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Sample records for advanced short takeoff

  1. Advanced Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing (ASTOVL) Concepts Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In this cooperative program between NASA, Lockheed Corporation, and the Advanced Research and Projects Agency (ARPA), an advanced short takeoff and vertical landing (ASTOVL) model was tested in the 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The 10-percent scaled model was tested over a range of headwind velocities from 25 to 120 kn. This inlet/forebody test was a key part of an important Department of Defense program investigation enabling technologies for future high-performance ASTOVL aircraft. The Lockheed concept is focused on a shaft-coupled lift fan system centered around Pratt & Whitney's F119 power plant. As envisioned, a conventional takeoff and landing version (CTOL) would replace the U.S. Air Force's F-16's. The ASTOVL version would eventually replace Marine and, possibly, British Harrier aircraft. The ASTOVL and CTOL versions are scheduled to begin their manufacturing development phases in 2000. The purpose of this test was to acquire data pertinent to the inlet-forebody model. The test was very successful. Both steady-state and dynamic data were obtained. This small-scale testing, which is directed at reducing risks, may greatly reduce the risks on a full-scale aircraft.

  2. Evaluation of Four Advanced Nozzle Concepts for Short Takeoff and Landing Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinto, P. Frank; Kemmerly, Guy T.; Paulson, John W., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Four advanced nozzle concepts were tested on a canard-wing fighter in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. The four vectoring-nozzle concepts were as follows: (1) an axisymmetric nozzle (AXI); (2) an asymmetric, load balanced exhaust nozzle (ALBEN); (3) a low aspect ratio, single expansion ramp nozzle (LASERN); and (4) a high aspect ratio, single expansion ramp nozzle (HASERN). The investigation was conducted to determine the most suitable nozzle concept for short takeoff and landing (STOL) performance. The criterion for the best STOL performance was a takeoff ground roll of less than 1000 ft. At approach, the criteria were high lift and sufficient drag to maintain a glide slope of -3 to -6 deg with enough pitching-moment control from the canards. The test was performed at a dynamic pressure of 45 lb/sq ft and an angle-of-attack range of 0 to 20 deg. The nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 1.0 to 4.3 at both dry power and after burning nozzle configurations with nozzle vectoring to 60 deg. In addition, the model was tested in and out of ground effects. The ALBEN concept was the best of the four nozzle concepts tested for STOL performance.

  3. Design of a Low Cost Short Takeoff-vertical Landing Export Fighter/attack Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, Anne; Bodeker, Dan, III; Miu, Steve; Petro, Laura; Senf, Cary Taylor; Woeltjen, Donald

    1990-01-01

    The design of a supersonic short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft is presented that is suitable for export. An advanced four poster, low bypass turbofan engine is to be used for propulsion. Preliminary aerodynamic analysis is presented covering a determination of CD versus CL, CD versus Mach number, as well as best cruise Mach number and altitude. Component locations are presented and center of gravity determined. Cost minimization is achieved through the use of developed subsystems and standard fabrication techniques using nonexotic materials. Conclusions regarding the viability of the STOVL design are presented.

  4. Preliminary design of a supersonic Short-Takeoff and Vertical-Landing (STOVL) fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary study of a supersonic short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) fighter is presented. Three configurations (a lift plus lift/cruise concept, a hybrid fan vectored thrust concept, and a mixed flow vectored thrust concept) were initially investigated with one configuration selected for further design analysis. The selected configuration, the lift plus lift/cruise concept, was successfully integrated to accommodate the powered lift short takeoff and vertical landing requirements as well as the demanding supersonic cruise and point performance requirements. A supersonic fighter aircraft with a short takeoff and vertical landing capability using the lift plus lift/cruise engine concept seems a viable option for the next generation fighter.

  5. Low Noise Cruise Efficient Short Take-Off and Landing Transport Vehicle Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyun D.; Berton, Jeffrey J.; Jones, Scott M.

    2007-01-01

    The saturation of the airspace around current airports combined with increasingly stringent community noise limits represents a serious impediment to growth in world aviation travel. Breakthrough concepts that both increase throughput and reduce noise impacts are required to enable growth in aviation markets. Concepts with a 25 year horizon must facilitate a 4x increase in air travel while simultaneously meeting community noise constraints. Attacking these horizon issues holistically is the concept study of a Cruise Efficient Short Take-Off and Landing (CESTOL) high subsonic transport under the NASA's Revolutionary Systems Concepts for Aeronautics (RSCA) project. The concept is a high-lift capable airframe with a partially embedded distributed propulsion system that takes a synergistic approach in propulsion-airframe-integration (PAI) by fully integrating the airframe and propulsion systems to achieve the benefits of both low-noise short take-off and landing (STOL) operations and efficient high speed cruise. This paper presents a summary of the recent study of a distributed propulsion/airframe configuration that provides low-noise STOL operation to enable 24-hour use of the untapped regional and city center airports to increase the capacity of the overall airspace while still maintaining efficient high subsonic cruise flight capability.

  6. Preliminary design of a supersonic Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing (STOVL) fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Brian; Borchers, Paul; Gomer, Charlie; Henderson, Dean; Jacobs, Tavis; Lawson, Todd; Peterson, Eric; Ross, Tweed, III; Bellmard, Larry

    1990-01-01

    The preliminary design study of a supersonic Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing (STOVL) fighter is presented. A brief historical survey of powered lift vehicles was presented, followed by a technology assessment of the latest supersonic STOVL engine cycles under consideration by industry and government in the U.S. and UK. A survey of operational fighter/attack aircraft and the modern battlefield scenario were completed to develop, respectively, the performance requirements and mission profiles for the study. Three configurations were initially investigated with the following engine cycles: a hybrid fan vectored thrust cycle, a lift+lift/cruise cycle, and a mixed flow vectored thrust cycle. The lift+lift/cruise aircraft configuration was selected for detailed design work which consisted of: (1) a material selection and structural layout, including engine removal considerations, (2) an aircraft systems layout, (3) a weapons integration model showing the internal weapons bay mechanism, (4) inlet and nozzle integration, (5) an aircraft suckdown prediction, (6) an aircraft stability and control analysis, including a takeoff, hover, and transition control analysis, (7) a performance and mission capability study, and (8) a life cycle cost analysis. A supersonic fighter aircraft with STOVL capability with the lift+lift/cruise engine cycle seems a viable option for the next generation fighter.

  7. Adaptive Data-based Predictive Control for Short Take-off and Landing (STOL) Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, Jonathan Spencer; Acosta, Diana Michelle; Phan, Minh Q.

    2010-01-01

    Data-based Predictive Control is an emerging control method that stems from Model Predictive Control (MPC). MPC computes current control action based on a prediction of the system output a number of time steps into the future and is generally derived from a known model of the system. Data-based predictive control has the advantage of deriving predictive models and controller gains from input-output data. Thus, a controller can be designed from the outputs of complex simulation code or a physical system where no explicit model exists. If the output data happens to be corrupted by periodic disturbances, the designed controller will also have the built-in ability to reject these disturbances without the need to know them. When data-based predictive control is implemented online, it becomes a version of adaptive control. The characteristics of adaptive data-based predictive control are particularly appropriate for the control of nonlinear and time-varying systems, such as Short Take-off and Landing (STOL) aircraft. STOL is a capability of interest to NASA because conceptual Cruise Efficient Short Take-off and Landing (CESTOL) transport aircraft offer the ability to reduce congestion in the terminal area by utilizing existing shorter runways at airports, as well as to lower community noise by flying steep approach and climb-out patterns that reduce the noise footprint of the aircraft. In this study, adaptive data-based predictive control is implemented as an integrated flight-propulsion controller for the outer-loop control of a CESTOL-type aircraft. Results show that the controller successfully tracks velocity while attempting to maintain a constant flight path angle, using longitudinal command, thrust and flap setting as the control inputs.

  8. Takeoff certification considerations for large subsonic and supersonic transport airplanes using the Ames flight simulator for advanced aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, C. T.; Drinkwater, F. J., III; Fry, E. B.; Forrest, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    Data for use in development of takeoff airworthiness standards for new aircraft designs such as the supersonic transport (SST) and the large wide-body subsonic jet transport are provided. An advanced motion simulator was used to compare the performance and handling characteristics of three representative large jet transports during specific flight certification tasks. Existing regulatory constraints and methods for determining rotation speed were reviewed, and the effects on takeoff performance of variations in rotation speed, pitch attitude, and pitch attitude rate during the rotation maneuver were analyzed. A limited quantity of refused takeoff information was obtained. The aerodynamics, wing loading, and thrust-to-weight ratio of the subject SST resulted in takeoff speeds limited by climb (rather than lift-off) considerations. Take-off speeds based on U.S. subsonic transport requirements were found unacceptable because of the criticality of rotation-abuse effects on one-engine-inoperative climb performance. Adequate safety margin was provided by takeoff speeds based on proposed Anglo-French supersonic transport (TSS) criteria, with the limiting criterion being that takeoff safety speed be at least 1.15 times the one-engine-inoperative zero-rate-of-climb speed. Various observations related to SST certification are presented.

  9. Cruise-Efficient Short Takeoff and Landing (CESTOL): Potential Impact on Air Traffic Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Couluris, G. J.; Signor, D.; Phillips, J.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is investigating technological and operational concepts for introducing Cruise-Efficient Short Takeoff and Landing (CESTOL) aircraft into a future US National Airspace System (NAS) civil aviation environment. CESTOL is an aircraft design concept for future use to increase capacity and reduce emissions. CESTOL provides very flexible takeoff, climb, descent and landing performance capabilities and a high-speed cruise capability. In support of NASA, this study is a preliminary examination of the potential operational impact of CESTOL on airport and airspace capacity and delay. The study examines operational impacts at a subject site, Newark Liberty Intemational Airport (KEWR), New Jersey. The study extends these KEWR results to estimate potential impacts on NAS-wide network traffic operations due to the introduction of CESTOL at selected major airports. These are the 34 domestic airports identified in the Federal Aviation Administration's Operational Evolution Plan (OEP). The analysis process uses two fast-time simulation tools to separately model local and NAS-wide air traffic operations using predicted flight schedules for a 24-hour study period in 2016. These tools are the Sen sis AvTerminal model and NASA's Airspace Concept Evaluation System (ACES). We use both to simulate conventional-aircraft-only and CESTOL-mixed-with-conventional-aircraft operations. Both tools apply 4-dimension trajectory modeling to simulate individual flight movement. The study applies AvTerminal to model traffic operations and procedures for en route and terminal arrival and departures to and from KEWR. These AvTerminal applications model existing arrival and departure routes and profiles and runway use configurations, with the assumption jet-powered, large-sized civil CESTOL aircraft use a short runway and standard turboprop arrival and departure procedures. With these rules, the conventional jet and CESTOL aircraft are procedurally

  10. A Conceptual Design of a Short Takeoff and Landing Regional Jet Airliner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Andrew S.

    2010-01-01

    Most jet airliner conceptual designs adhere to conventional takeoff and landing performance. Given this predominance, takeoff and landing performance has not been critical, since it has not been an active constraint in the design. Given that the demand for air travel is projected to increase dramatically, there is interest in operational concepts, such as Metroplex operations that seek to unload the major hub airports by using underutilized surrounding regional airports, as well as using underutilized runways at the major hub airports. Both of these operations require shorter takeoff and landing performance than is currently available for airliners of approximately 100-passenger capacity. This study examines the issues of modeling performance in this now critical flight regime as well as the impact of progressively reducing takeoff and landing field length requirements on the aircraft s characteristics.

  11. Design and fabrication of an aeroelastic flap element for a Short TakeOff and Landing (STOL) aircraft model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belleman, G. W.; June, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    A flap element typifying a third element in the flap system of a short takeoff and landing aircraft was designed, fabricated, and instrumented. It was delivered to NASA for flight-simulated testing. The flap element was aluminum skin-stringer-rib construction with adhesive laminated skins. The tests conducted were as follows: (1) sonic check, (2) thermal expansion, (3) end fitting stiffness, (4) material properties, (5) maximum bending stress in the skin, and (6) effective skin width and stringer spacing.

  12. Wind tunnel results of advanced high speed propellers in the takeoff, climb, and landing operating regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefko, G. L.; Jeracki, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Low speed wind tunnel performance tests of two advanced propellers were completed. The 62.2 cm diameter adjustable pitch models were tested at Mach numbers typical of takeoff, initial climbout, and landing speeds in the 10 by 10 ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel. Both models had eight blades and a cruise design point operating condition of 0.80 Mach number, 10.668 km S.A. altitude, 243.8 m/s tip speed and a high power loading of 301 kW sq m. No adverse or unusual low speed operating conditions were found during the test with either the straight blade SR-2 or the 45 deg swept SR-3 propellers. The 45 deg swept propeller efficiency exceeded the straight blade efficiency by 4 to 5 percent. Typical net efficiencies of the straight and 45 deg swept propeller at a Mach 0.20 takeoff condition were 50.2 and 54.9 percent respectively. At a Mach 0.34 climb condition, the efficiencies were 53.7 and 59.1 percent. Reverse thrust data indicates that these propellers are capable of producing more reverse thrust at Mach 0.20 than a high bypass turbofan engine at Mach 0.20.

  13. Wind tunnel results of advanced high speed propellers in the takeoff, climb and landing operating regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefko, G. L.; Jeracki, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Low speed wind tunnel performance tests of two advanced propellers were completed. The 62.2 cm diameter adjustable pitch models were tested at Mach numbers typical of takeoff, initial climbout, and landing speeds in the 10 by 10 ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel. Both models had eight blades and a cruise design point operating condition of 0.80 Mach number, 10.668 km S.A. altitude, 243.8 m/s tip speed and a high power loading of 301 kW sq m. No adverse or unusual low speed operating conditions were found during the test with either the straight blade SR-2 or the 45 deg swept SR-3 propellers. The 45 deg swept propeller efficiency exceeded the straight blade efficiency by 4 to 5%. Typical net efficiencies of the straight and 45 deg swept propeller at a Mach 0.20 takeoff condition were 50.2 and 54.9% respectively. At a Mach 0.34 climb condition, the efficiencies were 53.7 and 59.1%. Reverse thrust data indicates that these propellers are capable of producing more reverse thrust at Mach 0.20 than a high bypass turbofan engine at Mach 0.20.

  14. Quiet Cruise Efficient Short Take-off and Landing Subsonic Transport System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawai, Ron

    2008-01-01

    This NASA funded study conceived a revolutionary airplane concept to enable future traffic growth by using regional air space. This requires a very quiet airplane with STOL capability. Starting with a Blended Wing Body that is cruise efficient with inherent low noise characteristics from forward noise shielding and void of aft downward noise reflections, integration of embedded distributed propulsion enables incorporation of the revolutionary concept for jet noise shielding. Embedded distributed propulsion also enables incorporation of a fan bleed internally blown flap for quiet powered lift. The powered lift provides STOL capability for operation at regional airports with rapid take-off and descent to further reduce flyover noise. This study focused on configuring the total engine noise shielding STOL concept with a BWB airplane using the Boeing Phantom Works WingMOD multidisciplinary optimization code to define a planform that is pitch controllable. The configuration was then sized and mission data developed to enable NASA to assess the flyover and sideline noise. The foundational technologies needed are identified including military dual use benefits.

  15. Short Field Take-Off and Landing Performance as an Enabling Technology for a Greener, More Efficient Airspace System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hange, Craig E.

    2009-01-01

    The Cruise Efficient Short Take-Off and Landing (CESTOL) aircraft and Civil Tiltrotor (CTR) are two examples of powered-lift aircraft concepts that are of interest to NASA. These concepts will be able to utilize the shorter unused or underutilized runways and corresponding airspace at the crowded hub airports and many unused airfields and airspace that currently exist in other expanding urban areas providing additional capacity to the airspace system and reductions in congestion and delays seen in the current system. By treating the use of CESTOL and CTR as critical components that supplement other green aircraft to be used in the overall airspace system, the efficiency and improvements gained by the entire system will offset the potential increased fuel usage and emissions that may be a result of providing short field capability to the powered-lift aircraft. My presentation will address how NASA and the aerospace industry may identify, analysis, and finally implement these powered-lift aircraft into the airspace system and improve the capacity and reduce delay, while obtaining an overall reduction in noise, fuel usage, and emissions.

  16. Optimum design considerations of a gust alleviator for aircraft. [for aircraft stability of short takeoff aircraft during atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oehman, W. I.

    1976-01-01

    A gust alleviation system for aircraft flying in turbulent air was analyzed. A vane sensor (with noise) was used to measure vertical gusts, and elevators and flaps were used to reduce the root-mean-square value of the normal accelerations associated with the aircraft response to gusts. Since turbulence has stochastic properties, stochastic control theory was used in the analysis. A quadratic performance-index function involving normal acceleration and control deflections was minimized. Application of the analysis was illustrated by a short take-off and landing (STOL) airplane in flight through turbulent air. Effects of varying the noise characteristics of the vane sensor and of a weighting matrix in the performance-index function were determined. Calculations were performed as required by stochastic control theory to obtain the root-mean-square response of the airplane to turbulence. Results show that good alleviation was calculated when the intensity of the measurement noise was about 3.6 percent of the vane deflection angles.

  17. Wind-Tunnel Results of Advanced High-Speed Propellers at Takeoff, Climb, and Landing Mach Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefko, George L.; Jeracki, Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    Low-speed wind-tunnel performance tests of two advanced propellers have been completed at the NASA Lewis Research Center as part of the NASA Advanced Turboprop Program. The 62.2 cm (24.5 in.) diameter adjustable-pitch models were tested at Mach numbers typical of takeoff, initial climbout, and landing speeds (i.e., from Mach 0.10 to 0.34) at zero angle of attack in the NASA Lewis 10 by 10 Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. Both models had eight blades and a cruise-design-point operating condition of Mach 0.80, and 10.668 km (35,000 ft) I.S.A. altitude, a 243.8 m/s (800 ft/sec) tip speed, and a high power loading of 301 kW/sq m (37.5 shp/sq ft). Each model had its own integrally designed area-ruled spinner, but used the same specially contoured nacelle. These features reduced blade-section Mach numbers and relieved blade-root choking at the cruise condition. No adverse or unusual low-speed operating conditions were found during the test with either the straight blade SR-2 or the 45 deg swept SR-3 propeller. Typical efficiencies of the straight and 45 deg swept propellers were 50.2 and 54.9 percent, respectively, at a takeoff condition of Mach 0.20 and 53.7 and 59.1 percent, respectively, at a climb condition of Mach 0.34.

  18. Aerodynamically controlled expansion (ACE) nozzle for short takeoff and vertical landing aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrier, Douglas Anthony

    2000-10-01

    An Aerodynamically Controlled Expansion (ACE) propulsion nozzle that improves hover thrust performance by 2.5 percent in a short take off and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft has been developed. The ACE concept employs a carefully defined step in the nozzle internal contour that interacts with the boundary layer to induce flow separation in the divergent section, thereby relieving over-expansion losses during hover. This study specifies design parameters for a passive boundary layer control step for application on the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF). In addition, parametric performance predictions presented herein provide a basic understanding of how the step concept can be applied to overcome undesirable over-expansion in generalized supersonic nozzle flows. The aerodynamic phenomena governing the interaction of the step with the nozzle flow were investigated in an extensive, parametric CFD analysis. The CFD analysis matrix consists of thirty-three axi-symmetric nozzle cases including expansion area ratios (A9/A 8) of 1.1, 1.3 and 1.5, slot area ratios (A s/A8) of 1.0 (baseline), 1.1 and 1.2, and covering the nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) range of 2.0 to 8.0. The CFD results define the NPR at which flow separation occurs as a function of A9/A8, and A s/A8, and the effect of the step on nozzle performance. Results indicate that the onset of separation occurs at higher NPR with increasing A9/A 8 and increasing As/A 8. For the case of the JSF nozzle with A9/ A8 = 1.3, the CFD analysis predicted that a nozzle having an As/A8 = 1.1 produces an improvement of approximately 2.5 percent in hover thrust relative to the baseline with a minimal adverse impact at other design conditions. Twelve percent scale models representing the baseline, and step sizes of 1.1 and 1.2 were tested in the Lockheed Martin Thrust Measurement Facility (TMF). Test results showed excellent agreement with CFD predictions and validated the step performance. Preliminary design integration studies support

  19. Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing Capability Upgraded in NASA Glenn's 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, David E.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center supports short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) tests in its 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (9 x 15 LSWT). As part of a facility capability upgrade, a dynamic actuation system (DAS) was fabricated to enhance the STOVL testing capabilities. The DAS serves as the mechanical interface between the 9 x 15 LSWT test section structure and the STOVL model to be tested. It provides vertical and horizontal translation of the model in the test section and maintains the model attitude (pitch, yaw, and roll) during translation. It also integrates a piping system to supply the model with exhaust and hot air to simulate the inlet suction and nozzle exhausts, respectively. Hot gas ingestion studies have been performed with the facility ground plane installed. The DAS provides vertical (ascent and descent) translation speeds of up to 48 in./s and horizontal translation speeds of up to 12 in./s. Model pitch variations of +/- 7, roll variations of +/- 5, and yaw variations of 0 to 180 deg can be accommodated and are maintained within 0.25 deg throughout the translation profile. The hot air supply, generated by the facility heaters and regulated by control valves, provides three separate temperature zones to the model for STOVL and hot gas ingestion testing. Channels along the supertube provide instrumentation paths from the model to the facility data system for data collection purposes. The DAS is supported by the 9 x 15 LSWT test section ceiling structure. A carriage that rides on two linear rails provides for horizontal translation of the system along the test section longitudinal axis. A vertical translation assembly, consisting of a cage and supertube, is secured to the carriage. The supertube traverses vertically through the cage on a set of linear rails. Both translation axes are hydraulically actuated and provide position and velocity profile control. The lower flange on the supertube serves as the model interface to the DAS. The

  20. Final Scientific/Technical Report: ADVANCED INTEGRATION OF POWER TAKE-OFF IN VIVACE

    SciTech Connect

    Simiao, Gustavo

    2014-03-21

    Vortex Hydro Energy is commercializing a University of Michigan patented MHK device, the VIVACE converter (Vortex Induced Vibration Aquatic Clean Energy). Unlike water turbines, it does not use propeller blades. Rather, river or ocean currents flow around cylinders causing them to move up and down in Flow Induced Motions (FIM). This kinetic energy of the cylinder is then converted to electricity. Importantly, the VIVACE converter is simpler in design and more cost effective than water turbines. This project accelerated the development of the VIVACE technology. Funding from the DOE enabled VHE to accelerate the development in three ways. One was to increase the efficiency of the hydrodynamics of the system. This aided in maximizing the power output for a wide range of water speeds. The second was to design, build, and test an efficient power take-off (PTO) that converted the most power from the VIVACE cylinders into electricity. This effort was necessary because of the nature of power generated using this technology. Although the PTO uses off-the-shelf components, it is specifically tuned to the specific water flow characteristics. The third way the development was accelerated was by testing the improved Beta 1B prototype over a longer period of time in a river. The greatest benefit from the longer open-water testing-period is a better understand of the power generation characteristics of the system as well as the maintenance lifespan of the device. Renewable energy generation is one of today’s most challenging global dilemmas. The energy crisis requires tapping into every source of energy and developing every technology that can generate energy at a competitive cost within the next 50 years. Development of VIVACE will bolster domestic energy security and mitigate global climate change. There are numerous commercial and military applications for a fully developed system, which could generate clean/renewable energy from small scale (1-5kW) to medium scale (500k

  1. 14 CFR 25.113 - Takeoff distance and takeoff run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Takeoff distance and takeoff run. 25.113... and takeoff run. (a) Takeoff distance on a dry runway is the greater of— (1) The horizontal distance... include a clearway, the takeoff run is equal to the takeoff distance. If the takeoff distance includes...

  2. 14 CFR 25.113 - Takeoff distance and takeoff run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Takeoff distance and takeoff run. 25.113... and takeoff run. (a) Takeoff distance on a dry runway is the greater of— (1) The horizontal distance... include a clearway, the takeoff run is equal to the takeoff distance. If the takeoff distance includes...

  3. 14 CFR 25.113 - Takeoff distance and takeoff run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Takeoff distance and takeoff run. 25.113... and takeoff run. (a) Takeoff distance on a dry runway is the greater of— (1) The horizontal distance... include a clearway, the takeoff run is equal to the takeoff distance. If the takeoff distance includes...

  4. 14 CFR 25.113 - Takeoff distance and takeoff run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Takeoff distance and takeoff run. 25.113... and takeoff run. (a) Takeoff distance on a dry runway is the greater of— (1) The horizontal distance... include a clearway, the takeoff run is equal to the takeoff distance. If the takeoff distance includes...

  5. 14 CFR 23.59 - Takeoff distance and takeoff run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Takeoff distance and takeoff run. 23.59... Takeoff distance and takeoff run. For each commuter category airplane, the takeoff distance and, at the option of the applicant, the takeoff run, must be determined. (a) Takeoff distance is the greater of—...

  6. 14 CFR 25.113 - Takeoff distance and takeoff run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Takeoff distance and takeoff run. 25.113... and takeoff run. (a) Takeoff distance on a dry runway is the greater of— (1) The horizontal distance... include a clearway, the takeoff run is equal to the takeoff distance. If the takeoff distance includes...

  7. 14 CFR 23.59 - Takeoff distance and takeoff run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Takeoff distance and takeoff run. 23.59... Takeoff distance and takeoff run. For each commuter category airplane, the takeoff distance and, at the option of the applicant, the takeoff run, must be determined. (a) Takeoff distance is the greater of—...

  8. Assessment at full scale of nozzle/wing geometry effects on OTW aero-acoustic characteristics. [short takeoff aircraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groesbeck, D.; Vonglahn, U.

    1979-01-01

    The effects on acoustic characteristics of nozzle type and location on a wing for STOL engine over-the-wing configurations are assessed at full scale on the basis of model-scale data. Three types of nozzle configurations are evaluated: a circular nozzle with external deflector mounted above the wing, a slot nozzle with external deflector mounted on the wing and a slot nozzle mounted on the wing. Nozzle exhaust plane locations with respect to the wing leading edge are varied from 10 to 46 percent chord (flaps retracted) with flap angles of 20 (takeoff altitude) and 60 (approach attitude). Perceived noise levels (PNL) are calculated as a function of flyover distance at 152 m altitude. From these plots, static EPNL values, defined as flyover relative noise levels, are calculated and plotted as a function of lift and thrust ratios. From such plots the acoustic benefits attributable to variations in nozzle/deflector/wing geometry at full scale are assessed for equal aerodynamic performance.

  9. 14 CFR 23.59 - Takeoff distance and takeoff run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Takeoff distance and takeoff run. 23.59... Takeoff distance and takeoff run. For normal, utility, and acrobatic category multiengine jets of more... option of the applicant, the takeoff run, must be determined. (a) Takeoff distance is the greater of—...

  10. 14 CFR 23.59 - Takeoff distance and takeoff run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Takeoff distance and takeoff run. 23.59... Takeoff distance and takeoff run. For normal, utility, and acrobatic category multiengine jets of more... option of the applicant, the takeoff run, must be determined. (a) Takeoff distance is the greater of—...

  11. Static internal performance of ventral and rear nozzle concepts for short-takeoff and vertical-landing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Re, Richard J.; Carson, George T., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The internal performance of two exhaust system concepts applicable to single-engine short-take-off and vertical-landing tactical fighter configurations was investigated. These concepts involved blocking (or partially blocking) tailpipe flow to the rear (cruise) nozzle and diverting it through an opening to a ventral nozzle exit for vertical thrust. A set of variable angle vanes at the ventral nozzle exit were used to vary ventral nozzle thrust angle between 45 and 110 deg relative to the positive axial force direction. In the vertical flight mode the rear nozzle (or tailpipe flow to it) was completely blocked. In the transition flight mode flow in the tailpipe was split between the rear and ventral nozzles and the flow was vectored at both exits for aircraft control purposes through this flight regime. In the cruise flight mode the ventral nozzle was sealed and all flow exited through the rear nozzle.

  12. 14 CFR 23.59 - Takeoff distance and takeoff run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Takeoff distance and takeoff run. 23.59... Takeoff distance and takeoff run. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR 75753, December 2, 2011. For... run, must be determined. (a) Takeoff distance is the greater of— (1) The horizontal distance along...

  13. Aircraft concepts for advanced short haul systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galloway, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    The results of recent NASA-sponsored high-density and medium-density short-haul (less than 500 miles) air transportation systems studies are summarized. Trends in vehicle characteristics, in particular of RTOL and STOL concepts, are noted, and their economic suitability and impact on the community are examined.

  14. Advanced short haul aircraft for high density markets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galloway, T. L.

    1977-01-01

    The short haul (less than 500 miles) passenger enplanements represent about 50% of the total domestic enplanements. These can be distinguished by the annual passenger flow for a given city pair and classified into low, medium and high densiy markets. NASA studies have investigated various advanced short haul aircraft concepts that have potential application in these three market areas. Although advanced operational techniques impact all market densities, advanced vehicle design concepts such as RTOL, STOL and VTOL have the largest impact in the high density markets. This paper summarizes the results of NASA sponsored high density short haul air transportation systems studies and briefly reviews NASA sponsored advanced VTOL conceptual aircraft design studies. Trends in vehicle characteristics and operational requirements will be indicated in addition to economic suitability and impact on the community.

  15. Prediction of noise constrained optimum takeoff procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, S. L.

    1980-01-01

    An optimization method is used to predict safe, maximum-performance takeoff procedures which satisfy noise constraints at multiple observer locations. The takeoff flight is represented by two-degree-of-freedom dynamical equations with aircraft angle-of-attack and engine power setting as control functions. The engine thrust, mass flow and noise source parameters are assumed to be given functions of the engine power setting and aircraft Mach number. Effective Perceived Noise Levels at the observers are treated as functionals of the control functions. The method is demonstrated by applying it to an Advanced Supersonic Transport aircraft design. The results indicate that automated takeoff procedures (continuously varying controls) can be used to significantly reduce community and certification noise without jeopardizing safety or degrading performance.

  16. Application of advanced technologies to small, short-haul aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, D. G.; Brubaker, P. W.; Bryant, S. L.; Clay, C. W.; Giridharadas, B.; Hamamoto, M.; Kelly, T. J.; Proctor, D. K.; Myron, C. E.; Sullivan, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The results of a preliminary design study which investigates the use of selected advanced technologies to achieve low cost design for small (50-passenger), short haul (50 to 1000 mile) transports are reported. The largest single item in the cost of manufacturing an airplane of this type is labor. A careful examination of advanced technology to airframe structure was performed since one of the most labor-intensive parts of the airplane is structures. Also, preliminary investigation of advanced aerodynamics flight controls, ride control and gust load alleviation systems, aircraft systems and turbo-prop propulsion systems was performed. The most beneficial advanced technology examined was bonded aluminum primary structure. The use of this structure in large wing panels and body sections resulted in a greatly reduced number of parts and fasteners and therefore, labor hours. The resultant cost of assembled airplane structure was reduced by 40% and the total airplane manufacturing cost by 16% - a major cost reduction. With further development, test verification and optimization appreciable weight saving is also achievable. Other advanced technology items which showed significant gains are as follows: (1) advanced turboprop-reduced block fuel by 15.30% depending on range; (2) configuration revisions (vee-tail)-empennage cost reduction of 25%; (3) leading-edge flap addition-weight reduction of 2500 pounds.

  17. Ski jump takeoff performance predictions for a mixed-flow, remote-lift STOVL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birckelbaw, Lourdes G.

    1992-01-01

    A ski jump model was developed to predict ski jump takeoff performance for a short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft. The objective was to verify the model with results from a piloted simulation of a mixed flow, remote lift STOVL aircraft. The prediction model is discussed. The predicted results are compared with the piloted simulation results. The ski jump model can be utilized for basic research of other thrust vectoring STOVL aircraft performing a ski jump takeoff.

  18. Analysis of Dragonfly Take-off Mechanism: Initial Impulse Generated by Aerodynamic Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ruijie; Bode-Oke, Ayodeji; Ren, Yan; Dong, Haibo; Flow Simulation Research Team

    2013-11-01

    Take-off is a critical part of insect flight due to not only that every single flight initiates from take-off, but also that the take-off period, despite its short duration, accounts for a relatively large fraction of the total energy consumption. Thus, studying the mechanism of insect take-off will help to improve the design of Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) in two major properties, the success rate and the energy efficiency of take-off. In this work, we study 20 cases in which dragonflies (species including Pachydiplax longipennis, Epitheca Cynosura, Epitheca princeps etc.) take off from designed platform. By high-speed photogrammetry, 3-d reconstruction and numerical simulation, we explore how dragonflies coordinate different body parts to help take-off. We evaluate how aerodynamic forces generated by wing flapping create the initial impulse, and how these forces help save energy consumption. Supported by NSF CBET-1343154.

  19. 14 CFR 25.111 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Takeoff path. 25.111 Section 25.111... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.111 Takeoff path. (a) The takeoff path... and VFTO is reached, whichever point is higher. In addition— (1) The takeoff path must be based on...

  20. 14 CFR 25.111 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Takeoff path. 25.111 Section 25.111... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.111 Takeoff path. (a) The takeoff path... and VFTO is reached, whichever point is higher. In addition— (1) The takeoff path must be based on...

  1. 14 CFR 25.111 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Takeoff path. 25.111 Section 25.111... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.111 Takeoff path. (a) The takeoff path... and VFTO is reached, whichever point is higher. In addition— (1) The takeoff path must be based on...

  2. 14 CFR 25.111 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Takeoff path. 25.111 Section 25.111... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.111 Takeoff path. (a) The takeoff path... and VFTO is reached, whichever point is higher. In addition— (1) The takeoff path must be based on...

  3. 14 CFR 23.57 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Takeoff path. 23.57 Section 23.57... path. For each commuter category airplane, the takeoff path is as follows: (a) The takeoff path extends... completed; and (1) The takeoff path must be based on the procedures prescribed in § 23.45; (2) The...

  4. 14 CFR 25.111 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Takeoff path. 25.111 Section 25.111... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.111 Takeoff path. (a) The takeoff path... and VFTO is reached, whichever point is higher. In addition— (1) The takeoff path must be based on...

  5. 14 CFR 23.57 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Takeoff path. 23.57 Section 23.57... path. For each commuter category airplane, the takeoff path is as follows: (a) The takeoff path extends... completed; and (1) The takeoff path must be based on the procedures prescribed in § 23.45; (2) The...

  6. Application of advanced technologies to small, short-haul transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coussens, T. G.; Tullis, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    The performance and economic benefits available by incorporation of advanced technologies into the small, short haul air transport were assessed. Low cost structure and advanced composite material, advanced turboprop engines and new propellers, advanced high lift systems and active controls; and alternate aircraft configurations with aft mounted engines were investigated. Improvements in fuel consumed and aircraft economics (acquisition cost and direct operating cost) are available by incorporating selected advanced technologies into the small, short haul aircraft.

  7. 14 CFR 29.61 - Takeoff distance: Category A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... (a) The normal takeoff distance is the horizontal distance along the takeoff path from the start of.... (b) For elevated heliports, the takeoff distance is the horizontal distance along the takeoff...

  8. 14 CFR 29.61 - Takeoff distance: Category A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... (a) The normal takeoff distance is the horizontal distance along the takeoff path from the start of.... (b) For elevated heliports, the takeoff distance is the horizontal distance along the takeoff...

  9. 14 CFR 29.61 - Takeoff distance: Category A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... (a) The normal takeoff distance is the horizontal distance along the takeoff path from the start of.... (b) For elevated heliports, the takeoff distance is the horizontal distance along the takeoff...

  10. 14 CFR 29.61 - Takeoff distance: Category A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... (a) The normal takeoff distance is the horizontal distance along the takeoff path from the start of.... (b) For elevated heliports, the takeoff distance is the horizontal distance along the takeoff...

  11. Take-off of heavily loaded airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proll, A

    1928-01-01

    In the present article, several suggestions will be made for shortening the otherwise long take-off distance. For the numerical verification of the process, I will use a graphic method for determining the take-off distance of seaplanes.

  12. 14 CFR 23.53 - Takeoff performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... takeoff and climb to a height of 50 feet above the takeoff surface must be determined for each weight..., utility, and acrobatic category multiengine jets of more than 6,000 pounds maximum weight and...

  13. 14 CFR 23.53 - Takeoff performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... takeoff and climb to a height of 50 feet above the takeoff surface must be determined for each weight..., utility, and acrobatic category multiengine jets of more than 6,000 pounds maximum weight and...

  14. Takeoff characteristics of turbofan engines

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Y.B. )

    1990-05-01

    The present derivation of reliable formulas for the takeoff characteristics of turbofan-powered aircraft, encompassing ground-roll distance and time, fuel consumption, etc, incorporates ground effect-induced drag reduction. This drag reduction factor is varied according to type of aircraft; the turbofans in question may be of high-bypass transport-aircraft type or of low bypass and afterburner-employing configuration, as is typically the case in military aircraft. It is shown that bypass ratio variations have little influence on takeoff ground-rolling distance.

  15. 14 CFR 23.57 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Takeoff path. 23.57 Section 23.57... path. For normal, utility, and acrobatic category multiengine jets of more than 6,000 pounds maximum weight and commuter category airplanes, the takeoff path is as follows: (a) The takeoff path extends...

  16. 14 CFR 23.57 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Takeoff path. 23.57 Section 23.57... path. For normal, utility, and acrobatic category multiengine jets of more than 6,000 pounds maximum weight and commuter category airplanes, the takeoff path is as follows: (a) The takeoff path extends...

  17. 14 CFR 23.57 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Takeoff path. 23.57 Section 23.57... path. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR 75753, December 2, 2011. For each commuter category airplane, the takeoff path is as follows: (a) The takeoff path extends from a standing start to a point...

  18. 14 CFR 23.53 - Takeoff performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Takeoff performance. 23.53 Section 23.53... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 23.53 Takeoff performance. (a) For normal, utility, and acrobatic category airplanes, the takeoff distance must...

  19. Advanced concept considerations for STOL short-haul systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, H. S.; Renshaw, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Design, performance, and economic tradeoffs for STOL short-haul systems are presented. The analyses showed that quiet, short-field aircraft can be economically viable and provide benefits to airport congestion and to community noise relief. The objective of the studies was to compare and evaluate propulsive-lift systems and low-wing-loading aircraft provided with ride quality control and gust load alleviation, and to determine fuel consumption and cost tradeoffs, along with recommendations for development of technology, noise criteria, and airport planning. In the low density arena, the optimum aircraft sized for less than 50 passengers have active controls for ride quality and gust alleviation; turboprop propulsion offers significant cost and fuel saving with no appreciable block time penalty for the short typical stage lengths (on the order of 150 miles). In the high density arena, high bypass-ratio fan-powered aircraft, with design cruise speed of 0.7 to 0.75M and range capability to 1500 miles, are considered to be optimum. Field performance of 3000 feet or better can be achieved by the hybrid over-the-wing/internally blown flap concept with viable economics and low fuel consumption. Mechanical flap aircraft with high bypass-ratio engines are indicated to be superior for field lengths of 3500 feet or more. Technology development of propulsive lift is required, and further definition of the best fan-powered engine for low noise and low fuel consumption is needed.

  20. Application of advanced technologies to small, short-haul transport aircraft (STAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraus, E. F.; Mall, O. D.; Awker, R. W.; Scholl, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    The benefits of selected advanced technologies for 19 and 30 passenger, short-haul aircraft were identified. Advanced technologies were investigated in four areas: aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, and ride quality. Configuration sensitivity studies were conducted to show design tradeoffs associated with passenger capacity, cabin comfort level, and design field length.

  1. 14 CFR 29.51 - Takeoff data: general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... engines within approved operating limitations. (b) Takeoff data must— (1) Be determined on a smooth, dry, hard surface; and (2) Be corrected to assume a level takeoff surface. (c) No takeoff made to...

  2. 14 CFR 29.51 - Takeoff data: general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... engines within approved operating limitations. (b) Takeoff data must— (1) Be determined on a smooth, dry, hard surface; and (2) Be corrected to assume a level takeoff surface. (c) No takeoff made to...

  3. 14 CFR 29.51 - Takeoff data: general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... engines within approved operating limitations. (b) Takeoff data must— (1) Be determined on a smooth, dry, hard surface; and (2) Be corrected to assume a level takeoff surface. (c) No takeoff made to...

  4. 14 CFR 29.51 - Takeoff data: general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... engines within approved operating limitations. (b) Takeoff data must— (1) Be determined on a smooth, dry, hard surface; and (2) Be corrected to assume a level takeoff surface. (c) No takeoff made to...

  5. Advanced short haul systems in high density markets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galloway, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    The design requirements, performance, economics, and noise aspects of STOL and VTOL conceptual aircraft developed for short haul air transportation are reviewed, along with the characteristics of areas of high-density annual passenger flow in which the aircraft are intended to operate. It is shown that aircraft of 100 to 200 passenger capacity provide the best return on investment in high density markets. The various STOL propulsive lift concepts have the same general trends with field length; their wing loadings are 20 to 30 pounds per square foot higher than the nonpropulsive lift concepts. A comparison of the aircraft under consideration shows that no one aircraft concept will be optimum for all future operational environments.

  6. 14 CFR 27.51 - Takeoff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the ranges of altitude from standard sea level conditions to the maximum altitude for which takeoff... and r.p.m. at the most critical center of gravity, and with weight from the maximum weight at sea level to the weight for which takeoff certification is requested for each altitude covered by...

  7. 14 CFR 27.51 - Takeoff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the ranges of altitude from standard sea level conditions to the maximum altitude for which takeoff... and r.p.m. at the most critical center of gravity, and with weight from the maximum weight at sea level to the weight for which takeoff certification is requested for each altitude covered by...

  8. 14 CFR 27.51 - Takeoff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the ranges of altitude from standard sea level conditions to the maximum altitude for which takeoff... and r.p.m. at the most critical center of gravity, and with weight from the maximum weight at sea level to the weight for which takeoff certification is requested for each altitude covered by...

  9. 14 CFR 27.51 - Takeoff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the ranges of altitude from standard sea level conditions to the maximum altitude for which takeoff... and r.p.m. at the most critical center of gravity, and with weight from the maximum weight at sea level to the weight for which takeoff certification is requested for each altitude covered by...

  10. 14 CFR 27.51 - Takeoff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the ranges of altitude from standard sea level conditions to the maximum altitude for which takeoff... and r.p.m. at the most critical center of gravity, and with weight from the maximum weight at sea level to the weight for which takeoff certification is requested for each altitude covered by...

