Science.gov

Sample records for advanced semiconductor device

  1. Advanced Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, Michael S.; Maki, Paul A.; Kolodzey, James

    2007-06-01

    I. Wide band gap devices. Wide-Bandgap Semiconductor devices for automotive applications / M. Sugimoto ... [et al.]. A GaN on SiC HFET device technology for wireless infrastructure applications / B. Green ... [et al.]. Drift velocity limitation in GaN HEMT channels / A. Matulionis. Simulations of field-plated and recessed gate gallium nitride-based heterojunction field-effect transistors / V. O. Turin, M. S. Shur and D. B. Veksler. Low temperature electroluminescence of green and deep green GaInN/GaN light emitting diodes / Y. Li ... [et al.]. Spatial spectral analysis in high brightness GaInN/GaN light emitting diodes / T. Detchprohm ... [et al.]. Self-induced surface texturing of Al2O3 by means of inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching in Cl2 chemistry / P. Batoni ... [et al.]. Field and termionic field transport in aluminium gallium arsenide heterojunction barriers / D. V. Morgan and A. Porch. Electrical characteristics and carrier lifetime measurements in high voltage 4H-SiC PiN diodes / P. A. Losee ... [et al.]. Geometry and short channel effects on enhancement-mode n-Channel GaN MOSFETs on p and n- GaN/sapphire substrates / W. Huang, T. Khan and T. P. Chow. 4H-SiC Vertical RESURF Schottky Rectifiers and MOSFETs / Y. Wang, P. A. Losee and T. P. Chow. Present status and future Directions of SiGe HBT technology / M. H. Khater ... [et al.]Optical properties of GaInN/GaN multi-quantum Wells structure and light emitting diode grown by metalorganic chemical vapor phase epitaxy / J. Senawiratne ... [et al.]. Electrical comparison of Ta/Ti/Al/Mo/Au and Ti/Al/Mo/Au Ohmic contacts on undoped GaN HEMTs structure with AlN interlayer / Y. Sun and L. F. Eastman. Above 2 A/mm drain current density of GaN HEMTs grown on sapphire / F. Medjdoub ... [et al.]. Focused thermal beam direct patterning on InGaN during molecular beam epitaxy / X. Chen, W. J. Schaff and L. F. Eastman -- II. Terahertz and millimeter wave devices. Temperature-dependent microwave performance of

  2. Improved Thermoelectric Devices: Advanced Semiconductor Materials for Thermoelectric Devices

    SciTech Connect

    2009-12-11

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Phononic Devices is working to recapture waste heat and convert it into usable electric power. To do this, the company is using thermoelectric devices, which are made from advanced semiconductor materials that convert heat into electricity or actively remove heat for refrigeration and cooling purposes. Thermoelectric devices resemble computer chips, and they manage heat by manipulating the direction of electrons at the nanoscale. These devices aren’t new, but they are currently too inefficient and expensive for widespread use. Phononic Devices is using a high-performance, cost-effective thermoelectric design that will improve the device’s efficiency and enable electronics manufacturers to more easily integrate them into their products.

  3. Advanced Stress, Strain And Geometrical Analysis In Semiconductor Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Neels, Antonia; Dommann, Alex; Niedermann, Philippe; Farub, Claudiu; Kaenel, Hans von

    2010-11-24

    High stresses and defect densities increases the risk of semiconductor device failure. Reliability studies on potential failure sources have an impact on design and are essential to assure the long term functioning of the device. Related to the dramatically smaller volume of semiconductor devices and new bonding techniques on such devices, new methods in testing and qualification are needed. Reliability studies on potential failure sources have an impact on design and are essential to assure the long term functioning of the device. In this paper, the applications of advanced High Resolution X-ray Diffraction (HRXRD) methods in strain, defect and deformation analysis on semiconductor devices are discussed. HRXRD with Rocking Curves (RC's) and Reciprocal Space Maps (RSM's) is used as accurate, non-destructive experimental method to evaluate the crystalline quality, and more precisely for the given samples, the in-situ strain, defects and geometrical parameters such as tilt and bending of device. The combination with advanced FEM simulations gives the possibility to support efficiently semiconductor devices design.

  4. Advanced numerical methods and software approaches for semiconductor device simulation

    SciTech Connect

    CAREY,GRAHAM F.; PARDHANANI,A.L.; BOVA,STEVEN W.

    2000-03-23

    In this article the authors concisely present several modern strategies that are applicable to drift-dominated carrier transport in higher-order deterministic models such as the drift-diffusion, hydrodynamic, and quantum hydrodynamic systems. The approaches include extensions of upwind and artificial dissipation schemes, generalization of the traditional Scharfetter-Gummel approach, Petrov-Galerkin and streamline-upwind Petrov Galerkin (SUPG), entropy variables, transformations, least-squares mixed methods and other stabilized Galerkin schemes such as Galerkin least squares and discontinuous Galerkin schemes. The treatment is representative rather than an exhaustive review and several schemes are mentioned only briefly with appropriate reference to the literature. Some of the methods have been applied to the semiconductor device problem while others are still in the early stages of development for this class of applications. They have included numerical examples from the recent research tests with some of the methods. A second aspect of the work deals with algorithms that employ unstructured grids in conjunction with adaptive refinement strategies. The full benefits of such approaches have not yet been developed in this application area and they emphasize the need for further work on analysis, data structures and software to support adaptivity. Finally, they briefly consider some aspects of software frameworks. These include dial-an-operator approaches such as that used in the industrial simulator PROPHET, and object-oriented software support such as those in the SANDIA National Laboratory framework SIERRA.

  5. Advanced Numerical Methods and Software Approaches for Semiconductor Device Simulation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carey, Graham F.; Pardhanani, A. L.; Bova, S. W.

    2000-01-01

    In this article we concisely present several modern strategies that are applicable to driftdominated carrier transport in higher-order deterministic models such as the driftdiffusion, hydrodynamic, and quantum hydrodynamic systems. The approaches include extensions of “upwind” and artificial dissipation schemes, generalization of the traditional Scharfetter – Gummel approach, Petrov – Galerkin and streamline-upwind Petrov Galerkin (SUPG), “entropy” variables, transformations, least-squares mixed methods and other stabilized Galerkin schemes such as Galerkin least squares and discontinuous Galerkin schemes. The treatment is representative rather than an exhaustive review and several schemes are mentioned only briefly with appropriate reference to the literature. Some of themore » methods have been applied to the semiconductor device problem while others are still in the early stages of development for this class of applications. We have included numerical examples from our recent research tests with some of the methods. A second aspect of the work deals with algorithms that employ unstructured grids in conjunction with adaptive refinement strategies. The full benefits of such approaches have not yet been developed in this application area and we emphasize the need for further work on analysis, data structures and software to support adaptivity. Finally, we briefly consider some aspects of software frameworks. These include dial-an-operator approaches such as that used in the industrial simulator PROPHET, and object-oriented software support such as those in the SANDIA National Laboratory framework SIERRA.« less

  6. Unitary lens semiconductor device

    DOEpatents

    Lear, K.L.

    1997-05-27

    A unitary lens semiconductor device and method are disclosed. The unitary lens semiconductor device is provided with at least one semiconductor layer having a composition varying in the growth direction for unitarily forming one or more lenses in the semiconductor layer. Unitary lens semiconductor devices may be formed as light-processing devices such as microlenses, and as light-active devices such as light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, and resonant cavity photodetectors. 9 figs.

  7. Unitary lens semiconductor device

    DOEpatents

    Lear, Kevin L.

    1997-01-01

    A unitary lens semiconductor device and method. The unitary lens semiconductor device is provided with at least one semiconductor layer having a composition varying in the growth direction for unitarily forming one or more lenses in the semiconductor layer. Unitary lens semiconductor devices may be formed as light-processing devices such as microlenses, and as light-active devices such as light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, and resonant cavity photodetectors.

  8. Interconnected semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Grimmer, Derrick P.; Paulson, Kenneth R.; Gilbert, James R.

    1990-10-23

    Semiconductor layer and conductive layer formed on a flexible substrate, divided into individual devices and interconnected with one another in series by interconnection layers and penetrating terminals.

  9. The quantum hydrodynamic model for semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Carl L.

    1995-02-01

    Quantum semiconductor devices are playing an increasingly important role in advanced microelectronic applications, including multiple-state logic and memory devices. To model quantum devices, the classical hydrodynamic model for semiconductor devices can be extended to include O(h(2)) quantum corrections. This proposal focused on theoretical and computational investigations of the flow of electrons in semiconductor devices based on the quantum hydrodynamic model. The development of efficient, robots numerical methods for the QHD model in one and two spatial dimensions we also emphasized.

  10. Semiconductor structure and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinkel, Nancy A. (Inventor); Goldstein, Bernard (Inventor); Ettenberg, Michael (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Semiconductor devices such as lasers which include a substrate with a channel therein with a clad layer overlying the substrate and filling the channel exhibit irregularities such as terraces in the surface of the clad layer which are detrimental to device performance. These irregularities are substantially eliminated by forming the channel in a surface of a buffer layer greater than about 4 micrometers thick on the substrate and forming the clad layer over the buffer layer and the channel. CW lasers incorporating the principles of the invention exhibit the highest output power in a single spatial mode and maximum output power which have been observed to date.

  11. Device Concepts in Semiconductor Spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molenkamp, Laurens W.

    Semiconductor spintronics has now reached a stage where the basic physical mechanisms controlling spin injection and detection are understood. Moreover, some critical technological issues involved in the growth and lithography of the magnetic semiconductors have been solved. This has allowed us to explore the physics of meanwhile quite complex spintronic devices. The lectures will start with an introduction to spin transport in metals and semiconductors. Building upon this, I will discuss various simple devices that demonstrate this basic physics in action. Subsequently, more advanced devices will be covered. For example, I will discuss resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) fabricated from paramagnetic II-VI semiconductors that can be operated as a voltage controlled spin-switch. A quantum dot version of these RTDs exhibits, unexpectedly, remanent magnetism at zero external field, which we interpret as resulting from tunneling through a single magnetic polaron. In the ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga, Mn)As we have observed a very large spin valve effect due to domain wall pinning at sub-10 nm sized constrictions. Furthermore, we have found a novel magnetoresistance effect in this material, dubbed tunnel anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR), which is due to the strongly (magneto-)anisotropic density of states in a ferromagnetic semiconductor. The effect leads to the observation of a spin valve-like behavior in tunnel structures containg a single ferromagnetic layer and also dominates the spin-valve signal obtained from structures containing two (Ga, Mn)As layers, where the effect may cause resistance changes of five orders of magnitude. Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  12. Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project

    SciTech Connect

    Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bolton, T.; Horton-Smith, G.; Maravin, Y.; Ratra, B.; Stanton, N.; von Toerne, E.; Wilson, G.

    2007-09-21

    KASP (Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project) completed the new Layer 0 upgrade for D0, assumed key electronics projects for the US CMS project, finished important new physics measurements with the D0 experiment at Fermilab, made substantial contributions to detector studies for the proposed e+e- international linear collider (ILC), and advanced key initiatives in non-accelerator-based neutrino physics.

  13. Theoretical tools for semiconductors devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hagan, P.; Cox, R.; Randall, E.; Reyna, L.

    1996-10-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Future generations of Very Large Scale Integrated (VLSI) circuits require semiconducting devices that are much faster and smaller than current devices. Three-dimensional and transient effects are critical to the performance of these devices. Yet using Monte Carlo (MC) codes to perform time-dependent, three-dimensional simulations will not be feasible in the foreseeable future. Here we re-analyze the physics of semiconductors; use singular perturbation techniques to derive the reduced-dimensionality equations that accurately describe the semiconductor in the regimes corresponding to ultra-small ultra-fast devices; and validate the resulting theoretical models against MC simulations and experimental data. The objective of this project was to gain the capability of accurately simulating ultra-small ultra-fast devices in three spatial dimensions with the ultimate goal of transforming the design of advanced devices.

  14. Improvement of process control using wafer geometry for enhanced manufacturability of advanced semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Honggoo; Lee, Jongsu; Kim, Sang Min; Lee, Changhwan; Han, Sangjun; Kim, Myoungsoo; Kwon, Wontaik; Park, Sung-Ki; Vukkadala, Pradeep; Awasthi, Amartya; Kim, J. H.; Veeraraghavan, Sathish; Choi, DongSub; Huang, Kevin; Dighe, Prasanna; Lee, Cheouljung; Byeon, Jungho; Dey, Soham; Sinha, Jaydeep

    2015-03-01

    Aggressive advancements in semiconductor technology have resulted in integrated chip (IC) manufacturing capability at sub-20nm half-pitch nodes. With this, lithography overlay error budgets are becoming increasingly stringent. The delay in EUV lithography readiness for high volume manufacturing (HVM) and the need for multiple-patterning lithography with 193i technology has further amplified the overlay issue. Thus there exists a need for technologies that can improve overlay errors in HVM. The traditional method for reducing overlay errors predominantly focused on improving lithography scanner printability performance. However, processes outside of the lithography sector known as processinduced overlay errors can contribute significantly to the total overlay at the current requirements. Monitoring and characterizing process-induced overlay has become critical for advanced node patterning. Recently a relatively new technique for overlay control that uses high-resolution wafer geometry measurements has gained significance. In this work we present the implementation of this technique in an IC fabrication environment to monitor wafer geometry changes induced across several points in the process flow, of multiple product layers with critical overlay performance requirement. Several production wafer lots were measured and analyzed on a patterned wafer geometry tool. Changes induced in wafer geometry as a result of wafer processing were related to down-stream overlay error contribution using the analytical in-plane distortion (IPD) calculation model. Through this segmentation, process steps that are major contributors to down-stream overlay were identified. Subsequent process optimization was then isolated to those process steps where maximum benefit might be realized. Root-cause for the within-wafer, wafer-to-wafer, tool-to-tool, and station-to-station variations observed were further investigated using local shape curvature changes - which is directly related to

  15. Stress-induced Effects Caused by 3D IC TSV Packaging in Advanced Semiconductor Device Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Sukharev, V.; Kteyan, A.; Choy, J.-H.; Hovsepyan, H.; Markosian, A.; Zschech, E.; Huebner, R.

    2011-11-10

    Potential challenges with managing mechanical stress and the consequent effects on device performance for advanced 3D through-silicon-via (TSV) based technologies are outlined. The paper addresses the growing need in a simulation-based design verification flow capable to analyze a design of 3D IC stacks and to determine across-die out-of-spec variations in device electrical characteristics caused by the layout and through-silicon-via (TSV)/package-induced mechanical stress. The limited characterization/measurement capabilities for 3D IC stacks and a strict ''good die'' requirement make this type of analysis critical for the achievement of an acceptable level of functional and parametric yield and reliability. The paper focuses on the development of a design-for-manufacturability (DFM) type of methodology for managing mechanical stresses during a sequence of designs of 3D TSV-based dies, stacks and packages. A set of physics-based compact models for a multi-scale simulation to assess the mechanical stress across the device layers in silicon chips stacked and packaged with the 3D TSV technology is proposed. A calibration technique based on fitting to measured stress components and electrical characteristics of the test-chip devices is presented. A strategy for generation of a simulation feeding data and respective materials characterization approach are proposed, with the goal to generate a database for multi-scale material parameters of wafer-level and package-level structures. For model validation, high-resolution strain measurements in Si channels of the test-chip devices are needed. At the nanoscale, the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is the only technique available for sub-10 nm strain measurements so far.

  16. Survey of cryogenic semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Talarico, L.J.; McKeever, J.W.

    1996-04-01

    Improved reliability and electronic performance can be achieved in a system operated at cryogenic temperatures because of the reduction in mechanical insult and in disruptive effects of thermal energy on electronic devices. Continuing discoveries of new superconductors with ever increasing values of T{sub c} above that of liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT) have provided incentive for developing semiconductor electronic systems that may also operate in the superconductor`s liquid nitrogen bath. Because of the interest in high-temperature superconductor (HTS) devices, liquid nitrogen is the cryogen of choice and LNT is the temperature on which this review is focused. The purpose of this survey is to locate and assemble published information comparing the room temperature (298 K), performance of commercially available conventional and hybrid semiconductor device with their performance at LNT (77K), to help establish their candidacy as cryogenic electronic devices specifically for use at LNT. The approach to gathering information for this survey included the following activities. Periodicals and proceedings were searched for information on the behavior of semiconductor devices at LNT. Telephone calls were made to representatives of semiconductor industries, to semiconductor subcontractors, to university faculty members prominent for their research in the area of cryogenic semiconductors, and to representatives of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and NASA subcontractors. The sources and contacts are listed with their responses in the introduction, and a list of references appears at the end of the survey.

  17. Nanoscale Semiconductor Devices as New Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, John; Parameswaran, Ramya; Tian, Bozhi

    2016-01-01

    Research on nanoscale semiconductor devices will elicit a novel understanding of biological systems. First, we discuss why it is necessary to build interfaces between cells and semiconductor nanoelectronics. Second, we describe some recent molecular biophysics studies with nanowire field effect transistor sensors. Third, we present the use of nanowire transistors as electrical recording devices that can be integrated into synthetic tissues and targeted intra- or extracellularly to study single cells. Lastly, we discuss future directions and challenges in further developing this area of research, which will advance biology and medicine. PMID:27213041

  18. Mechanical scriber for semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Peter T.

    1985-01-01

    A mechanical scriber using a scribing tip, such as a diamond, provides controlled scriber forces with a spring-loaded compound lever arrangement. The scribing force and range of scribing depth are adjusted by a pair of adjustable micrometer heads. A semiconductor device, such as a multilayer solar cell, can be formed into scribed strips at each layer.

  19. Mechanical scriber for semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Lin, P.T.

    1985-03-05

    A mechanical scriber using a scribing tip, such as a diamond, provides controlled scriber forces with a spring-loaded compound lever arrangement. The scribing force and range of scribing depth are adjusted by a pair of adjustable micrometer heads. A semiconductor device, such as a multilayer solar cell, can be formed into scribed strips at each layer. 5 figs.

  20. Architectures for Improved Organic Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Jonathan H.

    Advancements in the microelectronics industry have brought increasing performance and decreasing prices to a wide range of users. Conventional silicon-based electronics have followed Moore's law to provide an ever-increasing integrated circuit transistor density, which drives processing power, solid-state memory density, and sensor technologies. As shrinking conventional integrated circuits became more challenging, researchers began exploring electronics with the potential to penetrate new applications with a low price of entry: "Electronics everywhere." The new generation of electronics is thin, light, flexible, and inexpensive. Organic electronics are part of the new generation of thin-film electronics, relying on the synthetic flexibility of carbon molecules to create organic semiconductors, absorbers, and emitters which perform useful tasks. Organic electronics can be fabricated with low energy input on a variety of novel substrates, including inexpensive plastic sheets. The potential ease of synthesis and fabrication of organic-based devices means that organic electronics can be made at very low cost. Successfully demonstrated organic semiconductor devices include photovoltaics, photodetectors, transistors, and light emitting diodes. Several challenges that face organic semiconductor devices are low performance relative to conventional devices, long-term device stability, and development of new organic-compatible processes and materials. While the absorption and emission performance of organic materials in photovoltaics and light emitting diodes is extraordinarily high for thin films, the charge conduction mobilities are generally low. Building highly efficient devices with low-mobility materials is one challenge. Many organic semiconductor films are unstable during fabrication, storage, and operation due to reactions with water, oxygen and hydroxide. A final challenge facing organic electronics is the need for new processes and materials for electrodes

  1. Quality Control On Strained Semiconductor Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Dommann, Alex; Neels, Antonia

    2010-11-24

    New semiconductor devices are based very often on strained silicon which promises to squeeze more device performance out of current devices. With strained silicon it is possible to get the same device performance using less power. The technique is using strain as a 'design element' for silicon to improve the device performance and has become a hot topic in semiconductor research in the past years. However in the same time topics like 'System in Package'(SiP) on thin wafers are getting more and more important. The chips of thin wafers in advanced packaging are extremely sensitive to induced stresses due to packaging issues. If we are using now strain as a design element for improving device performance we increase the sensitivity again and therefore also the risk of aging of such SiP's. High Resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) techniques such as Rocking Curves (RC's) and Reciprocal Space Mapping (RSM) are therefore very powerful tools to study the stresses in packaged devices.

  2. Semiconductor devices having a recessed electrode structure

    SciTech Connect

    Palacios, Tomas Apostol; Lu, Bin; Matioli, Elison de Nazareth

    2015-05-26

    An electrode structure is described in which conductive regions are recessed into a semiconductor region. Trenches may be formed in a semiconductor region, such that conductive regions can be formed in the trenches. The electrode structure may be used in semiconductor devices such as field effect transistors or diodes. Nitride-based power semiconductor devices are described including such an electrode structure, which can reduce leakage current and otherwise improve performance.

  3. Method for fabricating semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Grunthaner, Frank J. (Inventor); Hecht, Michael H. (Inventor); Bell, Lloyd D. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A process for fabricating gold/gallium arsenide structures, in situ, on molecular beam epitaxially grown gallium arsenide. The resulting interface proves to be Ohmic, an unexpected result which is interpreted in terms of increased electrode interdiffusion. More importantly, the present invention surprisingly permits the fabrication of Ohmic contacts in a III-V semiconductor material at room temperature. Although it may be desireable to heat the Ohmic contact to a temperature of, for example, 200 degrees Centigrade if one wishes to further decrease the resistance of the contact, such low temperature annealing is much less likely to have any deleterious affect on the underlying substrate. The use of the term in situ herein, contemplates continuously maintaining an ultra-high vacuum, that is a vacuum which is at least 10.sup.-8 Torr, until after the metallization has been completed. An alternative embodiment of the present invention comprising an additional step, namely the termination of the gallium arsenide by a two monolayer thickness of epitaxial aluminum arsenide as a diffusion barrier, enables the recovery of Schottky barrier behavior, namely a rectified I-V characteristic. The present invention provides a significant breakthrough in the fabrication of III-V semiconductor devices wherein excellent Ohmic contact and Schottky barrier interfaces to such devices can be achieved simply and inexpensively and without requiring the high temperature processing of the prior art and also without requiring the use of exotic high temperature refractory materials as substitutes for those preferred contact metals such as gold, aluminum and the like.

  4. Heating device for semiconductor wafers

    DOEpatents

    Vosen, Steven R.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for heat treating semiconductor wafers is disclosed. The apparatus includes a heating device which contains an assembly of light energy sources for emitting light energy onto a wafer. In particular, the light energy sources are positioned such that many different radial heating zones are created on a wafer being heated. For instance, in one embodiment, the light energy sources form a spiral configuration. In an alternative embodiment, the light energy sources appear to be randomly dispersed with respect to each other so that no discernable pattern is present. In a third alternative embodiment of the present invention, the light energy sources form concentric rings. Tuning light sources are then placed in between the concentric rings of light.

  5. Heating device for semiconductor wafers

    DOEpatents

    Vosen, S.R.

    1999-07-27

    An apparatus for heat treating semiconductor wafers is disclosed. The apparatus includes a heating device which contains an assembly of light energy sources for emitting light energy onto a wafer. In particular, the light energy sources are positioned such that many different radial heating zones are created on a wafer being heated. For instance, in one embodiment, the light energy sources form a spiral configuration. In an alternative embodiment, the light energy sources appear to be randomly dispersed with respect to each other so that no discernible pattern is present. In a third alternative embodiment of the present invention, the light energy sources form concentric rings. Tuning light sources are then placed in between the concentric rings of light. 4 figs.

  6. Method of making a semiconductor device assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dholakia, Anil R. (Inventor); Trager, Louis (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The invention is a semiconductor device assembly and method of making the same. A mounting plate has positioning means for positioning the plate relative to a header, a first mounting surface of the plate is attached to the header and a semiconductor device is attached to a second mounting surface of the mounting plate. The assembly is made by forming the mounting plate, positioning the mounting plate relative to the header by the positioning means, attaching the first mounting surface to the header and the semiconductor device to the second mounting surface. Another method of making the assembly is by defining and etching a mounting plate and attaching the first mounting surface to the header and the semiconductor device to the second mounting surface. This assembly and process provides an efficient means for mounting semiconductor devices and in particular electro-optic devices such as lasers.

  7. Advanced 3-V semiconductor technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowogrodzki, M.

    1983-01-01

    Components required for extensions of currently planned space communications systems are discussed for large antennas, crosslink systems, single sideband systems, Aerostat systems, and digital signal processing. Systems using advanced modulation concepts and new concepts in communications satellites are included. The current status and trends in materials technology are examined with emphasis on bulk growth of semi-insulating GaAs and InP, epitaxial growth, and ion implantation. Microwave solid state discrete active devices, multigigabit rate GaAs digital integrated circuits, microwave integrated circuits, and the exploratory development of GaInAs devices, heterojunction devices, and quasi-ballistic devices is considered. Competing technologies such as RF power generation, filter structures, and microwave circuit fabrication are discussed. The fundamental limits of semiconductor devices and problems in implementation are explored.

  8. Radiation-Hardness Data For Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, W. E.; Nichols, D. K.; Brown, S. F.; Gauthier, M. K.; Martin, K. E.

    1984-01-01

    Document presents data on and analysis of radiation hardness of various semiconductor devices. Data specifies total-dose radiation tolerance of devices. Volume 1 of report covers diodes, bipolar transistors, field effect transistors, silicon controlled rectifiers and optical devices. Volume 2 covers integrated circuits. Volume 3 provides detailed analysis of data in volumes 1 and 2.

  9. Library Analog Semiconductor Devices SPICE Simulators

    1996-07-23

    SPICE-SANDIA.LIB is a library of parameter sets and macromodels of semiconductor devices. They are used with Spice-based (SPICE is a program for electronic circuit analysis) simulators to simulate electronic circuits.

  10. Conductive Container for Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, J. T.

    1986-01-01

    Container for semiconductor components not only protects them against mechanical damage but ensures they are not harmed by electrostatic discharges. Container holds components in fixed positions so they can be serialized and identified from their locations. Suitable for holding components during both storing and shipping. Originally developed for microwave diodes, container concept readily adaptable to transistors and integrated circuits.

  11. Optical processing for semiconductor device fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1994-01-01

    A new technique for semiconductor device processing is described that uses optical energy to produce local heating/melting in the vicinity of a preselected interface of the device. This process, called optical processing, invokes assistance of photons to enhance interface reactions such as diffusion and melting, as compared to the use of thermal heating alone. Optical processing is performed in a 'cold wall' furnace, and requires considerably lower energies than furnace or rapid thermal annealing. This technique can produce some device structures with unique properties that cannot be produced by conventional thermal processing. Some applications of optical processing involving semiconductor-metal interfaces are described.

  12. Optical devices featuring nonpolar textured semiconductor layers

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D; Moldawer, Adam; Bhattacharyya, Anirban; Abell, Joshua

    2013-11-26

    A semiconductor emitter, or precursor therefor, has a substrate and one or more textured semiconductor layers deposited onto the substrate in a nonpolar orientation. The textured layers enhance light extraction, and the use of nonpolar orientation greatly enhances internal quantum efficiency compared to conventional devices. Both the internal and external quantum efficiencies of emitters of the invention can be 70-80% or higher. The invention provides highly efficient light emitting diodes suitable for solid state lighting.

  13. Whatever happened to silicon carbide. [semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    The progress made in silicon carbide semiconductor devices in the 1955 to 1975 time frame is examined and reasons are given for the present lack of interest in the material. Its physical and chemical properties and methods of preparation are discussed. Fabrication techniques and the characteristics of silicon carbide devices are reviewed. It is concluded that a combination of economic factors and the lack of progress in fabrication techniques leaves no viable market for SiC devices in the near future.

  14. Stabilizing Semiconductor Devices With Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overhauser, Albert W.; Maserjian, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    Damage by radiation healed rapidly. Feature provides continuous, rapid recovery of devices from degradation caused by hot electrons, photons, and ionizing radiation. Several candidate sites for palladium film catalysts, inserted during manufacture as integral parts of devices. Paladium films made by evaporation, sputtering, or chemical-vapor deposition. If additional storage required, thick layer of palladium plated on inside of package surrounding device. Hydrogen stored by exposing palladium to hydrogen gas just before package sealed hermetically.

  15. Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter

    DOEpatents

    Baldasaro, Paul F.

    1999-01-01

    A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

  16. International Semiconductor Device Research Symposium (ISDRS-93)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, Michael

    1994-04-01

    The goal of this second biannual international meeting was to provide a congenial forum for the exchange of information and new ideas for researchers from university, industry and government laboratories in the field of semiconductor devices and device physics. To this end, we have an unusually short period between the submission of papers and the conference, a speedy publication of the proceedings, poster sessions, panel discussions, and a wide dissemination of the conference proceedings. Our other goal is to make this conference truly international. To achieve this, the symposium has sub-committees in Asia, Europe and the former Soviet Union. This conference is organized in cooperation with the IEEE MTT Society, the European Physical Society, the United States National Committee of URSI and the Russian Physical Society. Generous financial support has been provided by the Army Research Office, the Office of Naval Research, the NASA Ames Research Center and the Soros International Science Foundation. Papers cover a broad range of topics, including novel and ultrasmall devices, photonics and optoelectronics, heterostructure and cryogenic devices, wide band gap semiconductors, thin film transistors, MOSFET technology and devices, carrier transport phenomena, materials and device characterization, simulation and modeling. It is hoped that such a broad range of topics will foster a cross-fertilization of the different fields related to semiconductor materials and devices.

  17. Semiconductors: In Situ Processing of Photovoltaic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, Peter A.

    1998-01-01

    The possible processing of semiconductor photovoltaic devices is discussed. The requirements for lunar PV cells is reviewed, and the key challenges involved in their manufacturing are investigated. A schematic diagram of a passivated emitter and rear cell (PERC) is presented. The possible fabrication of large photovoltaic arrays in space from lunar materials is also discussed.

  18. General Electronics Technician: Semiconductor Devices and Circuits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilley, Robert

    These instructional materials include a teacher's guide designed to assist instructors in organizing and presenting an introductory course in general electronics focusing on semiconductor devices and circuits and a student guide. The materials are based on the curriculum-alignment concept of first stating the objectives, developing instructional…

  19. Power semiconductor device with negative thermal feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borky, J. M.; Thornton, R. D.

    1970-01-01

    Composite power semiconductor avoids second breakdown and provides stable operation. It consists of an array of parallel-connected integrated circuits fabricated in a single chip. The output power device and associated low-level amplifier are closely coupled thermally, so that they have a predetermined temperature relationship.

  20. Semiconductor device PN junction fabrication using optical processing of amorphous semiconductor material

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, Bhushan; Rangappan, Anikara

    2014-11-25

    Systems and methods for semiconductor device PN junction fabrication are provided. In one embodiment, a method for fabricating an electrical device having a P-N junction comprises: depositing a layer of amorphous semiconductor material onto a crystalline semiconductor base, wherein the crystalline semiconductor base comprises a crystalline phase of a same semiconductor as the amorphous layer; and growing the layer of amorphous semiconductor material into a layer of crystalline semiconductor material that is epitaxially matched to the lattice structure of the crystalline semiconductor base by applying an optical energy that penetrates at least the amorphous semiconductor material.

  1. Methods and devices for fabricating and assembling printable semiconductor elements

    DOEpatents

    Nuzzo, Ralph G; Rogers, John A; Menard, Etienne; Lee, Keon Jae; Khang, Dahl-Young; Sun, Yugang; Meitl, Matthew; Zhu, Zhengtao

    2013-05-14

    The invention provides methods and devices for fabricating printable semiconductor elements and assembling printable semiconductor elements onto substrate surfaces. Methods, devices and device components of the present invention are capable of generating a wide range of flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices and arrays of devices on substrates comprising polymeric materials. The present invention also provides stretchable semiconductor structures and stretchable electronic devices capable of good performance in stretched configurations.

  2. Methods and devices for fabricating and assembling printable semiconductor elements

    DOEpatents

    Nuzzo, Ralph G; Rogers, John A; Menard, Etienne; Lee, Keon Jae; Khang, Dahl-Young; Sun, Yugang; Meitl, Matthew; Zhu, Zhengtao

    2014-03-04

    The invention provides methods and devices for fabricating printable semiconductor elements and assembling printable semiconductor elements onto substrate surfaces. Methods, devices and device components of the present invention are capable of generating a wide range of flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices and arrays of devices on substrates comprising polymeric materials. The present invention also provides stretchable semiconductor structures and stretchable electronic devices capable of good performance in stretched configurations.

  3. Methods and devices for fabricating and assembling printable semiconductor elements

    DOEpatents

    Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Rogers, John A.; Menard, Etienne; Lee, Keon Jae; Khang, Dahl-Young; Sun, Yugang; Meitl, Matthew; Zhu, Zhengtao

    2009-11-24

    The invention provides methods and devices for fabricating printable semiconductor elements and assembling printable semiconductor elements onto substrate surfaces. Methods, devices and device components of the present invention are capable of generating a wide range of flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices and arrays of devices on substrates comprising polymeric materials. The present invention also provides stretchable semiconductor structures and stretchable electronic devices capable of good performance in stretched configurations.

  4. Methods and devices for fabricating and assembling printable semiconductor elements

    DOEpatents

    Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Rogers, John A.; Menard, Etienne; Lee, Keon Jae; Khang, Dahl-Young; Sun, Yugang; Meitl, Matthew; Zhu, Zhengtao

    2011-07-19

    The invention provides methods and devices for fabricating printable semiconductor elements and assembling printable semiconductor elements onto substrate surfaces. Methods, devices and device components of the present invention are capable of generating a wide range of flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices and arrays of devices on substrates comprising polymeric materials. The present invention also provides stretchable semiconductor structures and stretchable electronic devices capable of good performance in stretched configurations.

  5. EDITORIAL: Frontiers in semiconductor-based devices Frontiers in semiconductor-based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Sanjay; Phillips, Jamie; Ghosh, Siddhartha; Ma, Jack; Sabarinanthan, Jayshri; Stiff-Roberts, Adrienne; Xu, Jian; Zhou, Weidong

    2009-12-01

    This special cluster of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics reports proceedings from the Frontiers in Semiconductor-Based Devices Symposium, held in honor of the 60th birthday of Professor Pallab Bhattacharya by his former doctoral students. The symposium took place at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor on 6-7 December 2009. Pallab Bhattacharya has served on the faculty of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor for 25 years. During this time, he has made pioneering contributions to semiconductor epitaxy, characterization of strained heterostructures, self-organized quantum dots, quantum-dot optoelectronic devices, and integrated optoelectronics. Professor Bhattacharya has been recognized for his accomplishments by membership of the National Academy of Engineering, by chaired professorships (Charles M Vest Distinguished University Professor and James R Mellor Professor of Engineering), and by selection as a Fellow of the IEEE, among numerous other honors and awards. Professor Bhattacharya has also made remarkable contributions in education, including authorship of the textbook Semiconductor Optoelectronic Devices (Prentice Hall, 2nd edition) and the production of 60 PhD students (and counting). In fact, this development of critical human resources is one of the biggest impacts of Professor Bhattacharya's career. His guidance and dedication have shaped the varied professional paths of his students, many of whom currently enjoy successful careers in academia, industry, and government around the world. This special cluster acknowledges the importance of Professor Bhattacharya's influence as all of the contributions are from his former doctoral students. The symposium reflects the significant impact of Professor Bhattacharya's research in that the topics span diverse, critical research areas, including: semiconductor lasers and modulators, nanoscale quantum structure-based devices, flexible CMOS

  6. Semiconductor quantum wells: old technology or new device functionalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbas, R. M.; Lo, Y. C.; Hsieh, K. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Reed, F. E.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, T.

    2009-08-01

    The introduction of semiconductor quantum wells in the 1970s created a revolution in optoelectronic devices. A large fraction of today's lasers and light emitting diodes are based on quantum wells. It has been more than 30 years but novel ideas and new device functions have recently been demonstrated using quantum well heterostructures. This paper provides a brief overview of the subject and then focuses on the physics of quantum wells that the lead author believes holds the key to new device functionalities. The data and figures contained within are not new. They have been assembled from 30 years of work. They are presented to convey the story of why quantum wells continue to fuel the engine that drives the semiconductor optoelectronic business. My apologies in advance to my students and co-workers that contributed so much that could not be covered in such a short manuscript. The explanations provided are based on the simplest models possible rather than the very sophisticated mathematical models that have evolved over many years. The intended readers are those involved with semiconductor optoelectronic devices and are interested in new device possibilities.

  7. Amphoteric oxide semiconductors for energy conversion devices: a tutorial review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kalpana; Nowotny, Janusz; Thangadurai, Venkataraman

    2013-03-01

    In this tutorial review, we discuss the defect chemistry of selected amphoteric oxide semiconductors in conjunction with their significant impact on the development of renewable and sustainable solid state energy conversion devices. The effect of electronic defect disorders in semiconductors appears to control the overall performance of several solid-state ionic devices that include oxide ion conducting solid oxide fuel cells (O-SOFCs), proton conducting solid oxide fuel cells (H-SOFCs), batteries, solar cells, and chemical (gas) sensors. Thus, the present study aims to assess the advances made in typical n- and p-type metal oxide semiconductors with respect to their use in ionic devices. The present paper briefly outlines the key challenges in the development of n- and p-type materials for various applications and also tries to present the state-of-the-art of defect disorders in technologically related semiconductors such as TiO(2), and perovskite-like and fluorite-type structure metal oxides. PMID:23257778

  8. ZnCdMgSe as a Materials Platform for Advanced Photonic Devices: Broadband Quantum Cascade Detectors and Green Semiconductor Disk Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Jesus, Joel

    The ZnCdMgSe family of II-VI materials has unique and promising characteristics that may be useful in practical applications. For example they can be grown lattice matched to InP substrates with lattice matched bandgaps that span from 2.1 to 3.5 eV, they can be successfully doped n-type, have a large conduction band offset (CBO) with no intervalley scattering present when strained, they have lower average phonon energies, and the InP lattice constant lies in the middle of the ZnSe and CdSe binaries compounds giving room to experiment with tensile and compressive stress. However they have not been studied in detail for use in practical devices. Here we have identified two types of devices that are being currently developed that benefit from the ZnCdMgSe-based material properties. These are the intersubband (ISB) quantum cascade (QC) detectors and optically pumped semiconductor lasers that emit in the visible range. The paucity for semiconductor lasers operating in the green-orange portion of the visible spectrum can be easily overcome with the ZnCdMgSe materials system developed in our research. The non-strain limited, large CBO available allows to expand the operating wavelength of ISB devices providing shorter and longer wavelengths than the currently commercially available devices. This property can also be exploited to develop broadband room temperature operation ISB detectors. The work presented here focused first on using the ZnCdMgSe-based material properties and parameter to understand and predict the interband and intersubband transitions of its heterostructures. We did this by studying an active region of a QC device by contactless electroreflectance, photoluminescence, FTIR transmittance and correlating the measurements to the quantum well structure by transfer matrix modeling. Then we worked on optimizing the ZnCdMgSe material heterostructures quality by studying the effects of growth interruptions on their optical and optoelectronic properties of

  9. Semiconductor-based, large-area, flexible, electronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit

    2011-03-15

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate the same resulting in flexible, large-area, triaxially textured, single-crystal or single-crystal-like, semiconductor-based, electronic devices are disclosed. Potential applications of resulting articles are in areas of photovoltaic devices, flat-panel displays, thermophotovoltaic devices, ferroelectric devices, light emitting diode devices, computer hard disc drive devices, magnetoresistance based devices, photoluminescence based devices, non-volatile memory devices, dielectric devices, thermoelectric devices and quantum dot laser devices.

  10. III-V semiconductor devices integrated with silicon III-V semiconductor devices integrated with silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkinson, Mark; Martin, Trevor; Smowton, Peter

    2013-09-01

    The integration of III-V semiconductor devices with silicon is one of the most topical challenges in current electronic materials research. The combination has the potential to exploit the unique optical and electronic functionality of III-V technology with the signal processing capabilities and advanced low-cost volume production techniques associated with silicon. Key industrial drivers include the use of high mobility III-V channel materials (InGaAs, InAs, InSb) to extend the performance of Si CMOS, the unification of electronics and photonics by combining photonic components (GaAs, InP) with a silicon platform for next-generation optical interconnects and the exploitation of large-area silicon substrates and high-volume Si processing capabilities to meet the challenges of low-cost production, a challenge which is particularly important for GaN-based devices in both power management and lighting applications. The diverse nature of the III-V and Si device approaches, materials technologies and the distinct differences between industrial Si and III-V processing have provided a major barrier to integration in the past. However, advances over the last decade in areas such as die transfer, wafer fusion and epitaxial growth have promoted widespread renewed interest. It is now timely to bring some of these topics together in a special issue covering a range of approaches and materials providing a snapshot of recent progress across the field. The issue opens a paper describing a strategy for the epitaxial integration of photonic devices where Kataria et al describe progress in the lateral overgrowth of InP/Si. As an alternative, Benjoucef and Reithmaier report on the potential of InAs quantum dots grown direct onto Si surfaces whilst Sandall et al describe the properties of similar InAs quantum dots as an optical modulator device. As an alternative to epitaxial integration approaches, Yokoyama et al describe a wafer bonding approach using a buried oxide concept, Corbett

  11. Semiconductor Device Analysis on Personal Computers

    1993-02-08

    PC-1D models the internal operation of bipolar semiconductor devices by solving for the concentrations and quasi-one-dimensional flow of electrons and holes resulting from either electrical or optical excitation. PC-1D uses the same detailed physical models incorporated in mainframe computer programs, yet runs efficiently on personal computers. PC-1D was originally developed with DOE funding to analyze solar cells. That continues to be its primary mode of usage, with registered copies in regular use at more thanmore » 100 locations worldwide. The program has been successfully applied to the analysis of silicon, gallium-arsenide, and indium-phosphide solar cells. The program is also suitable for modeling bipolar transistors and diodes, including heterojunction devices. Its easy-to-use graphical interface makes it useful as a teaching tool as well.« less

  12. Semiconductor devices incorporating multilayer interference regions

    DOEpatents

    Biefeld, R.M.; Drummond, T.J.; Gourley, P.L.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1987-08-31

    A semiconductor high reflector comprising a number of thin alternating layers of semiconductor materials is electrically tunable and may be used as a temperature insensitive semiconductor laser in a Fabry-Perot configuration. 8 figs.

  13. Semiconductor devices incorporating multilayer interference regions

    DOEpatents

    Biefeld, Robert M.; Drummond, Timothy J.; Gourley, Paul L.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1990-01-01

    A semiconductor high reflector comprising a number of thin alternating layers of semiconductor materials is electrically tunable and may be used as a temperature insensitive semiconductor laser in a Fabry-Perot configuration.

  14. Method for fabricating an interconnected array of semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Grimmer, Derrick P.; Paulson, Kenneth R.; Gilbert, James R.

    1989-10-10

    Semiconductor layer and conductive layer formed on a flexible substrate, divided into individual devices and interconnected with one another in series by interconnection layers and penetrating terminals.

  15. Ion implantation in compound semiconductors for high-performance electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Zolper, J.C.; Baca, A.G.; Sherwin, M.E.; Klem, J.F.

    1996-05-01

    Advanced electronic devices based on compound semiconductors often make use of selective area ion implantation doping or isolation. The implantation processing becomes more complex as the device dimensions are reduced and more complex material systems are employed. The authors review several applications of ion implantation to high performance junction field effect transistors (JFETs) and heterostructure field effect transistors (HFETs) that are based on compound semiconductors, including: GaAs, AlGaAs, InGaP, and AlGaSb.

  16. Coated semiconductor devices for neutron detection

    DOEpatents

    Klann, Raymond T.; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2002-01-01

    A device for detecting neutrons includes a semi-insulated bulk semiconductor substrate having opposed polished surfaces. A blocking Schottky contact comprised of a series of metals such as Ti, Pt, Au, Ge, Pd, and Ni is formed on a first polished surface of the semiconductor substrate, while a low resistivity ("ohmic") contact comprised of metals such as Au, Ge, and Ni is formed on a second, opposed polished surface of the substrate. In one embodiment, n-type low resistivity pinout contacts comprised of an Au/Ge based eutectic alloy or multi-layered Pd/Ge/Ti/Au are also formed on the opposed polished surfaces and in contact with the Schottky and ohmic contacts. Disposed on the Schottky contact is a neutron reactive film, or coating, for detecting neutrons. The coating is comprised of a hydrogen rich polymer, such as a polyolefin or paraffin; lithium or lithium fluoride; or a heavy metal fissionable material. By varying the coating thickness and electrical settings, neutrons at specific energies can be detected. The coated neutron detector is capable of performing real-time neutron radiography in high gamma fields, digital fast neutron radiography, fissile material identification, and basic neutron detection particularly in high radiation fields.

  17. Skutterudite Compounds For Power Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Caillat, Thierry; Borshchevsky, Alexander; Vandersande, Jan

    1996-01-01

    New semiconducting materials with p-type carrier mobility values much higher than state-of-art semiconductors discovered. Nine compounds, antimonides CoSb(sub3), RhSb(sub3), IrSb(sub3), arsenides CoAs(sub3), RhAs(sub3), IrAs(sub3), and phosphides CoP(sub3), RhP(sub3) and IrP(sub3), exhibit same skutterudite crystallographic structure and form solid solutions of general composition Co(1-x-y)RH(x)Ir(y)P(1-w-z)As(w)Sb(z). Materials exhibit high hole mobilities, high doping levels, and high electronic figures of merit. Some compositions show great potential for application to thermoelectric devices.

  18. Semiconductor device assembly and method of making same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dholakia, Anil R. (Inventor); Trager, Louis (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The invention is a semiconductor device assembly and method of making the same. A mounting plate has positioning means for positioning the plate relative to a header, a first mounting surface of the plate is attached to the header and a semiconductor device is attached to a second mounting surface of the mounting plate. The assembly is made by forming the mounting plate, positioning the mounting plate relative to the header by the positioning means, attaching the first mounting surface to the header and the semiconductor device to the second mounting surface. Another method of making the assembly is by defining and etching a mounting plate and attaching the first mounting surface to the header and the semiconductor device to the second mounting surface. This assembly and process provides an efficient means for mounting semiconductor devices and in particular electro-optic devices such as lasers.

  19. Graphene-semiconductor heterojunctions and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Tzu-Min

    on a semiconductor, resulting in a depletion region inside the semiconductor that induces a complementary charge in the graphene. Changing the reverse bias across the graphene-semiconductor junction modulates the depletion region width and thereby changes the total charge in graphene. The charge density of the graphene is also modulated by the doping density of the semiconductor substrate. The GJFET structure provides a solution for Dirac voltage tuning and back gate isolation by location-specific doping on a single device wafer. A detailed understanding of the device is obtained through the design, fabrication, and analysis of GJFETs with atmospheric pressure chemical-vapor deposited graphene on n-type Si and 4H-SiC substrates of various doping densities. A variable depletion width model is built to numerically simulate the performance. A representative n-Si (4.5x10 15 cm-3) GJFET exhibits an on-off ratio of 3.8, an intrinsic hole density of 8x1011 cm-2, and a Dirac voltage of 14.1 V. Fitting the transfer characteristic of the Si GJFET with our device model yields an electron and hole mobility of 300 and 1300 cm2/Vs respectively. The tunability of the threshold voltage by varying the substrate doping density is also demonstrated. With an increasing substrate doping from 8x1014 to 2x10 16 cm-3, the threshold of the Si GJFET decreases from 24.9 V to 3.8 V. With even higher doping density (5x1018 cm-3) in n+4H-SiC, the Dirac voltage of the GJFET is further reduced to 1.5 V. These results also demonstrate the feasibility of integrating GJFET with semiconductor substrates other than Si, widening their potential for use in high-frequency electronics.

  20. Semiconductor device modeling on a workstation

    SciTech Connect

    Diegert, C.

    1985-09-01

    We choose to move from large mainframe computers to workstations to gain the interactive graphics we need to prepare and to analyze semiconductor device modeling problems. Given this much on a workstation, it is convenient to attempt to solve the entire problem there. We find that a top-of-the-line Apollo 660 workstation, with bit-slice processor, pipelined arithmetic processor, and 4 megabytes of real memory, is surprisingly effective in finding solutions when running the Pisces II device modeling code. In our experiment we find where the workstation bogs down when running these problems. We both analyze the Pisces CPU time log and we sample the executing program to accumulate a histogram of execution time as distributed over the source code. Results suggest how Pisces could be adapted to solve somewhat larger problems entirely on the workstation. Evolution of a trusted derivative of Pisces, to be used on supercomputers without interactivity, is suggested to complement our success with Pisces on workstations. 4 refs.

  1. Semiconductor nanowires: Synthesis, passivation, and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagannathan, Hemanth

    Semiconductor nanowires have received much attention in recent years to further the scaling of electronic devices, and for their use in memory, sensors, photonics, and 3-D integrated devices. Germanium nanowires, in particular, are of great interest due to their low synthesis temperatures and high carrier mobility compared to silicon. However, there exists little work to date exploring the low-temperature controlled-synthesis of germanium nanowires. This work studies the heteroepitaxy of germanium nanowires on silicon substrates. Key parameters such as substrate orientation, growth temperature, partial pressure of reactive gas, thermal history, and exposure to ambient atmosphere are identified, and their effects on the resulting epitaxial nanowire synthesis are studied. Additionally, self-assembled highly oriented cylindrical mesopores are used as templates for controlling nanowire synthesis and serve as an attractive alternative to epitaxy. In this method, the orientations and dimensions of the pores control the growth of nanowires (direction, density, order, and size) irrespective of the starting substrate. Stable passivation techniques post-growth to prevent subsequent oxidation are also essential for realizing the large scale integration of nanowires. The well known HF treatments that have been used for decades in silicon processing are ineffective in passivating germanium surfaces, thus beckoning the need for new passivation solutions. This dissertation presents systematic studies performed to passivate germanium nanowires using aqueous halides (HF, HCl, HBr, and HI). Hydrogen bromide passivated germanium surfaces for well over 24 hours with negligible etching of germanium, and is consequently identified as the most promising candidate among the aqueous hydrogen halides. The final portion of this dissertation discusses the integration of nanowires into back-gate field-effect transistors. Important considerations in the choice of source/drain electrode

  2. Iterative solution of the semiconductor device equations

    SciTech Connect

    Bova, S.W.; Carey, G.F.

    1996-12-31

    Most semiconductor device models can be described by a nonlinear Poisson equation for the electrostatic potential coupled to a system of convection-reaction-diffusion equations for the transport of charge and energy. These equations are typically solved in a decoupled fashion and e.g. Newton`s method is used to obtain the resulting sequences of linear systems. The Poisson problem leads to a symmetric, positive definite system which we solve iteratively using conjugate gradient. The transport equations lead to nonsymmetric, indefinite systems, thereby complicating the selection of an appropriate iterative method. Moreover, their solutions exhibit steep layers and are subject to numerical oscillations and instabilities if standard Galerkin-type discretization strategies are used. In the present study, we use an upwind finite element technique for the transport equations. We also evaluate the performance of different iterative methods for the transport equations and investigate various preconditioners for a few generalized gradient methods. Numerical examples are given for a representative two-dimensional depletion MOSFET.

  3. Optical devices featuring textured semiconductor layers

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D.; Cabalu, Jasper S.

    2012-08-07

    A semiconductor sensor, solar cell or emitter, or a precursor therefor, has a substrate and one or more textured semiconductor layers deposited onto the substrate. The textured layers enhance light extraction or absorption. Texturing in the region of multiple quantum wells greatly enhances internal quantum efficiency if the semiconductor is polar and the quantum wells are grown along the polar direction. Electroluminescence of LEDs of the invention is dichromatic, and results in variable color LEDs, including white LEDs, without the use of phosphor.

  4. Optical devices featuring textured semiconductor layers

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D.; Cabalu, Jasper S.

    2011-10-11

    A semiconductor sensor, solar cell or emitter, or a precursor therefor, has a substrate and one or more textured semiconductor layers deposited onto the substrate. The textured layers enhance light extraction or absorption. Texturing in the region of multiple quantum wells greatly enhances internal quantum efficiency if the semiconductor is polar and the quantum wells are grown along the polar direction. Electroluminescence of LEDs of the invention is dichromatic, and results in variable color LEDs, including white LEDs, without the use of phosphor.

  5. Contributive research in compound semiconductor material and related devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twist, James R.

    1988-05-01

    The objective of this program was to provide the Electronic Device Branch (AFWAL/AADR) with the support needed to perform state of the art electronic device research. In the process of managing and performing on the project, UES has provided a wide variety of scientific and engineering talent who worked in-house for the Avionics Laboratory. These personnel worked on many different types of research programs from gas phase microwave driven lasers, CVD and MOCVD of electronic materials to Electronic Device Technology for new devices. The fields of research included MBE and theoretical research in this novel growth technique. Much of the work was slanted towards the rapidly developing technology of GaAs and the general thrust of the research that these tasks started has remained constant. This work was started because the Avionics Laboratory saw a chance to advance the knowledge and level of the current device technology by working in the compounds semiconductor field. UES is pleased to have had the opportunity to perform on this program and is looking forward to future efforts with the Avionics Laboratory.

  6. Exposure tool control for advanced semiconductor lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, Tomoyuki

    2015-08-01

    This is a review paper to show how we control exposure tool parameters in order to satisfy patterning performance and productivity requirements for advanced semiconductor lithography. In this paper, we will discuss how we control illumination source shape to satisfy required imaging performance, heat-induced lens aberration during exposure to minimize the aberration impact on imaging, dose and focus control to realize uniform patterning performance across the wafer and patterning position of circuit patterns on different layers. The contents are mainly about current Nikon immersion exposure tools.

  7. Photovoltaic healing of non-uniformities in semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Karpov, Victor G.; Roussillon, Yann; Shvydka, Diana; Compaan, Alvin D.; Giolando, Dean M.

    2006-08-29

    A method of making a photovoltaic device using light energy and a solution to normalize electric potential variations in the device. A semiconductor layer having nonuniformities comprising areas of aberrant electric potential deviating from the electric potential of the top surface of the semiconductor is deposited onto a substrate layer. A solution containing an electrolyte, at least one bonding material, and positive and negative ions is applied over the top surface of the semiconductor. Light energy is applied to generate photovoltage in the semiconductor, causing a redistribution of the ions and the bonding material to the areas of aberrant electric potential. The bonding material selectively bonds to the nonuniformities in a manner such that the electric potential of the nonuniformities is normalized relative to the electric potential of the top surface of the semiconductor layer. A conductive electrode layer is then deposited over the top surface of the semiconductor layer.

  8. Advanced resistive exercise device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raboin, Jasen L. (Inventor); Niebuhr, Jason (Inventor); Cruz, Santana F. (Inventor); Lamoreaux, Christopher D. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to an exercise device, which includes a vacuum cylinder and a flywheel. The flywheel provides an inertial component to the load, which is particularly well suited for use in space as it simulates exercising under normal gravity conditions. Also, the present invention relates to an exercise device, which has a vacuum cylinder and a load adjusting armbase assembly.

  9. A Semiconductor Device Noise Model: A Deterministic Approach to Semiconductor Device Current Noise for Semiclassical Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Noaman, B. A.; Korman, C. E.

    2009-04-23

    In this paper, we present a deterministic approach to calculate terminal current noise characteristics in semiconductor devices in the framework of semiclassical transport based on the spherical harmonics of the Boltzmann Transport Equation. The model relies on the solution of the Boltzmann equation in the frequency domain with special initial and boundary conditions. The terminal current fluctuation is directly related to scattering without the additional Langevin noise term added to the calculation. Simulation results are presented for the terminal current spectral density for a 1-D n{sup +}nn{sup +} structure due to elastic-acoustic and intervally scattering.

  10. Quantum transport in nanoscale semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Gregory Millington

    Because of technological advancement, transistor dimensions are approaching the length scale of the electron Fermi wavelength, on the order of only nanometers. In this regime, quantum mechanical phenomena will dominate electron transport. Using InAs single quantum wells, we have fabricated Y-shaped electron waveguides whose lengths are smaller than the elastic mean free path. Electron transport in these waveguides is ballistic, a quantum mechanical phenomenon. Coupled to the electron waveguide are two gates used to coherently steer the electron wave. We demonstrate for the first time that gating modifies the electron's wave function, by changing its geometrical resonance in the waveguide. Evidence of this alteration is the observation of anti-correlated, oscillatory transconductances. Our data provides direct evidence of wavefunction steering in a transistor structure and has applications in high-speed, low-power electronics. Quantum computing, if realized, will have a significant impact in computer security. The development of quantum computers has been hindered by challenges in producing the basic building block, the qubit. Qubit approaches using semiconductors promise upscalability and can take the form of a single electron transistor. We have designed, fabricated, and characterized single electron transistors in InAs, and separately in silicon, for the application of quantum computing. With the InAs single electron transistor, we have demonstrated one-electron quantum dots using a single-top-gate transistor configuration on a composite quantum well. Electrical transport data indicates a 15meV charging energy and a 20meV orbital energy spacing, which implies a quantum dot of 20nm in diameter. InAs is attractive due to its large electron Lande g-factor. With the silicon-based single electron transistor, we have demonstrated a structure that is similar to conventional silicon-based metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors. The substrate is undoped and

  11. EDITORIAL: Focus on Advanced Semiconductor Heterostructures for Optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amann, Markus C.; Capasso, Federico; Larsson, Anders; Pessa, Markus

    2009-12-01

    Semiconductor heterostructures are the basic materials underlying optoelectronic devices, particularly lasers and light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Made from various III-V-, II-VI-, SiGe- and other compound semiconductors, modern semiconductor devices are available for the generation, detection and modulation of light covering the entire ultra-violet to far-infrared spectral region. Recent approaches that introduced multilayer heterostructures tailored on the lower nanometre scale made possible artificial semiconductors with new properties, such as extended wavelength coverage, that enabled new applications. Together with ongoing progress on wide-gap semiconductors, the optical wavelengths accessible by semiconductor devices are steadily expanding towards the short-wavelength ultra-violet regime, as well as further into the far-infrared and terahertz spectral regions. It is the aim of this focus issue to present cutting-edge research topics on the most recent optoelectronic material and device developments in this field using advanced semiconductor heterostructures. Focus on Advanced Semiconductor Heterostructures for Optoelectronics Contents Theoretical and experimental investigations of the limits to the maximum output power of laser diodes H Wenzel, P Crump, A Pietrzak, X Wang, G Erbert and G Tränkle GaN/AlGaN intersubband optoelectronic devices H Machhadani, P Kandaswamy, S Sakr, A Vardi, A Wirtmüller, L Nevou, F Guillot, G Pozzovivo, M Tchernycheva, A Lupu, L Vivien, P Crozat, E Warde, C Bougerol, S Schacham, G Strasser, G Bahir, E Monroy and F H Julien Bound-to-continuum terahertz quantum cascade laser with a single-quantum-well phonon extraction/injection stage Maria I Amanti, Giacomo Scalari, Romain Terazzi, Milan Fischer, Mattias Beck, Jérôme Faist, Alok Rudra, Pascal Gallo and Eli Kapon Structural and optical characteristics of GaN/ZnO coaxial nanotube heterostructure arrays for light-emitting device applications Young Joon Hong, Jong-Myeong Jeon, Miyoung

  12. Advanced underwater lift device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanagan, David T.; Hopkins, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    Flexible underwater lift devices ('lift bags') are used in underwater operations to provide buoyancy to submerged objects. Commercially available designs are heavy, bulky, and awkward to handle, and thus are limited in size and useful lifting capacity. An underwater lift device having less than 20 percent of the bulk and less than 10 percent of the weight of commercially available models was developed. The design features a dual membrane envelope, a nearly homogeneous envelope membrane stress distribution, and a minimum surface-to-volume ratio. A proof-of-concept model of 50 kg capacity was built and tested. Originally designed to provide buoyancy to mock-ups submerged in NASA's weightlessness simulators, the device may have application to water-landed spacecraft which must deploy flotation upon impact, and where launch weight and volume penalties are significant. The device may also be useful for the automated recovery of ocean floor probes or in marine salvage applications.

