research Program that is preeminent within NASA. RIACS serves as a bridge between NASA Ames and the academic community, and RIACS scientists and visitors work in close collaboration with NASA scientists. RIACS has the additional goal of broadening the base of researchers in these areas of importance to the nation's space and aeronautics enterprises. RIACS research focuses on the three cornerstones of information technology research necessary to meet the future challenges of NASA missions: (1) Automated Reasoning for Autonomous Systems. Techniques are being developed enabling spacecraft that will be self-guiding and self-correcting to the extent that they will require little or no human intervention. Such craft will be equipped to independently solve problems as they arise, and fulfill their missions with minimum direction from Earth; (2) Human-Centered Computing. Many NASA missions require synergy between humans and computers, with sophisticated computational aids amplifying human cognitive and perceptual abilities; (3) High Performance Computing and Networking. Advances in the performance of computing and networking continue to have major impact on a variety of NASA endeavors, ranging from modeling and simulation to data analysis of large datasets to collaborative engineering, planning and execution. In addition, RIACS collaborates with NASA scientists to apply information technology research to a

  12. Autonomic Computing Paradigm For Large Scale Scientific And Engineering Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariri, S.; Yang, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Large-scale distributed scientific applications are highly adaptive and heterogeneous in terms of their computational requirements. The computational complexity associated with each computational region or domain varies continuously and dramatically both in space and time throughout the whole life cycle of the application execution. Furthermore, the underlying distributed computing environment is similarly complex and dynamic in the availabilities and capacities of the computing resources. These challenges combined together make the current paradigms, which are based on passive components and static compositions, ineffectual. Autonomic Computing paradigm is an approach that efficiently addresses the complexity and dynamism of large scale scientific and engineering applications and realizes the self-management of these applications. In this presentation, we present an Autonomic Runtime Manager (ARM) that supports the development of autonomic applications. The ARM includes two modules: online monitoring and analysis module and autonomic planning and scheduling module. The ARM behaves as a closed-loop control system that dynamically controls and manages the execution of the applications at runtime. It regularly senses the state changes of both the applications and the underlying computing resources. It then uses these runtime information and prior knowledge about the application behavior and its physics to identify the appropriate solution methods as well as the required computing and storage resources. Consequently this approach enables us to develop autonomic applications, which are capable of self-management and self-optimization. We have developed and implemented the autonomic computing paradigms for several large scale applications such as wild fire simulations, simulations of flow through variably saturated geologic formations, and life sciences. The distributed wildfire simulation models the wildfire spread behavior by considering such factors as fuel

  13. InSAR Scientific Computing Environment on the Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Shams, K. S.; Gurrola, E. M.; George, B. A.; Knight, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    In response to the needs of the international scientific and operational Earth observation communities, spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems are being tasked to produce enormous volumes of raw data daily, with availability to scientists to increase substantially as more satellites come online and data becomes more accessible through more open data policies. The availability of these unprecedentedly dense and rich datasets has led to the development of sophisticated algorithms that can take advantage of them. In particular, interferometric time series analysis of SAR data provides insights into the changing earth and requires substantial computational power to process data across large regions and over large time periods. This poses challenges for existing infrastructure, software, and techniques required to process, store, and deliver the results to the global community of scientists. The current state-of-the-art solutions employ traditional data storage and processing applications that require download of data to the local repositories before processing. This approach is becoming untenable in light of the enormous volume of data that must be processed in an iterative and collaborative manner. We have analyzed and tested new cloud computing and virtualization approaches to address these challenges within the context of InSAR in the earth science community. Cloud computing is democratizing computational and storage capabilities for science users across the world. The NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory has been an early adopter of this technology, successfully integrating cloud computing in a variety of production applications ranging from mission operations to downlink data processing. We have ported a new InSAR processing suite called ISCE (InSAR Scientific Computing Environment) to a scalable distributed system running in the Amazon GovCloud to demonstrate the efficacy of cloud computing for this application. We have integrated ISCE with Polyphony to

  14. Phantom limbs: pain, embodiment, and scientific advances in integrative therapies.

    PubMed

    Lenggenhager, Bigna; Arnold, Carolyn A; Giummarra, Melita J

    2014-03-01

    Research over the past two decades has begun to identify some of the key mechanisms underlying phantom limb pain and sensations; however, this continues to be a clinically challenging condition to manage. Treatment of phantom pain, like all chronic pain conditions, demands a holistic approach that takes into consideration peripheral, spinal, and central neuroplastic mechanisms. In this review, we focus on nonpharmacological treatments tailored to reverse the maladaptive neuroplasticity associated with phantom pain. Recent scientific advances emerging from interdisciplinary research between neuroscience, virtual reality, robotics, and prosthetics show the greatest promise for alternative embodiment and maintaining the integrity of the multifaceted representation of the body in the brain. Importantly, these advances have been found to prevent and reduce phantom limb pain. In particular, therapies that involve sensory and/or motor retraining, most naturally through the use of integrative prosthetic devices, as well as peripheral (e.g., transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation) or central (e.g., transcranial magnetic stimulation or deep brain stimulation) stimulation techniques, have been found to both restore the neural representation of the missing limb and to reduce the intensity of phantom pain. While the evidence for the efficacy of these therapies is mounting, but well-controlled and large-scale studies are still needed. WIREs Cogn Sci 2014, 5:221-231. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1277 CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The authors have no financial or other relationship that might lead to a conflict of interest. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26304309

  15. Java Performance for Scientific Applications on LLNL Computer Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kapfer, C; Wissink, A

    2002-05-10

    Languages in use for high performance computing at the laboratory--Fortran (f77 and f90), C, and C++--have many years of development behind them and are generally considered the fastest available. However, Fortran and C do not readily extend to object-oriented programming models, limiting their capability for very complex simulation software. C++ facilitates object-oriented programming but is a very complex and error-prone language. Java offers a number of capabilities that these other languages do not. For instance it implements cleaner (i.e., easier to use and less prone to errors) object-oriented models than C++. It also offers networking and security as part of the language standard, and cross-platform executables that make it architecture neutral, to name a few. These features have made Java very popular for industrial computing applications. The aim of this paper is to explain the trade-offs in using Java for large-scale scientific applications at LLNL. Despite its advantages, the computational science community has been reluctant to write large-scale computationally intensive applications in Java due to concerns over its poor performance. However, considerable progress has been made over the last several years. The Java Grande Forum [1] has been promoting the use of Java for large-scale computing. Members have introduced efficient array libraries, developed fast just-in-time (JIT) compilers, and built links to existing packages used in high performance parallel computing.

  16. Airborne Advanced Reconfigurable Computer System (ARCS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjurman, B. E.; Jenkins, G. M.; Masreliez, C. J.; Mcclellan, K. L.; Templeman, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    A digital computer subsystem fault-tolerant concept was defined, and the potential benefits and costs of such a subsystem were assessed when used as the central element of a new transport's flight control system. The derived advanced reconfigurable computer system (ARCS) is a triple-redundant computer subsystem that automatically reconfigures, under multiple fault conditions, from triplex to duplex to simplex operation, with redundancy recovery if the fault condition is transient. The study included criteria development covering factors at the aircraft's operation level that would influence the design of a fault-tolerant system for commercial airline use. A new reliability analysis tool was developed for evaluating redundant, fault-tolerant system availability and survivability; and a stringent digital system software design methodology was used to achieve design/implementation visibility.

  17. Integrating multiple scientific computing needs via a Private Cloud infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnasco, S.; Berzano, D.; Brunetti, R.; Lusso, S.; Vallero, S.

    2014-06-01

    In a typical scientific computing centre, diverse applications coexist and share a single physical infrastructure. An underlying Private Cloud facility eases the management and maintenance of heterogeneous use cases such as multipurpose or application-specific batch farms, Grid sites catering to different communities, parallel interactive data analysis facilities and others. It allows to dynamically and efficiently allocate resources to any application and to tailor the virtual machines according to the applications' requirements. Furthermore, the maintenance of large deployments of complex and rapidly evolving middleware and application software is eased by the use of virtual images and contextualization techniques; for example, rolling updates can be performed easily and minimizing the downtime. In this contribution we describe the Private Cloud infrastructure at the INFN-Torino Computer Centre, that hosts a full-fledged WLCG Tier-2 site and a dynamically expandable PROOF-based Interactive Analysis Facility for the ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC and several smaller scientific computing applications. The Private Cloud building blocks include the OpenNebula software stack, the GlusterFS filesystem (used in two different configurations for worker- and service-class hypervisors) and the OpenWRT Linux distribution (used for network virtualization). A future integration into a federated higher-level infrastructure is made possible by exposing commonly used APIs like EC2 and by using mainstream contextualization tools like CloudInit.

  18. Scientific advances provide opportunities to improve pediatric environmental health

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.; Reddy, Micaela B.; Reddy, Carol F.

    2004-01-01

    The health consequences of contaminants in the environment, with respect to the health of children and infants, recently have been dramatically brought to public attention by the motion pictures Erin Brockovich and A Civil Action. These productions focused public attention on the potential link between water contaminants and pediatric health, a continuing subject of public concern. As a consequence of the increasing production of new commercial chemicals, many chemicals have appeared in the scientific and public awareness as potential threats to health. These new or novel compounds eventually distribute in the environment and often are termed emerging contaminants. Gitterman and Bearer stated, "Children may serve as unwitting sentinels for society; they are often the youngest exposed to many environmental toxicants and may become the youngest in age to manifest adverse responses." The discipline of pediatric environmental health is still in its adolescence, but it will be increasingly important as new chemicals are generated and as more is learned about the health effects of chemicals already in commerce. Here, we provide an overview of recent advances in biomonitoring and environmental monitoring of environmental contaminants including emerging contaminants. Our purpose in writing this commentary is to make pediatricians aware of the current resources available for learning about pediatric environmental health and of ongoing research initiatives that provide opportunities to improve pediatric environmental health.

  19. Acts -- A collection of high performing software tools for scientific computing

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, L.A.; Marques, O.A.

    2002-11-01

    During the past decades there has been a continuous growth in the number of physical and societal problems that have been successfully studied and solved by means of computational modeling and simulation. Further, many new discoveries depend on high performance computer simulations to satisfy their demands for large computational resources and short response time. The Advanced CompuTational Software (ACTS) Collection brings together a number of general-purpose computational tool development projects funded and supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These tools make it easier for scientific code developers to write high performance applications for parallel computers. They tackle a number of computational issues that are common to a large number of scientific applications, mainly implementation of numerical algorithms, and support for code development, execution and optimization. The ACTS collection promotes code portability, reusability, reduction of duplicate efforts, and tool maturity. This paper presents a brief introduction to the functionality available in ACTS. It also highlight the tools that are in demand by Climate and Weather modelers.

  20. Scientific Grand Challenges: Forefront Questions in Nuclear Science and the Role of High Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-10-01

    This report is an account of the deliberations and conclusions of the workshop on "Forefront Questions in Nuclear Science and the Role of High Performance Computing" held January 26-28, 2009, co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Physics (ONP) and the DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing (ASCR). Representatives from the national and international nuclear physics communities, as well as from the high performance computing community, participated. The purpose of this workshop was to 1) identify forefront scientific challenges in nuclear physics and then determine which-if any-of these could be aided by high performance computing at the extreme scale; 2) establish how and why new high performance computing capabilities could address issues at the frontiers of nuclear science; 3) provide nuclear physicists the opportunity to influence the development of high performance computing; and 4) provide the nuclear physics community with plans for development of future high performance computing capability by DOE ASCR.

  1. Advanced I/O for large-scale scientific applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Klasky, Scott; Schwan, Karsten; Oldfield, Ron A.; Lofstead, Gerald F., II

    2010-01-01

    As scientific simulations scale to use petascale machines and beyond, the data volumes generated pose a dual problem. First, with increasing machine sizes, the careful tuning of IO routines becomes more and more important to keep the time spent in IO acceptable. It is not uncommon, for instance, to have 20% of an application's runtime spent performing IO in a 'tuned' system. Careful management of the IO routines can move that to 5% or even less in some cases. Second, the data volumes are so large, on the order of 10s to 100s of TB, that trying to discover the scientifically valid contributions requires assistance at runtime to both organize and annotate the data. Waiting for offline processing is not feasible due both to the impact on the IO system and the time required. To reduce this load and improve the ability of scientists to use the large amounts of data being produced, new techniques for data management are required. First, there is a need for techniques for efficient movement of data from the compute space to storage. These techniques should understand the underlying system infrastructure and adapt to changing system conditions. Technologies include aggregation networks, data staging nodes for a closer parity to the IO subsystem, and autonomic IO routines that can detect system bottlenecks and choose different approaches, such as splitting the output into multiple targets, staggering output processes. Such methods must be end-to-end, meaning that even with properly managed asynchronous techniques, it is still essential to properly manage the later synchronous interaction with the storage system to maintain acceptable performance. Second, for the data being generated, annotations and other metadata must be incorporated to help the scientist understand output data for the simulation run as a whole, to select data and data features without concern for what files or other storage technologies were employed. All of these features should be attained while

  2. AVES: A Computer Cluster System approach for INTEGRAL Scientific Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federici, M.; Martino, B. L.; Natalucci, L.; Umbertini, P.

    The AVES computing system, based on an "Cluster" architecture is a fully integrated, low cost computing facility dedicated to the archiving and analysis of the INTEGRAL data. AVES is a modular system that uses the software resource manager (SLURM) and allows almost unlimited expandibility (65,536 nodes and hundreds of thousands of processors); actually is composed by 30 Personal Computers with Quad-Cores CPU able to reach the computing power of 300 Giga Flops (300x10{9} Floating point Operations Per Second), with 120 GB of RAM and 7.5 Tera Bytes (TB) of storage memory in UFS configuration plus 6 TB for users area. AVES was designed and built to solve growing problems raised from the analysis of the large data amount accumulated by the INTEGRAL mission (actually about 9 TB) and due to increase every year. The used analysis software is the OSA package, distributed by the ISDC in Geneva. This is a very complex package consisting of dozens of programs that can not be converted to parallel computing. To overcome this limitation we developed a series of programs to distribute the workload analysis on the various nodes making AVES automatically divide the analysis in N jobs sent to N cores. This solution thus produces a result similar to that obtained by the parallel computing configuration. In support of this we have developed tools that allow a flexible use of the scientific software and quality control of on-line data storing. The AVES software package is constituted by about 50 specific programs. Thus the whole computing time, compared to that provided by a Personal Computer with single processor, has been enhanced up to a factor 70.

  3. Industrial applications of computed tomography at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, R.P.; Morris, R.A.; Wecksung, G.W.; Wonn, G.; London, R.

    1980-06-01

    A research and development program was begun two years ago at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) to study nonmedical applications of computed tomography. This program had several goals. The first goal was to develop the necessary reconstruction algorithms to accurately reconstruct cross sections of nonmedical industrial objects. The second goal was to be able to perform extensive tomographic simulations to determine the efficacy of tomographic reconstruction with a variety of hardware configurations. The final goal was to construct an inexpensive industrial prototype scanner with a high degree of design flexibility. The implementation of these program goals is described.

  4. Recent advances in computational actinoid chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongqi; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F; Chai, Zhifang

    2012-09-01

    We briefly review advances in computational actinoid (An) chemistry during the past ten years in regard to two issues: the geometrical and electronic structures, and reactions. The former addresses the An-O, An-C, and M-An (M is a metal atom including An) bonds in the actinoid molecular systems, including actinoid oxo and oxide species, actinoid-carbenoid, dinuclear and diatomic systems, and the latter the hydration and ligand exchange, the disproportionation, the oxidation, the reduction of uranyl, hydroamination, and the photolysis of uranium azide. Concerning their relevance to the electronic structures and reactions of actinoids and their importance in the development of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle, we also mentioned the work on actinoid carbides and nitrides, which have been proposed to be candidates of the next generation of nuclear fuel, and the oxidation of PuO(x), which is important to understand the speciation of actinoids in the environment, followed by a brief discussion on the urgent need for a heavier involvement of computational actinoid chemistry in developing advanced reprocessing protocols of spent nuclear fuel. The paper is concluded with an outlook. PMID:22777520

  5. Molecular Science Computing Facility Scientific Challenges: Linking Across Scales

    SciTech Connect

    De Jong, Wibe A.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to define the evolving science drivers for performing environmental molecular research at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) and to provide guidance associated with the next-generation high-performance computing center that must be developed at EMSL's Molecular Science Computing Facility (MSCF) in order to address this critical research. The MSCF is the pre-eminent computing facility?supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER)?tailored to provide the fastest time-to-solution for current computational challenges in chemistry and biology, as well as providing the means for broad research in the molecular and environmental sciences. The MSCF provides integral resources and expertise to emerging EMSL Scientific Grand Challenges and Collaborative Access Teams that are designed to leverage the multiple integrated research capabilities of EMSL, thereby creating a synergy between computation and experiment to address environmental molecular science challenges critical to DOE and the nation.

  6. Scientific computing in the 1990ies: An astronomical perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adorf, Hans-Martin

    1992-01-01

    The compute performance, storage capability, degree of networking, and usability of modern computer hardware have enormously progressed in the past decade. These hardware advances are not paralleled by an equivalent increase in software productivity. Among astronomers the need is gradually perceived to discuss questions such as whether we are prepared to meet the pending challenge of vector and massively parallel computers. Therefore, a moderated, time-limited and access-restricted, wide-area network discussion forum is proposed for having a first, broad-minded go at the question of whether our current software efforts are heading in the right direction. The main topics, goals, means, and form of the proposed discussion process are presented.

  7. Charon Message-Passing Toolkit for Scientific Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWijngaart, Rob F.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The Charon toolkit for piecemeal development of high-efficiency parallel programs for scientific computing is described. The portable toolkit, callable from C and Fortran, provides flexible domain decompositions and high-level distributed constructs for easy translation of serial legacy code or design to distributed environments. Gradual tuning can subsequently be applied to obtain high performance, possibly by using explicit message passing. Charon also features general structured communications that support stencil-based computations with complex recurrences. Through the separation of partitioning and distribution, the toolkit can also be used for blocking of uni-processor code, and for debugging of parallel algorithms on serial machines. An elaborate review of recent parallelization aids is presented to highlight the need for a toolkit like Charon. Some performance results of parallelizing the NAS Parallel Benchmark SP program using Charon are given, showing good scalability.

  8. Charon Message-Passing Toolkit for Scientific Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWijngarrt, Rob F.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The Charon toolkit for piecemeal development of high-efficiency parallel programs for scientific computing is described. The portable toolkit, callable from C and Fortran, provides flexible domain decompositions and high-level distributed constructs for easy translation of serial legacy code or design to distributed environments. Gradual tuning can subsequently be applied to obtain high performance, possibly by using explicit message passing. Charon also features general structured communications that support stencil-based computations with complex recurrences. Through the separation of partitioning and distribution, the toolkit can also be used for blocking of uni-processor code, and for debugging of parallel algorithms on serial machines. An elaborate review of recent parallelization aids is presented to highlight the need for a toolkit like Charon. Some performance results of parallelizing the NAS Parallel Benchmark SP program using Charon are given, showing good scalability. Some performance results of parallelizing the NAS Parallel Benchmark SP program using Charon are given, showing good scalability.

  9. Computational Design of Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Savrasov, Sergey; Kotliar, Gabriel; Haule, Kristjan

    2014-06-03

    The objective of the project was to develop a method for theoretical understanding of nuclear fuel materials whose physical and thermophysical properties can be predicted from first principles using a novel dynamical mean field method for electronic structure calculations. We concentrated our study on uranium, plutonium, their oxides, nitrides, carbides, as well as some rare earth materials whose 4f eletrons provide a simplified framework for understanding complex behavior of the f electrons. We addressed the issues connected to the electronic structure, lattice instabilities, phonon and magnon dynamics as well as thermal conductivity. This allowed us to evaluate characteristics of advanced nuclear fuel systems using computer based simulations and avoid costly experiments.

  10. ATCA for Machines-- Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.S.; /SLAC

    2008-04-22

    The Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture is a new industry open standard for electronics instrument modules and shelves being evaluated for the International Linear Collider (ILC). It is the first industrial standard designed for High Availability (HA). ILC availability simulations have shown clearly that the capabilities of ATCA are needed in order to achieve acceptable integrated luminosity. The ATCA architecture looks attractive for beam instruments and detector applications as well. This paper provides an overview of ongoing R&D including application of HA principles to power electronics systems.

  11. Advanced Test Reactor - A National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford J. Stanley

    2008-05-01

    The ATR is a pressurized, light-water moderated and cooled, beryllium-reflected nuclear research reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The unique serpentine configuration of the fuel elements creates five main reactor power lobes (regions) and nine flux traps. In addition to these nine flux traps there are 68 additional irradiation positions in the reactor core reflector tank. There are also 34 low-flux irradiation positions in the irradiation tanks outside the core reflector tank. The ATR is designed to provide a test environment for the evaluation of the effects of intense radiation (neutron and gamma). Due to the unique serpentine core design each of the five lobes can be operated at different powers and controlled independently. Options exist for the individual test trains and assemblies to be either cooled by the ATR coolant (i.e., exposed to ATR coolant flow rates, pressures, temperatures, and neutron flux) or to be installed in their own independent test loops where such parameters as temperature, pressure, flow rate, neutron flux, and energy can be controlled per experimenter specifications. The full-power maximum thermal neutron flux is ~1.0 x1015 n/cm2-sec with a maximum fast flux of ~5.0 x1014 n/cm2-sec. The Advanced Test Reactor, now a National Scientific User Facility, is a versatile tool in which a variety of nuclear reactor, nuclear physics, reactor fuel, and structural material irradiation experiments can be conducted. The cumulative effects of years of irradiation in a normal power reactor can be duplicated in a few weeks or months in the ATR due to its unique design, power density, and operating flexibility.

  12. Domain analysis of computational science - Fifty years of a scientific computing group

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, M.

    2010-02-23

    I employed bibliometric- and historical-methods to study the domain of the Scientific Computing group at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for an extended period of fifty years, from 1958 to 2007. I noted and confirmed the growing emergence of interdisciplinarity within the group. I also identified a strong, consistent mathematics and physics orientation within it.

  13. Adherence to Scientific Method while Advancing Exposure Science

    EPA Science Inventory

    Paul Lioy was simultaneously a staunch adherent to the scientific method and an innovator of new ways to conduct science, particularly related to human exposure. Current challenges to science and the application of the scientific method are presented as they relate the approaches...

  14. Carbon Nanotube Computer: Transforming Scientific Discoveries into Working Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Subhasish

    2014-03-01

    The miniaturization of electronic devices has been the principal driving force behind the semiconductor industry, and has brought about major improvements in computational power and energy efficiency. Although advances with silicon-based electronics continue to be made, alternative technologies are being explored. Digital circuits based on transistors fabricated from carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the potential to outperform silicon by improving the energy- delay product, a metric of energy efficiency, by more than an order of magnitude. Hence, CNTs are an exciting complement to existing semiconductor technologies. However, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are subject to substantial inherent imperfections that pose major obstacles to the design of robust and very large-scale CNFET digital systems: (i) It is nearly impossible to guarantee perfect alignment and positioning of all CNTs. This limitation introduces stray conducting paths, resulting in incorrect circuit functionality. (ii) CNTs can be metallic or semiconducting depending on chirality. Metallic CNTs cause shorts resulting in excessive leakage and incorrect circuit functionality. A combination of design and processing technique overcomes these challenges by creating robust CNFET digital circuits that are immune to these inherent imperfections. This imperfection-immune design paradigm enables the first experimental demonstration of the carbon nanotube computer, and, more generally, arbitrary digital systems that can be built using CNFETs. The CNT computer is capable of performing multitasking: as a demonstration, we perform counting and integer-sorting simultaneously. In addition, we emulate 20 different instructions from the commercial MIPS instruction set to demonstrate the generality of our CNT computer. This is the most complex carbon-based electronic system yet demonstrated. It is a considerable advance because CNTs are prominent among a variety of emerging technologies that are being considered for the next

  15. Institute for scientific computing research;fiscal year 1999 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, D

    2000-03-28

    Large-scale scientific computation, and all of the disciplines that support it and help to validate it, have been placed at the focus of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory by the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI). The Laboratory operates the computer with the highest peak performance in the world and has undertaken some of the largest and most compute-intensive simulations ever performed. Computers at the architectural extremes, however, are notoriously difficult to use efficiently. Even such successes as the Laboratory's two Bell Prizes awarded in November 1999 only emphasize the need for much better ways of interacting with the results of large-scale simulations. Advances in scientific computing research have, therefore, never been more vital to the core missions of the Laboratory than at present. Computational science is evolving so rapidly along every one of its research fronts that to remain on the leading edge, the Laboratory must engage researchers at many academic centers of excellence. In FY 1999, the Institute for Scientific Computing Research (ISCR) has expanded the Laboratory's bridge to the academic community in the form of collaborative subcontracts, visiting faculty, student internships, a workshop, and a very active seminar series. ISCR research participants are integrated almost seamlessly with the Laboratory's Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC), which, in turn, addresses computational challenges arising throughout the Laboratory. Administratively, the ISCR flourishes under the Laboratory's University Relations Program (URP). Together with the other four Institutes of the URP, it must navigate a course that allows the Laboratory to benefit from academic exchanges while preserving national security. Although FY 1999 brought more than its share of challenges to the operation of an academic-like research enterprise within the context of a national security laboratory, the results declare the challenges well met and well

  16. Carbon Dioxide Measurements from Space: Scientific Advance and Societal Benefit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boland, S. W.; Duren, R. M.; Miller, C. E.

    2009-04-01

    The dawn of the 21st Century finds spaceborne sensors poised to revolutionize the atmospheric CO2 record by providing high-quality measurements with unprecedented spatio-temporal coverage and density. Space-based CO2 observations will augment local and regional measurements from ground and airborne sensors, providing global context for existing measurements and covering regions not readily accessible or instrumented by other means. Hyperspectral data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), launched in 2002, have been used to produce global maps of CO2 concentrations in the mid-troposphere. These data provide important new constraints on the global distribution and transport of CO2. Future satellite missions dedicated to CO2 observations will collect precise global measurements, enabling more detailed process studies and contributing to further improvements in coupled carbon-climate model development, initialization, and validation. Japan's GOSAT mission, scheduled for launch in January 2009 will measure CO2 and CH4 spectral radiances via thermal and near infrared spectrometry to study the transport mechanisms of greenhouse gases with an emphasis on identification of CO2 sources and sinks on sub-continental scales in support of the Kyoto protocol. NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO), scheduled to launch in February 2009, will deliver measurements of column-averaged CO2 dry air mole fraction, XCO2, with the precision, temporal and spatial resolution, and coverage needed to characterize the variability of CO2 sources and sinks on regional spatial scales and seasonal to interannual time scales. Satellite CO2 observations, combined with continued ground and airborne measurements, will improve our understanding of the natural processes and human activities that regulate the atmospheric abundance and distribution of this important greenhouse gas, generating both scientific advance and societal benefit. Deriving actionable information from these observation

  17. A data management system for engineering and scientific computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, L.; Kunii, H. S.; Browne, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    Data elements and relationship definition capabilities for this data management system are explicitly tailored to the needs of engineering and scientific computing. System design was based upon studies of data management problems currently being handled through explicit programming. The system-defined data element types include real scalar numbers, vectors, arrays and special classes of arrays such as sparse arrays and triangular arrays. The data model is hierarchical (tree structured). Multiple views of data are provided at two levels. Subschemas provide multiple structural views of the total data base and multiple mappings for individual record types are supported through the use of a REDEFINES capability. The data definition language and the data manipulation language are designed as extensions to FORTRAN. Examples of the coding of real problems taken from existing practice in the data definition language and the data manipulation language are given.

  18. White House Scientific Integrity Efforts Advance Despite Delay in Recommendations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2010-11-01

    A delay in the White House's release of recommendations on guaranteeing scientific integrity in the executive branch has led to a recent lawsuit and has raised some concerns about the implementation of a 2009 White House memorandum on the topic, even as some steps are being taken by the government to move forward with aspects of that memorandum. The memorandum on scientific integrity, issued on 9 March 2009, directed the head of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) to develop by 9 July 2009 recommendations to guarantee scientific integrity. A 19 October 2010 lawsuit filed by the Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER) seeks to compel OSTP to disclose records that “concern the promulgation of proposed policies to ‘restore scientific integrity in government decision making.’”

  19. SciDAC Advances and Applications in Computational Beam Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R.; Abell, D.; Adelmann, A.; Amundson, J.; Bohn, C.; Cary, J.; Colella, P.; Dechow, D.; Decyk, V.; Dragt, A.; Gerber, R.; Habib, S.; Higdon, D.; Katsouleas, T.; Ma, K.-L.; McCorquodale, P.; Mihalcea, D.; Mitchell, C.; Mori, W.; Mottershead, C.T.; Neri, F.; Pogorelov, I.; Qiang, J.; Samulyak, R.; Serafini, D.; Shalf, J.; Siegerist, C.; Spentzouris, P.; Stoltz, P.; Terzic, B.; Venturini, M.; Walstrom, P.

    2005-06-26

    SciDAC has had a major impact on computational beam dynamics and the design of particle accelerators. Particle accelerators--which account for half of the facilities in the DOE Office of Science Facilities for the Future of Science 20 Year Outlook--are crucial for US scientific, industrial, and economic competitiveness. Thanks to SciDAC, accelerator design calculations that were once thought impossible are now carried routinely, and new challenging and important calculations are within reach. SciDAC accelerator modeling codes are being used to get the most science out of existing facilities, to produce optimal designs for future facilities, and to explore advanced accelerator concepts that may hold the key to qualitatively new ways of accelerating charged particle beams. In this poster we present highlights from the SciDAC Accelerator Science and Technology (AST) project Beam Dynamics focus area in regard to algorithm development, software development, and applications.

  20. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; James I. Cole; Jeff B. Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2012-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is one of the world’s premier test reactors for studying the effects of intense neutron radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR began operation in 1967, and has operated continuously since then, averaging approximately 250 operating days per year. The combination of high flux, large test volumes, and multiple experiment configuration options provide unique testing opportunities for nuclear fuels and material researchers. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water moderated and cooled, beryllium-reflected highly-enriched uranium fueled, reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The ATR peak thermal flux can reach 1.0 x1015 n/cm2-sec, and the core configuration creates five main reactor power lobes (regions) that can be operated at different powers during the same operating cycle. In addition to these nine flux traps there are 68 irradiation positions in the reactor core reflector tank. The test positions range from 0.5” to 5.0” in diameter and are all 48” in length, the active length of the fuel. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material radiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. Goals of the ATR NSUF are to define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light water reactors, and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. The ATR NSUF has developed partnerships with other universities and national laboratories to enable ATR NSUF researchers to perform research at these other facilities, when the research objectives

  1. Scientific Application Requirements for Leadership Computing at the Exascale

    SciTech Connect

    Ahern, Sean; Alam, Sadaf R; Fahey, Mark R; Hartman-Baker, Rebecca J; Barrett, Richard F; Kendall, Ricky A; Kothe, Douglas B; Mills, Richard T; Sankaran, Ramanan; Tharrington, Arnold N; White III, James B

    2007-12-01

    The Department of Energy s Leadership Computing Facility, located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory s National Center for Computational Sciences, recently polled scientific teams that had large allocations at the center in 2007, asking them to identify computational science requirements for future exascale systems (capable of an exaflop, or 1018 floating point operations per second). These requirements are necessarily speculative, since an exascale system will not be realized until the 2015 2020 timeframe, and are expressed where possible relative to a recent petascale requirements analysis of similar science applications [1]. Our initial findings, which beg further data collection, validation, and analysis, did in fact align with many of our expectations and existing petascale requirements, yet they also contained some surprises, complete with new challenges and opportunities. First and foremost, the breadth and depth of science prospects and benefits on an exascale computing system are striking. Without a doubt, they justify a large investment, even with its inherent risks. The possibilities for return on investment (by any measure) are too large to let us ignore this opportunity. The software opportunities and challenges are enormous. In fact, as one notable computational scientist put it, the scale of questions being asked at the exascale is tremendous and the hardware has gotten way ahead of the software. We are in grave danger of failing because of a software crisis unless concerted investments and coordinating activities are undertaken to reduce and close this hardwaresoftware gap over the next decade. Key to success will be a rigorous requirement for natural mapping of algorithms to hardware in a way that complements (rather than competes with) compilers and runtime systems. The level of abstraction must be raised, and more attention must be paid to functionalities and capabilities that incorporate intent into data structures, are aware of memory hierarchy

  2. Making Advanced Computer Science Topics More Accessible through Interactive Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shao, Kun; Maher, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Teaching advanced technical concepts in a computer science program to students of different technical backgrounds presents many challenges. The purpose of this paper is to present a detailed experimental pedagogy in teaching advanced computer science topics, such as computer networking, telecommunications and data structures using…

  3. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility 2010 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mary Catherine Thelen; Todd R. Allen

    2011-05-01

    This is the 2010 ATR National Scientific User Facility Annual Report. This report provides an overview of the program for 2010, along with individual project reports from each of the university principal investigators. The report also describes the capabilities offered to university researchers here at INL and at the ATR NSUF partner facilities.

  4. Final Scientific Report - Wireless and Sensing Solutions Advancing Industrial Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Budampati, Rama; McBrady, Adam; Nusseibeh, Fouad

    2009-09-28

    The project team's goal for the Wireless and Sensing Solution Advancing Industrial Efficiency award (DE-FC36-04GO14002) was to develop, demonstrate, and test a number of leading edge technologies that could enable the emergence of wireless sensor and sampling systems for the industrial market space. This effort combined initiatives in advanced sensor development, configurable sampling and deployment platforms, and robust wireless communications to address critical obstacles in enabling enhanced industrial efficiency.

  5. PS3 CELL Development for Scientific Computation and Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, M.; Sevre, E.; Wang, S. M.; Yuen, D. A.; Liu, S.; Lyness, M. D.; Broten, M.

    2007-12-01

    The Cell processor is one of the most powerful processors on the market, and researchers in the earth sciences may find its parallel architecture to be very useful. A cell processor, with 7 cores, can easily be obtained for experimentation by purchasing a PlayStation 3 (PS3) and installing linux and the IBM SDK. Each core of the PS3 is capable of 25 GFLOPS giving a potential limit of 150 GFLOPS when using all 6 SPUs (synergistic processing units) by using vectorized algorithms. We have used the Cell's computational power to create a program which takes simulated tsunami datasets, parses them, and returns a colorized height field image using ray casting techniques. As expected, the time required to create an image is inversely proportional to the number of SPUs used. We believe that this trend will continue when multiple PS3s are chained using OpenMP functionality and are in the process of researching this. By using the Cell to visualize tsunami data, we have found that its greatest feature is its power. This fact entwines well with the needs of the scientific community where the limiting factor is time. Any algorithm, such as the heat equation, that can be subdivided into multiple parts can take advantage of the PS3 Cell's ability to split the computations across the 6 SPUs reducing required run time by one sixth. Further vectorization of the code can allow for 4 simultanious floating point operations by using the SIMD (single instruction multiple data) capabilities of the SPU increasing efficiency 24 times.

  6. Application of advanced electronics to a future spacecraft computer design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    Advancements in hardware and software technology are summarized with specific emphasis on spacecraft computer capabilities. Available state of the art technology is reviewed and candidate architectures are defined.

  7. First 3 years of operation of RIACS (Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science) (1983-1985). Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Denning, P.J.

    1986-04-01

    The focus of the Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) is to explore matches between advanced computing architectures and the processes of scientific research. An architecture evaluation of the MIT static dataflow machine, specification of a graphical language for expressing distributed computations, and specification of an expert system for aiding in grid generation for two-dimensional flow problems was initiated. Research projects for 1984 and 1985 are summarized.

  8. Developing an Advanced Environment for Collaborative Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becerra-Fernandez, Irma; Stewart, Helen; DelAlto, Martha; DelAlto, Martha; Knight, Chris

    1999-01-01

    Knowledge management in general tries to organize and make available important know-how, whenever and where ever is needed. Today, organizations rely on decision-makers to produce "mission critical" decisions that am based on inputs from multiple domains. The ideal decision-maker has a profound understanding of specific domains that influence the decision-making process coupled with the experience that allows them to act quickly and decisively on the information. In addition, learning companies benefit by not repeating costly mistakes, and by reducing time-to-market in Research & Development projects. Group-decision making tools can help companies make better decisions by capturing the knowledge from groups of experts. Furthermore, companies that capture their customers preferences can improve their customer service, which translates to larger profits. Therefore collaborative computing provides a common communication space, improves sharing of knowledge, provides a mechanism for real-time feedback on the tasks being performed, helps to optimize processes, and results in a centralized knowledge warehouse. This paper presents the research directions. of a project which seeks to augment an advanced collaborative web-based environment called Postdoc, with workflow capabilities. Postdoc is a "government-off-the-shelf" document management software developed at NASA-Ames Research Center (ARC).

  9. Recent scientific advances in the use of radar in scientific hydrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engman, Edwin T.

    1993-01-01

    The data needs in scientific hydrology involve measurements of system states and fluxes. The microwave region is particularly well suited for measuring the system states of soil moisture and snow and the major flux into the earth as rainfall. This paper discusses the unique data needs of hydrology and presents some recent examples from AIRSAR experiments.