  11. 14 CFR 25.107 - Takeoff speeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Takeoff speeds. 25.107 Section 25.107... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.107 Takeoff speeds. (a) V1 must be... be less than VEF plus the speed gained with critical engine inoperative during the time...

  12. 14 CFR 23.53 - Takeoff performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., and acrobatic category airplanes, the distance required to takeoff and climb to a height of 50 feet above the takeoff surface must be determined for each weight, altitude, and temperature within the... category multiengine jets of more than 6,000 pounds maximum weight and commuter category airplanes,...

  13. 14 CFR 25.107 - Takeoff speeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Takeoff speeds. 25.107 Section 25.107... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.107 Takeoff speeds. (a) V1 must be... be less than VEF plus the speed gained with critical engine inoperative during the time...

  14. 14 CFR 25.107 - Takeoff speeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Takeoff speeds. 25.107 Section 25.107... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.107 Takeoff speeds. (a) V1 must be... be less than VEF plus the speed gained with critical engine inoperative during the time...

  15. Wing and body motion and aerodynamic and leg forces during take-off in droneflies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mao Wei; Zhang, Yan Lai; Sun, Mao

    2013-12-01

    Here, we present a detailed analysis of the take-off mechanics in droneflies performing voluntary take-offs. Wing and body kinematics of the insects during take-off were measured using high-speed video techniques. Based on the measured data, the inertia force acting on the insect was computed and the aerodynamic force of the wings was calculated by the method of computational fluid dynamics. Subtracting the aerodynamic force and the weight from the inertia force gave the leg force. In take-off, a dronefly increases its stroke amplitude gradually in the first 10-14 wingbeats and becomes airborne at about the 12th wingbeat. The aerodynamic force increases monotonously from zero to a value a little larger than its weight, and the leg force decreases monotonously from a value equal to its weight to zero, showing that the droneflies do not jump and only use aerodynamic force of flapping wings to lift themselves into the air. Compared with take-offs in insects in previous studies, in which a very large force (5-10 times of the weight) generated either by jumping legs (locusts, milkweed bugs and fruit flies) or by the 'fling' mechanism of the wing pair (butterflies) is used in a short time, the take-off in the droneflies is relatively slow but smoother. PMID:24132205

  16. Wing and body motion and aerodynamic and leg forces during take-off in droneflies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mao Wei; Zhang, Yan Lai; Sun, Mao

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present a detailed analysis of the take-off mechanics in droneflies performing voluntary take-offs. Wing and body kinematics of the insects during take-off were measured using high-speed video techniques. Based on the measured data, the inertia force acting on the insect was computed and the aerodynamic force of the wings was calculated by the method of computational fluid dynamics. Subtracting the aerodynamic force and the weight from the inertia force gave the leg force. In take-off, a dronefly increases its stroke amplitude gradually in the first 10–14 wingbeats and becomes airborne at about the 12th wingbeat. The aerodynamic force increases monotonously from zero to a value a little larger than its weight, and the leg force decreases monotonously from a value equal to its weight to zero, showing that the droneflies do not jump and only use aerodynamic force of flapping wings to lift themselves into the air. Compared with take-offs in insects in previous studies, in which a very large force (5–10 times of the weight) generated either by jumping legs (locusts, milkweed bugs and fruit flies) or by the ‘fling’ mechanism of the wing pair (butterflies) is used in a short time, the take-off in the droneflies is relatively slow but smoother. PMID:24132205

  17. 14 CFR 29.1047 - Takeoff cooling test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... critical altitude) for the same period as this power is used in determining the takeoff climbout path under... those used in determining the takeoff flight path under § 29.59. (b) Category B. For each category B... must be used for the same time interval as takeoff power is used in determining the takeoff flight...

  18. 14 CFR 25.115 - Takeoff flight path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Takeoff flight path. 25.115 Section 25.115... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.115 Takeoff flight path. (a) The takeoff flight path shall be considered to begin 35 feet above the takeoff surface at the end of the...

  19. 14 CFR 29.1047 - Takeoff cooling test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... critical altitude) for the same period as this power is used in determining the takeoff climbout path under... those used in determining the takeoff flight path under § 29.59. (b) Category B. For each category B... must be used for the same time interval as takeoff power is used in determining the takeoff flight...

  20. 14 CFR 23.61 - Takeoff flight path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Takeoff flight path. 23.61 Section 23.61... flight path. For each commuter category airplane, the takeoff flight path must be determined as follows: (a) The takeoff flight path begins 35 feet above the takeoff surface at the end of the...

  1. 14 CFR 29.59 - Takeoff path: Category A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Takeoff path: Category A. 29.59 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Performance § 29.59 Takeoff path: Category A. (a) The takeoff path extends from the point of commencement of the takeoff procedure to a point at...

  2. 14 CFR 23.61 - Takeoff flight path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Takeoff flight path. 23.61 Section 23.61... flight path. For each commuter category airplane, the takeoff flight path must be determined as follows: (a) The takeoff flight path begins 35 feet above the takeoff surface at the end of the...

  3. 14 CFR 25.115 - Takeoff flight path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Takeoff flight path. 25.115 Section 25.115... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.115 Takeoff flight path. (a) The takeoff flight path shall be considered to begin 35 feet above the takeoff surface at the end of the...

  4. 14 CFR 29.59 - Takeoff path: Category A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Takeoff path: Category A. 29.59 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Performance § 29.59 Takeoff path: Category A. (a) The takeoff path extends from the point of commencement of the takeoff procedure to a point at...

  5. 14 CFR 25.115 - Takeoff flight path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Takeoff flight path. 25.115 Section 25.115... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.115 Takeoff flight path. (a) The takeoff flight path shall be considered to begin 35 feet above the takeoff surface at the end of the...

  6. 14 CFR 29.59 - Takeoff path: Category A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Takeoff path: Category A. 29.59 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Performance § 29.59 Takeoff path: Category A. (a) The takeoff path extends from the point of commencement of the takeoff procedure to a point at...

  7. 14 CFR 29.59 - Takeoff path: Category A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Takeoff path: Category A. 29.59 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Performance § 29.59 Takeoff path: Category A. (a) The takeoff path extends from the point of commencement of the takeoff procedure to a point at...

  8. 14 CFR 25.115 - Takeoff flight path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Takeoff flight path. 25.115 Section 25.115... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.115 Takeoff flight path. (a) The takeoff flight path shall be considered to begin 35 feet above the takeoff surface at the end of the...

  9. 14 CFR 29.59 - Takeoff path: Category A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Takeoff path: Category A. 29.59 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Performance § 29.59 Takeoff path: Category A. (a) The takeoff path extends from the point of commencement of the takeoff procedure to a point at...

  10. 14 CFR 25.115 - Takeoff flight path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Takeoff flight path. 25.115 Section 25.115... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.115 Takeoff flight path. (a) The takeoff flight path shall be considered to begin 35 feet above the takeoff surface at the end of the...

  11. Short Animation Movies as Advance Organizers in Physics Teaching: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koscianski, Andre; Ribeiro, Rafael Joao; da Silva, Sani Carvalho Rutz

    2012-01-01

    Background: Advance organizers are instructional materials that help students use previous knowledge to make links with new information. Short animation movies are a possible format and are well suited for physics, as they can portray dynamic phenomena and represent abstract concepts. Purpose: The study aimed to determine guidelines for the…

  12. Effectiveness of the Mindfulness Art Therapy Short Version for Japanese Patients with Advanced Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ando, Michiyo; Kira, Haruko; Hayashida, Shigeru; Ito, Sayoko

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of the Mindfulness Art Therapy Short Version for Japanese patients with advanced cancer. Patients learned mindfulness practices and then made art to express their feelings in the first session. After receiving instruction on practicing mindfulness 2 weeks later, they participated in a second…

  13. Career Advancement through Short-Term Training Project (CAST). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cofer-Henderson, Karen

    The Career Advancement through Short-term Training (CAST) project offered comprehensive career guidance and counseling to those persons needing to upgrade technical skills, those needing flexible training schedules, those moving into new careers, and those needing prerequisite training. Materials and products were developed to implement a…

  14. Advancing Sexuality Studies: A Short Course on Sexuality Theory and Research Methodologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Gillian; Dowsett, Gary W.; Duncan, Duane; Slavin, Sean; Corboz, Julienne

    2013-01-01

    Critical Sexuality Studies is an emerging field of academic enquiry linked to an international network of advocacy agencies, activists, and political issues. This paper reports on the development of an advanced short course in sexuality theory and research, drawing on Critical Sexuality Studies and aiming directly at academics in developing…

  15. TAKEOFF AND LANDING PERFORMANCE CAPABILITIES OF TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRCRAFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foss, W. E.

    1994-01-01

    One of the most important considerations in the design of a commercial transport aircraft is the aircraft's performance during takeoff and landing operations. The aircraft must be designed to meet field length constraints in accordance with airworthiness standards specified in the Federal Aviation Regulations. In addition, the noise levels generated during these operations must be within acceptable limits. This computer program provides for the detailed analysis of the takeoff and landing performance capabilities of transport category aircraft. The program calculates aircraft performance in accordance with the airworthiness standards of the Federal Aviation Regulations. The aircraft and flight constraints are represented in sufficient detail to permit realistic sensitivity studies in terms of either configuration modifications or changes in operational procedures. This program provides for the detailed performance analysis of the takeoff and landing capabilities of specific aircraft designs and allows for sensitivity studies. The program is not designed to synthesize configurations or to generate aerodynamic, propulsion, or structural characteristics. This type of information must be generated externally to the program and then input as data. The program's representation of the aircraft data is extensive and includes realistic limits on engine and aircraft operational boundaries and maximum attainable lift coefficients. The takeoff and climbout flight-path is generated by a stepwise integration of the equation of motion. Special features include options for nonstandard-day operation, for balanced field length, for derated throttle to meet a given field length for off-loaded aircraft, and for throttle cutback during climbout for community noise alleviation. Advanced takeoff procedures for noise alleviation such as programmed throttle and control flaps may be investigated with the program. Approach profiles may incorporate advanced procedures such as two segment

  16. Could preoperative short-course radiotherapy be the treatment of choice for localized advanced rectal carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Ciria, Juan Pablo; Eguiguren, Mikel; Cafiero, Sergio; Uranga, Intza; Diaz de Cerio, Ivan; Querejeta, Arrate; Urraca, Jose Maria; Minguez, Julian; Guimon, Elena; Puertolas, Jose Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Short-course preoperative radiotherapy (RT) is widely used in northern Europe for locally advanced resectable rectal cancer, but its role in the era of advanced imaging techniques is uncertain. Here, we reviewed articles and abstracts on SCRT published from 1974 through 2013 with the goal of identifying patients who might be best suited for short-course RT. We included relevant articles comparing surgery with or without preoperative radiation published before and after the advent of total mesorectal excision. We also analyzed two randomized trials directly comparing short-course RT with conventionally fractionated chemoradiation (the Polish Colorectal Study Group and the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group) that compared short-course RT with conventional chemoradiotherapy. We conclude from our review that short-course RT can be generally applied for operable rectal cancer and produces high rates of pelvic control with acceptable toxicity; it reduces local recurrence rates but does not increase overall survival. SCRT seems to be best used for tumors considered "low risk," i.e., those that are >5 cm from the anal margin, without circumferential margin involvement, and involvement of fewer than 4 lymph nodes. Whether sequential chemotherapy can further improve outcomes remains to be seen, as does the best time for surgery (immediately or 6-8 weeks after RT). We further recommend that selection of patients for short-course RT should be based on findings from magnetic resonance imaging or transrectal ultrasonography. PMID:25535578

  17. 14 CFR 25.107 - Takeoff speeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... speed increment attained (in accordance with § 25.111(c)(2)) before reaching a height of 35 feet above....111(c)(2)) that allows reaching V 2 before reaching a height of 35 feet above the takeoff surface;...

  18. 14 CFR 25.107 - Takeoff speeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... speed increment attained (in accordance with § 25.111(c)(2)) before reaching a height of 35 feet above....111(c)(2)) that allows reaching V 2 before reaching a height of 35 feet above the takeoff surface;...

  19. 14 CFR 25.105 - Takeoff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... takeoff data must be based on— (1) In the case of land planes and amphibians: (i) Smooth, dry and wet..., hard-surfaced runways. (2) Smooth water, in the case of seaplanes and amphibians; and (3) Smooth,...

  20. 14 CFR 25.105 - Takeoff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... takeoff data must be based on— (1) In the case of land planes and amphibians: (i) Smooth, dry and wet..., hard-surfaced runways. (2) Smooth water, in the case of seaplanes and amphibians; and (3) Smooth,...

  1. 14 CFR 25.105 - Takeoff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... takeoff data must be based on— (1) In the case of land planes and amphibians: (i) Smooth, dry and wet..., hard-surfaced runways. (2) Smooth water, in the case of seaplanes and amphibians; and (3) Smooth,...

  2. 14 CFR 25.105 - Takeoff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... takeoff data must be based on— (1) In the case of land planes and amphibians: (i) Smooth, dry and wet..., hard-surfaced runways. (2) Smooth water, in the case of seaplanes and amphibians; and (3) Smooth,...

  3. 14 CFR 25.105 - Takeoff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... takeoff data must be based on— (1) In the case of land planes and amphibians: (i) Smooth, dry and wet..., hard-surfaced runways. (2) Smooth water, in the case of seaplanes and amphibians; and (3) Smooth,...

  4. Seat Capacity Selection for an Advanced Short-Haul Aircraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marien, Ty V.

    2016-01-01

    A study was performed to determine the target seat capacity for a proposed advanced short-haul aircraft concept projected to enter the fleet by 2030. This analysis projected the potential demand in the U.S. for a short-haul aircraft using a transportation theory approach, rather than selecting a target seat capacity based on recent industry trends or current market demand. A transportation systems model was used to create a point-to-point network of short-haul trips and then predict the number of annual origin-destination trips on this network. Aircraft of varying seat capacities were used to meet the demand on this network, assuming a single aircraft type for the entire short-haul fleet. For each aircraft size, the ticket revenue and operational costs were used to calculate a total market profitability metric for all feasible flights. The different aircraft sizes were compared, based on this market profitability metric and also the total number of annual round trips and markets served. Sensitivity studies were also performed to determine the effect of changing the aircraft cruise speed and maximum trip length. Using this analysis, the advanced short-haul aircraft design team was able to select a target seat capacity for their design.

  5. Model aerodynamic test results for two variable cycle engine coannular exhaust systems at simulated takeoff and cruise conditions. Comprehensive data report. Volume 2: Tabulated aeroynamic data book 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Tabulated data from wind tunnel tests conducted to evaluate the aerodynamic performance of an advanced coannular exhaust nozzle for a future supersonic propulsion system are presented. Tests were conducted with two test configurations: (1) a short flap mechanism for fan stream control with an isentropic contoured flow splitter, and (2) an iris fan nozzle with a conical flow splitter. Both designs feature a translating primary plug and an auxiliary inlet ejector. Tests were conducted at takeoff and simulated cruise conditions. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0, 0.36, 0.9, and 2.0 for a wide range of nozzle operating conditions. At simulated supersonic cruise, both configurations demonstrated good performance, comparable to levels assumed in earlier advanced supersonic propulsion studies. However, at subsonic cruise, both configurations exhibited performance that was 6 to 7.5 percent less than the study assumptions. At takeoff conditions, the iris configuration performance approached the assumed levels, while the short flap design was 4 to 6 percent less. Data are provided through test run 25.

  6. Development of processing procedures for advanced silicon solar cells. [antireflection coatings and short circuit currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Monck, J. A.; Stella, P. M.; Avery, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    Ten ohm-cm silicon solar cells, 0.2 mm thick, were produced with short circuit current efficiencies up to thirteen percent and using a combination of recent technical advances. The cells were fabricated in conventional and wraparound contact configurations. Improvement in cell collection efficiency from both the short and long wavelengths region of the solar spectrum was obtained by coupling a shallow junction and an optically transparent antireflection coating with back surface field technology. Both boron diffusion and aluminum alloying techniques were evaluated for forming back surface field cells. The latter method is less complicated and is compatible with wraparound cell processing.

  7. Evaluation of advanced lift concepts and potential fuel conservation for short-haul aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, H. S.; Renshaw, J. H.; Bowden, M. K.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of different field lengths, cruise requirements, noise level, and engine cycle characteristics on minimizing fuel consumption and minimizing operating cost at high fuel prices were evaluated for some advanced short-haul aircraft. The conceptual aircraft were designed for 148 passengers using the upper surface-internally blown jet flap, the augmentor wing, and the mechanical flap lift systems. Advanced conceptual STOL engines were evaluated as well as a near-term turbofan and turboprop engine. Emphasis was given to designs meeting noise levels equivalent to 95-100 EPNdB at 152 m (500 ft) sideline.

  8. [Weekly administration of paclitaxel with a short course of premedication for advanced or recurrent gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shigetaka; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Ito, Toshinori; Nakai, Sumio; Morimoto, Yoshikazu; Kitagawa, Tohru; Kurihara, Youjirou; Nishimura, Junichi

    2003-01-01

    Weekly administration of paclitaxel with a short course of premedication was performed for 8 patients with advanced or recurrent gastric cancer. In this regimen, 500 ml of physiological saline with vitamins was administered in a 3-hour infusion. After 30 minutes of infusion, dexamethasone 10 mg, chlorpheniramine maleate 5 mg, famotidine 20 mg and ramosetron hydrochloride 0.3 mg were administered intravenously. After 30 more minutes of infusion, paclitaxel at a dose of 65 mg/m2 was admixed in the residual normal physiological saline and administered over 2 hours. Administration was continued for 3 weeks with a 1 week rest. Though the partial response rate was 25%, clinical symptoms improved in all patients. Moreover, both hematological and non-hematological toxicities were mild. Weekly administration of paclitaxel with a short course of premedication is an effective and well-tolerated method for patients with advanced or recurrent gastric cancer. PMID:12557707

  9. Flight test of takeoff performance monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, David B.; Srivatsan, Raghavachari; Person, Lee H., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The Takeoff Performance Monitoring System (TOPMS) is a computer software and hardware graphics system that visually displays current runway position, acceleration performance, engine status, and other situation advisory information to aid pilots in their decision to continue or to abort a takeoff. The system was developed at the Langley Research Center using the fixed-base Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV) simulator. (The TSRV is a highly modified Boeing 737-100 research airplane.) Several versions of the TOPMS displays were evaluated on the TSRV B-737 simulator by more than 40 research, United States Air Force, airline and industry and pilots who rated the system satisfactory and recommended further development and testing. In this study, the TOPMS was flight tested on the TSRV. A total of 55 takeoff and 30 abort situations were investigated at 5 airfields. TOPMS displays were observed on the navigation display screen in the TSRV research flight deck during various nominal and off-nominal situations, including normal takeoffs; reduced-throttle takeoffs; induced-acceleration deficiencies; simulated-engine failures; and several gross-weight, runway-geometry, runway-surface, and ambient conditions. All tests were performed on dry runways. The TOPMS software executed accurately during the flight tests and the displays correctly depicted the various test conditions. Evaluation pilots found the displays easy to monitor and understand. The algorithm provides pretakeoff predictions of the nominal distances that are needed to accelerate the airplane to takeoff speed and to brake it to a stop; these predictions agreed reasonably well with corresponding values measured during several fully executed and aborted takeoffs. The TOPMS is operational and has been retained on the TSRV for general use and demonstration.

  10. Superconducting Cavity Design for Short-Pulse X-Rays at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    G.J. Waldschmidt, R. Nassiri, G. Cheng, R.A. Rimmer, H. Wang

    2011-03-01

    Superconducting cavities have been analyzed for the short-pulse x-ray (SPX) project at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Due to the strong damping requirements in the APS storage ring, single-cell superconducting cavities have been designed. The geometry has been optimized for lower-order and higher-order mode damping, reduced peak surface magnetic fields, and compact size. The integration of the cavity assembly, with dampers and waveguide input coupler, into a cryomodule will be discussed.

  11. Application of advanced high speed turboprop technology to future civil short-haul transport aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlon, J. A.; Bowles, J. V.

    1978-01-01

    With an overall goal of defining the needs and requirements for short-haul transport aircraft research and development, the objective of this paper is to determine the performance and noise impact of short-haul transport aircraft designed with an advanced turboprop propulsion system. This propulsion system features high-speed propellers that have more blades and reduced diameters. Aircraft are designed for short and medium field lengths; mission block fuel and direct operating costs (DOC) are used as performance measures. The propeller diameter was optimized to minimize DOC. Two methods are employed to estimate the weight of the acoustic treatment needed to reduce interior noise to an acceptable level. Results show decreasing gross weight, block fuel, DOC, engine size, and optimum propfan diameter with increasing field length. The choice of acoustic treatment method has a significant effect on the aircraft design.

  12. 14 CFR 29.63 - Takeoff: Category B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... unfavorable center of gravity. The takeoff may be begun in any manner if— (a) The takeoff surface is defined; (b) Adequate safeguards are maintained to ensure proper center of gravity and control positions;...

  13. 14 CFR 29.63 - Takeoff: Category B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... unfavorable center of gravity. The takeoff may be begun in any manner if— (a) The takeoff surface is defined; (b) Adequate safeguards are maintained to ensure proper center of gravity and control positions;...

  14. 14 CFR 29.63 - Takeoff: Category B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... unfavorable center of gravity. The takeoff may be begun in any manner if— (a) The takeoff surface is defined; (b) Adequate safeguards are maintained to ensure proper center of gravity and control positions;...

  15. 14 CFR 29.63 - Takeoff: Category B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... unfavorable center of gravity. The takeoff may be begun in any manner if— (a) The takeoff surface is defined; (b) Adequate safeguards are maintained to ensure proper center of gravity and control positions;...

  16. 14 CFR 25.703 - Takeoff warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., that would not allow a safe takeoff: (1) The wing flaps or leading edge devices are not within the approved range of takeoff positions. (2) Wing spoilers (except lateral control spoilers meeting...

  17. 14 CFR 25.703 - Takeoff warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., that would not allow a safe takeoff: (1) The wing flaps or leading edge devices are not within the approved range of takeoff positions. (2) Wing spoilers (except lateral control spoilers meeting...

  18. 14 CFR 25.703 - Takeoff warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., that would not allow a safe takeoff: (1) The wing flaps or leading edge devices are not within the approved range of takeoff positions. (2) Wing spoilers (except lateral control spoilers meeting...

  19. 14 CFR 25.703 - Takeoff warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., that would not allow a safe takeoff: (1) The wing flaps or leading edge devices are not within the approved range of takeoff positions. (2) Wing spoilers (except lateral control spoilers meeting...

  20. 14 CFR 25.703 - Takeoff warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., that would not allow a safe takeoff: (1) The wing flaps or leading edge devices are not within the approved range of takeoff positions. (2) Wing spoilers (except lateral control spoilers meeting...

  1. 14 CFR 29.63 - Takeoff: Category B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... unfavorable center of gravity. The takeoff may be begun in any manner if— (a) The takeoff surface is defined; (b) Adequate safeguards are maintained to ensure proper center of gravity and control positions;...

  2. 14 CFR 29.1047 - Takeoff cooling test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the lowest practicable altitude and must be conducted with one engine inoperative. (3) The operating... critical altitude) for the same period as this power is used in determining the takeoff climbout path under... stabilized, a climb must be started at the lowest practicable altitude with takeoff power. (3) Takeoff...

  3. 14 CFR 23.61 - Takeoff flight path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Takeoff flight path. 23.61 Section 23.61... flight path. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR 75753, December 2, 2011. For each commuter category airplane, the takeoff flight path must be determined as follows: (a) The takeoff flight path begins 35...

  4. 14 CFR 135.217 - IFR: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 135.217 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.217 IFR: Takeoff limitations. No person may takeoff an aircraft under IFR from an airport where weather conditions are at or above takeoff minimums but are...

  5. 14 CFR 135.217 - IFR: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 135.217 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.217 IFR: Takeoff limitations. No person may takeoff an aircraft under IFR from an airport where weather conditions are at or above takeoff minimums but are...

  6. 14 CFR 135.217 - IFR: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 135.217 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.217 IFR: Takeoff limitations. No person may takeoff an aircraft under IFR from an airport where weather conditions are at or above takeoff minimums but are...

  7. 14 CFR 135.217 - IFR: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 135.217 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.217 IFR: Takeoff limitations. No person may takeoff an aircraft under IFR from an airport where weather conditions are at or above takeoff minimums but are...

  8. 14 CFR 135.217 - IFR: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 135.217 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.217 IFR: Takeoff limitations. No person may takeoff an aircraft under IFR from an airport where weather conditions are at or above takeoff minimums but are...

  9. Application of Advanced Technologies to Small, Short-haul Air Transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adcock, C.; Coverston, C.; Knapton, B.

    1980-01-01

    A study was conducted of the application of advanced technologies to small, short-haul transport aircraft. A three abreast, 30 passenger design for flights of approximately 100 nautical miles was evaluated. Higher wing loading, active flight control, and a gust alleviation system results in improved ride quality. Substantial savings in fuel and direct operating cost are forecast. An aircraft of this configuration also has significant benefits in forms of reliability and operability which should enable it to sell a total of 450 units through 1990, of which 80% are for airline use.

  10. Evaluation of advanced lift concepts and fuel conservative short-haul aircraft, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renshaw, J. H.; Bowden, M. K.; Narucki, C. W.; Bennett, J. A.; Smith, P. R.; Ferrill, R. S.; Randall, C. C.; Tibbetts, J. G.; Patterson, R. W.; Meyer, R. T.

    1974-01-01

    The performance and economics of a twin-engine augmentor wing airplane were evaluated in two phases. Design aspects of the over-the-wing/internally blown flap hybrid, augmentor wing, and mechanical flap aircraft were investigated for 910 m. field length with parametric extension to other field lengths. Fuel savings achievable by application of advanced lift concepts to short-haul aircraft were evaluated and the effect of different field lengths, cruise requirements, and noise levels on fuel consumption and airplane economics at higher fuel prices were determined. Conclusions and recommendations are presented.

  11. Status of the Short-Pulse X-ray Project at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Nassiri, A; Berenc, T G; Borland, M; Brajuskovic, B; Bromberek, D J; Carwardine, J; Decker, G; Emery, L; Fuerst, J D; Grelick, A E; Horan, D; Kaluzny, J; Lenkszus, F; Lill, R M; Liu, J; Ma, H; Sajaev, V; Smith, T L; Stillwell, B K; Waldschmidt, G J; Wu, G; Yang, B X; Yang, Y; Zholents, A; Byrd, J M; Doolittle, L R; Huang, G; Cheng, G; Ciovati, G; Dhakal, P; Eremeev, G V; Feingold, J J; Geng, R L; Henry, J; Kneisel, P; Macha, K; Mammosser, J D; Matalevich, J; Palczewski, A D; Rimmer, R A; Wang, H; Wilson, K M; Wiseman, M; Li, Z; Xiao, L

    2012-07-01

    The Advanced Photon Source Upgrade (APS-U) Project at Argonne will include generation of short-pulse x-rays based on Zholents deflecting cavity scheme. We have chosen superconducting (SC) cavities in order to have a continuous train of crabbed bunches and flexibility of operating modes. In collaboration with Jefferson Laboratory, we are prototyping and testing a number of single-cell deflecting cavities and associated auxiliary systems with promising initial results. In collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we are working to develop state-of-the-art timing, synchronization, and differential rf phase stability systems that are required for SPX. Collaboration with Advanced Computations Department at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is looking into simulations of complex, multi-cavity geometries with lower- and higher-order modes waveguide dampers using ACE3P. This contribution provides the current R&D status of the SPX project.

  12. In-medium short-range dynamics of nucleons: Recent theoretical and experimental advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atti, Claudio Ciofi degli

    2015-08-01

    The investigation of in-medium short-range dynamics of nucleons, usually referred to as the study of short-range correlations (SRCs), is a key issue in nuclear and hadronic physics. As a matter of fact, even in the simplified assumption that the nucleus could be described as a system of protons and neutrons interacting via effective nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions, several non trivial problems arise concerning the description of in-medium (NN short-range dynamics, namely: (i) the behavior of the NN interaction at short inter-nucleon distances in medium cannot be uniquely constrained by the experimental NN scattering phase shifts due to off-shell effects; (ii) by rigorous renormalization group (RG) techniques entire families of phase equivalent interactions differing in the short-range part can be derived; (iii) the in-medium NN interaction may be, in principle, different from the free one; (iv) when the short inter-nucleon separation is of the order of the nucleon size, the question arises of possible effects from quark and gluon degrees of freedom. For more than fifty years, experimental evidence of SRCs has been searched by means of various kinds of nuclear reactions, without however convincing results, mainly because the effects of SRCs arise from non observable quantities, like, e.g., the momentum distributions, and have been extracted from observable cross sections where short- and long-range effects, effects from nucleonic and non nucleonic degrees of freedom, and effects from final state interaction, could not be unambiguously separated out. Recent years, however, were witness of new progress in the field: from one side, theoretical and computational progress has allowed one to solve ab initio the many-nucleon non relativistic Schrödinger equation in terms of realistic NN interactions, obtaining realistic microscopic wave functions, unless the case of parametrized wave functions used frequently in the past, moreover the development of advanced treatments

  13. Airplane takeoff and landing performance monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, David B. (Inventor); Srivatsan, Raghavachari (Inventor); Person, Jr., Lee H. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The invention is a real-time takeoff and landing performance monitoring system for an aircraft which provides a pilot with graphic and metric information to assist in decisions related to achieving rotation speed (V.sub.R) within the safe zone of a runway, or stopping the aircraft on the runway after landing or take-off abort. The system processes information in two segments: a pretakeoff segment and a real-time segment. One-time inputs of ambient conditions and airplane configuration information are used in the pretakeoff segment to generate scheduled performance data. The real-time segment uses the scheduled performance data, runway length data and transducer measured parameters to monitor the performance of the airplane throughout the takeoff roll. Airplane acceleration and engine-performance anomalies are detected and annunciated. A novel and important feature of this segment is that it updates the estimated runway rolling friction coefficient. Airplane performance predictions also reflect changes in head wind occurring as the takeoff roll progresses. The system provides a head-down display and a head-up display. The head-up display is projected onto a partially reflective transparent surface through which the pilot views the runway. By comparing the present performance of the airplane with a continually predicted nominal performance based upon given conditions, performance deficiencies are detected by the system and conveyed to pilot in form of both elemental information and integrated information.

  14. Take-off and propeller thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrenk, Martin

    1933-01-01

    As a result of previous reports, it was endeavored to obtain, along with the truest possible comprehension of the course of thrust, a complete, simple and clear formula for the whole take-off distance up to a certain altitude, which shall give the correct relative weight to all the factors.

  15. Airplane takeoff and landing performance monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, David B. (Inventor); Srivatsan, Raghavachari (Inventor); Person, Lee H., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a real-time takeoff and landing performance monitoring system for an aircraft which provides a pilot with graphic and metric information to assist in decisions related to achieving rotation speed (VR) within the safe zone of a runway, or stopping the aircraft on the runway after landing or take-off abort. The system processes information in two segments: a pretakeoff segment and a real-time segment. One-time inputs of ambient conditions and airplane configuration information are used in the pretakeoff segment to generate scheduled performance data. The real-time segment uses the scheduled performance data, runway length data and transducer measured parameters to monitor the performance of the airplane throughout the takeoff roll. Airplane acceleration and engine-performance anomalies are detected and annunciated. A novel and important feature of this segment is that it updates the estimated runway rolling friction coefficient. Airplane performance predictions also reflect changes in head wind occurring as the takeoff roll progresses. The system provides a head-down display and a head-up display. The head-up display is projected onto a partially reflective transparent surface through which the pilot views the runway. By comparing the present performance of the airplane with a continually predicted nominal performance based upon given conditions, performance deficiencies are detected by the system and conveyed to pilot in form of both elemental information and integrated information.

  16. Airplane takeoff and landing performance monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, David B. (Inventor); Srivatsan, Raghavachari (Inventor); Person, Jr., Lee H. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The invention is a real-time takeoff and landing performance monitoring system for an aircraft which provides a pilot with graphic and metric information to assist in decisions related to achieving rotation speed (V.sub.R) within the safe zone of a runway, or stopping the aircraft on the runway after landing or take-off abort. The system processes information in two segments: a pretakeoff segment and a real-time segment. One-time inputs of ambient conditions and airplane configuration information are used in the pretakeoff segment to generate scheduled performance data. The real-time segment uses the scheduled performance data, runway length data and transducer measured parameters to monitor the performance of the airplane throughout the takeoff roll. Airplane and engine performance deficiencies are detected and annunciated. A novel and important feature of this segment is that it updates the estimated runway rolling friction coefficient. Airplane performance predictions also reflect changes in head wind occurring as the takeoff roll progresses. The system provides a head-down display and a head-up display. The head-up display is projected onto a partially reflective transparent surface through which the pilot views the runway. By comparing the present performance of the airplane with a predicted nominal performance based upon given conditions, performance deficiencies are detected by the system.

  17. 14 CFR 23.51 - Takeoff speeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Takeoff speeds. 23.51 Section 23.51... speeds. (a) For normal, utility, and acrobatic category airplanes, rotation speed, VR, is the speed at... seaplanes and amphibians taking off from water, VR, may be any speed that is shown to be safe under...

  18. 14 CFR 23.51 - Takeoff speeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Takeoff speeds. 23.51 Section 23.51... speeds. (a) For normal, utility, and acrobatic category airplanes, rotation speed, VR, is the speed at... seaplanes and amphibians taking off from water, VR, may be any speed that is shown to be safe under...

  19. Calculation of Takeoff and Landing Performance Under Different Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yajuan; Wang, Jiangfeng; Chen, Yongliang; Wu, Yizhao

    2016-06-01

    The takeoff and the landing of an aircraft are the most dangerous phases of flight, so the study of takeoff performance and landing performance is of great importance for aircraft design and safety. In the paper, a high-precision numerical integration algorithm for evaluating takeoff and landing performance is developed, which establishes and solves the equations of dynamics during takeoff and landing process. The proposed method is capable of calculating takeoff and landing performance under different environments. To verify the current approach, all-engine operating takeoff distance, one engine failure takeoff distance, takeoff stop distance and landing distance of a certain type of plane with four engines are analyzed. It shows that the developed calculation method is reliable and effective. Based on this algorithm, a detailed analysis of the main factors affecting the takeoff and landing performance is given. The influences of altitude, temperature, takeoff and landing weight and wind speed are analyzed. Through theoretical derivation and examples verification, the proposed method will be reference for the study of takeoff and landing performance.

  20. Study of quiet turbofan STOL aircraft for short haul transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, T. P.; Stout, E. G.; Sweet, H. S.

    1973-01-01

    A study of quiet turbofan short takeoff aircraft for short haul air transportation was conducted. The objectives of the study were to: (1) define representative aircraft configurations, characteristics, and costs associated with their development, (2) identify critical technology and technology related problems to be resolved in successful introduction of representative short haul aircraft, (3) determine relationships between quiet short takeoff aircraft and the economic and social viability of short haul, and (4) identify high payoff technology areas.

  1. A hybrid approach for generating ultra-short bunches for advanced accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2015-09-01

    Generation of electron beams with high phase-space density, short bunch length and high peak current is an essential requirement for future linear colliders and bright electron beam sources. Unfortunately, such bunches cannot be produced directly from the source since forces from the mutual repulsion of electrons would destroy the brilliance of the beam within a short distance. Here, we detail a beam dynamics study of an innovative two-stage compression scheme that can generate ultra-short bunches without degrading the beam quality. In the first stage, the beam is compressed with an advanced velocity bunching technique in which the longitudinal phase space is rotated so that electrons on the bunch tail become faster than electrons in the bunch head. In the second stage, the beam is further compressed with a conventional magnetic chicane. With the aid of numerical simulations we show that our two-staged scheme is capable to increase the current of a 50 pC bunch to a notable factor of 100 while the emittance growth can be suppressed to 1% with appropriate tailoring of the initial beam distribution.

  2. Study of belly-flaps to enhance lift and pitching moment coefficient of a Blended-Wing-Body airplane in landing and takeoff configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staelens, Yann Daniel

    During the first century of flight few major changes have been made to the configuration of subsonic airplanes. A distinct fuselage with wings, a tail, engines and a landing gear persists as the dominant arrangement. During WWII some companies developed tailless all-wing airplanes. However the concept failed to advance till the late 80's when the B-2, the only flying wing to enter production to date, illustrated its benefits at least for a stealth platform. The advent of the Blended-Wing-Body (BWB) addresses the historical shortcomings of all-wing designs, specifically poor volume utility and excess wetted area as a result. The BWB is now poised to become the new standard for large subsonic airplanes. Major aerospace companies are studying the concept for next generation of passenger airplanes. But there are still challenges. One is the BWB's short control lever-arm pitch. This affects rotation and go-around performances. This study presents a possible solution by using a novel type of control surface, a belly-flap, on the under side of the wing to enhance its lift and pitching moment coefficient during landing, go-around and takeoff. Increases of up to 30% in lift-off CL and 8% in positive pitching moment have been achieved during wind tunnel tests on a generic BWB-model with a belly-flap. These aerodynamic improvements when used in a mathematical simulation of landing, go-around and takeoff procedure were showing reduction in landing-field-length by up to 22%, in takeoff-field-length by up to 8% and in loss in altitude between initiation of rotation and actual rotation during go-around by up to 21.5%.

  3. Reusable aerospace system with horizontal take-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozino-Lozinskii, G. E.; Shkadov, L. M.; Plokhikh, V. P.

    1990-10-01

    An aerospace system (ASS) concept aiming at cost reductions for launching facilities, reduction of ground preparations for start and launch phases, flexibility of use, international inspection of space systems, and emergency rescue operations is presented. The concept suggests the utilization of an AN-225 subsonic carrier aircraft capable of carrying up to 250 ton of the external load, external fuel tank, and orbital spacecraft. It includes a horizontal take-off, full reusable or single-use system, orbital aircraft with hypersonic characteristics, the use of an air-breathing jet engine on the first stage of launch, and the utilization of advanced structural materials. Among possible applications for ASS are satellite launches into low supporting orbits, suborbital cargo and passenger flights, scientific and economic missions, and the technical servicing of orbital vehicles and stations.

  4. 14 CFR 29.60 - Elevated heliport takeoff path: Category A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Elevated heliport takeoff path: Category A... Elevated heliport takeoff path: Category A. (a) The elevated heliport takeoff path extends from the point of commencement of the takeoff procedure to a point in the takeoff path at which the rotorcraft is...

  5. 14 CFR 29.60 - Elevated heliport takeoff path: Category A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Elevated heliport takeoff path: Category A... Elevated heliport takeoff path: Category A. (a) The elevated heliport takeoff path extends from the point of commencement of the takeoff procedure to a point in the takeoff path at which the rotorcraft is...

  6. 14 CFR 29.60 - Elevated heliport takeoff path: Category A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Elevated heliport takeoff path: Category A... Elevated heliport takeoff path: Category A. (a) The elevated heliport takeoff path extends from the point of commencement of the takeoff procedure to a point in the takeoff path at which the rotorcraft is...

  7. 14 CFR 29.60 - Elevated heliport takeoff path: Category A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Elevated heliport takeoff path: Category A... Elevated heliport takeoff path: Category A. (a) The elevated heliport takeoff path extends from the point of commencement of the takeoff procedure to a point in the takeoff path at which the rotorcraft is...

  8. 14 CFR 29.60 - Elevated heliport takeoff path: Category A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Elevated heliport takeoff path: Category A... Elevated heliport takeoff path: Category A. (a) The elevated heliport takeoff path extends from the point of commencement of the takeoff procedure to a point in the takeoff path at which the rotorcraft is...

  9. Short-term effects of dietary advanced glycation end products in rats.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Malene W; Andersen, Jeanette M; Hedegaard, Rikke V; Madsen, Andreas N; Krath, Britta N; Monošík, Rastislav; Bak, Monika J; Nielsen, John; Holst, Birgitte; Skibsted, Leif H; Larsen, Lesli H; Dragsted, Lars O

    2016-02-28

    Dietary advanced glycation end products (AGE) formed during heating of food have gained interest as potential nutritional toxins with adverse effects on inflammation and glucose metabolism. In the present study, we investigated the short-term effects of high and low molecular weight (HMW and LMW) dietary AGE on insulin sensitivity, expression of the receptor for AGE (RAGE), the AGE receptor 1 (AGER1) and TNF-α, F2-isoprostaglandins, body composition and food intake. For 2 weeks, thirty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a diet containing 20% milk powder with different proportions of this being given as heated milk powder (0, 40 or 100%), either native (HMW) or hydrolysed (LMW). Gene expression of RAGE and AGER1 in whole blood increased in the group receiving a high AGE LMW diet, which also had the highest urinary excretion of the AGE, methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone 1 (MG-H1). Urinary excretion of N ε-carboxymethyl-lysine increased with increasing proportion of heat-treated milk powder in the HMW and LMW diets but was unrelated to gene expression. There was no difference in insulin sensitivity, F2-isoprostaglandins, food intake, water intake, body weight or body composition between the groups. In conclusion, RAGE and AGER1 expression can be influenced by a high AGE diet after only 2 weeks in proportion to MG-H1 excretion. No other short-term effects were observed. PMID:26824730

  10. Genioglossus advancement and hyoid myotomy: short-term and long-term results.

    PubMed

    Neruntarat, C

    2003-06-01

    Successful results of genioglossus advancement and hyoid myotomy with suspension (GAHM) in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) have been reported. However, there have been few studies of long-term results. Forty-six patients with hypopharyngeal obstruction underwent GAHM. Patients had a mean age of 40.1 +/- 4.2 years and a mean body mass index (BMI) of 28.9 +/- 2.1 kg/m(2). The mean follow-up was 39.4 +/- 5.7 months with a range of 37 to 46 months. The mean pre-operative RDI, short-term RDI, and long-term RDI were 47.9 +/- 8.4, 14.2 +/- 3.9, 18.6 +/- 4.1, respectively. The mean post-operative LSAT, short-term LSAT, and long-term LSAT were 81.2 per cent +/- 2.9 per cent, 88.8 per cent +/- 2.7 per cent and 87.2 per cent +/- 3.1 per cent, respectively. The change in BMI was significantly different in the patients with, and without, recurrence (2.1 +/- 0.3 vs 0.4 +/- 0.2.kg/m(2), <0.05). Thirty (65.2 per cent) patients had long-term clinical success, and six (16.7 per cent) patients with short-term success failed long-term. GAHM appears to be an effective procedure and results in long-term success. However, patients with weight gain are at risk of recurrence. PMID:12818058

  11. The Short-Pulse X-ray Facility at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Linda; Evans, Paul

    2013-05-01

    The Short-Pulse X-ray (SPX) Facility will extend time-resolved x-ray scattering and spectroscopy to the picosecond time scale while retaining the powerful characteristics of synchrotron radiation, i.e., user-controlled continuous tunability of energy, polarization, and bandwidth combined with exquisite x-ray energy and pulse-length stability over a wide energy range. Experiments at the SPX facility will produce 1-ps stroboscopic snapshots of molecular rotations, molecular excited-state transient structures, stress/strain wave propagation, magnetic domain wall dynamics, phase transitions, and the coupling between electronic, vibrational, and magnetic degrees of freedom in condensed matter systems. Time-resolved studies of transient dynamics will be possible with simultaneous picosecond time resolution and picometer structural precision for a variety of atomic, molecular, supramolecular, nanoscale, and bulk material systems. Pump-probe experiments using high-average-power, sub-picosecond, high-repetition-rate laser systems will make efficient use of the MHz x-ray rates of the SPX. Five end stations for x-ray scattering, diffraction, spectroscopy, imaging, and microscopy can be developed as part of the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade project. The Advanced Photon Source is an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Dept of Energy Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  12. The reduction of takeoff ground roll by the application of a nose gear jump strut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppel, Joseph C.; Maisel, Martin D.; Mcclain, J. Greer; Luce, W.