  13. SPICE-SANDIA.LIB. Library Analog Semiconductor Devices SPICE Simulators

    SciTech Connect

    Deveney, M.F.; Archer, W.; Bogdan, C.

    1996-06-06

    SPICE-SANDIA.LIB is a library of parameter sets and macromodels of semiconductor devices. They are used with Spice-based (SPICE is a program for electronic circuit analysis) simulators to simulate electronic circuits.

  14. Efficient semiconductor light-emitting device and method

    DOEpatents

    Choquette, K.D.; Lear, K.L.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.

    1996-02-20

    A semiconductor light-emitting device and method are disclosed. The semiconductor light-emitting device is provided with at least one control layer or control region which includes an annular oxidized portion thereof to channel an injection current into the active region, and to provide a lateral refractive index profile for index guiding the light generated within the device. A periodic composition grading of at least one of the mirror stacks in the device provides a reduced operating voltage of the device. The semiconductor light-emitting device has a high efficiency for light generation, and may be formed either as a resonant-cavity light-emitting diode (RCLED) or as a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). 12 figs.

  15. Efficient semiconductor light-emitting device and method

    DOEpatents

    Choquette, Kent D.; Lear, Kevin L.; Schneider, Jr., Richard P.

    1996-01-01

    A semiconductor light-emitting device and method. The semiconductor light-emitting device is provided with at least one control layer or control region which includes an annular oxidized portion thereof to channel an injection current into the active region, and to provide a lateral refractive index profile for index guiding the light generated within the device. A periodic composition grading of at least one of the mirror stacks in the device provides a reduced operating voltage of the device. The semiconductor light-emitting device has a high efficiency for light generation, and may be formed either as a resonant-cavity light-emitting diode (RCLED) or as a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL).

  16. Apparatus for measuring semiconductor device resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matzen, W. J. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A test structure is described for enabling the accurate measurement of the resistance characteristics of a semiconductor material and includes one or more pairs of electrical terminals disposed on the surface of the material to enable measurements of the resistance encountered by currents passed between the terminals. A pair of terminals includes a first terminal extending in a closed path, such as a circle, around a second terminal, so that all currents flowing between the terminals flow along a region of known width and length. Two or more pairs of concentric terminals can be utilized, wherein the ratio of radii of each pair of terminals is the same as the ratio for all other pairs of terminals, to facilitate the calculation of the contact resistance between each terminal and the semiconductor surface, as well as the calculation of the resistance of the semiconductor material apart from the effect of the terminal to semiconductor contact resistances.

  17. Simulation of neutron radiation damage in silicon semiconductor devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Shadid, John Nicolas; Hoekstra, Robert John; Hennigan, Gary Lee; Castro, Joseph Pete Jr.; Fixel, Deborah A.

    2007-10-01

    A code, Charon, is described which simulates the effects that neutron damage has on silicon semiconductor devices. The code uses a stabilized, finite-element discretization of the semiconductor drift-diffusion equations. The mathematical model used to simulate semiconductor devices in both normal and radiation environments will be described. Modeling of defect complexes is accomplished by adding an additional drift-diffusion equation for each of the defect species. Additionally, details are given describing how Charon can efficiently solve very large problems using modern parallel computers. Comparison between Charon and experiment will be given, as well as comparison with results from commercially-available TCAD codes.

  18. Separating semiconductor devices from substrate by etching graded composition release layer disposed between semiconductor devices and substrate including forming protuberances that reduce stiction

    SciTech Connect

    Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Nielson, Gregory N; Cederberg, Jeffrey G; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis

    2015-05-12

    A method includes etching a release layer that is coupled between a plurality of semiconductor devices and a substrate with an etch. The etching includes etching the release layer between the semiconductor devices and the substrate until the semiconductor devices are at least substantially released from the substrate. The etching also includes etching a protuberance in the release layer between each of the semiconductor devices and the substrate. The etch is stopped while the protuberances remain between each of the semiconductor devices and the substrate. The method also includes separating the semiconductor devices from the substrate. Other methods and apparatus are also disclosed.

  19. Method for fabricating an interconnected array of semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimmer, Derrick P. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method of forming an array of interconnected solar cells. A flexible substrate carrying semiconductor and conductive layers is divided into individual devices by slitting the substrate along the web length. The individual devices are then connected with one another in series by laminating the substrate onto an insulating backing and by depositing conducting interconnection layers which join the lower conductor of one device with the top conductor of the adjoining device.

  20. Metal microstructures in advanced CMOS devices

    SciTech Connect

    Gignac, L.M.; Rodbell, K.P.

    1996-12-31

    As advanced semiconductor device features shrink, grain boundaries and interfaces become increasingly more important to the properties of thin metal film. With film thickness decreasing to the range of 10 nm and the corresponding features also decreasing to sub-micrometer sizes, interface and grain boundary properties become dominant. In this regime the details of the surface and grain boundaries dictate the interactions between film layers and the subsequent electrical properties. Therefore it is necessary to accurately characterize these materials on the proper length scale in order to first understand and then to improve the device effectiveness. In this talk we will examine the importance of microstructural characterization of thin metal films used in semiconductor devices and show how microstructure can influence the electrical performance. Specifically, we will review Co and Ti silicides for silicon contact and gate conductor applications, Ti/TiN liner films used for adhesion and diffusion barriers in chemical vapor deposited (CVD) tungsten vertical wiring (vias) and Ti/AlCu/Ti-TiN films used as planar interconnect metal lines.

  1. Tapered rib fiber coupler for semiconductor optical devices

    DOEpatents

    Vawter, Gregory A.; Smith, Robert Edward

    2001-01-01

    A monolithic tapered rib waveguide for transformation of the spot size of light between a semiconductor optical device and an optical fiber or from the fiber into the optical device. The tapered rib waveguide is integrated into the guiding rib atop a cutoff mesa type semiconductor device such as an expanded mode optical modulator or and expanded mode laser. The tapered rib acts to force the guided light down into the mesa structure of the semiconductor optical device instead of being bound to the interface between the bottom of the guiding rib and the top of the cutoff mesa. The single mode light leaving or entering the output face of the mesa structure then can couple to the optical fiber at coupling losses of 1.0 dB or less.

  2. 75 FR 44015 - Certain Semiconductor Products Made by Advanced Lithography Techniques and Products Containing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ... COMMISSION Certain Semiconductor Products Made by Advanced Lithography Techniques and Products Containing... importation of certain semiconductor products made by advanced lithography techniques and products containing... certain semiconductor products made by advanced lithography techniques or products containing same...

  3. A Thermal and Electrical Analysis of Power Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vafai, Kambiz

    1997-01-01

    The state-of-art power semiconductor devices require a thorough understanding of the thermal behavior for these devices. Traditional thermal analysis have (1) failed to account for the thermo-electrical interaction which is significant for power semiconductor devices operating at high temperature, and (2) failed to account for the thermal interactions among all the levels involved in, from the entire device to the gate micro-structure. Furthermore there is a lack of quantitative studies of the thermal breakdown phenomenon which is one of the major failure mechanisms for power electronics. This research work is directed towards addressing. Using a coupled thermal and electrical simulation, in which the drift-diffusion equations for the semiconductor and the energy equation for temperature are solved simultaneously, the thermo-electrical interactions at the micron scale of various junction structures are thoroughly investigated. The optimization of gate structure designs and doping designs is then addressed. An iterative numerical procedure which incorporates the thermal analysis at the device, chip and junction levels of the power device is proposed for the first time and utilized in a BJT power semiconductor device. In this procedure, interactions of different levels are fully considered. The thermal stability issue is studied both analytically and numerically in this research work in order to understand the mechanism for thermal breakdown.

  4. Nanostructured Semiconductor Device Design in Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Hongmei

    We demonstrate the use of embedded CdS nanowires in improving spectral transmission loss and the low mechanical and electrical robustness of planar CdS window layer and thus enhancing the quantum efficiency and the reliability of the CdS-CdTe solar cells. CdS nanowire window layer enables light transmission gain at 300nm-550nm. A nearly ideal spectral response of quantum efficiency at a wide spectrum range provides an evidence for improving light transmission in the window layer and enhancing absorption and carrier generation in absorber. Nanowire CdS/CdTe solar cells with Cu/graphite/silver paste as back contacts, on SnO2/ITO-soda lime glass substrates, yield the highest efficiency of 12% in nanostructured CdS-CdTe solar cells. Reliability is improved by approximately 3 times over the cells with the traditional planar CdS counterpart. Junction transport mechanisms are delineated for advancing the basic understanding of device physics at the interface. Our results prove the efficacy of this nanowire approach for enhancing the quantum efficiency and the reliability in windowabsorber type solar cells (CdS-CdTe, CdS-CIGS and CdS-CZTSSe etc) and other optoelectronic devices. We further introduce MoO3-x as a transparent, low barrier back contact. We design nanowire CdS-CdTe solar cells on flexible foils of metals in a superstrate device structure, which makes low-cost roll-to-roll manufacturing process feasible and greatly reduces the complexity of fabrication. The MoO3 layer reduces the valence band offset relative to the CdTe, and creates improved cell performance. Annealing as-deposited MoO3 in N 2 reduces series resistance from 9.98 O/cm2 to 7.72 O/cm2, and hence efficiency of the nanowire solar cell is improved from 9.9% to 11%, which efficiency comparable to efficiency of planar counterparts. When the nanowire solar cell is illuminated from MoO 3-x /Au side, it yields an efficiency of 8.7%. This reduction in efficiency is attributed to decrease in Jsc from 25.5m

  5. Fabrication of optically reflecting ohmic contacts for semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, B.L.

    1995-07-04

    A method is provided to produce a low-resistivity ohmic contact having high optical reflectivity on one side of a semiconductor device. The contact is formed by coating the semiconductor substrate with a thin metal film on the back reflecting side and then optically processing the wafer by illuminating it with electromagnetic radiation of a predetermined wavelength and energy level through the front side of the wafer for a predetermined period of time. This method produces a thin epitaxial alloy layer between the semiconductor substrate and the metal layer when a crystalline substrate is used. The alloy layer provides both a low-resistivity ohmic contact and high optical reflectance. 5 figs.

  6. Producing Silicon Carbide for Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C.; Rohatgi, N. K.

    1986-01-01

    Processes proposed for production of SiC crystals for use in semiconductors operating at temperatures as high as 900 degrees C. Combination of new processes produce silicon carbide chips containing epitaxial layers. Chips of SiC first grown on porous carbon matrices, then placed in fluidized bed, where additional layer of SiC grows. Processes combined to yield complete process. Liquid crystallization process used to make SiC particles or chips for fluidized-bed process.

  7. Advanced Modeling of Micromirror Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalicek, M. Adrian; Sene, Darren E.; Bright, Victor M.

    1995-01-01

    The flexure-beam micromirror device (FBMD) is a phase only piston style spatial light modulator demonstrating properties which can be used for phase adaptive corrective optics. This paper presents a complete study of a square FBMD, from advanced model development through final device testing and model verification. The model relates the electrical and mechanical properties of the device by equating the electrostatic force of a parallel-plate capacitor with the counter-acting spring force of the device's support flexures. The capacitor solution is derived via the Schwartz-Christoffel transformation such that the final solution accounts for non-ideal electric fields. The complete model describes the behavior of any piston-style device, given its design geometry and material properties. It includes operational parameters such as drive frequency and temperature, as well as fringing effects, mirror surface deformations, and cross-talk from neighboring devices. The steps taken to develop this model can be applied to other micromirrors, such as the cantilever and torsion-beam designs, to produce an advanced model for any given device. The micromirror devices studied in this paper were commercially fabricated in a surface micromachining process. A microscope-based laser interferometer is used to test the device in which a beam reflected from the device modulates a fixed reference beam. The mirror displacement is determined from the relative phase which generates a continuous set of data for each selected position on the mirror surface. Plots of this data describe the localized deflection as a function of drive voltage.

  8. Method of producing strained-layer semiconductor devices via subsurface-patterning

    DOEpatents

    Dodson, Brian W.

    1993-01-01

    A method is described for patterning subsurface features in a semiconductor device, wherein the semiconductor device includes an internal strained layer. The method comprises creating a pattern of semiconductor material over the semiconductor device, the semiconductor material having a predetermined thickness which stabilizes areas of the strained semiconductor layer that lie beneath the pattern. Subsequently, a heating step is applied to the semiconductor device to cause a relaxation in areas of the strained layer which do not lie beneath the semiconductor material pattern, whereby dislocations result in the relaxed areas and impair electrical transport therethrough.

  9. Methods of Measurement for Semiconductor Materials, Process Control, and Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullis, W. M. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The development of methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices is reported. Significant accomplishments include: (1) Completion of an initial identification of the more important problems in process control for integrated circuit fabrication and assembly; (2) preparations for making silicon bulk resistivity wafer standards available to the industry; and (3) establishment of the relationship between carrier mobility and impurity density in silicon. Work is continuing on measurement of resistivity of semiconductor crystals; characterization of generation-recombination-trapping centers, including gold, in silicon; evaluation of wire bonds and die attachment; study of scanning electron microscopy for wafer inspection and test; measurement of thermal properties of semiconductor devices; determination of S-parameters and delay time in junction devices; and characterization of noise and conversion loss of microwave detector diodes.

  10. Silicon superlattices: Theory and application to semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moriarty, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Silicon superlattices and their applicability to improved semiconductor devices were studied. The device application potential of the atomic like dimension of III-V semiconductor superlattices fabricated in the form of ultrathin periodically layered heterostructures was examined. Whether this leads to quantum size effects and creates the possibility to alter familiar transport and optical properties over broad physical ranges was studied. Applications to improved semiconductor lasers and electrondevices were achieved. Possible application of silicon sperlattices to faster high speed computing devices was examined. It was found that the silicon lattices show features of smaller fundamental energyband gaps and reduced effective masses. The effects correlate strongly with both the chemical and geometrical nature of the superlattice.

  11. Excitons and the lifetime of organic semiconductor devices

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    While excitons are responsible for the many beneficial optical properties of organic semiconductors, their non-radiative recombination within the material can result in material degradation due to the dumping of energy onto localized molecular bonds. This presents a challenge in developing strategies to exploit the benefits of excitons without negatively impacting the device operational stability. Here, we will briefly review the fundamental mechanisms leading to excitonic energy-driven device ageing in two example devices: blue emitting electrophosphorescent organic light emitting devices (PHOLEDs) and organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. We describe strategies used to minimize or even eliminate this fundamental device degradation pathway. PMID:25987572

  12. Deep impurity trapping concepts for power semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    High voltage semiconductor switches using deep impurity doped silicon now appear feasible for high voltage (1-100 kV), high power (10 Kw) switching and protection functions for future space power applications. Recent discoveries have demonstrated several practical ways of gating deep impurity doped silicon devices in planar configurations and of electrically controlling their characteristics, leading to a vast array of possible circuit applications. A new family of semiconductor switching devices and transducers are possible based on this technology. New deep impurity devices could be simpler than conventional p-n junction devices and yet use the same basic materials and processing techniques. In addition, multiple functions may be possible on a single device as well as increased ratings.

  13. Methods of forming semiconductor devices and devices formed using such methods

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Robert V; Rodriguez, Rene G; Pak, Joshua

    2013-05-21

    Single source precursors are subjected to carbon dioxide to form particles of material. The carbon dioxide may be in a supercritical state. Single source precursors also may be subjected to supercritical fluids other than supercritical carbon dioxide to form particles of material. The methods may be used to form nanoparticles. In some embodiments, the methods are used to form chalcopyrite materials. Devices such as, for example, semiconductor devices may be fabricated that include such particles. Methods of forming semiconductor devices include subjecting single source precursors to carbon dioxide to form particles of semiconductor material, and establishing electrical contact between the particles and an electrode.

  14. A thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter

    SciTech Connect

    Baldasaro, Paul F.

    1997-12-01

    A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential are disclosed. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

  15. Second International Semiconductor Device Research Symposium (ISDRS-1993)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, Michael; Money, John M.

    1994-04-01

    The goal of this second biannual international meeting was to provide a congenial forum for the exchange of information and new ideas for researchers from university, industry and government laboratories in the field of semiconductor devices and device physics. To this end, we have an unusually short period between the submission of papers and the conference, a speedy publication of the proceedings, poster sessions, panel discussions, and a wide dissemination of the conference proceedings. Our other goal is to make this conference truly international. To achieve this, the symposium has sub-committees in Asia, Europe and the former Soviet Union. This conference is organized in cooperation with the IEEE MTT Society, the European Physical Society, the United States National Committee of URSI and the Russian Physical Society. Generous financial support has been provided by the Army Research Office, the Office of Naval Research, the NASA Ames Research Center and the Soros International Science Foundation. Papers cover a broad range of topics, including novel and ultrasmall devices, photonics and optoelectronics, heterostructure and cryogenic devices, wide band gap semiconductors, thin film transistors, MOSFET technology and devices, carrier transport phenomena, materials and device characterization, simulation and modeling. It is hoped that such a broad range of topics will foster a cross-fertilization of the different fields related to semiconductor materials and devices.

  16. Porous silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A semiconductor device employs at least one layer of semiconducting porous silicon carbide (SiC). The porous SiC layer has a monocrystalline structure wherein the pore sizes, shapes, and spacing are determined by the processing conditions. In one embodiment, the semiconductor device is a p-n junction diode in which a layer of n-type SiC is positioned on a p-type layer of SiC, with the p-type layer positioned on a layer of silicon dioxide. Because of the UV luminescent properties of the semiconducting porous SiC layer, it may also be utilized for other devices such as LEDs and optoelectronic devices.

  17. Cosmic Ray Ruggedness of Power Semiconductor Devices for Hybrid Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Shuichi; Shoji, Tomoyuki; Ohnishi, Toyokazu; Fujikawa, Touma; Nose, Noboru; Ishiko, Masayasu; Hamada, Kimimori

    Power semiconductors that are used under high voltage conditions in hybrid vehicles (HVs) are required to have a high destruction tolerance against cosmic rays as well as to meet conventional quality standards. In this paper, the failure mechanism for single event burnouts (SEB) induced by cosmic rays in insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs) was investigated. Device destruction tolerance can be greatly improved by adopting an optimized device design that greatly suppresses parasitic thyristor action.

  18. Improvement of screening methods for silicon planar semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    The results of the program for the development of a more sensitive method for selecting silicon planar semiconductor devices for long life applications are reported. The manufacturing technologies (MOS and Bipolar) are discussed along with the screening procedures developed as a result of the tests and evaluations, and the effectiveness of the MOS and Bilayer screening procedures are evaluated.

  19. Multilevel metallization method for fabricating a metal oxide semiconductor device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, B. R., Jr.; Feltner, W. R.; Bouldin, D. L.; Routh, D. E. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An improved method is described of constructing a metal oxide semiconductor device having multiple layers of metal deposited by dc magnetron sputtering at low dc voltages and low substrate temperatures. The method provides multilevel interconnections and cross over between individual circuit elements in integrated circuits without significantly reducing the reliability or seriously affecting the yield.

  20. Novel optoelectronic devices based on single semiconductor nanowires (nanobelts)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) or nanobelts (NBs) have attracted more and more attention due to their potential application in novel optoelectronic devices. In this review, we present our recent work on novel NB photodetectors, where a three-terminal metal–semiconductor field-effect transistor (MESFET) device structure was exploited. In contrast to the common two-terminal NB (NW) photodetectors, the MESFET-based photodetector can make a balance among overall performance parameters, which is desired for practical device applications. We also present our recent work on graphene nanoribbon/semiconductor NW (SNW) heterojunction light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Herein, by taking advantage of both graphene and SNWs, we have fabricated, for the first time, the graphene-based nano-LEDs. This achievement opens a new avenue for developing graphene-based nano-electroluminescence devices. Moreover, the novel graphene/SNW hybrid devices can also find use in other applications, such as high-sensitivity sensor and transparent flexible devices in the future. PMID:22501032

  1. Combining semiconductor quantum dots and bioscaffolds into nanoscale energy transfer devices.

    PubMed

    Spillmann, Christopher M; Stewart, Michael H; Susumu, Kimihiro; Medintz, Igor L

    2015-11-01

    Significant advances have been made in the development of nanoscale devices capable of exciton transport via Förster resonance energy transfer. Several requirements must be met for effective operation, including a reliable energy-harvesting source along with highly organized, precisely placed energy relay elements. For the latter, biological scaffolds such as DNA provide a customizable, symmetric, and stable structure that can be site-specifically modified with organic fluorophores. Here, advancements in nanoscale energy transfer devices incorporating semiconductor nanocrystals and bioscaffolds are reviewed with discussion of biofunctionalization, linker chemistries, design considerations, and concluding with applications in light harvesting, multiplexed biosensing, and optical logic. PMID:26560627

  2. Release strategies for making transferable semiconductor structures, devices and device components

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John A; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Meitl, Matthew; Ko, Heung Cho; Yoon, Jongseung; Menard, Etienne; Baca, Alfred J

    2014-11-25

    Provided are methods for making a device or device component by providing a multilayer structure having a plurality of functional layers and a plurality of release layers and releasing the functional layers from the multilayer structure by separating one or more of the release layers to generate a plurality of transferable structures. The transferable structures are printed onto a device substrate or device component supported by a device substrate. The methods and systems provide means for making high-quality and low-cost photovoltaic devices, transferable semiconductor structures, (opto-)electronic devices and device components.

  3. Release strategies for making transferable semiconductor structures, devices and device components

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John A.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Meitl, Matthew; Ko, Heung Cho; Yoon, Jongseung; Menard, Etienne; Baca, Alfred J.

    2016-05-24

    Provided are methods for making a device or device component by providing a multi layer structure having a plurality of functional layers and a plurality of release layers and releasing the functional layers from the multilayer structure by separating one or more of the release layers to generate a plurality of transferable structures. The transferable structures are printed onto a device substrate or device component supported by a device substrate. The methods and systems provide means for making high-quality and low-cost photovoltaic devices, transferable semiconductor structures, (opto-)electronic devices and device components.

  4. Release strategies for making transferable semiconductor structures, devices and device components

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John A.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Meitl, Matthew; Ko, Heung Cho; Yoon, Jongseung; Menard, Etienne; Baca, Alfred J.

    2011-04-26

    Provided are methods for making a device or device component by providing a multilayer structure having a plurality of functional layers and a plurality of release layers and releasing the functional layers from the multilayer structure by separating one or more of the release layers to generate a plurality of transferable structures. The transferable structures are printed onto a device substrate or device component supported by a device substrate. The methods and systems provide means for making high-quality and low-cost photovoltaic devices, transferable semiconductor structures, (opto-)electronic devices and device components.

  5. Metallization and packaging of compound semiconductor devices at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Seigal, P.K.; Armendariz, M.G.; Rieger, D.J.; Lear, K.L.; Sullivan, C.T.

    1996-11-01

    Recent advances in compound semiconductor technology utilize a variety of metal thin films fabricated by thermal and electron-beam evaporation, and electroplating. An overview of metal processes used by Sandia`s Compound Semiconductor Research Laboratory is presented. Descriptions of electrical n-type and p-type ohmic contact alloys, interconnect metal, and metal layers specifically included for packaging requirements are addressed. Several illustrations of devices incorporating gold plated air bridges are included. ``Back-end`` processes such as flip-chip under bump metallurgy with fluxless solder reflow and plated solder processes are mentioned as current research areas.

  6. Electromagnetic radiation screening of semiconductor devices for long life applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, T. C.; Brammer, W. G.

    1972-01-01

    A review is presented of the mechanism of interaction of electromagnetic radiation in various spectral ranges, with various semiconductor device defects. Previous work conducted in this area was analyzed as to its pertinence to the current problem. The task was studied of implementing electromagnetic screening methods in the wavelength region determined to be most effective. Both scanning and flooding type stimulation techniques are discussed. While the scanning technique offers a considerably higher yield of useful information, a preliminary investigation utilizing the flooding approach is first recommended because of the ease of implementation, lower cost and ability to provide go-no-go information in semiconductor screening.

  7. Silicon carbide semiconductor device fabrication and characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. F.; Das, K.

    1990-01-01

    A number of basic building blocks i.e., rectifying and ohmic contacts, implanted junctions, MOS capacitors, pnpn diodes and devices, such as, MESFETs on both alpha and beta SiC films were fabricated and characterized. Gold forms a rectifying contact on beta SiC. Since Au contacts degrade at high temperatures, these are not considered to be suitable for high temperature device applications. However, it was possible to utilize Au contact diodes for electrically characterizing SiC films. Preliminary work indicates that sputtered Pt or Pt/Si contacts on beta SiC films are someways superior to Au contacts. Sputtered Pt layers on alpha SiC films form excellent rectifying contacts, whereas Ni layers following anneal at approximately 1050 C provide an ohmic contact. It has demonstrated that ion implantation of Al in substrates held at 550 C can be successfully employed for the fabrication of rectifying junction diodes. Feasibility of fabricating pnpn diodes and platinum gated MESFETs on alpha SiC films was also demonstrated.

  8. Optimization of semiconductor quantum devices by evolutionary search.

    PubMed

    Goldoni, G; Rossi, F

    2000-07-15

    A novel simulation strategy is proposed for searching for semiconductor quantum devices that are optimized with respect to required performances. Based on evolutionary programming, a technique that implements the paradigm of genetic algorithms in more-complex data structures than strings of bits, the proposed algorithm is able to deal with quantum devices with preset nontrivial constraints (e.g., transition energies, geometric requirements). Therefore our approach allows for automatic design, thus avoiding costly by-hand optimizations. We demonstrate the advantages of the proposed algorithm through a relevant and nontrivial application, the optimization of a second-harmonic-generation device working in resonance conditions. PMID:18064261

  9. Porous silicon carbide (SIC) semiconductor device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating porous silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described porous silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. Porous silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made porous and then the porous layer is subsequently removed. The process to form porous silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.

  10. Screenable contact structure and method for semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Ross, Bernd

    1980-08-26

    An ink composition for deposition upon the surface of a semiconductor device to provide a contact area for connection to external circuitry is disclosed, the composition comprising an ink system containing a metal powder, a binder and vehicle, and a metal frit. The ink is screened onto the semiconductor surface in the desired pattern and is heated to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal frit to become liquid. The metal frit dissolves some of the metal powder and densifies the structure by transporting the dissolved metal powder in a liquid sintering process. The sintering process typically may be carried out in any type of atmosphere. A small amount of dopant or semiconductor material may be added to the ink systems to achieve particular results if desired.

  11. Methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullis, W. M. (Editor)

    1972-01-01

    Significant accomplishments include development of a procedure to correct for the substantial differences of transistor delay time as measured with different instruments or with the same instrument at different frequencies; association of infrared response spectra of poor quality germanium gamma ray detectors with spectra of detectors fabricated from portions of a good crystal that had been degraded in known ways; and confirmation of the excellent quality and cosmetic appearance of ultrasonic bonds made with aluminum ribbon wire. Work is continuing on measurement of resistivity of semiconductor crystals; study of gold-doped silicon, development of the infrared response technique; evaluation of wire bonds and die attachment; and measurement of thermal properties of semiconductor devices, delay time and related carrier transport properties in junction devices, and noise properties of microwave diodes.

  12. Graphene-oxide-semiconductor planar-type electron emission device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Katsuhisa; Tanaka, Shunsuke; Miyashita, Akira; Nagao, Masayoshi; Nemoto, Yoshihiro; Takeguchi, Masaki; Fujita, Jun-ichi

    2016-02-01

    Graphene was used as the topmost electrode for a metal-oxide-semiconductor planar-type electron emission device. With several various layers, graphene as a gate electrode on the thin oxide layer was directly deposited by gallium vapor-assisted chemical vapor deposition. The maximum efficiency of the electron emission, defined as the ratio of anode current to cathode current, showed no dependency on electrode thickness in the range from 1.8 nm to 7.0 nm, indicating that electron scattering on the inside of the graphene electrode is practically suppressed. In addition, a high emission current density of 1-100 mA/cm2 was obtained while maintaining a relatively high electron emission efficiency of 0.1%-1.0%. The graphene-oxide-semiconductor planar-type electron emission device has great potential to achieve both high electron emission efficiency and high electron emission current density in practical applications.

  13. Quasi-Newton and multigrid methods for semiconductor device simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Slamet, S.

    1983-12-01

    A finite difference approximation to the semiconductor device equations using the Bernoulli function approximation to the exponential function is described, and the robustness of this approximation is demonstrated. Sheikh's convergence analysis of Gummel's method and quasi-Newton methods is extended to a nonuniform mesh and the Bernoulli function discretization. It is proved that Gummel's method and the quasi-Newton methods for the scaled carrier densities and carrier densities converge locally for sufficiently smooth problems.

  14. Zinc Alloys for the Fabrication of Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Yungryel; Lee, Tae S.

    2009-01-01

    ZnBeO and ZnCdSeO alloys have been disclosed as materials for the improvement in performance, function, and capability of semiconductor devices. The alloys can be used alone or in combination to form active photonic layers that can emit over a range of wavelength values. Materials with both larger and smaller band gaps would allow for the fabrication of semiconductor heterostructures that have increased function in the ultraviolet (UV) region of the spectrum. ZnO is a wide band-gap material possessing good radiation-resistance properties. It is desirable to modify the energy band gap of ZnO to smaller values than that for ZnO and to larger values than that for ZnO for use in semiconductor devices. A material with band gap energy larger than that of ZnO would allow for the emission at shorter wavelengths for LED (light emitting diode) and LD (laser diode) devices, while a material with band gap energy smaller than that of ZnO would allow for emission at longer wavelengths for LED and LD devices. The amount of Be in the ZnBeO alloy system can be varied to increase the energy bandgap of ZnO to values larger than that of ZnO. The amount of Cd and Se in the ZnCdSeO alloy system can be varied to decrease the energy band gap of ZnO to values smaller than that of ZnO. Each alloy formed can be undoped or can be p-type doped using selected dopant elements, or can be n-type doped using selected dopant elements. The layers and structures formed with both the ZnBeO and ZnCdSeO semiconductor alloys - including undoped, p-type-doped, and n-type-doped types - can be used for fabricating photonic and electronic semiconductor devices for use in photonic and electronic applications. These devices can be used in LEDs, LDs, FETs (field effect transistors), PN junctions, PIN junctions, Schottky barrier diodes, UV detectors and transmitters, and transistors and transparent transistors. They also can be used in applications for lightemitting display, backlighting for displays, UV and

  15. Strategies for Radiation Hardness Testing of Power Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soltis, James V. (Technical Monitor); Patton, Martin O.; Harris, Richard D.; Rohal, Robert G.; Blue, Thomas E.; Kauffman, Andrew C.; Frasca, Albert J.

    2005-01-01

    Plans on the drawing board for future space missions call for much larger power systems than have been flown in the past. These systems would employ much higher voltages and currents to enable more powerful electric propulsion engines and other improvements on what will also be much larger spacecraft. Long term human outposts on the moon and planets would also require high voltage, high current and long life power sources. Only hundreds of watts are produced and controlled on a typical robotic exploration spacecraft today. Megawatt systems are required for tomorrow. Semiconductor devices used to control and convert electrical energy in large space power systems will be exposed to electromagnetic and particle radiation of many types, depending on the trajectory and duration of the mission and on the power source. It is necessary to understand the often very different effects of the radiations on the control and conversion systems. Power semiconductor test strategies that we have developed and employed will be presented, along with selected results. The early results that we have obtained in testing large power semiconductor devices give a good indication of the degradation in electrical performance that can be expected in response to a given dose. We are also able to highlight differences in radiation hardness that may be device or material specific.

  16. Advanced Semiconductor Dosimetry in Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Anatoly B.

    2011-05-05

    Modern radiation therapy is very conformal, resulting in a complexity of delivery that leads to many small radiation fields with steep dose gradients, increasing error probability. Quality assurance in delivery of such radiation fields is paramount and requires real time and high spatial resolution dosimetry. Semiconductor radiation detectors due to their small size, ability to operate in passive and active modes and easy real time multichannel readout satisfy many aspects of in vivo and in a phantom quality assurance in modern radiation therapy. Update on the recent developments and improvements in semiconductor radiation detectors and their application for quality assurance in radiation therapy, based mostly on the developments at the Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, is presented.

  17. Spin dephasing in drift-dominated semiconductor spintronics devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Biqin; Appelbaum, Ian

    2008-04-01

    A spin-transport model is employed to study the effects of spin dephasing induced by diffusion-driven transit-time uncertainty through semiconductor spintronic devices where drift is the dominant transport mechanism. It is found that in the ohmic regime, dephasing is independent of transit length and determined primarily by voltage drop across the spin-transport region. The effects of voltage and temperature predicted by the model are compared to experimental results from a 350-μm -thick silicon spin-transport device using derived mathematical expressions of spin dephasing.

  18. Method of making high breakdown voltage semiconductor device

    DOEpatents

    Arthur, Stephen D.; Temple, Victor A. K.

    1990-01-01

    A semiconductor device having at least one P-N junction and a multiple-zone junction termination extension (JTE) region which uniformly merges with the reverse blocking junction is disclosed. The blocking junction is graded into multiple zones of lower concentration dopant adjacent termination to facilitate merging of the JTE to the blocking junction and placing of the JTE at or near the high field point of the blocking junction. Preferably, the JTE region substantially overlaps the graded blocking junction region. A novel device fabrication method is also provided which eliminates the prior art step of separately diffusing the JTE region.

  19. Statistical analysis of accelerated temperature aging of semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, W. A.; Milles, M. F.

    1981-05-01

    A number of semiconductor devices taken from a distribution were operated at several elevated temperatures to induce failure in all devices within a reasonable time. Assuming general characteristics of the device failure probability density function (pdf) and its temperature dependence, the expected cumulative failure function (cff) for devices in normal operation were estimated based on statistical inference, taking the average probability of a random device (from the same distribution but operated at a normal temperature) failing as a function of time. A review of the mathematical formalism employed in semiconductor reliability discussions is included. Three failure pdf's at particular usefulness to this analysis--exponential, normal, and lognormal - are discussed. The cff, at times orders of magnitude loss then, at times comparable to the desired system useful, life (*10 to the 4th power to 10 to the 5th power hr) is considered. A review of accelerated temperature aging is presented, and the assumption concerning the general characteristics of the failure pdf, which are fundamental to this analysis, are emphasized.

  20. Science and Technology of Semiconductor-On-Insulator Structures and Devices Operating in a Harsh Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flandre, Denis; Nazarov, Alexei N.; Hemment, Peter L. F.

    This book collects the papers presented during NATO Advanced Research Workshop "Science and technology of Semiconductor on Insulator (SOI) structures and devices operating in a harsh environment" held in Kiev 26-30 April 2004. The volume contains both reviews from invited speakers and selected papers presenting major innovations in SOI materials and devices. Particular attention is paid to the reliability of SOI structures operated under harsh conditions. In the first part of the book dealing with SOI material technology, the evolution of SOI materials, achievements in the main standard technologies as Smart Cut, SIMOX, porous silicon as well as methods to create more exotic structures are described.

  1. An integrated semiconductor device enabling non-optical genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Rothberg, Jonathan M; Hinz, Wolfgang; Rearick, Todd M; Schultz, Jonathan; Mileski, William; Davey, Mel; Leamon, John H; Johnson, Kim; Milgrew, Mark J; Edwards, Matthew; Hoon, Jeremy; Simons, Jan F; Marran, David; Myers, Jason W; Davidson, John F; Branting, Annika; Nobile, John R; Puc, Bernard P; Light, David; Clark, Travis A; Huber, Martin; Branciforte, Jeffrey T; Stoner, Isaac B; Cawley, Simon E; Lyons, Michael; Fu, Yutao; Homer, Nils; Sedova, Marina; Miao, Xin; Reed, Brian; Sabina, Jeffrey; Feierstein, Erika; Schorn, Michelle; Alanjary, Mohammad; Dimalanta, Eileen; Dressman, Devin; Kasinskas, Rachel; Sokolsky, Tanya; Fidanza, Jacqueline A; Namsaraev, Eugeni; McKernan, Kevin J; Williams, Alan; Roth, G Thomas; Bustillo, James

    2011-07-21

    The seminal importance of DNA sequencing to the life sciences, biotechnology and medicine has driven the search for more scalable and lower-cost solutions. Here we describe a DNA sequencing technology in which scalable, low-cost semiconductor manufacturing techniques are used to make an integrated circuit able to directly perform non-optical DNA sequencing of genomes. Sequence data are obtained by directly sensing the ions produced by template-directed DNA polymerase synthesis using all-natural nucleotides on this massively parallel semiconductor-sensing device or ion chip. The ion chip contains ion-sensitive, field-effect transistor-based sensors in perfect register with 1.2 million wells, which provide confinement and allow parallel, simultaneous detection of independent sequencing reactions. Use of the most widely used technology for constructing integrated circuits, the complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process, allows for low-cost, large-scale production and scaling of the device to higher densities and larger array sizes. We show the performance of the system by sequencing three bacterial genomes, its robustness and scalability by producing ion chips with up to 10 times as many sensors and sequencing a human genome. PMID:21776081

  2. Semiconductor-based, large-area, flexible, electronic devices on {110}<100> oriented substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Amit

    2014-08-05

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate the same resulting in flexible, oriented, semiconductor-based, electronic devices on {110}<100> textured substrates are disclosed. Potential applications of resulting articles are in areas of photovoltaic devices, flat-panel displays, thermophotovoltaic devices, ferroelectric devices, light emitting diode devices, computer hard disc drive devices, magnetoresistance based devices, photoluminescence based devices, non-volatile memory devices, dielectric devices, thermoelectric devices and quantum dot laser devices.

  3. [100] or [110] aligned, semiconductor-based, large-area, flexible, electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Amit

    2015-03-24

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate the same resulting in flexible, large-area, [100] or [110] textured, semiconductor-based, electronic devices are disclosed. Potential applications of resulting articles are in areas of photovoltaic devices, flat-panel displays, thermophotovoltaic devices, ferroelectric devices, light emitting diode devices, computer hard disc drive devices, magnetoresistance based devices, photoluminescence based devices, non-volatile memory devices, dielectric devices, thermoelectric devices and quantum dot laser devices.

  4. Lattice-gas approach to semiconductor device simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancona, M. G.

    1990-12-01

    A new approach to semiconductor device simulation is presented which is based on a lattice-gas or cellular-automata model and is quite similar to methods recently explored in fluid dynamics. The approach obtains a stochastic solution to the diffusion-drift partial differential equations describing electron transport in semiconductors. The lattice-gas method appears to be fairly well-suited to electron transport simulation with its ability to handle complex geometry, its ease of programming and its stability being some key advantages. In addition, we show that the structure of the model itself—its Boolean character—leads to a partial inclusion of electron degeneracy effects. Finally, we make a preliminary assessment of the performance of the diffusion-drift lattice-gas model, finding it to be competitive with conventional approaches when its inherent parallelism is fully exploited.

  5. Radiation hardening of metal-oxide semi-conductor (MOS) devices by boron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danchenko, V.

    1974-01-01

    Technique using boron effectively protects metal-oxide semiconductor devices from ionizing radiation without using shielding materials. Boron is introduced into insulating gate oxide layer at semiconductor-insulator interface.

  6. Oblique Hanle effect in semiconductor spin transport devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Huang, Biqin; Appelbaum, Ian

    2008-04-01

    Spin precession and dephasing ("Hanle effect") provide an unambiguous means to establish the presence of spin transport in semiconductors. We compare theoretical modeling with experimental data from drift-dominated silicon spin-transport devices, illustrating the nontrivial consequences of employing oblique magnetic fields (due to misalignment or intentional, fixed in-plane field components) to measure the effects of spin precession. Model results are also calculated for Hanle measurements under conditions of diffusion-dominated transport, revealing an expected Hanle peak-widening effect induced by the presence of fixed in-plane magnetic bias fields.

  7. Methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullis, W. M. (Editor)

    1972-01-01

    Activities directed toward the development of methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices are described. Topics investigated include: measurements of transistor delay time; application of the infrared response technique to the study of radiation-damaged, lithium-drifted silicon detectors; and identification of a condition that minimizes wire flexure and reduces the failure rate of wire bonds in transistors and integrated circuits under slow thermal cycling conditions. Supplementary data concerning staff, standards committee activities, technical services, and publications are included as appendixes.

  8. Methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullis, W. M. (Editor)

    1971-01-01

    The development of methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices is discussed. The following subjects are also presented: (1) demonstration of the high sensitivity of the infrared response technique by the identification of gold in a germanium diode, (2) verification that transient thermal response is significantly more sensitive to the presence of voids in die attachment than steady-state thermal resistance, and (3) development of equipment for determining susceptibility of transistors to hot spot formation by the current-gain technique.

  9. Contact formation and gettering of precipitated impurities by multiple firing during semiconductor device fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan

    2014-05-27

    Methods for contact formation and gettering of precipitated impurities by multiple firing during semiconductor device fabrication are provided. In one embodiment, a method for fabricating an electrical semiconductor device comprises: a first step that includes gettering of impurities from a semiconductor wafer and forming a backsurface field; and a second step that includes forming a front contact for the semiconductor wafer, wherein the second step is performed after completion of the first step.

  10. Tunnel based spin injection devices for semiconductor spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xin

    This dissertation summarizes the work on spin-dependent electron transport and spin injection in tunnel based spintronic devices. In particular, it focuses on a novel three terminal hot electron device combining ferromagnetic metals and semiconductors---the magnetic tunnel transistor (MTT). The MTT has extremely high magnetic field sensitivity and is a useful tool to explore spin-dependent electron transport in metals, semiconductors, and at their interfaces over a wide energy range. In Chap. 1, the basic concept and fabrication of the MTT are discussed. Two types of MTTs, with ferromagnetic single and spin-valve base layers, respectively, are introduced and compared. In the following chapters, the transport properties of the MTT are discussed in detail, including the spin-dependent hot electron attenuation lengths in CoFe and NiFe thin films on GaAs (Chap. 2), the bias voltage dependence of the magneto-current (Chap. 3), the giant magneto-current effect in MTTs with a spin-valve base (Chap. 4), and the influence of non-magnetic seed layers on magneto-electronic properties of MTTs with a Si collector (Chap. 5). Chap. 6 concentrates on electrical injection of spin-polarized electrons into semiconductors, which is an essential ingredient in semiconductor spintronics. Two types of spin injectors are discussed: an MTT injector and a CoFe/MgO tunnel injector. The spin polarization of the injected electron current is detected optically by measuring the circular polarization of electroluminescence from a quantum well light emitting diode. Using an MTT injector a spin polarization of ˜10% is found for injection electron energy of ˜2 eV at 1.4K. This moderate spin polarization is most likely limited by significant electron spin relaxation at high energy. Much higher spin injection efficiency is obtained by using a CoFe/MgO tunnel injector with spin polarization values of ˜50% at 100K. The temperature and bias dependence of the electroluminescence polarization provides

  11. Development of silicon carbide semiconductor devices for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Powell, J. Anthony; Petit, Jeremy B.

    1991-01-01

    The semiconducting properties of electronic grade silicon carbide crystals, such as wide energy bandgap, make it particularly attractive for high temperature applications. Applications for high temperature electronic devices include instrumentation for engines under development, engine control and condition monitoring systems, and power conditioning and control systems for space platforms and satellites. Discrete prototype SiC devices were fabricated and tested at elevated temperatures. Grown p-n junction diodes demonstrated very good rectification characteristics at 870 K. A depletion-mode metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor was also successfully fabricated and tested at 770 K. While optimization of SiC fabrication processes remain, it is believed that SiC is an enabling high temperature electronic technology.

  12. Modeling and simulation of bulk gallium nitride power semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabui, G.; Parbrook, P. J.; Arredondo-Arechavala, M.; Shen, Z. J.

    2016-05-01

    Bulk gallium nitride (GaN) power semiconductor devices are gaining significant interest in recent years, creating the need for technology computer aided design (TCAD) simulation to accurately model and optimize these devices. This paper comprehensively reviews and compares different GaN physical models and model parameters in the literature, and discusses the appropriate selection of these models and parameters for TCAD simulation. 2-D drift-diffusion semi-classical simulation is carried out for 2.6 kV and 3.7 kV bulk GaN vertical PN diodes. The simulated forward current-voltage and reverse breakdown characteristics are in good agreement with the measurement data even over a wide temperature range.

  13. Comparison of Non-Parabolic Hydrodynamic Simulations for Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. W.; Brennan, K. F.

    1996-01-01

    Parabolic drift-diffusion simulators are common engineering level design tools for semiconductor devices. Hydrodynamic simulators, based on the parabolic band approximation, are becoming more prevalent as device dimensions shrink and energy transport effects begin to dominate device characteristic. However, band structure effects present in state-of-the-art devices necessitate relaxing the parabolic band approximation. This paper presents simulations of ballistic diodes, a benchmark device, of Si and GaAs using two different non-parabolic hydrodynamic formulations. The first formulation uses the Kane dispersion relationship in the derivation of the conservation equations. The second model uses a power law dispersion relation {(hk)(exp 2)/2m = xW(exp Y)}. Current-voltage relations show that for the ballistic diodes considered. the non-parabolic formulations predict less current than the parabolic case. Explanations of this will be provided by examination of velocity and energy profiles. At low bias, the simulations based on the Kane formulation predict greater current flow than the power law formulation. As the bias is increased this trend changes and the power law predicts greater current than the Kane formulation. It will be shown that the non-parabolicity and energy range of the hydrodynamic model based on the Kane dispersion relation are limited due to the binomial approximation which was utilized in the derivation.

  14. TOPICAL REVIEW: Multiferroic thin-film integration onto semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Reji; Scott, J. F.; Bose, Dwarka N.; Katiyar, Ram S.

    2010-10-01

    This review deals with thin films of single-phase materials which exhibit two primary ferroic properties, namely ferroelectricity and (anti)ferromagnetism, deposited directly or through buffer layers onto semiconductors. It is the electrical control of ferromagnetism and magnetic control of ferroelectricity at room temperature and resulting device functionality that served as the driving force for the recent widespread research activities in this field. Although Gilbert demonstrated in 1600 that electrostatics (amber) do not couple to magnetostatics (compass needles), charges in motion certainly couple to magnetism, as shown later by Oersted and epitomized by Maxwell's theoretical derivation of the properties of electromagnetic waves. We survey the important contributions of various eminent physicists, from Curie to Dzyaloshinskii and Astrov to Schmid, without whom this field of research might not have developed. Most of the known multiferroic materials are classified into different groups, primarily based on Khomskii's classification of oxide multiferroics. We follow this with a brief discussion on the device application of multiferroics with semiconductor integration.

  15. Multiferroic thin-film integration onto semiconductor devices.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Reji; Scott, J F; Bose, Dwarka N; Katiyar, Ram S

    2010-10-27

    This review deals with thin films of single-phase materials which exhibit two primary ferroic properties, namely ferroelectricity and (anti)ferromagnetism, deposited directly or through buffer layers onto semiconductors. It is the electrical control of ferromagnetism and magnetic control of ferroelectricity at room temperature and resulting device functionality that served as the driving force for the recent widespread research activities in this field. Although Gilbert demonstrated in 1600 that electrostatics (amber) do not couple to magnetostatics (compass needles), charges in motion certainly couple to magnetism, as shown later by Oersted and epitomized by Maxwell's theoretical derivation of the properties of electromagnetic waves. We survey the important contributions of various eminent physicists, from Curie to Dzyaloshinskii and Astrov to Schmid, without whom this field of research might not have developed. Most of the known multiferroic materials are classified into different groups, primarily based on Khomskii's classification of oxide multiferroics. We follow this with a brief discussion on the device application of multiferroics with semiconductor integration. PMID:21403306

  16. Surface chemistry relevant to material processing for semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Lynne Aiko

    Metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures are the core of many modern integrated circuit (IC) devices. Each material utilized in the different regions of the device has its own unique chemistry. Silicon is the base semiconductor material used in the majority of these devices. With IC device complexity increasing and device dimensions decreasing, understanding material interactions and processing becomes increasingly critical. Hsb2 desorption is the rate-limiting step in silicon growth using silane under low temperature conditions. Activation energies for Hsb2 desorption measured during Si chemical vapor deposition (CVD) versus single-crystal studies are found to be significantly lower. It has been proposed that defect sites on the silicon surface could explain the observed differences. Isothermal Hsb2 desorption studies using laser induced thermal desorption (LITD) techniques have addressed this issue. The growth of low temperature oxides is another relevant issue for fabrication of IC devices. Recent studies using 1,4-disilabutane (DSB) (SiHsb3CHsb2CHsb2SiHsb3) at 100sp°C in ambient Osb2 displayed the successful low temperature growth of silicon dioxide (SiOsb2). However, these studies provided no information about the deposition mechanism. We performed LITD and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) studies on single-crystal and porous silicon surfaces to examine the adsorption, decomposition, and desorption processes to determine the deposition mechanism. Titanium nitride (TiN) diffusion barriers are necessary in modern metallization structures. Controlled deposition using titanium tetrachloride (TiClsb4) and ammonia (NHsb3) has been demonstrated using atomic layered processing (ALP) techniques. We intended to study the sequential deposition method by monitoring the surface intermediates using LITD techniques. However, formation of a Cl impurity source, ammonium chloride (NHsb4sp+Clsp-), was observed, thereby, limiting our ability for effective studies. Tetrakis

  17. Recent advances in semiconductors for photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical water splitting.

    PubMed

    Hisatomi, Takashi; Kubota, Jun; Domen, Kazunari

    2014-11-21

    Photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical water splitting under irradiation by sunlight has received much attention for production of renewable hydrogen from water on a large scale. Many challenges still remain in improving energy conversion efficiency, such as utilizing longer-wavelength photons for hydrogen production, enhancing the reaction efficiency at any given wavelength, and increasing the lifetime of the semiconductor materials. This introductory review covers the fundamental aspects of photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical water splitting. Controlling the semiconducting properties of photocatalysts and photoelectrode materials is the primary concern in developing materials for solar water splitting, because they determine how much photoexcitation occurs in a semiconductor under solar illumination and how many photoexcited carriers reach the surface where water splitting takes place. Given a specific semiconductor material, surface modifications are important not only to activate the semiconductor for water splitting but also to facilitate charge separation and to upgrade the stability of the material under photoexcitation. In addition, reducing resistance loss and forming p-n junction have a significant impact on the efficiency of photoelectrochemical water splitting. Correct evaluation of the photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical activity for water splitting is becoming more important in enabling an accurate comparison of a number of studies based on different systems. In the latter part, recent advances in the water splitting reaction under visible light will be presented with a focus on non-oxide semiconductor materials to give an overview of the various problems and solutions. PMID:24413305

  18. Flexible non-volatile memory devices based on organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosseddu, Piero; Casula, Giulia; Lai, Stefano; Bonfiglio, Annalisa

    2015-09-01

    The possibility of developing fully organic electronic circuits is critically dependent on the ability to realize a full set of electronic functionalities based on organic devices. In order to complete the scene, a fundamental element is still missing, i.e. reliable data storage. Over the past few years, a considerable effort has been spent on the development and optimization of organic polymer based memory elements. Among several possible solutions, transistor-based memories and resistive switching-based memories are attracting a great interest in the scientific community. In this paper, a route for the fabrication of organic semiconductor-based memory devices with performances beyond the state of the art is reported. Both the families of organic memories will be considered. A flexible resistive memory based on a novel combination of materials is presented. In particular, high retention time in ambient conditions are reported. Complementary, a low voltage transistor-based memory is presented. Low voltage operation is allowed by an hybrid, nano-sized dielectric, which is also responsible for the memory effect in the device. Thanks to the possibility of reproducibly fabricating such device on ultra-thin substrates, high mechanical stability is reported.

  19. Trace explosive sensor devices based on semiconductor nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Danling

    This dissertation discusses an explosive sensing device based on semiconductor nanomaterials. Here, we mainly focus on two kinds of materials: titanium dioxide nanowires and silicon nanowires to detect explosive trace vapor. Herein, methods for the synthesis, fabrication, design of nanostructured sensing materials using low-cost hydrothermal process are present. In addition, the nanomaterials have been systemically tested on different explosive. The first part of dissertation is focused on the fabrication of TiO2(B) dominant nanowires and testing the response to explosives. It was found that the high porous TiO2(B) nanowires when mixed anatase TiO2, exhibit a very fast and highly sensitive response to nitro-containing explosives. The second part of dissertation has studied the basic sensing mechanism of TiO2(B) nanowire sensor to detect explosives. It shows the specific surface characteristics of TiO2 responsible for the nitro-containing explosives. This information is then used to propose a method using UV illumination to reduce the effect of water vapor on TiO2(B) nanowires. The third part discussed an explosive sensor based on silicon nanowires. We analyzed the mechanism of silicon nanowires to detect nitro-related explosive compounds. In order to further investigate the sensing mechanism of TiO2, the fourth part of dissertation studies the effect on sensor performance by using different crystal phases of TiO2, different microstructure of TiO2, surface modification of TiO2, and different kinds of nanostructured semiconductors such as ZnO nanowires, TiO2 coated ZnO nanowires, V2O5 nanowires, and CdS nanowires to detect explosives. It is found that only TiO2 related semiconductor shows good response to explosives.

  20. Analysis of Carbon Nanotube Metal-Semiconductor Diode Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We study recently reported drain current Id-drain voltage Vd characteristics of a carbon nanotube metal semiconductor diode device with the gate voltage Vg applied to modulate the carrier density in the nanotube. The diode was kink-shaped at the metal-semiconductor interface. It was shown that (1) larger negative Vg blocked Id more effectively in the negative Vd region, resulting in the rectifying Id-Vd characteristics, and that (2) positive Vg allowed Id in the both Vd polarities, resulting in the non-rectifying characteristics. The negative Vd was the Schottky reverse direction, judging from the negligible Id behavior for a wide region of -4 V less than Vd less than 0 V, with Vg = -4 V. Such negative Vg would attract positive charges from the metallic electrodes (charge reservoir) to the nanotube and lower the nanotube Fermi energy (EF). With larger negative Vg, the experiment showed that the Schottky forward direction (Vd greater than 0) had a smaller turn-on voltage and the Schottky reverse direction (Vd less than 0) was more resistant to the tunneling breakdown. Therefore, the majority carriers in the transport would be electrons since they can see a lower tunneling barrier (shallower built-in potential) in the forward direction when EF is lowered, and a thicker tunneling barrier (Schottky barrier) in the reverse direction due to the reduction in the electron density when EF is lowered.

  1. Semiconductor Devices Inspired By and Integrated With Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, John

    2012-04-25

    Biology is curved, soft and elastic; silicon wafers are not. Semiconductor technologies that can bridge this gap in form and mechanics will create new opportunities in devices that adopt biologically inspired designs or require intimate integration with the human body. This talk describes the development of ideas for electronics that offer the performance of state-of-the-art, wafer- based systems but with the mechanical properties of a rubber band. We explain the underlying materials science and mechanics of these approaches, and illustrate their use in (1) bio- integrated, ‘tissue-like’ electronics with unique capabilities for mapping cardiac and neural electrophysiology, and (2) bio-inspired, ‘eyeball’ cameras with exceptional imaging properties enabled by curvilinear, Petzval designs.

  2. Nonequilibrium drift-diffusion model for organic semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felekidis, Nikolaos; Melianas, Armantas; Kemerink, Martijn

    2016-07-01

    Two prevailing formalisms are currently used to model charge transport in organic semiconductor devices. Drift-diffusion calculations, on the one hand, are time effective but assume local thermodynamic equilibrium, which is not always realistic. Kinetic Monte Carlo models, on the other hand, do not require this assumption but are computationally expensive. Here, we present a nonequilibrium drift-diffusion model that bridges this gap by fusing the established multiple trap and release formalism with the drift-diffusion transport equation. For a prototypical photovoltaic system the model is shown to quantitatively describe, with a single set of parameters, experiments probing (1) temperature-dependent steady-state charge transport—space-charge limited currents, and (2) time-resolved charge transport and relaxation of nonequilibrated photocreated charges. Moreover, the outputs of the developed kinetic drift-diffusion model are an order of magnitude, or more, faster to compute and in good agreement with kinetic Monte Carlo calculations.

  3. Amorphous metallizations for high-temperature semiconductor device applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, J. D.; Perepezko, J. H.; Nordman, J. E.; Kang-Jin, G.

    1981-01-01

    The initial results of work on a class of semiconductor metallizations which appear to hold promise as primary metallizations and diffusion barriers for high temperature device applications are presented. These metallizations consist of sputter-deposited films of high T sub g amorphous-metal alloys which (primarily because of the absence of grain boundaries) exhibit exceptionally good corrosion-resistance and low diffusion coefficients. Amorphous films of the alloys Ni-Nb, Ni-Mo, W-Si, and Mo-Si were deposited on Si, GaAs, GaP, and various insulating substrates. The films adhere extremely well to the substrates and remain amorphous during thermal cycling to at least 500 C. Rutherford backscattering and Auger electron spectroscopy measurements indicate atomic diffussivities in the 10 to the -19th power sq cm/S range at 450 C.

  4. System for characterizing semiconductor materials and photovoltaic devices through calibration

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, B.L.; Allen, L.C.; Marshall, C.; Murphy, R.C.; Marshall, T.

    1998-05-26

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for measuring characteristics of a piece of material, typically semiconductor materials including photovoltaic devices. The characteristics may include dislocation defect density, grain boundaries, reflectance, external LBIC, internal LBIC, and minority carrier diffusion length. The apparatus includes a light source, an integrating sphere, and a detector communicating with a computer. The measurement or calculation of the characteristics is calibrated to provide accurate, absolute values. The calibration is performed by substituting a standard sample for the piece of material, the sample having a known quantity of one or more of the relevant characteristics. The quantity measured by the system of the relevant characteristic is compared to the known quantity and a calibration constant is created thereby. 44 figs.

  5. System for characterizing semiconductor materials and photovoltaic devices through calibration

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.; Allen, Larry C.; Marshall, Craig; Murphy, Robert C.; Marshall, Todd

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring characteristics of a piece of material, typically semiconductor materials including photovoltaic devices. The characteristics may include dislocation defect density, grain boundaries, reflectance, external LBIC, internal LBIC, and minority carrier diffusion length. The apparatus includes a light source, an integrating sphere, and a detector communicating with a computer. The measurement or calculation of the characteristics is calibrated to provide accurate, absolute values. The calibration is performed by substituting a standard sample for the piece of material, the sample having a known quantity of one or more of the relevant characteristics. The quantity measured by the system of the relevant characteristic is compared to the known quantity and a calibration constant is created thereby.

  6. Conductance matrix of multiterminal semiconductor devices with edge channels

    SciTech Connect

    Danilovskii, E. Yu. Bagraev, N. T.