  10. DOE Advanced Scientific Advisory Committee (ASCAC): Workforce Subcommittee Letter

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Barbara; Calandra, Henri; Crivelli, Silvia; Dongarra, Jack; Hittinger, Jeffrey; Lathrop, Scott A.; Sarkar, Vivek; Stahlberg, Eric; Vetter, Jeffrey S.; Williams, Dean

    2014-07-23

    Simulation and computing are essential to much of the research conducted at the DOE national laboratories. Experts in the ASCR ¬relevant Computing Sciences, which encompass a range of disciplines including Computer Science, Applied Mathematics, Statistics and domain Computational Sciences, are an essential element of the workforce in nearly all of the DOE national laboratories. This report seeks to identify the gaps and challenges facing DOE with respect to this workforce. This letter is ASCAC’s response to the charge of February 19, 2014 to identify disciplines in which significantly greater emphasis in workforce training at the graduate or postdoctoral levels is necessary to address workforce gaps in current and future Office of Science mission needs.

  11. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research

    SciTech Connect

    John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

    2013-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue University’s Interaction of Materials

  12. Advanced computational research in materials processing for design and manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.

    1995-04-01

    Advanced mathematical techniques and computer simulation play a major role in providing enhanced understanding of conventional and advanced materials processing operations. Development and application of mathematical models and computer simulation techniques can provide a quantitative understanding of materials processes and will minimize the need for expensive and time consuming trial- and error-based product development. As computer simulations and materials databases grow in complexity, high performance computing and simulation are expected to play a key role in supporting the improvements required in advanced material syntheses and processing by lessening the dependence on expensive prototyping and re-tooling. Many of these numerical models are highly compute-intensive. It is not unusual for an analysis to require several hours of computational time on current supercomputers despite the simplicity of the models being studied. For example, to accurately simulate the heat transfer in a 1-m{sup 3} block using a simple computational method requires 10`2 arithmetic operations per second of simulated time. For a computer to do the simulation in real time would require a sustained computation rate 1000 times faster than that achievable by current supercomputers. Massively parallel computer systems, which combine several thousand processors able to operate concurrently on a problem are expected to provide orders of magnitude increase in performance. This paper briefly describes advanced computational research in materials processing at ORNL. Continued development of computational techniques and algorithms utilizing the massively parallel computers will allow the simulation of conventional and advanced materials processes in sufficient generality.

  13. Advanced flight computers for planetary exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, R. Rhoads

    Research concerning flight computers for use on interplanetary probes is reviewed. The history of these computers from the Viking mission to the present is outlined. The differences between ground commercial computers and computers for planetary exploration are listed. The development of a computer for the Mariner Mark II comet rendezvous asteroid flyby mission is described. Various aspects of recently developed computer systems are examined, including the Max real time, embedded computer, a hypercube distributed supercomputer, a SAR data processor, a processor for the High Resolution IR Imaging Spectrometer, and a robotic vision multiresolution pyramid machine for processsing images obtained by a Mars Rover.

  14. Advanced flight computers for planetary exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephenson, R. Rhoads

    1988-01-01

    Research concerning flight computers for use on interplanetary probes is reviewed. The history of these computers from the Viking mission to the present is outlined. The differences between ground commercial computers and computers for planetary exploration are listed. The development of a computer for the Mariner Mark II comet rendezvous asteroid flyby mission is described. Various aspects of recently developed computer systems are examined, including the Max real time, embedded computer, a hypercube distributed supercomputer, a SAR data processor, a processor for the High Resolution IR Imaging Spectrometer, and a robotic vision multiresolution pyramid machine for processsing images obtained by a Mars Rover.

  15. TerraFERMA: Harnessing Advanced Computational Libraries in Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C. R.; Spiegelman, M.; van Keken, P.

    2012-12-01

    Many important problems in Earth sciences can be described by non-linear coupled systems of partial differential equations. These "multi-physics" problems include thermo-chemical convection in Earth and planetary interiors, interactions of fluids and magmas with the Earth's mantle and crust and coupled flow of water and ice. These problems are of interest to a large community of researchers but are complicated to model and understand. Much of this complexity stems from the nature of multi-physics where small changes in the coupling between variables or constitutive relations can lead to radical changes in behavior, which in turn affect critical computational choices such as discretizations, solvers and preconditioners. To make progress in understanding such coupled systems requires a computational framework where multi-physics problems can be described at a high-level while maintaining the flexibility to easily modify the solution algorithm. Fortunately, recent advances in computational science provide a basis for implementing such a framework. Here we present the Transparent Finite Element Rapid Model Assembler (TerraFERMA), which leverages several advanced open-source libraries for core functionality. FEniCS (fenicsproject.org) provides a high level language for describing the weak forms of coupled systems of equations, and an automatic code generator that produces finite element assembly code. PETSc (www.mcs.anl.gov/petsc) provides a wide range of scalable linear and non-linear solvers that can be composed into effective multi-physics preconditioners. SPuD (amcg.ese.ic.ac.uk/Spud) is an application neutral options system that provides both human and machine-readable interfaces based on a single xml schema. Our software integrates these libraries and provides the user with a framework for exploring multi-physics problems. A single options file fully describes the problem, including all equations, coefficients and solver options. Custom compiled applications are

  16. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Bramley, Randall B.

    2012-08-02

    Indiana University’s SWIM activities have primarily been in three areas. All are completed, but we are continuing to work on two of them because refinements are useful to both DoE laboratories and the high performance computing community.

  17. 78 FR 64931 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-30

    ... members of the public notify the DFO, Christine Chalk, that you intend to call-into the meeting via email at: christine.chalk@science.doe.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Melea Baker, Office...

  18. 78 FR 50404 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... sufficient access lines for the public, we request that members of the public notify the DFO, Christine Chalk that you intend to call-into the meeting via email at: christine.chalk@science.doe.gov . FOR...

  19. 76 FR 31945 - Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... sufficient access lines for the public, we request that members of the public notify the DFO, Christine Chalk, that you intend to call-into the meeting via e-mail at christine.chalk@science.doe.gov . FOR...

  20. 75 FR 64720 - DOE/Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE...: Melea.Baker@science.doe.gov ). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Purpose of the Meeting: The purpose of this... Baker via FAX at 301-903-4846 or via e-mail ( Melea.Baker@science.doe.gov ). You must make your...

  1. Using the Scientific Python ecosystem to advance open radar science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collis, S. M.; Helmus, J.

    2015-12-01

    The choice of a programming language or environment is rarely made with consideration of its benefits and disadvantages. Often it is something inherited from mentor or enforced by an institution. Python, developed as a "hobby" programming project, has seen increased migration of users from more traditional domain specific environments. This presentation charts our own journey in using the scientific python ecosystem, first as users and then as the developers of a community based toolkit for working with weather radar data, the Python ARM Radar Toolkit, Py-ART. We will highlight how a data model driven design approach can extend the usefulness and reusability of code and act as a bridge between amorphous mathematical algorithms and domain specific data. Finally we will showcase how Python and Py-ART can be used on clusters to tackle pleasantly parallel problems like deriving climatologies swiftly, painlessly and most importantly: reproducibly.

  2. Some Recent Advances in Computer Graphics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitted, Turner

    1982-01-01

    General principles of computer graphics are reviewed, including discussions of display hardware, geometric modeling, algorithms, and applications in science, computer-aided design, flight training, communications, business, art, and entertainment. (JN)

  3. Scientific Society Partnerships & Effective Strategies for Advancing Policy Objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, P. W.; Greenamoyer, J.

    2012-12-01

    From the perspective of Congress, science is just another interest group that seeks a generous slice of an increasingly shrinking federal budget pie. Traditionally, the science community has not been effective at lobbying for the legislative advances and federal appropriations that enable the R&D enterprise. However, over the last couple decades, science societies have become more strategic in their outreach to Congress and the President. Indeed, many societies have lobbyists on staff, many of whom have a background in science. Yet, while science societies are beginning to be more effective as a political interest group, their members have been much slower to come around to this perspective as an important component of their professional lives. In this talk, we will illustrate how the American Institute of Physics partners with AGU and other science societies to identify joint policy priorities and then reach out to Congress and the President to advance these priorities. The biggest issue is funding for R&D, but science education is increasingly important as is other issues such as publishing policy. We will draw from a number examples, such as the NSF budget, funding for Pu-238, K-12 physical science education policy, and Open Access to illustrate how partnerships work and how scientists can be engaged as powerful political actors in the process.

  4. Accelerating Scientific Discovery Through Computation and Visualization III. Tight-Binding Wave Functions for Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Sims, James S.; George, William L.; Griffin, Terence J.; Hagedorn, John G.; Hung, Howard K.; Kelso, John T.; Olano, Marc; Peskin, Adele P.; Satterfield, Steven G.; Terrill, Judith Devaney; Bryant, Garnett W.; Diaz, Jose G.

    2008-01-01

    This is the third in a series of articles that describe, through examples, how the Scientific Applications and Visualization Group (SAVG) at NIST has utilized high performance parallel computing, visualization, and machine learning to accelerate scientific discovery. In this article we focus on the use of high performance computing and visualization for simulations of nanotechnology. PMID:27096116

  5. Computing Advances in the Teaching of Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskett, W. P.; Matthews, G. P.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses three trends in computer-oriented chemistry instruction: (1) availability of interfaces to integrate computers with experiments; (2) impact of the development of higher resolution graphics and greater memory capacity; and (3) role of videodisc technology on computer assisted instruction. Includes program listings for auto-titration and…

  6. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL METHODS IN DOSE MODELING: APPLICATION OF COMPUTATIONAL BIOPHYSICAL TRANSPORT, COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational toxicology (CompTox) leverages the significant gains in computing power and computational techniques (e.g., numerical approaches, structure-activity relationships, bioinformatics) realized over the last few years, thereby reducing costs and increasing efficiency i...

  7. Advancing the scientific basis of trivalent actinide-lanthanide separations

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K.L.

    2013-07-01

    For advanced fuel cycles designed to support transmutation of transplutonium actinides, several options have been demonstrated for process-scale aqueous separations for U, Np, Pu management and for partitioning of trivalent actinides and fission product lanthanides away from other fission products. The more difficult mutual separation of Am/Cm from La-Tb remains the subject of considerable fundamental and applied research. The chemical separations literature teaches that the most productive alternatives to pursue are those based on ligand donor atoms less electronegative than O, specifically N- and S-containing complexants and chloride ion (Cl{sup -}). These 'soft-donor' atoms have exhibited usable selectivity in their bonding interactions with trivalent actinides relative to lanthanides. In this report, selected features of soft donor reagent design, characterization and application development will be discussed. The roles of thiocyanate, aminopoly-carboxylic acids and lactate in separation processes are detailed. (authors)

  8. Enabling Interoperation of High Performance, Scientific Computing Applications: Modeling Scientific Data with the Sets & Fields (SAF) Modeling System

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M C; Reus, J F; Matzke, R P; Arrighi, W J; Schoof, L A; Hitt, R T; Espen, P K; Butler, D M

    2001-02-07

    This paper describes the Sets and Fields (SAF) scientific data modeling system. It is a revolutionary approach to interoperation of high performance, scientific computing applications based upon rigorous, math-oriented data modeling principles. Previous technologies have required all applications to use the same data structures and/or meshes to represent scientific data or lead to an ever expanding set of incrementally different data structures and/or meshes. SAF addresses this problem by providing a small set of mathematical building blocks--sets, relations and fields--out of which a wide variety of scientific data can be characterized. Applications literally model their data by assembling these building blocks. A short historical perspective, a conceptual model and an overview of SAF along with preliminary results from its use in a few ASCI codes are discussed.

  9. Communication, Interventions, and Scientific Advances in Autism: A Commentary

    PubMed Central

    Llaneza, Danielle C.; DeLuke, Susan V.; Batista, Myra; Crawley, Jacqueline N.; Christodulu, Kristin V.; Frye, Cheryl A.

    2010-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) affect approximately 1 in 150 children across the U.S., and are characterized by abnormal social actions, language difficulties, repetitive or restrictive behaviors, and special interests. ASD include autism (autistic disorder), Asperger syndrome, and Pervasive Developmental Disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS or atypical autism). High-functioning individuals may communicate with moderate-to-high language skills, although difficulties in social skills may result in communication deficits. Low-functioning individuals may have severe deficiencies in language, resulting in poor communication between the individual and others. Behavioral intervention programs have been developed for ASD, and are frequently adjusted to accommodate specific individual needs. Many of these programs are school-based and aim to support the child in the development of their skills, for use outside the classroom with family and friends. Strides are being made in understanding the factors contributing to the development of ASD, particularly the genetic contributions that may underlie these disorders. Mutant mouse models provide powerful research tools to investigate the genetic factors associated with ASD and its co-morbid disorders. In support, the BTBR T+tf/J mouse strain incorporates ASD-like social and communication deficits and high levels of repetitive behaviors. This commentary briefly reviews the reciprocal relationship between observations made during evidence-based behavioral interventions of high- versus low-functioning children with ASD and the accumulating body of research in autism, including animal studies and basic research models. This reciprocity is one of the hallmarks of the scientific method, such that research may inform behavioral treatments, and observations made during treatment may inform subsequent research. PMID:20093134

  10. Advancing crime scene computer forensics techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosmer, Chet; Feldman, John; Giordano, Joe

    1999-02-01

    Computers and network technology have become inexpensive and powerful tools that can be applied to a wide range of criminal activity. Computers have changed the world's view of evidence because computers are used more and more as tools in committing `traditional crimes' such as embezzlements, thefts, extortion and murder. This paper will focus on reviewing the current state-of-the-art of the data recovery and evidence construction tools used in both the field and laboratory for prosection purposes.

  11. Climate Solutions based on advanced scientific discoveries of Allatra physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vershigora, Valery

    2016-05-01

    Global climate change is one of the most important international problems of the 21st century. The overall rapid increase in the dynamics of cataclysms, which have been observed in recent decades, is particularly alarming. Howdo modern scientists predict the occurrence of certain events? In meteorology, unusually powerful cumulonimbus clouds are one of the main conditions for the emergence of a tornado. The former, in their turn, are formed during the invasion of cold air on the overheated land surface. The satellite captures the cloud front, and, based on these pictures, scientists make assumptions about the possibility of occurrence of the respective natural phenomena. In fact, mankind visually observes and draws conclusions about the consequences of the physical phenomena which have already taken place in the invisible world, so the conclusions of scientists are assumptions by their nature, rather than precise knowledge of the causes of theorigin of these phenomena in the physics of microcosm. The latest research in the field of the particle physics and neutrino astrophysics, which was conducted by a working team of scientists of ALLATRA International Public Movement (hereinafter ALLATRA SCIENCE group)allatra-science.org, last accessed 10 April 2016. , offers increased opportunities for advanced fundamental and applied research in climatic engineering.

  12. Paradigms and strategies for scientific computing on distributed memory concurrent computers

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, I.T.; Walker, D.W.

    1994-06-01

    In this work we examine recent advances in parallel languages and abstractions that have the potential for improving the programmability and maintainability of large-scale, parallel, scientific applications running on high performance architectures and networks. This paper focuses on Fortran M, a set of extensions to Fortran 77 that supports the modular design of message-passing programs. We describe the Fortran M implementation of a particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulation application, and discuss issues in the optimization of the code. The use of two other methodologies for parallelizing the PIC application are considered. The first is based on the shared object abstraction as embodied in the Orca language. The second approach is the Split-C language. In Fortran M, Orca, and Split-C the ability of the programmer to control the granularity of communication is important is designing an efficient implementation.

  13. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL METHODS IN DOSE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall goal of the EPA-ORD NERL research program on Computational Toxicology (CompTox) is to provide the Agency with the tools of modern chemistry, biology, and computing to improve quantitative risk assessments and reduce uncertainties in the source-to-adverse outcome conti...

  14. Transonic wing analysis using advanced computational methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henne, P. A.; Hicks, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of three-dimensional computational transonic flow methods to several different types of transport wing designs. The purpose of these applications is to evaluate the basic accuracy and limitations associated with such numerical methods. The use of such computational methods for practical engineering problems can only be justified after favorable evaluations are completed. The paper summarizes a study of both the small-disturbance and the full potential technique for computing three-dimensional transonic flows. Computed three-dimensional results are compared to both experimental measurements and theoretical results. Comparisons are made not only of pressure distributions but also of lift and drag forces. Transonic drag rise characteristics are compared. Three-dimensional pressure distributions and aerodynamic forces, computed from the full potential solution, compare reasonably well with experimental results for a wide range of configurations and flow conditions.

  15. Application of advanced computational technology to propulsion CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szuch, John R.

    The Internal Fluid Mechanics Division of the NASA Lewis Research Center is combining the key elements of computational fluid dynamics, aerothermodynamic experiments, and advanced computational technology to bring internal computational fluid dynamics (ICFM) to a state of practical application for aerospace propulsion system design. This paper presents an overview of efforts underway at NASA Lewis to advance and apply computational technology to ICFM. These efforts include the use of modern, software engineering principles for code development, the development of an AI-based user-interface for large codes, the establishment of a high-performance, data communications network to link ICFM researchers and facilities, and the application of parallel processing to speed up computationally intensive and/or time-critical ICFM problems. A multistage compressor flow physics program is cited as an example of efforts to use advanced computational technology to enhance a current NASA Lewis ICFM research program.

  16. The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Advancing Nuclear Technology

    SciTech Connect

    T. R. Allen; J. B. Benson; J. A. Foster; F. M. Marshall; M. K. Meyer; M. C. Thelen

    2009-05-01

    To help ensure the long-term viability of nuclear energy through a robust and sustained research and development effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor and associated post-irradiation examination facilities a National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), allowing broader access to nuclear energy researchers. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class nuclear research facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. The ATR NSUF seeks to create an engaged academic and industrial user community that routinely conducts reactor-based research. Cost free access to the ATR and PIE facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to DOE mission. Extensive publication of research results is expected as a condition for access. During FY 2008, the first full year of ATR NSUF operation, five university-led experiments were awarded access to the ATR and associated post-irradiation examination facilities. The ATR NSUF has awarded four new experiments in early FY 2009, and anticipates awarding additional experiments in the fall of 2009 as the results of the second 2009 proposal call. As the ATR NSUF program mature over the next two years, the capability to perform irradiation research of increasing complexity will become available. These capabilities include instrumented irradiation experiments and post-irradiation examinations on materials previously irradiated in U.S. reactor material test programs. The ATR critical facility will also be made available to researchers. An important component of the ATR NSUF an education program focused on the reactor-based tools available for resolving nuclear science and technology issues. The ATR NSUF provides education programs including a summer short course, internships, faculty-student team

  17. PREFACE: 16th International workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in physics research (ACAT2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiala, L.; Lokajicek, M.; Tumova, N.

    2015-05-01

    This volume of the IOP Conference Series is dedicated to scientific contributions presented at the 16th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT 2014), this year the motto was ''bridging disciplines''. The conference took place on September 1-5, 2014, at the Faculty of Civil Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic. The 16th edition of ACAT explored the boundaries of computing system architectures, data analysis algorithmics, automatic calculations, and theoretical calculation technologies. It provided a forum for confronting and exchanging ideas among these fields, where new approaches in computing technologies for scientific research were explored and promoted. This year's edition of the workshop brought together over 140 participants from all over the world. The workshop's 16 invited speakers presented key topics on advanced computing and analysis techniques in physics. During the workshop, 60 talks and 40 posters were presented in three tracks: Computing Technology for Physics Research, Data Analysis - Algorithms and Tools, and Computations in Theoretical Physics: Techniques and Methods. The round table enabled discussions on expanding software, knowledge sharing and scientific collaboration in the respective areas. ACAT 2014 was generously sponsored by Western Digital, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Hewlett Packard, DataDirect Networks, M Computers, Bright Computing, Huawei and PDV-Systemhaus. Special appreciations go to the track liaisons Lorenzo Moneta, Axel Naumann and Grigory Rubtsov for their work on the scientific program and the publication preparation. ACAT's IACC would also like to express its gratitude to all referees for their work on making sure the contributions are published in the proceedings. Our thanks extend to the conference liaisons Andrei Kataev and Jerome Lauret who worked with the local contacts and made this conference possible as well as to the program

  18. Computing Algorithms for Nuffield Advanced Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, M. K.

    1978-01-01

    Defines all recurrence relations used in the Nuffield course, to solve first- and second-order differential equations, and describes a typical algorithm for computer generation of solutions. (Author/GA)

  19. Aerodynamic optimization studies on advanced architecture computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chawla, Kalpana

    1995-01-01

    The approach to carrying out multi-discipline aerospace design studies in the future, especially in massively parallel computing environments, comprises of choosing (1) suitable solvers to compute solutions to equations characterizing a discipline, and (2) efficient optimization methods. In addition, for aerodynamic optimization problems, (3) smart methodologies must be selected to modify the surface shape. In this research effort, a 'direct' optimization method is implemented on the Cray C-90 to improve aerodynamic design. It is coupled with an existing implicit Navier-Stokes solver, OVERFLOW, to compute flow solutions. The optimization method is chosen such that it can accomodate multi-discipline optimization in future computations. In the work , however, only single discipline aerodynamic optimization will be included.

  20. Scientific and high-performance computing at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisel, Ivan

    2015-05-01

    Future FAIR experiments have to deal with very high input rates, large track multiplicities, make full event reconstruction and selection on-line on a large dedicated computer farm equipped with heterogeneous many-core CPU/GPU compute nodes. To develop efficient and fast algorithms, which are optimized for parallel computations, is a challenge for the groups of experts dealing with the HPC computing. Here we present and discuss the status and perspectives of the data reconstruction and physics analysis software of one of the future FAIR experiments, namely, the CBM experiment.

  1. Advanced Crew Personal Support Computer (CPSC) task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muratore, Debra

    1991-01-01

    The topics are presented in view graph form and include: background; objectives of task; benefits to the Space Station Freedom (SSF) Program; technical approach; baseline integration; and growth and evolution options. The objective is to: (1) introduce new computer technology into the SSF Program; (2) augment core computer capabilities to meet additional mission requirements; (3) minimize risk in upgrading technology; and (4) provide a low cost way to enhance crew and ground operations support.

  2. Recent advances in optical computing in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Satoshi

    The results of recent Japanese research in optical and hybrid computer systems and components are summarized and illustrated with drawings and diagrams, and the organizational structure of the research efforts is outlined. Topics addressed include optical logic devices, spatial light modulators, two-dimensional lasers, optical bistable devices, device theory, optically controlled array processing, an optical bus for a multiprocessor system, real-time multiple-matrix-product processing, optical numerical processing, optical parallel-array logic systems, optical associative memory, and neural-network computation. Consideration is given to the roles of the Optical Computer Group of the Japan Society of Applied Physics, industry, and government (through the universities and Ministry of Education and through the Ministry of International Trade and Industry).

  3. Advances in Computer-Supported Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neto, Francisco; Brasileiro, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    The Internet and growth of computer networks have eliminated geographic barriers, creating an environment where education can be brought to a student no matter where that student may be. The success of distance learning programs and the availability of many Web-supported applications and multimedia resources have increased the effectiveness of…

  4. Space data systems: Advanced flight computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Harry F.

    1991-01-01

    The technical objectives are to develop high-performance, space-qualifiable, onboard computing, storage, and networking technologies. The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: technology challenges; state-of-the-art assessment; program description; relationship to external programs; and cooperation and coordination effort.

  5. Multicore Challenges and Benefits for High Performance Scientific Computing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nielsen, Ida M. B.; Janssen, Curtis L.

    2008-01-01

    Until recently, performance gains in processors were achieved largely by improvements in clock speeds and instruction level parallelism. Thus, applications could obtain performance increases with relatively minor changes by upgrading to the latest generation of computing hardware. Currently, however, processor performance improvements are realized by using multicore technology and hardware support for multiple threads within each core, and taking full advantage of this technology to improve the performance of applications requires exposure of extreme levels of software parallelism. We will here discuss the architecture of parallel computers constructed from many multicore chips as well as techniques for managing the complexitymore » of programming such computers, including the hybrid message-passing/multi-threading programming model. We will illustrate these ideas with a hybrid distributed memory matrix multiply and a quantum chemistry algorithm for energy computation using Møller–Plesset perturbation theory.« less

  6. Evaluation of Advanced Computing Techniques and Technologies: Reconfigurable Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, B. Earl

    2003-01-01

    The focus of this project was to survey the technology of reconfigurable computing determine its level of maturity and suitability for NASA applications. To better understand and assess the effectiveness of the reconfigurable design paradigm that is utilized within the HAL-15 reconfigurable computer system. This system was made available to NASA MSFC for this purpose, from Star Bridge Systems, Inc. To implement on at least one application that would benefit from the performance levels that are possible with reconfigurable hardware. It was originally proposed that experiments in fault tolerance and dynamically reconfigurability would be perform but time constraints mandated that these be pursued as future research.

  7. Development of an interactive computer program for advance care planning

    PubMed Central

    Green, Michael J.; Levi, Benjamin H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the development of an innovative, multimedia decision aid for advance care planning. Background Advance care planning is an important way for people to articulate their wishes for medical care when they are not able to speak for themselves. Living wills and other types of advance directives are the most commonly used tools for advance care planning, but have been criticized for being vague, difficult to interpret, and inconsistent with individuals’ core beliefs and values. Results We developed a multimedia, computer-based decision aid for advance care planning (‘Making Your Wishes Known: Planning Your Medical Future’) to overcome many of the limitations of standard advance directive forms. This computer program guides individuals through the process of advance care planning, and unlike standard advance directives, provides tailored education, values clarification exercises, and a decision-making tool that translates an individual’s values and preferences into a specific medical plan that can be implemented by a health-care team. Pilot testing with 50 adult volunteers recruited from an outpatient primary care clinic showed high levels of satisfaction with the program. Further pilot testing with 34 cancer patients indicated that the program was perceived to be highly accurate at representing patients’ wishes. Conclusions This paper describes the development of an innovative decision aid for advance care planning that was designed to overcome common problems with standard advance directives. Preliminary testing suggests that it is acceptable to users and is accurate. PMID:18823445

  8. Advanced Computing Tools and Models for Accelerator Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, Robert; Ryne, Robert D.

    2008-06-11

    This paper is based on a transcript of my EPAC'08 presentation on advanced computing tools for accelerator physics. Following an introduction I present several examples, provide a history of the development of beam dynamics capabilities, and conclude with thoughts on the future of large scale computing in accelerator physics.

  9. Advances in Computationally Modeling Human Oral Bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junmei; Hou, Tingjun

    2015-01-01

    Although significant progress has been made in experimental high throughput screening (HTS) of ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion) and pharmacokinetic properties, the ADME and Toxicity (ADME-Tox) in silico modeling is still indispensable in drug discovery as it can guide us to wisely select drug candidates prior to expensive ADME screenings and clinical trials. Compared to other ADME-Tox properties, human oral bioavailability (HOBA) is particularly important but extremely difficult to predict. In this paper, the advances in human oral bioavailability modeling will be reviewed. Moreover, our deep insight on how to construct more accurate and reliable HOBA QSAR and classification models will also discussed. PMID:25582307

  10. Advances in computationally modeling human oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junmei; Hou, Tingjun

    2015-06-23

    Although significant progress has been made in experimental high throughput screening (HTS) of ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion) and pharmacokinetic properties, the ADME and Toxicity (ADME-Tox) in silico modeling is still indispensable in drug discovery as it can guide us to wisely select drug candidates prior to expensive ADME screenings and clinical trials. Compared to other ADME-Tox properties, human oral bioavailability (HOBA) is particularly important but extremely difficult to predict. In this paper, the advances in human oral bioavailability modeling will be reviewed. Moreover, our deep insight on how to construct more accurate and reliable HOBA QSAR and classification models will also discussed. PMID:25582307

  11. ASDA - Advanced Suit Design Analyzer computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Conger, Bruce C.; Iovine, John V.; Chang, Chi-Min

    1992-01-01

    An ASDA model developed to evaluate the heat and mass transfer characteristics of advanced pressurized suit design concepts for low pressure or vacuum planetary applications is presented. The model is based on a generalized 3-layer suit that uses the Systems Integrated Numerical Differencing Analyzer '85 in conjunction with a 41-node FORTRAN routine. The latter simulates the transient heat transfer and respiratory processes of a human body in a suited environment. The user options for the suit encompass a liquid cooled garment, a removable jacket, a CO2/H2O permeable layer, and a phase change layer.

  12. Computer-Supported Aids to Making Sense of Scientific Articles: Cognitive, Motivational, and Attitudinal Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gegner, Julie A.; Mackay, Donald H. J.; Mayer, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    High school students can access original scientific research articles on the Internet, but may have trouble understanding them. To address this problem of online literacy, the authors developed a computer-based prototype for guiding students' comprehension of scientific articles. High school students were asked to read an original scientific…

  13. From Mars to Minerva: The origins of scientific computing in the AEC labs

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, R.W. |

    1996-10-01

    Although the AEC laboratories are renowned for the development of nuclear weapons, their largess in promoting scientific computing also had a profound effect on scientific and technological development in the second half of the 20th century. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Position Paper: Applying Machine Learning to Software Analysis to Achieve Trusted, Repeatable Scientific Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Prowell, Stacy J; Symons, Christopher T

    2015-01-01

    Producing trusted results from high-performance codes is essential for policy and has significant economic impact. We propose combining rigorous analytical methods with machine learning techniques to achieve the goal of repeatable, trustworthy scientific computing.

  15. Comparison of Scientific Calipers and Computer-Enabled CT Review for the Measurement of Skull Base and Craniomaxillofacial Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Citardi, Martin J.; Herrmann, Brian; Hollenbeak, Chris S.; Stack, Brendan C.; Cooper, Margaret; Bucholz, Richard D.

    2001-01-01

    Traditionally, cadaveric studies and plain-film cephalometrics provided information about craniomaxillofacial proportions and measurements; however, advances in computer technology now permit software-based review of computed tomography (CT)-based models. Distances between standardized anatomic points were measured on five dried human skulls with standard scientific calipers (Geneva Gauge, Albany, NY) and through computer workstation (StealthStation 2.6.4, Medtronic Surgical Navigation Technology, Louisville, CO) review of corresponding CT scans. Differences in measurements between the caliper and CT model were not statistically significant for each parameter. Measurements obtained by computer workstation CT review of the cranial skull base are an accurate representation of actual bony anatomy. Such information has important implications for surgical planning and clinical research. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:17167599

  16. Advances in Computer-Based Autoantibodies Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soda, Paolo; Iannello, Giulio

    Indirect Immunofluorescence (IIF) imaging is the recommended me-thod to detect autoantibodies in patient serum, whose common markers are antinuclear autoantibodies (ANA) and autoantibodies directed against double strand DNA (anti-dsDNA). Since the availability of accurately performed and correctly reported laboratory determinations is crucial for the clinicians, an evident medical demand is the development of Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) tools supporting physicians' decisions.

  17. High throughput computing: a solution for scientific analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Donnell, M.

    2011-01-01

    handle job failures due to hardware, software, or network interruptions (obviating the need to manually resubmit the job after each stoppage); be affordable; and most importantly, allow us to complete very large, complex analyses that otherwise would not even be possible. In short, we envisioned a job-management system that would take advantage of unused FORT CPUs within a local area network (LAN) to effectively distribute and run highly complex analytical processes. What we found was a solution that uses High Throughput Computing (HTC) and High Performance Computing (HPC) systems to do exactly that (Figure 1).

  18. A language comparison for scientific computing on MIMD architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Mark T.; Patrick, Merrell L.; Voigt, Robert G.

    1989-01-01

    Choleski's method for solving banded symmetric, positive definite systems is implemented on a multiprocessor computer using three FORTRAN based parallel programming languages, the Force, PISCES and Concurrent FORTRAN. The capabilities of the language for expressing parallelism and their user friendliness are discussed, including readability of the code, debugging assistance offered, and expressiveness of the languages. The performance of the different implementations is compared. It is argued that PISCES, using the Force for medium-grained parallelism, is the appropriate choice for programming Choleski's method on the multiprocessor computer, Flex/32.

  19. Advances in computational fluid dynamics solvers for modern computing environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertenstein, Daniel; Humphrey, John R.; Paolini, Aaron L.; Kelmelis, Eric J.

    2013-05-01

    EM Photonics has been investigating the application of massively multicore processors to a key problem area: Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). While the capabilities of CFD solvers have continually increased and improved to support features such as moving bodies and adjoint-based mesh adaptation, the software architecture has often lagged behind. This has led to poor scaling as core counts reach the tens of thousands. In the modern High Performance Computing (HPC) world, clusters with hundreds of thousands of cores are becoming the standard. In addition, accelerator devices such as NVIDIA GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi are being installed in many new systems. It is important for CFD solvers to take advantage of the new hardware as the computations involved are well suited for the massively multicore architecture. In our work, we demonstrate that new features in NVIDIA GPUs are able to empower existing CFD solvers by example using AVUS, a CFD solver developed by the Air Force Research Labratory (AFRL) and the Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC). The effort has resulted in increased performance and scalability without sacrificing accuracy. There are many well-known codes in the CFD space that can benefit from this work, such as FUN3D, OVERFLOW, and TetrUSS. Such codes are widely used in the commercial, government, and defense sectors.

  20. Advanced computational techniques for hypersonic propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.

    1989-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has played a major role in the resurgence of hypersonic flight, on the premise that numerical methods will allow performance of simulations at conditions for which no ground test capability exists. Validation of CFD methods is being established using the experimental data base available, which is below Mach 8. It is important, however, to realize the limitations involved in the extrapolation process as well as the deficiencies that exist in numerical methods at the present time. Current features of CFD codes are examined for application to propulsion system components. The shortcomings in simulation and modeling are identified and discussed.

  1. Tools for 3D scientific visualization in computational aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bancroft, Gordon; Plessel, Todd; Merritt, Fergus; Watson, Val

    1989-01-01

    The purpose is to describe the tools and techniques in use at the NASA Ames Research Center for performing visualization of computational aerodynamics, for example visualization of flow fields from computer simulations of fluid dynamics about vehicles such as the Space Shuttle. The hardware used for visualization is a high-performance graphics workstation connected to a super computer with a high speed channel. At present, the workstation is a Silicon Graphics IRIS 3130, the supercomputer is a CRAY2, and the high speed channel is a hyperchannel. The three techniques used for visualization are post-processing, tracking, and steering. Post-processing analysis is done after the simulation. Tracking analysis is done during a simulation but is not interactive, whereas steering analysis involves modifying the simulation interactively during the simulation. Using post-processing methods, a flow simulation is executed on a supercomputer and, after the simulation is complete, the results of the simulation are processed for viewing. The software in use and under development at NASA Ames Research Center for performing these types of tasks in computational aerodynamics is described. Workstation performance issues, benchmarking, and high-performance networks for this purpose are also discussed as well as descriptions of other hardware for digital video and film recording.

  2. Argonne National Lab - Theory and Computing Sciences, Accelerating Scientific Discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Beckman, Pete

    2009-01-01

    Argonne's new TCS building houses all of Argonne's computing divisions, and is designed to foster collaboration of the Manhattan Project model "Getting the best people together and having them work on a problem with singular determination." More at http://www.anl.gov/Media_Center/News/2009/tcs0910.html

  3. Intelligent Software Tools for Advanced Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgart, C.W.

    2001-04-03

    Feature extraction and evaluation are two procedures common to the development of any pattern recognition application. These features are the primary pieces of information which are used to train the pattern recognition tool, whether that tool is a neural network, a fuzzy logic rulebase, or a genetic algorithm. Careful selection of the features to be used by the pattern recognition tool can significantly streamline the overall development and training of the solution for the pattern recognition application. This report summarizes the development of an integrated, computer-based software package called the Feature Extraction Toolbox (FET), which can be used for the development and deployment of solutions to generic pattern recognition problems. This toolbox integrates a number of software techniques for signal processing, feature extraction and evaluation, and pattern recognition, all under a single, user-friendly development environment. The toolbox has been developed to run on a laptop computer, so that it may be taken to a site and used to develop pattern recognition applications in the field. A prototype version of this toolbox has been completed and is currently being used for applications development on several projects in support of the Department of Energy.

  4. AVES: A high performance computer cluster array for the INTEGRAL satellite scientific data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federici, Memmo; Martino, Bruno Luigi; Ubertini, Pietro

    2012-07-01

    In this paper we describe a new computing system array, designed, built and now used at the Space Astrophysics and Planetary Institute (IAPS) in Rome, Italy, for the INTEGRAL Space Observatory scientific data analysis. This new system has become necessary in order to reduce the processing time of the INTEGRAL data accumulated during the more than 9 years of in-orbit operation. In order to fulfill the scientific data analysis requirements with a moderately limited investment the starting approach has been to use a `cluster' array of commercial quad-CPU computers, featuring the extremely large scientific and calibration data archive on line.

  5. Using the High-Level Based Program Interface to Facilitate the Large Scale Scientific Computing

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yizi; Shang, Ling; Gao, Chuanchang; Lu, Guiming; Ye, Yuntao; Jia, Dongdong

    2014-01-01

    This paper is to make further research on facilitating the large-scale scientific computing on the grid and the desktop grid platform. The related issues include the programming method, the overhead of the high-level program interface based middleware, and the data anticipate migration. The block based Gauss Jordan algorithm as a real example of large-scale scientific computing is used to evaluate those issues presented above. The results show that the high-level based program interface makes the complex scientific applications on large-scale scientific platform easier, though a little overhead is unavoidable. Also, the data anticipation migration mechanism can improve the efficiency of the platform which needs to process big data based scientific applications. PMID:24574931

  6. Recent advances in transonic computational aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.; Bennett, Robert M.; Seidel, David A.; Cunningham, Herbert J.; Bland, Samuel R.