    1994-01-01

    A series of flight tests were conducted to evaluate the reduction of takeoff ground roll distance obtainable from a rapid extension of the nose gear strut. The NASA Quiet Short-haul Research Aircraft (QSRA) used for this investigation is a transport-size short take off and landing (STOL) research vehicle with a slightly swept wing that employs the upper surface blowing (USB) concept to attain the high lift levels required for its low-speed, short-field performance. Minor modifications to the conventional nose gear assembly and the addition of a high-pressure pneumatic system and a control system provided the extendable nose gear, or jump strut, capability. The limited flight test program explored the effects of thrust-to-weight ratio, wing loading, storage tank initial pressure, and control valve open time duration on the ground roll distance. The data show that a reduction of takeoff ground roll on the order of 10 percent was achieved with the use of the jump strut, as predicted. Takeoff performance with the jump strut was also found to be essentially independent of the pneumatic supply pressure and was only slightly affected by control valve open time within the range of the parameters examined.

  13. Runway Independent Aircraft Extremely Short Takeoff and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David W.; Pasman, Renee

    2004-01-01

    This report Summarizes the work done is support of NASA/Ames Runway Independent Aircraft Research during the summer of 2003. This work centered on the tasks laid out by the Statement of Work, which was to: Identify and assess operational scenarios including airport air and ground operations and how RIA operations would interface; 2) Identify critical technologies and create a list of technologies that might be pushed to provide a quantum jump in operating economy, reliability, and safety should sufficient finding be available; 3) Create public domain powered high lift methodologies; and 4) Identify and assess vehicle concepts that provide innovative approaches to RIA operations. All these tasks were accomplished, with certain areas needing additional exploration in future grant work. Three designs were analyzed to provide strawman configurations for the RIA operations. All three aircraft carried 60 passengers, with a stage length of 1,000 nautical miles. They were capable of operating with a balanced field length of 2000 feet or less. Three different technology approaches were explored. The first, the Model 115, was a mid-wing USB design, developed as a near-term, low risk concept. The second aircraft, the EMAX, used a directed thrust system, was a far-term, high-risk approach. The third configuration was the Model 114, whose development began in summer 2002. In addition, further research was conducted on issues related to STOL operations, such as noise concerns, SNI operations, and other areas of interest.

  14. 14 CFR 29.55 - Takeoff decision point (TDP): Category A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... is assured under § 29.59 and is the last point in the takeoff path from which a rejected takeoff is... takeoff path using no more than two parameters; e.g., airspeed and height, to designate the TDP....

  15. 14 CFR 29.55 - Takeoff decision point (TDP): Category A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... is assured under § 29.59 and is the last point in the takeoff path from which a rejected takeoff is... takeoff path using no more than two parameters; e.g., airspeed and height, to designate the TDP....

  16. 14 CFR 29.55 - Takeoff decision point (TDP): Category A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... is assured under § 29.59 and is the last point in the takeoff path from which a rejected takeoff is... takeoff path using no more than two parameters; e.g., airspeed and height, to designate the TDP....

  17. 14 CFR 29.55 - Takeoff decision point (TDP): Category A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... is assured under § 29.59 and is the last point in the takeoff path from which a rejected takeoff is... takeoff path using no more than two parameters; e.g., airspeed and height, to designate the TDP....

  18. 14 CFR 29.55 - Takeoff decision point (TDP): Category A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... is assured under § 29.59 and is the last point in the takeoff path from which a rejected takeoff is... takeoff path using no more than two parameters; e.g., airspeed and height, to designate the TDP....

  19. Short-Course Accelerated Radiotherapy in Palliative Treatment of Advanced Pelvic Malignancies: A Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Caravatta, Luciana; Padula, Gilbert D.A.; Macchia, Gabriella; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Deodato, Francesco; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Mignogna, Samantha; Tambaro, Rosa; Rossi, Marco; Flocco, Mariano; Scapati, Andrea; and others

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose of a conformal short-course accelerated radiotherapy in patients with symptomatic advanced pelvic cancer. Methods and Materials: A phase I trial in 3 dose-escalation steps was designed: 14 Gy (3.5-Gy fractions), 16 Gy (4-Gy fractions), and 18 Gy (4.5-Gy fractions). The eligibility criteria included locally advanced and/or metastatic pelvic cancer and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of {<=}3. Treatment was delivered in 2 days with twice-daily fractionation and at least an 8-hour interval. Patients were treated in cohorts of 6-12 to define the maximum tolerated dose. The dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any acute toxicity of grade 3 or greater, using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Pain was recorded using a visual analog scale. The effect on quality of life was evaluated according to Cancer Linear Analog Scale (CLAS). Results: Of the 27 enrolled patients, 11 were male and 16 were female, with a median age of 72 years (range 47-86). The primary tumor sites were gynecologic (48%), colorectal (33.5%), and genitourinary (18.5%). The most frequent baseline symptoms were bleeding (48%) and pain (33%). Only grade 1-2 acute toxicities were recorded. No patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity. With a median follow-up time of 6 months (range 3-28), no late toxicities were observed. The overall (complete plus partial) symptom remission was 88.9% (95% confidence interval 66.0%-97.8%). Five patients (41.7%) had complete pain relief, and six (50%) showed >30% visual analog scale reduction. The overall response rate for pain was 91.67% (95% confidence interval 52.4%-99.9%). Conclusions: Conformal short course radiotherapy in twice-daily fractions for 2 consecutive days was well tolerated up to a total dose of 18 Gy. A phase II study is ongoing to confirm the efficacy on symptom control and quality of life indexes.

  20. Recent Advances and New Techniques in Visualization of Ultra-short Relativistic Electron Bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

    2012-06-05

    Ultrashort electron bunches with rms length of {approx} 1 femtosecond (fs) can be used to generate ultrashort x-ray pulses in FELs that may open up many new regimes in ultrafast sciences. It is also envisioned that ultrashort electron bunches may excite {approx}TeV/m wake fields for plasma wake field acceleration and high field physics studies. Recent success of using 20 pC electron beam to drive an x-ray FEL at LCLS has stimulated world-wide interests in using low charge beam (1 {approx} 20 pC) to generate ultrashort x-ray pulses (0.1 fs {approx} 10 fs) in FELs. Accurate measurement of the length (preferably the temporal profile) of the ultrashort electron bunch is essential for understanding the physics associated with the bunch compression and transportation. However, the shorter and shorter electron bunch greatly challenges the present beam diagnostic methods. In this paper we review the recent advances in the measurement of ultra-short electron bunches. We will focus on several techniques and their variants that provide the state-of-the-art temporal resolution. Methods to further improve the resolution of these techniques and the promise to break the 1 fs time barrier is discussed. We review recent advances in the measurement of ultrashort relativistic electron bunches. We will focus on several techniques and their variants that are capable of breaking the femtosecond time barrier in measurements of ultrashort bunches. Techniques for measuring beam longitudinal phase space as well as the x-ray pulse shape in an x-ray FEL are also discussed.

  1. Model aerodynamic test results for a refined actuated inlet ejector nozzle at simulated takeoff and cruise conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    Wind tunnel model tests were conducted to demonstrate the aerodynamic performance improvements of a refined actuated inlet ejector nozzle. Models of approximately one-tenth scale were configured to simulate nozzle operation at takeoff, subsonic cruise, transonic cruise and supersonic cruise. Variations of model components provided a performance evaluation of ejector inlet and exit area, forebody boattail angle and ejector inlet operation in the open and closed mode. Approximately 700 data points were acquired at Mach numbers of 0, 0.36, 0.9, 1.2, and 2.0 for a wide range of nozzle flow conditions. Results show that relative to two ejector nozzles previously tested performance was improved significantly at takeoff and subsonic cruise performance, a C sub f of 0.982, was attained equal to the high performance of the previous tests. The established advanced supersonic transport propulsion study performance goals were met or closely approached at takeoff and supersonic cruise.

  2. Flight investigation of the use of a nose gear jump strut to reduce takeoff ground roll distance of STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppel, Joseph C.; Hardy, Gordon; Martin, James L.

    1994-01-01

    A series of flight tests was conducted to evaluate the reduction of takeoff ground roll distance obtainable from a rapid extension of the nose gear strut. The NASA Quiet Short-haul Research Aircraft (QSRA) used for this investigation is a transport-size short takeoff and landing (STOL) research vehicle with a slightly swept wing that employs the upper surface blowing (USB) concept to attain the high lift levels required for its low speed, short-field performance. Minor modifications to the conventional nose gear assembly and the addition of a high pressure pneumatic system and a control system provided the extendible nose gear, or 'jump strut,' capability. The limited flight test program explored the effects of thrust-to-weight ratio, storage tank initial pressure, and control valve open time duration on the ground roll distance. The data show that the predicted reduction of takeoff ground roll on the order of 10 percent was achieved with the use of the jump strut. Takeoff performance with the jump strut was also found to be essentially independent of the pneumatic supply pressure and was only slightly affected by control valve open time within the range of the parameters examined.

  3. Shipboard trials of the Quiet Short-Haul Research Aircraft /QSRA/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. L.; Strickland, P. B.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of the application of advanced state-of-the-art high lift STOL aircraft in the aircraft carrier environment was evaluated using the NASA Quiet Short-Haul Research Aircraft (QSRA). The QSRA made repeated unarrested landings and free deck takeoffs from the USS Kitty Hawk while being flown by three pilots of significant different backgrounds. The exercise demonstrated that the USB propulsive lift technology presents no unusual problems in the aircraft carrier environment. Optimum parameters for landing the QSRA were determined from the shore-based program; these proved satisfactory during operations aboard ship. Correlation of shipboard experience with shore-based data indicates that both free deck takeoffs and unarrested landings could be conducted with zero to 35 knots of wind across the deck of an aircraft carrier the size of the USS Kitty Hawk.

  4. Short-term morbidity in transdiaphragmatic cardiophrenic lymph node resection for advanced stage gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    LaFargue, C J; Sawyer, B T; Bristow, R E

    2016-08-01

    Ovarian cancer is commonly diagnosed at an advanced stage, with disease involving the upper abdomen. The finding of enlarged cardiophrenic lymph nodes (CPLNs) on pre-operative imaging often indicates the presence of malignant spread to the mediastinum. Surgical resection of CPLN through a transdiaphragmatic approach can help to achieve cytoreduction to no gross residual. A retrospective chart review was conducted on all patients who underwent transdiaphragmatic cardiophrenic lymph node resection from 8/1/11 through 2/1/15. All relevant pre-, intra-, and post-operative characteristics and findings were recorded. A brief description of the surgical technique is included for reference. Eleven patients were identified who had undergone transdiaphragmatic resection of cardiophrenic lymph nodes. Malignancy was identified in 18/21 (86%) of total lymph nodes submitted. The median number of post-operative days was 7. The overall post-operative morbidity associated with CPLN resection was low, with the most common finding being a small pleural effusion present on chest x-ray between POD# 3-5 (55%). Transdiaphragmatic CPLN resection is a feasible procedure with relatively minor short-term post-operative morbidities that can be used to achieve cytoreduction to no gross residual disease. PMID:27354998

  5. Airplane takeoff and landing performance monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, David B. (Inventor); Srivatsan, Raghavachari (Inventor); Person, Lee H. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The invention is a real-time takeoff and landing performance monitoring system which provides the pilot with graphic and metric information to assist in decisions related to achieving rotation speed (V sub R) within the safe zone of the runway or stopping the aircraft on the runway after landing or take off abort. The system processes information in two segments: a pretakeoff segment and a real-time segment. One-time inputs of ambient conditions and airplane configuration information are used in the pretakeoff segment to generate scheduled performance data. The real-time segment uses the scheduled performance data, runway length data and transducer measured parameters to monitor the performance of the airplane throughout the takeoff roll. An important feature of this segment is that it updates the estimated runway rolling friction coefficient. Airplane performance predictions also reflect changes in headwind occurring as the takeoff roll progresses. The system displays the position of the airplane on the runway, indicating runway used and runway available, summarizes the critical information into a situation advisory flag, flags engine failures and off-nominal acceleration performance, and indicates where on the runway particular events such as decision speed (V sub 1), rotation speed (V sub R) and expected stop points will occur based on actual or predicted performance. The display also indicates airspeed, wind vector, engine pressure ratios, second segment climb speed, and balanced field length (BFL). The system detects performance deficiencies by comparing the airplane's present performance with a predicted nominal performance based upon the given conditions.

  6. Take-off distance for airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proll, A

    1926-01-01

    There are two principal ways in which the total take-off distance (taxying plus hovering plus the first part of the climb) can be reduced to a minimum. These are: 1) taxying and hovering until the maximum speed has been attained close to the ground and then changing to a steep rapid climb; 2) lifting the airplane from the ground as soon as possible and then climbing at a relatively large angle of attack. These cases, as well as all the other conceivable combinations, can be expressed with a single basic formula, which is derived from the energy equation for rectilinear flight.

  7. Development of SCR Aircraft takeoff and landing procedures for community noise abatement and their impact on flight safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, W. D.; Smith, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    Piloted simulator studies to determine takeoff and landing procedures for a supersonic cruise transport concept that result in predicted community noise levels which meet current Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) standards are discussed. The results indicate that with the use of advanced procedures, the subject simulated aircraft meets the FAA traded noise levels during takeoff and landing utilizing average flight crew skills. The advanced takeoff procedures developed involved violating three of the current Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR) noise test conditions. These were: (1) thrust cutbacks at altitudes below 214 meters (700 ft); (2) thrust cutback level below those presently allowed; and (3) configuration change, other than raising the landing gear. It was not necessary to violate any FAR noise test conditions during landing approach. It was determined that the advanced procedures developed do not compromise flight safety. Automation of some of the aircraft functions reduced pilot workload, and the development of a simple head-up display to assist in the takeoff flight mode proved to be adequate.

  8. 14 CFR 25.491 - Taxi, takeoff and landing roll.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., takeoff and landing roll. Within the range of appropriate ground speeds and approved weights, the airplane structure and landing gear are assumed to be subjected to loads not less than those obtained when the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Taxi, takeoff and landing roll....

  9. 14 CFR 25.491 - Taxi, takeoff and landing roll.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., takeoff and landing roll. Within the range of appropriate ground speeds and approved weights, the airplane structure and landing gear are assumed to be subjected to loads not less than those obtained when the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Taxi, takeoff and landing roll....

  10. 14 CFR 29.51 - Takeoff data: general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Takeoff data: general. 29.51 Section 29.51 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Performance § 29.51 Takeoff data: general. (a) The...

  11. 14 CFR 23.61 - Takeoff flight path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Takeoff flight path. 23.61 Section 23.61... flight path. For normal, utility, and acrobatic category multiengine jets of more than 6,000 pounds maximum weight and commuter category airplanes, the takeoff flight path must be determined as follows:...

  12. 14 CFR 23.61 - Takeoff flight path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Takeoff flight path. 23.61 Section 23.61... flight path. For normal, utility, and acrobatic category multiengine jets of more than 6,000 pounds maximum weight and commuter category airplanes, the takeoff flight path must be determined as follows:...

  13. On the take-off of heavily loaded airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breguet, Louis

    1928-01-01

    This report examines the take-off conditions of airplanes equipped with tractive propellers, and particularly the more difficult take-off of airplanes heavily loaded per unit of wing area (wing loading) or per unit of engine power (power loading).

  14. 14 CFR 121.199 - Nontransport category airplanes: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Nontransport category airplanes: Takeoff... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.199 Nontransport category airplanes: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating...

  15. 14 CFR 121.199 - Nontransport category airplanes: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Nontransport category airplanes: Takeoff... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.199 Nontransport category airplanes: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating...

  16. 14 CFR 121.199 - Nontransport category airplanes: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Nontransport category airplanes: Takeoff... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.199 Nontransport category airplanes: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating...

  17. 14 CFR 121.199 - Nontransport category airplanes: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nontransport category airplanes: Takeoff... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.199 Nontransport category airplanes: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating...

  18. Item Response Theory Analysis and Differential Item Functioning across Age, Gender and Country of a Short Form of the Advanced Progressive Matrices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiesi, Francesca; Ciancaleoni, Matteo; Galli, Silvia; Morsanyi, Kinga; Primi, Caterina

    2012-01-01

    Item Response Theory (IRT) models were applied to investigate the psychometric properties of the Arthur and Day's Advanced Progressive Matrices-Short Form (APM-SF; 1994) [Arthur and Day (1994). "Development of a short form for the Raven Advanced Progressive Matrices test." "Educational and Psychological Measurement, 54," 395-403] in order to test…

  19. 14 CFR 135.367 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the takeoff and reach a height of 50 feet, as indicated by the takeoff path data, before passing over... by the takeoff path data) or 200 feet horizontally within the airport boundaries and 300 feet... takeoff path data) and after that without banking more than 15 degrees. (b) In applying this...

  20. NASA KingAir #801 during takeoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA KingAir N801NA during takeoff. The Beechcraft Beech 200 Super KingAir aircraft N7NA, known as NASA 7, has been a support aircraft for many years, flying 'shuttle' missions to Ames Research Center. It once flew from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and back each day but now (2001) flies between the Dryden Flight Research Center and Ames. Dryden assumed the mission and aircraft in September 1996. A second Beechcraft Beech 200 Super King Air, N701NA, redesignated N801NA, transferred to Dryden on 3 Oct. 1997 and is used for research missions but substitutes for NASA 7 on shuttle missions when NASA 7 is not available.

  1. Altus I aircraft in flight, retracting landing gear after takeoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The landing gear of the remotely piloted Altus I aircraft retracts into the fuselage after takeoff from Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The short series of test flights sponsored by the Naval Postgraduate School in early August, 1997, was designed to demonstrate the ability of the experimental craft to cruise at altitudes above 40,000 feet for sustained durations. On its final flight Aug. 15, the Altus I reached an altitude of 43,500 feet. The Altus I and its sister ship, the Altus II, are variants of the Predator surveillance drone built by General Atomics/Aeronautical Systems, Inc. They are designed for high-altitude, long-duration scientific sampling missions. The Altus I incorporates a single-stage turbocharger, while the Altus II, built for NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology project, sports a two-stage turbocharger to enable the craft to fly at altitudes above 55,000 feet.

  2. Short Cue Presentations Encourage Advance Task Preparation: A Recipe to Diminish the Residual Switch Cost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verbruggen, Frederick; Liefooghe, Baptist; Vandierendonck, Andre; Demanet, Jelle

    2007-01-01

    In the task-switching literature, it has frequently been demonstrated that although advance task preparation reduces the switch cost, it never really eliminates the switch cost. This remaining residual switch cost received much attention, and it has been argued that advance preparation is restricted in nature. In the present study, the role of…

  3. Model ducted propulsor noise characteristics at takeoff conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Bock, Lawrence A.; Heidelberg, Laurence J.; Hall, David G.

    1994-01-01

    A model Advanced Ducted Propulsor (ADP) was tested in the NASA Lewis Low-Speed Anechoic Wind Tunnel at a simulated takeoff velocity of Mach 0.2. The model was designed and manufactured by Pratt & Whitney. The 16-blade rotor ADP was tested with 22- and 40-vane stators to achieve cut-on and cut-off criterion with respect to propagation of the fundamental rotor-stator interaction tone. Additional test parameters included three inlet lengths, three nozzle sizes, two spinner configurations, and two rotor rub strip configurations. The model was tested over a range of rotor blade setting angles and inlet angles of attack. Acoustic data were taken with a sideline translating microphone probe and with a unique inlet microphone probe that identified inlet rotating acoustic modes. The beneficial acoustic effects of cut-off were clearly demonstrated. A 10-dB fundamental tone reduction was associated with the long inlet and 40-vane stator. The fundamental tone level was essentially unaffected by inlet angle of attack at rotor speeds of above 96% design.

  4. An Overview of High Energy Short Pulse Technology for Advanced Radiography of Laser Fusion Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, C J; Key, M; Britten, J; Beach, R; Beer, G; Brown, C; Bryan, S; Caird, J; Carlson, T; Crane, J; Dawson, J; Erlandson, A C; Fittinghoff, D; Hermann, M; Hoaglan, C; Iyer, A; Jones, L; Jovanovic, I; Komashko, A; Landen, O; Liao, Z; Molander, W; Mitchell, A; Moses, E; Nielsen, N; Nguyen, H; Nissen, J; Payne, S; Pennington, D; Risinger, L; Rushford, M; Skulina, K; Spaeth, M; Stuart, B; Tietbohl, G; Wattellier, B

    2004-06-18

    The technical challenges and motivations for high-energy, short-pulse generation with NIF-class, Nd:glass laser systems are reviewed. High energy short pulse generation (multi-kilojoule, picosecond pulses) will be possible via the adaptation of chirped pulse amplification laser techniques on the NIF. Development of meter-scale, high efficiency, high-damage-threshold final optics is a key technical challenge. In addition, deployment of HEPW pulses on NIF is constrained by existing laser infrastructure and requires new, compact compressor designs and short-pulse, fiber-based, seed-laser systems. The key motivations for high energy petawatt pulses on NIF is briefly outlined and includes high-energy, x-ray radiography, proton beam radiography, proton isochoric heating and tests of the fast ignitor concept for inertial confinement fusion.

  5. Russian Advanced Course: A Short History of the Development of Russian Language and Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    The purpose of this volume is to acquaint the student with the historical development of the Russian language and literature. Samples of the original works with English translations and lists of recommended readings are provided. Contents include a review of Russian literature by century, samples of the short story "Samizdat," and major…

  6. CME Onset and Take-Off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Karpen, J. T.; DeVore, C. R.

    2011-01-01

    For understanding and eventually predicting coronal mass ejections/eruptive flares, two critical questions must be answered: What is the mechanism for eruption onset, and what is the mechanism for the rapid acceleration? We address these questions in the context of the breakout model using 2.5D MHD simulations with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The AMR capability allowed us to achieve ultra-high numerical resolution and, thereby, determine the influence of the effective Lundquist number on the eruption. Our calculations show that, at least, for the breakout model, the onset of reconnection external to the highly sheared filament channel is the onset mechanism. Once this reconnection turns on, eruption is inevitable. However, as long as this is the only reconnection in the system, the eruption remains slow. We find that the eruption undergoes an abrupt "take-off" when the flare reconnection below the erupting plasmoid develops significant reconnection jets. We conclude that in fast CMEs, flare reconnection is the primary mechanism responsible for both flare heating and CME acceleration. We discuss the implications of these results for SDO observations and describe possible tests of the model.

  7. Tu-144LL ramp taxi and takeoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A jointly funded activity by the NASA High Speed Research (HSR) program and the Boeing Commercial Airplane Group took place to obtain experimental flight data on the Tu-144 supersonic transport built by Russia. The Tu-144 was modified by the Tupolev Aircraft Design Bureau, Moscow, Russia, in 1995-1996 into the Tu-144LL Flying Laboratory to perform flight experiments as part of the NASA HSR Program. Knowledge gained from the flights will benefit the NASA efforts to develop technology that may enable design of an efficient, environmentally friendly second-generation supersonic transport in this country. This program involved eight experiments -- six aboard the aircraft and two ground test engine experiments. Between November 1996 and February 1998 the Tu-144LL flew 19 research flights. The follow-on Tu-144LL program encompassed about eight flights, focusing on extensions of five experiments from the first project and two new experiments to measure fuel system temperatures and to define in-flight wing deflections. This 31-second clip shows the Russian Tu-144 LL supersonic transport on the ramp in Moscow, then taxiing into position and making its takeoff run, rotating from the runway and climbing away.

  8. Short x-ray pulse generation using deflecting cavities at the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Sajaev, V.; Borland, M.; Chae, Y.-C.; Decker, G.; Dejus, R.; Emery, L.; Harkay, K.; Nassiri, A.; Shastri, S.; Waldschmidt, G.; Yang, B.; Anfinrud, P.; Dolgashev, V.; NIH; SLAC

    2007-11-11

    Storage-ring-based third-generation light sources can provide intense radiation pulses with durations as short as 100 ps. However, there is growing interest within the synchrotron radiation user community in performing experiments with much shorter X-ray pulses. Zholents et al. [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 425 (1999) 385] recently proposed using RF orbit deflection to generate sub-ps X-ray pulses. In this scheme, two deflecting cavities are used to deliver a longitudinally dependent vertical kick to the beam. An optical slit can then be used to slice out a short part of the radiation pulse. Implementation of this scheme is planned for one APS beamline in the near future. In this paper, we summarize our feasibility study of this method and the expected X-ray beam parameters. We find that a pulse length of less than two picoseconds can be achieved.

  9. A hybrid approach for generating ultra-short bunches for advanced accelerator applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2016-06-01

    Generation of electron beams with high phase-space density, short bunch length and high peak current is an essential requirement for future linear colliders and bright electron beam sources. Unfortunately, such bunches cannot be produced directly from the source since forces from the mutual repulsion of electrons would destroy the brilliance of the beam within a short distance. Here, we detail a beam dynamics study of a two-stage compression scheme that can generate ultra-short bunches without degrading the beam quality. In the first stage, a magnetized beam is compressed with a velocity bunching technique in which the longitudinal phase space is rotated so that electrons on the bunch tail become faster than electrons in the bunch head. In the second stage, the beam is further compressed with a magnetic chicane. With the aid of numerical simulations we show that our two-staged scheme is capable to increase the current of a 50 pC bunch by a notable factor of 100 (from 15 A to 1.5 kA) while the emittance growth can be suppressed to 1% with appropriate tailoring of the initial beam distribution.

  10. Advanced supersonic propulsion study, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howlett, R. A.; Johnson, J.; Sabatella, J.; Sewall, T.

    1976-01-01

    The variable stream control engine is determined to be the most promising propulsion system concept for advanced supersonic cruise aircraft. This concept uses variable geometry components and a unique throttle schedule for independent control of two flow streams to provide low jet noise at takeoff and high performance at both subsonic and supersonic cruise. The advanced technology offers a 25% improvement in airplane range and an 8 decibel reduction in takeoff noise, relative to first generation supersonic turbojet engines.

  11. LDSS-P: an advanced algorithm to extract functional short motifs associated with coordinated gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ichida, Hiroyuki; Long, Sharon R.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying functional elements in promoter sequences is a major goal in computational and experimental genome biology. Here, we describe an algorithm, Local Distribution of Short Sequences for Prokaryotes (LDSS-P), to identify conserved short motifs located at specific positions in the promoters of co-expressed prokaryotic genes. As a test case, we applied this algorithm to a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacterium, Sinorhizobium meliloti. The LDSS-P profiles that overlap with the 5′ section of the extracytoplasmic function RNA polymerase sigma factor RpoE2 consensus sequences displayed a sharp peak between -34 and -32 from TSS positions. The corresponding genes overlap significantly with RpoE2 targets identified from previous experiments. We further identified several groups of genes that are co-regulated with characterized marker genes. Our data indicate that in S. meliloti, and possibly in other Rhizobiaceae species, the master cell cycle regulator CtrA may recognize an expanded motif (AACCAT), which is positionally shifted from the previously reported CtrA consensus sequence in Caulobacter crescentus. Bacterial one-hybrid experiments showed that base substitution in the expanded motif either increase or decrease the binding by CtrA. These results show the effectiveness of LDSS-P as a method to delineate functional promoter elements. PMID:27190233

  12. LDSS-P: an advanced algorithm to extract functional short motifs associated with coordinated gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ichida, Hiroyuki; Long, Sharon R

    2016-06-20

    Identifying functional elements in promoter sequences is a major goal in computational and experimental genome biology. Here, we describe an algorithm, Local Distribution of Short Sequences for Prokaryotes (LDSS-P), to identify conserved short motifs located at specific positions in the promoters of co-expressed prokaryotic genes. As a test case, we applied this algorithm to a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacterium, Sinorhizobium meliloti The LDSS-P profiles that overlap with the 5' section of the extracytoplasmic function RNA polymerase sigma factor RpoE2 consensus sequences displayed a sharp peak between -34 and -32 from TSS positions. The corresponding genes overlap significantly with RpoE2 targets identified from previous experiments. We further identified several groups of genes that are co-regulated with characterized marker genes. Our data indicate that in S. meliloti, and possibly in other Rhizobiaceae species, the master cell cycle regulator CtrA may recognize an expanded motif (AACCAT), which is positionally shifted from the previously reported CtrA consensus sequence in Caulobacter crescentus Bacterial one-hybrid experiments showed that base substitution in the expanded motif either increase or decrease the binding by CtrA. These results show the effectiveness of LDSS-P as a method to delineate functional promoter elements. PMID:27190233

  13. Advanced concepts for high-power, short-pulse CO2 laser development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Daniel F.; Hasson, Victor; von Bergmann, Hubertus; Chen, Yu-hsin; Schmitt-Sody, A.; Penano, Joseph R.

    2016-06-01

    Ultra-short pulse lasers are dominated by solid-state technology, which typically operates in the near-infrared. Efforts to extend this technology to longer wavelengths are meeting with some success, but the trend remains that longer wavelengths correlate with greatly reduced power. The carbon dioxide (CO2) laser is capable of delivering high energy, 10 micron wavelength pulses, but the gain structure makes operating in the ultra-short pulse regime difficult. The Naval Research Laboratory and Air Force Research Laboratory are developing a novel CO2 laser designed to deliver ~1 Joule, ~1 picosecond pulses, from a compact gain volume (~2x2x80 cm). The design is based on injection seeding an unstable resonator, in order to achieve high energy extraction efficiency, and to take advantage of power broadening. The unstable resonator is seeded by a solid state front end, pumped by a custom built titanium sapphire laser matched to the CO2 laser bandwidth. In order to access a broader range of mid infrared wavelengths using CO2 lasers, one must consider nonlinear frequency multiplication, which is non-trivial due to the bandwidth of the 10 micron radiation.

  14. Short-Term Monitoring Results for Advanced New Construction Test House -- Roseville, California

    SciTech Connect

    Stecher, D.; Brozyna, K.; Imm, C.

    2013-09-01

    A builder (K. Hovnanian Homes), design consultant, and trades collaborated to identify a systems integrated measures package for a 2,253-ft2 slab-on-grade ranch house to achieve a modeled energy savings of 60% with respect to the Building America House Simulation Protocols (Hendron, R. and Engebrecht, C. 'Building America House Simulation Protocols.' Golden, CO: National Renewable EnergyLaboratory, 2010) while minimizing construction costs and without requiring changes to the drawing that would impact local code or zoning approval. The key building improvements were applying R-10 insulation to the slab edge, increasing exterior wall cavity insulation from R-13 to R-15, and increasing attic insulation from R-30 to R-38. Also, the air handling unit was relocated from the attic toconditioned space, and ductwork was relocated along the attic floor with an insulated bulkhead built above it. Short-term testing results showed that duct air leakage was low due to short duct runs and the placement of ductwork in conditioned space. However, during commissioning, the lack of access for servicing the ductwork and dampers in the bulkhead area prevented retroactive balancing ofindividual branches, resulting in significant differences between specified and measured airflow values for some duct runs. Thermal imaging results performed on the house when operating in both heating and cooling modes validated historic stratification issues of ceiling supply registers with high supply air temperatures. Long-term monitoring results will be detailed in a future report.

  15. Short-Term Monitoring Results for Advanced New Construction Test House - Roseville, California

    SciTech Connect

    Stecher, D.; Brozyna, K.; Imm, C.

    2013-09-01

    A builder (K. Hovnanian® Homes®), design consultant, and trades collaborated to identify a systems integrated measures package for a 2,253-ft² slab-on-grade ranch house to achieve a modeled energy savings of 60% with respect to the Building America House Simulation Protocols, while minimizing construction costs and without requiring changes to the drawing that would impact local code or zoning approval. The key building improvements were applying R-10 insulation to the slab edge, increasing exterior wall cavity insulation from R-13 to R-15, and increasing attic insulation from R-30 to R-38. Also, the air handling unit was relocated from the attic to conditioned space, and ductwork was relocated along the attic floor with an insulated bulkhead built above it. Short-term testing results showed that duct air leakage was low due to short duct runs and the placement of ductwork in conditioned space. However, during commissioning, the lack of access for servicing the ductwork and dampers in the bulkhead area prevented retroactive balancing of individual branches, resulting in significant differences between specified and measured airflow values for some duct runs. Thermal imaging results performed on the house when operating in both heating and cooling modes validated historic stratification issues of ceiling supply registers with high supply air temperatures. Long-term monitoring results will be detailed in a future report.

  16. LOCALIZATION OF SHORT DURATION GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE TRANSIENTS WITH THE EARLY ADVANCED LIGO AND VIRGO DETECTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Katsavounidis, Erik; Vedovato, Gabriele; Klimenko, Sergey

    2015-02-20

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo advanced ground-based gravitational-wave detectors will begin collecting science data in 2015. With first detections expected to follow, it is important to quantify how well generic gravitational-wave transients can be localized on the sky. This is crucial for correctly identifying electromagnetic counterparts as well as understanding gravitational-wave physics and source populations. We present a study of sky localization capabilities for two search and parameter estimation algorithms: coherent WaveBurst, a constrained likelihood algorithm operating in close to real-time, and LALInferenceBurst, a Markov chain Monte Carlo parameter estimation algorithm developed to recover generic transient signals with latency of a few hours. Furthermore, we focus on the first few years of the advanced detector era, when we expect to only have two (2015) and later three (2016) operational detectors, all below design sensitivity. These detector configurations can produce significantly different sky localizations, which we quantify in detail. We observe a clear improvement in localization of the average detected signal when progressing from two-detector to three-detector networks, as expected. Although localization depends on the waveform morphology, approximately 50% of detected signals would be imaged after observing 100-200 deg{sup 2} in 2015 and 60-110 deg{sup 2} in 2016, although knowledge of the waveform can reduce this to as little as 22 deg{sup 2}. This is the first comprehensive study on sky localization capabilities for generic transients of the early network of advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors, including the early LIGO-only two-detector configuration.

  17. Advances in high repetition rate, ultra-short, gigawatt laser systems for time-resolved spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    DiMauro, L.F.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this article is to emphasize the current advances in the development of high-repetition rate amplifier pumps. Although this review highlights amplifier pump development, any recent data from achieved outputs via the tunable amplifier section is also discussed. The first section describes desirable parameters attributable to the pump amplifier while the rest of the article deals with specific examples for various options. The pump amplifiers can be characterized into two distinct classes; those achieving operation in the hundred hertz regime and those performing at repetition rates {ge}1kHz. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Advances in high repetition rate, ultra-short, gigawatt laser systems for time-resolved spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    DiMauro, L.F.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this article is to emphasize the current advances in the development of high-repetition rate amplifier pumps. Although this review highlights amplifier pump development, any recent data from achieved outputs via the tunable amplifier section is also discussed. The first section describes desirable parameters attributable to the pump amplifier while the rest of the article deals with specific examples for various options. The pump amplifiers can be characterized into two distinct classes; those achieving operation in the hundred hertz regime and those performing at repetition rates {ge}1kHz. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Development and operating experience of a short-period superconducting undulator at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyushenkov, Y.; Harkay, K.; Abliz, M.; Boon, L.; Borland, M.; Capatina, D.; Collins, J.; Decker, G.; Dejus, R.; Dooling, J.; Doose, C.; Emery, L.; Fuerst, J.; Gagliano, J.; Hasse, Q.; Jaski, M.; Kasa, M.; Kim, S. H.; Kustom, R.; Lang, J. C.; Liu, J.; Moog, E.; Robinson, D.; Sajaev, V.; Schroeder, K.; Sereno, N.; Shiroyanagi, Y.; Skiadopoulos, D.; Smith, M.; Sun, X.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Vasserman, I.; Vella, A.; Xiao, A.; Xu, J.; Zholents, A.; Gluskin, E.; Lev, V.; Mezentsev, N.; Syrovatin, V.; Tsukanov, V.; Makarov, A.; Pfotenhauer, J.; Potratz, D.

    2015-04-01

    A decade-long effort at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) on development of superconducting undulators culminated in December 2012 with the installation of the first superconducting undulator "SCU0" into Sector 6 of the APS storage ring. The device was commissioned in January 2013 and has been in user operation since. This paper presents the magnetic and cryogenic design of the SCU0 together with the results of stand-alone cold tests. The initial commissioning and characterization of SCU0 as well as its operating experience in the APS storage ring are described.

  20. Model aerodynamic test results for two variable cycle engine coannular exhaust systems at simulated takeoff and cruise conditions. [Lewis 8 by 6-foot supersonic wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.

    1980-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to evaluate the aerodynamic performance of a coannular exhaust nozzle for a proposed variable stream control supersonic propulsion system. Tests were conducted with two simulated configurations differing primarily in the fan duct flowpaths: a short flap mechanism for fan stream control with an isentropic contoured flow splitter, and an iris fan nozzle with a conical flow splitter. Both designs feature a translating primary plug and an auxiliary inlet ejector. Tests were conducted at takeoff and simulated cruise conditions. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0, 0.36, 0.9, and 2.0 for a wide range of nozzle operating conditions. At simulated supersonic cruise, both configurations demonstrated good performance, comparable to levels assumed in earlier advanced supersonic propulsion studies. However, at subsonic cruise, both configurations exhibited performance that was 6 to 7.5 percent less than the study assumptions. At take off conditions, the iris configuration performance approached the assumed levels, while the short flap design was 4 to 6 percent less.

  1. 75 FR 60304 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a regulatory evaluation..., GA, Valdosta Rgnl, Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle DP, Amdt 2 Flora, IL, Flora Muni, Takeoff...

  2. 75 FR 12977 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-18

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a... Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures; Miscellaneous Amendments AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

  3. Analysis and Model Tests of Autogiro Jump Take-off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheatley, John B; Bioletti, Carlton

    1936-01-01

    An analysis is made of the autogiro jump take-off, in which the kinetic energy of the rotor turning at excess speed is used to effect a vertical take-off. By the use of suitable approximations, the differential equation of motion of the rotor during this maneuver is reduced to a form that can be solved. Only the vertical jump was studied; the effect of a forward motion during the jump is discussed briefly. The results of model tests of the jump take-off have been incorporated in the paper and used to establish the relative accuracy of the results predicted from the analysis. Good agreement between calculation and experiment was obtained by making justifiable allowances.

  4. Aerodynamic Ground Effect in Fruitfly Sized Insect Takeoff.

    PubMed

    Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Maeda, Masateru; Engels, Thomas; Liu, Hao; Schneider, Kai; Nave, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Aerodynamic ground effect in flapping-wing insect flight is of importance to comparative morphologies and of interest to the micro-air-vehicle (MAV) community. Recent studies, however, show apparently contradictory results of either some significant extra lift or power savings, or zero ground effect. Here we present a numerical study of fruitfly sized insect takeoff with a specific focus on the significance of leg thrust and wing kinematics. Flapping-wing takeoff is studied using numerical modelling and high performance computing. The aerodynamic forces are calculated using a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver based on a pseudo-spectral method with volume penalization. It is coupled with a flight dynamics solver that accounts for the body weight, inertia and the leg thrust, while only having two degrees of freedom: the vertical and the longitudinal horizontal displacement. The natural voluntary takeoff of a fruitfly is considered as reference. The parameters of the model are then varied to explore possible effects of interaction between the flapping-wing model and the ground plane. These modified takeoffs include cases with decreased leg thrust parameter, and/or with periodic wing kinematics, constant body pitch angle. The results show that the ground effect during natural voluntary takeoff is negligible. In the modified takeoffs, when the rate of climb is slow, the difference in the aerodynamic forces due to the interaction with the ground is up to 6%. Surprisingly, depending on the kinematics, the difference is either positive or negative, in contrast to the intuition based on the helicopter theory, which suggests positive excess lift. This effect is attributed to unsteady wing-wake interactions. A similar effect is found during hovering. PMID:27019208

  5. Aerodynamic Ground Effect in Fruitfly Sized Insect Takeoff

    PubMed Central

    Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Maeda, Masateru; Engels, Thomas; Liu, Hao; Schneider, Kai; Nave, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Aerodynamic ground effect in flapping-wing insect flight is of importance to comparative morphologies and of interest to the micro-air-vehicle (MAV) community. Recent studies, however, show apparently contradictory results of either some significant extra lift or power savings, or zero ground effect. Here we present a numerical study of fruitfly sized insect takeoff with a specific focus on the significance of leg thrust and wing kinematics. Flapping-wing takeoff is studied using numerical modelling and high performance computing. The aerodynamic forces are calculated using a three-dimensional Navier–Stokes solver based on a pseudo-spectral method with volume penalization. It is coupled with a flight dynamics solver that accounts for the body weight, inertia and the leg thrust, while only having two degrees of freedom: the vertical and the longitudinal horizontal displacement. The natural voluntary takeoff of a fruitfly is considered as reference. The parameters of the model are then varied to explore possible effects of interaction between the flapping-wing model and the ground plane. These modified takeoffs include cases with decreased leg thrust parameter, and/or with periodic wing kinematics, constant body pitch angle. The results show that the ground effect during natural voluntary takeoff is negligible. In the modified takeoffs, when the rate of climb is slow, the difference in the aerodynamic forces due to the interaction with the ground is up to 6%. Surprisingly, depending on the kinematics, the difference is either positive or negative, in contrast to the intuition based on the helicopter theory, which suggests positive excess lift. This effect is attributed to unsteady wing-wake interactions. A similar effect is found during hovering. PMID:27019208

  6. A warning concerning the take-off with heavy load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Elliott G; Carroll, Thomas

    1927-01-01

    A successful take-off can be made with an airplane so heavily loaded that it cannot climb to a height greater than the span of its wings. The explanation is that the power required to maintain level flight at an altitude of the order of the wing span may be as much as 50 per cent greater than that necessary when the airplane is just clear of the ground. The failure of heavily loaded airplanes to continue climbing at the rate attained immediately after the actual take-off is a grave hazard and has resulted in great risk or catastrophe in three notable cases which are cited.