    2014-12-15

    A method for determining the conductance matrix of multiterminal semiconductor structures with edge channels is proposed. The method is based on the solution of a system of linear algebraic equations based on Kirchhoff equations, made up of potential differences U{sub ij} measured at stabilized currents I{sub kl}, where i, j, k, l are terminal numbers. The matrix obtained by solving the system of equations completely describes the structure under study, reflecting its configuration and homogeneity. This method can find wide application when using the known Landauer-Buttiker formalism to analyze carrier transport in the quantum Hall effect and quantum spin Hall effect modes. Within the proposed method, the contribution of the contact area resistances R{sub c} to the formation of conductance matrix elements is taken into account. The possibilities of practical application of the results obtained in developing analog cryptographic devices are considered.

  7. Thermoelectric Devices Advance Thermal Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Thermoelectric (TE) devices heat, cool, and generate electricity when a temperature differential is provided between the two module faces. In cooperation with NASA, Chico, California-based United States Thermoelectric Consortium Inc. (USTC) built a gas emissions analyzer (GEA) for combustion research. The GEA precipitated hydrocarbon particles, preventing contamination that would hinder precise rocket fuel analysis. The USTC research and design team uses patent-pending dimple, pin-fin, microchannel and microjet structures to develop and design heat dissipation devices on the mini-scale level, which not only guarantee high performance of products, but also scale device size from 1 centimeter to 10 centimeters. USTC continues to integrate the benefits of TE devices in its current line of thermal management solutions and has found the accessibility of NASA technical research to be a valuable, sustainable resource that has continued to positively influence its product design and manufacturing

  8. Materials Science and Device Physics of 2-Dimensional Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hui

    Materials and device innovations are the keys to future technology revolution. For MOSFET scaling in particular, semiconductors with ultra-thin thickness on insulator platform is currently of great interest, due to the potential of integrating excellent channel materials with the industrially mature Si processing. Meanwhile, ultra-thin thickness also induces strong quantum confinement which in turn affect most of the material properties of these 2-dimensional (2-D) semiconductors, providing unprecedented opportunities for emerging technologies. In this thesis, multiple novel 2-D material systems are explored. Chapter one introduces the present challenges faced by MOSFET scaling. Chapter two covers the integration of ultrathin III V membranes with Si. Free standing ultrathin III-V is studied to enable high performance III-V on Si MOSFETs with strain engineering and alloying. Chapter three studies the light absorption in 2-D membranes. Experimental results and theoretical analysis reveal that light absorption in the 2-D quantum membranes is quantized into a fundamental physical constant, where we call it the quantum unit of light absorption, irrelevant of most of the material dependent parameters. Chapter four starts to focus on another 2-D system, atomic thin layered chalcogenides. Single and few layered chalcogenides are first explored as channel materials, with focuses in engineering the contacts for high performance MOSFETs. Contact treatment by molecular doping methods reveals that many layered chalcogenides other than MoS2 exhibit good transport properties at single layer limit. Finally, Chapter five investigated 2-D van der Waals heterostructures built from different single layer chalcogenides. The investigation in a WSe2/MoS2 hetero-bilayer shows a large Stokes like shift between photoluminescence peak and lowest absorption peak, as well as strong photoluminescence intensity, consistent with spatially indirect transition in a type II band alignment in this

  9. Application of copper-carbon fiber composites to power semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuniya, Keiichi; Arakawa, Hideo; Sakaue, Tadashi; Minorikawa, Hitoshi; Akeyama, Kenji; Sakamoto, Tatsuji

    1988-01-01

    Copper-carbon composite electrodes are used in a series of power semiconductor devices, i.e., resin molded diodes, button-type diodes, stud-type diodes, power modules, and integrated circuit igniter modules. The properties of these power semiconductor devices compare favorably with those conventional devices using Mo or W electrodes. In thermal fatigue tests, no degradation in the electrical and mechanical characteristics of these devices are observed. The new composite electrode with carbon fibers satisfies all of the major requirements for the electrodes in power semiconductor devices.

  10. Semiconductor Nonlinear Waveguide Devices and Integrated-Mirror Etalons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Chih-Li.

    This dissertation investigates different III-V semiconductor devices for applications in nonlinear photonics. These include passive and active nonlinear directional couplers, current-controlled optical phase shifter, and integrated -mirror etalons. A novel method to find the propagation constants of an optical waveguide is introduced. The same method is applied, with minor modifications, to find the coupling length of a directional coupler. The method presented provides a tool for the design of optical waveguide devices. The design, fabrication, and performance of a nonlinear directional coupler are presented. This device uses light intensity to control the direction of light coming out. This is achieved through photo-generated-carriers mechanism in the picosecond regime and through the optical Stark effect in the femtosecond regime. A two-transverse -dimensions beam-propagation computation is used to model the switching behavior in the nonlinear directional coupler. It is found that, by considering the pulse degradation effect, the computation agrees well with experiments. The possibility of operating a nonlinear directional coupler with gain is investigated. It is concluded that by injecting current into the nonlinear directional coupler does not provide the advantages hoped for and the modelling using 2-D beam -propagation methods verifies that. Using current injection to change the refractive index of a waveguide, an optical phase shifter is constructed. This device has the merit of delivering large phase shift with almost no intensity modulation. A phase shift as large as 3pi is produced in a waveguide 400 μm in length. Finally, a new structure, grown by the molecular beam epitaxy machine, is described. The structure consists of two quarter-wave stacks and a spacer layer to form an integrated-mirror etalon. The theory, design principles, spectral analyses are discussed with design examples to clarify the ideas. Emphasis is given to the vertical-cavity surface

  11. III-V aresenide-nitride semiconductor materials and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, Jo S. (Inventor); Welch, David F. (Inventor); Scifres, Donald R. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    III-V arsenide-nitride semiconductor crystals, methods for producing such crystals and devices employing such crystals. Group III elements are combined with group V elements, including at least nitrogen and arsenic, in concentrations chosen to lattice match commercially available crystalline substrates. Epitaxial growth of these III-V crystals results in direct bandgap materials, which can be used in applications such as light emitting diodes and lasers. Varying the concentrations of the elements in the III-V crystals varies the bandgaps, such that materials emitting light spanning the visible spectra, as well as mid-IR and near-UV emitters, can be created. Conversely, such material can be used to create devices that acquire light and convert the light to electricity, for applications such as full color photodetectors and solar energy collectors. The growth of the III-V crystals can be accomplished by growing thin layers of elements or compounds in sequences that result in the overall lattice match and bandgap desired.

  12. Analysis of Carbon Nanotube Metal-Semiconductor Diode Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We study recently reported drain current I(sub d)-drain voltage V(sub d) characteristics of a carbon nanotube metal-semiconductor diode device with the gate voltage V(sub g) applied to modulate the carrier density in the nanotube. The diode was kink-shaped at the metal-semiconductor interface. It was shown that (1) larger negative V(sub g) blocked I(sub d) more effectively in the negative V(sub d) region, resulting in the rectifying I(sub d)-V(sub d) characteristics, and that (2) positive V(sub g) allowed I(sub d) in the both V(sub d) polarities, resulting in the non-rectifying characteristics. The negative V(sub d) was the Schottky reverse direction, judging from the negligible I(sub d) behavior for a wide region of -4 V (is less than) V(sub d) (is less than) 0 V, with V(sub g) = -4 V. Such negative V(sub g) would attract positive charges from the metallic electrodes (charge reservoir) to the nanotube and lower the nanotube Fermi energy (E(sub F)). With larger negative V(sub g), the experiment showed that the Schottky forward direction (V(sub d) (is greater than) 0) had a smaller turn-on voltage and the Schottky reverse direction (V(sub d) (is less than) 0) was more resistant to the tunneling breakdown. Therefore, the majority carriers in the transport would be electrons since they can see a lower tunneling barrier (shallower built-in potential) in the forward direction when E(sub F) is lowered, and a thicker tunneling barrier (Schottky barrier) in the reverse direction due to the reduction in the electron density when E(sub F) is lowered.

  13. An investigation of corrosion in semiconductor bridge explosive devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Klassen, Sandra Ellen; Sorensen, Neil Robert

    2007-05-01

    In the course of a failure investigation, corrosion of the lands was occasionally found in developmental lots of semiconductor bridge (SCB) detonators and igniters. Evidence was found in both detonators and igniters of the gold layer being deposited on top of a corroded aluminum layer, but inspection of additional dies from the same wafer did not reveal any more corroded parts. In some detonators, evidence was found that corrosion of the aluminum layer also happened after the gold was deposited. Moisture and chloride must both be present for aluminum to corrode. A likely source for chloride is the adhesive used to bond the die to the header. Inspection of other SCB devices, both recently manufactured and manufactured about ten years ago, found no evidence for corrosion even in devices that contained SCBs with aluminum lands and no gold. Several manufacturing defects were noted such as stains, gouges in the gold layer due to tooling, and porosity of the gold layer. Results of atmospheric corrosion experiments confirmed that devices with a porous gold layer over the aluminum layer are susceptible to extensive corrosion when both moisture and chlorine are present. The extent of corrosion depends on the level of chlorine contamination, and corrosion did not occur when only moisture was present. Elimination of the gold plating on the lands eliminated corrosion of the lands in these experiments. Some questions remain unanswered, but enough information was gathered to recommend changes to materials and procedures. A second lot of detonators was successfully built using aluminum SCBs, limiting the use of Ablebond{trademark} adhesive, increasing the rigor in controlling exposure to moisture, and adding inspection steps.

  14. Lorentz factor determination for local electric fields in semiconductor devices utilizing hyper-thin dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, J. W.

    2015-11-28

    The local electric field (the field that distorts, polarizes, and weakens polar molecular bonds in dielectrics) has been investigated for hyper-thin dielectrics. Hyper-thin dielectrics are currently required for advanced semiconductor devices. In the work presented, it is shown that the common practice of using a Lorentz factor of L = 1/3, to describe the local electric field in a dielectric layer, remains valid for hyper-thin dielectrics. However, at the very edge of device structures, a rise in the macroscopic/Maxwell electric field E{sub diel} occurs and this causes a sharp rise in the effective Lorentz factor L{sub eff}. At capacitor and transistor edges, L{sub eff} is found to increase to a value 2/3 < L{sub eff} < 1. The increase in L{sub eff} results in a local electric field, at device edge, that is 50%–100% greater than in the bulk of the dielectric. This increase in local electric field serves to weaken polar bonds thus making them more susceptible to breakage by standard Boltzmann and/or current-driven processes. This has important time-dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) implications for all electronic devices utilizing polar materials, including GaN devices that suffer from device-edge TDDB.

  15. Atomically Flat Surfaces Developed for Improved Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. Anthony

    2001-01-01

    New wide bandgap semiconductor materials are being developed to meet the diverse high temperature, -power, and -frequency demands of the aerospace industry. Two of the most promising emerging materials are silicon carbide (SiC) for high-temperature and high power applications and gallium nitride (GaN) for high-frequency and optical (blue-light-emitting diodes and lasers) applications. This past year Glenn scientists implemented a NASA-patented crystal growth process for producing arrays of device-size mesas whose tops are atomically flat (i.e., step-free). It is expected that these mesas can be used for fabricating SiC and GaN devices with major improvements in performance and lifetime. The promising new SiC and GaN devices are fabricated in thin-crystal films (known as epi films) that are grown on commercial single-crystal SiC wafers. At this time, no commercial GaN wafers exist. Crystal defects, known as screw defects and micropipes, that are present in the commercial SiC wafers propagate into the epi films and degrade the performance and lifetime of subsequently fabricated devices. The new technology isolates the screw defects in a small percentage of small device-size mesas on the surface of commercial SiC wafers. This enables atomically flat surfaces to be grown on the remaining defect-free mesas. We believe that the atomically flat mesas can also be used to grow GaN epi films with a much lower defect density than in the GaN epi films currently being grown. Much improved devices are expected from these improved low-defect epi films. Surface-sensitive SiC devices such as Schottky diodes and field effect transistors should benefit from atomically flat substrates. Also, we believe that the atomically flat SiC surface will be an ideal surface on which to fabricate nanoscale sensors and devices. The process for achieving atomically flat surfaces is illustrated. The surface steps present on the "as-received" commercial SiC wafer is also illustrated. because of the

  16. Electroluminescent devices formed using semiconductor nanocrystals as an electron transport media and method of making such electroluminescent devices

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Colvin, Vickie

    1996-01-01

    An electroluminescent device is described, as well as a method of making same, wherein the device is characterized by a semiconductor nanocrystal electron transport layer capable of emitting visible light in response to a voltage applied to the device. The wavelength of the light emitted by the device may be changed by changing either the size or the type of semiconductor nanocrystals used in forming the electron transport layer. In a preferred embodiment the device is further characterized by the capability of emitting visible light of varying wavelengths in response to changes in the voltage applied to the device. The device comprises a hole processing structure capable of injecting and transporting holes, and usually comprising a hole injecting layer and a hole transporting layer; an electron transport layer in contact with the hole processing structure and comprising one or more layers of semiconductor nanocrystals; and an electron injecting layer in contact with the electron transport layer for injecting electrons into the electron transport layer. The capability of emitting visible light of various wavelengths is principally based on the variations in voltage applied thereto, but the type of semiconductor nanocrystals used and the size of the semiconductor nanocrystals in the layers of semiconductor nanometer crystals may also play a role in color change, in combination with the change in voltage.

  17. Lithography for enabling advances in integrated circuits and devices.

    PubMed

    Garner, C Michael

    2012-08-28

    Because the transistor was fabricated in volume, lithography has enabled the increase in density of devices and integrated circuits. With the invention of the integrated circuit, lithography enabled the integration of higher densities of field-effect transistors through evolutionary applications of optical lithography. In 1994, the semiconductor industry determined that continuing the increase in density transistors was increasingly difficult and required coordinated development of lithography and process capabilities. It established the US National Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors and this was expanded in 1999 to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors to align multiple industries to provide the complex capabilities to continue increasing the density of integrated circuits to nanometre scales. Since the 1960s, lithography has become increasingly complex with the evolution from contact printers, to steppers, pattern reduction technology at i-line, 248 nm and 193 nm wavelengths, which required dramatic improvements of mask-making technology, photolithography printing and alignment capabilities and photoresist capabilities. At the same time, pattern transfer has evolved from wet etching of features, to plasma etch and more complex etching capabilities to fabricate features that are currently 32 nm in high-volume production. To continue increasing the density of devices and interconnects, new pattern transfer technologies will be needed with options for the future including extreme ultraviolet lithography, imprint technology and directed self-assembly. While complementary metal oxide semiconductors will continue to be extended for many years, these advanced pattern transfer technologies may enable development of novel memory and logic technologies based on different physical phenomena in the future to enhance and extend information processing. PMID:22802500

  18. Solution-processed Optoelectronic Devices from Colloidal Inorganic Semiconductor Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchieu, Andrew A.

    This dissertation contains design, synthesis, fabrication and testing of optoelectronic devices which are composed of colloidal inorganic semiconductor materials and fabricated by potentially low-cost solution-processing methods. The first part of this dissertation demonstrates a novel fabrication method where colloidal quantum dots (QDs) are self-assembled layer-by-layer into a thin film structure through electrostatic interaction. This process allows precise control of QD thin film thickness by self-assembly and can in principle be applied to a wide range of substrates. Using such QD thin films, photoconductor photodetectors and metal-intrinsic-metal photodiodes have been demonstrated. In the second part of this dissertation, heavy-metal-free colloidal Si materials are synthesized by electrochemical etching Si wafers, followed by surface modification and ultra-sonication for dispersion of Si nano- and/or micro-particles in various solvents. Demonstrated applications include RGB photoluminescent Si phosphors, scattering-enhanced Si nano-/micro-particle composite photodetectors and hybrid Si QD-organic light-emitting-diodes (LEDs).

  19. EDITORIAL: Semiconductor nanotechnology: novel materials and devices for electronics, photonics and renewable energy applications Semiconductor nanotechnology: novel materials and devices for electronics, photonics and renewable energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodnick, Stephen; Korkin, Anatoli; Krstic, Predrag; Mascher, Peter; Preston, John; Zaslavsky, Alex

    2010-04-01

    Electronic and photonic information technology and renewable energy alternatives, such as solar energy, fuel cells and batteries, have now reached an advanced stage in their development. Cost-effective improvements to current technological approaches have made great progress, but certain challenges remain. As feature sizes of the latest generations of electronic devices are approaching atomic dimensions, circuit speeds are now being limited by interconnect bottlenecks. This has prompted innovations such as the introduction of new materials into microelectronics manufacturing at an unprecedented rate and alternative technologies to silicon CMOS architectures. Despite the environmental impact of conventional fossil fuel consumption, the low cost of these energy sources has been a long-standing economic barrier to the development of alternative and more efficient renewable energy sources, fuel cells and batteries. In the face of mounting environmental concerns, interest in such alternative energy sources has grown. It is now widely accepted that nanotechnology offers potential solutions for securing future progress in information and energy technologies. The Canadian Semiconductor Technology Conference (CSTC) forum was established 25 years ago in Ottawa as an important symbol of the intrinsic strength of the Canadian semiconductor research and development community, and the Canadian semiconductor industry as a whole. In 2007, the 13th CSTC was held in Montreal, moving for the first time outside the national capital region. The first three meetings in the series of 'Nano and Giga Challenges in Electronics and Photonics'— NGCM2002 in Moscow, NGCM2004 in Krakow, and NGC2007 in Phoenix— were focused on interdisciplinary research from the fundamentals of materials science to the development of new system architectures. In 2009 NGC2009 and the 14th Canadian Semiconductor Technology Conference (CSTC2009) were held as a joint event, hosted by McMaster University (10

  20. Electrical contacts for a thin-film semiconductor device

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.; Dickson, Charles R.; D'Aiello, Robert V.

    1989-08-08

    A method of fabricating spaced-apart back contacts on a thin film of semiconductor material by forming strips of buffer material on top of the semiconductor material in locations corresponding to the desired dividing lines between back contacts, forming a film of metal substantially covering the semiconductor material and buffer strips, and scribing portions of the metal film overlying the buffer strips with a laser without contacting the underlying semiconductor material to separate the metal layer into a plurality of back contacts. The buffer material serves to protect the underlying semiconductor material from being damaged during the laser scribing. Back contacts and multi-cell photovoltaic modules incorporating such back contacts also are disclosed.

  1. 77 FR 39510 - Certain Semiconductor Integrated Circuit Devices and Products Containing Same; Determination Not...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... COMMISSION Certain Semiconductor Integrated Circuit Devices and Products Containing Same; Determination Not... the sale within the United States after importation of certain semiconductor integrated circuit... FR 25747-48 (May 1, 2012). The complaint alleges violations of section 337 of the Tariff Act of...

  2. Production of films and powders for semiconductor device applications

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghu Nath; Noufi, Rommel; Wang, Li

    1998-01-01

    A process for chemical bath deposition of selenide and sulfide salts as films and powders employable as precursors for the fabrication of solar cell devices. The films and powders include (1) Cu.sub.x Se.sub.n, wherein x=1-2 and n=1-3; (2) Cu.sub.x Ga.sub.y Se.sub.n, wherein x=1-2, y=0-1 and n=1-3; (3) Cu.sub.x In.sub.y Se.sub.n, wherein x=1-2.27, y=0.72-2 and n=1-3; (4) Cu.sub.x (InGa).sub.y Se.sub.n, wherein x=1-2.17, y=0.96-2 and n=1-3; (5) In.sub.y Se.sub.n, wherein y=1-2.3 and n=1-3; (6) Cu.sub.x S.sub.n, wherein x=1-2 and n=1-3; and (7) Cu.sub.x (InGa).sub.y (SeS).sub.n, wherein x=1-2, y=0.07-2 and n=0.663-3. A reaction vessel containing therein a substrate upon which will form one or more layers of semiconductor material is provided, and relevant solution mixtures are introduced in a sufficient quantity for a sufficient time and under favorable conditions into the vessel to react with each other to produce the resultant salt being prepared and deposited as one or more layers on the substrate and as a powder on the floor of the vessel. Hydrazine is present during all reaction processes producing non-gallium containing products and optionally present during reaction processes producing gallium-containing products to function as a strong reducing agent and thereby enhance reaction processes.

  3. Production of films and powders for semiconductor device applications

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, R.N.; Noufi, R.; Li Wang

    1998-03-24

    A process is described for chemical bath deposition of selenide and sulfide salts as films and powders employable as precursors for the fabrication of solar cell devices. The films and powders include (1) Cu{sub x}Se{sub n}, wherein x=1--2 and n=1--3; (2) Cu{sub x}Ga{sub y}Se{sub n}, wherein x=1--2, y=0--1 and n=1--3; (3) Cu{sub x}In{sub y}Se{sub n}, wherein x=1--2.27, y=0.72--2 and n=1--3; (4) Cu{sub x}(InGa){sub y}Se{sub n}, wherein x=1--2.17, y=0.96--2 and n=1--3; (5) In{sub y}Se{sub n}, wherein y=1--2.3 and n=1--3; (6) Cu{sub x}S{sub n}, wherein x=1--2 and n=1--3; and (7) Cu{sub x}(InGa){sub y}(SeS){sub n}, wherein x=1--2, y=0.07--2 and n=0.663--3. A reaction vessel containing therein a substrate upon which will form one or more layers of semiconductor material is provided, and relevant solution mixtures are introduced in a sufficient quantity for a sufficient time and under favorable conditions into the vessel to react with each other to produce the resultant salt being prepared and deposited as one or more layers on the substrate and as a powder on the floor of the vessel. Hydrazine is present during all reaction processes producing non-gallium containing products and optionally present during reaction processes producing gallium-containing products to function as a strong reducing agent and thereby enhance reaction processes. 4 figs.

  4. Accurate analytical modelling of cosmic ray induced failure rates of power semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Friedhelm D.

    2009-06-01

    A new, simple and efficient approach is presented to conduct estimations of the cosmic ray induced failure rate for high voltage silicon power devices early in the design phase. This allows combining common design issues such as device losses and safe operating area with the constraints imposed by the reliability to result in a better and overall more efficient design methodology. Starting from an experimental and theoretical background brought forth a few yeas ago [Kabza H et al. Cosmic radiation as a cause for power device failure and possible countermeasures. In: Proceedings of the sixth international symposium on power semiconductor devices and IC's, Davos, Switzerland; 1994. p. 9-12, Zeller HR. Cosmic ray induced breakdown in high voltage semiconductor devices, microscopic model and possible countermeasures. In: Proceedings of the sixth international symposium on power semiconductor devices and IC's, Davos, Switzerland; 1994. p. 339-40, and Matsuda H et al. Analysis of GTO failure mode during d.c. blocking. In: Proceedings of the sixth international symposium on power semiconductor devices and IC's, Davos, Switzerland; 1994. p. 221-5], an exact solution of the failure rate integral is derived and presented in a form which lends itself to be combined with the results available from commercial semiconductor simulation tools. Hence, failure rate integrals can be obtained with relative ease for realistic two- and even three-dimensional semiconductor geometries. Two case studies relating to IGBT cell design and planar junction termination layout demonstrate the purpose of the method.

  5. George E. Pake Prize: A Few Challenges in the Evolution of Semiconductor Device/Manufacturing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doering, Robert

    In the early 1980s, the semiconductor industry faced the related challenges of ``scaling through the one-micron barrier'' and converting single-level-metal NMOS integrated circuits to multi-level-metal CMOS. Multiple advances in lithography technology and device materials/process integration led the way toward the deep-sub-micron transistors and interconnects that characterize today's electronic chips. In the 1990s, CMOS scaling advanced at an accelerated pace enabled by rapid advances in many aspects of optical lithography. However, the industry also needed to continue the progress in manufacturing on ever-larger silicon wafers to maintain economy-of-scale trends. Simultaneously, the increasing complexity and absolute-precision requirements of manufacturing compounded the necessity for new processes, tools, and control methodologies. This talk presents a personal perspective on some of the approaches that addressed the aforementioned challenges. In particular, early work on integrating silicides, lightly-doped-drain FETs, shallow recessed isolation, and double-level metal will be discussed. In addition, some pioneering efforts in deep-UV lithography and single-wafer processing will be covered. The latter will be mainly based on results from the MMST Program - a 100 M +, 5-year R&D effort, funded by DARPA, the U.S. Air Force, and Texas Instruments, that developed a wide range of new technologies for advanced semiconductor manufacturing. The major highlight of the program was the demonstration of sub-3-day cycle time for manufacturing 350-nm CMOS integrated circuits in 1993. This was principally enabled by the development of: (1) 100% single-wafer processing, including rapid-thermal processing (RTP), and (2) computer-integrated-manufacturing (CIM), including real-time, in-situ process control.

  6. Bottom-up superconducting and Josephson junction devices inside a group-IV semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Shim, Yun-Pil; Tahan, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Superconducting circuits are exceptionally flexible, enabling many different devices from sensors to quantum computers. Separately, epitaxial semiconductor devices such as spin qubits in silicon offer more limited device variation but extraordinary quantum properties for a solid-state system. It might be possible to merge the two approaches, making single-crystal superconducting devices out of a semiconductor by utilizing the latest atomistic fabrication techniques. Here we propose superconducting devices made from precision hole-doped regions within a silicon (or germanium) single crystal. We analyse the properties of this superconducting semiconductor and show that practical superconducting wires, Josephson tunnel junctions or weak links, superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) and qubits are feasible. This work motivates the pursuit of 'bottom-up' superconductivity for improved or fundamentally different technology and physics. PMID:24985349

  7. Recent advances in conjugated polymers for light emitting devices.

    PubMed

    Alsalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Alam, Javed; Dass, Lawrence Arockiasamy; Raja, Mohan

    2011-01-01

    A recent advance in the field of light emitting polymers has been the discovery of electroluminescent conjugated polymers, that is, kind of fluorescent polymers that emit light when excited by the flow of an electric current. These new generation fluorescent materials may now challenge the domination by inorganic semiconductor materials of the commercial market in light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED) and polymer laser devices. This review provides information on unique properties of conjugated polymers and how they have been optimized to generate these properties. The review is organized in three sections focusing on the major advances in light emitting materials, recent literature survey and understanding the desirable properties as well as modern solid state lighting and displays. Recently, developed conjugated polymers are also functioning as roll-up displays for computers and mobile phones, flexible solar panels for power portable equipment as well as organic light emitting diodes in displays, in which television screens, luminous traffic, information signs, and light-emitting wallpaper in homes are also expected to broaden the use of conjugated polymers as light emitting polymers. The purpose of this review paper is to examine conjugated polymers in light emitting diodes (LEDs) in addition to organic solid state laser. Furthermore, since conjugated polymers have been approved as light-emitting organic materials similar to inorganic semiconductors, it is clear to motivate these organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) and organic lasers for modern lighting in terms of energy saving ability. In addition, future aspects of conjugated polymers in LEDs were also highlighted in this review. PMID:21673938

  8. Recent Advances in Conjugated Polymers for Light Emitting Devices

    PubMed Central

    AlSalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Alam, Javed; Dass, Lawrence Arockiasamy; Raja, Mohan

    2011-01-01

    A recent advance in the field of light emitting polymers has been the discovery of electroluminescent conjugated polymers, that is, kind of fluorescent polymers that emit light when excited by the flow of an electric current. These new generation fluorescent materials may now challenge the domination by inorganic semiconductor materials of the commercial market in light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED) and polymer laser devices. This review provides information on unique properties of conjugated polymers and how they have been optimized to generate these properties. The review is organized in three sections focusing on the major advances in light emitting materials, recent literature survey and understanding the desirable properties as well as modern solid state lighting and displays. Recently, developed conjugated polymers are also functioning as roll-up displays for computers and mobile phones, flexible solar panels for power portable equipment as well as organic light emitting diodes in displays, in which television screens, luminous traffic, information signs, and light-emitting wallpaper in homes are also expected to broaden the use of conjugated polymers as light emitting polymers. The purpose of this review paper is to examine conjugated polymers in light emitting diodes (LEDs) in addition to organic solid state laser. Furthermore, since conjugated polymers have been approved as light-emitting organic materials similar to inorganic semiconductors, it is clear to motivate these organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) and organic lasers for modern lighting in terms of energy saving ability. In addition, future aspects of conjugated polymers in LEDs were also highlighted in this review. PMID:21673938

  9. An Assessment of Critical Dimension Small Angle X-ray Scattering Metrology for Advanced Semiconductor Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Settens, Charles M.

    Simultaneous migration of planar transistors to FinFET architectures, the introduction of a plurality of materials to ensure suitable electrical characteristics, and the establishment of reliable multiple patterning lithography schemes to pattern sub-10 nm feature sizes imposes formidable challenges to current in-line dimensional metrologies. Because the shape of a FinFET channel cross-section immediately influences the electrical characteristics, the evaluation of 3D device structures requires measurement of parameters beyond traditional critical dimension (CD), including their sidewall angles, top corner rounding and footing, roughness, recesses and undercuts at single nanometer dimensions; thus, metrologies require sub-nm and approaching atomic level measurement uncertainty. Synchrotron critical dimension small angle X-ray scattering (CD-SAXS) has unique capabilities to non-destructively monitor the cross-section shape of surface structures with single nanometer uncertainty and can perform overlay metrology to sub-nm uncertainty. In this dissertation, we perform a systematic experimental investigation using CD-SAXS metrology on a hierarchy of semiconductor 3D device architectures including, high-aspect-ratio contact holes, H 2 annealed Si fins, and a series of grating type samples at multiple points along a FinFET fabrication process increasing in structural intricacy and ending with fully fabricated FinFET. Comparative studies between CD-SAXS metrology and other relevant semiconductor dimensional metrologies, particularly CD-SEM, CD-AFM and TEM are used to determine physical limits of CD-SAXS approach for advanced semiconductor samples. CD-SAXS experimental tradeoffs, advice for model-dependent analysis and thoughts on the compatibility with a semiconductor manufacturing environment are discussed.

  10. {100}<100> or 45.degree.-rotated {100}<100>, semiconductor-based, large-area, flexible, electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Amit

    2012-05-15

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate the same resulting in flexible, {100}<100> or 45.degree.-rotated {100}<100> oriented, semiconductor-based, electronic devices are disclosed. Potential applications of resulting articles are in areas of photovoltaic devices, flat-panel displays, thermophotovoltaic devices, ferroelectric devices, light emitting diode devices, computer hard disc drive devices, magnetoresistance based devices, photoluminescence based devices, non-volatile memory devices, dielectric devices, thermoelectric devices and quantum dot laser devices.

  11. Exploring graphene field effect transistor devices to improve spectral resolution of semiconductor radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Richard Karl; Howell, Stephen Wayne; Martin, Jeffrey B.; Hamilton, Allister B.

    2013-12-01

    Graphene, a planar, atomically thin form of carbon, has unique electrical and material properties that could enable new high performance semiconductor devices. Graphene could be of specific interest in the development of room-temperature, high-resolution semiconductor radiation spectrometers. Incorporating graphene into a field-effect transistor architecture could provide an extremely high sensitivity readout mechanism for sensing charge carriers in a semiconductor detector, thus enabling the fabrication of a sensitive radiation sensor. In addition, the field effect transistor architecture allows us to sense only a single charge carrier type, such as electrons. This is an advantage for room-temperature semiconductor radiation detectors, which often suffer from significant hole trapping. Here we report on initial efforts towards device fabrication and proof-of-concept testing. This work investigates the use of graphene transferred onto silicon and silicon carbide, and the response of these fabricated graphene field effect transistor devices to stimuli such as light and alpha radiation.

  12. Biasing, operation and parasitic current limitation in single device equivalent to CMOS, and other semiconductor systems

    DOEpatents

    Welch, James D.

    2003-09-23

    Disclosed are semiconductor devices including at least one junction which is rectifying whether the semiconductor is caused to be N or P-type, by the presence of applied gate voltage field induced carriers in essentially intrinsic, essentially homogeneously simultaneously containing both N and P-type metallurgical dopants at substantially equal doping levels, essentially homogeneously simultaneously containing both N and P-type metallurgical dopants at different doping levels, and containing a single metallurgical doping type, and functional combinations thereof. In particular, inverting and non-inverting gate voltage channel induced semiconductor single devices with operating characteristics similar to conventional multiple device CMOS systems, which can be operated as modulators, are disclosed as are a non-latching SCR and an approach to blocking parasitic currents utilizing material(s) which form rectifying junctions with both N and P-type semiconductor whether metallurigically or field induced.

  13. More Efficient Power Conversion for EVs: Gallium-Nitride Advanced Power Semiconductor and Packaging

    SciTech Connect

    2010-02-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Delphi is developing power converters that are smaller and more energy efficient, reliable, and cost-effective than current power converters. Power converters rely on power transistors which act like a very precisely controlled on-off switch, controlling the electrical energy flowing through an electrical circuit. Most power transistors today use silicon (Si) semiconductors. However, Delphi is using semiconductors made with a thin layer of gallium-nitride (GaN) applied on top of the more conventional Si material. The GaN layer increases the energy efficiency of the power transistor and also enables the transistor to operate at much higher temperatures, voltages, and power-density levels compared to its Si counterpart. Delphi is packaging these high-performance GaN semiconductors with advanced electrical connections and a cooling system that extracts waste heat from both sides of the device to further increase the device’s efficiency and allow more electrical current to flow through it. When combined with other electronic components on a circuit board, Delphi’s GaN power transistor package will help improve the overall performance and cost-effectiveness of HEVs and EVs.

  14. Semiconductor Nanotechnology: Novel Materials and Devices for Electronics, Photonics, and Renewable Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Goodnick, Stephen; Korkin, Anatoli; Krstic, Predrag S; Mascher, Peter; Preston, John; Zaslavsky, Alex

    2010-03-01

    Electronic and photonic information technology and renewable energy alternatives, such as solar energy, fuel cells and batteries, have now reached an advanced stage in their development. Cost-effective improvements to current technological approaches have made great progress, but certain challenges remain. As feature sizes of the latest generations of electronic devices are approaching atomic dimensions, circuit speeds are now being limited by interconnect bottlenecks. This has prompted innovations such as the introduction of new materials into microelectronics manufacturing at an unprecedented rate and alternative technologies to silicon CMOS architectures. Despite the environmental impact of conventional fossil fuel consumption, the low cost of these energy sources has been a long-standing economic barrier to the development of alternative and more efficient renewable energy sources, fuel cells and batteries. In the face of mounting environmental concerns, interest in such alternative energy sources has grown. It is now widely accepted that nanotechnology offers potential solutions for securing future progress in information and energy technologies. The Canadian Semiconductor Technology Conference (CSTC) forum was established 25 years ago in Ottawa as an important symbol of the intrinsic strength of the Canadian semiconductor research and development community, and the Canadian semiconductor industry as a whole. In 2007, the 13th CSTC was held in Montreal, moving for the first time outside the national capital region. The first three meetings in the series of Nano and Giga Challenges in Electronics and Photonics NGCM2002 in Moscow, NGCM2004 in Krakow, and NGC2007 in Phoenix were focused on interdisciplinary research from the fundamentals of materials science to the development of new system architectures. In 2009 NGC2009 and the 14th Canadian Semiconductor Technology Conference (CSTC2009) were held as a joint event, hosted by McMaster University (10 14 August

  15. Oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors: a review of recent advances.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, E; Barquinha, P; Martins, R

    2012-06-12

    Transparent electronics is today one of the most advanced topics for a wide range of device applications. The key components are wide bandgap semiconductors, where oxides of different origins play an important role, not only as passive component but also as active component, similar to what is observed in conventional semiconductors like silicon. Transparent electronics has gained special attention during the last few years and is today established as one of the most promising technologies for leading the next generation of flat panel display due to its excellent electronic performance. In this paper the recent progress in n- and p-type oxide based thin-film transistors (TFT) is reviewed, with special emphasis on solution-processed and p-type, and the major milestones already achieved with this emerging and very promising technology are summarizeed. After a short introduction where the main advantages of these semiconductors are presented, as well as the industry expectations, the beautiful history of TFTs is revisited, including the main landmarks in the last 80 years, finishing by referring to some papers that have played an important role in shaping transparent electronics. Then, an overview is presented of state of the art n-type TFTs processed by physical vapour deposition methods, and finally one of the most exciting, promising, and low cost but powerful technologies is discussed: solution-processed oxide TFTs. Moreover, a more detailed focus analysis will be given concerning p-type oxide TFTs, mainly centred on two of the most promising semiconductor candidates: copper oxide and tin oxide. The most recent data related to the production of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) devices based on n- and p-type oxide TFT is also be presented. The last topic of this review is devoted to some emerging applications, finalizing with the main conclusions. Related work that originated at CENIMAT|I3N during the last six years is included in more detail, which

  16. Advanced Electro-Optic Surety Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Watterson, C.E.

    1997-05-01

    The Advanced Electro-Optic Surety Devices project was initiated in march 1991 to support design laboratory guidance on electro-optic device packaging and evaluation. Sandia National Laboratory requested AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), to prepare for future packaging efforts in electro-optic integrated circuits. Los Alamos National Laboratory requested the evaluation of electro-optic waveguide devices for nuclear surety applications. New packaging techniques involving multiple fiber optic alignment and attachment, binary lens array development, silicon V-groove etching, and flip chip bonding were requested. Hermetic sealing of the electro-optic hybrid and submicron alignment of optical components present new challenges to be resolved. A 10-channel electro-optic modulator and laser amplifier were evaluated for potential surety applications.

  17. Modeling of Total Ionizing Dose Effects in Advanced Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez Esqueda, Ivan

    2011-12-01

    The increased use of commercial complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technologies in harsh radiation environments has resulted in a new approach to radiation effects mitigation. This approach utilizes simulation to support the design of integrated circuits (ICs) to meet targeted tolerance specifications. Modeling the deleterious impact of ionizing radiation on ICs fabricated in advanced CMOS technologies requires understanding and analyzing the basic mechanisms that result in buildup of radiation-induced defects in specific sensitive regions. Extensive experimental studies have demonstrated that the sensitive regions are shallow trench isolation (STI) oxides. Nevertheless, very little work has been done to model the physical mechanisms that result in the buildup of radiation-induced defects and the radiation response of devices fabricated in these technologies. A comprehensive study of the physical mechanisms contributing to the buildup of radiation-induced oxide trapped charges and the generation of interface traps in advanced CMOS devices is presented in this dissertation. The basic mechanisms contributing to the buildup of radiation-induced defects are explored using a physical model that utilizes kinetic equations that captures total ionizing dose (TID) and dose rate effects in silicon dioxide (SiO2). These mechanisms are formulated into analytical models that calculate oxide trapped charge density (Not) and interface trap density (Nit) in sensitive regions of deep-submicron devices. Experiments performed on field-oxide-field-effect-transistors (FOXFETs) and metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors permit investigating TID effects and provide a comparison for the radiation response of advanced CMOS devices. When used in conjunction with closed-form expressions for surface potential, the analytical models enable an accurate description of radiation-induced degradation of transistor electrical characteristics. In this dissertation, the incorporation

  18. Semiconductor Devices and Applications. Electronics Module 5. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, John; And Others

    This module is the fifth of 10 modules in the competency-based electronics series. Introductory materials include a listing of competencies addressed in the module, a parts/equipment list, and a cross-reference table of instructional materials. Sixteen instructional units cover: semiconductor materials; diodes; diode applications and…

  19. High Temperature Superconductor/Semiconductor Hybrid Microwave Devices and Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.; Miranda, Felix A.

    1999-01-01

    Contents include following: film deposition technique; laser ablation; magnetron sputtering; sequential evaporation; microwave substrates; film characterization at microwave frequencies; complex conductivity; magnetic penetration depth; surface impedance; planar single-mode filters; small antennas; antenna arrays phase noise; tunable oscillations; hybrid superconductor/semiconductor receiver front ends; and noise modeling.

  20. The structure of constitutive equations for semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, G.R.; Girrens, S.P.; Bennett, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    The fundamental equations that describe carrier transport in semiconductor materials are developed using the methods of continuum mixture theory and Maxwell's equations for electrodynamics. There are five basic equations that govern the behavior of current flux, electrostatic potential, electrons, and holes. The bahavior of the electrical chemical potentials are introduced and their relation to the current flux is discussed.

  1. Glass encapsulation provides extra protection for IC semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doelp, W. L., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Oxide-passivated semiconductor chip is given protective glass coating by means of vapor deposition over metallic substrate of integrated circuit (IC). Method provides more reliable oxide-passivation and hermetic sealing in current use. Chips and scratches incurred during dicing, testing, and assembly are markedly reduced.

  2. Sputtered pin amorphous silicon semi-conductor device and method therefor

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D.; Friedman, Robert A.

    1983-11-22

    A high efficiency amorphous silicon PIN semi-conductor device is constructed by the sequential sputtering of N, I and P layers of amorphous silicon and at least one semi-transparent ohmic electrode. A method of construction produces a PIN device, exhibiting enhanced physical integrity and facilitates ease of construction in a singular vacuum system and vacuum pump down procedure.

  3. Hybrid method of making an amorphous silicon P-I-N semiconductor device

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D.; Morel, Don L.; Abeles, Benjamin

    1983-10-04

    The invention is directed to a hydrogenated amorphous silicon PIN semiconductor device of hybrid glow discharge/reactive sputtering fabrication. The hybrid fabrication method is of advantage in providing an ability to control the optical band gap of the P and N layers, resulting in increased photogeneration of charge carriers and device output.

  4. Advanced devices and systems for radiation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, G.F.; Wehe, D.K.; He, Z.; Barrett, C.; Miyamoto, J.

    1996-06-01

    The authors` most recent work continues their long-standing efforts to develop semiconductor detectors based on the collection of only a single type of charge carrier. Their best results are an extension of the principle of coplanar electrodes first described by Paul Luke of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 18 months ago. This technique, described in past progress reports, has the effect of deriving an output signal from detectors that depends only on the motion of carriers close to one surface. Since nearly all of these carriers are of one type (electrons) that are attracted to that electrode, the net effect is to nearly eliminate the influence of hole motion on the properties of the output signal. The result is that the much better mobility of electrons in compound semiconductors materials such as CZT can now be exploited without the concurrent penalty of poor hole collection. They have also developed new techniques in conjunction with the coplanar electrode principle that extends the technique into a new dimension. By proper processing of signals from the opposite electrode (the cathode) from the coplanar surface, they are able to derive a signal that is a good indication of the depth of interaction at which the charge carriers were initially formed. They have been the first group to demonstrate this technique, and examples of separate pulse height spectra recorded at a variety of different depths of interaction are shown in several of the figures that follow. Obtaining depth information is one step in the direction of obtaining volumetric point-of-interaction information from the detector. If one could known the coordinates of each specific interaction, then corrections could be applied to account for the inhomogeneities that currently plague many room-temperature devices.

  5. Solid state technology: A compilation. [on semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A compilation, covering selected solid state devices developed and integrated into systems by NASA to improve performance, is presented. Data are also given on device shielding in hostile radiation environments.

  6. Electronic-carrier-controlled photochemical etching process in semiconductor device fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Myers, David R.; Vook, Frederick L.

    1989-01-01

    An electronic-carrier-controlled photochemical etching process for carrying out patterning and selective removing of material in semiconductor device fabrication includes the steps of selective ion implanting, photochemical dry etching, and thermal annealing, in that order. In the selective ion implanting step, regions of the semiconductor material in a desired pattern are damaged and the remainder of the regions of the material not implanted are left undamaged. The rate of recombination of electrons and holes is increased in the damaged regions of the pattern compared to undamaged regions. In the photochemical dry etching step which follows ion implanting step, the material in the undamaged regions of the semiconductor are removed substantially faster than in the damaged regions representing the pattern, leaving the ion-implanted, damaged regions as raised surface structures on the semiconductor material. After completion of photochemical dry etching step, the thermal annealing step is used to restore the electrical conductivity of the damaged regions of the semiconductor material.

  7. Electronic-carrier-controlled photochemical etching process in semiconductor device fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Myers, D.R.; Vook, F.L.

    1988-06-16

    An electronic-carrier-controlled photochemical etching process for carrying out patterning and selective removing of material in semiconductor device fabrication includes the steps of selective ion implanting, photochemical dry etching, and thermal annealing, in that order. In the selective ion implanting step, regions of the semiconductor material in a desired pattern are damaged and the remainder of the regions of the material not implanted are left undamaged. The rate of recombination of electrons and holes is increased in the damaged regions of the pattern compared to undamaged regions. In the photochemical dry etching step which follows ion implanting step, the material in the undamaged regions of the semiconductor are removed substantially faster than in the damaged regions representing the pattern, leaving the ion-implanted, damaged regions as raised surface structures on the semiconductor material. After completion of photochemical dry etching step, the thermal annealing step is used to restore the electrical conductivity of the damaged regions of the semiconductor material.

  8. Exact and reliable overlay metrology in nanoscale semiconductor devices using an image processing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jinkook; Shin, ChaeHo; Kim, Minkook; Kim, Junghwan; Park, JeongKyun; Kim, JungSoo; Jun, ChungSam; Yim, Yeny; Lee, Janghee

    2014-10-01

    As semiconductor processing becomes more complicated and pattern sizes shrink, the overlay metrology has become one of the most important issues in the semiconductor industry. Therefore, in order to obtain correct, reliable overlay values in semiconductor fabrication facilities (fab), quantization methods for the efficient management and implementation of a measurement algorithm are required, as well as an understanding of the target structures in the semiconductor device. We implemented correct, reliable overlay values in the pattern using the image processing method. The quantization method, through correlation analysis and a new algorithm for target structures, were able to improve the sensitivity to misalignment in the pattern and enable more stable and credible in-line measurement by decreasing the distribution of the residuals in overlay values. Since overlay values of the pattern in the fab were measured and managed more reliably and quickly, it is expected that our study will be able to contribute to the yield enhancement of semiconductor companies.

  9. Growth of coincident site lattice matched semiconductor layers and devices on crystalline substrates

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Andrew G; Ptak, Aaron J

    2013-08-13

    Methods of fabricating a semiconductor layer or device and said devices are disclosed. The methods include but are not limited to providing a substrate having a crystalline surface with a known lattice parameter (a). The method further includes growing a crystalline semiconductor layer on the crystalline substrate surface by coincident site lattice matched epitaxy, without any buffer layer between the crystalline semiconductor layer and the crystalline surface of the substrate. The crystalline semiconductor layer will be prepared to have a lattice parameter (a') that is related to the substrate lattice parameter (a). The lattice parameter (a') maybe related to the lattice parameter (a) by a scaling factor derived from a geometric relationship between the respective crystal lattices.

  10. Semiconductor laser devices having lateral refractive index tailoring

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Hadley, G. Ronald; Hohimer, John P.; Owyoung, Adelbert

    1990-01-01

    A broad-area semiconductor laser diode includes an active lasing region interposed between an upper and a lower cladding layer, the laser diode further comprising structure for controllably varying a lateral refractive index profile of the diode to substantially compensate for an effect of junction heating during operation. In embodiments disclosed the controlling structure comprises resistive heating strips or non-radiative linear junctions disposed parallel to the active region. Another embodiment discloses a multi-layered upper cladding region selectively disordered by implanted or diffused dopant impurities. Still another embodiment discloses an upper cladding layer of variable thickness that is convex in shape and symmetrically disposed about a central axis of the active region. The teaching of the invention is also shown to be applicable to arrays of semiconductor laser diodes.

  11. Noncontact inspection technique for electrical failures in semiconductor devices using a laser terahertz emission microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Masatsugu; Otani, Chiko; Kawase, Kodo; Nikawa, Kiyoshi; Tonouchi, Masayoshi

    2008-07-01

    We have proposed and demonstrated a novel technique for the noncontact inspection of electrical failures in semiconductor devices using a laser terahertz emission microscope. It was found that the waveforms of the terahertz pulses, emitted by exciting p-n junctions in semiconductor circuits with focused ultrafast laser pulses, depend on the interconnection structures of the circuits. We successfully distinguished damaged silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor circuits with disconnected wires from normal ones by comparing the images of terahertz emission amplitudes between a normal chip and a defective one.

  12. Interfacial charge transfer behavior of conducting polymers as contact electrode for semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakita, Jin; Fujikawa, Yuki; Nagata, Takahiro; Chikyow, Toyohiro

    2016-04-01

    As an alternative contact electrode material to metals, which is necessary for downsized semiconductor devices in 10 nm processes, an intrinsically conducting polymer was studied in terms of its interfacial charge-transfer behavior with an inorganic semiconductor. Polypyrrole as the conducting polymer was formed using an electrochemical technique on an oxide semiconductor and its electronic properties were evaluated using scanning probe microscopy. The experimental results showed that an ohmic contact was observed dynamically at local positions, although a Schottky barrier was expected in the static electronic state over the measurement area. From this research, the conducting polymer was found to be promising as a contact electrode.

  13. Nonlinear fibre-optic devices pumped by semiconductor disk lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chamorovskiy, A Yu; Okhotnikov, Oleg G

    2012-11-30

    Semiconductor disk lasers offer a unique combination of characteristics that are particularly attractive for pumping Raman lasers and amplifiers. The advantages of disk lasers include a low relative noise intensity (-150 dB Hz{sup -1}), scalable (on the order of several watts) output power, and nearly diffraction-limited beam quality resulting in a high ({approx}70 % - 90 %) coupling efficiency into a single-mode fibre. Using this technology, low-noise fibre Raman amplifiers operating at 1.3 {mu}m in co-propagation configuration are developed. A hybrid Raman-bismuth doped fibre amplifier is proposed to further increase the pump conversion efficiency. The possibility of fabricating mode-locked picosecond fibre lasers operating under both normal and anomalous dispersion is shown experimentally. We demonstrate the operation of 1.38-{mu}m and 1.6-{mu}m passively mode-locked Raman fibre lasers pumped by 1.29-{mu}m and 1.48-{mu}m semiconductor disk lasers and producing 1.97- and 2.7-ps pulses, respectively. Using a picosecond semiconductor disk laser amplified with an ytterbium-erbium fibre amplifier, the supercontinuum generation spanning from 1.35 {mu}m to 2 {mu}m is achieved with an average power of 3.5 W. (invited paper)

  14. Transmission line pulse system for avalanche characterization of high power semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccio, Michele; Ascione, Giovanni; De Falco, Giuseppe; Maresca, Luca; De Laurentis, Martina; Irace, Andrea; Breglio, Giovanni

    2013-05-01

    Because of the increasing in power density of electronic devices for medium and high power application, reliabilty of these devices is of great interest. Understanding the avalanche behaviour of a power device has become very important in these last years because it gives an indication of the maximum energy ratings which can be seen as an index of the device ruggedness. A good description of this behaviour is given by the static IV blocking characteristc. In order to avoid self heating, very relevant in high power devices, very short pulses of current have to be used, whose value can change from few milliamps up to tens of amps. The most used method to generate short pulses is the TLP (Transmission Line Pulse) test, which is based on charging the equivalent capacitance of a transmission line to high value of voltage and subsequently discharging it onto a load. This circuit let to obtain very short square pulses but it is mostly used for evaluate the ESD capability of semiconductor and, in this environment, it generates pulses of low amplitude which are not high enough to characterize the avalanche behaviour of high power devices . Advanced TLP circuit able to generate high current are usually very expensive and often suffer of distorption of the output pulse. In this article is proposed a simple, low cost circuit, based on a boosted-TLP configuration, which is capable to produce very square pulses of about one hundreds of nanosecond with amplitude up to some tens of amps. A prototype is implemented which can produce pulses up to 20A of amplitude with 200 ns of duration which can characterize power devices up to 1600V of breakdown voltage. Usage of microcontroller based logic make the circuit very flexible. Results of SPICE simulation are provided, together with experimental results. To prove the effectiveness of the circuit, the I-V blocking characteristics of two commercial devices, namely a 600V PowerMOS and a 1200V Trench-IGBT, are measured at different

  15. Fully Electrical Read-Write Device Out of a Ferromagnetic Semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, S.; Dürrenfeld, P.; Pappert, K.; Ebel, L.; Brunner, K.; Gould, C.; Molenkamp, L. W.

    2011-02-01

    We report the realization of a read-write device out of the ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As as the first step to a fundamentally new information processing paradigm. Writing the magnetic state is achieved by current-induced switching and readout of the state is done by the means of the tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance effect. This 1 bit demonstrator device can be used to design an electrically programmable memory and logic device.

  16. Device Concepts Based on Spin-dependent Transmission in Semiconductor Heterostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. - Y.; Cartoixa, X.

    2004-01-01

    We examine zero-magnetic-field spin-dependent transmission in nonmagnetic semiconductor heterostructures with structural inversion asymmetry (SIA) and bulk inversion asymmetry (BIA), and report spin devices concepts that exploit their properties. Our modeling results show that several design strategies could be used to achieve high spin filtering efficiencies. The current spin polarization of these devices is electrically controllable, and potentially amenable to highspeed spin modulation, and could be integrated in optoelectronic devices for added functionality.

  17. Advanced Devices for Cryogenic Thermal Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugby, D.; Stouffer, C.; Garzon, J.; Beres, M.; Gilchrist, A.

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes six advanced cryogenic thermal management devices/subsystems developed by Swales Aerospace for ground/space-based applications of interest to NASA, DoD, and the commercial sector. The devices/subsystems described herein include the following: (a) a differential thermal expansion cryogenic thermal switch (DTE-CTSW) constructed with high purity aluminum end-pieces and an Ultem support rod for the 6 K Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) (b) a quad-redundant DTE-CTSW assembly for the 35 K science instruments (NIRCam, NIRSpec, and FGS) mounted on the JWST Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) (c) a cryogenic diode heat pipe (CDHP) thermal switching system using methane as the working fluid for the 100 K CRISM hyperspectral mapping instrument on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) and (d) three additional devices/subsystems developed during the AFRL-sponsored CRYOTOOL program, which include a dual DTE-CTSW/dual cryocooler test bed, a miniaturized neon cryogenic loop heat pipe (mini-CLHP), and an across gimbal cryogenic thermal transport system (GCTTS). For the first three devices/subsystems mentioned above, this paper describes key aspects of the development efforts including concept definition, design, fabrication, and testing. For the latter three, this paper provides brief overview descriptions as key details are provided in a related paper.

  18. Cryogenic switching of inductive loads using semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreaux, R.R.; Nelms, R.M.

    1998-07-01

    A cryogenic inductive energy storage system may be utilized to supply the pulse power requirements of some future electric propulsion systems for deep space vehicles. Discussed in this paper is the operation of one inductive storage approach at temperatures down to {minus}184 C. Three different semiconductor technologies (IGBTs, MOSFETs, and MCTs) are evaluated at low temperatures to determine their potential application as an opening switch in a cryogenic inductive energy storage system. Low temperature tests indicate that an IGBT protected by an transient voltage suppressor should be employed in this inductive storage approach.

  19. Image stabilization for SWIR advanced optoelectronic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiopu, Paul; Manea, Adrian; Cristea, Ionica; Grosu, Neculai; Craciun, Anca-Ileana; Craciun, Alexandru; Granciu, Dana

    2015-02-01

    At long ranges and under low visibility conditions, Advanced Optoelectronic Device provides the signal-to-noise ratio and image quality in the Short-wave Infra-red - SWIR (wavelengths between 1,1 ÷2,5 μm), significantly better than in the near wave infrared - NWIR and visible spectral bands [1,2]. The quality of image is nearly independent of the polarization in the incoming light, but it is influenced by the relative movement between the optical system and the observer (the operators' handshake), and the movement towards the support system (land and air vehicles). All these make it difficult to detect objectives observation in real time. This paper presents some systems enhance which the ability of observation and sighting through the optical systems without the use of the stands, tripods or other means. We have to eliminate the effect of "tremors of the hands" and the vibration in order to allow the use of optical devices by operators on the moving vehicles on land, on aircraft, or on boats, and to provide additional comfort for the user to track the moving object through the optical system, without losing the control in the process of detection and tracking. The practical applications of stabilization image process, in SWIR, are the most advanced part of the optical observation systems available worldwide [3,4,5]. This application has a didactic nature, because it ensures understanding by the students about image stabilization and their participation in research.

  20. Optoelectronic device simulation: Optical modeling for semiconductor optical amplifiers and solid state lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Xue (Michael)

    2006-07-01

    Recent advances in optoelectronic devices require sophisticated optical simulation and modeling. These tiny semiconductor device structures, such as semiconductor lasers and light emitting diodes (LED), not only need detailed electrical computation, such as band structure, carrier transportation, and electron-hole recombination under different external voltages, but also require comprehensive optical modeling, such as photon generation and propagation. Optical modeling also includes waveguide structure calculations, guided mode and leakage mode identification, as well far-field pattern prediction using optical ray tracing. In modeling semiconductor lasers, light emission and propagation can be treated using the single mode of wave optics, the so-called photon propagation equation coupled with carrier transport equations. These differential equations can be numerically solved using the Finite Difference Method (FDM). In the LED modeling, the main tools are based on optical ray tracing, and photons are treated as light emissions with random directions and polarizations. Optical waveguide theory is used to qualitatively analyze photon emissions inside a LED chip, and helps to design the LED device structure. One important area of semiconductor laser modeling is the optical simulation of the wavelength converter based on semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA). This wavelength converter is a critical device in optical communication, and it can copy information from one wavelength to anther through cross-gain modulation. Some numerical methods have been developed to model the wavelength conversion. In these methods, solutions are found by solving differential equations in the time domain using FDM. In all previous models, the waveguide internal loss is assumed uniform across the cavity of the SOA, or the gain coefficient is based on the polynomial approximation method, i.e., the gain coefficient is assumed proportional to the difference between the carrier and

  1. Towards manufacturing of advanced logic devices by double-patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koay, Chiew-seng; Halle, Scott; Holmes, Steven; Petrillo, Karen; Colburn, Matthew; van Dommelen, Youri; Jiang, Aiqin; Crouse, Michael; Dunn, Shannon; Hetzer, David; Kawakami, Shinichiro; Cantone, Jason; Huli, Lior; Rodgers, Martin; Martinick, Brian

    2011-04-01

    As reported previously, the IBM Alliance has established a DETO (Double-Expose-Track-Optimized) baseline, in collaboration with ASML, TEL, and CNSE, to evaluate commercially available DETO photoresist system for the manufacturing of advanced logic devices. Although EUV lithography is the baseline strategy for <2x nm logic nodes, alternative techniques are still being pursued. The DETO technique produces pitch-split patterns capable of supporting 16 nm and 11 nm node semiconductor devices. We present the long-term monitoring performances of CD uniformity (CDU), overlay, and defectivity of our DETO process. CDU and overlay performances for controlled experiments are also presented. Two alignment schemes in DETO are compared experimentally for their effects on inter-level & intralevel overlays, and space CDU. We also experimented with methods for improving CDU, in which the CD-OptimizerTMand DoseMapperTM were evaluated separately and in tandem. Overlay improvements using the Correction Per Exposure (CPE) and the intra-field High-Order Process Correction (i-HOPC) were compared against the usual linear correction method. The effects of the exposure field size are also compared between a small field and the full field. Included in all the above, we also compare the performances derived from stack-integrated wafers and bare-Si wafers.

  2. Dynamic detection of electron spin accumulation in ferromagnet–semiconductor devices by ferromagnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changjiang; Patel, Sahil J.; Peterson, Timothy A.; Geppert, Chad C.; Christie, Kevin D.; Stecklein, Gordon; Palmstrøm, Chris J.; Crowell, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    A distinguishing feature of spin accumulation in ferromagnet–semiconductor devices is its precession in a magnetic field. This is the basis for detection techniques such as the Hanle effect, but these approaches become ineffective as the spin lifetime in the semiconductor decreases. For this reason, no electrical Hanle measurement has been demonstrated in GaAs at room temperature. We show here that by forcing the magnetization in the ferromagnet to precess at resonance instead of relying only on the Larmor precession of the spin accumulation in the semiconductor, an electrically generated spin accumulation can be detected up to 300 K. The injection bias and temperature dependence of the measured spin signal agree with those obtained using traditional methods. We further show that this approach enables a measurement of short spin lifetimes (<100 ps), a regime that is not accessible in semiconductors using traditional Hanle techniques. PMID:26777243

  3. The state variable method as a unifying approach to the study of semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castoldi, A.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.