    1988-01-01

    A transonic unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelasticity code called CAP-TSD was developed for application to realistic aircraft configurations. The code permits the calculation of steady and unsteady flows about complete aircraft configurations for aeroelastic analysis in the flutter critical transonic speed range. The CAP-TSD code uses a time accurate approximate factorization algorithm for solution of the unsteady transonic small disturbance potential equation. An overview is given of the CAP-TSD code development effort and results are presented which demonstrate various capabilities of the code. Calculations are presented for several configurations including the General Dynamics 1/9 scale F-16 aircraft model and the ONERA M6 wing. Calculations are also presented from a flutter analysis of a 45 deg sweptback wing which agrees well with the experimental data. Descriptions are presented of the CAP-TSD code and algorithm details along with results and comparisons which demonstrate these recent developments in transonic computational aeroelasticity.

  7. Charon Message-Passing Toolkit for Scientific Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWijngaart, Rob F.; Yan, Jerry (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Charon is a library, callable from C and Fortran, that aids the conversion of structured-grid legacy codes-such as those used in the numerical computation of fluid flows-into parallel, high- performance codes. Key are functions that define distributed arrays, that map between distributed and non-distributed arrays, and that allow easy specification of common communications on structured grids. The library is based on the widely accepted MPI message passing standard. We present an overview of the functionality of Charon, and some representative results.

  8. [Scientific advice by the national and European approval authorities concerning advanced therapy medicinal products].

    PubMed

    Jost, Nils; Schüssler-Lenz, Martina; Ziegele, Bettina; Reinhardt, Jens

    2015-11-01

    The aim of scientific advice is to support pharmaceutical developers in regulatory and scientific questions, thus facilitating the development of safe and efficacious new medicinal products. Recent years have shown that the development of advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) in particular needs a high degree of regulatory support. On one hand, this is related to the complexity and heterogeneity of this group of medicinal products and on the other hand due to the fact that mainly academic research institutions and small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are developing ATMPs. These often have limited regulatory experience and resources. In 2009 the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut (PEI) initiated the Innovation Office as a contact point for applicants developing ATMPs. The mandate of the Innovation Office is to provide support on regulatory questions and to coordinate national scientific advice meetings concerning ATMPs for every phase in drug development and especially with view to the preparation of clinical trial applications. On the European level, the Scientific Advice Working Party (SAWP) of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) of the European Medicinal Agency (EMA) offers scientific advice. This article describes the concepts of national and EMA scientific advice concerning ATMPs and summarizes the experience of the last six years. PMID:26369763

  9. Advanced ERS design using computer simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Melhem, G.A.

    1995-12-31

    There are two schools of thought regarding pressure relief design, shortcut/simplified methods and detailed methods. The shortcut/simplified methods are mostly applicable to non-reactive systems. These methods use direct scale-up techniques to obtain a vent size. Little useful information can be obtained for reaction data such as onset temperatures, activation energy, decompositon stoichiometry, etc. In addition, this approach does not readily provide the ability to perform what-if and sensitivity analysis or data that can be used for post-release mitigation design. The detailed approach advocates a more fundamental approach to pressure relief design, especially for reactive systems. First, the reaction chemistry is qualified using small scale experiments and then this data is coupled with fluid dynamics to design the emergency relief system. In addition to vent sizing information, this approach provides insights into process modification and refinement as well as the establishment of a safe operating envelope. This approach provides necessary flow data for vent containment design (if required), structural support, etc. This approach also allows the direct evaluation of design sensitivity to variables such as temperature, pressure, composition, fill level, etc. on vent sizing while the shortcut approach requires an additional experiment per what-if scenario. This approach meets DIERS technology requirements for two-phase flow and vapor/liquid disengagement and exceeds it in many key areas for reacting systems such as stoichiometry estimation for decomposition reactions, non-ideal solutions effects, continuing reactions in piping and vent containment systems, etc. This paper provides an overview of our proposed equation of state based modeling approach and its computer code implementation. Numerous examples and model validations are also described. 42 refs., 23 figs., 9 tabs.

  10. Scientific Grand Challenges: Challenges in Climate Change Science and the Role of Computing at the Extreme Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Johnson, Gary M.; Washington, Warren M.

    2009-07-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) in partnership with the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) held a workshop on the challenges in climate change science and the role of computing at the extreme scale, November 6-7, 2008, in Bethesda, Maryland. At the workshop, participants identified the scientific challenges facing the field of climate science and outlined the research directions of highest priority that should be pursued to meet these challenges. Representatives from the national and international climate change research community as well as representatives from the high-performance computing community attended the workshop. This group represented a broad mix of expertise. Of the 99 participants, 6 were from international institutions. Before the workshop, each of the four panels prepared a white paper, which provided the starting place for the workshop discussions. These four panels of workshop attendees devoted to their efforts the following themes: Model Development and Integrated Assessment; Algorithms and Computational Environment; Decadal Predictability and Prediction; Data, Visualization, and Computing Productivity. The recommendations of the panels are summarized in the body of this report.

  11. PREFACE: International Scientific Conference of Young Scientists: Advanced Materials in Construction and Engineering (TSUAB2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopanitsa, Natalia O.

    2015-01-01

    In October 15-17, 2014 International Scientific Conference of Young Scientists: Advanced Materials in Construction and Engineering (TSUAB2014) took place at Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building (Tomsk, Russia). The Conference became a discussion platform for researchers in the fields of studying structure and properties of advanced building materials and included open lectures of leading scientists and oral presentations of master, postgraduate and doctoral students. A special session was devoted to reports of school children who further plan on starting a research career. The Conference included an industrial exhibition where companies displayed the products and services they supply. The companies also gave presentations of their products within the Conference sessions.

  12. Performance Evaluation of Three Distributed Computing Environments for Scientific Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatoohi, Rod; Weeratunga, Sisira; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We present performance results for three distributed computing environments using the three simulated CFD applications in the NAS Parallel Benchmark suite. These environments are the DCF cluster, the LACE cluster, and an Intel iPSC/860 machine. The DCF is a prototypic cluster of loosely coupled SGI R3000 machines connected by Ethernet. The LACE cluster is a tightly coupled cluster of 32 IBM RS6000/560 machines connected by Ethernet as well as by either FDDI or an IBM Allnode switch. Results of several parallel algorithms for the three simulated applications are presented and analyzed based on the interplay between the communication requirements of an algorithm and the characteristics of the communication network of a distributed system.

  13. Object-Based Parallel Framework for Scientific Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Brian; Omelchenko, Y. A.

    1999-11-01

    We have developed a library of software in Fortran 90 and MPI for running simulations on massively parallel facilities. This is modeled after Omelchenko's FLAME code which was written in C++. With Fortran 90 we found several advantages, such as the array syntax and the intrinsic functions. The parallel portion of this library is achieved by dividing the data into subdomains, and distributing the subdomains among the processors to be computed concurrently (with periodic updates in neighboring region information as is necessary). The library is flexible enough so that one can use it to run simulations on any number of processors, and the user can divide up the data between the processors in an arbitrary fashion. We have tested this library for correctness and speed by using it to conduct simulations on a parallel cluster at General Atomics and on a serial workstation.

  14. Scientific visualization in computational aerodynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bancroft, Gordon V.; Plessel, Todd; Merritt, Fergus; Walatka, Pamela P.; Watson, Val

    1989-01-01

    The visualization methods used in computational fluid dynamics research at the NASA-Ames Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation facility are examined, including postprocessing, tracking, and steering methods. The visualization requirements of the facility's three-dimensional graphical workstation are outlined and the types hardware and software used to meet these requirements are discussed. The main features of the facility's current and next-generation workstations are listed. Emphasis is given to postprocessing techniques, such as dynamic interactive viewing on the workstation and recording and playback on videodisk, tape, and 16-mm film. Postprocessing software packages are described, including a three-dimensional plotter, a surface modeler, a graphical animation system, a flow analysis software toolkit, and a real-time interactive particle-tracer.

  15. Multidimensional Environmental Data Resource Brokering on Computational Grids and Scientific Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montella, Raffaele; Giunta, Giulio; Laccetti, Giuliano

    Grid computing has widely evolved over the past years, and its capabilities have found their way even into business products and are no longer relegated to scientific applications. Today, grid computing technology is not restricted to a set of specific grid open source or industrial products, but rather it is comprised of a set of capabilities virtually within any kind of software to create shared and highly collaborative production environments. These environments are focused on computational (workload) capabilities and the integration of information (data) into those computational capabilities. An active grid computing application field is the fully virtualization of scientific instruments in order to increase their availability and decrease operational and maintaining costs. Computational and information grids allow to manage real-world objects in a service-oriented way using industrial world-spread standards.

  16. PREFACE: 15th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianxiong

    2014-06-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to scientific contributions presented at the 15th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT 2013) which took place on 16-21 May 2013 at the Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. The workshop series brings together computer science researchers and practitioners, and researchers from particle physics and related fields to explore and confront the boundaries of computing and of automatic data analysis and theoretical calculation techniques. This year's edition of the workshop brought together over 120 participants from all over the world. 18 invited speakers presented key topics on the universe in computer, Computing in Earth Sciences, multivariate data analysis, automated computation in Quantum Field Theory as well as computing and data analysis challenges in many fields. Over 70 other talks and posters presented state-of-the-art developments in the areas of the workshop's three tracks: Computing Technologies, Data Analysis Algorithms and Tools, and Computational Techniques in Theoretical Physics. The round table discussions on open-source, knowledge sharing and scientific collaboration stimulate us to think over the issue in the respective areas. ACAT 2013 was generously sponsored by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), National Natural Science Foundation of China (NFSC), Brookhaven National Laboratory in the USA (BNL), Peking University (PKU), Theoretical Physics Cernter for Science facilities of CAS (TPCSF-CAS) and Sugon. We would like to thank all the participants for their scientific contributions and for the en- thusiastic participation in all its activities of the workshop. Further information on ACAT 2013 can be found at http://acat2013.ihep.ac.cn. Professor Jianxiong Wang Institute of High Energy Physics Chinese Academy of Science Details of committees and sponsors are available in the PDF

  17. Use of advanced computers for aerodynamic flow simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, F. R.; Ballhaus, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    The current and projected use of advanced computers for large-scale aerodynamic flow simulation applied to engineering design and research is discussed. The design use of mature codes run on conventional, serial computers is compared with the fluid research use of new codes run on parallel and vector computers. The role of flow simulations in design is illustrated by the application of a three dimensional, inviscid, transonic code to the Sabreliner 60 wing redesign. Research computations that include a more complete description of the fluid physics by use of Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes and large-eddy simulation formulations are also presented. Results of studies for a numerical aerodynamic simulation facility are used to project the feasibility of design applications employing these more advanced three dimensional viscous flow simulations.

  18. SIAM Conference on Parallel Processing for Scientific Computing - March 12-14, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    2008-09-08

    The themes of the 2008 conference included, but were not limited to: Programming languages, models, and compilation techniques; The transition to ubiquitous multicore/manycore processors; Scientific computing on special-purpose processors (Cell, GPUs, etc.); Architecture-aware algorithms; From scalable algorithms to scalable software; Tools for software development and performance evaluation; Global perspectives on HPC; Parallel computing in industry; Distributed/grid computing; Fault tolerance; Parallel visualization and large scale data management; and The future of parallel architectures.

  19. Certainty in Stockpile Computing: Recommending a Verification and Validation Program for Scientific Software

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.R.

    1998-11-01

    As computing assumes a more central role in managing the nuclear stockpile, the consequences of an erroneous computer simulation could be severe. Computational failures are common in other endeavors and have caused project failures, significant economic loss, and loss of life. This report examines the causes of software failure and proposes steps to mitigate them. A formal verification and validation program for scientific software is recommended and described.

  20. Building an advanced climate model: Program plan for the CHAMMP (Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics, and Model Physics) Climate Modeling Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    The issue of global warming and related climatic changes from increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has received prominent attention during the past few years. The Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics, and Model Physics (CHAMMP) Climate Modeling Program is designed to contribute directly to this rapid improvement. The goal of the CHAMMP Climate Modeling Program is to develop, verify, and apply a new generation of climate models within a coordinated framework that incorporates the best available scientific and numerical approaches to represent physical, biogeochemical, and ecological processes, that fully utilizes the hardware and software capabilities of new computer architectures, that probes the limits of climate predictability, and finally that can be used to address the challenging problem of understanding the greenhouse climate issue through the ability of the models to simulate time-dependent climatic changes over extended times and with regional resolution.

  1. Computational brain connectivity mapping: A core health and scientific challenge.

    PubMed

    Deriche, Rachid

    2016-10-01

    One third of the burden of all the diseases in Europe is due to problems caused by diseases affecting brain. Although exceptional progress have been obtained for exploring the brain during the past decades, it is still terra-incognita and calls for specific efforts in research to better understand its architecture and functioning. To take up this great challenge of modern science and to solve the limited view of the brain provided just by one imaging modality, this article advocates the idea developed in my research group of a global approach involving new generation of models for brain connectivity mapping and strong interactions between structural and functional connectivities. Capitalizing on the strengths of integrated and complementary non invasive imaging modalities such as diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dMRI) and Electro & Magneto-Encephalography (EEG & MEG) will contribute to achieve new frontiers for identifying and characterizing structural and functional brain connectivities and to provide a detailed mapping of the brain connectivity, both in space and time. Thus leading to an added clinical value for high impact diseases with new perspectives in computational neuro-imaging and cognitive neuroscience. PMID:27338172

  2. High-Precision Floating-Point Arithmetic in ScientificComputation

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.

    2004-12-31

    At the present time, IEEE 64-bit floating-point arithmetic is sufficiently accurate for most scientific applications. However, for a rapidly growing body of important scientific computing applications, a higher level of numeric precision is required: some of these applications require roughly twice this level; others require four times; while still others require hundreds or more digits to obtain numerically meaningful results. Such calculations have been facilitated by new high-precision software packages that include high-level language translation modules to minimize the conversion effort. These activities have yielded a number of interesting new scientific results in fields as diverse as quantum theory, climate modeling and experimental mathematics, a few of which are described in this article. Such developments suggest that in the future, the numeric precision used for a scientific computation may be as important to the program design as are the algorithms and data structures.

  3. Model-Driven Development for scientific computing. Computations of RHEED intensities for a disordered surface. Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniluk, Andrzej

    2010-03-01

    Scientific computing is the field of study concerned with constructing mathematical models, numerical solution techniques and with using computers to analyse and solve scientific and engineering problems. Model-Driven Development (MDD) has been proposed as a means to support the software development process through the use of a model-centric approach. This paper surveys the core MDD technology that was used to develop an application that allows computation of the RHEED intensities dynamically for a disordered surface. New version program summaryProgram title: RHEED1DProcess Catalogue identifier: ADUY_v4_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADUY_v4_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 31 971 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3 039 820 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Embarcadero C++ Builder Computer: Intel Core Duo-based PC Operating system: Windows XP, Vista, 7 RAM: more than 1 GB Classification: 4.3, 7.2, 6.2, 8, 14 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADUY_v3_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 180 (2009) 2394 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: No Nature of problem: An application that implements numerical simulations should be constructed according to the CSFAR rules: clear and well-documented, simple, fast, accurate, and robust. A clearly written, externally and internally documented program is much easier to understand and modify. A simple program is much less prone to error and is more easily modified than one that is complicated. Simplicity and clarity also help make the program flexible. Making the program fast has economic benefits. It also allows flexibility because some of the features that make a program efficient can be traded off for

  4. Media Articles Describing Advances in Scientific Research as a Vehicle for Student Engagement Fostering Climate Literacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brassell, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    "Records of Global Climate Change" enables students to fulfill the science component of an undergraduate distribution requirement in "Critical Approaches" at IU Bloomington. The course draws students from all disciplines with varying levels of understanding of scientific approaches and often limited familiarity with climate issues. Its discussion sessions seek to foster scientific literacy via an alternating series of assignments focused on a combination of exercises that involve either examination and interpretation of on-line climate data or consideration and assessment of the scientific basis of new discoveries about climate change contained in recently published media articles. The final assignment linked to the discussion sessions requires students to review and summarize the topics discussed during the semester. Their answers provide direct evidence of newly acquired abilities to assimilate and evaluate scientific information on a range of topics related to climate change. In addition, student responses to an end-of-semester survey confirm that the vast majority considers that their knowledge and understanding of climate change was enhanced, and unsolicited comments note that the discussion sessions contributed greatly to this advancement. Many students remarked that the course's emphasis on examination of paleoclimate records helped their comprehension of the unprecedented nature of present-day climate trends. Others reported that their views on the significance of climate change had been transformed, and some commented that they now felt well equipped to engage in discussions about climate change because they were better informed about its scientific basis and facts.

  5. Advanced Placement Computer Science with Pascal. Volume 2. Experimental Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY.

    This curriculum guide presents 100 lessons for an advanced placement course on programming in Pascal. Some of the topics covered include arrays, sorting, strings, sets, records, computers in society, files, stacks, queues, linked lists, binary trees, searching, hashing, and chaining. Performance objectives, vocabulary, motivation, aim,…

  6. The Federal Government's Role in Advancing Computer Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information Hotline, 1978

    1978-01-01

    As part of the Federal Data Processing Reorganization Study submitted by the Science and Technology Team, the Federal Government's role in advancing and diffusing computer technology is discussed. Findings and conclusions assess the state-of-the-art in government and in industry, and five recommendations provide directions for government policy…

  7. Computer-Assisted Foreign Language Teaching and Learning: Technological Advances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zou, Bin; Xing, Minjie; Wang, Yuping; Sun, Mingyu; Xiang, Catherine H.

    2013-01-01

    Computer-Assisted Foreign Language Teaching and Learning: Technological Advances highlights new research and an original framework that brings together foreign language teaching, experiments and testing practices that utilize the most recent and widely used e-learning resources. This comprehensive collection of research will offer linguistic…

  8. Advances in reversed field pinch theory and computation

    SciTech Connect

    Schnack, D.D.; Ho, Y.L.; Carreras, B.A.; Sidikman, K.; Craddock, G.G.; Mattor, N.; Nebel, R.A.; Prager, S.C.; Terry, P.W.; Zita, E.J.

    1992-12-31

    Advances in theory and computations related to the reversed field pinch (RFP) are presented. These are: (1) the effect of the dynamo on thermal transport; (2) a theory of ion heating due to dynamo fluctuations; (3) studies of active and passive feedback schemes for controlling dynamo fluctuations; and (4) an analytic model for coupled g-mode and rippling turbulence in the RFP edge.

  9. Advanced computational research in materials processing for design and manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.

    1994-12-31

    The computational requirements for design and manufacture of automotive components have seen dramatic increases for producing automobiles with three times the mileage. Automotive component design systems are becoming increasingly reliant on structural analysis requiring both overall larger analysis and more complex analyses, more three-dimensional analyses, larger model sizes, and routine consideration of transient and non-linear effects. Such analyses must be performed rapidly to minimize delays in the design and development process, which drives the need for parallel computing. This paper briefly describes advanced computational research in superplastic forming and automotive crash worthiness.

  10. Advanced computational tools for 3-D seismic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barhen, J.; Glover, C.W.; Protopopescu, V.A.

    1996-06-01

    The global objective of this effort is to develop advanced computational tools for 3-D seismic analysis, and test the products using a model dataset developed under the joint aegis of the United States` Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) and the European Association of Exploration Geophysicists (EAEG). The goal is to enhance the value to the oil industry of the SEG/EAEG modeling project, carried out with US Department of Energy (DOE) funding in FY` 93-95. The primary objective of the ORNL Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR) is to spearhead the computational innovations techniques that would enable a revolutionary advance in 3-D seismic analysis. The CESAR effort is carried out in collaboration with world-class domain experts from leading universities, and in close coordination with other national laboratories and oil industry partners.

  11. Scientific Process Automation Improves Data Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Critchlow, Terence J.

    2009-09-30

    This is an article written for the September 09 Scientific Computing magazine about the work of the Scientific Process Automation team of The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program. The SPA team is focused on developing and deploying automated workflows for a variety of computational science domains. Scientific workflows are the formalization of a scientific process that is frequently and repetitively performed.

  12. Advances in Numerical Boundary Conditions for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.

    1997-01-01

    Advances in Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) depend critically on the availability of accurate, nondispersive, least dissipative computation algorithm as well as high quality numerical boundary treatments. This paper focuses on the recent developments of numerical boundary conditions. In a typical CAA problem, one often encounters two types of boundaries. Because a finite computation domain is used, there are external boundaries. On the external boundaries, boundary conditions simulating the solution outside the computation domain are to be imposed. Inside the computation domain, there may be internal boundaries. On these internal boundaries, boundary conditions simulating the presence of an object or surface with specific acoustic characteristics are to be applied. Numerical boundary conditions, both external or internal, developed for simple model problems are reviewed and examined. Numerical boundary conditions for real aeroacoustic problems are also discussed through specific examples. The paper concludes with a description of some much needed research in numerical boundary conditions for CAA.

  13. Heterogeneous high throughput scientific computing with APM X-Gene and Intel Xeon Phi

    SciTech Connect

    Abdurachmanov, David; Bockelman, Brian; Elmer, Peter; Eulisse, Giulio; Knight, Robert; Muzaffar, Shahzad

    2015-01-01

    Electrical power requirements will be a constraint on the future growth of Distributed High Throughput Computing (DHTC) as used by High Energy Physics. Performance-per-watt is a critical metric for the evaluation of computer architectures for cost- efficient computing. Additionally, future performance growth will come from heterogeneous, many-core, and high computing density platforms with specialized processors. In this paper, we examine the Intel Xeon Phi Many Integrated Cores (MIC) co-processor and Applied Micro X-Gene ARMv8 64-bit low-power server system-on-a-chip (SoC) solutions for scientific computing applications. As a result, we report our experience on software porting, performance and energy efficiency and evaluate the potential for use of such technologies in the context of distributed computing systems such as the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG).

  14. Heterogeneous High Throughput Scientific Computing with APM X-Gene and Intel Xeon Phi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdurachmanov, David; Bockelman, Brian; Elmer, Peter; Eulisse, Giulio; Knight, Robert; Muzaffar, Shahzad

    2015-05-01

    Electrical power requirements will be a constraint on the future growth of Distributed High Throughput Computing (DHTC) as used by High Energy Physics. Performance-per-watt is a critical metric for the evaluation of computer architectures for cost- efficient computing. Additionally, future performance growth will come from heterogeneous, many-core, and high computing density platforms with specialized processors. In this paper, we examine the Intel Xeon Phi Many Integrated Cores (MIC) co-processor and Applied Micro X-Gene ARMv8 64-bit low-power server system-on-a-chip (SoC) solutions for scientific computing applications. We report our experience on software porting, performance and energy efficiency and evaluate the potential for use of such technologies in the context of distributed computing systems such as the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG).

  15. Heterogeneous high throughput scientific computing with APM X-Gene and Intel Xeon Phi

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abdurachmanov, David; Bockelman, Brian; Elmer, Peter; Eulisse, Giulio; Knight, Robert; Muzaffar, Shahzad

    2015-01-01

    Electrical power requirements will be a constraint on the future growth of Distributed High Throughput Computing (DHTC) as used by High Energy Physics. Performance-per-watt is a critical metric for the evaluation of computer architectures for cost- efficient computing. Additionally, future performance growth will come from heterogeneous, many-core, and high computing density platforms with specialized processors. In this paper, we examine the Intel Xeon Phi Many Integrated Cores (MIC) co-processor and Applied Micro X-Gene ARMv8 64-bit low-power server system-on-a-chip (SoC) solutions for scientific computing applications. As a result, we report our experience on software porting, performance and energy efficiency and evaluatemore » the potential for use of such technologies in the context of distributed computing systems such as the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG).« less

  16. Lost in Translation: The Gap in Scientific Advancements and Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Moure, Joseph S.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of medicine and medical technology hinges on the successful translation of basic science research from the bench to clinical implementation at the bedside. Out of the increasing need to facilitate the transfer of scientific knowledge to patients, translational research has emerged. Significant leaps in improving global health, such as antibiotics, vaccinations, and cancer therapies, have all seen successes under this paradigm, yet today, it has become increasingly difficult to realize this ideal scenario. As hospital revenue demand increases, and financial support declines, clinician-protected research time has been limited. Researchers, likewise, have been forced to abandon time- and resource-consuming translational research to focus on publication-generating work to maintain funding and professional advancement. Compared to the surge in scientific innovation and new fields of science, realization of transformational scientific findings in device development and materials sciences has significantly lagged behind. Herein, we describe: how the current scientific paradigm struggles in the new health-care landscape; the obstacles met by translational researchers; and solutions, both public and private, to overcoming those obstacles. We must rethink the old dogma of academia and reinvent the traditional pathways of research in order to truly impact the health-care arena and ultimately those that matter most: the patient. PMID:27376058

  17. Lost in Translation: The Gap in Scientific Advancements and Clinical Application.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Moure, Joseph S

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of medicine and medical technology hinges on the successful translation of basic science research from the bench to clinical implementation at the bedside. Out of the increasing need to facilitate the transfer of scientific knowledge to patients, translational research has emerged. Significant leaps in improving global health, such as antibiotics, vaccinations, and cancer therapies, have all seen successes under this paradigm, yet today, it has become increasingly difficult to realize this ideal scenario. As hospital revenue demand increases, and financial support declines, clinician-protected research time has been limited. Researchers, likewise, have been forced to abandon time- and resource-consuming translational research to focus on publication-generating work to maintain funding and professional advancement. Compared to the surge in scientific innovation and new fields of science, realization of transformational scientific findings in device development and materials sciences has significantly lagged behind. Herein, we describe: how the current scientific paradigm struggles in the new health-care landscape; the obstacles met by translational researchers; and solutions, both public and private, to overcoming those obstacles. We must rethink the old dogma of academia and reinvent the traditional pathways of research in order to truly impact the health-care arena and ultimately those that matter most: the patient. PMID:27376058

  18. An expanded framework for the advanced computational testing and simulation toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, Osni A.; Drummond, Leroy A.

    2003-11-09

    The Advanced Computational Testing and Simulation (ACTS) Toolkit is a set of computational tools developed primarily at DOE laboratories and is aimed at simplifying the solution of common and important computational problems. The use of the tools reduces the development time for new codes and the tools provide functionality that might not otherwise be available. This document outlines an agenda for expanding the scope of the ACTS Project based on lessons learned from current activities. Highlights of this agenda include peer-reviewed certification of new tools; finding tools to solve problems that are not currently addressed by the Toolkit; working in collaboration with other software initiatives and DOE computer facilities; expanding outreach efforts; promoting interoperability, further development of the tools; and improving functionality of the ACTS Information Center, among other tasks. The ultimate goal is to make the ACTS tools more widely used and more effective in solving DOE's and the nation's scientific problems through the creation of a reliable software infrastructure for scientific computing.

  19. CRADA ORNL 91-0046B final report: Assessment of IBM advanced computing architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, G.A.

    1996-02-01

    This was a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with IBM to assess their advanced computer architectures. Over the course of this project three different architectures were evaluated. The POWER/4 RIOS1 based shared memory multiprocessor, the POWER/2 RIOS2 based high performance workstation, and the J30 PowerPC based shared memory multiprocessor. In addition to this hardware several software packages where beta tested for IBM including: ESSO scientific computing library, nv video-conferencing package, Ultimedia multimedia display environment, FORTRAN 90 and C++ compilers, and the AIX 4.1 operating system. Both IBM and ORNL benefited from the research performed in this project and even though access to the POWER/4 computer was delayed several months, all milestones were met.

  20. National Resource for Computation in Chemistry (NRCC). Attached scientific processors for chemical computations: a report to the chemistry community

    SciTech Connect

    Ostlund, N.S.

    1980-01-01

    The demands of chemists for computational resources are well known and have been amply documented. The best and most cost-effective means of providing these resources is still open to discussion, however. This report surveys the field of attached scientific processors (array processors) and attempts to indicate their present and possible future use in computational chemistry. Array processors have the possibility of providing very cost-effective computation. This report attempts to provide information that will assist chemists who might be considering the use of an array processor for their computations. It describes the general ideas and concepts involved in using array processors, the commercial products that are available, and the experiences reported by those currently using them. In surveying the field of array processors, the author makes certain recommendations regarding their use in computational chemistry. 5 figures, 1 table (RWR)

  1. PREFACE: 14th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorescu, Liliana; Britton, David; Glover, Nigel; Heinrich, Gudrun; Lauret, Jérôme; Naumann, Axel; Speer, Thomas; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro

    2012-06-01

    ACAT2011 This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to scientific contributions presented at the 14th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT 2011) which took place on 5-7 September 2011 at Brunel University, UK. The workshop series, which began in 1990 in Lyon, France, brings together computer science researchers and practitioners, and researchers from particle physics and related fields in order to explore and confront the boundaries of computing and of automatic data analysis and theoretical calculation techniques. It is a forum for the exchange of ideas among the fields, exploring and promoting cutting-edge computing, data analysis and theoretical calculation techniques in fundamental physics research. This year's edition of the workshop brought together over 100 participants from all over the world. 14 invited speakers presented key topics on computing ecosystems, cloud computing, multivariate data analysis, symbolic and automatic theoretical calculations as well as computing and data analysis challenges in astrophysics, bioinformatics and musicology. Over 80 other talks and posters presented state-of-the art developments in the areas of the workshop's three tracks: Computing Technologies, Data Analysis Algorithms and Tools, and Computational Techniques in Theoretical Physics. Panel and round table discussions on data management and multivariate data analysis uncovered new ideas and collaboration opportunities in the respective areas. This edition of ACAT was generously sponsored by the Science and Technology Facility Council (STFC), the Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology (IPPP) at Durham University, Brookhaven National Laboratory in the USA and Dell. We would like to thank all the participants of the workshop for the high level of their scientific contributions and for the enthusiastic participation in all its activities which were, ultimately, the key factors in the

  2. Sudden Cardiac Risk Stratification with Electrocardiographic Indices - A Review on Computational Processing, Technology Transfer, and Scientific Evidence.

    PubMed

    Gimeno-Blanes, Francisco J; Blanco-Velasco, Manuel; Barquero-Pérez, Óscar; García-Alberola, Arcadi; Rojo-Álvarez, José L

    2016-01-01

    Great effort has been devoted in recent years to the development of sudden cardiac risk predictors as a function of electric cardiac signals, mainly obtained from the electrocardiogram (ECG) analysis. But these prediction techniques are still seldom used in clinical practice, partly due to its limited diagnostic accuracy and to the lack of consensus about the appropriate computational signal processing implementation. This paper addresses a three-fold approach, based on ECG indices, to structure this review on sudden cardiac risk stratification. First, throughout the computational techniques that had been widely proposed for obtaining these indices in technical literature. Second, over the scientific evidence, that although is supported by observational clinical studies, they are not always representative enough. And third, via the limited technology transfer of academy-accepted algorithms, requiring further meditation for future systems. We focus on three families of ECG derived indices which are tackled from the aforementioned viewpoints, namely, heart rate turbulence (HRT), heart rate variability (HRV), and T-wave alternans. In terms of computational algorithms, we still need clearer scientific evidence, standardizing, and benchmarking, siting on advanced algorithms applied over large and representative datasets. New scenarios like electronic health recordings, big data, long-term monitoring, and cloud databases, will eventually open new frameworks to foresee suitable new paradigms in the near future. PMID:27014083

  3. Sudden Cardiac Risk Stratification with Electrocardiographic Indices - A Review on Computational Processing, Technology Transfer, and Scientific Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Gimeno-Blanes, Francisco J.; Blanco-Velasco, Manuel; Barquero-Pérez, Óscar; García-Alberola, Arcadi; Rojo-Álvarez, José L.

    2016-01-01

    Great effort has been devoted in recent years to the development of sudden cardiac risk predictors as a function of electric cardiac signals, mainly obtained from the electrocardiogram (ECG) analysis. But these prediction techniques are still seldom used in clinical practice, partly due to its limited diagnostic accuracy and to the lack of consensus about the appropriate computational signal processing implementation. This paper addresses a three-fold approach, based on ECG indices, to structure this review on sudden cardiac risk stratification. First, throughout the computational techniques that had been widely proposed for obtaining these indices in technical literature. Second, over the scientific evidence, that although is supported by observational clinical studies, they are not always representative enough. And third, via the limited technology transfer of academy-accepted algorithms, requiring further meditation for future systems. We focus on three families of ECG derived indices which are tackled from the aforementioned viewpoints, namely, heart rate turbulence (HRT), heart rate variability (HRV), and T-wave alternans. In terms of computational algorithms, we still need clearer scientific evidence, standardizing, and benchmarking, siting on advanced algorithms applied over large and representative datasets. New scenarios like electronic health recordings, big data, long-term monitoring, and cloud databases, will eventually open new frameworks to foresee suitable new paradigms in the near future. PMID:27014083

  4. A distributed computing environment with support for constraint-based task scheduling and scientific experimentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, J.P.; Shapiro, L.G.; Tanimoto, S.L.

    1997-04-01

    This paper describes a computing environment which supports computer-based scientific research work. Key features include support for automatic distributed scheduling and execution and computer-based scientific experimentation. A new flexible and extensible scheduling technique that is responsive to a user`s scheduling constraints, such as the ordering of program results and the specification of task assignments and processor utilization levels, is presented. An easy-to-use constraint language for specifying scheduling constraints, based on the relational database query language SQL, is described along with a search-based algorithm for fulfilling these constraints. A set of performance studies show that the environment can schedule and execute program graphs on a network of workstations as the user requests. A method for automatically generating computer-based scientific experiments is described. Experiments provide a concise method of specifying a large collection of parameterized program executions. The environment achieved significant speedups when executing experiments; for a large collection of scientific experiments an average speedup of 3.4 on an average of 5.5 scheduled processors was obtained.

  5. Institute for Scientific Computing Research Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, D; McGraw, J

    2004-02-12

    The University Relations Program (URP) encourages collaborative research between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the University of California campuses. The Institute for Scientific Computing Research (ISCR) actively participates in such collaborative research, and this report details the Fiscal Year 2003 projects jointly served by URP and ISCR.

  6. Advanced computer graphic techniques for laser range finder (LRF) simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedkowski, Janusz; Jankowski, Stanislaw

    2008-11-01

    This paper show an advanced computer graphic techniques for laser range finder (LRF) simulation. The LRF is the common sensor for unmanned ground vehicle, autonomous mobile robot and security applications. The cost of the measurement system is extremely high, therefore the simulation tool is designed. The simulation gives an opportunity to execute algorithm such as the obstacle avoidance[1], slam for robot localization[2], detection of vegetation and water obstacles in surroundings of the robot chassis[3], LRF measurement in crowd of people[1]. The Axis Aligned Bounding Box (AABB) and alternative technique based on CUDA (NVIDIA Compute Unified Device Architecture) is presented.

  7. Advanced computer architecture specification for automated weld systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsinis, Constantine

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the requirements for an advanced automated weld system and the associated computer architecture, and defines the overall system specification from a broad perspective. According to the requirements of welding procedures as they relate to an integrated multiaxis motion control and sensor architecture, the computer system requirements are developed based on a proven multiple-processor architecture with an expandable, distributed-memory, single global bus architecture, containing individual processors which are assigned to specific tasks that support sensor or control processes. The specified architecture is sufficiently flexible to integrate previously developed equipment, be upgradable and allow on-site modifications.

  8. Advanced computer modeling techniques expand belt conveyor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Alspaugh, M.

    1998-07-01

    Increased mining production is continuing to challenge engineers and manufacturers to keep up. The pressure to produce larger and more versatile equipment is increasing. This paper will show some recent major projects in the belt conveyor industry that have pushed the limits of design and engineering technology. Also, it will discuss the systems engineering discipline and advanced computer modeling tools that have helped make these achievements possible. Several examples of technologically advanced designs will be reviewed. However, new technology can sometimes produce increased problems with equipment availability and reliability if not carefully developed. Computer modeling techniques that help one design larger equipment can also compound operational headaches if engineering processes and algorithms are not carefully analyzed every step of the way.

  9. Soft computing in design and manufacturing of advanced materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cios, Krzysztof J.; Baaklini, George Y; Vary, Alex

    1993-01-01

    The potential of fuzzy sets and neural networks, often referred to as soft computing, for aiding in all aspects of manufacturing of advanced materials like ceramics is addressed. In design and manufacturing of advanced materials, it is desirable to find which of the many processing variables contribute most to the desired properties of the material. There is also interest in real time quality control of parameters that govern material properties during processing stages. The concepts of fuzzy sets and neural networks are briefly introduced and it is shown how they can be used in the design and manufacturing processes. These two computational methods are alternatives to other methods such as the Taguchi method. The two methods are demonstrated by using data collected at NASA Lewis Research Center. Future research directions are also discussed.

  10. Scientific Grand Challenges: Discovery In Basic Energy Sciences: The Role of Computing at the Extreme Scale - August 13-15, 2009, Washington, D.C.

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Giulia; Dunning, Thom

    2009-08-13

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) and Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) workshop in August 2009 on extreme-scale computing provided a forum for more than 130 researchers to explore the needs and opportunities that will arise due to expected dramatic advances in computing power over the next decade. This scientific community firmly believes that the development of advanced theoretical tools within chemistry, physics, and materials science—combined with the development of efficient computational techniques and algorithms—has the potential to revolutionize the discovery process for materials and molecules with desirable properties. Doing so is necessary to meet the energy and environmental challenges of the 21st century as described in various DOE BES Basic Research Needs reports. Furthermore, computational modeling and simulation are a crucial complement to experimental studies, particularly when quantum mechanical processes controlling energy production, transformations, and storage are not directly observable and/or controllable. Many processes related to the Earth’s climate and subsurface need better modeling capabilities at the molecular level, which will be enabled by extreme-scale computing.