  7. 14 CFR 121.651 - Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR: All certificate holders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR... Flight Release Rules § 121.651 Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR: All certificate holders. (a) Notwithstanding any clearance from ATC, no pilot may begin a takeoff in an airplane under IFR when the...

  8. 14 CFR 121.651 - Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR: All certificate holders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR... Flight Release Rules § 121.651 Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR: All certificate holders. (a) Notwithstanding any clearance from ATC, no pilot may begin a takeoff in an airplane under IFR when the...

  9. 14 CFR 121.651 - Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR: All certificate holders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR... Flight Release Rules § 121.651 Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR: All certificate holders. (a) Notwithstanding any clearance from ATC, no pilot may begin a takeoff in an airplane under IFR when the...

  10. 14 CFR 121.651 - Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR: All certificate holders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR... Flight Release Rules § 121.651 Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR: All certificate holders. (a) Notwithstanding any clearance from ATC, no pilot may begin a takeoff in an airplane under IFR when the...

  11. 14 CFR 121.651 - Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR: All certificate holders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR... Flight Release Rules § 121.651 Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR: All certificate holders. (a) Notwithstanding any clearance from ATC, no pilot may begin a takeoff in an airplane under IFR when the...

  12. Real-time manned simulation of advanced terminal area guidance concepts for short-haul operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, L.; Obrien, P. J.

    1977-01-01

    A real-time simulation was conducted of three-dimensional area navigation and four-dimensional area navigation equipped (STOL) aircraft operating in a high-density terminal area traffic environment. The objectives were to examine the effects of 3D RNAV and 4D RNAV equipped aircraft on the terminal area traffic efficiency, and to examine the performance of an air traffic control system concept and associated controller display proposed for use with advanced RNAV systems. Three types of STOL aircraft were simulated each with different performance capabilities. System performance was measured in both the 4D mode and in a 3D mode; the 3D mode, used as a baseline, was simply the 4D mode less any time specification. The results show that communications workload in the 4D mode was reduced by about 35 percent compared to the 3D, while 35 percent more traffic was handled with the 4D. Aircraft holding time in the 4D mode was only 30 percent of that required in the 3D mode. In addition, the orderliness of traffic was improved significantly in the 4D mode.

  13. Planned Use of Pulsed Crab Cavities for Short X-Ray Pulse Generation at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Borland, Michael; Carwardine, J.; Chae, Y.; Emery, L.; Den Hartog, Patric; Harkay, K.C.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Nassiri, A.; Sajaev, V.; Sereno, Nicholas S.; Waldschmidt, G.; Yang, B.X.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2007-11-06

    Recently, we have explored application to the Advanced Photon Source (APS) of Zholents'[1] crab cavity scheme for production of short x-ray pulses. We assumed use of superconducting (SC) cavities in order to have a continuous stream of crabbed bunches and flexibility of operating modes. The challenges of the SC approach are related to the size, cost, and development time of the cavities and associated systems. A good case can be made [2] for a pulsed system using room-temperature cavities. APS has elected to pursue such a system in the near term, with the SC-based system planned for a later date. This paper describes the motivation for the pulsed system and gives an overview of the planned implementation and issues. Among these are overall configuration options and constraints, cavity design options, frequency choice, cavity design challenges, tolerances, instabilities, and diagnostics plans.

  14. High-power Waveguide Dampers for the Short-Pulse X-Ray Project at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Waldschmidt, G J; Liu, J; Middendorf, M E; Nassiri, A; Smith, T L; Wu, G; Henry, J; Mammosser, J D; Rimmer, R A; Wiseman, M

    2012-07-01

    High-power waveguide dampers have been designed and prototyped for the Short-Pulse X-ray (SPX) cavities at the Advanced Photon Source. The cavities will operate at 2.815 GHz and utilize the TM110 dipole mode. As a result, higher-order (HOM) and lower-order mode (LOM) in-vacuum dampers have been designed to satisfy the demanding broadband damping requirements in the APS storage ring. The SPX single-cell cavity consists of two WR284 waveguides for damping the HOMs and one WR284 waveguide for primarily damping the LOM where up to 2kW will be dissipated in the damping material. The damper designs and high-power experimental results will be discussed in this paper.

  15. The Wakefield Effects of Pulsed Crab Cavities at the Advanced Photon Source for Short-X-ray Pulse Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Chae, Y.-C.; Waldschmidt, G.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2007-11-07

    In recent years we have explored the application to the Advanced Photon Source (APS) of Zholents' crab-cavity based scheme for production of short x-ray pulses. As a near-term project, the APS has elected to pursue a pulsed system using room-temperature cavities. The cavity design has been optimized to heavily damp parasitic modes while maintaining large shunt impedance for the deflecting dipole mode. We evaluated a system consisting of three crab cavities as an impedance source and determined their effect on the single- and multi-bunch instabilities. In the single-bunch instability we used the APS impedance model as the reference system in order to predict the overall performance of the ring when the crab cavities are installed in the future. For multi-bunch instabilities we used a realistic fill pattern, including hybrid-fill, and tracked multiple bunches where each bunch was treated as soft in distribution.

  16. Superconducting Multi-Cell Deflecting Cavity for Short-Pulse X-Ray Generation at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    G.J. Waldschmidt, L.H. Morrison, R. Nassiri, R.A. Rimmer, K. Tian, H. Wang

    2009-05-01

    A superconducting multi-cell cavity for the production of short x-ray pulses at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) has been explored as an alternative to a single-cell cavity design in order to improve the packing factor and potentially reduce the number of high-power RF systems and low-level RF controls required. The cavity will operate at 2815 MHz in the APS storage ring and will require heavy damping of parasitic modes to maintain stable beam operation. Novel on-cell dampers, attached directly to the cavity body, have been utilized by taking advantage of the magnetic field null on the equatorial plane in order to enhance damping. Design issues and simulation results will be discussed.

  17. Status of the Short-Pulse X-ray Project (SPX) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS)

    SciTech Connect

    Nassiri, R; Berenc, G; Borland, M; Bromberek, D J; Chae, Y -C; Decker, G; Emery, L; Fuerst, J D; Grelick, A E; Horan, D; Lenkszus, F; Lill, R M; Sajaev, V; Smith, T L; Waldschmidt, G J; Wu, G; Yang, B X; Zholents, A; Byrd, J M; Doolittle, L R; Huang, G; Cheng, G; Ciovati, G; Henry, J; Kneisel, P; Mammosser, J D; Rimmer, R A; Turlington, L

    2011-03-01

    The Advanced Photon Source Upgrade project (APS-U) at Argonne includes implementation of Zholents’* deflecting cavity scheme for production of short x-ray pulses. This is a joint project between Argonne National Laboratory, Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This paper describes performance characteristics of the proposed source and technical issues related to its realization. Ensuring stable APS storage ring operation requires reducing quality factors of these modes by many orders of magnitude. These challenges reduce to those of the design of a single-cell SC cavity that can achieve the desired operating deflecting fields while providing needed damping of all these modes. The project team is currently prototyping and testing several promising designs for single-cell cavities with the goal of deciding on a winning design in the near future. Here

  18. Neoadjuvant short-course hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (SC-HART) combined with S-1 for locally advanced rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Doi, Hiroshi; Beppu, Naohito; Odawara, Soichi; Tanooka, Masao; Takada, Yasuhiro; Niwa, Yasue; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Kimura, Fumihiko; Yanagi, Hidenori; Yamanaka, Naoki; Kamikonya, Norihiko; Hirota, Shozo

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the safety and feasibility of a novel protocol of neoadjuvant short-course hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (SC-HART) combined with S-1 for locally advanced rectal cancer. A total of 56 patients with lower rectal cancer of cT3N1M0 (Stage III b) was treated with SC-HART followed by radical surgery, and were analyzed in the present study. SC-HART was performed with a dose of 2.5 Gy twice daily, with an interval of at least 6 hours between fractions, up to a total dose of 25 Gy (25 Gy in 10 fractions for 5 days) combined with S-1 for 10 days. Radical surgery was performed within three weeks following the end of the SC-HART. The median age was 64.6 (range, 39-85) years. The median follow-up term was 16.3 (range, 2-53) months. Of the 56 patients, 53 (94.4%) had no apparent adverse events before surgery; 55 (98.2%) completed the full course of neoadjuvant therapy, while one patient stopped chemotherapy because of Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity (CTCAE v.3). The sphincter preservation rate was 94.6%. Downstaging was observed in 45 patients (80.4%). Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 43 patients (76.8%). The local control rate, disease-free survival rate and disease-specific survival rate were 100%, 91.1% and 100%, respectively. To conclude, SC-HART combined with S-1 for locally advanced rectal cancer was well tolerated and produced good short-term outcomes. SC-HART therefore appeared to have a good feasibility for use in further clinical trials. PMID:23658415

  19. Preliminary performance of a vertical-attitude takeoff and landing, supersonic cruise aircraft concept having thrust vectoring integrated into the flight control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robins, A. W.; Beissner, F. L., Jr.; Domack, C. S.; Swanson, E. E.

    1985-01-01

    A performance study was made of a vertical attitude takeoff and landing (VATOL), supersonic cruise aircraft concept having thrust vectoring integrated into the flight control system. Those characteristics considered were aerodynamics, weight, balance, and performance. Preliminary results indicate that high levels of supersonic aerodynamic performance can be achieved. Further, with the assumption of an advanced (1985 technology readiness) low bypass ratio turbofan engine and advanced structures, excellent mission performance capability is indicated.

  20. 14 CFR 121.199 - Nontransport category airplanes: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... nontransport category airplane may take off that airplane at a weight greater than the weight that would allow... power off stalling speed in the takeoff configuration, whichever is greater. (b) For the purposes of... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Nontransport category airplanes:...

  1. Aerodynamics of a beetle in take-off flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Boogeon; Park, Hyungmin; Kim, Sun-Tae

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, we investigate the aerodynamics of a beetle in its take-off flights based on the three-dimensional kinematics of inner (hindwing) and outer (elytron) wings, and body postures, which are measured with three high-speed cameras at 2000 fps. To track the highly deformable wing motions, we distribute 21 morphological markers and use the modified direct linear transform algorithm for the reconstruction of measured wing motions. To realize different take-off conditions, we consider two types of take-off flights; that is, one is the take-off from a flat ground and the other is from a vertical rod mimicking a branch of a tree. It is first found that the elytron which is flapped passively due to the motion of hindwing also has non-negligible wing-kinematic parameters. With the ground, the flapping amplitude of elytron is reduced and the hindwing changes its flapping angular velocity during up and downstrokes. On the other hand, the angle of attack on the elytron and hindwing increases and decreases, respectively, due to the ground. These changes in the wing motion are critically related to the aerodynamic force generation, which will be discussed in detail. Supported by the grant to Bio-Mimetic Robot Research Center funded by Defense Acquisition Program Administration (UD130070ID).

  2. 14 CFR 91.175 - Takeoff and landing under IFR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... III approach is determined by the appropriate 14 CFR part 97 approach procedure, letter of... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Takeoff and landing under IFR. 91.175 Section 91.175 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  3. 14 CFR 121.571 - Briefing passengers before takeoff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Briefing passengers before takeoff. 121.571 Section 121.571 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG,...

  4. 14 CFR 121.571 - Briefing passengers before takeoff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Briefing passengers before takeoff. 121.571 Section 121.571 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG,...

  5. Vertical Takeoff and Landing (VTOL) propulsion technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciepluch, C. C.; Abbott, J. M.; Moore, R. D.; Sellers, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    Propulsion problems and advanced technology requirements of VTOL aircraft are discussed. Specific topics covered include inlets with high angle of attack capability, rapid thrust modulation fans, and propulsion-system/aircraft-control integration.

  6. Determination of optimal trajectories for an aircraft returning to the runway following a complete loss of thrust after takeoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Craig A.

    This thesis examines the ability of a small, single-engine airplane to return to the runway following an engine failure shortly after takeoff. Two sets of trajectories are examined. One set of trajectories has the airplane fly a straight climb on the runway heading until engine failure. The other set of trajectories has the airplane perform a 90° turn at an altitude of 500 feet and continue until engine failure. Various combinations of wind speed, wind direction, and engine failure times are examined. The runway length required to complete the entire flight from the beginning of the takeoff roll to wheels stop following the return to the runway after engine failure is calculated for each case. The optimal trajectories following engine failure consist of three distinct segments: a turn back toward the runway using a large bank angle and angle of attack; a straight glide; and a reversal turn to align the airplane with the runway. The 90° turn results in much shorter required runway lengths at lower headwind speeds. At higher headwind speeds, both sets of trajectories are limited by the length of runway required for the landing rollout, but the straight climb cases generally require a lower angle of attack to complete the flight. The glide back to the runway is performed at an airspeed below the best glide speed of the airplane due to the need to conserve potential energy after the completion of the turn back toward the runway. The results are highly dependent on the rate of climb of the airplane during powered flight. The results of this study can aid the pilot in determining whether or not a return to the runway could be performed in the event of an engine failure given the specific wind conditions and runway length at the time of takeoff. The results can also guide the pilot in determining the takeoff profile that would offer the greatest advantage in returning to the runway.

  7. Advanced nuclear magnetic resonance lanthanide probe analyses of short-range conformational interrelations controlling ribonucleic acid structures.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, S; Inagaki, F; Miyazawa, T

    1981-05-12

    An advanced method was developed for lanthanide-probe analyses of the conformations of flexible biomolecules such as nucleotides. The new method is to determine structure parameters (such as internal-rotation angles) and population parameters for local conformational equilibria of flexible sites, together with standard deviations of these parameters. As the prominent advantage of this method, the interrelations among local conformations of flexible sites may be quantitatively elucidated from the experimental data of lanthanide-induced shifts and relaxations and vicinal coupling constants. As a structural unit of ribonucleic acids, the molecular conformations and conformational equilibria of uridine 3'-monophosphate in aqueous solution were analyzed. The stable local conformers about the C3'-O3' bond are the G+ (phi' = 281 +/- 11 degrees) and G- (phi' = 211 +/- 8 degrees) forms. The internal rotation about the C3'-O3' bond and the ribose-ring puckering are interrelated; 97 +/- 5% of the C3'-endo ribose ring is associated with the G- form while 70 +/- 22% o the C2'-endo ribose ring is associated with the G+ form. An interdependency also exists between the internal rotation about the C4'-C5' bond and the ribose-ring puckering. These short-range conformational interrelations are probably important in controlling the dynamic aspects of ribonucleic acid structures. PMID:6166319

  8. Using the Advanced Progressive Matrices (Set I) to Assess Fluid Ability in a Short Time Frame: An Item Response Theory-Based Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiesi, Francesca; Ciancaleoni, Matteo; Galli, Silvia; Primi, Caterina

    2012-01-01

    This article is aimed at evaluating the possibility that Set I of the Advanced Progressive Matrices (APM-Set I) can be employed to assess fluid ability in a short time frame. The APM-Set I was administered to a sample of 1,389 primary and secondary school students. Confirmatory factor analysis attested to the unidimensionality of the scale. Item…

  9. Morphometric relationships of take-off speed in anuran amphibians.

    PubMed

    Choi, Inho; Shim, Jae Han; Ricklefs, Robert E

    2003-10-01

    Locomotory speed correlates with muscle mass (determining force and stride rate), limb length (stride rate and distance), and laterally compressed body trunk (force and stride distance). To delineate generalization of the locomotory-morphometric relationships specifically in anuran amphibians, we investigated take-off speed and the three morphological variables from seven species, Rana nigromaculata, R. rugosa, and Bombina orientalis, Eleuthrodectilus fitzingeri, E. diastema, Bufo typhonius, Colostethus flotator and Physalaemus pustulosus. The fastest jumper E. fitzingeri (3.41 m s(-1)) showed 2.49-fold greater speed than the slowest B. typhonius. Take-off speed correlated well with both thigh muscle mass relative to body mass and hindlimb length relative to snout-vent length (HL/SVL), but poorly correlated with the inter-ilial width relative to SVL. The best morphological predictor was HL/SVL (speed=-3.28+3.916 HL/SVL, r=0.968, P<0.0001), suggesting that anuran take-off speed is portrayed well with high gear and acceleration distance characterized by hindlimbs. PMID:12975797

  10. Effects of airplane characteristics and takeoff noise and field length constraints on engine cycle selection for a Mach 2.32 cruise application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlow, J. B., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Sideline noise and takeoff field length were varied for two types of Mach 2.32 cruise airplane to determine their effect on engine cycle selection. One of these airplanes was the NASA/Langley-LTV arrow wing while the other was a Boeing modified delta-plus-tail derived from the earlier 2707-300 concept. Advanced variable cycle engines were considered. A more conventional advanced low bypass turbofan engine was used as a baseline for comparison. Appropriate exhaust nozzle modifications were assumed, where needed, to allow all engines to receive either an inherent co-annular or annular jet noise suppression benefit. All the VCE's out-performed the baseline engine by substantial margins in a design range comparison, regardless of airplane choice or takeoff restrictions. The choice among the three VCE's considered, however, depends on the field length, noise level, and airplane selected.

  11. AGFATL- ACTIVE GEAR FLEXIBLE AIRCRAFT TAKEOFF AND LANDING ANALYSIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    The Active Gear, Flexible Aircraft Takeoff and Landing Analysis program, AGFATL, was developed to provide a complete simulation of the aircraft takeoff and landing dynamics problem. AGFATL can represent an airplane either as a rigid body with six degrees of freedom or as a flexible body with multiple degrees of freedom. The airframe flexibility is represented by the superposition of up to twenty free vibration modes on the rigid-body motions. The analysis includes maneuver logic and autopilots programmed to control the aircraft during glide slope, flare, landing, and takeoff. The program is modular so that performance of the aircraft in flight and during landing and ground maneuvers can be studied separately or in combination. A program restart capability is included in AGFATL. Effects simulated in the AGFATL program include: (1) flexible aircraft control and performance during glide slope, flare, landing roll, and takeoff roll under conditions of changing winds, engine failures, brake failures, control system failures, strut failures, restrictions due to runway length, and control variable limits and time lags; (2) landing gear loads and dynamics for up to five gears; (3) single and multiple engines (maximum of four) including selective engine reversing and failure; (4) drag chute and spoiler effects; (5) wheel braking (including skid-control) and selective brake failure; (6) aerodynamic ground effects; (7) aircraft carrier operations; (8) inclined runways and runway perturbations; (9) flexible or rigid airframes; 10) rudder and nose gear steering; and 11) actively controlled landing gear shock struts. Input to the AGFATL program includes data which describe runway roughness; vehicle geometry, flexibility and aerodynamic characteristics; landing gear(s); propulsion; and initial conditions such as attitude, attitude change rates, and velocities. AGFATL performs a time integration of the equations of motion and outputs comprehensive information on the airframe

  12. 14 CFR 23.66 - Takeoff climb: One-engine inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... automatically assumes; (b) The remaining engine(s) at takeoff power; (c) The landing gear extended, except that if the landing gear can be retracted in not more than seven seconds, the test may be conducted with the gear retracted; (d) The wing flaps in the takeoff position(s): (e) The wings level; and (f)...

  13. 14 CFR 121.189 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff... Limitations § 121.189 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that airplane at a weight greater than that listed in...

  14. 14 CFR 121.189 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff... Limitations § 121.189 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that airplane at a weight greater than that listed in...

  15. 14 CFR 121.189 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff... Limitations § 121.189 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that airplane at a weight greater than that listed in...

  16. 14 CFR 121.189 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff... Limitations § 121.189 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that airplane at a weight greater than that listed in...

  17. 14 CFR 121.177 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... reach a height of 50 feet, as indicated by the takeoff path data, before passing over the end of the... path data) or 200 feet horizontally within the airport boundaries and 300 feet horizontally beyond the boundaries, without banking before reaching a height of 50 feet (as shown by the takeoff path data)...

  18. 14 CFR 23.66 - Takeoff climb: One-engine inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Takeoff climb: One-engine inoperative. 23.66 Section 23.66 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Performance § 23.66 Takeoff climb: One-engine inoperative. For normal, utility, and acrobatic...

  19. 76 FR 64005 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a..., Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle DP, Orig, CANCELLED Lexington, MO, Lexington Muni, VOR/DME OR GPS RWY 22... County, Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle DP, Amdt 1 Maxton, NC, Laurinburg-Maxton, RNAV (GPS) RWY 5, Amdt...

  20. 77 FR 31180 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... rule '' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,1979); and (3) does not... 36, Orig Forest, VA, New London, Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle DP, Orig Effective 28 JUNE 2012 Arcata..., KY, Glasgow Muni, Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle DP, Amdt 1 Orange, MA, Orange Muni, VOR-A, Amdt...

  1. 76 FR 66179 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... ``significant rule '' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3..., Amdt 2A Salinas, CA, Salinas Muni, Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle DP, Amdt 4 Atlanta, GA, Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta Intl, Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle DP, Amdt 4A Newton, KS, Newton-City-County,...

  2. 78 FR 14010 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-04

    ... ``significant rule '' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,1979); and (3) does..., Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle DP, Amdt 6 Des Moines, IA, Des Moines Intl, Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle DP... and Obstacle DP, Amdt 2 Willcox, AZ, Cochise County, COCHISE ONE, Graphic DP Willcox, AZ,...

  3. 76 FR 18379 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,1979) ; and (3)does not warrant preparation of a... DP, Amdt 3 Taylor, AZ, Taylor Muni, Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle DP, Amdt 1 Rio Vista, CA, Rio Vista... Rgnl, Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle DP, Amdt 2 Chicago/Prospect Hgts/Wheeling, IL, Chicago...

  4. 14 CFR 121.649 - Takeoff and landing weather minimums: VFR: Domestic operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Takeoff and landing weather minimums: VFR... Flight Release Rules § 121.649 Takeoff and landing weather minimums: VFR: Domestic operations. (a) Except... weather minimums in this section do not apply to the VFR operation of fixed-wing aircraft at any of...

  5. 14 CFR 125.381 - Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR... § 125.381 Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR. (a) Regardless of any clearance from ATC, if the reported weather conditions are less than that specified in the certificate holder's...

  6. 14 CFR 121.649 - Takeoff and landing weather minimums: VFR: Domestic operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Takeoff and landing weather minimums: VFR... Flight Release Rules § 121.649 Takeoff and landing weather minimums: VFR: Domestic operations. (a) Except... weather minimums in this section do not apply to the VFR operation of fixed-wing aircraft at any of...

  7. 14 CFR 125.381 - Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR... § 125.381 Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR. (a) Regardless of any clearance from ATC, if the reported weather conditions are less than that specified in the certificate holder's...

  8. 14 CFR 121.649 - Takeoff and landing weather minimums: VFR: Domestic operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Takeoff and landing weather minimums: VFR... Flight Release Rules § 121.649 Takeoff and landing weather minimums: VFR: Domestic operations. (a) Except... weather minimums in this section do not apply to the VFR operation of fixed-wing aircraft at any of...

  9. 14 CFR 125.381 - Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR... § 125.381 Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR. (a) Regardless of any clearance from ATC, if the reported weather conditions are less than that specified in the certificate holder's...

  10. 75 FR 45049 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a regulatory evaluation... 14 CFR Part 97 Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure... (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures for operations at...

  11. 75 FR 12979 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-18

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a... 14 CFR Part 97 Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure... (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures for operations at...

  12. 76 FR 47985 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a... Administration 14 CFR Part 97 Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle... Procedures (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures for operations...

  13. 75 FR 51666 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a... 14 CFR Part 97 Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure... (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures for operations at...

  14. 75 FR 5232 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a... 14 CFR Part 97 Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure... (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures for operations at...

  15. 76 FR 4064 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a... 14 CFR Part 97 Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure... (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures for operations at...

  16. 14 CFR 125.381 - Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR... § 125.381 Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR. (a) Regardless of any clearance from ATC, if the reported weather conditions are less than that specified in the certificate holder's...

  17. 14 CFR 121.649 - Takeoff and landing weather minimums: VFR: Domestic operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Takeoff and landing weather minimums: VFR... Flight Release Rules § 121.649 Takeoff and landing weather minimums: VFR: Domestic operations. (a) Except... weather minimums in this section do not apply to the VFR operation of fixed-wing aircraft at any of...

  18. 14 CFR 121.649 - Takeoff and landing weather minimums: VFR: Domestic operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Takeoff and landing weather minimums: VFR... Flight Release Rules § 121.649 Takeoff and landing weather minimums: VFR: Domestic operations. (a) Except... weather minimums in this section do not apply to the VFR operation of fixed-wing aircraft at any of...

  19. 14 CFR 125.381 - Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR... § 125.381 Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR. (a) Regardless of any clearance from ATC, if the reported weather conditions are less than that specified in the certificate holder's...

  20. Preoperative Treatment of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: Assets and Drawbacks of Short Course and Long Course in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Ngan, Samuel Y

    2016-07-01

    Preoperative short-course radiotherapy and preoperative long-course chemoradiotherapy are the standards of care for high-risk rectal cancer in different parts of the world. Both treatments are effective in local control and carry a low morbidity. The advantage of short course is its simplicity, whereas long course has the advantage of downsizing tumors thus increasing the chance of sphincter preservation. Although 2 randomized trials comparing short course and long course have been performed, the better form of preoperative treatment remains a subject of discussion. This article reviews the evidence supporting each approach, and it discusses their relative merits and future directions. PMID:27238469

  1. Whiteflies stabilize their take-off with closed wings.

    PubMed

    Ribak, Gal; Dafni, Eyal; Gerling, Dan

    2016-06-01

    The transition from ground to air in flying animals is often assisted by the legs pushing against the ground as the wings start to flap. Here, we show that when tiny whiteflies (Bemisia tabaci, body length ca. 1 mm) perform take-off jumps with closed wings, the abrupt push against the ground sends the insect into the air rotating forward in the sagittal (pitch) plane. However, in the air, B. tabaci can recover from this rotation remarkably fast (less than 11 ms), even before spreading its wings and flapping. The timing of body rotation in air, a simplified biomechanical model and take-off in insects with removed wings all suggest that the wings, resting backwards alongside the body, stabilize motion through air to prevent somersaulting. The increased aerodynamic force at the posterior tip of the body results in a pitching moment that stops body rotation. Wing deployment increases the pitching moment further, returning the body to a suitable angle for flight. This inherent stabilizing mechanism is made possible by the wing shape and size, in which half of the wing area is located behind the posterior tip of the abdomen. PMID:27045098

  2. Biomechanical and dynamic mechanism of locust take-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dian-Sheng; Yin, Jun-Mao; Chen, Ke-Wei; Li, Zhen

    2014-10-01

    The biomimetic locust robot hopping vehicle has promising applications in planet exploration and reconnaissance. This paper explores the bionic dynamics model of locust jumping by using high-speed video and force analysis. This paper applies hybrid rigid-flexible mechanisms to bionic locust hopping and studies its dynamics with emphasis laid on the relationship between force and jumping performance. The hybrid rigid-flexible model is introduced in the analysis of locust mechanism to address the principles of dynamics that govern locust joints and mechanisms during energy storage and take-off. The dynamic response of the biomimetic mechanism is studied by considering the flexibility according to the locust jumping dynamics mechanism. A multi-rigid-body dynamics model of locust jumping is established and analyzed based on Lagrange method; elastic knee and tarsus mechanisms that were proposed in previous works are analyzed alongside the original bionic joint configurations and their machinery principles. This work offers primary theories for take-off dynamics and establishes a theoretical basis for future studies and engineering applications.

  3. Noise impact of advanced high lift systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmer, Kevin R.; Joshi, Mahendra C.

    1995-01-01

    The impact of advanced high lift systems on aircraft size, performance, direct operating cost and noise were evaluated for short-to-medium and medium-to-long range aircraft with high bypass ratio and very high bypass ratio engines. The benefit of advanced high lift systems in reducing noise was found to be less than 1 effective-perceived-noise decibel level (EPNdB) when the aircraft were sized to minimize takeoff gross weight. These aircraft did, however, have smaller wings and lower engine thrusts for the same mission than aircraft with conventional high lift systems. When the advanced high lift system was implemented without reducing wing size and simultaneously using lower flap angles that provide higher L/D at approach a cumulative noise reduction of as much as 4 EPNdB was obtained. Comparison of aircraft configurations that have similar approach speeds showed cumulative noise reduction of 2.6 EPNdB that is purely the result of incorporating advanced high lift system in the aircraft design.

  4. A fuel conservation study for transport aircraft utilizing advanced technology and hydrogen fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, W.; Calleson, R.; Espil, J.; Quartero, C.; Swanson, E.

    1972-01-01

    The conservation of fossil fuels in commercial aviation was investigated. Four categories of aircraft were selected for investigation: (1) conventional, medium range, low take-off gross weight; (2) conventional, long range, high take-off gross weights; (3) large take-off gross weight aircraft that might find future applications using both conventional and advanced technology; and (4) advanced technology aircraft of the future powered with liquid hydrogen fuel. It is concluded that the hydrogen fueled aircraft can perform at reduced size and gross weight the same payload/range mission as conventionally fueled aircraft.

  5. An overview of LLNL high-energy short-pulse technology for advanced radiography of laser fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barty, C. P. J.; Key, M.; Britten, J.; Beach, R.; Beer, G.; Brown, C.; Bryan, S.; Caird, J.; Carlson, T.; Crane, J.; Dawson, J.; Erlandson, A. C.; Fittinghoff, D.; Hermann, M.; Hoaglan, C.; Iyer, A.; Jones, L., II; Jovanovic, I.; Komashko, A.; Landen, O.; Liao, Z.; Molander, W.; Mitchell, S.; Moses, E.; Nielsen, N.; Nguyen, H.-H.; Nissen, J.; Payne, S.; Pennington, D.; Risinger, L.; Rushford, M.; Skulina, K.; Spaeth, M.; Stuart, B.; Tietbohl, G.; Wattellier, B.

    2004-12-01

    The technical challenges and motivations for high-energy, short-pulse generation with NIF and possibly other large-scale Nd : glass lasers are reviewed. High-energy short-pulse generation (multi-kilojoule, picosecond pulses) will be possible via the adaptation of chirped pulse amplification laser techniques on NIF. Development of metre-scale, high-efficiency, high-damage-threshold final optics is a key technical challenge. In addition, deployment of high energy petawatt (HEPW) pulses on NIF is constrained by existing laser infrastructure and requires new, compact compressor designs and short-pulse, fibre-based, seed-laser systems. The key motivations for HEPW pulses on NIF is briefly outlined and includes high-energy, x-ray radiography, proton beam radiography, proton isochoric heating and tests of the fast ignitor concept for inertial confinement fusion.

  6. Advanced Vehicle Concepts and Implications for NextGen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Matt; Smith, Jim; Wright, Ken; Mediavilla Ricky; Kirby, Michelle; Pfaender, Holger; Clarke, John-Paul; Volovoi, Vitali; Dorbian, Christopher; Ashok, Akshay; Reynolds, Tom; Waitz, Ian; Hileman, James; Arunachalam, Sarav; Hedrick, Matt; Vempati, Lakshmi; Laroza, Ryan; denBraven, Wim; Henderson, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    This report presents the results of a major NASA study of advanced vehicle concepts and their implications for the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). Comprising the efforts of dozens of researchers at multiple institutions, the analyses presented here cover a broad range of topics including business-case development, vehicle design, avionics, procedure design, delay, safety, environmental impacts, and metrics. The study focuses on the following five new vehicle types: Cruise-efficient short takeoff and landing (CESTOL) vehicles Large commercial tiltrotor aircraft (LCTRs) Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) Very light jets (VLJs) Supersonic transports (SST). The timeframe of the study spans the years 2025-2040, although some analyses are also presented for a 3X scenario that has roughly three times the number of flights as today. Full implementation of NextGen is assumed.

  7. Comparative Analysis of the Tour Jete and Aerial with Detailed Analysis of Aerial Takeoff Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierson, Mimi; Coplin, Kim

    2006-10-01

    Whether internally as muscle tension or from external sources, forces are necessary for all motion. This research focused on athletic rotations where conditions of flight are established during takeoff. By studying reaction forces that produce torques, moments of inertia, and linear and angular differences between distinct rotations around different principle axes of the body (tour jete in ballet - longitudinal axis; aerial in gymnastics - anteroposterior axis), and by looking at the values of angular momentum in the specific mechanics of aerial takeoff, we can gain insight into possible causes of injury, flaws in technique and limitations of athletes. Results showed significant differences in the horizontal and vertical components of takeoff between the tour jete and the aerial, and a realization that torque was produced in different biomechanical planes. Both rotations showed braking forces before takeoff to counteract forward momentum and increase vertical lift, but the angle of applied force varied, and the horizontal components of velocity and force and vertical velocity as well as moment of inertia throughout flight were consistently greater for the aerial. Breakdown of aerial takeoff highlighted the relative importance of the takeoff phases, showing that completion depends fundamentally upon the rotation of the rear foot and torso twisting during takeoff rather than the last foot in contact with the ground.

  8. A brief study of the effects of turbofan-engine bypass ratio on short and long haul cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, A. L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A brief study of the effects of turbofan-engine bypass ratio on Breguet cruise range and take-off distance for subsonic cruise aircraft showed significant differences between short- and long-haul aircraft designs. Large thrust lapse rates at high bypass ratios caused severe reductions in cruise range for short-haul aircraft because of increases in propulsion system weight. Long-haul aircraft, with a higher fuel fraction (ratio of propulsion weight plus total fuel weight to gross take-off weight), are less sensitive to propulsion-system weight and, accordingly, were not significantly affected by bypass-ratio variations. Both types of aircraft have shorter take-off distances at higher bypass ratios because of higher take-off thrust-weight ratios.

  9. Development of a small flapping robot. Motion analysis during takeoff by numerical simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, Taro; Hirakawa, Kazuaki; Okuma, Shinnosuke; Udagawa, Takamasa; Nakano, Satoru; Kikuchi, Koki

    2008-08-01

    We present the development of a small flapping robot for use as an observation system in hazardous environments. An isometric physical model was constructed based on the observations of body and wing motions during takeoff of a butterfly, and we compared the flapping motion of the model with that of a butterfly. A computational model based on the finite-element method is used to analyze the vortex around the wing of the model during takeoff of the constructed robot. Computation results clarify the takeoff mechanism of the model and show the feasibility of a small flying device employing a flapping mechanism.

  10. Advanced prediction technique for the low speed aerodynamics of V/STOL aircraft. Volume 1: Technical discussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, T. D.; Worthey, M. K.

    1984-01-01

    The V/STOL Aircraft Propulsive Effects (VAPE) computerized prediction method is evaluated. The program analyzes viscous effects, various jet, inlet, and Short TakeOff and Landing (STOL) models, and examines the aerodynamic configurations of V/STOL aircraft.

  11. Microbial enzymatic production and applications of short-chain fructooligosaccharides and inulooligosaccharides: recent advances and current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mutanda, T; Mokoena, M P; Olaniran, A O; Wilhelmi, B S; Whiteley, C G

    2014-06-01

    The industrial production of short-chain fructooligosaccharides (FOS) and inulooligosaccharides is expanding rapidly due to the pharmaceutical importance of these compounds. These compounds, concisely termed prebiotics, have biofunctional properties and hence health benefits if consumed in recommended dosages. Prebiotics can be produced enzymatically from sucrose elongation or via enzymatic hydrolysis of inulin by exoinulinases and endoinulinases acting alone or synergistically. Exoinulinases cleave the non-reducing β-(2, 1) end of inulin-releasing fructose while endoinulinases act on the internal linkages randomly to release inulotrioses (F3), inulotetraoses (F4) and inulopentaoses (F5) as major products. Fructosyltransferases act by cleaving a sucrose molecule and then transferring the liberated fructose molecule to an acceptor molecule such as sucrose or another oligosaccharide to elongate the short-chain fructooligosaccharide. The FOS produced by the action of fructosyltransferases are 1-kestose (GF2), nystose (GF3) and fructofuranosyl nystose (GF4). The production of high yields of oligosaccharides of specific chain length from simple raw materials such as inulin and sucrose is a technical challenge. This paper critically explores recent research trends in the production and application of short-chain oligosaccharides. Inulin and enzyme sources for the production of prebiotics are discussed. The mechanism of FOS chain elongation and also the health benefits associated with prebiotics consumption are discussed in detail. PMID:24793124

  12. Measured noise of a scale model high speed propeller at simulated takeoff/approach conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.

    1987-01-01

    A model high-speed advanced propeller, SR-7A, was tested in the NASA Lewis 9x15 foot anechoic wind tunnel at simulated takeoff/approach conditions of 0.2 Mach number. These tests were in support of the full-scale Propfan Text Assessment (PTA) flight program. Acoustic measurements were taken with fixed microphone arrays and with an axially translating microphone probe. Limited aerodynamic measurements were also taken to establish the propeller operating conditions. Tests were conducted with the propeller alone and with three down-stream wing configurations. The propeller was run over a range of blade setting angles from 32.0 deg. to 43.6 deg., tip speeds from 183 to 290 m/sec (600 to 950 ft/sec), and angles of attack from -10 deg. to +15 deg. The propeller alone BPF tone noise was found to increase 10 dB in the flyover plane at 15 deg. propeller axis angle of attack. The installation of the straight wing at minimum spacing of 0.54 wing chord increased the tone noise 5 dB under the wing of 10 deg. propeller axis angle of attack, while a similarly spaced inboard upswept wing only increased the tone noise 2 dB.

  13. Conceptual Design of a Vertical Takeoff and Landing Unmanned Aerial Vehicle with 24-HR Endurance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredericks, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a conceptual design study for a vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) that is able to carry a 25-lb science payload for 24 hr and is able to land and take off at elevations as high as 15,000 ft without human intervention. In addition to the science payload, this vehicle must be able to carry a satellite communication system, and the vehicle must be able to be transported in a standard full-size pickup truck and assembled by only two operators. This project started with a brainstorming phase to devise possible vehicle configurations that might satisfy the requirements. A down select was performed to select a near-term solution and two advanced vehicle concepts that are better suited to the intent of the mission. Sensitivity analyses were also performed on the requirements and the technology levels to obtain a better understanding of the design space. This study found that within the study assumptions the mission is feasible; the selected concepts are recommended for further development.

  14. 14 CFR 135.225 - IFR: Takeoff, approach and landing minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... that airport when used as an alternate airport, for each pilot in command of a turbine-powered airplane... minimums, unless otherwise restricted, if— (1) The wind direction and velocity at the time of takeoff...

  15. 14 CFR 135.225 - IFR: Takeoff, approach and landing minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... that airport when used as an alternate airport, for each pilot in command of a turbine-powered airplane... minimums, unless otherwise restricted, if— (1) The wind direction and velocity at the time of takeoff...

  16. 75 FR 45047 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a... Village Field, Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle DP, Amdt 2 Atlantic City, NJ, Atlantic City Intl, RNAV...

  17. 75 FR 55963 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a... NOV 2010 Nome, AK, Nome, RNAV (GPS) RWY 28, Orig-A Ruby, AK, Ruby, Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle...

  18. 75 FR 21983 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-27

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a... ONE Graphic Obstacle DP Napa, CA, Napa County, Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle DP, Amdt 4 San Diego,...

  19. A model for nocturnal frost formation on a wing section: Aircraft takeoff performance penalties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietenberger, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The nocturnal frost formation on a wing section, to explain the hazard associated with frost during takeoff was investigated. A model of nocturnal frost formation on a wing section which predicts when the nocturnal frost will form and also its thickness and density as a function of time was developed. The aerodynamic penalities as related to the nocturnal frost formation properties were analyzed to determine how much the takeoff performance would be degraded by a specific frost layer. With an aircraft takeoff assuming equations representing a steady climbing flight, it is determined that a reduction in the maximum gross weight or a partial frost clearance and a reduction in the takeoff angle of attack is needed to neutralize drag and life penalities which are due to frost. Atmospheric conditions which produce the most hazardous frost buildup are determined.

  20. 76 FR 56969 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    ... Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a regulatory evaluation... Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures; Miscellaneous Amendments AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

  1. 77 FR 18679 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a... Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures; Miscellaneous Amendments AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle...

  2. 78 FR 70494 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ... ``significant rule '' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,1979); and (3) does... Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures; Miscellaneous Amendments AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle...

  3. 76 FR 30534 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a regulatory evaluation... Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures; Miscellaneous Amendments AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Instrument Approach Procedures ] (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure...

  4. 78 FR 40383 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,1979); and (3) does... Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures; Miscellaneous Amendments AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle...

  5. 76 FR 40600 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,1979); and (3)does not warrant preparation of a... Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures; Miscellaneous Amendments AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

  6. 76 FR 16686 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a... Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures; Miscellaneous Amendments AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle...

  7. 77 FR 59738 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a... Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures; Miscellaneous Amendments AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle...

  8. 78 FR 5254 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-25

    ... ``significant rule '' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,1979); and (3) does... Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures; Miscellaneous Amendments AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle...

  9. 75 FR 9095 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3)does not warrant preparation of a... Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures; Miscellaneous Amendments AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

  10. 76 FR 1354 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-10

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a... Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures; Miscellaneous Amendments AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

  11. 76 FR 30536 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures; Miscellaneous Amendments AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure... commissioning of new navigational facilities, adding new obstacles, or changing air traffic requirements....

  12. 76 FR 25232 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-04

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,1979) ; and (3)does not warrant preparation of a... Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures; Miscellaneous Amendments AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

  13. 76 FR 8291 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a regulatory evaluation... Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures; Miscellaneous Amendments AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

  14. Influence of determination of reference position of image on rocket take-off drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Shuhua; Liu, Jun; Shen, Si; Hu, Shaolin

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical analysis model for influence of reference position deviation on carrier rocket take-off drift has been made to tackle the issue on determination of reference position of reticule for optical tracking and measurement of video image in aerospace test range and the variation in rocket take-off drift due to reference position deviation has been subjected to quantitative analysis based on angular error of tracking and lateral error of measuring point as a result of deviation of reference position of reticule cross. The method serves as technical support to quality analysis of rocket take-off deviation measurement data and improvement in data processing precision for carrier rocket take-off drift.

  15. Computer programs for estimation of STOL takeoff, landing, and static performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, S. E.

    1972-01-01

    A set of computer programs has been developed for evaluating the performance of powered-lift STOL aircraft. Included are a static performance summary and dynamic calculations of takeoff and landing performance. The input, output, options, and calculations for each program are described. The programs are written in FORTRAN IV and are currently available on TSS 360. Three independent sections are presented corresponding to the three programs: (1) static performance, (2) takeoff performance, and (3) landing performance.