    The application of the state variable method to the solution of the one dimensional Poisson equation at thermal equilibrium in semiconductor devices is presented. The method is based on the determination of the analytical relationship between the state variables potential (p) and electric field (e), and on its representation, as a trajectory, in the plane. The trajectories of semiconductors, metal contacts and oxide layers are calculated. A device formed of any combination of these materials can be represented and studied in the p/e plane. The graphical representation of these trajectories is addressed and it is shown how analysis allows, in a simple and didactic way, a thorough comprehension of the typical characteristics of multijunction devices. Devices different from one another (like pn junctions and MOS structures) are considered.

  4. Total-dose radiation effects data for semiconductor devices (1989 supplement)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Keith E.; Coss, James R.; Goben, Charles A.; Shaw, David C.; Farmanesh, Sam; Davarpanah, Michael M.; Craft, Leroy H.; Price, William E.

    1990-01-01

    Steady state, total dose radiation test data are provided for electronic designers and other personnel using semiconductor devices in a radiation environment. The data are presented in graphic and narrative formats. Two primary radiation source types were used: Cobalt-60 gamma rays and a Dynamitron electron accelerator capable of delivering 2.5 MeV electrons at a steady rate.

  5. Recent Developments in p-Type Oxide Semiconductor Materials and Devices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenwei; Nayak, Pradipta K; Caraveo-Frescas, Jesus A; Alshareef, Husam N

    2016-05-01

    The development of transparent p-type oxide semiconductors with good performance may be a true enabler for a variety of applications where transparency, power efficiency, and greater circuit complexity are needed. Such applications include transparent electronics, displays, sensors, photovoltaics, memristors, and electrochromics. Hence, here, recent developments in materials and devices based on p-type oxide semiconductors are reviewed, including ternary Cu-bearing oxides, binary copper oxides, tin monoxide, spinel oxides, and nickel oxides. The crystal and electronic structures of these materials are discussed, along with approaches to enhance valence-band dispersion to reduce effective mass and increase mobility. Strategies to reduce interfacial defects, off-state current, and material instability are suggested. Furthermore, it is shown that promising progress has been made in the performance of various types of devices based on p-type oxides. Several innovative approaches exist to fabricate transparent complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) devices, including novel device fabrication schemes and utilization of surface chemistry effects, resulting in good inverter gains. However, despite recent developments, p-type oxides still lag in performance behind their n-type counterparts, which have entered volume production in the display market. Recent successes along with the hurdles that stand in the way of commercial success of p-type oxide semiconductors are presented. PMID:26879813

  6. 77 FR 19032 - Certain Semiconductor Integrated Circuit Devices and Products Containing Same Notice of Receipt...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-29

    ...Notice is hereby given that the U.S. International Trade Commission has received a complaint entitled Certain Semiconductor Integrated Circuit Devices and Products Containing Same, DN 2888; the Commission is soliciting comments on any public interest issues raised by the complaint or complainant's filing under section 210.8(b) of the Commission's Rules of Practice and Procedure (19 CFR......

  7. Novel compound semiconductor devices based on III-V nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.; Ren, F.

    1995-10-01

    New developments in dry and wet etching, ohmic contacts and epitaxial growth of Ill-V nitrides are reported. These make possible devices such as microdisk laser structures and GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors with improved InN ohmic contacts.

  8. System for characterizing semiconductor materials and photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus for detecting and mapping defects in the surfaces of polycrystalline material in a manner that distinguishes dislocation pits from grain boundaries includes a first laser of a first wavelength for illuminating a wide spot on the surface of the material, a second laser of a second relatively shorter wavelength for illuminating a relatively narrower spot on the surface of the material, a light integrating sphere with apertures for capturing light scattered by etched dislocation pits in an intermediate range away from specular reflection while allowing light scattered by etched grain boundaries in a near range from specular reflection to pass through, and optical detection devices for detecting and measuring intensities of the respective intermediate scattered light and near specular scattered light. A center blocking aperture or filter can be used to screen out specular reflected light, which would be reflected by nondefect portions of the polycrystalline material surface. An X-Y translation stage for mounting the polycrystalline material and signal processing and computer equipment accommodate raster mapping, recording, and displaying of respective dislocation and grain boundary defect densities. A special etch procedure is included, which prepares the polycrystalline material surface to produce distinguishable intermediate and near specular light scattering in patterns that have statistical relevance to the dislocation and grain boundary defect densities. A reflectance measurement of the piece of material is obtained by adding together the signals from the optical detection devices. In the case where the piece of material includes a photovoltaic device, the current induced in the device by the illuminating light can be measured with a current sensing amplifier after the light integrating sphere is moved away from the device.

  9. System for characterizing semiconductor materials and photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, B.L.

    1996-12-03

    Apparatus for detecting and mapping defects in the surfaces of polycrystalline material in a manner that distinguishes dislocation pits from grain boundaries includes a first laser of a first wavelength for illuminating a wide spot on the surface of the material, a second laser of a second relatively shorter wavelength for illuminating a relatively narrower spot on the surface of the material, a light integrating sphere with apertures for capturing light scattered by etched dislocation pits in an intermediate range away from specular reflection while allowing light scattered by etched grain boundaries in a near range from specular reflection to pass through, and optical detection devices for detecting and measuring intensities of the respective intermediate scattered light and near specular scattered light. A center blocking aperture or filter can be used to screen out specular reflected light, which would be reflected by nondefect portions of the polycrystalline material surface. An X-Y translation stage for mounting the polycrystalline material and signal processing and computer equipment accommodate raster mapping, recording, and displaying of respective dislocation and grain boundary defect densities. A special etch procedure is included, which prepares the polycrystalline material surface to produce distinguishable intermediate and near specular light scattering in patterns that have statistical relevance to the dislocation and grain boundary defect densities. A reflectance measurement of the piece of material is obtained by adding together the signals from the optical detection devices. In the case where the piece of material includes a photovoltaic device, the current induced in the device by the illuminating light can be measured with a current sensing amplifier after the light integrating sphere is moved away from the device. 22 figs.

  10. Characteristics of III-V Semiconductor Devices at High Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Young, Paul G.; Taub, Susan R.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the development of III-V based pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors (PHEMT's) designed to operate over the temperature range 77 to 473 K (-196 to 200 C). These devices have a pseudomorphic undoped InGaAs channel that is sandwiched between an AlGaAs spacer and a buffer layer; gate widths of 200, 400, 1600, and 3200 micrometers; and a gate length of 2 micrometers. Measurements were performed at both room temperature and 473 K (200 C) and show that the drain current decreases by 30 percent and the gate current increases to about 9 microns A (at a reverse bias of -1.5 V) at the higher temperature. These devices have a maximum DC power dissipation of about 4.5 W and a breakdown voltage of about 16 V.

  11. Ferroelectric HfO2 for Emerging Ferroelectric Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florent, Karine

    The spontaneous polarization in ferroelectrics (FE) makes them particularly attractive for non-volatile memory and logic applications. Non-volatile FRAM memories using perovskite structure materials, such as Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) and Strontium Bismuth Tantalate (SBT) have been studied for many years. However, because of their scaling limit and incompatibility with CMOS beyond 130 nm node, floating gate Flash memory technology has been preferred for manufacturing. The recent discovery of ferroelectricity in doped HfO2 in 2011 has opened the door for new ferroelectric based devices compatible with CMOS technology, such as Ferroelectric Field Effect Transistor (FeFET) and Ferroelectric Tunnel Junctions (FTJ). This work began with developing ferroelectric hysteresis characterization capabilities at RIT. Initially reactively sputtered aluminum doped HfO 2 films were investigated. It was observed that the composition control using co-sputtering was not achievable within the existing capabilities. During the course of this study, collaboration was established with the NaMLab group in Germany to investigate Si doped HfO2 deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). Metal Ferroelectric Metal (MFM) devices were fabricated using TiN as the top and bottom electrode with Si:HfO2 thickness ranging from 6.4 nm to 22.9 nm. The devices were electrically tested for P-E, C-V and I-V characteristics. Structural characterizations included TEM, EELS, XRR, XRD and XPS/Auger spectroscopy. Higher remanant polarization (Pr) was observed for films of 9.3 nm and 13.1 nm thickness. Thicker film (22.9 nm) showed smaller Pr. Devices with 6.4 nm thick films exhibit tunneling behavior showing a memristor like I-V characteristics. The tunnel current and ferroelectricity showed decrease with cycling indicating a possible change in either the structure or the domain configurations. Theoretical simulations using the improved FE model were carried out to model the ferroelectric behavior of

  12. Accelerated Aging System for Prognostics of Power Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celaya, Jose R.; Vashchenko, Vladislav; Wysocki, Philip; Saha, Sankalita

    2010-01-01

    Prognostics is an engineering discipline that focuses on estimation of the health state of a component and the prediction of its remaining useful life (RUL) before failure. Health state estimation is based on actual conditions and it is fundamental for the prediction of RUL under anticipated future usage. Failure of electronic devices is of great concern as future aircraft will see an increase of electronics to drive and control safety-critical equipment throughout the aircraft. Therefore, development of prognostics solutions for electronics is of key importance. This paper presents an accelerated aging system for gate-controlled power transistors. This system allows for the understanding of the effects of failure mechanisms, and the identification of leading indicators of failure which are essential in the development of physics-based degradation models and RUL prediction. In particular, this system isolates electrical overstress from thermal overstress. Also, this system allows for a precise control of internal temperatures, enabling the exploration of intrinsic failure mechanisms not related to the device packaging. By controlling the temperature within safe operation levels of the device, accelerated aging is induced by electrical overstress only, avoiding the generation of thermal cycles. The temperature is controlled by active thermal-electric units. Several electrical and thermal signals are measured in-situ and recorded for further analysis in the identification of leading indicators of failures. This system, therefore, provides a unique capability in the exploration of different failure mechanisms and the identification of precursors of failure that can be used to provide a health management solution for electronic devices.

  13. A technique for optimizing the design of power semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, E. S.

    1976-01-01

    A technique is described that provides a basis for predicting whether any device design change will improve or degrade the unavoidable trade-off that must be made between the conduction loss and the turn-off speed of fast-switching high-power thyristors. The technique makes use of a previously reported method by which, for a given design, this trade-off was determined for a wide range of carrier lifetimes. It is shown that by extending this technique, one can predict how other design variables affect this trade-off. The results show that for relatively slow devices the design can be changed to decrease the current gains to improve the turn-off time without significantly degrading the losses. On the other hand, for devices having fast turn-off times design changes can be made to increase the current gain to decrease the losses without a proportionate increase in the turn-off time. Physical explanations for these results are proposed.

  14. Charge transport and device physics of layered-crystalline organic semiconductors (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Tatsuo

    2015-10-01

    Here we present and discuss our recent investigations into the understanding of microscopic charge transport, novel film processing technologies, and a development of layered-crystalline organic semiconductors for high performance OTFTs. We first discuss the microscopic charge transport in the OTFTs, as investigated by field-induced electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The technique can detect signals due to tiny amount of field-induced carriers, accumulated at the semiconductor-insulator interfaces. Following aspects are presented and discussed; 1) Carrier motion within the crystalline domains can be understood in terms of the trap-and-release transport, 2) charge trap states are spatially extended over several sites depending on the trap levels, and 3) the intra- and inter-domain transport can be discriminated by anisotropic electron spin resonance measurements. Next we discuss novel print production technologies for organic semiconductors showing high layered crystallinity. The concept of "printed electronics" is now regarded as a realistic paradigm to manufacture light-weight, thin, and impact-resistant electronics devices, although production of highly crystalline semiconductor films may be incompatible with conventional printing process. We here present printing techniques for manufacturing high performance OTFTs; 1) double-shot inkjet printing for small-molecule-based semiconductors, and 2) push-coating for semiconducting polymers. We demonstrate that both processes are useful to manufacture high quality semiconductor layers with the high layered crystallinity.

  15. Advances in mode-locked semiconductor disk lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornaszewski, Lukaz; Hempler, Nils; Hamilton, Craig J.; Maker, Gareth T.; Malcolm, Graeme P. A.

    2013-02-01

    NonLinear Microscopy techniques, such as Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence and Second Harmonic Generation provide advantages over conventional Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy. A key element in a NonLinear Microscope is an ultrafast laser which produces short pulses with the high intensities needed for exciting nonlinear processes. Semiconductor Disk Lasers potentially offer an alternative to expensive Ti:Sapphire lasers. The reported 200MHz operation of a modelocked Semiconductor Disk laser is to our knowledge the lowest repetition rate as yet demonstrated.

  16. Present status and prospects of R&D of radiation-resistant semiconductor devices at JAEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, H.

    2013-05-01

    Research and development of radiation resistant semiconductor devices have been performed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) for their application to electronic system used in harsh environments like space, accelerator and nuclear facilities. Such devices are also indispensable for robots and equipment necessary for decommissioning of the damaged reactors at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants. For this purpose, we have fabricated transistors based on a wide band-gap semiconductor SiC and examined their radiation degradation. As a result, SiC-based transistors exhibited no significant degradation up to 1MGy, indicating their excellent radiation resistance. Recent our R&Ds of radiation resistant devices based on SiC are summarized and reviewed.

  17. High conductance ohmic junction for monolithic semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Carol R. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In order to increase the efficiency of solar cells, a monolithic stacked device is constructed comprising a plurality of solar sub-cells adjusted for different bands of radiation. The interconnection between these sub-cells has been a significant technical problem. The invention provides an interconnection which is a thin layer of high ohmic conductance material formed between the sub-cells. Such a layer tends to form beads which serve as a shorting interconnect while passing a large fraction of the radiation to the lower sub-cells and permitting lattice-matching between the sub-cells to be preserved.

  18. Templated growth of II-VI semiconductor optical fiber devices and steps towards infrared fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazio, Pier J. A.; Sparks, Justin R.; He, Rongrui; Krishnamurthi, Mahesh; Fitzgibbons, Thomas C.; Chaudhuri, Subhasis; Baril, Neil F.; Peacock, Anna C.; Healy, Noel; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Badding, John V.

    2015-02-01

    ZnSe and other zinc chalcogenide semiconductor materials can be doped with divalent transition metal ions to create a mid-IR laser gain medium with active function in the wavelength range 2 - 5 microns and potentially beyond using frequency conversion. As a step towards fiberized laser devices, we have manufactured ZnSe semiconductor fiber waveguides with low (less than 1dB/cm at 1550nm) optical losses, as well as more complex ternary alloys with ZnSxSe(1-x) stoichiometry to potentially allow for annular heterostructures with effective and low order mode corecladding waveguiding.

  19. Spectroscopy of semiconductor meta-device building blocks (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butakov, Nikita A.; Schuller, Jon A.

    2015-09-01

    Inspired by the potential of designing highly efficient nanophotonic optical elements, numerous researchers are currently exploring the use of dielectric resonators in constructing meta-devices. A wide range of optical components have been demonstrated, including metasurfaces that act as two-dimensional lenses, gratings, and axicons. At the core of these devices is a dielectric building block, typically a Silicon nano-disk or nano-rod, that supports Mie-like leaky mode excitations with a geometrically tunable amplitude and phase response. Here we present a comprehensive experimental characterization of these building blocks. We elucidate their multipolar mode structure, and explain the dependence on the underlying substrate. We find that fundamentally new buried magnetic modes emerge in high-index substrates, and that Fabry-Perot effects in silicon-on-insulator platforms can be utilized to enhance or suppress specific modes. When individual resonators are arranged into arrays with sub-wavelength periodicities, inter-particle coupling leads to a shift in the resonant response. When the periodicities are on the same order as the operating wavelength, the localized resonances may couple with the global diffraction modes, leading to the possible formation of distinct high-quality-factor surface-lattice-resonant modes, similar to those encountered in plasmonic gratings. We conclude by exploring the behavior of resonators constructed out of active materials, such as polar materials that support phonon-polariton excitations, and phase-change materials with tunable dielectric constants.

  20. Method of making suspended thin-film semiconductor piezoelectric devices

    DOEpatents

    Casalnuovo, Stephen A.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2001-01-01

    A process for forming a very thin suspended layer of piezoelectric material of thickness less than 10 microns. The device is made from a combination of GaAs and AlGaAs layers to form either a sensor or an electronic filter. Onto a GaAs substrate is epitaxially deposited a thin (1-5 micron) sacrificial AlGaAs layer, followed by a thin GaAs top layer. In one embodiment the substrate is selectively etched away from below until the AlGaAs layer is reached. Then a second selective etch removes the sacrificial AlGaAs layer, that has acted here as an etch stop, leaving the thin suspended layer of piezoelectric GaAs. In another embodiment, a pattern of small openings is etched through the thin layer of GaAs on top of the device to expose the sacrificial AlGaAs layer. A second selective etch is done through these openings to remove the sacrificial AlGaAs layer, leaving the top GaAs layer suspended over the GaAs substrate. A novel etchant solution containing a surface tension reducing agent is utilized to remove the AlGaAs while preventing buildup of gas bubbles that would otherwise break the thin GaAs layer.

  1. Advances in defect characterizations of semiconductors using positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, K.G.; Asoka-Kumar, P.

    1996-12-31

    Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) is a sensitive probe for studying the electronic structure of defects in solids. The authors summarize recent developments in defect characterization of semiconductors using depth-resolved PAS. The progress achieved in extending the capabilities of the PAS method is also described.

  2. Investigation of III-V magnetic semiconductor thin films and heterojunction devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangaraju, Nikhil

    Magnetic field control of semiconductor device properties is of great interest for novel electronics because it offers a way to control the spin degree of freedom of charge carriers. One way to achieve this control is the use of dilute magnetic semiconductor as an active element in semiconductor devices. In this work, the relationship between the magnetic and electronic properties of magnetic bipolar heterojunction devices is examined. InMnAs/n-type heterojunctions were fabricated using metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. The capacitace of these devices was measured at room temperature as a function of magnetic field. The capacitance of these junction increases with magnetic field by up to 1.25% at 0.5 T. The change in capacitance suggests that there is spin splitting in the material. The magnetotransport properties of InMnAs/InAs heterojunction diode were measured as a function of magnetic field from 0 to 18 T and at various temperatures. These devices exhibit excellent rectifying properties at room temperature and zero magnetic field. When a magnetic field is applied, the junctions show resistive behavior, which dominates at high magnetic fields. The magnetoresistance of these diodes was measured as a function of current. The magnetoresistance for 15 mA through the device is 2600% at 18 T. The magnetoresistance of this device is attributed to efficient spin-polarized carrier transport. The conductance behavior of InMnAs diodes in high magnetic fields is analyzed to explain the spin selective transport. The change in current through the device at a constant voltage increases linearly with magnetic field for low magnetic fields and saturates at high magnetic field. The measured field dependence of the current change is attributed to the existence of a paramagnetic component, which determines the degree of spin polarization of the junction current. This work indicates that highly spin-polarized magnetic semiconductor heterojunction devices that operate at room

  3. ZnCdMgSe-Based Semiconductors for Intersubband Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Tamargo, Maria C.

    2008-11-13

    This paper presents a review of recent results on the application of ZnCdMgSe-based wide bandgap II-VI compounds to intersubband devices such as quantum cascade lasers and quantum well infrared photodetectors operating in the mid-infrared region. The conduction band offset of ZnCdSe/ZnCdMgSe quantum well structures was determined from contactless electroreflectance measurements to be as high as 1.12 eV. FT-IR was used to measure intersubband absorption in multi-quantum well structures in the mid-IR range. Electroluminescence at 4.8 {mu}m was observed from a quantum cascade emitter structure made from these materials. Preliminary results are also presented on self assembled quantum dots of CdSe on ZnCdMgSe, and novel quantum well structures with metastable binary MgSe barriers.

  4. Growth, characterization, modeling and device applications of semiconductor nanowire networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohn, Andrew J.

    Semiconducting nanowire networks composed specifically of indium phosphide or silicon are developed with the goal of understanding their electrical, thermal and optoelectronic properties while developing scalable, manufacturable solutions to a number of problems of contemporary interest to society, with particular emphasis on direct conversion of heat to electricity. Nanowire networks are grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on non-single crystalline surfaces leading to highly interconnected networks of nanowires capable of long-range three-dimensional transport while retaining many of the unique properties of highly conned nanowire structures and displaying advantageous and unique properties such as mechanical flexibility. Growth of semiconducting nanowire networks is discussed in depth, especially relating to the role of the non-single crystalline surfaces from which they grow and morphological changes associated with doping. Finite element simulations suggest that the physical intersections present within a nanowire network are found to play a complex and potentially useful role in thermal transport and in electrical transport through experiment, demonstrating quantized conductance for the first time at room temperature. Electrical transport over distances far in excess of the dimensions of the individual nanowires is also studied experimentally by applying surface photovoltage techniques for the first time to nanowire networks. The theoretical model developed to analyze data from this, first of its type, experiment reveals insights that can aid in developing improved thermoelectric devices. Such thermoelectric devices were fabricated using a highly scalable and very low cost approach. Thermoelectric testing displays large series electrical resistance but Seebeck voltages comparable to its bulk counterpart. The preliminary results clearly indicate that if series electrical resistance can be decreased, nanowire networks will be an excellent candidate

  5. SEM-contour shape analysis method for advanced semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Yasutaka; Shindo, Hiroyuki; Ota, Yoshihiro; Matsuoka, Ryoichi; Hojo, Yutaka; Fuchimoto, Daisuke; Hibino, Daisuke; Sakai, Hideo

    2013-04-01

    The new measuring method that we developed executes a contour shape analysis that is based on the pattern edge information from a SEM image. This analysis helps to create a highly precise quantification of every circuit pattern shape by comparing the contour extracted from the SEM image using a CD measurement algorithm and the ideal circuit pattern. The developed method, in the next phase, can generate four shape indices by using the analysis mass measurement data. When the shape index measured using the developed method is compared the CD, the difference of the shape index and the CD is negligibly small for the quantification of the circuit pattern shape. In addition, when the 2D patterns on a FEM wafer are measured using the developed method, the tendency for shape deformations is precisely caught by the four shape indices. This new method and the evaluation results will be presented in detail in this paper.

  6. Total-dose radiation effects data for semiconductor devices, volume 1. [radiation resistance of components for the Galileo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, W. E.; Martin, K. E.; Nichols, D. K.; Gauthier, M. K.; Brown, S. F.

    1981-01-01

    Steady-state, total-dose radiation test data are provided in graphic format, for use by electronic designers and other personnel using semiconductor devices in a radiation environment. Data are presented by JPL for various NASA space programs on diodes, bipolar transistors, field effect transistors, silicon-controlled rectifiers, and optical devices. A vendor identification code list is included along with semiconductor device electrical parameter symbols and abbreviations.

  7. Electrochemical test methods for advanced battery and semiconductor technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chao-Hung

    This dissertation consists of two studies. The first study was the evaluation of metallic materials for advanced lithium ion batteries and the second study was the determination of the dielectric constant k for the low-k materials. The advanced lithium ion battery is miniature for implantable medical devices and capable of being recharged from outside of the body using magnetic induction without physical connections. The stability of metallic materials employed in the lithium ion battery is one of the major safety concerns. Three types of materials---Pt-Ir alloy, Ti alloys, and stainless steels---were evaluated extensively in this study. The electrochemical characteristics of Pt-Ir alloy, Ti alloys, and stainless steels were evaluated in several types of battery electrolytes in order to determine the candidate materials for long-term use in lithium ion batteries. The dissolution behavior of these materials and the decomposition behavior of the battery electrolyte were investigated using the anodic potentiodynamic polarization (APP) technique. Lifetime prediction for metal dissolution was conducted using constant potential polarization (CPP) technique. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique was employed to investigate the metal dissolution behavior or the battery electrolyte decomposition at the open circuit potential (OCP). The scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to observe the morphology changes after these tests. The effects of experimental factors on the corrosion behaviors of the metallic materials and stabilities of the battery electrolytes were also investigated using the 23 factorial design approach. Integration of materials having low dielectric constant k as interlayer dielectrics and/or low-resistivity conductors will partially solve the RC delay problem for the limiting performance of high-speed logic chips. The samples of JSR LKD 5109 material capped by several materials were evaluated by using EIS. The feasibility of using

  8. Device processing of wide bandgap semiconductors - challenges and directions

    SciTech Connect

    Pearton, S.J.; Shul, R.J.; Zolper, J.C.

    1997-10-01

    The wide gap materials SiC, GaN and to a lesser extent diamond are attracting great interest for high power/high temperature electronics. There are a host of device processing challenges presented by these materials because of their physical and chemical stability, including difficulty in achieving stable, low contact resistances, especially for one conductivity type, absence of convenient wet etch recipes, generally slow dry etch rates, the high temperatures needed for implant activation, control of suitable gate dielectrics and the lack of cheap, large diameter conducting and semi-insulating substrates. The relatively deep ionization levels of some of the common dopants (Mg, in GaN; B, Al in SiC; P in diamond) means that carrier densities may be low at room temperature even if the impurity is electrically active - this problem will be reduced at elevated temperature, and thus contact resistances will be greatly improved provided the metallization is stable and reliable. Some recent work with CoSi{sub x} on SiC and W-alloys on GaN show promise for improved ohmic contacts. The issue of unintentional hydrogen passivation of dopants will also be covered - this leads to strong increases in resistivity of p-SiC and GaN, but to large decreases in resistivity of diamond. Recent work on development of wet etches has found recipes for AlN (KOH), while photochemical etching of SiC and GaN has been reported. In the latter cases p-type materials is not etched, which can be a major liability in some devices. The dry etch results obtained with various novel reactors, including ICP, ECR and LE4 will be compared - the high ion densities in the former techniques produce the highest etch rates for strongly-bonded materials, but can lead to preferential loss of N from the nitrides and therefore to a highly conducting surface. This is potentially a major problem for fabrication of dry etched, recessed gate FET structures.

  9. Distributed and coupled 2D electro-thermal model of power semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkacem, Ghania; Lefebvre, Stéphane; Joubert, Pierre-Yves; Bouarroudj-Berkani, Mounira; Labrousse, Denis; Rostaing, Gilles

    2014-05-01

    The development of power electronics in the field of transportations (automotive, aeronautics) requires the use of power semiconductor devices providing protection and diagnostic functions. In the case of series protections power semiconductor devices which provide protection may operate in shortcircuit and act as a current limiting device. This mode of operations is very constraining due to the large dissipation of power. In these particular conditions of operation, electro-thermal models of power semiconductor devices are of key importance in order to optimize their thermal design and increase their reliability. The development of such an electro-thermal model for power MOSFET transistors based on the coupling between two computation softwares (Matlab and Cast3M) is described in this paper. The 2D electro-thermal model is able to predict (i) the temperature distribution on chip surface well as in the volume under short-circuit operations, (ii) the effect of the temperature on the distribution of the current flowing within the die and (iii) the effects of the ageing of the metallization layer on the current density and the temperature. In this paper, the electrical and thermal models are described as well as the implemented coupling scheme.

  10. Energy Models for One-Carrier Transport in Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jerome, Joseph W.; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1991-01-01

    Moment models of carrier transport, derived from the Boltzmann equation, made possible the simulation of certain key effects through such realistic assumptions as energy dependent mobility functions. This type of global dependence permits the observation of velocity overshoot in the vicinity of device junctions, not discerned via classical drift-diffusion models, which are primarily local in nature. It was found that a critical role is played in the hydrodynamic model by the heat conduction term. When ignored, the overshoot is inappropriately damped. When the standard choice of the Wiedemann-Franz law is made for the conductivity, spurious overshoot is observed. Agreement with Monte-Carlo simulation in this regime required empirical modification of this law, or nonstandard choices. Simulations of the hydrodynamic model in one and two dimensions, as well as simulations of a newly developed energy model, the RT model, are presented. The RT model, intermediate between the hydrodynamic and drift-diffusion model, was developed to eliminate the parabolic energy band and Maxwellian distribution assumptions, and to reduce the spurious overshoot with physically consistent assumptions. The algorithms employed for both models are the essentially non-oscillatory shock capturing algorithms. Some mathematical results are presented and contrasted with the highly developed state of the drift-diffusion model.

  11. Semiconductor heterojunctions at the Conference on the Physics and Chemistry of Semiconductor Interfaces: A device physicist`s perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Kroemer, H.

    1993-07-01

    After a very slow start, heterojunctions have emerged as one of the central topics of the Conference on the Physics and Chemistry of Semiconductor Interfaces. The presentation describes this emergence, starting from such items as the electron affinity rule of conduction band offsets, Dingle`s first determination of the GaAs-(Al,Ga)As band lineups, and the first lineup theories. Some of the blind alleys in this development (85:15 Rule, Common-Anion Rule, and others) are retold by one of the participants. The treatment then turns to a few of the most recent developments, such as the emerging role of ab initio computations as a quasiexperimental tool, plus a few developments this writer finds worth speculating about. The treatment is from the perspective of a device physicist, rather than a surface scientist, and some thoughts are offered on why there is not more commonality between heterojunctions and Schottky barriers. 28 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Reactivity and morphology of vapor-deposited Al/polymer interfaces for organic semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirkan, K.; Mathew, A.; Weiland, C.; Reid, M.; Opila, R. L.

    2008-02-01

    The chemistry and the morphology of metal-deposited organic semiconductor interfaces play a significant role in determining the performance and reliability of organic semiconductor devices. We investigated the aluminum metallization of poly(2-methoxy-5,2'-ethyl-hexyloxy-phenylene vinylene) (MEH-PPV), polystyrene, and ozone-treated polystyrene surfaces by chemical (x-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy) and microscopic [atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), focused ion beam (FIB)] analyses. Photoelectron spectroscopy showed the degree of chemical interaction between Al and each polymer; for MEH-PPV, the chemical interactions were mainly through the C-O present in the side chain of the polymer structure. The chemical interaction of aluminum with polystyrene was less significant, but it showed a dramatic increase after ozone treatment of the polystyrene surface (due to the formation of exposed oxygen sites). Results showed a strong relationship between the surface reactivity and the condensation/sticking of the aluminum atoms on the surface. SEM analysis showed that, during the initial stages of the metallization, a significant clustering of aluminum takes place. FIB analysis showed that such clustering yields a notably porous structure. The chemical and the morphological properties of the vapor-deposited Al on organic semiconductor surfaces makes such electrical contacts more complicated. The possible effects of surface chemistry and interface morphology on the electrical properties and reliability of organic semiconductor devices are discussed in light of the experimental findings.

  13. Theoretical discovery of stable structures of group III-V monolayers: The materials for semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Tatsuo

    2015-11-23

    Group III-V compounds are very important as the materials of semiconductor devices. Stable structures of the monolayers of group III-V binary compounds have been discovered by using first-principles calculations. The primitive unit cell of the discovered structures is a rectangle, which includes four group-III atoms and four group-V atoms. A group-III atom and its three nearest-neighbor group-V atoms are placed on the same plane; however, these connections are not the sp{sup 2} hybridization. The bond angles around the group-V atoms are less than the bond angle of sp{sup 3} hybridization. The discovered structure of GaP is an indirect transition semiconductor, while the discovered structures of GaAs, InP, and InAs are direct transition semiconductors. Therefore, the discovered structures of these compounds have the potential of the materials for semiconductor devices, for example, water splitting photocatalysts. The discovered structures may become the most stable structures of monolayers which consist of other materials.

  14. Evaluation of semiconductor devices for Electric and Hybrid Vehicle (EHV) ac-drive applications, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F. C.; Chen, D. Y.; Jovanovic, M.; Hopkins, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    The results of evaluation of power semiconductor devices for electric hybrid vehicle ac drive applications are summarized. Three types of power devices are evaluated in the effort: high power bipolar or Darlington transistors, power MOSFETs, and asymmetric silicon control rectifiers (ASCR). The Bipolar transistors, including discrete device and Darlington devices, range from 100 A to 400 A and from 400 V to 900 V. These devices are currently used as key switching elements inverters for ac motor drive applications. Power MOSFETs, on the other hand, are much smaller in current rating. For the 400 V device, the current rating is limited to 25 A. For the main drive of an electric vehicle, device paralleling is normally needed to achieve practical power level. For other electric vehicle (EV) related applications such as battery charger circuit, however, MOSFET is advantageous to other devices because of drive circuit simplicity and high frequency capability. Asymmetrical SCR is basically a SCR device and needs commutation circuit for turn off. However, the device poses several advantages, i.e., low conduction drop and low cost.

  15. Semiconductor-free hot carrier devices for energy harvesting and photodetection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Tao; Munday, Jeremy

    The maximum efficiency for a single-junction solar cell is around 30% by the Shockley-Queisser (SQ) limit. The energy loss is typically through a thermalization process between the excited high-energy carriers, e.g. hot carriers, and the lattice. Therefore, the collection of the hot carriers before thermalization would allow for reduced power loss. Recently, photodetectors based on metal-semiconductor Schottky junctions have been exploiting hot electron effects to allow sub-bandgap absorption and hence show promise as near IR wavelength detectors. Here we present a simple, semiconductor-free hot carrier device based on transparent conducting oxides (TCO) electrodes. We experimentally demonstrate the hot carrier generation and extraction under monochromatic and broadband light illumination of normal and oblique incidence. Under optimized conditions, a power conversion efficiency >10% is predicted for high-energy photon excitation. The performance of the device shows further improvement by employing nanostructures, which couple the incident light into surface plasmons, leading to absorption enhancement. This semiconductor-free device provides an alternative way of energy harvesting and photodetection.

  16. Low-temperature sintering of nanoscale silver paste for semiconductor device interconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Guofeng

    This research has developed a lead-free semiconductor device interconnect technology by studying the processing-microstructure-property relationships of low-temperature sintering of nanoscale silver pastes. The nanoscale silver pastes have been formulated by adding organic components (dispersant, binder and thinner) into nano-silver particles. The selected organic components have the nano-particle polymeric stabilization, paste processing quality adjustment, and non-densifying diffusion retarding functions and thus help the pastes sinter to ˜80% bulk density at temperatures no more than 300°C. It has been found that the low-temperature sintered silver has better electrical, thermal and overall thermomechanical properties compared with the existing semiconductor device interconnecting materials such as solder alloys and conductive epoxies. After solving the organic burnout problems associated with the covered sintering, a lead-free semiconductor device interconnect technology has been designed to be compatible with the existing surface-mounting techniques with potentially low-cost. It has been found that the low-temperature sintered silver joints have high electrical, thermal, and mechanical performance. The reliability of the silver joints has also been studied by the 50-250°C thermal cycling experiment. Finally, the bonging strength drop of the silver joints has been suggested to be ductile fracture in the silver joints as micro-voids nucleated at microscale grain boundaries during the temperature cycling. The low-temperature silver sintering technology has enabled some benchmark packaging concepts and substantial advantages in future applications.

  17. P and n-type microcrystalline semiconductor alloy material including band gap widening elements, devices utilizing same

    DOEpatents

    Guha, Subhendu; Ovshinsky, Stanford R.

    1988-10-04

    An n-type microcrystalline semiconductor alloy material including a band gap widening element; a method of fabricating p-type microcrystalline semiconductor alloy material including a band gap widening element; and electronic and photovoltaic devices incorporating said n-type and p-type materials.

  18. Mercuric iodide (HgI 2) semiconductor devices as charged particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becchetti, F. D.; Raymond, R. S.; Ristinen, R. A.; Schnepple, W. F.; Ortale, C.

    1983-07-01

    The properties of HgI 2 semiconductor devices as charged particle detectors have been investigated. Nearly linear energy response with fwhm resolution of 5-15% is observed for 1,2H and 3,4He ions, E < 40 MeV. Fast proton damage is observed for 10 10 protons/cm 2. However, based on measurements with two HgI 2 detectors, little fast neutron damage is apparent at fluences up to 10 15 neutrons/cm 2. This suggests considerably greater resistance to radiation damage than is observed for Si and other solid state devices.

  19. Unified model of fractal conductance fluctuations for diffusive and ballistic semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlow, C. A.; Taylor, R. P.; Martin, T. P.; Scannell, B. C.; Linke, H.; Fairbanks, M. S.; Hall, G. D. R.; Shorubalko, I.; Samuelson, L.; Fromhold, T. M.; Brown, C. V.; Hackens, B.; Faniel, S.; Gustin, C.; Bayot, V.; Wallart, X.; Bollaert, S.; Cappy, A.

    2006-05-01

    We present an experimental comparison of magnetoconductance fluctuations measured in the ballistic, quasiballistic, and diffusive scattering regimes of semiconductor devices. In contradiction to expectations, we show that the spectral content of the magnetoconductance fluctuations exhibits an identical fractal behavior for these scattering regimes and that this behavior is remarkably insensitive to device boundary properties. We propose a unified model of fractal conductance fluctuations in the ballistic, quasiballistic, and diffusive transport regimes, in which the generic fractal behavior is generated by a subtle interplay between boundary and material-induced chaotic scattering events.

  20. Procedure for pressure contact on high-power semiconductor devices free of thermal fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knobloch, J.

    1979-01-01

    To eliminate thermal fatigue, a procedure for manufacturing semiconductor power devices with pure pressure contact without solid binding was developed. Pressure contact without the use of a solid binding to avoid a limitation of the maximum surface in the contact was examined. A silicon wafer covered with a relatively thick metal layer is imbedded with the aid of a soft silver foil between two identically sized hard contact discs (molybdenum or tungsten) which are rotationally symmetrical. The advantages of this concept are shown for large diameters. The pressure contact was tested successfully in many devices in a large variety of applications.

  1. Advanced development of double-injection, deep-impurity semiconductor switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanes, M. H.

    1987-01-01

    Deep-impurity, double-injection devices, commonly refered to as (DI) squared devices, represent a class of semiconductor switches possessing a very high degree of tolerance to electron and neutron irradiation and to elevated temperature operation. These properties have caused them to be considered as attractive candidates for space power applications. The design, fabrication, and testing of several varieties of (DI) squared devices intended for power switching are described. All of these designs were based upon gold-doped silicon material. Test results, along with results of computer simulations of device operation, other calculations based upon the assumed mode of operation of (DI) squared devices, and empirical information regarding power semiconductor device operation and limitations, have led to the conculsion that these devices are not well suited to high-power applications. When operated in power circuitry configurations, they exhibit high-power losses in both the off-state and on-state modes. These losses are caused by phenomena inherent to the physics and material of the devices and cannot be much reduced by device design optimizations. The (DI) squared technology may, however, find application in low-power functions such as sensing, logic, and memory, when tolerance to radiation and temperature are desirable (especially is device performance is improved by incorporation of deep-level impurities other than gold.

  2. Spin polarized state filter based on semiconductor–dielectric–iron–semiconductor multi-nanolayer device

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, Vladimir I.; Khmelinskii, Igor

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Development of a new spintronics device. • Development of quantum spin polarized filters. • Development of theory of quantum spin polarized filter. - Abstract: Presently we report spin-polarized state transport in semiconductor–dielectric–iron–semiconductor (SDIS) four-nanolayer sandwich devices. The exchange-resonance spectra in such devices are quite specific, differing also from spectra observed earlier in other three-nanolayer devices. The theoretical model developed earlier is extended and used to interpret the available experimental results. A detailed ab initio analysis of the magnetic-field dependence of the output magnetic moment is also performed. The model predicts an exchange spectrum comprising a series of peaks, with the spectral structure determined by several factors, discussed in the paper.

  3. Combining and Correlating DC, Modulated, and Transient Measurement Techniques to Disentangle and Quantify Key Physical Properties for Organic Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, David

    2015-03-01

    Organic thin film electronics offer the potential to significantly impact how humans interface with their surroundings and society in general. Substantial contributions over the past two decades in this highly multidisciplinary area of research have led to significant improvements in discrete device performance and several impressive advanced technology demonstrations. However, fundamental understanding and quantification of the physical properties and processes that govern device operation remains limited compared to conventional semiconductors, such as silicon. In this presentation I will discuss our recent development and application of combined and correlated optical-electrical measurement methods to obtain a more nuanced understanding and quantification of the critical properties and fundamental processes relevant to device operation. In particular, I will discuss the use of steady state and pulsed light techniques combined with modulated and DC electrical measurements tailored to the specific operating regimes and device structures of organic diodes (solar cells and light emitters) and transistors to provide greater understanding of charge injection, transport, lifetime, density, and recombination kinetics.

  4. Theory of Current Transients in Planar Semiconductor Devices: Insights and Applications to Organic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawks, Steven A.; Finck, Benjamin Y.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.

    2015-04-01

    Time-domain current measurements are widely used to characterize semiconductor material properties, such as carrier mobility, doping concentration, carrier lifetime, and the static dielectric constant. It is therefore critical that these measurements be theoretically understood if they are to be successfully applied to assess the properties of materials and devices. In this paper, we derive generalized relations for describing current-density transients in planar semiconductor devices at uniform temperature. By spatially averaging the charge densities inside the semiconductor, we are able to provide a rigorous, straightforward, and experimentally relevant way to interpret these measurements. The formalism details several subtle aspects of current transients, including how the electrode charge relates to applied bias and internal space charge, how the displacement current can alter the apparent free-carrier current, and how to understand the integral of a charge-extraction transient. We also demonstrate how the formalism can be employed to derive the current transients arising from simple physical models, like those used to describe charge extraction by linearly increasing voltage (CELIV) and time-of-flight experiments. In doing so, we find that there is a nonintuitive factor-of-2 reduction in the apparent free-carrier concentration that can be easily missed, for example, in the application of charge-extraction models. Finally, to validate our theory and better understand the different current contributions, we perform a full time-domain drift-diffusion simulation of a CELIV trace and compare the results to our formalism. As expected, our analytic equations match precisely with the numerical solutions to the drift-diffusion, Poisson, and continuity equations. Thus, overall, our formalism provides a straightforward and general way to think about how the internal space-charge distribution, the electrode charge, and the externally applied bias translate into a measured

  5. Diversionary device history and revolutionary advancements.

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Paul W.; Grubelich, Mark Charles

    2005-04-01

    Diversionary devices also known as flash bangs or stun grenades were first employed about three decades ago. These devices produce a loud bang accompanied by a brilliant flash of light and are employed to temporarily distract or disorient an adversary by overwhelming their visual and auditory senses in order to gain a tactical advantage. Early devices that where employed had numerous shortcomings. Over time, many of these deficiencies were identified and corrected. This evolutionary process led to today's modern diversionary devices. These present-day conventional diversionary devices have undergone evolutionary changes but operate in the same manner as their predecessors. In order to produce the loud bang and brilliant flash of light, a flash powder mixture, usually a combination of potassium perchlorate and aluminum powder is ignited to produce an explosion. In essence these diversionary devices are small pyrotechnic bombs that produce a high point-source pressure in order to achieve the desired far-field effect. This high point-source pressure can make these devices a hazard to the operator, adversaries and hostages even though they are intended for 'less than lethal' roles. A revolutionary diversionary device has been developed that eliminates this high point-source pressure problem and eliminates the need for the hazardous pyrotechnic flash powder composition. This new diversionary device employs a fuel charge that is expelled and ignited in the atmosphere. This process is similar to a fuel air or thermobaric explosion, except that it is a deflagration, not a detonation, thereby reducing the overpressure hazard. This technology reduces the hazard associated with diversionary devices to all involved with their manufacture, transport and use. An overview of the history of diversionary device development and developments at Sandia National Laboratories will be presented.

  6. Low-temperature optical processing of semiconductor devices using photon effects

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.L.; Cudzinovic, M.; Symko, M.

    1995-08-01

    In an RTA process the primary purpose of the optical energy incident on the semiconductor sample is to increase its temperature rapidly. The activation of reactions involved in processes such as the formation of junctions, metal contacts, deposition of oxides or nitrides, takes place purely by the temperature effects. We describe the observation of a number of new photonic effects that take place within the bulk and at the interfaces of a semiconductor when a semiconductor device is illuminated with a spectrally broad-band light. Such effects include changes in the diffusion properties of impurities in the semiconductor, increased diffusivity of impurities across interfaces, and generation of electric fields that can alter physical and chemical properties of the interface. These phenomena lead to certain unique effects in an RTA process that do not occur during conventional furnace annealing under the same temperature conditions. Of particular interest are observations of low-temperature alloying of Si-Al interfaces, enhanced activation of phosphorus in Si during drive-in, low-temperature oxidation of Si, and gettering of impurities at low-temperatures under optical illumination. These optically induced effects, in general, diminish with an increase in the temperature, thus allowing thermally activated reaction rates to dominate at higher temperatures.

  7. Novel engineered compound semiconductor heterostructures for advanced electronics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillman, Gregory E.; Holonyak, Nick, Jr.; Coleman, James J.

    1992-06-01

    To provide the technology base that will enable SDIO capitalization on the performance advantages offered through novel engineered multiple-lavered compound semiconductor structures, this project has focussed on three specific areas: (1) carbon doping of AlGaAs/GaAs and InP/InGaAs materials for reliable high frequency heterojunction bipolar transistors; (2) impurity induced layer disordering and the environmental degradation of AlxGal-xAs-GaAs quantum-well heterostructures and the native oxide stabilization of AlxGal-xAs-GaAs quantum well heterostructure lasers; and (3) non-planar and strained-layer quantum well heterostructure lasers and laser arrays. The accomplishments in this three year research are reported in fifty-six publications and the abstracts included in this report.

  8. Crystal growth of hexaferrite architecture for magnetoelectrically tunable microwave semiconductor integrated devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bolin

    Hexaferrites (i.e., hexagonal ferrites), discovered in 1950s, exist as any one of six crystallographic structural variants (i.e., M-, X-, Y-, W-, U-, and Z-type). Over the past six decades, the hexaferrites have received much attention owing to their important properties that lend use as permanent magnets, magnetic data storage materials, as well as components in electrical devices, particularly those operating at RF frequencies. Moreover, there has been increasing interest in hexaferrites for new fundamental and emerging applications. Among those, electronic components for mobile and wireless communications especially incorporated with semiconductor integrated circuits at microwave frequencies, electromagnetic wave absorbers for electromagnetic compatibility, random-access memory (RAM) and low observable technology, and as composite materials having low dimensions. However, of particular interest is the magnetoelectric (ME) effect discovered recently in the hexaferrites such as SrScxFe12-xO19 (SrScM), Ba2--xSrxZn 2Fe12O22 (Zn2Y), Sr4Co2Fe 36O60 (Co2U) and Sr3Co2Fe 24O41 (Co2Z), demonstrating ferroelectricity induced by the complex internal alignment of magnetic moments. Further, both Co 2Z and Co2U have revealed observable magnetoelectric effects at room temperature, representing a step toward practical applications using the ME effect. These materials hold great potential for applications, since strong magnetoelectric coupling allows switching of the FE polarization with a magnetic field (H) and vice versa. These features could lead to a new type of storage devices, such as an electric field-controlled magnetic memory. A nanoscale-driven crystal growth of magnetic hexaferrites was successfully demonstrated at low growth temperatures (25--40% lower than the temperatures required often for crystal growth). This outcome exhibits thermodynamic processes of crystal growth, allowing ease in fabrication of advanced multifunctional materials. Most importantly, the

  9. 75 FR 81643 - In the Matter of Certain Semiconductor Products Made by Advanced Lithography Techniques and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... certain claims of U.S. Patent No. 6,042,998. 75 FR. 44,015 (July 27, 2010). The complaint named two... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Semiconductor Products Made by Advanced Lithography Techniques and... for ] importation, and sale within the United States after importation of certain...

  10. Direct CVD Graphene Growth on Semiconductors and Dielectrics for Transfer-Free Device Fabrication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huaping; Yu, Gui

    2016-07-01

    Graphene is the most broadly discussed and studied two-dimensional material because of its preeminent physical, mechanical, optical, and thermal properties. Until now, metal-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been widely employed for the scalable production of high-quality graphene. However, in order to incorporate the graphene into electronic devices, a transfer process from metal substrates to targeted substrates is inevitable. This process usually results in contamination, wrinkling, and breakage of graphene samples - undesirable in graphene-based technology and not compatible with industrial production. Therefore, direct graphene growth on desired semiconductor and dielectric substrates is considered as an effective alternative. Over the past years, there have been intensive investigations to realize direct graphene growth using CVD methods without the catalytic role of metals. Owing to the low catalytic activity of non-metal substrates for carbon precursor decomposition and graphene growth, several strategies have been designed to facilitate and engineer graphene fabrication on semiconductors and insulators. Here, those developed strategies for direct CVD graphene growth on semiconductors and dielectrics for transfer-free fabrication of electronic devices are reviewed. By employing these methods, various graphene-related structures can be directly prepared on desired substrates and exhibit excellent performance, providing versatile routes for varied graphene-based materials fabrication. PMID:27122247

  11. Ionic Liquid Activation of Amorphous Metal-Oxide Semiconductors for Flexible Transparent Electronic Devices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Noh, Joo Hyon; Wong, Anthony T.; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Haglund, Amanda V.; Dai, Sheng; Ward, Thomas Zac; Mandrus, David; Rack, Philip D.

    2016-02-09

    To begin this abstract, amorphous metal-oxide semiconductors offer the high carrier mobilities and excellent large-area uniformity required for high performance, transparent, flexible electronic devices; however, a critical bottleneck to their widespread implementation is the need to activate these materials at high temperatures which are not compatible with flexible polymer substrates. The highly controllable activation of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide semiconductor channels using ionic liquid gating at room temperature is reported. Activation is controlled by electric field-induced oxygen migration across the ionic liquid-semiconductor interface. In addition to activation of unannealed devices, it is shown that threshold voltages of a transistormore » can be linearly tuned between the enhancement and depletion modes. Finally, the first ever example of transparent flexible thin film metal oxide transistor on a polyamide substrate created using this simple technique is demonstrated. Finally, this study demonstrates the potential of field-induced activation as a promising alternative to traditional postdeposition thermal annealing which opens the door to wide scale implementation into flexible electronic applications.« less

  12. Highly entangled photons from hybrid piezoelectric-semiconductor quantum dot devices.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Rinaldo; Wildmann, Johannes S; Zallo, Eugenio; Schmidt, Oliver G; Rastelli, Armando

    2014-06-11

    Entanglement resources are key ingredients of future quantum technologies. If they could be efficiently integrated into a semiconductor platform, a new generation of devices could be envisioned, whose quantum-mechanical functionalities are controlled via the mature semiconductor technology. Epitaxial quantum dots (QDs) embedded in diodes would embody such ideal quantum devices, but a fine-structure splitting (FSS) between the bright exciton states lowers dramatically the degree of entanglement of the sources and hampers severely their real exploitation in the foreseen applications. In this work, we overcome this hurdle using strain-tunable optoelectronic devices, where any QD can be tuned for the emission of photon pairs featuring the highest degree of entanglement ever reported for QDs, with concurrence as high as 0.75 ± 0.02. Furthermore, we study the evolution of Bell's parameters as a function of FSS and demonstrate for the first time that filtering-free violation of Bell's inequalities requires the FSS to be smaller than 1 μeV. This upper limit for the FSS also sets the tuning range of exciton energies (∼1 meV) over which our device operates as an energy-tunable source of highly entangled photons. A moderate temporal filtering further increases the concurrence and the tunability of exciton energies up to 0.82 and 2 meV, respectively, though at the expense of 60% reduction of count rate. PMID:24845369

  13. Structural and optical properties of silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor light-emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kaikai; Zhang, Zhengyuan; Zhang, Zhengping

    2016-01-01

    A silicon p-channel metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (Si-PMOSFET) that is fully compatible with the standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor process is investigated based on the phenomenon of optical radiation observed in the reverse-biased p-n junction in the Si-PMOSFET device. The device can be used either as a two-terminal silicon diode light-emitting device (Si-diode LED) or as a three-terminal silicon gate-controlled diode light-emitting device (Si gate-controlled diode LED). It is seen that the three-terminal operating mode could provide much higher power transfer efficiency than the two-terminal operating mode. A new solution based on the concept of a theoretical quantum efficiency model combined with calculated results is proposed for interpreting the evidence of light intensity reduction at high operating voltages. The Si-LED that can be easily integrated into CMOS fabrication process is an important step toward optical interconnects.

  14. Memory effects in a Al/Ti:HfO2/CuPc metal-oxide-semiconductor device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Udbhav; Kaur, Ramneek

    2016-05-01

    Metal oxide semiconductor structured organic memory device has been successfully fabricated. Ti doped hafnium oxide (Ti:HfO2) nanoparticles has been fabricated by precipitation method and further calcinated at 800 °C. Copper phthalocyanine, a hole transporting material has been utilized as an organic semiconductor. The electrical properties of the fabricated device have been studied by measuring the current-voltage and capacitance-voltage characteristics. The amount of charge stored in the nanoparticles has been calculated by using flat band condition. This simple approach for fabricating MOS memory device has opens up opportunities for the development of next generation memory devices.

  15. ARED (Advanced-Resistive Exercise Device) Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes ARED which is a new hardware exercise device for use on the International Space Station. Astronaut physiological adaptations, muscle parameters, and cardiovascular parameters are also reviewed.

  16. An advanced space rotary power transfer device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, P. E.

    A new electrical signal and rotary power transfer device has recently evolved from ball-bearing and electrical-transfer technologies. This hybrid device, known as a roll ring, has been tested extensively since the late 1970s and has demonstrated important operational advantages in a wide variety of signal and power transfer configurations. A high power version has been developed and evaluated. This paper describes this latter roll ring configuration. The paper also summarizes test results.

  17. Microfluidic Devices in Advanced Caenorhabditis elegans Research.

    PubMed

    Muthaiyan Shanmugam, Muniesh; Subhra Santra, Tuhin

    2016-01-01

    The study of model organisms is very important in view of their potential for application to human therapeutic uses. One such model organism is the nematode worm, Caenorhabditis elegans. As a nematode, C. elegans have ~65% similarity with human disease genes and, therefore, studies on C. elegans can be translated to human, as well as, C. elegans can be used in the study of different types of parasitic worms that infect other living organisms. In the past decade, many efforts have been undertaken to establish interdisciplinary research collaborations between biologists, physicists and engineers in order to develop microfluidic devices to study the biology of C. elegans. Microfluidic devices with the power to manipulate and detect bio-samples, regents or biomolecules in micro-scale environments can well fulfill the requirement to handle worms under proper laboratory conditions, thereby significantly increasing research productivity and knowledge. The recent development of different kinds of microfluidic devices with ultra-high throughput platforms has enabled researchers to carry out worm population studies. Microfluidic devices primarily comprises of chambers, channels and valves, wherein worms can be cultured, immobilized, imaged, etc. Microfluidic devices have been adapted to study various worm behaviors, including that deepen our understanding of neuromuscular connectivity and functions. This review will provide a clear account of the vital involvement of microfluidic devices in worm biology. PMID:27490525

  18. Total-dose radiation effects data for semiconductor devices: 1985 supplement, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, K. E.; Gauthier, M. K.; Coss, J. R.; Dantas, A. R. V.; Price, W. E.

    1985-01-01

    Steady-state, total-dose radiation test data are provided, in graphic format, for use by electronic designers and other personnel using semiconductor devices in a radiation environment. The data were generated by JPL for various NASA space programs. The document is in two volumes: Volume 1 provides data on diodes, bipolar transistors, field effect transistors, and miscellaneous semiconductor types, and Volume 2 provides total-dose radiation test data on integrated circuits. Volume 1 of this 1985 Supplement contains new total-dose radiation test data generated since the August 1, 1981 release date of the original Volume 1. Publication of Volume 2 of the 1985 Supplement will follow that of Volume 1 by approximately three months.

  19. Field-induced activation of metal oxide semiconductor for low temperature flexible transparent electronic device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Noh, Joo Hyon; Wong, Anthony; Haglund, Amada; Ward, Thomas Zac; Mandrus, David; Rack, Philip

    Amorphous metal-oxide semiconductors have been extensively studied as an active channel material in thin film transistors due to their high carrier mobility, and excellent large-area uniformity. Here, we report the athermal activation of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide semiconductor channels by an electric field-induced oxygen migration via gating through an ionic liquid. Using field-induced activation, a transparent flexible thin film transistor is demonstrated on a polyamide substrate with transistor characteristics having a current ON-OFF ratio exceeding 108, and saturation field effect mobility of 8.32 cm2/(V.s) without a post-deposition thermal treatment. This study demonstrates the potential of field-induced activation as an athermal alternative to traditional post-deposition thermal annealing for metal oxide electronic devices suitable for transparent and flexible polymer substrates. Materials Science and Technology Division, ORBL, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA.

  20. Implantable micro-optical semiconductor devices for optical theranostics in deep tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takehara, Hiroaki; Katsuragi, Yuji; Ohta, Yasumi; Motoyama, Mayumi; Takehara, Hironari; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Optical therapy and diagnostics using photoactivatable molecular tools are promising approaches in medical applications; however, a method for the delivery of light deep inside biological tissues remains a challenge. Here, we present a method of illumination and detection of light using implantable micro-optical semiconductor devices. Unlike in conventional transdermal light delivery methods using low-energy light (>620 nm or near-infrared light), in our method, high-energy light (470 nm) can also be used for illumination. Implanted submillimeter-sized light-emitting diodes were found to provide sufficient illumination (0.6-4.1 mW/cm2), and a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor image sensor enabled the detection of fluorescence signals.

  1. H+-type and OH--type biological protonic semiconductors and complementary devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yingxin; Josberger, Erik; Jin, Jungho; Rousdari, Anita Fadavi; Helms, Brett A.; Zhong, Chao; Anantram, M. P.; Rolandi, Marco

    2013-10-01

    Proton conduction is essential in biological systems. Oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria, proton pumping in bacteriorhodopsin, and uncoupling membrane potentials by the antibiotic Gramicidin are examples. In these systems, H+ hop along chains of hydrogen bonds between water molecules and hydrophilic residues - proton wires. These wires also support the transport of OH- as proton holes. Discriminating between H+ and OH- transport has been elusive. Here, H+ and OH- transport is achieved in polysaccharide- based proton wires and devices. A H+- OH- junction with rectifying behaviour and H+-type and OH--type complementary field effect transistors are demonstrated. We describe these devices with a model that relates H+ and OH- to electron and hole transport in semiconductors. In turn, the model developed for these devices may provide additional insights into proton conduction in biological systems.

  2. Advances in nonlinear optical materials and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    The recent progress in the application of nonlinear techniques to extend the frequency of laser sources has come from the joint progress in laser sources and in nonlinear materials. A brief summary of the progress in diode pumped solid state lasers is followed by an overview of progress in nonlinear frequency extension by harmonic generation and parametric processes. Improved nonlinear materials including bulk crystals, quasiphasematched interactions, guided wave devices, and quantum well intersubband studies are discussed with the idea of identifying areas of future progress in nonlinear materials and devices.