  11. An evolving infrastructure for scientific computing and the integration of new graphics technology

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, K.W.

    1993-02-01

    The National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently pursuing several projects to implement and integrate new hardware and software technologies. While each of these projects ought to be and is in fact individually justifiable, there is an appealing metaphor for viewing them collectively which provides a simple and memorable way to understand the future direction not only of supercomputing services but of computer centers in general. Once this general direction is understood, it becomes clearer what future computer graphics technologies would be possible and desirable, at least within the context of large scale scientific computing.

  12. Evaluation of cache-based superscalar and cacheless vector architectures for scientific computations

    SciTech Connect

    Oliker, Leonid; Canning, Andrew; Carter, Jonathan; Shalf, John; Skinner, David; Ethier, Stephane; Biswas, Rupak; Djomehri, Jahed; Van der Wijngaart, Rob

    2003-05-01

    The growing gap between sustained and peak performance for scientific applications is a well-known problem in high end computing. The recent development of parallel vector systems offers the potential to bridge this gap for many computational science codes and deliver a substantial increase in computing capabilities. This paper examines the intranode performance of the NEC SX-6 vector processor and the cache-based IBM Power3/4 superscalar architectures across a number of scientific computing areas. First, we present the performance of a microbenchmark suite that examines low-level machine characteristics. Next, we study the behavior of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks. Finally, we evaluate the performance of several scientific computing codes. Results demonstrate that the SX-6 achieves high performance on a large fraction of our applications and often significantly out performs the cache-based architectures. However, certain applications are not easily amenable to vectorization and would re quire extensive algorithm and implementation reengineering to utilize the SX-6 effectively.

  13. Evaluation of Cache-based Superscalar and Cacheless Vector Architectures for Scientific Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliker, Leonid; Carter, Jonathan; Shalf, John; Skinner, David; Ethier, Stephane; Biswas, Rupak; Djomehri, Jahed; VanderWijngaart, Rob

    2003-01-01

    The growing gap between sustained and peak performance for scientific applications has become a well-known problem in high performance computing. The recent development of parallel vector systems offers the potential to bridge this gap for a significant number of computational science codes and deliver a substantial increase in computing capabilities. This paper examines the intranode performance of the NEC SX6 vector processor and the cache-based IBM Power3/4 superscalar architectures across a number of key scientific computing areas. First, we present the performance of a microbenchmark suite that examines a full spectrum of low-level machine characteristics. Next, we study the behavior of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks using some simple optimizations. Finally, we evaluate the perfor- mance of several numerical codes from key scientific computing domains. Overall results demonstrate that the SX6 achieves high performance on a large fraction of our application suite and in many cases significantly outperforms the RISC-based architectures. However, certain classes of applications are not easily amenable to vectorization and would likely require extensive reengineering of both algorithm and implementation to utilize the SX6 effectively.

  14. Rapid Scientific Response as an Educational Opportunity Integrating Geoscience and Advanced Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskin, M. E.; Kellogg, L. H.; Team, K.

    2014-12-01

    Natural disasters provide important opportunities to conduct original scientific research. We present the results of a graduate course at the University of California, Davis centered on rapid scientific response to the 24 August magnitude 6.0 South Napa earthquake. Students from both geoscience and computer visualization formed collaborative teams to conduct original research, choosing from diverse research topics including mapping of the surface rupture, both in the field and remotely, production and analysis of three-dimensional scans of offset features, topographic point-cloud differencing, identification and mapping of pre-historic earthquake scarps, analysis of geodetic data for pre-earthquake fault loading rate and modeling of finite fault offset, aftershock distribution, construction and 3D visualization of earth structure and seismic velocity models, shaking intensity from empirical models, and earthquake rupture simulation.

  15. Cloud Bursting with GlideinWMS: Means to satisfy ever increasing computing needs for Scientific Workflows

    SciTech Connect

    Mhashilkar, Parag; Tiradani, Anthony; Holzman, Burt; Larson, Krista; Sfiligoi, Igor; Rynge, Mats

    2014-01-01

    Scientific communities have been in the forefront of adopting new technologies and methodologies in the computing. Scientific computing has influenced how science is done today, achieving breakthroughs that were impossible to achieve several decades ago. For the past decade several such communities in the Open Science Grid (OSG) and the European Grid Infrastructure (EGI) have been using GlideinWMS to run complex application workflows to effectively share computational resources over the grid. GlideinWMS is a pilot-based workload management system (WMS) that creates on demand, a dynamically sized overlay HTCondor batch system on grid resources. At present, the computational resources shared over the grid are just adequate to sustain the computing needs. We envision that the complexity of the science driven by 'Big Data' will further push the need for computational resources. To fulfill their increasing demands and/or to run specialized workflows, some of the big communities like CMS are investigating the use of cloud computing as Infrastructure-As-A-Service (IAAS) with GlideinWMS as a potential alternative to fill the void. Similarly, communities with no previous access to computing resources can use GlideinWMS to setup up a batch system on the cloud infrastructure. To enable this, the architecture of GlideinWMS has been extended to enable support for interfacing GlideinWMS with different Scientific and commercial cloud providers like HLT, FutureGrid, FermiCloud and Amazon EC2. In this paper, we describe a solution for cloud bursting with GlideinWMS. The paper describes the approach, architectural changes and lessons learned while enabling support for cloud infrastructures in GlideinWMS.

  16. Cloud Bursting with GlideinWMS: Means to satisfy ever increasing computing needs for Scientific Workflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mhashilkar, Parag; Tiradani, Anthony; Holzman, Burt; Larson, Krista; Sfiligoi, Igor; Rynge, Mats

    2014-06-01

    Scientific communities have been in the forefront of adopting new technologies and methodologies in the computing. Scientific computing has influenced how science is done today, achieving breakthroughs that were impossible to achieve several decades ago. For the past decade several such communities in the Open Science Grid (OSG) and the European Grid Infrastructure (EGI) have been using GlideinWMS to run complex application workflows to effectively share computational resources over the grid. GlideinWMS is a pilot-based workload management system (WMS) that creates on demand, a dynamically sized overlay HTCondor batch system on grid resources. At present, the computational resources shared over the grid are just adequate to sustain the computing needs. We envision that the complexity of the science driven by "Big Data" will further push the need for computational resources. To fulfill their increasing demands and/or to run specialized workflows, some of the big communities like CMS are investigating the use of cloud computing as Infrastructure-As-A-Service (IAAS) with GlideinWMS as a potential alternative to fill the void. Similarly, communities with no previous access to computing resources can use GlideinWMS to setup up a batch system on the cloud infrastructure. To enable this, the architecture of GlideinWMS has been extended to enable support for interfacing GlideinWMS with different Scientific and commercial cloud providers like HLT, FutureGrid, FermiCloud and Amazon EC2. In this paper, we describe a solution for cloud bursting with GlideinWMS. The paper describes the approach, architectural changes and lessons learned while enabling support for cloud infrastructures in GlideinWMS.

  17. High-Performance Computing for Advanced Smart Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhenyu; Chen, Yousu

    2012-07-06

    The power grid is becoming far more complex as a result of the grid evolution meeting an information revolution. Due to the penetration of smart grid technologies, the grid is evolving as an unprecedented speed and the information infrastructure is fundamentally improved with a large number of smart meters and sensors that produce several orders of magnitude larger amounts of data. How to pull data in, perform analysis, and put information out in a real-time manner is a fundamental challenge in smart grid operation and planning. The future power grid requires high performance computing to be one of the foundational technologies in developing the algorithms and tools for the significantly increased complexity. New techniques and computational capabilities are required to meet the demands for higher reliability and better asset utilization, including advanced algorithms and computing hardware for large-scale modeling, simulation, and analysis. This chapter summarizes the computational challenges in smart grid and the need for high performance computing, and present examples of how high performance computing might be used for future smart grid operation and planning.

  18. Space and Earth Sciences, Computer Systems, and Scientific Data Analysis Support, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Ronald H. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This Final Progress Report covers the specific technical activities of Hughes STX Corporation for the last contract triannual period of 1 June through 30 Sep. 1993, in support of assigned task activities at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). It also provides a brief summary of work throughout the contract period of performance on each active task. Technical activity is presented in Volume 1, while financial and level-of-effort data is presented in Volume 2. Technical support was provided to all Division and Laboratories of Goddard's Space Sciences and Earth Sciences Directorates. Types of support include: scientific programming, systems programming, computer management, mission planning, scientific investigation, data analysis, data processing, data base creation and maintenance, instrumentation development, and management services. Mission and instruments supported include: ROSAT, Astro-D, BBXRT, XTE, AXAF, GRO, COBE, WIND, UIT, SMM, STIS, HEIDI, DE, URAP, CRRES, Voyagers, ISEE, San Marco, LAGEOS, TOPEX/Poseidon, Pioneer-Venus, Galileo, Cassini, Nimbus-7/TOMS, Meteor-3/TOMS, FIFE, BOREAS, TRMM, AVHRR, and Landsat. Accomplishments include: development of computing programs for mission science and data analysis, supercomputer applications support, computer network support, computational upgrades for data archival and analysis centers, end-to-end management for mission data flow, scientific modeling and results in the fields of space and Earth physics, planning and design of GSFC VO DAAC and VO IMS, fabrication, assembly, and testing of mission instrumentation, and design of mission operations center.

  19. Computation of the tip vortex flowfield for advanced aircraft propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Tommy M.; Dejong, Frederick J.; Levy, Ralph

    1988-01-01

    The tip vortex flowfield plays a significant role in the performance of advanced aircraft propellers. The flowfield in the tip region is complex, three-dimensional and viscous with large secondary velocities. An analysis is presented using an approximate set of equations which contains the physics required by the tip vortex flowfield, but which does not require the resources of the full Navier-Stokes equations. A computer code was developed to predict the tip vortex flowfield of advanced aircraft propellers. A grid generation package was developed to allow specification of a variety of advanced aircraft propeller shapes. Calculations of the tip vortex generation on an SR3 type blade at high Reynolds numbers were made using this code and a parametric study was performed to show the effect of tip thickness on tip vortex intensity. In addition, calculations of the tip vortex generation on a NACA 0012 type blade were made, including the flowfield downstream of the blade trailing edge. Comparison of flowfield calculations with experimental data from an F4 blade was made. A user's manual was also prepared for the computer code (NASA CR-182178).

  20. MiniGhost : a miniapp for exploring boundary exchange strategies using stencil computations in scientific parallel computing.

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, Richard Frederick; Heroux, Michael Allen; Vaughan, Courtenay Thomas

    2012-04-01

    A broad range of scientific computation involves the use of difference stencils. In a parallel computing environment, this computation is typically implemented by decomposing the spacial domain, inducing a 'halo exchange' of process-owned boundary data. This approach adheres to the Bulk Synchronous Parallel (BSP) model. Because commonly available architectures provide strong inter-node bandwidth relative to latency costs, many codes 'bulk up' these messages by aggregating data into a message as a means of reducing the number of messages. A renewed focus on non-traditional architectures and architecture features provides new opportunities for exploring alternatives to this programming approach. In this report we describe miniGhost, a 'miniapp' designed for exploration of the capabilities of current as well as emerging and future architectures within the context of these sorts of applications. MiniGhost joins the suite of miniapps developed as part of the Mantevo project.

  1. High resolution computed tomography of advanced composite and ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yancey, R. N.; Klima, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced composite and ceramic materials are being developed for use in many new defense and commercial applications. In order to achieve the desired mechanical properties of these materials, the structural elements must be carefully analyzed and engineered. A study was conducted to evaluate the use of high resolution computed tomography (CT) as a macrostructural analysis tool for advanced composite and ceramic materials. Several samples were scanned using a laboratory high resolution CT scanner. Samples were also destructively analyzed at the locations of the scans and the nondestructive and destructive results were compared. The study provides useful information outlining the strengths and limitations of this technique and the prospects for further research in this area.

  2. Whole-genome CNV analysis: advances in computational approaches

    PubMed Central

    Pirooznia, Mehdi; Goes, Fernando S.; Zandi, Peter P.

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that DNA copy number variation (CNV) is likely to make a significant contribution to human diversity and also play an important role in disease susceptibility. Recent advances in genome sequencing technologies have enabled the characterization of a variety of genomic features, including CNVs. This has led to the development of several bioinformatics approaches to detect CNVs from next-generation sequencing data. Here, we review recent advances in CNV detection from whole genome sequencing. We discuss the informatics approaches and current computational tools that have been developed as well as their strengths and limitations. This review will assist researchers and analysts in choosing the most suitable tools for CNV analysis as well as provide suggestions for new directions in future development. PMID:25918519

  3. Scientific computation of big data in real-world clinical research.

    PubMed

    Li, Guozheng; Zuo, Xuewen; Liu, Baoyan

    2014-09-01

    The advent of the big data era creates both opportunities and challenges for traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). This study describes the origin, concept, connotation, and value of studies regarding the scientific computation of TCM. It also discusses the integration of science, technology, and medicine under the guidance of the paradigm of real-world, clinical scientific research. TCM clinical diagnosis, treatment, and knowledge were traditionally limited to literature and sensation levels; however, primary methods are used to convert them into statistics, such as the methods of feature subset optimizing, multi-label learning, and complex networks based on complexity, intelligence, data, and computing sciences. Furthermore, these methods are applied in the modeling and analysis of the various complex relationships in individualized clinical diagnosis and treatment, as well as in decision-making related to such diagnosis and treatment. Thus, these methods strongly support the real-world clinical research paradigm of TCM. PMID:25190349

  4. Relative performances of several scientific computers for a liquid molecular dynamics simulation. [Computers tested are: VAX 11/70, CDC 7600, CRAY-1, CRAY-1*, VAX-FPSAP

    SciTech Connect

    Ceperley, D.M.

    1980-08-01

    Some of the computational characteristics of simulations and the author's experience in using his standard simulation program called CLAMPS on several scientific computers are discussed. CLAMPS is capable of performing Metropolis Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics simulations of arbitrary mixtures of single atoms. The computational characteristics of simulations and what makes a good simulation computer are also summarized.

  5. Scalability of a Base Level Design for an On-Board-Computer for Scientific Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treudler, Carl Johann; Schroder, Jan-Carsten; Greif, Fabian; Stohlmann, Kai; Aydos, Gokce; Fey, Gorschwin

    2014-08-01

    Facing a wide range of mission requirements and the integration of diverse payloads requires extreme flexibility in the on-board-computing infrastructure for scientific missions. We show that scalability is principally difficult. We address this issue by proposing a base level design and show how the adoption to different needs is achieved. Inter-dependencies between scaling different aspects and their impact on different levels in the design are discussed.

  6. DB90: A Fortran Callable Relational Database Routine for Scientific and Engineering Computer Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrenn, Gregory A.

    2005-01-01

    This report describes a database routine called DB90 which is intended for use with scientific and engineering computer programs. The software is written in the Fortran 90/95 programming language standard with file input and output routines written in the C programming language. These routines should be completely portable to any computing platform and operating system that has Fortran 90/95 and C compilers. DB90 allows a program to supply relation names and up to 5 integer key values to uniquely identify each record of each relation. This permits the user to select records or retrieve data in any desired order.

  7. Managing competing elastic Grid and Cloud scientific computing applications using OpenNebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnasco, S.; Berzano, D.; Lusso, S.; Masera, M.; Vallero, S.

    2015-12-01

    Elastic cloud computing applications, i.e. applications that automatically scale according to computing needs, work on the ideal assumption of infinite resources. While large public cloud infrastructures may be a reasonable approximation of this condition, scientific computing centres like WLCG Grid sites usually work in a saturated regime, in which applications compete for scarce resources through queues, priorities and scheduling policies, and keeping a fraction of the computing cores idle to allow for headroom is usually not an option. In our particular environment one of the applications (a WLCG Tier-2 Grid site) is much larger than all the others and cannot autoscale easily. Nevertheless, other smaller applications can benefit of automatic elasticity; the implementation of this property in our infrastructure, based on the OpenNebula cloud stack, will be described and the very first operational experiences with a small number of strategies for timely allocation and release of resources will be discussed.

  8. Advances in Computational Stability Analysis of Composite Aerospace Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Degenhardt, R.; Araujo, F. C. de

    2010-09-30

    European aircraft industry demands for reduced development and operating costs. Structural weight reduction by exploitation of structural reserves in composite aerospace structures contributes to this aim, however, it requires accurate and experimentally validated stability analysis of real structures under realistic loading conditions. This paper presents different advances from the area of computational stability analysis of composite aerospace structures which contribute to that field. For stringer stiffened panels main results of the finished EU project COCOMAT are given. It investigated the exploitation of reserves in primary fibre composite fuselage structures through an accurate and reliable simulation of postbuckling and collapse. For unstiffened cylindrical composite shells a proposal for a new design method is presented.

  9. Advances in Electromagnetic Modelling through High Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, K.; Folwell, N.; Ge, L.; Guetz, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Prudencio, E.; Schussman, G.; Uplenchwar, R.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2006-03-29

    Under the DOE SciDAC project on Accelerator Science and Technology, a suite of electromagnetic codes has been under development at SLAC that are based on unstructured grids for higher accuracy, and use parallel processing to enable large-scale simulation. The new modeling capability is supported by SciDAC collaborations on meshing, solvers, refinement, optimization and visualization. These advances in computational science are described and the application of the parallel eigensolver Omega3P to the cavity design for the International Linear Collider is discussed.

  10. Computer modeling for advanced life support system analysis.

    PubMed

    Drysdale, A

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses the equivalent mass approach to advanced life support system analysis, describes a computer model developed to use this approach, and presents early results from modeling the NASA JSC BioPlex. The model is built using an object oriented approach and G2, a commercially available modeling package Cost factor equivalencies are given for the Volosin scenarios. Plant data from NASA KSC and Utah State University (USU) are used, together with configuration data from the BioPlex design effort. Initial results focus on the importance of obtaining high plant productivity with a flight-like configuration. PMID:11540448

  11. Secure Scientific Applications Scheduling Technique for Cloud Computing Environment Using Global League Championship Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Abdulhamid, Shafi’i Muhammad; Abd Latiff, Muhammad Shafie; Abdul-Salaam, Gaddafi; Hussain Madni, Syed Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Cloud computing system is a huge cluster of interconnected servers residing in a datacenter and dynamically provisioned to clients on-demand via a front-end interface. Scientific applications scheduling in the cloud computing environment is identified as NP-hard problem due to the dynamic nature of heterogeneous resources. Recently, a number of metaheuristics optimization schemes have been applied to address the challenges of applications scheduling in the cloud system, without much emphasis on the issue of secure global scheduling. In this paper, scientific applications scheduling techniques using the Global League Championship Algorithm (GBLCA) optimization technique is first presented for global task scheduling in the cloud environment. The experiment is carried out using CloudSim simulator. The experimental results show that, the proposed GBLCA technique produced remarkable performance improvement rate on the makespan that ranges between 14.44% to 46.41%. It also shows significant reduction in the time taken to securely schedule applications as parametrically measured in terms of the response time. In view of the experimental results, the proposed technique provides better-quality scheduling solution that is suitable for scientific applications task execution in the Cloud Computing environment than the MinMin, MaxMin, Genetic Algorithm (GA) and Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) scheduling techniques. PMID:27384239

  12. Secure Scientific Applications Scheduling Technique for Cloud Computing Environment Using Global League Championship Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Abdulhamid, Shafi'i Muhammad; Abd Latiff, Muhammad Shafie; Abdul-Salaam, Gaddafi; Hussain Madni, Syed Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Cloud computing system is a huge cluster of interconnected servers residing in a datacenter and dynamically provisioned to clients on-demand via a front-end interface. Scientific applications scheduling in the cloud computing environment is identified as NP-hard problem due to the dynamic nature of heterogeneous resources. Recently, a number of metaheuristics optimization schemes have been applied to address the challenges of applications scheduling in the cloud system, without much emphasis on the issue of secure global scheduling. In this paper, scientific applications scheduling techniques using the Global League Championship Algorithm (GBLCA) optimization technique is first presented for global task scheduling in the cloud environment. The experiment is carried out using CloudSim simulator. The experimental results show that, the proposed GBLCA technique produced remarkable performance improvement rate on the makespan that ranges between 14.44% to 46.41%. It also shows significant reduction in the time taken to securely schedule applications as parametrically measured in terms of the response time. In view of the experimental results, the proposed technique provides better-quality scheduling solution that is suitable for scientific applications task execution in the Cloud Computing environment than the MinMin, MaxMin, Genetic Algorithm (GA) and Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) scheduling techniques. PMID:27384239

  13. Final Report for the Account Creation/Deletion Reenginering Task for the Scientific Computing Department

    SciTech Connect

    JENNINGS, BARBARA J.; MCALLISTER, PAULA L.

    2002-04-01

    In October 2000, the personnel responsible for administration of the corporate computers managed by the Scientific Computing Department assembled to reengineer the process of creating and deleting users' computer accounts. Using the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Capability Maturity Model (CMM) for quality improvement process, the team performed the reengineering by way of process modeling, defining and measuring the maturity of the processes, per SEI and CMM practices. The computers residing in the classified environment are bound by security requirements of the Secure Classified Network (SCN) Security Plan. These security requirements delimited the scope of the project, specifically mandating validation of all user accounts on the central corporate computer systems. System administrators, in addition to their assigned responsibilities, were spending valuable hours performing the additional tacit responsibility of tracking user accountability for user-generated data. For example, in cases where the data originator was no longer an employee, the administrators were forced to spend considerable time and effort determining the appropriate management personnel to assume ownership or disposition of the former owner's data files. In order to prevent this sort of problem from occurring and to have a defined procedure in the event of an anomaly, the computer account management procedure was thoroughly reengineered, as detailed in this document. An automated procedure is now in place that is initiated and supplied data by central corporate processes certifying the integrity, timeliness and authentication of account holders and their management. Automated scripts identify when an account is about to expire, to preempt the problem of data becoming ''orphaned'' without a responsible ''owner'' on the system. The automated account-management procedure currently operates on and provides a standard process for all of the computers maintained by the

  14. Operational Philosophy for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    J. Benson; J. Cole; J. Jackson; F. Marshall; D. Ogden; J. Rempe; M. C. Thelen

    2013-02-01

    In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). At its core, the ATR NSUF Program combines access to a portion of the available ATR radiation capability, the associated required examination and analysis facilities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and INL staff expertise with novel ideas provided by external contributors (universities, laboratories, and industry). These collaborations define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high-temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light-water reactors (LWRs), and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. To make possible the broadest access to key national capability, the ATR NSUF formed a partnership program that also makes available access to critical facilities outside of the INL. Finally, the ATR NSUF has established a sample library that allows access to pre-irradiated samples as needed by national research teams.

  15. The real-time learning mechanism of the Scientific Research Associates Advanced Robotic System (SRAARS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Alexander Y.

    1990-01-01

    Scientific research associates advanced robotic system (SRAARS) is an intelligent robotic system which has autonomous learning capability in geometric reasoning. The system is equipped with one global intelligence center (GIC) and eight local intelligence centers (LICs). It controls mainly sixteen links with fourteen active joints, which constitute two articulated arms, an extensible lower body, a vision system with two CCD cameras and a mobile base. The on-board knowledge-based system supports the learning controller with model representations of both the robot and the working environment. By consecutive verifying and planning procedures, hypothesis-and-test routines and learning-by-analogy paradigm, the system would autonomously build up its own understanding of the relationship between itself (i.e., the robot) and the focused environment for the purposes of collision avoidance, motion analysis and object manipulation. The intelligence of SRAARS presents a valuable technical advantage to implement robotic systems for space exploration and space station operations.

  16. Infrastructure Systems for Advanced Computing in E-science applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzo, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    In the e-science field are growing needs for having computing infrastructure more dynamic and customizable with a model of use "on demand" that follow the exact request in term of resources and storage capacities. The integration of grid and cloud infrastructure solutions allows us to offer services that can adapt the availability in terms of up scaling and downscaling resources. The main challenges for e-sciences domains will on implement infrastructure solutions for scientific computing that allow to adapt dynamically the demands of computing resources with a strong emphasis on optimizing the use of computing resources for reducing costs of investments. Instrumentation, data volumes, algorithms, analysis contribute to increase the complexity for applications who require high processing power and storage for a limited time and often exceeds the computational resources that equip the majority of laboratories, research Unit in an organization. Very often it is necessary to adapt or even tweak rethink tools, algorithms, and consolidate existing applications through a phase of reverse engineering in order to adapt them to a deployment on Cloud infrastructure. For example, in areas such as rainfall monitoring, meteorological analysis, Hydrometeorology, Climatology Bioinformatics Next Generation Sequencing, Computational Electromagnetic, Radio occultation, the complexity of the analysis raises several issues such as the processing time, the scheduling of tasks of processing, storage of results, a multi users environment. For these reasons, it is necessary to rethink the writing model of E-Science applications in order to be already adapted to exploit the potentiality of cloud computing services through the uses of IaaS, PaaS and SaaS layer. An other important focus is on create/use hybrid infrastructure typically a federation between Private and public cloud, in fact in this way when all resources owned by the organization are all used it will be easy with a federate

  17. Scientific advances of the MyOcean projects underpinning the transition towards the Marine Copernicus service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasseur, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    The MyOcean projects supported by the European Commission period have been developed during the 2008-2015 period to build an operational service of ocean physical state and ecosystem information to intermediate and downstream users in the areas of marine safety, marine resources, marine and coastal environment and weather, climate and seasonal forecasting. The "core" information provided to users is obtained through the combination of satellite and in situ observations, eddy-resolving modelling of the global ocean and regional european seas, biochemistry, ecosystem and sea-ice modelling, and data assimilation for global to basin scale circulation. A comprehensive R&D plan was established in 2010 to ensure the collection and provision of information of best possible quality for daily estimates of the ocean state (real-time), its short-term evolution, and its history over the past (reanalyses). A service validation methodology was further developed to ensure proper scientific evaluation and routine monitoring of the accuracy of MyOcean products. In this presentation, we will present an overview of the main scientific advances achieved in MyOcean using the NEMO modelling platform, ensemble-based assimilation schemes, coupled circulation-ecosystem, sea-ice assimilative models and probabilistic methodologies for ensemble validation. We will further highlight the key areas that will require additional innovation effort to support the Marine Copernicus service evolution.

  18. Computational ocean acoustics: Advances in 3D ocean acoustic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Henrik; Jensen, Finn B.

    2012-11-01

    The numerical model of ocean acoustic propagation developed in the 1980's are still in widespread use today, and the field of computational ocean acoustics is often considered a mature field. However, the explosive increase in computational power available to the community has created opportunities for modeling phenomena that earlier were beyond reach. Most notably, three-dimensional propagation and scattering problems have been prohibitive computationally, but are now addressed routinely using brute force numerical approaches such as the Finite Element Method, in particular for target scattering problems, where they are being combined with the traditional wave theory propagation models in hybrid modeling frameworks. Also, recent years has seen the development of hybrid approaches coupling oceanographic circulation models with acoustic propagation models, enabling the forecasting of sonar performance uncertainty in dynamic ocean environments. These and other advances made over the last couple of decades support the notion that the field of computational ocean acoustics is far from being mature. [Work supported by the Office of Naval Research, Code 321OA].

  19. Advanced Test Reactor -- Testing Capabilities and Plans AND Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility -- Partnerships and Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Frances M. Marshall

    2008-07-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the world’s premier test reactors for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The physical configuration of the ATR, a 4-leaf clover shape, allows the reactor to be operated at different power levels in the corner “lobes” to allow for different testing conditions for multiple simultaneous experiments. The combination of high flux (maximum thermal neutron fluxes of 1E15 neutrons per square centimeter per second and maximum fast [E>1.0 MeV] neutron fluxes of 5E14 neutrons per square centimeter per second) and large test volumes (up to 122 cm long and 12.7 cm diameter) provide unique testing opportunities. For future research, some ATR modifications and enhancements are currently planned. In 2007 the US Department of Energy designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper provides more details on some of the ATR capabilities, key design features, experiments, and plans for the NSUF.

  20. (Advanced materials, robotics, and advanced computers for use in nuclear power plants)

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.D.

    1989-11-17

    The aim of the IAEA Technical Committee Workshop was to provide an opportunity to exchange information on the status of advances in technologies such as improved materials, robotics, and advanced computers already used or expected to be used in the design of nuclear power plants, and to review possible applications of advanced technologies in future reactor designs. Papers were given in these areas by Belgium, France, Mexico, Canada, Russia, India, and the United States. Notably absent from this meeting were Japan, Germany, Italy, Spain, the United Kingdom, and the Scandinavian countries -- all of whom are working in the areas of interest to this meeting. Most of the workshop discussion, however, was focused on advanced controls (including human-machine interface and software development and testing) and electronic descriptions of power plants. Verification and validation of design was also a topic of considerable discussion. The traveler was surprised at the progress made in 3-D electronic images of nuclear power plants and automatic updating of these images to reflect as-built conditions. Canadian plants and one Mexican plant have used photogrammetry to update electronic drawings automatically. The Canadians also have started attaching other electronic data bases to the electronic drawings. These data bases include parts information and maintenance work. The traveler observed that the Advanced Controls Program is better balanced and more forward looking than other nuclear controls R D activities described. The French participants made this observation in the meeting and expressed interest in collaborative work in this area.

  1. Socioscientific Issues: A Path Towards Advanced Scientific Literacy and Improved Conceptual Understanding of Socially Controversial Scientific Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinzino, Dean William

    This thesis investigates the use of socioscientific issues (SSI) in the high school science classroom as an introduction to argumentation and socioscientific reasoning, with the goal of improving students' scientific literacy (SL). Current research is reviewed that supports the likelihood of students developing a greater conceptual understanding of scientific theories as well as a deeper understanding of the nature of science (NOS), through participation in informal and formal forms of argumentation in the context of SSI. Significant gains in such understanding may improve a student's ability to recognize the rigor, legitimacy, and veracity of scientific claims and better discern science from pseudoscience. Furthermore, students that participate in significant SSI instruction by negotiating a range of science-related social issues can make significant gains in content knowledge and develop the life-long skills of argumentation and evidence-based reasoning, goals not possible in traditional lecture-based science instruction. SSI-based instruction may therefore help students become responsible citizens. This synthesis also suggests that that the improvements in science literacy and NOS understanding that develop from sustained engagement in SSI-based instruction will better prepare students to examine and scrutinize socially controversial scientific theories (i.e., evolution, global warming, and the Big Bang).

  2. Advances in computed tomography evaluation of skull base diseases.

    PubMed

    Prevedello, Luciano M

    2014-10-01

    Introduction Computed tomography (CT) is a key component in the evaluation of skull base diseases. With its ability to clearly delineate the osseous anatomy, CT can provide not only important tips to diagnosis but also key information for surgical planning. Objectives The purpose of this article is to describe some of the main CT imaging features that contribute to the diagnosis of skull base tumors, review recent knowledge related to bony manifestations of these conditions, and summarize recent technological advances in CT that contribute to image quality and improved diagnosis. Data Synthesis Recent advances in CT technology allow fine-detailed evaluation of the bony anatomy using submillimetric sections. Dual-energy CT material decomposition capabilities allow clear separation between contrast material, bone, and soft tissues with many clinical applications in the skull base. Dual-energy technology has also the ability to decrease image degradation from metallic hardwares using some techniques that can result in similar or even decreased radiation to patients. Conclusions CT is very useful in the evaluation of skull base diseases, and recent technological advances can increase disease conspicuity resulting in improved diagnostic capabilities and enhanced surgical planning. PMID:25992136

  3. Recent Advances in Computational Mechanics of the Human Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, M.; Dabiri, Y.; Li, L. P.

    2013-01-01

    Computational mechanics has been advanced in every area of orthopedic biomechanics. The objective of this paper is to provide a general review of the computational models used in the analysis of the mechanical function of the knee joint in different loading and pathological conditions. Major review articles published in related areas are summarized first. The constitutive models for soft tissues of the knee are briefly discussed to facilitate understanding the joint modeling. A detailed review of the tibiofemoral joint models is presented thereafter. The geometry reconstruction procedures as well as some critical issues in finite element modeling are also discussed. Computational modeling can be a reliable and effective method for the study of mechanical behavior of the knee joint, if the model is constructed correctly. Single-phase material models have been used to predict the instantaneous load response for the healthy knees and repaired joints, such as total and partial meniscectomies, ACL and PCL reconstructions, and joint replacements. Recently, poromechanical models accounting for fluid pressurization in soft tissues have been proposed to study the viscoelastic response of the healthy and impaired knee joints. While the constitutive modeling has been considerably advanced at the tissue level, many challenges still exist in applying a good material model to three-dimensional joint simulations. A complete model validation at the joint level seems impossible presently, because only simple data can be obtained experimentally. Therefore, model validation may be concentrated on the constitutive laws using multiple mechanical tests of the tissues. Extensive model verifications at the joint level are still crucial for the accuracy of the modeling. PMID:23509602

  4. XVis: Visualization for the Extreme-Scale Scientific-Computation Ecosystem: Year-end report FY15 Q4.

    SciTech Connect

    Moreland, Kenneth D.; Sewell, Christopher; Childs, Hank; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Geveci, Berk; Meredith, Jeremy

    2015-12-01

    The XVis project brings together the key elements of research to enable scientific discovery at extreme scale. Scientific computing will no longer be purely about how fast computations can be performed. Energy constraints, processor changes, and I/O limitations necessitate significant changes in both the software applications used in scientific computation and the ways in which scientists use them. Components for modeling, simulation, analysis, and visualization must work together in a computational ecosystem, rather than working independently as they have in the past. This project provides the necessary research and infrastructure for scientific discovery in this new computational ecosystem by addressing four interlocking challenges: emerging processor technology, in situ integration, usability, and proxy analysis.

  5. NASA Trapezoidal Wing Computations Including Transition and Advanced Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, C. L.; Lee-Rausch, E. M.

    2012-01-01

    Flow about the NASA Trapezoidal Wing is computed with several turbulence models by using grids from the first High Lift Prediction Workshop in an effort to advance understanding of computational fluid dynamics modeling for this type of flowfield. Transition is accounted for in many of the computations. In particular, a recently-developed 4-equation transition model is utilized and works well overall. Accounting for transition tends to increase lift and decrease moment, which improves the agreement with experiment. Upper surface flap separation is reduced, and agreement with experimental surface pressures and velocity profiles is improved. The predicted shape of wakes from upstream elements is strongly influenced by grid resolution in regions above the main and flap elements. Turbulence model enhancements to account for rotation and curvature have the general effect of increasing lift and improving the resolution of the wing tip vortex as it convects downstream. However, none of the models improve the prediction of surface pressures near the wing tip, where more grid resolution is needed.

  6. Scientific Reasoning and Argumentation: Advancing an Interdisciplinary Research Agenda in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Frank; Kollar, Ingo; Ufer, Stefan; Sodian, Beate; Hussmann, Heinrich; Pekrun, Reinhard; Neuhaus, Birgit; Dorner, Birgit; Pankofer, Sabine; Fischer, Martin; Strijbos, Jan-Willem; Heene, Moritz; Eberle, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Scientific reasoning and scientific argumentation are highly valued outcomes of K-12 and higher education. In this article, we first review main topics and key findings of three different strands of research, namely research on the development of scientific reasoning, research on scientific argumentation, and research on approaches to support…

  7. Smart Libraries: Best SQE Practices for Libraries with an Emphasis on Scientific Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M C; Reus, J F; Matzke, R P; Koziol, Q A; Cheng, A P

    2004-12-15

    As scientific computing applications grow in complexity, more and more functionality is being packaged in independently developed libraries. Worse, as the computing environments in which these applications run grow in complexity, it gets easier to make mistakes in building, installing and using libraries as well as the applications that depend on them. Unfortunately, SQA standards so far developed focus primarily on applications, not libraries. We show that SQA standards for libraries differ from applications in many respects. We introduce and describe a variety of practices aimed at minimizing the likelihood of making mistakes in using libraries and at maximizing users' ability to diagnose and correct them when they occur. We introduce the term Smart Library to refer to a library that is developed with these basic principles in mind. We draw upon specific examples from existing products we believe incorporate smart features: MPI, a parallel message passing library, and HDF5 and SAF, both of which are parallel I/O libraries supporting scientific computing applications. We conclude with a narrative of some real-world experiences in using smart libraries with Ale3d, VisIt and SAF.

  8. POET (parallel object-oriented environment and toolkit) and frameworks for scientific distributed computing

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, R.; Cheung, A.

    1997-01-01

    Frameworks for parallel computing have recently become popular as a means for preserving parallel algorithms as reusable components. Frameworks for parallel computing in general, and POET in particular, focus on finding ways to orchestrate and facilitate cooperation between components that implement the parallel algorithms. Since performance is a key requirement for POET applications, CORBA or CORBA-like systems are eschewed for a SPMD message-passing architecture common to the world of distributed-parallel computing. Though the system is written in C++ for portability, the behavior of POET is more like a classical framework, such as Smalltalk. POET seeks to be a general platform for scientific parallel algorithm components which can be modified, linked, mixed and matched to a user`s specification. The purpose of this work is to identify a means for parallel code reuse and to make parallel computing more accessible to scientists whose expertise is outside the field of parallel computing. The POET framework provides two things: (1) an object model for parallel components that allows cooperation without being restrictive; (2) services that allow components to access and manage user data and message-passing facilities, etc. This work has evolved through application of a series of real distributed-parallel scientific problems. The paper focuses on what is required for parallel components to cooperate and at the same time remain ``black-boxes`` that users can drop into the frame without having to know the exquisite details of message-passing, data layout, etc. The paper walks through a specific example of a chemically reacting flow application. The example is implemented in POET and the authors identify component cooperation, usability and reusability in an anecdotal fashion.