  16. Hybrid vehicle powertrain system with power take-off driven vehicle accessory

    DOEpatents

    Beaty, Kevin D.; Bockelmann, Thomas R.; Zou, Zhanijang; Hope, Mark E.; Kang, Xiaosong; Carpenter, Jeffrey L.

    2006-09-12

    A hybrid vehicle powertrain system includes a first prime mover, a first prime mover driven power transmission mechanism having a power take-off adapted to drive a vehicle accessory, and a second prime mover. The second prime mover is operable to drive the power transmission mechanism alone or in combination with the first prime mover to provide power to the power take-off through the power transmission mechanism. The invention further includes methods for operating a hybrid vehicle powertrain system.

  17. Preoperative Short-Course Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy Followed by Delayed Surgery for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Phase 2 Multicenter Study (KROG 10-01)

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Seung-Gu; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Dae Yong; Baek, Ji Yeon; Kim, Sun Young; Park, Ji Won; Kim, Min Ju; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Tae Hyun; Lee, Jong Hoon; Jang, Hong Seok; Kim, Jun-Gi; Lee, Myung Ah; Nam, Taek-Keun

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: A prospective phase 2 multicenter trial was performed to investigate the efficacy and safety of preoperative short-course concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) followed by delayed surgery for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventy-three patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiation therapy of 25 Gy in 5 fractions was delivered over 5 consecutive days using helical tomotherapy. Concurrent chemotherapy was administered on the same 5 days with intravenous bolus injection of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m{sup 2}/day) and leucovorin (20 mg/m{sup 2}/day). After 4 to 8 weeks, total mesorectal excision was performed. The primary endpoint was the pathologic downstaging (ypStage 0-I) rate, and secondary endpoints included tumor regression grade, tumor volume reduction rate, and toxicity. Results: Seventy-one patients completed the planned preoperative CRT and surgery. Downstaging occurred in 20 (28.2%) patients, including 1 (1.4%) with a pathologic complete response. Favorable tumor regression (grade 4-3) was observed in 4 (5.6%) patients, and the mean tumor volume reduction rate was 62.5 ± 21.3%. Severe (grade ≥3) treatment toxicities were reported in 27 (38%) patients from CRT until 3 months after surgery. Conclusions: Preoperative short-course concurrent CRT followed by delayed surgery for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer demonstrated poor pathologic responses compared with conventional long-course CRT, and it yielded considerable toxicities despite the use of an advanced radiation therapy technique.

  18. Timing of autumn bird migration under climate change: advances in long-distance migrants, delays in short-distance migrants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenni, L.; Kery, M.

    2003-01-01

    As a response to increasing spring temperature in temperate regions in recent years, populations of many plant and animal species, including migratory birds, have advanced the seasonal start of their reproduction or growth. However, the effects of climate changes on subsequent events of the annual cycle remain poorly understood. We investigated long-term changes in the timing of autumn migration in birds, a key event in the annual cycle limiting the reproductive period. Using data spanning a 42-year period, we analysed long-term changes in the passage of 65 species of migratory birds through Western Europe. The autumn passage of migrants wintering south of the Sahara has advanced in recent years, presumably as a result of selection pressure to cross the Sahel before its seasonal dry period. In contrast, migrants wintering north of the Sahara have delayed autumn passage. In addition, species with a variable rather than a fixed number of broods per year have delayed passage, possibly because they are free to attempt more broods. Recent climate changes seem to have a simple unidirectional effect on the seasonal onset of reproduction, but complex and opposing effects on the timing of subsequent events in the annual cycle, depending on the ecology and life history of a species. This complicates predictions of overall effects of global warming on avian communities.

  19. Monitoring techniques for the X-29A aircraft's high-speed rotating power takeoff shaft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voracek, David F.

    1990-01-01

    The experimental X-29A forward swept-wing aircraft has many unique and critical systems that require constant monitoring during ground or flight operation. One such system is the power takeoff shaft, which is the mechanical link between the engine and the aircraft-mounted accessory drive. The X-29A power takeoff shaft opertes in a range between 0 and 16,810 rpm, is longer than most jet engine power takeoff shafts, and is made of graphite epoxy material. Since the X-29A aircraft operates on a single engine, failure of the shaft during flight could lead to loss of the aircraft. The monitoring techniques and test methods used during power takeoff shaft ground and flight operations are discussed. Test data are presented in two case studies where monitoring and testing of the shaft dynamics proved instrumental in discovering and isolating X-29A power takeoff shaft problems. The first study concerns the installation of an unbalanced shaft. The effect of the unbalance on the shaft vibration data and the procedure used to correct the problem are discussed. The second study deals with the shaft exceeding the established vibration limits during flight. This case study found that the vibration of connected rotating machinery unbalances contributed to the excessive vibration level of the shaft. The procedures used to identify the contributions of other rotating machinery unbalances to the power takeoff shaft unbalance are discussed.

  20. REVISITING COINCIDENCE RATE BETWEEN GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTION AND SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST FOR THE ADVANCED AND THIRD GENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Regimbau, T.; Siellez, K.; Meacher, D.; Gendre, B.; Boër, M.

    2015-01-20

    We use realistic Monte Carlo simulations including both gravitational-wave (GW) and short gamma-ray burst (sGRB) selection effects to revisit the coincident rate of binary systems composed of two neutron stars or a neutron star and a black hole. We show that the fraction of GW triggers that can be observed in coincidence with sGRBs is proportional to the beaming factor at z = 0, but increases with the distance until it reaches 100% at the GW detector horizon distance. When this is taken into account the rate is improved by a factor of three compared to the simple beaming factor correction. We provide an estimate of the performance future GRB detectors should achieve in order to fully exploit the potentiality of the planned third-generation GW antenna Einstein Telescope, and we propose a simple method to constrain the beaming angle of sGRBs.

  1. The development of advanced automatic flare and decrab for powered lift short haul aircraft using a microwave landing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gevaert, G.; Feinreich, B.

    1977-01-01

    Advanced automatic flare and decrab control laws were developed for future powered lift STOL aircraft using the NASA-C-8A augmentor wing vehicle as the aircraft model. The longitudinal control laws utilize the throttle for flight path control and use the direct lift augmentor flap chokes for flight path augmentation. The elevator is used to control airspeed during the approach phase and to enhance path control during the flare. The forward slip maneuver was selected over the flat decrab technique for runway alignment because it can effectively handle the large crab angles obtained at STOL approach speeds. Performance evaluation of selected system configurations were obtained over the total landing environment. Limitations were defined and critical failure modes assessed. Pilot display concepts are discussed.

  2. Mesenchymal stromal stem cell therapy in advanced interstitial lung disease - Anaphylaxis and short-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Thangakunam, Balamugesh; Christopher, Devasahayam Jesudas; Mathews, Vikram; Srivastava, Alok

    2015-01-01

    There are limited treatment options for advanced interstitial lung disease (ILD). We describe a patient of ILD treated with mesenchymal stromal stem cell infusion. The index patient had end-stage ILD due to a combination of insults including treatment with radiotherapy and a tyrosine kinase inhibitor Erlotinib. He was oxygen-dependent and this was hampering his quality of life. He tolerated the first infusion stem cells without any problem. During the second infusion he developed anaphylactic shock, which was appropriately managed. At 6-months follow-up he had no improvement in oxygenation, pulmonary function or CT scan parameters. In view of anaphylaxis, further infusions of MSC were withheld. A longer follow-up may reveal long-term benefits or side effects, if any. However the occurrence of anaphylaxis is of concern suggesting that further trials should be conducted with intensive monitoring. PMID:26628765

  3. Phase I/II study of a short course of weekly cisplatin in patients with advanced solid tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Planting, A. S.; van der Burg, M. E.; de Boer-Dennert, M.; Stoter, G.; Verweij, J.

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with advanced solid tumours were entered in a phase I/II study of six, weekly cycles of cisplatin. Nineteen patients were chemonaive and six were previously treated. The starting dose was 50 mg m-2 week-1. This dose could be escalated without major toxicity to 70 mg m-2 week-1. At a dose of 80 mg m-2 myelosuppression grade 3 occurred as well as grade 1 nephro- and neurotoxicity. The maximum tolerated dose was 85 mg m-2 with dose limiting thrombocytopenia. Hypertonic saline was effective in preventing nephrotoxicity. Ondansetron was a very effective antiemetic in the first weeks of treatment but its efficacy waned later on. Responses were observed in head and neck cancer, melanoma and mesothelioma. At the dose level of 80 mg m-2 the optimal dose intensity was reached. This schedule will be tested further in phase II studies. PMID:8398709

  4. Short-Term Oxidation Studies on Nicrofer- 6025HT in Air at Elevated Temperatures for Advanced Coal Based Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Vineet V.; Meier, Alan; Darsell, Jens T.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Bowden, Mark E.; Weil, K. Scott

    2013-04-01

    Several advanced air separation unit (ASU) designs being considered for use in coal gasification rely on the use of solid state mixed ionic and electronic conductors. Nicrofer-6025HT, a nickel-based alloy, has been identified as a potential manifold material to transport the hot gases into the ASUs. In the current study, isothermal oxidation tests were conducted on Nicrofer-6025HT in the temperature range of 700–900 °C for up to 24 h. The evolution of oxide scale was evaluated using SEM, XRD, and XPS. The composite surface oxide layer that formed consisted of an outer chromia-rich scale and an inner alumina scale. For the longer times at the higher temperatures evaluated, a NiCr2O4 spinel phase was located at the interface between the alumina and chromia. Based on the experimental results a four-step oxidation model was proposed.

  5. Runway Independent Aircraft Extremely Short Takeoff and Landing Regional Airliner: The Model 110

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David W.

    2003-01-01

    Airports throughout the United States are plagued with growing congestion. With the increase in air traffic predicted in the next few years, congestion will worsen. The accepted solution of building larger airplanes to carry more travelers is no longer a viable option, as airports are unable to accommodate larger aircraft without expensive infrastructure changes. Past NASA research has pointed to the need for a new approach, which can economically and safely utilize smaller airports. To study this option further, NASA requested the California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo (Cal Poly/SLO) to design a baseline aircraft to be used for system studies. The requirements put forth by NASA are summarized. The design team was requested to create a demonstrator vehicle, which could be built without requiring enabling technology development. To this end, NASA requested that the tested and proven high-lift system of the Boeing C-17 Globemaster III be combined with the fuselage of the BAe-146. NASA also requested that Cal Poly determine the availability and usability of underutilized airports starting with California, then expanding if time and funds permitted to the U.S.

  6. The Calculated Effect of Various Hydrodynamic and Aerodynamic Factors on the Take-Off of a Large Flying Boat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, R.E.; Allison, J.M.

    1939-01-01

    Present designs for large flying boats are characterized by high wing loading, high aspect ratio, and low parasite drag. The high wing loading results in the universal use of flaps for reducing the takeoff and landing speeds. These factors have an effect on takeoff performance and influence to a certain extent the design of the hull. An investigation was made of the influence of various factors and design parameters on the takeoff performance of a hypothetical large flying boat by means of takeoff calculations. The parameters varied in the calculations were size of hull (load coefficient), wing setting, trim, deflection of flap, wing loading, aspect ratio, and parasite drag. The takeoff times and distances were calculated to the stalling speeds and the performance above these speeds was studied separately to determine piloting technique for optimum takeoff. The advantage of quick deflection of the flap at high water speeds is shown.

  7. Characteristics of a Boat Type Seaplane During Take-off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, J W; Ronan, K M

    1926-01-01

    This report, on the planing and get-away characteristics of the F-5-L, gives the results of the second of a series of take-off tests on three different seaplanes conducted by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at the suggestion of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department. The single-float seaplane was the first tested and the twin-float seaplane is to be the third. The characteristics of the boat type were found to be similar to the single float, the main difference being the increased sluggishness and relatively larger planing resistance of the larger seaplane. At a water speed of 15 miles per hour the seaplane trims aft to about 12 degrees and remains in this angular position while plowing. At 2.25 miles per hour the planing stage is started and the planing angle is immediately lowered to about 10 degrees. As the velocity increases the longitudinal control becomes more effective but over control will produce instability. At the get-away the range of angle of attack is 19 degrees to 11 degrees with velocities from the stalling speed through about 25 per cent of the speed range.

  8. Noise of the Harrier in vertical landing and takeoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Foster, John D.

    1988-01-01

    The noise of the Harrier AV8C aircraft in vertical takeoff and landing was measured 100 feet to the side of the aircraft where jet noise dominates. The noise levels were quite high - up to 125 dB overall sound level at 100 feet. The increased noise due to jet impingement on the ground is presented as a function of jet height to diameter ratio. The impingement noise with the aircraft close to the ground was 14 to 17 dB greater than noise from a free jet. Results are compared with small-scale jet impingement data acquired elsewhere. The agreement between small-scale and full-scale noise increase in ground effect is fairly good except with the jet close to the ground. It is proposed that differences in the jet Reynolds numbers and the resultant character of the jets may be partially responsible for the disparity in the full-scale and small-scale jet impingement noise. The difference between single-jet impingement and multiple-jet impingement may also have been responsible for the small-scale and full-scale disagreement.

  9. SR-71A/YF-12A takeoff and flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The YF-12 'Blackbird' was an experimental fighter-interceptor version of the Lockheed A-12 aircraft. In Air Force flight tests on May 1, 1965, the YF-12 set a speed record of 2,070.101 miles per hour and an altitude record of 80,258 feet. First publicly displayed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, in 1964, the YF-12 was never adopted by the military as an operational aircraft. It was, however, a precursor to the SR-71 Blackbird reconnaissance plane. Two YF-12 aircraft were flown in a joint Air Force-NASA research program at the NASA Flight Research Center (now the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center) between 1969 and 1979, although the second plane, piloted primarily by the Air Force, was lost to an inflight fire in 1971. The two YF-12 aircraft bore the serial numbers 60-6935 and 60-6936. This clip, which runs 36 seconds in length, begins with shots of the crew boarding and takeoff of an SR-71A (serial no. 61-7951) flown at NASA Dryden but designated as a YF-12C. The clip ends with air-to-air footage of a true YF-12A (serial no. 60-6935) identified by its distinctive radome that housed a powerful search and attack radar.

  10. Characteristics of a Single Float Seaplane During Take-off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, J W , Jr; Ronan, K M

    1925-01-01

    At the request of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at Langley Field is investigating the get-away characteristics of an N-9H, a DT-2, and an F-5l, as representing, respectively, a single float, a double float, and a boat type of seaplane. This report covers the investigation conducted on the N-9H. The results show that a single float seaplane trims aft in taking off. Until a planing condition is reached the angle of attack is about 15 degrees and is only slightly affected by controls. When planing it seeks a lower angle, but is controllable through a widening range, until at the take-off it is possible to obtain angles of 8 degrees to 15 degrees with corresponding speeds of 53 to 41 M. P. H. or about 40 per cent of the speed range. The point of greatest resistance occurs at about the highest angle of a pontoon planing angle of 9 1/2 degrees and at a water speed of 24 M. P. H.

  11. Advanced short-wavelength infrared range-gated imaging for ground applications in monostatic and bistatic configurations.

    PubMed

    Repasi, Endre; Lutzmann, Peter; Steinvall, Ove; Elmqvist, Magnus; Göhler, Benjamin; Anstett, Gregor

    2009-11-01

    Some advanced concepts for gated viewing are presented, including spectral diversity illumination techniques, non-line-of-sight imaging, indirect scene illumination, and in particular setups in bistatic configurations. By using a multiple-wavelength illumination source target speckles could be substantially reduced, leading to an improved image quality and enhanced range accuracy. In non-line-of-sight imaging experiments we observed the scenery through the reflections in a window plane. The scene was illuminated indirectly as well by a diffuse reflection of the laser beam at different nearby objects. In this setup several targets could be spotted, which, e.g., offers the capability to look around the corner in urban situations. In the presented measuring campaigns the advantages of bistatic setups in comparison with common monostatic configurations are discussed. The appearance of shadows or local contrast enhancements as well as the mitigation of retroreflections supports the human observer in interpreting the scene. Furthermore a bistatic configuration contributes to a reduced dazzling risk and to observer convertness. PMID:19881663

  12. The calculated effect of various hydrodynamic and aerodynamic factors on the take-off of a large flying boat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, R E; Allison, J M

    1940-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation made to determine the influence of various factors on the take-off performance of a hypothetical large flying boat by means of take-off calculations. The factors varied in the calculations were size of hull (load coefficient), wing setting, trim, deflection of flap, wing loading, aspect ratio, and parasite drag. The take-off times and distances were calculated to the stalling speeds and the performance above these speeds was separately studied to determine piloting technique for optimum take-off.

  13. Thorough warm-up before take-off in honey bee swarms.

    PubMed

    Seeley, Thomas D; Kleinhenz, Marco; Bujok, Brigitte; Tautz, Jürgen

    2003-06-01

    In a bivouacked swarm of honey bees, most individuals are quiescent while a small minority (the scouts) are active in choosing the swarm's future nest site. This study explores the way in which the members of a swarm warm their flight muscles for take-off when the swarm eventually decamps. An infrared camera was used to measure the thoracic (flight muscle) temperatures of individual bees on the surface of a swarm cluster. These are generally the coolest bees in a swarm. The warming of the surface-layer bees occurred mainly in the last 10 min before take-off. By the time a take-off began, 100% of the bees had their flight muscles heated to at least 35 degrees C, which is sufficient to support rapid flight. Take-offs began only a few seconds after all the surface-layer bees had their flight muscles warmed to at least 35 degrees C, but exactly how take-offs are triggered remains a mystery. PMID:12835835

  14. Wing/body kinematics measurement and force and moment analyses of the takeoff flight of fruitflies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mao-Wei; Sun, Mao

    2014-08-01

    In the paper, we present a detailed analysis of the takeoff mechanics of fruitflies which perform voluntary takeoff flights. Wing and body kinematics of the insects during takeoff were measured using high-speed video techniques. Based on the measured data, inertia force acting on the insect was computed and aerodynamic force and moment of the wings were calculated by the method of computational fluid dynamics. Subtracting the aerodynamic force and the weight from the inertia force gave the leg force. The following has been shown. In its voluntary takeoff, a fruitfly jumps during the first wingbeat and becomes airborne at the end of the first wingbeat. When it is in the air, the fly has a relatively large "initial" pitch-up rotational velocity (more than 5 000°/s) resulting from the jumping, but in about 5 wing-beats, the pitch-up rotation is stopped and the fly goes into a quasi-hovering flight. The fly mainly uses the force of jumping legs to lift itself into the air (the force from the flapping wings during the jumping is only about 5%-10% of the leg force). The main role played by the flapping wings in the takeoff is to produce a pitch-down moment to nullify the large "initial" pitch-up rotational velocity (otherwise, the fly would have kept pitching-up and quickly fallen down).

  15. Correlation of climbing perception and eye movements during daytime and nighttime takeoffs using a flight simulator.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Atsushi; Wada, Yoshiro; Shimizu, Naoki; Inui, Takuo; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2016-05-01

    Conclusion This study suggests that the subjective climbing perception can be quantitatively evaluated using values calculated from induced eye movements, and the findings may aid in the detection of pilots who are susceptible to spatial disorientation in a screening test. Objective The climbing perception experienced by a pilot during takeoff at night is stronger than that experienced during the day. To investigate this illusion, this study assessed eye movements and analyzed their correlation with subjective climbing perception during daytime and nighttime takeoffs. Methods Eight male volunteers participated in this study. A simulated aircraft takeoff environment was created using a flight simulator and the maximum slow-phase velocities and vestibulo-ocular reflex gain of vertical eye movements were calculated during takeoff simulation. Results Four of the eight participants reported that their perception of climbing at night was stronger, while the other four reported that there was no difference between day and night. These perceptions were correlated with eye movements; participants with a small difference in the maximum slow-phase velocities of their downward eye movements between daytime and nighttime takeoffs indicated that their perception of climbing was the same under the two conditions. PMID:26808614

  16. A Simulator Study of Take-Off Characteristics of Proposed Supersonic Transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Charles T., Jr.; Snyder, C. Thomas

    1965-01-01

    Fixed-cockpit piloted simulator studies of delta-planform and variable-wing-sweep supersonic transport configurations are being conducted at the Ames Research Center to investigate the handling qualities and certification requirements related to the take-off maneuver. Validation of the simulation was achieved by duplicating the take-off certification program of a subsonic jet transport. Evaluation of the simulator was made by NASA pilots as well as company and FAA pilots involved in the actual certification flights of the airplane. The present paper is limited to a discussion of normal take-off, minimum control speed (ground), rotation characteristics, and initial climbout. Comparisons of the take-off characteristics are made between the supersonic transport and the current class of subsonic jet transports. Results indicate that minimum control speed (ground) characteristics are a function of thrust-weight ratio, the time provided for SST rotation should be at least as long as that for the subsonic jet transports, abused take-offs are more likely to result in tail scrapes, and climbout below the minimum drag speed requires that the pilot carefully monitor airspeed.

  17. Power takeoff for tractor having parallelogram front wheel suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Slazas, J.J.

    1986-11-11

    A tractor having a rigid frame under which a mower can be carried longitudinally intermediate rear driving wheels and steerable front wheels. The tractor comprises an engine mounted on a front portion of the frame, a rigid laterally extending support member near the front end of the frame, laterally opposite wheel supporting brackets, one pivoted to each end portion of the support member to swing about a longitudinally extending upper axis. The tractor also comprises a laterally extending link pivoted to each of the brackets on a lower axis that is below and parallel to the upper axis to cooperate with the support member in connecting the brackets in a parallelogram linkage, and an axle member for each bracket having a laterally inner portion pivoted to the bracket to swing about a substantially vertical axis and having a laterally outwardly extending axle portion on which a front wheel is rotatable. The tractor is characterized by: A. a tubular bushing secured to the support member intermediate the ends thereof with its axis extending longitudinally; B. a power takeoff shaft coaxially rotatable in the bushing having opposite end portions that respectively project forward and rearward beyond the bushing; C. a laterally extending hitch support having means near its opposite ends for detachable connection to it of forwardly projecting hitch members of a mower; D. a sleeve secured to the hitch support intermediate its ends and surrounding the bushing to pivot the hitch support for tilting about the axis of the bushing; E. a connection between the link and the hitch support whereby substantially lateral motion of the link imparts tilting motion to the hitch support; and F. a driving connection between the engine and one of the end portions of the shaft.

  18. Conceptual design study of advanced acoustic-composite nacelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordstrom, K. E.; Marsh, A. H.; Sargisson, D. F.

    1975-01-01

    Conceptual studies were conducted to assess the impact of incorporating advanced technologies in the nacelles of a current wide-bodied transport and an advanced technology transport. The improvement possible in the areas of fuel consumption, flyover noise levels, airplane weight, manufacturing costs, and airplane operating cost were evaluated for short and long-duct nacelles. Use of composite structures for acoustic duct linings in the fan inlet and exhaust ducts was considered as well as for other nacelle components. For the wide-bodied transport, the use of a long-duct nacelle with an internal mixer nozzle in the primary exhaust showed significant improvement in installed specific fuel consumption and airplane direct operating costs compared to the current short-duct nacelle. The long-duct mixed-flow nacelle is expected to achieve significant reductions in jet noise during takeoff and in turbo-machinery noise during landing approach. Recommendations were made of the technology development needed to achieve the potential fuel conservation and noise reduction benefits.

  19. Upfront Systemic Chemotherapy and Short-Course Radiotherapy with Delayed Surgery for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer with Distant Metastases: Outcomes, Compliance, and Favorable Prognostic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hyung; Ahn, Joong Bae; Jung, Minkyu; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Hoguen; Shin, Sang Joon; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s) Optimal treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) with distant metastasis remains elusive. We aimed to evaluate upfront systemic chemotherapy and short-course radiotherapy (RT) followed by delayed surgery for such patients, and to identify favorable prognostic factors. Materials/Methods We retrospectively reviewed 50 LARC patients (cT4 or cT3, <2 mm from the mesorectal fascia) with synchronous metastatic disease. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). The secondary endpoints were overall survival, treatment-related toxicity, and compliance. We considered P values <0.05 significant. Results At 22 months median follow-up, the median PFS time was 16 months and the 2-year PFS rate was 34.8%. Thirty-five patients who received radical surgery for primary and metastatic tumors were designated the curable group. Six patients with clinical complete response (ypCR) of metastases who underwent radical surgery for only the primary tumor were classified as potentially curable. Nine patients who received no radical surgery (3 received palliative surgery) were deemed the palliative group. The ypCR rate among surgery patients was 13.6%. PFS rates for the curable or potentially curable groups were significantly longer than that of the palliative group (P<0.001). On multivariate analysis, solitary organ metastasis and R0 status were independent prognostic factors for PFS. Conclusions These findings demonstrated that a strong possibility that upfront chemotherapy and short-course RT with delayed surgery are an effective alternative treatment for LARC with potentially resectable distant metastasis, owing to achievement of pathologic down-staging, R0 resection, and favorable compliance and toxicity, despite the long treatment duration. PMID:27536871

  20. Muscle function during takeoff and landing flight in the pigeon (Columba livia).

    PubMed

    Robertson, Angela M Berg; Biewener, Andrew A

    2012-12-01

    This study explored the muscle strain and activation patterns of several key flight muscles of the pigeon (Columba livia) during takeoff and landing flight. Using electromyography (EMG) to measure muscle activation, and sonomicrometry to quantify muscle strain, we evaluated the muscle function patterns of the pectoralis, biceps, humerotriceps and scapulotriceps as pigeons flew between two perches. These recordings were analyzed in the context of three-dimensional wing kinematics. To understand the different requirements of takeoff, midflight and landing, we compared the activity and strain of these muscles among the three flight modes. The pectoralis and biceps exhibited greater fascicle strain rates during takeoff than during midflight or landing. However, the triceps muscles did not exhibit notable differences in strain among flight modes. All observed strain, activation and kinematics were consistent with hypothesized muscle functions. The biceps contracted to stabilize and flex the elbow during the downstroke. The humerotriceps contracted to extend the elbow at the upstroke-downstroke transition, followed by scapulotriceps contraction to maintain elbow extension during the downstroke. The scapulotriceps also appeared to contribute to humeral elevation. Greater muscle activation intensity was observed during takeoff, compared with mid-flight and landing, in all muscles except the scapulotriceps. The timing patterns of muscle activation and length change differed among flight modes, yet demonstrated that pigeons do not change the basic mechanical actions of key flight muscles as they shift from flight activities that demand energy production, such as takeoff and midflight, to maneuvers that require absorption of energy, such as landing. Similarly, joint kinematics were consistent among flight modes. The stereotypy of these neuromuscular and joint kinematic patterns is consistent with previously observed stereotypy of wing kinematics relative to the pigeon's body

  1. A simplified flight-test method for determining aircraft takeoff performance that includes effects of pilot technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, T. J.; Schweikhard, W. G.

    1974-01-01

    A method for evaluating aircraft takeoff performance from brake release to air-phase height that requires fewer tests than conventionally required is evaluated with data for the XB-70 airplane. The method defines the effects of pilot technique on takeoff performance quantitatively, including the decrease in acceleration from drag due to lift. For a given takeoff weight and throttle setting, a single takeoff provides enough data to establish a standardizing relationship for the distance from brake release to any point where velocity is appropriate to rotation. The lower rotation rates penalized takeoff performance in terms of ground roll distance; the lowest observed rotation rate required a ground roll distance that was 19 percent longer than the highest. Rotations at the minimum rate also resulted in lift-off velocities that were approximately 5 knots lower than the highest rotation rate at any given lift-off distance.

  2. XV-15 tilt rotor takeoff - first NASA Dryden flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This photo shows the 1st XV-15 tilt rotor flight for NASA/Dryden at the Army contingent at Edwards Air Force Base, Edwards, California, October 1980. The former XB-70 hangar can be seen to the lower right. The two smaller cutouts on each side of the tail section slot were extra modifications for the large twin-tailed plane. The Bell XV-15 Tiltrotor aircraft were involved in limited research at the Hugh L. Dryden Flight Research Center in 1980 and 1981. The development of the XV-15 Tiltrotor research aircraft was initiated in 1973 with joint Army/NASA funding as a 'proof of concept', or 'technology demonstrator' program, with two aircraft being built by Bell Helicopter Textron (BHT) in 1977. NASA Ames Research Center, where most of the NASA research is conducted, continues to be in charge of the joint NASA/Army/Bell program. The aircraft are powered by twin Lycoming T-53 turboshaft engines that are connected by a cross-shaft and drive three-bladed, 25 ft diameter metal rotors (the size extensively tested in a wind tunnel). The engines and main transmissions are located in wingtip nacelles to minimize the operational loads on the cross-shaft system and, with the rotors, tilt as a single unit. For takeoff, the proprotors and their engines are used in the straight-up position where the thrust is directed downward. The XV-15 then climbs vertically into the air like a helicopter. In this VTOL mode, the vehicle can lift off and hover for approximately one hour. Once off the ground, the XV-15 has the ability to fly in one of two different modes. It can fly as a helicopter, in the partially converted airplane mode. The XV-15 can also then convert from the helicopter mode to the airplane mode. This is accomplished by continuous rotation of the proprotors from the helicopter rotor position to the conventional airplane propeller position. During the ten to fifteen second conversion period, the aircraft speed increases and lift is transferred from the rotors to the wing. To

  3. Study of quiet turbofan STOL aircraft for short-haul transportation. Volume 3: Airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The airport siting, design, cost, operation, and implementation aspects of a short takeoff aircraft transportation system are analyzed. Problem areas are identified and alternative solutions or actions required to achieve system implementation by the early 1980's are recommended. Factors associated with the ultimate community acceptance of the STOL program, such as noise, emissions, and congestion, are given special emphasis.

  4. 76 FR 16689 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a regulatory evaluation..., Nampa Muni, RNAV (GPS) RWY 11, Amdt 1 Pittsburg, KS, Atkinson Muni, Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle DP...) RWY 17L, Orig Waco, TX, TSTC Waco, RNAV (GPS) RWY 35R, Orig Fort Atkinson, WI, Atkinson Muni,...

  5. Increasing Functional Variability in the Preparatory Phase of the Takeoff Improves Elite Springboard Diving Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barris, Sian; Farrow, Damian; Davids, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Previous research demonstrating that specific performance outcome goals can be achieved in different ways is functionally significant for springboard divers whose performance environment can vary extensively. This body of work raises questions about the traditional approach of balking (terminating the takeoff) by elite divers aiming to…

  6. 40 CFR 1037.525 - Special procedures for testing hybrid vehicles with power take-off.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special procedures for testing hybrid vehicles with power take-off. 1037.525 Section 1037.525 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW HEAVY-DUTY MOTOR VEHICLES Test and Modeling Procedures §...

  7. 40 CFR 1037.525 - Special procedures for testing hybrid vehicles with power take-off.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special procedures for testing hybrid vehicles with power take-off. 1037.525 Section 1037.525 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW HEAVY-DUTY MOTOR VEHICLES Test and Modeling Procedures §...

  8. 14 CFR 135.367 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes....367 Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane may take off...

  9. 14 CFR 135.367 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes....367 Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane may take off...

  10. 14 CFR 121.637 - Takeoffs from unlisted and alternate airports: Domestic and flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) No pilot may take off from an alternate airport unless the weather conditions are at least equal to... operations. (a) No pilot may takeoff an airplane from an airport that is not listed in the operations specifications unless— (1) The airport and related facilities are adequate for the operation of the airplane;...

  11. 14 CFR 121.637 - Takeoffs from unlisted and alternate airports: Domestic and flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) No pilot may take off from an alternate airport unless the weather conditions are at least equal to... operations. (a) No pilot may takeoff an airplane from an airport that is not listed in the operations specifications unless— (1) The airport and related facilities are adequate for the operation of the airplane;...

  12. 14 CFR 135.379 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a turbine engine... existing at take- off. (b) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category...

  13. 14 CFR 135.379 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a turbine engine... existing at take- off. (b) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category...

  14. 14 CFR 135.379 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. 135.379 Section 135.379 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS...

  15. 14 CFR 135.225 - IFR: Takeoff, approach and landing minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false IFR: Takeoff, approach and landing minimums. 135.225 Section 135.225 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON...

  16. 14 CFR 135.379 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a turbine engine... existing at take- off. (b) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category...

  17. 14 CFR 135.379 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a turbine engine... existing at take- off. (b) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category...

  18. 14 CFR 121.189 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. 121.189 Section 121.189 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS:...

  19. Simulator evaluation of a display for a Takeoff Performance Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, David B.; Srivatsan, Raghavachari; Person, Lee H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A Takeoff Performance Monitoring System (TOPMS) has been developed to provide the pilot with graphic and numeric information pertinent to his decision to continue or abort a takeoff. The TOPMS information display consists primarily of a runway graphic overlaid with symbolic status, situation, and advisory information including: (1) current position and airspeed; (2) predicted locations for reaching decision speed (V sub 1) and rotation speed (V sub R); (3) groundroll limit for reaching (V sub R); (4) predicted stop point for an aborted takeoff from current conditions; (5) engine-status flags; and (6) an overall situation advisory flag that recommends continuation or rejection of the takeoff. In this study, 32 experienced multi-engine pilots evaluated the TOPMS on the Langley B-737 real-time research simulator. They rated the system satisfactory - good and judged it to be suitable for implementation on an aircraft. The TOPMS, the TOPMS simulation, and the results of the simulator evaluation are described here. Appendices contain the pilot's prebriefing package (written explanation of the TOPMS--sent to the pilots prior to their visit), evaluation instructions, debriefing questions, and rating criteria (organized into a flow diagram similar to the Cooper-Harper diagram for evaluation of aircraft handling qualities).

  20. 78 FR 78713 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ...This rule establishes, amends, suspends, or revokes Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures for operations at certain airports. These regulatory actions are needed because of the adoption of new or revised criteria, or because of changes occurring in the National Airspace System, such as the commissioning of new......

  1. 14 CFR 135.367 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes....367 Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane may take off...

  2. 14 CFR 121.637 - Takeoffs from unlisted and alternate airports: Domestic and flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... airports: Domestic and flag operations. 121.637 Section 121.637 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.637 Takeoffs from unlisted and alternate airports: Domestic and...

  3. 14 CFR 121.637 - Takeoffs from unlisted and alternate airports: Domestic and flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... airports: Domestic and flag operations. 121.637 Section 121.637 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.637 Takeoffs from unlisted and alternate airports: Domestic and...

  4. 14 CFR 121.637 - Takeoffs from unlisted and alternate airports: Domestic and flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... airports: Domestic and flag operations. 121.637 Section 121.637 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.637 Takeoffs from unlisted and alternate airports: Domestic and...

  5. 78 FR 34559 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-10

    ...This rule establishes, amends, suspends, or revokes Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures for operations at certain airports. These regulatory actions are needed because of the adoption of new or revised criteria, or because of changes occurring in the National Airspace System, such as the commissioning of new......

  6. 75 FR 5230 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a...) RWY 13, Orig-A. Effective 8 APR 2010 Elim, AK, Elim, ELIM ONE Graphic Obstacle DP. Elim, AK, Elim..., Cortez Muni, LEDVE ONE Graphic Obstacle DP. Cortez, CO, Cortez Muni, Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle...

  7. 75 FR 32653 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-09

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a... ONE Graphic Obstacle DP Clifton/Morenci, AZ, Greenlee County, Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle DP, Orig Mesa, AZ, Falcon Field, MESA ONE Graphic Obstacle DP Safford, AZ, Safford Rgnl, SAFFORD ONE...

  8. 76 FR 43580 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ...This establishes, amends, suspends, or revokes Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures for operations at certain airports. These regulatory actions are needed because of the adoption of new or revised criteria, or because of changes occurring in the National Airspace System, such as the commissioning of new navigational......

  9. 77 FR 37801 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-25

    ... ``significant rule '' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,1979) ; and (3...: * * * Effective July 26, 2012 Sand Point, AK, Sand Point, RAYMD (RNAV) ONE Graphic DP Sand Point, AK, Sand Point... Field, ZILLA THREE Graphic DP Prairie Du Chien, WI, Prairie Du Chien Muni, Takeoff Minimums and...

  10. 76 FR 55233 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ...This establishes, amends, suspends, or revokes Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures for operations at certain airports. These regulatory actions are needed because of the adoption of new or revised criteria, or because of changes occurring in the National Airspace System, such as the commissioning of new navigational......

  11. 77 FR 50012 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,1979); and (3) does..., Boggs Field, Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle DP, Amdt 1 RESCINDED: On July 20, 2012 (77 FR 42627), the FAA..., Amdt 4 RESCINDED: On July 20, 2012 (77 FR 42627), the FAA published an Amendment in Docket No....

  12. 77 FR 71495 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-03

    ... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,1979); and (3) does...: On October 15, 2012 (77 FR 62429), the FAA published an Amendment in Docket No. 30864, Amdt No. 3499... RWY 29, Amdt 1 Middleton Island, AK, Middleton Island, Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle DP,...

  13. 75 FR 39152 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,1979); and (3)does not warrant preparation of a... June 09, 2010 (75 FR 32654) the FAA published an Amendment in Docket No. 30727, Amdt 3376 to Part 97 of... Edwards Field, Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle DP, Orig Bakersfield, CA, Meadows Field, ILS OR LOC/DME...

  14. 14 CFR 135.389 - Large nontransport category airplanes: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Large nontransport category airplanes... ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.389 Large nontransport category airplanes: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a large nontransport category airplane...

  15. 14 CFR 121.177 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.177 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Takeoff limitations....

  16. 14 CFR 135.389 - Large nontransport category airplanes: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Large nontransport category airplanes... ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.389 Large nontransport category airplanes: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a large nontransport category airplane...

  17. 14 CFR 121.177 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.177 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Takeoff limitations....

  18. 14 CFR 135.389 - Large nontransport category airplanes: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Large nontransport category airplanes... ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.389 Large nontransport category airplanes: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a large nontransport category airplane...

  19. 14 CFR 121.177 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.177 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Takeoff limitations....

  20. Feasibility study on linear-motor-assisted take-off (LMATO) of winged launch vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatomo, Makoto; Kyotani, Yoshihiro

    1987-11-01

    Application of technology of magnetically levitated transportation to horizontal take-off of an experimental space vehicle has been studied. An experimental system of linear-motor-assisted take-off (LMATO) consists of the HIMES space vehicle and a magnetically levitated and propelled sled which is a modified MLU model developed by the JNR. The original MLU model is a train of three cars which weighs 30 tons and is driven by a thrust of 15 tons. The maximum speed is 400 km/h. The highest speed of 517 km/h has been obtained by the first JNR linear motor car. Since the take-off speed of the HIMES vehicle with the initial mass of 14 tons is 470 km/h, the existing technology can be used for the LMATO of the vehicle. The concept of the HIMES/LMATO is to use the MLU vehicles to accelerate the HIMES vehicle at 0.33 g on a 5 km guide track until the speed reaches 300 km/h, when the rocket engines of the space vehicle are started to increase the acceleration up to 1 g. The total system will take the final checkout for take-off during the acceleration phase and the speed exceeds 470 km/h which is large enough to aerodynamically lift the space vehicle, then the fastening mechanism is unlocked to separate the vehicles. The experimental system can be applied for initial acceleration of a vehicle with air-breathing propulsion.

  1. 75 FR 22215 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-28

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a..., Sky Harbor, NDB OR GPS-B, Amdt 1, CANCELLED Columbus, MS, Columbus-Lowndes County, RNAV (GPS) RWY 18... Muni, Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle DP, Orig Martinsville, VA, Blue Ridge, LOC RWY 30, Amdt 1...

  2. 77 FR 1015 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-09

    ...This rule establishes, amends, suspends, or revokes Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures for operations at certain airports. These regulatory actions are needed because of the adoption of new or revised criteria, or because of changes occurring in the National Airspace System, such as the commissioning of new......

  3. 75 FR 35629 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-23

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a..., Amdt 1 On June 09, 2010 (75 FR 32654) the FAA published an Amendment in Docket No. 30727, Amdt 3376 to..., Summerville, Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle DP, Amdt 1 Big Spring, TX, Big Springs Mc Mahon-Wrinkle, RNAV...

  4. 14 CFR 135.389 - Large nontransport category airplanes: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large nontransport category airplanes... ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.389 Large nontransport category airplanes: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a large nontransport category airplane...

  5. 14 CFR 121.177 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.177 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Takeoff limitations....

  6. 76 FR 35101 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ...This establishes, amends, suspends, or revokes Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures for operations at certain airports. These regulatory actions are needed because of the adoption of new or revised criteria, or because of changes occurring in the National Airspace System, such as the commissioning of new navigational......

  7. 76 FR 28171 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-16

    ...This establishes, amends, suspends, or revokes Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures for operations at certain airports. These regulatory actions are needed because of the adoption of new or revised criteria, or because of changes occurring in the National Airspace System, such as the commissioning of new navigational......

  8. 75 FR 35627 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-23

    ...This rule establishes, amends, suspends, or revokes Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures for operations at certain airports. These regulatory actions are needed because of the adoption of new or revised criteria, or because of changes occurring in the National Airspace System, such as the commissioning of new......

  9. 76 FR 52239 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-22

    ...This establishes, amends, suspends, or revokes Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures for operations at certain airports. These regulatory actions are needed because of the adoption of new or revised criteria, or because of changes occurring in the National Airspace System, such as the commissioning of new navigational......

  10. NASA advanced propeller research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, John F.; Bober, Lawrence J.

    1988-01-01

    Acoustic and aerodynamic research at NASA Lewis Research Center on advanced propellers is reviewed including analytical and experimental results on both single and counterrotation. Computational tools used to calculate the detailed flow and acoustic fields are described along with wind tunnel tests to obtain data for code verification. Results from two kinds of experiments are reviewed: (1) performance and near field noise at cruise conditions as measured in the NASA Lewis 8- by 6-foot Wind Tunnel; and (2) far field noise and performance for takeoff/approach conditions as measured in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot Anechoic Wind Tunnel. Detailed measurements of steady blade surface pressures are described along with vortex flow phenomena at off-design conditions. Near field noise at cruise is shown to level out or decrease as tip relative Mach number is increased beyond 1.15. Counterrotation interaction noise is shown to be a dominant source at takeoff but a secondary source at cruise. Effects of unequal rotor diameters and rotor-to-rotor spacing on interaction noise are also illustrated. Comparisons of wind tunnel acoustic measurements to flight results are made. Finally, some future directions in advanced propeller research such as swirl recovery vanes, higher sweep, forward sweep, and ducted propellers are discussed.