  3. Fault localization and analysis in semiconductor devices with optical-feedback infrared confocal microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sarmiento, Raymund; Cemine, Vernon Julius; Tagaca, Imee Rose; Salvador, Arnel; Mar Blanca, Carlo; Saloma, Caesar

    2007-11-01

    We report on a cost-effective optical setup for characterizing light-emitting semiconductor devices with optical-feedback confocal infrared microscopy and optical beam-induced resistance change.We utilize the focused beam from an infrared laser diode to induce local thermal resistance changes across the surface of a biased integrated circuit (IC) sample. Variations in the multiple current paths are mapped by scanning the IC across the focused beam. The high-contrast current maps allow accurate differentiation of the functional and defective sites, or the isolation of the surface-emittingp-i-n devices in the IC. Optical beam-induced current (OBIC) is not generated since the incident beam energy is lower than the bandgap energy of the p-i-n device. Inhomogeneous current distributions in the IC become apparent without the strong OBIC background. They are located at a diffraction-limited resolution by referencing the current maps against the confocal reflectance image that is simultaneously acquired via optical-feedback detection. Our technique permits the accurate identification of metal and semiconductor sites as well as the classification of different metallic structures according to thickness, composition, or spatial inhomogeneity.

  4. Recent Advances in Organic Photovoltaics: Device Structure and Optical Engineering Optimization on the Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guoping; Ren, Xingang; Zhang, Su; Wu, Hongbin; Choy, Wallace C H; He, Zhicai; Cao, Yong

    2016-03-23

    Organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices, which can directly convert absorbed sunlight to electricity, are stacked thin films of tens to hundreds of nanometers. They have emerged as a promising candidate for affordable, clean, and renewable energy. In the past few years, a rapid increase has been seen in the power conversion efficiency of OPV devices toward 10% and above, through comprehensive optimizations via novel photoactive donor and acceptor materials, control of thin-film morphology on the nanoscale, device structure developments, and interfacial and optical engineering. The intrinsic problems of short exciton diffusion length and low carrier mobility in organic semiconductors creates a challenge for OPV designs for achieving optically thick and electrically thin device structures to achieve sufficient light absorption and efficient electron/hole extraction. Recent advances in the field of OPV devices are reviewed, with a focus on the progress in device architecture and optical engineering approaches that lead to improved electrical and optical characteristics in OPV devices. Successful strategies are highlighted for light wave distribution, modulation, and absorption promotion inside the active layer of OPV devices by incorporating periodic nanopatterns/nanostructures or incorporating metallic nanomaterials and nanostructures. PMID:26856789

  5. Advanced excimer laser technologies enable green semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Hitomi; Yoo, Youngsun; Minegishi, Yuji; Hisanaga, Naoto; Enami, Tatsuo

    2014-03-01

    "Green" has fast become an important and pervasive topic throughout many industries worldwide. Many companies, especially in the manufacturing industries, have taken steps to integrate green initiatives into their high-level corporate strategies. Governments have also been active in implementing various initiatives designed to increase corporate responsibility and accountability towards environmental issues. In the semiconductor manufacturing industry, there are growing concerns over future environmental impact as enormous fabs expand and new generation of equipments become larger and more powerful. To address these concerns, Gigaphoton has implemented various green initiatives for many years under the EcoPhoton™ program. The objective of this program is to drive innovations in technology and services that enable manufacturers to significantly reduce both the financial and environmental "green cost" of laser operations in high-volume manufacturing environment (HVM) - primarily focusing on electricity, gas and heat management costs. One example of such innovation is Gigaphoton's Injection-Lock system, which reduces electricity and gas utilization costs of the laser by up to 50%. Furthermore, to support the industry's transition from 300mm to the next generation 450mm wafers, technologies are being developed to create lasers that offer double the output power from 60W to 120W, but reducing electricity and gas consumption by another 50%. This means that the efficiency of lasers can be improve by up to 4 times in 450mm wafer production environments. Other future innovations include the introduction of totally Heliumfree Excimer lasers that utilize Nitrogen gas as its replacement for optical module purging. This paper discusses these and other innovations by Gigaphoton to enable green manufacturing.

  6. Optimization of segmented alignment marks for advanced semiconductor fabrication processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiang; Lu, Zhijian G.; Williams, Gary; Zach, Franz X.; Liegl, Bernhard

    2001-08-01

    The continued downscaling of semiconductor fabrication ground rule has imposed increasingly tighter overlay tolerances, which becomes very challenging at the 100 nm lithographic node. Such tight tolerances will require very high performance in alignment. Past experiences indicate that good alignment depends largely on alignment signal quality, which, however, can be strongly affected by chip design and various fabrication processes. Under some extreme circumstances, they can even be reduced to the non- usable limit. Therefore, a systematic understanding of alignment marks and a method to predict alignment performance based on mark design are necessary. Motivated by this, we have performed a detailed study of bright field segmented alignment marks that are used in current state-of- the-art fabrication processes. We find that alignment marks at different lithographic levels can be organized into four basic categories: trench mark, metal mark, damascene mark, and combo mark. The basic principles of these four types of marks turn out to be so similar that they can be characterized within the theoretical framework of a simple model based on optical gratings. An analytic expression has been developed for such model and it has been tested using computer simulation with the rigorous time-domain finite- difference (TD-FD) algorithm TEMPEST. Consistent results have been obtained; indicating that mark signal can be significantly improved through the optimization of mark lateral dimensions, such as segment pitch and segment width. We have also compared simulation studies against experimental data for alignment marks at one typical lithographic level and a good agreement is found.

  7. Non-parabolic hydrodynamic formulations for the simulation of inhomogeneous semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Arlynn W.; Brennan, Kevin F.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrodynamic models are becoming prevalent design tools for small scale devices and other devices in which high energy effects can dominate transport. Most current hydrodynamic models use a parabolic band approximation to obtain fairly simple conservation equations. Interest in accounting for band structure effects in hydrodynamic device simulation has begun to grow since parabolic models can not fully describe the transport in state of the art devices due to the distribution populating non-parabolic states within the band. This paper presents two different non-parabolic formulations of the hydrodynamic model suitable for the simulation of inhomogeneous semiconductor devices. The first formulation uses the Kane dispersion relationship (hk)(exp 2)/2m = W(1 + alpha(W)). The second formulation makes use of a power law ((hk)(exp 2)/2m = xW(sup y)) for the dispersion relation. Hydrodynamic models which use the first formulation rely on the binomial expansion to obtain moment equations with closed form coefficients. This limits the energy range over which the model is valid. The power law formulation readily produces closed form coefficients similar to those obtained using the parabolic band approximation. However, the fitting parameters (x,y) are only valid over a limited energy range. The physical significance of the band non-parabolicity is discussed as well as the advantages/disadvantages and approximations of the two non-parabolic models. A companion paper describes device simulations based on the three dispersion relationships: parabolic, Kane dispersion, and power low dispersion.

  8. Dielectric response of doped organic semiconductor devices: P3HT:PCBM solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbruster, Oskar; Lungenschmied, Christoph; Bauer, Siegfried

    2011-08-01

    We introduce a model to account for the dielectric response of doped organic semiconductor devices. In addition to the phenomena observed for undoped devices, mobile charge carriers created by doping can alter the dielectric function of the organic material and hence the dielectric response of the devices. These extrinsic charges may be trapped and contribute to the capacitance on re-emission. We directly model the real part of the dielectric function based on this phenomenon. The imaginary part is obtained via the application of the Kramers-Kronig transformation. We use oxygen-doped poly(3-hexylthiophene):[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester- (P3HT:PCBM) based organic solar cells as a model system to test our approach and hence contribute to the understanding of oxygen-induced degradation in these devices. We fit our equations to the measured dielectric data and compare it to Debye relaxation as well as two widely used equivalent circuit models. Together with the device resistance determined from the steady-state current-voltage characteristic around 0V an excellent agreement between the experimental data and our model is achieved for both the real and the imaginary part of the dielectric function over a frequency range covering five orders of magnitude. Unlike the Debye relaxation model or the equivalent circuit approach, our model yields important device parameters such as the dopant concentration.

  9. Non-Parabolic Hydrodynamic Formulations for the Simulation of Inhomogeneous Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. W.; Brennan, K. F.

    1996-01-01

    Hydrodynamic models are becoming prevalent design tools for small scale devices and other devices in which high energy effects can dominate transport. Most current hydrodynamic models use a parabolic band approximation to obtain fairly simple conservation equations. Interest in accounting for band structure effects in hydrodynamic device simulation has begun to grow since parabolic models cannot fully describe the transport in state of the art devices due to the distribution populating non-parabolic states within the band. This paper presents two different non-parabolic formulations or the hydrodynamic model suitable for the simulation of inhomogeneous semiconductor devices. The first formulation uses the Kane dispersion relationship ((hk)(exp 2)/2m = W(1 + alphaW). The second formulation makes use of a power law ((hk)(exp 2)/2m = xW(exp y)) for the dispersion relation. Hydrodynamic models which use the first formulation rely on the binomial expansion to obtain moment equations with closed form coefficients. This limits the energy range over which the model is valid. The power law formulation readily produces closed form coefficients similar to those obtained using the parabolic band approximation. However, the fitting parameters (x,y) are only valid over a limited energy range. The physical significance of the band non-parabolicity is discussed as well as the advantages/disadvantages and approximations of the two non-parabolic models. A companion paper describes device simulations based on the three dispersion relationships; parabolic, Kane dispersion and power law dispersion.

  10. Wide-band-gap, alkaline-earth-oxide semiconductor and devices utilizing same

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, Marvin M.; Chen, Yok; Kernohan, Robert H.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to novel and comparatively inexpensive semiconductor devices utilizing semiconducting alkaline-earth-oxide crystals doped with alkali metal. The semiconducting crystals are produced by a simple and relatively inexpensive process. As a specific example, a high-purity lithium-doped MgO crystal is grown by conventional techniques. The crystal then is heated in an oxygen-containing atmosphere to form many [Li].degree. defects therein, and the resulting defect-rich hot crystal is promptly quenched to render the defects stable at room temperature and temperatures well above the same. Quenching can be effected conveniently by contacting the hot crystal with room-temperature air.

  11. 22nd RD50 Workshop on Radiation Hard Semiconductor Devices for High Luminosity Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, Sally

    2013-05-06

    The 22nd RD50 Workshop on Radiation Hard Semiconductor Devices for High Luminosity Colliders was held on the campus of the University of New Mexico from June 3 to 5, 2013. This was the first North American meeting of the series going back to 2001. The sessions covered Material and Defect Characterization, Detector Characterization, Full Detector Systems, and New Structures. A half-day mini-workshop was allocated to radiation damage at LHC experiments. All talks are archived permanently available to the public at rd50.web.cern.ch. Financial support was used for room rental audiovisual equipment rental, and document preparation services.

  12. An alternative treatment of heat flow for charge transport in semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Grupen, Matt

    2009-12-15

    A unique thermodynamic model of Fermi gases suitable for semiconductor device simulation is presented. Like other models, such as drift diffusion and hydrodynamics, it employs moments of the Boltzmann transport equation derived using the Fermi-Dirac distribution function. However, unlike other approaches, it replaces the concept of an electron thermal conductivity with the heat capacity of an ideal Fermi gas to determine heat flow. The model is used to simulate a field-effect transistor and show that the external current-voltage characteristics are strong functions of the state space available to the heated Fermi distribution.

  13. Optimal convolution SOR acceleration of waveform relaxation with application to semiconductor device simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichelt, Mark

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we describe a novel generalized SOR (successive overrelaxation) algorithm for accelerating the convergence of the dynamic iteration method known as waveform relaxation. A new convolution SOR algorithm is presented, along with a theorem for determining the optimal convolution SOR parameter. Both analytic and experimental results are given to demonstrate that the convergence of the convolution SOR algorithm is substantially faster than that of the more obvious frequency-independent waveform SOR algorithm. Finally, to demonstrate the general applicability of this new method, it is used to solve the differential-algebraic system generated by spatial discretization of the time-dependent semiconductor device equations.

  14. Features of the piezo-phototronic effect on optoelectronic devices based on wurtzite semiconductor nanowires.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing; Wu, Yuanpeng; Liu, Ying; Pan, Caofeng; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2014-02-21

    The piezo-phototronic effect, a three way coupling effect of piezoelectric, semiconductor and photonic properties in non-central symmetric semiconductor materials, utilizing the piezo-potential as a "gate" voltage to tune the charge transport/generation/recombination and modulate the performance of optoelectronic devices, has formed a new field and attracted lots of interest recently. The mechanism was verified in various optoelectronic devices such as light emitting diodes (LEDs), photodetectors and solar cells etc. The fast development and dramatic increasing interest in the piezo-phototronic field not only demonstrate the way the piezo-phototronic effects work, but also indicate the strong need for further research in the physical mechanism and potential applications. Furthermore, it is important to distinguish the contribution of the piezo-phototronic effect from other factors induced by external strain such as piezoresistance, band shifting or contact area change, which also affect the carrier behaviour and device performance. In this perspective, we review our recent progress on piezo-phototronics and especially focus on pointing out the features of piezo-phototronic effect in four aspects: I-V characteristics; c-axis orientation; influence of illumination; and modulation of carrier behaviour. Finally we proposed several criteria for describing the contribution made by the piezo-phototronic effect to the performance of optoelectronic devices. This systematic analysis and comparison will not only help give an in-depth understanding of the piezo-phototronic effect, but also work as guide for the design of devices in related areas. PMID:24402437

  15. Design and fabrication of 6.1-.ANG. family semiconductor devices using semi-insulating A1Sb substrate

    DOEpatents

    Sherohman, John W.; Coombs, III, Arthur W.; Yee, Jick Hong; Wu, Kuang Jen J.

    2007-05-29

    For the first time, an aluminum antimonide (AlSb) single crystal substrate is utilized to lattice-match to overlying semiconductor layers. The AlSb substrate establishes a new design and fabrication approach to construct high-speed, low-power electronic devices while establishing inter-device isolation. Such lattice matching between the substrate and overlying semiconductor layers minimizes the formation of defects, such as threaded dislocations, which can decrease the production yield and operational life-time of 6.1-.ANG. family heterostructure devices.

  16. Energetic semiconductor bridge device incorporating Al/MoOx multilayer nanofilms and negative temperature coefficient thermistor chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Peng; Jiao, Jianshe; Shen, Ruiqi; Ye, Yinghua; Fu, Shuai; Li, Dongle

    2014-05-01

    The design, fabrication, and characterization of an energetic semiconductor bridge device are presented. The device consists of a semiconductor bridge heating element, which has been selectively coated with Al/MoOx multilayer nanofilms to enhance ignition of a conventional pyrotechnics. Integrated negative temperature coefficient thermistor chip provides protection against electromagnetic and electrostatic discharge events. The device was specifically configured to allow ease of interconnection by wire bonds and silver-filled conductive epoxy. Extensive design validation testing was performed. The device has demonstrated low, predictable firing energy and insensitivity. Al/MoOx multilayer nanofilms have no distinct influence on the electrical properties of semiconductor bridge. Nanothermite reaction provides reliable ignition by being able to ignite across a gap.

  17. Ultraviolet random lasing from asymmetrically contacted MgZnO metal-semiconductor-metal device

    SciTech Connect

    Morshed, Muhammad M.; Suja, Mohammad; Zuo, Zheng; Liu, Jianlin

    2014-11-24

    Nitrogen-doped Mg{sub 0.12}Zn{sub 0.88}O nanocrystalline thin film was grown on c-plane sapphire substrate. Asymmetric Ni/Au and Ti/Au Schottky contacts and symmetric Ni/Au contacts were deposited on the thin film to form metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) laser devices. Current-voltage, photocurrent, and electroluminescence characterizations were performed. Evident random lasing with a threshold current of ∼36 mA is demonstrated only from the asymmetric MSM device. Random lasing peaks are mostly distributed between 340 and 360 nm and an output power of 15 nW is measured at 43 mA injection current. The electron affinity difference between the contact metal and Mg{sub 0.12}Zn{sub 0.88}O:N layer plays an important role for electron and hole injection and subsequent stimulated random lasing.

  18. Mixed-RKDG Finite Element Methods for the 2-D Hydrodynamic Model for Semiconductor Device Simulation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Zhangxin; Cockburn, Bernardo; Jerome, Joseph W.; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new method for numerically solving the equations of the hydrodynamic model for semiconductor devices in two space dimensions. The method combines a standard mixed finite element method, used to obtain directly an approximation to the electric field, with the so-called Runge-Kutta Discontinuous Galerkin (RKDG) method, originally devised for numerically solving multi-dimensional hyperbolic systems of conservation laws, which is applied here to the convective part of the equations. Numerical simulations showing the performance of the new method are displayed, and the results compared with those obtained by using Essentially Nonoscillatory (ENO) finite difference schemes. Frommore » the perspective of device modeling, these methods are robust, since they are capable of encompassing broad parameter ranges, including those for which shock formation is possible. The simulations presented here are for Gallium Arsenide at room temperature, but we have tested them much more generally with considerable success.« less

  19. Optical devices combining an organic semiconductor crystal with a two-dimensional inorganic diffraction grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, Takenori; Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu

    2016-02-01

    We have fabricated optical devices using an organic semiconductor crystal as an emission layer in combination with a two-dimensional (2D) inorganic diffraction grating used as an optical cavity. We formed the inorganic diffraction grating by wet etching of aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) under a 2D cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) diffraction grating used as a mask. The COC diffraction grating was fabricated by nanoimprint lithography. The AZO diffraction grating was composed of convex prominences arranged in a triangular lattice. The organic crystal placed on the AZO diffraction grating indicated narrowed peaks in its emission spectrum under ultraviolet light excitation. These are detected parallel to the crystal plane. The peaks were shifted by rotating the optical devices around the normal to the crystal plane, which reflected the rotational symmetries of the triangular lattice through 60°.

  20. Practical photoluminescence and photoreflectance spectroscopic system for optical characterization of semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Ching-Hwa; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Lin, Yu-Shyan; Lin, Der-Yuh

    2005-05-01

    We present a practical experimental design for performing photoluminescence (PL) and photoreflectance (PR) measurements of semiconductors with only one PL spectroscopic system. The measurement setup is more cost efficient than typical PL-plus-PR systems. The design of the experimental setup of the PL-PR system is described in detail. Measurements of two actual device structures, a high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) and a double heterojunction-bipolar transistor (DHBT), are carried out by using this design. The experimental PL and PR spectra of the HEMT device, as well as polarized-photoreflectance (PPR) spectra of the DHBT structure, are analyzed in detailed and discussed. The experimental analyses demonstrate the well-behaved performance of this PL-PR design.

  1. Atomic origin of high-temperature electron trapping in metal-oxide-semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Xiao; Dhar, Sarit; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2015-04-06

    MOSFETs based on wide-band-gap semiconductors are suitable for operation at high temperature, at which additional atomic-scale processes that are benign at lower temperatures can get activated, resulting in device degradation. Recently, significant enhancement of electron trapping was observed under positive bias in SiC MOSFETs at temperatures higher than 150 °C. Here, we report first-principles calculations showing that the enhanced electron trapping is associated with thermally activated capturing of a second electron by an oxygen vacancy in SiO{sub 2} by which the vacancy transforms into a structure that comprises one Si dangling bond and a bond between a five-fold and a four-fold Si atoms. The results suggest a key role of oxygen vacancies and their structural reconfigurations in the reliability of high-temperature MOS devices.

  2. Characterization of an oxygen plasma process for cleaning packaged semiconductor devices. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B.E.

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this research was to experimentally determine the operating {open_quotes}window{close_quotes} for an oxygen plasma cleaning process to be used on microelectronics components just prior to wire bonding. The process was being developed to replace one that used vapor degreasing with trichlorotrifluoroethane, an ozone-depleting substance. A Box-Behnken experimental design was used to generate data from which the oxygen plasma cleaning process could be characterized. Auger electron spectrophotometry was used to measure the contamination thickness on the dice after cleaning. An empirical equation correlating the contamination thickness on the die surface with the operating parameters of the plasma system was developed from the collected Auger data, and optimum settings for cleaning semiconductor devices were determined. Devices were also tested for undesirable changes in electrical parameters resulting from cleaning in the plasma system. An increase in leakage current occurred for bipolar transistors and diodes after exposure to the oxygen plasma. Although an increase in leakage current occurred, each device`s parameter remained well below the acceptable specification limit. Based upon the experimental results, the optimum settings for the plasma cleaning process were determined to be 200 watts of power applied for five minutes in an enclosure maintained at 0.7 torr. At these settings, all measurable contamination was removed without compromising the reliability of the devices.

  3. Charge collection efficiency degradation induced by MeV ions in semiconductor devices: Model and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittone, E.; Pastuovic, Z.; Breese, M. B. H.; Garcia Lopez, J.; Jaksic, M.; Raisanen, J.; Siegele, R.; Simon, A.; Vizkelethy, G.

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates both theoretically and experimentally the charge collection efficiency (CCE) degradation in silicon diodes induced by energetic ions. Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC) measurements carried out on n- and p-type silicon diodes which were previously irradiated with MeV He ions show evidence that the CCE degradation does not only depend on the mass, energy and fluence of the damaging ion, but also depends on the ion probe species and on the polarization state of the device. A general one-dimensional model is derived, which accounts for the ion-induced defect distribution, the ionization profile of the probing ion and the charge induction mechanism. Using the ionizing and non-ionizing energy loss profiles resulting from simulations based on the binary collision approximation and on the electrostatic/transport parameters of the diode under study as input, the model is able to accurately reproduce the experimental CCE degradation curves without introducing any phenomenological additional term or formula. Although limited to low level of damage, the model is quite general, including the displacement damage approach as a special case and can be applied to any semiconductor device. It provides a method to measure the capture coefficients of the radiation induced recombination centres. They can be considered indexes, which can contribute to assessing the relative radiation hardness of semiconductor materials.

  4. Charge collection efficiency degradation induced by MeV ions in semiconductor devices: Model and experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vittone, Ettore; Pastuovic, Zeljko; Breese, Mark B. H.; Lopez, Javier Garicia; Jaksic, Milko; Raisanen, Jyrki; Siegele, Rainer; Simon, Aliz; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy

    2016-02-08

    This study investigates both theoretically and experimentally the charge collection efficiency (CCE) degradation in silicon diodes induced by energetic ions. Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC) measurements carried out on n- and p-type silicon diodes which were previously irradiated with MeV He ions show evidence that the CCE degradation does not only depend on the mass, energy and fluence of the damaging ion, but also depends on the ion probe species and on the polarization state of the device. A general one-dimensional model is derived, which accounts for the ion-induced defect distribution, the ionization profile of the probing ion and themore » charge induction mechanism. Using the ionizing and non-ionizing energy loss profiles resulting from simulations based on the binary collision approximation and on the electrostatic/transport parameters of the diode under study as input, the model is able to accurately reproduce the experimental CCE degradation curves without introducing any phenomenological additional term or formula. Although limited to low level of damage, the model is quite general, including the displacement damage approach as a special case and can be applied to any semiconductor device. It provides a method to measure the capture coefficients of the radiation induced recombination centres. They can be considered indexes, which can contribute to assessing the relative radiation hardness of semiconductor materials.« less

  5. Self-organized patterns in successive bifurcations in planar semiconductor-gas-discharge device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astrov, Yu. A.; Lodygin, A. N.; Portsel, L. M.

    2015-03-01

    The formation of dissipative structures is investigated in a planar semiconductor-gas-discharge device at room temperature. The width of the discharge gap is about 1 mm. The gap is filled with nitrogen at a pressure that corresponds to the discharge operation at the right branch of the Paschen curve. Wafers of semi-insulating GaAs that exhibit linear transport in the whole range of voltage and current studied are used as semiconductor electrodes. In addition to the earlier investigated Andronov-Hopf bifurcation, a different mode of self-organization of the device is observed, where the transport of charge proceeds through an ensemble of pulsating current filaments. The corresponding critical current for the present bifurcation does not depend on the polarity of the bias voltage, while the spatiotemporal dynamics of a pattern differs substantially for a change in the polarity. Pulsating filaments can form a spatially ordered pattern when the GaAs electrode is under the positive potential. We also observe self-organization modes, where pulsating filaments form an irregular spatiotemporal dynamics of a pattern. The data obtained are briefly discussed in the frame of corresponding theoretical results in the field.

  6. Advanced colour processing for mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillich, Eugen; Dörksen, Helene; Lohweg, Volker

    2015-02-01

    Mobile devices such as smartphones are going to play an important role in professionally image processing tasks. However, mobile systems were not designed for such applications, especially in terms of image processing requirements like stability and robustness. One major drawback is the automatic white balance, which comes with the devices. It is necessary for many applications, but of no use when applied to shiny surfaces. Such an issue appears when image acquisition takes place in differently coloured illuminations caused by different environments. This results in inhomogeneous appearances of the same subject. In our paper we show a new approach for handling the complex task of generating a low-noise and sharp image without spatial filtering. Our method is based on the fact that we analyze the spectral and saturation distribution of the channels. Furthermore, the RGB space is transformed into a more convenient space, a particular HSI space. We generate the greyscale image by a control procedure that takes into account the colour channels. This leads in an adaptive colour mixing model with reduced noise. The results of the optimized images are used to show how, e. g., image classification benefits from our colour adaptation approach.

  7. Advances in modeling and simulation of vacuum electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Mondelli, A.A.; Levush, B.; Verboncoeur, J.P.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1999-05-01

    Recent advances in the modeling and simulation of vacuum electronic devices are reviewed. Design of these devices makes use of a variety of physical models and numerical code types. Progress in the development of these models and codes is outlined and illustrated with specific examples. The state of the art in device simulation is evolving to the point such that devices can be designed on the computer, thereby eliminating many trial and error fabrication and test steps. The role of numerical simulation in the design process can be expected to grow further in the future.

  8. Microscopy imaging device with advanced imaging properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Kunal; Burns, Laurie; El Gamal, Abbas; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Cocker, Eric; Ho, Tatt Wei

    2015-11-24

    Systems, methods and devices are implemented for microscope imaging solutions. One embodiment of the present disclosure is directed toward an epifluorescence microscope. The microscope includes an image capture circuit including an array of optical sensor. An optical arrangement is configured to direct excitation light of less than about 1 mW to a target object in a field of view of that is at least 0.5 mm.sup.2 and to direct epi-fluorescence emission caused by the excitation light to the array of optical sensors. The optical arrangement and array of optical sensors are each sufficiently close to the target object to provide at least 2.5 .mu.m resolution for an image of the field of view.

  9. Recent advances in spintronics for emerging memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Seung H.

    2008-09-01

    The emerging field of spintronics has the potential to bring game-changing opportunities to nanoelectronic technologies far beyond its traditional contribution to mass storage applications such as hard disk drives. The value proposition is timely since the dominant semiconductor industry is in pursuit of “More-than-Moore” to extend the technology roadmap or to create functional diversifications through enhanced system platforms. This article overviews a promising spintronic device in conjunction with recent breakthroughs in tunnel magnetoresistance and spin-transfer-torque magnetization switching.

  10. III-antimonide/nitride based semiconductors for optoelectronic materials and device studies : LDRD 26518 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, Steven Ross; Hargett, Terry W.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Waldrip, Karen Elizabeth; Modine, Normand Arthur; Klem, John Frederick; Jones, Eric Daniel; Cich, Michael Joseph; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Peake, Gregory Merwin

    2003-12-01

    The goal of this LDRD was to investigate III-antimonide/nitride based materials for unique semiconductor properties and applications. Previous to this study, lack of basic information concerning these alloys restricted their use in semiconductor devices. Long wavelength emission on GaAs substrates is of critical importance to telecommunication applications for cost reduction and integration into microsystems. Currently InGaAsN, on a GaAs substrate, is being commercially pursued for the important 1.3 micrometer dispersion minima of silica-glass optical fiber; due, in large part, to previous research at Sandia National Laboratories. However, InGaAsN has not shown great promise for 1.55 micrometer emission which is the low-loss window of single mode optical fiber used in transatlantic fiber. Other important applications for the antimonide/nitride based materials include the base junction of an HBT to reduce the operating voltage which is important for wireless communication links, and for improving the efficiency of a multijunction solar cell. We have undertaken the first comprehensive theoretical, experimental and device study of this material with promising results. Theoretical modeling has identified GaAsSbN to be a similar or potentially superior candidate to InGaAsN for long wavelength emission on GaAs. We have confirmed these predictions by producing emission out to 1.66 micrometers and have achieved edge emitting and VCSEL electroluminescence at 1.3 micrometers. We have also done the first study of the transport properties of this material including mobility, electron/hole mass, and exciton reduced mass. This study has increased the understanding of the III-antimonide/nitride materials enough to warrant consideration for all of the target device applications.

  11. Pulsed Laser System to Simulate Effects of Cosmic Rays in Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aveline, David C.; Adell, Philippe C.; Allen, Gregory R.; Guertin, Steven M.; McClure, Steven S.

    2011-01-01

    Spaceflight system electronic devices must survive a wide range of radiation environments with various particle types including energetic protons, electrons, gamma rays, x-rays, and heavy ions. High-energy charged particles such as heavy ions can pass straight through a semiconductor material and interact with a charge-sensitive region, generating a significant amount of charge (electron-hole pairs) along their tracks. These excess charges can damage the device, and the response can range from temporary perturbations to permanent changes in the state or performance. These phenomena are called single event effects (SEE). Before application in flight systems, electronic parts need to be qualified and tested for performance and radiation sensitivity. Typically, their susceptibility to SEE is tested by exposure to an ion beam from a particle accelerator. At such facilities, the device under test (DUT) is irradiated with large beams so there is no fine resolution to investigate particular regions of sensitivity on the parts. While it is the most reliable approach for radiation qualification, these evaluations are time consuming and costly. There is always a need for new cost-efficient strategies to complement accelerator testing: pulsed lasers provide such a solution. Pulsed laser light can be utilized to simulate heavy ion effects with the advantage of being able to localize the sensitive region of an integrated circuit. Generally, a focused laser beam of approximately picosecond pulse duration is used to generate carrier density in the semiconductor device. During irradiation, the laser pulse is absorbed by the electronic medium with a wavelength selected accordingly by the user, and the laser energy can ionize and simulate SEE as would occur in space. With a tightly focused near infrared (NIR) laser beam, the beam waist of about a micrometer can be achieved, and additional scanning techniques are able to yield submicron resolution. This feature allows mapping of all

  12. Quantum filter of spin polarized states: Metal–dielectric–ferromagnetic/semiconductor device

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, Vladimir I.; Khmelinskii, Igor

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • Development of a new spintronics device. • Development of quantum spin polarized filters. • Development of theory of quantum spin polarized filter. - Abstract: Recently we proposed a model for the Quantum Spin-Polarized State Filter (QSPSF). The magnetic moments are transported selectively in this model, detached from the electric charge carriers. Thus, transfer of a spin-polarized state between two conductors was predicted in a system of two levels coupled by exchange interaction. The strength of the exchange interaction between the two conductive layers depends on the thickness of the dielectric layer separating them. External magnetic fields modulate spin-polarized state transfer, due to Zeeman level shift. Therefore, a linearly growing magnetic field generates a series of current peaks in a nearby coil. Thus, our spin-state filter should contain as least three nanolayers: (1) conductive or ferromagnetic; (2) dielectric; and (3) conductive or semiconductive. The spectrum of spin-polarized states generated by the filter device consists of a series of resonance peaks. In a simple case the number of lines equals S, the total spin angular momentum of discrete states in one of the coupled nanolayers. Presently we report spin-polarized state transport in metal–dielectric–ferromagnetic (MDF) and metal–dielectric–semiconductor (MDS) three-layer sandwich devices. The exchange-resonance spectra in such devices are quite specific, differing also from spectra observed earlier in other three-layer devices. The theoretical model is used to interpret the available experimental results. A detailed ab initio analysis of the magnetic-field dependence of the output magnetic moment averaged over the surface of the device was carried out. The model predicts the resonance structure of the signal, although at its present accuracy it cannot predict the positions of the spectral peaks.

  13. Future Opportunities for Advancing Glucose Test Device Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Young, Brian R; Young, Teresa L; Joyce, Margaret K; Kennedy, Spencer I; Atashbar, Massood Z

    2011-01-01

    Advancements in the field of printed electronics can be applied to the field of diabetes testing. A brief history and some new developments in printed electronics components applicable to personal test devices, including circuitry, batteries, transmission devices, displays, and sensors, are presented. Low-cost, thin, and lightweight materials containing printed circuits with energy storage or harvest capability and reactive/display centers, made using new printing/imaging technologies, are ideal for incorporation into personal-use medical devices such as glucose test meters. Semicontinuous rotogravure printing, which utilizes flexible substrates and polymeric, metallic, and/or nano “ink” composite materials to effect rapidly produced, lower-cost printed electronics, is showing promise. Continuing research advancing substrate, “ink,” and continuous processing development presents the opportunity for research collaboration with medical device designers. PMID:22027300

  14. Total-dose radiation effects data for semiconductor devices. 1985 Supplement. Volume 2, part B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, K. E.; Gauthier, M. K.; Coss, J. R.; Dantas, A. R. V.; Price, W. E.

    1986-01-01

    Steady-state, total-dose radiation test data are provided in graphic format, for use by electronic designers and other personnel using semiconductor devices in a radiation environment. The data were generated by JPL for various NASA space programs. The document is in two volumes: Volume 1 provides data on diodes, bipolar transistors, field effect transistors, and miscellaneous semiconductor types, and Volume 2 (Parts A and B) provides data on integrated circuits. The data are presented in graphic, tabular, and/or narrative format, depending on the complexity of the integrated circuit. Most tests were done steady-state 2.5-MeV electron beam. However, some radiation exposures were made with a Cobalt-60 gamma ray source, the results of which should be regarded as only an approximate measure of the radiation damage that would be incurred by an equivalent electron dose. All data were generated in support of NASA space programs by the JPL Radiation Effects and Testing Group (514).

  15. High speed all-optical data processing in fast semiconductor and optical fiber based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongzhi

    Future generations of communication systems demand ultra high speed data processing and switching components. Conventional electrical parts have reached their bottleneck both speed-wise and efficiency-wise. The idea of manipulating high speed data in optical domain is gaining more popularity. In this PhD thesis work, we proposed and demonstrated various schemes of all-optical Boolean logic gate at data rate as high as 80Gb/s by using semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA), SOA Mach-Zehnder interferometer (SOA-MZI), highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF) and optical fiber based components. With the invention of quantum dot (QD) based semiconductor devices, speed limit of all optical data processing has a chance to boost up to 250Gb/s. We proposed and simulated QD-SOA based Boolean functions, and their application such as shift register and pseudorandom bit sequence generation (PRBS). Clock and data recovery of high speed data signals has been simulated and demonstrated by injection lock and phase lock loop techniques in a fiber and SOA ring and an optical-electrical (OE) feedback loop.

  16. Polymer biophotonic lab-on-chip devices with integrated organic semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mappes, Timo; Vannahme, Christoph; Klinkhammer, Sönke; Woggon, Thomas; Schelb, Mauno; Lenhert, Steven; Mohr, Jürgen; Lemmer, Uli

    2009-08-01

    We present optofluidic lab-on-a-chip devices (LOCs) for single use as disposables. In our approach we are aiming for systems out of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) that integrate (a) organic lasers, (b) optical waveguides, (c) microfluidic channels, (d) surface functionalization, and (e) fluorescence excitation on one single chip. We are utilizing mass production techniques to show the applicability of this approach by avoiding electrical interconnects but using optical and fluidic interfaces only. With our experiments we can show the feasibility of this approach by respectively combining two consecutive elements (a - e) of the path of light: Organic semiconductor lasers are integrated by evaporating a thin film of photoactive material on top of a distributed feedback (DFB) grating. For this purpose, grating masters are replicated by hot embossing into PMMA bulk material. The lasing wavelength in the visible light regime is tuned by altering the thickness of the vacuum deposited organic semiconductor active material or the DFB grating period. Emitted light from the DFB laser is coupled into polymer strip optical waveguides realized by Deep UV lithography. The waveguides allow optical guidance to a microfluidic channel. Tailored surface functionalization in the microfluidic channel by Dip-Pen Nanolithography (DPN) enables the local excitation of fluorescent markers and thus a detection of selected components in biomedical or environmentally relevant fluids.

  17. Hydrogen-Bonded Organic Semiconductor Micro- And Nanocrystals: From Colloidal Syntheses to (Opto-)Electronic Devices

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Organic pigments such as indigos, quinacridones, and phthalocyanines are widely produced industrially as colorants for everyday products as various as cosmetics and printing inks. Herein we introduce a general procedure to transform commercially available insoluble microcrystalline pigment powders into colloidal solutions of variously sized and shaped semiconductor micro- and nanocrystals. The synthesis is based on the transformation of the pigments into soluble dyes by introducing transient protecting groups on the secondary amine moieties, followed by controlled deprotection in solution. Three deprotection methods are demonstrated: thermal cleavage, acid-catalyzed deprotection, and amine-induced deprotection. During these processes, ligands are introduced to afford colloidal stability and to provide dedicated surface functionality and for size and shape control. The resulting micro- and nanocrystals exhibit a wide range of optical absorption and photoluminescence over spectral regions from the visible to the near-infrared. Due to excellent colloidal solubility offered by the ligands, the achieved organic nanocrystals are suitable for solution processing of (opto)electronic devices. As examples, phthalocyanine nanowire transistors as well as quinacridone nanocrystal photodetectors, with photoresponsivity values by far outperforming those of vacuum deposited reference samples, are demonstrated. The high responsivity is enabled by photoinduced charge transfer between the nanocrystals and the directly attached electron-accepting vitamin B2 ligands. The semiconducting nanocrystals described here offer a cheap, nontoxic, and environmentally friendly alternative to inorganic nanocrystals as well as a new paradigm for obtaining organic semiconductor materials from commercial colorants. PMID:25253644

  18. Ultrafast characterization of semiconductor gain and absorber devices for mode-locked VECSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Caleb; Scheller, Maik; Yang, Hwang-Jye; Koch, Stephan W.; Jones, Ronald J.; Moloney, Jerome V.; Ruiz Perez, Antje; Stolz, Wolfgang; Addamane, Sadhvikas; Balakrishnan, Ganesh

    2016-03-01

    We present a comprehensive characterization of semiconductor gain and absorber devices utilizing novel measurement techniques. Using a 20fs probe laser, a time resolution in the few femtosecond range is achieved in traditional pump and probe measurements performed on VECSELs and SESAMs. In-situ characterizations of VECSEL samples mode-locked in the sub-500fs regime reveal the fast and longtime recoveries of the gain present in real lasing conditions. Spectrally-resolved probing gives further information about the properties of carriers in VECSEL gain media. Our results indicate that stable mode-locked operation is sustained by multiple carrier relaxation mechanisms ranging from a few femtoseconds to the pico- and nanosecond regimes.

  19. Total-dose radiation effects data for semiconductor devices. 1985 supplement. Volume 2, part A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, K. E.; Gauthier, M. K.; Coss, J. R.; Dantas, A. R. V.; Price, W. E.

    1986-01-01

    Steady-state, total-dose radiation test data, are provided in graphic format for use by electronic designers and other personnel using semiconductor devices in a radiation environment. The data were generated by JPL for various NASA space programs. This volume provides data on integrated circuits. The data are presented in graphic, tabular, and/or narrative format, depending on the complexity of the integrated circuit. Most tests were done using the JPL or Boeing electron accelerator (Dynamitron) which provides a steady-state 2.5 MeV electron beam. However, some radiation exposures were made with a Cobalt-60 gamma ray source, the results of which should be regarded as only an approximate measure of the radiation damage that would be incurred by an equivalent electron dose.

  20. Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor-Compatible Back-Side-Illuminated Photodiode for Optoelectronic Integrated Circuit Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sang-Baie; Sekiguchi, Hiroto; Okada, Hiroshi; Wakahara, Akihiro

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the prototype optoelectronic integrated circuits (OEICs) operating with optical input signals were designed and fabricated. A back-side-illuminated (BSI) photodiode was designed and demonstrated by a newly proposed practical method, utilizing micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) and postcomplement metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) processes. Additional fabrication processes for the BSI photodiode were proposed and described in detail in this paper. The operational amplifier for amplification of the optical current by the BSI photodiode as the transimpedance amplifier was designed and fabricated. And the pulse width modulation (PWM) wave generator was implemented for modulating optical signals as the prototype OEIC device. The maximum quantum efficiency of 28.4% was obtained from the fabricated BSI photodiode. Output signals of PWM were successfully controlled by the generated optical current of the BSI photodiode.

  1. Heterodyne mixing of millimetre electromagnetic waves and sub-THz sound in a semiconductor device

    PubMed Central

    Heywood, Sarah L.; Glavin, Boris A.; Beardsley, Ryan P.; Akimov, Andrey V.; Carr, Michael W.; Norman, James; Norton, Philip C.; Prime, Brian; Priestley, Nigel; Kent, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate heterodyne mixing of a 94 GHz millimetre wave photonic signal, supplied by a Gunn diode oscillator, with coherent acoustic waves of frequency ~100 GHz, generated by pulsed laser excitation of a semiconductor surface. The mixing takes place in a millimetre wave Schottky diode, and the intermediate frequency electrical signal is in the 1–12 GHz range. The mixing process preserves all the spectral content in the acoustic signal that falls within the intermediate frequency bandwidth. Therefore this technique may find application in high-frequency acoustic spectroscopy measurements, exploiting the nanometre wavelength of sub-THz sound. The result also points the way to exploiting acoustoelectric effects in photonic devices working at sub-THz and THz frequencies, which could provide functionalities at these frequencies, e.g. acoustic wave filtering, that are currently in widespread use at lower (GHz) frequencies. PMID:27477841

  2. Heterodyne mixing of millimetre electromagnetic waves and sub-THz sound in a semiconductor device.

    PubMed

    Heywood, Sarah L; Glavin, Boris A; Beardsley, Ryan P; Akimov, Andrey V; Carr, Michael W; Norman, James; Norton, Philip C; Prime, Brian; Priestley, Nigel; Kent, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate heterodyne mixing of a 94 GHz millimetre wave photonic signal, supplied by a Gunn diode oscillator, with coherent acoustic waves of frequency ~100 GHz, generated by pulsed laser excitation of a semiconductor surface. The mixing takes place in a millimetre wave Schottky diode, and the intermediate frequency electrical signal is in the 1-12 GHz range. The mixing process preserves all the spectral content in the acoustic signal that falls within the intermediate frequency bandwidth. Therefore this technique may find application in high-frequency acoustic spectroscopy measurements, exploiting the nanometre wavelength of sub-THz sound. The result also points the way to exploiting acoustoelectric effects in photonic devices working at sub-THz and THz frequencies, which could provide functionalities at these frequencies, e.g. acoustic wave filtering, that are currently in widespread use at lower (GHz) frequencies. PMID:27477841

  3. Low Temperature Processed Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Device by Oxidation Effect from Capping Layer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenwei; Al-Jawhari, Hala A.; Nayak, Pradipta K.; Caraveo-Frescas, J. A.; Wei, Nini; Hedhili, M. N.; Alshareef, H. N.

    2015-01-01

    In this report, both p- and n-type tin oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) were simultaneously achieved using single-step deposition of the tin oxide channel layer. The tuning of charge carrier polarity in the tin oxide channel is achieved by selectively depositing a copper oxide capping layer on top of tin oxide, which serves as an oxygen source, providing additional oxygen to form an n-type tin dioxide phase. The oxidation process can be realized by annealing at temperature as low as 190°C in air, which is significantly lower than the temperature generally required to form tin dioxide. Based on this approach, CMOS inverters based entirely on tin oxide TFTs were fabricated. Our method provides a solution to lower the process temperature for tin dioxide phase, which facilitates the application of this transparent oxide semiconductor in emerging electronic devices field. PMID:25892711

  4. Heterodyne mixing of millimetre electromagnetic waves and sub-THz sound in a semiconductor device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heywood, Sarah L.; Glavin, Boris A.; Beardsley, Ryan P.; Akimov, Andrey V.; Carr, Michael W.; Norman, James; Norton, Philip C.; Prime, Brian; Priestley, Nigel; Kent, Anthony J.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate heterodyne mixing of a 94 GHz millimetre wave photonic signal, supplied by a Gunn diode oscillator, with coherent acoustic waves of frequency ~100 GHz, generated by pulsed laser excitation of a semiconductor surface. The mixing takes place in a millimetre wave Schottky diode, and the intermediate frequency electrical signal is in the 1–12 GHz range. The mixing process preserves all the spectral content in the acoustic signal that falls within the intermediate frequency bandwidth. Therefore this technique may find application in high-frequency acoustic spectroscopy measurements, exploiting the nanometre wavelength of sub-THz sound. The result also points the way to exploiting acoustoelectric effects in photonic devices working at sub-THz and THz frequencies, which could provide functionalities at these frequencies, e.g. acoustic wave filtering, that are currently in widespread use at lower (GHz) frequencies.

  5. Advanced radiation detector development: Advanced semiconductor detector development: Development of a oom-temperature, gamma ray detector using gallium arsenide to develop an electrode detector

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, G.F.

    1995-11-01

    The advanced detector development project at the University of Michigan has completed the first full year of its current funding. Our general goals are the development of radiation detectors and spectrometers that are capable of portable room temperature operation. Over the past 12 months, we have worked primarily in the development of semiconductor spectrometers with {open_quotes}single carrier{close_quotes} response that offer the promise of room temperature operation and good energy resolution in gamma ray spectroscopy. We have also begun a small scale effort at investigating the properties of a small non-spectroscopic detector system with directional characteristics that will allow identification of the approximate direction in which gamma rays are incident. These activities have made use of the extensive clean room facilities at the University of Michigan for semiconductor device fabrication, and also the radiation measurement capabilities provided in our laboratory in the Phoenix Building on the North Campus. In addition to our laboratory based activities, Professor Knoll has also been a participant in several Department of Energy review activities held in the Forrestal Building and at the Germantown site. The most recent of these has been service on a DOE review panel chaired by Dr. Hap Lamonds that is reviewing the detector development programs supported through the Office of Arms Control and International Security.

  6. Investigation of new devices and characterization techniques in the III-V semiconductor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiao-Chang

    This thesis concerns the investigation of novel devices and material characterization techniques in the III-V semiconductor system. In the first part of the thesis, we demonstrate that novel devices, such as avalanche photodiodes and tunnel switch diodes, can be fabricated from InAs/GaSb/AlSb heterostructures by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). In the second part of the thesis, ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM) is employed to examine the local band offset in these heterostructures, which is often found to be crucial in device design. In the avalanche photodiode study, devices with near infrared response out to 1.74 mum were demonstrated. Two types of devices were investigated: those with a bulk Al0.04Ga0.96Sb multiplication region and those with a GaSb/AlSb superlattice multiplication region. Both types of devices were implemented in a MBE grown p-n + structure that uses a selectively doped InAs/AlSb superlattice as the n-type layer. This particular structure was optimized through several design, fabrication, characterization cycles. It was found that the photodiode dark current depended critically on the InAs/AlSb superlattice period and the resulting band offset at the p-n+ heterojunction. The InAs/AlSb superlattice was henceforth optimized by using a three stage design. The ionization rates in bulk multiplication layer devices were measured and found to be consistent with hole impact ionization enhancement in Al0.04Ga0.96Sb. However, direct comparison with superlattice multiplication layer devices revealed the latter to be more promising due to more effective dark current suppression from the larger band gap of the superlattice multiplication layer. The second device studied is the tunnel switch diode. We have fabricated the first such device in the antimonide material system and obtained characteristic "S" shaped I-V curves from these devices. The epilayer and barrier dependence of tunnel diode switching were studied and found to deviate significantly

  7. The Influence of the Construction of the Cooling System of Semiconductor Devices on the Watt-Hour Efficiency of DC-DC Converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarębski, Janusz; Górecki, Krzysztof

    In the paper the influence of cooling conditions of semiconductor devices on the characteristics of a boost converter is considered. The form of the thermal model of semiconductor devices is proposed and some results of calculations and measurements of the characteristics of this converter are shown. The investigations were performed for the selected types of power MOSFETs operating at different cooling conditions.

  8. Method for sputtering a PIN amorphous silicon semi-conductor device having partially crystallized P and N-layers

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D.; Maruska, H. Paul

    1985-07-09

    A high efficiency amorphous silicon PIN semiconductor device having partially crystallized (microcrystalline) P and N layers is constructed by the sequential sputtering of N, I and P layers and at least one semi-transparent ohmic electrode. The method of construction produces a PIN device, exhibiting enhanced electrical and optical properties, improved physical integrity, and facilitates the preparation in a singular vacuum system and vacuum pump down procedure.

  9. Development of a Handmade Conductivity Measurement Device for a Thin-Film Semiconductor and Its Application to Polypyrrole

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seng, Set; Shinpei, Tomita; Yoshihiko, Inada; Masakazu, Kita

    2014-01-01

    The precise measurement of conductivity of a semiconductor film such as polypyrrole (Ppy) should be carried out by the four-point probe method; however, this is difficult for classroom application. This article describes the development of a new, convenient, handmade conductivity device from inexpensive materials that can measure the conductivity…

  10. Advances in device and formulation technologies for pulmonary drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chan, John Gar Yan; Wong, Jennifer; Zhou, Qi Tony; Leung, Sharon Shui Yee; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2014-08-01

    Inhaled pharmaceuticals are formulated and delivered differently according to the therapeutic indication. However, specific device-formulation coupling is often fickle, and new medications or indications also demand new strategies. The discontinuation of chlorofluorocarbon propellants has seen replacement of older metered dose inhalers with dry powder inhaler formulations. High-dose dry powder inhalers are increasingly seen as an alternative dosage form for nebulised medications. In other cases, new medications have completely bypassed conventional inhalers and been formulated for use with unique inhalers such as the Staccato® device. Among these different devices, integration of software and electronic assistance has become a shared trend. This review covers recent device and formulation advances that are forming the current landscape of inhaled therapeutics. PMID:24728868

  11. Electrical properties of inalp native oxides for metal-oxide-semiconductor device applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Zhang, J.; Li, X.; Kosel, T.H.; Fay, P.; Hall, D.C.; Zhang, X.B.; Dupuis, R.D.; Jasinski, J.B.; Liliental-Weber, Z.

    2004-09-01

    Data are presented on the insulating properties and capacitance-voltage (CV) characteristics of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) device-thickness (below approx. 100 nm) native oxides formed by wet thermal oxidation of thin InAlP epilayers lattice matched to GaAs. Low leakage current densities of J=1.4 x 10-9 A/cm2 and J=8.7 x 10-11 A/cm2 are observed at an applied field of 1 MV/cm for MOS capacitors fabricated with 17 nm and 48 nm oxides, respectively. TEM images show that the In-rich interfacial particles which exist in 110 nm oxides are absent in 17 nm oxide films. Quasi-static capacitance-voltage measurements of MOS capacitors fabricated on both n-type and p-type GaAs show that the InAlP oxide-GaAs interface is sufficiently free of traps to support inversion, indicating an unpinned Fermi level. These data suggest that InAlP native oxides may be a viable insulator for GaAs MOS device applications.

  12. Multifunctional semiconductor micro-Hall devices for magnetic, electric, and photo-detection

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbertson, A. M.; Cohen, L. F.; Sadeghi, Hatef; Lambert, C. J.; Panchal, V.; Kazakova, O.; Solin, S. A.

    2015-12-07

    We report the real-space voltage response of InSb/AlInSb micro-Hall devices to local photo-excitation, electric, and magnetic fields at room temperature using scanning probe microscopy. We show that the ultrafast generation of localised photocarriers results in conductance perturbations analogous to those produced by local electric fields. Experimental results are in good agreement with tight-binding transport calculations in the diffusive regime. The magnetic, photo, and charge sensitivity of a 2 μm wide probe are evaluated at a 10 μA bias current in the Johnson noise limit (valid at measurement frequencies > 10 kHz) to be, respectively, 500 nT/√Hz; 20 pW/√Hz (λ = 635 nm) comparable to commercial photoconductive detectors; and 0.05 e/√Hz comparable to that of single electron transistors. These results demonstrate the remarkably versatile sensing attributes of simple semiconductor micro-Hall devices that can be applied to a host of imaging and sensing applications.

  13. Growth and Characterization of III-V Semiconductors for Device Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Michael D.

    2000-01-01

    The research goal was to achieve a fundamental understanding of the physical processes occurring at the surfaces and interfaces of epitaxially grown InGaAs/GaAs (100) heterostructures. This will facilitate the development of quantum well devices for infrared optical applications and provide quantitative descriptions of key phenomena which impact their performance. Devices impacted include high-speed laser diodes and modulators for fiber optic communications at 1.55 micron wavelengths and intersub-band lasers for longer infrared wavelengths. The phenomenon of interest studied was the migration of indium in InGaAs structures. This work centered on the molecular beam epitaxy reactor and characterization apparatus donated to CAU by AT&T Bell Laboratories. The material characterization tool employed was secondary ion mass spectrometry. The training of graduate and undergraduate students was an integral part of this program. The graduate students received a thorough exposure to state-of-the-art techniques and equipment for semiconductor materials analysis as part of the Master''s degree requirement in physics. The undergraduates were exposed to a minority scientist who has an excellent track record in this area. They also had the opportunity to explore surface physics as a career option. The results of the scientific work was published in a refereed journal and several talks were presented professional conferences and academic seminars.

  14. Recovering doping profiles in semiconductor devices with the Boltzmann-Poisson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yingda; Gamba, Irene M.; Ren, Kui

    2011-05-01

    We investigate numerically an inverse problem related to the Boltzmann-Poisson system of equations for transport of electrons in semiconductor devices. The objective of the (ill-posed) inverse problem is to recover the doping profile of a device, presented as a source function in the mathematical model, from its current-voltage characteristics. To reduce the degree of ill-posedness of the inverse problem, we proposed to parameterize the unknown doping profile function to limit the number of unknowns in the inverse problem. We showed by numerical examples that the reconstruction of a few low moments of the doping profile is possible when relatively accurate time-dependent or time-independent measurements are available, even though the later reconstruction is less accurate than the former. We also compare reconstructions from the Boltzmann-Poisson (BP) model to those from the classical drift-diffusion-Poisson (DDP) model, assuming that measurements are generated with the BP model. We show that the two type of reconstructions can be significantly different in regimes where drift-diffusion-Poisson equation fails to model the physics accurately. However, when noise presented in measured data is high, no difference in the reconstructions can be observed.

  15. Advances in graphene-based semiconductor photocatalysts for solar energy conversion: fundamentals and materials engineering.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiuqiang; Kretschmer, Katja; Wang, Guoxiu

    2015-08-28

    Graphene-based semiconductor photocatalysis has been regarded as a promising technology for solar energy storage and conversion. In this review, we summarized recent developments of graphene-based photocatalysts, including preparation of graphene-based photocatalysts, typical key advances in the understanding of graphene functions for photocatalytic activity enhancement and methodologies to regulate the electron transfer efficiency in graphene-based composite photocatalysts, by which we hope to offer enriched information to harvest the utmost fascinating properties of graphene as a platform to construct efficient graphene-based composite photocatalysts for solar-to-energy conversion. PMID:26204442

  16. Intersubband transitions in III-V semiconductors for novel infrared optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Mohammed Imrul

    Intersubband transitions (ISBTs) in the conduction band (CB) of semiconductor multiple quantum wells (QW) have led to devices, like quantum-well infrared photodetectors and quantum cascade lasers (QCL). Due to the complexities related to the valence band (VB), hole ISBTs have not been explored as intensively as their electronic counterparts. Absorption and photoluminescence due to ISBT in the VB have been reported for p-type Si-SiGe QWs but this material system suffers from significant challenges associated with the built-in strain of these lattice mismatched materials. The GaAs/AlGaAs material system is virtually strain-free and quite mature. We are investigating the properties of bound-to-bound inter-valence subband transitions in GaAs QWs with high Al composition barriers for mid-infrared emitters. Hole ISBTs are interesting because the polarization of the light emitted in heavy-to-light hole transitions is not restricted to the perpendicular of the quantum wells (unlike electron ISBTs in the CB due to selection rules), therefore surface emitting QCLs and ultimately vertical-cavity surface emitting devices are possible using these transitions. Moreover the valence-band offset for pure GaAs and AlAs is comparable with the conduction-band offset in the traditional InGaAs/InAlAs lattice matched to InP system. Very recently we have observed strong heavy to light hole absorption and heavy to heavy hole electroluminescence from ridge waveguide structures in the mid infra-red range. We are also investigating dual wavelength mid infra-red QCLs in the InGaAs/InAlAs system lattice matched to InP. This device may be useful in applications like differential absorption lidar where light has to be evaluated and compared at two different frequencies for environmental sensing application. Most approaches to multi-wavelength QCL operation involve the use of heterogeneous cascades. Our design involves a single type of active region, emitting at two widely different wavelengths in

  17. Advanced photon source experience with vacuum chambers for insertion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hartog, P.D.; Grimmer, J.; Xu, S.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Wiemerslage, G.

    1997-08-01

    During the last five years, a new approach to the design and fabrication of extruded aluminum vacuum chambers for insertion devices was developed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). With this approach, three different versions of the vacuum chamber, with vertical apertures of 12 mm, 8 mm, and 5 mm, were manufactured and tested. Twenty chambers were installed into the APS vacuum system. All have operated with beam, and 16 have been coupled with insertion devices. Two different vacuum chambers with vertical apertures of 16 mm and 11 mm were developed for the BESSY-II storage ring and 3 of 16 mm chambers were manufactured.

  18. Advanced Sensor Fish Device for ImprovedTurbine Design

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Thomas J.

    2009-09-14

    Juvenile salmon (smolts) passing through hydroelectric turbines are subjected to environmental conditions that can potentially kill or injure them. Many turbines are reaching the end of their operational life expectancies and will be replaced with new turbines that incorporate advanced “fish friendly” designs devised to prevent injury and death to fish. To design a fish friendly turbine, it is first necessary to define the current conditions fish encounter. One such device used by biologists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was the sensor fish device to collect data that measures the forces fish experience during passage through hydroelectric projects.

  19. Method to determine the position-dependant metal correction factor for dose-rate equivalent laser testing of semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, Kevin M.

    2013-07-09

    A method reconstructs the charge collection from regions beneath opaque metallization of a semiconductor device, as determined from focused laser charge collection response images, and thereby derives a dose-rate dependent correction factor for subsequent broad-area, dose-rate equivalent, laser measurements. The position- and dose-rate dependencies of the charge-collection magnitude of the device are determined empirically and can be combined with a digital reconstruction methodology to derive an accurate metal-correction factor that permits subsequent absolute dose-rate response measurements to be derived from laser measurements alone. Broad-area laser dose-rate testing can thereby be used to accurately determine the peak transient current, dose-rate response of semiconductor devices to penetrating electron, gamma- and x-ray irradiation.

  20. Laser-based irradiation apparatus and method to measure the functional dose-rate response of semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Horn, Kevin M.

    2008-05-20

    A broad-beam laser irradiation apparatus can measure the parametric or functional response of a semiconductor device to exposure to dose-rate equivalent infrared laser light. Comparisons of dose-rate response from before, during, and after accelerated aging of a device, or from periodic sampling of devices from fielded operational systems can determine if aging has affected the device's overall functionality. The dependence of these changes on equivalent dose-rate pulse intensity and/or duration can be measured with the apparatus. The synchronized introduction of external electrical transients into the device under test can be used to simulate the electrical effects of the surrounding circuitry's response to a radiation exposure while exposing the device to dose-rate equivalent infrared laser light.