  9. Advanced information processing system: Inter-computer communication services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhardt, Laura; Masotto, Tom; Sims, J. Terry; Whittredge, Roy; Alger, Linda S.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose is to document the functional requirements and detailed specifications for the Inter-Computer Communications Services (ICCS) of the Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS). An introductory section is provided to outline the overall architecture and functional requirements of the AIPS and to present an overview of the ICCS. An overview of the AIPS architecture as well as a brief description of the AIPS software is given. The guarantees of the ICCS are provided, and the ICCS is described as a seven-layered International Standards Organization (ISO) Model. The ICCS functional requirements, functional design, and detailed specifications as well as each layer of the ICCS are also described. A summary of results and suggestions for future work are presented.

  10. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY10-11 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Carnes, B

    2009-06-08

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that

  11. Advanced Simulation & Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Meisner, R; Perry, J; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

    2008-04-30

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future nonnuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear-weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable Stockpile Life Extension Programs (SLEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining the support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one

  12. Advanced Simulation and Computing Fiscal Year 2011-2012 Implementation Plan, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, M; Phillips, J; Hpson, J; Meisner, R

    2010-04-22

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering (D&E) programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional (3D) simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model

  13. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY08-09 Implementation Plan Volume 2 Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, M; Kusnezov, D; Bikkel, T; Hopson, J

    2007-04-25

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future nonnuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear-weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable Stockpile Life Extension Programs (SLEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining the support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one

  14. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kissel, L

    2009-04-01

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that

  15. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan, Volume 2, Revision 0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Meisner, R; Hopson, J; Peery, J; McCoy, M

    2008-10-07

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one

  16. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY08-09 Implementation Plan, Volume 2, Revision 0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Kusnezov, D; Bickel, T; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

    2007-09-13

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear-weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable Stockpile Life Extension Programs (SLEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining the support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from

  17. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY10-FY11 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Meisner, R; Peery, J; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

    2009-09-08

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering (D&E) programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional (3D) simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model

  18. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY07-08 Implementation Plan Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kusnezov, D; Hale, A; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

    2006-06-22

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future nonnuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program will require the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear-weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable Stockpile Life Extension Programs (SLEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining the support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from

  19. Recent advances in computational structural reliability analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thacker, Ben H.; Wu, Y.-T.; Millwater, Harry R.; Torng, Tony Y.; Riha, David S.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of structural reliability analysis is to determine the probability that the structure will adequately perform its intended function when operating under the given environmental conditions. Thus, the notion of reliability admits the possibility of failure. Given the fact that many different modes of failure are usually possible, achievement of this goal is a formidable task, especially for large, complex structural systems. The traditional (deterministic) design methodology attempts to assure reliability by the application of safety factors and conservative assumptions. However, the safety factor approach lacks a quantitative basis in that the level of reliability is never known and usually results in overly conservative designs because of compounding conservatisms. Furthermore, problem parameters that control the reliability are not identified, nor their importance evaluated. A summary of recent advances in computational structural reliability assessment is presented. A significant level of activity in the research and development community was seen recently, much of which was directed towards the prediction of failure probabilities for single mode failures. The focus is to present some early results and demonstrations of advanced reliability methods applied to structural system problems. This includes structures that can fail as a result of multiple component failures (e.g., a redundant truss), or structural components that may fail due to multiple interacting failure modes (e.g., excessive deflection, resonate vibration, or creep rupture). From these results, some observations and recommendations are made with regard to future research needs.

  20. Optical design and characterization of an advanced computational imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, R. Hamilton; Fernandez-Cull, Christy; Raskar, Ramesh; Shi, Boxin; Barsi, Christopher; Zhao, Hang

    2014-09-01

    We describe an advanced computational imaging system with an optical architecture that enables simultaneous and dynamic pupil-plane and image-plane coding accommodating several task-specific applications. We assess the optical requirement trades associated with custom and commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) optics and converge on the development of two low-cost and robust COTS testbeds. The first is a coded-aperture programmable pixel imager employing a digital micromirror device (DMD) for image plane per-pixel oversampling and spatial super-resolution experiments. The second is a simultaneous pupil-encoded and time-encoded imager employing a DMD for pupil apodization or a deformable mirror for wavefront coding experiments. These two testbeds are built to leverage two MIT Lincoln Laboratory focal plane arrays - an orthogonal transfer CCD with non-uniform pixel sampling and on-chip dithering and a digital readout integrated circuit (DROIC) with advanced on-chip per-pixel processing capabilities. This paper discusses the derivation of optical component requirements, optical design metrics, and performance analyses for the two testbeds built.

  1. Reliability of an interactive computer program for advance care planning.

    PubMed

    Schubart, Jane R; Levi, Benjamin H; Camacho, Fabian; Whitehead, Megan; Farace, Elana; Green, Michael J

    2012-06-01

    Despite widespread efforts to promote advance directives (ADs), completion rates remain low. Making Your Wishes Known: Planning Your Medical Future (MYWK) is an interactive computer program that guides individuals through the process of advance care planning, explaining health conditions and interventions that commonly involve life or death decisions, helps them articulate their values/goals, and translates users' preferences into a detailed AD document. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that (in the absence of major life changes) the AD generated by MYWK reliably reflects an individual's values/preferences. English speakers ≥30 years old completed MYWK twice, 4 to 6 weeks apart. Reliability indices were assessed for three AD components: General Wishes; Specific Wishes for treatment; and Quality-of-Life values (QoL). Twenty-four participants completed the study. Both the Specific Wishes and QoL scales had high internal consistency in both time periods (Knuder Richardson formula 20 [KR-20]=0.83-0.95, and 0.86-0.89). Test-retest reliability was perfect for General Wishes (κ=1), high for QoL (Pearson's correlation coefficient=0.83), but lower for Specific Wishes (Pearson's correlation coefficient=0.57). MYWK generates an AD where General Wishes and QoL (but not Specific Wishes) statements remain consistent over time. PMID:22512830

  2. Reliability of an Interactive Computer Program for Advance Care Planning

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Benjamin H.; Camacho, Fabian; Whitehead, Megan; Farace, Elana; Green, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Despite widespread efforts to promote advance directives (ADs), completion rates remain low. Making Your Wishes Known: Planning Your Medical Future (MYWK) is an interactive computer program that guides individuals through the process of advance care planning, explaining health conditions and interventions that commonly involve life or death decisions, helps them articulate their values/goals, and translates users' preferences into a detailed AD document. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that (in the absence of major life changes) the AD generated by MYWK reliably reflects an individual's values/preferences. English speakers ≥30 years old completed MYWK twice, 4 to 6 weeks apart. Reliability indices were assessed for three AD components: General Wishes; Specific Wishes for treatment; and Quality-of-Life values (QoL). Twenty-four participants completed the study. Both the Specific Wishes and QoL scales had high internal consistency in both time periods (Knuder Richardson formula 20 [KR-20]=0.83–0.95, and 0.86–0.89). Test-retest reliability was perfect for General Wishes (κ=1), high for QoL (Pearson's correlation coefficient=0.83), but lower for Specific Wishes (Pearson's correlation coefficient=0.57). MYWK generates an AD where General Wishes and QoL (but not Specific Wishes) statements remain consistent over time. PMID:22512830

  3. Seventh SIAM Conference on Parallel Processing for Scientific Computing. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The Seventh SIAM Conference on Parallel Processing for Scientific Computing was held in downtown San Francisco on the dates above. More than 400 people attended the meeting. This SIAM conference is, in this organizer`s opinion, the premier forum for developments in parallel numerical algorithms, a field that has seen very lively and fruitful developments over the past decade, and whose health is still robust. Other, related areas, most notably parallel software and applications, are also well represented. The strong contributed sessions and minisymposia at the meeting attest to these claims.

  4. Fortran Transformational Tools in Support of Scientific Application Development for Petascale Computer Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Sottille, Matthew

    2013-09-12

    This document is the final report for a multi-year effort building infrastructure to support tool development for Fortran programs. We also investigated static analysis and code transformation methods relevant to scientific programmers who are writing Fortran programs for petascale-class high performance computing systems. This report details our accomplishments, technical approaches, and provides information on where the research results and code may be obtained from an open source software repository. The report for the first year of the project that was performed at the University of Oregon prior to the PI moving to Galois, Inc. is included as an appendix.

  5. Challenges and Opportunities in Using Automatic Differentiation with Object-Oriented Toolkits for Scientific Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Hovland, P; Lee, S; McInnes, L; Norris, B; Smith, B

    2001-04-17

    The increased use of object-oriented toolkits in large-scale scientific simulation presents new opportunities and challenges for the use of automatic (or algorithmic) differentiation (AD) techniques, especially in the context of optimization. Because object-oriented toolkits use well-defined interfaces and data structures, there is potential for simplifying the AD process. Furthermore, derivative computation can be improved by exploiting high-level information about numerical and computational abstractions. However, challenges to the successful use of AD with these toolkits also exist. Among the greatest challenges is balancing the desire to limit the scope of the AD process with the desire to minimize the work required of a user. They discuss their experiences in integrating AD with the PETSc, PVODE, and TAO toolkits and the plans for future research and development in this area.

  6. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report October 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Ogden

    2014-10-01

    Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report October 2014 Highlights • Rory Kennedy, Dan Ogden and Brenden Heidrich traveled to Germantown October 6-7, for a review of the Infrastructure Management mission with Shane Johnson, Mike Worley, Bradley Williams and Alison Hahn from NE-4 and Mary McCune from NE-3. Heidrich briefed the group on the project progress from July to October 2014 as well as the planned path forward for FY15. • Jim Cole gave two invited university seminars at Ohio State University and University of Florida, providing an overview of NSUF including available capabilities and the process for accessing facilities through the peer reviewed proposal process. • Jim Cole and Rory Kennedy co-chaired the NuMat meeting with Todd Allen. The meeting, sponsored by Elsevier publishing, was held in Clearwater, Florida, and is considered one of the premier nuclear fuels and materials conferences. Over 340 delegates attended with 160 oral and over 200 posters presented over 4 days. • Thirty-one pre-applications were submitted for NSUF access through the NE-4 Combined Innovative Nuclear Research Funding Opportunity Announcement. • Fourteen proposals were received for the NSUF Rapid Turnaround Experiment Summer 2014 call. Proposal evaluations are underway. • John Jackson and Rory Kennedy attended the Nuclear Fuels Industry Research meeting. Jackson presented an overview of ongoing NSUF industry research.

  7. The Advanced Test Reactor Irradiation Capabilities Available as a National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2008-09-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. The ATR is a very versatile facility with a wide variety of experimental test capabilities for providing the environment needed in an irradiation experiment. These capabilities include simple capsule experiments, instrumented and/or temperature-controlled experiments, and pressurized water loop experiment facilities. Monitoring systems have also been utilized to monitor different parameters such as fission gases for fuel experiments, to measure specimen performance during irradiation. ATR’s control system provides a stable axial flux profile throughout each reactor operating cycle, and allows the thermal and fast neutron fluxes to be controlled separately in different sections of the core. The ATR irradiation positions vary in diameter from 16 mm to 127 mm over an active core height of 1.2 m. This paper discusses the different irradiation capabilities with examples of different experiments and the cost/benefit issues related to each capability. The recent designation of ATR as a national scientific user facility will make the ATR much more accessible at very low to no cost for research by universities and possibly commercial entities.

  8. Advances in computer technology: impact on the practice of medicine.

    PubMed

    Groth-Vasselli, B; Singh, K; Farnsworth, P N

    1995-01-01

    Advances in computer technology provide a wide range of applications which are revolutionizing the practice of medicine. The development of new software for the office creates a web of communication among physicians, staff members, health care facilities and associated agencies. This provides the physician with the prospect of a paperless office. At the other end of the spectrum, the development of 3D work stations and software based on computational chemistry permits visualization of protein molecules involved in disease. Computer assisted molecular modeling has been used to construct working 3D models of lens alpha-crystallin. The 3D structure of alpha-crystallin is basic to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in lens fiber cell maturation, stabilization of the inner nuclear region, the maintenance of lens transparency and cataractogenesis. The major component of the high molecular weight aggregates that occur during cataractogenesis is alpha-crystallin subunits. Subunits of alpha-crystallin occur in other tissues of the body. In the central nervous system accumulation of these subunits in the form of dense inclusion bodies occurs in pathological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis and toxoplasmosis (Iwaki, Wisniewski et al., 1992), as well as neoplasms of astrocyte origin (Iwaki, Iwaki, et al., 1991). Also cardiac ischemia is associated with an increased alpha B synthesis (Chiesi, Longoni et al., 1990). On a more global level, the molecular structure of alpha-crystallin may provide information pertaining to the function of small heat shock proteins, hsp, in maintaining cell stability under the stress of disease. PMID:8721907

  9. Activities and operations of Argonne's Advanced Computing Research Facility: February 1990 through April 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, G.W.

    1991-05-01

    This report reviews the activities and operations of the Advanced Computing Research Facility (ACRF) from February 1990 through April 1991. The ACRF is operated by the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory. The facility's principal objective is to foster research in parallel computing. Toward this objective, the ACRF operates experimental advanced computers, supports investigations in parallel computing, and sponsors technology transfer efforts to industry and academia. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  10. The Centre of High-Performance Scientific Computing, Geoverbund, ABC/J - Geosciences enabled by HPSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollet, Stefan; Görgen, Klaus; Vereecken, Harry; Gasper, Fabian; Hendricks-Franssen, Harrie-Jan; Keune, Jessica; Kulkarni, Ketan; Kurtz, Wolfgang; Sharples, Wendy; Shrestha, Prabhakar; Simmer, Clemens; Sulis, Mauro; Vanderborght, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The Centre of High-Performance Scientific Computing (HPSC TerrSys) was founded 2011 to establish a centre of competence in high-performance scientific computing in terrestrial systems and the geosciences enabling fundamental and applied geoscientific research in the Geoverbund ABC/J (geoscientfic research alliance of the Universities of Aachen, Cologne, Bonn and the Research Centre Jülich, Germany). The specific goals of HPSC TerrSys are to achieve relevance at the national and international level in (i) the development and application of HPSC technologies in the geoscientific community; (ii) student education; (iii) HPSC services and support also to the wider geoscientific community; and in (iv) the industry and public sectors via e.g., useful applications and data products. A key feature of HPSC TerrSys is the Simulation Laboratory Terrestrial Systems, which is located at the Jülich Supercomputing Centre (JSC) and provides extensive capabilities with respect to porting, profiling, tuning and performance monitoring of geoscientific software in JSC's supercomputing environment. We will present a summary of success stories of HPSC applications including integrated terrestrial model development, parallel profiling and its application from watersheds to the continent; massively parallel data assimilation using physics-based models and ensemble methods; quasi-operational terrestrial water and energy monitoring; and convection permitting climate simulations over Europe. The success stories stress the need for a formalized education of students in the application of HPSC technologies in future.

  11. Availability measurement of grid services from the perspective of a scientific computing centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marten, H.; Koenig, T.

    2011-12-01

    The Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) is the merger of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and the Technical University Karlsruhe. The Steinbuch Centre for Computing (SCC) was one of the first new organizational units of KIT, combining the former Institute for Scientific Computing of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and the Computing Centre of the University. IT service management according to the worldwide de-facto-standard "IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL)" [1] was chosen by SCC as a strategic element to support the merging of the two existing computing centres located at a distance of about 10 km. The availability and reliability of IT services directly influence the customer satisfaction as well as the reputation of the service provider, and unscheduled loss of availability due to hardware or software failures may even result in severe consequences like data loss. Fault tolerant and error correcting design features are reducing the risk of IT component failures and help to improve the delivered availability. The ITIL process controlling the respective design is called Availability Management [1]. This paper discusses Availability Management regarding grid services delivered to WLCG and provides a few elementary guidelines for availability measurements and calculations of services consisting of arbitrary numbers of components.

  12. Open Science in the Cloud: Towards a Universal Platform for Scientific and Statistical Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chine, Karim

    The UK, through the e-Science program, the US through the NSF-funded cyber infrastructure and the European Union through the ICT Calls aimed to provide "the technological solution to the problem of efficiently connecting data, computers, and people with the goal of enabling derivation of novel scientific theories and knowledge".1 The Grid (Foster, 2002; Foster; Kesselman, Nick, & Tuecke, 2002), foreseen as a major accelerator of discovery, didn't meet the expectations it had excited at its beginnings and was not adopted by the broad population of research professionals. The Grid is a good tool for particle physicists and it has allowed them to tackle the tremendous computational challenges inherent to their field. However, as a technology and paradigm for delivering computing on demand, it doesn't work and it can't be fixed. On one hand, "the abstractions that Grids expose - to the end-user, to the deployers and to application developers - are inappropriate and they need to be higher level" (Jha, Merzky, & Fox), and on the other hand, academic Grids are inherently economically unsustainable. They can't compete with a service outsourced to the Industry whose quality and price would be driven by market forces. The virtualization technologies and their corollary, the Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) style cloud, hold the promise to enable what the Grid failed to deliver: a sustainable environment for computational sciences that would lower the barriers for accessing federated computational resources, software tools and data; enable collaboration and resources sharing and provide the building blocks of a ubiquitous platform for traceable and reproducible computational research.

  13. Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, James H.; Cox, Philip; Harrington, William J; Campbell, Joseph L

    2013-09-03

    ABSTRACT Project Title: Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing PROJECT OBJECTIVE The objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets of power density, energy density and lifetime. These targets were laid out in the DOE’s R&D roadmap to develop an advanced direct methanol fuel cell power supply that meets commercial entry requirements. Such a power supply will enable mobile computers to operate non-stop, unplugged from the wall power outlet, by using the high energy density of methanol fuel contained in a replaceable fuel cartridge. Specifically this project focused on balance-of-plant component integration and miniaturization, as well as extensive component, subassembly and integrated system durability and validation testing. This design has resulted in a pre-production power supply design and a prototype that meet the rigorous demands of consumer electronic applications. PROJECT TASKS The proposed work plan was designed to meet the project objectives, which corresponded directly with the objectives outlined in the Funding Opportunity Announcement: To engineer the fuel cell balance-of-plant and packaging to meet the needs of consumer electronic systems, specifically at power levels required for mobile computing. UNF used existing balance-of-plant component technologies developed under its current US Army CERDEC project, as well as a previous DOE project completed by PolyFuel, to further refine them to both miniaturize and integrate their functionality to increase the system power density and energy density. Benefits of UNF’s novel passive water recycling MEA (membrane electrode assembly) and the simplified system architecture it enabled formed the foundation of the design approach. The package design was hardened to address orientation independence, shock, vibration, and environmental requirements. Fuel cartridge and fuel subsystems were improved to ensure effective fuel

  14. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report November 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, Renae

    2014-11-01

    Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report November 2014 Highlights Rory Kennedy and Sarah Robertson attended the American Nuclear Society Winter Meeting and Nuclear Technology Expo in Anaheim, California, Nov. 10-13. ATR NSUF exhibited at the technology expo where hundreds of meeting participants had an opportunity to learn more about ATR NSUF. Dr. Kennedy briefed the Nuclear Engineering Department Heads Organization (NEDHO) on the workings of the ATR NSUF. • Rory Kennedy, James Cole and Dan Ogden participated in a reactor instrumentation discussion with Jean-Francois Villard and Christopher Destouches of CEA and several members of the INL staff. • ATR NSUF received approval from the NE-20 office to start planning the annual Users Meeting. The meeting will be held at INL, June 22-25. • Mike Worley, director of the Office of Innovative Nuclear Research (NE-42), visited INL Nov. 4-5. Milestones Completed • Recommendations for the Summer Rapid Turnaround Experiment awards were submitted to DOE-HQ Nov. 12 (Level 2 milestone due Nov. 30). Major Accomplishments/Activities • The University of California, Santa Barbara 2 experiment was unloaded from the GE-2000 at HFEF. The experiment specimen packs will be removed and shipped to ORNL for PIE. • The Terrani experiment, one of three FY 2014 new awards, was completed utilizing the Advanced Photon Source MRCAT beamline. The experiment investigated the chemical state of Ag and Pd in SiC shell of irradiated TRISO particles via X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. Upcoming Meetings/Events • The ATR NSUF program review meeting will be held Dec. 9-10 at L’Enfant Plaza. In addition to NSUF staff and users, NE-4, NE-5 and NE-7 representatives will attend the meeting. Awarded Research Projects Boise State University Rapid Turnaround Experiments (14-485 and 14-486) Nanoindentation and TEM work on the T91, HT9, HCM12A and 9Cr ODS specimens has been completed at

  15. A New Approach in Advance Network Reservation and Provisioning for High-Performance Scientific Data Transfers

    SciTech Connect

    Balman, Mehmet; Chaniotakis, Evangelos; Shoshani, Arie; Sim, Alex

    2010-01-28

    Scientific applications already generate many terabytes and even petabytes of data from supercomputer runs and large-scale experiments. The need for transferring data chunks of ever-increasing sizes through the network shows no sign of abating. Hence, we need high-bandwidth high speed networks such as ESnet (Energy Sciences Network). Network reservation systems, i.e. ESnet's OSCARS (On-demand Secure Circuits and Advance Reservation System) establish guaranteed bandwidth of secure virtual circuits at a certain time, for a certain bandwidth and length of time. OSCARS checks network availability and capacity for the specified period of time, and allocates requested bandwidth for that user if it is available. If the requested reservation cannot be granted, no further suggestion is returned back to the user. Further, there is no possibility from the users view-point to make an optimal choice. We report a new algorithm, where the user specifies the total volume that needs to be transferred, a maximum bandwidth that he/she can use, and a desired time period within which the transfer should be done. The algorithm can find alternate allocation possibilities, including earliest time for completion, or shortest transfer duration - leaving the choice to the user. We present a novel approach for path finding in time-dependent networks, and a new polynomial algorithm to find possible reservation options according to given constraints. We have implemented our algorithm for testing and incorporation into a future version of ESnet?s OSCARS. Our approach provides a basis for provisioning end-to-end high performance data transfers over storage and network resources.

  16. Activities and operations of the Advanced Computing Research Facility, October 1986-October 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, G.W.

    1987-01-01

    This paper contains a description of the work being carried out at the advanced computing research facility at Argonne National Laboratory. Topics covered are upgrading of computers, networking changes, algorithms, parallel programming, programming languages, and user training. (LSP)

  17. The Effects of Inquiry-Based Computer Simulation with Cooperative Learning on Scientific Thinking and Conceptual Understanding of Gas Laws

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdullah, Sopiah; Shariff, Adilah

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of inquiry-based computer simulation with heterogeneous-ability cooperative learning (HACL) and inquiry-based computer simulation with friendship cooperative learning (FCL) on (a) scientific reasoning (SR) and (b) conceptual understanding (CU) among Form Four students in Malaysian Smart…

  18. Advanced electric field computation for RF sheaths prediction with TOPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanesio, Daniele; Maggiora, Riccardo

    2012-10-01

    The design of an Ion Cyclotron (IC) launcher is not only driven by its coupling properties, but also by its capability of maintaining low parallel electric fields in front of it, in order to provide good power transfer to plasma and to reduce the impurities production. However, due to the impossibility to verify the antenna performances before the starting of the operations, advanced numerical simulation tools are the only alternative to carry out a proper antenna design. With this in mind, it should be clear that the adoption of a code, such as TOPICA [1], able to precisely take into account a realistic antenna geometry and an accurate plasma description, is extremely important to achieve these goals. Because of the recently introduced features that allow to compute the electric field distribution everywhere inside the antenna enclosure and in the plasma column, the TOPICA code appears to be the only alternative to understand which elements may have a not negligible impact on the antenna design and then to suggest further optimizations in order to mitigate RF potentials. The present work documents the evaluation of the electric field map from actual antennas, like the Tore Supra Q5 and the JET A2 launchers, and the foreseen ITER IC antenna. [4pt] [1] D. Milanesio et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 115019 (2009).

  19. Quantitative Computed Tomography and Image Analysis for Advanced Muscle Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Edmunds, Kyle Joseph; Gíslason, Magnus K.; Arnadottir, Iris D.; Marcante, Andrea; Piccione, Francesco; Gargiulo, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Medical imaging is of particular interest in the field of translational myology, as extant literature describes the utilization of a wide variety of techniques to non-invasively recapitulate and quantity various internal and external tissue morphologies. In the clinical context, medical imaging remains a vital tool for diagnostics and investigative assessment. This review outlines the results from several investigations on the use of computed tomography (CT) and image analysis techniques to assess muscle conditions and degenerative process due to aging or pathological conditions. Herein, we detail the acquisition of spiral CT images and the use of advanced image analysis tools to characterize muscles in 2D and 3D. Results from these studies recapitulate changes in tissue composition within muscles, as visualized by the association of tissue types to specified Hounsfield Unit (HU) values for fat, loose connective tissue or atrophic muscle, and normal muscle, including fascia and tendon. We show how results from these analyses can be presented as both average HU values and compositions with respect to total muscle volumes, demonstrating the reliability of these tools to monitor, assess and characterize muscle degeneration. PMID:27478562

  20. Computing Spatial Distance Histograms for Large Scientific Datasets On-the-Fly

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anand; Grupcev, Vladimir; Yuan, Yongke; Huang, Jin; Shen, Gang

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on an important query in scientific simulation data analysis: the Spatial Distance Histogram (SDH). The computation time of an SDH query using brute force method is quadratic. Often, such queries are executed continuously over certain time periods, increasing the computation time. We propose highly efficient approximate algorithm to compute SDH over consecutive time periods with provable error bounds. The key idea of our algorithm is to derive statistical distribution of distances from the spatial and temporal characteristics of particles. Upon organizing the data into a Quad-tree based structure, the spatiotemporal characteristics of particles in each node of the tree are acquired to determine the particles’ spatial distribution as well as their temporal locality in consecutive time periods. We report our efforts in implementing and optimizing the above algorithm in Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) as means to further improve the efficiency. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed algorithm is backed by mathematical analysis and results of extensive experiments using data generated from real simulation studies. PMID:25264418

  1. Activities and operations of the Advanced Computing Research Facility, January 1989--January 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, G.W.

    1990-02-01

    This report reviews the activities and operations of the Advanced Computing Research Facility (ACRF) for the period January 1, 1989, through January 31, 1990. The ACRF is operated by the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory. The facility's principal objective is to foster research in parallel computing. Toward this objective, the ACRF continues to operate experimental advanced computers and to sponsor new technology transfer efforts and new research projects. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Data mining techniques for scientific computing: Application to asymptotic paraxial approximations to model ultrarelativistic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assous, Franck; Chaskalovic, Joël

    2011-06-01

    We propose a new approach that consists in using data mining techniques for scientific computing. Indeed, data mining has proved to be efficient in other contexts which deal with huge data like in biology, medicine, marketing, advertising and communications. Our aim, here, is to deal with the important problem of the exploitation of the results produced by any numerical method. Indeed, more and more data are created today by numerical simulations. Thus, it seems necessary to look at efficient tools to analyze them. In this work, we focus our presentation to a test case dedicated to an asymptotic paraxial approximation to model ultrarelativistic particles. Our method directly deals with numerical results of simulations and try to understand what each order of the asymptotic expansion brings to the simulation results over what could be obtained by other lower-order or less accurate means. This new heuristic approach offers new potential applications to treat numerical solutions to mathematical models.

  3. DOE High Performance Computing Operational Review (HPCOR): Enabling Data-Driven Scientific Discovery at HPC Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Richard; Allcock, William; Beggio, Chris; Campbell, Stuart; Cherry, Andrew; Cholia, Shreyas; Dart, Eli; England, Clay; Fahey, Tim; Foertter, Fernanda; Goldstone, Robin; Hick, Jason; Karelitz, David; Kelly, Kaki; Monroe, Laura; Prabhat,; Skinner, David; White, Julia

    2014-10-17

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities are on the verge of a paradigm shift in the way they deliver systems and services to science and engineering teams. Research projects are producing a wide variety of data at unprecedented scale and level of complexity, with community-specific services that are part of the data collection and analysis workflow. On June 18-19, 2014 representatives from six DOE HPC centers met in Oakland, CA at the DOE High Performance Operational Review (HPCOR) to discuss how they can best provide facilities and services to enable large-scale data-driven scientific discovery at the DOE national laboratories. The report contains findings from that review.

  4. Impact of Quad-core Cray XT4 System and Software Stack on Scientific Computation

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Sadaf R; Barrett, Richard F; Jagode, Heike; Kuehn, Jeffery A; Poole, Stephen W; Sankaran, Ramanan

    2009-01-01

    An upgrade from dual-core to quad-core AMD processor on the Cray XT system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Leadership Computing Facility (LCF) has resulted in significant changes in the hardware and software stack, including a deeper memory hierarchy, SIMD instructions and a multi-core aware MPI library. In this paper, we evaluate impact of a subset of these key changes on large-scale scientific applications. We will provide insights into application tuning and optimization process and report on how different strategies yield varying rates of successes and failures across different application domains. For instance, we demonstrate that the vectorization instructions (SSE) provide a performance boost of as much as 50% on fusion and combustion applications. Moreover, we reveal how the resource contentions could limit the achievable performance and provide insights into how application could exploit Petascale XT5 system's hierarchical parallelism.

  5. Exploring prospective secondary science teachers' understandings of scientific inquiry and Mendelian genetics concepts using computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakir, Mustafa

    The primary objective of this case study was to examine prospective secondary science teachers' developing understanding of scientific inquiry and Mendelian genetics. A computer simulation of basic Mendelian inheritance processes (Catlab) was used in combination with small-group discussions and other instructional scaffolds to enhance prospective science teachers' understandings. The theoretical background for this research is derived from a social constructivist perspective. Structuring scientific inquiry as investigation to develop explanations presents meaningful context for the enhancement of inquiry abilities and understanding of the science content. The context of the study was a teaching and learning course focused on inquiry and technology. Twelve prospective science teachers participated in this study. Multiple data sources included pre- and post-module questionnaires of participants' view of scientific inquiry, pre-posttests of understandings of Mendelian concepts, inquiry project reports, class presentations, process videotapes of participants interacting with the simulation, and semi-structured interviews. Seven selected prospective science teachers participated in in-depth interviews. Findings suggest that while studying important concepts in science, carefully designed inquiry experiences can help prospective science teachers to develop an understanding about the types of questions scientists in that field ask, the methodological and epistemological issues that constrain their pursuit of answers to those questions, and the ways in which they construct and share their explanations. Key findings included prospective teachers' initial limited abilities to create evidence-based arguments, their hesitancy to include inquiry in their future teaching, and the impact of collaboration on thinking. Prior to this experience the prospective teachers held uninformed views of scientific inquiry. After the module, participants demonstrated extended expertise in

  6. Testing framework for GRASS GIS: ensuring reproducibility of scientific geospatial computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petras, V.; Gebbert, S.

    2014-12-01

    GRASS GIS, a free and open source GIS, is used by many scientists directly or through other projects such as R or QGIS to perform geoprocessing tasks. Thus, a large number of scientific geospatial computations depend on quality and correct functionality of GRASS GIS. Automatic functionality testing is therefore necessary to ensure software reliability. Here we present a testing framework for GRASS GIS which addresses different needs of GRASS GIS and geospatial software in general. It allows to test GRASS tools (referred to as GRASS modules) and examine outputs including large raster and vector maps as well as temporal datasets. Furthermore, it enables to test all levels of GRASS GIS architecture including C and Python application programming interface and GRASS modules invoked as subprocesses. Since GRASS GIS is used as a platform for development of geospatial algorithms and models, the testing framework allows not only to test GRASS GIS core functionality but also tools developed by scientists as a part of their research. Using testing framework we can test GRASS GIS and related tools automatically and repetitively and thus detect errors caused by code changes and new developments. Tools and code are then easier to maintain which results in preserving reproducibility of scientific results over time. Similarly to open source code, the test results are publicly accessible, so that all current and potential users can see them. The usage of testing framework will be presented on an example of a test suite for r.slope.aspect module, a tool for computation of terrain slope, aspect, curvatures and other terrain characteristics.

  7. Scientific Advancements and Technological Developments of High P-T Neutron Diffraction at LANSCE, Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Daemen, L. L.; Zhang, J.

    2003-12-01

    In-situ high P-T neutron diffraction experiments provide unique opportunities to study the crystal structure, hydrogen bonding, magnetism, and thermal parameters of light elements (eg. H, Li, B) and heavy elements (eg. Ta, U, Pu,), that are virtually impossible to determine with x-ray diffraction techniques. For example, thermoelasticity and Debye-Waller factor as function of pressure and temperature can be derived using in-situ high P-T neutron diffraction techniques. These applications can also be extended to a much broader spectrum of scientific problems. For instance, puzzles in Earth science such as the carbon cycle and the role of hydrous minerals for water exchange between lithosphere and biosphere can be directly addressed. Moreover, by introducing in-situ shear, texture of metals and minerals accompanied with phase transitions at high P-T conditions can also be studied by high P-T neutron diffraction. We have successfully conducted high P-T neutron diffraction experiments at LANSCE and achieved simultaneous high pressures and temperatures of 10 GPa and 1500 K. With an average 3-6 hours of data collection, the diffraction data are of sufficiently high quality for the determination of structural parameters and thermal vibrations. We have studied hydrous mineral (MgOD), perovskite (K.15,Na.85)MgF3, clathrate hydrates (CH4-, CO2-, and H2-), metals (Mo, Al, Zr), and amorphous materials (carbon black, BMG). The aim of our research is to accurately map bond lengths, bond angles, neighboring atomic environments, and phase stability in P-T-X space. Studies based on high-pressure neutron diffraction are important for multi-disciplinary science and we welcome researchers from all fields to use this advanced technique. We have developed a 500-ton toroidal press, TAP-98, to conduct simultaneous high P-T neutron diffraction experiments inside of HIPPO (High-Pressure and Preferred-Orientation diffractometer). We have also developed a large gem-crystal anvil cell, ZAP-01

  8. Advances in astronomy (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 27 February 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-07-01

    A scientific session of the Division of Physical Sciences of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), entitled "Advances in Astronomy" was held on 27 February 2013 at the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS. The following reports were put on the session agenda posted on the website http://www.gpad.ac.ru of the RAS Physical Sciences Division: (1) Chernin A D (Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Moscow State University, Moscow) "Dark energy in the local Universe: HST data, nonlinear theory, and computer simulations"; (2) Gnedin Yu N (Main (Pulkovo) Astronomical Observatory, RAS, St. Petersburg) "A new method of supermassive black hole studies based on polarimetric observations of active galactic nuclei"; (3) Efremov Yu N (Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Moscow State University, Moscow) "Our Galaxy: grand design and moderately active nucleus"; (4) Gilfanov M R (Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow) "X-ray binaries, star formation, and type-Ia supernova progenitors"; (5) Balega Yu Yu (Special Astrophysical Observatory, RAS, Nizhnii Arkhyz, Karachaevo-Cherkessia Republic) "The nearest 'star factory' in the Orion Nebula"; (6) Bisikalo D V (Institute of Astronomy, RAS, Moscow) "Atmospheres of giant exoplanets"; (7) Korablev O I (Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Spectroscopy of the atmospheres of Venus and Mars: new methods and new results"; (8) Ipatov A V (Institute of Applied Astronomy, RAS, St. Petersburg) "A new-generation radio interferometer for fundamental and applied research". Summaries of the papers based on reports 1, 2, 4, 7, 8 are given below. • Dark energy in the nearby Universe: HST data, nonlinear theory, and computer simulations, A D Chernin Physics-Uspekhi, 2013, Volume 56, Number 7, Pages 704-709 • Investigating supermassive black holes: a new method based on the polarimetric observations of active galactic nuclei, Yu N Gnedin Physics-Uspekhi, 2013, Volume 56, Number 7, Pages 709-714 • X-ray binaries and star formation, M R

  9. Current Advances in the Computational Simulation of the Formation of Low-Mass Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R I; Inutsuka, S; Padoan, P; Tomisaka, K

    2005-10-24

    Developing a theory of low-mass star formation ({approx} 0.1 to 3 M{sub {circle_dot}}) remains one of the most elusive and important goals of theoretical astrophysics. The star-formation process is the outcome of the complex dynamics of interstellar gas involving non-linear interactions of turbulence, gravity, magnetic field and radiation. The evolution of protostellar condensations, from the moment they are assembled by turbulent flows to the time they reach stellar densities, spans an enormous range of scales, resulting in a major computational challenge for simulations. Since the previous Protostars and Planets conference, dramatic advances in the development of new numerical algorithmic techniques have been successfully implemented on large scale parallel supercomputers. Among such techniques, Adaptive Mesh Refinement and Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics have provided frameworks to simulate the process of low-mass star formation with a very large dynamic range. It is now feasible to explore the turbulent fragmentation of molecular clouds and the gravitational collapse of cores into stars self-consistently within the same calculation. The increased sophistication of these powerful methods comes with substantial caveats associated with the use of the techniques and the interpretation of the numerical results. In this review, we examine what has been accomplished in the field and present a critique of both numerical methods and scientific results. We stress that computational simulations should obey the available observational constraints and demonstrate numerical convergence. Failing this, results of large scale simulations do not advance our understanding of low-mass star formation.

  10. Advanced Certification Program for Computer Graphic Specialists. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkland Coll., Champaign, IL.