  11. Technology requirements for advanced earth orbital transportation systems. Volume 2: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepler, A. K.; Bangsund, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    The results of efforts to identify the technology requirements for advanced earth orbital transportation systems are reported. Topics discussed include: (1) design and definition of performance potential of vehicle systems, (2) advanced technology assessment, and (3) extended performance. It is concluded that the horizontal take-off concept is the most feasible system considered.

  12. Feasibility of a responsive, hybrid propulsion augmented, Vertical-Takeoff-and-Landing, Single-Stage-to-Orbit launch system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelaccio, Dennis G.

    1996-03-01

    A novel, reusable, Vertical-Takeoff-and-Landing, Single-Stage-to-Orbit (VTOL/SSTO) launch system concept, named HYP-SSTO, is presented in this paper. This launch vehicle system concept uses a highly coupled, main high performance liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen (LOX/LH2) propulsion system, that is used only for launch, with a hybrid auxiliary propulsion system which is used during final orbit insertion, major orbit maneuvering, and landing propulsive burn phases of flight. By using a hybrid propulsion system for major orbit maneuver burns and landing, this launch system concept has many advantages over conventional VTOL/SSTO concepts that use LOX/LH2 propulsion system(s) burns for all phases of flight. Because hybrid propulsion systems are relatively simple and inert by their nature, this concept has the potential to support short turnaround times between launches, be economical to develop, and be competitive in terms of overall system life-cycle cost. This paper provides a technical description of the novel, reusable HYP-SSTO launch system concept. Launch capability performance, as well as major design and operational system attributes, are identified and discussed.

  13. SR-71A - in Flight from Below at Takeoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. An upward-looking ultraviolet video camera placed in the SR-71's nosebay studied a variety of celestial objects in wavelengths that are blocked to ground-based astronomers. Earlier in its history, Dryden had a decade of past experience at sustained speeds above Mach 3. Two YF-12A aircraft and an SR-71 designated as a YF-12C were flown at the center between December 1969 and November 1979 in a joint NASA/USAF program to learn more about the capabilities and limitations of high-speed, high-altitude flight. The YF-12As were prototypes of a planned interceptor aircraft based on a design that later evolved into the SR-71 reconnaissance aircraft. Dave Lux was the NASA SR-71 project manger for much of the decade of the 1990s, followed by Steve Schmidt. Developed for the USAF as reconnaissance aircraft more than 30 years ago, SR-71s are still the world's fastest and highest-flying production aircraft. The aircraft can fly at speeds of more than 2,200 miles per hour (Mach 3+, or more than three times the speed of sound) and at altitudes of over 85,000 feet. The Lockheed Skunk Works (now Lockheed Martin) built the original SR-71 aircraft. Each aircraft is 107.4 feet long, has a wingspan of 55.6 feet, and is 18.5 feet high (from the ground to the top of the rudders, when parked). Gross takeoff weight is about 140,000 pounds, including a possible fuel weight of 80,280 pounds. The airframes are built almost entirely of titanium and titanium alloys to withstand heat generated by sustained Mach 3 flight. Aerodynamic control surfaces consist of all-moving vertical tail surfaces, ailerons on the outer wings, and elevators on the trailing edges between the engine exhaust nozzles. The two SR-71s at Dryden have been assigned the following NASA tail numbers: NASA 844 (A model), military serial 61-7980 and NASA 831 (B model), military serial 61-7956. From 1990 through 1994, Dryden also had another 'A' model, NASA 832, military serial 61-7971. This

  14. SR-71 Takeoff with Afterburner Showing Shock Diamonds in Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. An upward-looking ultraviolet video camera placed in the SR-71's nosebay studied a variety of celestial objects in wavelengths that are blocked to ground-based astronomers. Earlier in its history, Dryden had a decade of past experience at sustained speeds above Mach 3. Two YF-12A aircraft and an SR-71 designated as a YF-12C were flown at the center between December 1969 and November 1979 in a joint NASA/USAF program to learn more about the capabilities and limitations of high-speed, high-altitude flight. The YF-12As were prototypes of a planned interceptor aircraft based on a design that later evolved into the SR-71 reconnaissance aircraft. Dave Lux was the NASA SR-71 project manger for much of the decade of the 1990s, followed by Steve Schmidt. Developed for the USAF as reconnaissance aircraft more than 30 years ago, SR-71s are still the world's fastest and highest-flying production aircraft. The aircraft can fly at speeds of more than 2,200 miles per hour (Mach 3+, or more than three times the speed of sound) and at altitudes of over 85,000 feet. The Lockheed Skunk Works (now Lockheed Martin) built the original SR-71 aircraft. Each aircraft is 107.4 feet long, has a wingspan of 55.6 feet, and is 18.5 feet high (from the ground to the top of the rudders, when parked). Gross takeoff weight is about 140,000 pounds, including a possible fuel weight of 80,280 pounds. The airframes are built almost entirely of titanium and titanium alloys to withstand heat generated by sustained Mach 3 flight. Aerodynamic control surfaces consist of all-moving vertical tail surfaces, ailerons on the outer wings, and elevators on the trailing edges between the engine exhaust nozzles. The two SR-71s at Dryden have been assigned the following NASA tail numbers: NASA 844 (A model), military serial 61-7980 and NASA

  15. Trajectory-Based Takeoff Time Predictions Applied to Tactical Departure Scheduling: Concept Description, System Design, and Initial Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelland, Shawn A.; Capps, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Current aircraft departure release times are based on manual estimates of aircraft takeoff times. Uncertainty in takeoff time estimates may result in missed opportunities to merge into constrained en route streams and lead to lost throughput. However, technology exists to improve takeoff time estimates by using the aircraft surface trajectory predictions that enable air traffic control tower (ATCT) decision support tools. NASA s Precision Departure Release Capability (PDRC) is designed to use automated surface trajectory-based takeoff time estimates to improve en route tactical departure scheduling. This is accomplished by integrating an ATCT decision support tool with an en route tactical departure scheduling decision support tool. The PDRC concept and prototype software have been developed, and an initial test was completed at air traffic control facilities in Dallas/Fort Worth. This paper describes the PDRC operational concept, system design, and initial observations.

  16. Issues related to aircraft take-off plumes in a mesoscale photochemical model.

    PubMed

    Bossioli, Elissavet; Tombrou, Maria; Helmis, Costas; Kurtenbach, Ralf; Wiesen, Peter; Schäfer, Klaus; Dandou, Aggeliki; Varotsos, Kostas V

    2013-07-01

    The physical and chemical characteristics of aircraft plumes at the take-off phase are simulated with the mesoscale CAMx model using the individual plume segment approach, in a highly resolved domain, covering the Athens International Airport. Emission indices during take-off measured at the Athens International Airport are incorporated. Model predictions are compared with in situ point and path-averaged observations (NO, NO₂) downwind of the runway at the ground. The influence of modeling process, dispersion properties and background air composition on the chemical evolution of the aircraft plumes is examined. It is proven that the mixing properties mainly determine the plume dispersion. The initial plume properties become significant for the selection of the appropriate vertical resolution. Besides these factors, the background NOx and O₃ concentration levels control NOx distribution and their conversion to nitrogen reservoir species. PMID:23584035

  17. Microphysical Properties of Warm Clouds During The Aircraft Take-Off and Landing Over Bucharest, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, Sabina; Nicolae Vajaiac, Sorin; Boscornea, Andreea

    2016-06-01

    This paper is focused on airborne measurements of microphysical parameters into warm clouds when the aircraft penetrates the cloud, both during take-off and landing. The experiment was conducted during the aircraft flight between Bucharest and Craiova, in the southern part of Romania. The duration of the experimental flight was 2 hours and 35 minutes in October 7th, 2014, but the present study is dealing solely with the analysis of cloud microphysical properties at the beginning of the experiment (during the aircraft take-off) and at the end, when it got finalized by the aircraft landing procedure. The processing and interpretation of the measurements showed the differences between microphysical parameters, emphasizing that the type of cloud over Bucharest changed, as it was expected. In addition, the results showed that it is important to take into account both the synoptic context and the cloud perturbation due to the velocity of the aircraft, in such cases.

  18. Analysis of Convair 990 rejected-takeoff accident with emphasis on decision making, training and procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batthauer, Byron E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper analyzes a NASA Convair 990 (CV-990) accident with emphasis on rejected-takeoff (RTO) decision making, training, procedures, and accident statistics. The NASA Aircraft Accident Investigation Board was somewhat perplexed that an aircraft could be destroyed as a result of blown tires during the takeoff roll. To provide a better understanding of tire failure RTO's, The Board obtained accident reports, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) studies, and other pertinent information related to the elements of this accident. This material enhanced the analysis process and convinced the Accident Board that high-speed RTO's in transport aircraft should be given more emphasis during pilot training. Pilots should be made aware of various RTO situations and statistics with emphasis on failed-tire RTO's. This background information could enhance the split-second decision-making process that is required prior to initiating an RTO.

  19. AVALON: definition and modeling of a vertical takeoff and landing UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, N. B. F.; Marconato, E. A.; Branco, K. R. L. J. C.

    2015-09-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have been used in numerous applications, like remote sensing, precision agriculture and atmospheric data monitoring. Vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) is a modality of these aircrafts, which are capable of taking off and landing vertically, like a helicopter. This paper presents the definition and modeling of a fixed- wing VTOL, named AVALON (Autonomous VerticAL takeOff and laNding), which has the advantages of traditional aircrafts with improved performance and can take off and land in small areas. The principles of small UAVs development were followed to achieve a better design and to increase the range of applications for this VTOL. Therefore, we present the design model of AVALON validated in a flight simulator and the results show its validity as a physical option for an UAV platform.

  20. Short stature

    MedlinePlus

    Idiopathic short stature; Non-growth hormone deficient short stature ... Turner syndrome Williams syndrome Other reasons include: Growth hormone deficiency Infections of the developing baby before birth ...

  1. Behind Start of Take-Off Roll Aircraft Sound Level Directivity Study - Revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Michael C.; Roof, Christopher J.; Fleming, Gregg G.; Rapoza, Amanda S.; Boeker, Eric R.; McCurdy, David A.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Langley Research Center (LaRC) and the Environmental Measurement and Modeling Division of the Department of Transportation's Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Volpe) conducted a noise measurement study to examine aircraft sound level directivity patterns behind the start-of-takeoff roll. The study was conducted at Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD) from October 4 through 20, 2004.

  2. Requirements report for SSTO vertical take-off and horizontal landing vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, H. S.

    1994-01-01

    This document describes the detailed design requirements and design criteria to support Structures/TPS Technology development for SSTO winged vehicle configurations that use vertical take-off and horizontal landing and delivers 25,000 lb payloads to a 220 nm circular orbit at an inclination of 51.6 degrees or 40,000 lb payloads to a 150 nm circular orbit at a 28.5 degree inclination.

  3. Simulator evaluation of displays for a revised takeoff performance monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, David B.; Srivatsan, Raghavachari; Person, Lee H., Jr

    1992-01-01

    Cockpit displays for a Takeoff Performance Monitoring System (TOPMS) to provide pilots with graphic and alphanumeric information pertinent to their decision to continue or abort a takeoff are evaluated. Revised head-down and newly developed head-up displays were implemented on electronic screens in the real-time Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV) Simulator for the Boeing 737 airplane at the Langley Research Center and evaluated by 17 NASA, U.S. Air Force, airline, and industry pilots. Both types of displays were in color, but they were not dependent upon it. The TOPMS head-down display is composed of a runway graphic overlaid with symbolic status and advisory information related to both the expected takeoff point and the predicted stop point (in the event an abort becomes necessary). In addition, an overall Situation Advisory Flag indicates a preferred course of action based on analysis of the various elements of airplane performance and system status. A simpler head-up display conveys most of this same information and relates it to the visual scene. The evaluation pilots found the displays to be credible, easy to monitor, and appropriate for the task. In particular, the pilots said the head-up display was monitored with very little effort and did not obstruct or distract them from monitoring the simulated out-the-window runway scene. This report augments NASA TP-2908, 1989.

  4. Linear kinematics at take-off in horses jumping the wall in an international Puissance competition.

    PubMed

    Powers, Pippa

    2005-07-01

    Sagittal plane SVHS video recordings (50 Hz) were made of horses jumping the wall at an international Puissance competition. Video sequences were manually digitized and six kinematic variables at take-off were analyzed. Nine horses started the competition with the fence height at 1.80 m, and two horses attempted the fence in the fifth and final round with the fence height at 2.27 m. For successful performances, fence height was correlated with the following take-off variables: vertical velocity of the centre of mass (r = 0.45, p = 0.03); height of centre of mass (r = 0.44, p = 0.04); distance of centre of mass from fence (r = 0.46, p = 0.03); and distance from leading hind limb to centre of mass (r = -0.61, p < 0.01). These results indicated that body position at take-off is the most important aspect when jumping high fences. This is the first known study that has examined horses jumping over a Puissance wall. The results should help horse riders and trainers improve performance in Puissance jumping horses, and perhaps help in the early selection of horses with a talent for jumping high fences. PMID:16138654

  5. Calculated effect of various types of flap on take-off over obstacles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetmore, J W

    1936-01-01

    In order to determine whether or not flaps could be expected to have any beneficial effect on take-off performance, the distances required to take off and climb to an altitude of 50 feet were calculated for hypothetical airplanes, corresponding to relatively high-speed types and equipped with several types of flap. The types considered are the Fowler wing, the Hall wing, the split flap, the balanced split flap, the plain flap, and the external-airfoil flap. The results indicate that substantial reductions in take-off distance are possible through the use of flaps, provided that the proper flap angle corresponding to a given set of conditions is used. The best flap angle for taking off varies inversely as power loading and, to a much smaller extent, varies inversely with wing loading. Apparently, the best take-off characteristics are provided by the type of device in which the flap forms an extension to the main wing as in the case of the Fowler wing and the external-airfoil flap.

  6. Airport take-off noise assessment aimed at identify responsible aircraft classes.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Perez, Luis A; Sanchez-Fernandez, Luis P; Shaout, Adnan; Suarez-Guerra, Sergio

    2016-01-15

    Assessment of aircraft noise is an important task of nowadays airports in order to fight environmental noise pollution given the recent discoveries on the exposure negative effects on human health. Noise monitoring and estimation around airports mostly use aircraft noise signals only for computing statistical indicators and depends on additional data sources so as to determine required inputs such as the aircraft class responsible for noise pollution. In this sense, the noise monitoring and estimation systems have been tried to improve by creating methods for obtaining more information from aircraft noise signals, especially real-time aircraft class recognition. Consequently, this paper proposes a multilayer neural-fuzzy model for aircraft class recognition based on take-off noise signal segmentation. It uses a fuzzy inference system to build a final response for each class p based on the aggregation of K parallel neural networks outputs Op(k) with respect to Linear Predictive Coding (LPC) features extracted from K adjacent signal segments. Based on extensive experiments over two databases with real-time take-off noise measurements, the proposed model performs better than other methods in literature, particularly when aircraft classes are strongly correlated to each other. A new strictly cross-checked database is introduced including more complex classes and real-time take-off noise measurements from modern aircrafts. The new model is at least 5% more accurate with respect to previous database and successfully classifies 87% of measurements in the new database. PMID:26540603

  7. Evaluation of Flying Qualities and Guidance Displays for an Advanced Tilt-Wing STOL Transport Aircraft in Final Approach and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Chad R.; Franklin, James A.; Hardy, Gordon H.

    2002-01-01

    A piloted simulation was performed on the Vertical Motion Simulator at NASA Ames Research Center to evaluate flying qualities of a tilt-wing Short Take-Off and Landing (STOL) transport aircraft during final approach and landing. The experiment was conducted to assess the design s handling qualities, and to evaluate the use of flightpath-centered guidance for the precision approach and landing tasks required to perform STOL operations in instrument meteorological conditions, turbulence, and wind. Pilots rated the handling qualities to be satisfactory for all operations evaluated except those encountering extreme crosswinds and severe windshear; even in these difficult meteorological conditions, adequate handling qualities were maintained. The advanced flight control laws and guidance displays provided consistent performance and precision landings.

  8. Annoyance caused by advanced turboprop aircraft flyover noise: Single-rotating propeller configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccurdy, David A.

    1988-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to quantify the annoyance of people to advanced turboprop (propfan) aircraft flyover noise. The objectives were to: (1) determine the effects on annoyance of various tonal characteristics; and (2) compare annoyance to advanced turboprops with annoyance to conventional turboprops and jets. A computer was used to produce realistic, time-varying simulations of advanced turboprop aircraft takeoff noise. In the first experiment, subjects judged the annoyance of 45 advanced turboprop noises in which the tonal content was systematically varied to represent the factorial combinations of five fundamental frequencies, three frequency envelope shapes, and three tone-to-broadband noise ratios. Each noise was presented at three sound levels. In the second experiment, 18 advanced turboprop takeoffs, 5 conventional turboprop takeoffs, and 5 conventional jet takeoffs were presented at three sound pressure levels to subjects. Analysis indicated that frequency envelope shape did not significantly affect annoyance. The interaction of fundamental frequency with tone-to-broadband noise ratio did have a large and complex effect on annoyance. The advanced turboprop stimuli were slightly less annoying than the conventional stimuli.

  9. Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) first flight takeoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    cells of an aerospike engine and was mounted on a housing known as the 'canoe,' which contained the gaseous hydrogen, helium, and instrumentation gear. The model, engine, and canoe together were called a 'pod.' The experiment focused on determining how a reusable launch vehicle's engine flume would affect the aerodynamics of its lifting-body shape at specific altitudes and speeds. The interaction of the aerodynamic flow with the engine plume could create drag; design refinements looked at minimizing this interaction. The entire pod was 41 feet in length and weighed 14,300 pounds. The experimental pod was mounted on one of NASA's SR-71s, which were at that time on loan to NASA from the U.S. Air Force. Lockheed Martin may use the information gained from the LASRE and X-33 Advanced Technology Demonstrator Projects to develop a potential future reusable launch vehicle. NASA and Lockheed Martin were partners in the X-33 program through a cooperative agreement. The goal of that program was to enable significant reductions in the cost of access to space and to promote creation and delivery of new space services and activities to improve the United States's economic competitiveness. In March 2001, however, NASA cancelled the X-33 program.

  10. VIDEO REVIEW: Maths in a Box video: Take-off - moving bodies with constant mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Ken

    1999-09-01

    I write this review as a PGCE maths tutor, and therefore from the perspective of using parts of this series at A-level. The sample video, `Take-off - moving bodies with constant mass', is a good example of combining real footage with commentary as the viewer is invited to think about modelling the take-off of an aircraft. The style is reminiscent of Open University presentations and here the challenge is to determine the necessary length of the runway. The video is split into two sections. The first, commentary, section works quite well, although it jars a bit to hear Newton's Third Law put across as `Action and reaction are equal and opposite'; this is a familiar offering but one that still causes mystification in the sixth form. The viewer is invited to think about setting up equations, and reminded that the chain rule will be necessary to solve the differential equation generated from Newton's Second Law. This gives a good indication of the level of mathematics required. Unfortunately the flow is then somewhat disturbed by a strong emphasis on boundary conditions. If the student can cope with the general level of calculus required, this aspect of the challenge would also seem to fit more naturally into the second section of the video. This second section looks at setting up the equations and `solutions'. It can be used after classroom discussion, and takes the viewer through three, increasingly sophisticated, models involving functions for drag and resistance forces. On the whole this is clear and helpful, but for some reason the solutions each stop with an equation linking the length of the runway to the take-off velocity, failing to make use of the second equation to eliminate this intermediate variable. All in all, it is a useful addition to resources for A-level, particularly if students are also following the sort of mechanics syllabus (within mathematics) that emphasizes modelling.

  11. Stress-strain state of ice cover during aircraft takeoff and landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelova, A. V.; Kozin, V. M.; Matyushina, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    We consider the linear unsteady motion of an IL-76TD aircraft on ice. Water is treated as an ideal incompressible liquid, and the liquid motion is considered potential. Ice cover is modeled by an initially unstressed uniform isotropic elastic plate, and the load exerted by the aircraft on the ice cover with consideration of the wing lift is modeled by regions of distributed pressure of variable intensity, arranged under the aircraft landing gear. The effect of the thickness and elastic modulus of the ice plate, takeoff and landing regimes on stress-strain state of the ice cover used as a runway.

  12. Effects of visual and motion simulation cueing systems on pilot performance during takeoffs with engine failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parris, B. L.; Cook, A. M.

    1978-01-01

    Data are presented that show the effects of visual and motion during cueing on pilot performance during takeoffs with engine failures. Four groups of USAF pilots flew a simulated KC-135 using four different cueing systems. The most basic of these systems was of the instrument-only type. Visual scene simulation and/or motion simulation was added to produce the other systems. Learning curves, mean performance, and subjective data are examined. The results show that the addition of visual cueing results in significant improvement in pilot performance, but the combined use of visual and motion cueing results in far better performance.

  13. Data Visualization of Invisible Airflow Hazards During Helicopter Takeoff and Landing Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aragon, Cecilia R.

    2004-01-01

    Many aircraft accidents each year are caused by encounters with unseen airflow hazards near the ground such as vortices, downdrafts, wind shear, microbursts, or other turbulence. While such hazards frequently pose problems to fixed-wing airplanes, they are especially dangerous to helicopters, which often have to operate in confined spaces and under operationally stressful conditions. We are developing flight-deck visualizations of airflow hazards during helicopter takeoff and landing operations, and are evaluating their effectiveness with usability studies. Our hope is.that this work will lead to the production of an airflow hazard detection system for pilots that will save lives.

  14. An analysis of the takeoff and landing performance of a jet-powered STOL augmentor wing design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, S. E.; Gambucci, B. J.; Holzhauser, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    A preliminary study of the takeoff and landing performance characteristics of a swept wing airplane with augmented jet flap, designed for STOL operation and low noise is presented. The study is based on aerodynamic data from wind tunnel tests of a large-scale swept augmentor wing model, scaled up to a 48,000 pound airplane. Engine characteristics are based on a turbo fan with a fan pressure ratio of 2.5 delivering the major portion of the thrust to the augmentor flap. A description of the overall airplane configuration, the propulsion system, and the use of the aerodynamics is presented. To assess the STOL performance of the airplane, takeoff and landing distances and flight path capabilities were computed at various flap deflections and thrust levels. After evaluating these results in terms of desired STOL performance with required margins, basic takeoff and landing configurations were chosen.

  15. 14 CFR Appendix G to Part 36 - Takeoff Noise Requirements for Propeller-Driven Small Airplane and Propeller-Driven, Commuter...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.); E. O. 11514, March 5, 1970 and 14 CFR... significantly alter the noise level of the airplane when the nose is recorded at the required measuring point... 10 dB(A), a takeoff measurement point nearer to the start of the takeoff roll must be used and...

  16. 14 CFR Appendix G to Part 36 - Takeoff Noise Requirements for Propeller-Driven Small Airplane and Propeller-Driven, Commuter...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.); E. O. 11514, March 5, 1970 and 14 CFR... significantly alter the noise level of the airplane when the nose is recorded at the required measuring point... 10 dB(A), a takeoff measurement point nearer to the start of the takeoff roll must be used and...

  17. 14 CFR Appendix G to Part 36 - Takeoff Noise Requirements for Propeller-Driven Small Airplane and Propeller-Driven, Commuter...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.); E. O. 11514, March 5, 1970 and 14 CFR... significantly alter the noise level of the airplane when the nose is recorded at the required measuring point... 10 dB(A), a takeoff measurement point nearer to the start of the takeoff roll must be used and...

  18. Measurement of the Errors of Service Altimeter Installations During Landing-Approach and Take-Off Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gracey, William; Jewel, Joseph W., Jr.; Carpenter, Gene T.

    1960-01-01

    The overall errors of the service altimeter installations of a variety of civil transport, military, and general-aviation airplanes have been experimentally determined during normal landing-approach and take-off operations. The average height above the runway at which the data were obtained was about 280 feet for the landings and about 440 feet for the take-offs. An analysis of the data obtained from 196 airplanes during 415 landing approaches and from 70 airplanes during 152 take-offs showed that: 1. The overall error of the altimeter installations in the landing- approach condition had a probable value (50 percent probability) of +/- 36 feet and a maximum probable value (99.7 percent probability) of +/- 159 feet with a bias of +10 feet. 2. The overall error in the take-off condition had a probable value of +/- 47 feet and a maximum probable value of +/- 207 feet with a bias of -33 feet. 3. The overall errors of the military airplanes were generally larger than those of the civil transports in both the landing-approach and take-off conditions. In the landing-approach condition the probable error and the maximum probable error of the military airplanes were +/- 43 and +/- 189 feet, respectively, with a bias of +15 feet, whereas those for the civil transports were +/- 22 and +/- 96 feet, respectively, with a bias of +1 foot. 4. The bias values of the error distributions (+10 feet for the landings and -33 feet for the take-offs) appear to represent a measure of the hysteresis characteristics (after effect and recovery) and friction of the instrument and the pressure lag of the tubing-instrument system.

  19. Research and application of a new kind of measurement technology of take-off and landing performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chunbao, Yang

    A video-based take-off and landing performance measurement system has been developed to aid in certification of the Y-12 aircraft. The system has high accuracy and is adaptable to computer analysis. Employing dual channel audio inputs, and the video system is capable of coordinating such synchronous signals as IRIG B time code and voice with flight data obtained using an airborne data acquisition system. Applications of the system include searching for the best take-off and landing flight path, the establishment of helicopter hovering capacity, and fly-over noise evaluation.

  20. A Mathematical Model for Vertical Attitude Takeoff and Landing (VATOL) Aircraft Simulation. Volume 1; Model Description Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortenbaugh, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    A mathematical model of a high performance airplane capable of vertical attitude takeoff and landing (VATOL) was developed. An off line digital simulation program incorporating this model was developed to provide trim conditions and dynamic check runs for the piloted simulation studies and support dynamic analyses of proposed VATOL configuration and flight control concepts. Development details for the various simulation component models and the application of the off line simulation program, Vertical Attitude Take-Off and Landing Simulation (VATLAS), to develop a baseline control system for the Vought SF-121 VATOL airplane concept are described.

  1. A mathematical model for Vertical Attitude Takeoff and Landing (VATOL) aircraft simulation. Volume 3: User's manual for VATOL simulation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortenbaugh, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Instructions for using Vertical Attitude Takeoff and Landing Aircraft Simulation (VATLAS), the digital simulation program for application to vertical attitude takeoff and landing (VATOL) aircraft developed for installation on the NASA Ames CDC 7600 computer system are described. The framework for VATLAS is the Off-Line Simulation (OLSIM) routine. The OLSIM routine provides a flexible framework and standardized modules which facilitate the development of off-line aircraft simulations. OLSIM runs under the control of VTOLTH, the main program, which calls the proper modules for executing user specified options. These options include trim, stability derivative calculation, time history generation, and various input-output options.

  2. Field evaluation of proposed ICAO annex 16 takeoff noise certification procedure for propeller-driven airplanes not exceeding 5700 kg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, H. H.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Ahlswede, M.; Anders, K. P.; Spiegel, K. H.

    1983-09-01

    Five propeller driven airplanes with a takeoff mass ranging from 650 to 4375 kg were tested, using the Takeoff Noise Certification Procedure for Propeller-driven Aeroplanes not Exceeding 5700 kg proposed by the Alternative Certification Subgroup of the ICAO Committee on Aircraft Noise (CAN)/Working Group C. Field tests show the procedure to be entirely feasible, if more time-consuming than the conventional horizontal flyover noise certification test procedure. Utilizing available data, certification noise limits are proposed for noise-metrics Maximum A-weighted Level, and Sound Exposure Level.

  3. Testing of lift/cruise fan exhaust deflector. [for a tip turbine lift fan in short takeoff aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlundt, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    A lift/cruise exhaust deflector system for the LF336/A tip turbine lift fan was designed, built, and tested to determine the design and performance characteristics of a large-scale, single swivel nozzle thrust vectoring system. The exhaust deflector static testing was performed at the Ames Research Center outside static test stand facilities. The test hardware was installed on a hydraulic lift platform to permit both in and out of ground effect testing. The exhaust flow of the LF336/A lift fan was vectored from 0 degrees through 130 degrees during selected fan speeds to obtain performance at different operating conditions. The system was operated with and without flow vanes installed in the small radius bends to evaluate the system performance based on a proposed method of improving the internal flow losses. The program also included testing at different ground heights, to the nozzle exhaust plane, to obtain ground effect data, and the testing of two methods of thrust spoiling using a duct bypass door system and nozzle flap system.

  4. Magnetic levitation assisted aircraft take-off and landing (feasibility study - GABRIEL concept)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohacs, Daniel; Rohacs, Jozsef

    2016-08-01

    The Technology Roadmap 2013 developed by the International Air Transport Association envisions the option of flying without an undercarriage to be in operation by 2032. Preliminary investigations clearly indicate that magnetic levitation technology (MagLev) might be an appealing solution to assist the aircraft take-off and landing. The EU supported research project, abbreviated as GABRIEL, was dealing with (i) the concept development, (ii) the identification, evaluation and selection of the deployable magnetic levitation technology, (iii) the definition of the core system elements (including the required aircraft modifications, the ground-based system and airport elements, and the rendezvous control system), (iv) the analysis of the safety and security aspects, (v) the concept validation and (vi) the estimation of the proposed concept impact in terms of aircraft weight, noise, emission, cost-benefit). All results introduced here are compared to a medium size hypothetic passenger aircraft (identical with an Airbus A320). This paper gives a systematic overview of (i) the applied methods, (ii) the investigation of the possible use of magnetic levitation technology to assist the commercial aircraft take-off and landing processes and (iii) the demonstrations, validations showing the feasibility of the radically new concept. All major results are outlined.

  5. Trim drag reduction concepts for horizontal takeoff single-stage-to-Orbit vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaughnessy, John D.; Gregory, Irene M.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a study to investigate concepts for minimizing trim drag of horizontal takeoff single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicles are presented. A generic hypersonic airbreathing conical configuration was used as the subject aircraft. The investigation indicates that extreme forward migration of the aerodynamic center as the vehicle accelerates to orbital velocities causes severe aerodynamic instability and trim moments that must be counteracted. Adequate stability can be provided by active control of elevons and rudder, but use of elevons to produce trim moments results in excessive trim drag and fuel consumption. To alleviate this problem, two solution concepts are examined. Active control of the center of gravity (COG) location to track the aerodynamic center decreases trim moment requirements, reduces elevon deflections, and leads to significant fuel savings. Active control of the direction of the thrust vector produces required trim moments, reduces elevon deflections, and also results in significant fuel savings. It is concluded that the combination of active flight control to provide stabilization, (COG) position control to minimize trim moment requirements, and thrust vectoring to generate required trim moments has the potential to significantly reduce fuel consumption during ascent to orbit of horizontal takeoff SSTO vehicles.

  6. Use of an individual mandibular advancement device for an?obstructive sleep apnoea patient with facial paralysis: a short-term follow-up case report.

    PubMed

    Pişkin, B; Sipahi, C; Köse, M; Karakoç, Ö; Şevketbeyoğlu, H; Ataç, G K

    2012-06-01

    This case report aimed to describe the fabrication procedure and treatment efficacy of an individual, one-piece, non-adjustable mandibular advancement device (MAD) for a moderate obstructive sleep apnoea patient with facial paralysis (FP). Mandibular advancement device was fabricated with autopolymerising acrylic resin. The intermaxillary relations were recorded such as to fix the mandible at a protruded position with increased vertical dimension. Initial evaluation of the MAD was made with axial magnetic resonance imaging and polysomnography on the first day of usage. Following evaluations were made on the third and sixth month. After a follow-up period of 6 months, Apnoea/Hypopnea Index (AHI) significantly decreased from 26·7 to 3·0. However, the average oxygen saturation did not improve as expected initially. The MAD therapy decreased the AHI scores of a patient with FP. At the end of a follow-up period of 6 months, the patient did not report any serious complaint except temporary tooth pains. PMID:22329406

  7. Short bones

    MedlinePlus

    Short bones in the human body are often cube-like, their length, width, and height are all about the same. Short bones include the carpal bones of the hands and wrist, and the tarsal bones of the feet and ankles.

  8. Changes in Jump-Down Performance After Space Flight: Short- and Long-Term Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kofman, I. S.; Reschke, M. F.; Cerisano, J. M.; Fisher, E. A.; Lawrence, E. L.; Peters, B. T.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Successful jump performance requires functional coordination of visual, vestibular, and somatosensory systems, which are affected by prolonged exposure to microgravity. Astronauts returning from space flight exhibit impaired ability to coordinate effective landing strategies when jumping from a platform to the ground. This study compares the jump strategies used by astronauts before and after flight, the changes to those strategies within a test session, and the recoveries in jump-down performance parameters across several postflight test sessions. These data were obtained as part of an ongoing interdisciplinary study (Functional Task Test, FTT) designed to evaluate both astronaut postflight functional performance and related physiological changes. METHODS Six astronauts from short-duration (Shuttle) and three from long-duration (International Space Station) flights performed 3 two-footed jumps from a platform 30 cm high. A force plate measured the ground reaction forces and center-of-pressure displacement from the landings. Muscle activation data were collected from the medial gastrocnemius and anterior tibialis of both legs using surface electromyography electrodes. Two load cells in the platform measured the load exerted by each foot during the takeoff phase of the jump. Data were collected in 2 preflight sessions, on landing day (Shuttle only), and 1, 6, and 30 days after flight. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION Many of the astronauts tested were unable to maintain balance on their first postflight jump landing but recovered by the third jump, showing a learning progression in which the performance improvement could be attributed to adjustments of strategy on takeoff, landing, or both. Takeoff strategy changes were evident in air time (time between takeoff and landing), which was significantly reduced after flight, and also in increased asymmetry in foot latencies on takeoff. Landing modifications were seen in changes in ground reaction force curves. The

  9. Technology requirements for advanced earth-orbital transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haefeli, R. C.; Littler, E. G.; Hurley, J. B.; Winter, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    Areas of advanced technology that are either critical or offer significant benefits to the development of future Earth-orbit transportation systems were identified. Technology assessment was based on the application of these technologies to fully reusable, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicle concepts with horizontal landing capability. Study guidelines included mission requirements similar to space shuttle, an operational capability begining in 1995, and main propulsion to be advanced hydrogen-fueled rocket engines. Also evaluated was the technical and economic feasibility of this class of SSTO concepts and the comparative features of three operational take-off modes, which were vertical boost, horizontal sled launch, and horizontal take-off with subsequent inflight fueling. Projections of both normal and accelerated technology growth were made. Figures of merit were derived to provide relative rankings of technology areas. The influence of selected accelerated areas on vehicle design and program costs was analyzed by developing near-optimum point designs.

  10. Forward velocity effects on fan noise and the suppression characteristics of advanced inlets as measured in the NASA-Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, M. T.

    1980-01-01

    Forward velocity effects on the forward radiated fan noise and on the suppression characteristics of three advanced inlets relative to a baseline cylindrical inlet were measured in the NASA Ames Research Center 40 x 80 foot Wind Tunnel. A modified JT15D turbofan engine in a quiet nacelle was the source of fan noise; the advanced inlets were a Conventional Takeoff/Landing (CTOL) hybrid inlet, a Short Takeoff/Landing (STOL) hybrid inlet, and a treated deflector inlet. Also measured were the static to flight effects on the fan noise of canting the baseline inlet 4 deg downward to simulate typical wing mounted turbofan engines. The CTOL hybrid inlet suppressed the high tip speed fan noise as much as 18 PNdB on a 61 m (200 ft) sideline scaled to a CF6 size engine while the STOL hybrid inlet suppressed the low tip speed fan noise as much as 13 PNdB on a 61 m (200 ft) sideline scaled to a OCSEE size engine. The deflector inlet suppressed the high tip speed fan noise as much as 13 PNdB at 61 m (200 ft) overhead scaled to a CF6 size engine. No significant changes in fan noise suppression for the CTOL and STOL hybrid inlets occurred for forward velocity changes above 21 m/s (68 ft/s) or for angle of attack changes up to 15 deg. However, changes in both forward velocity and angle of attack changed the deflector inlet noise unpredictably due to the asymmetry of the inlet flow field into the fan.

  11. Comparison of the short-term efficacy between docetaxel plus carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil plus carboplatin in locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xing; Xia, Wei-Xiong; Ke, Liang-Ru; Yang, Jing; Qiu, Wen-Zhe; Yu, Ya-Hui; Liang, Hu; Huang, Xin-Jun; Liu, Guo-Yin; Zeng, Qi; Guo, Xiang; Xiang, Yan-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Objective Platinum-based chemotherapy in combination with radiotherapy is a standard treatment strategy for locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). This study aimed to investigate the long-term efficacy and tolerability of inductive chemotherapy with docetaxel plus carboplatin (TC) or 5-fluorouracil plus carboplatin (FC) followed by concurrent radiation therapy in patients with NPC. Methods Patients (N=88) were randomized to receive TC or FC as inductive therapy followed by concurrent radiotherapy (60–70 Gy) with two cycles of carboplatin (area under the curve =5 mg·h/L). Patients were followed up for 8 years. Primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary end points included overall survival (OS), toxicity, tumor response, distant metastasis-free survival, and local recurrence-free survival. Results At the end of the follow-up period, 31 patients died, 32 had disease progression, eleven had cancer recurrence, and 25 had distant metastasis. Overall, there was no difference between treatment groups with regard to response or survival. We found that following induction and concurrent chemoradiotherapy, the majority of patients showed a complete response (~96%–98% for induction therapy and 82%–84% for comprehensive therapy) to both therapies. PFS and OS were also similar between groups. The rate of PFS was 63.6% for both FC and TC and that of OS was 65.9% and 63.5%, respectively. The overall incidence of grade 3–4 adverse events in the TC group (20.5%) was higher than in the FC group (10.7%). Neutropenia and leukopenia were the most common grade 3–4 adverse events in the TC group, and mucositis was the most common in the FC group. Conclusion These data indicate that TC and FC therapies have similar efficacy in treating locally advanced NPC and both are well tolerated. PMID:27574453

  12. Study of head takeoff phenomenon influenced by stick-slip vibration of slider on head-disk interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, H.; Goshi, K.; Hamaguchi, T.; Suzuki, K.

    2006-04-01

    Takeoff performance of the magnetic head slider on head-disk interface is influenced by a stick-slip vibration of slider enhanced by the friction of head-disk contact. We studied this phenomenon using altitude test and a simulation of slider vibration based on stick-slip analysis. Obvious degradation in the takeoff performance was observed for the disks with small roughness. This phenomenon can be explained using a simple stick-slip model of slider vibration enhanced by friction force, and investigated through the evaluation of the pressure hysteresis defined by the difference of takeoff pressure and touchdown pressure. Hysteresis simulation based on the stick-slip model revealed that large stick-slip vibration induces hysteresis for the disk with low roughness. We confirmed by the experiment and simulation that this stick-slip vibration of slider continues in the case of large friction coefficient after one slider-disk contact. We also confirmed that, slider-disk contact in low fly height occurs due to the trigger which the slider contacts on lubricant pooling. Reduction of friction force was found to be effective to improve the pressure hysteresis and takeoff performance.

  13. Aircraft systems design studies employing advanced transport technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, B.; Pearce, C.; Quartero, C.; Taylor, A.

    1972-01-01

    System and design integration studies are presented to define and assess the application of the advanced technology most likely to result in a superior next generation, high subsonic/sonic conventional takeoff and landing transport aircraft system. It is concluded that the new technologies can be directed toward the achievement of improved economy and performance. These benefits may be used to compensate for the penalties associated with reduced noise requirements anticipated to make future aircraft ecologically acceptable.

  14. Recent Advances in Solid Catalysts Obtained by Metalloporphyrins Immobilization on Layered Anionic Exchangers: A Short Review and Some New Catalytic Results.

    PubMed

    Nakagaki, Shirley; Mantovani, Karen Mary; Machado, Guilherme Sippel; Castro, Kelly Aparecida Dias de Freitas; Wypych, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Layered materials are a very interesting class of compounds obtained by stacking of two-dimensional layers along the basal axis. A remarkable property of these materials is their capacity to interact with a variety of chemical species, irrespective of their charge (neutral, cationic or anionic). These species can be grafted onto the surface of the layered materials or intercalated between the layers, to expand or contract the interlayer distance. Metalloporphyrins, which are typically soluble oxidation catalysts, are examples of molecules that can interact with layered materials. This work presents a short review of the studies involving metalloporphyrin immobilization on two different anionic exchangers, Layered Double Hydroxides (LDHs) and Layered Hydroxide Salts (LHSs), published over the past year. After immobilization of anionic porphyrins, the resulting solids behave as reusable catalysts for heterogeneous oxidation processes. Although a large number of publications involving metalloporphyrin immobilization on LDHs exist, only a few papers have dealt with LHSs as supports, so metalloporphyrins immobilized on LHSs represent a new and promising research field. This work also describes new results on an anionic manganese porphyrin (MnP) immobilized on Mg/Al-LDH solids with different nominal Mg/Al molar ratios (2:1, 3:1 and 4:1) and intercalated with different anions (CO₃(2-) or NO₃(-)). The influence of the support composition on the MnP immobilization rates and the catalytic performance of the resulting solid in cyclooctene oxidation reactions will be reported. PMID:26938518

  15. Rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) powered spaceliner class vehicle can advantageously employ vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1995-01-01

    The subject is next generation orbital space transporation, taken to be fully reusable non-staged 'aircraft like' systems targeted for routine, affordable access to space. Specifically, the takeoff and landing approach to be selected for such systems is considered, mainly from a propulsion viewpoint. Conventional wisdom has it that any transatmospheric-class vehicle which uses high-speed airbreathing propulsion modes (e.g., scramjet) intrinsically must utilize horizontal takeoff and landing, HTOHL. Although this may be true for all-airbreathing propulsion (i.e., no rocket content as in turboramjet propulsion), that emerging class of powerplant which integrally combines airbreathing and rocket propulsion, referred to as rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) propulsion, is considerably more flexible with respect to selecting takeoff/landing modes. In fact, it is proposed that any of the modes of interest may potentially be selected: HTOHL, VTOHL, VTOVL. To illustrate this surmise, the case of a previously documented RBCC-powered 'Spaceliner' class space transport concept, which is designed for vertical takeoff and landing, is examined. The 'RBCC' and 'Spaceliner' categories are first described for background. Departing form an often presumed HTOHL baseline, the leading design and operational advantages of moving to VTOVL are then elucidated. Technical substantiation that the RBCC approach, in fact, enables this capability (but also that of HTOHL and VTOVL) is provided, with extensive reference to case-in-point supporting studies. The paper closes with a set of conditional surmises bearing on its set of conclusions, which point up the operational cost advantages associated with selecting the vertical takeoff and landing mode combination (VTOL), uniquely offered by RBCC propulsion.