  1. Materials Advances for Next-Generation Ingestible Electronic Medical Devices.

    PubMed

    Bettinger, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    Electronic medical implants have collectively transformed the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases, but have many inherent limitations. Electronic implants require invasive surgeries, operate in challenging microenvironments, and are susceptible to bacterial infection and persistent inflammation. Novel materials and nonconventional device fabrication strategies may revolutionize the way electronic devices are integrated with the body. Ingestible electronic devices offer many advantages compared with implantable counterparts that may improve the diagnosis and treatment of pathologies ranging from gastrointestinal infections to diabetes. This review summarizes current technologies and highlights recent materials advances. Specific focus is dedicated to next-generation materials for packaging, circuit design, and on-board power supplies that are benign, nontoxic, and even biodegradable. Future challenges and opportunities are also highlighted. PMID:26403162

  2. Insertion devices for the Advanced Light Source at LBL

    SciTech Connect

    Hassenzahl, W.; Chin, J.; Halbach, K.; Hoyer, E.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.; Savoy, R.

    1989-03-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory will be the first of the new generation of dedicated synchrotron light sources to be put into operation. Specially designed insertion devices will be required to realize the high brightness photon beams made possible by the low emittance of the electron beam. The complement of insertion devices on the ALS will include undulators with periods as short as 3.9 cm and one or more high field wigglers. The first device to be designed is a 5 m long, 5 cm period, hybrid undulator. The goal of very high brightness and high harmonic output imposes unusually tight tolerances on the magnetic field quality and thus on the mechanical structure. The design process, using a generic structure for all undulators, is described. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Nonlinear current-voltage characteristics based on semiconductor nanowire networks enable a new concept in thermoelectric device optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz Leon, Juan J.; Norris, Kate J.; Hartnett, Ryan J.; Garrett, Matthew P.; Tompa, Gary S.; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P.

    2016-08-01

    Thermoelectric (TE) devices that produce electric power from heat are driven by a temperature gradient (Δ T = T_{{hot}} - T_{{cold}}, T hot: hot side temperature, T cold: cold side temperature) with respect to the average temperature ( T). While the resistance of TE devices changes as Δ T and/or T change, the current-voltage ( I- V) characteristics have consistently been shown to remain linear, which clips generated electric power ( P gen) within the given open-circuit voltage ( V OC) and short-circuit current ( I SC). This P gen clipping is altered when an appropriate nonlinearity is introduced to the I- V characteristics—increasing P gen. By analogy, photovoltaic cells with a large fill factor exhibit nonlinear I- V characteristics. In this paper, the concept of a unique TE device with nonlinear I- V characteristics is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. A single TE device with nonlinear I- V characteristics is fabricated by combining indium phosphide (InP) and silicon (Si) semiconductor nanowire networks. These TE devices show P gen that is more than 25 times larger than those of comparable devices with linear I- V characteristics. The plausible causes of the nonlinear I- V characteristics are discussed. The demonstrated concept suggests that there exists a new pathway to increase P gen of TE devices made of semiconductors.

  4. Study on the photoresponse of amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O and zinc oxynitride semiconductor devices by the extraction of sub-gap-state distribution and device simulation.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jun Tae; Park, Jozeph; Ahn, Byung Du; Kim, Dong Myong; Choi, Sung-Jin; Kim, Hyun-Suk; Kim, Dae Hwan

    2015-07-22

    Persistent photoconduction (PPC) is a phenomenon that limits the application of oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors (TFTs) in optical sensor-embedded displays. In the present work, a study on zinc oxynitride (ZnON) semiconductor TFTs based on the combination of experimental results and device simulation is presented. Devices incorporating ZnON semiconductors exhibit negligible PPC effects compared with amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O (a-IGZO) TFTs, and the difference between the two types of materials are examined by monochromatic photonic C-V spectroscopy (MPCVS). The latter method allows the estimation of the density of subgap states in the semiconductor, which may account for the different behavior of ZnON and IGZO materials with respect to illumination and the associated PPC. In the case of a-IGZO TFTs, the oxygen flow rate during the sputter deposition of a-IGZO is found to influence the amount of PPC. Small oxygen flow rates result in pronounced PPC, and large densities of valence band tail (VBT) states are observed in the corresponding devices. This implies a dependence of PPC on the amount of oxygen vacancies (VO). On the other hand, ZnON has a smaller bandgap than a-IGZO and contains a smaller density of VBT states over the entire range of its bandgap energy. Here, the concept of activation energy window (AEW) is introduced to explain the occurrence of PPC effects by photoinduced electron doping, which is likely to be associated with the formation of peroxides in the semiconductor. The analytical methodology presented in this report accounts well for the reduction of PPC in ZnON TFTs, and provides a quantitative tool for the systematic development of phototransistors for optical sensor-embedded interactive displays. PMID:26094854

  5. High resolution infrared ``vision'' of dynamic electron processes in semiconductor devices (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyutenko, V. K.

    2003-01-01

    Infrared cameras have been traditionally used in semiconductor industry for noncontact measurements of printed circuit boards (PCBs) local overheating. While an effective way to prevent defective PCB application in a "find-problems-before-your-customer-do" manner, this conventional static (25-50 frames/s) and small spatial resolution (>100 μm) approach is incapable, in principle, of explaining the physical reason for the PCB failure. What follows in this report is the demonstration of an IR camera based new approach in high-resolution dynamic study of electron processes responsible for single device performance. More specifically, time resolved two-dimensional visualization of current carrier drift and diffusion processes across the device base that happen in microsecond scale is of prime concern in the work. Thus, contrary to the conventional visualization-through-heating measurements, objective is mapping of electron processes in a device base through negative and positive luminescence (provoked by band-to-band electron transitions) and nonequilibrium thermal emission (provoked by intraband electron transitions) studies inside the region in which current flows. Therefore, the parameters of interest are not only a device thermal mass and thermal conductance, but also free carrier lifetime, surface recombination velocity, diffusion length, and contact properties. The micro-mapping system developed consists of reflective type IR microscope coaxially attached to calibrated scanning IR thermal imaging cameras (3-5 and 8-12 μm spectral ranges, HgCdTe cooled photodetectors, scene spatial resolution of some 20 μm, minimum time resolved interval of 10 μs, and temperature resolution of about 0.5 °C at 30 °C). Data acquisition and image processing (emissivity equalization, noise reduction by image averaging, and external triggering) are computer controlled. Parallel video channel equipped with a CCD camera permits easy positioning and focusing of <1×1 mm2 object

  6. Enabling Earth-Abundant Pyrite (FeS2) Semiconductor Nanostructures for High Performance Photovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Song

    2014-11-18

    This project seeks to develop nanostructures of iron pyrite, an earth-abundant semiconductor, to enable their applications in high-performance photovoltaic (PV) devices. Growth of high purity iron pyrite nanostructures (nanowires, nanorods, and nanoplates), as well as iron pyrite thin films and single crystals, has been developed and their structures characterized. These structures have been fundamentally investigated to understand the origin of the low solar energy conversion efficiency of iron pyrite and various passivation strategies and doping approaches have been explored in order to improve it. By taking advantage of the high surface-to-bulk ratio in nanostructures and effective electrolyte gating, we fully characterized both the surface inversion and bulk electrical transport properties for the first time through electrolyte-gated Hall measurements of pyrite nanoplate devices and show that pyrite is n-type in the bulk and p-type near the surface due to strong inversion, which has important consequences to using nanocrystalline pyrite for efficient solar energy conversion. Furthermore, through a comprehensive investigation on n-type iron pyrite single crystals, we found the ionization of high-density bulk deep donor states, likely resulting from bulk sulfur vacancies, creates a non-constant charge distribution and a very narrow surface space charge region that limits the total barrier height, thus satisfactorily explains the limited photovoltage and poor photoconversion efficiency of iron pyrite single crystals. These findings suggest new ideas on how to improve single crystal pyrite and nanocrystalline or polycrystalline pyrite films to enable them for high performance solar applications.

  7. The way to zeros: The future of semiconductor device and chemical mechanical polishing technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimura, Manabu

    2016-06-01

    For the last 60 years, the development of cutting-edge semiconductor devices has strongly emphasized scaling; the effort to scale down current CMOS devices may well achieve the target of 5 nm nodes by 2020. Planarization by chemical mechanical polishing (CMP), is one technology essential for supporting scaling. This paper summarizes the history of CMP transitions in the planarization process as well as the changing degree of planarity required, and, finally, introduces innovative technologies to meet the requirements. The use of CMP was triggered by the replacement of local oxidation of silicon (LOCOS) as the element isolation technology by shallow trench isolation (STI) in the 1980s. Then, CMP’s use expanded to improving embedability of aluminum wiring, tungsten (W) contacts, Cu wiring, and, more recently, to its adoption in high-k metal gate (HKMG) and FinFET (FF) processes. Initially, the required degree of planarity was 50 nm, but now 0 nm is required. Further, zero defects on a post-CMP wafer is now the goal, and it is possible that zero psi CMP loading pressure will be required going forward. Soon, it seems, everything will have to be “zero” and perfect. Although the process is also chemical in nature, the CMP process is actually mechanical with a load added using slurry particles several tens of nm in diameter. Zero load in the loading process, zero nm planarity with no trace of processing, and zero residual foreign material, including the very slurry particles used in the process, are all required. This article will provide an overview of how to achieve these new requirements and what technologies should be employed.

  8. Quantum interference measurement of spin interactions in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure

    SciTech Connect

    Deo, Vincent; Zhang, Yao; Soghomonian, Victoria; Heremans, Jean J.

    2015-03-30

    Quantum interference is used to measure the spin interactions between an InAs surface electron system and the iron center in the biomolecule hemin in nanometer proximity in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure. The interference quantifies the influence of hemin on the spin decoherence properties of the surface electrons. The decoherence times of the electrons serve to characterize the biomolecule, in an electronic complement to the use of spin decoherence times in magnetic resonance. Hemin, prototypical for the heme group in hemoglobin, is used to demonstrate the method, as a representative biomolecule where the spin state of a metal ion affects biological functions. The electronic determination of spin decoherence properties relies on the quantum correction of antilocalization, a result of quantum interference in the electron system. Spin-flip scattering is found to increase with temperature due to hemin, signifying a spin exchange between the iron center and the electrons, thus implying interactions between a biomolecule and a solid-state system in the hemin/InAs hybrid structure. The results also indicate the feasibility of artificial bioinspired materials using tunable carrier systems to mediate interactions between biological entities.

  9. Quantum interference measurement of spin interactions in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Deo, Vincent; Zhang, Yao; Soghomonian, Victoria; Heremans, Jean J.

    2015-03-30

    Quantum interference is used to measure the spin interactions between an InAs surface electron system and the iron center in the biomolecule hemin in nanometer proximity in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure. The interference quantifies the influence of hemin on the spin decoherence properties of the surface electrons. The decoherence times of the electrons serve to characterize the biomolecule, in an electronic complement to the use of spin decoherence times in magnetic resonance. Hemin, prototypical for the heme group in hemoglobin, is used to demonstrate the method, as a representative biomolecule where the spin state of a metal ion affects biologicalmore » functions. The electronic determination of spin decoherence properties relies on the quantum correction of antilocalization, a result of quantum interference in the electron system. Spin-flip scattering is found to increase with temperature due to hemin, signifying a spin exchange between the iron center and the electrons, thus implying interactions between a biomolecule and a solid-state system in the hemin/InAs hybrid structure. The results also indicate the feasibility of artificial bioinspired materials using tunable carrier systems to mediate interactions between biological entities.« less

  10. Quantum interference measurement of spin interactions in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deo, Vincent; Zhang, Yao; Soghomonian, Victoria; Heremans, Jean J.

    2015-03-01

    Quantum interference is used to measure the spin interactions between an InAs surface electron system and the iron center in the biomolecule hemin in nanometer proximity in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure. The interference quantifies the influence of hemin on the spin decoherence properties of the surface electrons. The decoherence times of the electrons serve to characterize the biomolecule, in an electronic complement to the use of spin decoherence times in magnetic resonance. Hemin, prototypical for the heme group in hemoglobin, is used to demonstrate the method, as a representative biomolecule where the spin state of a metal ion affects biological functions. The electronic determination of spin decoherence properties relies on the quantum correction of antilocalization, a result of quantum interference in the electron system. Spin-flip scattering is found to increase with temperature due to hemin, signifying a spin exchange between the iron center and the electrons, thus implying interactions between a biomolecule and a solid-state system in the hemin/InAs hybrid structure. The results also indicate the feasibility of artificial bioinspired materials using tunable carrier systems to mediate interactions between biological entities.

  11. Performance of a parallel algebraic multilevel preconditioner for stabilized finite element semiconductor device modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Paul T. Shadid, John N.; Sala, Marzio; Tuminaro, Raymond S.; Hennigan, Gary L.; Hoekstra, Robert J.

    2009-09-20

    In this study results are presented for the large-scale parallel performance of an algebraic multilevel preconditioner for solution of the drift-diffusion model for semiconductor devices. The preconditioner is the key numerical procedure determining the robustness, efficiency and scalability of the fully-coupled Newton-Krylov based, nonlinear solution method that is employed for this system of equations. The coupled system is comprised of a source term dominated Poisson equation for the electric potential, and two convection-diffusion-reaction type equations for the electron and hole concentration. The governing PDEs are discretized in space by a stabilized finite element method. Solution of the discrete system is obtained through a fully-implicit time integrator, a fully-coupled Newton-based nonlinear solver, and a restarted GMRES Krylov linear system solver. The algebraic multilevel preconditioner is based on an aggressive coarsening graph partitioning of the nonzero block structure of the Jacobian matrix. Representative performance results are presented for various choices of multigrid V-cycles and W-cycles and parameter variations for smoothers based on incomplete factorizations. Parallel scalability results are presented for solution of up to 10{sup 8} unknowns on 4096 processors of a Cray XT3/4 and an IBM POWER eServer system.

  12. Performance of a parallel algebraic multilevel preconditioner for stabilized finite element semiconductor device modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Paul T.; Shadid, John N.; Sala, Marzio; Tuminaro, Raymond S.; Hennigan, Gary L.; Hoekstra, Robert J.

    2009-09-01

    In this study results are presented for the large-scale parallel performance of an algebraic multilevel preconditioner for solution of the drift-diffusion model for semiconductor devices. The preconditioner is the key numerical procedure determining the robustness, efficiency and scalability of the fully-coupled Newton-Krylov based, nonlinear solution method that is employed for this system of equations. The coupled system is comprised of a source term dominated Poisson equation for the electric potential, and two convection-diffusion-reaction type equations for the electron and hole concentration. The governing PDEs are discretized in space by a stabilized finite element method. Solution of the discrete system is obtained through a fully-implicit time integrator, a fully-coupled Newton-based nonlinear solver, and a restarted GMRES Krylov linear system solver. The algebraic multilevel preconditioner is based on an aggressive coarsening graph partitioning of the nonzero block structure of the Jacobian matrix. Representative performance results are presented for various choices of multigrid V-cycles and W-cycles and parameter variations for smoothers based on incomplete factorizations. Parallel scalability results are presented for solution of up to 108 unknowns on 4096 processors of a Cray XT3/4 and an IBM POWER eServer system.

  13. Advanced radiation detector development: Advanced semiconductor detector development: Development of a room-temperature, gamma ray detector using gallium arsenide to develop an electrode detector. Annual progress report, September 30, 1994--September 29, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, G.F.

    1995-11-01

    The advanced detector development project at the University of Michigan has completed the first full year of its current funding. The general goals are the development of radiation detectors and spectrometers that are capable of portable room temperature operation. Over the past 12 months, the authors have worked primarily in the development of semiconductor spectrometers with ``single carrier`` response that offer the promise of room temperature operation and good energy resolution in gamma ray spectroscopy. They have also begun a small scale effort at investigating the properties of a small non-spectroscopic detector system with directional characteristics that will allow identification of the approximate direction in which gamma rays are incident. These activities have made use of the extensive clean room facilities at the University of Michigan for semiconductor device fabrication, and also the radiation measurement capabilities provided in the laboratory in the Phoenix Building on the North Campus.

  14. Heteroepitaxial growth of 3-5 semiconductor compounds by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition for device applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collis, Ward J.; Abul-Fadl, Ali

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to design, install and operate a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition system which is to be used for the epitaxial growth of 3-5 semiconductor binary compounds, and ternary and quaternary alloys. The long-term goal is to utilize this vapor phase deposition in conjunction with existing current controlled liquid phase epitaxy facilities to perform hybrid growth sequences for fabricating integrated optoelectronic devices.

  15. PREFACE: Semiconductor Nanostructures towards Electronic and Optoelectronic Device Applications II (Symposium K, E-MRS 2009 Spring Meeting)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nötzel, Richard

    2009-07-01

    This volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering contains papers that were presented at the special symposium K at the EMRS 2009 Spring Meeting held 8-12 June in Strasbourg, France, which was entitled 'Semiconductor Nanostructures towards Electronic and Optoelectronic Device Applications II'. Thanks to the broad interest a large variety of quantum dots and quantum wires and related nanostructures and their application in devices could be covered. There was significant progress in the epitaxial growth of semiconductor quantum dots seen in the operation of high-power, as well as mode locked laser diodes and the lateral positioning of quantum dots on patterned substrates or by selective area growth for future single quantum dot based optoelectronic and electronic devices. In the field of semiconductor nanowires high quality, almost twin free structures are now available together with a new degree of freedom for band structure engineering based on alternation of the crystal structure. In the search for Si based light emitting structures, nanocrystals and miniband-related near infrared luminescence of Si/Ge quantum dot superlattices with high quantum efficiency were reported. These highlights, among others, and the engaged discussions of the scientists, engineers and students brought together at the symposium emphasize how active the field of semiconductor nanostructures and their applications in devices is, so that we can look forward to the progress to come. Guest Editor Richard Nötzel COBRA Research Institute Department of Applied Physics Eindhoven University of Technology 5600 MB Eindhoven The Netherlands Tel.: +31 40 247 2047; fax: +31 40 246 1339 E-mail address: r.noetzel@tue.nl

  16. Method for manufacturing electrical contacts for a thin-film semiconductor device

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.; Dickson, Charles R.; D'Aiello, Robert V.

    1988-11-08

    A method of fabricating spaced-apart back contacts on a thin film of semiconductor material by forming strips of buffer material on top of the semiconductor material in locations corresponding to the desired dividing lines between back contacts, forming a film of metal substantially covering the semiconductor material and buffer strips, and scribing portions of the metal film overlying the buffer strips with a laser without contacting the underlying semiconductor material to separate the metal layer into a plurality of back contacts. The buffer material serves to protect the underlying semiconductor material from being damaged during the laser scribing. Back contacts and multi-cell photovoltaic modules incorporating such back contacts also are disclosed.

  17. Recent Advances in Photonic Devices for Optical Computing and the Role of Nonlinear Optics-Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin; Frazier, Donald O.; Witherow, William K.; Banks, Curtis E.; Paley, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    The twentieth century has been the era of semiconductor materials and electronic technology while this millennium is expected to be the age of photonic materials and all-optical technology. Optical technology has led to countless optical devices that have become indispensable in our daily lives in storage area networks, parallel processing, optical switches, all-optical data networks, holographic storage devices, and biometric devices at airports. This chapters intends to bring some awareness to the state-of-the-art of optical technologies, which have potential for optical computing and demonstrate the role of nonlinear optics in many of these components. Our intent, in this Chapter, is to present an overview of the current status of optical computing, and a brief evaluation of the recent advances and performance of the following key components necessary to build an optical computing system: all-optical logic gates, adders, optical processors, optical storage, holographic storage, optical interconnects, spatial light modulators and optical materials.

  18. TID Simulation of Advanced CMOS Devices for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajid, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    This paper focuses on Total Ionizing Dose (TID) effects caused by accumulation of charges at silicon dioxide, substrate/silicon dioxide interface, Shallow Trench Isolation (STI) for scaled CMOS bulk devices as well as at Buried Oxide (BOX) layer in devices based on Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology to be operated in space radiation environment. The radiation induced leakage current and corresponding density/concentration electrons in leakage current path was presented/depicted for 180nm, 130nm and 65nm NMOS, PMOS transistors based on CMOS bulk as well as SOI process technologies on-board LEO and GEO satellites. On the basis of simulation results, the TID robustness analysis for advanced deep sub-micron technologies was accomplished up to 500 Krad. The correlation between the impact of technology scaling and magnitude of leakage current with corresponding total dose was established utilizing Visual TCAD Genius program.

  19. Advanced Measurement Devices for the Microgravity Electromagnetic Levitation Facility EML

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brillo, Jurgen; Fritze, Holger; Lohofer, Georg; Schulz, Michal; Stenzel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on two advanced measurement devices for the microgravity electromagnetic levitation facility (EML), which is currently under construction for the use onboard the "International Space Station (ISS)": the "Sample Coupling Electronics (SCE)" and the "Oxygen Sensing and Control Unit (OSC)". The SCE measures by a contactless, inductive method the electrical resistivity and the diameter of a spherical levitated metallic droplet by evaluating the voltage and electrical current applied to the levitation coil. The necessity of the OSC comes from the insight that properties like surface tension or, eventually, viscosity cannot seriously be determined by the oscillating drop method in the EML facility without knowing the conditions of the surrounding atmosphere. In the following both measurement devices are explained and laboratory test results are presented.

  20. Characterization techniques for semiconductors and nanostructures: a review of recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acher, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy techniques are widely used for the characterization of semiconductors and nanostructures. Confocal Raman microscopy is useful to retrieve chemical and molecular information at the ultimate submicrometer resolution of optical microscopy. Fast imaging capabilities, 3D confocal ability, and multiple excitation wavelengths, have increased the power of the technique while making it simpler to use for material scientists. Recently, the development of the Tip Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (TERS) has opened the way to the use of Raman information at nanoscale, by combining the resolution of scanning probe microscopy and chemical selectivity of Raman spectroscopy. Significant advances have been reported in the field of profiling the atomic composition of multilayers, using the Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy technique, including real-time determination of etched depth by interferometry. This allows the construction of precise atomic profiles of sophisticated multilayers with a few nm resolution. Ellipsometry is another widely used technique to determine the profile of multilayers, and recent development have provided enhanced spatial resolution useful for the investigation of patterned materials. In addition to the advances of the different characterization techniques, the capability to observe the same regions at micrometer scale at different stages of material elaboration, or with different instrument, is becoming a critical issue. Several advances have been made to allow precise re-localization and co-localization of observation with different complementary characterization techniques.

  1. The Advanced Space Plant Culture Device with Live Imaging Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Weibo; Zhang, Tao; Tong, Guanghui

    The live imaging techniques, including the color and fluorescent imags, are very important and useful for space life science. The advanced space plant culture Device (ASPCD) with live imaging Technique, developed for Chinese Spacecraft, would be introduced in this paper. The ASPCD had two plant experimental chambers. Three cameras (two color cameras and one fluorescent camera) were installed in the two chambers. The fluorescent camera could observe flowering genes, which were labeled by GFP. The lighting, nutrient, temperature controling and water recycling were all independent in each chamber. The ASPCD would beed applied to investigate for the growth and development of the high plant under microgravity conditions on board the Chinese Spacecraft.

  2. Channel Strain in Advanced Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors Measured Using Nano-Beam Electron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Akio; Nakamura, Hidetatsu; Fukai, Toshinori; Ikarashi, Nobuyuki

    2008-04-01

    Using high-precision nano-beam electron diffraction (NBD), we clarified the influences of stress liner and the stress of shallow trench isolation on channel strain in advanced metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs). For systematic strain measurements, we improved the precision of NBD by observing large reciprocal lattice vectors under appropriate diffraction conditions. The absolute value of the channel strain increases by stress liner as gate length decreases, although the drive current increase due to stress liner saturates at a shorter channel length. The normal strain in the gate length direction is inversely proportional to the distance from the gate electrode to the shallow trench isolation (STI). Furthermore, the relationship between measured channel strain induced by STI and drive current change was shown. The drive current of n- and p-MOSFET changes about 5% with 2×10-3 channel strain variation. This result suggests that reducing the shallow trench isolation stress is effective for controlling the drive current change, depending on the active region layout. We conclude that the experimental measurement of channel strain is necessary for device and circuit design.

  3. A novel measuring method of clamping force for electrostatic chuck in semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesheng, Wang; Jia, Cheng; Yin, Zhong; Linhong, Ji

    2016-04-01

    Electrostatic chucks are one of the core components of semiconductor devices. As a key index of electrostatic chucks, the clamping force must be controlled within a reasonable range. Therefore, it is essential to accurately measure the clamping force. To reduce the negative factors influencing measurement precision and repeatability, this article presents a novel method to measure the clamping force and we elaborate both the principle and the key procedure. A micro-force probe component is introduced to monitor, adjust, and eliminate the gap between the wafer and the electrostatic chuck. The contact force between the ruby probe and the wafer is selected as an important parameter to characterize de-chucking, and we have found that the moment of de-chucking can be exactly judged. Moreover, this article derives the formula calibrating equivalent action area of backside gas pressure under real working conditions, which can effectively connect the backside gas pressure at the moment of de-chucking and the clamping force. The experiments were then performed on a self-designed measuring platform. The de-chucking mechanism is discussed in light of our analysis of the experimental data. Determination criteria for de-chucking point are summed up. It is found that the relationship between de-chucking pressure and applied voltage conforms well to quadratic equation. Meanwhile, the result reveals that actual de-chucking behavior is much more complicated than the description given in the classical empirical formula. Project supported by No. 02 National Science and Technology Major Project of China (No. 2011ZX02403-004).

  4. Electrical Characterization of Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Memory Devices with High-Density Self-Assembled Tungsten Nanodots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Yan-Li; Fukushima, Takafumi; Tanaka, Tetsu; Koyanagi, Mitsumasa

    2008-04-01

    Tungsten nanodots (W-NDs) with an ultrahigh density of 1×1013/cm2 and a small size of around of 1.5-2 nm were successfully formed by self-assembled nanodot deposition (SAND). A metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) memory device was also fabricated with a W-ND layer placed between tunneling SiO2 and block SiO2. Using this device, the effects of annealing on the capacitance characteristics were investigated in detail. After 900 °C post deposition annealing (PDA), an extremely large memory window of about 9.2 V was obtained, indicating that the device is a strong contender for future nonvolatile memory (NVM) applications. The program/erase speed and retention characteristics were also evaluated. The oxidation of tungsten by oxygen from the cosputtered silicon oxide was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurement. It is considered to degrade the retention characteristics of MOS memory devices.

  5. Semiconductor devices: solar cells. January 1975-May 1981 (citations from the International Information Service for the Physics and Engineering Communities Data Base). Report for Jan 75-May 81

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    The applications of semiconductor devices to solar cells and arrays are presented. Emphasis is placed on manufacturing processes, cell design, and performance. (Contains 235 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  6. Atomic and electronic structure of interfaces in materials systems for future semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopatin, Sergei

    Because of the intrinsic limits of the Si/SiO2 based industry, there is a great trend towards the monolithic integration of new materials into already well developed silicon technology. Having lasted for several decades now, downscaling reaches the limit, in which a critical device dimension approaches the size of one atom. At this level of the miniaturization, it is not the bulk material, but the interface between the two materials that what controls the properties of the resulting optoelectronic device. Thus, the characterization of precise atomic arrangements at different interfaces and the influence of these arrangements on the optoelectronic properties of interfaces is required. Therefore, in this study, a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) techniques and density functional theory calculations was used as a research tool for the characterization of interfaces. The STEM instruments used for the study were equipped with prototypes of spherical aberration correctors, enabling to achieve the highest resolution currently available both in space and energy. The combination of experimental and theoretical methods was applied to study interfaces between Si/GaAs, Si/Ge, Ge/SiO2, Si/HfO2 and Si/Al2O3. As the result of the present research, a new dislocation configuration at the Si/GaAs interface was reported for the first time. The influence of this dislocation structure on the electrical properties of the Si/GaAs interface was analyzed. Also, the transition from Si to GaAs and from Si to Ge at corresponding interfaces was described with atomic precision. For the first time, the interface between Ge and SiO2 was shown to have "ideal" characteristics (chemical abruptness and sharpness). This indicates the potential, both for a more successful use of Ge in high-speed devices and for advances in interface engineering to enhance performance in electronic devices. The features of Si/HfO2 and Si/Al2O3 interfaces, namely the distribution and

  7. Nanoscale Copper and Copper Compounds for Advanced Device Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lih-Juann

    2016-04-01

    Copper has been in use for at least 10,000 years. Copper alloys, such as bronze and brass, have played important roles in advancing civilization in human history. Bronze artifacts date at least 6500 years. On the other hand, discovery of intriguing properties and new applications in contemporary technology for copper and its compounds, particularly on nanoscale, have continued. In this paper, examples for the applications of Cu and Cu alloys for advanced device applications will be given on Cu metallization in microelectronics devices, Cu nanobats as field emitters, Cu2S nanowire array as high-rate capability and high-capacity cathodes for lithium-ion batteries, Cu-Te nanostructures for field-effect transistor, Cu3Si nanowires as high-performance field emitters and efficient anti-reflective layers, single-crystal Cu(In,Ga)Se2 nanotip arrays for high-efficiency solar cell, multilevel Cu2S resistive memory, superlattice Cu2S-Ag2S heterojunction diodes, and facet-dependent Cu2O diode.

  8. Advanced Silicon Solar Cell Device Physics and Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deceglie, Michael Gardner

    A fundamental challenge in the development and deployment of solar photovoltaic technology is a reduction in cost enabling direct competition with fossil-fuel-based energy sources. A key driver in this cost reduction is optimized device efficiency, because increased energy output leverages all photovoltaic system costs, from raw materials and module manufacturing to installation and maintenance. To continue progress toward higher conversion efficiencies, solar cells are being fabricated with increasingly complex designs, including engineered nanostructures, heterojunctions, and novel contacting and passivation schemes. Such advanced designs require a comprehensive and unified understanding of the optical and electrical device physics at the microscopic scale. This thesis focuses on a microscopic understanding of solar cell optoelectronic performance and its impact on cell optimization. We consider this in three solar cell platforms: thin-film crystalline silicon, amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunctions, and thin-film cells with nanophotonic light trapping. The work described in this thesis represents a powerful design paradigm, based on a detailed physical understanding of the mechanisms governing solar cell performance. Furthermore, we demonstrate the importance of understanding not just the individual mechanisms, but also their interactions. Such an approach to device optimization is critical for the efficiency and competitiveness of future generations of solar cells.

  9. Silicon high speed modulator for advanced modulation: device structures and exemplary modulator performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milivojevic, Biljana; Wiese, Stefan; Whiteaway, James; Raabe, Christian; Shastri, Anujit; Webster, Mark; Metz, Peter; Sunder, Sanjay; Chattin, Bill; Anderson, Sean P.; Dama, Bipin; Shastri, Kal

    2014-03-01

    Fiber optics is well established today due to the high capacity and speed, unrivaled flexibility and quality of service. However, state of the art optical elements and components are hardly scalable in terms of cost and size required to achieve competitive port density and cost per bit. Next-generation high-speed coherent optical communication systems targeting a data rate of 100-Gb/s and beyond goes along with innovations in component and subsystem areas. Consequently, by leveraging the advanced silicon micro and nano-fabrication technologies, significant progress in developing CMOS platform-based silicon photonic devices has been made all over the world. These achievements include the demonstration of high-speed IQ modulators, which are important building blocks in coherent optical communication systems. In this paper, we demonstrate silicon photonic QPSK modulator based on a metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitor structure, address different modulator configuration structures and report our progress and research associated with highspeed advanced optical modulation in silicon photonics

  10. Intravital fluorescence imaging of mouse brain using implantable semiconductor devices and epi-illumination of biological tissue

    PubMed Central

    Takehara, Hiroaki; Ohta, Yasumi; Motoyama, Mayumi; Haruta, Makito; Nagasaki, Mizuki; Takehara, Hironari; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The application of the fluorescence imaging method to living animals, together with the use of genetically engineered animals and synthesized photo-responsive compounds, is a powerful method for investigating brain functions. Here, we report a fluorescence imaging method for the brain surface and deep brain tissue that uses compact and mass-producible semiconductor imaging devices based on complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. An image sensor chip was designed to be inserted into brain tissue, and its size was 1500 × 450 μm. Sample illumination is also a key issue for intravital fluorescence imaging. Hence, for the uniform illumination of the imaging area, we propose a new method involving the epi-illumination of living biological tissues, and we performed investigations using optical simulations and experimental evaluation. PMID:26137364

  11. Accumulation capacitance frequency dispersion of III-V metal-insulator-semiconductor devices due to disorder induced gap states

    SciTech Connect

    Galatage, R. V.; Zhernokletov, D. M.; Dong, H.; Brennan, B.; Hinkle, C. L.; Wallace, R. M.; Vogel, E. M.

    2014-07-07

    The origin of the anomalous frequency dispersion in accumulation capacitance of metal-insulator-semiconductor devices on InGaAs and InP substrates is investigated using modeling, electrical characterization, and chemical characterization. A comparison of the border trap model and the disorder induced gap state model for frequency dispersion is performed. The fitting of both models to experimental data indicate that the defects responsible for the measured dispersion are within approximately 0.8 nm of the surface of the crystalline semiconductor. The correlation between the spectroscopically detected bonding states at the dielectric/III-V interface, the interfacial defect density determined using capacitance-voltage, and modeled capacitance-voltage response strongly suggests that these defects are associated with the disruption of the III-V atomic bonding and not border traps associated with bonding defects within the high-k dielectric.

  12. Accumulation capacitance frequency dispersion of III-V metal-insulator-semiconductor devices due to disorder induced gap states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galatage, R. V.; Zhernokletov, D. M.; Dong, H.; Brennan, B.; Hinkle, C. L.; Wallace, R. M.; Vogel, E. M.

    2014-07-01

    The origin of the anomalous frequency dispersion in accumulation capacitance of metal-insulator-semiconductor devices on InGaAs and InP substrates is investigated using modeling, electrical characterization, and chemical characterization. A comparison of the border trap model and the disorder induced gap state model for frequency dispersion is performed. The fitting of both models to experimental data indicate that the defects responsible for the measured dispersion are within approximately 0.8 nm of the surface of the crystalline semiconductor. The correlation between the spectroscopically detected bonding states at the dielectric/III-V interface, the interfacial defect density determined using capacitance-voltage, and modeled capacitance-voltage response strongly suggests that these defects are associated with the disruption of the III-V atomic bonding and not border traps associated with bonding defects within the high-k dielectric.

  13. Group III nitride semiconductors for short wavelength light-emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, J. W.; Foxon, C. T.

    1998-01-01

    The group III nitrides (AlN, GaN and InN) represent an important trio of semiconductors because of their direct band gaps which span the range 1.95-6.2 eV, including the whole of the visible region and extending well out into the ultraviolet (UV) range. They form a complete series of ternary alloys which, in principle, makes available any band gap within this range and the fact that they also generate efficient luminescence has been the main driving force for their recent technological development. High brightness visible light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are now commercially available, a development which has transformed the market for LED-based full colour displays and which has opened the way to many other applications, such as in traffic lights and efficient low voltage, flat panel white light sources. Continuously operating UV laser diodes have also been demonstrated in the laboratory, exciting tremendous interest for high-density optical storage systems, UV lithography and projection displays. In a remarkably short space of time, the nitrides have therefore caught up with and, in some ways, surpassed the wide band gap II-VI compounds (ZnCdSSe) as materials for short wavelength optoelectronic devices. The purpose of this paper is to review these developments and to provide essential background material in the form of the structural, electronic and optical properties of the nitrides, relevant to these applications. We have been guided by the fact that the devices so far available are based on the binary compound GaN (which is relatively well developed at the present time), together with the ternary alloys AlGaN and InGaN, containing modest amounts of Al or In. We therefore concentrate, to a considerable extent, on the properties of GaN, then introduce those of the alloys as appropriate, emphasizing their use in the formation of the heterostructures employed in devices. The nitrides crystallize preferentially in the hexagonal wurtzite structure and devices have so

  14. Consistent low-field mobility modeling for advanced MOS devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanojević, Zlatan; Baumgartner, Oskar; Filipović, Lidija; Kosina, Hans; Karner, Markus; Kernstock, Christian; Prause, Philipp

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we develop several extensions to semi-classical modeling of low-field mobility, which are necessary to treat planar and non-planar channel geometries on equal footing. We advance the state-of-the-art by generalizing the Prange-Nee model for surface roughness scattering to non-planar geometries, providing a fully numerical treatment of Coulomb scattering, and formulating the Kubo-Greenwood mobility model in a consistent, dimension-independent manner. These extensions allow meaningful comparison of planar and non-planar structures alike, and open the door to evaluating emerging device concepts, such as the FinFET or the junction-less transistor, on physical grounds.

  15. Final LDRD report : design and fabrication of advanced device structures for ultra high efficiency solid state lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    Koleske, Daniel David; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Shul, Randy John; Wendt, Joel Robert; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Fischer, Arthur Joseph

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this one year LDRD was to improve the overall efficiency of InGaN LEDs by improving the extraction of light from the semiconductor chip. InGaN LEDs are currently the most promising technology for producing high efficiency blue and green semiconductor light emitters. Improving the efficiency of InGaN LEDs will enable a more rapid adoption of semiconductor based lighting. In this LDRD, we proposed to develop photonic structures to improve light extraction from nitride-based light emitting diodes (LEDs). While many advanced device geometries were considered for this work, we focused on the use of a photonic crystal for improved light extraction. Although resonant cavity LEDs and other advanced structures certainly have the potential to improve light extraction, the photonic crystal approach showed the most promise in the early stages of this short program. The photonic crystal (PX)-LED developed here incorporates a two dimensional photonic crystal, or photonic lattice, into a nitride-based LED. The dimensions of the photonic crystal are selected such that there are very few or no optical modes in the plane of the LED ('lateral' modes). This will reduce or eliminate any radiation in the lateral direction so that the majority of the LED radiation will be in vertical modes that escape the semiconductor, which will improve the light-extraction efficiency. PX-LEDs were fabricated using a range of hole diameters and lattice constants and compared to control LEDs without a photonic crystal. The far field patterns from the PX-LEDs were dramatically modified by the presence of the photonic crystal. An increase in LED brightness of 1.75X was observed for light measured into a 40 degree emission cone with a total increase in power of 1.5X for an unencapsulated LED.

  16. Capacitance-voltage characteristics of Si and Ge nanomembrane based flexible metal-oxide-semiconductor devices under bending conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Minkyu; Seo, Jung-Hun; Park, Dong-Wook; Zhou, Weidong; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2016-06-01

    Metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) device is the basic building block for field effect transistors (FET). The majority of thin-film transistors (TFTs) are FETs. When MOSFET are mechanically bent, the MOS structure will be inevitably subject to mechanical strain. In this paper, flexible MOS devices using single crystalline Silicon (Si) and Germanium (Ge) nanomembranes (NM) with SiO2, SiO, and Al2O3 dielectric layers are fabricated on a plastic substrate. The relationships between semiconductor nanomembranes and various oxide materials are carefully investigated under tensile/compressive strain. The flatband voltage, threshold voltage, and effective charge density in various MOS combinations revealed that Si NM-SiO2 configuration shows the best interface charge behavior, while Ge NM-Al2O3 shows the worst. This investigation of flexible MOS devices can help us understand the impact of charges in the active region of the flexible TFTs and capacitance changes under the tensile/compressive strains on the change in electrical characteristics in flexible NM based TFTs.

  17. Towards large-scale multi-socket, multicore parallel simulations: Performance of an MPI-only semiconductor device simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Paul T.; Shadid, John N.

    2010-09-01

    This preliminary study considers the scaling and performance of a finite element (FE) semiconductor device simulator on a set of multi-socket, multicore architectures with nonuniform memory access (NUMA) compute nodes. These multicore architectures include two linux clusters with multicore processors: a quad-socket, quad-core AMD Opteron platform and a dual-socket, quad-core Intel Xeon Nehalem platform; and a dual-socket, six-core AMD Opteron workstation. These platforms have complex memory hierarchies that include local core-based cache, local socket-based memory, access to memory on the same mainboard from another socket, and then memory across network links to different nodes. The specific semiconductor device simulator used in this study employs a fully-coupled Newton-Krylov solver with domain decomposition and multilevel preconditioners. Scaling results presented include a large-scale problem of 100+ million unknowns on 4096 cores and a comparison with the Cray XT3/4 Red Storm capability platform. Although the MPI-only device simulator employed for this work can take advantage of all the cores of quad-core and six-core CPUs, the efficiency of the linear system solve is decreasing with increased core count and eventually a different programming paradigm will be needed.

  18. Influence of material quality and process-induced defects on semiconductor device performance and yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, W. A.; Mckee, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    An overview of major causes of device yield degradation is presented. The relationships of device types to critical processes and typical defects are discussed, and the influence of the defect on device yield and performance is demonstrated. Various defect characterization techniques are described and applied. A correlation of device failure, defect type, and cause of defect is presented in tabular form with accompanying illustrations.

  19. Epitaxial MoS2/GaN structures to enable vertical 2D/3D semiconductor heterostructure devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzmetov, D.; Zhang, K.; Stan, G.; Kalanyan, B.; Eichfeld, S.; Burke, R.; Shah, P.; O'Regan, T.; Crowne, F.; Birdwell, A. G.; Robinson, J.; Davydov, A.; Ivanov, T.

    MoS2/GaN structures are investigated as a building block for vertical 2D/3D semiconductor heterostructure devices that utilize a 3D substrate (GaN) as an active component of the semiconductor device without the need of mechanical transfer of the 2D layer. Our CVD-grown monolayer MoS2 has been shown to be epitaxially aligned to the GaN lattice which is a pre-requisite for high quality 2D/3D interfaces desired for efficient vertical transport and large area growth. The MoS2 coverage is nearly 50 % including isolated triangles and monolayer islands. The GaN template is a double-layer grown by MOCVD on sapphire and allows for measurement of transport perpendicular to the 2D layer. Photoluminescence, Raman, XPS, Kelvin force probe microscopy, and SEM analysis identified high quality monolayer MoS2. The MoS2/GaN structures electrically conduct in the out-of-plane direction and across the van der Waals gap, as measured with conducting AFM (CAFM). The CAFM current maps and I-V characteristics are analyzed to estimate the MoS2/GaN contact resistivity to be less than 4 Ω-cm2 and current spreading in the MoS2 monolayer to be approx. 1 μm in diameter. Epitaxial MoS2/GaN heterostructures present a promising platform for the design of energy-efficient, high-speed vertical devices incorporating 2D layered materials with 3D semiconductors.

  20. Control system for insertion devices at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, Oleg A.; Den Hartog, Patric; Moog, Elizabeth R.; Smith, Martin L.

    1997-07-01

    Eighteen insertion devices (IDs) are installed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), and three more are scheduled for installation by the end of this year. A distributed control system for insertion devices at the APS storage ring was created with the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). The basic components of this system are operator interfaces (OPIs), input output controllers (IOCs), and a local area network that allows the OPI and IOC to communicate. The IOC operates under the VxWorks OS with an EPICS database and a sequencer. The sequencer runs an ID control program written in State Notation Language. The OPI is built with the EPICS tool MEDM and provides display screens with input and output fields and buttons for gap control of the IDs. Global commands like 'open all IDs' are C-shell scripts invoked from the display menu. The algorithms for control and protection of the ID and ID vacuum chamber and the accuracy of gap control are discussed.

  1. Control system for insertion devices at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, O.A.; Den Hartog, P.; Moog, E.R.; Smith, M.L.

    1997-09-01

    Eighteen insertion devices (IDs) are installed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), and three more are scheduled for installation by the end of this year. A distributed control system for insertion devices at the APS storage ring was created with the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). The basic components of this system are operator interfaces (OPIs), input output controllers (IOCs), and a local area network that allows the OPI and IOC to communicate. The IOC operates under the VxWorks OS with an EPICS database and a sequencer. The sequencer runs an ID control program written in State Notation Language. The OPI is built with the EPICS tool MEDM and provides display screens with input and output fields and buttons for gap control of the IDs. Global commands like ``open all IDs`` are C-shell scripts invoked from the display menu. The algorithms for control and protection of the ID and ID vacuum chamber and the accuracy of gap control are discussed.

  2. Control system for insertion devices at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, O.A.; Den Hartog, P.; Moog, E.R.; Smith, M.L.

    1997-07-01

    Eighteen insertion devices (IDs) are installed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), and three more are scheduled for installation by the end of this year. A distributed control system for insertion devices at the APS storage ring was created with the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). The basic components of this system are operator interfaces (OPIs), input output controllers (IOCs), and a local area network that allows the OPI and IOC to communicate. The IOC operates under the VxWorks OS with an EPICS database and a sequencer. The sequencer runs an ID control program written in State Notation Language. The OPI is built with the EPICS tool MEDM and provides display screens with input and output fields and buttons for gap control of the IDs. Global commands like {open_quotes}open all IDs{close_quotes} are C-shell scripts invoked from the display menu. The algorithms for control and protection of the ID and ID vacuum chamber and the accuracy of gap control are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Evaluation of Advanced COTS Passive Devices for Extreme Temperature Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad; Dones, Keishla R.

    2009-01-01

    Electronic sensors and circuits are often exposed to extreme temperatures in many of NASA deep space and planetary surface exploration missions. Electronics capable of operation in harsh environments would be beneficial as they simplify overall system design, relax thermal management constraints, and meet operational requirements. For example, cryogenic operation of electronic parts will improve reliability, increase energy density, and extend the operational lifetimes of space-based electronic systems. Similarly, electronic parts that are able to withstand and operate efficiently in high temperature environments will negate the need for thermal control elements and their associated structures, thereby reducing system size and weight, enhancing its reliability, improving its efficiency, and reducing cost. Passive devices play a critical role in the design of almost all electronic circuitry. To address the needs of systems for extreme temperature operation, some of the advanced and most recently introduced commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) passive devices, which included resistors and capacitors, were examined for operation under a wide temperature regime. The types of resistors investigated included high temperature precision film, general purpose metal oxide, and wirewound.

  4. Thin film complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) device using a single-step deposition of the channel layer.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Pradipta K; Caraveo-Frescas, J A; Wang, Zhenwei; Hedhili, M N; Wang, Q X; Alshareef, H N

    2014-01-01

    We report, for the first time, the use of a single step deposition of semiconductor channel layer to simultaneously achieve both n- and p-type transport in transparent oxide thin film transistors (TFTs). This effect is achieved by controlling the concentration of hydroxyl groups (OH-groups) in the underlying gate dielectrics. The semiconducting tin oxide layer was deposited at room temperature, and the maximum device fabrication temperature was 350 °C. Both n and p-type TFTs showed fairly comparable performance. A functional CMOS inverter was fabricated using this novel scheme, indicating the potential use of our approach for various practical applications. PMID:24728223

  5. Bio-photosensors based on monolithic integration of light sensitive proteins with semiconductor devices and integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jian

    This Ph.D. work is aimed to study the integration of a suitably engineered protein, bacteriorhodopsin (BR), with semiconductor optoelectronic devices and circuits. A detailed study was carried out on the coupling mechanism at the protein-semiconductor interface. It was found that electrophoretic deposition of dried protein membranes is best suited for reliable integration with semiconductor devices. In the course of this study, the photoelectric response time was directly measured by a femtosecond electro-optic sampling technique. The measured transient response time of 4.5 picosecond, gives valuable information in the photocycle and kinetic processes associated with the photoisomerization. A highly sensitive bio-photosensor was designed and demonstrated, for the first time, based on the monolithic integration of bacteriorhodopsin and GaAs/AlGaAs modulation doped field effect transistors (MODFET). In this device, the small photovoltage generated by the protein is applied to the gate of the transistor embedded underneath, and therefore amplified and transformed into a large current signal. A light responsivity of 3.8 A/W was measured. Following this, double stage high gain MODFET-based transimpedance amplifier circuits were designed and monolithically integrated with the BR/FET bio-photosensors. The integrated bio-photoreceiver circuit exhibits a high responsivity of 175 V/W. The photoresponse was measured to be linear within several orders of magnitudes of the peak intensity of the light pulses. Unlike most semiconductor photodetectors, this bio-photosensor exhibits high sensitivity to change in incident light intensities, which is the essence of motion and edge detection. Polarization sensitive detection with the bio-photosensors was also demonstrated. This was achieved by photochemically modifying the molecular arrangement of the protein molecules inside the protein membrane. In addition, a dual focus electro-optic micro-Fresnel lens was developed for an

  6. Coherent tools for physics-based simulation and characterization of noise in semiconductor devices oriented to nonlinear microwave circuit CAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riah, Zoheir; Sommet, Raphael; Nallatamby, Jean C.; Prigent, Michel; Obregon, Juan

    2004-05-01

    We present in this paper a set of coherent tools for noise characterization and physics-based analysis of noise in semiconductor devices. This noise toolbox relies on a low frequency noise measurement setup with special high current capabilities thanks to an accurate and original calibration. It relies also on a simulation tool based on the drift diffusion equations and the linear perturbation theory, associated with the Green's function technique. This physics-based noise simulator has been implemented successfully in the Scilab environment and is specifically dedicated to HBTs. Some results are given and compared to those existing in the literature.

  7. Thin Film Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Device Using a Single-Step Deposition of the Channel Layer

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Pradipta K.; Caraveo-Frescas, J. A.; Wang, Zhenwei; Hedhili, M. N.; Wang, Q. X.; Alshareef, H. N.

    2014-01-01

    We report, for the first time, the use of a single step deposition of semiconductor channel layer to simultaneously achieve both n- and p-type transport in transparent oxide thin film transistors (TFTs). This effect is achieved by controlling the concentration of hydroxyl groups (OH-groups) in the underlying gate dielectrics. The semiconducting tin oxide layer was deposited at room temperature, and the maximum device fabrication temperature was 350°C. Both n and p-type TFTs showed fairly comparable performance. A functional CMOS inverter was fabricated using this novel scheme, indicating the potential use of our approach for various practical applications. PMID:24728223

  8. Wet Oxidation of High-Al-Content III-V Semiconductors: Important Materials Considerations for Device Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, Carol I.H.

    1999-05-19

    Wet oxidation of high-Al-content AIGaAs semiconductor layers in vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELS) has produced devices with record low threshold currents and voltages and with wall-plug efficiencies greater than 50%. Wet oxidation of buried AlGaAs layers has been employed to reduce the problems associated with substrate current leakage in GaAs-on- insulator (GOI) MESFETS. Wet oxidation of high-Al-content AlGaAs semiconductor layers in vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELS) has produced devices with record low threshold currents and voltages and with wall-plug efficiencies greater than 50%. Wet oxidation of buried AlGaAs layers has been employed to reduce the problems associated with substrate current leakage in GaAs-on- insulator (GOI) MESFETS. Wet oxidation has also been considered as a route to the long-sought goal of a IH-V MIS technology. To continue improving device designs for even higher performance and to establish a truly manufacturable technology based on wet oxidation, the effect of oxidation of a given layer on the properties of the entire device structure must be understood. The oxidation of a given layer can strongly affect the electrical and chemical properties of adjacent layers. Many of these effects are derived from the production of large amounts of elemental As during the oxidation reaction, the resultant generation of point defects, and the diffusion of these defects into adjacent regions. This can modify the chemical and electrical properties of these regions in ways that can impact device design, fabrication, and performance. Current understanding of the problem is discussed here.

  9. Semiconductor nanowire thermoelectric materials and devices, and processes for producing same

    DOEpatents

    Lagally, Max G; Evans, Paul G; Ritz, Clark S

    2013-09-17

    The present invention provides nanowires and nanoribbons that are well suited for use in thermoelectric applications. The nanowires and nanoribbons are characterized by a periodic compositional longitudinal modulation. The nanowires are constructed using lithographic techniques from thin semiconductor membranes, or "nanomembranes."

  10. Semiconductor nanowire thermoelectric materials and devices, and processes for producing same

    DOEpatents

    Lagally, Max G.; Evans, Paul G.; Ritz, Clark S.

    2011-02-15

    The present invention provides nanowires and nanoribbons that are well suited for use in thermoelectric applications. The nanowires and nanoribbons are characterized by a periodic longitudinal modulation, which may be a compositional modulation or a strain-induced modulation. The nanowires are constructed using lithographic techniques from thin semiconductor membranes, or "nanomembranes."

  11. Semiconductor nanowire thermoelectric materials and devices, and processes for producing same

    DOEpatents

    Lagally, Max G.; Evans, Paul G.; Ritz, Clark S.

    2015-11-17

    The present invention provides nanowires and nanoribbons that are well suited for use in thermoelectric applications. The nanowires and nanoribbons are characterized by a periodic compositional longitudinal modulation. The nanowires are constructed using lithographic techniques from thin semiconductor membranes, or "nanomembranes."

  12. Air-gating and chemical-gating in transistors and sensing devices made from hollow TiO2 semiconductor nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alivov, Yahya; Funke, Hans; Nagpal, Prashant

    2015-07-01

    Rapid miniaturization of electronic devices down to the nanoscale, according to Moore’s law, has led to some undesirable effects like high leakage current in transistors, which can offset additional benefits from scaling down. Development of three-dimensional transistors, by spatial extension in the third dimension, has allowed higher contact area with a gate electrode and better control over conductivity in the semiconductor channel. However, these devices do not utilize the large surface area and interfaces for new electronic functionality. Here, we demonstrate air gating and chemical gating in hollow semiconductor nanotube devices and highlight the potential for development of novel transistors that can be modulated using channel bias, gate voltage, chemical composition, and concentration. Using chemical gating, we reversibly altered the conductivity of nanoscaled semiconductor nanotubes (10-500 nm TiO2 nanotubes) by six orders of magnitude, with a tunable rectification factor (ON/OFF ratio) ranging from 1-106. While demonstrated air- and chemical-gating speeds were slow here (˜seconds) due to the mechanical-evacuation rate and size of our chamber, the small nanoscale volume of these hollow semiconductors can enable much higher switching speeds, limited by the rate of adsorption/desorption of molecules at semiconductor interfaces. These chemical-gating effects are completely reversible, additive between different chemical compositions, and can enable semiconductor nanoelectronic devices for ‘chemical transistors’, ‘chemical diodes’, and very high-efficiency sensing applications.

  13. Air-gating and chemical-gating in transistors and sensing devices made from hollow TiO2 semiconductor nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Alivov, Yahya; Funke, Hans; Nagpal, Prashant

    2015-07-24

    Rapid miniaturization of electronic devices down to the nanoscale, according to Moore's law, has led to some undesirable effects like high leakage current in transistors, which can offset additional benefits from scaling down. Development of three-dimensional transistors, by spatial extension in the third dimension, has allowed higher contact area with a gate electrode and better control over conductivity in the semiconductor channel. However, these devices do not utilize the large surface area and interfaces for new electronic functionality. Here, we demonstrate air gating and chemical gating in hollow semiconductor nanotube devices and highlight the potential for development of novel transistors that can be modulated using channel bias, gate voltage, chemical composition, and concentration. Using chemical gating, we reversibly altered the conductivity of nanoscaled semiconductor nanotubes (10-500 nm TiO2 nanotubes) by six orders of magnitude, with a tunable rectification factor (ON/OFF ratio) ranging from 1-10(6). While demonstrated air- and chemical-gating speeds were slow here (∼seconds) due to the mechanical-evacuation rate and size of our chamber, the small nanoscale volume of these hollow semiconductors can enable much higher switching speeds, limited by the rate of adsorption/desorption of molecules at semiconductor interfaces. These chemical-gating effects are completely reversible, additive between different chemical compositions, and can enable semiconductor nanoelectronic devices for 'chemical transistors', 'chemical diodes', and very high-efficiency sensing applications. PMID:26134618

  14. Compound semiconductor native oxide-based technologies for optical and electrical devices grown on gallium arsenide substrates using MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Adrian Lawrence

    1999-11-01

    The beginning of the modern microelectronics industry can be traced back to an invention made in 1947 when Bardeen and Brattain created the first semiconductor switch, called a transistor. Several other important discoveries followed; however, two of the more significant were (i) the development of the first planar process using silicon dioxide (SiO2) as a mask for diffusions into silicon by Frosch in 1955, and (ii) the subsequent integration of several transistors in tiny circuits by Kilby in 1958. Due to the superior quality of the SiO2-silicon interface, Si-based metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) transistors have primarily been used in integrated circuits. Until recently, compound semiconductors did not have a native oxide of sufficient quality to create similar MOS transistors. In 1990, research performed by Professor Holonyak and his group at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has led to a high-quality, stable, and insulating native oxide created from aluminum-containing compound semiconductor alloys. This study investigates native oxide films that are formed by the thermal oxidation of AlAs and InAlP epitaxial layers grown lattice-matched on GaAs substrates using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The primary goal is to evaluate how these native oxides can help form novel device structures and transistors. To qualify the material properties of these native oxide films, we have used several characterization techniques including photoluminescence, cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Additionally, we have performed leakage current and capacitance-voltage measurements to evaluate the electrical characteristics of the native oxide-semiconductor interface. The kinetics of the thermal oxidation process for both the surface oxidation of InAlP and lateral oxidation of AlAs are studied and contrasted. Aided by this knowledge, we have created a sealed

  15. Advanced materials and concepts for energy storage devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Shiang Jen

    Over the last decade, technological progress and advances in the miniaturization of electronic devices have increased demands for light-weight, high-efficiency, and carbon-free energy storage devices. These energy storage devices are expected to play important roles in automobiles, the military, power plants, and consumer electronics. Two main types of electrical energy storage systems studied in this research are Li ion batteries and supercapacitors. Several promising solid state electrolytes and supercapacitor electrode materials are investigated in this research. The first section of this dissertation is focused on the novel results on pulsed laser annealing of Li7La3Zr2O12 (LLZO). LLZO powders with a tetragonal structure were prepared by a sol-gel technique, then a pulsed laser annealing process was employed to convert the tetragonal powders to cubic LLZO without any loss of lithium. The second section of the dissertation reports on how Li5La 3Nb2O12 (LLNO) was successfully synthesized via a novel molten salt synthesis (MSS) method at the relatively low temperature of 900°C. The low sintering temperature prevented the loss of lithium that commonly occurs during synthesis using conventional solid state or wet chemical reactions. The second type of energy storage device studied is supercapacitors. Currently, research on supercapacitors is focused on increasing their energy densities and lowering their overall production costs by finding suitable electrode materials. The third section of this dissertation details how carbonized woods electrodes were used as supercapacitor electrode materials. A high energy density of 45.6 Wh/kg and a high power density of 2000 W/kg were obtained from the supercapacitor made from carbonized wood electrodes. The high performance of the supercapacitor was discovered to originate from the hierarchical porous structures of the carbonized wood. Finally, the fourth section of this dissertation is on the electrochemical effects of

  16. Semiconductor nanowires for future electronics: Growth, characterization, device fabrication, and integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayeh, Shadi A.

    This dissertation concerns with fundamental aspects of organo-metallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) of III-V semiconductor nanowires (NWs), and their structural and electrical properties inferred from a variety of device schemes. An historical perspective on the NW growth techniques and mechanisms, and an overview of demonstrated NW devices and their performance is summarized in chapter 1. In part I of the dissertation, OMVPE synthesis of InAs NWs on SiO 2/Si and InAs (111)B surfaces is discussed and their growth mechanism is resolved. Nucleation, evolution, and the role of Au nanoparticles in the growth of InAs NWs on SiO2/Si surfaces are presented in chapter 2. Our results indicate that In droplets can lead to InAs NW growth and that Au nanoparticles are necessary for efficient AsH3 pyrolysis. Chapter 3 discusses the key thermodynamic and kinetic processes that contribute to the InAs NW growth on InAs (111)B surfaces. Controversy in the interpretation of III-V NW growth is overviewed. Experimental evidence on the nucleation of InAs NWs from In droplets as well as the catalytic effect of Au nanoparticles on the InAs (111)B surfaces are described. NW cessation at high growth temperatures or at increased input molar V/III ratios is explained via a switch-over from vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) NW growth to vapor-solid thin film growth, in contrast to previous interpretation of vapor-solid-solid growth of III-V NWs. The substrate-NW adatom exchange is also treated, and experimental distinction of two NW growth regimes depending on this exchange is demonstrated for the first time. Our results indicate that when growing extremely uniform InAs NWs, solid-phase diffusion of In adatoms on the NW sidewalls is the dominant material incorporation process with surface diffusion lengths of ˜ 1 mum. This understanding was further utilized for the growth of axial and radial InAs-InP heterostructure NWs. Polymorphism in III-V NW crystal structure is also discussed and growth

  17. 76 FR 48169 - Advancing Regulatory Science for Highly Multiplexed Microbiology/Medical Countermeasure Devices...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... Microbiology/ Medical Countermeasure Devices; Public Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... following public meeting: ``Advancing Regulatory Science for Highly Multiplexed Microbiology/Medical... multiplexed microbiology/medical countermeasure (MCM) devices, their clinical application and public...