    A pioneer program in computer graphics was implemented at Parkland College (Illinois) to meet the demand for specialized technicians to visualize data generated on high performance computers. In summer 1989, 23 students were accepted into the pilot program. Courses included C programming, calculus and analytic geometry, computer graphics, and…

  11. Nationwide Buildings Energy Research enabled through an integrated Data Intensive Scientific Workflow and Advanced Analysis Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Lansing, Carina S.; Elsethagen, Todd O.; Hathaway, John E.; Guillen, Zoe C.; Dirks, James A.; Skorski, Daniel C.; Stephan, Eric G.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Gorton, Ian; Liu, Yan

    2014-01-28

    Modern workflow systems enable scientists to run ensemble simulations at unprecedented scales and levels of complexity, allowing them to study system sizes previously impossible to achieve, due to the inherent resource requirements needed for the modeling work. However as a result of these new capabilities the science teams suddenly also face unprecedented data volumes that they are unable to analyze with their existing tools and methodologies in a timely fashion. In this paper we will describe the ongoing development work to create an integrated data intensive scientific workflow and analysis environment that offers researchers the ability to easily create and execute complex simulation studies and provides them with different scalable methods to analyze the resulting data volumes. The integration of simulation and analysis environments is hereby not only a question of ease of use, but supports fundamental functions in the correlated analysis of simulation input, execution details and derived results for multi-variant, complex studies. To this end the team extended and integrated the existing capabilities of the Velo data management and analysis infrastructure, the MeDICi data intensive workflow system and RHIPE the R for Hadoop version of the well-known statistics package, as well as developing a new visual analytics interface for the result exploitation by multi-domain users. The capabilities of the new environment are demonstrated on a use case that focusses on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) building energy team, showing how they were able to take their previously local scale simulations to a nationwide level by utilizing data intensive computing techniques not only for their modeling work, but also for the subsequent analysis of their modeling results. As part of the PNNL research initiative PRIMA (Platform for Regional Integrated Modeling and Analysis) the team performed an initial 3 year study of building energy demands for the US Eastern

  12. Important Advances in Technology and Unique Applications to Cardiovascular Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chaikriangkrai, Kongkiat; Choi, Su Yeon; Nabi, Faisal; Chang, Su Min

    2014-01-01

    For the past decade, multidetector cardiac computed tomography and its main application, coronary computed tomography angiography, have been established as a noninvasive technique for anatomical assessment of coronary arteries. This new era of coronary artery evaluation by coronary computed tomography angiography has arisen from the rapid advancement in computed tomography technology, which has led to massive diagnostic and prognostic clinical studies in various patient populations. This article gives a brief overview of current multidetector cardiac computed tomography systems, developing cardiac computed tomography technologies in both hardware and software fields, innovative radiation exposure reduction measures, multidetector cardiac computed tomography functional studies, and their newer clinical applications beyond coronary computed tomography angiography. PMID:25574342

  13. Important advances in technology and unique applications to cardiovascular computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Chaikriangkrai, Kongkiat; Choi, Su Yeon; Nabi, Faisal; Chang, Su Min

    2014-01-01

    For the past decade, multidetector cardiac computed tomography and its main application, coronary computed tomography angiography, have been established as a noninvasive technique for anatomical assessment of coronary arteries. This new era of coronary artery evaluation by coronary computed tomography angiography has arisen from the rapid advancement in computed tomography technology, which has led to massive diagnostic and prognostic clinical studies in various patient populations. This article gives a brief overview of current multidetector cardiac computed tomography systems, developing cardiac computed tomography technologies in both hardware and software fields, innovative radiation exposure reduction measures, multidetector cardiac computed tomography functional studies, and their newer clinical applications beyond coronary computed tomography angiography. PMID:25574342

  14. Multithreaded transactions in scientific computing. The Growth06_v2 program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniluk, Andrzej

    2009-07-01

    efficient than the previous ones [3]. Summary of revisions:The design pattern (See Fig. 2 of Ref. [3]) has been modified according to the scheme shown on Fig. 1. A graphical user interface (GUI) for the program has been reconstructed. Fig. 2 presents a hybrid diagram of a GUI that shows how onscreen objects connect to use cases. The program has been compiled with English/USA regional and language options. Note: The figures mentioned above are contained in the program distribution file. Unusual features: The program is distributed in the form of source project GROWTH06_v2.dpr with associated files, and should be compiled using Borland Delphi compilers versions 6 or latter (including Borland Developer Studio 2006 and Code Gear compilers for Delphi). Additional comments: Two figures are included in the program distribution file. These are captioned Static classes model for Transaction design pattern. A model of a window that shows how onscreen objects connect to use cases. Running time: The typical running time is machine and user-parameters dependent. References: [1] A. Daniluk, Comput. Phys. Comm. 170 (2005) 265. [2] W.H. Press, B.P. Flannery, S.A. Teukolsky, W.T. Vetterling, Numerical Recipes in Pascal: The Art of Scientific Computing, first ed., Cambridge University Press, 1989. [3] M. Brzuszek, A. Daniluk, Comput. Phys. Comm. 175 (2006) 678.

  15. Generalized Advanced Propeller Analysis System (GAPAS). Volume 2: Computer program user manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glatt, L.; Crawford, D. R.; Kosmatka, J. B.; Swigart, R. J.; Wong, E. W.

    1986-01-01

    The Generalized Advanced Propeller Analysis System (GAPAS) computer code is described. GAPAS was developed to analyze advanced technology multi-bladed propellers which operate on aircraft with speeds up to Mach 0.8 and altitudes up to 40,000 feet. GAPAS includes technology for analyzing aerodynamic, structural, and acoustic performance of propellers. The computer code was developed for the CDC 7600 computer and is currently available for industrial use on the NASA Langley computer. A description of all the analytical models incorporated in GAPAS is included. Sample calculations are also described as well as users requirements for modifying the analysis system. Computer system core requirements and running times are also discussed.

  16. Computer architectures for computational physics work done by Computational Research and Technology Branch and Advanced Computational Concepts Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Slides are reproduced that describe the importance of having high performance number crunching and graphics capability. They also indicate the types of research and development underway at Ames Research Center to ensure that, in the near term, Ames is a smart buyer and user, and in the long-term that Ames knows the best possible solutions for number crunching and graphics needs. The drivers for this research are real computational physics applications of interest to Ames and NASA. They are concerned with how to map the applications, and how to maximize the physics learned from the results of the calculations. The computer graphics activities are aimed at getting maximum information from the three-dimensional calculations by using the real time manipulation of three-dimensional data on the Silicon Graphics workstation. Work is underway on new algorithms that will permit the display of experimental results that are sparse and random, the same way that the dense and regular computed results are displayed.

  17. INFN-Pisa scientific computation environment (GRID, HPC and Interactive Analysis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arezzini, S.; Carboni, A.; Caruso, G.; Ciampa, A.; Coscetti, S.; Mazzoni, E.; Piras, S.

    2014-06-01

    The INFN-Pisa Tier2 infrastructure is described, optimized not only for GRID CPU and Storage access, but also for a more interactive use of the resources in order to provide good solutions for the final data analysis step. The Data Center, equipped with about 6700 production cores, permits the use of modern analysis techniques realized via advanced statistical tools (like RooFit and RooStat) implemented in multicore systems. In particular a POSIX file storage access integrated with standard SRM access is provided. Therefore the unified storage infrastructure is described, based on GPFS and Xrootd, used both for SRM data repository and interactive POSIX access. Such a common infrastructure allows a transparent access to the Tier2 data to the users for their interactive analysis. The organization of a specialized many cores CPU facility devoted to interactive analysis is also described along with the login mechanism integrated with the INFN-AAI (National INFN Infrastructure) to extend the site access and use to a geographical distributed community. Such infrastructure is used also for a national computing facility in use to the INFN theoretical community, it enables a synergic use of computing and storage resources. Our Center initially developed for the HEP community is now growing and includes also HPC resources fully integrated. In recent years has been installed and managed a cluster facility (1000 cores, parallel use via InfiniBand connection) and we are now updating this facility that will provide resources for all the intermediate level HPC computing needs of the INFN theoretical national community.

  18. Analysis, scientific computing and fundamental studies in fluid mechanics. Summary report number 19, May 1, 1995--April 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    Summaries are given of the progress on each of the following research projects: (1) a multi-resolution finite element method for computing multiscale solutions; (2) numerical study of free interface problems; (3) numerical simulation of two-dimensional particle coarsening; (4) numerical simulation of three-dimensional water waves; (5) vortex dynamics; (6) vortex models and turbulence; (7) flow in a non-uniform Hele-Shaw cell; (8) numerical analysis/scientific computing.

  19. The Advance of Computing from the Ground to the Cloud

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breeding, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    A trend toward the abstraction of computing platforms that has been developing in the broader IT arena over the last few years is just beginning to make inroads into the library technology scene. Cloud computing offers for libraries many interesting possibilities that may help reduce technology costs and increase capacity, reliability, and…

  20. The Operation of a Specialized Scientific Information and Data Analysis Center With Computer Base and Associated Communications Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottrell, William B.; And Others

    The Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) is a highly sophisticated scientific information center operated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. Its information file, which consists of both data and bibliographic information, is computer stored and numerous programs have been developed to facilitate the…

  1. The Goal Specificity Effect on Strategy Use and Instructional Efficiency during Computer-Based Scientific Discovery Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunsting, Josef; Wirth, Joachim; Paas, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Using a computer-based scientific discovery learning environment on buoyancy in fluids we investigated the "effects of goal specificity" (nonspecific goals vs. specific goals) for two goal types (problem solving goals vs. learning goals) on "strategy use" and "instructional efficiency". Our empirical findings close an important research gap,…

  2. Final Scientific Report: A Scalable Development Environment for Peta-Scale Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Karbach, Carsten; Frings, Wolfgang

    2013-02-22

    This document is the final scientific report of the project DE-SC000120 (A scalable Development Environment for Peta-Scale Computing). The objective of this project is the extension of the Parallel Tools Platform (PTP) for applying it to peta-scale systems. PTP is an integrated development environment for parallel applications. It comprises code analysis, performance tuning, parallel debugging and system monitoring. The contribution of the Juelich Supercomputing Centre (JSC) aims to provide a scalable solution for system monitoring of supercomputers. This includes the development of a new communication protocol for exchanging status data between the target remote system and the client running PTP. The communication has to work for high latency. PTP needs to be implemented robustly and should hide the complexity of the supercomputer's architecture in order to provide a transparent access to various remote systems via a uniform user interface. This simplifies the porting of applications to different systems, because PTP functions as abstraction layer between parallel application developer and compute resources. The common requirement for all PTP components is that they have to interact with the remote supercomputer. E.g. applications are built remotely and performance tools are attached to job submissions and their output data resides on the remote system. Status data has to be collected by evaluating outputs of the remote job scheduler and the parallel debugger needs to control an application executed on the supercomputer. The challenge is to provide this functionality for peta-scale systems in real-time. The client server architecture of the established monitoring application LLview, developed by the JSC, can be applied to PTP's system monitoring. LLview provides a well-arranged overview of the supercomputer's current status. A set of statistics, a list of running and queued jobs as well as a node display mapping running jobs to their compute resources form the

  3. Advanced Telescopes and Observatories and Scientific Instruments and Sensors Capability Roadmaps: General Background and Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulter, Dan; Bankston, Perry

    2005-01-01

    Agency objective are: Strategic Planning Transformation. Advanced Planning Organizational Roles. Public Involvement in Strategic Planning. Strategic Roadmaps and Schedule. Capability Roadmaps and Schedule. Purpose of NRC Review. Capability Roadmap Development (Progress to Date).

  4. The impact of the data archiving file format on the sharing of scientific data for use in popular computational environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Kelly; Robertson, James

    2010-04-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) conducted an initial study on the performance of XML and HDF5 in three popular computational software environments, MATLAB, Octave, and Python, all of which use high-level scripting languages and computational software tools designed for computational processing. Although usable for sharing and exchanging data, the initial results of the study indicated XML has clear limitations in a computational environment. Popular computational tools are unable to handle very large XML formatted files, thus limiting processing of large XML archived data files. We show the breakdown points of XML formatted files for various popular computational tools and explore the performance dependencies of XML and HDF5 formatted files in popular computational environments on the hardware, operating system, and mathematical function. This study also explores the inverse file size relationship between HDF5 and XML data files. Several organizations, including ARL, use both XML and HDF5 for archiving and exchanging data. XML is best suited for storing "light" data (such as metadata) and HDF5 is best suited for storing "heavy" scientific data. Integrating and using both XML and HDF5 for data archiving offers the best solution for data providers and consumers to share information for computational and scientific purposes.

  5. 2015 Annual Report - Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, James R.; Papka, Michael E.; Cerny, Beth A.; Coffey, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility provides supercomputing capabilities to the scientific and engineering community to advance fundamental discovery and understanding in a broad range of disciplines.

  6. 2014 Annual Report - Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, James R.; Papka, Michael E.; Cerny, Beth A.; Coffey, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility provides supercomputing capabilities to the scientific and engineering community to advance fundamental discovery and understanding in a broad range of disciplines.

  7. Advances in computational design and analysis of airbreathing propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klineberg, John M.

    1989-01-01

    The development of commercial and military aircraft depends, to a large extent, on engine manufacturers being able to achieve significant increases in propulsion capability through improved component aerodynamics, materials, and structures. The recent history of propulsion has been marked by efforts to develop computational techniques that can speed up the propulsion design process and produce superior designs. The availability of powerful supercomputers, such as the NASA Numerical Aerodynamic Simulator, and the potential for even higher performance offered by parallel computer architectures, have opened the door to the use of multi-dimensional simulations to study complex physical phenomena in propulsion systems that have previously defied analysis or experimental observation. An overview of several NASA Lewis research efforts is provided that are contributing toward the long-range goal of a numerical test-cell for the integrated, multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization of propulsion systems. Specific examples in Internal Computational Fluid Mechanics, Computational Structural Mechanics, Computational Materials Science, and High Performance Computing are cited and described in terms of current capabilities, technical challenges, and future research directions.

  8. New Sensors for In-Pile Temperature Detection at the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; J. E. Daw; K. G. Condie; S. Curtis Wilkins

    2009-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. As a user facility, the ATR is supporting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, as they conduct basic and applied nuclear research and development to advance the nation’s energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to develop and evaluate new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the strategy for determining what instrumentation is needed and the program for developing new or enhanced sensors that can address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing new sensors now available and under development for in-pile detection of temperature at various irradiation locations in the ATR.

  9. The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE): A Python Framework for Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Gurrola, E. M.; Agram, P. S.; Sacco, G. F.; Lavalle, M.

    2015-12-01

    The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE, funded by NASA ESTO) provides a modern computing framework for geodetic image processing of InSAR data from a diverse array of radar satellites and aircraft. ISCE is both a modular, flexible, and extensible framework for building software components and applications as well as a toolbox of applications for processing raw or focused InSAR and Polarimetric InSAR data. The ISCE framework contains object-oriented Python components layered to construct Python InSAR components that manage legacy Fortran/C InSAR programs. Components are independently configurable in a layered manner to provide maximum control. Polymorphism is used to define a workflow in terms of abstract facilities for each processing step that are realized by specific components at run-time. This enables a single workflow to work on either raw or focused data from all sensors. ISCE can serve as the core of a production center to process Level-0 radar data to Level-3 products, but is amenable to interactive processing approaches that allow scientists to experiment with data to explore new ways of doing science with InSAR data. The NASA-ISRO SAR (NISAR) Mission will deliver data of unprecedented quantity and quality, making possible global-scale studies in climate research, natural hazards, and Earth's ecosystems. ISCE is planned as the foundational element in processing NISAR data, enabling a new class of analyses that take greater advantage of the long time and large spatial scales of these new data. NISAR will be but one mission in a constellation of radar satellites in the future delivering such data. ISCE currently supports all publicly available strip map mode space-borne SAR data since ERS and is expected to include support for upcoming missions. ISCE has been incorporated into two prototype cloud-based systems that have demonstrated its elasticity in addressing larger data processing problems in a "production" context and its ability to be

  10. Parallel biomolecular computation on surfaces with advanced finite automata.

    PubMed

    Soreni, Michal; Yogev, Sivan; Kossoy, Elizaveta; Shoham, Yuval; Keinan, Ehud

    2005-03-23

    A biomolecular, programmable 3-symbol-3-state finite automaton is reported. This automaton computes autonomously with all of its components, including hardware, software, input, and output being biomolecules mixed together in solution. The hardware consisted of two enzymes: an endonuclease, BbvI, and T4 DNA ligase. The software (transition rules represented by transition molecules) and the input were double-stranded (ds) DNA oligomers. Computation was carried out by autonomous processing of the input molecules via repetitive cycles of restriction, hybridization, and ligation reactions to produce a final-state output in the form of a dsDNA molecule. The 3-symbol-3-state deterministic automaton is an extension of the 2-symbol-2-state automaton previously reported, and theoretically it can be further expanded to a 37-symbol-3-state automaton. The applicability of this design was further amplified by employing surface-anchored input molecules, using the surface plasmon resonance technology to monitor the computation steps in real time. Computation was performed by alternating the feed solutions between endonuclease and a solution containing the ligase, ATP, and appropriate transition molecules. The output detection involved final ligation with one of three soluble detection molecules. Parallel computation and stepwise detection were carried out automatically with a Biacore chip that was loaded with four different inputs. PMID:15771530

  11. Some recent advances in computational aerodynamics for helicopter applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccroskey, W. J.; Baeder, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The growing application of computational aerodynamics to nonlinear helicopter problems is outlined, with particular emphasis on several recent quasi-two-dimensional examples that used the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations and an eddy-viscosity model to approximate turbulence. Rotor blade section characteristics can now be calculated accurately over a wide range of transonic flow conditions. However, a finite-difference simulation of the complete flow field about a helicopter in forward flight is not currently feasible, despite the impressive progress that is being made in both two and three dimensions. The principal limitations are today's computer speeds and memories, algorithm and solution methods, grid generation, vortex modeling, structural and aerodynamic coupling, and a shortage of engineers who are skilled in both computational fluid dynamics and helicopter aerodynamics and dynamics.

  12. Advanced Light Source First-Phase Scientific Program, 1993/1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    This composite document outlines ten different experiments planned for the beamline at the Advanced Light Source. Researchers from various parts of the country have detailed their methods and equipment to be used in experiments in biology and physics. X-ray spectroscopy and microscopy are the common topics to these experiments. (GHH)

  13. The Biopsychosocial Approach to Chronic Pain: Scientific Advances and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatchel, Robert J.; Peng, Yuan Bo; Peters, Madelon L.; Fuchs, Perry N.; Turk, Dennis C.

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence and cost of chronic pain is a major physical and mental health care problem in the United States today. As a result, there has been a recent explosion of research on chronic pain, with significant advances in better understanding its etiology, assessment, and treatment. The purpose of the present article is to provide a review of…

  14. Advanced Computational Aeroacoustics Methods for Fan Noise Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane (Technical Monitor); Tam, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Direct computation of fan noise is presently not possible. One of the major difficulties is the geometrical complexity of the problem. In the case of fan noise, the blade geometry is critical to the loading on the blade and hence the intensity of the radiated noise. The precise geometry must be incorporated into the computation. In computational fluid dynamics (CFD), there are two general ways to handle problems with complex geometry. One way is to use unstructured grids. The other is to use body fitted overset grids. In the overset grid method, accurate data transfer is of utmost importance. For acoustic computation, it is not clear that the currently used data transfer methods are sufficiently accurate as not to contaminate the very small amplitude acoustic disturbances. In CFD, low order schemes are, invariably, used in conjunction with unstructured grids. However, low order schemes are known to be numerically dispersive and dissipative. dissipative errors are extremely undesirable for acoustic wave problems. The objective of this project is to develop a high order unstructured grid Dispersion-Relation-Preserving (DRP) scheme. would minimize numerical dispersion and dissipation errors. contains the results of the funded portion of the project. scheme on an unstructured grid has been developed. constructed in the wave number space. The characteristics of the scheme can be improved by the inclusion of additional constraints. Stability of the scheme has been investigated. Stability can be improved by adopting the upwinding strategy.

  15. Advanced Computer Image Generation Techniques Exploiting Perceptual Characteristics. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenger, Anthony J.; And Others

    This study suggests and identifies computer image generation (CIG) algorithms for visual simulation that improve the training effectiveness of CIG simulators and identifies areas of basic research in visual perception that are significant for improving CIG technology. The first phase of the project entailed observing three existing CIG simulators.…

  16. MAX - An advanced parallel computer for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Blair F.; Bunker, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    MAX is a fault-tolerant multicomputer hardware and software architecture designed to meet the needs of NASA spacecraft systems. It consists of conventional computing modules (computers) connected via a dual network topology. One network is used to transfer data among the computers and between computers and I/O devices. This network's topology is arbitrary. The second network operates as a broadcast medium for operating system synchronization messages and supports the operating system's Byzantine resilience. A fully distributed operating system supports multitasking in an asynchronous event and data driven environment. A large grain dataflow paradigm is used to coordinate the multitasking and provide easy control of concurrency. It is the basis of the system's fault tolerance and allows both static and dynamical location of tasks. Redundant execution of tasks with software voting of results may be specified for critical tasks. The dataflow paradigm also supports simplified software design, test and maintenance. A unique feature is a method for reliably patching code in an executing dataflow application.

  17. Advanced Simulation and Computing Co-Design Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, James A.; Hoang, Thuc T.; Kelly, Suzanne M.; McPherson, Allen; Neely, Rob

    2015-11-01

    This ASC Co-design Strategy lays out the full continuum and components of the co-design process, based on what we have experienced thus far and what we wish to do more in the future to meet the program’s mission of providing high performance computing (HPC) and simulation capabilities for NNSA to carry out its stockpile stewardship responsibility.

  18. Connecting Performance Analysis and Visualization to Advance Extreme Scale Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, Peer-Timo; Mohr, Bernd; Schulz, Martin; Pasccci, Valerio; Gamblin, Todd; Brunst, Holger

    2015-07-29

    The characterization, modeling, analysis, and tuning of software performance has been a central topic in High Performance Computing (HPC) since its early beginnings. The overall goal is to make HPC software run faster on particular hardware, either through better scheduling, on-node resource utilization, or more efficient distributed communication.

  19. Toward a common component architecture for high-performance scientific computing

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, R; Gannon, D; Geist, A; Katarzyna, K; Kohn, S; McInnes, L; Parker, S; Smolinski, B

    1999-06-09

    This paper describes work in progress to develop a standard for interoperability among high-performance scientific components. This research stems from growing recognition that the scientific community must better manage the complexity of multidisciplinary simulations and better address scalable performance issues on parallel and distributed architectures. Driving forces are the need for fast connections among components that perform numerically intensive work and parallel collective interactions among components that use multiple processes or threads. This paper focuses on the areas we believe are most crucial for such interactions, namely an interface definition language that supports scientific abstractions for specifying component interfaces and a ports connection model for specifying component interactions.

  20. Integrated computer aided planning and manufacture of advanced technology jet engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhas, B. K.; George, Chacko; Arul Raj, A.

    1987-10-01

    This paper highlights an attempt at evolving a computer aided manufacturing system on a personal computer. A case study of an advanced technology jet engine component is included to illustrate various outputs from the system. The proposed system could be an alternate solution to sophisticated and expensive CAD/CAM workstations.

  1. Advanced Computational Thermal Studies and their Assessment for Supercritical-Pressure Reactors (SCRs)

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. McEligot; J. Y. Yoo; J. S. Lee; S. T. Ro; E. Lurien; S. O. Park; R. H. Pletcher; B. L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J. M. Wallace

    2009-04-01

    The goal of this laboratory / university collaboration of coupled computational and experimental studies is the improvement of predictive methods for supercritical-pressure reactors. The general objective is to develop supporting knowledge needed of advanced computational techniques for the technology development of the concepts and their safety systems.

  2. Project T.E.A.M. (Technical Education Advancement Modules). Introduction to Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Brenda

    This instructional guide, one of a series developed by the Technical Education Advancement Modules (TEAM) project, is a 3-hour introduction to computers. The purpose is to develop the following competencies: (1) orientation to data processing; (2) use of data entry devices; (3) use of computer menus; and (4) entry of data with accuracy and…

  3. Teaching Advanced Concepts in Computer Networks: VNUML-UM Virtualization Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Pereniguez-Garcia, F.; Marin-Lopez, R.; Ruiz-Martinez, P. M.; Skarmeta-Gomez, A. F.

    2013-01-01

    In the teaching of computer networks the main problem that arises is the high price and limited number of network devices the students can work with in the laboratories. Nowadays, with virtualization we can overcome this limitation. In this paper, we present a methodology that allows students to learn advanced computer network concepts through…

  4. Do Scientific Advancements Lean on the Shoulders of Giants? A Bibliometric Investigation of the Ortega Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Bornmann, Lutz; de Moya Anegón, Félix; Leydesdorff, Loet

    2010-01-01

    Background In contrast to Newton's well-known aphorism that he had been able “to see further only by standing on the shoulders of giants,” one attributes to the Spanish philosopher Ortega y Gasset the hypothesis saying that top-level research cannot be successful without a mass of medium researchers on which the top rests comparable to an iceberg. Methodology/Principal Findings The Ortega hypothesis predicts that highly-cited papers and medium-cited (or lowly-cited) papers would equally refer to papers with a medium impact. The Newton hypothesis would be supported if the top-level research more frequently cites previously highly-cited work than that medium-level research cites highly-cited work. Our analysis is based on (i) all articles and proceedings papers which were published in 2003 in the life sciences, health sciences, physical sciences, and social sciences, and (ii) all articles and proceeding papers which were cited within these publications. The results show that highly-cited work in all scientific fields more frequently cites previously highly-cited papers than that medium-cited work cites highly-cited work. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrate that papers contributing to the scientific progress in a field lean to a larger extent on previously important contributions than papers contributing little. These findings support the Newton hypothesis and call into question the Ortega hypothesis (given our usage of citation counts as a proxy for impact). PMID:20967252

  5. Scientific opportunities at the proposed 6-7 GeV Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Shency, G.K.; Viccaro, P.J.

    1986-10-01

    Two different types of insertion devices - undulators and wigglers - have been developed to satisfy the many present and future requirements of various investigations using synchrotron radiation. The characteristics of the radiation from the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne are summarized, including the insertion device sources, source size and brilliance, and spectral character of the wiggler and undulator sources. Possible applications of the source are also given. (LEW)

  6. The ergonomics of computer aided design within advanced manufacturing technology.

    PubMed

    John, P A

    1988-03-01

    Many manufacturing companies have now awakened to the significance of computer aided design (CAD), although the majority of them have only been able to purchase computerised draughting systems of which only a subset produce direct manufacturing data. Such companies are moving steadily towards the concept of computer integrated manufacture (CIM), and this demands CAD to address more than draughting. CAD architects are thus having to rethink the basic specification of such systems, although they typically suffer from an insufficient understanding of the design task and have consequently been working with inadequate specifications. It is at this fundamental level that ergonomics has much to offer, making its contribution by encouraging user-centred design. The discussion considers the relationships between CAD and: the design task; the organisation and people; creativity; and artificial intelligence. It finishes with a summary of the contribution of ergonomics. PMID:15676646

  7. Cogeneration computer model assessment: Advanced cogeneration research study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, L.

    1983-01-01

    Cogeneration computer simulation models to recommend the most desirable models or their components for use by the Southern California Edison Company (SCE) in evaluating potential cogeneration projects was assessed. Existing cogeneration modeling capabilities are described, preferred models are identified, and an approach to the development of a code which will best satisfy SCE requirements is recommended. Five models (CELCAP, COGEN 2, CPA, DEUS, and OASIS) are recommended for further consideration.

  8. Parallel computing in genomic research: advances and applications

    PubMed Central

    Ocaña, Kary; de Oliveira, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Today’s genomic experiments have to process the so-called “biological big data” that is now reaching the size of Terabytes and Petabytes. To process this huge amount of data, scientists may require weeks or months if they use their own workstations. Parallelism techniques and high-performance computing (HPC) environments can be applied for reducing the total processing time and to ease the management, treatment, and analyses of this data. However, running bioinformatics experiments in HPC environments such as clouds, grids, clusters, and graphics processing unit requires the expertise from scientists to integrate computational, biological, and mathematical techniques and technologies. Several solutions have already been proposed to allow scientists for processing their genomic experiments using HPC capabilities and parallelism techniques. This article brings a systematic review of literature that surveys the most recently published research involving genomics and parallel computing. Our objective is to gather the main characteristics, benefits, and challenges that can be considered by scientists when running their genomic experiments to benefit from parallelism techniques and HPC capabilities. PMID:26604801

  9. Advanced Computational Methods for Security Constrained Financial Transmission Rights

    SciTech Connect

    Kalsi, Karanjit; Elbert, Stephen T.; Vlachopoulou, Maria; Zhou, Ning; Huang, Zhenyu

    2012-07-26

    Financial Transmission Rights (FTRs) are financial insurance tools to help power market participants reduce price risks associated with transmission congestion. FTRs are issued based on a process of solving a constrained optimization problem with the objective to maximize the FTR social welfare under power flow security constraints. Security constraints for different FTR categories (monthly, seasonal or annual) are usually coupled and the number of constraints increases exponentially with the number of categories. Commercial software for FTR calculation can only provide limited categories of FTRs due to the inherent computational challenges mentioned above. In this paper, first an innovative mathematical reformulation of the FTR problem is presented which dramatically improves the computational efficiency of optimization problem. After having re-formulated the problem, a novel non-linear dynamic system (NDS) approach is proposed to solve the optimization problem. The new formulation and performance of the NDS solver is benchmarked against widely used linear programming (LP) solvers like CPLEX™ and tested on both standard IEEE test systems and large-scale systems using data from the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). The performance of the NDS is demonstrated to be comparable and in some cases is shown to outperform the widely used CPLEX algorithms. The proposed formulation and NDS based solver is also easily parallelizable enabling further computational improvement.

  10. International space station accomplishments update: Scientific discovery, advancing future exploration, and benefits brought home to earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumm, Tracy; Robinson, Julie A.; Alleyne, Camille; Hasbrook, Pete; Mayo, Susan; Buckley, Nicole; Johnson-Green, Perry; Karabadzhak, George; Kamigaichi, Shigeki; Umemura, Sayaka; Sorokin, Igor V.; Zell, Martin; Istasse, Eric; Sabbagh, Jean; Pignataro, Salvatore

    2014-10-01

    Throughout the history of the International Space Station (ISS), crews on board have conducted a variety of scientific research and educational activities. Well into the second year of full utilization of the ISS laboratory, the trend of scientific accomplishments and educational opportunities continues to grow. More than 1500 investigations have been conducted on the ISS since the first module launched in 1998, with over 700 scientific publications. The ISS provides a unique environment for research, international collaboration and educational activities that benefit humankind. This paper will provide an up to date summary of key investigations, facilities, publications, and benefits from ISS research that have developed over the past year. Discoveries in human physiology and nutrition have enabled astronauts to return from ISS with little bone loss, even as scientists seek to better understand the new puzzle of “ocular syndrome” affecting the vision of up to half of astronauts. The geneLAB campaign will unify life sciences investigations to seek genomic, proteomic and metabolomics of the effect of microgravity on life as a whole. Combustion scientists identified a new “cold flame” phenomenon that has the potential to improve models of efficient combustion back on Earth. A significant number of instruments in Earth remote sensing and astrophysics are providing new access to data or nearing completion for launch, making ISS a significant platform for understanding of the Earth system and the universe. In addition to multidisciplinary research, the ISS partnership conducts a myriad of student led research investigations and educational activities aimed at increasing student interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Over the past year, the ISS partnership compiled new statistics of the educational impact of the ISS on students around the world. More than 43 million students, from kindergarten to graduate school, with more than 28

  11. International Space Station Accomplishments Update: Scientific Discovery, Advancing Future Exploration, and Benefits Brought Home to Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thumm, Tracy; Robinson, Julie A.; Alleyne, Camille; Hasbrook, Pete; Mayo, Susan; Johnson-Green, Perry; Buckley, Nicole; Karabadzhak, George; Kamigaichi, Shigeki; Umemura, Sayaka; Sorokin, Igor V.; Zell, Martin; Istasse, Eric; Sabbagh, Jean; Pignataro, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Throughout the history of the International Space Station (ISS), crews on board have conducted a variety of scientific research and educational activities. Well into the second year of full utilization of the ISS laboratory, the trend of scientific accomplishments and educational opportunities continues to grow. More than 1500 investigations have been conducted on the ISS since the first module launched in 1998, with over 700 scientific publications. The ISS provides a unique environment for research, international collaboration and educational activities that benefit humankind. This paper will provide an up to date summary of key investigations, facilities, publications, and benefits from ISS research that have developed over the past year. Discoveries in human physiology and nutrition have enabled astronauts to return from ISS with little bone loss, even as scientists seek to better understand the new puzzle of "ocular syndrome" affecting the vision of up to half of astronauts. The geneLAB campaign will unify life sciences investigations to seek genomic, proteomic, and metabolomics of the effect of microgravity on life as a whole. Combustion scientists identified a new "cold flame" phenomenon that has the potential to improve models of efficient combustion back on Earth. A significant number of instruments in Earth remote sensing and astrophysics are providing new access to data or nearing completion for launch, making ISS a significant platform for understanding of the Earth system and the universe. In addition to multidisciplinary research, the ISS partnership conducts a myriad of student led research investigations and educational activities aimed at increasing student interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Over the past year, the ISS partnership compiled new statistics of the educational impact of the ISS on students around the world. More than 43 million students, from kindergarten to graduate school, with more than 28 million

  12. Vision 20/20: Automation and advanced computing in clinical radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Kevin L. Moiseenko, Vitali; Kagadis, George C.; McNutt, Todd R.; Mutic, Sasa

    2014-01-15

    This Vision 20/20 paper considers what computational advances are likely to be implemented in clinical radiation oncology in the coming years and how the adoption of these changes might alter the practice of radiotherapy. Four main areas of likely advancement are explored: cloud computing, aggregate data analyses, parallel computation, and automation. As these developments promise both new opportunities and new risks to clinicians and patients alike, the potential benefits are weighed against the hazards associated with each advance, with special considerations regarding patient safety under new computational platforms and methodologies. While the concerns of patient safety are legitimate, the authors contend that progress toward next-generation clinical informatics systems will bring about extremely valuable developments in quality improvement initiatives, clinical efficiency, outcomes analyses, data sharing, and adaptive radiotherapy.

  13. Admixed human embryos and stem cells: legislative, ethical and scientific advances.

    PubMed

    Bahadur, G; Iqbal, M; Malik, S; Sanyal, A; Wafa, R; Noble, R

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the regulatory framework currently governing the creation of animal-human hybrids and chimera embryos in stem cell research, and some of the ethical implications of such research. It discusses the findings of a recent government select committee that considered the topic. It considers the debate around the precise definition of a human embryo, and whether such hybrids therefore fall within the remit of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority. It outlines the advantages of such hybrids, in lessening the need for human egg donors, as well as the moral objections to species boundary violation. It calls for an examination of the scientific benefits of such research to inform debate on the question, and argues for the need to take genuine account of the public's views on this matter. PMID:18644220

  14. More Than Pretty Pictures: How Translating Science Concepts into Pictures Advances Scientific Thinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankel, Felice

    2010-02-01

    The judgment and decision-making required to render science visual clarifies thinking. One must decide on a hierarchy of information--what must be included and what might be left out? What is the main point of the visual? Just as in writing an article or responding to an essay question, we must understand and then plan what we want to ``say'' in a drawing or other forms of representation. And since a visual representation of a scientific concept (or data) is a re-presentation, and not the thing itself, interpretation or translation is involved. The process tends to transcend barriers of linguistic facility and educational background; it attracts and communicates students and teachers of all backgrounds, where other methods intimidate. The rendered images are, in essence More Than Pretty Pictures. )

  15. S2PLOT: a Straightforward Library for Advanced 3-dimensional Scientific Visualisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, D. G.; Fluke, C. J.

    2008-08-01

    S2PLOT is a user-oriented programming library for generating and exploring 3-dimensional (3-d) scientific plots and diagrams. It provides a lightweight interface---inspired by the simple yet widely-used PGPLOT---to produce hardware-accelerated visualisations of point, line, image and volumetric data. S2PLOT provides C and FORTRAN interfaces, and supports monoscopic, stereoscopic and curved (eg. dome) display devices. PGPLOT-savvy astronomers can usually write their first S2PLOT program in less than ten minutes. In this paper, we introduce the latest S2PLOT version and highlight major new additions to the library, including volume rendering and isosurfacing of astronomical data. We describe a simple extension that enables the embedding of large-area FITS images directly into S2PLOT programs using standard World Coordinate Systems, and we introduce the Python interface to S2PLOT.

  16. An integrated computer system for preliminary design of advanced aircraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, R. E.; Sobieszczanski, J.; Landrum, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    A progress report is given on the first phase of a research project to develop a system of Integrated Programs for Aerospace-Vehicle Design (IPAD) which is intended to automate to the largest extent possible the preliminary and detailed design of advanced aircraft. The approach used is to build a pilot system and simultaneously to carry out two major contractual studies to define a practical IPAD system preparatory to programing. The paper summarizes the specifications and goals of the IPAD system, the progress to date, and any conclusion reached regarding its feasibility and scope. Sample calculations obtained with the pilot system are given for aircraft preliminary designs optimized with respect to discipline parameters, such as weight or L/D, and these results are compared with designs optimized with respect to overall performance parameters, such as range or payload.

  17. Certification of version 1.2 of the PORFLO-3 code for the WHC scientific and engineering computational center

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, N.W.