  16. Rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) powered spaceliner class vehicle can advantageously employ vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escher, William J. D.

    The subject is next generation orbital space transporation, taken to be fully reusable non-staged 'aircraft like' systems targeted for routine, affordable access to space. Specifically, the takeoff and landing approach to be selected for such systems is considered, mainly from a propulsion viewpoint. Conventional wisdom has it that any transatmospheric-class vehicle which uses high-speed airbreathing propulsion modes (e.g., scramjet) intrinsically must utilize horizontal takeoff and landing, HTOHL. Although this may be true for all-airbreathing propulsion (i.e., no rocket content as in turboramjet propulsion), that emerging class of powerplant which integrally combines airbreathing and rocket propulsion, referred to as rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) propulsion, is considerably more flexible with respect to selecting takeoff/landing modes. In fact, it is proposed that any of the modes of interest may potentially be selected: HTOHL, VTOHL, VTOVL. To illustrate this surmise, the case of a previously documented RBCC-powered 'Spaceliner' class space transport concept, which is designed for vertical takeoff and landing, is examined. The 'RBCC' and 'Spaceliner' categories are first described for background. Departing form an often presumed HTOHL baseline, the leading design and operational advantages of moving to VTOVL are then elucidated. Technical substantiation that the RBCC approach, in fact, enables this capability (but also that of HTOHL and VTOVL) is provided, with extensive reference to case-in-point supporting studies. The paper closes with a set of conditional surmises bearing on its set of conclusions, which point up the operational cost advantages associated with selecting the vertical takeoff and landing mode combination (VTOL), uniquely offered by RBCC propulsion.

  17. The energetic cost of short flights in birds.

    PubMed

    Nudds, R L; Bryant, D M

    2000-05-01

    Many small birds perform short flights, for which take-offs, ascents and descents form a large component of the total flight time and which are characterised by low airspeeds. Using the doubly-labelled water technique, zebra finches Taeniopygia guttata engaging in repeated short flights were found to expend 13.65 kJ more than 'non-flying' controls, which equated to a flight expenditure of 27.8 times their basal metabolic rate. This is over three times the predicted flight expenditure derived from existing aerodynamic models. These data were used to determine a coefficient (0.11) for converting the mechanical power derived from aerodynamic models into metabolic power. An equation is presented, based on body mass, which can be used to predict the costs of short flights in ecological and behavioural studies of birds. PMID:10769218

  18. Takeoff/approach noise for a model counterrotation propeller with a forward-swept upstream rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Hall, David G.; Podboy, Gary G.; Jeracki, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    A scale model of a counterrotating propeller with forward-swept blades in the forward rotor and aft-swept blades in the aft rotor (designated F39/A31) has been tested in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-Foot Anechoic Wind Tunnel. This paper presents aeroacoustic results at a takeoff/approach condition of Mach 0.20. Laser Doppler Velocimeter results taken in a plane between the two rotors are also included to quantify the interaction flow field. The intention of the forward-swept design is to reduce the magnitude of the forward rotor tip vortex and/or wakes which impinge on the aft rotor, thus lowering the interaction tone levels.

  19. Carrier differtial GPS for takeoff to landing of an unmanned flight vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, P.Y.; Parkinson, B.W.

    1996-10-01

    Using the carrier of the GPS signal, one is able to resolve relative displacements in space to the centimeter level. This paper describes the use of carrier differential techniques to determine the position, velocity, attitude and angular velocity of an autonomous aircraft in real time. The full state GPS estimates are used in linear quadratic (LQ) feedback control to automate the flight of the aircraft from takeoff thru landing. We present flight data from recent flight tests. In addition to GPS, the aircraft is instrumented with a variety of inexpensive conventional sensors including alpha and beta vanes, and a dynamic pressure sensor (pitot). These provide an independent measurement of the aircraft velocity relative to the air. This independent measurement of the aircraft velocity relative to the air. This independent measurements enables estimation of the the absolute wind vector, which is used in waypoint tracking. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Taxiing, Take-Off, and Landing Simulation of the High Speed Civil Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reaves, Mercedes C.; Horta, Lucas G.

    1999-01-01

    The aircraft industry jointly with NASA is studying enabling technologies for higher speed, longer range aircraft configurations. Higher speeds, higher temperatures, and aerodynamics are driving these newer aircraft configurations towards long, slender, flexible fuselages. Aircraft response during ground operations, although often overlooked, is a concern due to the increased fuselage flexibility. This paper discusses modeling and simulation of the High Speed Civil Transport aircraft during taxiing, take-off, and landing. Finite element models of the airframe for various configurations are used and combined with nonlinear landing gear models to provide a simulation tool to study responses to different ground input conditions. A commercial computer simulation program is used to numerically integrate the equations of motion and to compute estimates of the responses using an existing runway profile. Results show aircraft responses exceeding safe acceptable human response levels.

  1. Analytical study of takeoff and landing performance for a jet STOL transport configuration with full-span, externally blown, triple-slotted flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washington, H. P.; Gibbons, J. T.

    1973-01-01

    Takeoff and landing performance characteristics and field length requirements were determined analytically for a jet STOL transport configuration with full-span, externally blown, tripleslotted flaps. The configuration had a high wing, high T-tail, and four pod-mounted high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines located under and forward of the wing. One takeoff and three approach and landing flap settings were evaluated. The effects of wing loading, thrust-to-weight ratio, weight, ambient temperature, altitude on takeoff and landing field length requirements are discussed.

  2. Flapping tail membrane in bats produces potentially important thrust during horizontal takeoffs and very slow flight.

    PubMed

    Adams, Rick A; Snode, Emily R; Shaw, Jason B

    2012-01-01

    Historically, studies concerning bat flight have focused primarily on the wings. By analyzing high-speed video taken on 48 individuals of five species of vespertilionid bats, we show that the capacity to flap the tail-membrane (uropatagium) in order to generate thrust and lift during takeoffs and minimal-speed flight (<1 m (s-1)) was largely underestimated. Indeed, bats flapped the tail-membrane by extensive dorso-ventral fanning motions covering as much as 135 degrees of arc consistent with thrust generation by air displacement. The degree of dorsal extension of the tail-membrane, and thus the potential amount of thrust generated during platform launches, was significantly correlated with body mass (P = 0.02). Adduction of the hind limbs during upstrokes collapsed the tail-membrane thereby reducing its surface area and minimizing negative lift forces. Abduction of the hind limbs during the downstroke fully expanded the tail-membrane as it was swept ventrally. The flapping kinematics of the tail-membrane is thus consistent with expectations for an airfoil. Timing offsets between the wings and tail-membrane during downstrokes was as much as 50%, suggesting that the tail-membrane was providing thrust and perhaps lift when the wings were retracting through the upstoke phase of the wing-beat cycle. The extent to which the tail-membrane was used during takeoffs differed significantly among four vespertilionid species (P = 0.01) and aligned with predictions derived from bat ecomorphology. The extensive fanning motion of the tail membrane by vespertilionid bats has not been reported for other flying vertebrates. PMID:22393378

  3. Eclipse project QF-106 and C-141A takeoff on first tethered flight December 20, 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    TOW ROPE TAKEOFF - The Kelly Space & Technology (KST)/USAF Eclipse project's modified QF-106 and a USAF C-141A takeoff for the project's first tethered flight on December 20, 1997. The successful 18-minute-long flight reached an altitude of 10,000 feet. NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, hosted the project, providing engineering and facility support as well as the project pilot. In 1997 and 1998, the Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California, supported and hosted a Kelly Space & Technology, Inc. project called Eclipse, which sought to demonstrate the feasibility of a reusable tow-launch vehicle concept. The project goal was to successfully tow, inflight, a modified QF-106 delta-wing aircraft with an Air Force C-141A transport aircraft. This would demonstrate the possibility of towing and launching an actual launch vehicle from behind a tow plane. Dryden was the responsible test organization and had flight safety responsibility for the Eclipse project. Dryden provided engineering, instrumentation, simulation, modification, maintenance, range support, and research pilots for the test program. The Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC), Edwards, California, supplied the C-141A transport aircraft and crew and configured the aircraft as needed for the tests. The AFFTC also provided the concept and detail design and analysis as well as hardware for the tow system and QF-106 modifications. Dryden performed the modifications to convert the QF-106 drone into the piloted EXD-01 (Eclipse eXperimental Demonstrator-01) experimental aircraft. Kelly Space & Technology hoped to use the results gleaned from the tow test in developing a series of low-cost, reusable launch vehicles. These tests demonstrated the validity of towing a delta-wing aircraft having high wing loading, validated the tow simulation model, and demonstrated various operational procedures, such as ground processing of in-flight maneuvers and emergency abort scenarios.

  4. Flapping Tail Membrane in Bats Produces Potentially Important Thrust during Horizontal Takeoffs and Very Slow Flight

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Rick A.; Snode, Emily R.; Shaw, Jason B.

    2012-01-01

    Historically, studies concerning bat flight have focused primarily on the wings. By analyzing high-speed video taken on 48 individuals of five species of vespertilionid bats, we show that the capacity to flap the tail-membrane (uropatagium) in order to generate thrust and lift during takeoffs and minimal-speed flight (<1 m s−1) was largely underestimated. Indeed, bats flapped the tail-membrane by extensive dorso-ventral fanning motions covering as much as 135 degrees of arc consistent with thrust generation by air displacement. The degree of dorsal extension of the tail-membrane, and thus the potential amount of thrust generated during platform launches, was significantly correlated with body mass (P = 0.02). Adduction of the hind limbs during upstrokes collapsed the tail-membrane thereby reducing its surface area and minimizing negative lift forces. Abduction of the hind limbs during the downstroke fully expanded the tail-membrane as it was swept ventrally. The flapping kinematics of the tail-membrane is thus consistent with expectations for an airfoil. Timing offsets between the wings and tail-membrane during downstrokes was as much as 50%, suggesting that the tail-membrane was providing thrust and perhaps lift when the wings were retracting through the upstoke phase of the wing-beat cycle. The extent to which the tail-membrane was used during takeoffs differed significantly among four vespertilionid species (P = 0.01) and aligned with predictions derived from bat ecomorphology. The extensive fanning motion of the tail membrane by vespertilionid bats has not been reported for other flying vertebrates. PMID:22393378

  5. WAATS: A computer program for Weights Analysis of Advanced Transportation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glatt, C. R.

    1974-01-01

    A historical weight estimating technique for advanced transportation systems is presented. The classical approach to weight estimation is discussed and sufficient data is presented to estimate weights for a large spectrum of flight vehicles including horizontal and vertical takeoff aircraft, boosters and reentry vehicles. A computer program, WAATS (Weights Analysis for Advanced Transportation Systems) embracing the techniques discussed has been written and user instructions are presented. The program was developed for use in the ODIN (Optimal Design Integration System) system.

  6. Study of Advanced Propulsion Systems for Small Transport Aircraft Technology (STAT) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baerst, C. F.; Heldenbrand, R. W.; Rowse, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Definitions of takeoff gross weight, performance, and direct operating cost for both a 30 and 50 passenger airplane were established. The results indicate that a potential direct operating cost benefit, resulting from advanced technologies, of approximately 20 percent would be achieved for the 1990 engines. Of the numerous design features that were evaluated, only maintenance-related items contributed to a significant decrease in direct operating cost. Recommendations are made to continue research and technology programs for advanced component and engine development.

  7. Vertical Jump Height is more Strongly Associated with Velocity and Work Performed Prior to Take-off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bentley, J. R.; Loehr, J. A.; DeWitt, J. K.; Lee, S. M. C.; English, K. L.; Nash, R. E.; Leach, M. A.; Hagan, R. D.

    2008-01-01

    Vertical jump (VJ) height is commonly used as a measure of athletic capability in strength and power sports. Although VJ has been shown to be a predictor of athletic performance, it is not clear which kinetic ground reaction force (GRF) variables, such as peak force (PF), peak power (PP), peak velocity (PV), total work (TW) or impulse (Imp) are the best correlates. To determine which kinetic variables (PF, PP, PV, TW, and Imp) best correlate with VJ height. Twenty subjects (14 males, 6 females) performed three maximal countermovement VJs on a force platform (Advanced Mechanical Technology, Inc., Watertown, MA, USA). VJ jump height was calculated as the difference between standing reach and the highest reach point measured using a Vertec. PF, PP, PV, TW, and Imp were calculated using the vertical GRF data sampled at 1000 Hz from the lowest point in the countermovement through the concentric portion until take-off. GRF data were normalized to body mass measured using a standard scale (Detecto, Webb City, MO, USA). Correlation coefficients were computed between each GRF variable and VJ height using a Pearson correlation. VJ height (43.4 plus or minus 9.1 cm) was significantly correlated (p less than 0.001) with PF (998 plus or minus 321 N; r=0.51), PP (1997 plus or minus 772 W; r=0.69), PV (2.66 plus or minus 0.40 m (raised dot) s(sup -1); r=0.85), TW (259 plus or minus 93.0 kJ; r=0.82), and Imp (204 plus or minus 51.1 N(raised dot)s; r=0.67). Although all variables were correlated to VJ height, PV and TW were more strongly correlated to VJ height than PF, PP, and Imp. Therefore, since TW is equal to force times displacement, the relative displacement of the center of mass along with the forces applied during the upward movement of the jump are critical determinants of VJ height. PV and TW are key determinants of VJ height, and therefore successful training programs to increase VJ height should focus on rapid movement (PV) and TW by increasing power over time rather

  8. Take-off Stability Characteristics of a 1/13-scale Model of the Consolidated Vultee Skate 7 Seaplane (TED No. NACA DE 338)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKann, Robert; Coffee, Claude W.; Abrabian, Donald D.

    1949-01-01

    The take-off stability characteristics of a Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corporation Skate 7 seaplane were determined in the Langley tank no. 2. Trim limits of stability, trim tracks, and elevator limits of stability are presented.

  9. Acoustic test and analyses of three advanced turboprop models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, B. M.; Metzger, F. B.

    1980-01-01

    Results of acoustic tests of three 62.2 cm (24.5 inch) diameter models of the prop-fan (a small diameter, highly loaded. Multi-bladed variable pitch advanced turboprop) are presented. Results show that there is little difference in the noise produced by unswept and slightly swept designs. However, the model designed for noise reduction produces substantially less noise at test conditions simulating 0.8 Mach number cruise speed or at conditions simulating takeoff and landing. In the near field at cruise conditions the acoustically designed. In the far field at takeoff and landing conditions the acoustically designed model is 5 db quieter than unswept or slightly swept designs. Correlation between noise measurement and theoretical predictions as well as comparisons between measured and predicted acoustic pressure pulses generated by the prop-fan blades are discussed. The general characteristics of the pulses are predicted. Shadowgraph measurements were obtained which showed the location of bow and trailing waves.

  10. Excepting Myotis capaccinii, the wings' contribution to take-off performance does not correlate with foraging ecology in six species of insectivorous bat.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, James D; Altringham, John D; Papadatou, Elena; Nudds, Robert L

    2014-01-01

    Take-off in bats is separated into two distinct phases: an initial jump and a subsequent wing powered acceleration. Here, using footage from a high-speed camera, the first comparative study of the performance during the wing induced phase of take-off in six insectivorous bat species is described. Despite distinct differences in foraging strategy, the mass specific power generated by the bats during wing induced take-off did not differ between species, with the exception of Myotis capaccinii. This suggests that differences in take-off performance may only be evident in bats that exhibit particularly unusual foraging strategies, such as the trawling behaviour of M. capaccinii - with differences in the remaining species only manifesting in subtler aspects of flight performance such as agility or manoeuvrability. The poorer take-off performance of M. capaccinii could be related to either a reduction in wing-stroke amplitude to stop the wings hitting the water's surface during foraging or perhaps an effect of having very large feet. No scaling relationship between body mass and mass-specific take-off power was found, which supports earlier research on birds and insects, suggesting that the mass-specific muscle power available for flight is broadly similar across a large range of body sizes and species. PMID:25326512

  11. Excepting Myotis capaccinii, the wings' contribution to take-off performance does not correlate with foraging ecology in six species of insectivorous bat

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, James D.; Altringham, John D.; Papadatou, Elena; Nudds, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Take-off in bats is separated into two distinct phases: an initial jump and a subsequent wing powered acceleration. Here, using footage from a high-speed camera, the first comparative study of the performance during the wing induced phase of take-off in six insectivorous bat species is described. Despite distinct differences in foraging strategy, the mass specific power generated by the bats during wing induced take-off did not differ between species, with the exception of Myotis capaccinii. This suggests that differences in take-off performance may only be evident in bats that exhibit particularly unusual foraging strategies, such as the trawling behaviour of M. capaccinii – with differences in the remaining species only manifesting in subtler aspects of flight performance such as agility or manoeuvrability. The poorer take-off performance of M. capaccinii could be related to either a reduction in wing-stroke amplitude to stop the wings hitting the water's surface during foraging or perhaps an effect of having very large feet. No scaling relationship between body mass and mass-specific take-off power was found, which supports earlier research on birds and insects, suggesting that the mass-specific muscle power available for flight is broadly similar across a large range of body sizes and species. PMID:25326512

  12. Reduction of aircraft noise in civil air transport by optimization of flight tracks and takeoff and approach procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottmann, Uwe

    1988-08-01

    Noise optimized design of operational flight procedures for effective noise pollution reduction is analyzed. Power cutback during certain stages of approach and takeoff, extension of distance between sound source and sound receiver, as well as diminution of sound impact time are optimized for specific flight procedures and routings. Five takeoff and three landing procedures are analyzed in acoustic effects. Sound immission is computed by NOISIMSIS (NOISe IMpact SImulation System), a simulation system especially created for this task, under consideration of aircraft type specified sound emission characteristics and performance data as well as different meteorological conditions. The investigations for the example of Frankfurt airport result in formulating a planning guideline with notes and impulses for activities in operational noise abatement.

  13. Validation of a Flexible Aircraft TakeOff and Landing Analysis /FATOLA/ computer program using flight landing data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, H. D.; Mcgehee, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    A multiple-degree-of-freedom takeoff and landing analysis, Flexible Aircraft TakeOff and Landing Analysis computer program (FATOLA), was used to predict the landing behavior of a rigid-body X-24B reentry research vehicle and of a flexible-body modified-delta-wing supersonic YF-12 research aircraft. The analytical predictions were compared with flight test data for both research vehicles. Predicted time histories of vehicle motion and attitude, landing-gear strut stroke, and axial force transmitted from the landing gear to the airframe during the landing impact and rollout compared well with the actual time histories. Based on the comparisons presented, the versatility and validity of the FATOLA program for predicting landing dynamics of aircraft has been demonstrated.

  14. Ground noise measurements during landing, take-off, and flyby operations of a four-engine turbopropeller STOL airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilton, D. A.; Henderson, H. R.; Maglieri, D. J.

    1971-01-01

    Noise measurements were obtained for a four-engine turbopropeller STOL airplane during a Federal Aviation Administration flight evaluation program at the National Aviation Facilities Experimental Center. These noise measurements involved landing-approach, takeoff-climbout, and flyby operations of the airplane. A total of 13 measuring positions were used to define the noise characteristics around a simulated STOL port. The results are presented in the form of both physical and subjective measurements. An appendix is included to present tabulated values of various subjective reaction units which may be significant for the planning and operation of STOL ports. The main source of noise produced by this vehicle was found to be the propeller, and noise levels decrease generally in accordance with the inverse-distance law for distances up to about 457 meters. For similar slant ranges, somewhat lower noise levels were experienced during flyby than during takeoff or landing.

  15. Fatiguing effect of multiple take-offs and landings in regional airline operations.

    PubMed

    Honn, Kimberly A; Satterfield, Brieann C; McCauley, Peter; Caldwell, J Lynn; Van Dongen, Hans P A

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue is a risk factor for flight performance and safety in commercial aviation. In US commercial aviation, to help to curb fatigue, the maximum duration of flight duty periods is regulated based on the scheduled start time and the number of flight segments to be flown. There is scientific support for regulating maximum duty duration based on scheduled start time; fatigue is well established to be modulated by circadian rhythms. However, it has not been established scientifically whether the number of flight segments, per se, affects fatigue. To address this science gap, we conducted a randomized, counterbalanced, cross-over study with 24 active-duty regional airline pilots. Objective and subjective fatigue was compared between a 9-hour duty day with multiple take-offs and landings versus a duty day of equal duration with a single take-off and landing. To standardize experimental conditions and isolate the fatiguing effect of the number of segments flown, the entire duty schedules were carried out in a high-fidelity, moving-base, full-flight, regional jet flight simulator. Steps were taken to maintain operational realism, including simulated airplane inspections and acceptance checks, use of realistic dispatch releases and airport charts, real-world air traffic control interactions, etc. During each of the two duty days, 10 fatigue test bouts were administered, which included a 10-minute Psychomotor Vigilance Test (PVT) assessment of objective fatigue and Samn-Perelli (SP) and Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS) assessments of subjective sleepiness/fatigue. Results showed a greater build-up of objective and subjective fatigue in the multi-segment duty day than in the single-segment duty day. With duty start time and duration and other variables that could impact fatigue levels held constant, the greater build-up of fatigue in the multi-segment duty day was attributable specifically to the difference in the number of flight segments flown. Compared to findings in

  16. Aeroacoustics of advanced propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, John F.

    1990-01-01

    The aeroacoustics of advanced, high speed propellers (propfans) are reviewed from the perspective of NASA research conducted in support of the Advanced Turboprop Program. Aerodynamic and acoustic components of prediction methods for near and far field noise are summarized for both single and counterrotation propellers in uninstalled and configurations. Experimental results from tests at both takeoff/approach and cruise conditions are reviewed with emphasis on: (1) single and counterrotation model tests in the NASA Lewis 9 by 15 (low speed) and 8 by 6 (high speed) wind tunnels, and (2) full scale flight tests of a 9 ft (2.74 m) diameter single rotation wing mounted tractor and a 11.7 ft (3.57 m) diameter counterrotation aft mounted pusher propeller. Comparisons of model data projected to flight with full scale flight data show good agreement validating the scale model wind tunnel approach. Likewise, comparisons of measured and predicted noise level show excellent agreement for both single and counterrotation propellers. Progress in describing angle of attack and installation effects is also summarized. Finally, the aeroacoustic issues associated with ducted propellers (very high bypass fans) are discussed.

  17. Aeroacoustics of advanced propellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeneweg, John F.

    The aeroacoustics of advanced, high speed propellers (propfans) are reviewed from the perspective of NASA research conducted in support of the Advanced Turboprop Program. Aerodynamic and acoustic components of prediction methods for near and far field noise are summarized for both single and counterrotation propellers in uninstalled and configurations. Experimental results from tests at both takeoff/approach and cruise conditions are reviewed with emphasis on: (1) single and counterrotation model tests in the NASA Lewis 9 by 15 (low speed) and 8 by 6 (high speed) wind tunnels, and (2) full scale flight tests of a 9 ft (2.74 m) diameter single rotation wing mounted tractor and a 11.7 ft (3.57 m) diameter counterrotation aft mounted pusher propeller. Comparisons of model data projected to flight with full scale flight data show good agreement validating the scale model wind tunnel approach. Likewise, comparisons of measured and predicted noise level show excellent agreement for both single and counterrotation propellers. Progress in describing angle of attack and installation effects is also summarized. Finally, the aeroacoustic issues associated with ducted propellers (very high bypass fans) are discussed.

  18. NASA Advanced Propeller Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, John F.; Bober, Lawrence J.

    1988-01-01

    Acoustic and aerodynamic research at NASA Lewis Research Center on advanced propellers is reviewed including analytical and experimental results on both single and counterrotation. Computational tools used to calculate the detailed flow and acoustic i e l d s a r e described along with wind tunnel tests to obtain data for code verification . Results from two kinds of experiments are reviewed: ( 1 ) performance and near field noise at cruise conditions as measured in the NASA Lewis 8-by 6-Foot Wind Tunnel and ( 2 ) farfield noise and performance for takeoff/approach conditions as measured in the NASA Lewis 9-by 15-Font Anechoic Wind Tunnel. Detailed measurements of steady blade surface pressures are described along with vortex flow phenomena at off design conditions . Near field noise at cruise is shown to level out or decrease as tip relative Mach number is increased beyond 1.15. Counterrotation interaction noise is shown to be a dominant source at take off but a secondary source at cruise. Effects of unequal rotor diameters and rotor-to-rotor spacing on interaction noise a real so illustrated. Comparisons of wind tunnel acoustic measurements to flight results are made. Finally, some future directions in advanced propeller research such as swirl recovery vanes, higher sweep, forward sweep, and ducted propellers are discussed.

  19. Potential missions for advanced airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, D. T.; Joner, B. A.

    1975-01-01

    The freight commodity transport and the intercity passenger travel markets in the U.S. for 1967 and 1972 are analyzed, along with 1985 estimates, in order to establish the size, speed and cost enabling use of the airship in these markets. Items examined include frozen meat, confectionary, drugs, electrical equipment, mechanical parts, clothing and plastic products. A 50 ton/500 passenger payload capacity, a cruise speed of 100 kt and a VTOL capability or at minimum short take-off and vertical landing capability are needed to make an LTA vehicle viable in the transport market if it had a direct operating cost of $500 to $800 per hour for freight carrying and $1100 to $2700 an hour in passenger service with utilizations between 2000 hours and 4000 hours a year.

  20. Probabilistic model, analysis and computer code for take-off and landing related aircraft crashes into a structure

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, R.

    1996-02-06

    A methodology is presented that allows the calculation of the probability that any of a particular collection of structures will be hit by an aircraft in a take-off or landing related accident during a specified window of time with a velocity exceeding a given critical value. A probabilistic model is developed that incorporates the location of each structure relative to airport runways in the vicinity; the size of the structure; the sizes, types, and frequency of use of commercial, military, and general aviation aircraft which take-off and land at these runways; the relative frequency of take-off and landing related accidents by aircraft type; the stochastic properties of off-runway crashes, namely impact location, impact angle, impact velocity, and the heading, deceleration, and skid distance after impact; and the stochastic properties of runway overruns and runoffs, namely the position at which the aircraft exits the runway, its exit velocity, and the heading and deceleration after exiting. Relevant probability distributions are fitted from extensive commercial, military, and general aviation accident report data bases. The computer source code for implementation of the calculation is provided.

  1. Contingency Power Study for Short Haul Civil Tiltrotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenberg, Joseph D. (Technical Monitor); Wait, John

    2003-01-01

    AlliedSignal Engines (AE) defined a number of concepts that significantly increased the horsepower of a turboshaft engine to accommodate the loss of an engine and enable the safe landing of a twin-engined, 40-passenger, short haul civil tiltrotor. From these concepts, "Water/Methanol Injection," a "Better Power Turbine Than Required," and a "Secondary Combustor For Interturbine Reheat" were chosen, based on system safety and economics, for more detailed examination. Engine performance, mission, and cost analysis of these systems indicated contingency power levels of 26 to 70 percent greater than normal rated takeoff could be attained for short durations, thus enabling direct operating cost savings between 2 and 6 percent.

  2. The FM-007: An advanced jet commuter for HUB to spoke transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blouke, Peter Scott; Engel, George Bryan; Fordham, Kari Suzanne; Layne, Steven James; Moore, Joel David; Shaver, Frederick Martin; Thornton, Douglas Hershal, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Due to the increasing need for new commuter aircraft, the FM-007 is proposed, a technologically advanced jet propelled short takeoff and landing (STOL) airplane. The proposed commuter is designed for hub to spoke air travel. In order to reduce drag, natural laminar flow technology is integrated into the design using the natural laminar flow airfoil section for the wing. A three lifting surface configuration provides for more efficient cruise flight. This unique design includes a small forward wing (canard), a rear mounted high aspect ratio main wing, and a small horizontal stabilizer high atop the vertical tail. These three surfaces act together to reduce drag by minimizing the downward force the horizontal stabilizer has to account for due to the nose down pitching moment. Commuter aircraft must also incorporate passenger comfort. This is achieved by providing a spacious pressurized cabin with a large galley and reduced cabin noise due to incorporation of noise reduction gear. A basic oval design is adopted, as opposed to a circular design in order to allow for the seating of five passengers abreast. To get STOL capability, an over the wing blown flap is used using a Rolls Royce Tay series engine.

  3. Are Short Telomeres Predictive of Advanced Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Shay, Jerry W.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The combination of variable telomere length in cancer cells combined with shorter telomere length in cancer-associated stromal cells, strongly correlate with progression to prostate cancer metastasis and cancer death. The implications are that telomere length measurements not only have the potential as a prognostic indicator of prostate cancer outcomes but also as a risk stratification enrichment biomarker for individualized therapeutic interventions. PMID:24124228

  4. Mathematical model for takeoff simulation of a wing in proximity to the ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinaci, Omer Kemal

    2016-04-01

    Aircraft flying close to the ground benefit from enhanced efficiency owing to decreased induced drag and increased lift. In this study, a mathematical model is developed to simulate the takeoff of a wing near the ground using an Iterative Boundary Element Method (IBEM) and the finite difference scheme. Two stand-alone sub-codes and a mother code, which enables communication between the sub-codes, are developed to solve for the self-excitation of the Wing-In-Ground (WIG) effect. The aerodynamic force exerted on the wing is calculated by the first sub-code using the IBEM, and the vertical displacement of the wing is calculated by the second sub-code using the finite difference scheme. The mother code commands the two sub-codes and can solve for the aerodynamics of the wing and operating height within seconds. The developed code system is used to solve for the force, velocity, and displacement of an NACA6409 wing at a 4° Angle of Attack (AoA) which has various numerical and experimental studies in the literature. The effects of thickness and AoA are then investigated and conclusions were drawn with respect to generated results. The proposed model provides a practical method for understanding the flight dynamics and it is specifically beneficial at the pre-design stages of a WIG effect craft.

  5. Stability analysis of the Gyroscopic Power Take-Off wave energy point absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Zhang, Zili; Kramer, Morten M.; Olsen, Jan

    2015-10-01

    The Gyroscopic Power Take-Off (GyroPTO) wave energy point absorber consists of a float rigidly connected to a lever. The operational principle is somewhat similar to that of the so-called gyroscopic hand wrist exercisers, where the rotation of the float is brought forward by the rotational particle motion of the waves. At first, the equations of motion of the system are derived based on analytical rigid body dynamics. Next, assuming monochromatic waves simplified equations are derived, valid under synchronisation of the ring of the gyro to the angular frequency of the excitation. Especially, it is demonstrated that the dynamics of the ring can be described as an autonomous nonlinear single-degree-of-freedom system, affected by three different types of point attractors. One where the ring vibrations are attracted to a static equilibrium point indicating unstable synchronisation and two types of attractors where the ring is synchronised to the wave angular frequency, either rotating in one or the opposite direction. Finally, the stability conditions and the basins of attraction to the point attractors defining the synchronised motion are determined.

  6. Feedback Control of a Morphing Chevron for Takeoff and Cruise Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Schiller, Noah H.; Mabe, James H.; Ruggeri, Robert T.; Butler, G. W.

    2004-01-01

    Noise from commercial high-bypass ratio turbofan engines is generated by turbulent mixing of the hot jet exhaust, fan stream, and ambient air. Serrated aerodynamic devices, known as chevrons, along the trailing edges of a jet engine primary and secondary exhaust nozzle have been shown to reduce jet noise at takeoff and shock-cell noise at cruise conditions. Their optimum shape is a finely tuned compromise between noise-benefit and thrust-loss. The design of a full scale Variable Geometry Chevron (VGC) fan-nozzle incorporating Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) actuators is described in a companion paper. This paper describes the development and testing of a proportional-integral control system that regulates the heating of the SMA actuators to control the VGC s tip immersion. The VGC and control system were tested under representative flow conditions in Boeing s Nozzle Test Facility (NTF). Results from the NTF test which demonstrate controllable immersion of the VGC are described. The paper also describes the correlation between strains and temperatures on the chevron with a photogrammetric measurement of the chevron's tip immersion.

  7. Concentric circles based simple optical landing aid for vertical takeoff and landing aircrafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murshid, Syed H.; Enaya, Rayan; Lovell, Gregory L.

    2014-09-01

    Vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircrafts such as helicopters and drones, add a flexible degree of operation to airborne vehicles. In order to operate these devices in low light situations, where it is difficult to determine slope of the landing surface, a lightweight and standalone device is proposed here. This small optical device can be easily integrated into current VTOL systems. An optical projector consisting of low power, light weight, solid state laser along with minimal optics is utilized to illuminate the landing surface with donut shaped circles and coaxial centralized dot. This device can placed anywhere on the aircraft and a properly placed fiber system can be used to illuminate the surface beneath the bottom of the VTOL aircraft in a fashion that during operation, when the aircraft is parallel to the landing surface, the radius between the central dot and outer ring(s) are equidistant for the entire circumference; however, when there the landing surface of the VTOL aircraft is not parallel to the landing strip, the radial distance between two opposite sides of the circle and central dot will be unequal. The larger this distortion, the greater the difference will be between the opposite sides of the circle. Visual confirmation or other optical devices can be used to determine relative alignment of the projector output allowing the pilot to make proper adjustments as they approach the landing surface to ensure safe landings. Simulated and experimental results from a prototype optical projector are presented here.

  8. Mathematical model for takeoff simulation of a wing in proximity to the ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinaci, Omer Kemal

    2016-06-01

    Aircraft flying close to the ground benefit from enhanced efficiency owing to decreased induced drag and increased lift. In this study, a mathematical model is developed to simulate the takeoff of a wing near the ground using an Iterative Boundary Element Method (IBEM) and the finite difference scheme. Two stand-alone sub-codes and a mother code, which enables communication between the sub-codes, are developed to solve for the self-excitation of the Wing-In-Ground (WIG) effect. The aerodynamic force exerted on the wing is calculated by the first sub-code using the IBEM, and the vertical displacement of the wing is calculated by the second sub-code using the finite difference scheme. The mother code commands the two sub-codes and can solve for the aerodynamics of the wing and operating height within seconds. The developed code system is used to solve for the force, velocity, and displacement of an NACA6409 wing at a 4° Angle of Attack (AoA) which has various numerical and experimental studies in the literature. The effects of thickness and AoA are then investigated and conclusions were drawn with respect to generated results. The proposed model provides a practical method for understanding the flight dynamics and it is specifically beneficial at the pre-design stages of a WIG effect craft.

  9. Unsteady blade pressures on a propfan at takeoff: Euler analysis and flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, M.

    1991-01-01

    The unsteady blade pressures due to the operation of the propfan at an angle to the direction of the mean flow are obtained by solving the unsteady three dimensional Euler equations. The configuration considered is the eight bladed SR7L propfan at takeoff conditions and the inflow angles considered are 6.3 deg, 8.3 deg, 11.3 deg. The predicted blade pressure waveforms are compared with inflight measurements. At the inboard radial station (r/R = 0.68) the phase of the predicted waveforms show reasonable agreement with the measurements while the amplitudes are over predicted in the leading edge region of the blade. At the outboard radial station (r/R = 0.95), the predicted amplitudes of the waveforms on the pressure surface are in good agreement with flight data for all inflow angles. The measured (installed propfan) waveforms show a relative phase lag compared to the computed (propfan alone) waveforms. The phase lag depends on the axial location of the transducer and the surface of the blade. On the suction surface, in addition to the relative phase lag, the measurements show distortion (widening and steepening) of the waveforms. The extent of distortion increases with increase in inflow angle. This distortion seems to be due to viscous separation effects which depend on the azimuthal location of the blade and the axial location of the transducer.

  10. Composition and morphology of particle emissions from in-use aircraft during takeoff and landing.

    PubMed

    Mazaheri, Mandana; Bostrom, Thor E; Johnson, Graham R; Morawska, Lidia

    2013-05-21

    In order to provide realistic data for air pollution inventories and source apportionment at airports, the morphology and composition of ultrafine particles (UFP) in aircraft engine exhaust were measured and characterized. For this purpose, two independent measurement techniques were employed to collect emissions during normal takeoff and landing operations at Brisbane Airport, Australia. PM1 emissions in the airfield were collected on filters and analyzed using the particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique. Morphological and compositional analyses of individual ultrafine particles in aircraft plumes were performed on silicon nitride membrane grids using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). TEM results showed that the deposited particles were in the range of 5-100 nm in diameter, had semisolid spherical shapes and were dominant in the nucleation mode (18-20 nm). The EDX analysis showed the main elements in the nucleation particles were C, O, S, and Cl. The PIXE analysis of the airfield samples was generally in agreement with the EDX in detecting S, Cl, K, Fe, and Si in the particles. The results of this study provide important scientific information on the toxicity of aircraft exhaust and their impact on local air quality. PMID:23618073

  11. Flight dynamics and control of evasive maneuvers: the fruit fly's takeoff.

    PubMed

    Zabala, Francisco A; Card, Gwyneth M; Fontaine, Ebraheem I; Dickinson, Michael H; Murray, Richard M

    2009-09-01

    We have approached the problem of reverse-engineering the flight control mechanism of the fruit fly by studying the dynamics of the responses to a visual stimulus during takeoff. Building upon a prior framework [G. Card and M. Dickinson, J. Exp. Biol., vol. 211, pp. 341-353, 2008], we seek to understand the strategies employed by the animal to stabilize attitude and orientation during these evasive, highly dynamical maneuvers. As a first step, we consider the dynamics from a gray-box perspective: examining lumped forces produced by the insect's legs and wings. The reconstruction of the flight initiation dynamics, based on the unconstrained motion formulation for a rigid body, allows us to assess the fly's responses to a variety of initial conditions induced by its jump. Such assessment permits refinement by using a visual tracking algorithm to extract the kinematic envelope of the wings [E. I. Fontaine, F. Zabala, M. Dickinson, and J. Burdick, "Wing and body motion during flight initiation in Drosophila revealed by automated visual tracking," submitted for publication] in order to estimate lift and drag forces [F. Zabala, M. Dickinson, and R. Murray, "Control and stability of insect flight during highly dynamical maneuvers," submitted for publication], and recording actual leg-joint kinematics and using them to estimate jump forces [F. Zabala, "A bio-inspired model for directionality control of flight initiation," to be published.]. In this paper, we present the details of our approach in a comprehensive manner, including the salient results. PMID:19643699

  12. Comparison of advanced turboprop and conventional jet and propeller aircraft flyover noise annoyance: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccurdy, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to compare the flyover noise annoyance of proposed advanced turboprop aircraft with that of conventional turboprop and jet aircraft. The effects of fundamental frequency and tone-to-broadband noise ratio on advanced turboprop annoyance were also examined. A computer synthesis system is used to generate 18 realistic, time varying simulations of propeller aircraft takeoff noise in which the harmonic content is systematically varied to represent the factorial combinations of six fundamental frequencies ranging from 67.5 Hz to 292.5 Hz and three tone-to-broadband noise ratios of 0, 15, and 30 dB. These advanced turboprop simulations along with recordings of five conventional turboprop takeoffs and five conventional jet takeoffs are presented at D-weighted sound pressure levels of 70, 80, and 90 dB to 32 subjects in an anechoic chamber. Analyses of the subjects' annoyance judgments compare the three categories of aircraft and examine the effects of the differences in harmonic content among the advanced turboprop noises. The annoyance prediction ability of various noise measurement procedures and corrections is also examined.

  13. Advanced technologies for rocket single-stage-to-orbit vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhite, Alan W.; Bush, Lance B.; Cruz, Christopher I.; Lepsch, Roger A.; Morris, W. Douglas; Stanley, Douglas O.; Wurster, Kathryn E.

    1991-01-01

    A single-stage-to-orbit vertical takeoff/horizontal landing rocket vehicle was studied to determine the benefits of advanced technology. Advanced technologies that were included in the study were variable mixture ratio oxygen/hydrogen rocket engines and materials, structures, and subsystem technologies currently being developed in the National Aero-Space Plane Program. The application of advanced technology results in an 85 percent reduction in vehicle dry weight. With advanced materials, an external thermal protection system, like the Space Shuttle tiles, was not required. Compared to an all-airbreathing horizontal takeoff/horizontal landing vehicle using the same advanced technologies and mission requirements, the rocket vehicle is lighter in dry weight and has fewer subsystems. To increase reliability and safety, operational features were included in the rocket vehicle-robust subsystems, 5 percent additional margin, no slush hydrogen, fail-operational with an engine out, and a crew escape module. The resulting vehicle grew in dry weight and was still lower in dry weight than the airbreathing vehicle.

  14. Technology requirements for advanced earth-orbital transportation systems: Summary report. [single stage to orbit vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haefeli, R. C.; Littler, E. G.; Hurley, J. B.; Winter, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    Areas of advanced technology that are either critical or offer significant benefits to the development of future Earth-orbit transportation systems were identified. Technology assessment was based on the application of these technologies to fully reusable, single-state-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicle concepts with horizontal landing capability. Study guidelines included mission requirements similar to space shuttle, an operational capability beginning in 1995, and main propulsion to be advanced hydrogen-fueled rocket engines. The technical and economic feasibility of this class of SSTO concepts were evaluated as well as the comparative features of three operational take-off modes, which were vertical boost, horizontal sled launch, and horizontal take-off with subsequent inflight fueling. Projections of both normal and accelerated technology growth were made. Figures of merit were derived to provide relative rankings of technology areas. The influence of selected accelerated areas on vehicle design and program costs was analyzed by developing near-optimum point designs.

  15. Takeoff/approach noise for a model counterrotation propeller with a forward-swept upstream rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Hall, David G.; Podboy, Gary G.; Jeracki, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    A scale model of a counterrotating propeller with forward-swept blades in the forward rotor and aft-swept blades in the aft rotor (designated F39/A31) has been tested in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-Foot Anechoic Wind Tunnel. This paper presents aeroacoustic results at a takeoff/approach condition of Mach 0.20. Laser Doppler velocimeter results taken in a plane between the two rotors are also included to quantify the interaction flow field. The intention of the forward-swept design is to reduce the magnitude of the forward rotor tip vortex and/or wakes which impinge on the aft rotor, thus lowering the interaction tone levels. A reference model propeller (designated F31/A31), having aft-swept blades in both rotors, was also tested. Aeroelastic performance of the F39/A31 propeller was disappointing. The forward rotor tip region tended to untwist toward higher effective blade angles under load. The forward rotor also exhibited steady state blade flutter at speeds and loadings well below the design condition. The noise results, based on sideline acoustic data, show that the interaction tone levels were up to 8 dB higher with the forward-swept design compared to those for the reference propeller at similar operating conditions, with these tone level differences extending down to lower propeller speeds where flutter did not occur. These acoustic results are for a poorly-performing forward-swept propeller. It is quite possible that a properly-designed forward-swept propeller would exhibit substantial interaction tone level reductions.