  18. Ultraviolet-visible electroluminescence from metal-oxide-semiconductor devices with CeO{sub 2} films on silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Chunyan; Zhu, Chen; Wang, Canxing; Li, Dongsheng; Ma, Xiangyang Yang, Deren

    2015-03-15

    We report on ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) electroluminescence (EL) from metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices with the CeO{sub 2} films annealed at low temperatures. At the same injection current, the UV-Vis EL from the MOS device with the 550 °C-annealed CeO{sub 2} film is much stronger than that from the counterpart with the 450 °C-annealed CeO{sub 2} film. This is due to that the 550 °C-annealed CeO{sub 2} film contains more Ce{sup 3+} ions and oxygen vacancies. It is tentatively proposed that the recombination of the electrons in multiple oxygen-vacancy–related energy levels with the holes in Ce 4f{sup 1} energy band pertaining to Ce{sup 3+} ions leads to the UV-Vis EL.

  19. Development of an electronic device quality aluminum antimonide (AlSb) semiconductor for solar cell applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sherohman, John W; Yee, Jick Hong; Combs, III, Arthur W

    2014-11-11

    Electronic device quality Aluminum Antimonide (AlSb)-based single crystals produced by controlled atmospheric annealing are utilized in various configurations for solar cell applications. Like that of a GaAs-based solar cell devices, the AlSb-based solar cell devices as disclosed herein provides direct conversion of solar energy to electrical power.

  20. A comprehensive study of charge trapping in organic field-effect devices with promising semiconductors and different contact metals by displacement current measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisoyi, Sibani; Rödel, Reinhold; Zschieschang, Ute; Kang, Myeong Jin; Takimiya, Kazuo; Klauk, Hagen; Tiwari, Shree Prakash

    2016-02-01

    A systematic and comprehensive study on the charge-carrier injection and trapping behavior was performed using displacement current measurements in long-channel capacitors based on four promising small-molecule organic semiconductors (pentacene, DNTT, C10-DNTT and DPh-DNTT). In thin-film transistors, these semiconductors showed charge-carrier mobilities ranging from 1.0 to 7.8 cm2 V-1 s-1. The number of charges injected into and extracted from the semiconductor and the density of charges trapped in the device during each measurement were calculated from the displacement current characteristics and it was found that the density of trapped charges is very similar in all devices and of the order 1012 cm-2, despite the fact that the four semiconductors show significantly different charge-carrier mobilities. The choice of the contact metal (Au, Ag, Cu, Pd) was also found to have no significant effect on the trapping behavior.

  1. Semiconductor processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The primary thrust of the semiconductor processing is outlined. The purpose is to (1) advance the theoretical basis for bulk growth of elemental and compound semiconductors in single crystal form, and (2) to develop a new experimental approaches by which semiconductor matrices with significantly improved crystalline and chemical perfection can be obtained. The most advanced approaches to silicon crystal growth is studied. The projected research expansion, directed toward the capability of growth of 4 inch diameter silicon crystals was implemented. Both intra and interdepartmental programs are established in the areas of process metallurgy, heat transfer, mass transfer, and systems control. Solutal convection in melt growth systems is also studied.

  2. Performance of an MPI-only semiconductor device simulator on a quad socket/quad core InfiniBand platform.

    SciTech Connect

    Shadid, John Nicolas; Lin, Paul Tinphone

    2009-01-01

    This preliminary study considers the scaling and performance of a finite element (FE) semiconductor device simulator on a capacity cluster with 272 compute nodes based on a homogeneous multicore node architecture utilizing 16 cores. The inter-node communication backbone for this Tri-Lab Linux Capacity Cluster (TLCC) machine is comprised of an InfiniBand interconnect. The nonuniform memory access (NUMA) nodes consist of 2.2 GHz quad socket/quad core AMD Opteron processors. The performance results for this study are obtained with a FE semiconductor device simulation code (Charon) that is based on a fully-coupled Newton-Krylov solver with domain decomposition and multilevel preconditioners. Scaling and multicore performance results are presented for large-scale problems of 100+ million unknowns on up to 4096 cores. A parallel scaling comparison is also presented with the Cray XT3/4 Red Storm capability platform. The results indicate that an MPI-only programming model for utilizing the multicore nodes is reasonably efficient on all 16 cores per compute node. However, the results also indicated that the multilevel preconditioner, which is critical for large-scale capability type simulations, scales better on the Red Storm machine than the TLCC machine.

  3. New Source Heterojunction Structures with Relaxed/Strained Semiconductors for Quasi-Ballistic Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Transistors: Relaxation Technique of Strained Substrates and Design of Sub-10 nm Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomohisa Mizuno,; Naoki Mizoguchi,; Kotaro Tanimoto,; Tomoaki Yamauchi,; Mitsuo Hasegawa,; Toshiyuki Sameshima,; Tsutomu Tezuka,

    2010-04-01

    We have studied new abrupt-source-relaxed/strained semiconductor-heterojunction structures for quasi-ballistic complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices, by locally controlling the strain of a single strained semiconductor. Appling O+ ion implantation recoil energy to the strained semiconductor/buried oxide interface, Raman analysis of the strained layers indicates that we have successfully relaxed both strained-Si-on-insulator (SSOI) substrates for n-MOS and SiGe-on-insulator (SGOI) substrates for p-MOS without polycrystallizing the semiconductor layers, by optimizing O+ ion implantation conditions. As a result, it is considered that the source conduction and valence band offsets Δ EC and Δ EV can be realized by the energy difference in the source Si/channel-strained Si and the source-relaxed SiGe/channel-strained SiGe layers, respectively. The device simulator, considering the tunneling effects at the source heterojunction, shows that the transconductance of sub-10 nm source heterojunction MOS transistors (SHOT) continues to increase with increasing Δ EC. Therefore, SHOT structures with the novel source heterojunction are very promising for future quasi-ballistic CMOS devices.

  4. Methods of producing strain in a semiconductor waveguide and related devices

    DOEpatents

    Cox, Johathan Albert; Rakich, Peter Thomas

    2016-02-16

    Quasi-phase matched (QPM), semiconductor photonic waveguides include periodically-poled alternating first and second sections. The first sections exhibit a high degree of optical coupling (abbreviated "X.sup.2"), while the second sections have a low X.sup.2. The alternating first and second sections may comprise high-strain and low-strain sections made of different material states (such as crystalline and amorphous material states) that exhibit high and low X.sup.2 properties when formed on a particular substrate, and/or strained corrugated sections of different widths. The QPM semiconductor waveguides may be implemented as silicon-on-insulator (SOI), or germanium-on-silicon structures compatible with standard CMOS processes, or as silicon-on-sapphire (SOS) structures.

  5. Methods and devices for optimizing the operation of a semiconductor optical modulator

    DOEpatents

    Zortman, William A.

    2015-07-14

    A semiconductor-based optical modulator includes a control loop to control and optimize the modulator's operation for relatively high data rates (above 1 GHz) and/or relatively high voltage levels. Both the amplitude of the modulator's driving voltage and the bias of the driving voltage may be adjusted using the control loop. Such adjustments help to optimize the operation of the modulator by reducing the number of errors present in a modulated data stream.

  6. Design of advanced ultrasonic transducers for welding devices.

    PubMed

    Parrini, L

    2001-11-01

    A new high frequency ultrasonic transducer has been conceived, designed, prototyped, and tested. In the design phase, an advanced approach was used and established. The method is based on an initial design estimate obtained with finite element method (FEM) simulations. The simulated ultrasonic transducers and resonators are then built and characterized experimentally through laser interferometry and electrical resonance spectra. The comparison of simulation results with experimental data allows the parameters of FEM models to be adjusted and optimized. The achieved FEM simulations exhibit a remarkably high predictive potential and allow full control of the vibration behavior of the transducer. The new transducer is mounted on a wire bonder with a flange whose special geometry was calculated by means of FEM simulations. This flange allows the transducer to be attached on the wire bonder, not only in longitudinal nodes, but also in radial nodes of the ultrasonic field excited in the horn. This leads to a total decoupling of the transducer to the wire bonder, which has not been achieved so far. The new approach to mount ultrasonic transducers on a welding device is of major importance, not only for wire bonding, but also for all high power ultrasound applications and has been patented. PMID:11800125

  7. Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device

    SciTech Connect

    Mekhiche, Mike; Dufera, Hiz; Montagna, Deb

    2012-10-29

    The project conducted under DOE contract DE‐EE0002649 is defined as the Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Converter. The overall project is split into a seven‐stage, gated development program. The work conducted under the DOE contract is OPT Stage Gate III work and a portion of Stage Gate IV work of the seven stage product development process. The project effort includes Full Concept Design & Prototype Assembly Testing building on our existing PowerBuoy technology to deliver a device with much increased power delivery. Scaling‐up from 150kW to 500kW power generating capacity required changes in the PowerBuoy design that addressed cost reduction and mass manufacturing by implementing a Design for Manufacturing (DFM) approach. The design changes also focused on reducing PowerBuoy Installation, Operation and Maintenance (IO&M) costs which are essential to reducing the overall cost of energy. In this design, changes to the core PowerBuoy technology were implemented to increase capability and reduce both CAPEX and OPEX costs. OPT conceptually envisaged moving from a floating structure to a seabed structure. The design change from a floating structure to seabed structure would provide the implementation of stroke‐ unlimited Power Take‐Off (PTO) which has a potential to provide significant power delivery improvement and transform the wave energy industry if proven feasible.

  8. High precision two-dimensional strain mapping in semiconductor devices using nanobeam electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, Frieder H.

    2014-06-30

    A classical method used to characterize the strain in modern semiconductor devices is nanobeam diffraction (NBD) in the transmission electron microscope. One challenge for this method lies in the fact that the smaller the beam becomes, the more difficult it becomes to analyze the resulting diffraction spot pattern. We show that a carefully designed fitting algorithm enables us to reduce the sampling area for the diffraction patterns on the camera chip dramatically (∼1/16) compared to traditional settings without significant loss of precision. The resulting lower magnification of the spot pattern permits the presence of an annular dark field detector, which in turn makes the recording of images for drift correction during NBD acquisition possible. Thus, the reduced sampling size allows acquisition of drift corrected NBD 2D strain maps of up to 3000 pixels while maintaining a precision of better than 0.07%. As an example, we show NBD strain maps of a modern field effect transistor (FET) device. A special filtering feature used in the analysis makes it is possible to measure strain in silicon devices even in the presence of other crystalline materials covering the probed area, which is important for the characterization of the next generation of devices (Fin-FETs).

  9. An efficient, simple, and precise way to map strain with nanometer resolution in semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Christoph T.; Özdöl, V. Burak; van Aken, Peter A.

    2010-03-01

    We report on the development of the dark-field inline electron holography technique and its application to map strain in technologically relevant structures, using as an example the strain-engineered gate channel in a 45 nm metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor structure. We show that this technique combines a large field of view of several micrometers with high precision (better than 0.01%), high spatial resolution (better than 1 nm), and very loose experimental requirements not possible with any other technique currently available.

  10. Defect state passivation at III-V oxide interfaces for complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.; Guo, Y.; Lin, L.

    2015-03-21

    The paper describes the reasons for the greater difficulty in the passivation of interface defects of III–V semiconductors like GaAs. These include the more complex reconstructions of the starting surface which already possess defect configurations, the possibility of injecting As antisites into the substrate which give rise to gap states, and the need to avoid As-As bonds and As dangling bonds which give rise to gap states. The nature of likely defect configurations in terms of their electronic structure is described. The benefits of diffusion barriers and surface nitridation are discussed.

  11. 3D-profile measurement of advanced semiconductor features by reference metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamasu, Kiyoshi; Iwaki, Yuuki; Takahashi, Satoru; Kawada, Hiroki; Ikota, Masami; Lorusso, Gian F.; Horiguchi, Naoto

    2016-03-01

    A method of sub-nanometer uncertainty for the 3D-profile measurement using TEM (Transmission Electron Microscope) images is proposed to standardize 3D-profile measurement through reference metrology. The proposed method has been validated for profiles of Si lines, photoresist features and advanced-FinFET (Fin-shaped Field-Effect Transistor) features in our previous investigations. However, efficiency of 3D-profile measurement using TEM is limited by measurement time including processing of the sample. In this article, we demonstrate a novel on-wafer 3D-profile metrology as "FIB-to-CDSEM method" with FIB (Focused Ion Beam) slope cut and CD-SEM (Critical Dimension Secondary Electron Microscope) measuring. Using the method, a few micrometer wide on a wafer is coated and cut by 45 degree slope using FIB tool. Then, the wafer is transferred to CD-SEM to measure the cross section image by top down CD-SEM measurement. We apply FIB-to-CDSEM method to CMOS sensor device. 3D-profile and 3D-profile parameters such as top line width and side wall angles of CMOS sensor device are evaluated. The 3D-profile parameters also are measured by TEM images as reference metrology. We compare the 3D-profile parameters by TEM method and FIB-to-CDSEM method. The average values and correlations on the wafer are agreed well between TEM and FIB-to- CDSEM methods.

  12. Comparison of Wide-Bandgap Semiconductors for Power Electronics Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ozpineci, B.

    2004-01-02

    Recent developmental advances have allowed silicon (Si) semiconductor technology to approach the theoretical limits of the Si material; however, power device requirements for many applications are at a point that the present Si-based power devices cannot handle. The requirements include higher blocking voltages, switching frequencies, efficiency, and reliability. To overcome these limitations, new semiconductor materials for power device applications are needed. For high power requirements, wide-bandgap semiconductors like silicon carbide (SiC), gallium nitride (GaN), and diamond, with their superior electrical properties, are likely candidates to replace Si in the near future. This report compares wide-bandgap semiconductors with respect to their promise and applicability for power applications and predicts the future of power device semiconductor materials.

  13. Modeling direct band-to-band tunneling: From bulk to quantum-confined semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Carrillo-Nuñez, H.; Ziegler, A.; Luisier, M.; Schenk, A.

    2015-06-21

    A rigorous framework to study direct band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) in homo- and hetero-junction semiconductor nanodevices is introduced. An interaction Hamiltonian coupling conduction and valence bands (CVBs) is derived using a multiband envelope method. A general form of the BTBT probability is then obtained from the linear response to the “CVBs interaction” that drives the system out of equilibrium. Simple expressions in terms of the one-electron spectral function are developed to compute the BTBT current in two- and three-dimensional semiconductor structures. Additionally, a two-band envelope equation based on the Flietner model of imaginary dispersion is proposed for the same purpose. In order to characterize their accuracy and differences, both approaches are compared with full-band, atomistic quantum transport simulations of Ge, InAs, and InAs-Si Esaki diodes. As another numerical application, the BTBT current in InAs-Si nanowire tunnel field-effect transistors is computed. It is found that both approaches agree with high accuracy. The first one is considerably easier to conceive and could be implemented straightforwardly in existing quantum transport tools based on the effective mass approximation to account for BTBT in nanodevices.

  14. A bio-inspired memory device based on interfacing Physarum polycephalum with an organic semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Romeo, Agostino; Dimonte, Alice; Tarabella, Giuseppe; D’Angelo, Pasquale E-mail: iannotta@imem.cnr.it; Erokhin, Victor; Iannotta, Salvatore E-mail: iannotta@imem.cnr.it

    2015-01-01

    The development of devices able to detect and record ion fluxes is a crucial point in order to understand the mechanisms that regulate communication and life of organisms. Here, we take advantage of the combined electronic and ionic conduction properties of a conducting polymer to develop a hybrid organic/living device with a three-terminal configuration, using the Physarum polycephalum Cell (PPC) slime mould as a living bio-electrolyte. An over-oxidation process induces a conductivity switch in the polymer, due to the ionic flux taking place at the PPC/polymer interface. This behaviour endows a current-depending memory effect to the device.

  15. Development and fabrication of improved power transistor switches. [fabrication and manufacturing of semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hower, P. L.; Chu, C. K.

    1976-01-01

    A new class of high-voltage power transistors has been achieved by adapting present interdigitated thyristor processing techniques to the fabrication of NPN Si transistors. Present devices are 2.3 cm in diameter. The electrical performance obtained is consistent with the predictions of an optimum design theory specifically developed for power switching transistors. The forward safe operating area of the experimental transistors shows a significant improvement over commercially available devices. The report describes device design, wafer processing, and various measurements which include dc characteristics, forward and reverse second breakdown limits, and switching times.

  16. Point-of-care (POC) devices by means of advanced MEMS.

    PubMed

    Karsten, Stanislav L; Tarhan, Mehmet C; Kudo, Lili C; Collard, Dominique; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have become an invaluable technology to advance the development of point-of-care (POC) devices for diagnostics and sample analyses. MEMS can transform sophisticated methods into compact and cost-effective microdevices that offer numerous advantages at many levels. Such devices include microchannels, microsensors, etc., that have been applied to various miniaturized POC products. Here we discuss some of the recent advances made in the use of MEMS devices for POC applications. PMID:26459443

  17. Glass-to-metal bonding process improves stability and performance of semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trent, R. L.

    1970-01-01

    Anodic bonding of glass coverslips to photodiodes and photovoltaic devices eliminates the need for adhesive. The process requires relatively low temperatures /less than 560 degrees C/ and the metals and glass remain solid throughout the bonding process.

  18. CdSe Nanowire-Based Flexible Devices: Schottky Diodes, Metal-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors, and Inverters.

    PubMed

    Jin, Weifeng; Zhang, Kun; Gao, Zhiwei; Li, Yanping; Yao, Li; Wang, Yilun; Dai, Lun

    2015-06-24

    Novel CdSe nanowire (NW)-based flexible devices, including Schottky diodes, metal-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MESFETs), and inverters, have been fabricated and investigated. The turn-on voltage of a typical Schottky diode is about 0.7 V, and the rectification ratio is larger than 1 × 10(7). The threshold voltage, on/off current ratio, subthreshold swing, and peak transconductance of a typical MESFET are about -0.3 V, 4 × 10(5), 78 mV/dec, and 2.7 μS, respectively. The inverter, constructed with two MESFETs, exhibits clear inverting behavior with the gain to be about 28, 34, and 38, at the supply voltages (V(DD)) of 3, 5, and 7 V, respectively. The inverter also shows good dynamic behavior. The rising and falling times of the output signals are about 0.18 and 0.09 ms, respectively, under 1000 Hz square wave signals input. The performances of the flexible devices are stable and reliable under different bending conditions. Our work demonstrates these flexible NW-based Schottky diodes, MESFETs, and inverters are promising candidate components for future portable transparent nanoelectronic devices. PMID:26061530

  19. Electroluminescence from metal-oxide-semiconductor devices with erbium-doped CeO2 films on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Chunyan; Zhu, Chen; Wang, Canxing; Gao, Yuhan; Ma, Xiangyang; Yang, Deren

    2015-04-01

    We report on erbium (Er)-related electroluminescence (EL) in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) from metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices with Er-doped CeO2 (CeO2:Er) films on silicon. The onset voltage of such EL under either forward or reverse bias is smaller than 10 V. Moreover, the EL quenching can be avoidable for the CeO2:Er-based MOS devices. Analysis on the current-voltage characteristic of the device indicates that the electron transportation at the EL-enabling voltages under either forward or reverse bias is dominated by trap-assisted tunneling mechanism. Namely, electrons in n+-Si/ITO can tunnel into the conduction band of CeO2 host via defect states at sufficiently high forward/reverse bias voltages. Then, a fraction of such electrons are accelerated by electric field to become hot electrons, which impact-excite the Er3+ ions, thus leading to characteristic emissions. It is believed that this work has laid the foundation for developing viable silicon-based emitters using CeO2:Er films.

  20. Irradiate-anneal screening of total dose effects in semiconductor devices. [radiation hardening of spacecraft components of Mariner spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, A. G.; Price, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    An extensive investigation of irradiate-anneal (IRAN) screening against total dose radiation effects was carried out as part of a program to harden the Mariner Jupiter/Saturn 1977 (MJS'77) spacecraft to survive the Jupiter radiation belts. The method consists of irradiating semiconductor devices with Cobalt-60 to a suitable total dose under representative bias conditions and of separating the parts in the undesired tail of the distribution from the bulk of the parts by means of a predetermined acceptance limit. The acceptable devices are then restored close to their preirradiation condition by annealing them at an elevated temperature. IRAN was used when lot screen methods were impracticable due to lack of time, and when members of a lot showed a diversity of radiation response. The feasibility of the technique was determined by testing of a number of types of linear bipolar integrated circuits, analog switches, n-channel JFETS and bipolar transistors. Based on the results of these experiments a number of device types were selected for IRAN of flight parts in the MJS'77 spacecraft systems. The part types, screening doses, acceptance criteria, number of parts tested and rejected as well as the program steps are detailed.

  1. Electroluminescence from metal-oxide-semiconductor devices with erbium-doped CeO{sub 2} films on silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Chunyan; Zhu, Chen; Wang, Canxing; Gao, Yuhan; Ma, Xiangyang Yang, Deren

    2015-04-06

    We report on erbium (Er)-related electroluminescence (EL) in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) from metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices with Er-doped CeO{sub 2} (CeO{sub 2}:Er) films on silicon. The onset voltage of such EL under either forward or reverse bias is smaller than 10 V. Moreover, the EL quenching can be avoidable for the CeO{sub 2}:Er-based MOS devices. Analysis on the current-voltage characteristic of the device indicates that the electron transportation at the EL-enabling voltages under either forward or reverse bias is dominated by trap-assisted tunneling mechanism. Namely, electrons in n{sup +}-Si/ITO can tunnel into the conduction band of CeO{sub 2} host via defect states at sufficiently high forward/reverse bias voltages. Then, a fraction of such electrons are accelerated by electric field to become hot electrons, which impact-excite the Er{sup 3+} ions, thus leading to characteristic emissions. It is believed that this work has laid the foundation for developing viable silicon-based emitters using CeO{sub 2}:Er films.

  2. Materials and device design with III-V and II-VI compound-based diluted magnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi; Sato, Kazunori

    2002-03-01

    Since the discovery of the carrier induced ferromagnetism in (In, Mn)As and (Ga, Mn)As, diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) have been of much interest from the industrial viewpoint because of their potentiality as a new functional material (spintronics). In this paper, the magnetism in DMS is investigated based on the first principles calculations, and materials and device design with the DMS is proposed toward the spintronics. The electronic structure is calculated by the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method combined with the coherent potential approximation based on the local spin density approximation. We calculate the electronic structure of ferromagnetic and spin-glass DMS, and total energy difference between them is calculated to estimate whether the ferromagnetic state is stable or not. It is shown that V-, Cr- and Mn-doped III-V compounds, V- and Cr-doped II-VI compounds and Fe-, Co- and Ni-doped ZnO are promising candidates for a high-Curie temperature ferromagnet. A chemical trend in the ferromagnetism is well understood based on the double exchange mechanism [1]. Based upon this material design, some prototypes of the spintronics devices, such as a spin-FET, a photo-induced-magnetic memory and a coherent-spin-infection device, are proposed. [1] K. Sato and H. Katayama-Yoshida, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 39 (2000) L555, 40 (2001) L334, L485 and L651.

  3. Semiconductor Nanowire Light-Emitting Diodes Grown on Metal: A Direction Toward Large-Scale Fabrication of Nanowire Devices.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, A T M Golam; Carnevale, Santino D; Yang, Fan; Kent, Thomas F; Jamison, John J; McComb, David W; Myers, Roberto C

    2015-10-28

    Bottom-up nanowires are attractive for realizing semiconductor devices with extreme heterostructures because strain relaxation through the nanowire sidewalls allows the combination of highly lattice mismatched materials without creating dislocations. The resulting nanowires are used to fabricate light-emitting diodes (LEDs), lasers, solar cells, and sensors. However, expensive single crystalline substrates are commonly used as substrates for nanowire heterostructures as well as for epitaxial devices, which limits the manufacturability of nanowire devices. Here, nanowire LEDs directly grown and electrically integrated on metal are demonstrated. Optical and structural measurements reveal high-quality, vertically aligned GaN nanowires on molybdenum and titanium films. Transmission electron microscopy confirms the composition variation in the polarization-graded AlGaN nanowire LEDs. Blue to green electroluminescence is observed from InGaN quantum well active regions, while GaN active regions exhibit ultraviolet emission. These results demonstrate a pathway for large-scale fabrication of solid state lighting and optoelectronics on metal foils or sheets. PMID:26307552

  4. A Low-Leakage Epitaxial High-κ Gate Oxide for Germanium Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Devices.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chengqing; McDaniel, Martin D; Jiang, Aiting; Posadas, Agham; Demkov, Alexander A; Ekerdt, John G; Yu, Edward T

    2016-03-01

    Germanium (Ge)-based metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors are a promising candidate for high performance, low power electronics at the 7 nm technology node and beyond. However, the availability of high quality gate oxide/Ge interfaces that provide low leakage current density and equivalent oxide thickness (EOT), robust scalability, and acceptable interface state density (Dit) has emerged as one of the most challenging hurdles in the development of such devices. Here we demonstrate and present detailed electrical characterization of a high-κ epitaxial oxide gate stack based on crystalline SrHfO3 grown on Ge (001) by atomic layer deposition. Metal-oxide-Ge capacitor structures show extremely low gate leakage, small and scalable EOT, and good and reducible Dit. Detailed growth strategies and postgrowth annealing schemes are demonstrated to reduce Dit. The physical mechanisms behind these phenomena are studied and suggest approaches for further reduction of Dit. PMID:26859048

  5. Boron Arsenide and Boron Phosphide for High Temperature and Luminescent Devices. [semiconductor devices - crystal growth/crystal structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    The crystal growth of boron arsenide and boron phosphide in the form of bulk crystals and epitaxial layers on suitable substrates is discussed. The physical, chemical, and electrical properties of the crystals and epitaxial layers are examined. Bulk crystals of boron arsenide were prepared by the chemical transport technique, and their carrier concentration and Hall mobility were measured. The growth of boron arsenide crystals from high temperature solutions was attempted without success. Bulk crystals of boron phosphide were also prepared by chemical transport and solution growth techniques. Techniques required for the fabrication of boron phosphide devices such as junction shaping, diffusion, and contact formation were investigated. Alloying techniques were developed for the formation of low-resistance ohmic contacts to boron phosphide. Four types of boron phosphide devices were fabricated: (1) metal-insulator-boron phosphide structures, (2) Schottky barriers; (3) boron phosphide-silicon carbide heterojunctions; and (4) p-n homojunctions. Easily visible red electroluminescence was observed from both epitaxial and solution grown p-n junctions.

  6. Further improved algorithm for the solution of the nonlinear Poisson equation in semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouwerling, G. J. L.

    1989-12-01

    This paper gives a concise overview of some existing methods for the solution of the nonlinear Poisson equation in semiconductors. A method for the solution of this equation was recently proposed in this journal by I. D. Mayergoyz [J. Appl. Phys. 59, 195 (1986)]. Soon afterwards, an improved version was described by W. Keller [J. Appl. Phys. 61, 5189 (1987)]. Both methods are classified within the perspective of the existing methods. Moreover, Keller's method is further improved by the introduction of scaled variables and by using red-black ordening to allow for overrelaxation. All advantages of the two methods are maintained. An illustrative example shows an improvement in solution speed of at least a factor of 5.6.

  7. Electrical Breakdown and Lock-On in Photoconductive Semiconductor Switch (PCSS) Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjalmarson, Harold; Kambour, Kenneth; Zutavern, Fred; Myles, Charley

    2008-03-01

    Optically-triggered, high-power photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS's) using semi-insulating GaAs are being developed at Sandia Labs. These switches carry current in high carrier-density filaments. The properties of these filaments can be explained by redistribution of carrier energy caused by carrier-carrier scattering within the filament. This process enhances the impact ionization rate thus allowing these filaments to be sustained by relatively low fields, a process called lock-on. For GaAs, the sustaining field is approximately 4.5 kV/cm. For this talk, the physics mechanisms for lock-on and high-field electrical breakdown are described. Also, a continuum implementation of these physics mechanisms is used to compute the properties of these filaments. These continuum calculations are based on previous calculations in which the filament properties are computed using a Monte Carlo method to solve the steady-state Boltzmann equation.

  8. Single event upset (SEU) of semiconductor devices - A summary of JPL test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, D. K.; Price, W. E.; Malone, C. J.

    1983-01-01

    The data summarized describe single event upset (bit-flips) for 60 device types having data storage elements. The data are from 15 acceleration tests with both protons and heavier ions. Tables are included summarizing the upset threshold data and listing the devices tested for heavy ion induced bit-flip and the devices tested with protons. With regard to the proton data, it is noted that the data are often limited to one proton energy, since the tests were usually motivated by the engineering requirement of comparing similar candidate devices for a system. It is noted that many of the devices exhibited no upset for the given test conditions (the maximum fluence and the maximum proton energy Ep are given for these cases). It is believed, however, that some possibility of upset usually exists because there is a slight chance that the recoil atom may receive up to 10 to 20 MeV of recoil energy (with more energy at higher Ep).

  9. Device applications and structural and optical properties of Indigo - A biodegradable, low-cost organic semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengjun; Pisane, Kelly L.; Sierros, Konstantinos; Seehra, Mohindar S.; Korakakis, Dimitris

    2015-03-01

    Currently, memory devices based on organic materials are attracting great attention due to their simplicity in device structure, mechanical flexibility, potential for scalability, low-cost potential, low-power operation, and large capacity for data storage. In a recent paper from our group, Indigo-based nonvolatile organic write-once-read-many-times (WORM) memory device, consisting of a 100nm layer of indigo sandwiched between an indium tin oxide (ITO) cathode and an Al anode, has been reported. This device is found to be at its low resistance state (ON state) and can be switched to high resistance state (OFF state) by applying a positive bias with ON/OFF current ratio of the device being up to 1.02 × e6. A summary of these results along with the structural and optical properties of indigo powder will be reported. Analysis of x-ray diffraction shows a monoclinic structure with lattice parameters a(b)[c] = 0.924(0.577)[0.1222]nm and β =117° . Optical absorption shows a band edge at 1.70 eV with peak of absorption occurring at 1.90 eV. These results will be interpreted in terms of the HOMO-LUMO bands of Indigo.

  10. Demonstration of Y1Ba2Cu3O(7-delta) and complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor device fabrication on the same sapphire substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, M. J.; De La Houssaye, P. R.; Russell, S. D.; Garcia, G. A.; Clayton, S. R.; Ruby, W. S.; Lee, L. P.

    1993-01-01

    We report the first fabrication of active semiconductor and high-temperature superconducting devices on the same substrate. Test structures of complementary MOS transistors were fabricated on the same sapphire substrate as test structures of Y1Ba2Cu3O(7-delta) flux-flow transistors, and separately, Y1Ba2Cu3O(7-delta) superconducting quantum interference devices utilizing both biepitaxial and step-edge Josephson junctions. Both semiconductor and superconductor devices were operated at 77 K. The cofabrication of devices using these disparate yet complementary electronic technologies on the same substrate opens the door for the fabrication of true semiconductive/superconductive hybrid integrated circuits capable of exploiting the best features of each of these technologies.

  11. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES: A high-performance enhancement-mode AlGaN/GaN HEMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhihong, Feng; Shengyin, Xie; Rui, Zhou; Jiayun, Yin; Wei, Zhou; Shujun, Cai

    2010-08-01

    An enhancement-mode AlGaN/GaN HEMT with a threshold voltage of 0.35 V was fabricated by fluorine plasma treatment. The enhancement-mode device demonstrates high-performance DC characteristics with a saturation current density of 667 mA/mm at a gate bias of 4 V and a peak transconductance of 201 mS/mm at a gate bias of 0.8 V. The current-gain cut-off frequency and the maximum oscillation frequency of the enhancement-mode device with a gate length of 1 μm are 10.3 GHz and 12.5 GHz, respectively, which is comparable with the depletion-mode device. A numerical simulation supported by SIMS results was employed to give a reasonable explanation that the fluorine ions act as an acceptor trap center in the barrier layer.

  12. Impact of Air Filter Material on Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) Device Characteristics in HF Vapor Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Chih-Wen; Lou, Jen-Chung; Yeh, Ching-Fa; Hsieh, Chih-Ming; Lin, Shiuan-Jeng; Kusumi, Toshio

    2004-05-01

    Airborne molecular contamination (AMC) is becoming increasingly important as devices are scaled down to the nanometer generation. Optimum ultra low penetration air (ULPA) filter technology can eliminate AMC. In a cleanroom, however, the acid vapor generated from the cleaning process may degrade the ULPA filter, releasing AMC to the air and the surface of wafers, degrading the electrical characteristics of devices. This work proposes the new PTFE ULPA filter, which is resistant to acid vapor corrosion, to solve this problem. Experimental results demonstrate that the PTFE ULPA filter can effectively eliminate the AMC and provide a very clean cleanroom environment.

  13. Advanced methods for controlling untethered magnetic devices using rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, Arthur W., Jr.

    This dissertation presents results documenting advancements on the control of untethered magnetic devices, such as magnetic "microrobots" and magnetically actuated capsule endoscopes, motivated by problems in minimally invasive medicine. This dissertation focuses on applying rotating magnetic fields for magnetic manipulation. The contributions include advancements in the way that helical microswimmers (devices that mimic the propulsion of bacterial flagella) are controlled in the presence of gravitational forces, advancements in ways that groups of untethered magnetic devices can be differentiated and semi-independently controlled, advancements in the way that untethered magnetic device can be controlled with a single rotating permanent magnet, and an improved understanding in the nature of the magnetic force applied to an untethered device by a rotating magnet.

  14. Method for sputtering a PIN microcrystalline/amorphous silicon semiconductor device with the P and N-layers sputtered from boron and phosphorous heavily doped targets

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D.; Maruska, H. Paul

    1985-04-02

    A silicon PIN microcrystalline/amorphous silicon semiconductor device is constructed by the sputtering of N, and P layers of silicon from silicon doped targets and the I layer from an undoped target, and at least one semi-transparent ohmic electrode.

  15. Total-dose radiation effects data for semiconductor devices, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, W. E.; Martin, K. E.; Nichols, D. K.; Gauthier, M. K.; Brown, S. F.

    1982-01-01

    Volume 3 of this three-volume set provides a detailed analysis of the data in Volumes 1 and 2, most of which was generated for the Galileo Orbiter Program in support of NASA space programs. Volume 1 includes total ionizing dose radiation test data on diodes, bipolar transistors, field effect transistors, and miscellaneous discrete solid-state devices. Volume 2 includes similar data on integrated circuits and a few large-scale integrated circuits. The data of Volumes 1 and 2 are combined in graphic format in Volume 3 to provide a comparison of radiation sensitivities of devices of a given type and different manufacturer, a comparison of multiple tests for a single data code, a comparison of multiple tests for a single lot, and a comparison of radiation sensitivities vs time (date codes). All data were generated using a steady-state 2.5-MeV electron source (Dynamitron) or a Cobalt-60 gamma ray source. The data that compose Volume 3 represent 26 different device types, 224 tests, and a total of 1040 devices. A comparison of the effects of steady-state electrons and Cobat-60 gamma rays is also presented.

  16. Semiconductor diode laser material and devices with emission in visible region of the spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladany, I.; Kressel, H.

    1975-01-01

    Two alloy systems, (AlGa)As and (InGa)P, were studied for their properties relevant to obtaining laser diode operation in the visible region of the spectrum. (AlGa)As was prepared by liquid-phase epitaxy (LPE) and (InGa)P was prepared both by vapor-phase epitaxy and by liquid-phase epitaxy. Various schemes for LPE growth were applied to (InGa)P, one of which was found to be capable of producing device material. All the InGaP device work was done using vapor-phase epitaxy. The most successful devices were fabricated in (AlGa)As using heterojunction structures. At room temperature, the large optical cavity design yielded devices lasing in the red (7000 A). Because of the relatively high threshold due to the basic band structure limitation in this alloy, practical laser diode operation is presently limited to about 7300 A. At liquid-nitrogen temperature, practical continuous-wave operation was obtained at a wavelength of 6500 to 6600 A, with power emission in excess of 50 mW. The lowest pulsed lasing wavelength is 6280 A. At 223 K, lasing was obtained at 6770 A, but with high threshold currents. The work dealing with CW operation at room temperature was successful with practical operation having been achieved to about 7800 A.

  17. Reactively-sputtered zinc semiconductor films of high conductivity for heterojunction devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirn, Richard J. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A high conductivity, n-doped semiconductor film is produced from zinc, or Zn and Cd, and group VI elements selected from Se, S and Te in a reactive magnetron sputtering system having a chamber with one or two targets, a substrate holder, means for heating the substrate holder, and an electric field for ionizing gases in the chamber. Zinc or a compound of Zn and Cd is placed in the position of one of the two targets and doping material in the position of the other of the two targets. Zn and Cd may be placed in separate targets while a dopant is placed in the third target. Another possibility is to place an alloy of Zn and dopant, or Zn, Cd and dopant in one target, thus using only one target. A flow of the inert gas is ionized and directed toward said targets, while a flow of a reactant gas consisting of hydrides of the group VI elements is directed toward a substrate on the holder. The targets are biased to attract negatively ionized inert gas. The desired stochiometry for high conductivity is achieved by controlling the temperature of the substrate, and partial pressures of the gases, and the target power and total pressure of the gases in the chamber.

  18. The response of metal-oxide-semiconductor devices irradiated at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwank, James R.; Sexton, Fred W.; Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Rodgers, M. S.; Hughes, Kenneth L.

    To study the combined effects of high temperature and radiation on metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) integrated circuits (ICs), we have performed a series of experiments to characterize the response of MOS 16k static random access memories (SRAMs) irradiated at temperatures from 298 to 398 K. The irradiations were performed at dose rates approaching those of a spacebased nuclear reactor (approx. = 0.03 rad/s). Over the temperature range investigated, the failure dose of 16k SRAMs was found to decrease with increasing temperature due to complex interactions between radiation and temperature. Neither the failure mechanism nor the failure dose could be predicted from separate or independent measurements of room-temperature irradiation data and IC response preirradiation as a function of temperature. These results show that over the temperature range 298 to 398 K one cannot depend on elevated temperatures to extend the lifetime of ICs in a radiation environment. Extensive qualification tests must be performed if ICs on a space nuclear power platform are to exposed to high radiation levels in this temperature range. At temperatures much higher than 400 K, however, defect annealing can significantly increase the radiation tolerance of MOS circuits.

  19. The response of metal-oxide-semiconductor devices irradiated at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwank, James R.; Sexton, Fred W.; Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Rodgers, M. Steven; Hughes, Kenneth L.

    To study the combined effects of high temperature and radiation on metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) integrated circuits (ICs), we have performed a series of experiments to characterize the response of MOS 16k static random access memories (SRAMs) irradiated at temperatures from 298 to 398 K. The irradiations were performed at dose rates approaching those of a spacebased nuclear reactor (approx. = 0.03 rad/s). Over the temperature range investigated, the failure dose of 16k SRAMs was found to decrease with increasing temperature due to complex interactions between radiation and temperature. Neither the failure mechanism nor the failure dose could be predicted from separate or independent measurements of room-temperature irradiation data and IC response preirradiation as a function of temperature. These results show that over the temperature range 298 to 398 K one cannot depend on elevated temperatures to extend the lifetime of ICs in a radiation environment. Extensive qualification tests must be performed if ICs on a space nuclear power platform are to be exposed to high radiation levels in this temperature range. At temperatures much higher than 400 K, however, defect annealing can significantly increase the radiation tolerance of MOS circuits.

  20. Heavy ion induced Single Event Phenomena (SEP) data for semiconductor devices from engineering testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Donald K.; Huebner, Mark A.; Price, William E.; Smith, L. S.; Coss, James R.

    1988-01-01

    The accumulation of JPL data on Single Event Phenomena (SEP), from 1979 to August 1986, is presented in full report format. It is expected that every two years a supplement report will be issued for the follow-on period. This data for 135 devices expands on the abbreviated test data presented as part of Refs. (1) and (3) by including figures of Single Event Upset (SEU) cross sections as a function of beam Linear Energy Transfer (LET) when available. It also includes some of the data complied in the JPL computer in RADATA and the SPACERAD data bank. This volume encompasses bipolar and MOS (CMOS and MHNOS) device data as two broad categories for both upsets (bit-flips) and latchup. It also includes comments on less well known phenomena, such as transient upsets and permanent damage modes.

  1. Physical Modeling of Activation Energy in Organic Semiconductor Devices based on Energy and Momentum Conservations.

    PubMed

    Mao, Ling-Feng; Ning, H; Hu, Changjun; Lu, Zhaolin; Wang, Gaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Field effect mobility in an organic device is determined by the activation energy. A new physical model of the activation energy is proposed by virtue of the energy and momentum conservation equations. The dependencies of the activation energy on the gate voltage and the drain voltage, which were observed in the experiments in the previous independent literature, can be well explained using the proposed model. Moreover, the expression in the proposed model, which has clear physical meanings in all parameters, can have the same mathematical form as the well-known Meyer-Neldel relation, which lacks of clear physical meanings in some of its parameters since it is a phenomenological model. Thus it not only describes a physical mechanism but also offers a possibility to design the next generation of high-performance optoelectronics and integrated flexible circuits by optimizing device physical parameter. PMID:27103586

  2. Physical Modeling of Activation Energy in Organic Semiconductor Devices based on Energy and Momentum Conservations

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Ling-Feng; Ning, H.; Hu, Changjun; Lu, Zhaolin; Wang, Gaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Field effect mobility in an organic device is determined by the activation energy. A new physical model of the activation energy is proposed by virtue of the energy and momentum conservation equations. The dependencies of the activation energy on the gate voltage and the drain voltage, which were observed in the experiments in the previous independent literature, can be well explained using the proposed model. Moreover, the expression in the proposed model, which has clear physical meanings in all parameters, can have the same mathematical form as the well-known Meyer-Neldel relation, which lacks of clear physical meanings in some of its parameters since it is a phenomenological model. Thus it not only describes a physical mechanism but also offers a possibility to design the next generation of high-performance optoelectronics and integrated flexible circuits by optimizing device physical parameter. PMID:27103586

  3. Reliability study of opto-coupled semiconductor devices and Light Emitting Diodes (LED)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, R. C.; Weissflug, V. A.; Sisul, E. V.

    1977-01-01

    Opto-coupler and light emitting diode (LED) failure mechanisms and associated activation energies were determind from the results of environmental and accelerated lift tests of over 2,400 devices. The evaluation program included LED phototransistor opto-couplers from three sources, LED photoamplifier opto-couplers from a single source, and discrete infrared emitting LEDs from two sources. Environmental tests to evaluate device mechanical integrity included power cycling (10,000 cycles), temperature cycling (500 cycles) and a sequence of monitored shock, monitored vibration and constant acceleration. Multiple temperature operating life tests were conducted at ambient temperatures between 25 C and 200 C. Opto-couplers were operated in both the 'on' and 'off' states during life testing.

  4. Physical Modeling of Activation Energy in Organic Semiconductor Devices based on Energy and Momentum Conservations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Ling-Feng; Ning, H.; Hu, Changjun; Lu, Zhaolin; Wang, Gaofeng

    2016-04-01

    Field effect mobility in an organic device is determined by the activation energy. A new physical model of the activation energy is proposed by virtue of the energy and momentum conservation equations. The dependencies of the activation energy on the gate voltage and the drain voltage, which were observed in the experiments in the previous independent literature, can be well explained using the proposed model. Moreover, the expression in the proposed model, which has clear physical meanings in all parameters, can have the same mathematical form as the well-known Meyer-Neldel relation, which lacks of clear physical meanings in some of its parameters since it is a phenomenological model. Thus it not only describes a physical mechanism but also offers a possibility to design the next generation of high-performance optoelectronics and integrated flexible circuits by optimizing device physical parameter.

  5. Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Philip R.

    2011-09-27

    This presentation from the Water Peer Review highlights one of the program's marine and hyrokinetics device design projects to scale up the current Ocean Power Technology PowerBuoy from 150kW to 500kW.

  6. Advanced integrated safeguards using front-end-triggering devices

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, J.A.; Whitty, W.J.

    1995-12-01

    This report addresses potential uses of front-end-triggering devices for enhanced safeguards. Such systems incorporate video surveillance as well as radiation and other sensors. Also covered in the report are integration issues and analysis techniques.

  7. The Effects of Thermal Cycling on Gallium Nitride and Silicon Carbide Semiconductor Devices for Aerospace Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Electronics designed for use in NASA space missions are required to work efficiently and reliably under harsh environment conditions. These Include radiation, extreme temperatures, thermal cycling, to name a few. Preliminary data obtained on new Gallium Nitride and Silicon Carbide power devices under exposure to radiation followed by long term thermal cycling are presented. This work was done in collaboration with GSFC and JPL in support of the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program

  8. HeartWare left ventricular assist device for the treatment of advanced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hanke, Jasmin S; Rojas, Sebastian V; Avsar, Murat; Bara, Christoph; Ismail, Issam; Haverich, Axel; Schmitto, Jan D

    2016-01-01

    The importance of mechanical circulatory support in the therapy of advanced heart failure is steadily growing. The rapid developments in the field of mechanical support are characterized by continuous miniaturization and enhanced performance of the assist devices, providing increased pump durability and prolonged patient survival. The HeartWare left ventricular assist device system (HeartWare Inc., Framingham, MA, USA) is a mechanical ventricular assist device with over 8000 implantations worldwide. Compared with other available assist devices it is smaller in size and used in a broad range of patients. The possibility of minimally invasive procedures is one of the major benefits of the device - allowing implants and explants, as well as exchanges of the device with reduced surgical impact. We present here a review of the existing literature on the treatment of advanced heart failure using the HeartWare left ventricular assist device system. PMID:26597386

  9. Semiconductor photoelectrochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buoncristiani, A. M.; Byvik, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    Semiconductor photoelectrochemical reactions are investigated. A model of the charge transport processes in the semiconductor, based on semiconductor device theory, is presented. It incorporates the nonlinear processes characterizing the diffusion and reaction of charge carriers in the semiconductor. The model is used to study conditions limiting useful energy conversion, specifically the saturation of current flow due to high light intensity. Numerical results describing charge distributions in the semiconductor and its effects on the electrolyte are obtained. Experimental results include: an estimate rate at which a semiconductor photoelectrode is capable of converting electromagnetic energy into chemical energy; the effect of cell temperature on the efficiency; a method for determining the point of zero zeta potential for macroscopic semiconductor samples; a technique using platinized titanium dioxide powders and ultraviolet radiation to produce chlorine, bromine, and iodine from solutions containing their respective ions; the photoelectrochemical properties of a class of layered compounds called transition metal thiophosphates; and a technique used to produce high conversion efficiency from laser radiation to chemical energy.

  10. Off-axis electron holography with a dual-lens imaging system and its usefulness in 2-D potential mapping of semiconductor devices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Y; Kawasaki, M; Bruley, J; Gribelyuk, M; Domenicucci, A; Gaudiello, J

    2004-11-01

    A variable magnification electron holography, applicable for two-dimensional (2-D) potential mapping of semiconductor devices, employing a dual-lens imaging system is described. Imaging operation consists of a virtual image formed by the objective lens (OL) and a real image formed in a fixed imaging plane by the objective minilens. Wide variations in field of view (100-900 nm) and fringe spacing (0.7-6 nm) were obtained using a fixed biprism voltage by varying the total magnification of the dual OL system. The dual-lens system allows fringe width and spacing relative to the object to be varied roughly independently from the fringe contrast, resulting in enhanced resolution and sensitivity. The achievable fringe width and spacing cover the targets needed for devices in the semiconductor technology road map from the 350 to 45 nm node. Two-D potential maps for CMOS devices with 220 and 70 nm gate lengths were obtained. PMID:15450653

  11. Devices in the management of advanced, chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, William T.; Smith, Sakima A.

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a global phenomenon, and the overall incidence and prevalence of the condition are steadily increasing. Medical therapies have proven efficacious, but only a small number of pharmacological options are in development. When patients cease to respond adequately to optimal medical therapy, cardiac resynchronization therapy has been shown to improve symptoms, reduce hospitalizations, promote reverse remodelling, and decrease mortality. However, challenges remain in identifying the ideal recipients for this therapy. The field of mechanical circulatory support has seen immense growth since the early 2000s, and left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have transitioned over the past decade from large, pulsatile devices to smaller, more-compact, continuous-flow devices. Infections and haematological issues are still important areas that need to be addressed. Whereas LVADs were once approved only for ‘bridge to transplantation’, these devices are now used as destination therapy for critically ill patients with HF, allowing these individuals to return to the community. A host of novel strategies, including cardiac contractility modulation, implantable haemodynamic-monitoring devices, and phrenic and vagus nerve stimulation, are under investigation and might have an impact on the future care of patients with chronic HF. PMID:23229137

  12. Damage correlations in semiconductor devices exposed to gamma and high energy swift heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Pushpa, N.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana

    2015-05-15

    NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs are irradiated by different high energy swift heavy ions and {sup 60}Co gamma radiation in the dose range of 100 krad to 100 Mrad. The damage created by different heavy ions and {sup 60}Co gamma radiation in NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs have been correlated and studied in the same dose range. The recoveries in the electrical characteristics of different swift heavy ions and {sup 60}Co gamma irradiated devices have been studied after annihilation.

  13. Lanthanide impurities in wide bandgap semiconductors: A possible roadmap for spintronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caroena, G.; Machado, W. V. M.; Justo, J. F.; Assali, L. V. C.

    2013-02-01

    The electronic properties of lanthanide (from Eu to Tm) impurities in wurtzite gallium nitride and zinc oxide were investigated by first principles calculations, using an all electron methodology plus a Hubbard potential correction. The results indicated that the 4f-related energy levels remain outside the bandgap in both materials, in good agreement with a recent phenomenological model, based on experimental data. Additionally, zinc oxide doped with lanthanide impurities became an n-type material, showing a coupling between the 4f-related spin polarized states and the carriers. This coupling may generate spin polarized currents, which could lead to applications in spintronic devices.

  14. Damage correlations in semiconductor devices exposed to gamma and high energy swift heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushpa, N.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana

    2015-05-01

    NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs are irradiated by different high energy swift heavy ions and 60Co gamma radiation in the dose range of 100 krad to 100 Mrad. The damage created by different heavy ions and 60Co gamma radiation in NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs have been correlated and studied in the same dose range. The recoveries in the electrical characteristics of different swift heavy ions and 60Co gamma irradiated devices have been studied after annihilation.

  15. Method of making a high conductance ohmic junction for monolithic semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Carol R. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In order to increase the efficiency of solar cells, a monolithic stacked device is constructed comprising a plurality of solar sub-cells adjusted for different bands of radiation. The interconnection between these sub-cells has been a significant technical problem. The invention provides an interconnection which is a thin layer of high ohmic conductance material formed between the sub-cells. Such a layer tends to form beads which serve as a shorting interconnect while passing a large fraction of the radiation to the lower sub-cells and permitting lattice-matching between the sub-cells to be preserved.

  16. Method for making photovoltaic devices using oxygenated semiconductor thin film layers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, James Neil; Albin, David Scott; Feldman-Peabody, Scott; Pavol, Mark Jeffrey; Gossman, Robert Dwayne

    2014-12-16

    A method for making a photovoltaic device is presented. The method includes steps of disposing a window layer on a substrate and disposing an absorber layer on the window layer. Disposing the window layer, the absorber layer, or both layers includes introducing a source material into a deposition zone, wherein the source material comprises oxygen and a constituent of the window layer, of the absorber layer or of both layers. The method further includes step of depositing a film that comprises the constituent and oxygen.

  17. Transfer Printing of Semiconductor Nanowires with Lasing Emission for Controllable Nanophotonic Device Fabrication.

    PubMed

    Guilhabert, Benoit; Hurtado, Antonio; Jevtics, Dimitars; Gao, Qian; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati; Dawson, Martin D

    2016-04-26

    Accurate positioning and organization of indium phosphide (InP) nanowires (NWs) with lasing emission at room temperature is achieved using a nanoscale transfer printing (TP) technique. The NWs retained their lasing emission after their transfer to targeted locations on different receiving substrates (e.g., polymers, silica, and metal surfaces). The NWs were also organized into complex spatial patterns, including 1D and 2D arrays, with a controlled number of elements and dimensions. The developed TP technique enables the fabrication of bespoke nanophotonic systems using NW lasers and other NW devices as building blocks. PMID:26974392

  18. Recipient luminophoric mediums having narrow spectrum luminescent materials and related semiconductor light emitting devices and methods

    SciTech Connect

    LeToquin, Ronan P; Tong, Tao; Glass, Robert C

    2014-12-30

    Light emitting devices include a light emitting diode ("LED") and a recipient luminophoric medium that is configured to down-convert at least some of the light emitted by the LED. In some embodiments, the recipient luminophoric medium includes a first broad-spectrum luminescent material and a narrow-spectrum luminescent material. The broad-spectrum luminescent material may down-convert radiation emitted by the LED to radiation having a peak wavelength in the red color range. The narrow-spectrum luminescent material may also down-convert radiation emitted by the LED into the cyan, green or red color range.

  19. Si(C≡C)4-Based Single-Crystalline Semiconductor: Diamond-like Superlight and Superflexible Wide-Bandgap Material for the UV Photoconductive Device.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming-Jun; Cao, Xinrui; Cao, Zexing

    2016-07-01

    A wide-bandgap SiC4 semiconductor with low density and high elasticity has been designed and characterized by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and first-principles calculations. The through-space conjugation among the d orbitals of Si and the π* orbitals of ethynyl moieties can remarkably enhance the photoconductivity. This new-type superlight and superflexible semiconductor is predicted to have unique electronic, optical, and mechanical properties, and it is a quite promising material for the high-performance UV optoelectronic devices suitable for various practical demands in a complex environment. PMID:27334253

  20. MovAid- a novel device for advanced rehabilitation monitoring.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Prashant; Verma, Piyush; Gupta, Rakesh; Verma, Bhawna

    2015-08-01

    The present article introduces a new device "MovAid" which helps to measure and monitor rehabilitation. It has two main components- "MovAid device" and the "MovAid Smart Phone Application". The device connects wirelessly to the MovAid smart phone application via Bluetooth. It has electronic sensors to measure three important parameters of the patient- Angle of Joint Bent, Lift from the ground and Orientation of the limb. A mono-axis flex sensor to measure the degree of joint bent and a 3-axis accelerometer and gyroscope to measure the orientation of the limb and lift from the ground have been used. MovAid system bridges the gap between caretakers and patients, empowering both in ways never thought of before, by providing detailed and accurate data on every move. PMID:26737332

  1. Advances in optically pumped semiconductor lasers for blue emission under frequency doubling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yanbo; Wisdom, Jeffrey; Charles, John; Hyland, Patrick; Scholz, Christian; Xu, Zuntu; Lin, Yong; Weiss, Eli; Chilla, Juan; Lepert, Arnaud

    2016-03-01

    Optically pumped semiconductor lasers (OPSL) offer the advantage of excellent beam quality, wavelength agility, and high power scaling capability. In this talk we will present our recent progress of high-power, 920nm OPSLs frequency doubled to 460nm for lightshow applications. Fundamental challenges and mitigations are revealed through electrical, optical, thermal, and mechanical modeling. Results also include beam quality enhancement in addressing the competition from diode lasers.

  2. Advances in dental local anesthesia techniques and devices: An update

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Payal; Gupta, Saurabh K.; Newaskar, Vilas; Chandra, Anil

    2013-01-01

    Although local anesthesia remains the backbone of pain control in dentistry, researches are going to seek new and better means of managing the pain. Most of the researches are focused on improvement in the area of anesthetic agents, delivery devices and technique involved. Newer technologies have been developed that can assist the dentist in providing enhanced pain relief with reduced injection pain and fewer adverse effects. This overview will enlighten the practicing dentists regarding newer devices and methods of rendering pain control comparing these with the earlier used ones on the basis of research and clinical studies available. PMID:24163548

  3. Photovoltaic effect in a wide-area semiconductor-ferroelectric device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katiyar, R. K.; Kumar, A.; Morell, G.; Scott, J. F.; Katiyar, R. S.

    2011-08-01

    Millimeter-diameter planar devices of glass/ZnO:Al/BiFeO3/La0.67Sr0.33CoO3 (LSCO) heterostructures were fabricated by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) techniques. Diode-like behavior with high short-circuit current (SSC ˜ 4 mA/cm2) and open-circuit voltage (OCV ˜ 0.22 V) was obtained under the illumination of about 1% of maximum solar energy. Impedance spectroscopy revealed that electrode/dielectric interface and grain-boundary conduction are mainly responsible for the photo-current. Electrode/dielectric interface, grain boundary impedance, and low-frequency ac conductivity change by almost three orders of magnitude under weak light. Relaxation time of the photo-carriers changes from 80 ms to 96 μs suggesting that with optimal collecting instruments, one should expect currents several orders higher.

  4. Compound Semiconductor Devices for Low-Power High-Efficiency Radio Frequency Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, A.G.; Chang, P.C.; Hietala, V.M.; Sloan, L.R.

    1999-02-18

    The power consumption of Radio Frequency (RF) electronics is a significant issue for Wireless systems. Since most wireless systems are portable and thus battery operated, reductions in DC power consumption can significantly reduce the weight and/or increase the battery lifetime of the system. As transmission consumes significantly more power than reception for most Wireless applications, previous efforts have been focused on increasing the efficiency of RF power amplification. These efforts have resulted in large increases in transmit efficiencies with research-grade amplifier efficiencies approaching 100%. In this paper, they describe their efforts on reducing power consumption of reception and other small signal RF functions. Additionally, recent power efficiency measurements on InP HEMT devices for transmission are presented. This work focuses on the needs of today's typical portable Wireless systems, which operate at frequencies up to several GHz.

  5. Characterization and modeling of radiation effects NASA/MSFC semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerns, D. V., Jr.; Cook, K. B., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A literature review of the near-Earth trapped radiation of the Van Allen Belts, the radiation within the solar system resulting from the solar wind, and the cosmic radiation levels of deep space showed that a reasonable simulation of space radiation, particularly the Earth orbital environment, could be simulated in the laboratory by proton bombardment. A 3 MeV proton accelerator was used to irradiate CMOS integrated circuits fabricated from three different processes. The drain current and output voltage for three inverters was recorded as the input voltage was swept from zero to ten volts after each successive irradiation. Device parameters were extracted. Possible damage mechanisms are discussed and recommendations for improved radiation hardness are suggested.