    1994-12-29

    Version 1.2 of the PORFLO-3 Code has migrated from the Hanford Cray computer to workstations in the WHC Scientific and Engineering Computational Center. The workstation-based configuration and acceptance testing are inherited from the CRAY-based configuration. The purpose of this report is to document differences in the new configuration as compared to the parent Cray configuration, and summarize some of the acceptance test results which have shown that the migrated code is functioning correctly in the new environment.

  18. New Sensors for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Joy L. Rempe; Darrell L. Knudson; Keith G. Condie; Joshua E. Daw; Heng Ban; Brandon Fox; Gordon Kohse

    2009-06-01

    A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to develop and evaluate new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the selection strategy of what instrumentation is needed, and the program generated for developing new or enhanced sensors that can address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing new sensors now available to users of the ATR NSUF with data from irradiation tests using these sensors. In addition, progress is reported on current research efforts to provide users advanced methods for detecting temperature, fuel thermal conductivity, and changes in sample geometry.

  19. Inference on arthropod demographic parameters: computational advances using R.

    PubMed

    Maia, Aline De Holanda Nunes; Pazianotto, Ricardo Antonio De Almeida; Luiz, Alfredo José Barreto; Marinho-Prado, Jeanne Scardini; Pervez, Ahmad

    2014-02-01

    We developed a computer program for life table analysis using the open source, free software programming environment R. It is useful to quantify chronic nonlethal effects of treatments on arthropod populations by summarizing information on their survival and fertility in key population parameters referred to as fertility life table parameters. Statistical inference on fertility life table parameters is not trivial because it requires the use of computationally intensive methods for variance estimation. Our codes present some advantages with respect to a previous program developed in Statistical Analysis System. Additional multiple comparison tests were incorporated for the analysis of qualitative factors; a module for regression analysis was implemented, thus, allowing analysis of quantitative factors such as temperature or agrochemical doses; availability is granted for users, once it was developed using an open source, free software programming environment. To illustrate the descriptive and inferential analysis implemented in lifetable.R, we present and discuss two examples: 1) a study quantifying the influence of the proteinase inhibitor berenil on the eucalyptus defoliator Thyrinteina arnobia (Stoll) and 2) a study investigating the influence of temperature on demographic parameters of a predaceous ladybird, Hippodamia variegata (Goeze). PMID:24665730

  20. Recent advances in computer camera methods for machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Gaylord G.; Walker, Jo N.

    1998-10-01

    During the past year, several new computer camera methods (hardware and software) have been developed which have applications in machine vision. These are described below, along with some test results. The improvements are generally in the direction of higher speed and greater parallelism. A PCI interface card has been designed which is adaptable to multiple CCD types, both color and monochrome. A newly designed A/D converter allows for a choice of 8 or 10-bit conversion resolution and a choice of two different analog inputs. Thus, by using four of these converters feeding the 32-bit PCI data bus, up to 8 camera heads can be used with a single PCI card, and four camera heads can be operated in parallel. The card has been designed so that any of 8 different CCD types can be used with it (6 monochrome and 2 color CCDs) ranging in resolution from 192 by 165 pixels up to 1134 by 972 pixels. In the area of software, a method has been developed to better utilize the decision-making capability of the computer along with the sub-array scan capabilities of many CCDs. Specifically, it is shown below how to achieve a dual scan mode camera system wherein one scan mode is a low density, high speed scan of a complete image area, and a higher density sub-array scan is used in those areas where changes have been observed. The name given to this technique is adaptive sub-array scanning.

  1. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2001-10-01

    In the second year of the project, the Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for analyzing three-phase slurry flows in a bubble column is further developed. The approach uses an Eulerian analysis of liquid flows in the bubble column, and makes use of the Lagrangian trajectory analysis for the bubbles and particle motions. An experimental set for studying a two-dimensional bubble column is also developed. The operation of the bubble column is being tested and diagnostic methodology for quantitative measurements is being developed. An Eulerian computational model for the flow condition in the two-dimensional bubble column is also being developed. The liquid and bubble motions are being analyzed and the results are being compared with the experimental setup. Solid-fluid mixture flows in ducts and passages at different angle of orientations were analyzed. The model predictions were compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found. Gravity chute flows of solid-liquid mixtures is also being studied. Further progress was also made in developing a thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction in a state of turbulent motion. The balance laws are obtained and the constitutive laws are being developed. Progress was also made in measuring concentration and velocity of particles of different sizes near a wall in a duct flow. The technique of Phase-Doppler anemometry was used in these studies. The general objective of this project is to provide the needed fundamental understanding of three-phase slurry reactors in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquid fuel synthesis. The other main goal is to develop a computational capability for predicting the transport and processing of three-phase coal slurries. The specific objectives are: (1) To develop a thermodynamically consistent rate-dependent anisotropic model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction for application to coal liquefaction. Also establish the

  2. ADVANCES IN X-RAY COMPUTED MICROTOMOGRAPHY AT THE NSLS.

    SciTech Connect

    DOWD,B.A.

    1998-08-07

    The X-Ray Computed Microtomography workstation at beamline X27A at the NSLS has been utilized by scientists from a broad range of disciplines from industrial materials processing to environmental science. The most recent applications are presented here as well as a description of the facility that has evolved to accommodate a wide variety of materials and sample sizes. One of the most exciting new developments reported here resulted from a pursuit of faster reconstruction techniques. A Fast Filtered Back Transform (FFBT) reconstruction program has been developed and implemented, that is based on a refinement of the ''gridding'' algorithm first developed for use with radio astronomical data. This program has reduced the reconstruction time to 8.5 sec for a 929 x 929 pixel{sup 2} slice on an R10,000 CPU, more than 8x reduction compared with the Filtered Back-Projection method.

  3. Advances in x-ray computed microtomography at the NSLS

    SciTech Connect

    Dowd, B.A.; Andrews, A.B.; Marr, R.B.; Siddons, D.P.; Jones, K.W.; Peskin, A.M.

    1998-08-01

    The X-Ray Computed Microtomography workstation at beamline X27A at the NSLS has been utilized by scientists from a broad range of disciplines from industrial materials processing to environmental science. The most recent applications are presented here as well as a description of the facility that has evolved to accommodate a wide variety of materials and sample sizes. One of the most exciting new developments reported here resulted from a pursuit of faster reconstruction techniques. A Fast Filtered Back Transform (FFBT) reconstruction program has been developed and implemented, that is based on a refinement of the gridding algorithm first developed for use with radio astronomical data. This program has reduced the reconstruction time to 8.5 sec for a 929 x 929 pixel{sup 2} slice on an R10,000 CPU, more than 8x reduction compared with the Filtered Back-Projection method.

  4. Experimental and computing strategies in advanced material characterization problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolzon, G.

    2015-10-01

    The mechanical characterization of materials relies more and more often on sophisticated experimental methods that permit to acquire a large amount of data and, contemporarily, to reduce the invasiveness of the tests. This evolution accompanies the growing demand of non-destructive diagnostic tools that assess the safety level of components in use in structures and infrastructures, for instance in the strategic energy sector. Advanced material systems and properties that are not amenable to traditional techniques, for instance thin layered structures and their adhesion on the relevant substrates, can be also characterized by means of combined experimental-numerical tools elaborating data acquired by full-field measurement techniques. In this context, parameter identification procedures involve the repeated simulation of the laboratory or in situ tests by sophisticated and usually expensive non-linear analyses while, in some situation, reliable and accurate results would be required in real time. The effectiveness and the filtering capabilities of reduced models based on decomposition and interpolation techniques can be profitably used to meet these conflicting requirements. This communication intends to summarize some results recently achieved in this field by the author and her co-workers. The aim is to foster further interaction between engineering and mathematical communities.

  5. Experimental and computing strategies in advanced material characterization problems

    SciTech Connect

    Bolzon, G.

    2015-10-28

    The mechanical characterization of materials relies more and more often on sophisticated experimental methods that permit to acquire a large amount of data and, contemporarily, to reduce the invasiveness of the tests. This evolution accompanies the growing demand of non-destructive diagnostic tools that assess the safety level of components in use in structures and infrastructures, for instance in the strategic energy sector. Advanced material systems and properties that are not amenable to traditional techniques, for instance thin layered structures and their adhesion on the relevant substrates, can be also characterized by means of combined experimental-numerical tools elaborating data acquired by full-field measurement techniques. In this context, parameter identification procedures involve the repeated simulation of the laboratory or in situ tests by sophisticated and usually expensive non-linear analyses while, in some situation, reliable and accurate results would be required in real time. The effectiveness and the filtering capabilities of reduced models based on decomposition and interpolation techniques can be profitably used to meet these conflicting requirements. This communication intends to summarize some results recently achieved in this field by the author and her co-workers. The aim is to foster further interaction between engineering and mathematical communities.

  6. Scientific Advances with Aspergillus Species that Are Used for Food and Biotech Applications.

    PubMed

    Biesebeke, Rob Te; Record, Erik

    2008-01-01

    Yeast and filamentous fungi have been used for centuries in diverse biotechnological processes. Fungal fermentation technology is traditionally used in relation to food production, such as for bread, beer, cheese, sake and soy sauce. Last century, the industrial application of yeast and filamentous fungi expanded rapidly, with excellent examples such as purified enzymes and secondary metabolites (e.g. antibiotics), which are used in a wide range of food as well as non-food industries. Research on protein and/or metabolite secretion by fungal species has focused on identifying bottlenecks in (post-) transcriptional regulation of protein production, metabolic rerouting, morphology and the transit of proteins through the secretion pathway. In past years, genome sequencing of some fungi (e.g. Aspergillus oryzae, Aspergillus niger) has been completed. The available genome sequences have enabled identification of genes and functionally important regions of the genome. This has directed research to focus on a post-genomics era in which transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics methodologies will help to explore the scientific relevance and industrial application of fungal genome sequences. PMID:21558706

  7. Bulgarian Activities in the Project COSMOS: An Advanced Scientific Repository for Science Teaching and Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchev, D.; Kyurkchieva, D.; Borisov, B.; Radeva, V.

    2010-09-01

    One of the main purposes of the European educational project COSMOS (co-funded by the European Commission under the program eContentplus), is to create an experimental laboratory for the school of tomorrow in order to improve the education in astronomy by expanding the resources for teaching and learning in schools and universities and by providing more challenging and authentic learning experiences for students. A large educational database was created as a result of the project activities made by 15 partner institutions. The unusual electronic "library" offers to students and teachers unique educational resources: learning scenarios, images, presentations, videos and animations (most of them are impossible to produce in any scientific laboratory). It is freely accessible to anyone, anywhere, anytime. Our poster presents the contribution of the Shumen university (the only partner from Bulgaria) in the project: uploading more than 12000 astronomical images in the COSMOS portal; creation of 45 learning scenarios; holding 5 teaching workshops at different places for more than 100 Bulgarian teachers to use the possibilities of the COSMOS portal (including creation of their own learning scenarios). Our analysis of the questionnaires filled-in by the participating teachers shows the necessity of such projects and workshops.

  8. Advancing Scientific Reasoning in Upper Elementary Classrooms: Direct Instruction Versus Task Structuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazonder, Ard W.; Wiskerke-Drost, Sjanou

    2015-02-01

    Several studies found that direct instruction and task structuring can effectively promote children's ability to design unconfounded experiments. The present study examined whether the impact of these interventions extends to other scientific reasoning skills by comparing the inquiry activities of 55 fifth-graders randomly assigned to one of three conditions. Children in the control condition investigated a four-variable inquiry task without additional support. Performance of this task in the direct instruction condition was preceded by a short training in experimental design, whereas children in the task structuring condition, who did not receive the introductory training, were given a version of the task that addressed the four variables one at a time. Analysis of children's experimentation behavior confirmed that direct instruction and task structuring are equally effective and superior to unguided inquiry. Both interventions also evoked more determinate predictions and valid inferences. These findings demonstrate that the effect of short-term interventions designed to promote unconfounded experimentation extends beyond the control of variables.

  9. Recent scientific advances in leiomyoma (uterine fibroids) research facilitates better understanding and management.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Darlene K; Holthouser, Kristine; Segars, James H; Leppert, Phyllis C

    2015-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomas (fibroids) are the most prevalent medical problem of the female reproductive tract, but there are few non-surgical treatment options. Although many advances in the understanding of the molecular components of these tumors have occurred over the past five years, an effective pharmaceutical approach remains elusive. Further, there is currently no clinical method to distinguish a benign uterine leiomyoma from a malignant leiomyosarcoma prior to treatment, a pressing need given concerns about the use of the power morcellator for minimally invasive surgery. This paper reviews current studies regarding the molecular biology of uterine fibroids, discusses non-surgical approaches and suggests new cutting-edge therapeutic and diagnostic approaches. PMID:26236472

  10. Recent scientific advances in leiomyoma (uterine fibroids) research facilitates better understanding and management

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Darlene K.; Holthouser, Kristine; Segars, James H.; Leppert, Phyllis C.

    2015-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomas (fibroids) are the most prevalent medical problem of the female reproductive tract, but there are few non-surgical treatment options. Although many advances in the understanding of the molecular components of these tumors have occurred over the past five years, an effective pharmaceutical approach remains elusive. Further, there is currently no clinical method to distinguish a benign uterine leiomyoma from a malignant leiomyosarcoma prior to treatment, a pressing need given concerns about the use of the power morcellator for minimally invasive surgery. This paper reviews current studies regarding the molecular biology of uterine fibroids, discusses non-surgical approaches and suggests new cutting-edge therapeutic and diagnostic approaches. PMID:26236472

  11. Activities and operations of the Advanced Computing Research Facility, July-October 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    Research activities and operations of the Advanced Computing Research Facility (ACRF) at Argonne National Laboratory are discussed for the period from July 1986 through October 1986. The facility is currently supported by the Department of Energy, and is operated by the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne. Over the past four-month period, a new commercial multiprocessor, the Intel iPSC-VX/d4 hypercube was installed. In addition, four other commercial multiprocessors continue to be available for research - an Encore Multimax, a Sequent Balance 21000, an Alliant FX/8, and an Intel iPSC/d5 - as well as a locally designed multiprocessor, the Lemur. These machines are being actively used by scientists at Argonne and throughout the nation in a wide variety of projects concerning computer systems with parallel and vector architectures. A variety of classes, workshops, and seminars have been sponsored to train researchers on computing techniques for the advanced computer systems at the Advanced Computing Research Facility. For example, courses were offered on writing programs for parallel computer systems and hosted the first annual Alliant users group meeting. A Sequent users group meeting and a two-day workshop on performance evaluation of parallel computers and programs are being organized.

  12. Protecting food safety: more needs to be done to keep pace with scientific advances and the changing food supply.

    PubMed

    Olson, Erik D

    2011-05-01

    Foodborne illness and the health risks from chemicals in food are a concern. However, food safety statutes largely unchanged for more than forty years are failing to keep pace with scientific advances and the changing food supply. The FDA Food Safety Modernization Act, enacted in January 2011, is intended to help reduce foodborne illness by establishing new prevention measures for food regulated by the Food and Drug Administration. Additional funding is needed so that the agency has enough resources to help realize the law's potential. Furthermore, key food safety issues untouched by the 2011 statute, including restrictions on antibiotic use in animal agriculture, laws governing meat and poultry safety, and requirements governing the use of chemicals in food, should be reviewed and updated as necessary-using up-to-date science-to tighten the focus on preventing disease. PMID:21555475

  13. The Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - Site Status Update

    SciTech Connect

    Epperly, T W

    2008-12-03

    This report summarizes LLNL's progress for the period April through September of 2008 for the Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) SciDAC. The TASCS project is organized into four major thrust areas: CCA Environment (72%), Component Technology Initiatives (16%), CCA Toolkit (8%), and User and Application Outreach & Support (4%). The percentage of LLNL's effort allocation is shown in parenthesis for each thrust area. Major thrust areas are further broken down into activity areas, LLNL's effort directed to each activity is shown in Figure 1. Enhancements, Core Tools, and Usability are all part of CCA Environment, and Software Quality is part of Component Technology Initiatives. The balance of this report will cover our accomplishments in each of these activity areas.

  14. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2000-11-01

    In the first year of the project, solid-fluid mixture flows in ducts and passages at different angle of orientations were analyzed. The model predictions are compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found. Progress was also made in analyzing the gravity chute flows of solid-liquid mixtures. An Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for analyzing three-phase slurry flows in a bubble column is being developed. The approach uses an Eulerian analysis of gas liquid flows in the bubble column, and makes use of the Lagrangian particle tracking procedure to analyze the particle motions. Progress was also made in developing a rate dependent thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase slurry flows in a state of turbulent motion. The new model includes the effect of phasic interactions and leads to anisotropic effective phasic stress tensors. Progress was also made in measuring concentration and velocity of particles of different sizes near a wall in a duct flow. The formulation of a thermodynamically consistent model for chemically active multiphase solid-fluid flows in a turbulent state of motion was also initiated. The general objective of this project is to provide the needed fundamental understanding of three-phase slurry reactors in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquid fuel synthesis. The other main goal is to develop a computational capability for predicting the transport and processing of three-phase coal slurries. The specific objectives are: (1) To develop a thermodynamically consistent rate-dependent anisotropic model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction for application to coal liquefaction. Also to establish the material parameters of the model. (2) To provide experimental data for phasic fluctuation and mean velocities, as well as the solid volume fraction in the shear flow devices. (3) To develop an accurate computational capability incorporating the new rate-dependent and anisotropic model for analyzing reacting and

  15. Advanced Computer Simulations Of Nanomaterials And Stochastic Biological Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakova, Maria S.

    This dissertation consists of several parts. The first two chapters are devoted to of study of dynamic processes in cellular organelles called filopodia. A stochastic kinetics approach is used to describe non-equilibrium evolution of the filopodial system from nano- to micro scales. Dynamic coupling between chemistry and mechanics is also taken into account in order to investigate the influence of focal adhesions on cell motility. The second chapter explores the possibilities and effects of motor enhanced delivery of actin monomers to the polymerizing tips of filopodia, and how the steady-state filopodial length can exceed the limit set by pure diffusion. Finally, we also challenge the currently existing view of active transport and propose a new theoretical model that accurately describes the motor dynamics and concentration profiles seen in experiments in a physically meaningful way. The third chapter is a result of collaboration between three laboratories, as a part of Energy Frontier Research Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The work presented here unified the fields of synthetic chemistry, photochemistry, and computational physical chemistry in order to investigate a novel bio-synthetic compound and its energy transfer capabilities. This particular peptide-based design has never been studied via Molecular Dynamics with high precision, and it is the first attempt known to us to simulate the whole chromophore-peptide complex in solution in order to gain detailed information about its structural and dynamic features. The fourth chapter deals with the non-equilibrium relaxation induced transport of water molecules in a microemulsion. This problem required a different set of methodologies and a more detailed, all-atomistic treatment of the system. We found interesting water clustering effects and elucidated the most probable mechanism of water transfer through oil under the condition of saturated Langmuir monolayers. Together these

  16. The National Center for Biomedical Ontology: Advancing Biomedicinethrough Structured Organization of Scientific Knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Daniel L.; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Mungall, Chris J.; Misra,Sima; Westerfield, Monte; Ashburner, Michael; Sim, Ida; Chute,Christopher G.; Solbrig, Harold; Storey, Margaret-Anne; Smith, Barry; Day-Richter, John; Noy, Natalya F.; Musen, Mark A.

    2006-01-23

    The National Center for Biomedical Ontology (http://bioontology.org) is a consortium that comprises leading informaticians, biologists, clinicians, and ontologists funded by the NIH Roadmap to develop innovative technology and methods that allow scientists to record, manage, and disseminate biomedical information and knowledge in machine-processable form. The goals of the Center are: (1) to help unify the divergent and isolated efforts in ontology development by promoting high quality open-source, standards-based tools to create, manage, and use ontologies, (2) to create new software tools so that scientists can use ontologies to annotate and analyze biomedical data, (3) to provide a national resource for the ongoing evaluation, integration, and evolution of biomedical ontologies and associated tools and theories in the context of driving biomedical projects (DBPs), and (4) to disseminate the tools and resources of the Center and to identify, evaluate, and communicate best practices of ontology development to the biomedical community. The Center is working toward these objectives by providing tools to develop ontologies and to annotate experimental data, and by developing resources to integrate and relate existing ontologies as well as by creating repositories of biomedical data that are annotated using those ontologies. The Center is providing training workshops in ontology design, development, and usage, and is also pursuing research in ontology evaluation, quality, and use of ontologies to promote scientific discovery. Through the research activities within the Center, collaborations with the DBPs, and interactions with the biomedical community, our goal is to help scientists to work more effectively in the e-science paradigm, enhancing experiment design, experiment execution, data analysis, information synthesis, hypothesis generation and testing, and understand human disease.

  17. CART V: recent advancements in computer-aided camouflage assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Thomas; Müller, Markus

    2011-05-01

    In order to facilitate systematic, computer aided improvements of camouflage and concealment assessment methods, the software system CART (Camouflage Assessment in Real-Time) was built up for the camouflage assessment of objects in multispectral image sequences (see contributions to SPIE 2007-2010 [1], [2], [3], [4]). It comprises a semi-automatic marking of target objects (ground truth generation) including their propagation over the image sequence and the evaluation via user-defined feature extractors as well as methods to assess the object's movement conspicuity. In this fifth part in an annual series at the SPIE conference in Orlando, this paper presents the enhancements over the recent year and addresses the camouflage assessment of static and moving objects in multispectral image data that can show noise or image artefacts. The presented methods fathom the correlations between image processing and camouflage assessment. A novel algorithm is presented based on template matching to assess the structural inconspicuity of an object objectively and quantitatively. The results can easily be combined with an MTI (moving target indication) based movement conspicuity assessment function in order to explore the influence of object movement to a camouflage effect in different environments. As the results show, the presented methods contribute to a significant benefit in the field of camouflage assessment.

  18. Block sparse Cholesky algorithms on advanced uniprocessor computers

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, E.G.; Peyton, B.W.

    1991-12-01

    As with many other linear algebra algorithms, devising a portable implementation of sparse Cholesky factorization that performs well on the broad range of computer architectures currently available is a formidable challenge. Even after limiting our attention to machines with only one processor, as we have done in this report, there are still several interesting issues to consider. For dense matrices, it is well known that block factorization algorithms are the best means of achieving this goal. We take this approach for sparse factorization as well. This paper has two primary goals. First, we examine two sparse Cholesky factorization algorithms, the multifrontal method and a blocked left-looking sparse Cholesky method, in a systematic and consistent fashion, both to illustrate the strengths of the blocking techniques in general and to obtain a fair evaluation of the two approaches. Second, we assess the impact of various implementation techniques on time and storage efficiency, paying particularly close attention to the work-storage requirement of the two methods and their variants.

  19. An audio- and speech-based interface for computer-controlled scientific instruments.

    PubMed

    Loyd, D B; Phalangas, A C; Barner, K E

    1999-06-01

    Laboratory instruments are intrinsic to research and work in a wide array of scientific fields. They are used for the control of devices, data storage, and data analysis. The control of instruments is increasingly changing from independent on-instrument controls to multiple instrument integrate software control. Unfortunately, the graphical representation of controls and data makes it difficult for an individual with a visual impairment to independently operate laboratory instruments. Alternative interfaces have been previously developed for these individuals but have often proved limited in scope and accuracy, or otherwise expensive. The resulting inaccessibility to affordable and accurate scientific instrumentation, unfortunately, discourages many individuals with a visual impairment from entering scientific fields of research or work. This paper introduces an alternative interface method developed for LabVIEW, National Instruments' instrumentation software package. The method is specifically designed for individuals with visual impairments, and uses alternative navigation techniques as well as audio feedback. The developed user interface uses simple keyboard inputs to traverse through a hierarchical tree-based menu system. Speech and audio tones are used to alert the user to system settings and errors, as well as a help mechanism and data analysis tool. At this time, alternative interfaces have been developed for the following basic laboratory instruments: an oscilloscope and function/arbitrary waveform generator. The interface methodology, however, can be extended to include any scientific instrument that can be controlled by LabVIEW. PMID:10391595

  20. Scientific Inquiry, Digital Literacy, and Mobile Computing in Informal Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marty, Paul F.; Alemanne, Nicole D.; Mendenhall, Anne; Maurya, Manisha; Southerland, Sherry A.; Sampson, Victor; Douglas, Ian; Kazmer, Michelle M.; Clark, Amanda; Schellinger, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the connections between scientific inquiry and digital literacy in informal learning environments is essential to furthering students' critical thinking and technology skills. The Habitat Tracker project combines a standards-based curriculum focused on the nature of science with an integrated system of online and mobile…

  1. Computer Series, 52: Scientific Exploration with a Microcomputer: Simulations for Nonscientists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whisnant, David M.

    1984-01-01

    Describes two simulations, written for Apple II microcomputers, focusing on scientific methodology. The first is based on the tendency of colloidal iron in high concentrations to stick to fish gills and cause breathing difficulties. The second, modeled after the dioxin controversy, examines a hypothetical chemical thought to cause cancer. (JN)

  2. Proceedings: Workshop on advanced mathematics and computer science for power systems analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Esselman, W.H.; Iveson, R.H. )

    1991-08-01

    The Mathematics and Computer Workshop on Power System Analysis was held February 21--22, 1989, in Palo Alto, California. The workshop was the first in a series sponsored by EPRI's Office of Exploratory Research as part of its effort to develop ways in which recent advances in mathematics and computer science can be applied to the problems of the electric utility industry. The purpose of this workshop was to identify research objectives in the field of advanced computational algorithms needed for the application of advanced parallel processing architecture to problems of power system control and operation. Approximately 35 participants heard six presentations on power flow problems, transient stability, power system control, electromagnetic transients, user-machine interfaces, and database management. In the discussions that followed, participants identified five areas warranting further investigation: system load flow analysis, transient power and voltage analysis, structural instability and bifurcation, control systems design, and proximity to instability. 63 refs.

  3. Computational thinking and thinking about computing

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Jeannette M.

    2008-01-01

    Computational thinking will influence everyone in every field of endeavour. This vision poses a new educational challenge for our society, especially for our children. In thinking about computing, we need to be attuned to the three drivers of our field: science, technology and society. Accelerating technological advances and monumental societal demands force us to revisit the most basic scientific questions of computing. PMID:18672462

  4. The Harvard case of Xu Xiping: exploitation of the people, scientific advance, or genetic theft?

    PubMed

    Sleeboom, Margaret

    2005-04-01

    A unique history and make-up of a population may make it an attractive research target for population geneticists and pharmaco-genomic investors. The promise of pharmaceutical profits and advances in medical knowledge attracted Harvard researchers and the company Millennium Pharmaceuticals to remote areas in Anhui Province, Central China, leading to international diplomatic disagreements about issues such as the ownership of genetic material and informed consent (IC). This article discusses the role of genomics and genetic sampling in China, the way it is related to population policies (the new eugenics), the national importance of genetic materials and the conflicts it led to between the Chinese government and Harvard University. Here many consider the Xu Xiping case as textbook example of ruthless Western exploitation of development countries, illustrating the cold rationality of science in the process of globalisation. Ten perspectives on this case show that this view is simplistic and contributes little to an understanding of bioethical issues important to the population actually donating the samples. Viewing the Xu Xiping case as the nexus of the intertwinement of international, transnational, national, and local interest groups shows how different interest groups make use of different units of analysis. It also clarifies why the same practice of genetic sampling continues under a different regime, and why the discussion about genetic sampling has shifted from a concern with health care of the poor to an issue of international exploitation, terrorism and development. PMID:16552917

  5. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2004-10-01

    In this project, an Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for analyzing three-phase slurry flows in a bubble column was developed. The approach used an Eulerian analysis of liquid flows in the bubble column, and made use of the Lagrangian trajectory analysis for the bubbles and particle motions. The bubble-bubble and particle-particle collisions are included the model. The model predictions are compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found An experimental setup for studying two-dimensional bubble columns was developed. The multiphase flow conditions in the bubble column were measured using optical image processing and Particle Image Velocimetry techniques (PIV). A simple shear flow device for bubble motion in a constant shear flow field was also developed. The flow conditions in simple shear flow device were studied using PIV method. Concentration and velocity of particles of different sizes near a wall in a duct flow was also measured. The technique of Phase-Doppler anemometry was used in these studies. An Eulerian volume of fluid (VOF) computational model for the flow condition in the two-dimensional bubble column was also developed. The liquid and bubble motions were analyzed and the results were compared with observed flow patterns in the experimental setup. Solid-fluid mixture flows in ducts and passages at different angle of orientations were also analyzed. The model predictions were compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found. Gravity chute flows of solid-liquid mixtures were also studied. The simulation results were compared with the experimental data and discussed A thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction in a state of turbulent motion was developed. The balance laws were obtained and the constitutive laws established.

  6. Automatic differentiation of C++ codes for large-scale scientific computing.

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, David M.; Bartlett, Roscoe A; Phipps, Eric Todd

    2006-02-01

    We discuss computing first derivatives for models based on elements, such as large-scale finite-element PDE discretizations, implemented in the C++ programming language.We use a hybrid technique of automatic differentiation (AD) and manual assembly, with local element-level derivatives computed via AD and manually summed into the global derivative. C++ templating and operator overloading work well for both forward- and reverse-mode derivative computations. We found that AD derivative computations compared favorably in time to finite differencing for a scalable finite-element discretization of a convection-diffusion problem in two dimensions.

  7. WAATS: A computer program for Weights Analysis of Advanced Transportation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glatt, C. R.

    1974-01-01

    A historical weight estimating technique for advanced transportation systems is presented. The classical approach to weight estimation is discussed and sufficient data is presented to estimate weights for a large spectrum of flight vehicles including horizontal and vertical takeoff aircraft, boosters and reentry vehicles. A computer program, WAATS (Weights Analysis for Advanced Transportation Systems) embracing the techniques discussed has been written and user instructions are presented. The program was developed for use in the ODIN (Optimal Design Integration System) system.

  8. ADVANCED METHODS FOR THE COMPUTATION OF PARTICLE BEAM TRANSPORT AND THE COMPUTATION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS AND MULTIPARTICLE PHENOMENA

    SciTech Connect

    Alex J. Dragt

    2012-08-31

    Since 1980, under the grant DEFG02-96ER40949, the Department of Energy has supported the educational and research work of the University of Maryland Dynamical Systems and Accelerator Theory (DSAT) Group. The primary focus of this educational/research group has been on the computation and analysis of charged-particle beam transport using Lie algebraic methods, and on advanced methods for the computation of electromagnetic fields and multiparticle phenomena. This Final Report summarizes the accomplishments of the DSAT Group from its inception in 1980 through its end in 2011.

  9. Advanced entry guidance algorithm with landing footprint computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavitt, James Aaron

    -determined angle of attack profile. The method is also capable of producing orbital footprints using an automatically-generated set of angle of attack profiles of varying range, with the lowest profile designed for near-maximum range in the absence of an active heat load constraint. The accuracy of the footprint method is demonstrated by direct comparison with footprints computed independently by an optimization program.

  10. Teaching Advance Care Planning to Medical Students with a Computer-Based Decision Aid

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Benjamin H.

    2013-01-01

    Discussing end-of-life decisions with cancer patients is a crucial skill for physicians. This article reports findings from a pilot study evaluating the effectiveness of a computer-based decision aid for teaching medical students about advance care planning. Second-year medical students at a single medical school were randomized to use a standard advance directive or a computer-based decision aid to help patients with advance care planning. Students' knowledge, skills, and satisfaction were measured by self-report; their performance was rated by patients. 121/133 (91%) of students participated. The Decision-Aid Group (n=60) outperformed the Standard Group (n=61) in terms of students´ knowledge (p<0.01), confidence in helping patients with advance care planning (p<0.01), knowledge of what matters to patients (p=0.05), and satisfaction with their learning experience (p<0.01). Likewise, patients in the Decision Aid Group were more satisfied with the advance care planning method (p<0.01) and with several aspects of student performance. Use of a computer-based decision aid may be an effective way to teach medical students how to discuss advance care planning with cancer patients. PMID:20632222

  11. Computer sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Paul H.

    1988-01-01

    The Computer Science Program provides advanced concepts, techniques, system architectures, algorithms, and software for both space and aeronautics information sciences and computer systems. The overall goal is to provide the technical foundation within NASA for the advancement of computing technology in aerospace applications. The research program is improving the state of knowledge of fundamental aerospace computing principles and advancing computing technology in space applications such as software engineering and information extraction from data collected by scientific instruments in space. The program includes the development of special algorithms and techniques to exploit the computing power provided by high performance parallel processors and special purpose architectures. Research is being conducted in the fundamentals of data base logic and improvement techniques for producing reliable computing systems.

  12. The Representation of Anatomical Structures through Computer Animation for Scientific, Educational and Artistic Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stredney, Donald Larry

    An overview of computer animation and the techniques involved in its creation is provided in the introduction to this masters thesis, which focuses on the problems encountered by students in learning the forms and functions of complex anatomical structures and ways in which computer animation can address these problems. The objectives for,…

  13. Creating science-driven computer architecture: A new path to scientific leadership

    SciTech Connect

    McCurdy, C. William; Stevens, Rick; Simon, Horst; Kramer, William; Bailey, David; Johnston, William; Catlett, Charlie; Lusk, Rusty; Morgan, Thomas; Meza, Juan; Banda, Michael; Leighton, James; Hules, John

    2002-10-14

    This document proposes a multi-site strategy for creating a new class of computing capability for the U.S. by undertaking the research and development necessary to build supercomputers optimized for science in partnership with the American computer industry.

  14. The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Enabling Computational Technologies FY09 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Diachin, L F; Garaizar, F X; Henson, V E; Pope, G

    2009-10-12

    In this document we report on the status of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Enabling Computational Technologies (ECT) effort. In particular, we provide the context for ECT In the broader NEAMS program and describe the three pillars of the ECT effort, namely, (1) tools and libraries, (2) software quality assurance, and (3) computational facility (computers, storage, etc) needs. We report on our FY09 deliverables to determine the needs of the integrated performance and safety codes (IPSCs) in these three areas and lay out the general plan for software quality assurance to meet the requirements of DOE and the DOE Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). We conclude with a brief description of our interactions with the Idaho National Laboratory computer center to determine what is needed to expand their role as a NEAMS user facility.

  15. Advanced Communication and Control for Distributed Energy Resource Integration: Phase 2 Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect

    BPL Global

    2008-09-30

    The objective of this research project is to demonstrate sensing, communication, information and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of multivendor distributed energy resource (DER) units at aggregation levels that meet individual user requirements for facility operations (residential, commercial, industrial, manufacturing, etc.) and further serve as resource options for electric and natural gas utilities. The fully demonstrated DER aggregation system with embodiment of communication and control technologies will lead to real-time, interactive, customer-managed service networks to achieve greater customer value. Work on this Advanced Communication and Control Project (ACCP) consists of a two-phase approach for an integrated demonstration of communication and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of DER units to reach progressive levels of aggregated power output. Phase I involved design and proof-of-design, and Phase II involves real-world demonstration of the Phase I design architecture. The scope of work for Phase II of this ACCP involves demonstrating the Phase I design architecture in large scale real-world settings while integrating with the operations of one or more electricity supplier feeder lines. The communication and control architectures for integrated demonstration shall encompass combinations of software and hardware components, including: sensors, data acquisition and communication systems, remote monitoring systems, metering (interval revenue, real-time), local and wide area networks, Web-based systems, smart controls, energy management/information systems with control and automation of building energy loads, and demand-response management with integration of real-time market pricing. For Phase II, BPL Global shall demonstrate the Phase I design for integrating and controlling the operation of more than 10 DER units, dispersed at various locations in one or more Independent System Operator (ISO) Control Areas, at

  16. Multithreaded transactions in scientific computing: New versions of a computer program for kinematical calculations of RHEED intensity oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzuszek, Marcin; Daniluk, Andrzej

    2006-11-01

    Writing a concurrent program can be more difficult than writing a sequential program. Programmer needs to think about synchronisation, race conditions and shared variables. Transactions help reduce the inconvenience of using threads. A transaction is an abstraction, which allows programmers to group a sequence of actions on the program into a logical, higher-level computation unit. This paper presents multithreaded versions of the GROWTH program, which allow to calculate the layer coverages during the growth of thin epitaxial films and the corresponding RHEED intensities according to the kinematical approximation. The presented programs also contain graphical user interfaces, which enable displaying program data at run-time. New version program summaryTitles of programs:GROWTHGr, GROWTH06 Catalogue identifier:ADVL_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVL_v2_0 Program obtainable from:CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Catalogue identifier of previous version:ADVL Does the new version supersede the original program:No Computer for which the new version is designed and others on which it has been tested: Pentium-based PC Operating systems or monitors under which the new version has been tested: Windows 9x, XP, NT Programming language used:Object Pascal Memory required to execute with typical data:More than 1 MB Number of bits in a word:64 bits Number of processors used:1 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:20 931 Number of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 311 268 Distribution format:tar.gz Nature of physical problem: The programs compute the RHEED intensities during the growth of thin epitaxial structures prepared using the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The computations are based on the use of kinematical diffraction theory [P.I. Cohen, G.S. Petrich, P.R. Pukite, G.J. Whaley, A.S. Arrott, Surf. Sci. 216 (1989) 222. [1

  17. Projected role of advanced computational aerodynamic methods at the Lockheed-Georgia company

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lores, M. E.