  16. Validation of Self-Reported Power Take-Off Shielding Using On-Site Farm Audits.

    PubMed

    Chapel, D B; Sorensen, J A; Tinc, P J; Fiske, T; Wyckoff, S; Mellors, P W; Jenkins, P

    2015-04-01

    Despite the substantial contribution of power take-off (PTO) entanglements to workplace morbidity and mortality among agricultural workers, the degree of proper PTO shielding on U.S. farms remains poorly characterized. Sampling from the New York data of the USDA National Agricultural Statistical Service (NASS), at least 200 each of dairy, livestock, crop, fruit, and vegetable farms were surveyed by phone to determine the extent of proper PTO shielding. In the same year, on-site audits were performed at 211 randomly selected New York livestock and dairy farms using a four-point scale to assess PTO shielding. Supplemental data were gathered on farm acreage, number of livestock, principal commodity, and operator experience. The phone survey data for livestock and dairy farms were then compared to the on-farm audit data. In the phone survey, 72.5% of farms reported having shields on all implements. The mean percentage of implements reported to be shielded was 90.2%. By on-farm audit, 10% of farms had all implements properly shielded, and the mean percentage of properly shielded implements was 56.7%, with shielding rates differing widely for different classes of implements. No significant predictors of PTO shielding were identified. The phone survey greatly overestimated proper PTO shielding rates when compared with the on-farm audits. These data suggest a lower level of proper shielding among farmers than is mandated by current industry safety standards. The results also identify a principal weakness of phone surveys in accurately assessing the true magnitude of on-farm risk for PTO entanglement. PMID:26204785

  17. Short- and Long-Term Quality of Life and Bowel Function in Patients With MRI-Defined, High-Risk, Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Treated With an Intensified Neoadjuvant Strategy in the Randomized Phase 2 EXPERT-C Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Sclafani, Francesco; Peckitt, Clare; Cunningham, David; Tait, Diana; Giralt, Jordi; Glimelius, Bengt; Keränen, Susana Roselló; Bateman, Andrew; Hickish, Tamas; Tabernero, Josep; Thomas, Janet; Brown, Gina; Oates, Jacqueline; Chau, Ian

    2015-10-01

    Objective: Intensified preoperative treatments have been increasingly investigated in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), but limited data are available for the impact of these regimens on quality of life (QoL) and bowel function (BF). We assessed these outcome measures in EXPERT-C, a randomized phase 2 trial of neoadjuvant capecitabine combined with oxaliplatin (CAPOX), followed by chemoradiation therapy (CRT), total mesorectal excision, and adjuvant CAPOX with or without cetuximab in magnetic resonance imaging-defined, high-risk LARC. Methods and Materials: QoL was assessed using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 and QLQ-CR29 questionnaires. Bowel incontinence was assessed using the modified Fecal Incontinence Severity Index questionnaire. Results: Compared to baseline, QoL scores during preoperative treatment were better for symptoms associated with the primary tumor in the rectum (blood and mucus in stool, constipation, diarrhea, stool frequency, buttock pain) but worse for global health status, role functioning, and symptoms related to the specific safety profile of each treatment modality. During follow-up, improved emotional functioning and lessened anxiety and insomnia were observed, but deterioration of body image, increased urinary incontinence, less sexual interest (men), and increased impotence and dyspareunia were observed. Cetuximab was associated with a deterioration of global health status during neoadjuvant chemotherapy but did not have any long-term detrimental effect. An improvement in bowel continence was observed after preoperative treatment and 3 years after sphincter-sparing surgery. Conclusions: Intensifying neoadjuvant treatment by administering induction systemic chemotherapy before chemoradiation therapy improves tumor-related symptoms and does not appear to have a significantly detrimental effect on QoL and BF, in both the short and the long term.

  18. Advanced propeller research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, John F.; Bober, Lawrence J.

    1987-01-01

    Resent results of aerodynamic and acoustic research on both single and counter-rotation propellers are reviewed. Data and analytical results are presented for three propellers: SR-7A, the single rotation design used in the NASA Propfan Test Assessment (PTA); and F7-A7, the 8+8 counterrotating design used in the proof-of-concept Unducted Fan (UDF) engine. In addition to propeller efficiencies, cruise and takeoff noise, and blade pressure data, off-design phenomena involving formation of leading edge vortices are described. Aerodynamic and acoustic computational results derived from three-dimensional Euler and acoustic radiation codes are presented. Research on unsteady flows, which are particularly important for understanding counterrotation interaction noise, unsteady loading effects on acoustics, and flutter or forced response is described. The first results of three-dimensional unsteady Euler solutions are illustrated for a single rotation propeller at an angle of attack and for a counterrotation propeller. Basic experimental and theoretical results from studies of the unsteady aerodynamics of oscillating cascades are outlined. Finally, advanced concepts involving swirl recovery vanes and ultra bypass ducted propellers are discussed.

  19. Take-off speed in jumping mantises depends on body size and a power-limited mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sutton, G P; Doroshenko, M; Cullen, D A; Burrows, M

    2016-07-15

    Many insects such as fleas, froghoppers and grasshoppers use a catapult mechanism to jump, and a direct consequence of this is that their take-off velocities are independent of their mass. In contrast, insects such as mantises, caddis flies and bush crickets propel their jumps by direct muscle contractions. What constrains the jumping performance of insects that use this second mechanism? To answer this question, the jumping performance of the mantis Stagmomantis theophila was measured through all its developmental stages, from 5 mg first instar nymphs to 1200 mg adults. Older and heavier mantises have longer hind and middle legs and higher take-off velocities than younger and lighter mantises. The length of the propulsive hind and middle legs scaled approximately isometrically with body mass (exponent=0.29 and 0.32, respectively). The front legs, which do not contribute to propulsion, scaled with an exponent of 0.37. Take-off velocity increased with increasing body mass (exponent=0.12). Time to accelerate increased and maximum acceleration decreased, but the measured power that a given mass of jumping muscle produced remained constant throughout all stages. Mathematical models were used to distinguish between three possible limitations to the scaling relationships: first, an energy-limited model (which explains catapult jumpers); second, a power-limited model; and third, an acceleration -: limited model. Only the model limited by muscle power explained the experimental data. Therefore, the two biomechanical mechanisms impose different limitations on jumping: those involving direct muscle contractions (mantises) are constrained by muscle power, whereas those involving catapult mechanisms are constrained by muscle energy. PMID:27284067

  20. Take-off speed in jumping mantises depends on body size and a power-limited mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Doroshenko, M.; Cullen, D. A.; Burrows, M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many insects such as fleas, froghoppers and grasshoppers use a catapult mechanism to jump, and a direct consequence of this is that their take-off velocities are independent of their mass. In contrast, insects such as mantises, caddis flies and bush crickets propel their jumps by direct muscle contractions. What constrains the jumping performance of insects that use this second mechanism? To answer this question, the jumping performance of the mantis Stagmomantis theophila was measured through all its developmental stages, from 5 mg first instar nymphs to 1200 mg adults. Older and heavier mantises have longer hind and middle legs and higher take-off velocities than younger and lighter mantises. The length of the propulsive hind and middle legs scaled approximately isometrically with body mass (exponent=0.29 and 0.32, respectively). The front legs, which do not contribute to propulsion, scaled with an exponent of 0.37. Take-off velocity increased with increasing body mass (exponent=0.12). Time to accelerate increased and maximum acceleration decreased, but the measured power that a given mass of jumping muscle produced remained constant throughout all stages. Mathematical models were used to distinguish between three possible limitations to the scaling relationships: first, an energy-limited model (which explains catapult jumpers); second, a power-limited model; and third, an acceleration-limited model. Only the model limited by muscle power explained the experimental data. Therefore, the two biomechanical mechanisms impose different limitations on jumping: those involving direct muscle contractions (mantises) are constrained by muscle power, whereas those involving catapult mechanisms are constrained by muscle energy. PMID:27284067

  1. Performance and technological feasibility of rocket powered HTHL-SSTO with take-off assist (aerospace plane/ekranoplane)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Nobuyuki; Nebylov, Alexander V.; Sokolov, Victor V.; Ohkami, Yoshiaki

    It might be said that it is common understanding that rocket-powered single stage to orbit (SSTO) aerospace planes will become feasible with near-term technology as described in [1] (Koelle, D. E. Survey and comparison of winged launch vehicle options, ISTS 94-g-11 V 1994) and [2] (Bekey, I. Why SSTO rocket launch vehicles are now feasible and practical, IAF-94-V.1.524 1994). Among two methods of launching aerospace planes into orbit, vertical take-off (VT) and horizontal take-off (HT), it seems that VT takes the lead from HT [1, 2]. The decision for the X-33 program by NASA, also, seems to favor VT. In retrospect, almost all of the launch vehicles in the past have been VT, mainly because VT solved the problem of exit from atmosphere to space. However, broadening the range of requirements for space transportation systems from military to commercial and unmanned to manned seems to favor the need for HT. In this paper, the authors are going to prove that aerospace plane/ekranoplane system, which is a reusable launch vehicle system based on the HT concept, with ekranoplane as a take-off and possibly, landing assist, could be competitive with the VT concept from both technological and economical view points. Ekranoplane is a wing-in-ground-effect craft (WIG), which moves at a speed of approximately 0.5 M, carrying heavy loads above the sea surface. Combination of high initial velocity and high performance tri-propellant engine for aerospace plane makes it possible to configure an aerospace plane which is competitive with VT. Other specific features of HT in comparison with VT are discussed.

  2. Flight take-off and walking behavior of insecticide-susceptible and - resistant strains of Sitophilus zeamais exposed to deltamethrin.

    PubMed

    Guedes, N M P; Guedes, R N C; Ferreira, G H; Silva, L B

    2009-08-01

    Insects have evolved a variety of physiological and behavioral responses to various toxins in natural and managed ecosystems. However, insect behavior is seldom considered in insecticide studies although insects are capable of changing their behavior in response to their sensory perception of insecticides, which may compromise insecticide efficacy. This is particularly serious for insect pests that are physiologically resistant to insecticides since insecticide avoidance may further compromise their management. Locomotion plays a major role determining insecticide exposure and was, therefore, considered in investigating the behavioral responses of male and female adult insects from an insecticide-susceptible and two insecticide-resistant strains of the maize weevil Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a major pest of stored cereals. Different dose-dependent behavioral responses were expected among strains with behavioral resistance less likely to occur in physiologically resistant insects since they are able to withstand higher doses of insecticide. The behavioral responses to deltamethrin-sprayed surfaces differed among the maize weevil strains. Such responses were concentration-independent for all of the strains. Stimulus-independent behavioral resistance was unrelated to physiological resistance with one resistant strain exhibiting higher rates of flight take-off and the other resistant strain exhibiting lower flight take-off. Female mobility was similar for all strains, unlike male mobility. Males of each strain exhibited a pattern of mobility following the same trend of flight take-off. Behavioral patterns of response to insecticide are, therefore, variable among strains, particularly among insecticide-resistant strains, and worth considering in resistance surveys and management programs. PMID:19302721

  3. The design and evolution of the Beta two-stage-to-orbit horizontal takeoff and landing launch system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkardt, Leo; Norris, Rick

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes the design guidelines and operational characteristics of a two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) horizontal takeoff and landing launch vehicle termed Beta, designed for low-cost aircraftlike operations. It can take off and land from standard Strategic Air Command runways and is fully recoverable and reusable. The original Beta I has a payload capability of 50,000, while the newer downsized Beta II will deploy payloads of about 10,000 lbs to low polar orbit. The last Beta vehicle, Beta III which is in early stages of design, has increased operational efficiency. Design diagrams are presented illustrating Beta I and Beta II booster, nacelle, and orbiter concepts.

  4. The Rolling Friction of Several Airplane Wheels and Tires and the Effect of Rolling Friction on Take-Off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetmore, J W

    1937-01-01

    This report presents the results of test made to determine the rolling friction of airplane wheels and tires under various conditions of wheel loading, tire inflation pressure, and ground surface. The effect of wheel-bearing type was also investigated. Six pairs of wheels and tires were tested including two sizes of each of the types designated as standard (high pressure), low pressure, and extra low pressure. The results of calculations intended to show the effect of variations in rolling friction on take-off are also presented.

  5. Effect of fuel properties on performance of single aircraft turbojet combustor at simulated idle, cruise, and takeoff conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butze, H. F.; Smith, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    The performance of a single-can JT8D combustor was investigated with a number of fuels exhibiting wide variations in chemical composition and volatility. Performance parameters investigated were combustion efficiency, emissions of CO, unburned hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides, as well as liner temperatures and smoke. The most pronounced effects of changes in fuel composition were observed at simulated cruise and takeoff conditions where smoke and liner temperatures increased significantly as the hydrogen content of the fuel decreased. At the simulated idle condition, emissions of CO and unburned hydrocarbons increased slightly and, accordingly, combustion efficiencies decreased slightly as the hydrogen content of the fuels decreased.

  6. Beta 2: A near term, fully reusable, horizontal takeoff and landing two-stage-to-orbit launch vehicle concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkardt, Leo A.

    1992-01-01

    A recent study has confirmed the feasibility of a near term, fully reusable, horizontal takeoff and landing two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) launch vehicle concept. The vehicle stages at Mach 6.5. The first stage is powered by a turboramjet propulsion system with the turbojets being fueled by JP and the ramjet by LH2. The second stage is powered by a space shuttle main engine (SSME) rocket engine. For about the same gross weight as growth versions of the 747, the vehicle can place 10,000 lbm. in low polar orbit or 16,000 lbm. to Space Station Freedom.

  7. Development of an Advanced Annular Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rusnak, J. P.; Shadowen, J. H.

    1969-01-01

    The objective of the effort described in this report was to determine the structural durability of a full-scale advanced annular turbojet combustor using ASTM A-1 type fuel and operating at conditions typical of advanced supersonic aircraft. A full-scale annular combustor of the ram-induction type was fabricated and subjected to a 325-hour cyclic endurance test at conditions representative of operation in a Mach 3.0 aircraft. The combustor exhibited extensive cracking and scoop burning at the end of the test program. But these defects had no appreciable effect on combustor performance, as performance remained at a high level throughout the endurance program. Most performance goals were achieved with pressure loss values near 6% and 8%, and temperature rise variation ratio (deltaTVR) values near 1.25 and l.22 at takeoff and cruise conditions, respectively. Combustion efficiencies approached l004 and the exit radial temperature profiles were approximately as desired.

  8. Flight evaluations of the effect of advanced control systems and displays on the handling qualities of a general aviation airplane.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loschke, P. C.; Barber, M. R.; Jarvis, C. R.; Enevoldson, E. K.

    1972-01-01

    Flight tests have shown that, by means of improved displays and advanced control systems, it is possible to transform a typical light airplane into a flying machine that borders on being perfect from a handling-qualities standpoint. A flight-director display and an attitude-command control system used in combination transformed a vehicle with poor handling qualities during ILS approaches in turbulent air into a vehicle with extremely good handling qualities. The attitude-command control system also improved the ride qualities of the airplane. A rate-command control system was less beneficial than an attitude-command control system. Although this paper deals primarily with general aviation aircraft, the results presented pertain to other types of aircraft. Short-takeoff-and-landing (STOL) aircraft would be a natural application of the control systems because, as a result of their low speeds, they encounter many of the handling-qualities problems noted on light aircraft. The improved ride qualities should be of interest to all airline operations, and for STOL aircraft in particular, because of their prolonged exposure to low-altitude turbulence.

  9. Far-Field Acoustic Power Level and Performance Analyses of F31/A31 Open Rotor Model at Simulated Scaled Takeoff, Nominal Takeoff, and Approach Conditions: Technical Report I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sree, Dave

    2015-01-01

    Far-field acoustic power level and performance analyses of open rotor model F31/A31 have been performed to determine its noise characteristics at simulated scaled takeoff, nominal takeoff, and approach flight conditions. The nonproprietary parts of the data obtained from experiments in 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel (9?15 LSWT) tests were provided by NASA Glenn Research Center to perform the analyses. The tone and broadband noise components have been separated from raw test data by using a new data analysis tool. Results in terms of sound pressure levels, acoustic power levels, and their variations with rotor speed, angle of attack, thrust, and input shaft power have been presented and discussed. The effect of an upstream pylon on the noise levels of the model has been addressed. Empirical equations relating model's acoustic power level, thrust, and input shaft power have been developed. The far-field acoustic efficiency of the model is also determined for various simulated flight conditions. It is intended that the results presented in this work will serve as a database for comparison and improvement of other open rotor blade designs and also for validating open rotor noise prediction codes.

  10. Genetic Evaluation of Short Stature

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Ron G.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Genetics plays a major role in determining an individual's height. Although there are many monogenic disorders that lead to perturbations in growth and result in short stature, there is still no consensus as to the role that genetic diagnostics should play in the evaluation of a child with short stature. Evidence Acquisition: A search of PubMed was performed, focusing on the genetic diagnosis of short stature as well as on specific diagnostic subgroups included in this article. Consensus guidelines were reviewed. Evidence Synthesis: There are a multitude of rare genetic causes of severe short stature. There is no high-quality evidence to define the optimal approach to the genetic evaluation of short stature. We review genetic etiologies of a number of diagnostic subgroups and propose an algorithm for genetic testing based on these subgroups. Conclusion: Advances in genomic technologies are revolutionizing the diagnostic approach to short stature. Endocrinologists must become facile with the use of genetic testing in order to identify the various monogenic disorders that present with short stature. PMID:24915122

  11. Interaction of the elytra and hind wing of a rhinoceros beetle (Trypoxylus dichotomus) during a take-off mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Seungyoung; Oh, Sehyeong; Choi, Haecheon; Lee, Boogeon; Park, Hyungmin; Kim, Sun-Tae

    2015-11-01

    The elytra are a pair of hardened wings that cover the abdomen of a beetle to protect beetle's hind wings. During the take-off, these elytra open and flap in phase with the hind wings. We investigate the effect of the elytra flapping on beetle's aerodynamic performance. Numerical simulations are performed at Re=10,000 (based on the wingtip mean velocity and mean chord length of the hind wing) using an immersed boundary method. The simulations are focused on a take-off, and the wing kinematics used is directly obtained from the experimental observations using high speed cameras. The simulation result shows three-dimensional vortical structures generated by the hind wing of the beetle and their interaction with the elytra. The presence of elytra has a negative effect on the lift generation by the hind wings, but the lift force on the elytra themselves is negligible. Further discussions on the elytra - hind wing interaction will be provided during the presentation. Supported by UD130070ID.

  12. Beware Postpartum Shortness of Breath

    PubMed Central

    Akpinar, Guleser; Ipekci, Afsin; Gulen, Bedia; Ikizceli, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is one of the potentially life-threatening complications of pregnancy. We report a case of a 36-year-old female patient who presented with shortness of breath, swelling of feet after giving birth to triplets, and her tests revealed that left ventricle is dilated with its diameter on the borderline and she had EF 35% with advanced systolic dysfunction. Anterior wall and septum were severely hypokinetic. In the presence of these findings, the patient was evaluated as PPCM. PPCM must be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with shortness of breath and swelling of feet, which are also common in pregnancy. PMID:26649031

  13. Beware Postpartum Shortness of Breath.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Guleser; Ipekci, Afsin; Gulen, Bedia; Ikizceli, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is one of the potentially life-threatening complications of pregnancy. We report a case of a 36-year-old female patient who presented with shortness of breath, swelling of feet after giving birth to triplets, and her tests revealed that left ventricle is dilated with its diameter on the borderline and she had EF 35% with advanced systolic dysfunction. Anterior wall and septum were severely hypokinetic. In the presence of these findings, the patient was evaluated as PPCM. PPCM must be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with shortness of breath and swelling of feet, which are also common in pregnancy. PMID:26649031

  14. Application of advanced technologies to very large subsonic transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, Dennis W.; Mcgraw, Marvin E., Jr.; Arcara, Philip C., Jr.; Geiselhart, Karl A.

    1992-01-01

    A NASA-Langley study has used the interdisciplinary Flight Optimization System to examine the impact of advanced technologies on the performance and plausible size of large, long-range subsonic transport aircraft. The baseline, four-engine configuration studied would carry 412 passengers over 7300 n. mi.; the technologies evaluated encompass high aspect ratio supercritical-airfoil wings, a composite wing structure, an all-composite primary structure, and hybrid laminar flow control. The results obtained indicate that 600-passenger transports, whose takeoff gross weight is no greater than that of the 412-passenger baseline, are made possible by the new technologies.

  15. A short story of the short QT syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maluli, Hayan Al; Meshkov, Arnold B

    2013-01-01

    Short QT syndrome is a recently recognized cause of cardiac rhythm disorders, including sudden cardiac death. Although the syndrome is rare, its potential lethality justifies routinely screening the electrocardiograms of patients with syncope or unexplained atrial or ventricular arrhythmias to look for this diagnosis. This review discusses recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of this syndrome and outlines some of the challenges in establishing the diagnosis. PMID:23288944

  16. 31 CFR 585.208 - Prohibited overflights, takeoffs and landings of aircraft en route to or from the FRY (S&M).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., 14 CFR part 91. ... landings of aircraft en route to or from the FRY (S&M). 585.208 Section 585.208 Money and Finance: Treasury..., takeoffs and landings of aircraft en route to or from the FRY (S&M). Except as otherwise authorized,...

  17. 14 CFR Appendix G to Part 36 - Takeoff Noise Requirements for Propeller-Driven Small Airplane and Propeller-Driven, Commuter...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...-Driven Small Airplane and Propeller-Driven, Commuter Category Airplane Certification Tests on or After.... G Appendix G to Part 36—Takeoff Noise Requirements for Propeller-Driven Small Airplane and Propeller... measuring noise and adjusting these data to standard conditions, for propeller driven small airplanes...

  18. 14 CFR Appendix G to Part 36 - Takeoff Noise Requirements for Propeller-Driven Small Airplane and Propeller-Driven, Commuter...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Takeoff Noise Requirements for Propeller-Driven Small Airplane and Propeller-Driven, Commuter Category Airplane Certification Tests on or After December 22, 1988 G Appendix G to Part 36 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT...

  19. Preliminary Study of Advanced Turboprops for Low Energy Consumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, G. A.; Strack, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    The fuel savings potential of advanced turboprops (operational about 1985) was calculated and compared with that of an advanced turbofan for use in an advanced subsonic transport. At the design point, altitude 10.67 km and Mach 0.80, turbine-inlet temperature was fixed at 1590 K while overall pressure ratio was varied from 25 to 50. The regenerative turboprop had a pressure ratio of only 10 and an 85 percent effective rotary heat exchanger. Variable camber propellers were used with an efficiency of 85 percent. The study indicated a fuel savings of 33 percent, a takeoff gross weight reduction of 15 percent, and a direct operating cost reduction of 18 percent was possible when turboprops were used instead of the reference turbofan at a range of 10 200 km. These reductions were 28, 11, and 14 percent, respectively, at a range of 5500 km. Increasing overall pressure ratio from 25 to 50 saved little fuel and slightly increased takeoff gross weight.

  20. STS-66 Atlantis 747 SCA Ferry Flight Morning Takeoff for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis atop NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) during takeoff for a return ferry flight to the Kennedy Space Center from Edwards, California. The STS-66 mission was dedicated to the third flight of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science-3 (ATLAS-3), part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program. The astronauts also deployed and retrieved a free-flying satellite designed to study the middle and lower thermospheres and perform a series of experiments covering life sciences research and microgravity processing. The landing was at 7:34 a.m. (PST) 14 November 1994, after being waved off from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, due to adverse weather. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the

  1. Status of Technological Advancements for Reducing Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Pollutant Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudey, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Combustor test rig results indicate that substantial reductions from current emission levels of carbon monoxide (CO), total unburned hydrocarbons (THC), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), and smoke are achievable by employing varying degrees of technological advancements in combustion systems. Minor to moderate modifications to existing conventional combustors produced significant reductions in CO and THC emissions at engine low power (idle/taxi) operating conditions but did not effectively reduce NOx at engine full power (takeoff) operating conditions. Staged combusiton techniques were needed to simultaneously reduce the levels of all the emissions over the entire engine operating range (from idle to takeoff). Emission levels that approached or were below the requirements of the 1979 EPA standards were achieved with the staged combustion systems and in some cases with the minor to moderate modifications to existing conventional combustion systems. Results from research programs indicate that an entire new generation of combustor technology with extremely low emission levels may be possible in the future.

  2. Aerodynamic performance investigation of advanced mechanical suppressor and ejector nozzle concepts for jet noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagenknecht, C. D.; Bediako, E. D.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced Supersonic Transport jet noise may be reduced to Federal Air Regulation limits if recommended refinements to a recently developed ejector shroud exhaust system are successfully carried out. A two-part program consisting of a design study and a subscale model wind tunnel test effort conducted to define an acoustically treated ejector shroud exhaust system for supersonic transport application is described. Coannular, 20-chute, and ejector shroud exhaust systems were evaluated. Program results were used in a mission analysis study to determine aircraft takeoff gross weight to perform a nominal design mission, under Federal Aviation Regulation (1969), Part 36, Stage 3 noise constraints. Mission trade study results confirmed that the ejector shroud was the best of the three exhaust systems studied with a significant takeoff gross weight advantage over the 20-chute suppressor nozzle which was the second best.

  3. Optimization of engines for a commercial Mach 0.98 transport using advanced turbine cooling methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, G. A.; Whitlow, J. B., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A study was made of an advanced technology airplane using supercritical aerodynamics. Cruise Mach number was 0.98 at 40,000 feet altitude with a payload of 60,000 pounds and a range of 3000 nautical miles. Separate-flow turbofans were examined parametrically to determine the effect of sea-level-static design turbine-inlet-temperature and noise on takeoff gross weight (TOGW) assuming full-film turbine cooling. The optimum turbine inlet temperature was 2650 F. Two-stage-fan engines, with cruise fan pressure ratio of 2.25, achieved a noise goal of 103.5 EPNdB with todays noise technology while one-stage-fan engines, achieved a noise goal of 98 EPNdB. The take-off gross weight penalty to use the one-stage fan was 6.2 percent.

  4. Research Study to Identify Technology Requirements for Advanced Earth-Orbital Transportation Systems, Dual-Mode Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The results of a study of dual mode propulsion concepts applied to advanced earth orbital transportation systems using reuseable single stage to orbit vehicle concepts were summarized. Both series burn and parallel burn modes of propulsion were analyzed for vertical takeoff, horizontal landing vehicles based on accelerated technology goals. A major study objective was to assess the merits of dual mode main propulsion concepts compared to single mode concepts for carrying payloads of Space Shuttle type to orbit.

  5. Shortness of Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... Body & lifestyle changes > Shortness of breath Shortness of breath E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... oxygen your baby gets. Causes of shortness of breath during pregnancy Early pregnancy In the first few ...

  6. Advanced turboprop aircraft flyover noise: Annoyance to counter-rotating-propeller configurations with an equal number of blades on each rotor, preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccurdy, David A.

    1988-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to quantify the annoyance of people to the flyover noise of advanced turboprop aircraft with counter-rotating propellers (CRP) having an equal number of blades on each rotor. The objectives were: to determine the effects of total content on annoyance; and compare annoyance to n x n CRP advanced turboprop aircraft with annoyance to conventional turboprop and jet aircraft. A computer synthesis system was used to generate 27 realistic, time-varying simulations of advanced turboprop takeoff noise in which the tonal content was systematically varied to represent the factorial combinations of nine fundamental frequencies and three tone-to-broadband noise ratios. These advanced turboprop simulations along with recordings of five conventional turboprop takeoffs and five conventional jet takeoffs were presented at three D-weighted sound pressure levels to 64 subjects in an anechoic chamber. Analyses of the subjects' annoyance judgments compare the three aircraft types and examined the effects of the differences in tonal content among the advanced turboprop noises. The annoyance prediction ability of various noise metrics is also examined.

  7. Design of a hydraulic power take-off system for the wave energy device with an inverse pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Da-hai; Li, Wei; Zhao, Hai-tao; Bao, Jing-wei; Lin, Yong-gang

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes a dual-stroke acting hydraulic power take-off (PTO) system employed in the wave energy converter (WEC) with an inverse pendulum. The hydraulic PTO converts slow irregular reciprocating wave motions to relatively smooth, fast rotation of an electrical generator. The design of the hydraulic PTO system and its control are critical to maximize the generated power. A time domain simulation study and the laboratory experiment of the full-scale beach test are presented. The results of the simulation and laboratory experiments including their comparison at full-scale are also presented, which have validated the rationality of the design and the reliability of some key components of the prototype of the WEC with an inverse pendulum with the dual-stroke acting hydraulic PTO system.

  8. Noise generated by a flight weight, air flow control valve in a vertical takeoff and landing aircraft thrust vectoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Ronald G.

    1989-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the NASA Lewis Research Center's Powered Lift Facility to experimentally evaluate the noise generated by a flight weight, 12 in. butterfly valve installed in a proposed vertical takeoff and landing thrust vectoring system. Fluctuating pressure measurements were made in the circular duct upstream and downstream of the valve. This data report presents the results of these tests. The maximum overall sound pressure level is generated in the duct downstream of the valve and reached a value of 180 dB at a valve pressure ratio of 2.8. At the higher valve pressure ratios the spectra downstream of the valve is broad banded with its maximum at 1000 Hz.

  9. An evaluation of composite propulsion for single-stage-to-orbit vehicles designed for horizontal take-off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Composite propulsion was analyzed for single-stage-to-orbit vehicles designed for horizontal take-off. Trajectory, geometric, and mass analyses were performed to establish the orbital payload capability of six engines. The results indicated that none of the engines performed adequately to deliver payloads to orbit as analyzed. The single-stage turbine and oxidizer-rich gas generator resulted in a low engine specific impulse, and the performance increment of the ejector subsystem was less than that of a separate rocket system with a high combustion pressure. There was a benefit from incorporating a fan into the engine, and removal of the fan from the airstream during the ramjet mode increased the orbital payload capability.

  10. Maximizing height, distance or rotation from real-time analysis visualisation of take-off angles and speed.

    PubMed

    Green, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Studies to optimise take off angles for height or distance have usually involved either a time-consuming invasive approach of placing markers on the body in a laboratory setting or using even less efficient manual frame-by-frame joint angle calculations with one of the many sport science video analysis software tools available. This research introduces a computer-vision based, marker-free, real-time biomechanical analysis approach to optimise take-off angles based on speed, base of support and dynamically calculated joint angles and mass of body segments. The goal of a jump is usually for height, distance or rotation with consequent dependencies on speed and phase of joint angles, centre of mass COM) and base of support. First and second derivatives of joint angles and body part COMs are derived from a Continuous Human Movement Recognition (CHMR) system for kinematical and what-if calculations. Motion is automatically segmented using hierarchical Hidden Markov Models and 3D tracking is further stabilized by estimating the joint angles for the next frame using a forward smoothing Particle filter. The results from a study of jumps, leaps and summersaults supporting regular knowledge of results feedback during training sessions indicate that this approach is useful for optimising the height, distance or rotation of skills. Key PointsComputer-vision based marker-free tracking.Real-time biomechanical analysis.Improve tracking using a forward smoothing Particle filter.Automatically segment using hierarchical Hidden Markov Models.Recognize skills using segmented motion.Optimize take-off angles using speed, base of support, joint angles and mass of body segments.Optimize height, distance or rotation of skills. PMID:24357954

  11. Estimation of the Basic Reproductive Ratio for Dengue Fever at the Take-Off Period of Dengue Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jafaruddin; Indratno, Sapto W.; Nuraini, Nuning; Supriatna, Asep K.; Soewono, Edy

    2015-01-01

    Estimating the basic reproductive ratio ℛ0 of dengue fever has continued to be an ever-increasing challenge among epidemiologists. In this paper we propose two different constructions to estimate ℛ0 which is derived from a dynamical system of host-vector dengue transmission model. The construction is based on the original assumption that in the early states of an epidemic the infected human compartment increases exponentially at the same rate as the infected mosquito compartment (previous work). In the first proposed construction, we modify previous works by assuming that the rates of infection for mosquito and human compartments might be different. In the second construction, we add an improvement by including more realistic conditions in which the dynamics of an infected human compartments are intervened by the dynamics of an infected mosquito compartment, and vice versa. We apply our construction to the real dengue epidemic data from SB Hospital, Bandung, Indonesia, during the period of outbreak Nov. 25, 2008–Dec. 2012. We also propose two scenarios to determine the take-off rate of infection at the beginning of a dengue epidemic for construction of the estimates of ℛ0: scenario I from equation of new cases of dengue with respect to time (daily) and scenario II from equation of new cases of dengue with respect to cumulative number of new cases of dengue. The results show that our first construction of ℛ0 accommodates the take-off rate differences between mosquitoes and humans. Our second construction of the ℛ0 estimation takes into account the presence of infective mosquitoes in the early growth rate of infective humans and vice versa. We conclude that the second approach is more realistic, compared with our first approach and the previous work. PMID:26413140

  12. Estimation of the Basic Reproductive Ratio for Dengue Fever at the Take-Off Period of Dengue Infection.

    PubMed

    Jafaruddin; Indratno, Sapto W; Nuraini, Nuning; Supriatna, Asep K; Soewono, Edy

    2015-01-01

    Estimating the basic reproductive ratio ℛ 0 of dengue fever has continued to be an ever-increasing challenge among epidemiologists. In this paper we propose two different constructions to estimate ℛ 0 which is derived from a dynamical system of host-vector dengue transmission model. The construction is based on the original assumption that in the early states of an epidemic the infected human compartment increases exponentially at the same rate as the infected mosquito compartment (previous work). In the first proposed construction, we modify previous works by assuming that the rates of infection for mosquito and human compartments might be different. In the second construction, we add an improvement by including more realistic conditions in which the dynamics of an infected human compartments are intervened by the dynamics of an infected mosquito compartment, and vice versa. We apply our construction to the real dengue epidemic data from SB Hospital, Bandung, Indonesia, during the period of outbreak Nov. 25, 2008-Dec. 2012. We also propose two scenarios to determine the take-off rate of infection at the beginning of a dengue epidemic for construction of the estimates of ℛ 0: scenario I from equation of new cases of dengue with respect to time (daily) and scenario II from equation of new cases of dengue with respect to cumulative number of new cases of dengue. The results show that our first construction of ℛ 0 accommodates the take-off rate differences between mosquitoes and humans. Our second construction of the ℛ 0 estimation takes into account the presence of infective mosquitoes in the early growth rate of infective humans and vice versa. We conclude that the second approach is more realistic, compared with our first approach and the previous work. PMID:26413140

  13. Take-off and landing forces and the evolution of controlled gliding in northern flying squirrels Glaucomys sabrinus.

    PubMed

    Paskins, Keith E; Bowyer, Adrian; Megill, William M; Scheibe, John S

    2007-04-01

    Flying squirrels are well known for their ability to glide between trees at the top of a forest canopy. We present experimental performance and behavioural evidence that flight in flying squirrels may have evolved out of a need to control landing forces. Northern flying squirrels were filmed jumping from a horizontal branch to a much larger vertical pole. These were both slightly compliant (less than 1.9 mm N(-1)), and instrumented using strain gauges so that forces could be measured. Take-off and landing forces were both positively correlated with horizontal range between 0.5 and 2.5 m (r=0.355 and r=0.811, respectively, P<0.05), but not significantly different to each other at each range tested. Take-off forces ranged from 1 to 10 bodyweights, and landing forces were between 3 and 10 bodyweights. Glide angles increased rapidly with horizontal range, approaching 45 degrees at 3 m, above which they gradually decreased, suggesting that northern flying squirrels are optimised for long distance travel. We show that northern flying squirrels initiate full gliding posture at ranges of less than 1 m, without landing any higher than an equivalent ballistic projectile. However, this gliding posture enables them to pitch upwards, potentially stalling the wing, and spreads the landing reaction force over all four extended limbs. At steeper approach angles of close to 45 degrees , flying squirrels were unable to pitch up sufficiently and landed forelimbs first, consequently sustaining higher impact forces. We investigate four hypotheses to explain the origin of flight in these animals and conclude that the need to reduce landing impact forces was most likely to have stimulated the development of aerial control in flying squirrels. PMID:17401124

  14. Hot gas ingestion testing of an advanced STOVL concept in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot low speed wind tunnel with flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, Albert L.; Flood, Joseph D.; Strock, Thomas W.; Amuedo, Kurt C.

    1988-01-01

    Advanced Short Takeoff/Vertical Landing (STOVL) aircraft capable of operating from remote sites, damaged runways, and small air capable ships are being pursued for deployment around the turn of the century. To achieve this goal, it is important that the technologies critical to this unique class of aircraft be developed. Recognizing this need, NASA Lewis Research Center, McDonnell Douglas Aircraft, and DARPA defined a cooperative program for testing in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT) to establish a database for hot gas ingestion, one of the technologies critical to STOVL. Results from a test program are presented along with a discussion of the facility modifications allowing this type of testing at model scale. These modifications to the tunnel include a novel ground plane, an elaborate model support which included 4 degrees of freedom, heated high pressure air for nozzle flow, a suction system exhaust for inlet flow, and tunnel sidewall modifications. Several flow visualization techniques were employed including water mist in the nozzle flows and tufts on the ground plane. Headwind (free-stream) velocity was varied from 8 to 23 knots.

  15. Hot gas ingestion testing of an advanced STOVL concept in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel with flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, Albert L.; Flood, Joseph D.; Strock, Thomas W.; Amuedo, Kurt C.

    1988-01-01

    Advanced Short Takeoff/Vertical Landing (STOVL) aircraft capable of operating from remote sites, damaged runways, and small air capable ships are being pursued for deployment around the turn of the century. To achieve this goal, it is important that the technologies critical to this unique class of aircraft be developed. Recognizing this need, NASA Lewis Research Center, McDonnell Douglas Aircraft, and DARPA defined a cooperative program for testing in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT) to establish a database for hot gas ingestion, one of the technologies critical to STOVL. Results from a test program are presented along with a discussion of the facility modifications allowing this type of testing at modal scale. These modifications to the tunnel include a novel ground plane, an elaborate model support which included 4 degrees of freedom, heated high pressure air for nozzle flow, a suction system exhaust for inlet flow, and tunnel sidewall modifications. Several flow visualization techniques were employed including water mist in the nozzle flows and tufts on the ground plane. Headwind (free-stream) velocity was varied from 8 to 23 knots.

  16. Stopover optimization in a long-distance migrant: the role of fuel load and nocturnal take-off time in Alaskan northern wheatears (Oenanthe oenanthe)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In long-distance migrants, a considerably higher proportion of time and energy is allocated to stopovers rather than to flights. Stopover duration and departure decisions affect consequently subsequent flight stages and overall speed of migration. In Arctic nocturnal songbird migrants the trade-off between a relatively long migration distance and short nights available for travelling may impose a significant time pressure on migrants. Therefore, we hypothesize that Alaskan northern wheatears (Oenanthe oenanthe) use a time-minimizing migration strategy to reach their African wintering area 15,000 km away. Results We estimated the factors influencing the birds’ daily departure probability from an Arctic stopover before crossing the Bering Strait by using a Cormack-Jolly-Seber model. To identify in which direction and when migration was resumed departing birds were radio-tracked. Here we show that Alaskan northern wheatears did not behave as strict time minimizers, because their departure fuel load was unrelated to fuel deposition rate. All birds departed with more fuel load than necessary for the sea crossing. Departure probability increased with stopover duration, evening fuel load and decreasing temperature. Birds took-off towards southwest and hence, followed in general the constant magnetic and geographic course but not the alternative great circle route. Nocturnal departure times were concentrated immediately after sunset. Conclusion Although birds did not behave like time-minimizers in respect of the optimal migration strategies their surplus of fuel load clearly contradicted an energy saving strategy in terms of the minimization of overall energy cost of transport. The observed low variation in nocturnal take-off time in relation to local night length compared to similar studies in the temperate zone revealed that migrants have an innate ability to respond to changes in the external cue of night length. Likely, birds maximized their potential

  17. Cost benefit study of advanced materials technology for aircraft turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillery, R. V.; Johnston, R. P.

    1977-01-01

    The cost/benefits of eight advanced materials technologies were evaluated for two aircraft missions. The overall study was based on a time frame of commercial engine use of the advanced material technologies by 1985. The material technologies evaluated were eutectic turbine blades, titanium aluminide components, ceramic vanes, shrouds and combustor liners, tungsten composite FeCrAly blades, gamma prime oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy blades, and no coat ODS alloy combustor liners. They were evaluated in two conventional takeoff and landing missions, one transcontinental and one intercontinental.

  18. STS-66 Atlantis 747 SCA Ferry Flight Morning Takeoff for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis atop NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) during takeoff for a return ferry flight to the Kennedy Space Center from Edwards, California. The STS-66 mission was dedicated to the third flight of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science-3 (ATLAS-3), part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program. The astronauts also deployed and retrieved a free-flying satellite designed to study the middle and lower thermospheres and perform a series of experiments covering life sciences research and microgravity processing. The landing was at 7:34 a.m. (PST) 14 November 1994, after being waved off from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, due to adverse weather. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the

  19. The performance evaluation of a jet flap on an advanced supersonic harrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipera, L. D.; Sandlin, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    The performance concept of a supersonic vertical and short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) fighter, model 279-3, modified to utilize a jet flap was evaluated. Replacing the rear nozzles of the 279-3 with the jet flap favorably alters the pressure distribution over the airfoil and dramatically increases lift. The result is a significant decrease in takeoff distance, an increase in payload, and an improvement in combat performance. To investigate the benefit in increased payload, the 279-3 and the jet flapped 279-3JF were modeled on the NASA Aircraft Synthesis (ACSYNT) computer code and flown on a 250 feet takeoff distance interdiction mission. The increase in payload weight that the 279-3JF could carry was converted into fuel in one case, and in another, converted to bomb load. When the fuel was increased, the 279-3JF penetrated into enemy territory almost four times the distance of 279-3, and therefore increased mission capability. When the bomb load was increased, the 279-3JF carried 14 bombs the same distance the 279-3 carried four. The increase in mission performance and improvements in turning rates was realized with only a small penalty in increased empty weight.

  20. Single stage to orbit vertical takeoff and landing concept technology challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heald, Daniel A.; Kessler, Thomas L.

    1991-10-01

    General Dynamics has developed a VTOL concept for a single-stage-to-orbit under contract to the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization. This paper briefly describes the configuration and its basic operations. Two key advanced technolgy areas are then discussed: high-performance rocket propulsion employing a plug nozzle arrangement and integrated health management to facilitate very rapid turnaround between flights, more like an aircraft than today's rockets.