  6. Synthesis Methods, Microscopy Characterization and Device Integration of Nanoscale Metal Oxide Semiconductors for Gas Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Vander Wal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.; Kulis, Michael J.; Hunter, Gary W.; Xu, Jennifer C.; Evans, Laura

    2009-01-01

    A comparison is made between SnO2, ZnO, and TiO2 single-crystal nanowires and SnO2 polycrystalline nanofibers for gas sensing. Both nanostructures possess a one-dimensional morphology. Different synthesis methods are used to produce these materials: thermal evaporation-condensation (TEC), controlled oxidation, and electrospinning. Advantages and limitations of each technique are listed. Practical issues associated with harvesting, purification, and integration of these materials into sensing devices are detailed. For comparison to the nascent form, these sensing materials are surface coated with Pd and Pt nanoparticles. Gas sensing tests, with respect to H2, are conducted at ambient and elevated temperatures. Comparative normalized responses and time constants for the catalyst and noncatalyst systems provide a basis for identification of the superior metal-oxide nanostructure and catalyst combination. With temperature-dependent data, Arrhenius analyses are made to determine activation energies for the catalyst-assisted systems. PMID:22408484

  7. Optical wafer metrology sensors for process-robust CD and overlay control in semiconductor device manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Boef, Arie J.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents three optical wafer metrology sensors that are used in lithography for robustly measuring the shape and position of wafers and device patterns on these wafers. The first two sensors are a level sensor and an alignment sensor that measure, respectively, a wafer height map and a wafer position before a new pattern is printed on the wafer. The third sensor is an optical scatterometer that measures critical dimension-variations and overlay after the resist has been exposed and developed. These sensors have different optical concepts but they share the same challenge that sub-nm precision is required at high throughput on a large variety of processed wafers and in the presence of unknown wafer processing variations. It is the purpose of this paper to explain these challenges in more detail and give an overview of the various solutions that have been introduced over the years to come to process-robust optical wafer metrology.

  8. Novel device-based interventional strategies for advanced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Toth, Gabor G; Vanderheyden, Marc; Bartunek, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    While heart failure is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity, our tools to provide ultimate treatment solutions are still limited. Recent developments in new devices are designed to fill this therapeutic gap. The scope of this review is to focus on two particular targets, namely (1) left ventricular geometric restoration and (2) atrial depressurization. (1) Reduction of the wall stress by shrinking the ventricular cavity has been traditionally attempted surgically. Recently, the Parachute device (CardioKinetix Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA) has been introduced to restore ventricular geometry and cardiac mechanics. The intervention aims to partition distal dysfunctional segments that are non-contributory to the ventricular mechanics and forward cardiac output. (2) Diastolic heart failure is characterized by abnormal relaxation and chamber stiffness. The main therapeutic goal achieved should be the reduction of afterload and diastolic pressure load. Recently, new catheter-based approaches were proposed to reduce left atrial pressure and ventricular decompression: the InterAtrial Shunt Device (IASD™) (Corvia Medical Inc., Tewksbury, MA, USA) and the V-Wave Shunt (V-Wave Ltd, Or Akiva, Israel). Both are designed to create a controlled atrial septal defect in symptomatic patients with heart failure. While the assist devices are aimed at end-stage heart failure, emerging device-based percutaneous or minimal invasive techniques comprise a wide spectrum of innovative concepts that target ventricular remodeling, cardiac contractility or neuro-humoral modulation. The clinical adoption is in the early stages of the initial feasibility and safety studies, and clinical evidence needs to be gathered in appropriately designed clinical trials. PMID:26966444

  9. Novel device-based interventional strategies for advanced heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Vanderheyden, Marc; Bartunek, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    While heart failure is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity, our tools to provide ultimate treatment solutions are still limited. Recent developments in new devices are designed to fill this therapeutic gap. The scope of this review is to focus on two particular targets, namely (1) left ventricular geometric restoration and (2) atrial depressurization. (1) Reduction of the wall stress by shrinking the ventricular cavity has been traditionally attempted surgically. Recently, the Parachute device (CardioKinetix Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA) has been introduced to restore ventricular geometry and cardiac mechanics. The intervention aims to partition distal dysfunctional segments that are non-contributory to the ventricular mechanics and forward cardiac output. (2) Diastolic heart failure is characterized by abnormal relaxation and chamber stiffness. The main therapeutic goal achieved should be the reduction of afterload and diastolic pressure load. Recently, new catheter-based approaches were proposed to reduce left atrial pressure and ventricular decompression: the InterAtrial Shunt Device (IASD™) (Corvia Medical Inc., Tewksbury, MA, USA) and the V-Wave Shunt (V-Wave Ltd, Or Akiva, Israel). Both are designed to create a controlled atrial septal defect in symptomatic patients with heart failure. While the assist devices are aimed at end-stage heart failure, emerging device-based percutaneous or minimal invasive techniques comprise a wide spectrum of innovative concepts that target ventricular remodeling, cardiac contractility or neuro-humoral modulation. The clinical adoption is in the early stages of the initial feasibility and safety studies, and clinical evidence needs to be gathered in appropriately designed clinical trials. PMID:26966444

  10. A Comprehensive Microfluidics Device Construction and Characterization Module for the Advanced Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piunno, Paul A. E.; Zetina, Adrian; Chu, Norman; Tavares, Anthony J.; Noor, M. Omair; Petryayeva, Eleonora; Uddayasankar, Uvaraj; Veglio, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    An advanced analytical chemistry undergraduate laboratory module on microfluidics that spans 4 weeks (4 h per week) is presented. The laboratory module focuses on comprehensive experiential learning of microfluidic device fabrication and the core characteristics of microfluidic devices as they pertain to fluid flow and the manipulation of samples.…

  11. BORON NITRIDE CAPACITORS FOR ADVANCED POWER ELECTRONIC DEVICES

    SciTech Connect

    N. Badi; D. Starikov; C. Boney; A. Bensaoula; D. Johnstone

    2010-11-01

    This project fabricates long-life boron nitride/boron oxynitride thin film -based capacitors for advanced SiC power electronics with a broad operating temperature range using a physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique. The use of vapor deposition provides for precise control and quality material formation.

  12. Physical understanding and technological control of carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials and devices: A critique of conceptual development, state of the art and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanna, Vinod Kumar

    This paper surveys the current understanding of the diverse types of carrier lifetime in semiconductor physics, a fundamental physical parameter determining different terminal properties of semiconductor devices and a vital performance index of the degree of cleanliness of a semiconductor material or fabrication line. According as a recombination or generation mechanism is involved, two primary categories of carrier lifetime have been distinguished, namely, recombination and generation lifetimes. Depending on the recombination process, the recombination lifetime has been sub classified as phonon-assisted Shockley-Read-Hall recombination lifetime, photon-assisted radiative recombination lifetime and Auger recombination lifetime. Further from the viewpoint of injection level, lifetime has been divided into low-level and high-level types. Also, a demarcation has been made between lifetime in bulk semiconductor and lifetime in a region of semiconductor device. Both recombination and generation lifetimes or any of their classes, has been associated with a surface recombination/generation velocity and hence a surface lifetime; the measured lifetime value is the combined effect of the bulk and surface components. Quantum-mechanical theories of lifetime have been reviewed. After introduction of the Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) theory of recombination-generation statistics, the Dhariwal-Kothari-Jain modification, Dhariwal-Landsberg generalization and Landsberg's extension of SRH theory have been dealt with. Landsberg-Kousik model of dependence of carrier lifetime on doping concentration has been outlined. Beattie-Landsberg Auger recombination lifetime theory has been briefly treated followed by Auger recombination theory for non-interacting free-particle approximation and then Coulomb-enhanced Auger recombination theory based on the Hangleiter and Häcker quantum-mechanical approach. The correlation of lifetime with device properties such as the current gain of bipolar

  13. Orientation and morphology of self-assembled oligothiophene semiconductors and development of hybrid nanostructures for photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tevis, Ian David

    stability and improved photovoltaic devices were synthesized using titanium tetrafluoride hydrolysis. Straight perpendicular pores in titanium dioxide were produced by a pattern transfer method from porous anodic aluminum oxide. Films embossed on fluorine-doped tin oxide had pores 30 nm in diameter and 500 nm deep to give a stable structure for housing a p-type organic semiconductor with efficient exciton splitting and light adsorption. Hybrid films could be produced in one step by mineralizing cationic surfactants with titanium dioxide to produce interpenetrating domains of organic and anatase titanium dioxide perpendicular to a transparent conducting electrode.

  14. Optical and electrical characterization of high resistivity semiconductors for constant-bias microbolometer devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint John, David B.

    The commercial market for uncooled infrared imaging devices has expanded in the last several decades, following the declassification of pulse-biased microbolometer-based focal plane arrays (FPAs) using vanadium oxide as the sensing material. In addition to uncooled imaging platforms based on vanadium oxide, several constant-bias microbolometer FPAs have been developed using doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) as the active sensing material. While a-Si:H and the broader Si1-xGex:H system have been studied within the context of photovoltaic (PV) devices, only recently have these materials been studied with the purpose of qualifying and optimizing them for potential use in microbolometer applications, which demand thinner films deposited onto substrates different than those used in PV. The behavior of Ge:H is of particular interest for microbolometers due to its intrinsically low resistivity without the introduction of dopants, which alter the growth behavior and frustrate any attempt to address the merits of protocrystalline a-Ge:H. This work reports the optical, microstructural, and electrical characterization and qualification of a variety of Si:H, Si1-xGex:H, and Ge:H films deposited using a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process, including a-Ge:H films which exhibit high TCR (4-6 -%/K) and low 1/f noise at resistivities of interest for microbolometers (4000 -- 6000 O cm). Thin film deposition has been performed simultaneously with real-time optical characterization of the growth evolution dynamics, providing measurement of optical properties and surface roughness evolutions relevant to controlling the growth process for deliberate variations in film microstructure. Infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry has been used to characterize the Si-H and Ge-H absorption modes allowing assessment of the hydrogen content and local bonding behavior in thinner films than measured traditionally. This method allows IR absorption analysis of hydrogen

  15. Studies of the Effects of Side Walls on VLSI Semiconductor Devices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xin Sheng

    1990-08-01

    Properties and effects of side walls in very large scale integrated (VLSI) devices are explored and studied. Many side wall related properties, such as damage on side walls caused by reactive ion etching (RIE) and ion implantation, impurity diffusion in from side walls, segregation of atoms to side walls, and side wall heat absorption, are investigated and found to be significant. Properties of the side walls are compared to those of a horizontal surface. The wake potential of a fast charged particle is derived for an atomic system using a first-order quantum -mechanical perturbation theory. The atomic Coulomb excitation cross sections of the target atoms by this wake potential are then derived and found to be large. Numerical results for a model system of condensed atomic hydrogen show that the wake potential is important and should be included in calculating the atomic Coulomb excitation cross sections in condensed matter. The wake potential along the path of a fast charged particle is also calculated for the case of hydrogen 1s 2s and 2p transitions without a cutoff parameter. A computer program has been written to simulate the RBS spectrum from stripes that are similar to VLSI device components. The simulation fits experimental data well and can be used to determine diffusion in horizontal directions. It also provides an accurate way of measuring angle of the stripe side walls. The charged particle stopping power change due to the transition to the superconducting state is estimated and measured. The change of stopping power depends on the energy gap of the superconductor, and may be measurable for low energy charged particles. The relative stopping power difference of a 1 MeV proton between the superconducting and normal states of polycrystalline YBa_2 Cu_3O_7 at 77K was measured to be 0.06 +/- 0.14%. The hydrogen concentration in CVD P glass, CVD TEOS oxide, phosphorus doped TEOS oxide, plasma enhanced CVD oxide, low pressure CVD nitride and plasma enhanced

  16. Advanced investigation of two-phase charge-coupled devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosonocky, W. F.; Carnes, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The performance of experimental two phase, charge-coupled shift registers constructed using polysilicon gates overlapped by aluminum gates was studied. Shift registers with 64, 128, and 500 stages were built and operated. Devices were operated at the maximum clock frequency of 20 MHz. Loss per transfer of less than .0001 was demonstrated for fat zero operation. The effect upon transfer efficiency of various structural and materials parameters was investigated including substrate orientation, resistivity, and conductivity type; channel width and channel length; and method of channel confinement. Operation of the devices with and without fat zero was studied as well as operation in the complete charge transfer mode and the bias charge, or bucket brigade mode.

  17. Real-time and on-site γ-ray radiation response testing system for semiconductor devices and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Yifei; Zhao, Ce Zhou; Qi, Yanfei; Lam, Sang; Zhao, Chun; Lu, Qifeng; Cai, Yutao; Mitrovic, Ivona Z.; Taylor, Stephen; Chalker, Paul R.

    2016-04-01

    The construction of a turnkey real-time and on-site radiation response testing system for semiconductor devices is reported. Components of an on-site radiation response probe station, which contains a 1.11 GBq Cs137 gamma (γ)-ray source, and equipment of a real-time measurement system are described in detail for the construction of the whole system. The real-time measurement system includes a conventional capacitance-voltage (C-V) and stress module, a pulse C-V and stress module, a conventional current-voltage (I-V) and stress module, a pulse I-V and stress module, a DC on-the-fly (OTF) module and a pulse OTF module. Electrical characteristics of MOS capacitors or MOSFET devices are measured by each module integrated in the probe station under continuous γ-ray exposure and the measurement results are presented. The dose rates of different gate dielectrics are calculated by a novel calculation model based on the Cs137 γ-ray source placed in the probe station. For the sake of operators' safety, an equivalent dose rate of 70 nSv/h at a given operation distance is indicated by a dose attenuation model in the experimental environment. HfO2 thin films formed by atomic layer deposition are employed to investigate the radiation response of the high-κ material by using the conventional C-V and pulse C-V modules. The irradiation exposure of the sample is carried out with a dose rate of 0.175 rad/s and ±1 V bias in the radiation response testing system. Analysis of flat-band voltage shifts (ΔVFB) of the MOS capacitors suggests that the on-site and real-time/pulse measurements detect more serious degradation of the HfO2 thin films compared with the off-site irradiation and conventional measurement techniques.

  18. Enhanced quality thin film Cu(In,Ga)Se[sub 2] for semiconductor device applications by vapor-phase recrystallization

    DOEpatents

    Tuttle, J.R.; Contreras, M.A.; Noufi, R.; Albin, D.S.

    1994-10-18

    Enhanced quality thin films of Cu[sub w](In,Ga[sub y])Se[sub z] for semiconductor device applications are fabricated by initially forming a Cu-rich, phase-separated compound mixture comprising Cu(In,Ga):Cu[sub x]Se on a substrate to form a large-grain precursor and then converting the excess Cu[sub x]Se to Cu(In,Ga)Se[sub 2] by exposing it to an activity of In and/or Ga, either in vapor In and/or Ga form or in solid (In,Ga)[sub y]Se[sub z]. Alternatively, the conversion can be made by sequential deposition of In and/or Ga and Se onto the phase-separated precursor. The conversion process is preferably performed in the temperature range of about 300--600 C, where the Cu(In,Ga)Se[sub 2] remains solid, while the excess Cu[sub x]Se is in a liquid flux. The characteristic of the resulting Cu[sub w](In,Ga)[sub y]Se[sub z] can be controlled by the temperature. Higher temperatures, such as 500--600 C, result in a nearly stoichiometric Cu(In,Ga)Se[sub 2], whereas lower temperatures, such as 300--400 C, result in a more Cu-poor compound, such as the Cu[sub z](In,Ga)[sub 4]Se[sub 7] phase. 7 figs.

  19. Enhanced quality thin film Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2 for semiconductor device applications by vapor-phase recrystallization

    DOEpatents

    Tuttle, John R.; Contreras, Miguel A.; Noufi, Rommel; Albin, David S.

    1994-01-01

    Enhanced quality thin films of Cu.sub.w (In,Ga.sub.y)Se.sub.z for semiconductor device applications are fabricated by initially forming a Cu-rich, phase-separated compound mixture comprising Cu(In,Ga):Cu.sub.x Se on a substrate to form a large-grain precursor and then converting the excess Cu.sub.x Se to Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2 by exposing it to an activity of In and/or Ga, either in vapor In and/or Ga form or in solid (In,Ga).sub.y Se.sub.z. Alternatively, the conversion can be made by sequential deposition of In and/or Ga and Se onto the phase-separated precursor. The conversion process is preferably performed in the temperature range of about 300.degree.-600.degree. C., where the Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2 remains solid, while the excess Cu.sub.x Se is in a liquid flux. The characteristic of the resulting Cu.sub.w (In,Ga).sub.y Se.sub.z can be controlled by the temperature. Higher temperatures, such as 500.degree.-600.degree. C., result in a nearly stoichiometric Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2, whereas lower temperatures, such as 300.degree.-400.degree. C., result in a more Cu-poor compound, such as the Cu.sub.z (In,Ga).sub.4 Se.sub.7 phase.

  20. The use of perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology to determine fine leaks in hermeticity testing of semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, R.N.

    1991-05-01

    The BNL-developed perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology includes a rapid-response real-time (5-second) analyzer (COPS) which can detect PFT concentrations as low as 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} mL/mL and a concentrating analyzer (DTA) which can measure down to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} mL of PFT--separately quantifying up to 4 PFTs in a 6-min cycle time or less. Based on this technology, experimental leak- rate design concepts are proposed for determining the effectiveness (hermeticity) of the seal of semiconductor devices with internal cavities from 0.01 to 1 mL. The concept is based on pressurizing with PFT-containing air for 60 seconds, purging with PFT-free air for 60 seconds, pressure pulsing with air or He to extract the PFT leaked into the internal volume, and finally detecting the PFT vapor concentration with one of the two instruments. The COPS analyzer can quantify gross leaks from 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} mL/s in just 3 minutes for the complete test. The more-sensitive concentrating analyzer (DTA) can quantify fine leaks from 0.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} mL/s in just 12 minutes for the complete test; the latter procedure includes two determinations per test. 5 refs., 2 tabs.

  1. Continuous Monitoring of Electrical Activity of Pancreatic β-Cells Using Semiconductor-Based Biosensing Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Toshiya; Sugimoto, Haruyo

    2011-02-01

    The electrical activity of rat pancreatic β-cells caused by introduction of glucose was directly and noninvasively detected using a cell-based field-effect transistor (FET). Rat pancreatic β-cells were adhered to the gate sensing surface of the cell-based FET. The principle of cell-based FETs is based on the detection of charge density changes such as pH variation at the interface between the cell membrane and the gate surface. The gate surface potential of pancreatic β-cell-based FET increased continuously after introduction of glucose at a high concentration of 10 mg/ml. This result indicates that the electrical activity of β-cells was successfully monitored on the basis of pH changes, i.e., increase in the concentration of hydrogen ions, at the cell/gate interface using the pancreatic β-cell-based FET. We assume that the pH variation based on hydrogen ion accumulation at the cell/gate interface was induced by activation of respiration accompanied by insulin secretion process following glucose addition. The platform based on the field-effect devices is suitable for application in a real-time, noninvasive, and label-free detection system for cell functional analyses.

  2. Detection of ferromagnetic domain wall pinning and depinning with a semiconductor device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malec, Chris E.; Bennett, Brian R.; Johnson, Mark B.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate the detection of a ferromagnetic domain wall using a nanoscale Hall cross. A narrow permalloy wire is defined lithographically on top of a Hall cross fabricated from an InAs quantum well. The width of the Hall cross (500 nm-1 μm) is similar to the width of the ferromagnetic wire (200-500 nm), and a geometric pinning site is fabricated in the ferromagnetic wire to trap a domain wall within the area of the Hall cross. The devices provide a signal that is often the same order of magnitude as the offset Hall voltage when a domain wall is located above the Hall cross, and may be useful for memory applications. Different geometries for the Hall cross and ferromagnetic wire are tested, and radiofrequency pulses are sent into the wire to demonstrate current driven domain wall motion. Further changes to the Hall bar geometry with respect to the wire geometry are investigated by numerical computation. A large gain in signal is seen for Hall bars only slightly wider than the ferromagnetic wires as compared to those twice as wide, as well as a larger sensitivity to the exact position of the domain wall with respect to the center of the Hall cross.

  3. Method of making compound semiconductor films and making related electronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Basol, Bulent M.; Kapur, Vijay K.; Halani, Arvind T.; Leidholm, Craig R.; Roe, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    A method of forming a compound film includes the steps of preparing a source material, depositing the source material on a base to form a precursor film, and heating the precursor film in a suitable atmosphere to form a film. The source material includes Group IB-IIIA alloy-containing particles having at least one Group IB-IIIA alloy phase, with Group IB-IIIA alloys constituting greater than about 50 molar percent of the Group IB elements and greater than about 50 molar percent of the Group IIIA elements in the source material. The film, then, includes a Group IB-IIIA-VIA compound. The molar ratio of Group IB to Group IIIA elements in the source material may be greater than about 0.80 and less than about 1.0, or substantially greater than 1.0, in which case this ratio in the compound film may be reduced to greater than about 0.80 and less than about 1.0. The source material may be prepared as an ink from particles in powder form. The alloy phase may include a dopant. Compound films including a Group IIB-IVA-VA compound or a Group IB-VA-VIA compound may be substituted using appropriate substitutions in the method. The method, also, is applicable to fabrication of solar cells and other electronic devices.

  4. Detection of ferromagnetic domain wall pinning and depinning with a semiconductor device

    SciTech Connect

    Malec, Chris E.; Bennett, Brian R.; Johnson, Mark B.

    2015-12-21

    We demonstrate the detection of a ferromagnetic domain wall using a nanoscale Hall cross. A narrow permalloy wire is defined lithographically on top of a Hall cross fabricated from an InAs quantum well. The width of the Hall cross (500 nm–1 μm) is similar to the width of the ferromagnetic wire (200–500 nm), and a geometric pinning site is fabricated in the ferromagnetic wire to trap a domain wall within the area of the Hall cross. The devices provide a signal that is often the same order of magnitude as the offset Hall voltage when a domain wall is located above the Hall cross, and may be useful for memory applications. Different geometries for the Hall cross and ferromagnetic wire are tested, and radiofrequency pulses are sent into the wire to demonstrate current driven domain wall motion. Further changes to the Hall bar geometry with respect to the wire geometry are investigated by numerical computation. A large gain in signal is seen for Hall bars only slightly wider than the ferromagnetic wires as compared to those twice as wide, as well as a larger sensitivity to the exact position of the domain wall with respect to the center of the Hall cross.

  5. Metal-nitride-oxide-semiconductor light-emitting devices for general lighting.

    PubMed

    Berencén, Y; Carreras, Josep; Jambois, O; Ramírez, J M; Rodríguez, J A; Domínguez, C; Hunt, Charles E; Garrido, B

    2011-05-01

    The potential for application of silicon nitride-based light sources to general lighting is reported. The mechanism of current injection and transport in silicon nitride layers and silicon oxide tunnel layers is determined by electro-optical characterization of both bi- and tri-layers. It is shown that red luminescence is due to bipolar injection by direct tunneling, whereas Poole-Frenkel ionization is responsible for blue-green emission. The emission appears warm white to the eye, and the technology has potential for large-area lighting devices. A photometric study, including color rendering, color quality and luminous efficacy of radiation, measured under various AC excitation conditions, is given for a spectrum deemed promising for lighting. A correlated color temperature of 4800K was obtained using a 35% duty cycle of the AC excitation signal. Under these conditions, values for general color rendering index of 93 and luminous efficacy of radiation of 112 lm/W are demonstrated. This proof of concept demonstrates that mature silicon technology, which is extendable to low-cost, large-area lamps, can be used for general lighting purposes. Once the external quantum efficiency is improved to exceed 10%, this technique could be competitive with other energy-efficient solid-state lighting options. PMID:21643365

  6. Advances in silicon carbide Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) for semiconductor device fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. Anthony; Petit, Jeremy B.; Matus, Lawrence G.

    1991-01-01

    Improved SiC chemical vapor deposition films of both 3C and 6H polytypes were grown on vicinal (0001) 6H-SiC wafers cut from single-crystal boules. These films were produced from silane and propane in hydrogen at one atmosphere at a temperature of 1725 K. Among the more important factors which affected the structure and morphology of the grown films were the tilt angle of the substrate, the polarity of the growth surface, and the pregrowth surface treatment of the substrate. With proper pregrowth surface treatment, 6H films were grown on 6H substrates with tilt angles as small as 0.1 degrees. In addition, 3C could be induced to grow within selected regions on a 6H substrate. The polarity of the substrate was a large factor in the incorporation of dopants during epitaxial growth. A new growth model is discussed which explains the control of SiC polytype in epitaxial growth on vicinal (0001) SiC substrates.

  7. UV laser drilling of SiC for semiconductor device fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Olaf; Schöne, Gerd; Wernicke, Tim; John, Wilfred; Würfl, Joachim; Tränkle, Günther

    2007-04-01

    Pulsed UV laser processing is used to drill micro holes in silicon carbide (SiC) wafers supporting AlGaN/GaN transistor structures. Direct laser ablation using nanosecond pulses has been proven to provide an efficient way to create through and blind holes in 400 µm thick SiC. When drilling through, openings in the front pads are formed, while blind holes stop ~40 µm before the backside and were advanced to the electrical contact pad by subsequent plasma etching without an additional mask. Low induction connections (vias) between the transistor's source pads and the ground on the backside were formed by metallization of the holes. Micro vias having aspect ratios of 5-6 have been processed in 400 µm SiC. The process flow from wafer layout to laser drilling is available including an automated beam alignment that allows a positioning accuracy of ±1 µm with respect to existing patterns on the wafer. As proven by electrical dc and rf measurements the laser-assisted via technologies have successfully been implemented into fabrication of AlGaN/GaN high-power transistors.

  8. Characterization of failure modes in deep UV and deep green LEDs utilizing advanced semiconductor localization techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Tangyunyong, Paiboon; Miller, Mary A.; Cole, Edward Isaac, Jr.

    2012-03-01

    We present the results of a two-year early career LDRD that focused on defect localization in deep green and deep ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs). We describe the laser-based techniques (TIVA/LIVA) used to localize the defects and interpret data acquired. We also describe a defect screening method based on a quick electrical measurement to determine whether defects should be present in the LEDs. We then describe the stress conditions that caused the devices to fail and how the TIVA/LIVA techniques were used to monitor the defect signals as the devices degraded and failed. We also describe the correlation between the initial defects and final degraded or failed state of the devices. Finally we show characterization results of the devices in the failed conditions and present preliminary theories as to why the devices failed for both the InGaN (green) and AlGaN (UV) LEDs.

  9. Oxide-based method of making compound semiconductor films and making related electronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Kapur, Vijay K.; Basol, Bulent M.; Leidholm, Craig R.; Roe, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    A method for forming a compound film includes the steps of preparing a source material, depositing the source material on a base and forming a preparatory film from the source material, heating the preparatory film in a suitable atmosphere to form a precursor film, and providing suitable material to said precursor film to form the compound film. The source material includes oxide-containing particles including Group IB and IIIA elements. The precursor film includes non-oxide Group IB and IIIA elements. The compound film includes a Group IB-IIIA-VIA compound. The oxides may constitute greater than about 95 molar percent of the Group IB elements and greater than about 95 molar percent of the Group IIIA elements in the source material. Similarly, non-oxides may constitute greater than about 95 molar percent of the Group IB elements and greater than about 95 molar percent of the Group IIIA elements in the precursor film. The molar ratio of Group IB to Group IIIA elements in the source material may be greater than about 0.6 and less than about 1.0, or substantially greater that 1.0, in which case this ratio in the compound film may be reduced to greater than about 0.6 and less than about 1.0. The source material may be prepared as an ink from particles in powder form. The oxide-containing particles may include a dopant, as may the compound film. Compound films including a Group IIB-IVA-VA compound may be substituted using appropriate substitutions in the method. The method, also, is applicable to fabrication of solar cells and other electronic devices.

  10. Special Issue featuring invited articles arising from UK Semiconductors 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Edmund; Wada, Osamu

    2013-07-01

    Semiconductor research has formed the basis of many technological advances over the past 50 years, and the field is still highly active, as new material systems and device concepts are developed to address new applications or operating conditions. In addition to the development of traditional semiconductor devices, the wealth of experience with these materials also allows their use as an ideal environment for testing new physics, leading to new classes of devices exploiting quantum mechanical effects that can also benefit from the advantages of existing semiconductor technology in scalability, compactness and ease of mass production. This special issue features papers arising from the UK Semiconductors 2012 Conference, held at the University of Sheffield. The annual conference covers all aspects of semiconductor research, from crystal growth, through investigations of the physics of semiconductor structures to realization of semiconductor devices and their application in emerging technologies. The 2012 conference featured over 150 presentations, including plenary sessions on interband cascade lasers for the 3-6 µm spectral band, efficient single photon sources based on InAs quantum dots embedded in GaAs photonic nanowires, nitride-based quantum dot visible lasers and single photon sources, and engineering of organic light-emitting diodes. The seven papers collected here highlight current research advances, taken from across the scope of the conference. The papers feature growth of novel nitride-antimonide material systems for mid-infrared sources and detectors, use of semiconductor nanostructures for charge-based memory and visible lasers, optimization of device structures either to reduce losses in solar cells or achieve low noise amplification in transistors, design considerations for surface-emitting lasers incorporating photonic crystals and an assessment of laser power convertors for power transfer. The editors of this special issue and the conference

  11. Room-temperature electrically pumped near-infrared random lasing from high-quality m-plane ZnO-based metal-insulator-semiconductor devices.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Wang, Ti; Wu, Hao; Zheng, He; Wang, Jianbo; Xu, Yang; Liu, Chang

    2015-01-01

    Epitaxial m-plane ZnO thin films have been deposited on m-plane sapphire substrates at a low temperature of 200°C by atomic layer deposition. A 90° in-plane rotation is observed between the m-plane ZnO thin films and the sapphire substrates. Moreover, the residual strain along the ZnO [-12-10] direction is released. To fabricate metal-insulator-semiconductor devices, a 50-nm Al2O3 thin film is deposited on the m-plane ZnO thin films. It is interesting to observe the near-infrared random lasing from the metal-insulator-semiconductor devices. PMID:25852396

  12. Room-temperature electrically pumped near-infrared random lasing from high-quality m-plane ZnO-based metal-insulator-semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Wang, Ti; Wu, Hao; Zheng, He; Wang, Jianbo; Xu, Yang; Liu, Chang

    2015-03-01

    Epitaxial m-plane ZnO thin films have been deposited on m-plane sapphire substrates at a low temperature of 200°C by atomic layer deposition. A 90° in-plane rotation is observed between the m-plane ZnO thin films and the sapphire substrates. Moreover, the residual strain along the ZnO [-12-10] direction is released. To fabricate metal-insulator-semiconductor devices, a 50-nm Al2O3 thin film is deposited on the m-plane ZnO thin films. It is interesting to observe the near-infrared random lasing from the metal-insulator-semiconductor devices.

  13. River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials (River DREAM)

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, Daniel P.

    2013-07-03

    The purpose of this project is to develop a generator called a Galloping Hydroelectric Energy Extraction Device (GHEED). It uses a galloping prism to convert water flow into linear motion. This motion is converted into electricity via a dielectric elastomer generator (DEG). The galloping mechanism and the DEG are combined to create a system to effectively generate electricity. This project has three research objectives: 1. Oscillator development and design a. Characterize galloping behavior, evaluate control surface shape change on oscillator performance and demonstrate shape change with water flow change. 2. Dielectric Energy Generator (DEG) characterization and modeling a. Characterize and model the performance of the DEG based on oscillator design 3. Galloping Hydroelectric Energy Extraction Device (GHEED) system modeling and integration a. Create numerical models for construction of a system performance model and define operating capabilities for this approach Accomplishing these three objectives will result in the creation of a model that can be used to fully define the operating parameters and performance capabilities of a generator based on the GHEED design. This information will be used in the next phase of product development, the creation of an integrated laboratory scale generator to confirm model predictions.

  14. Advanced Thermophotovoltaic Devices for Space Nuclear Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wernsman, Bernard; Mahorter, Robert G.; Siergiej, Richard; Link, Samuel D.; Wehrer, Rebecca J.; Belanger, Sean J.; Fourspring, Patrick; Murray, Susan; Newman, Fred; Taylor, Dan; Rahmlow, Tom

    2005-02-06

    Advanced thermophotovoltaic (TPV) modules capable of producing > 0.3 W/cm2 at an efficiency > 22% while operating at a converter radiator and module temperature of 1228 K and 325 K, respectively, have been made. These advanced TPV modules are projected to produce > 0.9 W/cm2 at an efficiency > 24% while operating at a converter radiator and module temperature of 1373 K and 325 K, respectively. Radioisotope and nuclear (fission) powered space systems utilizing these advanced TPV modules have been evaluated. For a 100 We radioisotope TPV system, systems utilizing as low as 2 general purpose heat source (GPHS) units are feasible, where the specific power for the 2 and 3 GPHS unit systems operating in a 200 K environment is as large as {approx} 16 We/kg and {approx} 14 We/kg, respectively. For a 100 kWe nuclear powered (as was entertained for the thermoelectric SP-100 program) TPV system, the minimum system radiator area and mass is {approx} 640 m2 and {approx} 1150 kg, respectively, for a converter radiator, system radiator and environment temperature of 1373 K, 435 K and 200 K, respectively. Also, for a converter radiator temperature of 1373 K, the converter volume and mass remains less than 0.36 m3 and 640 kg, respectively. Thus, the minimum system radiator + converter (reactor and shield not included) specific mass is {approx} 16 kg/kWe for a converter radiator, system radiator and environment temperature of 1373 K, 425 K and 200 K, respectively. Under this operating condition, the reactor thermal rating is {approx} 1110 kWt. Due to the large radiator area, the added complexity and mission risk needs to be weighed against reducing the reactor thermal rating to determine the feasibility of using TPV for space nuclear (fission) power systems.

  15. Advanced Thermophotovoltaic Devices for Space Nuclear Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernsman, Bernard; Mahorter, Robert G.; Siergiej, Richard; Link, Samuel D.; Wehrer, Rebecca J.; Belanger, Sean J.; Fourspring, Patrick; Murray, Susan; Newman, Fred; Taylor, Dan; Rahmlow, Tom

    2005-02-01

    Advanced thermophotovoltaic (TPV) modules capable of producing > 0.3 W/cm2 at an efficiency > 22% while operating at a converter radiator and module temperature of 1228 K and 325 K, respectively, have been made. These advanced TPV modules are projected to produce > 0.9 W/cm2 at an efficiency > 24% while operating at a converter radiator and module temperature of 1373 K and 325 K, respectively. Radioisotope and nuclear (fission) powered space systems utilizing these advanced TPV modules have been evaluated. For a 100 We radioisotope TPV system, systems utilizing as low as 2 general purpose heat source (GPHS) units are feasible, where the specific power for the 2 and 3 GPHS unit systems operating in a 200 K environment is as large as ˜ 16 We/kg and ˜ 14 We/kg, respectively. For a 100 kWe nuclear powered (as was entertained for the thermoelectric SP-100 program) TPV system, the minimum system radiator area and mass is ˜ 640 m2 and ˜ 1150 kg, respectively, for a converter radiator, system radiator and environment temperature of 1373 K, 435 K and 200 K, respectively. Also, for a converter radiator temperature of 1373 K, the converter volume and mass remains less than 0.36 m3 and 640 kg, respectively. Thus, the minimum system radiator + converter (reactor and shield not included) specific mass is ˜ 16 kg/kWe for a converter radiator, system radiator and environment temperature of 1373 K, 425 K and 200 K, respectively. Under this operating condition, the reactor thermal rating is ˜ 1110 kWt. Due to the large radiator area, the added complexity and mission risk needs to be weighed against reducing the reactor thermal rating to determine the feasibility of using TPV for space nuclear (fission) power systems.

  16. Metal insulator semiconductor solar cell devices based on a Cu{sub 2}O substrate utilizing h-BN as an insulating and passivating layer

    SciTech Connect

    Ergen, Onur; Gibb, Ashley; Vazquez-Mena, Oscar; Zettl, Alex; Regan, William Raymond

    2015-03-09

    We demonstrate cuprous oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) based metal insulator semiconductor Schottky (MIS-Schottky) solar cells with efficiency exceeding 3%. A unique direct growth technique is employed in the fabrication, and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) serves simultaneously as a passivation and insulation layer on the active Cu{sub 2}O layer. The devices are the most efficient of any Cu{sub 2}O based MIS-Schottky solar cells reported to date.

  17. Advanced Epi Tools for Gallium Nitride Light Emitting Diode Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Patibandla, Nag; Agrawal, Vivek

    2012-12-01

    Over the course of this program, Applied Materials, Inc., with generous support from the United States Department of Energy, developed a world-class three chamber III-Nitride epi cluster tool for low-cost, high volume GaN growth for the solid state lighting industry. One of the major achievements of the program was to design, build, and demonstrate the world’s largest wafer capacity HVPE chamber suitable for repeatable high volume III-Nitride template and device manufacturing. Applied Materials’ experience in developing deposition chambers for the silicon chip industry over many decades resulted in many orders of magnitude reductions in the price of transistors. That experience and understanding was used in developing this GaN epi deposition tool. The multi-chamber approach, which continues to be unique in the ability of the each chamber to deposit a section of the full device structure, unlike other cluster tools, allows for extreme flexibility in the manufacturing process. This robust architecture is suitable for not just the LED industry, but GaN power devices as well, both horizontal and vertical designs. The new HVPE technology developed allows GaN to be grown at a rate unheard of with MOCVD, up to 20x the typical MOCVD rates of 3{micro}m per hour, with bulk crystal quality better than the highest-quality commercial GaN films grown by MOCVD at a much cheaper overall cost. This is a unique development as the HVPE process has been known for decades, but never successfully commercially developed for high volume manufacturing. This research shows the potential of the first commercial-grade HVPE chamber, an elusive goal for III-V researchers and those wanting to capitalize on the promise of HVPE. Additionally, in the course of this program, Applied Materials built two MOCVD chambers, in addition to the HVPE chamber, and a robot that moves wafers between them. The MOCVD chambers demonstrated industry-leading wavelength yield for GaN based LED wafers and industry

  18. Advanced materials development for multi-junction monolithic photovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, L.R.; Reno, J.L.

    1996-07-01

    We report results in three areas of research relevant to the fabrication of monolithic multi-junction photovoltaic devices. (1) The use of compliant intervening layers grown between highly mismatched materials, GaAs and GaP (same lattice constant as Si), is shown to increase the structural quality of the GaAs overgrowth. (2) The use of digital alloys applied to the MBE growth of GaAs{sub x}Sb{sub l-x} (a candidate material for a two junction solar cell) provides increased control of the alloy composition without degrading the optical properties. (3) A nitrogen plasma discharge is shown to be an excellent p-type doping source for CdTe and ZnTe, both of which are candidate materials for a two junction solar cell.

  19. 9 CFR 381.131 - Preparation of labeling or other devices bearing official inspection marks without advance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... devices bearing official inspection marks without advance approval prohibited; exceptions. 381.131 Section... Preparation of labeling or other devices bearing official inspection marks without advance approval prohibited... otherwise make any marking device containing any official mark or simulation thereof, or any label...

  20. Recrystallization method to selenization of thin-film Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2 for semiconductor device applications

    DOEpatents

    Albin, David S.; Carapella, Jeffrey J.; Tuttle, John R.; Contreras, Miguel A.; Gabor, Andrew M.; Noufi, Rommel; Tennant, Andrew L.

    1995-07-25

    A process for fabricating slightly Cu-poor thin-films of Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2 on a substrate for semiconductor device applications includes the steps of forming initially a slightly Cu-rich, phase separated, mixture of Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2 :Cu.sub.x Se on the substrate in solid form followed by exposure of the Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2 :Cu.sub.x Se solid mixture to an overpressure of Se vapor and (In,Ga) vapor for deposition on the Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2 :Cu.sub.x Se solid mixture while simultaneously increasing the temperature of the solid mixture toward a recrystallization temperature (about 550.degree. C.) at which Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2 is solid and Cu.sub.x Se is liquid. The (In,Ga) flux is terminated while the Se overpressure flux and the recrystallization temperature are maintained to recrystallize the Cu.sub.x Se with the (In, Ga) that was deposited during the temperature transition and with the Se vapor to form the thin-film of slightly Cu-poor Cu.sub.x (In,Ga).sub.y Se.sub.z. The initial Cu-rich, phase separated large grain mixture of Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2 :Cu.sub.x Se can be made by sequentially depositing or co-depositing the metal precursors, Cu and (In, Ga), on the substrate at room temperature, ramping up the thin-film temperature in the presence of Se overpressure to a moderate anneal temperature (about 450.degree. C.) and holding that temperature and the Se overpressure for an annealing period. A nonselenizing, low temperature anneal at about 100.degree. C. can also be used to homogenize the precursors on the substrates before the selenizing, moderate temperature anneal.

  1. Label-free detection of rheumatoid factor using YbYxOy electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor devices.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tung-Ming; Lin, Ting-Wei; Chen, Ching-Yi

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of yttrium content on the structural properties and sensing characteristics of YbYxOy sensing membranes for electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor (EIS) sensors to detect the rheumatoid factor (RF). The YbYxOy EIS device prepared at the 60 W plasma condition exhibited a higher sensitivity of 65.77 mV/pH, a lower hysteresis voltage of ∼1 mV, and a smaller drift rate of 0.14 mV/h than did those prepared at the other conditions. We attribute this behavior to the optimal yttrium content in the YbYxOy film forming a smooth surface. Furthermore, we used a novel YbTixOy EIS biosensor to measure the RF antigen in human serum because of its rapid and label-free detection. Two different techniques were used for the immobilization of RF antibody onto the surface of an YbTixOy EIS sensor. The RF antibody was directly immobilized on the EIS surface modified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) followed by glutaraldehyde (GA). In contrast, a mixture of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylamino-propyl)carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) solution was used to functionalize the carboxyl groups at the tail of RF antibodies. RF antibodies functionalized with the active NHS esters were covalently immobilized on the APTES-modified YbTixOy surface. The immobilized RF antibodies on the EIS that are functionalized with the EDC and NHS exhibit higher (41.11mV/pCRF) for detection of serum RF antigen in the range 10(-7) to 10(-3) M, compared to traditional antibody immobilization technique via APTES and GA linkage. The YbTixOy EIS biosensor is a promising analytical tool for RF antigen monitoring due to its good sensitivity, stability and repeatability. PMID:26388391

  2. Theory and modeling of electrically tunable metamaterial devices using inter-subband transitions in semiconductor quantum wells.

    PubMed

    Gabbay, Alon; Brener, Igal

    2012-03-12

    In this paper, we propose a new and versatile mechanism for electrical tuning of planar metamaterials: strong coupling of metamaterial resonances to engineered intersubband transitions that can be tuned through the application of an electrical bias. We present the general formalism that allows calculating the permittivity tensor for intersubband transitions in generic semiconductor heterostructures and we study numerically the specific case of coupling and tuning metamaterials in the thermal infrared through coupling to biased GaAs semiconductor quantum wells. This tuning mechanism can be scaled from the visible to the far infrared by the proper choice of metamaterials and semiconductor heterostructures. PMID:22418541

  3. Advanced Simulation Technology to Design Etching Process on CMOS Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuboi, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    Prediction and control of plasma-induced damage is needed to mass-produce high performance CMOS devices. In particular, side-wall (SW) etching with low damage is a key process for the next generation of MOSFETs and FinFETs. To predict and control the damage, we have developed a SiN etching simulation technique for CHxFy/Ar/O2 plasma processes using a three-dimensional (3D) voxel model. This model includes new concepts for the gas transportation in the pattern, detailed surface reactions on the SiN reactive layer divided into several thin slabs and C-F polymer layer dependent on the H/N ratio, and use of ``smart voxels''. We successfully predicted the etching properties such as the etch rate, polymer layer thickness, and selectivity for Si, SiO2, and SiN films along with process variations and demonstrated the 3D damage distribution time-dependently during SW etching on MOSFETs and FinFETs. We confirmed that a large amount of Si damage was caused in the source/drain region with the passage of time in spite of the existing SiO2 layer of 15 nm in the over etch step and the Si fin having been directly damaged by a large amount of high energy H during the removal step of the parasitic fin spacer leading to Si fin damage to a depth of 14 to 18 nm. By analyzing the results of these simulations and our previous simulations, we found that it is important to carefully control the dose of high energy H, incident energy of H, polymer layer thickness, and over-etch time considering the effects of the pattern structure, chamber-wall condition, and wafer open area ratio. In collaboration with Masanaga Fukasawa and Tetsuya Tatsumi, Sony Corporation. We thank Mr. T. Shigetoshi and Mr. T. Kinoshita of Sony Corporation for their assistance with the experiments.

  4. Current state-of-the-art of device therapy for advanced heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lawrence S.; Shekar, Prem S.

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure remains one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The advent of mechanical circulatory support devices has allowed significant improvements in patient survival and quality of life for those with advanced or end-stage heart failure. We provide a general overview of past and current mechanical circulatory support devices encompassing options for both short- and long-term ventricular support. PMID:25559828

  5. Verification, Validation and Credibility Assessment of a Computational Model of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, C. R.; Humphreys, B. T.; Mulugeta, L.

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) is the resistive exercise device used by astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) to mitigate bone loss and muscle atrophy due to extended exposure to microgravity (micro g). The Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) has developed a multi-body dynamics model of biomechanics models for use in spaceflight exercise physiology research and operations. In an effort to advance model maturity and credibility of the ARED model, the DAP performed verification, validation and credibility (VV and C) assessment of the analyses of the model in accordance to NASA-STD-7009 'Standards for Models and Simulations'.

  6. Compact environmental spectroscopy using advanced semiconductor light-emitting diodes and lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, I.J.; Klem, J.F.; Hafich, M.J.

    1997-04-01

    This report summarizes research completed under a Laboratory Directed Research and Development program funded for part of FY94, FY95 and FY96. The main goals were (1) to develop novel, compound-semiconductor based optical sources to enable field-based detection of environmentally important chemical species using miniaturized, low-power, rugged, moderate cost spectroscopic equipment, and (2) to demonstrate the utility of near-infrared spectroscopy to quantitatively measure contaminants. Potential applications would include monitoring process and effluent streams for volatile organic compound detection and sensing head-space gasses in storage vessels for waste management. Sensing is based on absorption in the 1.3-1.9 {mu}m band from overtones of the C-H, N-H and O-H stretch resonances. We describe work in developing novel broadband light-emitting diodes emitting over the entire 1.4-1.9 {mu}m wavelength range, first using InGaAs quantum wells, and second using a novel technique for growing digital-alloy materials in the InAlGaAs material system. Next we demonstrate the utility of near-infrared spectroscopy for quantitatively determining contamination of soil by motor oil. Finally we discuss the separability of different classes of organic compounds using near-infrared spectroscopic techniques.

  7. Advanced upper limb prosthetic devices: implications for upper limb prosthetic rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Resnik, Linda; Meucci, Marissa R; Lieberman-Klinger, Shana; Fantini, Christopher; Kelty, Debra L; Disla, Roxanne; Sasson, Nicole

    2012-04-01

    The number of catastrophic injuries caused by improvised explosive devices in the Afghanistan and Iraq Wars has increased public, legislative, and research attention to upper limb amputation. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has partnered with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and DEKA Integrated Solutions to optimize the function of an advanced prosthetic arm system that will enable greater independence and function. In this special communication, we examine current practices in prosthetic rehabilitation including trends in adoption and use of prosthetic devices, financial considerations, and the role of rehabilitation team members in light of our experiences with a prototype advanced upper limb prosthesis during a VA study to optimize the device. We discuss key challenges in the adoption of advanced prosthetic technology and make recommendations for service provision and use of advanced upper limb prosthetics. Rates of prosthetic rejection are high among upper limb amputees. However, these rates may be reduced with sufficient training by a highly specialized, multidisciplinary team of clinicians, and a focus on patient education and empowerment throughout the rehabilitation process. There are significant challenges emerging that are unique to implementing the use of advanced upper limb prosthetic technology, and a lack of evidence to establish clinical guidelines regarding prosthetic prescription and treatment. Finally, we make recommendations for future research to aid in the identification of best practices and development of policy decisions regarding insurance coverage of prosthetic rehabilitation. PMID:22464092

  8. A splitting scheme based on the space-time CE/SE method for solving multi-dimensional hydrodynamical models of semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisar, Ubaid Ahmed; Ashraf, Waqas; Qamar, Shamsul

    2016-08-01

    Numerical solutions of the hydrodynamical model of semiconductor devices are presented in one and two-space dimension. The model describes the charge transport in semiconductor devices. Mathematically, the models can be written as a convection-diffusion type system with a right hand side describing the relaxation effects and interaction with a self consistent electric field. The proposed numerical scheme is a splitting scheme based on the conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method for hyperbolic step, and a semi-implicit scheme for the relaxation step. The numerical results of the suggested scheme are compared with the splitting scheme based on Nessyahu-Tadmor (NT) central scheme for convection step and the same semi-implicit scheme for the relaxation step. The effects of various parameters such as low field mobility, device length, lattice temperature and voltages for one-space dimensional hydrodynamic model are explored to further validate the generic applicability of the CE/SE method for the current model equations. A two dimensional simulation is also performed by CE/SE method for a MESFET device, producing results in good agreement with those obtained by NT-central scheme.

  9. Random Interface-Traps-Induced Electrical Characteristic Fluctuation in 16-nm-Gate High-κ/Metal Gate Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Device and Inverter Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yiming; Cheng, Hui-Wen

    2012-04-01

    This work estimates electrical and transfer-characteristic fluctuations in 16-nm-gate high-κ/metal gate (HKMG) metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) devices and inverter circuit induced by random interface traps (ITs) at high-κ/silicon interface. Randomly generated devices with two-dimensional (2D) ITs at HfO2/Si interface are incorporated into quantum-mechanically corrected 3D device simulation. Device characteristics, as influenced by different degrees of fluctuation, are discussed in relation to random ITs near source and drain ends. Owing to a decreasing penetration of electric field from drain to source, the drain induced barrier lowering (DIBL) of the edvice decreases when the number of ITs increases. In contrast to random-dopant fluctuation, the screening effect of device's inversion layer cannot effectively screen potential's variation; thus, devices still have noticeable fluctuation of gate capacitance (CG) under high gate bias. The cutoff frequency decreases as increasing the number of ITs owing to the decreasing transconductance and increasing CG. Decreasing on-state current and increasing CG further result in increasing intrinsic gate delay time (τ) when the number of ITs increases. The fluctuation magnitude of DIBL, cutoff frequency, and τ above is increased as the number of ITs increases. Even for cases with the same number of random ITs, noise margins (NMs) of the 16-nm-gate complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor inverter circuit are still quite different due to the different distribution of random ITs. The NMs of inverter circuit increase as the number of random ITs increases; however, the NMs' fluctuations are increased due to the more sources of fluctuation at HfO2/Si interface of HKMG devices.

  10. Evaluation of advanced cooling therapy's esophageal cooling device for core temperature control.

    PubMed

    Naiman, Melissa; Shanley, Patrick; Garrett, Frank; Kulstad, Erik

    2016-05-01

    Managing core temperature is critical to patient outcomes in a wide range of clinical scenarios. Previous devices designed to perform temperature management required a trade-off between invasiveness and temperature modulation efficiency. The Esophageal Cooling Device, made by Advanced Cooling Therapy (Chicago, IL), was developed to optimize warming and cooling efficiency through an easy and low risk procedure that leverages heat transfer through convection and conduction. Clinical data from cardiac arrest, fever, and critical burn patients indicate that the Esophageal Cooling Device performs very well both in terms of temperature modulation (cooling rates of approximately 1.3°C/hour, warming of up to 0.5°C/hour) and maintaining temperature stability (variation around goal temperature ± 0.3°C). Physicians have reported that device performance is comparable to the performance of intravascular temperature management techniques and superior to the performance of surface devices, while avoiding the downsides associated with both. PMID:27043177

  11. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at $7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at $6.2 billion. Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing 'only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around $2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  12. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at 7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at 6.2 billion! Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing `only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around 2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  13. EDITORIAL The 23rd Nordic Semiconductor Meeting The 23rd Nordic Semiconductor Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ólafsson, Sveinn; Sveinbjörnsson, Einar

    2010-12-01

    A Nordic Semiconductor Meeting is held every other year with the venue rotating amongst the Nordic countries of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The focus of these meetings remains 'original research and science being carried out on semiconductor materials, devices and systems'. Reports on industrial activity have usually featured. The topics have ranged from fundamental research on point defects in a semiconductor to system architecture of semiconductor electronic devices. Proceedings from these events are regularly published as a topical issue of Physica Scripta. All of the papers in this topical issue have undergone critical peer review and we wish to thank the reviewers and the authors for their cooperation, which has been instrumental in meeting the high scientific standards and quality of the series. This meeting of the 23rd Nordic Semiconductor community, NSM 2009, was held at Háskólatorg at the campus of the University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland, 14-17 June 2009. Support was provided by the University of Iceland. Almost 50 participants presented a broad range of topics covering semiconductor materials and devices as well as related material science interests. The conference provided a forum for Nordic and international scientists to present and discuss new results and ideas concerning the fundamentals and applications of semiconductor materials. The meeting aim was to advance the progress of Nordic science and thus aid in future worldwide technological advances concerning technology, education, energy and the environment. Topics Theory and fundamental physics of semiconductors Emerging semiconductor technologies (for example III-V integration on Si, novel Si devices, graphene) Energy and semiconductors Optical phenomena and optical devices MEMS and sensors Program 14 June Registration 13:00-17:00 15 June Meeting program 09:30-17:00 and Poster Session I 16 June Meeting program 09:30-17:00 and Poster Session II 17 June Excursion and dinner

  14. Investigation of p-side contact layers for II-VI compound semiconductor optical devices fabricated on InP substrates by MBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamatsu, Shingo; Nomura, Ichirou; Shiraishi, Tomohiro; Kishino, Katsumi

    2015-09-01

    N-doped p-type ZnTe and ZnSeTe contact layers were investigated to evaluate which is more suitable for use in II-VI compound semiconductor optical devices on InP substrates. Contact resistances (Rc) between the contact layers and several electrode materials (Pd/Pt/Au, Pd/Au, and Au) were measured by the circular transmission line model (c-TLM) method using p-n diode samples grown on InP substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The lowest Rc (6.5×10-5 Ω cm2) was obtained in the case of the ZnTe contact and Pd/Pt/Au electrode combination, which proves that the combination is suitable for obtaining low Rc. Yellow light-emitting diode devices with a ZnTe and ZnSeTe p-contact layer were fabricated by MBE to investigate the effect of different contact layers. The devices were characterized under direct current injections at room temperature. Yellow emission at around 600 nm was observed for each device. Higher emission intensity and lower slope resistance were obtained for the device with the ZnTe contact layer and Pd/Pt/Au electrode compared with other devices. These device performances are ascribed to the low Rc of the ZnTe contact and Pd/Pt/Au electrode combination.

  15. Advanced photovoltaic system simulator to demonstrate the performance of advanced photovoltaic cells and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mrig, L.; DeBlasio, R.; O'Sullivan, G.A.; Tomko, R.P.

    1983-05-01

    This paper describes a photovoltaic system simulator for characterizing and evaluating the performance of advanced photovoltaic cells, modules, and arrays as well as for simulating the operation of advanced conceptual photovoltaic systems. The system simulator is capable of extrapolating the performance from a single laboratory cell, or of a module to power levels up to 10 kW. The major subsystems comprising the system simulator are (1) Solar Array Simulator, (2) Power Conditioning Unit, (3) Load Controller and Resistive Load Unit, (4) Data Acquisition and Control Unit, and (5) Cell Test Bed.

  16. Organic-inorganic heterostructure electroluminescent device using a layered perovskite semiconductor (C6H5C2H4NH3)2PbI4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Era, M.; Morimoto, S.; Tsutsui, T.; Saito, S.

    1994-08-01

    Using the combination of a layered perovskite compound (C6H5C2H4NH3)2PbI4 (PAPI), which forms a stable exciton with a large binding energy owing to its low-dimensional semiconductor nature and exhibits sharp and strong photoluminescence from the exciton band, and an electron-transporting oxadiazole derivative, we fabricated an organic-inorganic heterostructure electroluminescent (EL) device. The EL spectrum of the device corresponded well to the photoluminescence spectrum of the PAPI film; the emission was peaking at 520 nm and half-width of the emission was about 10 nm at liquid-nitrogen temperature. Further, highly intense EL of more than 10 000 cd m-2 was performed at 2 A cm-2 at liquid-nitrogen temperature in the device.

  17. Aircrew Training Devices: Utility and Utilization of Advanced Instructional Features (Phase IV--Summary Report).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polzella, Donald J.; And Others

    Modern aircrew training devices (ATDs) are equipped with sophisticated hardware and software capabilities, known as advanced instructional features (AIFs), that permit a simulator instructor to prepare briefings, manage training, vary task difficulty/fidelity, monitor performance, and provide feedback for flight simulation training missions. The…

  18. Measurement techniques for high-power semiconductor materials and devices. Annual report, October 1, 1980-December 31, 1981. [For calculating excess-carrier lifetime in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Thurber, W R; Phillips, W E; Larrabee, R D

    1982-08-01

    This annual report describes results of NBS research directed toward the development of measurement methods for semiconductor materials and devices which will lead to more effective use of high-power semiconductor devices in applications for energy generation, transmission, conversion, and conservation. Emphasis is on the development of measurement methods for power-device-grade silicon. Major accomplishments during this reporting period were : (1) characterizing by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) the energy levels in silicon power rectifier diodes, (2) writing of a computer program to predict lifetime-related parameters using as input the measured properties of the deep energy levels, (3) developing a novel method to detect nonexponential transients using a conventional double-boxcar DLTS system, (4) analyzing transient capacitance measurements to extend the techniques to nonexponential decays, (5) using a platinum resistance thermometer to calibrate temperature sensing diodes to obtain the precision needed for careful isothermal capacitance measurements, and (6) utilizing trap changing time as a technique to resolve overlapping DLTS peaks in sulfur-doped silicon.

  19. Mechanism of electronic-excitation transfer in organic light-emitting devices based on semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Vitukhnovskii, A. G. Vashchenko, A. A.; Lebedev, V. S.; Vasiliev, R. B.; Brunkov, P. N.; Bychkovskii, D. N.

    2013-07-15

    The results of an experimental study of organic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with luminescent layers based on two types of CdSe/CdS semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) with an average CdSe core diameter of 3 and 5 nm and a characteristic CdS shell thickness of 0.5 nm are presented. The dependences of the LED efficiency on the QD concentration are determined. The experimental data are used to determine the mechanism of electronic-excitation transfer from the organic matrix to the semiconductor QDs. Ways of optimizing the design of the LEDs in order to improve their efficiency are suggested on this basis.

  20. An advanced photovoltaic system simulator to demonstrate the performance of advanced photovoltaic cells and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mrig, L.; DeBlasio, R.; O'Sullivan, G.A.; Tomko, R.P.

    1982-09-01

    This paper describes a photovoltaic system simulator for characterizing and evaluating the performance of advanced photovoltaic cells, modules, and arrays as well as for simulating the operation of advanced conceptual photovoltaic systems. The system simulator is capable of extrapolating the performance from a single laboratory cell, or of a module to power levels up to 10 kw. The major subsystems comprising the system simulator are Solar Array Simulator, Power Conditioning Unit, Load Controller and Resistive Load Unit, Data Acquisition and Control Unit, and Cell Test Bed. The system was designed and fabricated by Abacus Controls, Inc., Somerville, NJ, under subcontract to SERI, and has recently been installed (except the cell test bed) at SERI, where initial operation is taking place.