    1978-01-01

    Experience with advanced computational methods being used at the Lockheed-Georgia Company to aid in the evaluation and design of new and modified aircraft indicates that large and specialized computers will be needed to make advanced three-dimensional viscous aerodynamic computations practical. The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility should be used to provide a tool for designing better aerospace vehicles while at the same time reducing development costs by performing computations using Navier-Stokes equations solution algorithms and permitting less sophisticated but nevertheless complex calculations to be made efficiently. Configuration definition procedures and data output formats can probably best be defined in cooperation with industry, therefore, the computer should handle many remote terminals efficiently. The capability of transferring data to and from other computers needs to be provided. Because of the significant amount of input and output associated with 3-D viscous flow calculations and because of the exceedingly fast computation speed envisioned for the computer, special attention should be paid to providing rapid, diversified, and efficient input and output.

  18. Impact of computer advances on future finite elements computations. [for aircraft and spacecraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, Robert E.

    1985-01-01

    Research performed over the past 10 years in engineering data base management and parallel computing is discussed, and certain opportunities for research toward the next generation of structural analysis capability are proposed. Particular attention is given to data base management associated with the IPAD project and parallel processing associated with the Finite Element Machine project, both sponsored by NASA, and a near term strategy for a distributed structural analysis capability based on relational data base management software and parallel computers for a future structural analysis system.

  19. Research in Computational Aeroscience Applications Implemented on Advanced Parallel Computing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wigton, Larry

    1996-01-01

    Improving the numerical linear algebra routines for use in new Navier-Stokes codes, specifically Tim Barth's unstructured grid code, with spin-offs to TRANAIR is reported. A fast distance calculation routine for Navier-Stokes codes using the new one-equation turbulence models is written. The primary focus of this work was devoted to improving matrix-iterative methods. New algorithms have been developed which activate the full potential of classical Cray-class computers as well as distributed-memory parallel computers.

  20. High performance computing and communications: Advancing the frontiers of information technology

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    This report, which supplements the President`s Fiscal Year 1997 Budget, describes the interagency High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program. The HPCC Program will celebrate its fifth anniversary in October 1996 with an impressive array of accomplishments to its credit. Over its five-year history, the HPCC Program has focused on developing high performance computing and communications technologies that can be applied to computation-intensive applications. Major highlights for FY 1996: (1) High performance computing systems enable practical solutions to complex problems with accuracies not possible five years ago; (2) HPCC-funded research in very large scale networking techniques has been instrumental in the evolution of the Internet, which continues exponential growth in size, speed, and availability of information; (3) The combination of hardware capability measured in gigaflop/s, networking technology measured in gigabit/s, and new computational science techniques for modeling phenomena has demonstrated that very large scale accurate scientific calculations can be executed across heterogeneous parallel processing systems located thousands of miles apart; (4) Federal investments in HPCC software R and D support researchers who pioneered the development of parallel languages and compilers, high performance mathematical, engineering, and scientific libraries, and software tools--technologies that allow scientists to use powerful parallel systems to focus on Federal agency mission applications; and (5) HPCC support for virtual environments has enabled the development of immersive technologies, where researchers can explore and manipulate multi-dimensional scientific and engineering problems. Educational programs fostered by the HPCC Program have brought into classrooms new science and engineering curricula designed to teach computational science. This document contains a small sample of the significant HPCC Program accomplishments in FY 1996.

  1. PARTNERING WITH DOE TO APPLY ADVANCED BIOLOGICAL, ENVIRONMENTAL, AND COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE TO ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    On February 18, 2004, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Department of Energy signed a Memorandum of Understanding to expand the research collaboration of both agencies to advance biological, environmental, and computational sciences for protecting human health and the ...

  2. Advanced Telecommunications and Computer Technologies in Georgia Public Elementary School Library Media Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Jackie L.

    The purpose of this study was to determine what recent progress had been made in Georgia public elementary school library media centers regarding access to advanced telecommunications and computer technologies as a result of special funding. A questionnaire addressed the following areas: automation and networking of the school library media center…

  3. COMPUTATIONAL TOXICOLOGY ADVANCES: EMERGING CAPABILITIES FOR DATA EXPLORATION AND SAR MODEL DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational Toxicology Advances: Emerging capabilities for data exploration and SAR model development
    Ann M. Richard and ClarLynda R. Williams, National Health & Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA; email: richard.ann@epa.gov

  4. Computers-for-edu: An Advanced Business Application Programming (ABAP) Teaching Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, Todd A.

    2007-01-01

    The "Computers-for-edu" case is designed to provide students with hands-on exposure to creating Advanced Business Application Programming (ABAP) reports and dialogue programs, as well as navigating various mySAP Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) transactions needed by ABAP developers. The case requires students to apply a wide variety of ABAP…

  5. A First Attempt to Bring Computational Biology into Advanced High School Biology Classrooms

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Suzanne Renick; Coon, William; Donley, Kristin; Scott, Abby; Goldberg, Debra S.

    2011-01-01

    Computer science has become ubiquitous in many areas of biological research, yet most high school and even college students are unaware of this. As a result, many college biology majors graduate without adequate computational skills for contemporary fields of biology. The absence of a computational element in secondary school biology classrooms is of growing concern to the computational biology community and biology teachers who would like to acquaint their students with updated approaches in the discipline. We present a first attempt to correct this absence by introducing a computational biology element to teach genetic evolution into advanced biology classes in two local high schools. Our primary goal was to show students how computation is used in biology and why a basic understanding of computation is necessary for research in many fields of biology. This curriculum is intended to be taught by a computational biologist who has worked with a high school advanced biology teacher to adapt the unit for his/her classroom, but a motivated high school teacher comfortable with mathematics and computing may be able to teach this alone. In this paper, we present our curriculum, which takes into consideration the constraints of the required curriculum, and discuss our experiences teaching it. We describe the successes and challenges we encountered while bringing this unit to high school students, discuss how we addressed these challenges, and make suggestions for future versions of this curriculum.We believe that our curriculum can be a valuable seed for further development of computational activities aimed at high school biology students. Further, our experiences may be of value to others teaching computational biology at this level. Our curriculum can be obtained at http://ecsite.cs.colorado.edu/?page_id=149#biology or by contacting the authors. PMID:22046118

  6. Teaching scientific principles through a computer-based, design-centered learning environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Michael Brian

    Research on science instruction indicates that the traditional science classroom is not always effective in improving students' scientific understanding. Physics courses, in particular, do not promote the ability to apply scientific principles for many reasons, based on their focus on procedural problem-solving and lab exercises. In this dissertation, I propose the Designing-to-Learn Architecture (DTLA), a design-centered goal-based scenario (GBS) architecture, theoretically grounded in the literature on design-centered learning environments, goal-based scenarios, intelligent tutoring systems and simulations. The DTLA offers an alternative approach to addressing the issues encountered in the traditional science classroom. The architecture consists of an artifact with associated design goals; components with component options; a simulation; a reference database; and guided tutorials. I describe the design of Goin' Up?, the prototype DTL application, serving as the basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the DTLA. I present results of interview and testing protocols from the formative evaluation of Goin' Up?, suggesting that learning outcomes, though not statistically significant, could be improved through DTLA enhancements informed by usage patterns in software sessions. I conclude with an analysis of the results and suggestions for improvements to the DTLA, including additional components to address reflection, provide support for novice designers, and offer tutorial guidance on the analysis of the artifact.

  7. FY05-FY06 Advanced Simulation and Computing Implementation Plan, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, A L

    2004-07-19

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program will require the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapon design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile life extension programs and the resolution of significant finding investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced system of technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions.

  8. The Impact of Misspelled Words on Automated Computer Scoring: A Case Study of Scientific Explanations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Minsu; Nehm, Ross H.

    2016-06-01

    Automated computerized scoring systems (ACSSs) are being increasingly used to analyze text in many educational settings. Nevertheless, the impact of misspelled words (MSW) on scoring accuracy remains to be investigated in many domains, particularly jargon-rich disciplines such as the life sciences. Empirical studies confirm that MSW are a pervasive feature of human-generated text and that despite improvements, spell-check and auto-replace programs continue to be characterized by significant errors. Our study explored four research questions relating to MSW and text-based computer assessments: (1) Do English language learners (ELLs) produce equivalent magnitudes and types of spelling errors as non-ELLs? (2) To what degree do MSW impact concept-specific computer scoring rules? (3) What impact do MSW have on computer scoring accuracy? and (4) Are MSW more likely to impact false-positive or false-negative feedback to students? We found that although ELLs produced twice as many MSW as non-ELLs, MSW were relatively uncommon in our corpora. The MSW in the corpora were found to be important features of the computer scoring models. Although MSW did not significantly or meaningfully impact computer scoring efficacy across nine different computer scoring models, MSW had a greater impact on the scoring algorithms for naïve ideas than key concepts. Linguistic and concept redundancy in student responses explains the weak connection between MSW and scoring accuracy. Lastly, we found that MSW tend to have a greater impact on false-positive feedback. We discuss the implications of these findings for the development of next-generation science assessments.

  9. The Impact of Misspelled Words on Automated Computer Scoring: A Case Study of Scientific Explanations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Minsu; Nehm, Ross H.

    2016-01-01

    Automated computerized scoring systems (ACSSs) are being increasingly used to analyze text in many educational settings. Nevertheless, the impact of misspelled words (MSW) on scoring accuracy remains to be investigated in many domains, particularly jargon-rich disciplines such as the life sciences. Empirical studies confirm that MSW are a pervasive feature of human-generated text and that despite improvements, spell-check and auto-replace programs continue to be characterized by significant errors. Our study explored four research questions relating to MSW and text-based computer assessments: (1) Do English language learners (ELLs) produce equivalent magnitudes and types of spelling errors as non-ELLs? (2) To what degree do MSW impact concept-specific computer scoring rules? (3) What impact do MSW have on computer scoring accuracy? and (4) Are MSW more likely to impact false-positive or false-negative feedback to students? We found that although ELLs produced twice as many MSW as non-ELLs, MSW were relatively uncommon in our corpora. The MSW in the corpora were found to be important features of the computer scoring models. Although MSW did not significantly or meaningfully impact computer scoring efficacy across nine different computer scoring models, MSW had a greater impact on the scoring algorithms for naïve ideas than key concepts. Linguistic and concept redundancy in student responses explains the weak connection between MSW and scoring accuracy. Lastly, we found that MSW tend to have a greater impact on false-positive feedback. We discuss the implications of these findings for the development of next-generation science assessments.

  10. A Queue Simulation Tool for a High Performance Scientific Computing Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spear, Carrie; McGalliard, James

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Center for Computational Sciences (NCCS) at the Goddard Space Flight Center provides high performance highly parallel processors, mass storage, and supporting infrastructure to a community of computational Earth and space scientists. Long running (days) and highly parallel (hundreds of CPUs) jobs are common in the workload. NCCS management structures batch queues and allocates resources to optimize system use and prioritize workloads. NCCS technical staff use a locally developed discrete event simulation tool to model the impacts of evolving workloads, potential system upgrades, alternative queue structures and resource allocation policies.

  11. IMPLEMENTING SCIENTIFIC SIMULATION CODES HIGHLY TAILORED FOR VECTOR ARCHITECTURES USING CUSTOM CONFIGURABLE COMPUTING MACHINES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutishauser, David K.

    2006-01-01

    The motivation for this work comes from an observation that amidst the push for Massively Parallel (MP) solutions to high-end computing problems such as numerical physical simulations, large amounts of legacy code exist that are highly optimized for vector supercomputers. Because re-hosting legacy code often requires a complete re-write of the original code, which can be a very long and expensive effort, this work examines the potential to exploit reconfigurable computing machines in place of a vector supercomputer to implement an essentially unmodified legacy source code. Custom and reconfigurable computing resources could be used to emulate an original application's target platform to the extent required to achieve high performance. To arrive at an architecture that delivers the desired performance subject to limited resources involves solving a multi-variable optimization problem with constraints. Prior research in the area of reconfigurable computing has demonstrated that designing an optimum hardware implementation of a given application under hardware resource constraints is an NP-complete problem. The premise of the approach is that the general issue of applying reconfigurable computing resources to the implementation of an application, maximizing the performance of the computation subject to physical resource constraints, can be made a tractable problem by assuming a computational paradigm, such as vector processing. This research contributes a formulation of the problem and a methodology to design a reconfigurable vector processing implementation of a given application that satisfies a performance metric. A generic, parametric, architectural framework for vector processing implemented in reconfigurable logic is developed as a target for a scheduling/mapping algorithm that maps an input computation to a given instance of the architecture. This algorithm is integrated with an optimization framework to arrive at a specification of the architecture parameters

  12. Distributed management of scientific projects - An analysis of two computer-conferencing experiments at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallee, J.; Gibbs, B.

    1976-01-01

    Between August 1975 and March 1976, two NASA projects with geographically separated participants used a computer-conferencing system developed by the Institute for the Future for portions of their work. Monthly usage statistics for the system were collected in order to examine the group and individual participation figures for all conferences. The conference transcripts were analysed to derive observations about the use of the medium. In addition to the results of these analyses, the attitudes of users and the major components of the costs of computer conferencing are discussed.

  13. Thinking and Behaving Scientifically in Computer Science: When Failure is an Option!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venables, Anne; Tan, Grace

    2006-01-01

    In a Finnish study of four different academic disciplines, Ylijoki (2000) found that in Computer Science there was a disparity between the conceptions held by undergraduate students and staff about their discipline; students viewed it as being far more pragmatic and results focused than did their instructors. Not surprisingly, here at our…

  14. SciCADE 95: International conference on scientific computation and differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This report consists of abstracts from the conference. Topics include algorithms, computer codes, and numerical solutions for differential equations. Linear and nonlinear as well as boundary-value and initial-value problems are covered. Various applications of these problems are also included.

  15. Conducting Scientific Research on Learning and Health Behavior Change with Computer-Based Health Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Richard E.; Lieberman, Debra A.

    2011-01-01

    This article is a guide for researchers interested in assessing the effectiveness of serious computer-based games (or video games, digital games, or electronic games) intended to improve health and health care. It presents a definition of health games, a rationale for their use, an overview of the current state of research, and recommendations for…

  16. Implementing an Affordable High-Performance Computing for Teaching-Oriented Computer Science Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abuzaghleh, Omar; Goldschmidt, Kathleen; Elleithy, Yasser; Lee, Jeongkyu

    2013-01-01

    With the advances in computing power, high-performance computing (HPC) platforms have had an impact on not only scientific research in advanced organizations but also computer science curriculum in the educational community. For example, multicore programming and parallel systems are highly desired courses in the computer science major. However,…

  17. Tools for 3D scientific visualization in computational aerodynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bancroft, Gordon; Plessel, Todd; Merritt, Fergus; Watson, Val

    1989-01-01

    Hardware, software, and techniques used by the Fluid Dynamics Division (NASA) for performing visualization of computational aerodynamics, which can be applied to the visualization of flow fields from computer simulations of fluid dynamics about the Space Shuttle, are discussed. Three visualization techniques applied, post-processing, tracking, and steering, are described, as well as the post-processing software packages used, PLOT3D, SURF (Surface Modeller), GAS (Graphical Animation System), and FAST (Flow Analysis software Toolkit). Using post-processing methods a flow simulation was executed on a supercomputer and, after the simulation was complete, the results were processed for viewing. It is shown that the high-resolution, high-performance three-dimensional workstation combined with specially developed display and animation software provides a good tool for analyzing flow field solutions obtained from supercomputers.

  18. Eighth SIAM conference on parallel processing for scientific computing: Final program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    This SIAM conference is the premier forum for developments in parallel numerical algorithms, a field that has seen very lively and fruitful developments over the past decade, and whose health is still robust. Themes for this conference were: combinatorial optimization; data-parallel languages; large-scale parallel applications; message-passing; molecular modeling; parallel I/O; parallel libraries; parallel software tools; parallel compilers; particle simulations; problem-solving environments; and sparse matrix computations.

  19. Comparison of scientific computing platforms for MCNP4A Monte Carlo calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, J.S.; Brockhoff, R.C. . Applied Theoretical Physics Division)

    1994-04-01

    The performance of seven computer platforms is evaluated with the widely used and internationally available MCNP4A Monte Carlo radiation transport code. All results are reproducible and are presented in such a way as to enable comparison with computer platforms not in the study. The authors observed that the HP/9000-735 workstation runs MCNP 50% faster than the Cray YMP 8/64. Compared with the Cray YMP 8/64, the IBM RS/6000-560 is 68% as fast, the Sun Sparc10 is 66% as fast, the Silicon Graphics ONYX is 90% as fast, the Gateway 2000 model 4DX2-66V personal computer is 27% as fast, and the Sun Sparc2 is 24% as fast. In addition to comparing the timing performance of the seven platforms, the authors observe that changes in compilers and software over the past 2 yr have resulted in only modest performance improvements, hardware improvements have enhanced performance by less than a factor of [approximately]3, timing studies are very problem dependent, MCNP4Q runs about as fast as MCNP4.

  20. Advances in computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacture technology.

    PubMed

    Calamia, J R

    1996-01-01

    Although the development of computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacture (CAM) technology and the benefits of increased productivity became obvious in the automobile and aerospace industries in the 1970s, investigations of this technology's application in the field of dentistry did not begin until the 1980s. Only now are we beginning to see the fruits of this work with the commercial availability of some systems; the potential for this technology seems boundless. This article reviews the recent literature with emphasis on the period from June 1992 to May 1993. This review should familiarize the reader with some of the latest developments in this technology, including a brief description of some systems currently available and the clinical and economical rationale for their acceptance into the dental mainstream. This article concentrates on a particular system, the Cerec (Siemens/Pelton and Crane, Charlotte, NC) system, for three reasons: First, this system has been available since 1985 and, as a result, has a track record of almost 7 years of data. Most of the data have just recently been released and consequently, much of this year's literature on CAD-CAM is monopolized by studies using this system. Second, this system was developed as a mobile, affordable, direct chairside CAD-CAM restorative method. As such, it is of special interest to the patient, providing a one-visit restoration. Third, the author is currently engaged in research using this particular system and has a working knowledge of this system's capabilities. PMID:9462062

  1. Advances in computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacture technology.

    PubMed

    Calamia, J R

    1994-01-01

    Although the development of computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacture (CAM) technology and the benefits of increased productivity became obvious in the automobile and aerospace industries in the 1970s, investigations of this technology's application in the field of dentistry did not begin until the 1980s. Only now are we beginning to see the fruits of this work with the commercial availability of some systems; the potential for this technology seems boundless. This article reviews the recent literature with emphasis on the period from June 1992 to May 1993. This review should familiarize the reader with some of the latest developments in this technology, including a brief description of some systems currently available and the clinical and economical rationale for their acceptance into the dental mainstream. This article concentrates on a particular system, the Cerec (Siemens/Pelton and Crane, Charlotte, NC) system, for three reasons: first, this system has been available since 1985 and, as a result, has a track record of almost 7 years of data. Most of the data have just recently been released and consequently, much of this year's literature on CAD-CAM is monopolized by studies using this system. Second, this system was developed as a mobile, affordable, direct chairside CAD-CAM restorative method. As such, it is of special interest to the dentist who will offer this new technology directly to the patient, providing a one-visit restoration. Third, the author is currently engaged in research using this particular system and has a working knowledge of this system's capabilities. PMID:8032444

  2. An Analysis on the Effect of Computer Self-Efficacy over Scientific Research Self-Efficacy and Information Literacy Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuncer, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Present research investigates reciprocal relations amidst computer self-efficacy, scientific research and information literacy self-efficacy. Research findings have demonstrated that according to standardized regression coefficients, computer self-efficacy has a positive effect on information literacy self-efficacy. Likewise it has been detected…

  3. Development of high performance scientific components for interoperability of computing packages

    SciTech Connect

    Gulabani, Teena Pratap

    2008-01-01

    Three major high performance quantum chemistry computational packages, NWChem, GAMESS and MPQC have been developed by different research efforts following different design patterns. The goal is to achieve interoperability among these packages by overcoming the challenges caused by the different communication patterns and software design of each of these packages. A chemistry algorithm is hard to develop as well as being a time consuming process; integration of large quantum chemistry packages will allow resource sharing and thus avoid reinvention of the wheel. Creating connections between these incompatible packages is the major motivation of the proposed work. This interoperability is achieved by bringing the benefits of Component Based Software Engineering through a plug-and-play component framework called Common Component Architecture (CCA). In this thesis, I present a strategy and process used for interfacing two widely used and important computational chemistry methodologies: Quantum Mechanics and Molecular Mechanics. To show the feasibility of the proposed approach the Tuning and Analysis Utility (TAU) has been coupled with NWChem code and its CCA components. Results show that the overhead is negligible when compared to the ease and potential of organizing and coping with large-scale software applications.

  4. The Automatic Parallelisation of Scientific Application Codes Using a Computer Aided Parallelisation Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ierotheou, C.; Johnson, S.; Leggett, P.; Cross, M.; Evans, E.; Jin, Hao-Qiang; Frumkin, M.; Yan, J.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The shared-memory programming model is a very effective way to achieve parallelism on shared memory parallel computers. Historically, the lack of a programming standard for using directives and the rather limited performance due to scalability have affected the take-up of this programming model approach. Significant progress has been made in hardware and software technologies, as a result the performance of parallel programs with compiler directives has also made improvements. The introduction of an industrial standard for shared-memory programming with directives, OpenMP, has also addressed the issue of portability. In this study, we have extended the computer aided parallelization toolkit (developed at the University of Greenwich), to automatically generate OpenMP based parallel programs with nominal user assistance. We outline the way in which loop types are categorized and how efficient OpenMP directives can be defined and placed using the in-depth interprocedural analysis that is carried out by the toolkit. We also discuss the application of the toolkit on the NAS Parallel Benchmarks and a number of real-world application codes. This work not only demonstrates the great potential of using the toolkit to quickly parallelize serial programs but also the good performance achievable on up to 300 processors for hybrid message passing and directive-based parallelizations.

  5. Recovery Act: Advanced Interaction, Computation, and Visualization Tools for Sustainable Building Design

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Donald P.; Hencey, Brandon M.

    2013-08-20

    Current building energy simulation technology requires excessive labor, time and expertise to create building energy models, excessive computational time for accurate simulations and difficulties with the interpretation of the results. These deficiencies can be ameliorated using modern graphical user interfaces and algorithms which take advantage of modern computer architectures and display capabilities. To prove this hypothesis, we developed an experimental test bed for building energy simulation. This novel test bed environment offers an easy-to-use interactive graphical interface, provides access to innovative simulation modules that run at accelerated computational speeds, and presents new graphics visualization methods to interpret simulation results. Our system offers the promise of dramatic ease of use in comparison with currently available building energy simulation tools. Its modular structure makes it suitable for early stage building design, as a research platform for the investigation of new simulation methods, and as a tool for teaching concepts of sustainable design. Improvements in the accuracy and execution speed of many of the simulation modules are based on the modification of advanced computer graphics rendering algorithms. Significant performance improvements are demonstrated in several computationally expensive energy simulation modules. The incorporation of these modern graphical techniques should advance the state of the art in the domain of whole building energy analysis and building performance simulation, particularly at the conceptual design stage when decisions have the greatest impact. More importantly, these better simulation tools will enable the transition from prescriptive to performative energy codes, resulting in better, more efficient designs for our future built environment.

  6. An analysis of the structure and evolution of the scientific collaboration network of computer intelligence in games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara-Cabrera, R.; Cotta, C.; Fernández-Leiva, A. J.

    2014-02-01

    Games constitute a research domain that is attracting the interest of scientists from numerous disciplines. This is particularly true from the perspective of computational intelligence. In order to examine the growing importance of this area in the gaming domain, we present an analysis of the scientific collaboration network of researchers working on computational intelligence in games (CIG). This network has been constructed from bibliographical data obtained from the Digital Bibliography & Library Project (DBLP). We have analyzed from a temporal perspective several properties of the CIG network at the macroscopic, mesoscopic and microscopic levels, studying the large-scale structure, the growth mechanics, and collaboration patterns among other features. Overall, computational intelligence in games exhibits similarities with other collaboration networks such as for example a log-normal degree distribution and sub-linear preferential attachment for new authors. It also has distinctive features, e.g. the number of papers co-authored is exponentially distributed, the internal preferential attachment (new collaborations among existing authors) is linear, and fidelity rates (measured as the relative preference for publishing with previous collaborators) grow super-linearly. The macroscopic and mesoscopic evolution of the network indicates the field is very active and vibrant, but it is still at an early developmental stage. We have also analyzed communities and central nodes and how these are reflected in research topics, thus identifying active research subareas.

  7. A comparison of computer architectures for the NASA demonstration advanced avionics system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seacord, C. L.; Bailey, D. G.; Larson, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    The paper compares computer architectures for the NASA demonstration advanced avionics system. Two computer architectures are described with an unusual approach to fault tolerance: a single spare processor can correct for faults in any of the distributed processors by taking on the role of a failed module. It was shown the system must be used from a functional point of view to properly apply redundancy and achieve fault tolerance and ultra reliability. Data are presented on complexity and mission failure probability which show that the revised version offers equivalent mission reliability at lower cost as measured by hardware and software complexity.

  8. High Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-07-28

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space, and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the US Department of Energy's SciDAC program has produced accelerator-modeling tools that have been employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. The authors discuss the Synergia framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. Our authors present Synergia's design principles and its performance on HPC platforms.

  9. High Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-07-28

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space, and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the US Department of Energy's SciDAC program has produced accelerator-modeling tools that have been employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. The authors discuss the Synergia framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable ofmore » handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. Our authors present Synergia's design principles and its performance on HPC platforms.« less

  10. Robotics, Stem Cells and Brain Computer Interfaces in Rehabilitation and Recovery from Stroke; Updates and Advances

    PubMed Central

    Boninger, Michael L; Wechsler, Lawrence R.; Stein, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the current state and latest advances in robotics, stem cells, and brain computer interfaces in rehabilitation and recovery for stroke. Design The authors of this summary recently reviewed this work as part of a national presentation. The paper represents the information included in each area. Results Each area has seen great advances and challenges as products move to market and experiments are ongoing. Conclusion Robotics, stem cells, and brain computer interfaces all have tremendous potential to reduce disability and lead to better outcomes for patients with stroke. Continued research and investment will be needed as the field moves forward. With this investment, the potential for recovery of function is likely substantial PMID:25313662

  11. Computational methods in the prediction of advanced subsonic and supersonic propeller induced noise: ASSPIN users' manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, M. H.; Tarkenton, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes the computational aspects of propeller noise prediction in the time domain and the use of high speed propeller noise prediction program ASSPIN (Advanced Subsonic and Supersonic Propeller Induced Noise). These formulations are valid in both the near and far fields. Two formulations are utilized by ASSPIN: (1) one is used for subsonic portions of the propeller blade; and (2) the second is used for transonic and supersonic regions on the blade. Switching between the two formulations is done automatically. ASSPIN incorporates advanced blade geometry and surface pressure modelling, adaptive observer time grid strategies, and contains enhanced numerical algorithms that result in reduced computational time. In addition, the ability to treat the nonaxial inflow case has been included.

  12. Computer-mediated scaffolding for collaborative argumentation on socio-scientific issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosborough, David

    Socioscientific Issues (SSI) education attempts to engage students in informal argumentation on controversial socioscientific issues. In this thesis, a computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) tool to support and scaffold student argumentation, called ArgueMint, is designed and implemented. A design research study was undertaken to examine how the software was used by pairs of students in a face-to-face setting, and to improve its usefulness and usability. Written output and transcripts were analysed for evidence of good argumentation, aspects of socioscientific inquiry and collaboration, and usability. The students in the study tended to consider multiple perspectives and support claims made in their argument, while they did not tend to consistently identify weaknesses in their arguments. Proposed directions for further development of ArgueMint, as well as questions for further research, are identified.

  13. Modular Approaches to Earth Science Scientific Computing: 3D Electromagnetic Induction Modeling as an Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandon, K.; Egbert, G.; Siripunvaraporn, W.

    2003-12-01

    We are developing a modular system for three-dimensional inversion of electromagnetic (EM) induction data, using an object oriented programming approach. This approach allows us to modify the individual components of the inversion scheme proposed, and also reuse the components for variety of problems in earth science computing howsoever diverse they might be. In particular, the modularity allows us to (a) change modeling codes independently of inversion algorithm details; (b) experiment with new inversion algorithms; and (c) modify the way prior information is imposed in the inversion to test competing hypothesis and techniques required to solve an earth science problem. Our initial code development is for EM induction equations on a staggered grid, using iterative solution techniques in 3D. An example illustrated here is an experiment with the sensitivity of 3D magnetotelluric inversion to uncertainties in the boundary conditions required for regional induction problems. These boundary conditions should reflect the large-scale geoelectric structure of the study area, which is usually poorly constrained. In general for inversion of MT data, one fixes boundary conditions at the edge of the model domain, and adjusts the earth?s conductivity structure within the modeling domain. Allowing for errors in specification of the open boundary values is simple in principle, but no existing inversion codes that we are aware of have this feature. Adding a feature such as this is straightforward within the context of the modular approach. More generally, a modular approach provides an efficient methodology for setting up earth science computing problems to test various ideas. As a concrete illustration relevant to EM induction problems, we investigate the sensitivity of MT data near San Andreas Fault at Parkfield (California) to uncertainties in the regional geoelectric structure.

  14. Recent Advances in Cardiac Computed Tomography: Dual Energy, Spectral and Molecular CT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Danad, Ibrahim; Fayad, Zahi A.; Willemink, Martin J.; Min, James K.

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) evolved into a powerful diagnostic tool and it is impossible to imagine current clinical practice without CT imaging. Due to its widespread availability, ease of clinical application, superb sensitivity for detection of CAD, and non-invasive nature, CT has become a valuable tool within the armamentarium of the cardiologist. In the last few years, numerous technological advances in CT have occurred—including dual energy CT (DECT), spectral CT and CT-based molecular imaging. By harnessing the advances in technology, cardiac CT has advanced beyond the mere evaluation of coronary stenosis to an imaging modality tool that permits accurate plaque characterization, assessment of myocardial perfusion and even probing of molecular processes that are involved in coronary atherosclerosis. Novel innovations in CT contrast agents and pre-clinical spectral CT devices have paved the way for CT-based molecular imaging. PMID:26068288

  15. Three-dimensional dynamics of scientific balloon systems in response to sudden gust loadings. [including a computer program user manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, D. R., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed of the three-dimensional dynamics of a high-altitude scientific research balloon system perturbed from its equilibrium configuration by an arbitrary gust loading. The platform is modelled as a system of four coupled pendula, and the equations of motion were developed in the Lagrangian formalism assuming a small-angle approximation. Three-dimensional pendulation, torsion, and precessional motion due to Coriolis forces are considered. Aerodynamic and viscous damping effects on the pendulatory and torsional motions are included. A general model of the gust field incident upon the balloon system was developed. The digital computer simulation program is described, and a guide to its use is given.

  16. Condition monitoring through advanced sensor and computational technology : final report (January 2002 to May 2005).

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jung-Taek; Luk, Vincent K.

    2005-05-01

    The overall goal of this joint research project was to develop and demonstrate advanced sensors and computational technology for continuous monitoring of the condition of components, structures, and systems in advanced and next-generation nuclear power plants (NPPs). This project included investigating and adapting several advanced sensor technologies from Korean and US national laboratory research communities, some of which were developed and applied in non-nuclear industries. The project team investigated and developed sophisticated signal processing, noise reduction, and pattern recognition techniques and algorithms. The researchers installed sensors and conducted condition monitoring tests on two test loops, a check valve (an active component) and a piping elbow (a passive component), to demonstrate the feasibility of using advanced sensors and computational technology to achieve the project goal. Acoustic emission (AE) devices, optical fiber sensors, accelerometers, and ultrasonic transducers (UTs) were used to detect mechanical vibratory response of check valve and piping elbow in normal and degraded configurations. Chemical sensors were also installed to monitor the water chemistry in the piping elbow test loop. Analysis results of processed sensor data indicate that it is feasible to differentiate between the normal and degraded (with selected degradation mechanisms) configurations of these two components from the acquired sensor signals, but it is questionable that these methods can reliably identify the level and type of degradation. Additional research and development efforts are needed to refine the differentiation techniques and to reduce the level of uncertainties.

  17. Recent advances in 3D computed tomography techniques for simulation and navigation in hepatobiliary pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masafumi

    2014-04-01

    A few years ago it could take several hours to complete a 3D image using a 3D workstation. Thanks to advances in computer science, obtaining results of interest now requires only a few minutes. Many recent 3D workstations or multimedia computers are equipped with onboard 3D virtual patient modeling software, which enables patient-specific preoperative assessment and virtual planning, navigation, and tool positioning. Although medical 3D imaging can now be conducted using various modalities, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and ultrasonography (US) among others, the highest quality images are obtained using CT data, and CT images are now the most commonly used source of data for 3D simulation and navigation image. If the 2D source image is bad, no amount of 3D image manipulation in software will provide a quality 3D image. In this exhibition, the recent advances in CT imaging technique and 3D visualization of the hepatobiliary and pancreatic abnormalities are featured, including scan and image reconstruction technique, contrast-enhanced techniques, new application of advanced CT scan techniques, and new virtual reality simulation and navigation imaging. PMID:24464989

  18. FluxSuite: a New Scientific Tool for Advanced Network Management and Cross-Sharing of Next-Generation Flux Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burba, G. G.; Johnson, D.; Velgersdyk, M.; Beaty, K.; Forgione, A.; Begashaw, I.; Allyn, D.

    2015-12-01

    Significant increases in data generation and computing power in recent years have greatly improved spatial and temporal flux data coverage on multiple scales, from a single station to continental flux networks. At the same time, operating budgets for flux teams and stations infrastructure are getting ever more difficult to acquire and sustain. With more stations and networks, larger data flows from each station, and smaller operating budgets, modern tools are needed to effectively and efficiently handle the entire process. This would help maximize time dedicated to answering research questions, and minimize time and expenses spent on data processing, quality control and station management. Cross-sharing the stations with external institutions may also help leverage available funding, increase scientific collaboration, and promote data analyses and publications. FluxSuite, a new advanced tool combining hardware, software and web-service, was developed to address these specific demands. It automates key stages of flux workflow, minimizes day-to-day site management, and modernizes the handling of data flows: Each next-generation station measures all parameters needed for flux computations Field microcomputer calculates final fully-corrected flux rates in real time, including computation-intensive Fourier transforms, spectra, co-spectra, multiple rotations, stationarity, footprint, etc. Final fluxes, radiation, weather and soil data are merged into a single quality-controlled file Multiple flux stations are linked into an automated time-synchronized network Flux network manager, or PI, can see all stations in real time, including fluxes, supporting data, automated reports, and email alerts PI can assign rights, allow or restrict access to stations and data: selected stations can be shared via rights-managed access internally or with external institutions Researchers without stations could form "virtual networks" for specific projects by collaborating with PIs from

  19. Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science: Annual Report October 1998 through September 1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiner, Barry M.; Gross, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) carries out basic research and technology development in computer science, in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's missions. RIACS is located at the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). It currently operates under a multiple year grant/cooperative agreement that began on October 1, 1997 and is up for renewal in the year 2002. ARC has been designated NASA's Center of Excellence in Information Technology. In this capacity, ARC is charged with the responsibility to build an Information Technology Research Program that is preeminent within NASA. RIACS serves as a bridge between NASA ARC and the academic community, and RIACS scientists and visitors work in close collaboration with NASA scientists. RIACS has the additional goal of broadening the base of researchers in these areas of importance to the nation's space and aeronautics enterprises. RIACS research focuses on the three cornerstones of information technology research necessary to meet the future challenges of NASA missions: (1) Automated Reasoning for Autonomous Systems. Techniques are being developed enabling spacecraft that will be self-guiding and self-correcting to the extent that they will require little or no human intervention. Such craft will be equipped to independently solve problems as they arise, and fulfill their missions with minimum direction from Earth. (2) Human-Centered Computing. Many NASA missions require synergy between humans and computers, with sophisticated computational aids amplifying human cognitive and perceptual abilities; (3) High Performance Computing and Networking Advances in the performance of computing and networking continue to have major impact on a variety of NASA endeavors, ranging from modeling and simulation to data analysis of large datasets to collaborative engineering, planning and execution. In addition, RIACS collaborates with NASA scientists to apply information technology research to

  20. A Computational Unification of Scientific Law:. Spelling out a Universal Semantics for Physical Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcer, Peter J.; Rowlands, Peter

    2013-09-01

    The principal criteria Cn (n = 1 to 23) and grammatical production rules are set out of a universal computational rewrite language spelling out a semantic description of an emergent, self-organizing architecture for the cosmos. These language productions already predicate: (1) Einstein's conservation law of energy, momentum and mass and, subsequently, (2) with respect to gauge invariant relativistic space time (both Lorentz special & Einstein general); (3) Standard Model elementary particle physics; (4) the periodic table of the elements & chemical valence; and (5) the molecular biological basis of the DNA / RNA genetic code; so enabling the Cybernetic Machine specialist Groups Mission Statement premise;** (6) that natural semantic language thinking at the higher level of the self-organized emergent chemical molecular complexity of the human brain (only surpassed by that of the cosmos itself!) would be realized (7) by this same universal semantic language via (8) an architecture of a conscious human brain/mind and self which, it predicates consists of its neural / glia and microtubule substrates respectively, so as to endow it with; (9) the intelligent semantic capability to be able to specify, symbolize, spell out and understand the cosmos that conceived it; and (10) provide a quantum physical explanation of consciousness and of how (11) the dichotomy between first person subjectivity and third person objectivity or `hard problem' is resolved.